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Sample records for dental restorative composites

  1. Confined compression of dental composites for Class I restorations

    PubMed Central

    Patki, Amol S.; Vural, Murat; Gosz, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the mechanical response of a particle-reinforced restorative dental composite (Renew™) under proportional transverse confinement to understand the effects of stress multiaxiality on its mechanical and failure behaviors. We describe the confining ring technique as an experimental tool to introduce multiaxial compressive stress states in dental composites that realistically mimic three-dimensional stress states commonly experienced by dental restorations in the oral cavity. Effect of initial radial misfit between confining ring and specimen is analyzed through computational finite element simulations, and an analytical treatment of problem is also provided to compute the confining stress during elasto-plastic expansion of confining ring. Experimental results suggest that inelastic response of Renew composite is significantly influenced by hydrostatic stress component, and pressure-dependent yield functions are required to analyze plastic deformations and internal damage accumulation process. PMID:21857744

  2. Recent advances and developments in composite dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Cramer, N B; Stansbury, J W; Bowman, C N

    2011-04-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance.

  3. Early failure of Class II resin composite versus Class II amalgam restorations placed by dental students.

    PubMed

    Overton, J D; Sullivan, Diane J

    2012-03-01

    Using the information from remake request slips in a dental school's predoctoral clinic, we examined the short-term survival of Class II resin composite restorations versus Class II dental amalgam restorations. In the student clinic, resin composite is used in approximately 58 percent of Class II restorations placed, and dental amalgam is used in the remaining 42 percent. In the period examined, Class II resin composite restorations were ten times more likely to be replaced at no cost to the patient than Class II dental amalgam restorations. A total of eighty-four resin composite restorations and six amalgam restorations were replaced due to an identified failure.

  4. Detecting margin leakage of dental composite restorations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.; Cobb, E.; Dermann, K.; Rupp, N.W.

    1983-01-01

    The degree of microleakage between a restoration and the cavity wall is difficult to quantify objectively. A silver-staining method is used and compared to the radioisotope method with results that indicate a superior definition and more accurate evaluation of microleakage. In addition to the accuracy, two advantages are presented: (1) scoring of the leakage can be refined and divided into more precise numbers, and (2) teeth can be observed directly in a microscope without resorting to the indirect interpretation of film or photograph.

  5. Recent Advances and Developments in Composite Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, N.B.; Stansbury, J.W.; Bowman, C.N.

    2011-01-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance. PMID:20924063

  6. Mechanical performance of novel bioactive glass containing dental restorative composites

    PubMed Central

    Khvostenko, D.; Mitchell, J. C.; Hilton, T. J.; Ferracane, J. L.; Kruzic, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Bioactive glass (BAG) is known to possess antimicrobial properties and release ions needed for remineralization of tooth tissue, and therefore may be a strategic additive for dental restorative materials. The objective of this study was to develop BAG containing dental restorative composites with adequate mechanical properties comparable to successful commercially available composites, and to confirm the stability of these materials when exposed to a biologically challenging environment. Methods Composites with 72 wt.% total filler content were prepared while substituting 0–15% of the filler with ground BAG. Flexural strength, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth tests were performed after several different soaking treatments: 24 hours in DI water (all experiments), two months in brain-heart infusion (BHI) media+S. mutans bacteria (all experiments) and two months in BHI media (only for flexural strength). Mechanical properties of new BAG composites were compared along with the commercial composite Heliomolar by two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s multiple comparison test (p≤0.05). Results Flexural strength, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth resistance for the BAG containing composites were unaffected by increasing BAG content up to 15% and were superior to Heliomolar after all post cure treatments. The flexural strength of the BAG composites was unaffected by two months exposure to aqueous media and a bacterial challenge, while some decreases in fracture toughness and fatigue resistance were observed. The favorable mechanical properties compared to Heliomolar were attributed to higher filler content and a microstructure morphology that better promoted the toughening mechanisms of crack deflection and bridging. Significance Overall, the BAG containing composites developed in this study demonstrated adequate and stable mechanical properties relative to successful commercial composites. PMID:24050766

  7. A silver staining technique for investigating wear of restorative dental composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.; Cobb, E.N.

    1981-05-01

    A silver staining technique was developed to demonstrate microdefects in dental restorative composites. Fine silver particles were preferentially introduced into the damaged region to provide optical contrast between the damaged and the undamaged regions. The amount of silver deposition determined with an electron probe microanalyzer, provided an indication of the extent of damage within the dental composites. Examples to demonstrate this technique were given with one clinically worn dental composite restoration and one in vitro worn composite sample.

  8. Amalgam and composite posterior restorations: curriculum versus practice in operative dentistry at a US dental school.

    PubMed

    Ottenga, Marc E; Mjör, Ivar

    2007-01-01

    This study recorded the number of preclinical lecture and simulation laboratory sessions spent teaching the preparation and placement of amalgam and resin composite posterior restorations. These data were compared to the use of both materials in the operative clinic as placed by third- and fourth-year students. The number of posterior restorations inserted by the students, expressed as a function of the number of restoration surfaces, was also evaluated. The results show that the teaching of posterior restorations pre-clinically has consistently favored amalgam 2.5 to 1 during the last three years. However, clinically, resin composite is being used for posterior restorations 2.3 times more often than amalgam. The only instance that favored amalgam over composite during the last year was in the placement of four surface posterior restorations. This shift in emphasis from amalgam to composite needs to be addressed within dental educational institutions so that newly graduated dentists are prepared to place composite restorations properly.

  9. Trends in material choice for posterior restorations in an Israeli dental school: composite resin versus amalgam.

    PubMed

    Ben-Gal, Gilad; Weiss, Ervin I

    2011-12-01

    According to a recent American Dental Association survey, posterior composite resin restorations now outnumber amalgam restorations in the United States. Dental schools around the world vary considerably in the extent to which they teach the use of composite resins. We aimed to determine if there has been an increase in the placement of posterior composite restorations in an Israeli dental school and if faculty experience affects the type of posterior restoration placed. In this retrospective study, we recorded and analyzed all the restorations performed by undergraduate students in the last five academic years at the Hebrew University Hadassah School of Dental Medicine in Jerusalem. All clinical records of student treatments between 2004 and 2009 were screened, and direct restorations were registered. Out of 6,094 posterior restorations performed during the study period, 42.3 percent were made of composite resin, increasing from 36.8 percent in 2004-05 to 48.5 percent in 2008-09, an increase of 11.7 percent. When clinical instructors were asked to state their preference if they themselves were to undergo posterior restoration, similar results were obtained. Instructors with less than ten years' experience preferred posterior composite resin restorations in 54.8 percent of the hypothetical situations, compared with 37.2 percent preferred by instructors with ten years of experience or more. It appears that the use of composite resin was influenced mainly by the prevailing trend and was not based on scientific evidence. Dental faculties should define criteria, based on up-to-date clinical studies, for using new materials, taking into consideration differences among instructors regarding treatment concept.

  10. Measurement of Poisson's ratio of dental composite restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sew Meng; Yap, Adrian U Jin; Koh, Wee Kiat; Tsai, Kuo Tsing; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the Poisson ratio of resin-based dental composites using a static tensile test method. Materials used in this investigation were from the same manufacturer (3M ESPE) and included microfill (A110), minifill (Z100 and Filtek Z250), polyacid-modified (F2000), and flowable (Filtek Flowable [FF]) composites. The Poisson ratio of the materials were determined after 1 week conditioning in water at 37 degrees C. The tensile test was performed with using a uniaxial testing system at crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data was analysed using one-way ANOVA/post-hoc Scheffe's test and Pearson's correlation test at significance level of 0.05. Mean Poisson's ratio (n=8) ranged from 0.302 to 0.393. The Poisson ratio of FF was significantly higher than all other composites evaluated, and the Poisson ratio of A110 was higher than Z100, Z250 and F2000. The Poisson ratio is higher for materials with lower filler volume fraction.

  11. Cytogenetic genotoxic investigation in peripheral blood lymphocytes of subjects with dental composite restorative filling materials.

    PubMed

    Pettini, F; Savino, M; Corsalini, M; Cantore, S; Ballini, A

    2015-01-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of a common dental composite material (Enamel Plus-HFO), in subjects with average 13 filled teeth with the same material, compared to a control group (subjects having neither amalgam nor composite resin fillings). Genotoxicity assessment of composite materials was carried out in vitro in human peripheral blood leukocytes using sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) cytogenetic tests. The results of correlation and multiple regression analyses confirmed the absence of a relationship between SCE/cell, high frequency of SCE(HFC) or CA frequencies and exposure to dental composite materials. These results indicate that composite resins used for dental restorations differ extensively in vivo in their cytotoxic and genotoxic potential and in their ability to affect chromosomal integrity, cell-cycle progression, DNA replication and repair.

  12. An update on glass fiber dental restorative composites: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Samad; Azam, Maria Tahir; Khan, Maria; Mian, Salman Aziz; Ur Rehman, Ihtesham

    2015-02-01

    Dentistry is a much developed field in the last few decades. New techniques have changed the conventional treatment methods as applications of new dental materials give better outcomes. The current century has suddenly forced on dentistry, a new paradigm regarding expected standards for state-of-the-art patient care. Within the field of restorative dentistry, the incredible advances in dental materials research have led to the current availability of esthetic adhesive restorations. The chemistry and structure of the resins and the nature of the glass fiber reinforced systems in dental composites are reviewed in relation to their influence and properties including mechanical, physical, thermal, biocompatibility, technique sensitivity, mode and rate of failure of restorations on clinical application. It is clear that a deeper understanding of the structure of the polymeric matrix and resin-based dental composite is required. As a result of ongoing research in the area of glass fiber reinforced composites and with the development and advancement of these composites, the future prospects of resin-based composite are encouraging.

  13. Synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray micro-computed tomography reveals dental bur debris under dental composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Hedayat, Assem; Nagy, Nicole; Packota, Garnet; Monteith, Judy; Allen, Darcy; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Zhu, Ning

    2016-05-01

    Dental burs are used extensively in dentistry to mechanically prepare tooth structures for restorations (fillings), yet little has been reported on the bur debris left behind in the teeth, and whether it poses potential health risks to patients. Here it is aimed to image dental bur debris under dental fillings, and allude to the potential health hazards that can be caused by this debris when left in direct contact with the biological surroundings, specifically when the debris is made of a non-biocompatible material. Non-destructive micro-computed tomography using the BioMedical Imaging & Therapy facility 05ID-2 beamline at the Canadian Light Source was pursued at 50 keV and at a pixel size of 4 µm to image dental bur fragments under a composite resin dental filling. The bur's cutting edges that produced the fragment were also chemically analyzed. The technique revealed dental bur fragments of different sizes in different locations on the floor of the prepared surface of the teeth and under the filling, which places them in direct contact with the dentinal tubules and the dentinal fluid circulating within them. Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis of the dental bur edges revealed that the fragments are made of tungsten carbide-cobalt, which is bio-incompatible.

  14. Anterior composite restorations in clinical practice: findings from a survey with general dental practitioners

    PubMed Central

    DEMARCO, Flávio Fernando; BALDISSERA, Rudimar Antonio; MADRUGA, Francine Cardozo; SIMÕES, Roberto Cuchiara; LUND, Rafael Guerra; CORREA, Marcos Britto; CENCI, Maximiliano Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess technical preferences of general dental practitioners when restoring anterior composite restorations. How the level of clinical experience or post-graduate training infuenced their options was also tested. Material and Methods A cross-sectional study was performed using a questionnaire with general dental practitioners (GDPs) (n=276) in Southern Brazil. Information regarding post graduation training (specialization, master's or PhD degree) and linical experience (years since completing graduation) were gathered. The options regarding anterior composite restorations (type of composite, adhesive system, light curing unit, polishing procedures and rubber dam use) were collected. Data were submitted to descriptive analysis and associations were tested. Results Response rate was 68% (187). GDPs selected microhybrid composite (52%) and 2-step total etch adhesive system (77%). LED was the preferred method of activation for 72.8%. Immediate polishing was preferred by 75%, using a combination of techniques. Most of the respondents (74.3%) did not use rubber dam. More experienced clinicians used more halogen lights (p<0.022), performed more light monitoring (p<0.001) and were resistant to use rubber dam (p<0.012). Dentists with post-graduation training used 3-etch-and-rinse system more frequently (p<0.04), usually monitored light intensity (p<0.014) and placed rubber dam more frequently (p<0.044). Conclusions Hybrid composite, simplifed adhesives, LED units and immediate polishing were preferred by Southern Brazilian dentists for anterior composite restorations. Few dentists used rubber dam to perform composite restorations in anterior teeth. Clinical experience and post-graduation training infuenced the dentists' choices. PMID:24473714

  15. A comparative evaluation of microleakage of restorations using silorane-based dental composite and methacrylate-based dental composites in Class II cavities: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Jambai Sampath Kumar; Prasad, A. S.; Soundappan, Saravanapriyan; Ragavendran, N.; Ajay, R.; Santham, Krishnamoorthy

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the microleakage of restorations using low shrinkage silorane-based dental composite and methacrylate-based dental composites in Class II cavity at the occlusal and gingival margins. Materials and Methods: Sixty mandibular molars were collected and divided into three experimental groups and one negative control group. Class II slot cavity was prepared on the mesial surface. Experimental groups were restored with Group I: silorane-based microhybrid composite, Group II: methacrylate-based nanohybrid composite, and Group III: Methacrylate-based microhybrid composite, respectively. Group IV: negative control. The samples were thermocycled, root apices were sealed with sticky wax and coated with nail varnish except 1 mm around the restoration. This was followed by immersion in 2% Rhodamine-B dye solution under vacuum at room temperature for 24 h. Then, the samples were sectioned longitudinally in the mesiodistal direction and evaluated under stereomicroscope ×40 magnification. Scoring was done according to the depth of dye penetration in to the cavity. Statistical analysis of the data was done. Results: The results were that no statistically significant difference in the microleakage at the occlusal margin for all the restorative materials, whereas at the gingival margin, silorane-based microhybrid composite showed less microleakage than the methacrylate-based nano- and micro-hybrid composites. Conclusion: In general, silorane-based microhybrid composite had less microleakage among the other materials used in this in vitro study. PMID:27829753

  16. The role of the ionomer glass component in polyacid-modified composite resin dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Adusei, Gabriel O; Deb, Sanjukta; Nicholson, John W

    2004-07-01

    In order to model the processes that occur within polyacid-modified composite resin ("compomer") dental restoratives, a series of experiments has been carried out with silanated and silane-free ionomer glass G338, and silanated and silane-free unreactive glass (Raysorb T-4000). In an acid-base reaction with dental grade aqueous maleic acid-acrylic acid copolymer solution, the setting time of the silanted G338 was found to be 9 min, compared with 5 min for the silane-free glass. Inclusion of each glass in an experimental composite resin system showed that the formulations which contained G338 absorbed more water than the formulations which contained Raysorb T-4000, regardless of whether or not the glass was silanted. Biaxial flexure strength was superior for experimental composites containing Raysorb T-4000, with highest results being obtained with the silanated glass. Overall these results demonstrate that silanation of the filler is essential for optimal physical properties but that, for the ionomer glass, it inhibits the acid-base reaction. The presence of ionomer glass led to an increase in water uptake compared with the unreactive glass, regardless of the presence of silane.

  17. Mechanistic aspects of fracture and fatigue in resin based dental restorative composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Minalben B.

    For resin based dental restorative composites, one of the major challenges is to optimize the balance between mechanical and optical properties. Although fracture is the second leading cause of dental restorative failures, very limited mechanistic understanding exists on a microscopic level. In the present study, the fracture properties and mechanisms of two commercial dental resin composites with different microstructures are examined using double notched four point beam bending and pre-cracked compact-tension, C(T), specimens. Four point bend flexural strength was also measured using un-notched beam samples. The first material is a microhybrid composite that combines a range of nano and micro scale filler particles to give an average particle size of 0.6 mum, while the second is a nanofill composite reinforced entirely with nano particles and their agglomerates. The influences of 60 days water hydration and a post-cure heat treatment were also examined. Fracture resistance curve (R-curve) experiments have demonstrated the microhybrid composite to be more fracture resistant than the nanofill composite in both as-processed and hydrated conditions. Rising fracture resistance with crack extension was observed in all specimens, independent of the environmental conditions. Compared to the as-processed condition, a significant reduction in the peak toughness was observed for the nanofill composite after 60 days of water aging. Hydration lowered flexural strength of both composites which was attributed to hydrolytic matrix degradation with additional interfacial debonding causing larger strength decrease in the nanofill. Optical and SEM observations revealed an interparticle matrix crack path promoting crack deflection as a toughening mechanism in all cases except the hydrated nanofill which showed particle-matrix debonding. Crack bridging was another observed extrinsic toughening mechanism that was believed to be responsible for the rising fracture resistance curve (R

  18. Assessing ex vivo dental biofilms and in vivo composite restorations using cross-polarization optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R.; Aparicio, C.; Chityala, R.; Chen, R.; Fok, A.; Rudney, J.

    2012-01-01

    A cross-polarization 1310-nm optical coherence tomography system (CP-OCT), using a beam splitter based design, was used to assess ex vivo growth of complex multi-species dental biofilms. These biofilm microcosms were derived from plaque samples along the interface of composite or amalgam restoration in children with a history of early childhood caries. This paper presents a method of measuring the mean biofilm height of mature biofilms using CP-OCT. For our in vivo application, the novel swept source based CP-OCT intraoral probe (Santec Co. Komaki, Japan) dimensions and system image acquisition speed (20 image frames/second) allowed imaging pediatric subjects as young as 4 years old. The subsurface enamel under the interface of composite resin restorations of pediatric subjects were imaged using CP-OCT. Cavitated secondary caries is clearly evident from sound resin composite restorations.

  19. Evaluation of dental adhesive systems with amalgam and resin composite restorations: comparison of microleakage and bond strength results.

    PubMed

    Neme, A L; Evans, D B; Maxson, B B

    2000-01-01

    A variety of laboratory tests have been developed to assist in predicting the clinical performance of dental restorative materials. Additionally, more than one methodology is in use for many types of tests performed in vitro. This project assessed and compared results derived from two specific laboratory testing methods, one for bond strength and one for microleakage. Seven multi-purpose dental adhesives were tested with the two methodologies in both amalgam and resin composite restorations. Bond strength was determined with a punch-out method in sections of human molar dentin. Microleakage was analyzed with a digital imaging system (Image-Pro Plus, Version 1.3) to determine the extent of dye penetration in Class V preparations centered at the CEJ on both the buccal and lingual surfaces of human molar teeth. There were 32 treatment groups (n = 10); seven experimental (dental adhesives) and one control (copal varnish, 37% phosphoric acid) followed by restoration with either amalgam or resin composite. Specimens were thermocycled 500 times in 5 degrees and 55 degrees C water with a one-minute dwell time. Bond strength and microleakage values were determined for each group. ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests demonstrated an interaction between restorative material and adhesive system with a significant difference among adhesives (p < 0.05). Using a multi-purpose adhesive system resulted in both a statistically significant increase in bond strength and a statistically significant decrease in extent of microleakage (p < 0.05). The effect of the adhesive upon both microleakage and bond strength was greater in the resin composite restorations than in the amalgam restorations. Bond strength testing was more discriminating than microleakage evaluation in identifying differences among materials.

  20. Curriculum time compared to clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in U.S. dental schools: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Rey, Rosalia; Nimmo, Susan; Childs, Gail S; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2015-03-01

    Dental clinicians have an expanding range of biomaterial choices for restoring tooth structure. Scientific developments in cariology, advances in dental biomaterials, and patients' esthetic concerns have led to a reduction in amalgam restorations and an increase in composite restorations. The aim of this study was to compare teaching time with students' clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in dental schools across the United States. Academic deans in 60 schools were invited to complete a survey that asked for the amount of instructional time for amalgam and composite posterior restorations and the number of clinical restorations performed by their Classes of 2009, 2010, and 2011. Of these 60, 12 returned surveys with complete data, for a 20% response rate. Responses from these schools showed little change in lecture and preclinical laboratory instruction from 2009 to 2011. There was a slight increase in two-surface restorations for both amalgam and composites; however, the total number of reported composite and amalgam restorations remained the same. Of 204,864 restorations reported, 53% were composite, and 47% were amalgam. There were twice as many multisurface large or complex amalgam restorations as composites. One-surface composite restorations exceeded amalgams. Among the participating schools, there was little to no change between curriculum time and clinical procedures. Findings from this preliminary study reflect a modest increase in two-surface resin-based restorations placed by dental students from 2009 to 2011 and little change in curricular time devoted to teaching amalgam restorations. The total number of posterior composite restorations placed by students in these schools was slightly higher than amalgams.

  1. Detection of composite resin restorations using an ultraviolet light-emitting diode flashlight during forensic dental identification.

