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Sample records for dental gold alloys

  1. Dissolution and uptake of cadmium from dental gold solder alloy implants.

    PubMed

    Bergman, B; Bergman, M; Söremark, R

    1977-11-01

    Pure metallic cadmium was irradiated by means of thermal neutrons. The irradiated cadmium (115Cd) was placed in bags of gold foil and the bags were implanted subcutaneously in the neck region of mice. Two and 3d respectively after implantation the mice were killed, the bags removed and the animals subjected to whole-body autoradiography. The autoradiograms revealed an uptake of 115Cd in liver and kidney. In another experiment specimens of a cadmium-containing dental gold solder alloy, a cadmium-free dental casting gold alloy and soldered assemblies made of these two alloys were implanted subcutaneously in the neck region of mice. The animals were killed after 6 months; cadmium analysis showed significant increases in the cadmium concentration in liver and kidney of those mice which had been given implants of gold solder alloy. The study clearly shows that due to electrochemical corrosion cadmium can be released from implants and accumulated in the kidneys and the liver.

  2. Photoelectron spectroscopic study on the electronic structures of the dental gold alloys and their interaction with L-cysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Koji; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Azuma, Junpei

    The valence electronic structures of the dental gold alloys, type 1, type 3, and K14, and their interaction with L-cysteine have been studied by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. It was found that the electronic structures of the type-1 and type-3 dental alloys are similar to that of polycrystalline Au, while that of the K14 dental alloy is much affected by Cu. The peak shift and the change in shape due to alloying are observed in all the dental alloys. It is suggested that the new peak observed around 2 eV for the L-cysteine thin films on all themore » dental alloys may be due to the bonding of S 3sp orbitals with the dental alloy surfaces, and the Cu-S bond, as well as the Au-S and Au-O bonds, may cause the change in the electronic structure of the L-cysteine on the alloys.« less

  3. Dental implant suprastructures using cobalt-chromium alloy compared with gold alloy framework veneered with ceramic or acrylic resin: a retrospective cohort study up to 18 years.

    PubMed

    Teigen, Kyrre; Jokstad, Asbjørn

    2012-07-01

    An association between the long-term success and survival of implant-supported prostheses as a function of biomaterial combinations has not been established. The use of cast cobalt-chromium for the suprastructure framework may be an alternative to the conventional approach of using type 3 gold alloys. A retrospective chart audit of all patients who had received implant-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDP) before 1996 was identified in a private practice clinic. Data were recorded for FDPs made from four combinations of alloy frameworks and veneering material, i.e. type 3 gold and cobalt-chromium with ceramic or prefabricated acrylic teeth. The extracted data from the charts were subjected to explorative statistical tests including Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. Patients (n=198) with 270 short and extensive FDPs supported entirely by 1117 implants were identified. The average follow-up observation periods varied between 4 and 220 months, with an average of 120 months. The success and survival, as well as event rates and types of biological and technical complications, were similar for implant-supported FDPs using cobalt-chromium and type 3 gold alloy frameworks veneered with ceramics or prefabricated acrylic teeth. An influence of the suprastructure biomaterial combination on the clinical performance of the individual supporting implants could not be established. Implant-supported FDPs made from type 3 gold or cobalt-chromium frameworks and veneered with ceramic or prefabricated acrylic teeth demonstrate comparable clinical performance. The biomaterial combinations do not appear to influence the success or survival of the individual implants. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Grindability of dental magnetic alloys.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Eisei; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu; Kimura, Kohei

    2005-06-01

    In this study, the grindability of cast magnetic alloys (Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy and magnetic stainless steel) was evaluated and compared with that of conventional dental casting alloys (Ag-Pd-Au alloy, Type 4 gold alloy, and cobalt-chromium alloy). Grindability was evaluated in terms of grinding rate (i.e., volume of metal removed per minute) and grinding ratio (i.e., volume ratio of metal removed compared to wheel material lost). Solution treated Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy had a significantly higher grinding rate than the aged one at a grinding speed of 750-1500 m x min(-1). At 500 m x min(-1), there were no significant differences in grinding rate between solution treated and aged Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloys. At a lower speed of 500 m x min(-1) or 750 m x min(-1), it was found that the grinding rates of aged Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy and stainless steel were higher than those of conventional casting alloys.

  5. Bond Strength of Gold Alloys Laser Welded to Cobalt-Chromium Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Ikuya; Wallace, Cameron

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the joint properties between cast gold alloys and Co-Cr alloy laser-welded by Nd:YAG laser. Cast plates were fabricated from three types of gold alloys (Type IV, Type II and low-gold) and a Co-Cr alloy. Each gold alloy was laser-welded to Co-Cr using a dental laser-welding machine. Homogeneously-welded and non-welded control specimens were also prepared. Tensile testing was conducted and data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. The homogeneously-welded groups showed inferior fracture load compared to corresponding control groups, except for Co-Cr. In the specimens welded heterogeneously to Co-Cr, Type IV was the greatest, followed by low-gold and Type II. There was no statistical difference (P<0.05) in fracture load between Type II control and that welded to Co-Cr. Higher elongations were obtained for Type II in all conditions, whereas the lowest elongation occurred for low-gold welded to Co-Cr. This study indicated that, of the three gold alloys tested, the Type IV gold alloy was the most suitable alloy for laser-welding to Co-Cr. PMID:19088892

  6. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1995-01-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99 gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  7. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1990-07-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99% gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  8. Crack injection in silver gold alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiying

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a materials degradation phenomena resulting from a combination of stress and a corrosive environment. Among the alphabet soup of proposed mechanism of SCC the most important are film-rupture, film-induced cleavage and hydrogen embrittlement. This work examines various aspects of film-induced cleavage in gold alloys for which the operation of hydrogen embrittlement processes can be strictly ruled out on thermodynamic grounds. This is so because in such alloys SCC occurs under electrochemical conditions within which water is stable to hydrogen gas evolution. The alloy system examined in this work is AgAu since the corrosion processes in this system occur by a dealloying mechanism that results in the formation of nanoporous gold. The physics behind the dealloying process as well as the resulting formation of nanoporous gold is today well understood. Two important aspects of the film-induced cleavage mechanism are examined in this work: dynamic fracture in monolithic nanoporous gold and crack injection. In crack injection there is a finite thickness dealloyed layer formed on a AgAu alloy sample and the question of whether or not a crack that nucleates within this layer can travel for some finite distance into the un-corroded parent phase alloy is addressed. Dynamic fracture tests were performed on single edge-notched monolithic nanoporous gold samples as well as "infinite strip" sample configurations for which the stress intensity remains constant over a significant portion of the crack length. High-speed photography was used to measure the crack velocity. In the dynamic fracture experiments cracks were observed to travel at speeds as large as 270 m/s corresponding to about 68% of the Raleigh wave velocity. Crack injection experiments were performed on single crystal Ag77Au23, polycrystalline Ag72Au28 and pure gold, all of which had thin nanoporous gold layers on the surface of samples. Through-thickness fracture was seen in both the

  9. [Microanalytical determinations of gold alloys for fixed dentures].

    PubMed

    Lotito, M; Negri, P; Fraschini, M

    1993-01-01

    In this work the authors analyse gold alloys for fixed prosthesis by X-ray spectrometry in energy dispersion (EDS). The results of this analysis, given in graphic and table form, show remarkable differences in alloy composition. For this reason recommended dentists are to be attentive and severe in the control of gold alloys for fixed prosthesis.

  10. Structure of dental gallium alloys.

    PubMed

    Herø, H; Simensen, C J; Jørgensen, R B

    1996-07-01

    The interest in gallium alloys as a replacement for amalgam has increased in recent years due to the risk of environmental pollution from amalgam. Alloy powders with compositions close to those for alloys of amalgam are mixed with a liquid gallium alloy. The mix is condensed into a prepared cavity in much the same way as for amalgam. The aim of the present work was to study the structure of: (1) two commercial alloy powders containing mainly silver, tin and copper, and (2) the phases formed by mixing these powders with a liquid alloy of gallium, indium and tin. One of the alloy powders contained 9 wt% palladium. Cross-sections of cylindrical specimens made by these gallium mixes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Discrete grains of the following phases were found to be present in both gallium alloys: hexagonal Ag2Ga, tetragonal Cu(Pd)Ga2, cubic Ag9In4 and tetragonal beta-Sn. Indications of hexagonal or orthorhombic Ag2Sn were found in the remaining, unreacted alloy particles. In the palladium-containing alloy the X-ray reflections indicate a minor fraction of cubic Cu9Ga4 in addition to the Cu(Pd)Ga2 phase. Particles of beta-Sn are probably precipitated because Sn-Ga phases cannot be formed according to the binary phase diagram.

  11. On the corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of palladium-based dental alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Desheng

    Palladium-based alloys have been used as dental restorative materials for about two decades with good clinical history. But there have been clinical case reports showing possible allergy effects from these alloys. The aim of this study was to characterize the corrosion behavior and mechanisms of several palladium-based dental alloys by potentiodynamic polarization methods, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy/atomic force microscopy (SKPFM/AFM), and to evaluate their biocompatibility by a cell culture technique and an animal model. Using SKPFM/AFM and scanning electron microscopy, the Ru-enriched phase from the use of ruthenium as a grain-refining element was identified as being slightly more noble than the palladium solid solution matrix in a high-palladium alloy. Other secondary precipitates that exist in the microstructures of these high-palladium alloys have minimal differences in Volta potential compared to the matrix. For high-palladium alloys, corrosion is generally uniform due to the predominant palladium content in the different phases. Potentiodynamic polarization and EIS have shown that representative palladium-silver alloys have low corrosion tendency and high corrosion resistance, which are equivalent to a well-known high-noble gold-palladium alloy in simulated body fluid and oral environments. The palladium-silver alloys tested are resistant to chloride ion corrosion. Passivation and dealloying have been identified for all of the tested palladium-silver alloys. The great similarity in corrosion behavior among the palladium-silver alloys is attributed to their similar chemical compositions. The variation in microstructures of palladium-silver alloys tested does not cause significant difference in corrosion behavior. The corrosion resistance of these palladium-silver alloys at elevated potentials relevant to oral environment is still satisfactory. The release of elements from representative dental

  12. Effects of chemical composition on the corrosion of dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Galo, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Rocha, Luís Augusto; de Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the oral environment on the corrosion of dental alloys with different compositions, using electrochemical methods. The corrosion rates were obtained from the current-potential curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of artificial saliva on the corrosion of dental alloys was dependent on alloy composition. Dissolution of the ions occurred in all tested dental alloys and the results were strongly dependent on the general alloy composition. Regarding the alloys containing nickel, the Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Ti alloys released 0.62 mg/L of Ni on average, while the Co-Cr dental alloy released ions between 0.01 and 0.03 mg/L of Co and Cr, respectively.The open-circuit potential stabilized at a higher level with lower deviation (standard deviation: Ni-Cr-6Ti = 32 mV/SCE and Co-Cr = 54 mV/SCE). The potenciodynamic curves of the dental alloys showed that the Ni-based dental alloy with >70 wt% of Ni had a similar curve and the Co-Cr dental alloy showed a low current density and hence a high resistance to corrosion compared with the Ni-based dental alloys. Some changes in microstructure were observed and this fact influenced the corrosion behavior for the alloys. The lower corrosion resistance also led to greater release of nickel ions to the medium. The quantity of Co ions released from the Co-Cr-Mo alloy was relatively small in the solutions. In addition, the quantity of Cr ions released into the artificial saliva from the Co-Cr alloy was lower than Cr release from the Ni-based dental alloys.

  13. Stability of suspended gold and silver alloy monatomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, Wei; Dong, Jinming

    2008-06-01

    Using the first-principles plane wave pseudopotential method, we have studied the structures and stability of gold and silver alloy monatomic chains. It is found that minimizing system's enthalpy instead of its energy is critical to identify the stability of stretched alloy chains at zero temperature since the string tension can efficiently suppress the self-purification. Our simulations show that all the gold-containing chains do exhibit a local enthalpy minimum, giving a reasonable interpretation for the experimental observations of gold and silver alloy chains with different Ag concentrations [Bettini et al., Nat. Nanotechnol. 1, 182 (2006)]. These alloy chains are stabilized by the combined actions of the gold's relativistic effect and the string tension applied by the tip contacts, having similar geometrical structures to those of the pure gold chains.

  14. Low gravity containerless processing of immiscible gold rhodium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry

    1986-01-01

    Under normal one-g conditions immiscible alloys segregate extensively during solidification due to sedementation of the more dense of the immiscible liquid phases. However, under low-g conditions it should be possible to form a dispersion of the two immiscible liquids and maintain this dispersed structure during solidification. Immiscible (hypermonotectic) gold-rhodium alloys were processed in the Marshall Space Flight Center 105 meter drop tube in order to investigate the influence of low gravity, containerless solidification on their microstructure. Hypermonotectic alloys composed of 65 atomic % rhodium exhibited a tendency for the gold rich liquid to wet the outer surface of the containerless processed samples. This tendency led to extensive segregation in several cases. However, well dispersed microstructures consisting of 2 to 3 micron diameter rhodium-rich spheres in a gold-rich matrix were produced in 23.4 atomic % rhodium alloys. This is one of the best dispersions obtained in research on immiscible alloy-systems to data.

  15. Cutting efficiency of air-turbine burs on cast titanium and dental casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, I; Ohkubo, C; Ford, J P; Atsuta, M; Okabe, T

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cutting efficiency of air-turbine burs on cast free-machining titanium alloy (DT2F) and to compare the results with those for cast commercially pure (CP) Ti, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and dental casting alloys. The cast metal (DT2F, CP Ti, Ti-6Al-4V, Type IV gold alloy and Co-Cr alloy) specimens were cut with air-turbine burs (carbide burs and diamond points) at air pressures of 138 or 207 kPa and a cutting force of 0.784 N. The cutting efficiency of each bur was evaluated as volume loss calculated from the weight loss cut for 5 s and the density of each metal. The bulk microhardness was measured to correlate the machinability and the hardness of each metal. The amounts of DT2F cut with the carbide burs were significantly (p < 0.05) greater than for the other titanium specimens at either 138 or 207 kPa. The diamond points exhibited similar machining efficiency among all metals except for Type IV gold alloy. The increase in the volume loss of Co-Cr alloy (Vitallium) cut with the diamond points showed a negative value (-29%) with an increase in air pressure from 138 to 207 kPa. There was a negative correlation between the amounts of metal removed (volume loss) and the hardness (r2 = 0.689) when the carbide burs were used. The results of this study indicated that a free-machining titanium alloy (DT2F) exhibited better machinability compared to CP Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy when using carbide fissure burs. When machining cast CP Ti and its alloys, carbide fissure burs possessed a greater machining efficiency than the diamond points and are recommended for titanium dental prostheses.

  16. Cytotoxicity of dental alloys, metals, and ceramics assessed by millipore filter, agar overlay, and MTT tests.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, G; Sletten, G; Dahl, J E

    2000-08-01

    Biocompatibility of dental materials is dependent on the release of elements from the materials. In addition, the composition, pretreatment, and handling of the materials influence the element release. This study evaluated the cytotoxicity of dental alloys, metals, and ceramics, with specific emphasis on the effects of altering the composition and the pretreatment. By using cells from a mouse fibroblast cell line and the agar overlay test, Millipore filter test, and MTT test, cytotoxicity of various metals, metal alloys, and ceramics for dental restoration were studied. Effects of altering the composition of a high noble gold alloy and of pretreatment of a ceramic-bonding alloy were also studied. In addition, the release of elements into the cell culture medium by the materials studied was measured using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrophotometer. The results of the MTT test were analyzed statistically using ANOVA and Scheffé test at a significance level of P <.05. Specimens manufactured from materials intended for dental restorations and handled in accordance with the manufacturers' instructions were ranked from "noncytotoxic" to "mildly cytotoxic" according to the agar overlay and Millipore filter tests. For the MTT test, no significant differences were observed between these materials and controls, with the exception of JS C-gold and unalloyed titanium. The modified materials were ranked from "mildly cytotoxic" to "moderately cytotoxic" in the agar overlay and Millipore filter tests and from "noncytotoxic" to "moderately cytotoxic" in the MTT test. Thus, cytotoxicity was related to the alloy composition and treatment. The release of Cu and Zn seemed to be important for the cytotoxic effect. Alterations in the composition and the pretreatment can greatly influence the cytotoxicity, and the results stress the importance of carefully following the manufacturers' instructions when handling dental materials.

  17. The influence of a hyperbaric environment and increased oxygen partial pressure on the corrosion of dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Mehl, Christian; Heblich, Frank; Lenz, Rudolf; Ludwig, Klaus; Kern, Matthias

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this in-vitro study was to determine whether there is a correlation between a hyperbaric environment or increased oxygen partial pressure and the corrosion of dental alloys used for dental restorations in divers. Samples of three commercially available dental alloys (palladium-based, reduced-gold-content and high-gold-content) were tested in the DIN EN ISO 1562 static immersion test and the amount of dissolved ions measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. The specimens were exposed to one of the following three conditions: normobaric and normoxic conditions (PO2 21 kPa); 608 kPa (6 bar, PO2 127 kPa) pressurised air in a pressure chamber or 506 kPa (5 bar, PO2 304 kPa) pressurised nitrox in a pressure chamber. None of the exposures suggested a correlation between increased ion solubility as a measure of corrosion and increased ambient pressure of the three alloys. The reduced-gold-content alloy released zinc ions at twice the weekly recommended dose. When the palladium-based alloy was exposed to a hyperbaric or hyperbaric/hyperoxic environment, ion solubility increased only slightly for gallium and silver. Within the limited sample size of the current study it can be concluded that hyperbaric and/or hyperoxic conditions do not seem to be a risk for increased corrosion for any of the three tested alloys.

  18. Influence of gold content on copper oxidation from silver-gold-copper alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbourne, D. R.; Barbante, G. G.; Strahan, A.

    1996-10-01

    In the final stages of the smelting of copper anode slimes, a silver alloy, known as “doré,” is produced. Oxidation refining is used to remove copper since this element interferes with subsequent electroparting of the small amounts of gold and platinum group metals in the doré. The gold content of doré can be greatly increased by gold scrap additions and this may affect the minimum achievable copper content of doré. In this work, silver-gold-copper alloys were oxidized by injecting pure oxygen at 1100 °C in the absence of any slag cover. For the gold contents expected in practice, the equilibrium copper content of the doré did not increase significantly as the gold content increased. However, at the other extreme of composition, the equilibrium copper content was a very strong function of the silver content of the gold bullion. The activity coefficient of copper in silver-gold alloys was calculated and compared to those predicted from a ternary subregular solution model of the system Ag-Au-Cu. Satisfactory agreement was found.

  19. The effect of hydrogen peroxide concentration on metal ion release from dental casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Al-Salehi, S K; Hatton, P V; Johnson, A; Cox, A G; McLeod, C

    2008-04-01

    There are concerns that tooth bleaching agents may adversely affect dental materials. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that increasing concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP) are more effective than water at increasing metal ion release from two typical dental casting alloys during bleaching. Discs (n = 28 for each alloy) were prepared by casting and heat treated to simulate a typical porcelain-firing cycle. Discs (n = 7) of each alloy were immersed in either 0%, 3%, 10% or 30% (w/v) HP solutions for 24 h at 37 degrees C. Samples were taken for metal ion release determination using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and the data analysed using a two-way anova followed by a one-way anova. The surface roughness of each disc was measured using a Talysurf contact profilometer before and after bleaching and the data analysed using a paired t-test. With the exception of gold, the differences in metal ion concentration after treatment with 0% (control) and each of 3%, 10% and 30% HP (w/v) were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Metal ion release from the two alloys increased with increasing HP concentrations (over 3000% increase in Ni and 1400% increase in Pd ions were recorded when HP concentration increased from 0% to 30%). Surface roughness values of the samples before and after bleaching were not significantly different (P > 0.05) Exposure of the two dental casting alloys to HP solutions increased metal ion release of all the elements except gold.

  20. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. (a) Identification. Dental amalgam is a device that consists of a combination of...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. (a) Identification. Dental amalgam is a device that consists of a combination of...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. (a) Identification. Dental amalgam is a device that consists of a combination of...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. (a) Identification. Dental amalgam is a device that consists of a combination of...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. (a) Identification. Dental amalgam is a device that consists of a combination of...

  5. Potentiodynamic polarization study of the in vitro corrosion behavior of 3 high-palladium alloys and a gold-palladium alloy in 5 media.

    PubMed

    Sun, Desheng; Monaghan, Peter; Brantley, William A; Johnston, William M

    2002-01-01

    Corrosion of cast alloy restorations may lead to their failure or adversely affect their biocompatibility. Although some documentation of the corrosion behavior of the high-palladium dental alloys exists, questions remain about their corrosion resistance and mechanisms. This study compared the in vitro corrosion characteristics of 3 high-palladium alloys and 1 gold-palladium alloy in simulated body fluid and oral environments. Two Pd-Cu-Ga alloys and 1 Pd-Ga alloy were selected; an Au-Pd alloy served as the control. The corrosion behavior for the as-cast and simulated porcelain-firing (heat-treated) conditions of each alloy (N = 5) was evaluated in 0.9% NaCl, 0.09% NaCl, and Fusayama solutions. Heat-treated specimens of each alloy (N = 5) were also tested in N(2)-deaerated 0.09% NaCl and Fusayama solutions (pH 4). After immersion in the electrolyte for 24 hours, the open-circuit potential (OCP) was measured, and linear polarization was performed from -20 mV to +20 mV (vs. OCP) at a scanning rate of 0.125 mV/s. Cyclic polarization was performed from -300 mV to +1000 mV and back to -300 mV (vs. OCP) at a scanning rate of 1 mV/s. Data were evaluated with analysis of variance and the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple-range test (alpha=.05). The OCP of each alloy varied with the condition (as-cast or heat-treated) and electrolyte used. Corrosion resistance was similar for the 4 alloys tested. For cyclic polarization, all alloys showed active-passive or spontaneous passive behavior in nearly all electrolytes. During some reverse scans, the 3 high-palladium alloys displayed 3 or 5 anodic peaks. No positive hysteresis was observed for any of the alloy/electrolyte combinations evaluated. The corrosion resistances of the 3 high-palladium alloys in simulated body fluid and oral environments were comparable to that of the gold-palladium alloy. The similar corrosion resistance for the 3 high-palladium alloys was attributed to their high noble metal content and theorized stable

  6. Assessment of exposures and potential risks to the US adult population from wear (attrition and abrasion) of gold and ceramic dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Richardson, G Mark; Clemow, Scott R; Peters, Rachel E; James, Kyle J; Siciliano, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Little has been published on the chemical exposures and risks of dental restorative materials other than from dental amalgam and composite resins. Here we provide the first exposure and risk assessment for gold (Au) alloy and ceramic restorative materials. Based on the 2001-2004 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we assessed the exposure of US adults to the components of Au alloy and ceramic dental restorations owing to dental material wear. Silver (Ag) is the most problematic component of Au alloy restorations, owing to a combination of toxicity and proportional composition. It was estimated that adults could possess an average of four tooth surfaces restored with Au alloy before exceeding, on average, the reference exposure level (REL) for Ag. Lithium (Li) is the most problematic component of dental ceramics. It was estimated that adults could possess an average of 15 tooth surfaces restored with ceramics before exceeding the REL for Li. Relative risks of chemical exposures from dental materials decrease in the following order: Amalgam>Au alloys>ceramics>composite resins.

  7. Silver, gold, and alloyed silver-gold nanoparticles: characterization and comparative cell-biologic action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahl, Dirk; Diendorf, Jörg; Ristig, Simon; Greulich, Christina; Li, Zi-An; Farle, Michael; Köller, Manfred; Epple, Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Silver, gold, and silver-gold-alloy nanoparticles were prepared by citrate reduction modified by the addition of tannin during the synthesis, leading to a reduction in particle size by a factor of three. Nanoparticles can be prepared by this easy water-based synthesis and subsequently functionalized by the addition of either tris(3-sulfonatophenyl)phosphine or poly( N-vinylpyrrolidone). The resulting nanoparticles of silver (diameter 15-25 nm), gold (5-6 nm), and silver-gold (50:50; 10-12 nm) were easily dispersable in water and also in cell culture media (RPMI + 10 % fetal calf serum), as shown by nanoparticle tracking analysis and differential centrifugal sedimentation. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed a polycrystalline nature of all nanoparticles. EDX on single silver-gold nanoparticles indicated that the concentration of gold is higher inside a nanoparticle. The biologic action of the nanoparticles toward human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) was different: Silver nanoparticles showed a significant concentration-dependent influence on the viability of hMSC. Gold nanoparticles showed only a small effect on the viability of hMSC after 7 days. Surprisingly, silver-gold nanoparticles had no significant influence on the viability of hMSC despite the silver content. Silver nanoparticles and silver-gold nanoparticles in the concentration range of 5-20 μg mL-1 induced the activation of hMSC as indicated by the release of IL-8. In contrast, gold nanoparticles led to a reduction of the release of IL-6 and IL-8.

  8. Americium alloys with gold and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, V. M.; Ryabinin, M. A.; Chernakova, T. A.; Tomilin, S. V.

    2010-03-01

    Presented are results of the production and X-ray examination of micro-samples of americium-241 compounds with gold and copper produced by high-temperature condensation of metal americium vapor onto corresponding substrates. No mutual solubility of the investigated system components was revealed at room temperature. The following three intermetallic compounds were revealed in the Am-Au system: Au6Am with tetragonal lattice of the Au6Sm structural type, AuAm with orthorhombic lattice of the CuCe structural type and AuAm with cubic lattice. The Am-Cu system showed the intermetallic compound Cu5Am (Cu7Am) with a hexagonal lattice of the Cu5Ca(Cu7Tb) structure type. An effect of the 241Am nuclide alpha-activity on the crystal structure of the produced intermetallide was studied.

  9. A new method for promoting adhesion between precious metal alloys and dental adhesives.

    PubMed

    Ohno, H; Araki, Y; Endo, K

    1992-06-01

    A new, simple method of modifying the adherend metal surface by a liquid Ga-Sn alloy (Adlloy) was applied to dental precious and base-metal alloys for adhesion with 4-META adhesive resin. Adhesions of 4-META resin to three other surface states--as-polished, oxidized at high temperature, and electroplated tin--were also performed for comparison with the adhesion on Adlloy-modified surfaces. Bond strength measurements were made, and the durability against water at the adhering interface was evaluated. The Adlloy-modified gold alloys (Type IV and 14 K) and silver-based alloys (Ag-Pd and Ag-Cu) showed not only high bond strengths but also excellent water durability at the adhesion interface. Surface modification by Adlloy, however, did not affect adhesion to Ag-In-Zn and base-metal (SUS, Co-Cr, and Ni-Cr) alloys. Adhesion to the tin-electroplated specimens was comparable with that to the Adlloy-modified specimens.

  10. [Clinical evaluation of the effect of gold alloy and Ni-Cr alloy porcelain fused metal crown restorations].

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei-ge; Liu, Xiang-hui; Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Chun; Xie, Ming-yi; Zhou, Wen-juan

    2009-02-01

    To observe the clinical effect of gold alloy porcelain fused metal (PFM) crown restoration and Ni-Cr alloy PFM crown restoration. A total of 168 teeth from 48 patients were restored with gold alloy PFM crown. The other 48 patients, with a total of 179 teeth were restored with Ni-Cr alloy PFM crown. They were examined in integrality, retention, shade, cervical margin, and gingival health immediately, 6 months, one year, two years ,and three years after restoration. The date was analyzed by rank sum test using SPSS12.0 software package. The clinical effect of Ni-Cr alloy PFM crown was as good as gold alloy PFM crown when checked up after cementation at once. However, when they were examined 6 months, one year, two years ,and three years after restoration, the clinical effect of gold alloy PFM crown group was significantly better than that of Ni-Cr alloy PFM crown, P<0.05. The gold alloy PFM crown has better properties than Ni-Cr alloy PFM crown as a kind of long-term restoration, especially on the aspect of shade.

  11. Silica coatings formed on noble dental casting alloy by the sol-gel dipping process.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Tanagawa, M; Kamada, K; Hatada, R; Baba, K; Inoi, T; Atsuta, M

    1999-08-01

    The sol-gel dipping process, in which liquid silicon alkoxide is transformed into the solid silicon-oxygen network, can produce a thin film coating of silica (SiO2). The features of this method are high homogeneity and purity of the thin SiO2 film and a low sinter temperature, which are important in preparation of coating films that can protect from metallic ion release from the metal substrate and prevent attachment of dental plaque. We evaluated the surface characteristics of the dental casting silver-palladium-copper-gold (Ag-Pd-Cu-Au) alloy coated with a thin SiO2 film by the sol-gel dipping process. The SiO2 film bonded strongly (over 40 MPa) to Ti-implanted Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy substrate as demonstrated by a pull test. Hydrophobilization of Ti-implanted/SiO2-coated surfaces resulted in a significant increase of the contact angle of water (80.5 degrees) compared with that of the noncoated alloy specimens (59.3 degrees). Ti-implanted/SiO2-coated specimens showed the release of many fewer metallic ions (192 ppb/cm2) from the substrate than did noncoated specimens (2,089 ppb/cm2). The formation of a thin SiO2 film by the sol-gel dipping process on the surface of Ti-implanted Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy after casting clinically may be useful for minimizing the possibilities of the accumulation of dental plaque and metal allergies caused by intraoral metal restorations.

  12. Development of binary and ternary titanium alloys for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Jairo M; Beline, Thamara; Ribeiro, Ana Lúcia R; Rangel, Elidiane C; da Cruz, Nilson C; Landers, Richard; Faverani, Leonardo P; Vaz, Luís Geraldo; Fais, Laiza M G; Vicente, Fabio B; Grandini, Carlos R; Mathew, Mathew T; Sukotjo, Cortino; Barão, Valentim A R

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop binary and ternary titanium (Ti) alloys containing zirconium (Zr) and niobium (Nb) and to characterize them in terms of microstructural, mechanical, chemical, electrochemical, and biological properties. The experimental alloys - (in wt%) Ti-5Zr, Ti-10Zr, Ti-35Nb-5Zr, and Ti-35Nb-10Zr - were fabricated from pure metals. Commercially pure titanium (cpTi) and Ti-6Al-4V were used as controls. Microstructural analysis was performed by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers microhardness, elastic modulus, dispersive energy spectroscopy, X-ray excited photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, surface roughness, and surface free energy were evaluated. The electrochemical behavior analysis was conducted in a body fluid solution (pH 7.4). The albumin adsorption was measured by the bicinchoninic acid method. Data were evaluated through one-way ANOVA and the Tukey test (α=0.05). The alloying elements proved to modify the alloy microstructure and to enhance the mechanical properties, improving the hardness and decreasing the elastic modulus of the binary and ternary alloys, respectively. Ti-Zr alloys displayed greater electrochemical stability relative to that of controls, presenting higher polarization resistance and lower capacitance. The experimental alloys were not detrimental to albumin adsorption. The experimental alloys are suitable options for dental implant manufacturing, particularly the binary system, which showed a better combination of mechanical and electrochemical properties without the presence of toxic elements. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhancement of antibiotic effect via gold:silver-alloy nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Margarida Moreira; Queiroz, Margarida João; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2012-05-01

    A strategy for the development of novel antimicrobials is to combine the stability and pleiotropic effects of inorganic compounds with the specificity and efficiency of organic compounds, such as antibiotics. Here we report on the use of gold:silver-alloy (Au:Ag-alloy) nanoparticles, obtained via a single-step citrate co-reduction method, combined to conventional antibiotics to enhance their antimicrobial effect on bacteria. Addition of the alloy nanoparticles considerably decreased the dose of antibiotic necessary to show antimicrobial effect, both for bacterial cells growing in rich medium in suspension and for bacterial cells resting in a physiological buffer on a humid cellulose surface. The observed effect was more pronounced than the sum of the individual effects of the nanoparticles and antibiotic. We demonstrate the enhancement effect of Au:Ag-alloy nanoparticles with a size distribution of 32.5 ± 7.5 nm mean diameter on the antimicrobial effect of (i) kanamycin on Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacterium), and (ii) a β-lactam antibiotic on both a sensitive and resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium). Together, these results may pave the way for the combined use of nanoparticle-antibiotic conjugates towards decreasing antibiotic resistance currently observed for certain bacteria and conventional antibiotics.

  14. Binary titanium alloys as dental implant materials-a review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaotian; Chen, Shuyang; Tsoi, James K H; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka

    2017-10-01

    Titanium (Ti) has been used for long in dentistry and medicine for implant purpose. During the years, not only the commercially pure Ti but also some alloys such as binary and tertiary Ti alloys were used. The aim of this review is to describe and compare the current literature on binary Ti alloys, including Ti-Zr, Ti-In, Ti-Ag, Ti-Cu, Ti-Au, Ti-Pd, Ti-Nb, Ti-Mn, Ti-Mo, Ti-Cr, Ti-Co, Ti-Sn, Ti-Ge and Ti-Ga, in particular to mechanical, chemical and biological parameters related to implant application. Literature was searched using the PubMed and Web of Science databases, as well as google without limiting the year, but with principle key terms such as ' Ti alloy', 'binary Ti ', 'Ti-X' (with X is the alloy element), 'dental implant' and 'medical implant'. Only laboratory studies that intentionally for implant or biomedical applications were included. According to available literatures, we might conclude that most of the binary Ti alloys with alloying <20% elements of Zr, In, Ag, Cu, Au, Pd, Nb, Mn, Cr, Mo, Sn and Co have high potential as implant materials, due to good mechanical performance without compromising the biocompatibility and biological behaviour compare to cp-Ti.

  15. [Studies on high temperature oxidation of noble metal alloys for dental use. (III) On high temperature oxidation resistance of noble metal alloys by adding small amounts of alloying elements. (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ohno, H

    1976-11-01

    The previous report pointed out the undesirable effects of high temperature oxidation on the casting. The influence of small separate additions of Zn, Mg, Si, Be and Al on the high temperature oxidation of the noble metal alloys was examined. These alloying elements were chosen because their oxide have a high electrical resistivity and they have much higher affinity for oxygen than Cu. The casting were oxidized at 700 degrees C for 1 hour in air. The results obtained were as follows: 1. The Cu oxides are not observed on the as-cast surface of noble metal alloys containing small amounts of Zn, Mg, Si, Be, and Al. The castings have gold- or silver-colored surface. 2. After heating of the unpolished and polished castings, the additions of Si, Be and Al are effective in preventing oxidation of Cu in the 18 carats gold alloys. Especially the golden surface is obtained by adding Be and Al. But there is no oxidation-resistance on the polished castings in the alloys containing Zn and Mg. 3. The zinc oxide film formed on the as-cast specimen is effective in preventing of oxidation Cu in 18 carats gold alloys. 4. It seems that the addition of Al is most available in dental application.

  16. Electrocatalysts having platium monolayers on palladium, palladium alloy, and gold alloy core-shell nanoparticles, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Mo, Yibo; Vukmirovic, Miomir; Zhang, Junliang

    2010-12-21

    The invention relates to platinum-coated particles useful as fuel cell electrocatalysts. The particles are composed of a noble metal or metal alloy core at least partially encapsulated by an atomically thin surface layer of platinum atoms. The invention particularly relates to such particles having a palladium, palladium alloy, gold alloy, or rhenium alloy core encapsulated by an atomic monolayer of platinum. In other embodiments, the invention relates to fuel cells containing these electrocatalysts and methods for generating electrical energy therefrom.

  17. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or alloys...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or alloys...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or alloys...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or alloys...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or alloys...

  7. Binary titanium alloys as dental implant materials—a review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaotian; Chen, Shuyang; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Titanium (Ti) has been used for long in dentistry and medicine for implant purpose. During the years, not only the commercially pure Ti but also some alloys such as binary and tertiary Ti alloys were used. The aim of this review is to describe and compare the current literature on binary Ti alloys, including Ti–Zr, Ti–In, Ti–Ag, Ti–Cu, Ti–Au, Ti–Pd, Ti–Nb, Ti–Mn, Ti–Mo, Ti–Cr, Ti–Co, Ti–Sn, Ti–Ge and Ti–Ga, in particular to mechanical, chemical and biological parameters related to implant application. Literature was searched using the PubMed and Web of Science databases, as well as google without limiting the year, but with principle key terms such as ‘ Ti alloy’, ‘binary Ti ’, ‘Ti-X’ (with X is the alloy element), ‘dental implant’ and ‘medical implant’. Only laboratory studies that intentionally for implant or biomedical applications were included. According to available literatures, we might conclude that most of the binary Ti alloys with alloying <20% elements of Zr, In, Ag, Cu, Au, Pd, Nb, Mn, Cr, Mo, Sn and Co have high potential as implant materials, due to good mechanical performance without compromising the biocompatibility and biological behaviour compare to cp-Ti. PMID:29026646

  8. In situ gold nanoparticles formation: contrast agent for dental optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braz, Ana K. S.; Araujo, Renato E. de; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y.; Shukla, Shoba; Bergey, Earl J.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2012-06-01

    In this work we demonstrate the potential use of gold nanoparticles as contrast agents for the optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique in dentistry. Here, a new in situ photothermal reduction procedure was developed, producing spherical gold nanoparticles inside dentinal layers and tubules. Gold ions were dispersed in the primer of commercially available dental bonding systems. After the application and permeation in dentin by the modified adhesive systems, the dental bonding materials were photopolymerized concurrently with the formation of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM images show the presence of gold nanospheres in the hybrid layer and dentinal tubules. The diameter of the gold nanoparticles was determined to be in the range of 40 to 120 nm. Optical coherence tomography images were obtained in two- and three-dimensions. The distribution of nanoparticles was analyzed and the extended depth of nanosphere production was determined. The results show that the OCT technique, using in situ formed gold nanoparticles as contrast enhancers, can be used to visualize dentin structures in a non-invasive and non-destructive way.

  9. Hybrid framework with cobalt-chromium alloy and gold cylinder for implant superstructure: Bond strength and corrosion resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, Masao; Uzawa, Shinobu; Komiyama, Yataro

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate tensile bond strengths and corrosion resistance of CoCr alloys joined with gold cylinder by a soldering system in comparison with the conventional cast-joining system. CoCr alloys joined with gold cylinder by a soldering system using a high-fusing gold solder (CoCr/Solder/Gold cylinder), gold alloy joined with gold cylinder by a cast joining system (Gold alloy/Gold cylinder) and CoCr castings were fabricated. The tensile bond strength and corrosion resistance in 0.9% NaCl solution (pH 7.4 and pH 2.3) were evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the fractured surface and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) of the joined interfaces were also performed. The tensile bond strengths of the CoCr/Solder/Gold cylinder specimens showed similar values as the Gold alloy/Gold cylinder specimens. SEM observation and EPMA analyses suggested firm bonding between the CoCr alloy and gold cylinder. The released elements from the CoCr/Solder/Gold cylinder specimens were similar to ones from CoCr castings. Results showed that superstructures made of CoCr alloys joined with the gold cylinder using a high-fusing gold solder had sufficient bond strength and high corrosion resistance. These hybrid frameworks with cobalt-chromium alloy and gold cylinder are promising prosthesis for implant superstructures with the low cost and favorable mechanical properties instead of conventional high-gold alloys. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. High pressure/temperature equation of state of gold-silver alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, W. J.; Jenei, Zs.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Yang, W.; Shebanova, O.

    2010-03-01

    It has been reported previously (McKeehan Phys.Rev. 20 p424) that gold-silver alloys crystallize in face centered cubic structures, like their constituant pure elements and the cell parameter of the alloy has a linear relationship with the ratios of Ag/Au in the alloy. We investigate the high-pressure/temperature behavior of gold-silver alloys with different Au/Ag ratios. Powder x-ray diffraction experiments performed at HPCAT/Advanced Photon Source confirm the stability of the alloy's fcc structure to pressures/temperatures exceeding 100 GPa/1000 K. We will present isothermal EOS of the alloys from ambient temperature up to 1000 K, discuss the thermal expansion and its variation with pressure.

  11. Biocorrosion of dental alloys due to Desulfotomaculum nigrificans bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mystkowska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Degradation processes of metallic biomaterials in the oral cavity limit the stability and reliability of dental materials. The influence of environment bacteria Desulfotomaculum nigrificans sulfate reducing bacteria on the corrosion processes of Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V alloys was assessed. After 28 and 56 days of contact of the materials with the bacterial environment, the surfaces of the biomaterials tested were observed by means of confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM), and their chemical composition was studied using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometry (XPS). Corrosive changes and the presence of sulfur (with medium atomic concentration of 0.5% for Co-Cr-Mo and 0.3% for Ti-6AL-4V) were observed on the surface of the biomaterials. Image analysis conducted using Aphelion software indicated that corrosion pits took up approx. 2.3% and 1.8% (after 28 days) and 4.2% and 3.1% (after 56 days) of the total test surfaces of cobalt and titanium alloys respectively. The greatest number of corrosion pits had a surface area within the range of 1-50 m2. They constituted from 37% up to 83% of all changes, depending on the type of material. An evident influence of the SRB on the surfaces of cobalt and titanium alloys was observed. Significant corrosive losses caused by the activity of microorganisms were observed on the metallic surfaces under study. The results of this study have much cognitive and utilitarian significance.

  12. Influence of S. mutans on base-metal dental casting alloy toxicity.

    PubMed

    McGinley, E L; Dowling, A H; Moran, G P; Fleming, G J P

    2013-01-01

    We have highlighted that exposure of base-metal dental casting alloys to the acidogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans significantly increases cellular toxicity following exposure to immortalized human TR146 oral keratinocytes. With Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), S. mutans-treated nickel-based (Ni-based) and cobalt-chromium-based (Co-Cr-based) dental casting alloys were shown to leach elevated levels of metal ions compared with untreated dental casting alloys. We targeted several biological parameters: cell morphology, viable cell counts, cell metabolic activity, cell toxicity, and inflammatory cytokine expression. S. mutans-treated dental casting alloys disrupted cell morphology, elicited significantly decreased viable cell counts (p < 0.0001) and cell metabolic activity (p < 0.0001), and significantly increased cell toxicity (p < 0.0001) and inflammatory cytokine expression (p < 0.0001). S. mutans-treated Ni-based dental casting alloys induced elevated levels of cellular toxicity compared with S. mutans-treated Co-Cr-based dental casting alloys. While our findings indicated that the exacerbated release of metal ions from S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys was the likely result of the pH reduction during S. mutans growth, the exact nature of mechanisms leading to accelerated dissolution of alloy-discs is not yet fully understood. Given the predominance of S. mutans oral carriage and the exacerbated cytotoxicity observed in TR146 cells following exposure to S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys, the implications for the long-term stability of base-metal dental restorations in the oral cavity are a cause for concern.

  13. Preparation, characterization, and optical properties of gold, silver, and gold-silver alloy nanoshells having silica cores.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Hyun; Bryan, William W; Lee, T Randall

    2008-10-07

    This report describes the structural and optical properties of a series of spherical shell/core nanoparticles in which the shell is comprised of a thin layer of gold, silver, or gold-silver alloy, and the core is comprised of a monodispersed silica nanoparticle. The silica core particles were prepared using the Stöber method, functionalized with terminal amine groups, and then seeded with small gold nanoparticles (approximately 2 nm in diameter). The gold-seeded silica particles were coated with a layer of gold, silver, or gold-silver alloy via solution-phase reduction of an appropriate metal ion or mixture of metal ions. The size, morphology, and elemental composition of the composite nanoparticles were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The optical properties of the nanoparticles were analyzed by UV-vis spectroscopy, which showed strong absorptions ranging from 400 nm into the near-IR region, where the position of the plasmon band reflected not only the thickness of the metal shell, but also the nature of the metal comprising the shell. Importantly, the results demonstrate a new strategy for tuning the position of the plasmon resonance without having to vary the core diameter or the shell thickness.

  14. Nazi Dental Gold: from Dead Bodies to Swiss Banks.

    PubMed

    Riaud, Xavier

    2015-06-01

    On the 23rd of September 1940 SS Reichsfürher Heinrich Himmler, gave the SS doctors orders to collect the gold teeth from the mouths of those killed in death camps. Here we ask: who were the SS dentists who are directly implicated in that collection, what were the figures behind the process and how did the Nazis conduct this retrieval of gold? Here we give the answers for the first time...

  15. High pressure/temperature equation of state of gold silver alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenei, Zsolt; Lipp, Magnus J.; Klepeis, Jae-Hyun P.; Cynn, Hyunchae; Evans, William J.; Park, Changyong

    2012-02-01

    Gold-silver alloys crystallize in face centered cubic structures, like their constituent pure elements [McKeehan -- Phys.Rev. 20, 424 (1922)]. The cell parameter of the alloys does not scale linearly with the ratio of Ag/Au. In this work we investigate the high-pressure/temperature behavior of gold-silver alloys with different Au/Ag ratios. Powder x-ray diffraction experiments performed at HPCAT/Advanced Photon Source confirm the stability of the alloy's fcc structure to pressures/temperatures exceeding 100 GPa/1000 K. We will present isothermal EOS of the alloys from ambient temperature up to 1000 K, discuss the thermal expansion and its variation with pressure.

  16. Reciprocal interaction between dental alloy biocorrosion and Streptococcus mutans virulent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songmei; Qiu, Jing; Ren, Yanfang; Yu, Weiqiang; Zhang, Fuqiang; Liu, Xiuxin

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion of dental alloys is a major concern in dental restorations. Streptococcus mutans reduces the pH in oral cavity and induces demineralization of the enamel as well as corrosion of restorative dental materials. The rough surfaces of dental alloys induced by corrosion enhance the subsequent accumulation of plaque. In this study, the corrosion process of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys in a nutrient-rich medium containing S. mutans was studied using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical corrosion test. Our results showed that the release of Ni and Co ions increased, particularly after incubation for 3 days. The electrochemical corrosion results showed a significant decrease in the corrosion resistance (Rp) value after the alloys were immersed in the media containing S. mutans for 3 days. Correspondingly, XPS revealed a reduction in the relative dominance of Ni, Co, and Cr in the surface oxides after the alloys were immersed in the S. mutans culture. After removal of the biofilm, the pre-corroded alloys were re-incubated in S. mutans medium, and the expressions of genes associated with the adhesion and acidogenesis of S. mutans, including gtfBCD, gbpB, fif and ldh, were evaluated by detecting the mRNA levels using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that the gtfBCD, gbpB, ftf and Idh expression of S. mutans were noticeably increased after incubation with pre-corroded alloys for 24 h. This study demonstrated that S. mutans enhanced the corrosion behavior of the dental alloys, on the other hand, the presence of corroded alloy surfaces up-regulated the virulent gene expression in S. mutans. Compared with smooth surfaces, the rough corroded surfaces of dental alloys accelerated the bacteria-adhesion and corrosion process by changing the virulence gene expression of S. mutans.

  17. The release of elements from dental casting alloy into cell-culture medium and artificial saliva.

    PubMed

    Can, Gülşen; Akpınar, Gül; Aydın, Ahmet

    2007-04-01

    The biocompatibility of dental casting alloys is a critical issue because these alloys are in long-term intimate contact with oral tissues. Since the biocompatibility of alloys is not completely known; the release of elements from the alloys has been studied. The aim of this study was to compare the elemental release from dental casting alloy during exposure to artificial saliva and cell-culture medium. Twenty specimens made from Ni-Cr alloy were provided in the form of 5 mm diameter discs, 2 mm in thickness with a 7 mm stem attached to one face to facilitate handling. Ten of twenty samples were polished separately using a conventional technique. The remaining ten samples were left sandblasted with 50 mum Al(2)0(3). Ten samples (5 polished, 5 sandblasted) were separately placed into cell-culture wells with Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium. The other ten samples were placed separately into cell-culture wells with artificial saliva. The samples were subjected in contact with these medium for 30 days. These medium were collected every 7 days. The cell-culture medium and artificial saliva without alloy samples were subjected to elemental analyses as a control. At the end of the exposure time, Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) was used to determine the release of elements from the alloys into all collected medium. Statistical analyses were assessed with two-way ANOVA. In general, the elemental release occurred with in all medium. The elemental releases of sandblasted alloys were higher than polished alloys. Artificial saliva was found to cause more release from the samples. In both media, Ni released from polished and sandblasted alloys were higher than Cr and Mo. The results suggest that the release of elements from the alloys might have correlated with the environments and the surface of dental alloy.

  18. The Release of Elements from Dental Casting Alloy into Cell-Culture Medium and Artificial Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Can, Gülşen; Akpınar, Gül; Aydın, Ahmet

    2007-01-01

    Objectives The biocompatibility of dental casting alloys is a critical issue because these alloys are in long-term intimate contact with oral tissues. Since the biocompatibility of alloys is not completely known; the release of elements from the alloys has been studied. The aim of this study was to compare the elemental release from dental casting alloy during exposure to artificial saliva and cell-culture medium. Materials and Methods Twenty specimens made from Ni-Cr alloy were provided in the form of 5 mm diameter discs, 2 mm in thickness with a 7 mm stem attached to one face to facilitate handling. Ten of twenty samples were polished separately using a conventional technique. The remaining ten samples were left sandblasted with 50 μm Al203. Ten samples (5 polished, 5 sandblasted) were separately placed into cell-culture wells with Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium. The other ten samples were placed separately into cell-culture wells with artificial saliva. The samples were subjected in contact with these medium for 30 days. These medium were collected every 7 days. The cell-culture medium and artificial saliva without alloy samples were subjected to elemental analyses as a control. At the end of the exposure time, Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) was used to determine the release of elements from the alloys into all collected medium. Statistical analyses were assessed with two-way ANOVA. Results In general, the elemental release occurred with in all medium. The elemental releases of sandblasted alloys were higher than polished alloys. Artificial saliva was found to cause more release from the samples. In both media, Ni released from polished and sandblasted alloys were higher than Cr and Mo. Conlusions The results suggest that the release of elements from the alloys might have correlated with the environments and the surface of dental alloy. PMID:19212482

  19. Mechanical properties and grindability of dental cast Ti-Nb alloys.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Okuno, Osamu

    2003-09-01

    Aiming at developing a dental titanium alloy with better mechanical properties and machinability than unalloyed titanium, a series of Ti-Nb alloys with Nb concentrations up to 30% was made. They were cast into magnesia-based molds using a dental casting machine and the mechanical properties and grindability of the castings were examined. The hardness of the alloys with Nb concentrations of 5% and above was significantly higher than that of titanium. The yield strength and tensile strength of the alloys with Nb concentrations of 10% and above were significantly higher than those of titanium, while the elongation was significantly lower. A small addition of niobium to titanium did not contribute to improving the grindability of titanium. The Ti-30% Nb alloy exhibited significantly better grindability at low grinding speed with higher hardness, strength, and Young's modulus than titanium, presumably due to precipitation of the omega phase in the beta matrix.

  20. A comparison of preload values in gold and titanium dental implant retaining screws.

    PubMed

    Doolabh, R; Dullabh, H D; Sykes, L M

    2014-08-01

    This in vitro investigation compared the effect of using either gold or titanium retaining screws on preload in the dental implant- abutment complex. Inadequate preload can result in screw loosening, whilst fracture may occur if preload is excessive. These are the most commonly reported complications in implant-retained prostheses, and result in unscheduled, costly and time-consuming visits for the patient and the clinician. This study investigated changes in preload generation after repeated torque applications to gold and titanium screws. The test set-up consisted of an implant body, a cylindrical transmucosa abutment, and the test samples of gold and of titanium retaining screws. The implant bodies were anchored using a load cell, and the transmucosal abutments were attached using either gold or titanium retaining screws. A torque gauge was used to apply torque of 20Ncm, 32Ncm, and 40Ncm to the retaining screws. The preloads generated in each screw type were compared at each torque setting, and after repeated tightening episodes. In addition, the effect of applying torque beyond the manufacturers' recommendations was also examined. Gold retaining screws were found to achieve consistently higher preload values than titanium retaining screws. Preload values were not significantly different from the first to the tenth torque cycle. Titanium screws showed more consistent preload values, albeit lower than those of the gold screws. However due to possible galling of the internal thread of the implant body by titanium screws, gold screws remain the retaining screw of choice. Based on the findings of this study, gold retaining screws generate better preload than titanium. Torque beyond the manufacturers' recommendations resulted in a more stable implant complex. However, further investigations, with torque applications repeated until screw breakage, are needed to advise on ideal maintenance protocols.

  1. Measurements of thermoelectric power in annealed and quenched gold-platinum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baarle, C. V.; Huebener, R. P.

    1969-01-01

    Report gives measurements of absolute thermoelectric powers of dilute gold-platinum alloys and influence of quenched-in lattice vacancies on their thermoelectric powers. It investigates phonon-drag component of thermoelectric power as a function of platinum concentration, and change in phonon-drag thermoelectric power by lattice vacancies.

  2. Electroplating Gold-Silver Alloys for Spherical Capsules for NIF Double-Shell Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandarkar, N.; Horwood, C.; Bunn, T.

    For Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions, a design based on gradients of high and mid Z materials could potentially be more robust than single element capsule systems. To that end, gold and silver alloys were electroplated on 2.0 mm diameter surrogate brass spheres using a new flow–based pulsed plating method specifically designed to minimize surface roughness without reducing plating rates. The coatings were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and white light interferometry for surface topography, and by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to determine near-surface gold and silver compositions. The alloy range attainable was 15 to 85 weight percentmore » gold using 1:1 and 1:3 silver to gold ratio plating baths at applied potentials of -0.7 volts to -1.8 volts. This range was bounded by the open circuit potential of the system and hydrogen evolution, and in theory could be extended by using ionic liquids or aprotic solutions. Preliminary gradient trials proved constant composition alloy data could be translated to smooth gradient plating, albeit at higher gold compositions.« less

  3. Grindability of dental cast Ti-Ag and Ti-Cu alloys.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Okabe, Toru; Okuno, Osamu

    2003-06-01

    Experimental Ti-Ag alloys (5, 10, and 20 mass% Ag) and Ti-Cu alloys (2, 5, and 10 mass% Cu) were cast into magnesia molds using a dental casting machine, and their grindability was investigated. At the lowest grinding speed (500 m min(-1)), there were no statistical differences among the grindability values of the titanium and titanium alloys. The grindability of the alloys increased as the grinding speed increased. At the highest grinding speed (1500 m x min(-1)), the grindability of the 20% Ag, 5% Cu, and 10% Cu alloys was significantly higher than that of titanium. It was found that alloying with silver or copper improved the grindability of titanium, particularly at a high speed. It appeared that the decrease in elongation caused by the precipitation of small amounts of intermetallic compounds primarily contributed to the favorable grindability of the experimental alloys.

  4. Wear resistance of a pressable low-fusing ceramic opposed by dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Faria, Adriana Cláudia Lapria; de Oliveira, André Almeida; Alves Gomes, Érica; Silveira Rodrigues, Renata Cristina; Faria Ribeiro, Ricardo

    2014-04-01

    Dental alloys have increasingly replaced by dental ceramics in dentistry because of aesthetics. As both dental alloys and ceramics can be present in the oral cavity, the evaluation of the wear resistance of ceramics opposed by dental alloys is important. The aim of the present study was to evaluate wear resistance of a pressable low-fusing ceramic opposed by dental alloys as well as the microhardness of the alloys and the possible correlation of wear and antagonist microhardness. Fifteen stylus tips samples of pressable low-fusing ceramic were obtained, polished and glazed. Samples were divided into three groups according to the disk of alloy/metal to be used as antagonist: Nickel-Chromium (Ni-Cr), Cobalt-Chromium (Co-Cr) and commercially pure titanium (cp Ti). Vickers microhardness of antagonist disks was evaluated before wear tests. Then, antagonist disks were sandblasted until surface roughness was adjusted to 0.75μm. Wear tests were performed at a speed of 60 cycles/min and distance of 10mm, in a total of 300,000 cycles. Before and after wear tests, samples were weighted and had their profile designed in an optical comparator to evaluate weight and height loss, respectively. Ni-Cr and cp Ti caused greater wear than Co-Cr, presenting greater weight (p=.009) and height (p=.002) loss. Cp Ti microhardness was lower than Ni-Cr and Co-Cr (p<.05). There is a positive correlation between weight and height loss (p<.05), but weight (p=.204) and height (p=.05) loss are not correlated to microhardness. The results suggest that pressable low-fusing ceramic presents different wear according to the dental alloy used as antagonist and the wear is not affected by antagonist microhardness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of heat treatments on machinability of gold alloy with age-hardenability at intraoral temperature.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, I; Baba, N; Watanabe, E; Atsuta, M; Okabe, T

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of heat treatment on the machinability of heat-treated cast gold alloy with age-hardenability at intraoral temperature using a handpiece engine with SiC wheels and an air-turbine handpiece with carbide burs and diamond points. Cast gold alloy specimens underwent various heat treatments [As-cast (AC); Solution treatment (ST); High-temperature aging (HA), Intraoral aging (IA)] before machinability testing. The machinability test was conducted at a constant machining force of 0.784N. The three circumferential speeds used for the handpiece engine were 500, 1,000 and 1,500 m/min. The machinability index (M-index) was determined as the amount of metal removed by machining (volume loss, mm(3)). The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Scheffé's test. When an air-turbine handpiece was used, there was no difference in the M-index of the gold alloy among the heat treatments. The air-turbine carbide burs showed significantly (p<0.05) higher M-indexes than the diamond points after any heat treatments. With the SiC wheels, increasing the circumferential speed increased the M-index values for each heat treatment. The specimens heat-treated with AC, HA and IA had similar M-indexes at the lower speeds (500 and 1,000 m/min). The ST specimens exhibited the lowest M-index at the lower speeds. However, at the highest speed (1,500 m/min), there were no significant differences in the M-indexes among the heat treatments except for HA, which showed the highest M-index. There was no effect of heat treatment on the machinability of the gold alloy using the air-turbine handpiece. The heat treatments had a small effect on the M-index of the gold alloy machined with a SiC wheel for a handpiece engine.

  6. Evaluation of the new TAMZ titanium alloy for dental cast application.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y M; Guo, T W; Li, Z C

    2000-12-01

    To reveal the potential of the new titanium alloy as dental prosthodontic materials. Dental castings of TAMZ alloy were investigated in the casting machine specially designed for titanium. A mesh pattern was used to count the castability value. The mechanical properties were measured by means of a universal testing machine. Optical micrography was done on the exposed cross-section of TAMZ alloy casting. From the surface to the inner part the Knoop hardness in reacted layer of TAMZ alloy casting was measured. The structure and elemental analyses of the reacted layer were made by SEM and element line scanning observation. The castability value (Cv = 98%) and the tensile test (sigma b = 850 Mpa, sigma 0.2 = 575 Mpa, delta = 7.33%) data were collected. The castings microstructure showed main alpha phase and small beta phase. Knoop hardness in the surface reacted layer was greater than that in the inner part. From the SEM and element line scanning observation, there are three different layers in the surface reacted layer of the TAMZ alloy castings, and higher level of element of O, Al, Si and Zr were found in the reacted layer while the Si permeated deeper than others. TAMZ alloy can be accepted as a material for dental alloy in prosthodontics.

  7. Corrosion behavior of as-received and previously cast type III gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Mohamed F; Ayad, Ghada M

    2010-04-01

    The rationale for using gold alloys is based largely upon their alleged ability to resist corrosion, but little information is available to determine the corrosion behavior of recast alloys. This study characterized the elemental composition of as-received and recast type III gold alloy and examined the in vitro corrosion behavior in two media using a potentiodynamic polarization technique. Seventy-eight disk-shaped specimens were prepared from a type III gold alloy under three casting protocols according to the proportion of as-received and recast gold alloy (n = 26). (1) Group as received (100% as-received metal), (2) group 50% to 50% (50% wt. new metal, 50% wt. once recast metal), and (3) group recast (100% once recast metal). The surface structures of 20 specimens from each group were examined under scanning electron microscopy, and their elemental compositions were determined using X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Further, the potentiodynamic cyclic polarization between -1000 and +1000 mV (SCE) were performed for six specimens from each casting protocol in 0.09% NaCl solution (n = 3) and Fusayama artificial saliva (n = 3) at 37 degrees C. Zero-current potential and corrosion current density were determined. The data were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA and the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple-range test t (alpha= 0.05). Elemental composition was significantly different among the casting groups (p < 0.001). The mean weight percentage values were 72.4 to 75.7% Au, 4.5 to 7.0% Pd, 10.7 to 11.1% Ag, 7.8 to 8.4% Cu, and 1.0 to 1.4% Zn. The mean values for Zero-current potential and corrosion current density for all casting protocols were not significant (p > 0.05); however, the difference between the electrolytes was significant (p < 0.001). Fusayama artificial saliva seemed to offer the most corrosive environment. Type III gold alloy in any casting protocol retained passivity under electrochemical conditions similar to the oral environment. Moreover, high-gold

  8. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel–chromium based alloys

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Xia, Gang; Cao, Xin-Ming; Wang, Jue; Xu, Bi-Yao; Huang, Pu; Chen, Yue; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel–chromium based alloy (Ni–Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni–Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of <1 month of the restoration duration, among which higher Ni excretions were found in those with either a higher number of teeth replaced by dental alloys or a higher index of metal crown not covered with the porcelain. Urinary levels of Cr were significantly higher in the three patient groups of <1, 1 to <3 and 3 to <6 months, especially in those with a higher metal crown exposure index. Linear curve estimations showed better relationships between urinary Ni and Cr in patients within 6-month groups. Our data suggested significant increased excretions of urinary Ni and Cr after dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni–Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated. PMID:23579466

  9. Gold-Copper alloy “nano-dumplings” with tunable compositions and plasmonic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Manoj, E-mail: duplasmonic@gmail.com; Kedia, Abhitosh; Kumar, P. Senthil

    The unique yet tunable optical properties of plasmonic metal nanoparticles have made them attractive targets for a wide range of applications including nanophotonics, molecular sensing, catalysis etc. Such diverse applications that require precisely stable / reproducible plasmonic properties depend sensitively on the particle morphology ie. the shape, size and constituents. Herein, we systematically study the size / shape controlled synthesis of gold-copper “dumpling” shaped alloy nanoparticles by simultaneous reduction of gold and copper salts in the PVP-methanol solute-solvent system, by effectively utilizing the efficient but mild reduction as well as capping abilities of Poly (N-vinylpyrrolidone). Introduction of copper salts notmore » only yielded the alloy nanoparticles, but also slowed down the growth process to maintain high mono-dispersity of the new shapes evolved. Copper and gold has different lattice constants (0.361 and 0.408 nm respectively) and hence doping/addition/replacement of copper atoms to gold FCC unit cell introduces strain into the lattice which is key parameter to the shape evolution in anisotropic nanoparticles. Synthesized alloy nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, XRD and TEM imaging.« less

  10. Gold-Copper alloy "nano-dumplings" with tunable compositions and plasmonic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Manoj; Kedia, Abhitosh; Kumar, P. Senthil

    2016-05-01

    The unique yet tunable optical properties of plasmonic metal nanoparticles have made them attractive targets for a wide range of applications including nanophotonics, molecular sensing, catalysis etc. Such diverse applications that require precisely stable / reproducible plasmonic properties depend sensitively on the particle morphology ie. the shape, size and constituents. Herein, we systematically study the size / shape controlled synthesis of gold-copper "dumpling" shaped alloy nanoparticles by simultaneous reduction of gold and copper salts in the PVP-methanol solute-solvent system, by effectively utilizing the efficient but mild reduction as well as capping abilities of Poly (N-vinylpyrrolidone). Introduction of copper salts not only yielded the alloy nanoparticles, but also slowed down the growth process to maintain high mono-dispersity of the new shapes evolved. Copper and gold has different lattice constants (0.361 and 0.408 nm respectively) and hence doping/addition/replacement of copper atoms to gold FCC unit cell introduces strain into the lattice which is key parameter to the shape evolution in anisotropic nanoparticles. Synthesized alloy nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, XRD and TEM imaging.

  11. Properties of experimental copper-aluminium-nickel alloys for dental post-and-core applications.

    PubMed

    Rittapai, Apiwat; Urapepon, Somchai; Kajornchaiyakul, Julathep; Harniratisai, Choltacha

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to develop a copper-aluminium-nickel alloy which has properties comparable to that of dental alloys used for dental post and core applications with the reasonable cost. Sixteen groups of experimental copper alloys with variants of 3, 6, 9, 12 wt% Al and 0, 2, 4, 6 wt% Ni were prepared and casted. Their properties were tested and evaluated. The data of thermal, physical, and mechanical properties were analyzed using the two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The alloy toxicity was evaluated according to the ISO standard. The solidus and liquidus points of experimental alloys ranged from 1023℃ to 1113℃ and increased as the nickel content increased. The highest ultimate tensile strength (595.9 ± 14.2 MPa) was shown in the Cu-12Al-4Ni alloy. The tensile strength was increased as the both elements increased. Alloys with 3-6 wt% Al exhibited a small amount of 0.2% proof strength. Accordingly, the Cu-9Al-2Ni and Cu-9Al-4Ni alloys not only demonstrated an appropriate modulus of elasticity (113.9 ± 8.0 and 122.8 ± 11.3 GPa, respectively), but also had a value of 0.2% proof strength (190.8 ± 4.8 and 198.2 ± 3.4 MPa, respectively), which complied with the ISO standard requirement (>180 MPa). Alloys with the highest contents of nickel (6 wt% Ni) revealed a widespread decolourisation zone (5.0-5.9 mm), which correspondingly produced the largest cell response, equating positive control. The copper alloys fused with 9 wt% Al and 2-4 wt% Ni can be considered for a potential use as dental post and core applications.

  12. Gold-silver alloy nanoshells: a new candidate for nanotherapeutics and diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghe, Dana E.; Cui, Lili; Karmonik, Christof; Brazdeikis, Audrius; Penaloza, Jose M.; Young, Joseph K.; Drezek, Rebekah A.; Bikram, Malavosklish

    2011-10-01

    We have developed novel gold-silver alloy nanoshells as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual T 1 (positive) and T 2 (negative) contrast agents as an alternative to typical gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents. Specifically, we have doped iron oxide nanoparticles with Gd ions and sequestered the ions within the core by coating the nanoparticles with an alloy of gold and silver. Thus, these nanoparticles are very innovative and have the potential to overcome toxicities related to renal clearance of contrast agents such as nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The morphology of the attained nanoparticles was characterized by XRD which demonstrated the successful incorporation of Gd(III) ions into the structure of the magnetite, with no major alterations of the spinel structure, as well as the growth of the gold-silver alloy shells. This was supported by TEM, ICP-AES, and SEM/EDS data. The nanoshells showed a saturation magnetization of 38 emu/g because of the presence of Gd ions within the crystalline structure with r 1 and r 2 values of 0.0119 and 0.9229 mL mg-1 s-1, respectively (Au:Ag alloy = 1:1). T 1- and T 2-weighted images of the nanoshells showed that these agents can both increase the surrounding water proton signals in the T 1-weighted image and reduce the signal in T 2-weighted images. The as-synthesized nanoparticles exhibited strong absorption in the range of 600-800 nm, their optical properties being strongly dependent upon the thickness of the gold-silver alloy shell. Thus, these nanoshells have the potential to be utilized for tumor cell ablation because of their absorption as well as an imaging agent.

  13. Influence of the casting processing route on the corrosion behavior of dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Galo, Rodrigo; Rocha, Luis Augusto; Faria, Adriana Claudia; Silveira, Renata Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; de Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello

    2014-12-01

    Casting in the presence of oxygen may result in an improvement of the corrosion performance of most alloys. However, the effect of corrosion on the casting without oxygen for dental materials remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the casting technique and atmosphere (argon or oxygen) on the corrosion behavior response of six different dental casting alloys. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by electrochemical measurements performed in artificial saliva for the different alloys cast in two different conditions: arc melting in argon and oxygen-gas flame centrifugal casting. A slight decrease in open-circuit potential for most alloys was observed during immersion, meaning that the corrosion tendency of the materials increases due to the contact with the solution. Exceptions were the Co-based alloys prepared by plasma, and the Co-Cr-Mo and Ni-Cr-4Ti alloys processed by oxidized flame, in which an increase in potential was observed. The amount of metallic ions released into the artificial saliva solution during immersion was similar for all specimens. Considering the pitting potential, a parameter of high importance when considering the fluctuating conditions of the oral environment, Co-based alloys show the best performance in comparison with the Ni-based alloys, independent of the processing route. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Corrosion property and oxide film of dental casting alloys before and after porcelain firing].

    PubMed

    Ma, Qian; Wu, Feng-ming

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the types and compositions of oxide films formed during porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) firing on three kinds of dental casting alloys, and to investigate the corrosion property of these alloys in Dulbecco's modification of Eagle's medium (DMEM) cell culture fluid, before and after PFM firing. Specimens of three dental casting alloys (Ni-Cr, Co-Cr and Ni-Ti) before and after PFM firing were prepared, and were immersed in DMEM cell culture fluid. After 30 days, the type and concentration of released metal ions were measured using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used for analysis of oxide film on the alloys. One way-ANOVA was adopted in data analysis. The total amount of metal ions released from the three dental alloys was found to be highest in Ni-Cr alloy [(2.829 ± 0.694) mg/L], followed by Co-Cr [(2.120 ± 0.418) mg/L] and Ni-Ti alloy [(1.211 ± 0.101) mg/L]. The amount of Ni ions released from Ni-Cr alloys [(1.531 ± 0.392) mg/L] was higher than that from Ni-Ti alloys [(0.830 ± 0.052) mg/L]. The amount of Cr, Mo ions released from Co-Cr alloy [Cr: (0.048 ± 0.011) mg/L, Mo: (1.562 ± 0.333) mg/L] was higher than that from Ni-Cr alloy [Cr: (0.034 ± 0.002) mg/L, Mo: (1.264 ± 0.302) mg/L] and Ni-Ti alloy [Cr: (0.013 ± 0.006) mg/L, Mo: (0.151 ± 0.026) mg/L] (P < 0.05). After PFM firing, the total amount of metal irons released from the three dental alloys decreased [Ni-Cr: (0.861 ± 0.054) mg/L, Co-Cr: (0.695 ± 0.327) mg/L, Ni-Ti: (0.892 ± 0.115) mg/L] (P < 0.05). In addition, XPS showed increase of Cr(2)O(3) and Mo-Ni oxide on the surface of all the alloys after PFM firing. The amount of ions released from Ni-Cr alloy was the highest among the three dental casting alloys, this means Ni-Cr alloy is prone to corrode. The PFM firing process changed the alloys' surface composition. Increased Ni, Cr and Mo were found in oxide film, and

  15. Corrosion behaviour of Ti-15Mo alloy for dental implant applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satendra; Narayanan, T S N Sankara

    2008-07-01

    The corrosion behaviour of Ti-15Mo alloy in 0.15M NaCl solution containing varying concentrations of fluoride ions (190, 570, 1140 and 9500 ppm) is evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and chronoamperometric/current-time transient (CTT) studies to ascertain its suitability for dental implant applications. The study reveals that there is a strong dependence of the corrosion resistance of Ti-15Mo alloy on the concentration of fluoride ions in the electrolyte medium. Increase in fluoride ion concentration from 0 to 9500 ppm shifts the corrosion potential (E(corr)) from -275 to -457 mV vs. SCE, increases the corrosion current density (i(corr)) from 0.31 to 2.30 microA/cm(2), the passive current density (i(pass)) from 0.07 to 7.32 mA/cm(2) and the double-layer capacitance (C(dl)) from 9.63 x 10(-5) to 1.79 x 10(-4)F and reduces the charge transfer resistance (R(ct)) from 6.58 x 10(4) to 6.64 x 10(3)Omega cm(2). In spite of the active dissolution, the Ti-15Mo alloy exhibit passivity at anodic potentials at all concentrations of the fluoride ions studied. In dental implants since the exposure of the alloy will be limited only to its 'neck', the amount of Mo ions released from Ti-15Mo alloy is not likely to have an adverse and hence, in terms of biocompatibility this alloy seems to be acceptable for dental implant applications. The results of the study suggest that Ti-15Mo alloy can be a suitable alternative for dental implant applications.

  16. Influence of ceramic surface texture on the wear of gold alloy and heat-pressed ceramics.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Nogawa, Hiroshi; Hiraba, Haruto; Akazawa, Nobutaka; Matsumura, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of ceramic surface texture on the wear of rounded rod specimens. Plate specimens were fabricated from zirconia (ZrO2), feldspathic porcelain, and lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDG ceramics). Plate surfaces were either ground or polished. Rounded rod specimens with a 2.0-mm-diameter were fabricated from type 4 gold alloy and heat-pressed ceramics (HP ceramics). Wear testing was performed by means of a wear testing apparatus under 5,000 reciprocal strokes of the rod specimen with 5.9 N vertical loading. The results were statistically analyzed with a non-parametric procedure. The gold alloy showed the maximal height loss (90.0 µm) when the rod specimen was abraded with ground porcelain, whereas the HP ceramics exhibited maximal height loss (49.8 µm) when the rod specimen was abraded with ground zirconia. There was a strong correlation between height loss of the rod and surface roughness of the underlying plates, for both the gold alloy and HP ceramics.

  17. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver, that...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver, that...

  19. Structural and morphological approach of Co-Cr dental alloys processed by alternative manufacturing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porojan, Sorin; Bîrdeanu, Mihaela; Savencu, Cristina; Porojan, Liliana

    2017-08-01

    The integration of digitalized processing technologies in traditional dental restorations manufacturing is an emerging application. The objective of this study was to identify the different structural and morphological characteristics of Co-Cr dental alloys processed by alternative manufacturing techniques in order to understand the influence of microstructure on restorations properties and their clinical behavior. Metallic specimens made of Co-Cr dental alloys were prepared using traditional casting (CST), and computerized milling (MIL), selective laser sintering (SLS) and selective laser melting (SLM). The structural information of the samples was obtained by X-ray diffraction, the morphology and the topography of the samples were investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscope. Given that the microstructure was significantly different, further differences in the clinical behavior of prosthetic restorations manufactured using additive techniques are anticipated.

  20. Structure, mechanical properties, and grindability of dental Ti-Zr alloys.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wen-Fu; Chen, Wei-Kai; Wu, Shih-Ching; Hsu, Hsueh-Chuan

    2008-10-01

    Structure, mechanical properties and grindability of a series of binary Ti-Zr alloys with zirconium contents ranging from 10 to 40 wt% have been investigated. Commercially pure titanium (c.p. Ti) was used as a control. Experimental results indicated that the diffraction peaks of all the Ti-Zr alloys matched those for alpha Ti. No beta-phase peaks were found. The hardness of the Ti-Zr alloys increased as the Zr contents increased, and ranged from 266 HV (Ti-10Zr) to 350 HV (Ti-40Zr). As the concentration of zirconium in the alloys increased, the strength, elastic recovery angles and hardness increased. Moreover, the elastically recoverable angle of Ti-40Zr was higher than of c.p. Ti by as much as 550%. The grindability of each metal was found to be largely dependent on the grinding conditions. The Ti-40Zr alloy had a higher grinding rate and grinding ratio than c.p. Ti at low speed. The grinding rate of the Ti-40Zr alloy at 500 m/min was about 1.8 times larger than that of c.p. Ti, and the grinding ratio was about 1.6 times larger than that of c.p. Ti. Our research suggested that the Ti-40Zr alloy has better mechanical properties, excellent elastic recovery capability and improved grindability at low grinding speed. The Ti-40Zr alloy has a great potential for use as a dental machining alloy.

  1. Further studies on gold alloys used in fabrication of porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations.

    PubMed

    Civjan, S; Huget, E F; Dvivedi, N; Cosner, H J

    1975-03-01

    Composition, microstructure, castability, mechanical properties, and heat treatment characteristics of two gold-palladium-silver-based alloys were studied. The materials exhibited compositional as well as microstructural differences. Clinically acceptable castings could not be obtained when manufacturers' recommended casting temperatures were used. Ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, modulus of elasticity, and Brinell hardness values for the alloys were comparable. The elastic limit of Cameo, however, was significantly higher than that of vivo-star. Maximum rehardening of annealed castings occurred on reheat treatment at temperatures between 1,200 and 1,300 F. As-cast specimens, however, were not heat hardenable. The sequence of heat treatments used in the application of porcelain reduced slightly the hardness of both alloys. Hardness of the metal substructures was not increased by return of porcelain-coated specimens to a 1,250 F oven for final heat treatment.

  2. High performance SERS on nanoporous gold substrates synthesized by chemical de-alloying a Au-based metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yanpeng; Scaglione, Federico; Rizzi, Paola; Battezzati, Livio

    2017-12-01

    A Au20Cu48Ag7Pd5Si20 metallic glass precursor has been used to synthesize nanoporous gold by chemical de-alloying in a mixture of HNO3 and HF. Gold ligaments of size ranging from 45 to 100 nm were obtained as a function of HNO3 concentration, electrolyte temperature and de-alloying time. The as-prepared nanoporous gold exhibited strong surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect using 4,4‧-bi-pyridine as probe molecule. For application in melamine sensing, the detection limit of 10-6 M was achieved, which indicated that this biocompatible material has great potential as SERS active substrate.

  3. Characteristics and porcelain bond strength of (Ti,Al)N coating on dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kwok-Hung; Duh, Jeng-Gong; Shin, Daehwan; Cagna, David R; Cronin, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    The effect of a novel titanium-aluminum nitride film, or (Ti,Al)N film, on the bond strength between a dental porcelain and two nickel-based dental alloy substrates was investigated. A thin layer of (Ti,Al)N film was deposited on flat metal samples using a reactive radio-frequency sputtering method. A uniform thickness of porcelain was applied to the film- coated metal samples. Metal-ceramic specimens were subjected to three-point bending, and failure loads were recorded. Bond strengths between the porcelain and (Ti,Al)N-coated metal alloys ranged from 159.0 +/- 11.7 N to 278.0 +/- 12.3 N. These values were significantly greater (p< 0.05) than bond strengths recorded for control samples that did not incorporate the (Ti,Al)N film. An electron probe microanalyzer with a line profile mode was used to characterize the interface between the (Ti,Al)N film and the porcelain. Results of this investigation suggest that the (Ti,Al)N film (1) increases the flexural bond strength between dental porcelain and nickel-based alloy substrates by permitting elemental diffusion, (2) interferes with the surface oxide formation that characteristically originates from the nickel-based metal alloy substrate, and (3) provides an appropriate oxide layer for porcelain application. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res (Appl Biomater) 63: 516-521, 2002

  4. A comparative analysis of metal allergens associated with dental alloy prostheses and the expression of HLA-DR in gingival tissue

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIN; WEI, LI-CHENG; WU, BIN; YU, LI-YING; WANG, XIAO-PING; LIU, YUE

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to provide guidance for the selection of prosthodontic materials and the management of patients with a suspected metal allergy. This included a comparison of the sensitivity of patients to alloys used in prescribed metal-containing prostheses, and correlation analysis between metal allergy and accompanying clinical symptoms of sensitized patients using a patch test. The results from the patch test and metal component analyses were processed to reach a final diagnosis. In the present study, four dental alloys were assessed. Subsequent to polishing the surface of a metal restoration, the components were analyzed using an X-ray fluorescence microscopy and spectrometry. Immunohistochemical analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to detect the expression levels of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR in gingival tissues affected by alloy restoration, and in normal gingival tissue samples. Positive allergens identified in the patch test were consistent with the components of the metal prostheses. The prevalence of nickel (Ni) allergy was highest (22.8%), and women were significantly more allergic to palladium and Ni than men (P<0.05). The protein and gene expression levels of HLA-DR in the Ni-chromium (Cr) prosthesis group were significantly higher, compared with those in the other groups (P<0.01); followed by cobalt-Cr alloy, gold alloy and titanium alloy. In conclusion, dentists require an understanding of the corrosion and allergy rates of prescribed alloys, in order to reduce the risk of allergic reactions. Patch testing for hypersensitive patients is recommended and caution is required when planning to use different alloys in the mouth. PMID:26573458

  5. Corrosion resistance evaluation of Pd-free Ag-Au-Pt-Cu dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Takuma, Yasuko; Hisatsune, Kunihiro

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of nine experimental Pd-free Ag-Au-Pt-Cu dental alloys in a 0.9% NaCl solution was investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). CV measurements revealed that the breakdown potential (E(bd)) and zero current potential (E(zc)) increased with increasing Au/(Au+Ag) atomic ratio. Thus, the Au/(Au+Ag) atomic ratio, but not the Cu content, influenced the corrosion resistance of Ag-Au-Pt-Cu alloys. After the forward scan of CV, both optical and scanning electron microscope images showed that in all the experimental alloys, the matrix phase was corroded but not the second phase. From corrosion resistance viewpoint, the Ag-Au-Pt-Cu alloys seemed to be suitable for clinical application.

  6. Effect of heat treatment on mechanical properties of age-hardenable gold alloy at intraoral temperature.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, I; Watanabe, E; Cai, Z; Okabe, T; Atsuta, M

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various heat treatments on the mechanical properties of gold alloys capable of age-hardening at intraoral temperature. Dumbbell-shaped patterns (ISO 6871) were cast with three gold alloys (Sofard; NC Type-IV; Aurum Cast, NihombashiTokuriki Co.). The Sofard alloy is age-hardenable at intraoral temperature. The castings underwent various heat treatments [as-cast (AC); solution treatment (ST); high-temperature aging (HA); intraoral aging (IA)]. After these heat treatments, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), 0.2% offset yield strength (YS), and elongation (EL) were measured at a strain rate of 1.7x10(-4)/s. Fracture surfaces of the specimens after tensile testing were observed using SEM. Vickers hardness was also measured after heat treating. After IA, the hardness values of the Sofard alloy increased and reached values similar to the hardness of the Sofard specimens aged at high temperature (HA). The hardness values of the NC Type-IV and Aurum Cast specimens slightly increased after IA, but did not reach the values of the specimens after HA. All the Sofard, NC Type-IV and Aurum Cast specimens showed significantly (P<0.05) greater hardness values after HA, compared with the values after any other heat treatments (AC, ST and IA). The UTS and YS of the specimens indicated a tendency similar to the results obtained for hardness. The Sofard specimens with ST showed the greatest elongation compared to the corresponding NC Type-IV and Aurum Cast specimens. However, the elongation of the Sofard specimens was abruptly reduced after intraoral aging. Intraoral aging significantly improved the mechanical properties and hardness of the Sofard alloy.

  7. Laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and their alloys in air and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starinskiy, Sergey V.; Shukhov, Yuri G.; Bulgakov, Alexander V.

    2017-02-01

    The nanosecond-laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and gold-silver alloys of various compositions in air and water have been measured for single-shot irradiation conditions. The experimental results are analyzed theoretically by solving the heat flow equation for the samples irradiated in air and in water taking into account vapor nucleation at the solid-water interface. The damage thresholds of Au-Ag alloys are systematically lower than those for pure metals, both in air and water that is explained by lower thermal conductivities of the alloys. The thresholds measured in air agree well with the calculated melting thresholds for all samples. The damage thresholds in water are found to be considerably higher, by a factor of ∼1.5, than the corresponding thresholds in air. This cannot be explained, in the framework of the used model, neither by the conductive heat transfer to water nor by the vapor pressure effect. Possible reasons for the high damage thresholds in water such as scattering of the incident laser light by the vapor-liquid interface and the critical opalescence in the superheated water are suggested. Optical pump-probe measurements have been performed to study the reflectance dynamics of the surface irradiated in air and water. Comparison of the transient reflectance signal with the calculated nucleation dynamics provides evidence that the both suggested scattering mechanisms are likely to occur during metal ablation in water.

  8. [The induction current, an ideal resource for the smelting of dental alloys].

    PubMed

    Ionescu, G; Chiper, C; Teofănescu, L; Brezulianu, C

    1996-01-01

    The authors present an electrical furnace for melting dental alloys, made by the German company BEGO. This furnace uses electrical current of high frequency. The advantages of this melting method are the possibility of controlling the adequate melting temperature for a specific type of alloy, the fusion in a protective environment of rare gas and casting by associating the centrifugation with the vacuum. This leads to exact castings without any defects. The authors describe as a personal contribution an external cooling system capable of maintaining the furnace's parameters even when the water pressure is low.

  9. Screening on binary Ti alloy with excellent mechanical property and castability for dental prosthesis application

    PubMed Central

    Li, H. F.; Qiu, K. J.; Yuan, W.; Zhou, F. Y.; Wang, B. L.; Li, L.; Zheng, Y. F.; Liu, Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the microstructure, mechanical property, castability, corrosion behavior and in vitro cytocompatibility of binary Ti–2X alloys with various alloying elements, including Ag, Bi, Ga, Ge, Hf, In, Mo, Nb, Sn and Zr, were systematically investigated, in order to assess their potential applications in dental field. The experimental results showed that all binary Ti‒2X alloys consisted entirely α–Ti phase. The tensile strength and microhardness of Ti were improved by adding alloying elements. The castability of Ti was significantly improved by separately adding 2 wt.% Bi, Ga, Hf, Mo, Nb, Sn and Zr. The corrosion resistance of Ti in both normal artificial saliva solution (AS) and extreme artificial saliva solution (ASFL, AS with 0.2 wt.% NaF and 0.3 wt.% lactic acid) has been improved by separately adding alloying elements. In addition, the extracts of studied Ti‒2X alloys produced no significant deleterious effect to both fibroblasts L929 cells and osteoblast-like MG63 cells, indicating a good in vitro cytocompatibility, at the same level as pure Ti. The combination of enhanced mechanical properties, castability, corrosion behavior, and in vitro cytocompatibility make the developed Ti‒2X alloys have great potential for future stomatological applications. PMID:27874034

  10. Mechanical Characterisation and Biomechanical and Biological Behaviours of Ti-Zr Binary-Alloy Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Garrudo, Antonio; Gil-Mur, Francisco Javier; Manero, José María; Punset-Fuste, Miquel; Chávarri-Prado, David; Diéguez-Pereira, Markel; Monticelli, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study is to characterise the mechanical properties of Ti-15Zr binary alloy dental implants and to describe their biomechanical behaviour as well as their osseointegration capacity compared with the conventional Ti-6Al-4V (TAV) alloy implants. The mechanical properties of Ti-15Zr binary alloy were characterised using Roxolid© implants (Straumann, Basel, Switzerland) via ultrasound. Their biomechanical behaviour was described via finite element analysis. Their osseointegration capacity was compared via an in vivo study performed on 12 adult rabbits. Young's modulus of the Roxolid© implant was around 103 GPa, and the Poisson coefficient was around 0.33. There were no significant differences in terms of Von Mises stress values at the implant and bone level between both alloys. Regarding deformation, the highest value was observed for Ti-15Zr implant, and the lowest value was observed for the cortical bone surrounding TAV implant, with no deformation differences at the bone level between both alloys. Histological analysis of the implants inserted in rabbits demonstrated higher BIC percentage for Ti-15Zr implants at 3 and 6 weeks. Ti-15Zr alloy showed elastic properties and biomechanical behaviours similar to TAV alloy, although Ti-15Zr implant had a greater BIC percentage after 3 and 6 weeks of osseointegration. PMID:29318142

  11. Hermetic diamond capsules for biomedical implants enabled by gold active braze alloys.

    PubMed

    Lichter, Samantha G; Escudié, Mathilde C; Stacey, Alastair D; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Fox, Kate; Ahnood, Arman; Apollo, Nicholas V; Kua, Dunstan C; Lee, Aaron Z; McGowan, Ceara; Saunders, Alexia L; Burns, Owen; Nayagam, David A X; Williams, Richard A; Garrett, David J; Meffin, Hamish; Prawer, Steven

    2015-01-01

    As the field of biomedical implants matures the functionality of implants is rapidly increasing. In the field of neural prostheses this is particularly apparent as researchers strive to build devices that interact with highly complex neural systems such as vision, hearing, touch and movement. A retinal implant, for example, is a highly complex device and the surgery, training and rehabilitation requirements involved in deploying such devices are extensive. Ideally, such devices will be implanted only once and will continue to function effectively for the lifetime of the patient. The first and most pivotal factor that determines device longevity is the encapsulation that separates the sensitive electronics of the device from the biological environment. This paper describes the realisation of a free standing device encapsulation made from diamond, the most impervious, long lasting and biochemically inert material known. A process of laser micro-machining and brazing is described detailing the fabrication of hermetic electrical feedthroughs and laser weldable seams using a 96.4% gold active braze alloy, another material renowned for biochemical longevity. Accelerated ageing of the braze alloy, feedthroughs and hermetic capsules yielded no evidence of corrosion and no loss of hermeticity. Samples of the gold braze implanted for 15 weeks, in vivo, caused minimal histopathological reaction and results were comparable to those obtained from medical grade silicone controls. The work described represents a first account of a free standing, fully functional hermetic diamond encapsulation for biomedical implants, enabled by gold active alloy brazing and laser micro-machining. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of the mechanical properties and porcelain bond strength of cobalt-chromium dental alloy fabricated by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lin; Zhu, Haiting; Gai, Xiuying; Wang, Yanyan

    2014-01-01

    Limited information is available regarding the microstructure and mechanical properties of dental alloy fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of a cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) dental alloy fabricated by SLM and to determine the correlation between its microstructure and mechanical properties and its porcelain bond strength. Five metal specimens and 10 metal ceramic specimens were fabricated to evaluate the mechanical properties of SLM Co-Cr dental alloy (SLM alloy) with a tensile test and its porcelain bond strength with a 3-point bending test. The relevant properties of the SLM alloy were compared with those of the currently used Co-Cr dental alloy fabricated with conventional cast technology (cast alloy). The Student t test was used to compare the results of the SLM alloy and the cast alloy (α=.05). The microstructure of the SLM alloy was analyzed with a metallographic microscope; the metal ceramic interface of the SLM porcelain bonded alloy was studied with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and an electron probe microanalyzer. Both the mean (standard deviation) yield strength (884.37 ± 8.96 MPa) and tensile strength (1307.50 ±10.65 MPa) of the SLM alloy were notably higher than yield strength (568.10 ± 30.94 MPa) and tensile strength (758.73 ± 25.85 MPa) of the currently used cast alloy, and the differences were significant (P<.05). The porcelain bond strength of the SLM alloy was 55.78 ± 3.02 MPa, which was similar to that of the cast alloy, 54.17 ± 4.96 MPa (P>.05). Microstructure analysis suggested that the SLM alloy had a dense and obviously orientated microstructure, which led to excellent mechanical properties. Analysis from scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and the electron probe microanalyzer indicated that the SLM alloy had an intermediate layer with elemental interpenetration between the alloy and the

  13. Gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirkemo, Harold; Newman, William L.; Ashley, Roger P.

    1998-01-01

    Through the ages, men and women have cherished gold, and many have had a compelling desire to amass great quantities of it -- so compelling a desire, in fact, that the frantic need to seek and hoard gold has been aptly named "gold fever." Gold was among the first metals to be mined because it commonly occurs in its native form -- that is, not combined with other elements -- because it is beautiful and imperishable, and because exquisite objects can be made from it.

  14. Non-Gold Base Dental Casting Alloys. Volume 2. Porcelain-Fused-to-Metal Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    of the tooth . At the same time, enamel porcelains can be applied from the incisal one-third, through the middle one-third, and be subtly blended into...alumina (aluminum oxide) in a glass matrix. 1 Natural tooth color and opacification are obtained by the addition of metallic oxides to the porcelain...are classified as opaque, dentin (or body), and enamel (or incisal) porcelain powders with numerous color concentrates, such s opaque and dentin color

  15. Physico-mechanical properties and prosthodontic applications of Co-Cr dental alloys: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt-Chromium (Co-Cr) alloys are classified as predominantly base-metal alloys and are widely known for their biomedical applications in the orthopedic and dental fields. In dentistry, Co-Cr alloys are commonly used for the fabrication of metallic frameworks of removable partial dentures and recently have been used as metallic substructures for the fabrication of porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations and implant frameworks. The increased worldwide interest in utilizing Co-Cr alloys for dental applications is related to their low cost and adequate physico-mechanical properties. Additionally, among base-metal alloys, Co-Cr alloys are used more frequently in many countries to replace Nickel-Chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys. This is mainly due to the increased concern regarding the toxic effects of Ni on the human body when alloys containing Ni are exposed to the oral cavity. This review article describes dental applications, metallurgical characterization, and physico-mechanical properties of Co-Cr alloys and also addresses their clinical and laboratory behavior in relation to those properties. PMID:24843400

  16. Corrosion of dental alloys in artificial saliva with Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chunhui; Zheng, Yuanli; Zhong, Qun

    2017-01-01

    A comparative study of the corrosion resistance of CoCr and NiCr alloys in artificial saliva (AS) containing tryptic soy broth (Solution 1) and Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) species (Solution 2) was performed by electrochemical methods, including open circuit potential measurements, impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization. The adherence of S. mutans to the NiCr and CoCr alloy surfaces immersed in Solution 2 for 24 h was verified by scanning electron microscopy, while the results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed the importance of biofilm formation for the corrosion process. The R(QR) equivalent circuit was successfully used to fit the data obtained for the AS mixture without S. mutans, while the R(Q(R(QR))) circuit was found to be more suitable for describing the biofilm properties after treatment with the AS containing S. mutans species. In addition, a negative shift of the open circuit potential with immersion time was observed for all samples regardless of the solution type. Both alloys exhibited higher charge transfer resistance after treatment with Solution 2, and lower corrosion current densities were detected for all samples in the presence of S. mutans. The obtained results suggest that the biofilm formation observed after 24 h of exposure to S. mutans bacteria might enhance the corrosion resistance of the studied samples by creating physical barriers that prevented oxygen interactions with the metal surfaces.

  17. Corrosion of dental alloys in artificial saliva with Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chunhui; Zheng, Yuanli; Zhong, Qun

    2017-01-01

    A comparative study of the corrosion resistance of CoCr and NiCr alloys in artificial saliva (AS) containing tryptic soy broth (Solution 1) and Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) species (Solution 2) was performed by electrochemical methods, including open circuit potential measurements, impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization. The adherence of S. mutans to the NiCr and CoCr alloy surfaces immersed in Solution 2 for 24 h was verified by scanning electron microscopy, while the results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed the importance of biofilm formation for the corrosion process. The R(QR) equivalent circuit was successfully used to fit the data obtained for the AS mixture without S. mutans, while the R(Q(R(QR))) circuit was found to be more suitable for describing the biofilm properties after treatment with the AS containing S. mutans species. In addition, a negative shift of the open circuit potential with immersion time was observed for all samples regardless of the solution type. Both alloys exhibited higher charge transfer resistance after treatment with Solution 2, and lower corrosion current densities were detected for all samples in the presence of S. mutans. The obtained results suggest that the biofilm formation observed after 24 h of exposure to S. mutans bacteria might enhance the corrosion resistance of the studied samples by creating physical barriers that prevented oxygen interactions with the metal surfaces. PMID:28350880

  18. Development of a discriminatory biocompatibility testing model for non-precious dental casting alloys.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Emma Louise; Fleming, Garry J P; Moran, Gary P

    2011-12-01

    To develop an enhanced, reproducible and discriminatory biocompatibility testing model for non-precious dental casting alloys, prepared to a clinically relevant surface finishing condition, using TR146 oral keratinocyte cells. Comparative biocompatibility was determined following direct and indirect exposure of TR146 cells to two nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and a cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy-discs. The surface roughness of the discs was determined using a contact stylus profilometer and the elemental ion release by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Subsequent biocompatibility analysis included cell morphology, cell density measurements with Trypan blue exclusion assay, inflammatory cytokine expression with ELISAs, cellular metabolic activity using XTT and cellular toxicity using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. TR146 cell morphology was altered following direct and indirect exposure to the Ni-Cr alloys but not the Co-Cr alloy. Significant reductions (all P<0.001) in viable cell density measurements, cellular metabolic activity, significant increases inflammatory cytokine expression and cellular toxicity were observed when TR146 cells were exposed to the Ni-Cr alloys. Significant decreases in cell density measurements, cellular metabolic activity, significant increases inflammatory cytokine expression and cellular toxicity for the Ni-Cr d.Sign(®)15 alloy compared with d.Sign(®)10 alloy were identifiable (all P<0.001). Cellular toxicity was attributed to nickel ion release levels in solution detected by ICP-MS analysis. Nickel ions from the Ni-Cr alloys permeated the epithelial cells and activated a proinflammatory response, namely IL-1a, IL-8 and PGE2 expression. Further evidence of nickel ioninduced cell death was supported by the decreased biocompatibility of the highest nickel ion releasing alloy (d.Sign(®)15 compared with d.Sign(®)10) and the increased biocompatibility of the Co-Cr (d.Sign(®)30) alloy where nickel ions were

  19. Assessment of exposures and potential risks to the US adult population from the leaching of elements from gold and ceramic dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Richardson, G Mark; James, Kyle Jordan; Peters, Rachel Elizabeth; Clemow, Scott Richard; Siciliano, Steven Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the 2001 to 2004 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) on the number and placement of tooth restorations in adults, we quantified daily doses due to leaching of elements from gold (Au) alloy and ceramic restorative materials. The elements with the greatest leaching rates from these materials are often the elements of lowest proportional composition. As a result, exposure due to wear will predominate for those elements of relatively high proportional composition, while exposure due leaching may predominate for elements of relatively low proportional composition. The exposure due to leaching of silver (Ag) and palladium (Pd) from Au alloys exceeded published reference exposure levels (RELs) for these elements when multiple full surface crowns were present. Six or more molar crowns would result in exceeding the REL for Ag, whereas three or more crowns would be necessary to exceed the REL for Pd. For platinum (Pt), the majority of tooth surfaces, beyond just molar crowns, would be necessary to exceed the REL for Pd. Exposures due to leaching of elements from ceramic dental materials were less than published RELs for all components examined here, including having all restorations composed of ceramic.

  20. Development of casting investment preventing blackening of noble metal alloys Part 2. Application of developed investment for type 4 gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Akira; Kakuta, Kiyoshi; Goto, Shin-ichi; Kato, Katuma; Yara, Atushi; Ogura, Hideo

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the developed investment for the prevention of blackening of a cast Type 4 gold and to analyze the oxides on its surface in relation to the blackening of the alloy. The experimental investments were prepared using a gypsum-bonded investment in which boron (B) or aluminum (Al) was added as a reducing agent. A Type 4 gold alloy was cast into the mold made of the prepared investment. The effect of the additives was evaluated from the color difference (deltaE*) between the as-cast surface and the polished surface of the cast specimen. B and Al were effective to prevent the blackening of a Type 4 gold alloy and the color of the as-cast surface approached that of the polished surface with increasing B and Al content. The prevention of the blackening of the gold alloy can be achieved by restraining the formation of CuO.

  1. Time and Temperature Dependence of Viscoelastic Stress Relaxation in Gold and Gold Alloy Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongkolsuttirat, Kittisun

    modulus relaxation of Au films also proves that the films exhibit linear viscoelastic behavior. From this, a linear viscoelastic model is shown to fit very well to experimental steady state stress relaxation data and can predict time dependent stress for complex loading histories including the ability to predict stress-time behavior at other strain rates during loading. Two specific factors that are expected to influence the viscoelastic behavior-degree of alloying and grain size are investigated to explore the influence of V concentration in solid solution and grain size of pure Au. It is found that the normalized modulus of Au films is dependent on both concentration (C) and grain size (D) with proportionalities of C1/3 and D 2, respectively. A quantitative model of the rate-equation for dislocation glide plasticity based on Frost and Ashby is proposed and fitted well with steady state anelastic stress relaxation experimental data. The activation volume and the density of mobile dislocations is determined using repeated stress relaxation tests in order to further understand the viscoelastic relaxation mechanism. A rapid decrease of mobile dislocation density is found at the beginning of relaxation, which correlates well with a large reduction of viscoelastic modulus at the early stage of relaxation. The extracted activation volume and dislocation mobility can be ascribed to mobile dislocation loops with double kinks generated at grain boundaries, consistent with the dislocation mechanism proposed for the low activation energy measured in this study.

  2. Effects of surface finishing conditions on the biocompatibility of a nickel-chromium dental casting alloy.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Emma Louise; Coleman, David C; Moran, Gary P; Fleming, Garry J P

    2011-07-01

    To assess the effects of surface finishing condition (polished or alumina particle air abraded) on the biocompatibility of direct and indirect exposure to a nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) d.Sign®10 dental casting alloy on oral keratinocytes. Biocompatibility was performed by assessing cellular viability and morphology, metabolic activity, cellular toxicity and presence of inflammatory cytokine markers. Discs of d.Sign®10 were cast, alumina particle air abraded and half were polished before surface roughness was determined by profilometry. Biocompatibility was assessed by placing the discs directly or indirectly (with immersion solutions) into contact with TR146 monolayers. Metal ion release was determined by ICP-MS. Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue dye exclusion, metabolic activity by XTT and cellular toxicity by LDH. Inflammatory cytokine analysis was performed using sandwich ELISAs. The mean polished Ra value was significantly reduced (P<0.001) compared with the alumina particle air abraded discs but metal ion release was significantly increased for the polished discs. Significant reductions in cell density of polished compared with alumina particle air abraded discs was observed following direct or indirect exposure. A significant reduction in metabolic activity, increase in cellular toxicity and an increase in the presence of inflammatory cytokine markers was highlighted for the polished relative to the alumina particle air abraded discs at 24h. Finishing condition of the Ni-Cr dental alloy investigated has important clinical implications. The approach of employing cell density and morphology, metabolic activity, cellular toxicity levels and inflammatory marker responses to TR146 epithelial cells combined with ICP-MS afforded the authors an increased insight into the complex processes dental alloys undergo in the oral environment. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Corrosive and cytotoxic properties of compact specimens and microparticles of Ni-Cr dental alloy.

    PubMed

    Ristic, Ljubisa; Vucevic, Dragana; Radovic, Ljubica; Djordjevic, Snezana; Nikacevic, Milutin; Colic, Miodrag

    2014-04-01

    Nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) dental alloys have been widely used in prosthodontic practice, but there is a permanent concern about their biocompatibility due to the release of metal ions. This is especially important when Ni-Cr metal microparticles are incorporated into gingival tissue during prosthodontic procedures. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine and compare the corrosion and cytotoxic properties of compact specimens and microparticles of Ni-Cr dental alloy. Ni-Cr alloy, Remanium CSe bars (4 mm diameter), were made by the standard casting method and then cut into 0.5-mm-thick disks. Metal particles were obtained by scraping the bars using a diamond instrument for crown preparation. The microstructure was observed by an optical microscope. Quantitative determination and morphological and dimensional characterization of metal particles were carried out by a scanning electron microscope and Leica Application Suite software for image analysis. Corrosion was studied by conditioning the alloy specimens in the RPMI 1640 medium, containing 10% fetal calf serum in an incubator with 5% CO2 for 72 hours at 37°C. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry was used to assess metal ion release. The cytotoxity of conditioning medium (CM) was investigated on L929 cells using an MTT test. One-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. After casting, the microstructure of the Remanium CSe compact specimen composed of Ni, Cr, Mo, Si, Fe, Al, and Co had a typical dendritic structure. Alloy microparticles had an irregular shape with a wide size range: from less than 1 μm to more than 100 μm. The release of metal ions, especially Ni and Mo from microparticles, was significantly higher, compared to the compact alloy specimen. The CM prepared from compact alloy was not cytotoxic at any tested dilutions, whereas CM from alloy microparticles showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity (90% CM and 45% CM versus control; p < 0.005). Ni-Cr microparticles showed less

  4. 3-T MRI safety assessments of magnetic dental attachments and castable magnetic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, K; Abe, Y; Ishii, T; Ishigami, T; Ohtani, K; Nagai, E; Ohyama, T; Umekawa, Y; Nakabayashi, S

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the safety of different magnetic dental attachments during 3-T MRI according to the American Society for Testing and Materials F2182-09 and F2052-06e1 standard testing methods and to develop a method to determine MRI compatibility by measuring magnetically induced torque. Methods: The temperature elevations, magnetically induced forces and torques of a ferromagnetic stainless steel keeper, a coping comprising a keeper and a cast magnetic alloy coping were measured on MRI systems. Results: The coping comprising a keeper demonstrated the maximum temperature increase (1.42 °C) for the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate and was calculated as 2.1 W kg−1 with the saline phantom. All deflection angles exceeded 45°. The cast magnetic alloy coping had the greatest deflection force (0.33 N) during 3-T MRI and torque (1.015 mN m) during 0.3-T MRI. Conclusions: The tested devices showed minimal radiofrequency (RF)-induced heating in a 3-T MR environment, but the cast magnetic alloy coping showed a magnetically induced deflection force and torque approximately eight times that of the keepers. For safety, magnetic dental attachments should be inspected before and after MRI and large prostheses containing cast magnetic alloy should be removed. Although magnetic dental attachments may pose no great risk of RF-induced heating or magnetically induced torque during 3-T MRI, their magnetically induced deflection forces tended to exceed acceptable limits. Therefore, the inspection of such devices before and after MRI is important for patient safety. PMID:25785821

  5. Oxygen reduction of several gold alloys in 1-molar potassium hydroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. O.

    1975-01-01

    With rotated disk-and-ring equipment, polarograms and other electrochemical measurements were made of oxygen reduction in 1-molar potassium hydroxide on an equiatomic gold-copper (Au-Cu) alloy and a Au-Cu alloy doped with either indium (In) or cobalt (Co) and on Au doped with either nickel (Ni) or platinum (Pt). The results were compared with those for pure Au and pure Pt. The two-electron reaction dominated on all Au alloys as it did on Au. The polarographic results at lower polarization potentials were compared, assuming exclusively a two-step reduction. A qualified ranking of cathodic electrocatalytic activity on the freshly polished reduced disks was indicated: anodized Au Au-Cu-In Au-Cu Au-Cu-Co is equivalent or equal to Au-Pt Au-Ni. Aging in distilled water improved the electrocatalytic efficiency of Au-Cu-Co, Au-Cu, and (to a lesser extent) Au-Cu-In.