    PubMed

    Guzy, Gerald; Clayton, Mary Ann

    2013-06-01

    With the increased use of composite resin and the decreased use of amalgam as a dental restorative material, the forensic dental identification of unidentified human remains has become more difficult. Various methods have been used to detect the presence of composite resin restorations including dyes, forensic alternative light sources, quantitative light-induced fluorescence, and ultraviolet lights. Although these methods may be helpful, the expense of the equipment, the electrical requirements, and the need for water to wash the dye from the mouth may make these methods impractical especially in a temporary morgue situation during a mass disaster. The fluorescent properties of composite resins, when exposed to ultraviolet light, are well documented. Standard tube ultraviolet lights have been used to detect the presence of composite resin, but these lights are large and bulky, and the tubes are fragile. The development of ultraviolet light emitting diode flashlights has provided forensic odontologists with a tool that is small, inexpensive, and battery operated. The two forensic dental identification cases described here demonstrate the value of ultraviolet light emitting diode flashlights as an adjunct to a careful clinical and radiographic examination.

  2. Non-thermal Atmospheric Plasma Treatment for Deactivation of Oral Bacteria and Improvement of Dental Composite Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qing Song; Li, H.; Ritts, A. C.; Yang, B.; Chen, M.; Hong, L.; Xu, C.; Yao, X.; Wang, Y.

    This paper reviews our recent research results of using non-thermal ­atmospheric plasmas for oral bacterial deactivation and for composite restoration improvement. Oral bacteria of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) with an initial bacterial population density between 1.0 × 108 and 5.0 × 108 cfu/ml were seeded on various media and their survivability with plasma exposure was examined. The plasma exposure time for a 99.9999% cell reduction was less than 15 s for S. mutans and within 5 min for L. acidophilus. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. After dental composite application and light curing, the teeth were then sectioned into micro-bars as the specimens for microtensile test. Student Newman Keuls (SNK) tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s plasma treatment of the dentin surfaces. These findings indicated that non-thermal atmospheric plasma technology is very promising for dental clinical applications.

  3. R-curve behavior and micromechanisms of fracture in resin based dental restorative composites.

    PubMed

    Shah, M B; Ferracane, J L; Kruzic, J J

    2009-10-01

    The fracture properties and micromechanisms of fracture for two commercial dental composites, one microhybrid (FiltekZ250) and one nanofill (FiltekSupreme Plus), were studied by measuring fracture resistance curves (R-curves) using pre-cracked compact-tension specimens and by conducting both unnotched and double notched four point beam bending experiments. Four point bending experiments showed about 20% higher mean flexural strength of the microhybrid composite compared to the nanofill. Rising fracture resistance was observed over approximately 1 mm of crack extension for both composites, and higher overall fracture resistance was observed for the microhybrid composite. Such fracture behavior was attributed to crack deflection and crack bridging toughening mechanisms that developed with crack extension, causing the toughness to increase. Despite the lower strength and toughness of the present nanofill composite, based on micromechanics observations, large nanoparticle clusters appear to be as effective at deflecting cracks and imparting toughening as solid particles. Thus, with further microstructural refinement, it should be possible to achieve a superior combination of aesthetic and mechanical performance using the nanocluster approach for dental composites.

  4. Clinical cross-polarization optical coherence tomography assessment of subsurface enamel below dental resin composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Lenton, Patricia; Rudney, Joel; Fok, Alex; Jones, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. A newly designed intraoral swept source cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) imaging system was used to examine the integrity of the subsurface enamel below resin composite restorations placed in primary teeth. CP-OCT analysis was performed using images obtained from resin composite restoration in 62 (n=62) pediatric subjects. Clinical examination was performed by a single examiner prior to CP-OCT imaging and analysis. CP-OCT images are presented using a unique combined intensity image, where a false color scale is overlaid on the grayscale intensity image. There was a clear difference in the distribution of the mean-backscattered intensity (mR) between restorations recently placed and those possessing frank cavitation (Student’s t-test, P<0.0001). For mR above 15.49 dB, the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 86%. The Youden index J was 0.8 above 12.3 dB where sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 80%. CP-OCT imaging may be used to confirm the subsurface marginal integrity below resin composite restorations but with careful consideration of limitations of the imaging modality. CP-OCT imaging may be a useful adjunct to clinical visual investigation to confirm that a composite margin has a sound and well-adapted interface. PMID:26158031

  5. Low-shrink monomers for dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Palin, W M; Fleming, G J P

    2003-04-01

    The main disadvantages of resin-based composites (RBCs) for use in load-bearing posterior restorations include the polymerization shrinkage following curing and inadequate wear resistance in service. These properties are largely influenced by the monomer system and research is currently being undertaken to decrease polymerization shrinkage and improve resin wear characteristics in an attempt to increase RBC restoration longevity. The scope of the current review will identify the development of resin-based restoratives, indicating the reported advantages and disadvantages of resin types routinely used in dental practice today and review the most recent advancements in resin technology.

  6. The effect of acrylate-based dental adhesive solvent content on microleakage in composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Mirzakhani, Mahboubeh; Mousavinasab, Sayed Mostafa; Atai, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different percentages of ethanol solvent of an experimental methacrylate-based dentin bonding agent containing polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) on the microleakage of resin composite restorations. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 42 extracted human premolar teeth used and 84 standard Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of the teeth. The teeth were divided into 6 groups of 7. Experimental bonding agents with different percentages of solvent were used in 5 groups and Single Bond® as a control. The teeth were restored with resin composite and subjected to thermal cycling test. Teeth were then immersed in a solution of 2% basic fuchsine dye for 24 h and sectioned buccolingually and scored using stereomicroscope with ×32 magnification. Microleakage data were analyzed using the Kruskal–Wallis, Mann–Whitney U, and Wilcoxon tests. Results: There were significant differences between the microleakage enamel margins (P = 0.036) and dentinal margins (P = 0.008) in all the groups. These significant differences were seen between the control group and groups containing 46 wt% solvent (P = 0.011), 46 wt% and 31 wt% solvent in dentinal (P = 0.027), 31 wt% and 0 wt% in enamel (P = 0.021), also 0 wt% and control in enamel (P = 0.039), and dentinal margins microleakage (P = 0.004). The microleakage in dentinal margins was higher than enamel margins (P < 0.001). In the groups with 46 wt% solvent (P = 0.103), 0 wt% (P = 0.122), and control group (P = 0.096), however, this difference was not significant. Conclusion: The adhesive containing 31 wt% solvent showed the least marginal microleakage, presence of POSS filler may also result in the reduction of microleakage. PMID:28182040

  7. Class II Resin Composites: Restorative Options.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minesh; Mehta, Shamir B; Banerji, Subir

    2015-10-01

    Tooth-coloured, resin composite restorations are amongst the most frequently prescribed forms of dental restoration to manage defects in posterior teeth. The attainment of a desirable outcome when placing posterior resin composite restorations requires the clinician to have a good understanding of the benefits (as well as the limitations) posed by this material, together with a sound knowledge of placement technique. Numerous protocols and materials have evolved to assist the dental operator with this type of demanding posterior restoration. With the use of case examples, four techniques available are reported here. CPD/Clinical Relevance: This article explores varying techniques for the restoration of Class II cavities using resin composite.

  8. Catechol-Functionalized Synthetic Polymer as a Dental Adhesive to Contaminated Dentin Surface for a Composite Restoration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Bae; González-Cabezas, Carlos; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kuroda, Kenichi

    2015-08-10

    This study reports a synthetic polymer functionalized with catechol groups as dental adhesives. We hypothesize that a catechol-functionalized polymer functions as a dental adhesive for wet dentin surfaces, potentially eliminating the complications associated with saliva contamination. We prepared a random copolymer containing catechol and methoxyethyl groups in the side chains. The mechanical and adhesive properties of the polymer to dentin surface in the presence of water and salivary components were determined. It was found that the new polymer combined with an Fe(3+) additive improved bond strength of a commercial dental adhesive to artificial saliva contaminated dentin surface as compared to a control sample without the polymer. Histological analysis of the bonding structures showed no leakage pattern, probably due to the formation of Fe-catechol complexes, which reinforce the bonding structures. Cytotoxicity test showed that the polymers did not inhibit human gingival fibroblast cells proliferation. Results from this study suggest a potential to reduce failure of dental restorations due to saliva contamination using catechol-functionalized polymers as dental adhesives.

  9. Catechol-Functionalized Synthetic Polymer as a Dental Adhesive to Contaminated Dentin Surface for a Composite Restoration

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a synthetic polymer functionalized with catechol groups as dental adhesives. We hypothesize that a catechol-functionalized polymer functions as a dental adhesive for wet dentin surfaces, potentially eliminating the complications associated with saliva contamination. We prepared a random copolymer containing catechol and methoxyethyl groups in the side chains. The mechanical and adhesive properties of the polymer to dentin surface in the presence of water and salivary components were determined. It was found that the new polymer combined with an Fe3+ additive improved bond strength of a commercial dental adhesive to artificial saliva contaminated dentin surface as compared to a control sample without the polymer. Histological analysis of the bonding structures showed no leakage pattern, probably due to the formation of Fe–catechol complexes, which reinforce the bonding structures. Cytotoxicity test showed that the polymers did not inhibit human gingival fibroblast cells proliferation. Results from this study suggest a potential to reduce failure of dental restorations due to saliva contamination using catechol-functionalized polymers as dental adhesives. PMID:26176305

  10. Interactions of liposomes with dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Sanko; Adamczak, Malgorzata; Hiorth, Marianne; Smistad, Gro; Kopperud, Hilde Molvig

    2015-12-01

    The in vitro adsorption and retention of liposomes onto four common types of dental restorative materials (conventional and silorane-based resin composites as well as conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GIC)) have been investigated due to their potential use in the oral cavity. Uncoated liposomes (positively and negatively charged) and pectin (low- and high-methoxylated) coated liposomes were prepared and characterized in terms of particle size and zeta potential. The adsorption of liposomes was performed by immersion, quantified by fluorescence detection, and visualized by fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy. Positive liposomes demonstrated the highest adsorption on all four types of materials likely due to their attractive surface charge. They also retained well (minimum 40% after 60 min) on both conventional resin composite and GIC even when exposed to simulated salivary flow. Although an intermediate initial level of adsorption was found for the pectin coated liposomes, at least 70% high methoxylated-pectin coated liposomes still remained on the conventional resin composite after 60 min flow exposure. This indicates significant contribution of hydrophobic interactions in the prolonged binding of liposomes to resin composites. Based on these results, the present paper suggests two new possible applications of liposomes in the preservation of dental restorations.

  11. Effect of modulated photo-activation on polymerization shrinkage behavior of dental restorative resin composites.

    PubMed

    Tauböck, Tobias T; Feilzer, Albert J; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Krejci, Ivo; Attin, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of modulated photo-activation on axial polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardening of light- and dual-curing resin-based composites. Three light-curing resin composites (SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD) and one dual-curing material (Rebilda DC) were subjected to different irradiation protocols with identical energy density (27 J cm(-2) ): high-intensity continuous light (HIC), low-intensity continuous light (LIC), soft-start (SS), and pulse-delay curing (PD). Axial shrinkage and shrinkage force of 1.5-mm-thick specimens were recorded in real time for 15 min using custom-made devices. Knoop hardness was determined at the end of the observation period. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences among the curing protocols for both Knoop hardness and axial shrinkage, irrespective of the composite material. Pulse-delay curing generated the significantly lowest shrinkage forces within the three light-curing materials SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD. High-intensity continuous light created the significantly highest shrinkage forces within Esthet X HD and Rebilda DC, and caused significantly higher forces than LIC within Esthet X flow. In conclusion, both the composite material and the applied curing protocol control shrinkage force formation. Pulse-delay curing decreases shrinkage forces compared with high-intensity continuous irradiation without affecting hardening and axial polymerization shrinkage.

  12. A 24-month Evaluation of Amalgam and Resin-Based Composite Restorations: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Michael S.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Litaker, Mark S.; Funkhouser, Ellen; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Shamp, Douglass G.; Qvist, Vibeke; Meral, Jeffrey S.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations. Methods This prospective cohort study gathered information from clinicians and offices participating in the network. Clinicians completed a baseline data collection form at the time of restoration placement, and annually thereafter. Data collected included patient factors, practice factors, and dentist factors, and were analyzed using mixed-model logistic regression. Results A total of 226 practitioners followed 6,218 direct restorations in 3,855 patients; 386 restorations failed (6.6 percent) during the mean follow-up period of 23.7 (SD 8.8) months. The number of tooth surfaces restored at baseline predicted subsequent restoration failure; large restorations were over 4 times more likely to fail. Material was not significantly associated with longevity; neither was tooth type. Patient age was highly associated with failure (p<0.0001). The failure rate for children was 5 percent, compared to 12 percent in persons 65 years old or older. Dentist gender and practice workload were significantly associated with restoration longevity. Conclusions In this prospective cohort study, these factors significantly predicted an increased failure rate for amalgam and RBC restorations: older patient age and a higher number of surfaces restored at baseline, with other key baseline variables taken into account. Material choice was not significantly predictive in these early results. Clinical Implications Understanding risk factors for early restoration failure may lead to more-effective patient care. PMID:23729455

  13. Finite element calculation of residual stress in dental restorative material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    A finite element methodology for residual stresses calculation in dental restorative materials is proposed. The material under concern is a multifunctional methacrylate-based composite for dental restorations, activated by visible light. Reaction kinetics, curing shrinkage, and viscoelastic relaxation functions were required as input data on a structural finite element solver. Post cure effects were considered in order to quantify the residual stresses coming out from natural contraction with respect to those debited to the chemical shrinkage. The analysis showed for a given test case that residual stresses frozen in the dental restoration at uniform temperature of 37°C are of the same order of magnitude of the strength of the dental composite material per se.

  14. Ceramics as biomaterials for dental restoration.

    PubMed

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Watzke, Ronny; Peschke, Arnd; Kappert, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Sintered ceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used as biomaterials for dental restoration, especially as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Biomaterials were developed either to veneer metal frameworks or to produce metal-free dental restorations. Different types of glass-ceramics and ceramics are available and necessary today to fulfill customers' needs (patients, dentists and dental technicians) regarding the properties of the biomaterials and the processing of the products. All of these different types of biomaterials already cover the entire range of indications of dental restorations. Today, patients are increasingly interested in metal-free restoration. Glass-ceramics are particularly suitable for fabricating inlays, crowns and small bridges, as these materials achieve very strong, esthetic results. High-strength ceramics are preferred in situations where the material is exposed to high masticatory forces.

  15. Atomic force microscopy in vitro study of surface roughness and fractal character of a dental restoration composite after air-polishing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Surface roughness is the main factor determining bacterial adhesion, biofilm growth and plaque formation on the dental surfaces in vivo. Air-polishing of dental surfaces removes biofilm but can also damage the surface by increasing its roughness. The purpose of this study was to investigate the surface damage of different conditions of air-polishing performed in vitro on a recently introduced dental restorative composite. Methods Abrasive powders of sodium bicarbonate and glycine, combined at different treatment times (5, 10 and 30 s) and distances (2 and 7 mm), have been tested. The resulting root mean square roughness of the surfaces has been measured by means of atomic force microscopy, and the data have been analyzed statistically to assess the significance. Additionally, a fractal analysis of the samples surfaces has been carried out. Results The minimum surface roughening was obtained by air-polishing with glycine powder for 5 s, at either of the considered distances, which resulted in a mean roughness of ~300 nm on a 30 × 30 μm2 surface area, whereas in the other cases it was in the range of 400-750 nm. Both untreated surfaces and surfaces treated with the maximum roughening conditions exhibited a fractal character, with comparable dimension in the 2.4-2.7 range, whereas this was not the case for the surfaces treated with the minimum roughening conditions. Conclusions For the dental practitioner it is of interest to learn that use of glycine in air polishing generates the least surface roughening on the considered restorative material, and thus is expected to provide the lowest rate of bacterial biofilm growth and dental plaque formation. Furthermore, the least roughening behaviour identified has been correlated with the disappearance of the surface fractal character, which could represent an integrative method for screening the air polishing treatment efficacy. PMID:20939880

  16. Costing dental restorations in public sector dental clinics.

    PubMed

    Khairiyah, Abdul Muttalib; Razak, Ishak Abdul; Raja-Latifah, Raja Jalludin; Tan, Bee Siew; Norain, Abu Talib; Noor-Aliyah, Ismail; Natifah, Che Salleh; Rauzi, Ismail

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study is to share cost analysis methodology and to obtain cost estimates for posterior restorations in public sector dental clinics. Two urban and 2 rural dental clinics in Selangor state were selected. Only cases of 1 posterior restoration per visit by dental officers were included over 6 months. One capsulated amalgam type, 1 capsulated tooth-colored, and 1 non-capsulated tooth-colored material were selected. A clinical pathway form was formulated to collect data per patient. Annual capital and recurrent expenditures were collected per clinic. The mean cost of an amalgam restoration was RM 30.96 (sdRM 7.86); and tooth-colored restorations ranged from RM 33.00 (sdRM 8.43) to RM 41.10 (sdRM 10.61). Wherein 1 USD = RM 2.8. Restoration costs were 35% to 55% higher in clinics in rural areas than in urban areas. The findings demonstrate economy of scale for clinic operation and restoration costs with higher patient load. Costs per restoration were higher in rural than in urban dental clinics. More studies are recommended to address the dearth of dental costs data in Malaysia.

  17. Fracture toughness of dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Nicoleta; Hickel, Reinhard; Valceanu, Anca Silvia; Huth, Karin Christine

    2012-04-01

    The ability of a restorative material to withstand fracture is of crucial importance especially in stress-bearing area. Therefore, the study aims to analyse the fracture toughness of a large number of dental restorative materials categories. The fracture toughness (K(IC)) of 69 restorative materials belonging to ten materials categories-micro-hybrid, nanofilled, microfilled, packable, ormocer-based, and flowable resin-based composites (RBC), compomers and flowable compomers, as well as glass ionomer cements (GIC) and resin-modified GIC was measured by means of the single-edge notched-beam method after storing the samples (n = 8) for 24 h in distilled water. Data were analyzed with the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Tukey's test and partial eta-squared statistics (p < 0.05). Large variations between the tested materials within a material category were found. The lowest fracture toughness was reached in the GIC group, followed by the microfilled RBCs, resin-modified GIC, and flowable compomers, which do not differ significantly among each other as a material group. The ormocer-based, packable, and micro-hybrid RBCs performed statistically similar, reaching the highest fracture toughness values. Between the two categories of flowables-composites and compomers-no differences were measured. The correlation between K(IC) and filler volume (0.34) and respective filler weight (0.40) was low. K(IC) increased with the volume fraction of fillers until a critical value of 57%, following with a plateau, with constant values until ca. 65% volume fraction. Above this value, K(IC) decreased slightly. Due to the very large variability of the fracture toughness within a material type, the selection of a suitable restorative material should have not been done with respect to a specific material category, especially in stress-bearing areas, but by considering the individual measured material properties.

  18. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Saurabh K; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A; Pant, Aditya B

    2012-09-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined.

  19. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh K.; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A.; Pant, Aditya B.

    2012-01-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined. PMID:23293458

  20. [Studies on the pre-treatment of dental alloy for adhesive restorations. 4. Adhesive durability of adhesive resin to various dental alloys treated with composite plating].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Y; Yamashita, A; Suzuki, K; Omura, I; Yamauchi, J I

    1989-07-01

    In this study, the durability of adhesion between an adhesive resin (Panavia EX) and dental alloys (gold or Ni-Cr) were examined in regard to thermal cycling, immersion, either in water (70 degrees C or 100 degrees C) or in sodium chloride solutions (pH was 3, 7 and 9). An favourable adhesive strength, such as 450-500 kgf/cm2, was obtained even after 24 hours immersion in 37 degrees C water, when the surface pre-treatment of the alloy was done with either Sn- or composite (TMSAC/Sn or PVC/Sn)-plating. However, during the durability test, the adhesive strength has decreased to such on extent, that about 60% of early strength with Sn-plating and 80% with TMSAC/Sn composite plating. But, with PVC/Sn composite-plating, more than 90% of the early strength was maintained. In regard to the pH of the corrosive solution, no apparent difference was observed regarding the above mentioned adhesive characteristics.