  6. Tunable synthesis and acetylation of dendrimer-entrapped or dendrimer-stabilized gold-silver alloy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Shen, Mingwu; Zhao, Jinglong; Guo, Rui; Cao, Xueyan; Zhang, Guixiang; Shi, Xiangyang

    2012-06-01

    In this study, amine-terminated generation 5 poly(amidoamine) dendrimers were used as templates or stabilizers to synthesize dendrimer-entrapped or dendrimer-stabilized Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles (NPs) with different gold atom/silver atom/dendrimer molar ratios with the assistance of sodium borohydride reduction chemistry. Following a one-step acetylation reaction to transform the dendrimer terminal amines to acetyl groups, a series of dendrimer-entrapped or dendrimer-stabilized Au-Ag alloy NPs with terminal acetyl groups were formed. The formed Au-Ag alloy NPs before and after acetylation reaction were characterized using different techniques. We showed that the optical property and the size of the bimetallic NPs were greatly affected by the metal composition. At the constant total metal atom/dendrimer molar ratio, the size of the alloy NPs decreased with the gold content. The formed Au-Ag alloy NPs were stable at different pH (pH 5-8) and temperature (4-50°C) conditions. X-ray absorption coefficient measurements showed that the attenuation of the binary NPs was dependent on both the gold content and the surface modification. With the increase of gold content in the binary NPs, their X-ray attenuation intensity was significantly enhanced. At a given metal composition, the X-ray attenuation intensity of the binary NPs was enhanced after acetylation. Cytotoxicity assays showed that after acetylation, the cytocompatibility of Au-Ag alloy NPs was significantly improved. With the controllable particle size and optical property, metal composition-dependent X-ray attenuation characteristics, and improved cytocompatibility after acetylation, these dendrimer-entrapped or dendrimer-stabilized Au-Ag alloy NPs should have a promising potential for CT imaging and other biomedical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Nd:YAG laser parameters on the penetration depth of a representative Ni-Cr dental casting alloy.

    PubMed

    Al Jabbari, Youssef S; Koutsoukis, Theodoros; Barmpagadaki, Xanthoula; El-Danaf, Ehab A; Fournelle, Raymond A; Zinelis, Spiros

    2015-02-01

    The effects of voltage and laser beam (spot) diameter on the penetration depth during laser beam welding in a representative nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) dental alloy were the subject of this study. The cast alloy specimens were butted against each other and laser welded at their interface using various voltages (160-390 V) and spot diameters (0.2-1.8 mm) and a constant pulse duration of 10 ms. After welding, the laser beam penetration depths in the alloy were measured. The results were plotted and were statistically analyzed with a two-way ANOVA, employing voltage and spot diameter as the discriminating variables and using Holm-Sidak post hoc method (a = 0.05). The maximum penetration depth was 4.7 mm. The penetration depth increased as the spot diameter decreased at a fixed voltage and increased as the voltage increased at a fixed spot diameter. Varying the parameters of voltage and laser spot diameter significantly affected the depth of penetration of the dental cast Ni-Cr alloy. The penetration depth of laser-welded Ni-Cr dental alloys can be accurately adjusted based on the aforementioned results, leading to successfully joined/repaired dental restorations, saving manufacturing time, reducing final cost, and enhancing the longevity of dental prostheses.

  8. Effects of soldering methods on tensile strength of a gold-palladium metal ceramic alloy.

    PubMed

    Ghadhanfari, Husain A; Khajah, Hasan M; Monaco, Edward A; Kim, Hyeongil

    2014-10-01

    The tensile strength obtained by conventional postceramic application soldering and laser postceramic welding may require more energy than microwave postceramic soldering, which could provide similar tensile strength values. The purpose of the study was to compare the tensile strength obtained by microwave postceramic soldering, conventional postceramic soldering, and laser postceramic welding. A gold-palladium metal ceramic alloy and gold-based solder were used in this study. Twenty-seven wax specimens were cast in gold-palladium noble metal and divided into 4 groups: laser welding with a specific postfiller noble metal, microwave soldering with a postceramic solder, conventional soldering with the same postceramic solder used in the microwave soldering group, and a nonsectioned control group. All the specimens were heat treated to simulate a normal porcelain sintering sequence. An Instron Universal Testing Machine was used to measure the tensile strength for the 4 groups. The means were analyzed statistically with 1-way ANOVA. The surface and fracture sites of the specimens were subjectively evaluated for fracture type and porosities by using a scanning electron microscope. The mean (standard deviation) ultimate tensile strength values were as follows: nonsectioned control 818 ±30 MPa, microwave 516 ±34 MPa, conventional 454 ±37 MPa, and laser weld 191 ±39 MPa. A 1-way ANOVA showed a significant difference in ultimate tensile strength among the groups (F3,23=334.5; P<.001). Follow-up multiple comparisons showed a significant difference among all the groups. Microwave soldering resulted in a higher tensile strength for gold and palladium noble metals than either conventional soldering or laser welding. Conventional soldering resulted in a higher tensile strength than laser welding. Under the experimental conditions described, either microwave or conventional postceramic soldering would appear to satisfy clinical requirements related to tensile strength

  9. Surface texture and hardness of dental alloys processed by alternative technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porojan, Liliana; Savencu, Cristina E.; Topală, Florin I.; Porojan, Sorin D.

    2017-08-01

    Technological developments have led to the implementation of novel digitalized manufacturing methods for the production of metallic structures in prosthetic dentistry. These technologies can be classified as based on subtractive manufacturing, assisted by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems, or on additive manufacturing (AM), such as the recently developed laser-based methods. The aim of the study was to assess the surface texture and hardness of metallic structures for dental restorations obtained by alternative technologies: conventional casting (CST), computerized milling (MIL), AM power bed fusion methods, respective selective laser melting (SLM) and selective laser sintering (SLS). For the experimental analyses metallic specimens made of Co-Cr dental alloys were prepared as indicated by the manufacturers. The specimen structure at the macro level was observed by an optical microscope and micro-hardness was measured in all substrates. Metallic frameworks obtained by AM are characterized by increased hardness, depending also on the surface processing. The formation of microstructural defects can be better controlled and avoided during SLM and MIL process. Application of power bed fusion techniques, like SLS and SLM, is currently a challenge in dental alloys processing.

  10. Electrochemical corrosion behaviour of dental/implant alloys in saline medium.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mohit; Kumar, A V Ramesh; Singh, Nirbhay

    2008-07-01

    Dental alloys implanted in mouth are exposed to various aggressive conditions. Keeping this in view, corrosion behaviour of various dental alloys viz. Ni-Cr, Co-Cr, Cu-Ni-Al and commercially pure Ti (c.p. Ti) were studied in 3% NaCl medium by using Tafel polarization, cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. EIS studies were carried out for different duration viz. 1 h, 1 day and 7 days to evaluate the stability of passive film and change in corrosion characteristics with time. It has been found that for Ni-Cr, Co-Cr (DRDO developed) and c.p. Ti the passive film characteristic changed with time whereas for Co-Cr (commercial) and Cu-Ni-Al alloys, the passive film characteristics remained same. From DC electrochemical studies various parameters viz. i(corr), E(corr), i(pass), E(pass) were evaluated. The corrosion rates were observed to be in the order Cu-Ni-Al > Co-Cr (commercial) > Ni-Cr > c.p. Ti > Co-Cr (DRDO).

  11. Is there scientific evidence favoring the substitution of commercially pure titanium with titanium alloys for the manufacture of dental implants?

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Jairo M; Barão, Valentim A R

    2017-02-01

    The development of Ti alloys to manufacture dental implants has emerged in recent years due to the increased failure of commercially pure titanium (cpTi) implants. Thus, this study reviews existing information about the mechanical, chemical, electrochemical, and biological properties of the main Ti alloys developed over the past few years to provide scientific evidence in favor of using Ti-based alloys as alternative to cpTi. Ti alloys may be considered viable substitutes in the fabrication of dental implants. Such evidence is given by the enhanced properties of alloys, such as a low elastic modulus, high tensile strength, satisfactory biocompatibility, and good corrosion and wear resistances. In addition, Ti alloys may be modified at the structural, chemical, and thermomechanical levels, which allows the development of materials in accordance with the demands of several situations encountered in clinical practice. Although several in vitro studies have established the superiority of Ti alloys over cpTi, mainly in terms of their mechanical properties, there is no scientific evidence that supports the total replacement of this material in vivo. This review demonstrates the superiority of β-type alloys. However, it is evident that in vivo studies are encouraged to test new alloys to consolidate their use as substitutes for cpTi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Defects-tolerant Co-Cr-Mo dental alloys prepared by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Qian, B; Saeidi, K; Kvetková, L; Lofaj, F; Xiao, C; Shen, Z

    2015-12-01

    CrCoMo alloy specimens were successfully fabricated using selective laser melting (SLM). The aim of this study was to carefully investigate microstructure of the SLM specimens in order to understand the influence of their structural features inter-grown on different length scales ranging from nano- to macro-levels on their mechanical properties. Two different sets of processing parameters developed for building the inner part (core) and the surface (skin) of dental prostheses were tested. Microstructures were characterized by SEM, EBSD and XRD analysis. The elemental distribution was assessed by EDS line profile analysis under TEM. The mechanical properties of the specimens were measured. The microstructures of both specimens were characterized showing formation of grains comprised of columnar sub-grains with Mo-enrichment at the sub-grain boundaries. Clusters of columnar sub-grains grew coherently along one common crystallographic direction forming much larger single crystal grains which are intercrossing in different directions forming an overall dendrite-like microstructure. Three types of microstructural defects were occasionally observed; small voids (<10 μm), fine cracks at grain boundaries (<10 μm) and cracks at weld line boundaries (>10 μm). Despite the presence of these defects, the yield and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) were 870 and 430MPa and 1300MPa and 1160MPa, respectively, for the skin and core specimens which are higher than casted dental alloy. Although the formation of microstructural defects is hard to be avoided during the SLM process, the SLM CoCrMo alloys can achieve improved mechanical properties than their casted counterparts, implying they are "defect-tolerant". Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of four dental alloys following torch/centrifugal and induction/ vacuum-pressure casting procedures.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Geoffrey A; Luo, Qing; Hefti, Arthur

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown casting methodology to influence the as-cast properties of dental casting alloys. It is important to consider clinically important mechanical properties so that the influence of casting can be clarified. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how torch/centrifugal and inductively cast and vacuum-pressure casting machines may affect the castability, microhardness, chemical composition, and microstructure of 2 high noble, 1 noble, and 1 base metal dental casting alloys. Two commonly used methods for casting were selected for comparison: torch/centrifugal casting and inductively heated/ vacuum-pressure casting. One hundred and twenty castability patterns were fabricated and divided into 8 groups. Four groups were torch/centrifugally cast in Olympia (O), Jelenko O (JO), Genesis II (G), and Liberty (L) alloys. Similarly, 4 groups were cast in O, JO, G, and L by an inductively induction/vacuum-pressure casting machine. Each specimen was evaluated for casting completeness to determine a castability value, while porosity was determined by standard x-ray techniques. Each group was metallographically prepared for further evaluation that included chemical composition, Vickers microhardness, and grain analysis of microstructure. Two-way ANOVA was used to determine significant differences among the main effects. Statistically significant effects were examined further with the Tukey HSD procedure for multiple comparisons. Data obtained from the castability experiments were non-normal and the variances were unequal. They were analyzed statistically with the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Significant results were further investigated statistically with the Steel-Dwass method for multiple comparisons (α=.05). The alloy type had a significant effect on surface microhardness (P<.001). In contrast, the technique used for casting did not affect the microhardness of the test specimen (P=.465). Similarly, the interaction between the alloy and casting

  14. Bond strength and interactions of machined titanium-based alloy with dental cements.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Chandur; Chung, Kwok-Hung

    2015-11-01

    The most appropriate luting agent for restoring cement-retained implant restorations has yet to be determined. Leachable chemicals from some types of cement designed for teeth may affect metal surfaces. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and interactions of machined titanium-based alloy with dental luting agents. Eight dental luting agents representative of 4 different compositional classes (resin, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer, and zinc oxide-based cements) were used to evaluate their effect on machined titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy surfaces. Ninety-six paired disks were cemented together (n=12). After incubation in a 37°C water bath for 7 days, the shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine (Instron) and a custom fixture with a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Differences were analyzed statistically with 1-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (α=.05). The debonded surfaces of the Ti alloy disks were examined under a light microscope at ×10 magnification to record the failure pattern, and the representative specimens were observed under a scanning electron microscope. The mean ±SD of shear failure loads ranged from 3.4 ±0.5 to 15.2 ±2.6 MPa. The retention provided by both polycarboxylate cements was significantly greater than that of all other groups (P<.05). The scanning electron microscope examination revealed surface pits only on the bonded surface cemented with the polycarboxylate cements. Cementation with polycarboxylate cement obtained higher shear bond strength. Some chemical interactions occurred between the machined Ti-6Al-4V alloy surface and polycarboxylate cements during cementation. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The laser welding technique applied to the non precious dental alloys procedure and results.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, C; Le Petitcorps, Y; Albingre, L; Dupuis, V

    2001-03-10

    The laser welding technique was chosen for its versatility in the repair of dental metal prosthesis. The aim of this research is to assess the accuracy, quality and reproducibility of this technique as applied to Ni-Cr-Mo and Cr-Co-Mo alloys often used to make prosthesis The alloy's ability to weld was evaluated with a pulsed Nd-Yag Laser equipment. In order to evaluate the joining, various cast wires with different diameters were used. The efficiency of the joining was measured with tensile tests. In order to understand this difference, metallographic examinations and X-Ray microprobe analysis were performed through the welded area and compared with the cast part. It was found that a very slight change in the chemistry of the Ni-Cr alloys had a strong influence on the quality of the joining. The Co-Cr alloy presented an excellent weldability. A very important change in the microstructure due to the effect of the laser was pointed out in the welding zone, increasing its micro-hardness. The higher level of carbon and boron in one of the two Ni-Cr was found to be responsible for its poor welding ability. However for the others, the maximum depth of welding was found to be around 2mm which is one of the usual thicknesses of the components which have to be repaired.

  16. Galvanic coupling of steel and gold alloy lingual brackets with orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Polychronis, Georgios; Al Jabbari, Youssef S; Eliades, Theodore; Zinelis, Spiros

    2018-03-06

    The aim of this research was to assess galvanic behavior of lingual orthodontic brackets coupled with representative types of orthodontic wires. Three types of lingual brackets: Incognito (INC), In-Ovation L (IOV), and STb (STB) were combined with a stainless steel (SS) and a nickel-titanium (NiTi) orthodontic archwire. All materials were initially investigated by scanning electron microscopy / x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) while wires were also tested by x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD). All bracket-wire combinations were immersed in acidic 0.1M NaCl 0.1M lactic acid and neutral NaF 0.3% (wt) electrolyte, and the potential differences were continuously recorded for 48 hours. The SEM/EDX analysis revealed that INC is a single-unit bracket made of a high gold (Au) alloy while IOV and STB are two-piece appliances in which the base and wing are made of SS alloys. The SS wire demonstrated austenite and martensite iron phase, while NiTi wire illustrated an intense austenite crystallographic structure with limited martensite. All bracket wire combinations showed potential differences below the threshold of galvanic corrosion (200 mV) except for INC and STB coupled with NiTi wire in NaF media. The electrochemical results indicate that all brackets tested demonstrated galvanic compatibility with SS wire, but fluoride treatment should be used cautiously with NiTi wires coupled with Au and SS brackets.

  17. Evaluation of irradiation effects of near-infrared free-electron-laser of silver alloy for dental application.

    PubMed

    Kuwada-Kusunose, Takao; Kusunose, Alisa; Wakami, Masanobu; Takebayashi, Chikako; Goto, Haruhiko; Aida, Masahiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Nakao, Keisuke; Nogami, Kyoko; Inagaki, Manabu; Hayakawa, Ken; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Sakae, Toshiro

    2017-08-01

    In the application of lasers in dentistry, there is a delicate balance between the benefits gained from laser treatment and the heat-related damage arising from laser irradiation. Hence, it is necessary to understand the different processes associated with the irradiation of lasers on dental materials. To obtain insight for the development of a safe and general-purpose laser for dentistry, the present study examines the physical effects associated with the irradiation of a near-infrared free-electron laser (FEL) on the surface of a commonly used silver dental alloy. The irradiation experiments using a 2900-nm FEL confirmed the formation of a pit in the dental alloy. The pit was formed with one macro-pulse of FEL irradiation, therefore, suggesting the possibility of efficient material processing with an FEL. Additionally, there was only a slight increase in the silver alloy temperature (less than 0.9 °C) despite the long duration of FEL irradiation, thus inferring that fixed prostheses in the oral cavity can be processed by FEL without thermal damage to the surrounding tissue. These results indicate that dental hard tissues and dental materials in the oral cavity can be safely and efficiently processed by the irradiation of a laser, which has the high repetition rate of a femtosecond laser pulse with a wavelength around 2900 nm.

  18. Effect of laser irradiation conditions on the laser welding strength of cobalt-chromium and gold alloys.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Hisaji; Kurotani, Tomoko; Kaketani, Masahiro; Hiraguchi, Hisako; Hirose, Hideharu; Yoneyama, Takayuki

    2011-09-01

    Using tensile tests, this study investigated differences in the welding strength of casts of cobalt-chromium and gold alloys resulting from changes in the voltage and pulse duration in order to clarify the optimum conditions of laser irradiation for achieving favorable welding strength. Laser irradiation was performed at voltages of 150 V and 170 V with pulse durations of 4, 8, and 12 ms. For cobalt-chromium and gold alloys, it was found that a good welding strength could be achieved using a voltage of 170 V, a pulse duration of 8 ms, and a spot diameter of 0.5 mm. However, when the power density was set higher than this, defects tended to occur, suggesting the need for care when establishing welding conditions.

  19. In vivo dose perturbation effects of metallic dental alloys during head and neck irradiation with intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Clifton D; Diaz, Irma; Cavanaugh, Sean X; Eng, Tony Y

    2004-07-01

    A patient with base of tongue squamous sell carcinoma, with significant CT artifact-inducing metallic alloy, non-removable dental restorations in both the mandible and maxilla was identified. Simultaneous with IMRT treatment, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed in the oral cavity. After a series of three treatments, the data from the TLDs and software calculations were analyzed. Analysis of mean in vivo TLD dosimetry reveals differentials from software predicted dose calculation that fall within acceptable dose variation limits. IMRT dose calculation software is a relatively accurate predictor of dose attenuation and augmentation due to dental alloys within the treatment volume, as measured by intra-oral thermoluminescent dosimetry. IMRT represents a safe and effective methodology to treat patients with non-removable metallic dental work who have head and neck cancer.

  20. [The effect of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on the surface properties of nickel-chromium dental casting alloys after electrochemical corrosion].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Guang-yan; Zhang, Li-xia; Wang, Jue; Shen, Qing-ping; Su, Jian-sheng

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effect of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on the surface properties of nickel-chromium dental alloys after electrochemical corrosion. The surface morphology and surface structure of nickel-chromium dental alloys were examined by stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscopy before and after electrochemical tests in 0 g/L and 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva. The surface element component and chemical states of nickel-chromium dental alloys were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectrograph after electrochemical tests in 0 g/L and 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva. More serious corrosion happened on the surface of nickel-chromium alloy in 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva than in 0 g/L EGCG. The diameters of corrosion pits were smaller, and the dendrite structure of the alloy surface was not affected in 0 g/L EGCG. While the diameters of corrosion pits were larger, the dendritic interval of the alloy surface began to merge, and the dendrite structure was fuzzy in 1.0 g/L EGCG. In addition, the O, Ni, Cr, Be, C and Mo elements were detected on the surface of nickel-chromium alloys after sputtered for 120 s in 0 g/L EGCG and 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva after electrochemical corrosion, and the surface oxides were mainly NiO and Cr(2)O(3). Compared with 0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva, the content of O, NiO and Cr(2)O(3) were lower in 1.0 g/L EGCG. The results of surface morphology and the corrosion products both show that the corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium alloys become worse and the oxide content of corrosion products on the surface reduce in 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva.

  1. Are new TiNbZr alloys potential substitutes of the Ti6Al4V alloy for dental applications? An electrochemical corrosion study.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Lúcia Roselino; Hammer, Peter; Vaz, Luís Geraldo; Rocha, Luís Augusto

    2013-12-01

    The main aim of this work was to assess the electrochemical behavior of new Ti35Nb5Zr and Ti35Nb10Zr alloys in artificial saliva at 37 °C to verify if they are indicated to be used as biomaterials in dentistry as alternatives to Ti6Al4V alloys in terms of corrosion protection efficiency of the material. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) experiments were carried out for different periods of time (0.5-216 h) in a three-electrode cell, where the working electrode (Ti alloys) was exposed to artificial saliva at 37 °C. The near-surface region of the alloys was investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). All alloys exhibited an increase in corrosion potential with the immersion time, indicating the growth and stabilization of the passive film. Ti35Nb5Zr and Ti6Al4V alloys had their EIS results interpreted by a double-layer circuit, while the Ti35Nb10Zr alloy was modeled by a one-layer circuit. In general, the new TiNbZr alloys showed similar behavior to that observed for the Ti6Al4V. XPS results suggest, in the case of the TiNbZr alloys, the presence of a thicker passive layer containing a lower fraction of TiO2 phase than that of Ti6Al4V. After long-term immersion, all alloys develop a calcium phosphate phase on the surface. The new TiNbZr alloys appear as potential candidates to be used as a substitute to Ti6Al4V in the manufacturing of dental implant-abutment sets.

  2. A novel luminol chemiluminescent method catalyzed by silver/gold alloy nanoparticles for determination of anticancer drug flutamide.

    PubMed

    Chaichi, Mohammad Javad; Azizi, Seyed Naser; Heidarpour, Maryam

    2013-12-01

    It was found that silver/gold alloy nanoparticles enhance the chemiluminescence (CL) of the luminol-H2O2 system in alkaline solution. The studies of UV-Vis spectra, CL spectra, effects of concentrations luminol, hydrogen peroxide and silver/gold alloy nanoparticles solutions were carried out to explore the CL enhancement mechanism. Flutamide was found to quench the CL signals of the luminol-H2O2 reaction catalyzed by silver/gold alloy nanoparticles, which made it applicable for the determination of flutamide. Under the optimum conditions, the CL intensity is proportional to the concentration of the flutamide in solution over the range 5.0 × 10(-7) to 1.0 × 10(-4)mol L(-1). Detection limit was obtained 1.2 × 10(-8)mol L(-1)and the relative standard deviation (RSD) γ5%. This work is introduced as a new method for the determination of flutamide in commercial tablets. Box-Behnken experimental design is applied to investigate and validate the CL measurement parameters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Alloy-assisted deposition of three-dimensional arrays of atomic gold catalyst for crystal growth studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yin; Jiang, Yuanwen; Cherukara, Mathew J.

    Large-scale assembly of individual atoms over smooth surfaces is difficult to achieve. A configuration of an atom reservoir, in which individual atoms can be readily extracted, may successfully address this challenge. In this work, we demonstrate that a liquid gold-silicon alloy established in classical vapor-liquid-solid growth can deposit ordered and three-dimensional rings of isolated gold atoms over silicon nanowire sidewalls. Here, we perform ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and unveil a surprising single atomic gold-catalyzed chemical etching of silicon. Experimental verification of this catalytic process in silicon nanowires yields dopant-dependent, massive and ordered 3D grooves with spacing down to similarmore » to 5 nm. Finally, we use these grooves as self-labeled and ex situ markers to resolve several complex silicon growths, including the formation of nodes, kinks, scale-like interfaces, and curved backbones.« less

  4. Alloy-assisted deposition of three-dimensional arrays of atomic gold catalyst for crystal growth studies

    DOE PAGES

    Fang, Yin; Jiang, Yuanwen; Cherukara, Mathew J.; ...

    2017-12-08

    Large-scale assembly of individual atoms over smooth surfaces is difficult to achieve. A configuration of an atom reservoir, in which individual atoms can be readily extracted, may successfully address this challenge. In this work, we demonstrate that a liquid gold-silicon alloy established in classical vapor-liquid-solid growth can deposit ordered and three-dimensional rings of isolated gold atoms over silicon nanowire sidewalls. Here, we perform ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and unveil a surprising single atomic gold-catalyzed chemical etching of silicon. Experimental verification of this catalytic process in silicon nanowires yields dopant-dependent, massive and ordered 3D grooves with spacing down to similarmore » to 5 nm. Finally, we use these grooves as self-labeled and ex situ markers to resolve several complex silicon growths, including the formation of nodes, kinks, scale-like interfaces, and curved backbones.« less

  5. Metastable phase in binary and ternary 12-carat gold alloys at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamiri, Imene; Abdelbaky, Mohammed S. M.; Hamana, Djamel; García-Granda, Santiago

    2018-04-01

    Low temperature phase transitions in 12-carat gold alloys have been investigated for binary Au-Cu and ternary Au-Cu-Ag compositions. The thermal analyses investigations using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the dilatometry were performed in the 50–300 °C temperature range in order to detect the structural transformations. The thermal analyses were carried out on annealed samples at 700 °C for two hour followed by water quenching. They reveal an important new reaction for both used compositions and both thermal techniques confirm each other. This reaction has been assessed as pre-ordering reaction. SEM and STM imaging were performed on annealed samples at 700 °C for two hours and water quenched followed by a heating from room temperature up to the temperature of the new peaks obtained in the thermal study. The imaging reveals the relationship between the pre-ordering reaction and the surface aspect presented in the fact of dendrite precipitates. A series of SEM observation have been performed in order to follow the kinetic of the observed precipitates by the way of several series of heating up, from 140 to 220 °C for the binary composition and from 100 to 180 °C for the ternary composition. Furthermore, this study shows that the silver accelerates the ordering reaction.

  6. Pentacle gold-copper alloy nanocrystals: a new system for entering male germ cells in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu; He, Rong; Sun, Liping; Yang, Yushan; Li, Wenqing; Sun, Fei

    2016-12-01

    Gold-based nanocrystals have attracted considerable attention for drug delivery and biological applications due to their distinct shapes. However, overcoming biological barriers is a hard and inevitable problem, which restricts medical applications of nanomaterials in vivo. Seeking for an efficient transportation to penetrate biological barriers is a common need. There are three barriers: blood-testis barrier, blood-placenta barrier, and blood-brain barrier. Here, we pay close attention to the blood-testis barrier. We found that the pentacle gold-copper alloy nanocrystals not only could enter GC-2 cells in vitro in a short time, but also could overcome the blood-testis barrier and enter male germ cells in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the entrance efficiency would become much higher in the development stages. The results also suggested that the pentacle gold-copper alloy nanocrystals could easier enter to germ cells in the pathological condition. This system could be a new method for theranostics in the reproductive system.

  7. Artefacts in multimodal imaging of titanium, zirconium and binary titanium–zirconium alloy dental implants: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Schöllchen, Maximilian; Aarabi, Ghazal; Assaf, Alexandre T; Rendenbach, Carsten; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Semmusch, Jan; Sedlacik, Jan; Heiland, Max; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze and evaluate imaging artefacts induced by zirconium, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy dental implants. Methods: Zirconium, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy implants were embedded in gelatin and MRI, CT and CBCT were performed. Standard protocols were used for each modality. For MRI, line–distance profiles were plotted to quantify the accuracy of size determination. For CT and CBCT, six shells surrounding the implant were defined every 0.5 cm from the implant surface and histogram parameters were determined for each shell. Results: While titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy induced extensive signal voids in MRI owing to strong susceptibility, zirconium implants were clearly definable with only minor distortion artefacts. For titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy, the MR signal was attenuated up to 14.1 mm from the implant. In CT, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy resulted in less streak artefacts in comparison with zirconium. In CBCT, titanium–zirconium alloy induced more severe artefacts than zirconium and titanium. Conclusions: MRI allows for an excellent image contrast and limited artefacts in patients with zirconium implants. CT and CBCT examinations are less affected by artefacts from titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy implants compared with MRI. The knowledge about differences of artefacts through different implant materials and image modalities might help support clinical decisions for the choice of implant material or imaging device in the clinical setting. PMID:27910719

  8. Artefacts in multimodal imaging of titanium, zirconium and binary titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Ralf; Schöllchen, Maximilian; Gauer, Tobias; Aarabi, Ghazal; Assaf, Alexandre T; Rendenbach, Carsten; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Semmusch, Jan; Sedlacik, Jan; Heiland, Max; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-02-01

    To analyze and evaluate imaging artefacts induced by zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants. Zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants were embedded in gelatin and MRI, CT and CBCT were performed. Standard protocols were used for each modality. For MRI, line-distance profiles were plotted to quantify the accuracy of size determination. For CT and CBCT, six shells surrounding the implant were defined every 0.5 cm from the implant surface and histogram parameters were determined for each shell. While titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy induced extensive signal voids in MRI owing to strong susceptibility, zirconium implants were clearly definable with only minor distortion artefacts. For titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy, the MR signal was attenuated up to 14.1 mm from the implant. In CT, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy resulted in less streak artefacts in comparison with zirconium. In CBCT, titanium-zirconium alloy induced more severe artefacts than zirconium and titanium. MRI allows for an excellent image contrast and limited artefacts in patients with zirconium implants. CT and CBCT examinations are less affected by artefacts from titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants compared with MRI. The knowledge about differences of artefacts through different implant materials and image modalities might help support clinical decisions for the choice of implant material or imaging device in the clinical setting.

  9. Corrosion of dental nickel-aluminum bronze with a minor gold content-mechanism and biological impact.

    PubMed

    Ardlin, Berit I; Lindholm-Sethson, Britta; Dahl, Jon E

    2009-02-01

    To study corrosion and to evaluate biological effects in vitro of corrosion products of a copper-aluminum-nickel alloy with 2% gold. The alloy NPGtrade mark+2 with the nominal composition Cu:77.3; Al:7.8; Ni:4.3; Fe:3.0; Zn:2.7; Au:2.0; and Mn:1.7 was characterized. Static immersion in acidic saline, pH 2.2-2.4, was used to determine release of metallic elements in a milieu simulating the condition of plaque build-up in interproximal areas of the tooth. Corrosion and surface reactions in saline and artificial saliva were studied by electrochemical techniques including registration of open-circuit-potentials, polarization curves and impedance spectra. Extracts were made in cell culture media and acidic saline and used for MTT test for cytotoxicity and HET-CAM method for irritation. The mean amount of elements released in the acidic saline were in microg cm(-2) : Cu:632; Al:210; Ni:144; Fe:122; Zn:48; Mn:52. No protective film was formed on the surface of the alloy, as extensive corrosion was observed in both saline and artificial saliva. The corrosion rate was higher in saline than in artificial saliva. Acidic extracts of the alloy diluted up to 64 times reduced cell viability with 80% or more. The extract induced coagulation of the blood vessels of the CAM and was rated as moderate irritant solution. The nickel-aluminum bronze showed high corrosion rate caused by an inability to create a protective surface layer. High levels of toxic elements were found after static immersion testing, and the corrosion products had a distinct adverse effect on the biological activity. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. An investigation of the microstructure and mechanical properties of electrochemically coated Ag(4)Sn dental alloy particles condensed in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez, Jose Antonio

    As part of the ongoing scientific effort to develop a new amalgam-like material without mercury, a team of metallurgists and electrochemists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, announced in 1993 the development of a new Ag-Sn dental alloy system without mercury that sought to replace conventional dental amalgams. They used spherical Ag3Sn and Ag4Sn intermetallic dental alloy particles, commonly used in conventional dental alloys, and coated them with electrodeposited silver with newly-developed electrolytic and immersion techniques. The particles had relatively pure silver coatings that were closely adherent to the intermetalfic cores. These silver-coated particles, due to silver's plasticity at room temperature, were condensed into PlexiglasRTM molds with the aid of an acidic surface activating solution (HBF4) and a mechanical condensing device, producing a metal-matrix composite with Ag3,4Sn filler particles surrounded by a cold-welded silver matrix. Since silver strain hardens rather easily, the layers had to be condensed in less than 0.5 mm increments to obtain a dense structure. Mechanical testing at NIST produced compressive strength values equal to or greater than those of conventional dental amalgams. Because of its potential for eliminating mercury as a constituent in dental amalgam, this material created a stir in dental circles when first developed and conceivably could prove to be a major breakthrough in the field of dental restoratives. To date, the chief impediments to its approval for human clinical applications by the Food and Drug Administration are the potentially-toxic surface activating solution used for oxide reduction, and the high condensation pressures needed for cold welding because of the tendency for silver to strain harden. In this related study, the author, who has practiced general dentistry for 25 years, evaluates some of the mechanical and microstructural properties of these

  11. Is It Real Gold?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Harold H.

    1999-01-01

    Features acid tests for determining whether jewelry is "real" gold or simply gold-plated. Describes the carat system of denoting gold content and explains how alloys are used to create various shades of gold jewelry. Addresses the question of whether gold jewelry can turn a wearer's skin green by considering various oxidation reactions.…

  12. Brazing open cell reticulated copper foam to stainless steel tubing with vacuum furnace brazed gold/indium alloy plating

    DOEpatents

    Howard, Stanley R [Windsor, SC; Korinko, Paul S [Aiken, SC

    2008-05-27

    A method of fabricating a heat exchanger includes brush electroplating plated layers for a brazing alloy onto a stainless steel tube in thin layers, over a nickel strike having a 1.3 .mu.m thickness. The resultant Au-18 In composition may be applied as a first layer of indium, 1.47 .mu.m thick, and a second layer of gold, 2.54 .mu.m thick. The order of plating helps control brazing erosion. Excessive amounts of brazing material are avoided by controlling the electroplating process. The reticulated copper foam rings are interference fit to the stainless steel tube, and in contact with the plated layers. The copper foam rings, the plated layers for brazing alloy, and the stainless steel tube are heated and cooled in a vacuum furnace at controlled rates, forming a bond of the copper foam rings to the stainless steel tube that improves heat transfer between the tube and the copper foam.

  13. Chemical passivation as a method of improving the electrochemical corrosion resistance of Co-Cr-based dental alloy.

    PubMed

    Rylska, Dorota; Sokołowski, Grzegorz; Sokołowski, Jerzy; Łukomska-Szymańska, Monika

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate corrosion resistance of Wirobond C® alloy after chemical passivation treatment. The alloy surface undergone chemical passivation treatment in four different media. Corrosion studies were carried out by means of electrochemical methods in saline solution. Corrosion effects were determined using SEM. The greatest increase in the alloy polarization resistance was observed for passive layer produced in Na2SO4 solution with graphite. The same layer caused the highest increase in corrosion current. Generally speaking, the alloy passivation in Na2SO4 solution with graphite caused a substantial improvement of the corrosion resistance. The sample after passivation in Na2SO4 solution without graphite, contrary to others, lost its protective properties along with successive anodic polarization cycles. The alloy passivation in Na3PO4 solution with graphite was the only one that caused a decrease in the alloy corrosion properties. The SEM studies of all samples after chemical passivation revealed no pit corrosion - in contrast to the sample without any modification. Every successive polarization cycle in anodic direction of pure Wirobond C® alloy enhances corrosion resistance shifting corrosion potential in the positive direction and decreasing corrosion current value. The chemical passivation in solutions with low pH values decreases susceptibility to electrochemical corrosion of Co-Cr dental alloy. The best protection against corrosion was obtained after chemical passivation of Wirobond C® in Na2SO4 solution with graphite. Passivation with Na2SO4 in solution of high pH does not cause an increase in corrosion resistance of WIROBOND C. Passivation process increases alloy resistance to pit corrosion.

  14. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... in any assay for quality of a karat gold industry product include springs, posts, and separable backs... screw assemblies; dowels; springs for spring shoe straps; metal parts permanently encased in a non-metallic covering; and for oxfords, 2 coil and joint springs. 2 Oxfords are a form of eyeglasses where a...

  15. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... in any assay for quality of a karat gold industry product include springs, posts, and separable backs... screw assemblies; dowels; springs for spring shoe straps; metal parts permanently encased in a non-metallic covering; and for oxfords, 2 coil and joint springs. 2 Oxfords are a form of eyeglasses where a...

  16. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... in any assay for quality of a karat gold industry product include springs, posts, and separable backs... screw assemblies; dowels; springs for spring shoe straps; metal parts permanently encased in a non-metallic covering; and for oxfords, 2 coil and joint springs. 2 Oxfords are a form of eyeglasses where a...

  17. Corrosion behaviours of the dental magnetic keeper complexes made by different alloys and methods.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min-Ke; Song, Ning; Liu, Fei; Kou, Liang; Lu, Xiao-Wen; Wang, Min; Wang, Hang; Shen, Jie-Fei

    2016-09-29

    The keeper and cast dowel-coping, as a primary component for a magnetic attachment, is easily subjected to corrosion in a wet environment, such as the oral cavity, which contains electrolyte-rich saliva, complex microflora and chewing behaviour and so on. The objective of this in vitro study was to examine the corrosion resistance of a dowel and coping-keeper complex fabricated by finish keeper and three alloys (cobalt-chromium, CoCr; silver-palladium-gold, PdAu; gold-platinum, AuPt) using a laser-welding process and a casting technique. The surface morphology characteristics and microstructures of the samples were examined by means of metallographic microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) with SEM provided elements analysis information for the test samples after 10% oxalic acid solution etching test. Tafel polarization curve recordings demonstrated parameter values indicating corrosion of the samples when subjected to electrochemical testing. This study has suggested that massive oxides are attached to the surface of the CoCr-keeper complex but not to the AuPt-keeper complex. Only the keeper area of cast CoCr-keeper complex displayed obvious intergranular corrosion and changes in the Fe and Co elements. Both cast and laser-welded AuPt-keeper complexes had the highest free corrosion potential, followed by the PdAu-keeper complex. We concluded that although the corrosion resistance of the CoCr-keeper complex was worst, the keeper surface passive film was actually preserved to its maximum extent. The laser-welded CoCr- and PdAu-keeper complexes possessed superior corrosion resistance as compared with their cast specimens, but no significant difference was found between the cast and laser-welded AuPt-keeper complexes. The Fe-poor and Cr-rich band, appearing on the edge of the keeper when casting, has been proven to be a corrosion-prone area.

  18. Evaluation of metal-ceramic bond characteristics of three dental Co-Cr alloys prepared with different fabrication techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongmei; Feng, Qing; Li, Ning; Xu, Sheng

    2016-12-01

    Limited information is available regarding the metal-ceramic bond strength of dental Co-Cr alloys fabricated by casting (CAST), computer numerical control (CNC) milling, and selective laser melting (SLM). The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the metal-ceramic bond characteristics of 3 dental Co-Cr alloys fabricated by casting, computer numerical control milling, and selective laser melting techniques using the 3-point bend test (International Organization for Standardization [ISO] standard 9693). Forty-five specimens (25×3×0.5 mm) made of dental Co-Cr alloys were prepared by CAST, CNC milling, and SLM techniques. The morphology of the oxidation surface of metal specimens was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After porcelain application, the interfacial characterization was evaluated by SEM equipped with energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis, and the metal-ceramic bond strength was assessed with the 3-point bend test. Failure type and elemental composition on the debonding interface were assessed by SEM/EDS. The bond strength was statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and Tukey honest significant difference test (α=.05). The oxidation surfaces of the CAST, CNC, and SLM groups were different. They were porous in the CAST group but compact and irregular in the CNC and SLM groups. The metal-ceramic interfaces of the SLM and CNC groups showed excellent combination compared with those of the CAST group. The bond strength was 37.7 ±6.5 MPa for CAST, 43.3 ±9.2 MPa for CNC, and 46.8 ±5.1 MPa for the SLM group. Statistically significant differences were found among the 3 groups tested (P=.028). The debonding surfaces of all specimens exhibited cohesive failure mode. The oxidation surface morphologies and thicknesses of dental Co-Cr alloys are dependent on the different fabrication techniques used. The bond strength of all 3 groups exceed the minimum acceptable value of 25 MPa recommended by ISO 9693; hence, dental Co-Cr alloy

  19. How can we make stable linear monoatomic chains? Gold-cesium binary subnanowires as an example of a charge-transfer-driven approach to alloying.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Cheol; Lee, Han Myoung; Kim, Woo Youn; Kwon, S K; Nautiyal, Tashi; Cheng, Da-Yong; Vishwanathan, K; Kim, Kwang S

    2007-02-16

    On the basis of first-principles calculations of clusters and one dimensional infinitely long subnanowires of the binary systems, we find that alkali-noble metal alloy wires show better linearity and stability than either pure alkali metal or noble metal wires. The enhanced alternating charge buildup on atoms by charge transfer helps the atoms line up straight. The cesium doped gold wires showing significant charge transfer from cesium to gold can be stabilized as linear or circular monoatomic chains.

  20. In vitro comparative analysis of the fit of gold alloy or commercially pure titanium implant-supported prostheses before and after electroerosion.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Ivete Aparecida de Mattias; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Francischone, Carlos Eduardo; de Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello

    2004-08-01

    For implant-supported prostheses, passive fit is critical for the success of rehabilitation, especially when alternative materials are used. The purpose of this study was to compare interfacial fit of implant-supported prostheses cast in titanium to those cast in gold alloy. Five 3-unit fixed partial dentures were fabricated in gold alloy (Degudent U) as 1-piece castings, and 5 others were similarly cast in commercially pure titanium (Grade 1). The interfacial gaps between the prostheses and the abutments were evaluated with an optical microscope, before and after electroerosion. Readings were made with both screws tightened (10 N.cm torque), and with only 1 side tightened, so as to also evaluate the passive fit of the prostheses. Data were compared statistically by 2-way analysis of variance and the post hoc Tukey multiple range test (alpha=.05). Before electroerosion, the interfacial gaps for the 1-piece prostheses were significantly smaller (P<.001) in the gold alloy group when the screws were tightened (Au=12.6 +/- 3.0 microm, compared to Ti=30.1 +/- 6.4 microm). When the side opposite the tightened side was analyzed, there was no significant difference between the gold alloy and titanium groups (Au=69.2 +/- 24.9 microm and Ti=94.2 +/- 39.6 microm). The electroerosion procedure significantly (P<.001) reduced the gaps at the interfaces for both groups under all conditions. Comparison between groups after electroerosion did not present significant differences when the side opposite the tightened side was analyzed, but the gold alloy group showed better fit when the tightened side was analyzed (12.8 +/- 1.4 microm for gold alloy; 29.6 +/- 4.4 microm for titanium) and when both screws were tightened (5.4 +/- 2.3 microm for gold alloy; 16.1 +/- 5.5 microm for titanium). Cast titanium prostheses, despite showing larger interfacial gaps between the prosthesis and abutment than those obtained with gold alloy, had improved fit after being subjected to electroerosion.

  1. Ion release from dental casting alloys as assessed by a continuous flow system: Nutritional and toxicological implications.

    PubMed

    López-Alías, José F; Martinez-Gomis, Jordi; Anglada, Josep M; Peraire, Maria

    2006-09-01

    The aims of this study were to quantify the metallic ions released by various dental alloys subjected to a continuous flow of saliva and to estimate the nutritional and toxicological implications of such a release. Four pieces of three nickel-based, one noble, one high-noble and two copper-aluminum alloys were cast and then immersed in a continuous flow of artificial saliva for 15 days. To simulate three meals a day, casts were subjected to thrice-daily episodes, lasting 30 min each and consisting of pH decreases and salinity increases. After 15 days, the metallic ions in the artificial saliva were analyzed. Data were expressed as averaged release rate: microg/cm2/day of ion released for each alloy. The highest value of 95% Cl of each ion was adapted to a hypothetical worst scenario of a subject with 100 cm2 of exposed metal surface. The results were compared with the tolerable upper daily intake level of each ion. The copper-aluminum alloys released copper, aluminum, nickel, manganese and iron. The nickel-based alloys essentially released nickel and chromium, while the beryllium-containing alloy released beryllium and significantly more nickel. The noble and high-noble alloys were very resistant to corrosion. The amount of ions released remained far below the upper tolerable intake level, with the exception of nickel, released by beryllium-containing nickel-based alloy, whose levels approach 50% of this threshold. The daily amount of ions released seems to be far below the tolerable upper intake levels for each ion.

  2. Effect of chemical composition of Ni-Cr dental casting alloys on the bonding characterization between porcelain and metal.

    PubMed

    Huang, H-H; Lin, M-C; Lee, T-H; Yang, H-W; Chen, F-L; Wu, S-C; Hsu, C-C

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of chemical composition of Ni-Cr dental casting alloys on the bonding behaviour between porcelain and metal. A three-point bending test was used to measure the fracture load of alloy after porcelain firing. A scanning electron microscope, accompanied by an energy dispersion spectrometer, was used to analyse the morphology and chemical composition of the fracture surface. An X-ray photoelectron spectrometer and glow discharge spectrometer were used to identify the structure and cross-sectional chemical composition, respectively, of oxide layers on Ni-Cr alloys after heat treatment at 990 degrees C for 5 min. Results showed that the oxide layers formed on all Ni-Cr alloys contained mainly Cr2O3, NiO, and trace MoO3. The Ni-Cr alloy with a higher Cr content had a thicker oxide layer, as well as a weaker bonding behaviour of porcelain/metal interface. The presence of Al (as Al2O3) and Be (as BeO) on the oxide layer suppressed the growth of the oxide layer, leading to a better porcelain/metal bonding behaviour. However, the presence of a small amount of Ti (as TiO2) on the oxide layer did not have any influence on the bonding behaviour. The fracture propagated along the interface between the opaque porcelain and metal, and exhibited an adhesive type of fracture morphology.

  3. Biocompatibility effects of indirect exposure of base-metal dental casting alloys to a human-derived three-dimensional oral mucosal model.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Emma Louise; Moran, Gary P; Fleming, Garry J P

    2013-11-01

    The study employed a three-dimensional (3D) human-derived oral mucosal model to assess the biocompatibility of base-metal dental casting alloys ubiquitous in fixed prosthodontic and orthodontic dentistry. Oral mucosal models were generated using primary human oral keratinocyte and gingival fibroblast cells seeded onto human de-epidermidised dermal scaffolds. Nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) base-metal alloy immersion solutions were exposed to oral mucosal models for increasing time periods (2-72h). Analysis methodologies (histology, viable cell counts, oxidative stress, cytokine expression and toxicity) were performed following exposure. Ni-based alloy immersion solutions elicited significantly decreased cell viability (P<0.0004) with increased oxidative stress (P<0.0053), inflammatory cytokine expression (P<0.0077) and cellular toxicity levels (P<0.0001) compared with the controls. However, the Ni-free Co-Cr-based alloy immersion solutions did not elicit adverse oxidative stress (P>0.4755) or cellular toxicity (P<0.2339) responses compared with controls. Although the multiple analyses highlighted Ni-Cr base-metal alloy immersion solutions elicited significantly detrimental effects to the oral mucosal models, it was possible to distinguish between Ni-Cr alloys using the approach employed. The study employed a 3D human-derived full-thickness differentiated oral mucosal model suitable for biocompatibility assessment of base-metal dental casting alloys through discriminatory experimental parameters. Increasing incidences of Ni hypersensitivity in the general population warrants serious consideration from dental practitioners and patients alike where fixed prosthodontic/orthodontic dental treatments are the treatment modality involved. The novel and analytical oral mucosal model has the potential to significantly contribute to the advancement of reproducible dental medical device and dental material appraisals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All

  4. A study on a dental device for the prevention of mucosal dose enhancement caused by backscatter radiation from dental alloy during external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Katsura, Kouji; Utsunomiya, Satoru; Abe, Eisuke; Sakai, Hironori; Kushima, Naotaka; Tanabe, Satoshi; Yamada, Takumi; Hayakawa, Takahide; Yamanoi, Yoshihiko; Kimura, Syuhei; Wada, Shinichi; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Hayashi, Takafumi

    2016-11-01

    The changes in dose distribution caused by backscatter radiation from a common commercial dental alloy (Au-Ag-Pd dental alloy; DA) were investigated to identify the optimal material and thicknesses of a dental device (DD) for effective prevention of mucositis. To this end, 1 cm 3 of DA was irradiated with a 6-MV X-ray beam (100 MU) in a field size of 10 × 10 cm 2 using a Novalis TX linear accelerator. Ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, polyolefin elastomer, and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were selected as DD materials. The depth dose along the central axis was determined with respect to the presence/absence of DA and DDs at thicknesses of 1-10 mm using a parallel-plate ionization chamber. The dose in the absence of DDs showed the lowest value at a distance of 5 mm from the DA surface and gradually increased with distance between the measurement point and the DA surface for distances of ≥5 mm. Except for PET, no significant difference between the DA dose curves for the presence and absence of DDs was observed. In the dose curve, PET showed a slightly higher dose for DA with DD than for DA without DD for thicknesses of ≥4 mm. The findings herein suggest that the optimal DD material for preventing local dose enhancement of the mucosa caused by DA backscatter radiation should have a relatively low atomic number and physical density and that optimal DD thickness should be chosen considering backscatter radiation and percentage depth dose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  5. Biomechanical Consequences of the Elastic Properties of Dental Implant Alloys on the Supporting Bone: Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chávarri-Prado, David; Jiménez-Garrudo, Antonio; Solaberrieta-Méndez, Eneko; Diéguez-Pereira, Markel; Fernández-González, Felipe J.; Dehesa-Ibarra, Borja; Monticelli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate how the elastic properties of the fabrication material of dental implants influence peri-implant bone load transfer in terms of the magnitude and distribution of stress and deformation. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis was performed; the model used was a section of mandibular bone with a single implant containing a cemented ceramic-metal crown on a titanium abutment. The following three alloys were compared: rigid (Y-TZP), conventional (Ti-6Al-4V), and hyperelastic (Ti-Nb-Zr). A 150-N static load was tested on the central fossa at 6° relative to the axial axis of the implant. The results showed no differences in the distribution of stress and deformation of the bone for any of the three types of alloys studied, mainly being concentrated at the peri-implant cortical layer. However, there were differences found in the magnitude of the stress transferred to the supporting bone, with the most rigid alloy (Y-TZP) transferring the least stress and deformation to cortical bone. We conclude that there is an effect of the fabrication material of dental implants on the magnitude of the stress and deformation transferred to peri-implant bone. PMID:27995137

  6. Annealing of Co-Cr dental alloy: effects on nanostructure and Rockwell hardness.

    PubMed

    Ayyıldız, Simel; Soylu, Elif Hilal; Ide, Semra; Kılıç, Selim; Sipahi, Cumhur; Pişkin, Bulent; Gökçe, Hasan Suat

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of annealing on the nanostructure and hardness of Co-Cr metal ceramic samples that were fabricated with a direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) technique. Five groups of Co-Cr dental alloy samples were manufactured in a rectangular form measuring 4 × 2 × 2 mm. Samples fabricated by a conventional casting technique (Group I) and prefabricated milling blanks (Group II) were examined as conventional technique groups. The DMLS samples were randomly divided into three groups as not annealed (Group III), annealed in argon atmosphere (Group IV), or annealed in oxygen atmosphere (Group V). The nanostructure was examined with the small-angle X-ray scattering method. The Rockwell hardness test was used to measure the hardness changes in each group, and the means and standard deviations were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA for comparison of continuous variables and Tukey's HSD test was used for post hoc analysis. P values of <.05 were accepted as statistically significant. The general nanostructures of the samples were composed of small spherical entities stacked atop one another in dendritic form. All groups also displayed different hardness values depending on the manufacturing technique. The annealing procedure and environment directly affected both the nanostructure and hardness of the Co-Cr alloy. Group III exhibited a non-homogeneous structure and increased hardness (48.16 ± 3.02 HRC) because the annealing process was incomplete and the inner stress was not relieved. Annealing in argon atmosphere of Group IV not only relieved the inner stresses but also decreased the hardness (27.40 ± 3.98 HRC). The results of fitting function presented that Group IV was the most homogeneous product as the minimum bilayer thickness was measured (7.11 Å). After the manufacturing with DMLS technique, annealing in argon atmosphere is an essential process for Co-Cr metal ceramic substructures. The dentists should be familiar with

  7. Annealing of Co-Cr dental alloy: effects on nanostructure and Rockwell hardness

    PubMed Central

    Soylu, Elif Hilal; İde, Semra; Kılıç, Selim; Sipahi, Cumhur; Pişkin, Bulent; Gökçe, Hasan Suat

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of annealing on the nanostructure and hardness of Co-Cr metal ceramic samples that were fabricated with a direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS Five groups of Co-Cr dental alloy samples were manufactured in a rectangular form measuring 4 × 2 × 2 mm. Samples fabricated by a conventional casting technique (Group I) and prefabricated milling blanks (Group II) were examined as conventional technique groups. The DMLS samples were randomly divided into three groups as not annealed (Group III), annealed in argon atmosphere (Group IV), or annealed in oxygen atmosphere (Group V). The nanostructure was examined with the small-angle X-ray scattering method. The Rockwell hardness test was used to measure the hardness changes in each group, and the means and standard deviations were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA for comparison of continuous variables and Tukey's HSD test was used for post hoc analysis. P values of <.05 were accepted as statistically significant. RESULTS The general nanostructures of the samples were composed of small spherical entities stacked atop one another in dendritic form. All groups also displayed different hardness values depending on the manufacturing technique. The annealing procedure and environment directly affected both the nanostructure and hardness of the Co-Cr alloy. Group III exhibited a non-homogeneous structure and increased hardness (48.16 ± 3.02 HRC) because the annealing process was incomplete and the inner stress was not relieved. Annealing in argon atmosphere of Group IV not only relieved the inner stresses but also decreased the hardness (27.40 ± 3.98 HRC). The results of fitting function presented that Group IV was the most homogeneous product as the minimum bilayer thickness was measured (7.11 Å). CONCLUSION After the manufacturing with DMLS technique, annealing in argon atmosphere is an essential process for Co-Cr metal ceramic

  8. A Comparative Analysis of the Corrosive Effect of Artificial Saliva of Variable pH on DMLS and Cast Co-Cr-Mo Dental Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Puskar, Tatjana; Jevremovic, Danimir; Williams, Robert J.; Eggbeer, Dominic; Vukelic, Djordje; Budak, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Dental alloys for direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) are available on the market today, but there is little scientific evidence reported on their characteristics. One of them is the release of ions, as an indicator of the corrosion characteristics of a dental alloy. Within this research, the difference in the elution of metals from DMLS and cast (CM) samples of Co-Cr-Mo dental alloy in saliva-like medium of three different pH was examined by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The obtained results show that the metal elution in artificial saliva from the DMLS alloy was lower than the elution from the CM alloy. The release of all investigated metal ions was influenced by the acidity, both from the DMLS and CM alloy, throughout the investigated period of 30 days. The change in acidity from a pH of 6.8 to a pH of 2.3 for the cast alloy led to a higher increase of the elution of Co, Cr and Mo from CM than from the DMLS alloy. The greatest release out of Co, Cr and Mo was for Co for both tested alloys. Further, the greatest release of all ions was measured at pH 2.3. In saliva of pH 2.3 and pH 4.5, the longer the investigated period, the higher the difference between the total metal ion release from the CM and DMLS alloys. Both alloys showed a safe level of elution according to the ISO definition in all investigated acidic environments. PMID:28788197

  9. A Comparative Analysis of the Corrosive Effect of Artificial Saliva of Variable pH on DMLS and Cast Co-Cr-Mo Dental Alloy.

    PubMed

    Puskar, Tatjana; Jevremovic, Danimir; Williams, Robert J; Eggbeer, Dominic; Vukelic, Djordje; Budak, Igor

    2014-09-11

    Dental alloys for direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) are available on the market today, but there is little scientific evidence reported on their characteristics. One of them is the release of ions, as an indicator of the corrosion characteristics of a dental alloy. Within this research, the difference in the elution of metals from DMLS and cast (CM) samples of Co-Cr-Mo dental alloy in saliva-like medium of three different pH was examined by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The obtained results show that the metal elution in artificial saliva from the DMLS alloy was lower than the elution from the CM alloy. The release of all investigated metal ions was influenced by the acidity, both from the DMLS and CM alloy, throughout the investigated period of 30 days. The change in acidity from a pH of 6.8 to a pH of 2.3 for the cast alloy led to a higher increase of the elution of Co, Cr and Mo from CM than from the DMLS alloy. The greatest release out of Co, Cr and Mo was for Co for both tested alloys. Further, the greatest release of all ions was measured at pH 2.3. In saliva of pH 2.3 and pH 4.5, the longer the investigated period, the higher the difference between the total metal ion release from the CM and DMLS alloys. Both alloys showed a safe level of elution according to the ISO definition in all investigated acidic environments.

  10. Mn-coatings on the micro-pore formed Ti-29Nb-xHf alloys by RF-magnetron sputtering for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seon-Yeong; Choe, Han-Cheol

    2018-02-01

    In this study, Mn-coatings on the micro-pore formed Ti-29Nb-xHf alloys by RF-magnetrons sputtering for dental applications were studied using different experimental techniques. Mn coating films were formed on Ti-29Nb-xHf alloys by a radio frequency magnetron sputtering technique for 0, 1, 3, and 5 min at 45 W. The microstructure, composition, and phase structure of the coated alloys were examined by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The microstructure of Ti-29Nb alloy showed α" phase in the needle-like structure and Ti-29Nb-15Hf alloy showed β phase in the equiaxed structure. As the sputtering time increased, the circular particles of Mn coatings on the Ti-29Nb alloy increased at inside and outside surfaces. As the sputtering time increased, [Mn + Ca/P] ratio of the plasma electrolytic oxidized films in Ti- 29Nb-xHf alloys increased. The corrosion potential (Ecorr) of Mn coatings on the Ti-29Nb alloy showed higher than that of Mn coatings on the Ti-29Nb-15Hf alloy. The passive current density (Ipass) of the Mn coating on the Ti-29Nb alloy and Mn coatings on the Ti-29Nb-15Hf alloy was less noble than the non-Mn coated Ti-29Nb and Ti-29Nb-15Hf alloys surface.

  11. SU-C-BRC-05: Monte Carlo Calculations to Establish a Simple Relation of Backscatter Dose Enhancement Around High-Z Dental Alloy to Its Atomic Number

    SciTech Connect

    Utsunomiya, S; Kushima, N; Katsura, K

    Purpose: To establish a simple relation of backscatter dose enhancement around a high-Z dental alloy in head and neck radiation therapy to its average atomic number based on Monte Carlo calculations. Methods: The PHITS Monte Carlo code was used to calculate dose enhancement, which is quantified by the backscatter dose factor (BSDF). The accuracy of the beam modeling with PHITS was verified by comparing with basic measured data namely PDDs and dose profiles. In the simulation, a high-Z alloy of 1 cm cube was embedded into a tough water phantom irradiated by a 6-MV (nominal) X-ray beam of 10 cmmore » × 10 cm field size of Novalis TX (Brainlab). The ten different materials of high-Z alloys (Al, Ti, Cu, Ag, Au-Pd-Ag, I, Ba, W, Au, Pb) were considered. The accuracy of calculated BSDF was verified by comparing with measured data by Gafchromic EBT3 films placed at from 0 to 10 mm away from a high-Z alloy (Au-Pd-Ag). We derived an approximate equation to determine the relation of BSDF and range of backscatter to average atomic number of high-Z alloy. Results: The calculated BSDF showed excellent agreement with measured one by Gafchromic EBT3 films at from 0 to 10 mm away from the high-Z alloy. We found the simple linear relation of BSDF and range of backscatter to average atomic number of dental alloys. The latter relation was proven by the fact that energy spectrum of backscatter electrons strongly depend on average atomic number. Conclusion: We found a simple relation of backscatter dose enhancement around high-Z alloys to its average atomic number based on Monte Carlo calculations. This work provides a simple and useful method to estimate backscatter dose enhancement from dental alloys and corresponding optimal thickness of dental spacer to prevent mucositis effectively.« less

  12. Mg-containing hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-6Al-4V alloy for dental materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ji-Min; Choe, Han-Cheol

    2018-02-01

    In this study, Mg-containing hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-6A1-4 V alloy for dental materials were researched using various experimental instruments. Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) was performed in electrolytes containing Mg (symbols of specimens: CaP, 5M%, 10M%, and 20M%) at 280 V for 3 min. The electrolyte used for PEO was produced by mixing Ca(CH3COO)2·H2O, C3H7NaCaO6P, and MgCl2·6H2O. The phases and composition of the oxide films were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The irregularity of the surface, pore size, and number of pores decreased as the Mg concentration increased. The ratio of the areas occupied and not occupied by pores decreased as the Mg concentration increased, with the numbers of both large and small pores decreasing with increasing Mg concentration. The number of particles on the internal surfaces of pores was increased as the Mg content increased. Mg content of all samples containing Mg ions showed higher in the pore outside than that of pore inside, whereas the Ca content was higher inside the pores. The P content of samples with the addition of Mg ions showed higher values inside the pores than outside. The Ca/P and [Mg + Ca]/P molar ratios in the PEO films decreased with Mg content. The crystallite size of anatase was increased with increasing Mg concentration in the solution.

  13. Gold silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN): an imaging probe for breast cancer screening with dual-energy mammography or computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naha, Pratap C.; Lau, Kristen C.; Hsu, Jessica C.; Hajfathalian, Maryam; Mian, Shaameen; Chhour, Peter; Uppuluri, Lahari; McDonald, Elizabeth S.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Cormode, David P.

    2016-07-01

    Earlier detection of breast cancer reduces mortality from this disease. As a result, the development of better screening techniques is a topic of intense interest. Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (DEM) is a novel technique that has improved sensitivity for cancer detection. However, the development of contrast agents for this technique is in its infancy. We herein report gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN) that have potent DEM contrast properties and improved biocompatibility. GSAN formulations containing a range of gold : silver ratios and capped with m-PEG were synthesized and characterized using various analytical methods. DEM and computed tomography (CT) phantom imaging showed that GSAN produced robust contrast that was comparable to silver alone. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation and DNA damage results revealed that the formulations with 30% or higher gold content are cytocompatible to Hep G2 and J774A.1 cells. In vivo imaging was performed in mice with and without breast tumors. The results showed that GSAN produce strong DEM and CT contrast and accumulated in tumors. Furthermore, both in vivo imaging and ex vivo analysis indicated the excretion of GSAN via both urine and feces. In summary, GSAN produce strong DEM and CT contrast, and has potential for both blood pool imaging and for breast cancer screening.Earlier detection of breast cancer reduces mortality from this disease. As a result, the development of better screening techniques is a topic of intense interest. Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (DEM) is a novel technique that has improved sensitivity for cancer detection. However, the development of contrast agents for this technique is in its infancy. We herein report gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN) that have potent DEM contrast properties and improved biocompatibility. GSAN formulations containing a range of gold : silver ratios and capped with m-PEG were synthesized and characterized using various

  14. [Effect of heat treatment on the structure of a Cu-Zn-Al-Ni system dental alloy].

    PubMed

    Guastaldi, A C; Adorno, A T; Beatrice, C R; Mondelli, J; Ishikiriama, A; Lacefield, W

    1990-01-01

    This article characterizes the structural phases present in the copper-based metallic alloy system "Cu-Zn-Al-Ni" developed for dental use, and relates those phases to other properties. The characterization was obtained after casting (using the lost wax process), and after heat treatment. In order to obtain better corrosion resistance by changing the microstructure, the castings were submitted to 30, 45 and 60 minutes of heat treatment at the following temperatures: 750 degrees C, 800 degrees C, and 850 degrees C. The various phases were analyzed using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results after heat treatment showed a phase (probably Cu3Al), that could be responsible for the improvement in the alloy's resistance to corrosion as compared to the as-cast structure.

  15. The influence of dental alloys on three-body wear of human enamel and dentin in an inlay-like situation.

    PubMed

    Graf, K; Johnson, G H; Mehl, A; Rammelsberg, P

    2002-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of metal alloys on three-body wear resistance of enamel and dentin, and vice versa. Three-body wear of human enamel, dentin, a soft gold alloy (BiOcclus Inlay), a CoCr alloy (Remanium 2000), a resin cement (Variolink II) and a zinc oxide phosphate cement (Harvard) was investigated using the ACTA-machine. Sample chambers of eight sample wheels were prepared with pure materials or combinations of human tooth substance, alloys and cement, simulating an inlay-like situation. After 100,000 and 200,000 cycles in a millet suspension with a spring force of 20 N, the amount of abraded material was profilometrically measured and evaluated by 3D surface data analysis. After 200,000 cycles, the materials demonstrated a mean loss of 0.41 microm for CoCr, 51 microm for gold, 57 microm for enamel, 164 microm for dentin, 79 microm for Variolink and 369 microm for Harvard. Using ANOVA and the Games-Howell-test, resin cement, enamel and gold were a subset not shown to differ, as was zinc phosphate cement and dentin. CoCr demonstrated the least wear and differed significantly from all materials. Enamel wear was significantly reduced in mixed chambers with CoCr, and gold after 200,000 cycles compared to enamel in pure chambers. In summary, a soft gold alloy can be recommended for inlays when considering three-body abrasion since the wear rate of the "soft" gold alloy corresponded to that of human enamel.

  16. [The effect of C-SiO2 composite films on corrosion resistance of dental Co-Cr alloy].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Hu, Jing-Yu; Liu, Yu-Pu; Zhao, Dong-Yuan; Yu, You-Cheng; Bi, Wei

    2016-10-01

    To study the effect of carbon-silica composite films on corrosion resistance of Co-Cr alloy in simulated oral environment and provide evidences for clinical application of this new material. Co-Cr alloy specimens were cut into appropriate size of 20 mm × 20 mm × 0.5 mm. Then, the carbon-silica composite films were spin-coated onto the specimens. Subsequently, ICP-AES was used to observe the Co, Cr, Mo ion concentrations. Finally, Tafel polarization curves of the specimens were used to measure the electrochemical corrosion resistance by electrochemical workstation. SAS8.0 software package was used for statistical analysis. The results of ICP-AES showed that the ion concentrations of Co, Cr, Mo of specimens coated with composite films in the testing liquid were significantly smaller than that of Co-Cr alloy specimens. Tafel polarization curves showed that in the specimens coated with composite films, the corrosion potential moved in the positive direction and increased from -0.261 V to -0.13 V. At the same time, the corrosion current density decreased from -5.0017μA/cm 2 to -5.3006 μA/cm 2 . Carbon-silica composite films (silica=61.71wt %) can reduce the release of metal ions significantly and improve the corrosion resistance of Co-Cr alloys effectively. Carbon-silica composite films may be a promising dental material.

  17. Effect of temporal pulse shaping on the reduction of laser weld defects in a Pd-Ag-Sn dental alloy.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, C; Poulon-Quintin, A

    2011-03-01

    To describe the influence of pulse shaping on the behavior of a palladium-based dental alloy during laser welding and to show how its choice is effective to promote good weld quality. Single spots, weld beads and welds with 80% overlapping were performed on Pd-Ag-Sn cast plates. A pulsed Nd:Yag laser was used with a specific welding procedure using all the possibilities for pulse-shaping: (1) the square pulse shape as the default setting, (2) a rising edge slope for gradual heating, (3) a falling edge slope to slow the cooling and (4) a combination of a rising and falling edges called bridge shape. The optimization of the pulse shape is supposed to enhance weldability and produce defect-free welds (cracks, pores…) Vickers microhardness measurements were made on cross sections of the welds. A correlation between laser welding parameters and microstructure evolution was found. Hot cracking and internal porosities were systematically detected when using rapid cooling. The presence of these types of defects was significantly reduced with the slow cooling of the molten pool. The best weld quality was obtained with the use of the bridge shape. The use of a slow cooling ramp is the only way to significantly reduce the presence of typical defects within the welds for this Pd-based alloy studied. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Corrosion behaviours of the dental magnetic keeper complexes made by different alloys and methods

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min-Ke; Song, Ning; Liu, Fei; Kou, Liang; Lu, Xiao-Wen; Wang, Min; Wang, Hang; Shen, Jie-Fei

    2016-01-01

    The keeper and cast dowel–coping, as a primary component for a magnetic attachment, is easily subjected to corrosion in a wet environment, such as the oral cavity, which contains electrolyte-rich saliva, complex microflora and chewing behaviour and so on. The objective of this in vitro study was to examine the corrosion resistance of a dowel and coping-keeper complex fabricated by finish keeper and three alloys (cobalt–chromium, CoCr; silver–palladium–gold, PdAu; gold–platinum, AuPt) using a laser-welding process and a casting technique. The surface morphology characteristics and microstructures of the samples were examined by means of metallographic microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) with SEM provided elements analysis information for the test samples after 10% oxalic acid solution etching test. Tafel polarization curve recordings demonstrated parameter values indicating corrosion of the samples when subjected to electrochemical testing. This study has suggested that massive oxides are attached to the surface of the CoCr–keeper complex but not to the AuPt–keeper complex. Only the keeper area of cast CoCr–keeper complex displayed obvious intergranular corrosion and changes in the Fe and Co elements. Both cast and laser-welded AuPt–keeper complexes had the highest free corrosion potential, followed by the PdAu–keeper complex. We concluded that although the corrosion resistance of the CoCr–keeper complex was worst, the keeper surface passive film was actually preserved to its maximum extent. The laser-welded CoCr– and PdAu–keeper complexes possessed superior corrosion resistance as compared with their cast specimens, but no significant difference was found between the cast and laser-welded AuPt–keeper complexes. The Fe-poor and Cr-rich band, appearing on the edge of the keeper when casting, has been proven to be a corrosion-prone area. PMID:27388806

  19. Electrochemical behavior of 45S5 bioactive ceramic coating on Ti6Al4V alloy for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado López, M. M.; Espitia Cabrera, M. I.; Faure, J.; Contreras García, M. E.

    2016-04-01

    Titanium and its alloys are widely used as implant materials because of their mechanical properties and non-toxic behavior. Unfortunately, they are not bioinert, which means that they can release ions and can only fix the bone by mechanical anchorage, this can lead to the encapsulation of dense fibrous tissue in the body. The bone fixation is required in clinical conditions treated by orthopedic and dental medicine. The proposal is to coat metallic implants with bioactive materials to establish good interfacial bonds between the metal substrate and bone by increasing bioactivity. Bioactive glasses, ceramics specifically 45 S5 Bioglass, have drawn attention as a serious functional biomaterial because osseointegration capacity. The EPD method of bioglass gel precursor was proposed in the present work as a new method to obtain 45S5/Ti6A14V for dental applications. The coatings, were thermally treated at 700 and 800°C and presented the 45 S5 bioglass characteristic phases showing morphology and uniformity with no defects, quantification percentages by EDS of Si, Ca, Na, P and O elements in the coating scratched powders, showed a good proportional relationship demonstrating the obtention of the 45S5 bioglass. The corrosion tests were carried out in Hank's solution. By Tafel extrapolation, Ti6Al4V alloy showed good corrosion resistance in Hank's solution media, by the formation of a passivation layer on the metal surface, however, in the system 45S5/Ti6Al4V there was an increase in the corrosion resistance; icon-, Ecorr and corrosion rate decreased, the mass loss and the rate of release of ions, were lower in this system than in the titanium alloy without coating.

  20. Effects of shot-peening and atmospheric-pressure plasma on aesthetic improvement of Ti-Nb-Ta-Zr alloy for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura-Fujiwara, Eri; Suzuki, Yuu; Ito, Michiko; Yamada, Motoko; Matsutake, Sinpei; Takashima, Seigo; Sato, Hisashi; Watanabe, Yoshimi

    2018-01-01

    Ti and Ti alloys are widely used for biomedical applications such as artificial joints and dental devices because of their good mechanical properties and biochemical compatibility. However, dental devices made of Ti and Ti alloys do not have the same color as teeth, so they are inferior to ceramics and polymers in terms of aesthetic properties. In a previous study, Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr was coated with a white Ti oxide layer by heat treatment to improve its aesthetic properties. Shot-peening is a severe plastic deformation process and can introduce a large shear strain on the peened surface. In this study, the effects of shot-peening and atmospheric-pressure plasma on Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr were investigated to form a white layer on the surface for dental applications.

  1. [Effect of chloride ion on corrosion of two commonly used dental alloys].

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weidan; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the eff ect of chloride concentration on the corrosion of Co-Cr alloy and pure Ti in a simulated oral environment. The electrochemical corrosion tests of pure Ti and Co-Cr alloy were carried out in neutral artificial saliva solutions with different NaCl concentrations (0.9%, 2.0%, and 3.0%). Th e morphologies of corroded surface for pure Ti and Co-Cr alloy were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Th e changes in the self-corrosion potentials (Ecorr) for pure Ti and Co-Cr alloy in three kinds of artificial saliva solutions was not obvious. However, the self-corrosion current densities (Icorr) of pure Ti were much lower than those of Co-Cr. The Icorr of Co-Cr alloy increased in a concentration-dependent manner of NaCl, whereas the breakdown potential (Eb) of Co-Cr alloy decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. Th e potential ranged for the breakdown of oxide film (Ev) was shortened in a concentration-dependent manner of NaCl. There was no obvious difference in the Icorr of pure Ti with different concentrations of NaCl. The breakdown potential was not seen according to the polarization curves. In a certain range, the increase of the concentration of Cl- leads to accelerate the corrosion behavior of Co-Cr alloy, but it does not affect pure Ti.

  2. [Effect of vacuum deposition technology on the metal-porcelain bond strength of a new type of CO-CR ceramic and framework dental alloy].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun-ling; Chao, Yong-lie; Ji, Ping; Gao, Xu

    2007-10-01

    To investigate the effect of a new engineering technique of vacuum deposition-plasma magnetron reactive sputter deposition technique on the metal-porcelain bond strength of a new type of Co-Cr ceramic and framework dental alloy. Before porcelain painted on the specimens, the standardized metal strips made from DA9-4 dental alloy were coated with a thin Al2O3 ceramic film by plasma magnetron reactive sputter deposition technique. The conformation, structure and thickness of the ceramic film were analyzed. The specimens for three-point bending test made from DA9-4 alloy and VMK95 porcelain were used for metal-porcelain bond strength measurement, in the same time the interface of metal-porcelain and element distribution were also observed. The flexural bonding strength of metal-porcelain of sputtering group and control group were (180.55+/-16.45) MPa and (143.80+/-24.49) MPa. The flexural bonding strength of metal-porcelain of sputtering group was higher than control group significantly through statistical analysis (P<0.01). The plasma magnetron reactive sputter deposition technique has a positive effect in improving the bonding strength of DA9-4 dental alloy and ceramic.

  3. Comparison of the microstructure and phase stability of as-cast, CAD/CAM and powder metallurgy manufactured Co-Cr dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai Chun; Prior, David J; Waddell, J Neil; Swain, Michael V

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the different microstructures produced by CC, PM and as-cast techniques for Co-Cr alloys and their phase stability following porcelain firings. Three bi-layer porcelain veneered Co-Cr specimens and one monolithic Co-Cr specimen of each alloy group [cast, powder metallurgy (PM), CAD/CAM (CC)] were manufactured and analyzed using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Specimens were treated to incremental numbers of porcelain firings (control 0, 5, 15) with crystallographic data, grain size and chemical composition subsequently obtained and analyzed. EBSD datasets of the cast alloy indicated large grains >200 μm whereas PM and CC alloy consisted of mean arithmetic grain sizes of 29.6 μm and 19.2 μm respectively. XRD and EBSD results both indicated the highest increase in hcp content (>13vol%) for cast Co-Cr alloy after treatment with porcelain firing while PM and CC indicated <2vol% hcp content. A fine grain interfacial layer developed on all surfaces of the alloy after porcelain firing. The depth of this layer increased with porcelain firings for as-cast and PM but no significant increase (p>.05) was observed in CC. EDS line scans indicated an increase in Cr content at the alloy surface after porcelain firing treatment for all three alloys. PM and CC produced alloy had superior fcc phase stability after porcelain firings compared to a traditional cast alloy. It is recommended that PM and CC alloys be used for porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Corrosion in artificial saliva of a Ni-Cr-based dental alloy joined by TIG welding and conventional brazing.

    PubMed

    Matos, Irma C; Bastos, Ivan N; Diniz, Marília G; de Miranda, Mauro S

    2015-08-01

    Fixed prosthesis and partial dental prosthesis frameworks are usually made from welded Ni-Cr-based alloys. These structures can corrode in saliva and have to be investigated to establish their safety. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the corrosion behavior of joints joined by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and conventional brazing in specimens made of commercial Ni-Cr alloy in Fusayama artificial saliva at 37°C (pH 2.5 and 5.5). Eighteen Ni-Cr base metal specimens were cast and welded by brazing or tungsten inert gas methods. The specimens were divided into 3 groups (base metal, 2 welded specimens), and the composition and microstructure were qualitatively evaluated. The results of potential corrosion and corrosion current density were analyzed with a 1-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test for pairwise comparisons (α=.05). Base metal and tungsten inert gas welded material showed equivalent results in electrochemical corrosion tests, while the air-torched specimens exhibited low corrosion resistance. The performance was worst at pH 2.5. These results suggest that tungsten inert gas is a suitable welding process for use in dentistry, because the final microstructure does not reduce the corrosion resistance in artificial saliva at 37°C, even in a corrosion-testing medium that facilitates galvanic corrosion processes. Moreover, the corrosion current density of brazed Ni-Cr alloy joints was significantly higher (P<.001) than the base metal and tungsten inert gas welded joints. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Differential study of the bonding characterization of dental porcelain to Ni-Cr alloys].

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Zhan, De-song; Wang, Yan-yan

    2008-10-01

    To study the bonding capability when Ni-Cr porcelain alloy was added with Ti, compound rare earth metals and removed the element of Be. Ni-Cr-Ti porcelain alloys manufactured by Institute of Metal Research of Chinese Academy of Sciences were tested. The test alloys were divided into three groups according to whether containing Be and compound rare earth metals or not. And HI BOND Ni-Cr base-metal alloy was chosen as control. The metal-ceramic specimens were prepared for shear test, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy spectrum analysis. The shear bond strength of the four groups were analyzed. No significant difference were observed among them (P > 0.05). No crackle was found and they were contacted tightly between the porcelain and metal. The composition and contents of the four groups' interfaces were closed. The shear bond strength of the self-made Ni-Cr-Ti porcelain alloys all can satisfy the clinical requirements. Experimental groups containing Ti, compound rare earth metals and removing the element of Be can be used as better recommendation for clinical practice.

  6. [A surface reacted layer study of titanium-zirconium alloy after dental casting].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Guo, T; Li, Z; Li, C

    2000-10-01

    To investigate the influence of the mold temperature on the surface reacted layer of Ti-Zr alloy castings. Ti-Zr alloy was casted into a mold which was made of a zircon (ZrO2.SiO2) for inner coating and a phosphate-bonded material for outer investing with a casting machine (China) designed as vacuum, pressure and centrifuge. At three mold temperatures (room temperature, 300 degrees C, 600 degrees C) the Ti-Zr alloy was casted separately. The surface roughness of the castings was calculated by instrument of smooth finish (China). From the surface to the inner part the Knoop hardness and thickness in reacted layer of Ti-Zr alloy casting was measured. The structure of the surface reacted layer was analysed by SEM. Elemental analyses of the interfacial zone of the casting was made by element line scanning observation. The surface roughness of the castings was increased significantly with the mold temperature increasing. At a higher mold temperature the Knoop hardness of the reactive layer was increased. At the three mold temperature the outmost surface was very hard, and microhardness data decreased rapidly where they reached constant values. The thickness was about 85 microns for castings at room temperature and 300 degrees C, 105 microns for castings at 600 degrees C. From the SEM micrograph of the Ti-Zr alloy casting, the surface reacted layer could be divided into three different layers. The first layer was called non-structure layer, which thickness was about 10 microns for room temperature group, 20 microns for 300 degrees C and 25 microns for 600 degrees C. The second layer was characterized by coarse-grained acicular crystal, which thickness was about 50 microns for three mold temperatures. The third layer was Ti-Zr alloy. The element line scanning showed non-structure layer with higher level of element of O, Al, Si and Zr, The higher the mold temperature during casting, the deeper the Si permeating and in the second layer the element Si could also be found

  7. In vitro biocompatibility and electrical stability of thick-film platinum/gold alloy electrodes printed on alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnicer-Lombarte, Alejandro; Lancashire, Henry T.; Vanhoestenberghe, Anne

    2017-06-01

    Objective. High-density electrode arrays are a powerful tool in both clinical neuroscience and basic research. However, current manufacturing techniques require the use of specialised techniques and equipment, which are available to few labs. We have developed a high-density electrode array with customisable design, manufactured using simple printing techniques and with commercially available materials. Approach. Electrode arrays were manufactured by thick-film printing a platinum-gold alloy (Pt/Au) and an insulating dielectric on 96% alumina ceramic plates. Arrays were conditioned in serum and serum-free conditions, with and without 1 kHz, 200 µA, charge balanced stimulation for up to 21 d. Array biocompatibility was assessed using an extract assay and a PC-12 cell contact assay. Electrode impedance, charge storage capacity and charge injection capacity were before and after array conditioning. Main results. The manufactured Pt/Au electrodes have a highly porous surface and exhibit electrical properties comparable to arrays manufactured using alternative techniques. Materials used in array manufacture were found to be non-toxic to L929 fibroblasts by extract assay, and neuronal-like PC-12 cells adhered and extended neurites on the array surfaces. Arrays remained functional after long-term delivery of electrical pulses while exposed to protein-rich environments. Charge storage capacities and charge injection capacities increased following stimulation accounted for by an increase in surface index (real surface area) observed by vertical scanning interferometry. Further, we observed accumulation of proteins at the electrode sites following conditioning in the presence of serum. Significance. This study demonstrates the in vitro biocompatibility of commercially available thick-film printing materials. The printing technique is both simple and versatile, with layouts readily modified to produce customized electrode arrays. Thick-film electrode arrays are an

  8. Corrosion Analysis of an Experimental Noble Alloy on Commercially Pure Titanium Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bortagaray, Manuel Alberto; Ibañez, Claudio Arturo Antonio; Ibañez, Maria Constanza; Ibañez, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the Noble Bond® Argen® alloy was electrochemically suitable for the manufacturing of prosthetic superstructures over commercially pure titanium (c.p. Ti) implants. Also, the electrolytic corrosion effects over three types of materials used on prosthetic suprastructures that were coupled with titanium implants were analysed: Noble Bond® (Argen®), Argelite 76sf +® (Argen®), and commercially pure titanium. Materials and Methods: 15 samples were studied, consisting in 1 abutment and one c.p. titanium implant each. They were divided into three groups, namely: Control group: five c.p Titanium abutments (B&W®), Test group 1: five Noble Bond® (Argen®) cast abutments and, Test group 2: five Argelite 76sf +® (Argen®) abutments. In order to observe the corrosion effects, the surface topography was imaged using a confocal microscope. Thus, three metric parameters (Sa: Arithmetical mean height of the surface. Sp: Maximum height of peaks. Sv: Maximum height of valleys.), were measured at three different areas: abutment neck, implant neck and implant body. The samples were immersed in artificial saliva for 3 months, after which the procedure was repeated. The metric parameters were compared by statistical analysis. Results: The analysis of the Sa at the level of the implant neck, abutment neck and implant body, showed no statistically significant differences on combining c.p. Ti implants with the three studied alloys. The Sp showed no statistically significant differences between the three alloys. The Sv showed no statistically significant differences between the three alloys. Conclusion: The effects of electrogalvanic corrosion on each of the materials used when they were in contact with c.p. Ti showed no statistically significant differences. PMID:27733875

  9. Accuracy of Teledentistry for Diagnosing Dental Pathology Using Direct Examination as a Gold Standard: Results of the Tel-e-dent Study of Older Adults Living in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Queyroux, Alain; Saricassapian, Bernard; Herzog, Daniel; Müller, Karin; Herafa, Isabelle; Ducoux, Dorothée; Marin, Benoît; Dantoine, Thierry; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Tchalla, Achille

    2017-06-01

    Dental neglect and high levels of unmet dental needs are becoming increasingly prevalent among elderly residents of long-term care facilities, although frail, elderly, and dependent populations are the most in need of professional dental care. Little is known about the validity of teledentistry for diagnosing dental pathology in nursing home residents. To evaluate the accuracy of teledentistry for diagnosing dental pathology, assessing the rehabilitation status of dental prostheses, and evaluating the chewing ability of older adults living in nursing homes (using direct examination as a gold standard). Multicenter diagnostic accuracy study performed in France and Germany. Eight nursing homes in France and Germany. Nursing home residents with oral or dental complaints, self-reported or reported by caregivers, willing to receive oral or dental preventive care. In total, 235 patients were examined. The mean age was 84.4 ± 8.3 years, and 59.1% of the subjects were female. The patients were examined twice. Each patient was his or her own control. First, the dental surgeon established a diagnosis by reviewing a video recorded in the nursing home and accessed remotely. Second, within a maximum of 7 days, patients were examined conventionally (face-to-face) by the same surgeon who established the initial diagnosis. All residents received a comprehensive clinical examination in their home by a trained geriatrician and underwent a dental hygiene evaluation that used the Silness-Loe and Greene-Vermillion dental hygiene assessment indices. The diagnoses established via the video recording and in the face-to-face setting were compared. The main outcome measure was number of dental pathologies. In total, 128 (55.4%) patients had a dental pathology. The sensitivity of teledentistry for diagnosing dental pathology was 93.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 90.7-96.9), and the specificity was 94.2% (95% CI 91.2-97.2). Among the 128 cases of dental pathology identified by

  10. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam material...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam material...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam material...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam material...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam material...

  15. Numerical assessment of bone remodeling around conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants.

    PubMed

    Akça, Kıvanç; Eser, Atılım; Çavuşoğlu, Yeliz; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Çehreli, Murat Cavit

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants by three-dimensional finite element stress analysis. Three-dimensional model of a dental implant was created and a thread area was established as a region of interest in trabecular bone to study a localized part of the global model with a refined mesh. The peri-implant tissues around conventionally loaded (model 1) and early loaded (model 2) implants were implemented and were used to explore principal stresses, displacement values, and equivalent strains in the peri-implant region of titanium and titanium-zirconium implants under static load of 300 N with or without 30° inclination applied on top of the abutment surface. Under axial loading, principal stresses in both models were comparable for both implants and models. Under oblique loading, principal stresses around titanium-zirconium implants were slightly higher in both models. Comparable stress magnitudes were observed in both models. The displacement values and equivalent strain amplitudes around both implants and models were similar. Peri-implant bone around titanium and titanium-zirconium implants experiences similar stress magnitudes coupled with intraosseous implant displacement values under conventional loading and early loading simulations. Titanium-zirconium implants have biomechanical outcome comparable to conventional titanium implants under conventional loading and early loading.

  16. THE ELECTROCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF FOUR DENTAL CASTING SUPRASTRUCTURE ALLOYS COUPLED WITH TITANIUM IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Suleyman Hakan; Pekmez, Nuran Ozcícek; Keyf, Filiz; Canlí, Fulya

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: As the choice of suprastructure alloy to be combined with titanium for the oral cavity is still a much debated issue, the aim of this study was to investigate the electrochemical interaction of the suprastructure/implant couples under the determined experiment conditions. Material and Methods: The potentiodynamic polarization curves and open-circuit potentials (OCP) of four UCLA type suprastructures coupled with straight Swiss Plus implant fixtures were taken in Afnor type artificial saliva solution at 37°C. The concentration of ions leached into artificial saliva solutions was estimated with ICP-MS. SEM images of the margins of suprastructure/implant couples were obtained before and after the electrochemical tests. Results: The OCP value of titanium became passive at the most negative potential. The lowest difference between the initial and constant OCP value was exhibited by the Au based suprastructure. Suprastructures made greater contributions to the potentiodynamic polarization curves of the implant/suprastructure couples. According to the ICP-MS results, Pd based and Au based couples dissolved less than Co-Ni based and Co-Cr based couples. Conclusions: Within the conditions this study, it may be concluded that the titanium implant forms a stable passive oxide layer in artificial saliva exposed to open air and does not affect the corrosion properties of the suprastructures. Pd based and Au based couples have been found to be more corrosion-resistant than base alloy couples. PMID:19936528

  17. Probing Interfacial Friction and Dissipation in Granular Gold­ Nickel Alloys with a Quartz Crystal Oscillator in an External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, K. M.; Krim, J.

    2015-03-01

    We present here a quartz crystal microbalance study of two-phase gold nickel alloys whose internal granular properties are probed by exposure to a fluctuating external magnetic field. The work is motivated by prior studies demonstrating that granular two-phase materials exhibited lower friction and wear than solid solution alloys with identical compositions. In particular, we report a ``flexing'' effect which appears when an external magnetic field is applied, and is manifested as a decrease in the magnitude of oscillation amplitude that is synchronized with the applied field; the effect is not seen on the complimentary solid solution samples. The effect is consistent with internal interfacial friction between nickel and gold grains, indicating a degree of freedom which may decrease friction even in the absence of an external magnetic field. This is supported through analysis of energy dissipation in the system, using the Butterworth­-Van Dyke equivalent circuit model. Data and interpretation are also presented that rule out alternate explanations such as giant magnetoresistance and/or other resistive phenomenon within the film. Funding provided by NSF DMR0805204. Thanks to L. Pan for sample preparation.

  18. Enhancement of wear and corrosion resistance of low modulus β-type Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3) dental alloys through thermal oxidation treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Gan, Xiaxia; Tang, Hongqun; Zhan, Yongzhong

    2017-07-01

    In order to obtain material with low elastic modulus, good abrasion resistance and high corrosion stability as screw for dental implant, the biomedical Zr-20Nb and Zr-20Nb-3Ti alloy with low elastic modulus were thermal oxidized respectively at 700°C for 1h and 600°C for 1.25h to obtain the compact oxidized layer to improve its wear resistance and corrosion resistance. The results show that smooth compact oxidized layer (composed of monoclinic ZrO 2 , tetragonal ZrO 2 and 6ZrO 2 -Nb 2 O 5 ) with 22.6μm-43.5μm thickness and 1252-1306HV hardness can be in-situ formed on the surface of the Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3). The adhesion of oxidized layers to the substrates is determined to be 58.35-66.25N. The oxidized Zr-20Nb-xTi alloys reveal great improvement of the pitting corrosion resistance in comparison with the un-oxidized alloys. In addition, the oxidized Zr-20Nb-3Ti exhibits sharply reduction of the corrosion rates and the oxidized Zr-20Nb shows higher corrosion rates than un-oxidized alloys, which is relevant with the content of the t-ZrO 2 . Wear test in artificial saliva demonstrates that the wear losses of the oxidized Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3) are superior to pure Ti. All of the un-oxidized Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3) alloys suffer from serious adhesive wear due to its high plasticity. Because of the protection from compact oxide layer with high adhesion and high hardness, the coefficients of friction and wear losses of the oxidized Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3) alloys decrease 50% and 95%, respectively. The defects on the oxidized Zr-20Nb have a negative effect on the friction and wear properties. In addition, after the thermal oxidation, compression test show that elastic modulus and strength of Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3) increase slightly with plastic deformation after 40% of transformation. Furthermore, stripping of the oxidized layer from the alloy matrix did not occur during the whole experiments. As the surface oxidized Zr-20Nb-3Ti alloy has a combination of excellent performance

  19. [The study of the colorimetric characteristics of the cobalt-chrome alloys abutments covered by four different all-ceramic crowns by using dental spectrophotometer].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifan; Liu, Hongchun; Meng, Yukun; Chao, Yonglie; Liu, Changhong

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the optical data of the different sites of the cobalt-chrome (Co-Cr) alloy abutments covered by four different all-ceramic crowns and the color difference between the crowns and target tab using a digital dental spectrophotometer. Ten Co-Cr alloy abutments were made and tried in four different groups of all-ceramic crowns, namely, Procera aluminia, Procera zirconia, Lava zirconia (Lava-Zir), and IPS E.max glass-ceramic lithium disilicate-reinforced monolithic. The color data of the cervical, body, and incisal sites of the samples were recorded and analyzed by dental spectrophotometer. The CIE L*, a*, b* values were again measured after veneering. The color difference between the abutments covered by all-ceramic crowns and A2 dentine shade tab was evaluated. The L* and b* values of the abutments can be increased by all of the four groups of all-ceramic copings, but a* values were decreased in most groups. A statistical difference was observed among four groups. After being veneered, the L* values of all the copings declined slightly, and the values of a*, b* increased significantly. When compared with A2 dentine shade tab, the ΔE of the crowns was below 4. Four ceramic copings were demonstrated to promote the lightness and hue of the alloy abutments effecttively. Though the colorimetric baseline of these copings was uneven, veneer porcelain can efficiently decrease the color difference between the samples and thee target.

  20. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1963-02-26

    A brazing alloy which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability, said alloy being capable of forming a corrosion resistant brazed joint wherein at least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion resistant refractory metal, said alloy consisting essentially of 20 to 50 per cent by weight of gold, 20 to 50 per cent by weight of nickel, and 15 to 45 per cent by weight of molybdenum. (AEC)

  1. New Ti-Alloys and Surface Modifications to Improve the Mechanical Properties and the Biological Response to Orthopedic and Dental Implants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kirmanidou, Yvoni; Sidira, Margarita; Drosou, Maria-Eleni; Bennani, Vincent; Bakopoulou, Athina; Tsouknidas, Alexander; Michailidis, Nikolaos; Michalakis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Titanium implants are widely used in the orthopedic and dentistry fields for many decades, for joint arthroplasties, spinal and maxillofacial reconstructions, and dental prostheses. However, despite the quite satisfactory survival rates failures still exist. New Ti-alloys and surface treatments have been developed, in an attempt to overcome those failures. This review provides information about new Ti-alloys that provide better mechanical properties to the implants, such as superelasticity, mechanical strength, and corrosion resistance. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo studies, which investigate the biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of these new biomaterials, are introduced. In addition, data regarding the bioactivity of new surface treatments and surface topographies on Ti-implants is provided. The aim of this paper is to discuss the current trends, advantages, and disadvantages of new titanium-based biomaterials, fabricated to enhance the quality of life of many patients around the world. PMID:26885506

  2. Fatigue Life of Titanium Alloys Fabricated by Additive Layer Manufacturing Techniques for Dental Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.; Koike, Marie; Mason, Robert L.; Okabe, Toru

    2013-02-01

    Additive layer deposition techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM) and laser beam melting (LBM) have been utilized to fabricate rectangular plates of Ti-6Al-4V with extra low interstitial (ELI) contents. The layer-by-layer deposition techniques resulted in plates that have different surface finishes which can impact significantly on the fatigue life by providing potential sites for fatigue cracks to initiate. The fatigue life of Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloys fabricated by EBM and LBM deposition techniques was investigated by three-point testing of rectangular beams of as-fabricated and electro-discharge machined surfaces under stress-controlled conditions at 10 Hz until complete fracture. Fatigue life tests were also performed on rolled plates of Ti-6Al-4V ELI, regular Ti-6Al-4V, and CP Ti as controls. Fatigue surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy to identify the crack initiation site in the various types of specimen surfaces. The fatigue life data were analyzed statistically using both analysis of variance techniques and the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis method with the Gehan-Breslow test. The results indicate that the LBM Ti-6Al-4V ELI material exhibits a longer fatigue life than the EBM counterpart and CP Ti, but a shorter fatigue life compared to rolled Ti-6Al-4V ELI. The difference in the fatigue life behavior may be largely attributed to the presence of rough surface features that act as fatigue crack initiation sites in the EBM material.

  3. Microstructural analyses of two high noble gold-platinum alloys before and after conditioning in a cell culture medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, R.; Anzel, I.; Gusel, L.; Stamenkovi, D.; Todorovi, A.; Colic, M.

    2010-12-01

    Microstructures of two high noble experimental Au-Pt alloys were compared before and after conditioning for biocompatibility, in order to identify phases and microelements responsible for the alloys' corrosive behaviour. Microstructural characterization was carried-out by optical and scanning electron microscopy, in addition to energy dispersive X-ray analysis. X-ray diffraction was applied to determine the phases' composition and their contribution in the alloys. Additionally, simultaneous thermal analysis was used to identify the temperatures of phase transformations. An overall assessment before conditioning showed that Au-Pt I is a two-phase alloy containing a dominant Au-rich α1 phase and a minor Pt-rich α2 phase, while the Au-Pt II alloy contains in addition three minor phases: AuZn3, Pt3Zn and Au1.4Zn0.52. The highest content of Zn (up to 6.76 wt.%) was detected in the Pt3Zn phase. After RPMI cell culture medium conditioning, the Pt3Zn and AuZn3 phases disappeared, suggesting that they are predominantly responsible for Zn loss and the lower corrosive stability of the Au-Pt II alloy.

  4. Electrochemiluminescence based competitive immunoassay for Sudan I by using gold-functionalized graphitic carbon nitride and Au/Cu alloy nanoflowers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wanlu; Yao, Xun; Zhou, Xinchun; Zhao, Kang; Deng, Anping; Li, Jianguo

    2018-05-01

    A flower-like Au/Cu alloy nanocomposite (Au/Cu NFs) was synthesized and used in an electrochemiluminescence (ECL) based method for sensitive determination of the dye Sudan I. The Au-g-C 3 N 4 nanosheets as an ECL emitter were prepared by electrostatic adsorption between gold nanoparticles and g-C 3 N 4 . They form a film on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and then can be connected with Sudan I antigen via gold-nitrogen bond and amidation reactions. The Au/Cu NFs combined with Sudan I antibody also via the Au-N bond and was introduced into the modified GCE by specific recognition between the antibody and the antigen. The overlap between emission spectra of the Au-g-C 3 N 4 nanosheets and absorption spectra of Au/Cu NFs enabled the appearance of ECL resonance energy transfer process. That is, when the Sudan I analyte not present, the ECL was weakened due to absorption by the gray Au/Cu NFs on applying voltages from -1.7 V to 0 V. Conversely, the Au/Cu NFs on the GCE are reduced due to the competition for the antibody between the analyte and the antigen. A strong green ECL emission was obtained. The ECL response is linear in the 0.5 pg mL -1 to 100 ng mL -1 Sudan I concentration range, and the detection limit is 0.17 pg mL -1 . Graphical abstract An Au/Cu alloy flower-like nanocomposite (Au/Cu NFs) is firstly synthesized as an acceptor to constitute an electrochemiluminescence-resonance energy transfer (ECL-RET) system for sensitive measurement of Sudan I, while Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) functionalized graphitic carbon nitride (g-C 3 N 4 ) acted as a donor.

  5. Au-Pt alloy nanoparticles obtained by nanosecond laser irradiation of gold and platinum bulk targets in an ethylene glycol solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniri, Samira; Reza Hantehzadeh, Mohammad; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Asadi Asadabad, Mohsen

    2017-07-01

    Au-Pt alloy nanoparticles (NPs) of different compositions ( Au0Pt100 , Au30Pt70 , Au50Pt50 , Au70Pt30 , and Au100Pt0 were obtained using the nanosecond laser ablation of gold and platinum bulk targets in ethylene glycol, followed by mixing highly monodisperse Au and Pt nanocolloids, for the first time. UV-vis absorption spectra of NPs showed that by increasing the Au content in the Au-Pt NPs, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak red-shifted, from 260 to 573nm in a nonlinear way. In addition, the mean crystalline size, crystal structure, d-spacing, and lattice parameters of NPs were estimated from the XRD spectra. Microscopy studies revealed the most NPs have a spherical or near-spherical shape, and the average sizes of Au0Pt100 , Au30Pt70 , Au50Pt50 , Au70Pt30 , and Au100Pt0 NPs were calculated to be 12.50, 14.15, 18.53, 19.29, and 26.38nm, respectively. Also, the chemical identity of the molecules adhering to the NPs surface was considered by Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy techniques. Among different synthesis methods, the demonstrated technique allows easy synthesis of alloy NPs in aqueous media at room temperature with no formation of by-products.

  6. Lead-Sulfide-Selenide Quantum Dots and Gold-Copper Alloy Nanoparticles Augment the Light-Harvesting Ability of Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Aparajita; Deepa, Melepurath; Ghosal, Partha

    2017-04-05

    Lead-sulfide-selenide (PbSSe) quantum dots (QDs) and gold-copper (AuCu) alloy nanoparticles (NPs) were incorporated into a cadmium sulfide (CdS)/titanium oxide (TiO 2 ) photoanode for the first time to achieve enhanced conversion of solar energy into electricity. PbSSe QDs with a band gap of 1.02 eV extend the light-harvesting range of the photoanode from the visible region to the near-infrared region. The conduction band (CB) edge of the PbSSe QDs is wedged between the CBs of TiO 2 and CdS; this additional level coupled with the good electrical conductivity of the dots facilitate charge transport and collection, and a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.44 % is achieved for the champion cell with the TiO 2 /PbSSe/CdS electrode. Upon including AuCu alloy NPs in the QD-sensitized electrodes, light absorption is enhance by plasmonic and light-scattering effects and also by the injection of hot electrons to the CBs of the QDs. Comparison of the incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency enhancement factors in addition to fluorescence decay and impedance studies reveal that the PbSSe QDs and AuCu alloy NPs promote charge injection to the current collector and increase the photogenerated charges produced, which thus enables the TiO 2 /PbSSe/CdS/AuCu cell to deliver the highest PCE of 5.26 % among all the various photoanode compositions used. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. [Determination of the dynamic levels of interleukin-8 in gingival crevicular fluid of porcelain teeth with three different alloys].

    PubMed

    Xu, Weixing; Su, Jiansheng

    2012-06-01

    To study the interleukin-8 (IL-8) levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of porcelain teeth coated with Ni-Cr, Co-Cr or gold alloy at different time periods, and to uncover the degree of stimulation by these alloys on gingiva at different time periods. 45 cases of porcelain teeth coated with Ni-Cr, Co-Cr or gold alloy were selected randomly, with 15 cases in each group. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine the concentration and total amount of IL-8 in GCF. The assay was done before treatment, as well as at 1, 3 and 6 months post-treatment. The total amounts of IL-8 and GCF volume in the Ni-Cr alloy coated porcelain teeth were higher in different time period than those before treatment (P<0.05). However, the IL-8 levels in Co-Cr and gold alloy coated porcelain teeth returned to pre-dental restoration after 3 months. Otherwise, the levels of IL-8 concentration in GCF showed no significant difference among the three different alloys coating at different time periods. IL-8 is an important cytokine during tissue inflammation. Therefore, the level of IL-8 in GCF is a useful criteria for the evaluation of stimulation degree on gingiva by different alloy coating materials in porcelain teeth. The clinical choice of different alloy coating for porcelain teeth should be considered accordingly.

  8. Glossary of Dental Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... More print this article enlarge text Glossary of Dental Terms Oral Health Defined Amalgam silver/mercury alloy ... to fill cavities | More Bleaching cosmetic whitening of teeth using peroxide | More Caries cavities, tooth decay | More ...

  9. Prevalence and distribution of dental restorative materials in US Air Force veterans.

    PubMed

    Albertini, T F; Kingman, A; Brown, L J

    1997-01-01

    Millions of restorative procedures are performed annually in the United States, yet very little is known about their distribution in the general population. With increasing concern about potential adverse health effects of some restorative materials, a better understanding of the extent of exposure to these materials in the population is important. The purpose of this study is to report the prevalence, patterns, and distribution of dental restorative materials in a population of male veterans. This collaborative study with the US Air Force examined 1,166 male veterans to assess exposure to dental amalgam and other restorative materials. An inventory of dental materials in the study population was obtained through oral examinations. Dental materials were classified into five categories: (1) amalgam; (2) resin; (3) porcelain, cement, or temporary, including ionomer (PCT); (4) cast gold alloys/direct filling gold; and (5) other metals (OM). The mean age of the study participants was 52.9 years. Over 94 percent of the study participants were dentate. The study participants averaged 45.8 restored/replaced surfaces. Restored/replaced surfaces increased with age while the number of teeth decreased with age. The most frequently used restorative material was amalgam, averaging 19.89 surfaces per subject, followed by PCT (9.38), resins (8.99), OM (5.52), and gold (4.91). The distributions of restorative materials varied by age, arch type, and location in the mouth. The study population experienced substantial exposure to dental materials.

  10. Wide-range tuning of the surface plasmon resonance of silver/gold core shell and alloyed nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubenthal, Frank; Ziegler, Torsten; Hendrich, Christian; Träger, Frank

    2004-03-01

    For many applications like surface enhanced Raman scattering in which the optical field enhancement associated with surface plasmon excitation is exploited, tunability of this collective resonance over a wide range is required. For this purpose we have prepared Ag/Au core shell and Ag/Au alloyed nanoparticles with different shell thicknesses and different percentages of the two metals. The nanoparticles were made by subsequent deposition of Ag and Au atoms on dielectric substrates followed by diffusion and nucleation or heat treatment. Depending on the Au shell thickness the plasmon frequency can be tuned, e.g. from 2.8 eV (442 nm) to 2.1 eV (590 nm). Annealing of the core-shell nanoparticles causes a shift of the resonance frequency to 2.6 eV. Theoretical modelling allows us to attribute this observation to the production of alloyed nanoparticles. Possible application of the Ag/Au nanoparticles will be discussed.

  11. Monodisperse gold-palladium alloy nanoparticles and their composition-controlled catalysis in formic acid dehydrogenation under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Metin, Önder; Sun, Xiaolian; Sun, Shouheng

    2013-02-07

    Monodisperse 4 nm AuPd alloy nanoparticles with controlled composition were synthesized by co-reduction of hydrogen tetrachloroaurate(III) hydrate and palladium(II) acetylacetonate with a borane-morpholine complex in oleylamine. These NPs showed high activity (TOF = 230 h(-1)) and stability in catalyzing formic acid dehydrogenation and hydrogen production in water at 50 °C without any additives.