  1. Multiaxial analysis of dental composite materials.

    PubMed

    Kotche, Miiri; Drummond, James L; Sun, Kang; Vural, Murat; DeCarlo, Francesco

    2009-02-01

    Dental composites are subjected to extreme chemical and mechanical conditions in the oral environment, contributing to the degradation and ultimate failure of the material in vivo. The objective of this study is to validate an alternative method of mechanically loading dental composite materials. Confined compression testing more closely represents the complex loading that dental restorations experience in the oral cavity. Dental composites, a nanofilled and a hybrid microfilled, were prepared as cylindrical specimens, light-cured in ring molds of 6061 aluminum, with the ends polished to ensure parallel surfaces. The samples were subjected to confined compression loading to 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15% axial strain. Upon loading, the ring constrains radial expansion of the specimen, generating confinement stresses. A strain gage placed on the outer wall of the aluminum confining ring records hoop strain. Assuming plane stress conditions, the confining stress (sigma(c)) can be calculated at the sample/ring interface. Following mechanical loading, tomographic data was generated using a high-resolution microtomography system developed at beamline 2-BM of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Extraction of the crack and void surfaces present in the material bulk is numerically represented as crack edge/volume (CE/V), and calculated as a fraction of total specimen volume. Initial results indicate that as the strain level increases the CE/V increases. Analysis of the composite specimens under different mechanical loads suggests that microtomography is a useful tool for three-dimensional evaluation of dental composite fracture surfaces.

  2. Preparation and characterization of a BisGMA-resin dental restorative composites with glass, silica and titania fillers.

    PubMed

    Thorat, Sanjay; Patra, Niranjan; Ruffilli, Roberta; Diaspro, Alberto; Salerno, Marco

    2012-01-01

    A photo-polymerizable Bisphenol-A diglycidylether methacrylate resin was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy after its irradiation under different conditions to identify the best curing. Bonding-agent free composites with particles of ball-milled glass, silica and titania at loading of 10 and 50%wt were prepared, and their viscoelastic properties investigated by dynamic mechanical analysis, in experimental conditions close to the working environment in the mouth. All composites showed good stability at the considered conditions. The stiffest composite was the silica one, which was based on the smallest primary particles. The storage moduli close to room temperature (25°C) and mastication frequency (1 Hz) were extracted as reference bending moduli for the materials, and compared to static compressive moduli measured by nanoindentation performed by atomic force microscopy.Nanoindentation showed qualitative results in agreement with dynamic mechanical analysis as to the ranking of different materials, while resulting in approximately two-fold elastic modulus.

  3. Evaluation of efficacy of restorative dental treatment provided under general anesthesia at hospitalized pediatric dental patients of Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Alireza; Samani, Mahdi Jafarzadeh; Najafi, Naghme Feyzi; Hajiahmadi, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Background: General anesthesia (GA) allows dental treatment to be rendered under optimal conditions, theoretically ensuring ideal outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of restorative dental procedures performed under GA. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional retrospective study, 305 pediatric patients who had been treated under GA 6 to 24 months before our survey at Isfahan's hospitalized dentistry center were examined. The examination was performed on dental chair with oral mirror and dental probe. The results were recorded in a special form for each patient for statistical analysis and evaluation of restorations to be successful or failed. Statistical analysis was performed by chi-square and fisher exact tests for comparison between success rates of restorations and Kendall's tau-b test for evaluating the effect of time on success rates of them (P < 0.05). Results: Stainless steel crown restorations had significantly better results vs class I and class II amalgam and class I and class II tooth color restorations. All types of posterior tooth color restorations had statistically same results with amalgam restorations. Anterior composite resin build-up represented significantly low success rates. The failure rates of stainless steel crown and anterior composite resin build-up restorations did not correlate with the time of follow-up (P = 0.344 and P = 0.091, respectively). Conclusion: Stainless steel crown restorations had significantly better results vs other posterior restorations. The failure rates of stainless steel crown and anterior composite resin build-up restorations did not correlate with the time of follow-up in comparison of other restorations. PMID:23162592

  4. Effect of dental restorative materials on total antioxidant capacity and calcium concentration of unstimulated saliva

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Mona-Momeni; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Asatourian, Armen; Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Scarbecz, Mark; Sheibani, Nader

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of dental amalgam and composite restorations on total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and calcium (Ca) ion concentration of unstimulated saliva. Material and Methods Forty-eight children aged 6-10 years selected and divided into three groups of sixteen (8 males, 8 females). In group A and B, samples consisted of two class II dental composite or amalgam restorations, while in group C samples were caries-free (control group). Unstimulated saliva from all samples was collected and TAC was measured by spectrophotometry using an adaptation of 2, 2’-azino-di-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonate) (ABTS) assay. The Ca ion level was estimated by an auto- analyzer. Data were analyzed with one- and two-way ANOVA test, at a p<.05 level of significance. Results Composite samples showed significantly higher TAC and lower Ca ion levels compared to amalgam and caries-free samples (p<.05). The TAC values showed only significant difference between groups (p<.05), while the Ca ion results showed significant differences within and between groups (p<.05). Conclusions Dental composite restorations increased TAC and decreased Ca ion levels more than amalgam restorations in saliva. Gender is an effective factor in changes induced in oral cavity as females showed more emphatic reaction to dental filling materials than males. Statement of Clinical Relevance Patients who have dental restorations, especially dental composites, should pay more attention to their dental hygiene, because dental restorations can increase oxidative stress and decrease Ca ion level in saliva, which might jeopardize remineralization process of tooth structures after demineralization. Key words:Amalgam, caries, composite, saliva, total antioxidant capacity. PMID:28149467

  5. Scattering and Absorption Properties of Biomaterials for Dental Restorative Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Oliveras, A.; Rubiño, M.; Pérez, M. M.

    2013-08-01

    The physical understanding of the optical properties of dental biomaterials is mandatory for their final success in restorative applications.Light propagation in biological media is characterized by the absorption coefficient, the scattering coefficient, the scattering phase function,the refractive index, and the surface conditions (roughness). We have employed the inverse adding-doubling (IAD) method to combine transmittance and reflectance measurements performed using an integrating-sphere setup with the results of the previous scattering-anisotropygoniometric measurements. This has led to the determination of the absorption and the scattering coefficients. The aim was to optically characterize two different dental-resin composites (nanocomposite and hybrid) and one type of zirconia ceramic, and comparatively study them. The experimental procedure was conducted under repeatability conditions of measurement in order to determine the uncertainty associated to the optical properties of the biomaterials. Spectral variations of the refraction index and the scattering anisotropy factor were also considered. The whole experimental procedure fulfilled all the necessary requirements to provide optical-property values with lower associated uncertainties. The effective transport coefficient presented a similar spectral behavior for the two composites but completely different for the zirconia ceramic. The results demonstrated that the scattering anisotropy exerted a clearly distinct impact on the optical properties of the zirconia ceramic compared with those of the dental-resin composites.

  6. Longevity of Posterior Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Opdam, N.J.M.; van de Sande, F.H.; Bronkhorst, E.; Cenci, M.S.; Bottenberg, P.; Pallesen, U.; Gaengler, P.; Lindberg, A.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; van Dijken, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis, based on individual participant data from several studies, was to investigate the influence of patient-, materials-, and tooth-related variables on the survival of posterior resin composite restorations. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we conducted a search resulting in 12 longitudinal studies of direct posterior resin composite restorations with at least 5 years’ follow-up. Original datasets were still available, including placement/failure/censoring of restorations, restored surfaces, materials used, reasons for clinical failure, and caries-risk status. A database including all restorations was constructed, and a multivariate Cox regression method was used to analyze variables of interest [patient (age; gender; caries-risk status), jaw (upper; lower), number of restored surfaces, resin composite and adhesive materials, and use of glass-ionomer cement as base/liner (present or absent)]. The hazard ratios with respective 95% confidence intervals were determined, and annual failure rates were calculated for subgroups. Of all restorations, 2,816 (2,585 Class II and 231 Class I) were included in the analysis, of which 569 failed during the observation period. Main reasons for failure were caries and fracture. The regression analyses showed a significantly higher risk of failure for restorations in high-caries-risk individuals and those with a higher number of restored surfaces. PMID:25048250

  7. Chlorhexidine-releasing methacrylate dental composite materials.

    PubMed

    Leung, Danny; Spratt, David A; Pratten, Jonathan; Gulabivala, Kishor; Mordan, Nicola J; Young, Anne M

    2005-12-01

    Light curable antibacterial, dental composite restoration materials, consisting of 80 wt% of a strontium fluoroaluminosilicate glass dispersed in methacrylate monomers have been produced. The monomers contained 40-100 wt% of a 10 wt% chlorhexidine diacetate (CHXA) in hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) solution and 60-0 wt% of a 50/50 mix of urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). On raising HEMA content, light cure polymerisation rates decreased. Conversely, water sorption induced swelling and rates of diffusion controlled CHXA release from the set materials increased. Experimental composites with 50 and 90 wt% of the CHXA in HEMA solution in the monomer were shown, within a constant depth film fermentor (CDFF), to have slower rates of biofilm growth on their surfaces between 1 and 7 days than the commercial dental composite Z250 or fluoride-releasing dental cements, Fuji II LC and Fuji IX. When an excavated bovine dentine cylinder re-filled with Z250 was placed for 10 weeks in the CDFF, both bacteria and polymers from the artificial saliva penetrated between the material and dentine. With the 50 wt% experimental HEMA/CHXA formulation, this bacterial microleakage was substantially reduced. Polymer leakage, however, still occurred. Both polymer and bacterial microleakage were prevented with a 90 wt% HEMA/CHXA restoration in the bovine dentine due to swelling compensation for polymerisation shrinkage in combination with antibacterial release.

  8. Rubber dam may increase the survival time of dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Keys, William; Carson, Susan J

    2017-03-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health's Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, LILACS, SciELO, Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, VIP, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, ClinicalTrials.gov, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, OpenGrey and Sciencepaper Online databases. Handsearches in a number of journals.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials, including split-mouth studies assessing the effects of rubber dam isolation for restorative treatments in dental patients.Data extraction and synthesisTwo review authors independently screened the results of the electronic searches, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies.ResultsFour studies involving a total of 1,270 patients were included. The studies were at high risk of bias. One trial was excluded from the analysis due to inconsistencies in the presented data. Restorations had a significantly higher survival rate in the rubber dam isolation group compared to the cotton roll isolation group at six months in participants receiving composite restorative treatment of non-carious cervical lesions (risk ratio (RR) 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04 to 1.37, very low-quality evidence). The rubber dam group had a lower risk of failure at two years in children undergoing proximal atraumatic restorative treatment in primary molars (hazard ratio (HR) 0.80, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.97, very low-quality evidence). One trial reported limited data showing that rubber dam usage during fissure sealing might shorten the treatment time. None of the included studies mentioned adverse effects or reported the direct cost of the treatment, or the level of patient acceptance/satisfaction. There was also no evidence evaluating the effects of rubber dam usage on the quality of the restorations.ConclusionsWe found some very low-quality evidence, from single studies, suggesting that rubber dam usage in dental direct

  9. Clinical Investigation of a New Bulk Fill Composite Resin in the Restoration of Posterior Teeth

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Dental Restoration Failure of Marginal Integrity; Dental Caries; Unrepairable Overhanging of Dental Restorative Materials; Poor Aesthetics of Existing Restoration; Secondary Dental Caries Associated With Failed or Defective Dental Restorations; Fractured Dental Restorative Materials Without Loss of Materials; Fracture of Dental Restorative Materials With Loss of Material

  10. Embryotoxicity assays for leached components from dental restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Currently, there are no suitable assays available to evaluate the embryotoxicity of leached components from restorative dental materials. Methods The effect of the medium conditioned by composites and amalgam on mouse blastocysts in vitro was tested. The materials were also subcutaneously implanted, and the effect of the medium supplemented with serum from the host blood was evaluated in the embryotoxicity assay. The embryo implantation rate in the material-transplanted mothers was also evaluated. Results The results show that while the culture in media conditioned by amalgams did not affect blastocyst development, the medium conditioned by composites caused blastocyst degeneration and apoptosis. The development of blastocysts in a medium containing serum obtained from animals after transplantation was, however, without effect. Finally, inconsistent reduction in the implantation rate in transplanted mothers was observed. Conclusions In this study, we provide examples of in vitro and in vivo tests that may be used to evaluate embryotoxicity for dental materials. Our results show that leached components from our composite-material induced embryotoxicity in vitro, however, no toxicity was observed when subcutaneously implanted in vivo. This highlights the necessity of integrated in vitro and in vivo tests for valuable predictive estimation of embryotoxicity for complex materials. PMID:21978455

  11. Comparison of Dental School and Practicing Dentists' Restorative Treatment Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bader, James D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Comparison and analysis of the restorative treatment recommendations made by dentists and dental school students for 63 patients found about 85% agreement on treatment plans. It is observed that the results provide some basis on which to assess how well dental school treatments reflect mainstream practice. (MSE)

  12. Loss of Alloy in Cast Restorations Fabricated by Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soh, George

    1991-01-01

    A study investigated the quantity of alloy lost in the fabrication of three types of cast restoration by dental students, and identified the proportion of loss at each of the four principal stages of the fabrication process. Suggestions for reducing metal loss and related costs in dental schools are offered. (MSE)

  13. New nano-sized Al2O3-BN coating 3Y-TZP ceramic composites for CAD/CAM-produced all-ceramic dental restorations. Part I. Fabrication of powders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Se Fei; Yang, Li Qiang; Jin, Zhi Hao; Guo, Tian Wen; Wang, Lei; Liu, Hong Chen

    2009-06-01

    Partially sintered 3 mol % yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconium dioxide (ZrO(2), zirconia) polycrystal (3Y-TZP) ceramics are used in dental posterior restorations with computer-aided design-computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) techniques. High strength is acquired after sintering, but shape distortion of preshaped compacts during their sintering is inevitable. The aim of this study is to fabricate new machinable ceramic composites with strong mechanical properties that are fit for all-ceramic dental restorations. Aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3))-coated 3Y-TZP powders were first prepared by the heterogeneous precipitation method starting with 3Y-TZP, Al(NO(3))(3) . 9H(2)O, and ammonia, then amorphous boron nitride (BN) was produced and the as-received composite powders were coated via in situ reaction with boric acid and urea. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze the status of Al(2)O(3)-BN on the surface of the 3Y-TZP particles. TEM micrographs show an abundance of Al(2)O(3) particles and amorphous BN appearing uniformly on the surface of the 3Y-TZP particles after the coating process. The size of the Al(2)O(3) particles is about 20 nm. The XRD pattern shows clearly the peak of amorphous BN among the peaks of ZrO(2).

  14. The demand for preventive and restorative dental services.

    PubMed

    Meyerhoefer, Chad D; Zuvekas, Samuel H; Manski, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Chronic tooth decay is the most common chronic condition in the United States among children ages 5-17 and also affects a large percentage of adults. Oral health conditions are preventable, but less than half of the US population uses dental services annually. We seek to examine the extent to which limited dental coverage and high out-of-pocket costs reduce dental service use by the nonelderly privately insured and uninsured. Using data from the 2001-2006 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and an American Dental Association survey of dental procedure prices, we jointly estimate the probability of using preventive and both basic and major restorative services through a correlated random effects specification that controls for endogeneity. We found that dental coverage increased the probability of preventive care use by 19% and the use of restorative services 11% to 16%. Both conditional and unconditional on dental coverage, the use of dental services was not sensitive to out-of-pocket costs. We conclude that dental coverage is an important determinant of preventive dental service use, but other nonprice factors related to consumer preferences, especially education, are equal if not stronger determinants.

  15. Nanotechnology-based restorative materials for dental caries management

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Mary A.S.; Guedes, Sarah F.F.; Xu, Hockin H.K.; Rodrigues, Lidiany K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been applied to dental materials as an innovative concept for the development of materials with better properties and anticaries potential. In this review we discuss the current progress and future applications of functional nanoparticles incorporated in dental restorative materials as useful strategies to dental caries management. We also overview proposed antimicrobial and remineralizing mechanisms. Nanomaterials have great potential to decrease biofilm accumulation, inhibit the demineralization process, to be used for remineralizing tooth structure, and to combat caries-related bacteria. These results are encouraging and open the doors to future clinical studies that will allow the therapeutic value of nanotechnology-based restorative materials to be established. PMID:23810638

  16. Complex layered dental restorations: Are they recognizable and do they survive extreme conditions?

    PubMed

    Soon, Alistair S; Bush, Mary A; Bush, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Recent research has shown that restorative dental materials can be recognized by microscopy and elemental analysis (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence; SEM/EDS and XRF) and that this is possible even in extreme conditions, such as cremation. These analytical methods and databases of dental materials properties have proven useful in DVI (disaster victim identification) of a commercial plane crash in 2009, and in a number of other victim identification cases. Dental materials appear on the market with ever expanding frequency. With their advent, newer methods of restoration have been proposed and adopted in the dental office. Methods might include placing multiple layers of dental materials, where they have different properties including adhesion, viscosity, or working time. These different dental materials include filled adhesives, flowable resins, glass ionomer cements, composite resins, liners and sealants. With possible combinations of different materials in these restorations, the forensic odontologist is now confronted with a new difficulty; how to recognize each individual material. The question might be posed if it is even possible to perform this task. Furthermore, an odontologist might be called upon to identify a victim under difficult circumstances, such as when presented with fragmented or incinerated remains. In these circumstances the ability to identify specific dental materials could assist in the identification of the deceased. Key to use of this information is whether these new materials and methods are detailed in the dental chart. Visual or radiographic inspection may not reveal the presence of a restoration, let alone the possible complex nature of that restoration. This study demonstrates another scientific method in forensic dental identification.

  17. Phase identification in dental porcelains for ceramo-metallic restorations.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, M M; Riesgo, O; Vicente, E E

    1989-01-01

    Most commercial dental porcelains designed for ceramo-metallic restorations are partially crystallized feldspathic glasses (glass-ceramics) that consist of low (tetragonal) leucite (K2O.Al2O3.4SiO2) crystals embedded in a glassy matrix. In this work, we have identified the crystalline phases in eight commercial dental porcelains (four enamels and four dentin bodies) in both powder (unfired) and sintered forms, by x-ray diffraction, emission spectroscopy analysis, reflection optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Besides low leucite and glass, we have found a second crystalline phase in the sintered and slow-cooled porcelains that we propose to be potash feldspar (K2O.Al2O3.6SiO2). It was impossible to ascertain whether these synthetic crystals may be sanidine, orthoclase, or microcline. The precipitation of feldspar during cooling is explained in terms of the crystallization behavior of typical body compositions in the ternary-phase diagram K2O-Al2O3-SiO2. Ceramography confirms the martensitic (displacive) nature of the transformation from high (cubic) to low (tetragonal) leucite upon cooling.

  18. Antibacterial activity of restorative dental biomaterials in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boeckh, Clemens; Schumacher, Eliane; Podbielski, Andreas; Haller, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the antibacterial effects against Streptococcus mutans of a fine-hybrid resin composite (FH-RC; Tetric ceram), an ion-releasing resin composite (Ariston pHc), a self-curing glass ionomer cement (SC-GIC; Ketac-Molar), a resin-modified GIC (RM-GIC; Photac-Fil), and a zinc oxide eugenol cement (ZOE; IRM). In a novel assay, bacterial suspensions were placed into narrow 20-microl conical cavities within the materials. After 0, 4, 8, 24, 48 h and 1 week of incubation, the suspensions were removed from the restoratives and the numbers of viable bacteria were determined. After incubation periods of 8 h or more, all restorative materials except the FH-RC showed significant growth inhibition when compared with controls. The strongest antibacterial activity was observed with ZOE. The inhibitory effect of Ariston pHc was similar to that of the SC-GIC and the RM-GIC. In the second assay, growth inhibition was evaluated in liquid cultures by incubating eluates of the materials with suspensions of S. mutans. Bacterial growth was determined up to 6 h by measuring absorption at 600 nm. The most marked inhibitory effect was again observed with ZOE. The SC-GIC caused a significant inhibition at all time intervals but the FH-RC, the RM-GIC and Ariston pHc exhibited no significant antibacterial effects. It is recommended to employ more than one method for assessing the antibacterial potential of restorative materials. Long-term clinical trials are necessary to determine whether the antimicrobial effects of dental materials are able to reduce the risk of secondary caries formation.

  19. In situ reaction kinetic analysis of dental restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younas, Basma; Samad Khan, Abdul; Muzaffar, Danish; Hussain, Ijaz; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in situ structural and thermal changes of dental restorative materials at periodical time intervals. The commercial materials included zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE), zinc phosphate type I (ZnPO4), glass ionomer cement type II (GIC) and resin-based nano-omposite (Filtek Z350 XT). These materials were processed according to manufacturer's instructions. For the structural analysis Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used at high resolution. TGA was used to evaluate thermal weight-loss. The FTIR spectra were collected at periodic time intervals. FTIR spectra showed that with time passing all materials exhibited an increase in peak intensities and a new appearance of shoulders and shifting of peaks for example, ZnPO4 (P-O), ZOE (C═O, C═N, C-O-C), GIC (COO-, C-H, Si-OH), composites (C═O, C═C, C═N, C-N-H). The peaks were replaced by bands and these bands became broader with time interval. Composites showed a degree of conversion and new peaks corresponded to the cross-linking of polymer composites. TGA analysis showed that significant changes in weight loss of set materials were observed after 24 h, where ZOE showed continuous changes in thermal degradation. The spectral changes and thermal degradation with time interval elucidated in situ setting behaviour and understanding of their bonding compatibility with tooth structure and change in relation to time.