  12. Gold in minerals and the composition of native gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Robert Sprague; Fleischer, Michael

    1969-01-01

    Gold occurs in nature mainly as the metal and as various alloys. It forms complete series of solid solutions with silver, copper, nickel, palladium, and platinum. In association with the platinum metals, gold occurs as free gold as well as in solid solution. The native elements contain the most gold, followed by the sulfide minerals. Several gold tellurides are known, but no gold selenides have been reported, and only one sulfide, the telluride-sulfide mineral nagyagite, is known. The nonmetallic minerals carry the least gold, and the light-colored minerals generally contain less gold than the dark minerals. Some conclusions in the literature are conflicting in regard to the relation of fineness of native gold to its position laterally and vertically within a lode, the nature of the country rocks, and the location and size of nuggets in a streambed, as well as to the variation of fineness within an individual nugget.

  13. Electrum, the Gold-Silver Alloy, from the Bulk Scale to the Nanoscale: Synthesis, Properties, and Segregation Rules.

    PubMed

    Guisbiers, Grégory; Mendoza-Cruz, Rubén; Bazán-Díaz, Lourdes; Velázquez-Salazar, J Jesús; Mendoza-Perez, Rafael; Robledo-Torres, José Antonio; Rodriguez-Lopez, José-Luis; Montejano-Carrizales, Juan Martín; Whetten, Robert L; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2016-01-26

    The alloy Au-Ag system is an important noble bimetallic phase, both historically (as "Electrum") and now especially in nanotechnology, as it is applied in catalysis and nanomedicine. To comprehend the structural characteristics and the thermodynamic stability of this alloy, a knowledge of its phase diagram is required that considers explicitly its size and shape (morphology) dependence. However, as the experimental determination remains quite challenging at the nanoscale, theoretical guidance can provide significant advantages. Using a regular solution model within a nanothermodynamic approach to evaluate the size effect on all the parameters (melting temperature, melting enthalpy, and interaction parameters in both phases), the nanophase diagram is predicted. Besides an overall shift downward, there is a "tilting" effect on the solidus-liquidus curves for some particular shapes exposing the (100) and (110) facets (cube, rhombic dodecahedron, and cuboctahedron). The segregation calculation reveals the preferential presence of silver at the surface for all the polyhedral shapes considered, in excellent agreement with the latest transmission electron microscopy observations and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. By reviewing the nature of the surface segregated element of different bimetallic nanoalloys, two surface segregation rules, based on the melting temperatures and surface energies, are deduced. Finally, the optical properties of Au-Ag nanoparticles, calculated within the discrete dipole approximation, show the control that can be achieved in the tuning of the local surface plasmon resonance, depending of the alloy content, the chemical ordering, the morphology, the size of the nanoparticle, and the nature of the surrounding environment.

  14. Effect of surface reaction layer on grindability of cast titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Hosoi, Toshio; Ford, J Phillip; Watanabe, Ikuya

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the cast surface reaction layer on the grindability of titanium alloys, including free-machining titanium alloy (DT2F), and to compare the results with the grindability of two dental casting alloys (gold and Co-Cr). All titanium specimens (pure Ti, Ti-6Al-4V and DT2F) were cast using a centrifugal casting machine in magnesia-based investment molds. Two specimen sizes were used to cast the titanium metals so that the larger castings would be the same size as the smaller gold and Co-Cr alloy specimens after removal of the surface reaction layer (alpha-case). Grindability was measured as volume loss ground from a specimen for 1 min using a handpiece engine with a SiC abrasive wheel at 0.1 kgf and four circumferential wheel speeds. For the titanium and gold alloys, grindability increased as the rotational speed increased. There was no statistical difference (p>0.05) in grindability for all titanium specimens either with or without the alpha-case. Of the titanium metals tested, Ti-6 Al-4V had the greatest grindability at higher speeds, followed by DT2F and CP Ti. The grindability of the gold alloy was similar to that of Ti-6 Al-4V, whereas the Co-Cr alloy had the lowest grindability. The results of this study indicated that the alpha-case did not significantly affect the grindability of the titanium alloys. The free-machining titanium alloy had improved grindability compared to CP Ti.

  15. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1962-02-20

    A brazing alloy is described which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability and is capable of forming a corrosion-resistant brazed joint. At least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion-resistant refractory metal. The brazing alloy consists essentially of 40 to 90 wt % of gold, 5 to 35 wt% of nickel, and 1 to 45 wt% of tantalum. (AEC)

  16. Machinability of an experimental Ti-Ag alloy in terms of tool life in a dental CAD/CAM system.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Ryoichi; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Takada, Yukyo; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Titanium is difficult to machine because of its intrinsic properties. In a previous study, the machinability of titanium was improved by alloying with silver. This study aimed to evaluate the durability of tungsten carbide burs after the fabrication of frameworks using a Ti-20%Ag alloy and titanium with a computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing system. There was a significant difference in attrition area ratio between the two metals. Compared with titanium, the ratio of the area of attrition of machining burs was significantly lower for the experimental Ti-20%Ag alloy. The difference in the area of attrition for titanium and Ti-20%Ag became remarkable with increasing number of machining operations. The results show that the same burs can be used for a longer time with Ti-20%Ag than with pure titanium. Therefore, in terms of tool life, the machinability of the Ti-20%Ag alloy is superior to that of titanium.

  17. Ceramic Defects in Metal-Ceramic Fixed Dental Prostheses Made from Co-Cr and Au-Pt Alloys: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Mikeli, Aikaterini; Boening, Klaus W; Lißke, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic defects in porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) restorations may depend on framework alloy type. This study assessed ceramic defects on cobalt-chromium- (Co-Cr-) and gold-platinum- (Au-Pt-) based PFM restorations. In this study, 147 Co-Cr-based and 168 Au-Pt-based PFM restorations inserted between 1998 and 2010 (139 patients) were examined for ceramic defects. Detected defects were assigned to three groups according to clinical defect relevance. Ceramic defect rates (Co-Cr-based: 12.9%; Au-Pt-based: 7.2%) revealed no significant difference but a strong statistical trend (U test, P = .082). Most defects were of little clinical relevance. Co-Cr PFM restorations may be at higher risk for ceramic defects compared to Au-Pt-based restorations.

  18. A Dental Prosthesis from the Early Modern Age in Tuscany (Italy).

    PubMed

    Minozzi, Simona; Panetta, Daniele; De Sanctis, Massimo; Giuffra, Valentina

    2017-04-01

    During archaeological excavation, carried out in the S. Francesco Monastery at Lucca (Tuscany, Italy), a golden dental appliance was discovered. The prosthesis was found, together with commingled human remains, in the collective tomb of the aristocratic family of the Guinigi, a powerful family who governed Lucca from 1392 until 1429. The exact archaeological dating of the prosthesis was not possible, but some elements suggest a dating to the beginning of the 17th century. Aim of the paper is to study and describe the dental appliance trough a multidisciplinary approach. Macroscopical and micro-CT examinations were performed to investigate the technics used for the realization of the dental prosthesis. SEM analysis was performed to study alloy composition of the metallic fixing lamina and microstructure of the deposits on the dental surface. The dental prosthesis consists in five mandibular teeth: three central incisors and two lateral canines linked together by a golden band inserted into the dental roots to replace the anterior arch of the jaw. Micro-CT scan revealed the presence of two small golden pins inserted into each tooth crossing the root and fixing the teeth to the internal gold band. SEM examination of the lamina indicated a homogeneous composition, with average contents of 73 wt% gold, 15.6 wt% Ag, and 11.4 wt% Cu. Apposition of dental calculus on the teeth indicated that the prosthesis had been worn for a long period. This dental prosthesis provides a unique finding of technologically advanced dentistry in this period. In fact, during the Early Modern Age, some authors described gold band technology for the replacement of missing teeth; nevertheless, no direct evidences of these devices have been brought to light up so far. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Co-Cr Dental Alloys Fabricated by Three CAD/CAM-Based Processing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae Ri; Jang, Seong-Ho; Kim, Young Kyung; Son, Jun Sik; Min, Bong Ki; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2016-01-01

    The microstructures and mechanical properties of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys produced by three CAD/CAM-based processing techniques were investigated in comparison with those produced by the traditional casting technique. Four groups of disc- (microstructures) or dumbbell- (mechanical properties) specimens made of Co-Cr alloys were prepared using casting (CS), milling (ML), selective laser melting (SLM), and milling/post-sintering (ML/PS). For each technique, the corresponding commercial alloy material was used. The microstructures of the specimens were evaluated via X-ray diffractometry, optical and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and electron backscattered diffraction pattern analysis. The mechanical properties were evaluated using a tensile test according to ISO 22674 (n = 6). The microstructure of the alloys was strongly influenced by the manufacturing processes. Overall, the SLM group showed superior mechanical properties, the ML/PS group being nearly comparable. The mechanical properties of the ML group were inferior to those of the CS group. The microstructures and mechanical properties of Co-Cr alloys were greatly dependent on the manufacturing technique as well as the chemical composition. The SLM and ML/PS techniques may be considered promising alternatives to the Co-Cr alloy casting process. PMID:28773718

  20. SU-F-T-426: Measurement of Dose Enhancement Due to Backscatter From Modern Dental Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hurwitz, M; Margalit, D; Williams, C

    Purpose: High-density materials used in dental restoration can cause significant localized dose enhancement due to electron backscatter in head-and-neck radiotherapy, increasing the risk of mucositis. The materials used in prosthetic dentistry have evolved in the last decades from metal alloys to ceramics. We aim to determine the dose enhancement caused by backscatter from currently-used dental materials. Methods: Measurements were performed for three different dental materials: lithium disilicate (Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}), zirconium dioxide (ZrO{sub 2}), and gold alloy. Small thin squares (2×2×0.15 cm{sup 3}) of the material were fabricated, and placed into a phantom composed of tissue-equivalent material. The phantommore » was irradiated with a single 6 MV photon field. A thin-window parallel-plate ion chamber was used to measure the dose at varying distances from the proximal interface between the material and the plastic. Results: The dose enhancement at the interface between the high-density and tissue-equivalent materials, relative to a homogeneous phantom, was 54% for the gold alloy, 31% for ZrO{sub 2}, and 9% for Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}. This enhancement decreased rapidly with distance from the interface, falling to 11%, 5%, and 0.5%, respectively, 2 mm from the interface. Comparisons with the modeling of this effect in treatment planning systems are performed. Conclusion: While dose enhancement due to dental restoration is smaller with ceramic materials than with metal alloys, it can still be significant. A spacer of about 2–3 mm would be effective in reducing this enhancement, even for metal alloys.« less

  1. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal... “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Dental Noble Metal Alloys.” The devices are exempt from the...

  2. The effect of moisture on the shear bond strength of gold alloy rods bonded to enamel with a self-adhesive and a hydrophobic resin cement.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Elisabeth; Wiechmann, Dirk; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of enamel moisture on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a hydrophobic resin cement, Maximum Cure (MC), and a self-adhesive resin cement, Multilink Sprint (MLS), after etching of the enamel. Forty cylindrical gold alloy rods were used to simulate the Incognito lingual bracket system. They were bonded to the enamel of 40 human teeth embedded in self-cured acrylic resin. Twenty were bonded with MC (10 on dry and 10 on wet enamel) and 20 with MLS (10 on dry and 10 on wet enamel). The SBS of MC and MLS was determined in a universal testing machine and the site of bond failure was defined by the adhesive remnant index (ARI). A Kruskal-Wallis test was performed followed by Games-Howell post hoc pairwise comparison tests on the SBS results (P < 0.05) and a chi-square test was used for the analysis of ARI scores (P < 0.05). On dry enamel, no significant differences between MC (58 +/- 5 MPa) and MLS (64 +/- 13 MPa) were noted. On wet enamel, the adherence of MC (6 +/- 8 MPa) and MLS (37 +/- 13 MPa) significantly decreased but to a lesser extent for MLS. The ARI scores corroborated these results. In conclusion, MC did not tolerate moisture. MLS was also affected but maintained sufficient adherence.

  3. Electrodeposition of gold-platinum alloy nanoparticles on ionic liquid-chitosan composite film and its application in fabricating an amperometric cholesterol biosensor.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Farjami, Fatemeh

    2011-01-15

    An electrodeposition method was applied to form gold-platinum (AuPt) alloy nanoparticles on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with a mixture of an ionic liquid (IL) and chitosan (Ch) (AuPt-Ch-IL/GCE). AuPt nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical methods. AuPt-Ch-IL/GCE electrocatalyzed the reduction of H(2)O(2) and thus was suitable for the preparation of biosensors. Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) was then, immobilized on the surface of the electrode by cross-linking ChOx and chitosan through addition of glutaraldehyde (ChOx/AuPt-Ch-IL/GCE). The fabricated biosensor exhibited two wide linear ranges of responses to cholesterol in the concentration ranges of 0.05-6.2 mM and 6.2-11.2 mM. The sensitivity of the biosensor was 90.7 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) and the limit of detection was 10 μM of cholesterol. The response time was less than 7 s. The Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) was found as 0.24 mM. The effect of the addition of 1 mM ascorbic acid and glucose was tested on the amperometric response of 0.5 mM cholesterol and no change in response current of cholesterol was observed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Not All That Glitters is Gold: Gold Imitations in History.

    PubMed

    Karpenko, Vladimír

    2007-07-01

    When gold became considered as a precious metal for decorative purposes and later for coinage, attempts at producing imitations soon began to appear. There were two motives behind this activity: to make a metal that could pass as gold, and to quite openly imitate this precious metal for people who could not afford true gold. Imitation gold was produced by metallurgists, and later also by alchemists. This paper is about gold imitations that did not contain any precious metal. Gold-like alloys of silver are thus excluded. An attempt is further undertaken to classify into separate groups the various gold imitations that have appeared in different cultures throughout time, with an emphasis on brass as a typical imitation of gold.

  5. Sandblasting and silica-coating of dental alloys: volume loss, morphology and changes in the surface composition.

    PubMed

    Kern, M; Thompson, V P

    1993-05-01

    Silica-coating alloys improves chemo-mechanical bonding. Sandblasting is recommended as pretreatment to thermal silica-coating or as part of a tribochemical silica-coating process. This study evaluated the effects of sandblasting and coating techniques on volume loss, surface morphology and compositional changes in noble (AuAgCu) and base alloys (NiCr and CoCr). Volume loss was statistically significantly higher in the noble as compared to the base alloys but does not seem to be critical for the clinical fit of restorations. Embedded alumina particles were found in all alloys after sandblasting and the alumina content increased to a range of 14 to 37 wt% as measured by EDS. Following tribochemical silica-coating, a layer of small silica particles remained on the surface, increasing the silica content to between 12 and 20 wt%. Ultrasonic cleaning removed loose alumina or silica particles from the surface, resulting in only slight decreases in alumina or silica contents, thus suggesting firm attachment of the major part of alumina and silica to the alloy surface. Clinically, ultrasonic cleaning of sandblasted and tribochemically silica-coated alloys might improve resin bonding as loose surface particles are removed without relevant changes in composition. Silica content following thermal silica-coating treatment increased only slightly from the sandblasted specimen. The silica layer employed by these silica-coating methods differs widely in both morphology and thickness. These results provide a basis for explanation of adhesive failure modes in bond strength tests which will possibly optimize resin bonding. Further research is needed to characterize the outermost surface layers after these treatments and the exact location of adhesive failures.

  6. Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I binding to dental primary afferent projections in the spinal trigeminal complex combined with double immunolabeling of substance P and GABA elements using peroxidase and colloidal gold.

    PubMed

    Matthews, M A; Hoffmann, K D; Hernandez, T V

    1989-01-01

    Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) is a plant lectin with an affinity for L-fucosyl residues in the chains of lactoseries oligosaccharides associated with medium- and smaller-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons and their axonal processes. These enter Lissauer's tract and terminate within the superficial laminae of the spinal cord overlapping projections known to have a nociceptive function. This implies that the surface coatings of neuronal membranes may have a relationship with functional modalities. The present investigation further examined this concept by studying a neuronal projection with a nociceptive function to determine whether fucosyl-lactoseries residues were incorporated in its primary afferent terminals. Transganglionic transport of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) following injection into tooth pulp chambers was employed to demonstrate dental pulp terminals in the trigeminal spinal complex, while peroxidase and fluorescent tags were used concomitantly to stain for UEA-I. Double immunolabeling for substance P (SP) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) using peroxidase and colloidal gold allowed a comparison of the distribution of a known excitatory nociceptive transmitter with that of UEA-I binding in specific subnuclei. Synaptic interrelationships between UEA-I positive dental pulp primary afferent inputs and specific inhibitory terminals were also examined. SP immunoreactivity occurred in laminae I and outer lamina II (IIo) of subnucleus caudalis (Vc) and in the ventrolateral and lateral marginal region of the caudal half of subnucleus interpolaris (Vi), including the periobex area in which Vi is slightly overlapped on its lateral aspect by cellular elements of Vc. The adjacent interstitial nucleus (IN) also showed an intense immunoreactivity for this peptide antibody. UEA-I binding displayed a similar distribution pattern in both Vc and Vi, but extended into lamina IIi and the superficial part of Lamina III in Vc. Dental pulp terminals were found to

  7. Effect of alkaline treatment of pure titanium and its alloys on the bonding strength of dental veneering resins.

    PubMed

    Ban, Seiji

    2003-07-01

    Commercially pure titanium (cpTi), Ti6Al4V, an experimental beta-type titanium (Ti 53.4 wt%, Nb 29 wt %, Ta 13 wt %, and Zr 4.6 wt %), and 12% AuPdAg alloy plates were sandblasted, cleaned in water, and dried. cpTi plates were treated with nine alkaline treatments that differed in the type of alkali, alkaline concentration, soaking temperature, soaking time, and heating temperature. cpTi plates that were only sandblasted or sandblasted and oxidized at 600 degrees C for 1 h in air were also prepared. Finally, the bonding strengths of 11 kinds of surface-treated cpTi to resin were measured using a pull-shear bonding method after immersion in physiologic saline solution at 37 degrees C for 24 h. The bonds of the standard alkaline-treated cpTi and two titanium alloys to resins were 1.5-1.9 times stronger than those of sandblasted specimens (p < 0.01), but no significant effects of the alkaline treatment were observed on the 12% AuPdAg alloy. The greatest bonding strengths were found for cpTi treated with NaOH and KOH and then heated at 600 degrees C (p < 0.01). In conclusion, alkaline treatment is a simple, effective surface modification of titanium that improves bonding to veneering resin. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Stability of cp-Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy for dental implants as a function of saliva pH - an electrochemical study.

    PubMed

    Barão, Valentim A R; Mathew, Mathew T; Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Wimmer, Markus A; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the role of different levels of pH of artificial saliva under simulated oral environment on the corrosion behavior of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Special attention is given to understand the changes in corrosion kinetics and surface characterization of Ti by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Fifty-four Ti disks (15-mm diameter, 2-mm thickness) were divided into six groups (n = 9) as a function of saliva pH (3, 6.5, and 9) and Ti type. Samples were mechanically polished using standard metallographic procedures. Standard electrochemical tests, such as open circuit potential, EIS, and potentiodynamic tests were conducted in a controlled environment. Data were evaluated by two-way ANOVA, Tukey multiple comparison test, and independent t-test (α = 0.05). Ti surfaces were examined using white-light-interferometry microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Saliva pH level significantly affected the corrosion behavior of both Ti types. At low pH, acceleration of ions exchange between Ti and saliva, and reduction of resistance of Ti surface against corrosion were observed (P < 0.05). Corrosion rate was also significantly increased in acidic medium (P < 0.05). Similar corrosion behavior was observed for both Ti types. The white-light-interferometry images of Ti surfaces show higher surface changes at low pH level. SEM images do not show detectable changes. No pitting corrosion was observed for any group. The pH level of artificial saliva influences the corrosion behavior of cp-Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy in that lower pH accelerates the corrosion rate and kinetics. The corrosion products may mitigate the survival rate of dental implants. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. 16 CFR 23.4 - Misrepresentation as to gold content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Misrepresentation as to gold content. 23.4... JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.4 Misrepresentation as to gold content. (a) It is unfair or deceptive to misrepresent the presence of gold or gold alloy in an industry product, or the...

  10. 16 CFR 23.4 - Misrepresentation as to gold content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Misrepresentation as to gold content. 23.4... JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.4 Misrepresentation as to gold content. (a) It is unfair or deceptive to misrepresent the presence of gold or gold alloy in an industry product, or the...

  11. Gold Rush!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brahier, Daniel J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a mathematical investigation of gold--how it is weighed, stored, used, and valued. For grades 3-4, children estimate the value of treasure chests filled with gold coins and explore the size and weight of gold bars. Children in grades 5-6 explore how gold is mined and used, and how the value of gold changes over time. (PVD)

  12. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with mercury...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with mercury...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with mercury...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with mercury...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with mercury...

  3. High temperature characteristics and solidification microstructures of dental metallic materials. Part III alloys for metal-bond porcelain.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Sakae; Yoshida, Takamitsu; Terashima, Nobuyoshi; Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Yagasaki, Hiroshi; Kamijo, Koichiro; Ito, Michio; Platt, Jeffrey A; Oshida, Yoshiki

    2005-03-01

    The thermal expansion rate, coefficient of thermal expansion, and high temperature strength of two types of commercially available alloy for metal-bond porcelain, KIK-HII (KIK) and Degubond-J2 (J2), were evaluated up to the liquidus point temperature using a thermo-mechanical analyzer. Furthermore, microstructure in the solid-liquid coexisting region was observed for evaluation. Our results revealed the following findings: 1. For KIK, solidus point was 1,209.3 +/- 3.2 degrees C, liquidus point was 1,308.3 +/- 7.10 degrees C, and melting expansion rate was 0.41+/- 0.16%. 2. For J2, solidus point was 1,198.3 +/- 0.6 degrees C, liquidus point was 1,253.0 +/- 4.4 degrees C, and melting expansion rate was 4.50 +/- 0.80%. 3. At high temperature, the mechanical characteristics of KIK greatly differed from those of J2. The risk of causing deformation during porcelain baking was suggested for KIK. Removal of segregation during casting was considered difficult in J2.

  4. Laser and plasma dental soldering techniques applied to Ti-6Al-4V alloy: ultimate tensile strength and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Castro, Morgana G; Araújo, Cleudmar A; Menegaz, Gabriela L; Silva, João Paulo L; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio A; Simamoto Júnior, Paulo Cézar

    2015-05-01

    The literature provides limited information regarding the performance of Ti-6Al-4V laser and plasma joints welded in prefabricated bars in dental applications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical strength of different diameters of Ti-6Al-4V alloy welded with laser and plasma techniques. Forty-five dumbbell-shaped rods were created from Ti-6Al-4V and divided into 9 groups (n=5): a control group with 3-mm and intact bars; groups PL2.5, PL3, PL4, and PL5 (specimens with 2.5-, 3-, 4-, and 5-mm diameters welded with plasma); and groups L2.5, L3, L4, and L5 (specimens with 2.5-, 3-, 4-, and 5-mm diameters welded with laser). The specimens were tested for ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and elongation percentages (EP) were obtained. Fractured specimens were analyzed by stereomicroscopy, and welded area percentages (WAP) were calculated. Images were made with scanning electron microscopy. In the initial analysis, the data were analyzed with a 2-way ANOVA (2×4) and the Tukey Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test. In the second analysis, the UTS and EP data were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA, and the Dunnett test was used to compare the 4 experimental groups with the control group (α=.05). The Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficient tests were applied to correlate the study factors. Finite element models were developed in a workbench environment with boundary conditions simulating those of a tensile test. The 2-way ANOVA showed that the factors welding type and diameter were significant for the UTS and WAP values. However, the interaction between them was not significant. The 1-way ANOVA showed statistically significant differences among the groups for UTS, WAP, and EP values. The Dunnett test showed that all the tested groups had lower UTS and EP values than the control group. The 2.5- and 3-mm diameter groups showed higher values for UTS and WAP than the other test groups. A positive correlation was found between welded area percentage and UTS

  5. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy measurements of elemental release from 2 high-palladium dental casting alloys into a corrosion testing medium.

    PubMed

    Tufekci, Eser; Mitchell, John C; Olesik, John W; Brantley, William A; Papazoglou, Efstratios; Monaghan, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The biocompatibility of high-palladium alloy restorations has been of some concern due to the release of palladium into the oral environment and sensitivity reactions in patients. This study measured the in vitro elemental release from a Pd-Cu-Ga alloy and a Pd-Ga alloy into a corrosion testing medium. Both alloys were cast into 12-mm-diameter x 1-mm-thick disks, subjected to heat treatment that simulated porcelain firing cycles, polished to a 0.05-mm surface finish, and ultrasonically cleaned in ethanol. Two specimens of each alloy were immersed 3 times (at 7, 70, and 700 hours) in an aqueous lactic acid/NaCl solution used for in vitro corrosion testing and maintained at 37 degrees C. The specimens were removed after each immersion time, and the elemental compositions of the solutions were analyzed with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Elemental concentrations for the 2 alloys at each immersion time were compared with Student t test (alpha=.05). No significant differences in palladium release were found for the 7- and 70-hour solutions, but significant differences were found for the 700-hour solutions. Mean concentrations of palladium and gallium in the 700-hour solutions, expressed as mass per unit area of alloy surface, were 97 (Pd) and 46 (Ga) microg/cm(2) for the Pd-Cu-Ga alloy and 5 (Pd) and 18 (Ga) microg/cm(2) for the Pd-Ga alloy. Relative proportions of the elements in the solutions were consistent with the release of palladium and breakdown of microstructural phases found in the alloys. The results suggest that there may be a lower risk of adverse biological reactions with the Pd-Ga alloy than with the Pd-Cu-Ga alloy tested.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a... dispense into a mixing capsule a predetermined amount of dental mercury in droplet form and a premeasured...

  7. [Exposure to metals in dental laboratories].

    PubMed

    Apostoli, P; Ferioli, A; Crippa, M; Redaelli, P; Braga Marcazzan, G; Alessio, L

    1988-11-01

    Dental care includes handling of different types of metal alloys usually classified as "noble" and "base" in relation to the presence or absence of either gold or other precious metals. It must be born in mind that exposure to metals in this activities is due not only to those metals present in the alloys but also to those contained in the other materials used during the processes of casting and finishing. The most important metals are the following: Al, Be, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Au, In, Hg, Mo, Ni, Pd, Pt, Si, Ag, Sn, Ti, W, Zn. In this paper we investigated the environmental exposure to metals in dental laboratories studying the environmental air concentration of metals in casting and finishing processes estimating the "quality" of the elements present by Particle Induces X-ray Emission (PIXE) and the "quantity" of the elements by electro thermic atomic absorption spectrophotometry (ET-AAS) and the concentration of the main metals in the blood and in the urine of exposed technicians by ET-AAS. These analyses permitted to detect all the metals present in the work environment and to quantify their concentration, which always resulted to be low (except some metals during short time operations). The biological monitoring revealed the existence of moderate absorption of these metals in the exposed workers but it is not possible for us to affirm if this phenomenon represents a real risk for the health of the technicians. Hence further epidemiological and health surveillance investigations are needed to verify morbidity and mortality of the subjects employed in this activity.

  8. Nanoporous Gold for Enzyme Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Stine, Keith J; Jefferson, Kenise; Shulga, Olga V

    2017-01-01

    Nanoporous gold (NPG) is a material of emerging interest for immobilization of biomolecules, especially enzymes. The material provides a high surface area form of gold that is suitable for physisorption or for covalent modification by self-assembled monolayers. The material can be used as a high surface area electrode and with immobilized enzymes can be used for amperometric detection schemes. NPG can be prepared in a variety of formats from alloys containing between 20 and 50 % atomic composition of gold and less noble element(s) by dealloying procedures. Materials resembling NPG can be prepared by hydrothermal and electrodeposition methods. Related high surface area gold structures have been prepared using templating approaches. Covalent enzyme immobilization can be achieved by first forming a self-assembled monolayer on NPG bearing a terminal reactive functional group followed by conjugation to the enzyme through amide linkages to lysine residues. Enzymes can also be entrapped by physisorption or immobilized by electrostatic interactions.

  9. Shape memory effect and super elasticity. Its dental applications.

    PubMed

    Kotian, R

    2001-01-01

    The shape memory alloys are quite fascinating materials characterized by a shape memory effect and super elasticity which ordinary metals do not have. This unique behaviour was first found in a Au-47.5 at % Cd alloy in 1951, and was published in 1963 by the discovery of Ti-Ni alloy. Shape memory alloys now being practically used as new functional alloys for various dental and medical applications.

  10. Mammalian sensitivity to elemental gold (Au?)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisler, R.

    2004-01-01

    There is increasing documentation of allergic contact dermatitis and other effects from gold jewelry, gold dental restorations, and gold implants. These effects were especially pronounced among females wearing body-piercing gold objects. One estimate of the prevalence of gold allergy worldwide is 13%, as judged by patch tests with monovalent organogold salts. Eczema of the head and neck was the most common response of individuals hypersensitive to gold, and sensitivity can last for at least several years. Ingestion of beverages containing flake gold can result in allergic-type reactions similar to those seen in gold-allergic individuals exposed to gold through dermal contact and other routes. Studies with small laboratory mammals and injected doses of colloidal gold showed increased body temperatures, accumulations in reticular cells, and dose enhancement in tumor therapy; gold implants were associated with tissue injuries. It is proposed that Au? toxicity to mammals is associated, in part, with formation of the more reactive Au+ and Au3+ species.

  11. Wear properties of dental ceramics and porcelains compared with human enamel.

    PubMed

    D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Vanini, Lorenzo; Rondoni, Giuseppe D; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Contemporary pressable and computer-aided design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) ceramics exhibit good mechanical and esthetic properties. Their wear resistance compared with human enamel and traditional gold based alloys needs to be better investigated. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the 2-body wear resistance of human enamel, gold alloy, and 5 different dental ceramics, including a recently introduced zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic (Celtra Duo). Cylindrical specimens were fabricated from a Type III gold alloy (Aurocast8), 2 hot pressed ceramics (Imagine PressX, IPS e.max Press), 2 CAD/CAM ceramics (IPS e.max CAD, Celtra Duo), and a CAD/CAM feldspathic porcelain (Vitablocs Mark II) (n=10). Celtra Duo was tested both soon after grinding and after a subsequent glaze firing cycle. Ten flat human enamel specimens were used as the control group. All specimens were subjected to a 2-body wear test in a dual axis mastication simulator for 120000 loading cycles against yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal cusps. The wear resistance was analyzed by measuring the vertical substance loss (mm) and the volume loss (mm(3)). Antagonist wear (mm) was also recorded. Data were statistically analyzed with 1-way ANOVA tests (α=.05). The wear depth (0.223 mm) of gold alloy was the closest to that of human enamel (0.217 mm), with no significant difference (P>.05). The greatest wear was recorded on the milled Celtra Duo (wear depth=0.320 mm), which appeared significantly less wear resistant than gold alloy or human enamel (P<.05). The milled and not glazed Celtra Duo showed a small but significantly increased wear depth compared with Aurocast8 and human enamel. Wear depth and volumetric loss for the glaze-fired Celtra Duo and for the other tested ceramics did not statistically differ in comparison with the human enamel. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Cervical adaptation of complete cast crowns of various metal alloys, with and without die spacers].

    PubMed

    Stephano, C B; Roselino, R F; Roselino, R B; Campos, G M

    1989-01-01

    A metallic replica from a dental preparation for crown was used to make 8 class-IV stone dies. The wax patterns for the casting of the crowns were obtained in two conditions: a) from the stone die with no spacer; and b) from the stone die with an acrylic spacer. Thus, 64 metallic crowns were casted, using 4 different alloys: DURACAST (Cu-Al), NICROCAST (Ni-Cr) and DURABOND (Ni-Cr), and gold. The casted crowns were fitted in the metallic replica and measured as to the cervical discrepance of fitting. The results showed that the use of die spacers decreases the clinical discrepancies of fitting of the casted crowns (in a statistically significant level), no matter the metallic alloy employed.

  13. Mechanisms of Oxidase and Superoxide Dismutation-like Activities of Gold, Silver, Platinum, and Palladium, and Their Alloys: A General Way to the Activation of Molecular Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaomei; Liu, Wenqi; Gao, Xuejiao; Lu, Zhanghui; Wu, Xiaochun; Gao, Xingfa

    2015-12-23

    Metal and alloy nanomaterials have intriguing oxidase- and superoxide dismutation-like (SOD-like) activities. However, origins of these activities remain to be studied. Using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we investigate mechanisms of oxidase- and SOD-like properties for metals Au, Ag, Pd and Pt and alloys Au4-xMx (x = 1, 2, 3; M = Ag, Pd, Pt). We find that the simple reaction-dissociation of O2-supported on metal surfaces can profoundly account for the oxidase-like activities of the metals. The activation (Eact) and reaction energies (Er) calculated by DFT can be used to effectively predict the activity. As verification, the calculated activity orders for series of metal and alloy nanomaterials are in excellent agreement with those obtained by experiments. Briefly, the activity is critically dependent on two factors, metal compositions and exposed facets. On the basis of these results, an energy-based model is proposed to account for the activation of molecular oxygen. As for SOD-like activities, the mechanisms mainly consist of protonation of O2(•-) and adsorption and rearrangement of HO2(•) on metal surfaces. Our results provide atomistic-level insights into the oxidase- and SOD-like activities of metals and pave a way to the rational design of mimetic enzymes based on metal nanomaterials. Especially, the O2 dissociative adsorption mechanism will serve as a general way to the activation of molecular oxygen by nanosurfaces and help understand the catalytic role of nanomaterials as pro-oxidants and antioxidants.

  14. Silver-gold alloy nanoparticles as tunable substrates for systematic control of ion-desorption efficiency and heat transfer in surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization.

    PubMed

    Lai, Samuel Kin-Man; Cheng, Yu-Hong; Tang, Ho-Wai; Ng, Kwan-Ming

    2017-08-09

    Systematically controlling heat transfer in the surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) process and thus enhancing the analytical performance of SALDI-MS remains a challenging task. In the current study, by tuning the metal contents of Ag-Au alloy nanoparticle substrates (AgNPs, Ag55Au45NPs, Ag15Au85NPs and AuNPs, ∅: ∼2.0 nm), it was found that both SALDI ion-desorption efficiency and heat transfer can be controlled in a wide range of laser fluence (21.3 mJ cm -2 to 125.9 mJ cm -2 ). It was discovered that ion detection sensitivity can be enhanced at any laser fluence by tuning up the Ag content of the alloy nanoparticle, whereas the extent of ion fragmentation can be reduced by tuning up the Au content. The enhancement effect of Ag content on ion desorption was found to be attributable to the increase in laser absorption efficiency (at 355 nm) with Ag content. Tuning the laser absorption efficiency by changing the metal composition was also effective in controlling the heat transfer from the NPs to the analytes. The laser-induced heating of Ag-rich alloy NPs could be balanced or even overridden by increasing the Au content of NPs, resulting in the reduction of the fragmentation of analytes. In the correlation of experimental measurement with molecular dynamics simulation, the effect of metal composition on the dynamics of the ion desorption process was also elucidated. Upon increasing the Ag content, it was also found that phase transition temperatures, such as melting, vaporization and phase explosion temperature, of NPs could be reduced. This further enhanced the desorption of analyte ions via phase-transition-driven desorption processes. The significant cooling effect on the analyte ions observed at high laser fluence was also determined to be originated from the phase explosion of the NPs. This study revealed that the development of alloy nanoparticles as SALDI substrates can constitute an effective means for the systematic control of ion

  15. Effects of TiN coating on the corrosion of nanostructured Ti-30Ta-xZr alloys for dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won-Gi; Choe, Han-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical characteristics of a titanium nitride (TiN)-coated/nanotube-formed Ti-Ta-Zr alloy for biomaterials have been researched by using the magnetic sputter and electrochemical methods. Ti-30Ta-xZr (x = 3, 7 and 15 wt%) alloys were prepared by arc melting and heat treated for 24 h at 1000 °C in an argon atmosphere and then water quenching. The formation of oxide nanotubes was achieved by anodizing a Ti-30Ta-xZr alloy in H3PO4 electrolytes containing small amounts of fluoride ions at room temperature. Anodization was carried out using a scanning potentiostat, and all experiments were conducted at room temperature. The microstructure and morphology of nanotube arrays were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The TiN coatings were obtained by the radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering technique. The depositions were performed from pure Ti targets on Ti-30Ta-xZr alloys substrates. The corrosion properties of the specimens were examined using potentiodynamic test in a 0.9% NaCl solution by using potentiostat. The microstructures of Ti-30Ta-xZr alloys were changed from an equiaxed to a needle-like structure with increasing Zr content. The interspace between the nanotubes was approximately 20, 80 and 200 nm for Zr contents of 3, 7 and 15 wt%, respectively. The corrosion resistance of the TiN-coated on the anodized Ti-30Ta-xZr alloys was higher than that of the untreated Ti alloys, indicating a better protective effect.

  16. The use of gold in dentistry: an historical overview.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, J A

    2012-01-01

    Gold was first used in dentistry over 2500 years ago, and its dental applications have increased steadily, especially during the past 100 years, to the point where they now absorb over 80 tons of gold per annum. Course of these developments is outlined in this review.

  17. An ultrasensitive luminol cathodic electrochemiluminescence immunosensor based on glucose oxidase and nanocomposites: graphene-carbon nanotubes and gold-platinum alloy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinya; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo; Cao, Yaling; Chen, Yingfeng; Wang, Haijun; Gan, Xianxue

    2013-06-14

    In the present study, a novel and ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor based on luminol cathodic ECL was fabricated by using Au nanoparticles and Pt nanoparticles (nano-AuPt) electrodeposited on graphene-carbon nanotubes nanocomposite as platform for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). For this introduced immunosensor, graphene (GR) and single wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dispersed in chitosan (Chi-GR-CNTs) were firstly decorated on the bare gold electrode (GE) surface. Then nano-AuPt were electrodeposited (DpAu-Pt) on the Chi-GR-CNTs modified electrode. Subsequently, glucose oxidase (GOD) was employed to block the non-specific sites of electrode surface. When glucose was present in the working buffer solution, GOD immediately catalyzed the oxidation of glucose to in situ generate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which could subsequently promote the oxidation of luminol with an amplified cathodic ECL signal. The proposed immunosensor was performed at low potential (-0.1 to 0.4V) and low concentration of luminol. The CEA was determined in the range of 0.1 pg mL(-1) to 40 ng mL(-1) with a limit of detection down to 0.03 pg mL(-1) (SN(-1)=3). Moreover, with excellent sensitivity, selectivity, stability and simplicity, the as-proposed luminol-based ECL immunosensor provided great potential in clinical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The intermetallic formation and growth kinetics at the interface of near eutectic tin-silver-copper solder alloys and gold/nickel metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Mao

    The formation of a one micron thick layer of an intermetallic compound between a solder alloy and a metallic substrate generally constitutes a good solder joint in an electronic device. However, if the compound grows too thick, and/or if multiple intermetallic compounds form, poor solder joint reliability may result. Thus significant interest has been focused on intermetallic compound phase selection and growth kinetics at such solder/metal interfaces. The present study focuses on one such specific problem, the formation and growth of intermetallic compounds at near eutectic Sn-Ag-Cu solder alloy/Ni interfaces. Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder was reflowed on Au/Ni substrates, resulting in the initial formation and growth of (CuNi)6Sn 5 at Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu /Ni interfaces. (NiCu)3Sn4 formed between the (CuNi)6Sn5 and the Ni substrate when the concentration of Cu in the liquid SnAgCu solder decreased to a critical value which depended upon temperature: 0.37, 0.31 and 0.3(wt.%) at reflow temperatures of 260°C, 245°C and 230°C respectively. The growth rate of (CuNi)6Sn5 was found to be consistent with extrapolations of a diffusion limited growth model formulated for lower temperature, solid state diffusion couples. The long range diffusion of Cu did not limit growth rates. The spalling of (CuNiAu)6Sn5 from (NiCu)3 Sn4 surfaces during reflow was also examined. When the Cu concentration in the solder decreased to approximately 0.28wt.%, the (Cu,Ni,Au) 6Sn5 was observed to spall. Compressive stress in (CuNiAu) 6Sn5 and weak adhesion between (CuNiAu)6Sn 5 and (NiCu)3Sn4 was found to cause this effect.

  19. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  20. Dental sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  1. Dental cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  2. Dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed.

  3. Containerless low gravity processing of glass forming and immiscible alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Briggs, Craig; Robinson, M. B.

    1990-01-01

    Under normal one-g conditions immiscible alloys segregate extensively during solidification due to sedimentation of the more dense of the immiscible liquid phases. Immiscible (hypermonotectic) gold-rhodium alloys were processed in the 100 meter drop tube under low gravity, containerless conditions to determine the feasibility of producing dispersed structures. Three alloy compositions were utilized. Alloys containing 10 percent by volume of the gold-rich hypermonotectic phase exhibited a tendency for the gold-rich liquid to wet the outer surface of the samples. This wetting tendency led to extensive segregation in several cases. Alloys containing 80 and 90 percent by volume of the gold-rich phase possessed completely different microstructures from the 10 percent samples when processed under low-g, containerless conditions. Several samples exhibited microstructures consisting of well dispersed 2 to 3 microns diameter rhodium-rich spheres in a gold-rich matrix.

  4. Influence of NiTi alloy on the root canal shaping capabilities of the ProTaper Universal and ProTaper Gold rotary instrument systems

    PubMed Central

    DUQUE, Jussaro Alves; VIVAN, Rodrigo Ricci; CAVENAGO, Bruno Cavalini; AMOROSO-SILVA, Pablo Andrés; BERNARDES, Ricardo Affonso; de VASCONCELOS, Bruno Carvalho; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the NiTi wire in Conventional NiTi (ProTaper Universal PTU) and Controlled Memory NiTi (ProTaper Gold PTG) instrument systems on the quality of root canal preparation. Material and Methods Twelve mandibular molars with separate mesial canals were scanned using a high-definition microcomputed tomography system. The PTU and PTG instruments were used to shape twelve mesial canals each. The canals were scanned after preparation with F2 and F3 instruments of the PTU and PTG systems. The analyzed parameters included the remaining dentin thickness at the apical and cervical levels, root canal volume and untouched canal walls. Data was analyzed for statistical significance by the Friedman and Dunn’s tests. For the comparison of data between groups, the Mann-Whitney test was used. Results In the pre-operative analysis, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of the area and volume of root canals (P>.05). There was also no statistically significant difference between the systems with respect to root canal volume after use of the F2 and F3 instruments. There was no statistical difference in the dentin thickness at the first apical level between, before and after instrumentation for both systems. At the 3 cervical levels, the PTG maintained centralization of the preparation on the transition between the F2 and F3 instruments, which did not occur with the PTU. Conclusion The Conventional NiTi (PTU) and Controlled Memory NiTi (PTG) instruments displayed comparable capabilities for shaping the straight mesial root canals of mandibular molars, although the PTG was better than the PTU at maintaining the centralization of the shape in the cervical portion. PMID:28198973

  5. Influence of NiTi alloy on the root canal shaping capabilities of the ProTaper Universal and ProTaper Gold rotary instrument systems.

    PubMed

    Duque, Jussaro Alves; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci; Cavenago, Bruno Cavalini; Amoroso-Silva, Pablo Andrés; Bernardes, Ricardo Affonso; Vasconcelos, Bruno Carvalho de; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the NiTi wire in Conventional NiTi (ProTaper Universal PTU) and Controlled Memory NiTi (ProTaper Gold PTG) instrument systems on the quality of root canal preparation. Twelve mandibular molars with separate mesial canals were scanned using a high-definition microcomputed tomography system. The PTU and PTG instruments were used to shape twelve mesial canals each. The canals were scanned after preparation with F2 and F3 instruments of the PTU and PTG systems. The analyzed parameters included the remaining dentin thickness at the apical and cervical levels, root canal volume and untouched canal walls. Data was analyzed for statistical significance by the Friedman and Dunn's tests. For the comparison of data between groups, the Mann-Whitney test was used. In the pre-operative analysis, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of the area and volume of root canals (P>.05). There was also no statistically significant difference between the systems with respect to root canal volume after use of the F2 and F3 instruments. There was no statistical difference in the dentin thickness at the first apical level between, before and after instrumentation for both systems. At the 3 cervical levels, the PTG maintained centralization of the preparation on the transition between the F2 and F3 instruments, which did not occur with the PTU. Conclusion The Conventional NiTi (PTU) and Controlled Memory NiTi (PTG) instruments displayed comparable capabilities for shaping the straight mesial root canals of mandibular molars, although the PTG was better than the PTU at maintaining the centralization of the shape in the cervical portion.

  6. Dental negligence.

    PubMed

    Tay, C S

    2000-02-01

    Medical and dental errors and negligence are again in the spotlight in recent news report. Dead because of doctor's bad handwriting Prescribing drug overdoses Germ-infested soap pumps--infections in hospitals This articles explains dental negligence including dental duty of care and the standard of care expected of dentists in relation to the Bolam principle.

  7. An investigation of the effect of scaling-induced surface roughness on bacterial adhesion in common fixed dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Checketts, Matthew R; Turkyilmaz, Ilser; Asar, Neset Volkan

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial plaque must be routinely removed from teeth, adjacent structures, and prostheses. However, the removal of this plaque can inadvertently increase the risk of future bacterial adhesion. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the change in the surface roughness of 3 different surfaces after dental prophylactic instrumentation and how this influenced bacterial adhesion. Forty specimens each of Type III gold alloy, lithium disilicate, and zirconia were fabricated in the same dimensions. The specimens were divided into 4 groups: ultrasonic scaler, stainless steel curette, prophylaxis cup, and control. Pretreatment surface roughness measurements were made with a profilometer. Surface treatments in each group were performed with a custom mechanical scaler. Posttreatment surface roughness values were measured. In turn, the specimens were inoculated with Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Actinomyces viscosus. Bacterial adhesion was assessed by rinsing the specimens with sterile saline to remove unattached cells. The specimens were then placed in sterile tubes with 1 mL of sterile saline. The solution was plated and quantified. Scanning electron microscopy was performed. The statistical analysis of surface roughness was completed by using repeated-measures single-factor ANOVA with a Bonferroni correction. The surface roughness values for gold alloy specimens increased as a result of prophylaxis cup treatment (0.221 to 0.346 Ra) (P<.01) and stainless steel curette treatment (0.264 to 1.835 Ra) (P<.01). The results for bacterial adhesion to gold alloy proved inconclusive. A quantitative comparison indicated no statistically significant differences in pretreatment and posttreatment surface roughness values for lithium disilicate and zirconia specimens. In spite of these similarities, the overall bacterial adherence values for lithium disilicate were significantly greater than those recorded for gold alloy or zirconia (P<.05). Instrumentation

  8. The interaction of gold with gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar-cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments designed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions have yielded several interesting results. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are also explained by invoking this mechanism.

  9. Gold Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Epner Technology Inc. responded to a need from Goddard Space Flight Center for the ultimate in electroplated reflectivity needed for the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Made of beryllium, the MOLA mirror was coated by Epner Technology Laser Gold process, specially improved for the project. Improved Laser Gold- coated reflectors have found use in an epitaxial reactor built for a large semiconductor manufacturer as well as the waveguide in Braun-Thermoscan tympanic thermometer and lasing cavities in various surgical instruments.

  10. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  11. 21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mercury and alloy dispenser. 872.3080 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a) Identification. A mercury and alloy dispenser is a device with a spring-activated valve intended to measure and...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mercury and alloy dispenser. 872.3080 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a) Identification. A mercury and alloy dispenser is a device with a spring-activated valve intended to measure and...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mercury and alloy dispenser. 872.3080 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a) Identification. A mercury and alloy dispenser is a device with a spring-activated valve intended to measure and...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of base metals, such as nickel, chromium, or cobalt, that is...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of base metals, such as nickel, chromium, or cobalt, that is...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of base metals, such as nickel, chromium, or cobalt, that is...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mercury and alloy dispenser. 872.3080 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a) Identification. A mercury and alloy dispenser is a device with a spring-activated valve intended to measure and...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of base metals, such as nickel, chromium, or cobalt, that is...

  19. Gold Pennies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominic, Sheryl

    1995-01-01

    Describes an approach to a demonstration of the Golden Penny Experiment for high school students in which the teacher assumes the disguise of an alchemist and invites the students to devise ways of determining whether the penny has really turned to gold. (DDR)

  20. Dental materials and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hubálková, Hana; Hora, Karel; Seidl, Zdenek; Krásenský, Jan

    2002-09-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the reaction of selected dental materials in the magnetic field of a magnetic resonance imaging device to determine a possible health risk. The following dental materials were tested in vitro during magnetic resonance imaging: 15 dental alloys, four dental implants, one surgical splint and two wires for fixation of maxillofacial fractures. Possible artefacts (corresponding with magnetic properties), heating and force effects were tested. Results concerning movement and heating were in agreement with the literature. The artefacts seen were significant: for the surgical splint, a spherical artefact with a diameter of 55 mm; for the wires, up to 22 mm; and for the dental blade implant, an artefact of 28 x 20 mm. The results of our tests of selected dental appliances indicate that their presence in the human organism is safe for patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging procedures. The presence of artefacts can substantially influence the magnetic resonance imaging results.

  1. Electrocatalysts having gold monolayers on platinum nanoparticle cores, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang

    2010-04-27

    The invention relates to gold-coated particles useful as fuel cell electrocatalysts. The particles are composed of an electrocatalytically active core at least partially encapsulated by an outer shell of gold or gold alloy. The invention more particularly relates to such particles having a noble metal-containing core, and more particularly, a platinum or platinum alloy core. In other embodiments, the invention relates to fuel cells containing these electrocatalysts and methods for generating electrical energy therefrom.

  2. Analyses of gold artifacts from Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šmit, Ž.; Budnar, M.; Pelicon, P.; Zorko, B.; Knific, T.; Istenič, J.; Trampuž-Orel, N.; Demortier, G.

    2000-03-01

    The method of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) was used for the study of two gold archaeological finds: a Norico-Pannonian brooch, presumably a votive item, and a pair of earrings and a ring from a Slavic female grave. The analysis was performed by an external proton millibeam and aimed to identify the manufacturing techniques. The brooch, including the spring, was made of a rather pure 98% gold. This may indicate that the brooch was produced for votive purposes, as a more flexible spring would suit an object to be worn. The Slavic ring was made of a different alloy than the earrings; moreover, its inhomogeneous alloy reveals the exploitation of local gold sources.

  3. Dental Hygienist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  4. Development of Ag-Pd-Au-Cu alloy for multiple dental applications. Part 1. Effects of Pd and Cu contents, and addition of Ga or Sn on physical properties and bond with ultra-low fusing ceramic.

    PubMed

    Goto, S; Miyagawa, Y; Ogura, H

    2000-09-01

    Ag-Pd-Au-Cu quaternary alloys consisting of 30-50% Ag, 20-40% Pd, 10-20% Cu and 20% Au (mother alloys) were prepared. Then 5% Sn or 5% Ga was added to the mother alloy compositions, and another two alloy systems (Sn-added alloys and Ga-added alloys) were also prepared. The bond between the prepared alloys and an ultra-low fusing ceramic as well as their physical properties such as the solidus point, liquidus point and the coefficient of thermal expansion were evaluated. The solidus point and liquidus point of the prepared alloys ranged from 802 degrees C to 1142 degrees C and from 931 degrees C to 1223 degrees C, respectively. The coefficient of thermal expansion ranged from 14.6 to 17.1 x 10(-6)/degrees C for the Sn- and Ga-added alloys. In most cases, the Pd and Cu contents significantly influenced the solidus point, liquidus point and coefficient of thermal expansion. All Sn- and Ga-added alloys showed high area fractions of retained ceramic (92.1-100%), while the mother alloy showed relatively low area fractions (82.3%) with a high standard deviation (20.5%). Based on the evaluated properties, six Sn-added alloys and four Ga-added alloys among the prepared alloys were suitable for the application of the tested ultra-low fusing ceramic.

  5. Fracture behavior of metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses with frameworks from cast or a newly developed sintered cobalt-chromium alloy.

    PubMed

    Krug, Klaus-Peter; Knauber, Andreas W; Nothdurft, Frank P

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fracture behavior of metal-ceramic bridges with frameworks from cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo), which are manufactured using conventional casting or a new computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) milling and sintering technique. A total of 32 metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDPs), which are based on a nonprecious metal framework, was produced using a conventional casting process (n = 16) or a new CAD/CAM milling and sintering process (n = 16). Eight unveneered frameworks were manufactured using each of the techniques. After thermal and mechanical aging of half of the restorations, all samples were subjected to a static loading test in a universal testing machine, in which acoustic emission monitoring was performed. Three different critical forces were revealed: the fracture force (F max), the force at the first reduction in force (F decr1), and the force at the critical acoustic event (F acoust1). With the exception of the veneered restorations with cast or sintered metal frameworks without artificial aging, which presented a statistically significant but slightly different F max, no statistically significant differences between cast and CAD/CAM sintered and milled FDPs were detected. Thermal and mechanical loading did not significantly affect the resulting forces. Cast and CAD/CAM milled and sintered metal-ceramic bridges were determined to be comparable with respect to the fracture behavior. FDPs based on CAD/CAM milled and sintered frameworks may be an applicable and less technique-sensitive alternative to frameworks that are based on conventionally cast frameworks.