  20. Ceramic whisker reinforcement of dental resin composites.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Martin, T A; Antonucci, J M; Eichmiller, F C

    1999-02-01

    Resin composites currently available are not suitable for use as large stress-bearing posterior restorations involving cusps due to their tendencies toward excessive fracture and wear. The glass fillers in composites provide only limited reinforcement because of the brittleness and low strength of glass. The aim of the present study was to reinforce dental resins with ceramic single-crystalline whiskers of elongated shapes that possess extremely high strength. A novel method was developed that consisted of fusing silicate glass particles onto the surfaces of individual whiskers for a two-fold benefit: (1) to facilitate silanization regardless of whisker composition; and (2) to enhance whisker retention in the matrix by providing rougher whisker surfaces. Silicon nitride whiskers, with an average diameter of 0.4 microm and length of 5 microm, were coated by the fusion of silica particles 0.04 microm in size to the whisker surface at temperatures ranging from 650 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. The coated whiskers were silanized and manually blended with resins by spatulation. Flexural, fracture toughness, and indentation tests were carried out for evaluation of the properties of the whisker-reinforced composites in comparison with conventional composites. A two-fold increase in strength and toughness was achieved in the whisker-reinforced composite, together with a substantially enhanced resistance to contact damage and microcracking. The highest flexural strength (195+/-8 MPa) and fracture toughness (2.1+/-0.3 MPa x m(1/2)) occurred in a composite reinforced with a whisker-silica mixture at whisker:silica mass ratio of 2:1 fused at 800 degrees C. To conclude, the strength, toughness, and contact damage resistance of dental resin composites can be substantially improved by reinforcement with fillers of ceramic whiskers fused with silica glass particles.

  1. Discrimination of tooth layers and dental restorative materials using cutting sounds.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Vahid; Arzanpour, Siamak; Chehroudi, Babak

    2015-03-01

    Dental restoration begins with removing carries and affected tissues with air-turbine rotary cutting handpieces, and later restoring the lost tissues with appropriate restorative materials to retain the functionality. Most restoration materials eventually fail as they age and need to be replaced. One of the difficulties in replacing failing restorations is discerning the boundary of restorative materials, which causes inadvertent removal of healthy tooth layers. Developing an objective and sensor-based method is a promising approach to monitor dental restorative operations and to prevent excessive tooth losses. This paper has analyzed cutting sounds of an air-turbine handpiece to discriminate between tooth layers and two commonly used restorative materials, amalgam and composite. Support vector machines were employed for classification, and the averaged short-time Fourier transform coefficients were selected as the features. The classifier performance was evaluated from different aspects such as the number of features, feature scaling methods, classification schemes, and utilized kernels. The total classification accuracies were 89% and 92% for cases included composite and amalgam materials, respectively. The obtained results indicated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Fluoride release and recharge abilities of contemporary fluoride-containing restorative materials and dental adhesives.

    PubMed

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades, Maria; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of five fluoride-releasing restorative materials and three dental adhesives, before and after NaF solution treatment. Five restorative materials (Fuji IX GP, GC Corp.; Ketac N100, 3M ESPE; Dyract Extra, Dentsply; Beautifil II, Shofu Inc.; Wave, SDI) and three dental adhesives (Stae, SDI; Fluorobond II - Shofu Inc.; Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) were investigated before and after NaF solution treatment. A fluoride ion-selective electrode was to measure fluoride concentrations. During the 86-day period before NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP released the highest amount of fluoride among the restorative materials while Prime & Bond NT was the highest among the dental adhesives. After NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP again ranked the highest in fluoride release among the restorative materials while Fluorobond II ranked the highest among dental adhesives. It was concluded that the compositions and setting mechanisms of fluoride-containing dental materials influenced their fluoride release and recharge abilities.

  3. Toxicity test of a dental commercial composite

    PubMed Central

    Ponce-Bravo, Santa; Martínez-Rivera, José-Luis; Garcés-Ortíz, Maricela

    2015-01-01

    Background International rules must be followed for testing biosecurity in dental materials. A new brand of restorative material appeared in the market and regulations indicated that it should be tested for toxicity. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the 90-day sub chronic toxicity of one triethylene glycol dimethacrylate containing composite (MEDENTAL Light-Cure Composite™) orally administered to rats according to Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development no. 48 guidelines and the requirements specified in the ISO 10993-11. Material and Methods Wistar rats ate the polymerized composite during 90 days and were observed to determine changes in their behavior, eye and skin signs and other attitudes such as aggressiveness, posture, walking and response to handling. After 90 days were sacrificed to ascertain blood alterations, we did special hematological tests and assessed microscopic slides from 33 different organs. Results We recorded no significant changes in clinical behavior of the animals. Microscopic review of the H&E stained slides obtained from the analyzed organs showed no abnormal inflammatory or cytological changes and all hematological special tests were within normal limits. Conclusions Results of this study show that under our experimental conditions the MEDENTAL Light-Cure Composite™ does not produce inflammatory or cytological changes suggestive of toxicity. Key words:Dental materials, composite resin, toxicity, inflammation, TEGDMA. PMID:26155348

  4. Effect of Industry Sponsorship on Dental Restorative Trials.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, F; Tu, Y-K; Blunck, U; Paris, S; Göstemeyer, G

    2016-01-01

    Industry sponsorship was found to potentially introduce bias into clinical trials. We assessed the effects of industry sponsorship on the design, comparator choice, and findings of randomized controlled trials on dental restorative materials. A systematic review was performed via MEDLINE, CENTRAL, and EMBASE. Randomized trials on dental restorative and adhesive materials published 2005 to 2015 were included. The design of sponsored and nonsponsored trials was compared statistically (risk of bias, treatment indication, setting, transferability, sample size). Comparator choice and network geometry of sponsored and nonsponsored trials were assessed via network analysis. Material performance rankings in different trial types were estimated via Bayesian network meta-analysis. Overall, 114 studies were included (15,321 restorations in 5,232 patients). We found 21 and 41 (18% and 36%) trials being clearly or possibly industry sponsored, respectively. Trial design of sponsored and nonsponsored trials did not significantly differ for most assessed items. Sponsored trials evaluated restorations of load-bearing cavities significantly more often than nonsponsored trials, had longer follow-up periods, and showed significantly increased risk of detection bias. Regardless of sponsorship status, comparisons were mainly performed within material classes. The proportion of trials comparing against gold standard restorative or adhesive materials did not differ between trial types. If ranked for performance according to the need to re-treat (best: least re-treatments), most material combinations were ranked similarly in sponsored and nonsponsored trials. The effect of industry sponsorship on dental restorative trials seems limited.

  5. Various Effects of Sandblasting of Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nishigawa, Goro; Maruo, Yukinori; Irie, Masao; Maeda, Naoto; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Minagi, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Background Sandblasting particles which remain on the surfaces of dental restorations are removed prior to cementation. It is probable that adhesive strength between luting material and sandblasting particle remnants might exceed that with restorative material. If that being the case, blasting particles adhere to sandblasted material surface could be instrumental to increasing adhesive strength like underlying bonding mechanism between luting material and silanized particles of tribochemical silica coating-treated surface. We hypothesize that ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces, which were pretreated with sandblasting, may affect adhesive strength of a resin luting material to dental restorative materials. Methods We therefore observed adhesive strength of resin luting material to aluminum oxide was greater than those to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy beforehand. To measure the shear bond strengths of resin luting material to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, forty specimens of each restorative material were prepared. Bonding surfaces were polished with silicon abrasive paper and then treated with sandblasting. For each restorative material, 40 sandblasted specimens were equally divided into two groups: ultrasonic cleaning (USC) group and non-ultrasonic cleaning (NUSC) group. After resin luting material was polymerized on bonding surface, shear test was performed to evaluate effect of ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces pretreated with sandblasting on bond strength. Results For both zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, NUSC group showed significantly higher shear bond strength than USC group. Conclusions Ultrasonic cleaning of dental restorations after sandblasting should be avoided to retain improved bonding between these materials. PMID:26764913

  6. Biofilm formation on dental restorative and implant materials.

    PubMed

    Busscher, H J; Rinastiti, M; Siswomihardjo, W; van der Mei, H C

    2010-07-01

    Biomaterials for the restoration of oral function are prone to biofilm formation, affecting oral health. Oral bacteria adhere to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, but due to fluctuating shear, little biofilm accumulates on hydrophobic surfaces in vivo. More biofilm accumulates on rough than on smooth surfaces. Oral biofilms mostly consist of multiple bacterial strains, but Candida species are found on acrylic dentures. Biofilms on gold and amalgam in vivo are thick and fully covering, but barely viable. Biofilms on ceramics are thin and highly viable. Biofilms on composites and glass-ionomer cements cause surface deterioration, which enhances biofilm formation again. Residual monomer release from composites influences biofilm growth in vitro, but effects in vivo are less pronounced, probably due to the large volume of saliva into which compounds are released and its continuous refreshment. Similarly, conflicting results have been reported on effects of fluoride release from glass-ionomer cements. Finally, biomaterial-associated infection of implants and devices elsewhere in the body is compared with oral biofilm formation. Biomaterial modifications to discourage biofilm formation on implants and devices are critically discussed for possible applications in dentistry. It is concluded that, for dental applications, antimicrobial coatings killing bacteria upon contact are more promising than antimicrobial-releasing coatings.

  7. [Influence Factors on Monomer Conversion of Dental Composite Resin].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Gao, Yan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yuntao; Wang, Fanghui; Wang, Qingshan

    2015-04-01

    Dental composite resin is a kind of material which has been widely used in dental restoration. Research has found that the influence of residual monomer on the material mechanical, chemical and biological properties cannot be ignored. This paper elaborates these harms of residual monomers. The effects of resin matrix, inorganic filler and initiating system, illumination, secondarily treatment on the degree of conversion were also analyzed. The paper also discusses the effective measures to increase the conversion, and offers theoretical basis for the clinical application and development of composite resin.

  8. The Decim system for the production of dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Sjölin, R; Sundh, A; Bergman, M

    1999-07-01

    The general background to the development of CAD/CAM is presented in short. Specific problems when using this technique for the manufacturing of dental restorations are emphasized, and then the reverse engineering and CAD/CAM process that have been implemented in the Decim (Dentronic AB, Skellefteå, Sweden) system are presented. The system is organized in the following way: 1. The measurement process is encapsulated in a product called Decim Reader. 2. The design functionality is provided by software running on a conventional personal computer. This unit is called Decim Designer. 3. The CAM calculation is done by a dedicated personal computer, the Decim Calculator, that does not require any user interaction. 4. The actual manufacturing of the restorations is performed in the Decim Producer that works with a grinding technique. These components communicate via a local computer network or, when a distributed solution is desired, via internet. The Decim System is presently used for the production of dental ceramic restorations, and it is the only system which can be used for manufacturing inlays of yttria-stabilized zirconia. This ceramic material is CE-approved under the brand name Denzir (Dentronic AB, Skellefteå, Sweden). Due to its favorable mechanical properties, it may be an alternative to dental amalgam, and is therefore of topical interest in dentistry. The use of computer-based techniques for manufacturing dental restorations is briefly outlined and commented on.

  9. Design and development of self-healing dental composites.

    PubMed

    Huyang, George; Debertin, Anne E; Sun, Jirun

    2016-03-15

    The purpose of this project is to design and develop a clinically applicable self-healing dental composite (SHDC). The value of resin-based dental restorations could be improved by increasing their service lives. One way to improve longevity is to obturate micro-cracks that form during or after the composite hardens in the dental cavity. Toward this end, we introduce here a new type of SHDC made with contemporary dental components plus two additional ingredients: a healing powder (HP, strongtium fluoroaluminosilicate particles) and a healing liquid (HL, aqueous solutions of polyacrylic acids) that is enclosed within silica microcapsules. As micro-cracks develop, they will break the microcapsules in their propagation path, thereby releasing HL. This liquid will then react with particles of HP exposed by the crack formation, forming an insoluble reaction product that fills and seals the cracks. The key factors to achieve this self-healing of cracks are discussed. The elastic modulus of a SHDC appeared to be satisfactory. The healing process was confirmed by means of mechanical, morphological, and chemical methods. The SHDC restored micro-cracks without external intervention, thereby showing potential for increasing the service lives of dental restorations. Importantly, this SHDC contains only clinically-tested, biocompatible materials, making it readily applicable.

  10. Regression of oral lichenoid lesions after replacement of dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Mårell, L; Tillberg, A; Widman, L; Bergdahl, J; Berglund, A

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prognosis and to evaluate the regression of lichenoid contact reactions (LCR) and oral lichen planus (OLP) after replacement of dental restorative materials suspected as causing the lesions. Forty-four referred patients with oral lesions participated in a follow-up study that was initiated an average of 6 years after the first examination at the Department of Odontology, i.e. the baseline examination. The patients underwent odontological clinical examination and answered a questionnaire with questions regarding dental health, medical and psychological health, and treatments undertaken from baseline to follow-up. After exchange of dental materials, regression of oral lesions was significantly higher among patients with LCR than with OLP. As no cases with OLP regressed after an exchange of materials, a proper diagnosis has to be made to avoid unnecessary exchanges of intact restorations on patients with OLP.

  11. Microleakage of Er:YAG laser and dental bur prepared cavities in primary teeth restored with different adhesive restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Baghalian, Ali; Nakhjavani, Yahya B; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Motahhary, Pouria; Bahramian, Hoda

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser irradiation and conventional dental bur cavity preparation on in vitro microleakage of class V cavities restored with different adhesive restorative materials and two types of self-etching adhesives in primary teeth. Standard class V cavities were prepared on 80 extracted primary, and the teeth were randomly divided into eight subgroups prepared either by dental bur or Er:YAG laser irradiation and then restored with self-cured glass ionomer (GI), resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), resin composite and Clearfil SE Bond (two-step self-etching adhesive), and resin composite and Clearfil S3 Bond (one-step self-etching adhesive). Restorations were finished and stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h and then subjected to thermocycling. All the teeth were sealed with nail varnish, placed in a silver nitrate solution, and then vertically cut in a buccolingually direction. Subsequently, the specimens were evaluated for gingival and occlusal microleakage using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Mann-Whitney test. Wilcoxon test was used for comparing occlusal microleakage with gingival microleakage at p < 0.05. A higher degree of occlusal and gingival microleakage values for the teeth restored with GI or RMGI was obtained by both preparation methods compared with that of resin composites and the two self-etching primers. Er:YAG laser irradiation resulted in a significantly higher degree of microleakage only at the gingival margins for teeth restored with GI or RMGI, or composite and Clearfil S3 Bond compared with the bur preparation. The Er:YAG laser-prepared teeth restored with composite and Clearfil SE Bond demonstrated a better marginal seal on occlusal and gingival margins compared with that of bur-prepared cavities. The degree of microleakage in class V cavities was affected by the type of adhesive

  12. Color Stability of Dental Restorative Materials Submitted to Heat Sources, for Forensic Purposes.

    PubMed

    Biancalana, Roberto Cesar; Vicente, Sergio Augusto de Freitas; Alves da Silva, Ricardo Henrique; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2017-03-01

    During postmortem examination of the dental arches of carbonized victims, dental restorative materials may be found. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat source action on the color stability of composite resin (CR) and glass ionomer cement (GIC) restorations, to discriminate between them and compare with antemortem dental data. Sixty bovine teeth (30 CR and 30 GIC) were prepared (6 × 6 × 2 mm) and separated into groups (n = 10). The color readouts were taken by spectrophotometer, before and after heat action (100°C, 200°C, 300°C), in an oven for 15 min. There were color alterations for all coordinates (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa* eΔb*) for both materials. GIC presented greater change. The authors concluded that it is possible to distinguish between the materials by the color changes analyzed by instrumental method, helping victim identification.

  13. What constitutes an ideal dental restorative material?

    PubMed

    Rekow, E D; Bayne, S C; Carvalho, R M; Steele, J G

    2013-11-01

    Intense environmental concerns recently have prompted dentistry to evaluate the performance and environmental impact of existing restoration materials. Doing so entices us to explore the 'what if?' innovation in materials science to create more ideal restorative materials. Articulating a specification for our design and evaluation methods is proving to be more complicated than originally anticipated. Challenges exist not only in specifying how the material should be manipulated and perform clinically but also in understanding and incorporating implications of the skill of the operator placing the restoration, economic considerations, expectations patients have for their investment, cost-effectiveness, influences of the health care system on how and for whom restorations are to be placed, and global challenges that limit the types of materials available in different areas of the world. The quandary is to find ways to actively engage multiple stakeholders to agree on priorities and future actions to focus future directions on the creation of more ideal restorative materials that can be available throughout the world.

  14. Compressive fatigue limit of four types of dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Öhman, Caroline; Jefferies, Steven R; Gray, Holly; Xia, Wei; Engqvist, Håkan

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quasi-static compressive strength and the compressive fatigue limit of four different dental restorative materials, before and after aging in distilled water for 30 days. A conventional glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP; IG), a zinc-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Chemfil rock; CF), a light curable resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC; LC) and a resin-based composite (Quixfil; QF) were investigated. Cylindrical specimens (4mm in diameter and 6mm in height) were prepared according to the manufacturer׳s instructions. The compressive fatigue limit was obtained using the staircase method. Samples were tested in distilled water at 37°C, at a frequency of 10Hz with 10(5) cycles set as run-out. 17 fatigue samples were tested for each group. Two-way ANOVA and one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey׳s post-hoc test were used to analyze the results. Among the four types of materials, the resin-based composite exhibited the highest compressive strength (244±13.0MPa) and compressive fatigue limit (134±7.8MPa), followed by the light-cured resin reinforced glass ionomer cement (168±8.5MPa and 92±6.6MPa, respectively) after one day of storage in distilled water. After being stored for 30 days, all specimens showed an increase in compressive strength. Aging showed no effect on the compressive fatigue limit of the resin-based composite and the light-cured resin reinforced glass ionomer cement, however, the conventional glass ionomer cements showed a drastic decrease (37% for IG, 31% for CF) in compressive fatigue limit. In conclusion, in the present study, resin modified GIC and resin-based composite were found to have superior mechanical properties to conventional GIC.

  15. Clinical Evaluation of Dental Restorative Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    of Nonprecious Alloys for Use with Porcelain Veneers . Part One, Physical Properties, J. Prosth Dent, 30: 424-431, 1973. Page 13...manufacturer (Jelenko and Company, Armonk, New York) recommends the use of their "thermotrol" casting set up. Attempt to cast this alloy with this piece of ...Nielsen, J.P. and Tuccillo, J’.J.: Calculations of Interfacial Stress in Dental Porcelain Bonded to Gold Alloy Substrate

  16. Posterior composite restoration update: focus on factors influencing form and function

    PubMed Central

    Bohaty, Brenda S; Ye, Qiang; Misra, Anil; Sene, Fabio; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    Restoring posterior teeth with resin-based composite materials continues to gain popularity among clinicians, and the demand for such aesthetic restorations is increasing. Indeed, the most common aesthetic alternative to dental amalgam is resin composite. Moderate to large posterior composite restorations, however, have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement. Investigators across the globe are researching new materials and techniques that will improve the clinical performance, handling characteristics, and mechanical and physical properties of composite resin restorative materials. Despite such attention, large to moderate posterior composite restorations continue to have a clinical lifetime that is approximately one-half that of the dental amalgam. While there are numerous recommendations regarding preparation design, restoration placement, and polymerization technique, current research indicates that restoration longevity depends on several variables that may be difficult for the dentist to control. These variables include the patient’s caries risk, tooth position, patient habits, number of restored surfaces, the quality of the tooth–restoration bond, and the ability of the restorative material to produce a sealed tooth–restoration interface. Although clinicians tend to focus on tooth form when evaluating the success and failure of posterior composite restorations, the emphasis must remain on advancing our understanding of the clinical variables that impact the formation of a durable seal at the restoration–tooth interface. This paper presents an update of existing technology and underscores the mechanisms that negatively impact the durability of posterior composite restorations in permanent teeth. PMID:23750102

  17. Utilizing optical coherence tomography for CAD/CAM of indirect dental restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chityala, Ravishankar; Vidal, Carola; Jones, Robert

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has seen broad application in dentistry including early carious lesion detection and imaging defects in resin composite restorations. This study investigates expanding the clinical usefulness by investigating methods to use OCT for obtaining three-dimensional (3D) digital impressions, which can be integrated to CAD/CAM manufacturing of indirect restorations. 3D surface topography `before' and `after' a cavity preparation was acquired by an intraoral cross polarization swept source OCT (CP-OCT) system with a Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) scanning mirror. Image registration and segmentation methods were used to digitally construct a replacement restoration that modeled the original surface morphology of a hydroxyapatite sample. After high resolution additive manufacturing (e.g. polymer 3D printing) of the replacement restoration, micro-CT imaging was performed to examine the marginal adaptation. This study establishes the protocol for further investigation of integrating OCT with CAD/CAM of indirect dental restorations.

  18. Antibacterial Dental Composites with Chlorhexidine and Mesoporous Silica

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J.F.; Wu, R.; Fan, Y.; Liao, S.; Wang, Y.; Wen, Z.T.; Xu, X.

    2014-01-01

    One of the leading causes for the failure of dental composite restorations is secondary caries. Effectively inhibiting cariogenic biofilms and reducing secondary caries could extend the service life of composite restorations. Dental composites releasing antibacterial agents such as chlorhexidine (CHX) have shown biofilm-inhibitory efficacy, but they usually have poor physical and mechanical properties. Herein, we present a study of a new method to encapsulate and release CHX from dental composite using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). SBA-15 MSNs were synthesized according to a reported procedure. CHX (62.9 wt%) was encapsulated into dried MSN from 0.3 M CHX ethanol solution. The dental composites containing 0% (control), 3%, 5%, and 6.3% CHX or the same amounts of CHX entrapped in MSN (denoted as CHX@MSN) were fabricated with methacrylate monomers and silanized glass fillers (CHX or CHX@MSN + glass filler particle = 70 wt%). The monomer mixture consisted of bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (BisGMA), hexanediol dimethacrylate (HDDMA), ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA), and urethane dimethacrylates (UEDMA) at a weight ratio of 40:30:20:10. The composites were tested for CHX release and recharge, flexural strength and modulus (at 24 hr and 1 mo), surface roughness, in vitro wear, and antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei (in both planktonic growth and biofilm formation). The results showed that the composites with CHX@MSN largely retained mechanical properties and smooth surfaces and showed controlled release of CHX over a long time. In contrast, the composites with directly mixed CHX showed reduced mechanical properties, rough surfaces, and burst release of CHX in a short time. The composites with CHX either directly mixed or in MSN showed strong inhibition to S. mutans and L. casei. This research has demonstrated the successful application of MSNs as a novel nanotechnology in dental materials to inhibit

  19. Antibacterial dental composites with chlorhexidine and mesoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J F; Wu, R; Fan, Y; Liao, S; Wang, Y; Wen, Z T; Xu, X

    2014-12-01

    One of the leading causes for the failure of dental composite restorations is secondary caries. Effectively inhibiting cariogenic biofilms and reducing secondary caries could extend the service life of composite restorations. Dental composites releasing antibacterial agents such as chlorhexidine (CHX) have shown biofilm-inhibitory efficacy, but they usually have poor physical and mechanical properties. Herein, we present a study of a new method to encapsulate and release CHX from dental composite using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). SBA-15 MSNs were synthesized according to a reported procedure. CHX (62.9 wt%) was encapsulated into dried MSN from 0.3 M CHX ethanol solution. The dental composites containing 0% (control), 3%, 5%, and 6.3% CHX or the same amounts of CHX entrapped in MSN (denoted as CHX@MSN) were fabricated with methacrylate monomers and silanized glass fillers (CHX or CHX@MSN + glass filler particle = 70 wt%). The monomer mixture consisted of bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (BisGMA), hexanediol dimethacrylate (HDDMA), ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA), and urethane dimethacrylates (UEDMA) at a weight ratio of 40:30:20:10. The composites were tested for CHX release and recharge, flexural strength and modulus (at 24 hr and 1 mo), surface roughness, in vitro wear, and antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei (in both planktonic growth and biofilm formation). The results showed that the composites with CHX@MSN largely retained mechanical properties and smooth surfaces and showed controlled release of CHX over a long time. In contrast, the composites with directly mixed CHX showed reduced mechanical properties, rough surfaces, and burst release of CHX in a short time. The composites with CHX either directly mixed or in MSN showed strong inhibition to S. mutans and L. casei. This research has demonstrated the successful application of MSNs as a novel nanotechnology in dental materials to inhibit

  20. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    PubMed

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  1. A panorama of dental CAD/CAM restorative systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Perng-Ru

    2005-07-01

    In the last 2 decades, exciting new developments in dental materials and computer technology have led to the success of contemporary dental computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. Several highly sophisticated chairside and laboratory CAD/CAM systems have been introduced or are under development. This article provides an overview of the development of various CAD/CAM systems. Operational components, methodologies, and restorative materials used with common CAD/CAM systems are discussed. Research data and clinical studies are presented to substantiate the clinical performance of these systems.

  2. Panorama of dental CAD/CAM restorative systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Perng-Ru; Essig, Milton E

    2008-10-01

    In the past two decades, exciting new developments in dental materials and computer technology have led to the success of contemporary dental computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) technology. Several highly sophisticated in-office and laboratory CAD/CAM systems have been introduced or are under development. This article provides an overview of the development of various CAD/CAM systems. Operational components, methodologies, and restorative materials used with common CAD/CAM systems are discussed. Research data and clinical studies are presented to substantiate the clinical performance of these systems.

  3. Backscattering from dental restorations and splint materials during therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, A.G.; Sharma, S.; George, D.I.; Wilson, D.; Dodd, D.; Figa, R.; Haskell, B.

    1985-08-01

    Models were constructed to simulate as closely as possible the human oral cavity. Radiation absorbed doses were determined for controls and various test situations involving the presence of dental restorative and splint materials during cobalt-60 irradiation of the models. Adjacent gold full crowns and adjacent solid dental silver amalgam cores both increased the dose to the interproximal gingivae by 20%. Use of orthodontic full bands for splinting the jaws increased the dose to the buccal tissues by an average of 10%. Augmentation of dose through backscatter radiation was determined to be only slight for intracoronal amalgam fillings and stainless steel or plastic bracket splints.

  4. Effect of composite/amalgam thickness on fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth, restored with combined amalgam-composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Firouzmandi, Maryam; Doozandeh, Maryam; Abbasi, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Combined amalgam-composite restorations have been used through many years to benefit from the advantages of both dental amalgam and composite resin. Two variations have been mentioned for this technique, this study investigated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth with extended mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities, restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restorations. Material and Methods Sixty intact extracted premolar teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (G1-G6) of 10 teeth. G1; consisted of intact teeth and G2; consisted of teeth with MOD preparations were assigned as the positive and negative control groups respectively. Other experimental groups after MOD preparations were as follows: G3, amalgam restoration; G4, composite restoration; G5 combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement only on 1mm of the gingival floor of the proximal boxes; G6, combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement to the height of contact area of the proximal surface of the tooth. Fracture strength of the specimens was measured and the data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The level of significance was P<0.05. Fracture mode of the specimens was also recorded. Results G1 had the highest value of fracture resistance (1736.90 N). G2 and G3 had the lowest fracture resistance (775.70 N and 874.70 N, respectively). The difference between G 4, 5 and 6 was not statistically significant. However, G4, G5 and G6 showed significantly higher resistance to fracture compared to G2 and G3. Fracture modes were favorable in all of the study groups except in G6. Conclusions Fracture resistance of the premolars restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restoration was similar to that achieved with composite restoration alone and more than that of amalgam restoration alone. It can be concluded that the thickness of amalgam in combined amalgam-composite restorations did not

  5. Effects of high temperature on different restorations in forensic identification: Dental samples and mandible

    PubMed Central

    Patidar, Kalpana A; Parwani, Rajkumar; Wanjari, Sangeeta

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The forensic odontologist strives to utilize the charred human dentition throughout each stage of dental evaluation, and restorations are as unique as fingerprints and their radiographic morphology as well as the types of filling materials are often the main feature for identification. The knowledge of detecting residual restorative material and composition of unrecovered adjacent restoration is a valuable tool-mark in the presumptive identification of the dentition of a burned victim. Gold, silver amalgam, silicate restoration, and so on, have a different resistance to prolonged high temperature, therefore, the identification of burned bodies can be correlated with adequate qualities and quantities of the traces. Most of the dental examination relies heavily on the presence of the restoration as well as the relationship of one dental structure to another. This greatly narrows the research for the final identification that is based on postmortem data. Aim: The purpose of this study is to examine the resistance of teeth and different restorative materials, and the mandible, to variable temperature and duration, for the purpose of identification. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 72 extracted teeth which were divided into six goups of 12 teeth each based on the type of restorative material. (Group 1 - unrestored teeth, group 2 - teeth restored with Zn3(PO4)2, group 3 - with silver amalgam, group 4 with glass ionomer cement, group 5 - Ni-Cr-metal crown, group 6 - metal ceramic crown) and two specimens of the mandible. The effect of incineration at 400°C (5 mins, 15 mins, 30 mins) and 1100°C (15 mins) was studied. Results: Damage to the teeth subjected to variable temperatures and time can be categorized as intact (no damage), scorched (superficially parched and discolored), charred (reduced to carbon by incomplete combustion) and incinerated (burned to ashes). PMID:21189989

  6. Factors affecting the placement or replacement of direct restorations in a dental school

    PubMed Central

    Silvani, Samara; Trivelato, Roberta Ferreira; Nogueira, Ruchele Dias; Gonçalves, Luciano de Souza; Geraldo-Martins, Vinícius Rangel

    2014-01-01

    Context: The knowledge of the reasons for the placement of direct restorations makes possible to trace an epidemiological profile of a specific population and to direct the teaching of dentistry to techniques that are commonly used today and will be continued performed in the future. Purpose: The aim of this study was to verify the reasons for placement and replacement of direct restorations in patients treated in the Dental Clinic of the Uberaba University – Brazil. Materials and Methods: This study evaluated 306 restorative procedures carried out on 60 patients. During the treatment planning, a form that contained information about the patient's gender, tooth number, the classification of restorations, the reasons for placement and replacement of amalgam and tooth-colored restorations, the material that had to be removed and the new material used to fill the cavities was filled for each patient. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square test (α = 0.05). Results: The data showed that most of the patients were female (66.7%). Of all the restorations placed, 60.45% were 1st-time placements, while 39.55% were replacements. For 1st-time restorations, the main reason for placement was primary caries (76.76%), followed by non-carious cervical lesions (15.14%). The amalgam restorations were replaced more frequently (67.77%). The primary reason for replacements was the presence of secondary caries (for both previous amalgam (42.68%) and composite (66.67%) restorations (P < 0.05). The resin composite was the most indicated material for the new restorations (98.04%) (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The main reason for placement of direct restorations was primary caries, while secondary caries was the main reason for replacements. In almost all cases, the material used to fill the cavities was the resin composite. PMID:24808696

  7. Antibacterial Activity of Dental Composites Containing Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sevinç, Berdan Aydin; Hanley, Luke

    2010-01-01

    The resin-based dental composites commonly used in restorations result in more plaque accumulation than other materials. Bacterial biofilm growth contributes to secondary caries and failure of resin-based dental composites. Methods to inhibit biofilm growth on dental composites have been sought for several decades. It is demonstrated here that zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) blended at 10% (w/w) fraction into dental composites display antimicrobial activity and reduce growth of bacterial biofilms by roughly 80% for a single-species model dental biofilm. Antibacterial effectiveness of ZnO-NPs was assessed against Streptococcus sobrinus ATCC 27352 grown both planktonically and as biofilms on composites. Direct contact inhibition was observed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy while biofilm formation was quantified by viable counts. An 80% reduction in bacterial counts was observed with 10% ZnO-NP-containing composites compared with their unmodified counterpart, indicating a statistically significant suppression of biofilm growth. Although, 20% of the bacterial population survived and could form a biofilm layer again, 10% ZnO-NP-containing composites maintained at least some inhibitory activity even after the third generation of biofilm growth. Microscopy demonstrated continuous biofilm formation for unmodified composites after one day growth, but only sparsely distributed biofilms formed on 10% ZnO-NP-containing composites. The minimum inhibitory concentration of ZnO-NPs suspended in S. sobrinus planktonic culture was 50 μg/ml. 10% ZnO-NP-containing composites qualitatively showed less biofilm after one day anaerobic growth of a three-species initial colonizer biofilm after when compared to unmodified composites, but did not significantly reduce growth after three days. PMID:20225252

  8. Seventeen Years of Using Flowable Resin Restoratives--A Dental Practitioner's Personal Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    Firla, Markus Th

    2015-04-01

    Seen through the author's eyes on the basis of his practising dentistry for almost three decades, light-activated flowable resin restoratives (FRCs) or, in common clinical dental terminology, flowable composites have gradually gained major importance in restorative dentistry. Inputs to this ongoing trend are coming from continuous improvements in material properties and the favourable handling characteristics experienced with this particular group of restoratives. Intended to be used in direct adhesive filling procedures, the number and variety of recent generations of flowable composites for lining, restoration of all cavity classes (I-V), core build-ups and, more recently, 'bulk-fill-restorations', however, necessitates a profound clinical understanding of the selective use of flowable composites to ensure clinical success and guarantee long-term high quality results. Clinical relevance: Today's flowable composites allow for reliable restoration of all kinds of defects. However, both the handling characteristics and the material properties of FRCs must be fully understood before taking advantage of their potentially excellent clinical performance.

  9. Teaching of posterior composites in dental schools in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M; Seow, L L; Lynch, C D; Wilson, N H F

    2009-04-01

    The teaching of posterior composites has undergone considerable refinement and development in western countries in recent years. However, little information exists on this teaching in other parts of the world. The aim of this paper is to investigate the teaching of posterior composites to undergraduate dental students in Japan. In late 2007/early 2008, a questionnaire seeking information on the teaching of posterior composites was distributed by email to the person responsible for teaching operative dentistry in each of the 29 dental schools having undergraduate dental degree programmes in Japan. Twenty-three completed responses were returned (response rate = 79%). While all 23 schools taught the placement of composite in occlusal cavities in premolars and molars, 7 schools did not teach the placement of two-surface occlusoproximal composites in premolars (n = 1) and molars (n = 6) and 14 schools and 15 schools do not teach placement of three surface occlusoproximal composites in premolars and molars, respectively. While composite at the time of the survey accounted for 45% of posterior direct restorations placed by students, it is anticipated that this proportion will increase to 59% in 5 years time. Variations were noted between schools in the teaching of principles of cavity design, techniques for restoring proximal contours and light-curing technologies; however, more consistency was observed in techniques used for protecting operatively exposed dentine than that observed in western countries. Despite variations between dental schools being noted in the teaching of certain techniques for posterior composites, the overall extent and content of teaching of posterior composites in Japan could be described as comparable, if not exceeding, than that observed in western countries.

  10. Testing adhesion of direct restoratives to dental hard tissue - a review.

    PubMed

    Salz, Ulrich; Bock, Thorsten

    2010-10-01

    This articles concerns itself with the testing of adhesion between direct restoratives and dental hard tissue, ie, enamel and dentin. The aim is to survey available methods for adhesion testing and influential parameters affecting experimental outcome. The testing of adhesion to indirect restorative materials, eg, ceramics and metals, is beyond the scope of this article and shall be discussed elsewhere. The longevity and success of modern dental restorations very often relies on potent dental adhesives to provide durable bonds between the dental hard substance and the restorative composite. To predict the clinical outcome of such restorative treatment, a large variety of in vitro laboratory tests and clinical in vivo experiments have been devised, analyzed, and published. The purpose of this review is to provide a current overview of bond strength testing methods and their applicability to the characterization of dental adhesives. Regardless of the method employed, subtle variations in sample preparation may already severely impact test results, usually necessitating at least co-testing of a well-known internal reference to allow conclusive interpretation. This article attempts to list and discuss the most influential parameters, such as substrate nature, age, health status, storage, clinically relevant pre-treatment, and sample preparation. Special attention is devoted to the last aspect, as numerous publications have stressed the tremendous influence of preparatory parameters on the validity and scope of obtained data. Added to the large variety of such factors, an equally large diversity of load-applying procedures exists to actually quantify adhesion between composites and dental hard substance. This article summarizes the basics of macro and micro approaches to shear and tensile bond strength testing, as well as push- and pull-out tests. The strengths and weaknesses inherent to each method and influential test parameters are reviewed and methods for

  11. Adhesion of oral streptococci to all-ceramics dental restorative materials in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Hauser-Gerspach, I; Lüthy, H; Meyer, J

    2008-10-01

    In recent years, patients have benefited from the development of better and more esthetic materials, including all-ceramics dental restorative materials. Dental plaque formation on teeth and restorative materials plays an important role in the pathogenesis of oral diseases. This study investigates initial adhesion of stationary phase streptococcal species to different all-ceramics dental restorative materials. The saliva-coated materials were incubated with the bacteria for 1 h in an in vitro flow chamber which mimics environmental conditions in the oral cavity. Number and vitality of adhering bacteria were determined microscopically after staining. Surface roughness and the composition of the materials had no distinctive influence on bacterial adhesion. However, S. mutans and S. sobrinus adhered about tenfold less numerous to all materials than the other streptococcal species. Further, there was a correlation between bacterial vitality and materials' glass content. The results showed that early plaque formation was influenced predominantly by the presence of the salivary pellicle rather than by material dependent parameters whereas the composition of the all-ceramics appeared to have influenced the percentage of viable cells during the adhesion process. This presented in vitro technique may provide a useful model to study the influence of different parameters on adherence of oral streptococcal species.

  12. Composite veneering of complex amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Zanchi, César Henrique; Bueno, Márcia; Piva, Evandro

    2007-01-01

    In large posterior cavities, indirect restorations could provide improved performance when compared to direct restorations, but with higher cost and removal of sound tooth structure. Improved mechanical properties have resulted in good clinical performance for amalgam in large cavities but without an esthetic appearance. Resin composites have become popular for posterior restorations, mainly because of good esthetic results. A restorative technique is presented that combines the esthetic properties of directly bonded resin composite and the wide range of indications for amalgam in stress-bearing areas.

  13. A Review of Developments in Computer-Based Systems to Image Teeth and Produce Dental Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Rekow, E. Dianne; Erdman, Arthur G.; Speidel, T. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) make it possible to automate the creation of dental restorations. Currently practiced techniques are described. Three automated systems currently under development are described and compared. Advances in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) provide a new option for dentistry, creating an alternative technique for producing dental restorations. It is possible to create dental restorations that are automatically produced and meet or exceed current requirements for fit and occlusion.

  14. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130–135, 86.6–124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  15. Buonocore Lecture. Placing dental composites--a stressful experience.

    PubMed

    Ferracane, Jack L

    2008-01-01

    The setting of dental composites is accompanied by significant polymerization contraction, resulting in the generation of stresses within the material and at the tooth-restoration interface. These stresses can have a deleterious effect on marginal integrity if they exceed the adhesive strength of the restorative, as well as on the properties of the composite. It has been determined that several factors affect these stresses, including the polymerization rate of the composite, its formulation, including filler and monomer composition and the constraints imposed by the geometry of the cavity preparation. Many strategies have been developed to reduce the effect of these stresses. Changes in the formulation of the composite have included experimentation with a variety of stress relieving additives, modified catalyst compositions and alternative monomer systems. Modifications to the placement techniques have included the use of incremental curing, altered light activation schemes and resilient liners. This manuscript will review many of the important scientific and clinical issues relating to the generation and quantitation of the stresses produced in dental composites during curing.

  16. [The impact of ultrasonic dental hygiene procedures on the bonding strength of restorations].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, D L; Mel'nik, A A; Laze, R; Petrikas, O A; Petrikas, I V

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic calculus scaling has become a common oral hygiene procedure in patients with composite restorations, dental veneers, orthodontic brackets. The aim of the study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of the EMS-ultrasonic system scaling on the flowable composite bond strength to the tooth enamel, dentine, and e-max ceramic. The samples were divided into three groups: 1 group (composite bonded to enamel), 2 group (composite bonded to dentine), 3 group (composite bonded to e-max ceramic). The bonded samples were loaded to failure in the universal testing machine. The shear bond strength was calculated in newtons (N). T (Student's)-test was used to evaluate the data. Significantly lower bond strengths were observed with the ultrasonic treated samples in each groups. The EMS-ultrasonic system scaling significantly decreases the flowable composite bond strength to the tooth enamel, dentine, and e-max ceramic.

  17. Restorative treatment and use of local anesthesia in free and subsidized public dental services in Helsinki, Finland.

    PubMed

    Palotie, Ulla; Vehkalahti, Miira

    2003-08-01

    Our aim was to evaluate restorative treatment and the use of local anesthetics in free and subsidized public dental care in Helsinki, Finland. Public dental clinics are open to all patients under the age of 36, and to some specific groups above that age. Patients up to age 19 receive all treatment free of charge and others at highly subsidized rates. Data were collected in May 2001 during a maximum 2-week period covering all public dental clinics in Helsinki. A one-page questionnaire was sent to all dentists (n = 140) in clinical fields. The data requested included the patient's gender and year of birth, and details on restorations: which tooth and which surfaces were filled, the reason for placement or replacement, the material used, and use of local anesthetic. The response rate was 96%. Of all restorations (n = 3057) placed, 14% were in primary teeth and in permanent teeth: 17% in premolars, 17% in incisors, and 52% in molars; the restorative material most often used was composite resin (69%). Glass-ionomer/compomers dominated in the primary teeth. Local anesthetic was used least (35%) in patients under 13 years of age. Replacements of restorations accounted for 10% of all in the free service (under 20 years of age) and 46% in subsidized dental care (20 and older). The major reasons for replacement were secondary caries (41%) and fractured or lost restoration (40%).