  6. American Dental Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seal of Acceptance Health Policy Institute ADA Scientific Research Dental Practice Parameters Dental Standards ... Publications ADA News JADA (The Journal of the American Dental Association) ADA Catalog ADA ...

  7. Oxide compounds on Ni-Cr alloys.

    PubMed

    Baran, G R

    1984-11-01

    Five Ni-Cr alloys were studied in order to identify the compounds formed on the alloy surface during oxidation under conditions similar to those encountered during dental laboratory procedures prior to application of porcelain. After the alloys were oxidized, the films covering the surfaces were removed with the aid of a Br-methanol solution. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the compounds formed. Oxides of nearly all elements contained by the alloys were found after low-temperature (650 degrees C) oxidation, while NiO and particularly Cr2O3 were predominant after oxidation at high temperatures (1000 degrees C).

  8. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys thereof...

  9. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys thereof...

  10. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys thereof...

  11. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys thereof...

  12. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys thereof...

  13. A comparative study on the bond strength of porcelain to the millingable Pd-Ag alloy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jun-Tae

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The porcelain fused to gold has been widely used as a restoration both with the natural esthetics of the porcelain and durability and marginal fit of metal casting. However, recently, due to the continuous rise in the price of gold, an interest towards materials to replace gold alloy is getting higher. This study compared the bond strength of porcelain to millingable palladium-silver (Pd-Ag) alloy, with that of 3 conventionally used metal-ceramic alloys. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four types of metal-ceramic alloys, castable nonprecious nickel-chrome alloy, castable precious metal alloys containing 83% and 32% of gold, and millingable Pd-Ag alloy were used to make metal specimens (n=40). And porcelain was applied on the center area of metal specimen. Three-point bending test was performed with universal testing machine. The bond strength data were analyzed with a one-way ANOVA and post hoc Scheffe's tests (α=.05). RESULTS The 3-point bending test showed the strongest (40.42 ± 5.72 MPa) metal-ceramic bond in the nonprecious Ni-Cr alloy, followed by millingable Pd-Ag alloy (37.71 ± 2.46 MPa), precious metal alloy containing 83% of gold (35.89 ± 1.93 MPa), and precious metal alloy containing 32% of gold (34.59 ± 2.63 MPa). Nonprecious Ni-Cr alloy and precious metal alloy containing 32% of gold showed significant difference (P<.05). CONCLUSION The type of metal-ceramic alloys affects the bond strength of porcelain. Every metal-ceramic alloy used in this study showed clinically applicable bond strength with porcelain (25 MPa). PMID:25352959

  14. Dental Fluorosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and School-Linked Dental Sealant Programs Coordinate Community Water Fluoridation Programs Targeted Clinical Preventive Services & Health Systems Changes State Oral Health Plans Research & Publications Oral Health In America: Summary of the ...

  15. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... produce dental materials such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental... materials such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other...

  16. Alloy materials

    DOEpatents

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  17. Fifty years of Brazilian Dental Materials Group: scientific contributions of dental materials field evaluated by systematic review

    PubMed Central

    ROSA, Wellington Luiz de Oliveira; SILVA, Tiago Machado; LIMA, Giana da Silveira; SILVA, Adriana Fernandes; PIVA, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective A systematic review was conducted to analyze Brazilian scientific and technological production related to the dental materials field over the past 50 years. Material and Methods This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (Prisma) statement. Searches were performed until December 2014 in six databases: MedLine (PubMed), Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, BBO, and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, the Brazilian patent database (INPI - Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial) was screened in order to get an overview of Brazilian technological development in the dental materials field. Two reviewers independently analyzed the documents. Only studies and patents related to dental materials were included in this review. Data regarding the material category, dental specialty, number of documents and patents, filiation countries, and the number of citations were tabulated and analyzed in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States). Results A total of 115,806 studies and 53 patents were related to dental materials and were included in this review. Brazil had 8% affiliation in studies related to dental materials, and the majority of the papers published were related to dental implants (1,137 papers), synthetic resins (681 papers), dental cements (440 papers), dental alloys (392 papers) and dental adhesives (361 papers). The Brazilian technological development with patented dental materials was smaller than the scientific production. The most patented type of material was dental alloys (11 patents), followed by dental implants (8 patents) and composite resins (7 patents). Conclusions Dental materials science has had a substantial number of records, demonstrating an important presence in scientific and technological development of dentistry. In addition, it is important to approximate the relationship between academia and industry to expand the technological development in

  18. Fifty years of Brazilian Dental Materials Group: scientific contributions of dental materials field evaluated by systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Wellington Luiz de Oliveira; Silva, Tiago Machado; Lima, Giana da Silveira; Silva, Adriana Fernandes; Piva, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to analyze Brazilian scientific and technological production related to the dental materials field over the past 50 years. This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (Prisma) statement. Searches were performed until December 2014 in six databases: MedLine (PubMed), Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, BBO, and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, the Brazilian patent database (INPI - Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial) was screened in order to get an overview of Brazilian technological development in the dental materials field. Two reviewers independently analyzed the documents. Only studies and patents related to dental materials were included in this review. Data regarding the material category, dental specialty, number of documents and patents, filiation countries, and the number of citations were tabulated and analyzed in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States). A total of 115,806 studies and 53 patents were related to dental materials and were included in this review. Brazil had 8% affiliation in studies related to dental materials, and the majority of the papers published were related to dental implants (1,137 papers), synthetic resins (681 papers), dental cements (440 papers), dental alloys (392 papers) and dental adhesives (361 papers). The Brazilian technological development with patented dental materials was smaller than the scientific production. The most patented type of material was dental alloys (11 patents), followed by dental implants (8 patents) and composite resins (7 patents). Dental materials science has had a substantial number of records, demonstrating an important presence in scientific and technological development of dentistry. In addition, it is important to approximate the relationship between academia and industry to expand the technological development in countries such as Brazil.

  19. Gold recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amey, Earle B.

    2001-01-01

    In 1998, 175 metric tons (t) of refined gold was recovered by U.S. refiners from old and new scrap. The overall recycling rate was 29 percent when scrap consumption was compared with apparent domestic supply. Sources of old scrap includes discarded jewelry, dental materials, plating solutions, and electronic equipment. A very high old scrap recycling efficiency of 96 percent was reached in 1998, the supply of old scrap peaked, gold prices were at an 18-year low, and substantial amounts of old scrap were exported. U.S. net exports of old scrap had a gold content of 28 t.

  20. Aluminium-gold reference material for the k0-standardisation of neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingelbrecht, C.; Peetermans, F.; De Corte, F.; De Wispelaere, A.; Vandecasteele, C.; Courtijn, E.; D'Hondt, P.

    1991-05-01

    Gold is an excellent comparator material for the k0-standardisation of neutron activation analysis because of its convenient and well defined nuclear properties. The most suitable form for a reference material is a dilute aluminium-gold alloy, for which the self-shielding effect for neutrons is small. Castings of composition Al-0.1 wt.% Au were prepared by crucible-less levitation melting, which gives close control of ingot composition with minimal contamination of the melt. The alloy composition was checked using induction-coupled plasma source emission spectrometry. The homogeneity of the alloy was measured by neutron activation analysis and a relative standard deviation of the gold content of 0.30% was found (10 mg samples). Metallography revealed a homogeneous distribution of AuAl 2 particles. The alloy was certified as Reference Material CBNM-530, with certified gold mass fraction 0.100±0.002 wt.%.

  1. Method for forming gold-containing catalyst with porous structure

    DOEpatents

    Biener, Juergen; Hamza, Alex V; Baeumer, Marcus; Schulz, Christian; Jurgens, Birte; Biener, Monika M.

    2014-07-22

    A method for forming a gold-containing catalyst with porous structure according to one embodiment of the present invention includes producing a starting alloy by melting together of gold and at least one less noble metal that is selected from the group consisting of silver, copper, rhodium, palladium, and platinum; and a dealloying step comprising at least partial removal of the less noble metal by dissolving the at least one less noble metal out of the starting alloy. Additional methods and products thereof are also presented.

  2. Effect of gold subsurface layer on the surface activity and segregation in Pt/Au/Pt3M (where M = 3d transition metals) alloy catalyst from first-principles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Eun; Lim, Dong-Hee; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Juhn; Yoon, Sung Pil; Han, Jonghee; Nam, Suk Woo; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Soon, Aloysius; Ham, Hyung Chul

    2015-01-21

    The effect of a subsurface hetero layer (thin gold) on the activity and stability of Pt skin surface in Pt3M system (M = 3d transition metals) is investigated using the spin-polarized density functional theory calculation. First, we find that the heterometallic interaction between the Pt skin surface and the gold subsurface in Pt/Au/Pt3M system can significantly modify the electronic structure of the Pt skin surface. In particular, the local density of states projected onto the d states of Pt skin surface near the Fermi level is drastically decreased compared to the Pt/Pt/Pt3M case, leading to the reduction of the oxygen binding strength of the Pt skin surface. This modification is related to the increase of surface charge polarization of outmost Pt skin atoms by the electron transfer from the gold subsurface atoms. Furthermore, a subsurface gold layer is found to cast the energetic barrier to the segregation loss of metal atoms from the bulk (inside) region, which can enhance the durability of Pt3M based catalytic system in oxygen reduction condition at fuel cell devices. This study highlights that a gold subsurface hetero layer can provide an additional mean to tune the surface activity toward oxygen species and in turn the oxygen reduction reaction, where the utilization of geometric strain already reaches its practical limit.

  3. Dental Arch Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Straightening teeth is an arduous process requiring months, often years, of applying corrective pressure by means of arch wires-better known as brace-which may have to be changed several times in the course of treatment. A new method has been developed by Dr. George Andreasen, orthodontist and dental scientist at the University of Iowa. The key is a new type of arch wire material, called Nitinol, with exceptional elasticity which helps reduce the required number of brace changes. An alloy of nickel and titanium, Nitinol was originally developed for aerospace applications by the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, now the Naval Surface Weapons Laboratory, White Oaks, Maryland. NASA subsequently conducted additional research on the properties of Nitinol and on procedures for processing the metal.

  4. Role of alloying elements in adhesive transfer and friction of copper-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted in a vacuum with binary-copper alloy riders sliding against a conventional bearing-steel surface with normal residual oxides present. The binary alloys contained 1 atomic percent of various alloying elements. Auger spectroscopy analysis was used to monitor the adhesive transfer of the copper alloys to the bearing-steel surface. A relation was found to exist between adhesive transfer and the reaction potential and free energy of formation of the alloying element in the copper. The more chemically active the element and the more stable its oxide, the greater was the adhesive transfer and wear of the copper alloy. Transfer occurred in all the alloys except copper-gold after relatively few (25) passes across the steel surface.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of a flow-through nanoporous gold nanowire/AAO composite membrane.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Lee, W; Huang, Z; Scholz, R; Gösele, U

    2008-08-20

    The fabrication of a composite membrane of nanoporous gold nanowires and anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) is demonstrated by the electrodeposition of Au-Ag alloy nanowires into an AAO membrane, followed by selective etching of silver from the alloy nanowires. This composite membrane is advantageous for flow-through type catalytic reactions. The morphology evolution of the nanoporous gold nanowires as a function of the diameter of the Au-Ag nanowire 'precursors' is also investigated.

  6. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Paul H; Rams, Thomas E

    An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  7. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  8. Study of Two-Body Wear Performance of Dental Materials.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Zhang, Qian; Ning, Jia; Wu, Wenmeng; Li, Changyi

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the two-body wear resistances of natural enamel and four dental materials in vitro. The testing machine was modified to form a type of pin-on-disk wear test apparatus. Four dental material specimens (Au-Pd alloy, Ag-Pd alloy, FiltekTMP60 and FiltekTMZ350 composite resins) and enamel were used as the pins, and a steatite ceramic grinding wheel was used as the abrasive counter face. The wear volume loss and the rigidity value was measured. The worn surface and the element analysis of the debris were analyzed. The wear volume loss of Au-Pd alloy and its steatite antagonists were the nearest to those of the dental enamel. SEM microphotographs showed that, the main wear mechanism of the dental materials was abrasive and adhesive wear. Au-Pd alloy had good wear resistance and was more suitable for dental applications than other three dental materials. Copyright © 2017 National Medical Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Zirconia in dental implantology: A review

    PubMed Central

    Apratim, Abhishek; Eachempati, Prashanti; Krishnappa Salian, Kiran Kumar; Singh, Vijendra; Chhabra, Saurabh; Shah, Sanket

    2015-01-01

    Background: Titanium has been the most popular material of choice for dental implantology over the past few decades. Its properties have been found to be most suitable for the success of implant treatment. But recently, zirconia is slowly emerging as one of the materials which might replace the gold standard of dental implant, i.e., titanium. Materials and Methods: Literature was searched to retrieve information about zirconia dental implant and studies were critically analyzed. PubMed database was searched for information about zirconia dental implant regarding mechanical properties, osseointegration, surface roughness, biocompatibility, and soft tissue health around it. The literature search was limited to English language articles published from 1975 to 2015. Results: A total of 45 papers met the inclusion criteria for this review, among the relevant search in the database. Conclusion: Literature search showed that some of the properties of zirconia seem to be suitable for making it an ideal dental implant, such as biocompatibility, osseointegration, favourable soft tissue response and aesthetics due to light transmission and its color. At the same time, some studies also point out its drawbacks. It was also found that most of the studies on zirconia dental implants are short-term studies and there is a need for more long-term clinical trials to prove that zirconia is worth enough to replace titanium as a biomaterial in dental implantology. PMID:26236672

  10. Psychophysiological reactivity of currently dental phobic-, remitted dental phobic- and never-dental phobic individuals during exposure to dental-related and other affect-inducing materials.

    PubMed

    Wannemueller, André; Adolph, Dirk; Joehren, Hans-Peter; Blackwell, Simon E; Margraf, Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    Psychophysiological responses indicating the preparation of defensive behaviour, such as heart rate (HR)-increase and startle-response (SR) potentiation, have often been reported amongst individuals suffering from phobic disorders when exposed to phobia-related information. Although exposure is widely considered the 'gold standard' for treatment of Specific Phobia, it is unclear to what extent psychophysiological defensive response patterns change following treatment, and whether any changes are maintained. We assessed the acoustic SR- and HR-response to neutral, positive, negative and phobia-related pictures and sounds in 41 individuals currently suffering from dental phobia, 22 formerly dental phobic individuals who had remitted following an exposure-based treatment eight months prior to assessment, and 29 control individuals with no history of dental phobia. We observed SR-potentiation to dental-related stimuli in controls combined with HR-deceleration. In contrast, amongst phobic individuals SR-potentiation was accompanied by HR-acceleration to dental pictures. Successfully treated individuals showed inhibited startle reactivity in combination with HR-deceleration to dental related materials of both modalities. Our findings suggest inappropriate fight-flight preparation amongst individuals with dental phobia, reflecting overactivation of the defensive system. However, successful treatment results in inhibited physiological defence preparation, with remitted individuals displaying a response pattern that differed from that of phobic individuals and controls. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Compressive and bend strength of experimental admixed high copper alloys].

    PubMed

    Sourai, P; Paximada, H; Lagouvardos, P; Douvitsas, G

    1988-01-01

    Mixed alloys for dental amalgams have been used mainly in the form of admixed alloys, where eutectic spheres are blend with conventional flakes. In the present study the compressive strength, bend strength and microstructure of two high-copper alloys (Tytin, Ana-2000) is compared with three experimental alloys prepared of the two high copper by mixing them in proportions of 3:1, 1:1 and 1:3 by weight. The results revealed that experimental alloys inherited high early and final strength values without any significant change in their microstructure.

  12. Trends in dental and allied dental education.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Laura M

    2004-09-01

    Educational programs play an important role in preparing a qualified dental work force. This article reviews the current status and trends in dental, advanced dental and allied dental education programs in the United States and examines their impact on the dental work force. This analysis focuses on survey data collected by the American Dental Association during the past 10 to 15 years and compares recent patterns in applications, enrollment and graduation with previous trends. The numbers of educational programs, applicants, enrollees and graduates have increased in dentistry, dental hygiene and dental assisting, while dental laboratory technology has declined in all measures. The proportion of women in dentistry has increased, while the ethnic profile of dental and allied personnel has shown little change. Both the cost of dental education and student debt continue to increase. Despite increases in the number of educational programs and overall numbers of graduates from dental and allied dental education programs, the proportion of underrepresented groups still lags behind their representation in the overall population, and the number of allied personnel falls short of practice needs. Patterns in applications, enrollment and graduation are important determinants of the dental and allied dental work force. The cost and funding of education significantly affect the attractiveness of dental careers and the sustainability of educational programs and should be monitored carefully by the profession.

  13. Dental Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide, developed for use in dental assistant education programs in Michigan, describes a task-based curriculum that can help a teacher to develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. It is based on task analysis and reflects the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that employers expect entry-level dental…

  14. Dental Training Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  15. An Investigation into Dental Local Anaesthesia Teaching in United Kingdom Dental Schools.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Graham; DavidD, Ailsa; Bell, Christopher; Robb, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    To review the current teaching of the use and administration of local anaesthesia in United Kingdom dental schools, along with their local guidelines and protocols. A qualitative and quantitative questionnaire was sent to sixteen UK dental schools to probe the methods of local anaesthetic teaching within each school. 14 of the 16 schools replied and the responses show a variety of practices being taught in the dental schools. 2% Lidocaine 1:80,000 Adrenaline is the first choice local anaesthetic solution for the majority of clinical situations. 2% Lidocaine with 1:80,000 Adrenaline remains the gold standard dental local anaesthetic with teaching about its safety and uses in all but a few situations. Most are taught the use of additional aids such as safety syringes and topical anaesthesia. There is variation with regards to the use of alternative anaesthetic agents.

  16. Gold grade variation and particle microchemistry in exploration pits of the Batouri gold district, SE Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishiti, A.; Suh, C. E.; Lehmann, B.; Egbe, J. A.; Shemang, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    The Batouri area hosts lode-gold mineralization under several-m-thick lateritic cover. Pitting to bed rock on a geochemical Au anomaly defined from previous reconnaissance soil sampling identified five horizons ranging from saprock at the base to laterite at the top. Analysis of bulk samples from each horizon by fire assay shows that most of the horizons are barren although 119 ppb and 48 ppb Au values were obtained from one laterite horizon and one saprolite horizon, respectively, from two separate pits. All the horizons were panned and particulate gold was also recovered only from these two horizons. The gold grains from both horizons are morphologically and compositionally indistinguishable with rare quartz, pyrite and galena inclusions. The grains have irregular, sub-rounded, bean to elongated shapes and they show a remarkable core-rim zonation. Electron microprobe analysis of the grains recorded high gold content in the rims (86.3-100 wt%) and along fissures within the grains (95.1-100 wt%). The cores are relatively Ag rich (11.8-14 wt% Ag) while the rims (0.63-13.7 wt% Ag, most of the values fall within the lower limit of this range) and fissures (0.03-5.02 wt% Ag) are poor in Ag. The low Ag concentration in the rims and along fissures is attributed to preferential leaching of Ag; a process recognized in gold grains and platiniferous alloys from alluvia. The core composition of the grains is similar to that of primary gold composition in the bedrock. These results show that gold in the soil is relic particulate gold derived from the primary source with no evidence of secondary gold precipitation in the weathering cycle. In all the pits no horizon was systematically enriched in gold suggesting there has been no chemical remobilization of gold in this environment. Rather the dispersion of gold here is in the particulate form. Therefore combining particulate gold features with assay data is relevant to exploration in such tropical environments.

  17. Correlation between radiographic analysis of alveolar bone density around dental implant and resonance frequency of dental implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prawoko, S. S.; Nelwan, L. C.; Odang, R. W.; Kusdhany, L. S.

    2017-08-01

    The histomorphometric test is the gold standard for dental implant stability quantification; however, it is invasive, and therefore, it is inapplicable to clinical patients. Consequently, accurate and objective alternative methods are required. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) and digital radiographic analysis are noninvasive methods with excellent objectivity and reproducibility. To analyze the correlation between the radiographic analysis of alveolar bone density around a dental implant and the resonance frequency of the dental implant. Digital radiographic images for 35 samples were obtained, and the resonance frequency of the dental implant was acquired using Osstell ISQ immediately after dental implant placement and on third-month follow-up. The alveolar bone density around the dental implant was subsequently analyzed using SIDEXIS-XG software. No significant correlation was reported between the alveolar bone density around the dental implant and the resonance frequency of the dental implant (r = -0.102 at baseline, r = 0.146 at follow-up, p > 0.05). However, the alveolar bone density and resonance frequency showed a significant difference throughout the healing period (p = 0.005 and p = 0.000, respectively). Conclusion: Digital dental radiographs and Osstell ISQ showed excellent objectivity and reproducibility in quantifying dental implant stability. Nonetheless, no significant correlation was observed between the results obtained using these two methods.

  18. Accuracy of Small Base Metal Dental Castings,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-10

    onre r puf~ eece an dif bydo:k itse Base metal al oy, c s ii.ing c ucyicatin nesmncatn ecnqe an.DISRBTOTTMN in( sten te hiquestatetrdISoc20itifrntrmRpr...34alternatives" to conventional dental golds. Determination and evaluation of composition , structure, physical and chemical properties, biologic features...maxillary right first molar was made from an industrial grade silicone . Then the tooth was machined to receive a full crown cast restoration. The tapered

  19. The Department of Defense Retiree Dental Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-05-01

    treatment. An age/sex factor was also developed for orthodontics (Table 13). 76 Table 13 Retiree and Dependent Eligible Population Age Bracket Age...does not cover the more costly dental procedures such as orthodontics , endodontics, periodontics, single crowns, and fixed and removable...program under section 1076a of title 10, United States Code. Orthodontic services, crowns, gold fillings, bridges, complete or partial dentures, and

  20. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Materials Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Share Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  1. Dental caries.

    PubMed

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D; Ekstrand, Kim; Weintraub, Jane A; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Tagami, Junji; Twetman, Svante; Tsakos, Georgios; Ismail, Amid

    2017-05-25

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries, acknowledging the historical era dominated by restoration of tooth decay by surgical means, but focuses on current, progressive and more holistic long-term, patient-centred, tooth-preserving preventive care.

  2. [A study on the color difference between Au-Pt alloy porcelain and Ni-Cr alloy porcelain].

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Zhao, Yunfeng; Li, Hong

    2003-06-01

    To investigate the color difference between Au-Pt alloy porcelain and Ni-Cr alloy porcelain. 30 metal-ceramic specimens with different dentin porcelain thickness were fabricated with two types of metal-ceramic alloy, each type of alloy had 15 specimens. L*, a*, b* were measured after opaque porcelain was applied, and dentin porcelain was fired 1, 3, 5, 7 times by MINOLTA CR-100. Then delta E was calculated which reflected the color difference between high-gold alloy porcelain and Ni-Cr alloy porcelain. Comparing with Ni-Cr alloy porcelain, the color of Au-Pt alloy porcelain was reddish, yellowish and less bright. The delta E between high-gold alloy porcelain and Ni-Cr alloy porcelain in shade A2 was largest when opaque porcelain was applied. It decreased when dentin porcelain was applied. It became smallest when fired 3 times, and increased along with the increase of fire times. It was larger than 1.5 except firing 3 times. When dentin porcelain was applied, delta E which was larger than 1.5 among different dentin porcelain thickness decreased along with the increase of dentin porcelain thickness. The color difference between the two types of metal-ceramic alloy should be carefully taken into account in order to improve the quality of color matching.

  3. Machinability of experimental Ti-Ag alloys.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Okuno, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    This study investigated the machinability of experimental Ti-Ag alloys (5, 10, 20, and 30 mass% Ag) as a new dental titanium alloy candidate for CAD/CAM use. The alloys were slotted with a vertical milling machine and carbide square end mills under two cutting conditions. Machinability was evaluated through cutting force using a three-component force transducer fixed on the table of the milling machine. The horizontal cutting force of the Ti-Ag alloys tended to decrease as the concentration of silver increased. Values of the component of the horizontal cutting force perpendicular to the feed direction for Ti-20% Ag and Ti-30% Ag were more than 20% lower than those for titanium under both cutting conditions. Alloying with silver significantly improved the machinability of titanium in terms of cutting force under the present cutting conditions.

  4. Therapeutic potential of dental stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Chalisserry, Elna Paul; Nam, Seung Yun; Park, Sang Hyug; Anil, Sukumaran

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell biology has become an important field in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering therapy since the discovery and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells. Stem cell populations have also been isolated from human dental tissues, including dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla, dental follicle progenitor cells, and periodontal ligament stem cells. Dental stem cells are relatively easily obtainable and exhibit high plasticity and multipotential capabilities. The dental stem cells represent a gold standard for neural-crest-derived bone reconstruction in humans and can be used for the repair of body defects in low-risk autologous therapeutic strategies. The bioengineering technologies developed for tooth regeneration will make substantial contributions to understand the developmental process and will encourage future organ replacement by regenerative therapies in a wide variety of organs such as the liver, kidney, and heart. The concept of developing tooth banking and preservation of dental stem cells is promising. Further research in the area has the potential to herald a new dawn in effective treatment of notoriously difficult diseases which could prove highly beneficial to mankind in the long run. PMID:28616151

  5. Dental MRI using wireless intraoral coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Scheifele, Christian; Nelson, Katja; Bock, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Herdt, Olga; Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the gold standard for dental imaging is projection radiography or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). These methods are fast and cost-efficient, but exhibit poor soft tissue contrast and expose the patient to ionizing radiation (X-rays). The need for an alternative imaging modality e.g. for soft tissue management has stimulated a rising interest in dental magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which provides superior soft tissue contrast. Compared to X-ray imaging, however, so far the spatial resolution of MRI is lower and the scan time is longer. In this contribution, we describe wireless, inductively-coupled intraoral coils whose local sensitivity enables high resolution MRI of dental soft tissue. In comparison to CBCT, a similar image quality with complementary contrast was obtained ex vivo. In-vivo, a voxel size of the order of 250•250•500 μm3 was achieved in 4 min only. Compared to dental MRI acquired with clinical equipment, the quality of the images was superior in the sensitive volume of the coils and is expected to improve the planning of interventions and monitoring thereafter. This method may enable a more accurate dental diagnosis and avoid unnecessary interventions, improving patient welfare and bringing MRI a step closer to becoming a radiation-free alternative for dental imaging.

  6. Metal Alloy ICF Capsules Created by Electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect

    Horwood, Corie; Stadermann, Michael; Bunn, Thomas L.

    Electrochemical deposition is an attractive alternative to physical vapor deposition and micromachining to produce metal capsules for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Electrochemical deposition (also referred to as electrodeposition or plating) is expected to produce full-density metal capsules without seams or inclusions of unwanted atomic constituents, the current shortcomings of micromachine and physical vapor deposition, respectively. In this paper, we discuss new cathode designs that allow for the rapid electrodeposition of gold and copper alloys on spherical mandrels by making transient contact with the constantly moving spheres. Electrodeposition of pure gold, copper, platinum, and alloys of gold-copper and gold-silver are demonstrated,more » with nonporous coatings of >40 µm achieved in only a few hours of plating. The surface roughness of the spheres after electrodeposition is comparable to the starting mandrel, and the coatings appear to be fully dense with no inclusions. A detailed understanding of the electrodeposition conditions that result in different alloy compositions and plating rates will allow for the electrodeposition of graded alloys on spheres in the near future. Finally, this report on the electrodeposition of metals on spherical mandrels is an important first step toward the fabrication of graded-density metal capsules for ICF experiments at the National Ignition Facility.« less

  7. Metal Alloy ICF Capsules Created by Electrodeposition

    DOE PAGES

    Horwood, Corie; Stadermann, Michael; Bunn, Thomas L.

    2017-12-04

    Electrochemical deposition is an attractive alternative to physical vapor deposition and micromachining to produce metal capsules for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Electrochemical deposition (also referred to as electrodeposition or plating) is expected to produce full-density metal capsules without seams or inclusions of unwanted atomic constituents, the current shortcomings of micromachine and physical vapor deposition, respectively. In this paper, we discuss new cathode designs that allow for the rapid electrodeposition of gold and copper alloys on spherical mandrels by making transient contact with the constantly moving spheres. Electrodeposition of pure gold, copper, platinum, and alloys of gold-copper and gold-silver are demonstrated,more » with nonporous coatings of >40 µm achieved in only a few hours of plating. The surface roughness of the spheres after electrodeposition is comparable to the starting mandrel, and the coatings appear to be fully dense with no inclusions. A detailed understanding of the electrodeposition conditions that result in different alloy compositions and plating rates will allow for the electrodeposition of graded alloys on spheres in the near future. Finally, this report on the electrodeposition of metals on spherical mandrels is an important first step toward the fabrication of graded-density metal capsules for ICF experiments at the National Ignition Facility.« less

  8. American Dental Education Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hygiene Programs) Applicants Program Directors ADEA AADSAS® (Dental School) Applicants Health Professions Advisors Admissions Officers ADEA CAAPID® (International Dentists) Applicants Admissions Officers ADEA PASS® (Advanced Dental ...

  9. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, H.; Razak, I. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS) questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht's DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates' of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%). However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%). Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P = 0.004). “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services. PMID:25386615

  10. Dental students--dental advocates.

    PubMed

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future.

  11. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  12. Evaluation and comparison of castability between an indigenous and imported Ni-Cr alloy.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Ganesh; Padmanabhan, T V; Ariga, Padma; Subramanian, R

    2011-01-01

    Since 1907 casting restorations have been in use in dentistry. Numerous companies have been manufacturing and marketing base metal alloys. Gold was a major component of casting alloys. But alloys with less than 65% gold tarnished easily and the increase in cost of gold post-1970s lead to the revival of base metal alloys such as nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys which were in use since 1930s. This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the castability between an indigenous alloy and an imported alloy, as imported base metal alloys are considered to be expensive for fabrication of crowns and bridges. This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the castability (for the accurate fabrication of crowns and bridges) between an indigenous base metal alloy-Non-ferrous Materials Technology Development Centre (NFTDC), Hyderabad (Alloy A) -and an imported base metal alloys (Alloy B). Castability measurement was obtained by counting the number of completely formed line segments surrounding the 81 squares in the pattern and later calculating the percentage values. The percentage obtained was taken as the castability value for a particular base metal alloy. The percentage of castability was determined by counting only the number of completely cast segments in a perfect casting (81 × 2 = 162), and then multiplying the resulting fraction by 100 to give the percentage completeness. The Student t-test was used. When the castability of alloys A and B was compared, the calculated value was less than the tabular value (1.171 < 2.048) leading to the conclusion that castability between alloys A and B is insignificant. Therefore we conclude that both the alloys have the same castability. Using the above-mentioned materials and following the method to test castability, we were able to derive favorable results. As the results were satisfactory, we can conclude that the castability of the indigenous alloy is on par with the imported alloy.

  13. Gold in placer deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yeend, Warren; Shawe, Daniel R.; Wier, Kenneth L.

    1989-01-01

    Man most likely first obtained gold from placer deposits, more than 6,000 years ago. Placers account for more than two-thirds of the total world gold supply, and roughly half of that mined in the States of California, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho.Placer deposits result from weathering and release of gold from lode deposits, transportation of the gold, and concentration of the gold dominantly in stream gravels. Unless preserved by burial, a placer subsequently may be eroded, and either dispersed or reconcentrated.California has produced more than 40 million troy ounces of gold from placers, both modern and fossil (Tertiary). The source of the great bulk of the gold is numerous quartz veins and mineralized zones of the Mother Lode and related systems in the western Sierra Nevada region. The gold-bearing lodes were emplaced in Carboniferous and Jurassic metamorphic rocks intruded by small bodies of Jurassic and Cretaceous igneous rocks. Mineralization occurred probably in Late Cretaceous time. Significant amounts of placer gold also were mined along the Salmon and Trinity Rivers in northern California. Source of the gold is lode deposits in Paleozoic and Mesozoic metamorphic rocks that were intruded by Mesozoic igneous rocks.Alaska has produced roughly 21 million ounces of gold from placer deposits. Most (about 13 million ounces) has come from the interior region, including 7,600,000 ounces from the Fairbanks district and 1,300,000 ounces from the Iditarod district. Lode sources are believed to be mostly quartz veins in Precambrian or Paleozoic metamorphic rocks intruded by small igneous bodies near Fairbanks, and shear zones in Tertiary(?) quartz monzonite stocks at Iditarod. The Seward Peninsula has produced more than 6 million ounces of placer gold, including about 4,000,000 ounces from the Nome district. Most of the gold was derived from raised beach deposits. Source of the gold probably is Tertiary-mineralized faults and joints in metamorphic rocks of late

  14. GOLD PLATING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Seegmiller, R.

    1957-08-01

    An improved bath is reported for plating gold on other metals. The composition of the plating bath is as follows: Gold cyanide from about 15 to about 50 grams, potassium cyanide from about 70 to about 125 grams, and sulfonated castor oil from about 0.1 to about 10 cc. The gold plate produced from this bath is smooth, semi-hard, and nonporous.

  15. Deposition and characterization of far-infrared absorbing gold black films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Advena, Donna J.; Bly, Vincent T.; Cox, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    A process is described for producing gold black films with high absorptance in the far IR. The optical and electrical properties of these films have been studied with particular emphasis on the absorptance of films at wavelengths as long as 50 microns. A substantial decrease in absorptance near 50 microns has been observed for pure gold black films on aging in air. This degradation can be largely avoided by alloying the gold with a small percentage of copper during the deposition. Preliminary results on two methods for delineating gold black films are also presented.

  16. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  17. Supercapacitive transport of pharmacologic agents using nanoporous gold electrodes.

    PubMed

    Gittard, Shaun D; Pierson, Bonnie E; Ha, Cindy M; Wu, Chung-An Max; Narayan, Roger J; Robinson, David B

    2010-02-01

    In this study, nanoporous gold supercapacitors were produced by electrochemical dealloying of gold-silver alloy. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed completion of the dealloying process and generation of a porous gold material with approximately 10 nm diameter pores. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry of the nanoporous gold electrodes indicated that these materials exhibited supercapacitor behavior. The storage capacity of the electrodes measured by chronoamperometry was approximately 3 mC at 200 mV. Electrochemical storage and voltage-controlled delivery of two model pharmacologic agents, benzylammonium and salicylic acid, was demonstrated. These results suggest that capacitance-based storage and delivery of pharmacologic agents may serve as an alternative to conventional drug delivery methods.

  18. Dental hygienists in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-H

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give basic information about the status of dental hygienists in Korea. This paper examines the changing process of the dental hygiene education system in Korea, from its start in 1965 until the present, 2003, the composition of dental personnel in Korea, the specialised areas and roles of dental hygienists after they receive their licenses, employment of dental hygienists, dental hygiene-related organisations, and the status and direction of dental hygienists in Korea. This paper shows the organisational, educational, governmental and individual efforts to increase the level of professionalism, education and quality of care delivered to Korean citizens nationwide.

  19. Dental education in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núñez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  20. URANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Seybolt, A.U.

    1958-04-15

    Uranium alloys containing from 0.1 to 10% by weight, but preferably at least 5%, of either zirconium, niobium, or molybdenum exhibit highly desirable nuclear and structural properties which may be improved by heating the alloy to about 900 d C for an extended period of time and then rapidly quenching it.

  1. ZIRCONIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, H.A.; Ames, D.P.

    1959-02-01

    A binary zirconiuin--antimony alloy is presented which is corrosion resistant and hard containing from 0.07% to 1.6% by weight of Sb. The alloys have good corrosion resistance and are useful in building equipment for the chemical industry.

  2. Nonswelling alloy

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-12-23

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses.

  3. Evaluation of dental therapists undertaking dental examinations in a school setting in Scotland.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Emma J; McMahon, Alex D; Jones, Colwyn M; Curnow, Morag M; Macpherson, Lorna M D

    2016-12-01

    To measure agreement between dental therapists and the Scottish gold-standard dentist undertaking National Dental Inspection Programme (NDIP) examinations. A study of interexaminer agreement between 19 dental therapists and the national gold-standard dentist was carried out. Pre-calibration training used the caries diagnostic criteria and examination techniques agreed by the British Association for the Study of Community Dentistry (BASCD). Twenty-three 5-year-old children (Primary 1) and 17 11-year-old children (Primary 7) children were examined. Agreement was assessed using kappa statistics on d 3 mft and D 3 MFT for P1 and P7 children, sensitivity and specificity values, and kappa statistics on d 3 t/D 3 T and ft/FT. Calibration data on P1 and P7 children from 2009-2012 involving dentists as examiners were used for comparison. Economic evaluation was undertaken using a cost minimization analysis approach. The mean kappa score was 0.84 (SD 0.07) ranging from 0.69 to 0.94. All dental therapists scored good or very good agreement with the gold-standard dentist. This compares with historic NDIP calibration data with dentists, against the same gold-standard dentist, where the mean kappa value was 0.68 (SD 0.22) with a range of 0.35-1.00. The mean sensitivity score was 0.98 (SD 0.04) (range 0.88-1.0) and mean specificity score was 0.90 (SD 0.06) (range 0.78-0.96). Health economic analysis estimated that salary costs would be 33.6% lower if dental therapists were substituted for dentists in the year 2013, with an estimated saving of approximately £103 646 per annum on the national budget. We conclude that dental therapists show a high level of interexaminer agreement, and with the appropriate annual training and calibration, they could undertake dental examinations as part of the NDIP programme. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Impact of Surface Potential on Apatite Formation in Ti Alloys Subjected to Acid and Heat Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Seiji; Hashimoto, Hideki; Nakai, Ryusuke; Takadama, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Titanium metal (Ti) and its alloys are widely used in orthopedic and dental fields. We have previously shown that acid and heat treatment was effective to introduce bone bonding, osteoconduction and osteoinduction on pure Ti. In the present study, acid and heat treatment with or without initial NaOH treatment was performed on typical Ti-based alloys used in orthopedic and dental fields. Dynamic movements of alloying elements were developed, which depended on the kind of treatment and type of alloy. It was found that the simple acid and heat treatment enriched/remained the alloying elements on Ti–6Al–4V, Ti–15Mo–5Zr–3Al and Ti–15Zr–4Nb–4Ta, resulting in neutral surface charges. Thus, the treated alloys did not form apatite in a simulated body fluid (SBF) within 3 days. In contrast, when the alloys were subjected to a NaOH treatment prior to an acid and heat treatment, alloying elements were selectively removed from the alloy surfaces. As a result, the treated alloys became positively charged, and formed apatite in SBF within 3 days. Thus, the treated alloys would be useful in orthopedic and dental fields since they form apatite even in a living body and bond to bone. PMID:28946646

  5. Dental hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R M

    2011-08-01

    A 14-year-old girl developed dental pain and was treated for acute infected pulpitis of her right upper lateral incisor with drilling and filling. The pain continued and was helped by analgesia, sucking ice cubes and drinking cold water. Forty-eight hours later, she became confused and disoriented. She started to vomit and complained of headache. Investigations revealed hyponatraemia with normal serum potassium levels and initially normal urinary sodium excretion. Over the next 24 hours, she passed 5.45 L of urine and her serum sodium rose from 125 to 143 mmol/L. Self-induced water intoxication has been described during drinking games and initiation ceremonies, but this would appear to an unusual cause. Conservative management proved successful in allowing this girl to recover without sequelae.

  6. PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Chynoweth, W.

    1959-06-16

    The preparation of low-melting-point plutonium alloys is described. In a MgO crucible Pu is placed on top of the lighter alloying metal (Fe, Co, or Ni) and the temperature raised to 1000 or 1200 deg C. Upon cooling, the alloy slug is broke out of the crucible. With 14 at. % Ni the m.p. is 465 deg C; with 9.5 at. % Fe the m.p. is 410 deg C; and with 12.0 at. % Co the m.p. is 405 deg C. (T.R.H.) l6262 l6263 ((((((((Abstract unscannable))))))))

  7. Dental amalgam and mercury vapor release.

    PubMed

    Osborne, J W

    1992-09-01

    Dental diseases are among the most common ailments, and dentists in the United States spend over 50% of their time in dental practice rebuilding carious, malformed, and traumatically injured teeth. It is logical, therefore, that the majority of the dental school curriculum is devoted to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of teeth with anomalies. Dentists have several choices of materials they can use to accomplish the task of rebuilding teeth. Besides amalgam, they have ceramic materials, resin composites, base-metal and noble casting alloys, and glass-ionomer cements to use to restore the posterior dentition. Each of these restorative materials has advantages and disadvantages, and the clinical judgment as to when a particular material should be used is given a high priority in dental education. Amalgam is the most widely used of these restorative materials, with 92% of dentists listing it as the material of choice in the posterior of the mouth (Clinical Research Associates, 1990). Dentists have been placing amalgams for over 150 years in the US. They placed 150 million last year, which represents over 75 tons of amalgam alloy. The reasons that dentists use this restorative material so frequently are its durability, ease of manipulation, and low cost. Numerous clinical studies have been conducted on the serviceability of amalgam. Most of these have been on the old, low-copper alloys, and results indicate that they last from 8 to 15 years (Bailit et al., 1979; Osborne et al., 1980; Qvist et al., 1986). In the past 20 years, vast improvements have been made in amalgams with the development of the high-copper systems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Cobalt-chromium alloys in fixed prosthodontics in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Kassapidou, Maria; Franke Stenport, Victoria; Hjalmarsson, Lars; Johansson, Carina B.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aim: The aim of this study was to compile the usage of Co-Cr alloys in fixed prosthodontics (FP) among dental laboratories in Sweden. Methods: From March to October 2015, questionnaires were sent to 542 registered dental laboratories in Sweden. The questionnaires were divided in two parts, one for fixed dental-supported prosthodontics (FDP) and one for fixed implant-supported prosthodontics (FIP). Reminders were sent three times. Results: In total of 542 dental laboratories, 55% answered the questionnaires. Most dental laboratories use Co-Cr in FP, 134 (74%) in FDP and 89(66%) in FIP. The laboratories used Co-Cr alloys of various compositions in the prostheses, 35 for FDP and 30 for FIP. The most commonly used Co-Cr alloys for tooth-supported FDPs were (a) Wirobond® 280, (b) Cara SLM and (c) Wirobond® C. For implant-supported frameworks the frequently used alloys were: (a) Cara SLM, (b) Cara Milled and (c) Wirobond® 280. Except for the difference in composition of these alloys, they were also manufactured with various techniques. In tooth-supported prostheses the dominating technique was the cast technique while newer techniques as laser-sintering and milling were more commonly reported for implant-supported constructions. A fourth technique; the ‘pre-state’ milling was reported in FDP. Conclusion: More than 30 different Co-Cr alloys were reported as being used in FP. Thus, there is a need for studies exploring the mechanical and physical behavior and the biological response to the most commonly used Co-Cr alloys. PMID:29242813

  9. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  10. Preparation and bactericide activity of gallic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Álvarez, S. A.; Martínez-Castañón, G. A.; Niño-Martínez, N.; Reyes-Macías, J. F.; Patiño-Marín, N.; Loyola-Rodríguez, J. P.; Ruiz, Facundo

    2010-10-01

    In this work, gold nanoparticles with three different sizes (13.7, 39.4, and 76.7 nm) were prepared using a simple aqueous method with gallic acid as the reducing and stabilizing agent, the different sizes were obtained varying some experimental parameters as the pH of the reaction and the amount of the gallic acid. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Samples were identified as elemental gold and present spherical morphology, a narrow size distribution and good stabilization according to TEM and DLS results. The antibacterial activity of this gallic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles against S. mutans (the etiologic agent of dental caries) was assessed using a microdilution method obtaining a minimum inhibitory concentration of 12.31, 12.31, and 49.25 μg/mL for 13.7, 39.4, and 76.7 nm gold nanoparticles, respectively. The antibacterial assay showed that gold nanoparticles prepared in this work present a bactericide activity by a synergistic action with gallic acid. The MIC found for this nanoparticles are much lower than those reported for mixtures of gold nanoparticles and antibiotics.

  11. Determination of structural, mechanical and corrosion properties of Nb2O5 and (NbyCu 1-y)Ox thin films deposited on Ti6Al4V alloy substrates for dental implant applications.

    PubMed

    Mazur, M; Kalisz, M; Wojcieszak, D; Grobelny, M; Mazur, P; Kaczmarek, D; Domaradzki, J

    2015-02-01

    In this paper comparative studies on the structural, mechanical and corrosion properties of Nb2O5/Ti and (NbyCu1-y)Ox/Ti alloy systems have been investigated. Pure layers of niobia and niobia with a copper addition were deposited on a Ti6Al4V titanium alloy surface using the magnetron sputtering method. The physicochemical properties of the prepared thin films were examined with the aid of XRD, XPS SEM and AFM measurements. The mechanical properties (i.e., nanohardness, Young's modulus and abrasion resistance) were performed using nanoindentation and a steel wool test. The corrosion properties of the coatings were determined by analysis of the voltammetric curves. The deposited coatings were crack free, exhibited good adherence to the substrate, no discontinuity of the thin film was observed and the surface morphology was homogeneous. The hardness of pure niobium pentoxide was ca. 8.64GPa. The obtained results showed that the addition of copper into pure niobia resulted in the preparation of a layer with a lower hardness of ca. 7.79 GPa (for niobia with 17 at.% Cu) and 7.75 GPa (for niobia with 25 at.% Cu). The corrosion properties of the tested thin films deposited on the surface of titanium alloy depended on the composition of the thin layer. The addition of copper (i.e. a noble metal) to Nb2O5 film increased the corrosion resistance followed by a significant decrease in the value of corrosion currents and, in case of the highest Cu content, the shift of corrosion potential towards the noble direction. The best corrosion properties were obtained from a sample of Ti6Al4V coated with (Nb0.75Cu0.25)Ox thin film. It seems that the tested materials could be used in the future as protection coatings for Ti alloys in biomedical applications such as implants. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Elastic moduli of cast Ti-Au, Ti-Ag, and Ti-Cu alloys.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Okuno, Osamu

    2006-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of alloying titanium with gold, silver, or copper on the elastic properties of the alloys. A series of binary titanium alloys was made with four concentrations of gold, silver, or copper (5, 10, 20, and 30 mass%) in an argon-arc melting furnace. The Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios of the alloy castings were determined with an ultrasonic-pulse method. The density of each alloy was previously measured by the Archimedes' principle. Results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and the Scheffé's test. The densities of Ti-Au, Ti-Ag, and Ti-Cu alloys monotonically increased as the concentration of alloying elements increased. As the concentration of gold or silver increased to 20%, the Young's modulus significantly decreased, followed by a subsequent increase in value. As the concentration of copper increased, the Young's modulus monotonically increased. The Young's moduli of all the Ti-Cu alloys were significantly higher than that of the titanium. The density of all the experimental alloys was virtually independent of the alloy phases, while the Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios of the alloys were dependent. The addition of gold or silver slightly reduced the Young's modulus of the titanium when the alloy phase was single alpha. The increase in the Young's modulus of the Ti-Cu alloys is probably due to the precipitation of intermetallic compound Ti2Cu. Copper turned out to be a moderate stiffener that gains a Young's modulus of titanium up to 20% at the copper concentration of 30 mass%.

  13. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes: Dental Tips For more copies contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse ... damage the gum and bone that hold your teeth in place and may lead to painful chewing ...

  14. Dental Effluent Guidelines

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Overview and documents for Dental Office Category regulation (40 CFR Part 441); comprising pretreatment standards for discharges of dental amalgam pollutants, including mercury, into publicly owned treatment works (POTWs).

  15. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  16. Dental Care in Scleroderma

    MedlinePlus

    Dental Care in Scleroderma People living with scleroderma face unique challenges while trying to maintain their oral ... They are more likely to be affected by dental conditions such as small mouth, dry mouth, jaw ...

  17. Dental Exam for Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 1 year. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Dental Association recommend scheduling a ... children and adolescents. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends scheduling regular dental checkups, with the most ...

  18. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Institute for Oral Health! Give Today Join ADHA Today! Use promo code HP2017 for a Free online ... Promoting the “Daily 4” Canadian Dental Hygienists' Association Global Dental Hygiene Conference ADHA stands with TDHA during ...

  19. Design and development of novel antibacterial Ti-Ni-Cu shape memory alloys for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Li, H F; Qiu, K J; Zhou, F Y; Li, L; Zheng, Y F

    2016-11-29

    In the case of medical implants, foreign materials are preferential sites for bacterial adhesion and microbial contamination, which can lead to the development of prosthetic infections. Commercially biomedical TiNi shape memory alloys are the most commonly used materials for permanent implants in contact with bone and dental, and the prevention of infections of TiNi biomedical shape memory alloys in clinical cases is therefore a crucial challenge for orthopaedic and dental surgeons. In the present study, copper has been chosen as the alloying element for design and development novel ternary biomedical Ti‒Ni‒Cu shape memory alloys with antibacterial properties. The effects of copper alloying element on the microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion behaviors, cytocompatibility and antibacterial properties of biomedical Ti‒Ni‒Cu shape memory alloys have been systematically investigated. The results demonstrated that Ti‒Ni‒Cu alloys have good mechanical properties, and remain the excellent shape memory effects after adding copper alloying element. The corrosion behaviors of Ti‒Ni‒Cu alloys are better than the commercial biomedical Ti‒50.8Ni alloys. The Ti‒Ni‒Cu alloys exhibit excellent antibacterial properties while maintaining the good cytocompatibility, which would further guarantee the potential application of Ti‒Ni‒Cu alloys as future biomedical implants and devices without inducing bacterial infections.

  20. Design and development of novel antibacterial Ti-Ni-Cu shape memory alloys for biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. F.; Qiu, K. J.; Zhou, F. Y.; Li, L.; Zheng, Y. F.

    2016-11-01

    In the case of medical implants, foreign materials are preferential sites for bacterial adhesion and microbial contamination, which can lead to the development of prosthetic infections. Commercially biomedical TiNi shape memory alloys are the most commonly used materials for permanent implants in contact with bone and dental, and the prevention of infections of TiNi biomedical shape memory alloys in clinical cases is therefore a crucial challenge for orthopaedic and dental surgeons. In the present study, copper has been chosen as the alloying element for design and development novel ternary biomedical Ti‒Ni‒Cu shape memory alloys with antibacterial properties. The effects of copper alloying element on the microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion behaviors, cytocompatibility and antibacterial properties of biomedical Ti‒Ni‒Cu shape memory alloys have been systematically investigated. The results demonstrated that Ti‒Ni‒Cu alloys have good mechanical properties, and remain the excellent shape memory effects after adding copper alloying element. The corrosion behaviors of Ti‒Ni‒Cu alloys are better than the commercial biomedical Ti‒50.8Ni alloys. The Ti‒Ni‒Cu alloys exhibit excellent antibacterial properties while maintaining the good cytocompatibility, which would further guarantee the potential application of Ti‒Ni‒Cu alloys as future biomedical implants and devices without inducing bacterial infections.

  1. Synthesis, Structure, Stability and Redispersion of Gold-based Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiruvalam, Ram Chandra

    Nanoscale gold has been shown to possess an intriguing combination of unexpected optical, photochemical and catalytic properties. The ability to control the size, shape, morphology, composition and dispersion of gold-based nanostructures is key to optimizing their performance for nanotechnology applications. The advanced electron microscopy studies described in this thesis analyze three important aspects of gold and gold-palladium alloy nanoparticles: namely, (i) the ability to synthesize gold nanoparticles of controlled size and shape in an aqueous medium; (ii) the colloidal preparation of designer gold-palladium alloys for selective oxidation catalysis; and (iii) the ability to disperse gold as finely and homogeneously as possible on a metal oxide or carbon support. The ability to exploit the nanoscale properties of gold for various engineering applications often depends on our ability to control size and shape of the nanoscale entity by careful manipulation of the synthesis parameters. We have explored an aqueous based synthesis route, using oleylamine as both a reductant and surfactant, for preparing gold nanostructures. By systematically varying synthesis parameters such as oleylamine concentration, reaction temperature, and aging time it is possible to identify processing regimens that generate Au nanostructures having either pseudo-spherical, faceted polyhedral, nanostar or wire shaped morphologies. Furthermore, by quenching the reaction partway through it is possible to create a class of metastable Au-containing structures such as nanocubes, nanoboxes and nanowires. Possible formation mechanisms for these gold based nano-objects are discussed. There is a growing interest in using supported bimetallic AuPd alloy nanoparticles for selective oxidation reactions. In this study, a systematic series of size controlled AuPd bimetallic particles have been prepared by colloidal synthesis methods. Particles having random alloy structures, as well as `designer

  2. Gold-bearing skarns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theodore, Ted G.; Orris, Greta J.; Hammerstrom, Jane M.; Bliss, James D.