  18. Effect of pre-heating resin composite on restoration microleakage.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Warren C; Aksu, Mert N; Asku, Mert N; Neme, Ann-Marie L; Linger, Jackson B; Pink, Frank E; Walker, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Improving the adaptation of resin composites during placement is necessary to increase durability and reduce microleakage. Flowable resin liners have been introduced to improve adaptation in composite restorations. In addition, a device that lowers the viscosity of regular dental composites has been introduced (Calset, AdDent Inc, Danbury, CT, USA). This device lowers the viscosity of composites by preheating them to 54.4 degrees C, which should lead to improved adaptation. This study compared microleakage in Class II composite restorations prepared using: 1) preheated resin composite, 2) unheated composite and 3) a flowable liner followed by unheated composite. Class II cavities were prepared on the mesial and distal surfaces of extracted third molars. Ten preparations were restored with resin composite (Esthet-X, Dentsply, York, PA, USA) for each of the following four techniques: Control (Esthet-X with Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply), Flowable (f) (as Control but used Esthet-X Flow liner), Preheated (p) (as Control but with preheating composite to 54.4 degrees C) and Delay (d) (as Preheated but followed by a 15-second delay before curing). The teeth were restored, finished, stored in distilled water for 24 hours, then thermocycled between water bath temperatures of 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C with a one-minute dwell time for 1000 cycles. Tooth apices were sealed with epoxy and varnish was applied to within 1 mm of the restoration margins. The teeth were placed in 0.5% basic fuschin dye for 24 hours, rinsed, then embedded in self-curing resin. The embedded teeth were sectioned mesiodistally with a slow-speed diamond saw, providing multiple sections per restoration. Microleakage was rated by two evaluators using a 0-4 ordinal scale at the occlusal and cervical margins of each restoration and light microscopy (40x). The data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA and pairwise testing with the Sign test (alpha=0.05). No statistical differences were observed among

  19. Degradation, fatigue and failure of resin dental composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, James L.

    2008-01-01

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle or fiber filler containing, indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed mode loading on the flexure strength and fracture toughness. Next several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading and then an examination of 3D tomography using multiaxial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection) and after that time period from secondary decay. PMID:18650540

  20. Matching the optical properties of direct esthetic dental restorative materials to those of human enamel and dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragain, James Carlton, Jr.

    One of the goals of the restorative dentist is to restore the appearance of the natural dentition. Clinical matching of teeth and restorative materials are seldom accurate and shade selection techniques are subjective. The first specific aim of this research was to characterize the optical absorption and scattering that occurs within enamel, dentin, and composite resin and compomer restorative materials and to relate those phenomena to translucency and color. The second aim was to evaluate small color differences among composite restorative materials which would be detectable by humans. The last aim was to lay the foundation for developing an improved model of specifying layers of dental restorative materials in order to match the translucency and color to those of human enamel. The Kubelka-Munk theory was validated for enamel, dentin, and the restorative materials. These tissues and materials were then characterized in terms of their color parameters. Tooth cores were also characterized in terms of color space parameters. Human subjects were evaluated for their abilities to discriminate small color differences in the dental composite resin materials. The following conclusions were derived from this study: (1) Kubelka-Munk theory accurately predicts the diffuse reflectance spectra of enamel, dentin, and the direct esthetic dental restorative materials studied. (2) Scattering and absorption coefficients of the dental tissues and esthetic restorative materials can be directly calculated from diffuse reflectance measurements of a uniformly thick slab of tissue/material using black and white backings and the appropriate refractive index. (3) For tooth cores, there is a positive correlation between L* and b* and a negative correlation between L* and a*. (4) The range of translucency parameters for the restorative materials studied does not match those of enamel and dentin. (5) None of the shades of the dental composite resin restorative materials studied fit into the

  1. Marginal integrity evaluation of dental composite using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Adrian-Tudor; Cojocariu, Andreea-Codruta; Antal, Anca Adriana; Topala, Florin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2016-03-01

    In clinical dental practice it is often difficult or even impossible to distinguish and control interfacial adhesive defects from adhesive restorations using visual inspection or other traditional diagnostic methods. Nonetheless, non-invasive biomedical imaging methods like Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) may provide a better view in this diagnostic outline. The aim of this study is to explore evaluations of the marginal adaptation of class I resin composites restorations using Time Domain (TD) OCT. Posterior human teeth have been chosen for this study. The teeth were stored in 0.9% physiological saline solution prior to use. A classical round-shaped class I cavity was prepared and cavities were restored with Charisma Diamond composite by Heraeus Kulzer and using a system of etch and rinse boding. The specimens were subjected to water storage and then to thermo-cycling. Three dimensional (3-D) scans of the restoration were obtained using a TD-OCT system centered at a 1300 nm wavelength. Open marginal adaptation at the interfaces and gaps inside the composite resins materials were identified using the proposed method. In conclusion, OCT has numerous advantages which justify its use for in vitro, as well as for in vivo studies. It can therefore be considered for non-invasive and fast detection of gaps at the restoration interface.

  2. Adhesion of Streptococcus sanguinis to dental implant and restorative materials in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hauser-Gerspach, Irmgard; Kulik, Eva M; Weiger, Roland; Decker, Eva-Maria; Von Ohle, Christiane; Meyer, Jürg

    2007-05-01

    Bacterial adhesion to tooth surfaces or dental materials starts immediately upon exposure to the oral environment. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the adhesion of Streptococcus sanguinis to saliva-coated human enamel and dental materials - during a one-hour period - using an in vitro flow chamber system which mimicked the oral cavity. After fluorescent staining, the number of adhered cells and their vitality were recorded. The dental materials used were: titanium (Rematitan M), gold (Neocast 3), ceramic (Vita Omega 900), and composite (Tetric Ceram). The number of adherent bacterial cells was higher on titanium, gold, and ceramic surfaces and lower on composite as compared to enamel. As for the percentage of adherent vital cells, it was higher on enamel than on the restorative materials tested. These results suggested that variations in the number and vitality of the adherent pioneer oral bacteria, S. sanguinis, in the in vitro system depended on the surface characteristics of the substratum and the acquired salivary pellicle. The in vitro adhesion model used herein provided a simple and reproducible approach to investigate the impact of surface-modified dental materials on bacterial adhesion and vitality.

  3. Assessment of exposures and potential risks to the US adult population from wear (attrition and abrasion) of gold and ceramic dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Richardson, G Mark; Clemow, Scott R; Peters, Rachel E; James, Kyle J; Siciliano, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Little has been published on the chemical exposures and risks of dental restorative materials other than from dental amalgam and composite resins. Here we provide the first exposure and risk assessment for gold (Au) alloy and ceramic restorative materials. Based on the 2001-2004 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we assessed the exposure of US adults to the components of Au alloy and ceramic dental restorations owing to dental material wear. Silver (Ag) is the most problematic component of Au alloy restorations, owing to a combination of toxicity and proportional composition. It was estimated that adults could possess an average of four tooth surfaces restored with Au alloy before exceeding, on average, the reference exposure level (REL) for Ag. Lithium (Li) is the most problematic component of dental ceramics. It was estimated that adults could possess an average of 15 tooth surfaces restored with ceramics before exceeding the REL for Li. Relative risks of chemical exposures from dental materials decrease in the following order: Amalgam>Au alloys>ceramics>composite resins.

  4. Selective removal of esthetic composite restorations with spectral guided laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ivana; Chan, Kenneth H.; Tsuji, Grant H.; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Dental composites are used for a wide range of applications such as fillings for cavities, adhesives for orthodontic brackets, and closure of gaps (diastemas) between teeth by esthetic bonding. Anterior restorations are used to replace missing, diseased and unsightly tooth structure for both appearance and function. When these restorations must be replaced, they are difficult to remove mechanically without causing excessive removal or damage to enamel because dental composites are color matched to teeth. Previous studies have shown that CO2 lasers have high ablation selectivity and are well suited for removal of composite on occlusal surfaces while minimizing healthy tissue loss. A spectral feedback guidance system may be used to discriminate between dental composite and dental hard tissue for selective ablation of composite material. The removal of composite restorations filling diastemas is more challenging due to the esthetic concern for anterior teeth. The objective of this study is to determine if composite spanning a diastema between anterior teeth can be removed by spectral guided laser ablation at clinically relevant rates with minimal damage to peripheral healthy tissue and with higher selectivity than a high speed dental hand-piece. PMID:26997742

  5. Selective removal of esthetic composite restorations with spectral guided laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ivana; Chan, Kenneth H; Tsuji, Grant H; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L; Fried, Daniel

    2016-02-13

    Dental composites are used for a wide range of applications such as fillings for cavities, adhesives for orthodontic brackets, and closure of gaps (diastemas) between teeth by esthetic bonding. Anterior restorations are used to replace missing, diseased and unsightly tooth structure for both appearance and function. When these restorations must be replaced, they are difficult to remove mechanically without causing excessive removal or damage to enamel because dental composites are color matched to teeth. Previous studies have shown that CO2 lasers have high ablation selectivity and are well suited for removal of composite on occlusal surfaces while minimizing healthy tissue loss. A spectral feedback guidance system may be used to discriminate between dental composite and dental hard tissue for selective ablation of composite material. The removal of composite restorations filling diastemas is more challenging due to the esthetic concern for anterior teeth. The objective of this study is to determine if composite spanning a diastema between anterior teeth can be removed by spectral guided laser ablation at clinically relevant rates with minimal damage to peripheral healthy tissue and with higher selectivity than a high speed dental hand-piece.

  6. Selective removal of esthetic composite restorations with spectral guided laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ivana; Chan, Kenneth H.; Tsuji, Grant H.; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Dental composites are used for a wide range of applications such as fillings for cavities, adhesives for orthodontic brackets, and closure of gaps (diastemas) between teeth by esthetic bonding. Anterior restorations are used to replace missing, diseased and unsightly tooth structure for both appearance and function. When these restorations must be replaced, they are difficult to remove mechanically without causing excessive removal or damage to enamel because dental composites are color matched to teeth. Previous studies have shown that CO2 lasers have high ablation selectivity and are well suited for removal of composite on occlusal surfaces while minimizing healthy tissue loss. A spectral feedback guidance system may be used to discriminate between dental composite and dental hard tissue for selective ablation of composite material. The removal of composite restorations filling diastemas is more challenging due to the esthetic concern for anterior teeth. The objective of this study is to determine if composite spanning a diastema between anterior teeth can be removed by spectral guided laser ablation at clinically relevant rates with minimal damage to peripheral healthy tissue and with higher selectivity than a high speed dental handpiece.

  7. Outcomes of implants and restorations placed in general dental practices

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, John D.; Kazimiroff, Julie; Papas, Athena; Curro, Frederick A.; Thompson, Van P.; Vena, Donald A.; Wu, Hongyu; Collie, Damon; Craig, Ronald G.

    2017-01-01

    implants, 20 (2.2 percent) had restorations replaced or judged as needing to be replaced. The majority of P-Is and patients were satisfied with the esthetic outcomes for both the implant and restoration. Conclusions These results suggest that implant survival and success rates in general dental practices may be lower than those reported in studies conducted in academic or specialty settings. Practical Implications The results of this study, generated in the private general practice setting, add to the evidence base to facilitate implant treatment planning. PMID:24982276

  8. Dental composites and amalgam and physical development in children.

    PubMed

    Maserejian, N N; Hauser, R; Tavares, M; Trachtenberg, F L; Shrader, P; McKinlay, S

    2012-11-01

    Resin-based composite dental restoration materials may release bisphenol-A, an endocrine-disrupting chemical. Using secondary analysis of a randomized clinical safety trial of amalgam vs. composites, we tested the hypothesis that dental restoration materials affect children's growth. Children (N = 218 boys, N = 256 girls) aged 6 to 10 yrs at baseline with ≥ 2 decayed posterior teeth were randomized to amalgam or composites (bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-dimethacrylate composite for permanent teeth, urethane-dimethacrylate compomer for primary teeth) for treatment of posterior caries throughout follow-up. Primary outcomes for this analysis were 5-year changes in BMI-for-age z-scores, body fat percentage (BF%), and height velocity; exploratory analyses (n = 113) examined age at menarche. Results showed no significant differences between treatment assignment and changes in physical development in boys [(composites vs. amalgam) BF%, 4.9 vs. 5.7, p = 0.49; (BMI-z-score) 0.13 vs. 0.25, p = 0.36] or girls (8.8 vs. 7.7, p = 0.95; 0.36 vs. 0.21, p = 0.49). Children with more treatment on primary teeth had greater increases in BF% regardless of material type. Girls assigned to composites had lower risk of menarche during follow-up (hazard ratio = 0.57, 95% CI 0.35-0.95). Overall, there were no significant differences in physical development over 5 years in children treated with composites or amalgam. Additional studies examining these restoration materials in relation to age at menarche are warranted (clinicaltrials.gov number NCT00065988).

  9. Translucency of human teeth and dental restorative materials and its clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2015-04-01

    The purpose was to review the translucency of human teeth and related dental materials that should be considered for the development of esthetic restorative materials. Translucency is the relative amount of light transmission or diffuse reflection from a substrate surface through a turbid medium. Translucency influences the masking ability, color blending effect, and the degree of light curing through these materials. Regarding the translucency indices, transmission coefficient, translucency parameter, and contrast ratio have been used, and correlations among these indices were confirmed. Translucency of human enamel and dentine increases in direct proportion to the wavelength of incident light in the visible light range. As for the translucency changes by aging, limited differences were reported in human dentine, while those for enamel proved to increase. There have been studies for the adjustment of translucency in dental esthetic restorative materials; the size and amount of filler and the kind of resin matrix were modified in resin composites, and the kind of ingredient and the degree of crystallization were modified in ceramics. Based on the translucency properties of human enamel and dentine, those of replacing restorative materials should be optimized for successful esthetic rehabilitation. Biomimetic simulation of the natural tooth microstructure might be a promising method.

  10. Determination of light elements in amalgam restorations. [Dental amalgam

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kraner, H.W.; Osborne, J.W.; Nelson, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering has been used to measure the major elemental compositions in the near-surface regions of freshly prepared and used samples of dental amalgam. A depletion from bulk stoichiometry of the major elements, which indicates an accumulation of lighter elements on the surface of the materials, has been observed. Increases in the F, Na, Cl, P, O, C, and N concentrations between freshly prepared samples and used samples were measured by observation of gamma rays produced by proton and deuteron induced reactions.

  11. [Atraumatic restorative treatment in relation to pain, discomfort and dental treatment anxiety].

    PubMed

    Frencken, J E F M; Flohil, K A; de Baat, C

    2014-01-01

    Dental treatment anxiety usually develops during childhood due to a bad experience and the dental drill as well as the injection needle are the most common causes. The Atraumatic Restorative Treatment provides the opportunity to provoke little or no dental treatment anxiety because only hand instruments are used and local anaesthesia is seldom required. Several scientific studies have indicated that the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment causes less pain, discomfort and anxiety by comparison with conventional treatments. Therefore, the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment is considered to be promising for the treatment of carious lesions in anxious children and adults, and potentially also for patients suffering from dental treatment phobia. Furthermore, the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment may be indicated as the primary treatment method in children to prevent dental treatment anxiety and treatment under general anaesthesia. These conclusions must still be confirmed with responsible scientific research.

  12. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations - dental milling machines from a mechanical engineering viewpoint. Part A: chairside milling machines.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Nicolas; Tapie, Laurent; Duret, Francois; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The dental milling machine is an important device in the dental CAD/CAM chain. Nowadays, dental numerical controlled (NC) milling machines are available for dental surgeries (chairside solution). This article provides a mechanical engineering approach to NC milling machines to help dentists understand the involvement of technology in digital dentistry practice. First, some technical concepts and definitions associated with NC milling machines are described from a mechanical engineering viewpoint. The technical and economic criteria of four chairside dental NC milling machines that are available on the market are then described. The technical criteria are focused on the capacities of the embedded technologies of these milling machines to mill both prosthetic materials and types of shape restorations. The economic criteria are focused on investment costs and interoperability with third-party software. The clinical relevance of the technology is assessed in terms of the accuracy and integrity of the restoration.

  13. Cluster Effects in a National Dental PBRN Restorative Study

    PubMed Central

    Litaker, M.S.; Gordan, V.V.; Rindal, D.B.; Fellows, J.L.; Gilbert, G.H.

    2013-01-01

    Items in clusters, such as patients of the same clinician or teeth within the same patient, tend to be more similar than items from different groups. This within-group similarity, represented by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), reduces precision, yielding less statistical power and wider confidence intervals, compared with non-clustered samples of the same size. This must be considered in the design of studies including clusters. We present ICC estimates from a study of 7,826 restorations placed in previously unrestored tooth surfaces of 4,672 patients by 222 clinicians in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network, as a resource for sample size planning in restorative studies. Our findings suggest that magnitudes of ICCs in practice-based research can be substantial. These can have large effects on precision and the power to detect treatment effects. Generally, we found relatively large ICCs for characteristics that are influenced by clinician choice (e.g., 0.36 for rubber dam use). ICCs for outcomes within individual patients, such as tooth surfaces affected by a caries lesion, tended to be smaller (from 0.03 to 0.15), but were still sufficiently large to substantially affect statistical power. Clustering should be taken into account in the design of oral health studies and derivation of statistical power estimates for these studies (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00847470). PMID:23857643

  14. Resin Composites Reinforced by Nanoscaled Fibers or Tubes for Dental Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoming; Liu, Wei; Sun, Lianwen; Aifantis, Katerina E.; Yu, Bo; Fan, Yubo; Cui, Fuzhai; Watari, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    It has been stated clearly that nanofillers could make an enhancement on the mechanical performances of dental composites. In order to address current shortage of traditional dental composites, fillers in forms of nanofibers or nanotubes are broadly regarded as ideal candidates to greatly increase mechanical performances of dental composites with low content of fillers. In this review, the efforts using nanofibers and nanotubes to reinforce mechanical performances of dental composites, including polymeric nanofibers, metallic nanofibers or nanotubes, and inorganic nanofibers or nanotubes, as well as their researches related, are demonstrated in sequence. The first purpose of current paper was to confirm the enhancement of nanofibers or nanotubes' reinforcement on the mechanical performances of dental restorative composite. The second purpose was to make a general description about the reinforcement mechanism of nanofibers and nanotubes, especially, the impact of formation of interphase boundary interaction and nanofibers themselves on the advanced mechanical behaviors of the dental composites. By means of the formation of interface interaction and poststretching nanofibers, reinforced effect of dental composites by sorts of nanofibers/nanotubes has been successfully obtained. PMID:24982894

  15. A study of composite restorations as a tool in forensic identification

    PubMed Central

    Hemasathya, Bahavathi Ananthan; Balagopal, Sundaresan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Comparing ante-mortem and post-mortem dental data is a principal method of identification in forensic odontology. Radiographic images of amalgam have been used in dental forensics for identification due to their unique appearance. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate whether radio-opaque composite restorations have a potential for identification in forensic odontology. Materials and Methods: Thirty typodont mandibular first molar teeth were prepared with Class-II (proximo-occlusal) cavities and restored with a radio-opaque composite (Tetric N-Ceram). Two sets of standardized radiographs were taken from the 30 teeth, keeping the radiological parameters constant. One set of these 30 radiographs was named as SET 1. Ten randomly chosen radiographs from the other set and two other radiographs of Class-II composite restorations in typodont teeth constituted SET 2. Thirty dentally trained examiners were asked to match the 12 radiographic images of SET 2 with those of SET 1. Results: The results show that 15 examiners were able to correctly match all the 12 images. Statistical analysis was done using kappa statistical test. Conclusion: This study shows that, if the post-mortem radiographs are accurate duplicates of ante-mortem radiographs of composite restorations, then the shape of the composite restoration is unique and can be used for identification. PMID:23960413

  16. Comparison of wear and clinical performance between amalgam, composite and open sandwich restorations: 2-year results.

    PubMed

    Sachdeo, A; Gray, Gordon B; Sulieman, M A; Jagger, Daryll C

    2004-03-01

    There has been some disquiet over the use of mercury containing restorative materials. The most commonly used alternative is composite resin but this has the potential disadvantage associated with wear and marginal leakage, which in turn, has proven to result in secondary caries and sensitivity. To overcome the shortcomings of a directly placed composite restoration, the glass-ionomer/composite open sandwich technique was introduced followed by the subsequent introduction of compomer systems. The aims of this study were to evaluate the wear and clinical performance of a control group of amalgam restorations compared with that of a group of posterior composite resin restorations fillings and a group of compomer/composite open sandwich restorations placed by a single general dental practitioner. The duration of the study was 2 years. One hundred and thirty three (71.4%) patients were successfully recalled and the wear and clinical performance of each restoration after 6, 12 and 24 months was measured, indirectly. There was no statistically significant difference recorded between the groups at 6 months or 1 year (p > 0.05). However, at the end of the 2-year study, there was a significantly lower rate of wear recorded for the control amalgam restorations compared with other two groups (p = 0.033). There was no statistically significant difference in wear recorded between the two groups of tooth-coloured restorations (p > 0.05). With regards to clinical performance of the restorations, occlusal and proximal contacts in each group of restoration remained satisfactory throughout the study.

  17. A useful and non-invasive microanalysis method for dental restoration materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoki, M.; Satsuma, T.; Nishigawa, K.; Takeuchi, H.; Asaoka, K.

    2012-12-01

    The elemental analysis of intraoral dental restorations provides considerable information for the treatment of dental metal allergy. Elemental analyses require specific instruments and complicated procedures, so this examination is not commonly carried out in private dental clinics. We describe a novel, simple and useful micro-analytical method for dental metal restorations. Micro metal dust was obtained by polishing the surface of restorative metal material with an unused silicone point (SUPER-SNAP). The metal dust on the silicone point was then rubbed onto adhesive tape, and this tape was covered with polyethylene film. The amount of metal dust material was <20 μg. An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was used to carry out the elementary analysis of the metal dust on the polyethylene film. Three types of dental metal alloy materials of known components were examined. The results of elementary analyses were compared with the specifications provided by the manufacturer. The same procedure was carried out for three dental metal restorations of an adult female volunteer in vivo. The results of elemental analyses for five alloy materials exactly matched the product specification. Three metal samples obtained from intraoral restoration were also available for elemental analyses. The distinct advantage of this method is that it enables sample extraction without an invasive effect for the restoration. The metal sample is in a polyethylene film, so it is easy to mail it for inspection at specialist institutes yet it can be also be used in general dental clinics.

  18. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists' Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations.

    PubMed

    Kopperud, Simen E; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-04-22

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists' satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists' treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p < 0.01), employees in the Public Dental Service (PDS) (p < 0.01) and dentists working in counties with low dentist density (p = 0.03). There was a tendency towards choosing minimally invasive treatment among dentists who also avoided operative treatment of early approximal lesions (p < 0.01). Norwegian dentists showed positive attitudes towards composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations.

  19. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Kopperud, Simen E.; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p < 0.01), employees in the Public Dental Service (PDS) (p < 0.01) and dentists working in counties with low dentist density (p = 0.03). There was a tendency towards choosing minimally invasive treatment among dentists who also avoided operative treatment of early approximal lesions (p < 0.01). Norwegian dentists showed positive attitudes towards composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations. PMID:27110804

  20. Randomized Control Trial of Composite Cuspal Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Fennis, W.M.; Kuijs, R.H.; Roeters, F.J.; Creugers, N.H.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this randomized control trial was to compare the five-year clinical performance of direct and indirect resin composite restorations replacing cusps. In 157 patients, 176 restorations were made to restore maxillary premolars with Class II cavities and one missing cusp. Ninety-two direct and 84 indirect resin composite restorations were placed by two operators, following a strict protocol. Treatment technique and operator were assigned randomly. Follow-up period was at least 4.5 yrs. Survival rates were determined with time to reparable failure and complete failure as endpoints. Kaplan-Meier five-year survival rates were 86.6% (SE 0.27%) for reparable failure and 87.2% (SE 0.27%) for complete failure. Differences between survival rates of direct and indirect restorations [89.9% (SE 0.34%) vs. 83.2% (SE 0.42%) for reparable failure and 91.2% (SE 0.32%) vs. 83.2% (SE 0.42%) for complete failure] were not statistically significant (p = .23 for reparable failure; p = .15 for complete failure). Mode of failure was predominantly adhesive. The results suggest that direct and indirect techniques provide comparable results over the long term (trial registration number: ISRCTN29200848). PMID:24155264

  1. Cariogenic Bacteria Degrade Dental Resin Composites and Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Bourbia, M.; Ma, D.; Cvitkovitch, D.G.; Santerre, J.P.; Finer, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A major reason for dental resin composite restoration replacement is related to secondary caries promoted by acid production from bacteria including Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). We hypothesized that S. mutans has esterase activities that degrade dental resin composites and adhesives. Standardized specimens of resin composite (Z250), total-etch (Scotchbond Multipurpose, SB), and self-etch (Easybond, EB) adhesives were incubated with S. mutans UA159 or uninoculated culture medium (control) for up to 30 days. Quantification of the BisGMA-derived biodegradation by-product, bishydroxy-propoxy-phenyl-propane (BisHPPP), was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Surface analysis of the specimens was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). S. mutans was shown to have esterase activities in levels comparable with those found in human saliva. A trend of increasing BisHPPP release throughout the incubation period was observed for all materials and was more elevated in the presence of bacteria vs. control medium for EB and Z250, but not for SB (p < .05). SEM confirmed the increased degradation of all materials with S. mutans UA159 vs. control. S. mutans has esterase activities at levels that degrade resin composites and adhesives; degree of degradation was dependent on the material’s chemical formulation. This finding suggests that the resin-dentin interface could be compromised by oral bacteria that contribute to the progression of secondary caries. PMID:24026951

  2. Influence of gag reflex on dental attendance, dental anxiety, self-reported temporomandibular disorders and prosthetic restorations.

    PubMed

    Akarslan, Z Z; Yıldırım Biçer, A Z

    2013-12-01

    To assess the influence of gag reflex severity, assessed according to the short form of the patient part of Gagging Problem Assessment Questionnaire (GPA-pa SF), on the dental attendance, dental anxiety, self-reported temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms and presence of prosthetic restorations among patients requiring prosthodontic treatment in Turkey. A total of 505 patients (305 women; mean age: 46·35 years, SD: 28·2 years) undergoing dental examination were administered a questionnaire containing questions regarding their age, gender, education level, dental attendance, TMD symptoms (limitation in jaw opening, muscle pain, pain/sounds in the temporomandibular jaw), the Turkish version of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) and the GPA-pa SF. Subsequently, any prosthetic restoration was recorded by a dentist. Descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance (anova) and the chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. Differences were found between GPA-pa SF scores 0, 1 and 2 for education level (P = 0·001), MDAS scores (P = 0·003), self-reported TMD (P = 0·000) and prosthesis wear (P = 0·000), but not for attendance patterns (P = 0·826). Patients with gag reflex had lower education levels, higher levels of dental anxiety, more self-reported TMD symptoms and fewer fixed or removable prosthetic restorations than patients without gag reflex. Gag reflex has impacts on dental anxiety, self-reported TMD and prosthetic restorations, but not on dental attendance patterns, according to the results of the GPA-pa SF.

  3. Machinable glass-ceramics forming as a restorative dental material.

    PubMed

    Chaysuwan, Duangrudee; Sirinukunwattana, Krongkarn; Kanchanatawewat, Kanchana; Heness, Greg; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2011-01-01

    MgO, SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), MgF(2), CaF(2), CaCO(3), SrCO(3), and P(2)O(5) were used to prepare glass-ceramics for restorative dental materials. Thermal properties, phases, microstructures and hardness were characterized by DTA, XRD, SEM and Vickers microhardness. Three-point bending strength and fracture toughness were applied by UTM according to ISO 6872: 1997(E). XRD showed that the glass crystallized at 892°C (second crystallization temperature+20°C) for 3 hrs consisted mainly of calcium-mica and fluorapatite crystalline phases. Average hardness (3.70 GPa) closely matched human enamel (3.20 GPa). The higher fracture toughness (2.04 MPa√m) combined with the hardness to give a lower brittleness index (1.81 µm(-1/2)) which indicates that they have exceptional machinability. Bending strength results (176.61 MPa) were analyzed by Weibull analysis to determine modulus value (m=17.80). Machinability of the calcium mica-fluorapatite glass-ceramic was demonstrated by fabricating with CAD/CAM.

  4. Legislation and informed consent brochures for dental patients receiving amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Cochran, Amy A; Cross, Catherine L; Wack, Courtney A; Long, William B; Newkirk, Anthony T

    2008-01-01

    In 2008, Norway banned the use of mercury for amalgam restorations. Four states in the United States have developed Informed Consent Brochures for amalgam restorations that must be given to their dental patients. The authors describe a patient who had a large cavity in his left lower molar tooth no.18 that had to be removed by an oral surgeon. When the patient went to the oral surgeon, the surgeon told the patient that he would replace the carious tooth with a gold implant. He was not given an Informed Consent Brochure regarding dental restorative materials. The oral surgeon extracted the carious tooth, replacing the tooth with a supposed gold crown implant. On his yearly dental examination, his dentist took an x-ray of his dental implant and explained that the x-ray could not distinguish whether the implant contained either gold or mercury. Consequently, the dentist referred him to a dental clinic in which the dental implant could be removed without mercury contamination of the patient's neurologic system during the extraction of the implant from the root canal. During the removal of the dental restoration, the dentist found build up expanding into the root canal that had a black color. The crown and underlying tooth were sent to ALT BioScience for analysis. Elemental analysis of the crown and underlying tooth confirmed the presence of mercury in the restoration. The patient should have been given an Informed Consent Brochure by the dentist that described the dental restoration that was used in the dental implant.

  5. Adhesive/Dentin Interface: The Weak Link in the Composite Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Paulette; Ye, Qiang; Park, Jonggu; Topp, Elizabeth M.; Misra, Anil; Marangos, Orestes; Wang, Yong; Bohaty, Brenda S.; Singh, Viraj; Sene, Fabio; Eslick, John; Camarda, Kyle; Katz, J. Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Results from clinical studies suggest that more than half of the 166 million dental restorations that were placed in the United States in 2005 were replacements for failed restorations. This emphasis on replacement therapy is expected to grow as dentists use composite as opposed to dental amalgam to restore moderate to large posterior lesions. Composite restorations have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement as compared to amalgam. Penetration of bacterial enzymes, oral fluids, and bacteria into the crevices between the tooth and composite undermines the restoration and leads to recurrent decay and premature failure. Under in vivo conditions the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface can be the first defense against these noxious, damaging substances. The intent of this article is to review structural aspects of the clinical substrate that impact bond formation at the adhesive/dentin interface; to examine physico-chemical factors that affect the integrity and durability of the adhesive/dentin interfacial bond; and to explore how these factors act synergistically with mechanical forces to undermine the composite restoration. The article will examine the various avenues that have been pursued to address these problems and it will explore how alterations in material chemistry could address the detrimental impact of physico-chemical stresses on the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface. PMID:20195761

  6. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus <15 GPa. Chemical additives can also effectively raise the hardness to as much as 1.34 GPa. Besides>alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with

  7. First Permanent Molar Restoration Differences between Those with or without Dental Sealants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuthy, Raymond A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study examined differences in the number of restorations in permanent, posterior teeth for those children receiving dental sealants with cost sharing when compared to children who do not receive sealants. Results indicated a 51 percent reduction in restoration rates for each quadrant sealed. Findings have implications for cost savings and…

  8. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations--the digital workflow from a mechanical engineering viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Tapie, L; Lebon, N; Mawussi, B; Fron Chabouis, H; Duret, F; Attal, J-P

    2015-01-01

    As digital technology infiltrates every area of daily life, including the field of medicine, so it is increasingly being introduced into dental practice. Apart from chairside practice, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) solutions are available for creating inlays, crowns, fixed partial dentures (FPDs), implant abutments, and other dental prostheses. CAD/CAM dental solutions can be considered a chain of digital devices and software for the almost automatic design and creation of dental restorations. However, dentists who want to use the technology often do not have the time or knowledge to understand it. A basic knowledge of the CAD/CAM digital workflow for dental restorations can help dentists to grasp the technology and purchase a CAM/CAM system that meets the needs of their office. This article provides a computer-science and mechanical-engineering approach to the CAD/CAM digital workflow to help dentists understand the technology.

  9. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel-chromium based alloys.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Xia, Gang; Cao, Xin-Ming; Wang, Jue; Xu, Bi-Yao; Huang, Pu; Chen, Yue; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2013-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel-chromium based alloy (Ni-Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni-Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of <1 month of the restoration duration, among which higher Ni excretions were found in those with either a higher number of teeth replaced by dental alloys or a higher index of metal crown not covered with the porcelain. Urinary levels of Cr were significantly higher in the three patient groups of <1, 1 to <3 and 3 to <6 months, especially in those with a higher metal crown exposure index. Linear curve estimations showed better relationships between urinary Ni and Cr in patients within 6-month groups. Our data suggested significant increased excretions of urinary Ni and Cr after dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni-Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated.

  10. Bulk-fill resin-based composite restorative materials: a review.

    PubMed

    Chesterman, J; Jowett, A; Gallacher, A; Nixon, P

    2017-03-10

    Resin-based composite (RBC) materials are increasingly being used for the restoration of posterior teeth. The increasing demand for aesthetic, tooth-coloured restorations coupled with the patient's concerns regarding the use of mercury containing restorations, has driven a surge in the use of RBC materials. With the Minamata Convention in 2013 calling for the phase-out of dental amalgam and dental schools increasingly teaching techniques for RBC restorations in posterior teeth, it is likely that the dental profession's reliance upon RBC for the restoration of posterior teeth will only increase. In order to simplify and speed-up the placement of large posterior RBCs, manufacturers have produced a range of materials which can be placed in single or deeper increments, known as bulk-fill RBCs. Over a relatively short period of time many bulk-fill RBCs have been marketed quoting increment depths between 4-10 mm. The placement of these larger increments of RBC may reduce the time needed when placing posterior restorations and thereby reduce technique sensitivity. This article aims to review the properties and handling characteristics of the bulk-fill RBC materials currently available, while advising the optimal techniques of placement.

  11. Efficient digitalization method for dental restorations using micro-CT data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changhwan; Baek, Seung Hoon; Lee, Taewon; Go, Jonggun; Kim, Sun Young; Cho, Seungryong

    2017-03-15

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-CT scan of dental impressions for fabricating dental restorations and to compare the dimensional accuracy of dental models generated from various methods. The key idea of the proposed protocol is that dental impression of patients can be accurately digitized by micro-CT scan and that one can make digital cast model from micro-CT data directly. As air regions of the micro-CT scan data of dental impression are equivalent to the real teeth and surrounding structures, one can segment the air regions and fabricate digital cast model in the STL format out of them. The proposed method was validated by a phantom study using a typodont with prepared teeth. Actual measurement and deviation map analysis were performed after acquiring digital cast models for each restoration methods. Comparisons of the milled restorations were also performed by placing them on the prepared teeth of typodont. The results demonstrated that an efficient fabrication of precise dental restoration is achievable by use of the proposed method.

  12. Efficient digitalization method for dental restorations using micro-CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changhwan; Baek, Seung Hoon; Lee, Taewon; Go, Jonggun; Kim, Sun Young; Cho, Seungryong

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-CT scan of dental impressions for fabricating dental restorations and to compare the dimensional accuracy of dental models generated from various methods. The key idea of the proposed protocol is that dental impression of patients can be accurately digitized by micro-CT scan and that one can make digital cast model from micro-CT data directly. As air regions of the micro-CT scan data of dental impression are equivalent to the real teeth and surrounding structures, one can segment the air regions and fabricate digital cast model in the STL format out of them. The proposed method was validated by a phantom study using a typodont with prepared teeth. Actual measurement and deviation map analysis were performed after acquiring digital cast models for each restoration methods. Comparisons of the milled restorations were also performed by placing them on the prepared teeth of typodont. The results demonstrated that an efficient fabrication of precise dental restoration is achievable by use of the proposed method.

  13. Efficient digitalization method for dental restorations using micro-CT data

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Changhwan; Baek, Seung Hoon; Lee, Taewon; Go, Jonggun; Kim, Sun Young; Cho, Seungryong

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-CT scan of dental impressions for fabricating dental restorations and to compare the dimensional accuracy of dental models generated from various methods. The key idea of the proposed protocol is that dental impression of patients can be accurately digitized by micro-CT scan and that one can make digital cast model from micro-CT data directly. As air regions of the micro-CT scan data of dental impression are equivalent to the real teeth and surrounding structures, one can segment the air regions and fabricate digital cast model in the STL format out of them. The proposed method was validated by a phantom study using a typodont with prepared teeth. Actual measurement and deviation map analysis were performed after acquiring digital cast models for each restoration methods. Comparisons of the milled restorations were also performed by placing them on the prepared teeth of typodont. The results demonstrated that an efficient fabrication of precise dental restoration is achievable by use of the proposed method. PMID:28294188

  14. Long-term cytotoxicity of resin-based dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Bouillaguet, S; Shaw, L; Gonzalez, L; Wataha, J C; Krejci, I

    2002-01-01

    Highly filled composites, Ormocers (organically modified ceramics) and 'smart' materials have been developed to overcome the polymerization shrinkage problems of conventional composite materials. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of longer-term (up to 8 weeks) ageing of these resin-based dental restorative materials and determine the effect of post-curing on cytotoxicity. Twelve discs of each material (Colombus/IDR, Definite/Degussa, Ariston pHc/Vivadent) were either light-cured (Lc) or light-cured and post-cured (Pc). For cytotoxicity testing, the discs were placed in contact with cell culture medium (DMEM) and incubated at 37 degrees C. Extracts from composite materials were collected after 24 h and weekly over a time period of 8 weeks. Cytotoxicity of the eluates to cultured fibroblasts (Balb/c3T3) were measured by the succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity (MTT assay) and the results expressed in percentage of negative controls (Teflon discs). The results showed that ageing significantly influenced the cytotoxicity of the materials. Except for Ariston pHc, materials were less cytotoxic after 8 weeks of ageing than they were in early intervals and post-curing was not generally useful in reducing cytotoxicity. The Ariston pHc was initially moderately toxic, but then become highly cytotoxic for 5 weeks before returning to initial levels. The current study demonstrated the importance of assessing the cytotoxicity of resin composite materials at multiple times.

  15. Fractographic features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based dental restorations fractured during clinical function.

    PubMed

    Oilo, Marit; Hardang, Anne D; Ulsund, Amanda H; Gjerdet, Nils R

    2014-06-01

    Fractures during clinical function have been reported as the major concern associated with all-ceramic dental restorations. The aim of this study was to analyze the fracture features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based restorations fractured during clinical use. Twenty-seven crowns and onlays were supplied by dentists and dental technicians with information about type of cement and time in function, if available. Fourteen lithium disilicate glass-ceramic restorations and 13 zirconia-based restorations were retrieved and analyzed. Fractographic features were examined using optical microscopy to determine crack initiation and crack propagation of the restorations. The material comprised fractured restorations from one canine, 10 incisors, four premolars, and 11 molars. One crown was not categorized because of difficulty in orientation of the fragments. The results revealed that all core and veneer fractures initiated in the cervical margin and usually from the approximal area close to the most coronally placed curvature of the margin. Three cases of occlusal chipping were found. The margin of dental all-ceramic single-tooth restorations was the area of fracture origin. The fracture features were similar for zirconia, glass-ceramic, and alumina single-tooth restorations. Design features seem to be of great importance for fracture initiation.

  16. Fractographic features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based dental restorations fractured during clinical function

    PubMed Central

    Øilo, Marit; Hardang, Anne D; Ulsund, Amanda H; Gjerdet, Nils R

    2014-01-01

    Fractures during clinical function have been reported as the major concern associated with all-ceramic dental restorations. The aim of this study was to analyze the fracture features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based restorations fractured during clinical use. Twenty-seven crowns and onlays were supplied by dentists and dental technicians with information about type of cement and time in function, if available. Fourteen lithium disilicate glass-ceramic restorations and 13 zirconia-based restorations were retrieved and analyzed. Fractographic features were examined using optical microscopy to determine crack initiation and crack propagation of the restorations. The material comprised fractured restorations from one canine, 10 incisors, four premolars, and 11 molars. One crown was not categorized because of difficulty in orientation of the fragments. The results revealed that all core and veneer fractures initiated in the cervical margin and usually from the approximal area close to the most coronally placed curvature of the margin. Three cases of occlusal chipping were found. The margin of dental all-ceramic single-tooth restorations was the area of fracture origin. The fracture features were similar for zirconia, glass-ceramic, and alumina single-tooth restorations. Design features seem to be of great importance for fracture initiation. PMID:24698173

  17. Slow crack propagation in composite restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Montes-G, G M; Draughn, R A

    1987-05-01

    The double-torsion test technique was used to study slow crack propagation in a set of dental composite resins including two glass-filled and two microfilled materials. The microstructure within each pair was the same but one of the resins was selfcured and the other photocured. The fracture behavior was dependent on the filler concentration and the presence of absorbed water. Wet materials fractured by slow crack growth in the range of crack velocity studied (10(-7) to 10(-3) m/s), and the microfilled composites, which contain a lower concentration of inorganic filler, had lower stress intensity factors (K1c) than the glass-filled composites tested. Dry specimens of the microfilled materials and the selfcured, glass-filled composite also showed unstable, stick-slip fracture behavior indicative of a crack blunting mechanism which leads to an elevation of the stress intensity factor for crack initiation over K1c for stable crack growth. The plasticizing effect of water increased the viscoelastic response of the materials measured by the slope of curves of slow crack growth. Analysis of fracture surfaces showed that cracks propagated at low velocities (10(-7) to 10(-5) m/s) by the apparent failure of the filler/matrix interfacial bond, and absorbed water affected the strength or fracture resistance of the interface. At high crack velocities the properties of the composite depend on the properties of the polymeric matrix, the filler, and the filler volume fraction, but at low velocities the interface is the controlling factor in the durability of these composites exposed to an aqueous environment.