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, a significant proportion of the mining industry's interest has been centered on discovery of gold deposits; this includes discovery of additional deposits where gold occurs in skarn, such as at Fortitude, Nevada, and at Red Dome, Australia. Under the classification of Au-bearing skarns, we have modeled these and similar gold-rich deposits that have a gold grade of at least 1 g/t and exhibit distinctive skarn mineralogy. Two subtypes, Au-skarns and byproduct Au-skarns, can be recognized on the basis of gold, silver, and base-metal grades, although many other geological factors apparently are still undistinguishable largely because of a lack of detailed studies of the Au-skarns. Median grades and tonnage for 40 Au-skarn deposits are 8.6 g/t Au, 5.0 g/t Ag, and 213,000 t. Median grades and tonnage for 50 byproduct and Au-skarn deposits are 3.7 g/t Au, 37 g/t Ag, and 330,000 t. Gold-bearing skarns are generally calcic exoskarns associated with intense retrograde hydrosilicate alteration. These skarns may contain economic amounts of numerous other commodities (Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn, As, Bi, W, Sb, Co, Cd, and S) as well as gold and silver. Most Au-bearing skarns are found in Paleozoic and Cenozoic orogenic-belt and island-arc settings and are associated with felsic to intermediate intrusive rocks of Paleozoic to Tertiary age. Native gold, electru, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, sphalerite, galena, bismuth minerals, and magnetite or hematite are the most common opaque minerals. Gangue minerals typically include garnet (andradite-grossular), pyroxene (diopside-hedenbergite), wollastonite, chlorite, epidote, quartz, actinolite-tremolite, and (or) calcite.

  3. Gold nanoprobes for theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Panchapakesan, Balaji; Book-Newell, Brittany; Sethu, Palaniappan; Rao, Madhusudhana; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoprobes have become attractive diagnostic and therapeutic agents in medicine and life sciences research owing to their reproducible synthesis with atomic level precision, unique physical and chemical properties, versatility of their morphologies, flexibility in functionalization, ease of targeting, efficiency in drug delivery and opportunities for multimodal therapy. This review highlights some of the recent advances and the potential for gold nanoprobes in theranostics. PMID:22122586

  4. Dental Manpower Fact Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ake, James N.; Johnson, Donald W.

    Statistical data on many aspects of dental and allied dental personnel supply, distribution, characteristics, and education and on certain other aspects of dental services are presented and discussed. The data on dentist supply show the national trend in the supply of active dentists since 1950 and the concurrent changes in dentist-to-population…

  5. DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GALAGAN, DONALD J.

    THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

  6. Dental Assisting Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiel, Sandra J.

    Compiled to introduce the dental assisting student to various techniques used in the dental office and to present theoretical information essential for the student's professional development, this laboratory guide consists of three units of instruction. The first unit is an introduction to dental assisting and contains five topics of study. The…

  7. Dental Laboratory Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC.

    The Air Force dental laboratory technology manual is designed as a basic training text as well as a reference source for dental laboratory technicians, a specialty occupation concerned with the design, fabrication, and repair of dental prostheses. Numerous instructive diagrams and photographs are included throughout the manual. The comprehensive…

  8. Getting the Gold Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Epner Technology, Inc., worked with Goddard Space Center to apply gold coating to the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mirror. This partnership resulted in new commercial applications for Epner's LaserGold(R) process in the automotive industry. Previously, the company did not have equipment large enough to handle the plating of the stainless steel panels cost effectively. Seeing a chance to renew this effort, Epner Technology and Goddard entered into an agreement by which NASA would fund the facility needed to do the gold-plating, and Epner Technology would cover all other costs as part of their internal research and development. The VCL mirror project proceeded successfully, fulfilling Goddard's needs and leaving Epner Technology with a new facility to provide LaserGold for the automotive industry. The new capability means increased power savings and improvements in both quality and production time for BMW Manufacturing Corporation of Spartanburg, South Carolina, and Cadillac of Detroit, Michigan, as well as other manufacturers who have implemented Epner Technology's LaserGold process. LaserGold(R) is a registered trademark of Epner Technology, Inc.

  9. Weaker Dental Enamel Explains Dental Decay

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Gibson, Carolyn W.; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is “weaker” while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution. PMID:25885796

  10. Antibacterial properties and mechanisms of gold-silver nanocages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yulan; Wan, Jiangshan; Miron, Richard J.; Zhao, Yanbin; Zhang, Yufeng

    2016-05-01

    Despite the number of antibiotics used in routine clinical practice, bacterial infections continue to be one of the most important challenges faced in humans. The main concerns arise from the continuing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the difficulties faced with the pharmaceutical development of new antibiotics. Thus, advancements in the avenue of novel antibacterial agents are essential. In this study, gold (Au) was combined with silver (Ag), a well-known antibacterial material, to form silver nanoparticles producing a gold-silver alloy structure with hollow interiors and porous walls (gold-silver nanocage). This novel material was promising in antibacterial applications due to its better biocompatibility than Ag nanoparticles, potential in photothermal effects and drug delivery ability. The gold-silver nanocage was then tested for its antibacterial properties and the mechanism involved leading to its antibacterial properties. This study confirms that this novel gold-silver nanocage has broad-spectrum antibacterial properties exerting its effects through the destruction of the cell membrane, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of cell apoptosis. Therefore, we introduce a novel gold-silver nanocage that serves as a potential nanocarrier for the future delivery of antibiotics.

  11. Dental implant tourism.

    PubMed

    Barrowman, R A; Grubor, D; Chandu, A

    2010-12-01

    Access and affordability of dental care can be problematic for some in the Australian community. Therefore, dental tourism is increasingly becoming more attractive to some patients due to decreased expense, increased convenience and immediacy of treatment. However, there are significant issues for both clinician and patient in regards to dental tourism. Lack of accountability and regulation are the main issues and this is particularly evident when complications occur. This paper presents five cases where complications have arisen in the setting of dental tourism. © 2010 Australian Dental Association.

  12. Backscattering from dental restorations and splint materials during therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, A.G.; Sharma, S.; George, D.I.

    1985-08-01

    Models were constructed to simulate as closely as possible the human oral cavity. Radiation absorbed doses were determined for controls and various test situations involving the presence of dental restorative and splint materials during cobalt-60 irradiation of the models. Adjacent gold full crowns and adjacent solid dental silver amalgam cores both increased the dose to the interproximal gingivae by 20%. Use of orthodontic full bands for splinting the jaws increased the dose to the buccal tissues by an average of 10%. Augmentation of dose through backscatter radiation was determined to be only slight for intracoronal amalgam fillings and stainless steelmore » or plastic bracket splints.« less

  13. Description and Documentation of the Dental School Dental Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Rosen and Wallace, Inc., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was undertaken to describe and document the dental school dental delivery system using an integrated systems approach. In late 1976 and early 1977, a team of systems analysts and dental consultants visited three dental schools to observe the delivery of dental services and patient flow and to interview administrative staff and faculty.…

  14. Increased mercury emissions from modern dental amalgams.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Ulf G; Hylander, Lars D

    2017-04-01

    All types of dental amalgams contain mercury, which partly is emitted as mercury vapor. All types of dental amalgams corrode after being placed in the oral cavity. Modern high copper amalgams exhibit two new traits of increased instability. Firstly, when subjected to wear/polishing, droplets rich in mercury are formed on the surface, showing that mercury is not being strongly bonded to the base or alloy metals. Secondly, high copper amalgams emit substantially larger amounts of mercury vapor than the low copper amalgams used before the 1970s. High copper amalgams has been developed with focus on mechanical strength and corrosion resistance, but has been sub-optimized in other aspects, resulting in increased instability and higher emission of mercury vapor. This has not been presented to policy makers and scientists. Both low and high copper amalgams undergo a transformation process for several years after placement, resulting in a substantial reduction in mercury content, but there exist no limit for maximum allowed emission of mercury from dental amalgams. These modern high copper amalgams are nowadays totally dominating the European, US and other markets, resulting in significant emissions of mercury, not considered when judging their suitability for dental restoration.

  15. The Future of Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonsen, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    The author, a representative of the American Dental Trade Association, identifies major challenges facing dental education in the areas of predoctoral dental education, postdoctoral dental education, and continuing dental education. Ten recommendations address preclinical and clinical courses, licensing examinations, mandatory continuing…

  16. Clinical Evaluation of Dental Restorative Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    approximately one- third of both sexes possessed fixed prostheses made with identified nickel-chromium dental base-metal alloys, VERABOND, ALPHA MS, and...incidence of nickel sensitivity increased to one- third of this age group. In view of the very significant correlation of pierced ears with the incidence...UNREI.ATED (U) 0 4 0 3 ENDODONTIC TREATMENT (V) 0 4 0 1 CROWN & PRIDGE (W) 0 0 0 0 TOOTH MISSING (X) 0 0 0 0 OumE.R UNRELATED (Y) 0 2 0 0 (PATIENT

  17. Biorecovery of gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisler, R.

    2003-01-01

    Recovery of ionic and metallic gold (Au) from a wide variety of solutions by selected species of bacteria, yeasts, fungi, algae, and higher plants is documented. Gold accumulations were up to 7.0 g/kg dry weight (DW) in various species of bacteria, 25.0 g/kg DW in freshwater algae, 84.0 g/kg DW in peat, and 100.0 g/kg DW in dried fungus mixed with keratinous material. Mechanisms of accumulation include oxidation, dissolution, reduction, leaching, and sorption. Uptake patterns are significantly modified by the physicochemical milieu. Crab exoskeletons accumulate up to 4.9 g Au/kg DW; however, gold accumulations in various tissues of living teleosts, decapod crustaceans, and bivalve molluscs are negligible.

  18. An Automatic and Robust Algorithm of Reestablishment of Digital Dental Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Bing; Xia, James J.; Gateno, Jaime; Xiong, Zixiang; Zhou, Xiaobo; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2017-01-01

    In the field of craniomaxillofacial (CMF) surgery, surgical planning can be performed on composite 3-D models that are generated by merging a computerized tomography scan with digital dental models. Digital dental models can be generated by scanning the surfaces of plaster dental models or dental impressions with a high-resolution laser scanner. During the planning process, one of the essential steps is to reestablish the dental occlusion. Unfortunately, this task is time-consuming and often inaccurate. This paper presents a new approach to automatically and efficiently reestablish dental occlusion. It includes two steps. The first step is to initially position the models based on dental curves and a point matching technique. The second step is to reposition the models to the final desired occlusion based on iterative surface-based minimum distance mapping with collision constraints. With linearization of rotation matrix, the alignment is modeled by solving quadratic programming. The simulation was completed on 12 sets of digital dental models. Two sets of dental models were partially edentulous, and another two sets have first premolar extractions for orthodontic treatment. Two validation methods were applied to the articulated models. The results show that using our method, the dental models can be successfully articulated with a small degree of deviations from the occlusion achieved with the gold-standard method. PMID:20529735

  19. Meeting Dental Health Needs Through Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1972-01-01

    Dental health needs of the country cannot be met through education of more dentists. Rather, we must educate auxiliaries to perform many of the intraoral procedures now regarded the sole responsibility of dentists. (SB)

  20. Employment of Dental Hygienists as Dental Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Cynthia; Odrich, Johanna

    1987-01-01

    A study of the use of dental hygienists to teach periodontics, preventive dentistry, community dentistry, and public health courses looked at employment patterns and practices and the qualifications of the teachers. (MSE)

  1. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    .... FDA-2008-N-0163] (formerly Docket No. 2001N-0067) RIN 0910-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam... the Federal Register of August 4, 2009 (74 FR 38686) which classified dental amalgam as a class II...

  2. Tribological characteristics of gold films deposited on metals by ion plating and vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The graded interface between an ion-plated film and a substrate is discussed as well as the friction and wear properties of ion-plated gold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and microhardness depth profiling were used to investigate the interface. The friction and wear properties of ion-plated and vapor-deposited gold films were studied both in an ultra high vacuum system to maximize adhesion and in oil to minimize adhesion. The results indicate that the solubility of gold on the substrate material controls the depth of the graded interface. Thermal diffusion and chemical diffusion mechanisms are thought to be involved in the formation of the gold-nickel interface. In iron-gold graded interfaces the gold was primarily dispersed in the iron and thus formed a physically bonded interface. The hardness of the gold film was influenced by its depth and was also related to the composition gradient between the gold and the substrate. The graded nickel-gold interface exhibited the highest hardness because of an alloy hardening effect. The effects of film thickness on adhesion and friction were established.

  3. Tribological characteristics of gold films deposited on metals by ion plating and vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    The graded interface between an ion-plated film and a substrate is discussed as well as the friction and wear properties of ion-plated gold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and microhardness depth profiling were used to investigate the interface. The friction and wear properties of ion-plated and vapor-deposited gold films were studied both in an ultra high vacuum system to maximize adhesion and in oil to minimize adhesion. The results indicate that the solubility of gold on the substrate material controls the depth of the graded interface. Thermal diffusion and chemical diffusion mechanisms are thought to be involved in the formation of the gold-nickel interface. In iron-gold graded interfaces the gold was primarily dispersed in the iron and thus formed a physically bonded interface. The hardness of the gold film was influenced by its depth and was also related to the composition gradient between the gold and the substrate. The graded nickel-gold interface exhibited the highest hardness because of an alloy hardening effect. The effects of film thickness on adhesion and friction were established.

  4. Mechanical properties and grindability of experimental Ti-Au alloys.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu

    2004-06-01

    Experimental Ti-Au alloys (5, 10, 20 and 40 mass% Au) were made. Mechanical properties and grindability of the castings of the Ti-Au alloys were examined. As the concentration of gold increased to 20%, the yield strength and the tensile strength of the Ti-Au alloys became higher without markedly deteriorating their ductility. This higher strength can be explained by the solid-solution strengthening of the a titanium. The Ti-40%Au alloy became brittle because the intermetallic compound Ti3Au precipitated intensively near the grain boundaries. There was no significant difference in the grinding rate and grinding ratio among all the Ti-Au alloys and the pure titanium at any speed.

  5. Levels of career satisfaction amongst dental healthcare professionals: comparison of dental therapists, dental hygienists and dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Newton, J T; Gibbons, D E

    2001-09-01

    To compare the levels of career satisfaction expressed by three professional groups working in dental health: dental therapists, dental hygienists and dental practitioners. Level of career satisfaction was assessed using a ten point scale in three surveys. Postal surveys were conducted of all dental therapists and dental hygienists registered with the General Dental Council. Data for dental practitioners were collected as part of the British Dental Association Omnibus Survey 2000. Data are reported for 227 dental therapists, 2,251 dental hygienists and 970 dental practitioners. Significant differences were found between groups in the level of career satisfaction expressed. Dental practitioners were less likely to express high levels of satisfaction in comparison with the other two professional groups. Within each group characteristics of the respondents were associated with satisfaction levels. Younger dental therapists and dental hygienists expressed lower levels of career satisfaction. The level of career satisfaction expressed by dental practitioners was associated with gender, place of work (North vs South UK), year of qualification, size of practice and system of remuneration. Dental practitioners express lower levels of job satisfaction in comparison to other groups of dental health care professionals. Job dissatisfaction among dental practitioners is related to a number of socio-demographic factors.

  6. Geochemistry of placer gold, Koyukuk-Chandalar mining district, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosier, E.L.; Cathrall, J.B.; Antweiler, J.C.; Tripp, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    The Koyukuk-Chandalar mining district of the Brooks Range mineral belt in north-central Alaska contains numerous placer gold deposits but few known lode gold sources. Gold grains, collected from 46 placer localities and 6 lode gold sites in the district, were analyzed for Ag and 37 trace elements utilizing direct current-arc optical emission spectroscopy. When possible, several measurements were made on each sample and averaged. Gold content was calculated by the summation of the 38 elements determined and subtracting from 100. The objectives of our study were to characterize the deposits by defining the type and number of distinct geochemical characteristics for the Au, to determine relationships of Au in placer deposits to possible lode sources (placer and lode), to identify possible primary sources of placer gold, and to study processes of placer formation. Interpretation of results emphasize that the Au grains are almost invariably ternary (Au-Ag-Cu) alloys. The average Cu content is 0.040% and the average Ag content and fineness [(Au/Au+Ag)??1,000] are 10.5% and 893 parts per thousand, respectively, for the 46 placer localities. Six geochemically distinct types of placer gold can be identified in the Koyukuk-Chandalar mining district based on Ag and Cu values. One type with an average Ag content of 21.2%, an average Cu content of 0.007%, and 786 average fineness is found only in the eastern part of the district. Placer gold grains that have an average Ag content of 6.0%, an average Cu content of 0.276%, and 940 average fineness were found in the western part of the district. Four intermediate types generally occur in order across the district. Variations in the chemistry of the placer gold can be related to variable depositional environments at the primary gold sources. Placer gold geochemistry is important in determining the origin and depositional environment of the primary Au sources and could add to the knowledge of the thermal history of the southcentral

  7. Central Dental Evacuation Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    handpiece . Inlets to this system are required throughout the dental facility for all disciplines of patient treatment where coolant and irrigation liquids...speed air turbine dental handpiece is used and for practically all other procedures in the practice of modern dentistry. Performance and reliability...AD-AI16 653 SCHOOL OF AEROSPACE MEDICINE BROOKS AFR TX F/G 6/5 CENTRAL DENTAL EVACUATION SYSTEMS.(U) MAY 52 J M POWELL, J M YOUNG UNCLASSIFIED SAM-TR

  8. Derivatized gold clusters and antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.; Furuya, F.R.

    1994-11-01

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be as small as 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies, Fab' or F(ab')[sub 2] fragments are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. The gold clusters may contain 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 55 or 67 gold atoms in their inner core. The clusters may also contain radioactive gold. The antibody-cluster conjugates are useful in electron microscopy applications as well as in clinical applications that include imaging, diagnosis and therapy. 7 figs.

  9. Derivatized gold clusters and antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, James F.; Furuya, Frederic R.

    1994-11-01

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be as small as 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies, Fab' or F(ab').sub.2 fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. The gold clusters may contain 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 55 or 67 gold atoms in their inner core. The clusters may also contain radioactive gold. The antibody-cluster conjugates are useful in electron microscopy applications as well as in clinical applications that include imaging, diagnosis and therapy.

  10. Gold Nanoparticle Microwave Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Krantz, Kelsie E.; Christian, Jonathan H.; Coopersmith, Kaitlin

    At the nanometer scale, numerous compounds display different properties than those found in bulk material that can prove useful in areas such as medicinal chemistry. Gold nanoparticles, for example, display promise in newly developed hyperthermia therapies for cancer treatment. Currently, gold nanoparticle synthesis is performed via the hot injection technique which has large variability in final particle size and a longer reaction time. One underdeveloped area by which these particles could be produced is through microwave synthesis. To initiate heating, microwaves agitate polar molecules creating a vibration that gives off the heat energy needed. Previous studies have used microwaves formore » gold nanoparticle synthesis; however, polar solvents were used that partially absorbed incident microwaves, leading to partial thermal heating of the sample rather than taking full advantage of the microwave to solely heat the gold nanoparticle precursors in a non-polar solution. Through this project, microwaves were utilized as the sole heat source, and non-polar solvents were used to explore the effects of microwave heating only as pertains to the precursor material. Our findings show that the use of non-polar solvents allows for more rapid heating as compared to polar solvents, and a reduction in reaction time from 10 minutes to 1 minute; this maximizes the efficiency of the reaction, and allows for reproducibility in the size/shape of the fabricated nanoparticles.« less

  11. Digging for Gold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2012-01-01

    In the case of higher education, the hills are more like mountains of data that "we're accumulating at a ferocious rate," according to Gerry McCartney, CIO of Purdue University (Indiana). "Every higher education institution has this data, but it just sits there like gold in the ground," complains McCartney. Big Data and the new tools people are…

  12. Bioassisted Phytomining of Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maluckov, Biljana S.

    2015-05-01

    Bioassisted phytomining implies targeted use of microorganisms and plants for the selective recovery of the metal. Metals from undissolved compounds are dissolved by applying specially chosen microorganisms and therefore become available to the hyperaccumulating plants. In the article, the selective extraction method of base metals and the precious metal gold by using microorganisms and plants is discussed.

  13. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  14. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  15. Effects of aluminum-copper alloy filtration on photon spectra, air kerma rate and image contrast.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Andréa; Rollo, João Manuel Domingos de Almeida; Gonçalves, Marcelo; Haiter Neto, Francisco; Bóscolo, Frab Norberto

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of aluminum-copper alloy filtration, without the original aluminum filter, for dental radiography in terms of x-ray energy spectrum, air kerma rate and image quality. Comparisons of various thicknesses of aluminum-copper alloy in three different percentages were made with aluminum filtration. Tests were conducted on an intra-oral dental x-ray machine and were made on mandible phantom and on step-wedge. Depending on the thickness of aluminum-copper alloy filtration, the beam could be hardened and filtrated. The use of the aluminum-copper alloy filter resulted in reductions in air kerma rate from 8.40% to 47.33%, and indicated the same image contrast when compared to aluminum filtration. Aluminum-copper alloy filtration may be considered a good alternative to aluminum filtration.

  16. Application of gold compositional analyses to mineral exploration in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Antweiler, J.C.; Campbell, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    Native gold is a mineral composed of Au, Ag and Cu in solid solution and it usually contains one or more trace metals as lattice impurities, as mineral inclusions, in grain boundaries or in surface coatings. Alloy proportions of Au, Ag and Cu, together with certain other elements, can be thought of as constituting a gold "signature". Gold is associated with a great variety of ore deposits and has characteristic signatures for each of several types of ore deposits. Signatures for gold derived from igneous-metamorphic, hypothermal, mesothermal and epithermal deposits reflect conditions of ore formation by their content of Ag, Cu and characteristic associated elements. At higher temperatures of ore formation, gold has low Ag and high Cu content, and Bi and Pb are the most abundant trace elements. But at lower temperatures of ore formation, Ag is high, Cu is low, and Pb is the most abundant trace element. The same trend in gold signatures is observable in gold mining districts, such as Central City, Colorado, where zoning as shown by mineral assemblages indicates ore deposition at progressively lower temperatures as the distance from a central high-temperature zone increases. The signatures of gold may be useful in searching for porphyry Cu deposits. Signatures from Butte (Montana), Mineral Park (Arizona) and Cala Abajo (Puerto Rico), on the basis of limited sampling, are similar and distinctive. They are characterized by a similar assemblage of trace elements and are relatively high in both Ag and Cu. Another application of gold compositional data is in tracing placer gold to its bedrock source. For example, the Ag content of placer gold in the Tarryall district of Colorado differed from that of nearly all of the bedrock sources of gold found by early prospectors. However, one lightly prospected area peripheral to the Tertiary quartz monzonite stock at Montgomery Gulch contains gold with a Ag content similar to that of the placer gold. This area is the most likely

  17. Gold and gold working in Late Bronze Age Northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Vavelidis, M; Andreou, S

    2008-04-01

    Numerous objects of gold displaying an impressive variety of types and manufacturing techniques are known from the Late Bronze Age (LBA) contexts of Mycenaean Greece, but very little is known about the origin and processing of gold during the second millennium B.C: . Ancient literature and recent research indicate that northern Greece is probably the richest gold-bearing region in Greece, and yet, very little evidence exists regarding the exploitation of its deposits and the production as well as use of gold in the area during prehistory. The unusual find of a group of small stone crucibles at the prehistoric settlement of Thessaloniki Toumba, one with visible traces of gold melting, proves local production and offers a rare opportunity to examine the process of on-site gold working. Furthermore, the comparison of the chemical composition of prehistoric artefacts from two settlements with those of gold deposits in their immediate areas supports the local extraction of gold and opens up the prospect for some of the Mycenaean gold to have originated in northern Greece. The scarcity of gold items in northern Greek LBA contexts may not represent the actual amount of gold produced and consumed, but could be a result of the local social attitudes towards the circulation and deposition of artefacts from precious metals.

  18. Gold and gold working in Late Bronze Age Northern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavelidis, M.; Andreou, S.

    2008-04-01

    Numerous objects of gold displaying an impressive variety of types and manufacturing techniques are known from the Late Bronze Age (LBA) contexts of Mycenaean Greece, but very little is known about the origin and processing of gold during the second millennium b.c. Ancient literature and recent research indicate that northern Greece is probably the richest gold-bearing region in Greece, and yet, very little evidence exists regarding the exploitation of its deposits and the production as well as use of gold in the area during prehistory. The unusual find of a group of small stone crucibles at the prehistoric settlement of Thessaloniki Toumba, one with visible traces of gold melting, proves local production and offers a rare opportunity to examine the process of on-site gold working. Furthermore, the comparison of the chemical composition of prehistoric artefacts from two settlements with those of gold deposits in their immediate areas supports the local extraction of gold and opens up the prospect for some of the Mycenaean gold to have originated in northern Greece. The scarcity of gold items in northern Greek LBA contexts may not represent the actual amount of gold produced and consumed, but could be a result of the local social attitudes towards the circulation and deposition of artefacts from precious metals.

  19. Alloy softening in binary molybdenum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of alloy additions of Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt on the hardness of Mo. Special emphasis was placed on alloy softening in these binary Mo alloys. Results showed that alloy softening was produced by those elements having an excess of s+d electrons compared to Mo, while those elements having an equal number or fewer s+d electrons than Mo failed to produce alloy softening. Alloy softening and hardening can be correlated with the difference in number of s+d electrons of the solute element and Mo.

  20. Implant-supported fixed dental prostheses with CAD/CAM-fabricated porcelain crown and zirconia-based framework.

    PubMed

    Takaba, Masayuki; Tanaka, Shinpei; Ishiura, Yuichi; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2013-07-01

    Recently, fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with a hybrid structure of CAD/CAM porcelain crowns adhered to a CAD/CAM zirconia framework (PAZ) have been developed. The aim of this report was to describe the clinical application of a newly developed implant-supported FDP fabrication system, which uses PAZ, and to evaluate the outcome after a maximum application period of 36 months. Implants were placed in three patients with edentulous areas in either the maxilla or mandible. After the implant fixtures had successfully integrated with bone, gold-platinum alloy or zirconia custom abutments were first fabricated. Zirconia framework wax-up was performed on the custom abutments, and the CAD/CAM zirconia framework was prepared using the CAD/CAM system. Next, wax-up was performed on working models for porcelain crown fabrication, and CAD/CAM porcelain crowns were fabricated. The CAD/CAM zirconia frameworks and CAD/CAM porcelain crowns were bonded using adhesive resin cement, and the PAZ was cemented. Cementation of the implant superstructure improved the esthetics and masticatory efficiency in all patients. No undesirable outcomes, such as superstructure chipping, stomatognathic dysfunction, or periimplant bone resorption, were observed in any of the patients. PAZ may be a potential solution for ceramic-related clinical problems such as chipping and fracture and associated complicated repair procedures in implant-supported FDPs. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  2. Gold Nanoparticles Cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironava, Tatsiana

    Over the last two decades gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used for many scientific applications and have attracted attention due to the specific chemical, electronic and optical size dependent properties that make them very promising agents in many fields such as medicine, imagine techniques and electronics. More specifically, biocompatible gold nanoparticles have a huge potential for use as the contrast augmentation agent in X-ray Computed Tomography and Photo Acoustic Tomography for early tumor diagnostic as well these nanoparticles are extensively researched for enhancing the targeted cancer treatment effectiveness such as photo-thermal and radiotherapy. In most biomedical applications biocompatible gold nanoparticles are labeled with specific tumor or other pathology targeting antibodies and used for site specific drug delivery. However, even though gold nanoparticles poses very high level of anti cancer properties, the question of their cytotoxicity ones they are released in normal tissue has to be researched. Moreover, the huge amount of industrially produced gold nanoparticles raises the question of these particles being a health hazard, since the penetration is fairly easy for the "nano" size substances. This study focuses on the effect of AuNPs on a human skin tissue, since it is fall in both categories -- the side effects for biomedical applications and industrial workers and users' exposure during production and handling. Therefore, in the present project, gold nanoparticles stabilized with the biocompatible agent citric acid were generated and characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxic effect of AuNPs release to healthy skin tissue was modeled on 3 different cell types: human keratinocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, and human adipose derived stromal (ADS) cells. The AuNPs localization inside the cell was found to be cell type dependent. Overall cytotoxicity was found to be dependent

  3. Dental Assisting Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental assisting curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level dental assistants, and includes job skills in the technical areas of preventive dentistry; four-handed dentistry; chairside assisting with emphasis in diagnostics,…

  4. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  5. Dental Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

  6. Clinical feline dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Lemmons, Matthew

    2013-05-01

    Dental radiography is a necessary diagnostic modality in small animal practice. It is not possible to accurately assess and diagnose tooth resorption, periodontal disease, endodontic disease, neoplasia and injury without it. Dental radiography is also necessary for treatment and assessment of the patient postoperatively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. In vitro cytotoxicity of traditional versus contemporary dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Messer, Regina L W; Lockwood, Petra E; Wataha, John C; Lewis, Jill B; Norris, Samuel; Bouillaguet, Serge

    2003-11-01

    The biocompatibility of new dental ceramics has not been assessed with the same scrutiny as has been applied to alloys and composites. Yet, the biocompatibility of ceramics is critical to the long-term success of dental prostheses because ceramics are in close contact with oral tissues for extended periods. Five dental ceramics (2 traditional feldspathic veneer porcelains [Vita Omega and Duceragold], 2 lithium disilicate pressable materials [Stylepress and Empress-2], and a pressable leucite-based material [Empress-1]) were tested for their ability to alter cellular mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity after fabrication using a tetrazolium assay, after aging for 2 weeks in a biologic solution and after post-aging polishing with either a fine diamond or diamond polishing paste. Cellular responses were compared with polytetrafluoroethylene controls (analysis of variance, Tukey pairwise post-hoc comparison, alpha=.05). The feldspathic porcelains caused only mild (<25% of controls) mitochondrial suppression regardless of aging or polishing. The pressable leucite-based material initially caused a 5% stimulation (not significant) of mitochondrial activity, which decreased significantly (P<.05) by 30% with aging to levels comparable to the feldspathic porcelains, and did not change with polishing. Both lithium disilicate materials caused an initial suppression of mitochondrial activity that decreased significantly with aging, but Empress-2 was severely cytotoxic initially (<20% of controls, P<.01), and became more cytotoxic again after polishing. Stylepress was less cytotoxic initially (85% of controls, not significant) and did not become cytotoxic again after polishing. Dental ceramics are not equivalent in their in vitro biologic effects, even within the same class of material, and biologic safety should not be assumed. Most ceramics caused only mild in vitro suppression of cell function to levels that would be acceptable on the basis of standards used to evaluate

  8. The future dental workforce?

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J E; Wilson, N H F

    2009-02-28

    The Editor-in-Chief of the BDJ has previously raised important questions about dental workforce planning and the implications for dental graduates of recent changes and pressures. It is now time to revisit this issue. Much has changed since the last workforce review in England and Wales, and the rate of change is in all probability set to increase. First, at the time of writing this paper the momentous step of including dental care professionals (DCPs) on General Dental Council (GDC) registers in the United Kingdom has recently been completed. Second, the Scope of Practice of all dental professionals has been under consultation by the General Dental Council, and research evidence suggests that greater use should be made of skill-mix in the dental team. Third, within England, Lord Darzi has just published the 'Final Report of the NHS Next Stage Review', which emphasises 'quality care' and 'team-working' as key features of healthcare; this report was accompanied by an important document entitled 'A High Quality Workforce', in which plans for local workforce planning within the NHS are outlined, placing responsibilities at national, local and regional levels. Fourth, policy makers across the UK are wrestling with addressing oral health needs, promoting health and facilitating access to dental care, all of which have implications for the nature and shape of the dental workforce. Fifth, with the impact of globalisation and European policies we are net gainers of dentists as well as having more in training. Sixth, although there have been reviews and policy initiatives by regulatory, professional and other bodies in support of shaping the dental workforce, there has been little serious consideration of skill-mix and funding mechanisms to encourage team-working. Together, these events demand that we enter a fresh debate on the future dental workforce which should extend beyond professional and national boundaries and inform workforce planning. This debate is of great

  9. [Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging artifacts of five common dental materials].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yisheng; Yu, Risheng

    2015-06-01

    To compare five materials commonly used in dentistry, including three types of metals and two types of ceramics, by using different sequences of three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) field strengths (0.35, 1.5, and 3.0 T). Three types of metals and two types of ceramics that were fabricated into the same size and thickness as an incisor crown were placed in a plastic tank filled with saline. The crowns were scanned using an magnetic resonance (MR) machine at 0.35, 1.5, and 3.0 T field strengths. The TlWI and T2WI images were obtained. The differences of various materials in different artifacts of field MR scans were determined. The zirconia crown presented no significant artifacts when scanned under the three types of MRI field strengths. The artifacts of casting ceramic were minimal. All dental precious metal alloys, nickel-chromium alloy dental porcelain, and cobalt-chromium ceramic alloy showed varying degrees of artifacts under the three MRI field strengths. Zirconia and casting ceramics present almost no or faint artifacts. By contrast, precious metal alloys, nickel-chromium alloy dental porcelain and cobalt-chromium ceramic alloy display MRI artifacts. The artifact area increase with increasing magnetic field.

  10. What is dental ecology?

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. 'Pot of Gold'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed 'Pot of Gold' (upper left), located near the base of the 'Columbia Hills' in Gusev Crater. The rock's nodules and layered appearance have inspired rover team members to investigate the rock's detailed chemistry in coming sols. This picture was taken on sol 158 (June 13, 2004).

  12. Gold-based thin multilayers for ohmic contacts in RF-MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulloni, V.; Iannacci, J.; Bartali, R.; Micheli, V.; Colpo, S.; Laidani, N.; Margesin, B.

    2011-06-01

    In RF-MEMS switches many reliability issues are related to the metal contacts in the switching area. The characteristics of this contact influence not only contact resistance and insertion loss, but also the most relevant switch failure mechanisms that are wear of ohmic contact, adhesion and stiction. Gold is widely used for this purpose because of its good conductivity and chemical inertness, but is a soft metal, and the development of hard contact materials with low resistivity is of great interest for RF-MEMS switch reliability. It is possible to increase the contact hardness preserving the convenient gold properties alternating gold layers with thin layers of different metals. The material becomes harder not only by simple alloying but also by the presence of interfaces which act as barriers for mechanical dislocation migration. A detailed study of mechanical, electrical and morphological properties of gold-chromium, gold-platinum and gold-palladium multilayers is presented and discussed. It is found that the annealing treatments are important for tuning hardness values, and a careful choice of the alloying metal is essential when the material is inserted in a real switch fabrication cycle, because hardness improvements can vanish during oxygen plasma treatments usually involved in RF-switches fabrication. Platinum is the only metal tested that is unaffected by oxidation, and also modifies the chromium adhesion layer diffusion on the contact surface.

  13. Epitaxial insertion of gold silicide nanodisks during the growth of silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Um, Han-Don; Jee, Sang-Won; Park, Kwang-Tae; Jung, Jin-Young; Guo, Zhongyi; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2011-07-01

    Nanodisk-shaped, single-crystal gold silicide heterojunctions were inserted into silicon nanowires during vapor-liquid-solid growth using Au as a catalyst within a specific range of chlorine-to-hydrogen atomic ratio. The mechanism of nanodisk formation has been investigated by changing the source gas ratio of SiCl4 to H2. We report that an over-supply of silicon into the Au-Si liquid alloy leads to highly supersaturated solution and enhances the precipitation of Au in the silicon nanowires due to the formation of unstable phases within the liquid alloy. It is shown that the gold precipitates embedded in the silicon nanowires consisted of a metastable gold silicide. Interestingly, faceting of gold silicide was observed at the Au/Si interfaces, and silicon nanowires were epitaxially grown on the top of the nanodisk by vapor-liquid-solid growth. High resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed that gold silicide nanodisks are epitaxially connected to the silicon nanowires in the direction of growth direction. These gold silicide nanodisks would be useful as nanosized electrical junctions for future applications in nanowire interconnections.

  14. Corrosion behaviour of high copper dental amalgams.

    PubMed

    Yap, A U J; Ng, B L; Blackwood, D J

    2004-06-01

    This study evaluated the corrosion behaviour of two high copper dental amalgam alloys [Dispersalloy (Dentsply-Caulk) and Tytin (Kerr)] in different electrolytes. Amalgam specimens were prepared, coupled to a copper wire, cemented into glass tubes and polished to a 600-grit finish. A corrosion cell was prepared using a carbon counter-electrode, a standard calomel electrode as the reference and amalgam as the working electrode. The alloys were tested in the following mediums at 37 degrees C: (i) artificial saliva based on Fusayama's solution (FS), (ii) artificial saliva with citric acid adjusted to pH 4.0 (FC) and (iii) 1% sodium chloride solution (SC). Corrosion potentials (E(corr)) and corrosion rates (I(corr)) were determined using potentiostatic and impedance spectroscopy methods. Data was subjected to anova/Scheffe's post hoc test at 0.05 significance level. For both alloys, the corrosion potential in FS was significantly greater than in SC. Corrosion potential of Tytin in FS and SC was also significantly greater than in FC. The corrosion rate of Dispersalloy in FC was significantly greater than in FS and SC. For Tytin, corrosion rate in SC was significantly greater than in FS and FC. Although no significant difference in corrosion potential/rate was observed between the alloys when tested in FS, significant differences were observed when electrochemical testing was carried out in FC and SC. The corrosion behaviour of high copper amalgam alloys are both material and environment dependent. Certain food substances may increase the corrosion of high copper amalgams.

  15. A useful and non-invasive microanalysis method for dental restoration materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoki, M.; Satsuma, T.; Nishigawa, K.; Takeuchi, H.; Asaoka, K.

    2012-12-01

    The elemental analysis of intraoral dental restorations provides considerable information for the treatment of dental metal allergy. Elemental analyses require specific instruments and complicated procedures, so this examination is not commonly carried out in private dental clinics. We describe a novel, simple and useful micro-analytical method for dental metal restorations. Micro metal dust was obtained by polishing the surface of restorative metal material with an unused silicone point (SUPER-SNAP). The metal dust on the silicone point was then rubbed onto adhesive tape, and this tape was covered with polyethylene film. The amount of metal dust material was <20 μg. An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was used to carry out the elementary analysis of the metal dust on the polyethylene film. Three types of dental metal alloy materials of known components were examined. The results of elementary analyses were compared with the specifications provided by the manufacturer. The same procedure was carried out for three dental metal restorations of an adult female volunteer in vivo. The results of elemental analyses for five alloy materials exactly matched the product specification. Three metal samples obtained from intraoral restoration were also available for elemental analyses. The distinct advantage of this method is that it enables sample extraction without an invasive effect for the restoration. The metal sample is in a polyethylene film, so it is easy to mail it for inspection at specialist institutes yet it can be also be used in general dental clinics.

  16. [Designing dental manpower index to evaluate dental manpower resources].

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Ni, Zong-zan

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to find out a method to evaluate dental manpower resources. We selected population, GDP, number of dentist and number of different oral health professionals from certain internet stations, published books and journals from 1996 to 2000 as our investigating data. Data was collected from 100 countries. Our investigation found that the design of dental manpower index to evaluate dental manpower resources was effective and convenient. Dental manpower index is a good method to evaluate dental manpower resources.

  17. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth"…

  18. Improvement of corrosion resistance and antibacterial effect of NiTi orthopedic materials by chitosan and gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Rasha A.; Fadl-allah, Sahar A.; El-Bagoury, Nader; El-Rab, Sanaa M. F. Gad

    2014-02-01

    Biocomposite consists of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and a natural polymer as Chitosan (CS) was electrodeposited over NiTi alloy to improve biocompatibility, biostability, surface corrosion resistance and antibacterial effect for orthopedic implantation. The forming process and surface morphology of this biocomposite coats over NiTi alloy were studied. The results showed that the nm-scale gold particles were embedded in the composite forming compact, thick and smooth coat. Elemental analysis revealed significant less Ni ion release from the coated NiTi alloy compared with the uncoated one by 20 fold. Furthermore, the electrochemical corrosion measurements indicated that AuNPs/CS composite coat was effective for improving corrosion resistance in different immersion times and at all pH values, which suggests that the coated NiTi alloys have potential for orthopedic applications. Additionally, the efficiencies of the biocomposite coats for inhibiting bacterial growth indicate high antibacterial effect.

  19. Plastic deformation in nanoscale gold single crystals and open-celled nanoporous gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongyun; Wei, Xiaoding; Zhao, Manhong; Chen, Xi; Jun, Seong C.; Hone, James; Kysar, Jeffrey W.

    2007-01-01

    The results of two sets of experiments to measure the elastic-plastic behaviour of gold at the nanometre length scale are reported. One set of experiments was on free-standing nanoscale single crystals of gold, and the other was on free-standing nanoscale specimens of open-celled nanoporous gold. Both types of specimens were fabricated from commercially available leaf which was either pure Au or a Au/Ag alloy following by dealloying of the Ag. Mechanical testing specimens of a 'dog-bone' shape were fabricated from the leaf using standard lithographic procedures after the leaf had been glued onto a silicon wafer. The thickness of the gauge portion of the specimens was about 100 nm, the width between 250 nm and 300 nm and the length 7 µm. The specimens were mechanically loaded with a nanoindenter (MTS) at the approximate midpoint of the gauge length. The resulting force-displacement curve of the single crystal gold was serrated and it was evident that slip localization occurred on individual slip systems; however, the early stages of the plastic deformation occurred in a non-localized manner. The results of detailed finite element analyses of the specimen suggest that the critical resolved shear stress of the gold single crystal was as high as 135 MPa which would lead to a maximum uniaxial stress of about 500 MPa after several per cent strain. The behaviour of the nanoporous gold was substantially different. It exhibited an apparent elastic behaviour until the point where it failed in an apparently brittle manner, although it is assumed that plastic deformation occurred in the ligaments prior to failure. The average elastic stiffness of three specimens was measured to be Enp = 8.8 GPa and the stress at ultimate failure averaged 190 MPa for the three specimens tested. Scaling arguments suggest that the stress in the individual ligaments could approach the theoretical shear strength. Presented at the IUTAM Symposium on Plasticity at the Micron Scale, Technical

  20. Finite element analysis (FEA) of dental implant fixture for mechanical stability and rapid osseointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabassum, Shafia; Murtaza, Ahmar; Ali, Hasan; Uddin, Zia Mohy; Zehra, Syedah Sadaf

    2017-10-01

    For rapid osseointegration of dental implant fixtures, various surface treatments including plasma spraying, hydroxyapatite coating, acid-etching, and surface grooving are used. However undesirable effects such as chemical modifications, loss of mechanical properties, prolonged processing times and post production treatment steps are often associated with these techniques. The osseointegration rate of the dental implants can be promoted by increasing the surface area of the dental implant, thus increasing the bone cells - implant material contact and allow bone tissues to grow rapidly. Additive Manufacturing (AM) techniques can be used to fabricate dental implant fixtures with desirable surface area in a single step manufacturing process. AM allows the use of Computer Aided Designing (CAD) for customised rapid prototyping of components with precise control over geometry. In this study, the dental implant fixture that replaces the tooth root was designed on commercially available software COMSOL. Nickel - titanium alloy was selected as build materials for dental implant. The geometry of the dental fixture was varied by changing the interspacing distance (thread pitch) and number of threads to increase the total surface area. Three different microstructures were introduced on the surface of dental implant. The designed models were used to examine the effect of changing geometries on the total surface area. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was performed to investigate the effect of changing geometries on the mechanical properties of the dental implant fixtures using stress analysis.

  1. Grindability of cast Ti-Hf alloys.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Sato, Hideki; Okuno, Osamu; Nunn, Martha E; Okabe, Toru

    2006-04-01

    As part of our systematic studies characterizing the properties of titanium alloys, we investigated the grindability of a series of cast Ti-Hf alloys. Alloy buttons with hafnium concentrations up to 40 mass% were made using an argon-arc melting furnace. Each button was cast into a magnesia-based mold using a dental titanium casting machine; three specimens were made for each metal. Prior to testing, the hardened surface layer was removed. The specimens were ground at five different speeds for 1 min at 0.98 N using a carborundum wheel on an electric dental handpiece. Grindability was evaluated as the volume of metal removed per minute (grinding rate) and the volume ratio of metal removed compared to the wheel material lost (grinding ratio). The data were analyzed using ANOVA. A trend of increasing grindability was found with increasing amounts of hafnium, although there was no statistical difference in the grindability with increasing hafnium contents. We also found that hafnium may be used to harden or strengthen titanium without deteriorating the grindability.

  2. Antibacterial effect of copper-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rui; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yumei; Ma, Zheng; Allaker, Robert P.; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-07-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms on dental implant material surfaces (titanium) may lead to the development of peri-implant diseases influencing the long term success of dental implants. In this study, a novel Cu-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) was designed and fabricated in order to efficiently kill bacteria and discourage formation of biofilms, and then inhibit bacterial infection and prevent implant failure, in comparison with pure Ti. Results from biofilm based gene expression studies, biofilm growth observation, bacterial viability measurements and morphological examination of bacteria, revealed antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities of Ti-Cu alloy against the oral specific bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Proliferation and adhesion assays with mesenchymal stem cells, and measurement of the mean daily amount of Cu ion release demonstrated Ti-Cu alloy to be biocompatible. In conclusion, Ti-Cu alloy is a promising dental implant material with antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities and acceptable biocompatibility.

  3. Dental student debt.

    PubMed

    Mannion, H; Bedi, R

    1995-09-01

    The aim of this investigation is to provide information about the financial status of dental students enrolled on the Bachelor of Dental Surgery degree course at the University of Birmingham. All undergraduate dental students enrolled during the academic year 1993-94 were asked to participate in the study. The pre-tested questionnaire, which was given to all students, covered personal details, expenditure levels, income, loans, overdrafts, use of government schemes ('top-up loans'), and so on. The questionnaire was completed by 115 dental students (response rate 47%). The results showed that dental students' debts increased each year throughout the course. A top-up loan (range 700 Pounds-850 Pounds) had been taken out by 36% of students. The financial status of 9% of students was severe enough to warrant their eligibility for awards from access funds. Credit cards were possessed by 52% of the surveyed students, and although only half of these owed money, 22% owed between 500 Pounds and 2000 Pounds. Personal overdrafts were held by 56% of respondents. A total of 17% of students engaged in weekly part-time employment. The average debt for final year students was 1200 Pounds. Dental students' estimates of the level of debt they were likely to incur was greater than the actual debt presently experienced by final year students. In conclusion, this preliminary study showed that most dental students incur debt during their undergraduate course and that this debt increases during the course.

  4. Metal alloy identifier

    DOEpatents

    Riley, William D.; Brown, Jr., Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  5. Conservative and esthetic cast gold fixed partial dentures-inlay, onlay, and partial veneer retainers, custom composite pontics, and stress-breakers: part I: fundamental design principles.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Richard G; Refela, Jane A

    2009-01-01

    Although in today's dental world implant restorations are considered the standard of care in the replacement of missing teeth, clinical contraindications and patient nonacceptance of implant placement can be encountered. Several scenarios are discussed here in which a single missing tooth can be restored with conservative fixed partial dentures (FPD) that employ cast gold retainers; each with a customized design in order to preserve tooth structure, maintain esthetics, and provide a long-term prognosis. The abutment teeth are prepared for conservative partial coverage restorations by using Brasseler burs (Brasseler USA, Savannah, GA, USA). Impressions are taken of the preparations, along with any retentive features, utilizing either the Vented Pin Channel technique or the Shooshan Plastic Pin technique. The latter technique utilizes Kodex twist drills and corresponding impression pins (Coltene Whaledent Inc., Mahwah, NJ, USA). The conservative FPD with non-rigid connectors is fabricated by using type III gold alloy. The pontic cage portion is chemically prepared utilizing the Panavia F2.0 cement kit (Kuraray America Inc., Houston, TX, USA) or other dual-polymerizing resin cement and restored with any type of direct composite resin material. A palette of opaquers and tints are used for chairside characterization of the esthetic pontic facing. The final polish of the pontic is completed by using FlexiDisc and FlexiBuff discs (Cosmedent Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE In cases where an implant restoration is contraindicated for replacement of a single tooth, a semi-precision FPD is a conservative, functional, and esthetic alternative.

  6. Optimization of dental implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  7. Advances in dental materials.

    PubMed

    Vaderhobli, Ram M

    2011-07-01

    The use of materials to rehabilitate tooth structures is constantly changing. Over the past decade, newer material processing techniques and technologies have significantly improved the dependability and predictability of dental material for clinicians. The greatest obstacle, however, is in choosing the right combination for continued success. Finding predictable approaches for successful restorative procedures has been the goal of clinical and material scientists. This article provides a broad perspective on the advances made in various classes of dental restorative materials in terms of their functionality with respect to pit and fissure sealants, glass ionomers, and dental composites. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bats, cyanide, and gold mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Donald R.

    1991-01-01

    Although the boom days of prospectors and gold nuggets are long gone, modern technology enables gold to continue to be extracted from ore. Unfortunately, the extraction method has often been disastrous for bats and other wildlife, an issue I first became aware of in early 1989. Phone calls from Drs. Merlin Tuttle and Elizabeth Pierson, a BCI member and bat researcher from Berkeley, California, alerted me that bats were dying from apparent cyanide poisoning at gold mines in the western United States.

  9. Quantification of dental prostheses on cone‐beam CT images by the Taguchi method

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Rong‐Fu; Fang, Kwang‐Ming; TY, Wong

    2016-01-01

    supported, nickel‐chromium alloys (Ni‐Cr) prostheses. Quantification of the effect of prostheses and scanning parameters on dental CBCT gray values was assessed. PACS numbers: 87.59.bd, 87.57Q PMID:26894354

  10. Surface-stabilized gold nanocatalysts

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Yan, Wenfu [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst includes a solid support having stabilizing surfaces for supporting gold nanoparticles, and a plurality of gold nanoparticles having an average particle size of less than 8 nm disposed on the stabilizing surfaces. The surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst provides enhanced stability, such as at high temperature under oxygen containing environments. In one embodiment, the solid support is a multi-layer support comprising at least a first layer having a second layer providing the stabilizing surfaces disposed thereon, the first and second layer being chemically distinct.

  11. The extractive metallurgy of gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongolo, K.; Mwema, M. D.

    1998-12-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy has been successfully used in investigation of the gold compounds present in ores and the gold species which occur during the process metallurgy of this metal. This paper is a survey of the basic recovery methods and techniques used in extractive metallurgy of gold. Process fundamentals on mineral processing, ore leaching, zinc dust cementation, adsorption on activated carbon, electrowinning and refining are examined. The recovery of gold as a by-product of the copper industry is also described. Alternative processing methods are indicated in order to shed light on new interesting research topics where Mössbauer spectroscopy could be applied.

  12. Twinning in fcc lattice creates low-coordinated catalytically active sites in porous gold

    SciTech Connect

    Krajčí, Marian; Kameoka, Satoshi; Tsai, An-Pang

    We describe a new mechanism for creation of catalytically active sites in porous gold. Samples of porous gold prepared by de-alloying Al{sub 2}Au exhibit a clear correlation between the catalytic reactivity towards CO oxidation and structural defects in the fcc lattice of Au. We have found that on the stepped (211) surfaces quite common twin boundary defects in the bulk structure of porous gold can form long close-packed rows of atoms with the coordination number CN = 6. DFT calculations confirm that on these low-coordinated Au sites dioxygen chemisorbs and CO oxidation can proceed via the Langmuir–Hinshelwood mechanism with themore » activation energy of 37 kJ/mol or via the CO–OO intermediate with the energy barrier of 19 kJ/mol. The existence of the twins in porous gold is stabilized by the surface energy.« less

  13. Friction and hardness of gold films deposited by ion plating and evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with ion-plated and vapor-deposited gold films on various substrates in contact with a 0.025-mm-radius spherical silicon carbide rider in mineral oil. Hardness measurements were also made to examine the hardness depth profile of the coated gold on the substrate. The results indicate that the hardness is influenced by the depth of the gold coating from the surface. The hardness increases with an increase in the depth. The hardness is also related to the composition gradient in the graded interface between the gold coating and the substrate. The graded interface exhibited the highest hardness resulting from an alloy hardening effect. The coefficient of friction is inversely related to the hardness, namely, the load carrying capacity of the surface. The greater the hardness that the metal surface possesses, the lower is the coefficient of friction. The graded interface exhibited the lowest coefficient of friction.

  14. Economic impact of dental hygienists on solo dental practices.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Vickie F; Guay, Albert H; Beazoglou, Tryfon J

    2012-08-01

    The fact that a significant percentage of dentists employ dental hygienists raises an important question: Are dental practices that utilize a dental hygienist structurally and operationally different from practices that do not? This article explores differences among dental practices that operate with and without dental hygienists. Using data from the American Dental Association's 2003 Survey of Dental Practice, a random sample survey of U.S. dentists, descriptive statistics were used to compare selected characteristics of solo general practitioners with and without dental hygienists. Multivariate regression analysis was used to estimate the effect of dental hygienists on the gross billings and net incomes of solo general practitioners. Differences in practice characteristics--such as hours spent in the practice and hours spent treating patients, wait time for a recall visit, number of operatories, square feet of office space, net income, and gross billings--were found between solo general practitioners who had dental hygienists and those who did not. Solo general practitioners with dental hygienists had higher gross billings. Higher gross billings would be expected, as would higher expenses. However, net incomes of those with dental hygienists were also higher. In contrast, the mean waiting time for a recall visit was higher among dentists who employed dental hygienists. Depending on personal preferences, availability of qualified personnel, etc., dentists who do not employ dental hygienists but have been contemplating that path may want to further research the benefits and opportunities that may be realized.

  15. Superior plasmon absorption in iron-doped gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Vincenzo; Saija, Rosalba; Maragò, Onofrio M; Iatì, Maria Antonia

    2015-05-21

    Although the excitation of localized surface plasmons is associated with enhanced scattering and absorption of incoming photons, only the latter is relevant for the efficient conversion of light into heat. Here we show that the absorption cross section of gold nanoparticles is sensibly increased when iron is included in the lattice as a substitutional dopant, i.e. in a gold-iron nanoalloy. Such an increase is size and shape dependent, with the best performance observed in nanoshells where a 90-190% improvement is found in a size range that is crucial for practical applications. Our findings are unexpected according to the common belief and previous experimental observations that alloys of Au with transition metals show a depressed plasmonic response. These results are promising for the design of efficient plasmonic converters of light into heat and pave the way to more in-depth investigations of the plasmonic properties in noble metal nanoalloys.

  16. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued before...

  17. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued before...

  18. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued before...

  19. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued before...

  20. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued before January 30, 1934, are exchangeable, as provided...

  1. Astronauts Congressional Gold Medal

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-20

    Apollo 11 Astronauts, from left, Michael Collins, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and NASA Administrator Charles Bolden attend the U.S House of Representatives Committee on Science and Technology tribute to the Apollo 11 Astronauts at the Cannon House Office Building on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, July 21, 2009 in Washington. The committee presented the three Apollo 11 astronauts with a framed copy of House Resolution 607 honoring their achievement, and announced passage of legislation awarding them and John Glenn the Congressional Gold Medal. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Astronauts Congressional Gold Medal

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-20

    Apollo 11 Astronauts, from left, Michael Collins, Neil Armstrong, and Buzz Aldrin stand in recognition of Astronaut John Glenn during the U.S House of Representatives Committee on Science and Technology tribute to the Apollo 11 Astronauts at the Cannon House Office Building on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, July 21, 2009 in Washington. The committee presented the three Apollo 11 astronauts with a framed copy of House Resolution 607 honoring their achievement, and announced passage of legislation awarding them and John Glenn the Congressional Gold Medal. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Dental care - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002213.htm Dental care - child To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Proper care of your child's teeth and gums includes brushing and rinsing daily. It ...

  4. Infant dental care (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Even though newborns and infants do not have teeth, care of the mouth and gums is important. ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which ...

  5. Dental Treatment Considerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be precipitated by certain medications used in dentistry. The dental team should be cognizant of the ... problems. Drug interactions Many common drugs used in dentistry may have potential complications for MG patients by ...

  6. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePlus

    ... among some population groups. In addition, this downward trend has recently reversed for young children. The National ... Click on the links below for details about trends in dental caries as well as detailed caries ...

  7. Comparative investigation of smooth polycrystalline diamond films on dental burs by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sein, Htet; Ahmed, Waqar; Rego, Christopher; Jackson, Mark; Polini, Riccardo

    2006-04-01

    Depositions of hot filament chemical vapor-deposited diamond on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) rotary cutting dental burs are presented. Conventional dental tools made of sintered polycrystalline diamond have a number of problems associated with the heterogeneity of the crystallite, decreased cutting efficiency, and short life. A preferential (111) faceted diamond was obtained after 15 h of deposition at a growth rate of 1.1 µm/h. Diamond-coated WC-Co dental burs and conventional sintered burs are mainly used in turning, milling, and drilling operations for machining metal ceramic hard alloys such as CoCr, composite teeth, and aluminum alloy in the dental laboratory. The influence of structure, the mechanical characteristics of both diamond grains and hard alloys on the wear behavior, as well as the regimen of grinding on diamond wear are considered. Erosion wear properties are also investigated under air-sand erosion testing. After machining with excessive cutting performance, calculations can be made on flank and crater wear areas. Diamond-coated WC-Co dental burs offered significantly better erosion and wear resistance compared with uncoated WC-Co tools and sintered burs.

  8. Portable Dental System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Portable dental system provides dental care in isolated communities. System includes a patient's chair and a dentist's stool, an X-ray machine and a power unit, all of which fold into compact packages. A large yellow "pumpkin" is a collapsible compressed air tank. Portable system has been used successfully in South America in out of the way communities with this back-packable system, and in American nursing homes. This product is no longer manufactured.

  9. TRICARE Dental Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    enrollee – $1,500 lifetime maximum for orthodontics – Contractor: Delta Dental of California 2011 MHS Conference TRICARE Retiree Dental Program...Benefits Comprehensive benefits 12-month waiting period for crowns, prosthetics and orthodontics No waiting period if enroll within 120 days of...retiring from active duty or transfer to Retired Reserve status from National Guard or Reserve  Orthodontics for children and adults Accident coverage

  10. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  11. Dental anxiety in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Morse, Zac; Takau, Aleva F

    2004-03-01

    Despite the technological advances in dentistry, anxiety about dental treatment and the fear of pain associated with dentistry remains globally widespread and is considered a major barrier to dental treatment. This can have detrimental consequences to people's oral health and pose a serious epidemiological challenge to oral health care professionals. Dental anxiety is well described in the Western world however there is little literature on the situation in the developing world. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the levels of dental anxiety in Fijians using Corah's DentalAnxiety Scale (DAS). 120 adults, aged 18-45 years were randomly selected from the capital city of Suva until there were 60 Indigenous and 60 IndoFijians, with 30 males and 30 females from each group responding to questions from Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale. The average DAS for all the participants was 8.8. The average DAS for IndoFijians was 9.8 and was significantly higher than for Indigenous Fijians ie 78. IndoFijians only reported less anxiety with increasing age as the Indigenous Fijians generally displayed low levels of anxiety. There was no significant difference in DAS between the genders. A considerable proportion of IndoFijians (28%) were anxious with 13% being highly anxious. Young IndoFijian adults are more likely to possess dental anxiety and should be managed appropriately which may include behavioural and/or pharmacological therapy. This may require referral to dental specialists or involve a multidisciplinary approach to the management of these people.

  12. AMONG TURKISH DENTAL STUDENTS.

    PubMed

    Eren, Hakan; Huri, Meral; Bağış, Nilsun; Başıbüyük, Onur; Şahin, Sedef; Umaroğlu, Mutlu; Orhan, Kaan

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of burnout and occupational participation limitation among dental students in a dental school in Turkey. Four hundred fifty-eight dental students (females=153; males=305) were included in the study. The age range varied from 17-to-38 years. Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Version (MBI-SV) and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) were used to gather data. Descriptive analyses, t-test, and Kruskall-Wallis test for independent groups were used for data analyses. The results indicated that 26% of all the students have burnout in terms of emotional exhaustion (25%), cynicism (18%), and academic efficacy (14%). The results showed that burnout is statistically significant in relation to demographics (p<0.05). Twenty-four percent of the students showed considerably decreased occupational performance and satisfaction scores, which suggested occupational participation limitations. Occupational performance and satisfaction scores were inversely correlated with emotional exhaustion and cynicism, while directly correlated with reduced academic efficacy (p<0.05). The results of the present study indicates that burnout and occupational participation limitation can be seen among dental students. Students with burnout may also have occupational participation limitation. Enriching dental education programs with different psychological strategies may be useful for education of healthy dentists and improve the quality of oral and dental health services.

  13. Saliva and dental erosion

    PubMed Central

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  14. Saliva and dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Hannas, Angélicas Reis; Kato, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  15. Managing dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Donald A; Jayanetti, Jay; Chu, Raymond; Staninec, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The clinical signs of dental erosion are initially subtle, yet often progress because the patient remains asymptomatic, unaware and uninformed. Erosion typically works synergistically with abrasion and attrition to cause loss of tooth structure, making diagnosis and management complex. The purpose of this article is to outline clinical examples of patients with dental erosion that highlight the strategy of early identification, patient education and conservative restorative management. Dental erosion is defined as the pathologic chronic loss of dental hard tissues as a result of the chemical influence of exogenous or endogenous acids without bacterial involvement. Like caries or periodontal disease, erosion has a multifactorial etiology and requires a thorough history and examination for diagnosis. It also requires patient understanding and compliance for improved outcomes. Erosion can affect the loss of tooth structure in isolation of other cofactors, but most often works in synergy with abrasion and attrition in the loss of tooth structure (Table 1). Although erosion is thought to be an underlying etiology of dentin sensitivity, erosion and loss of tooth structure often occurs with few symptoms. The purpose of this article is threefold: first, to outline existing barriers that may limit early management of dental erosion. Second, to review the clinical assessment required to establish a diagnosis of erosion. And third, to outline clinical examples that review options to restore lost tooth structure. The authors have included illustrations they hope will be used to improve patient understanding and motivation in the early management of dental erosion.

  16. Evaluation on the Corrosion of the Three Ni-Cr Alloys with Different Composition

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Srinivasa B.; Chowdhary, Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    Dental casting alloys are widely used in contact with oral tissue for many years now. With the development of new dental alloys over the past 15 years, many questions remain unanswered about their biologic safety. Concepts and current issues concerning the response to the biologic effects of dental casting alloys are presented. In this paper, samples of three commercially available nickel-chrome (Ni-cr) casting alloys (Dentaurum, Bego, Sankin) were taken to assess their corrosion behavior, using potentiodynamic polarization method (electrochemical method) with fusayama artificial saliva as an electrolyte medium to check for their biocompatibility. The parameters for corrosion rate and corrosion resistance were obtained from computer-controlled corrosion schematic instrument, namely, potentiostat through corrosion software (power CV). The results obtained were analyzed by classic Tafel analysis. Statistical analysis was done by Student's t-test and ANOVA test. It was concluded that Dentarum and Bego showed satisfactory corrosive behavior, with exception of Sankin which depicted higher corrosion rate and least resistance to corrosion. Thus, the selection of an alloy should be made on the basis of corrosion resistance and biologic data from dental manufactures. PMID:21461232

  17. Automated classification and visualization of healthy and pathological dental tissues based on near-infrared hyper-spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenik, Peter; Bürmen, Miran; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2011-03-01

    Despite major improvements in dental healthcare and technology, dental caries remains one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of modern society. The initial stages of dental caries are characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals, commonly known as white spots which are difficult to diagnose. If detected early enough, such demineralization can be arrested and reversed by non-surgical means through well established dental treatments (fluoride therapy, anti-bacterial therapy, low intensity laser irradiation). Near-infrared (NIR) hyper-spectral imaging is a new promising technique for early detection of demineralization based on distinct spectral features of healthy and pathological dental tissues. In this study, we apply NIR hyper-spectral imaging to classify and visualize healthy and pathological dental tissues including enamel, dentin, calculus, dentin caries, enamel caries and demineralized areas. For this purpose, a standardized teeth database was constructed consisting of 12 extracted human teeth with different degrees of natural dental lesions imaged by NIR hyper-spectral system, X-ray and digital color camera. The color and X-ray images of teeth were presented to a clinical expert for localization and classification of the dental tissues, thereby obtaining the gold standard. Principal component analysis was used for multivariate local modeling of healthy and pathological dental tissues. Finally, the dental tissues were classified by employing multiple discriminant analysis. High agreement was observed between the resulting classification and the gold standard with the classification sensitivity and specificity exceeding 85 % and 97 %, respectively. This study demonstrates that NIR hyper-spectral imaging has considerable diagnostic potential for imaging hard dental tissues.

  18. A new indicator mineral methodology based on a generic Bi-Pb-Te-S mineral inclusion signature in detrital gold from porphyry and low/intermediate sulfidation epithermal environments in Yukon Territory, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, R. J.; Allan, M. M.; Mortensen, J. K.; Wrighton, T. M.; Grimshaw, M. R.

    2017-12-01

    Porphyry-epithermal and orogenic gold are two of the most important styles of gold-bearing mineralization within orogenic belts. Populations of detrital gold resulting from bulk erosion of such regions may exhibit a compositional continuum wherein Ag, Cu, and Hg in the gold alloy may vary across the full range exhibited by natural gold. This paper describes a new methodology whereby orogenic and porphyry-epithermal gold may be distinguished according to the mineralogy of microscopic inclusions observed within detrital gold particles. A total of 1459 gold grains from hypogene, eluvial, and placer environments around calc-alkaline porphyry deposits in Yukon (Nucleus-Revenue, Casino, Sonora Gulch, and Cyprus-Klaza) have been characterized in terms of their alloy compositions (Au, Ag, Cu, and Hg) and their inclusion mineralogy. Despite differences in the evolution of the different magmatic hydrothermal systems, the gold exhibits a clear Bi-Pb-Te-S mineralogy in the inclusion suite, a signature which is either extremely weak or (most commonly) absent in both Yukon orogenic gold and gold from orogenic settings worldwide. Generic systematic compositional changes in ore mineralogy previously identified across the porphyry-epithermal transition have been identified in the corresponding inclusion suites observed in samples from Yukon. However, the Bi-Te association repeatedly observed in gold from the porphyry mineralization persists into the epithermal environment. Ranges of P-T-X conditions are replicated in the geological environments which define generic styles of mineralization. These parameters influence both gold alloy composition and ore mineralogy, of which inclusion suites are a manifestation. Consequently, we propose that this methodology approach can underpin a widely applicable indicator methodology based on detrital gold.

  19. Mineral resource of the month: gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Micheal W.

    2009-01-01

    The article presents information on the valuable mineral called gold. It states that early civilizations valued gold because of its scarcity, durability and characteristics yellow color. By the late 20th century, gold was used as an industrial metal because of its unique physicochemical properties. The U.S. has several productive deposits of gold, including placer, gold-quartz lode, epithermal and Carlin-type gold deposits.

  20. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section...

  1. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section...

  2. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section...

  3. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section...

  4. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section...

  5. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  6. In vitro element release and biological aspects of base–metal alloys for metal-ceramic applications

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Charlotta; Morisbak, Else; Kalfoss, Torill; Dahl, Jon E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aims of this study were to investigate the release of element from, and the biological response in vitro to, cobalt–chromium alloys and other base–metal alloys used for the fabrication of metal-ceramic restorations. Material and methods: Eighteen different alloys were investigated. Nine cobalt–chromium alloys, three nickel–chromium alloys, two cobalt–chromium–iron alloys, one palladium–silver alloy, one high-noble gold alloy, titanium grade II and one type III copper–aluminium alloy. Pure copper served as positive control. The specimens were prepared according to the ISO standards for biological and corrosion testing. Passive leaching of elements was measured by using Inductively Coupled Plasma – Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) after incubation in cell culture media, MEM, for 3 days. Corrosion testing was carried out in 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) and 1% lactic acid for 7 days, and the element release was measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma – Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The biological response from the extract solutions was measured though MTT cytotoxicity testing and the Hen's egg test-chorio-allantoic membrane (HET-CAM) technique for irritationt. Results: The corrosion test showed similar element release from base-metal alloys compared to noble alloys such as gold. Apart from the high-copper alloy, all alloys expressed low element release in the immersion test, no cytotoxic effect in the MTT test, and were rated non-irritant in the HET-CAM test. Conclusions: Minimal biological response was observed for all the alloys tested, with the exception of the high-copper alloy. PMID:28642904

  7. Neurological symptoms among dental assistants: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Moen, BE; Hollund, BE; Riise, T

    2008-01-01

    Background Dental assistants help the dentist in preparing material for filling teeth. Amalgam was the filling material mostly commonly used in Norway before 1980, and declined to about 5% of all fillings in 2005. Amalgam is usually an alloy of silver, copper, tin and mercury. Copper amalgam, giving particularly high exposure to mercury was used in Norway until 1994. Metallic mercury is neurotoxic. Few studies of the health of dental assistants exist, despite their exposure to mercury. There are questions about the existence of possible chronic neurological symptoms today within this working group, due to this exposure. The aim of this study was to compare the occurrence of neurological symptoms among dental assistants likely to be exposed to mercury from work with dental filling material, compared to similar health personnel with no such exposure. Methods All dental assistants still at work and born before 1970 registered in the archives of a trade union in Hordaland county of Norway were invited to participate (response rate 68%, n = 41), as well as a similar number of randomly selected assistant nurses (response rate 87%, n = 64) in the same age group. The participants completed a self-administered, mailed questionnaire, with questions about demographic variables, life-style factors, musculoskeletal, neurological and psychosomatic symptoms (Euroquest). Results The dental assistants reported significant higher occurrence of neurological symptoms; psychosomatic symptoms, problems with memory, concentration, fatigue and sleep disturbance, but not for mood. This was found by analyses of variance, adjusting for age, education, alcohol consumption, smoking and personality traits. For each specific neurological symptom, adjusted logistic regression analyses were performed, showing that these symptoms were mainly from arms, hands, legs and balance organs. Conclusion There is a possibility that the higher occurrence of neurological symptoms among the dental assistants

  8. Neurological symptoms among dental assistants: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Moen, Be; Hollund, Be; Riise, T

    2008-05-18

    Dental assistants help the dentist in preparing material for filling teeth. Amalgam was the filling material mostly commonly used in Norway before 1980, and declined to about 5% of all fillings in 2005. Amalgam is usually an alloy of silver, copper, tin and mercury. Copper amalgam, giving particularly high exposure to mercury was used in Norway until 1994. Metallic mercury is neurotoxic. Few studies of the health of dental assistants exist, despite their exposure to mercury. There are questions about the existence of possible chronic neurological symptoms today within this working group, due to this exposure. The aim of this study was to compare the occurrence of neurological symptoms among dental assistants likely to be exposed to mercury from work with dental filling material, compared to similar health personnel with no such exposure. All dental assistants still at work and born before 1970 registered in the archives of a trade union in Hordaland county of Norway were invited to participate (response rate 68%, n = 41), as well as a similar number of randomly selected assistant nurses (response rate 87%, n = 64) in the same age group. The participants completed a self-administered, mailed questionnaire, with questions about demographic variables, life-style factors, musculoskeletal, neurological and psychosomatic symptoms (Euroquest). The dental assistants reported significant higher occurrence of neurological symptoms; psychosomatic symptoms, problems with memory, concentration, fatigue and sleep disturbance, but not for mood. This was found by analyses of variance, adjusting for age, education, alcohol consumption, smoking and personality traits. For each specific neurological symptom, adjusted logistic regression analyses were performed, showing that these symptoms were mainly from arms, hands, legs and balance organs. There is a possibility that the higher occurrence of neurological symptoms among the dental assistants may be related to their previous work

  9. Evaluation of Surface Roughness and Tensile Strength of Base Metal Alloys Used for Crown and Bridge on Recasting (Recycling)

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Syed W.; Rao, Yogesh; Garg, Akanksha

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental casting alloys play a prominent role in the restoration of the partial dentition. Casting alloys have to survive long term in the mouth and also have the combination of structure, molecules, wear resistance and biologic compatibility. According to ADA system casting alloys were divided into three groups (wt%); high noble, Noble and predominantly base metal alloys. Aim To evaluate the mechanical properties such as tensile strength and surface roughness of the new and recast base metal (nickel-chromium) alloys. Materials and Methods Recasting of the base metal alloys derived from sprue and button, to make it reusable has been done. A total of 200 test specimens were fabricated using specially fabricated jig of metal and divided into two groups- 100 specimens of new alloy and 100 specimens of recast alloys, which were tested for tensile strength on universal testing machine and surface roughness on surface roughness tester. Results Tensile strength of new alloy showed no statistically significant difference (p-value>0.05) from recast alloy whereas new alloy had statistically significant surface roughness (Maximum and Average surface roughness) difference (p-value<0.01) as compared to recast alloy. Conclusion Within the limitations of the study it is concluded that the tensile strength will not be affected by recasting of nickel-chromium alloy whereas surface roughness increases markedly. PMID:26393194

  10. Evaluation of Surface Roughness and Tensile Strength of Base Metal Alloys Used for Crown and Bridge on Recasting (Recycling).

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Amit; Hashmi, Syed W; Rao, Yogesh; Garg, Akanksha

    2015-07-01

    Dental casting alloys play a prominent role in the restoration of the partial dentition. Casting alloys have to survive long term in the mouth and also have the combination of structure, molecules, wear resistance and biologic compatibility. According to ADA system casting alloys were divided into three groups (wt%); high noble, Noble and predominantly base metal alloys. To evaluate the mechanical properties such as tensile strength and surface roughness of the new and recast base metal (nickel-chromium) alloys. Recasting of the base metal alloys derived from sprue and button, to make it reusable has been done. A total of 200 test specimens were fabricated using specially fabricated jig of metal and divided into two groups- 100 specimens of new alloy and 100 specimens of recast alloys, which were tested for tensile strength on universal testing machine and surface roughness on surface roughness tester. Tensile strength of new alloy showed no statistically significant difference (p-value>0.05) from recast alloy whereas new alloy had statistically significant surface roughness (Maximum and Average surface roughness) difference (p-value<0.01) as compared to recast alloy. Within the limitations of the study it is concluded that the tensile strength will not be affected by recasting of nickel-chromium alloy whereas surface roughness increases markedly.

  11. Direct Filling Golds: An In-Vitro Study of Microleakage as a Function of Condensation Force: An In-Vivo Study of Marginal Quality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    three teeth in vivo in dogs . All three showed penetration surrounding the restorations. No mention was made as to whether a cavity varnish was...gingival reactions to gold foil restorations. J Periodontal 46:614, 1975. 12. Christensen, C.J.: -iologic implications of dental restorations. J -m Acad...1ack, C.17.: An investignr-ian of the physical characters of thle huna. tee--: in relation to their diseases and to practical dental o-ierations

  12. History of dental hygiene research.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    Dental hygiene is defined as the science and practice of the recognition, treatment and prevention of oral diseases. The history of dental hygiene research is considered in the context of the development of the discipline and an emerging infrastructure. Research-related events supporting the growth and maturation of the profession are considered from the early years to the most recent. The benefits of preventive oral health services provided by dental hygienists have been supported by research, and the practice of dental hygiene has expanded as a result of research findings since its inception 100 years ago. Dental hygienists' engagement in research, however, did not begin until the 1960s as research associates or administrators, primarily with dental researchers as primary investigators. The Journal of Dental Hygiene (JDH) has provided information for dental hygiene practice since 1927, and has been the primary venue for dissemination of dental hygiene research since 1945. Graduate education in dental hygiene at the master's degree level and the work of early dental hygiene researchers led to the first conference on dental hygiene research in 1982. Over 30 years later, dental hygiene has established a meta-paradigm and defined conceptual models, built an initial infrastructure to support research endeavors and contributed much to the development of dental hygiene as a unique discipline. A doctoral degree in the discipline, continued theory-based research, initiatives to foster collaborations between dental hygiene and other researchers and enhanced capabilities to attract funding to support large scale studies are goals that must be attained through the efforts of future researchers to address the needs for additional development in the discipline of dental hygiene. Dental hygiene research supports the growing discipline and its value to society.

  13. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  14. Dental Implantology in U.S. Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavitz, J. Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The results of a survey of 44 dental schools corroborate the belief that dental implantology is gaining widespread acceptance in U.S. dental schools. Currently, predoctoral students have limited clinical participation. Most programs have taken the position that clinical techniques are best taught within the existing specialties at a graduate…

  15. Histological evaluations and inflammatory responses of different dental implant abutment materials: A human histology pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sampatanukul, Teeratida; Serichetaphongse, Pravej; Pimkhaokham, Atiphan

    2018-04-01

    Improvements of soft tissue to the abutment surface results in more stable peri-implant conditions, however, few human histological studies have compared soft tissue responses around different abutment materials. To describe the peri-implant tissue around 3 abutment materials; titanium, zirconia, and gold alloy, over an 8-week healing period. Fifteen edentulous sites were treated with implants. Eight weeks later, peri-implant tissue was harvested and processed using a nonseparation resin embedded technique. The tissue attachment characteristics were assessed at clinical stages using the gingival index (GI) score, surgical stage (surgical score), and histological stage (histological attachment percentage). Additionally, the inflammatory responses were evaluated using inflammatory extent and inflammatory cellularity grades. Nonparametrical statistics were used to describe the GI and surgical scores, and analytical statistics were used to analyze the histological attachment percentages as well as the inflammatory extent and cellularity grades amongst the 3 groups. There were no statistically significant differences among the groups for GI score (P = .071) and surgical score (P = .262). Titanium and zirconia exhibited nearly similar mean histological attachment percentages while gold alloy had a significantly lower percentage (P = .004). For the inflammatory extent and cellularity grades, the odds of being one grade higher for gold alloy abutment was 5.18 and 17.8 times that of titanium abutment, respectively. However, for the zirconia abutment, the odds were 0.87 and 7.5 times higher than the titanium group. The tissue around the gold alloy abutments resulted in worse attachment conditions compared with the titanium and zirconia abutments. Inflammation tended to be higher in the tissue around the gold alloy abutments than the titanium and zirconia abutments. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Dental plaque identification at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003426.htm Dental plaque identification at home To use the sharing ... a sticky substance that collects around and between teeth. The home dental plaque identification test shows where ...

  17. [Dental care during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Luc, Egea; Coulibaly, Nadin; Demoersman, Julien; Boutigny, Hervé; Soueidan, Assem

    2012-01-01

    to understand and analyze knowledge and practices of dentists regarding dental care during pregnancy using a questionnaire which focuses on the knowledge of the relationship between oral infections and complications of pregnancy, the attitude of practitioners on the implementation of dental care during pregnancy and the training of practitioners. 53.9% of pregnant women are not referred by an obstetrician. Only 59.8% of practitioners believe that dental anesthesia is not contraindicated, and most practitioners believe that the best time for care is the second trimester or after pregnancy. During pregnancy, practitioners realize the motivation for hygiene (90.7%), drainage of an abscess (82.2%), scaling (76.1%), the placement of a splint (74.1%), the treatment of caries (70%), and the removable prosthesis (67.2%). these results indicate the existence of a gap between the care of pregnant women and the state of the art in dental science, despite current clinical recommendations to deliver all necessary care to pregnant patients during the first, second and third trimester. Moreover, the results highlight the need to reinforce the initial training of dental students, but also to develop the training for practitioners in this field.

  18. DENTAL PULP TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    Demarco, FF; Conde, MCM; Cavalcanti, B; Casagrande, L; Sakai, V; Nör, JE

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp is a highly specialized mesenchymal tissue, which have a restrict regeneration capacity due to anatomical arrangement and post-mitotic nature of odontoblastic cells. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial material cause loss of a significant amount of dentin leaving as life-lasting sequelae a non-vital and weakened tooth. However, regenerative endodontics is an emerging field of modern tissue engineering that demonstrated promising results using stem cells associated with scaffolds and responsive molecules. Thereby, this article will review the most recent endeavors to regenerate pulp tissue based on tissue engineering principles and providing insightful information to readers about the different aspects enrolled in tissue engineering. Here, we speculate that the search for the ideal combination of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenic factors for dental pulp tissue engineering may be extended over future years and result in significant advances in other areas of dental and craniofacial research. The finds collected in our review showed that we are now at a stage in which engineering a complex tissue, such as the dental pulp, is no longer an unachievable and the next decade will certainly be an exciting time for dental and craniofacial research. PMID:21519641

  19. Maintaining proper dental records.

    PubMed

    Leeuw, Wilhemina

    2014-01-01

    Referred to as Standard of Care, the legal duty of a dentist requires exercising the degree of skill and care that would be exhibited by other prudent dentists faced with the same patient-care situation. Primarily, the goal of keeping good dental records is to maintain continuity of care. Diligent and complete documentation and charting procedures are essential to fulfilling the Standard of Care. Secondly, because dental records are considered legal documents they help protect the interest of the dentist and/or the patient by establishing the details of the services rendered. Patients today are better educated and more assertive than ever before and dentists must be equipped to protect themselves against malpractice claims. Every record component must be handled as if it could be summoned to a court room and scrutinized by an attorney, judge or jury. Complete, accurate, objective and honest entries in a patient record are the only way to defend against any clinical and/or legal problems that might arise. Most medical and dental malpractice claims arise from an unfavorable interaction with the dentist and not from a poor treatment outcome. By implementing the suggestions mentioned in this course, dental health care professionals can minimize the legal risks associated with the delivery of dental care to promote greater understanding for patients of their rights and privileges to their complete record.

  20. Cosmogenic 3He in detrital gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Finlay; Yakubovich, Olga; Caracedo, Ana; Nesterenok, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Since the measurement of cosmogenic He in an alluvial diamond by McConville and Reynolds (1996) the application of cosmogenic noble gases to individual detrital grains to quantify surface processes has not been vigorously pursued. The likely low rate of diffusion of cosmogenic He in native metals, and their resistance to weathering and disintegration during erosion and transport, makes them a potential record of long-term Earth surface processes. In an effort to assess the extent that detrital refractory metals record the exposure history during transport and storage we have undertaken a reconnaissance study of the He isotope composition in 18 grains (2-200 mg) of native gold, copper, silver, and PtPd, Pt3Fe and OsIr alloys from alluvial placer deposits from around the world. 4He is dominantly the result of U and Th decay within the grains, or decay of 190Pt in the Pt-rich alloys. 3He is measurable in 13 grains, concentrations range up to 2.7E+6 atoms/g. 3He/4He are always in excess of the crustal radiogenic ratio, up to 306 Ra. Although nucleogenic 3He produced by (n,α) reactions on 6Li, and 3He from trapped hydrothermal fluids, are present, the majority of the 3He is cosmogenic in origin. Using newly calculated cosmogenic 3He production rates in heavy metals, and a determination of the effect of implantation based on the stopping distances of spallogenic 3He and 3H, the grains have 3Hecos concentrations that are equivalent to 0.35 to 1.5 Ma exposure at Earth's surface. In a study of detrital gold grains from several sites in Scotland we have found that 10 % have 3He concentrations that are significantly in excess of that generated since the Last Glacial Maximum. These studies demonstrate that, with refinement, cosmogenic 3He in refractory detrital minerals can be used to quantify sediment transport and storage on the 1-10 Ma timescale. P. McConville & J.H. Reynolds (1989). Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 53, 2365-75.

  1. Electronic structure of alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrenreich, H.; Schwartz, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    The description of electronic properties of binary substitutional alloys within the single particle approximation is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on a didactic exposition of the equilibrium properties of the transport and magnetic properties of such alloys. Topics covered include: multiple scattering theory; the single band alloy; formal extensions of the theory; the alloy potential; realistic model state densities; the s-d model; and the muffin tin model. 43 figures, 3 tables, 151 references. (GHT)

  2. Does dental caries affect dental development in children and adolescents?

    PubMed Central

    Dhamo, Brunilda; Elezi, Besiana; Kragt, Lea; Wolvius, Eppo B; Ongkosuwito, Edwin M

    2018-01-01

    Although a link between dietary changes, caries, and dental development has been observed, the literature provides little insight about this relationship. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between dental caries and dental development in a clinical sample of Albanian children and adolescents. In total, 118 children and adolescents, born between 1995 and 2004 and aged 6–15 years, were included. Dental caries in the deciduous dentition was assessed using the Decayed, Filled Teeth (dft) index and dental caries in the permanent dentition was assessed using the Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT) index. Dental development during the permanent dentition was determined using the Demirjian method. Linear and ordinal regression models were applied to analyze the associations of dental caries with dental age and developmental stages of each left mandibular tooth. Dental caries in the deciduous dentition, estimated as a median dft of 2.0 (90% range, 0.0–9.1), was significantly associated with lower dental age (β = -0.21; 90% CI: -0.29, -0.12) and with delayed development of the canine, both premolars, and the second molar. Untreated dental caries (dt) was associated with lower dental age (β = -0.19; 90% CI: -0.28, -0.10). Dental caries in the permanent dentition, estimated as a median DMFT of 1.0 (90% range, 0.0–8.0), was not significantly associated with dental age (β = 0.05; 90% CI: -0.04, 0.14). However, the DMFT was associated with the advanced stages of development of both premolars and the second molar. The untreated dental caries in the deciduous dentition delays the development of permanent teeth. PMID:29659350

  3. Impact of the De-Alloying Kinetics and Alloy Microstructure on the Final Morphology of De-Alloyed Meso-Porous Metal Films

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bao; Kong, Lingxue; Hodgson, Peter D.; Dumée, Ludovic F.

    2014-01-01

    Nano-textured porous metal materials present unique surface properties due to their enhanced surface energy with potential applications in sensing, molecular separation and catalysis. In this paper, commercial alloy foils, including brass (Cu85Zn15 and Cu70Zn30) and white gold (Au50Ag50) foils have been chemically de-alloyed to form nano-porous thin films. The impact of the initial alloy micro-structure and number of phases, as well as chemical de-alloying (DA) parameters, including etchant concentration, time and solution temperature on the final nano-porous thin film morphology and properties were investigated by electron microscopy (EM). Furthermore, the penetration depth of the pores across the alloys were evaluated through the preparation of cross sections by focus ion beam (FIB) milling. It is demonstrated that ordered pores ranging between 100 nm and 600 nm in diameter and 2–5 μm in depth can be successfully formed for the range of materials tested. The microstructure of the foils were obtained by electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) and linked to development of pits across the material thickness and surface during DA. The role of selective etching of both noble and sacrificial metal phases of the alloy were discussed in light of the competitive surface etching across the range of microstructures and materials tested. PMID:28344253

  4. Dental ethics and emotional intelligence.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Alvin B; Wolf, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Dental ethics is often taught, viewed, and conducted as an intell enterprise, uninformed by other noncognitive factors. Emotional intelligence (EQ) is defined distinguished from the cognitive intelligence measured by Intelligence Quotient (IQ). This essay recommends more inclusion of emotional, noncognitive input to the ethical decision process in dental education and dental practice.

  5. Trends in Postdoctoral Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Presents trend data concerning the current number of programs and positions in postdoctoral dental education, and examines applicant trends in postdoctoral dental education, as background for examining needs and issues that will emerge as a mandatory year of postdoctoral dental education is implemented. Factors influencing student plans to pursue…

  6. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a very small dose of ... x-ray , is a two-dimensional (2-D) dental x-ray examination that captures the entire mouth ...

  7. 76 FR 14600 - Dental Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN28 Dental Conditions AGENCY: Department of... its adjudication regulations regarding service connection of dental conditions for treatment purposes... Administration (VBA) of service connection of dental conditions for the purpose of establishing eligibility for...

  8. 77 FR 4469 - Dental Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN28 Dental Conditions AGENCY: Department of... rule the proposal to amend its adjudication regulations regarding service connection of dental... Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) for service connection of dental conditions for the purpose of...

  9. Dental Assistant Specialist. (AFSC 98150).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eling, David R.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for dental assistant specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are an introduction to dental services (the mission and organization of medical/dental service, career ladder progressions, medical readiness/wartime training, and…

  10. The Primary Dental Care Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neenan, M. Elaine; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study describes the characteristics of the current primary dental care workforce (dentists, hygienists, assistants), its distribution, and its delivery system in private and public sectors. Graduate dental school enrollments, trends in patient visits, employment patterns, state dental activities, and workforce issues related to health care…

  11. Dental therapists: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Nash, David A; Friedman, Jay W; Kardos, Thomas B; Kardos, Rosemary L; Schwarz, Eli; Satur, Julie; Berg, Darren G; Nasruddin, Jaafar; Mumghamba, Elifuraha G; Davenport, Elizabeth S; Nagel, Ron

    2008-04-01

    In 1921, New Zealand began training school dental nurses, subsequently deploying them throughout the country in school-based clinics providing basic dental care for children. The concept of training dental nurses, later to be designated dental therapists, was adopted by other countries as a means of improving access to care, particularly for children. This paper profiles six countries that utilise dental therapists, with a description of the training that therapists receive in these countries, and the context in which they practice. Based on available demographic information, it also updates the number of dental therapists practising globally, as well as the countries in which they practice. In several countries, dental therapy is now being integrated with dental hygiene in training and practice to create a new type of professional complementary to a dentist. Increasingly, dental therapists are permitted to treat adults as well as children. The paper also describes the status of a current initiative to introduce dental therapy to the United States. It concludes by suggesting that dental therapists can become valued members of the dental team throughout the world, helping to improve access to care and reducing existing disparities in oral health.

  12. Dental Hygiene Realpolitik Affecting Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bader, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Current conditions in dental hygiene influencing professional education are discussed. Workplace/practice issues include dental hygiene care as a component of dental practice, content, effects, and quality of care, hygienist supply and demand, and job satisfaction. Professional issues include the knowledge base, definitions of practice, and…

  13. High temperature alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, R. G.; Semmel, J. W., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Molybdenum is substituted for tungsten on an atomic basis in a cobalt-based alloy, S-1, thus enabling the alloy to be formed into various mill products, such as tubing and steels. The alloy is weldable, has good high temperature strength and is not subject to embrittlement produced by high temperature aging.

  14. SUPERCONDUCTING VANADIUM BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, H.J.

    1958-10-21

    A new vanadium-base alloy which possesses remarkable superconducting properties is presented. The alloy consists of approximately one atomic percent of palladium, the balance being vanadium. The alloy is stated to be useful in a cryotron in digital computer circuits.

  15. DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

    1960-03-22

    Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

  16. PLUTONIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-15

    New plutonium-base binary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuel are described. The alloys consist of 50 to 98 at.% thorium with the remainder plutonium. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are easy fabrication, phase stability, and the accompanying advantuge of providing a means for converting Th/sup 232/ into U/sup 233/.

  17. Dental materials for cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Faiza; Ur Rehman, Ihtesham; Muhammad, Nawshad; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-04-01

    Numerous bone and soft tissue grafting techniques are followed to repair cleft of lip and palate (CLP) defects. In addition to the gold standard surgical interventions involving the use of autogenous grafts, various allogenic and xenogenic graft materials are available for bone regeneration. In an attempt to discover minimally invasive and cost effective treatments for cleft repair, an exceptional growth in synthetic biomedical graft materials have occurred. This study gives an overview of the use of dental materials to repair cleft of lip and palate (CLP). The eligibility criteria for this review were case studies, clinical trials and retrospective studies on the use of various types of dental materials in surgical repair of cleft palate defects. Any data available on the surgical interventions to repair alveolar or palatal cleft, with natural or synthetic graft materials was included in this review. Those datasets with long term clinical follow-up results were referred to as particularly relevant. The results provide encouraging evidence in favor of dental and other related biomedical materials to fill the gaps in clefts of lip and palate. The review presents the various bones and soft tissue replacement strategies currently used, tested or explored for the repair of cleft defects. There was little available data on the use of synthetic materials in cleft repair which was a limitation of this study. In conclusion although clinical trials on the use of synthetic materials are currently underway the uses of autologous implants are the preferred treatment methods to date. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cytocompatibility and antibacterial activity of titania nanotubes incorporated with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tingting; Qian, Shi; Qiao, Yuqing; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-09-01

    TiO2 nanotubes prepared by electrochemical anodization have received considerable attention in the biomedical field. In this work, different amounts of gold nanoparticles were immobilized onto TiO2 nanotubes using 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane as coupling agent. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to investigate the surface morphology and composition. Photoluminescence spectra and surface zeta potential were also measured. The obtained results indicate that the surface modified gold nanoparticles can significantly enhance the electron storage capability and reduce the surface zeta potential compared to pristine TiO2 nanotubes. Moreover, the surface modified gold nanoparticles can stimulate initial adhesion and spreading of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells as well as proliferation, while the osteogenous performance of TiO2 nanotubes will not be reduced. The gold-modified surface presents moderate antibacterial effect on both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. It should be noted that the surface modified fewer gold nanoparticles has better antibacterial effect compared to the surface of substantial modification of gold nanoparticles. Our study illustrates a composite surface with favorable cytocompatibility and antibacterial effect and provides a promising candidate for orthopedic and dental implant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis of gold structures by gold-binding peptide governed by concentration of gold ion and peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungok; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Sylvia J; Rheem, Youngwoo; Myung, Nosang V; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2016-08-01

    Although biological synthesis methods for the production of gold structures by microorganisms, plant extracts, proteins, and peptide have recently been introduced, there have been few reports pertaining to controlling their size and morphology. The gold ion and peptide concentrations affected on the size and uniformity of gold plates by a gold-binding peptide Midas-11. The higher concentration of gold ions produced a larger size of gold structures reached 125.5 μm, but an increased amount of Midas-11 produced a smaller size of gold platelets and increased the yield percentage of polygonal gold particles rather than platelets. The mechanisms governing factors controlling the production of gold structures were primarily related to nucleation and growth. These results indicate that the synthesis of gold architectures can be controlled by newly isolated and substituted peptides under different reaction conditions.

  20. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dental implants: A review.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, B

    2016-12-01

    A high number of patients have one or more missing tooth and it is estimated that one in four American subjects over the age of 74 have lost all their natural teeth. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but dental implants have become one of the most used biomaterial to replace one (or more) missing tooth over the last decades. Contemporary dental implants made with titanium have been proven safe and effective in large series of patients. This review considers the main historical facts concerned with dental implants and present the different critical factors that will ensure a good osseo-integration that will ensure a stable prosthesis anchorage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Lasers in dental implantology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emile

    2004-10-01

    The parallels in the expansion of implant dentistry and laser dentistry in clinical practice are apparent. As advocates for laser dentistry continue to seek new ways to use the technology and as more practitioners become involved in implant dentistry, it is logical to see the concurrent use of both technologies in clinical practice. This article provides data that clearly support the value of dental lasers in the practice of implant dentistry. The challenge for the practitioner is the same as for any other area of dentistry: knowing when, where, and what armamentarium to use in any given situation. Not all dental laser wavelengths are necessarily useful in every dental implant situation. After clinicians know the characteristics of the wavelengths available to them, the application of the technology to the specific situation certainly is warranted.

  3. [The bonding mechanisms of base metals for metal-ceramic crown microstructure analysis of bonding agent and gold bond between porcelain and base metals].

    PubMed

    Wang, C C; Hsu, C S

    1996-06-01

    The use of base metal alloys for porcelain fused to a metal crown and bridges has increased recently because of lower price, high hardness, high tensile strength and high elastic modulus. The addition of beryllium to base metal alloys increased fluidity and improved casting fitness. Beryllium also controlled surface oxidation and bonding strength. The bonding agent and gold bonding agent also affected the bonding strength between porcelain and metal alloys. Four commercially available ceramic base alloys were studied (two alloys contained beryllium element, another two did not). The purpose of this investigation was to study the microstructure between porcelain matrix, bonding agent and alloy matrix interfaces. A scanning electron micro-probe analyzer and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) were used to study the distribution of elements (Ni, Cr, Mo, Cu, O, Si, Sn, Al) in four base alloys. The following results were obtained: 1. The thickness of the oxidized layer of Rexillium III alloy and Unitbond alloy (contained beryllium) was thinner than Unibond alloy and Wiron 88 alloy (no beryllium). 2. The thickness of the oxidized layer of alloys in air (10 minutes and 30 minutes) was thinner in Unitbond (2.45 microns and 3.80 microns) and thicker in Wiron 88 (4.39 microns and 5.96 microns). 3. The thickness of the oxidized layer occurring for a duration of ten minutes (in vaccum) showed that the Rexillium III alloy was the thinnest (1.93 microns), and Wiron 88 alloy was the thickest (2.30 microns). But in thirty minutes (vacuum), Unitbond alloy was the thinnest (3.37 microns), and Wiron 88 alloy was the thickest (5.51 microns). 4. The intensity of Cr elements was increased obviously near the interface between Unitbond alloy, Wiron 88 alloy (no beryllium) and oxidized layer, but the intensity of Ni and Mo elements was slightly increased. The intensity of Cr element was not increased markedly between Rexillium III alloy, Unitbond alloy (beryllium) and oxidized

  4. Enhancement of gold recovery using bioleaching from gold concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. H.; Cho, K. H.; Kim, B. J.; Choi, N. C.; Park, C. Y.

    2012-04-01

    The gold in refractory ores is encapsulated as fine particles (sometimes at a molecular level) in the crystal structure of the sulfide (typically pyrite with or without arsenopyrite) matrix. This makes it impossible to extract a significant amount of refractory gold by cyanidation since the cyanide solution cannot penetrate the pyrite/arsenopyrite crystals and dissolve gold particles, even after fine grinding. To effectively extract gold from these ores, an oxidative pretreatment is necessary to break down the sulfide matrix. The most popular methods of pretreatment include nitric acid oxidation, roasting, pressure oxidation and biological oxidation by microorganisms. This study investigated the bioleaching efficiency of Au concentrate under batch experimental conditions (adaptation cycles and chemical composition adaptation) using the indigenous acidophilic bacteria collected from gold mine leachate in Sunsin gold mine, Korea. We conducted the batch experiments at two different chemical composition (CuSO4 and ZnSO4), two different adaptation cycles 1'st (3 weeks) and 2'nd (6 weeks). The results showed that the pH in the bacteria inoculating sample decreased than initial condition and Eh increased. In the chemical composition adaptation case, the leached accumulation content of Fe and Pb was exhibited in CuSO4 adaptation bacteria sample more than in ZnSO4 adaptation bacteria samples, possibly due to pre-adaptation effect on chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) in gold concentrate. And after 21 days on the CuSO4 adaptation cycles case, content of Fe and Pb was appeared at 1'st adaptation bacteria sample(Fe - 1.82 and Pb - 25.81 times per control sample) lower than at 2'nd adaptation bacteria sample(Fe - 2.87 and Pb - 62.05 times per control sample). This study indicates that adaptation chemical composition and adaptation cycles can play an important role in bioleaching of gold concentrate in eco-/economic metallurgy process.

  5. Preliminary fabrication and characterization of electron beam melted Ti-6Al-4V customized dental implant.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar; Al Kheraif, Abdulaziz Abdullah; Mohammad, Ashfaq; Divakar, Darshan Devang; Kotha, Sunil Babu; Celur, Sree Lalita; Hashem, Mohamed I; Vallittu, Pekka K; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2017-05-01

    The current study was aimed to fabricate customized root form dental implant using additive manufacturing technique for the replacement of missing teeth. The root form dental implant was designed using Geomagic™ and Magics™, the designed implant was directly manufactured by layering technique using ARCAM A2™ electron beam melting system by employing medical grade Ti-6Al-4V alloy powder. Furthermore, the fabricated implant was characterized in terms of certain clinically important parameters such as surface microstructure, surface topography, chemical purity and internal porosity. Results confirmed that, fabrication of customized dental implants using additive rapid manufacturing technology offers an attractive method to produce extremely pure form of customized titanium dental implants, the rough and porous surface texture obtained is expected to provide better initial implant stabilization and superior osseointegration.

  6. Effects of Burning Conditions to the Formation of Gold Layer Photograph and Gold Layer Hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuge, Ken'ichi; Takahashi, Ataru; Harada, Takahito; Doi, Keiji; Sakai, Tomoko

    Burning stage from gold nanoparticles to gold layer in the formation process of gold-layer photograph using gold deposition development was investigated. The gelatin layer holding gold nanoparticles is carbonized at about 400°C and burned out until about 500°C. Because gold nanoparticles would be compressed only to vertical direction and then melt to form the gold layer, the gold-layer photograph still holds the high resolution. Gold nanoparaticles do not melt completely even at 900°C, and form continuous clusters of several hundred nm.

  7. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed bid...

  8. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed bid...

  9. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed bid...

  10. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed bid...

  11. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed bid...

  12. Dental Assistant, Advanced. Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    compound , or model- ing plaster instead of the rubber dam retainer Removing the Rubber Dam (figures 4-4 and 4-5). A ligature can also be used After the...roots or split crowns. If a is checked. When directed by the dental officer, ligature, dental compound , or modeling plaster remove the rubber dam...34clean" and 1 " dirty " JOB STEPS 1. Wash hands. 2. Recor! patient’s name. 3. Explain procedure to patient. 4. Tell patient to lie in bed or be seated

  13. Performance of Dental Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Rekow, E.D.; Silva, N.R.F.A.; Coelho, P.G.; Zhang, Y.; Guess, P.; Thompson, V.P.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical success of modern dental ceramics depends on an array of factors, ranging from initial physical properties of the material itself, to the fabrication and clinical procedures that inevitably damage these brittle materials, and the oral environment. Understanding the influence of these factors on clinical performance has engaged the dental, ceramics, and engineering communities alike. The objective of this review is to first summarize clinical, experimental, and analytic results reported in the recent literature. Additionally, it seeks to address how this new information adds insight into predictive test procedures and reveals challenges for future improvements. PMID:21224408

  14. Syllabus of Dental Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    Rubberloid Van R Dental Prod. Surgident Lactona Corp. Alginates Coe Alginate Coe Labs o Jeltrate L.D. Caulk Kerr Alginate Kerr/Sybron Alginate S.S. White Co...Surgident- Alginate Lactona Corp. Unijel II Unitek Corp. O Combination Agar/a ig inate Colloid 80 U.S. Shiza Corp. Dentloid Denterials, Ltd...66061 (215) 277-3800 (913) 782-2200 Shofu Dental Corp. Lactona Corp. (subsidary of 4025 Bohannon Dr. Warner-Lambert Co.) Menlo Park, CA 94025 . Academy

  15. Dental anxiety and regularity of dental attendance in younger adults.

    PubMed

    Quteish Taani, D S M

    2002-06-01

    Dental anxiety constitutes a major problem for patients and dental care providers alike. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between dental anxiety and regularity of dental attendance among young adults. A random sample of 15 course directors (1:50) was asked to participate in the study. Of these, only 10 course-directors agreed to handout the 500 questionnaires. All undergraduate students who participated in this study were asked to complete a questionnaire modified from Dental Fear Survey (DFS) questionnaire and 368 (73.6%) filled forms were returned for statistical analysis. The results showed that only 20.9% were regular dental attendee while the majority (79.1%) were irregular attendee. The reasons given for irregular attendance were 'lack of time' (36%), 'treatment not needed' (34.1%), 'fear from dentist' (13.3%) and 'cost' (16.6%). The sight and sensation of the injection and sight, sound, and sensation of the drill were the most common fear-eliciting stimuli. Increased heart rate was the commonest reported physiological response. Females had higher mean ratings, therefore tended to be more anxious than males. Dental anxiety represented by the mean responses to the items, was found to be higher in irregular dental attendee than regular attendee. In conclusion, this suggests that dental anxiety may affect the seeking of dental care, therefore to be taken into account when training dental care providers.

  16. Effect of Industry Sponsorship on Dental Restorative Trials.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, F; Tu, Y-K; Blunck, U; Paris, S; Göstemeyer, G

    2016-01-01

    Industry sponsorship was found to potentially introduce bias into clinical trials. We assessed the effects of industry sponsorship on the design, comparator choice, and findings of randomized controlled trials on dental restorative materials. A systematic review was performed via MEDLINE, CENTRAL, and EMBASE. Randomized trials on dental restorative and adhesive materials published 2005 to 2015 were included. The design of sponsored and nonsponsored trials was compared statistically (risk of bias, treatment indication, setting, transferability, sample size). Comparator choice and network geometry of sponsored and nonsponsored trials were assessed via network analysis. Material performance rankings in different trial types were estimated via Bayesian network meta-analysis. Overall, 114 studies were included (15,321 restorations in 5,232 patients). We found 21 and 41 (18% and 36%) trials being clearly or possibly industry sponsored, respectively. Trial design of sponsored and nonsponsored trials did not significantly differ for most assessed items. Sponsored trials evaluated restorations of load-bearing cavities significantly more often than nonsponsored trials, had longer follow-up periods, and showed significantly increased risk of detection bias. Regardless of sponsorship status, comparisons were mainly performed within material classes. The proportion of trials comparing against gold standard restorative or adhesive materials did not differ between trial types. If ranked for performance according to the need to re-treat (best: least re-treatments), most material combinations were ranked similarly in sponsored and nonsponsored trials. The effect of industry sponsorship on dental restorative trials seems limited. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  17. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  18. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  19. Gold, currencies and market efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav; Vosvrda, Miloslav

    2016-05-01

    Gold and currency markets form a unique pair with specific interactions and dynamics. We focus on the efficiency ranking of gold markets with respect to the currency of purchase. By utilizing the Efficiency Index (EI) based on fractal dimension, approximate entropy and long-term memory on a wide portfolio of 142 gold price series for different currencies, we construct the efficiency ranking based on the extended EI methodology we provide. Rather unexpected results are uncovered as the gold prices in major currencies lay among the least efficient ones whereas very minor currencies are among the most efficient ones. We argue that such counterintuitive results can be partly attributed to a unique period of examination (2011-2014) characteristic by quantitative easing and rather unorthodox monetary policies together with the investigated illegal collusion of major foreign exchange market participants, as well as some other factors discussed in some detail.

  20. Epidemiology of dental professional liability.

    PubMed

    Montagna, F; Cortesini, C; Manca, R; Montagna, L; Piras, A; Manfredini, D

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this article is to collect data relating to dental professional liability in Italy and provide a common platform for discussions among clinicians, legal medicine practitioners, and experts in law. On the basis of two different dental-legal statistical samples (1,670 reports of legal dental experts and 320 civil court decisions) we analyzed the dental professional liability lawsuit in the areas of distribution of lawsuits among the different dental specialties, recurrence and type of errors, outcome of civil suits, parameters of compensation. Some ideas are also proposed for possible strategies in the management of clinical risk (prevention of errors) and court proceedings.