  18. Does atraumatic restorative treatment reduce dental anxiety in children? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Arun K.; Bhumika, T. V.; Nair, N. Sreekumaran

    2015-01-01

    Dental anxiety is one of the major problems affecting children, which impairs the rendering of dental care, leading to impaired quality of life. It often leads to occupational stress in dental personnel and conflict between parents/caregivers. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials done in children, to synthesize evidence of the effectiveness of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) in reducing dental anxiety in children compared to conventional restorative treatments. The databases searched included PubMed, Google Scholar and The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register. Eligible studies reporting dental anxiety by a variety of psychometric scales were tabulated. The review was conducted and reported in accordance with the guidelines provided by the Cochrane Collaboration. Among 416 studies retrieved through literature search, six studies matched the inclusion criteria. Due to lack of data, only three studies were included for meta-analysis using RevMan software (Review Manager, Version 5.3;The Cochrane Collaboration, Copenhagen, 2014). The pooled meta-analysis data, (standardized mean difference − 2.12 [95% confidence interval: −4.52, 0.27]) failed to show any difference between ART group and the conventional treatment group. In conclusion, ART was not more beneficial in reducing dental anxiety among pediatric dental patients. The findings are relevant in the field of clinical practice in dentistry in the management of the anxious pediatric dental patient. PMID:26038668

  19. Nanotechnology strategies for antibacterial and remineralizing composites and adhesives to tackle dental caries.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Ke; Weir, Michael D; Melo, Mary Anne S; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H K

    2015-03-01

    Dental caries is the most widespread disease and an economic burden. Nanotechnology is promising to inhibit caries by controlling biofilm acids and enhancing remineralization. Nanoparticles of silver were incorporated into composites/adhesives, along with quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs), to combat biofilms. Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) released calcium/phosphate ions, remineralized tooth-lesions and neutralized acids. By combining nanoparticles of silver/QAM/NACP, a new class of composites and adhesives with antibacterial and remineralization double benefits was developed. Various other nanoparticles including metal and oxide nanoparticles such as ZnO and TiO2, as well as polyethylenimine nanoparticles and their antibacterial capabilities in dental resins were also reviewed. These nanoparticles are promising for incorporation into dental composites/cements/sealants/bases/liners/adhesives. Therefore, nanotechnology has potential to significantly improve restorative and preventive dentistry.

  20. Nanotechnology strategies for antibacterial and remineralizing composites and adhesives to tackle dental caries

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Ke; Weir, Michael D; Melo, Mary Anne S; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin HK

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is the most widespread disease and an economic burden. Nanotechnology is promising to inhibit caries by controlling biofilm acids and enhancing remineralization. Nanoparticles of silver were incorporated into composites/adhesives, along with quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs), to combat biofilms. Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) released calcium/phosphate ions, remineralized tooth-lesions and neutralized acids. By combining NAg/QAM/NACP, a new class of composites and adhesives with antibacterial and remineralization double benefits was developed. Various other nanoparticles including metal and oxide nanoparticles such as ZnO and TiO2, as well as polyethylenimine nanoparticles and their antibacterial capabilities in dental resins were also reviewed. These nanoparticles are promising for incorporation into dental composites/cements/sealants/bases/liners/adhesives. Therefore, nanotechnology has potential to significantly improve restorative and preventive dentistry. PMID:25723095

  1. Confocal time lapse imaging as an efficient method for the cytocompatibility evaluation of dental composites.

    PubMed

    Attik, Ghania Nina; Gritsch, Kerstin; Colon, Pierre; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2014-11-09

    It is generally accepted that in vitro cell material interaction is a useful criterion in the evaluation of dental material biocompatibility. The objective of this study was to use 3D CLSM time lapse confocal imaging to assess the in vitro biocompatibility of dental composites. This method provides an accurate and sensitive indication of viable cell rate in contact with dental composite extracts. The ELS extra low shrinkage, a dental composite used for direct restoration, has been taken as example. In vitro assessment was performed on cultured primary human gingival fibroblast cells using Live/Dead staining. Images were obtained with the FV10i confocal biological inverted system and analyzed with the FV10-ASW 3.1 Software. Image analysis showed a very slight cytotoxicity in the presence of the tested composite after 5 hours of time lapse. A slight decrease of cell viability was shown in contact with the tested composite extracts compared to control cells. The findings highlighted the use of 3D CLSM time lapse imaging as a sensitive method to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the biocompatibility behavior of dental composites.

  2. Amino acid derivative-mediated detoxification and functionalization of dual cure dental restorative material for dental pulp cell mineralization.

    PubMed

    Minamikawa, Hajime; Yamada, Masahiro; Iwasa, Fuminori; Ueno, Takeshi; Deyama, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Kuniaki; Yawaka, Yasutaka; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2010-10-01

    Current dental restorative materials are only used to fill the defect of hard tissues, such as dentin and enamel, because of their cytotoxicity. Therefore, exposed dental pulp tissues in deep cavities must be first covered by a pulp capping material like calcium hydroxide to form a layer of mineralized tissue. However, this tissue mineralization is based on pathological reaction and triggers long-lasting inflammation, often causing clinical problems. This study tested the ability of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), amino acid derivative, to reduce cytotoxicity and induce mineralized tissue conductivity in resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), a widely used dental restorative material having dual cure mechanism. Rat dental pulp cells were cultured on untreated or NAC-supplemented RMGI. NAC supplementation substantially increased the percentage of viable cells from 46.7 to 73.3% after 24-h incubation. Cell attachment, spreading, proliferative activity, and odontoblast-related gene and protein expressions increased significantly on NAC-supplemented RMGI. The mineralization capability of cells, which was nearly suppressed on untreated RMGI, was induced on NAC-supplemented RMGI. These improved behaviors and functions of dental pulp cells on NAC-supplemented RMGI were associated with a considerable reduction in the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and with the increased level of intracellular glutathione reserves. These results demonstrated that NAC could detoxify and functionalize RMGIs via two different mechanisms involving in situ material detoxification and antioxidant cell protection. We believe that this study provides a new approach for developing dental restorative materials that enables mineralized tissue regeneration.

  3. Benchmarking matching color in composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Migliau, Guido; Piccoli, Luca; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Romeo, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study was to investigate the color samples (A2, A3 and B1) of three different brands of resin composites using dentine masses. 135 discs were prepared (5 plates for each thickness, color and brand of composite material). A colorimetric evaluation, using white and black background, was performed just after preparation. The color was measured corresponding to “Vita” scale and ΔL, Δa, Δb and ΔE values were calculated using a spectrophotometer. The results showed that Value, Chroma and Hue often differ even if the same commercial color and same thickness is used. In conclusion, this study showed that the perfect aesthetics restoration is possible combining individual abilities, experience and correct techniques. PMID:27512531

  4. Ultrashort pulse laser processing of hard tissue, dental restoration materials, and biocompatibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, A.; Strassl, M.; Beer, F.; Verhagen, L.; Wittschier, M.; Wintner, E.

    2007-07-01

    During the last few years, ultra-short laser pulses have proven their potential for application in medical tissue treatment in many ways. In hard tissue ablation, their aptitude for material ablation with negligible collateral damage provides many advantages. Especially teeth representing an anatomically and physiologically very special region with less blood circulation and lower healing rates than other tissues require most careful treatment. Hence, overheating of the pulp and induction of microcracks are some of the most problematic issues in dental preparation. Up till now it was shown by many authors that the application of picosecond or femtosecond pulses allows to perform ablation with very low damaging potential also fitting to the physiological requirements indicated. Beside the short interaction time with the irradiated matter, scanning of the ultra-short pulse trains turned out to be crucial for ablating cavities of the required quality. One main reason for this can be seen in the fact that during scanning the time period between two subsequent pulses incident on the same spot is so much extended that no heat accumulation effects occur and each pulse can be treated as a first one with respect to its local impact. Extension of this advantageous technique to biocompatible materials, i.e. in this case dental restoration materials and titanium plasma-sprayed implants, is just a matter of consequence. Recently published results on composites fit well with earlier data on dental hard tissue. In case of plaque which has to be removed from implants, it turns out that removal of at least the calcified version is harder than tissue removal. Therefore, besides ultra-short lasers, also Diode and Neodymium lasers, in cw and pulsed modes, have been studied with respect to plaque removal and sterilization. The temperature increase during laser exposure has been experimentally evaluated in parallel.

  5. Opalescence of human teeth and dental esthetic restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2016-12-01

    Human tooth enamel is opalescent, which renders teeth bluish in reflected and orange in transmitted color. The aim was to review opalescent property of teeth and application and mimetic reproduction in esthetic restorations. A PubMed search for articles published in English till 2015 on the opalescence of teeth and esthetic materials revealed 29 relevant papers. Opalescence was measured with OP-RT index, which was calculated as the difference in the yellow-blue and red-green color coordinates between the reflected and transmitted colors. Mean OP-RT value of human enamel was 22.9. OP-RT values of direct resin composites changed after polymerization, and the range in these materials was 5.7-23.7. OP-RT value ranges were 1.6-6.1 and 2.0-7.1 for the core and veneer ceramics, respectively. Since the OP-RT values of esthetic materials were lower than that of enamel, it is recommended that materials that can reproduce the opalescence of enamel be further designed.

  6. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations--accuracy from a mechanical engineering viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Tapie, Laurent; Lebon, Nicolas; Mawussi, Bernardin; Fron-Chabouis, Hélène; Duret, Francois; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    As is the case in the field of medicine, as well as in most areas of daily life, digital technology is increasingly being introduced into dental practice. Computer-aided design/ computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) solutions are available not only for chairside practice but also for creating inlays, crowns, fixed partial dentures (FPDs), implant abutments, and other dental prostheses. CAD/CAM dental practice can be considered as the handling of devices and software processing for the almost automatic design and creation of dental restorations. However, dentists who want to use dental CAD/CAM systems often do not have enough information to understand the variations offered by such technology practice. Knowledge of the random and systematic errors in accuracy with CAD/CAM systems can help to achieve successful restorations with this technology, and help with the purchasing of a CAD/CAM system that meets the clinical needs of restoration. This article provides a mechanical engineering viewpoint of the accuracy of CAD/ CAM systems, to help dentists understand the impact of this technology on restoration accuracy.

  7. Optical properties of dental restorative materials in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm for the simulation of color perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friebel, Moritz; Povel, Kirsten; Cappius, Hans-Joachim; Helfmann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina

    2009-09-01

    Aesthetic restorations require dental restorative materials to have optical properties very similar to those of the teeth. A method is developed to this end to determine the optical parameters absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs, anisotropy factor g, and effective scattering coefficient μs' of dental restorative materials. The method includes sample preparation and measurements of transmittance and reflectance in an integrating sphere spectrometer followed by inverse Monte Carlo simulations. Using this method the intrinsic optical parameters are determined for shade B2 of the light-activated composites TPH® Spectrum®, Esthet-X®, and the Ormocer® Definite® in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm. By using the determined parameters μa, μs, and g together with an appropriate phase function, the reflectance of samples with 1-mm layer thickness and shade B2 could be predicted with a very high degree of accuracy using a forward Monte Carlo simulation. The color perception was calculated from the simulated reflectance according to the CIELAB system. We initiate the compilation of a data pool of optical parameters that in the future will enable calculation models to be used as a basis for optimization of the optical approximation of the natural tooth, and the composition of new materials and their production process.

  8. Optical properties of dental restorative materials in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm for the simulation of color perception.

    PubMed

    Friebel, Moritz; Povel, Kirsten; Cappius, Hans-Joachim; Helfmann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Aesthetic restorations require dental restorative materials to have optical properties very similar to those of the teeth. A method is developed to this end to determine the optical parameters absorption coefficient mu(a), scattering coefficient mu(s), anisotropy factor g, and effective scattering coefficient mu(s) (') of dental restorative materials. The method includes sample preparation and measurements of transmittance and reflectance in an integrating sphere spectrometer followed by inverse Monte Carlo simulations. Using this method the intrinsic optical parameters are determined for shade B2 of the light-activated composites TPH((R)) Spectrum, Esthet-X, and the Ormocer Definite in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm. By using the determined parameters mu(a), mu(s), and g together with an appropriate phase function, the reflectance of samples with 1-mm layer thickness and shade B2 could be predicted with a very high degree of accuracy using a forward Monte Carlo simulation. The color perception was calculated from the simulated reflectance according to the CIELAB system. We initiate the compilation of a data pool of optical parameters that in the future will enable calculation models to be used as a basis for optimization of the optical approximation of the natural tooth, and the composition of new materials and their production process.

  9. Optimal restoration of dental esthetics and function with advanced implant-supported prostheses: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Meulen, Peter van der; Linden, Wynand van der; Eeden, Ronnie van

    2012-07-01

    For more than 25 years, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has been used in implant restorative dentistry. Today this technology offers a means of milling titanium frameworks that fit dental implants accurately. This report presents a restoratively driven protocol employing advanced implant restorative and surgical techniques. Treatment of a patient with advanced periodontitis with extensive loss of hard and soft tissues is presented. After extraction of the patient's remaining hopeless teeth, dental implants were placed, along with interim, fixed-margin abutments and abutment protection caps. Two days later, acrylic resin fixed-interim prostheses restored the patient's esthetics and partial masticatory function. After implant osseointegration, maxillary, and mandibular frameworks for definitive prostheses were milled from Ti alloy, using one specific CAD/CAM technology. The benefits of this technology are also discussed.

  10. Development of novel self-healing and antibacterial dental composite containing calcium phosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junling; Weir, Michael D.; Melo, Mary Anne S.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Fracture and secondary caries are the primary reasons for dental restoration failure. The objective of this study was to develop a self-healing composite to heal cracks, while containing dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM) for antibacterial function and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) for remineralization. Methods Microcapsules were synthesized with poly(urea-formaldehyde) (PUF) shells containing triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and N,N-dihydroxyethyl-p-toluidine (DHEPT) as healing liquid. Composite contained 20 mass% of NACP and 35% glass fillers. In addition, composite contained 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, or 10% of microcapsules. A single edge V-notched beam method measured fracture toughness (KIC) and self-healing efficiency. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was used to test the antibacterial properties. Results Incorporation of microcapsules up to 7.5% into the composite did not adversely affect the mechanical properties (p > 0.1). Successful self-healing was achieved, with KIC recovery of 65–81% (mean ± sd; n = 6) to regain the load-bearing capability after composite fracture. The self-healing DMAHDM-NACP composite displayed a strong antibacterial potency, inhibiting biofilm viability and lactic acid production, and reducing colony-forming units by 3–4 orders of magnitude, compared to control composite without DMAHDM. Conclusions A dental composite was developed with triple benefits of self-healing after fracture, antibacterial activity, and remineralization capability for the first time. Clinical significance The self-healing, antibacterial and remineralizing composite may be promising for tooth cavity restorations to combat bulk fracture and secondary caries. The method of using triple agents (self-healing microcapsules, DMAHDM, and NACP) may have wide applicability to other dental composites, adhesives, sealants and cements. PMID:25625674

  11. Thermal stability of direct dental esthetic restorative materials at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Robinson, F G; Rueggeberg, F A; Lockwood, P E

    1998-11-01

    With increasing use of direct esthetic restorative materials, the identity of a body may rely upon knowledge of temperature effects on this class of dental restorations. This research examined the effect of atmospheric gas on thermal decomposition and color change of a wide variety of direct esthetic restorative materials. Cured discs (4 x 1 and 8 x 1 mm) were made using manufacturer's directions: traditional glass ionomer (Fuji II), light-curable resonomer (Fuji II LC), compomer (Geristore), and three types of resin composites--highly filled, urethane-based (Occlusin), and two Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resins: hybrid (Herculite XRV) and microfill (Silux Plus). Three replications of each material were heated at 5 degrees C/min in a thermogravimetric analysis unit using either room air or nitrogen purge to simulate different thermal environments. First derivative values of percent weight loss with respect to temperature were obtained to determine temperatures associated with increased decomposition rates. Room-air heating showed greater numbers of decomposition events than did nitrogen-heated discs. The only material decomposing less than 200 degrees C in either atmosphere was traditional glass ionomer. The majority of decomposition occurred between 200 degrees and 500 degrees C for all materials. Only products containing glass ionomer components decomposed between 600 degrees and 800 degrees C. Room-air heating resulted in ash white discs at 800 degrees C and higher. Specimens heated in nitrogen were gray to black at 600 degrees C and higher. Heating atmosphere greatly affected color, and some products demonstrated distinguishing color changes: glass ionomers, in particular, showed characteristic color features. An atlas was constructed from color change of specimens recovered after 200 degrees, 400 degrees, 600 degrees, 800 degrees, and 1000 degrees C compared with non-heated controls.

  12. A new technique for screening chemical toxicity to the pulp from dental restorative materials and procedures.

    PubMed

    Hume, W R

    1985-11-01

    An in vitro test system is described which allows for quick and relatively inexpensive examination of the potential for chemical toxicity to the pulp of materials and procedures used in the restoration of single teeth. The test system consisted of two sequential steps. First, a restorative procedure was carried out on a freshly-extracted human tooth crown, to the pulpal surface of which had been attached a chamber filled with sterile tissue-culture medium. The preparation was kept at 37 degrees C. The culture medium was removed at day one and replaced with fresh medium, which was removed at day 3. In the second step, we used a standard tissue-culture toxicity assessment technique to examine both culture medium samples for the presence of chemical toxins. In use, this system gave results which correlated well with the known clinical potential for pulpal toxicity of various dental materials and techniques. For example, zinc oxide-eugenol used as temporary filling or base had no apparent potential for toxicity. Sealing a cotton pellet containing phenol into a cavity was of high apparent potential toxicity. Acrylic resin as intracoronal or extracoronal fillings showed potential for toxicity; this potential was decreased by lining with calcium hydroxide cement. Composite resin placed onto etched dentin had apparent toxic potential, but had less such potential when placed onto unetched dentin. The technique had some advantages over previously described in vitro toxicity test for restorative materials, because it included a step requiring diffusion of potential toxins into and through human dentin, and because it allowed for examination of variations in technique which mimic clinical behavior, and of materials used in sequence or in combination.

  13. 12-year survival of composite vs. amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Opdam, N J M; Bronkhorst, E M; Loomans, B A C; Huysmans, M C D N J M

    2010-10-01

    Information about the long-term clinical survival of large amalgam and composite restorations is still lacking. This retrospective study compares the longevity of three- and four-/five-surface amalgam and composite restorations relative to patients' caries risk. Patient records from a general practice were used for data collection. We evaluated 1949 large class II restorations (1202 amalgam/747 composite). Dates of placement, replacement, and failure were recorded, and caries risk of patients was assessed. Survival was calculated from Kaplan-Meier statistics. After 12 years, 293 amalgam and 114 composite restorations had failed. Large composite restorations showed a higher survival in the combined population and in the low-risk group. For three-surface restorations in high-risk patients, amalgam showed better survival.

  14. A Comparison of US and Japanese Dental Restorative Care Present on Service Members Recovered from the WWII Era.

    PubMed

    Shiroma, Calvin Y

    2017-02-20

    The documentation of dental materials used in the USA during the WWII era is readily available, while references for the Japanese are minimal. It was therefore important to build a photographic database of Japanese restorative care which could be utilized as a comparison tool for the deployed odontologist. The dental restorative care of approximately 400 US and 100 Japanese sets of remains was evaluated. Both countries share many similar restorative techniques to include collared crowns, full-coverage restorations, cantilever bridge/pontics to close spaces; restorative materials such as amalgam, gold, and zinc phosphate (temporary) restorations; and removable prostheses. The dental restorative materials most commonly used by US dentists include the amalgam and silicate cement, while the full-coverage crown was the type of restoration most frequently seen on the Japanese remains. Silicates, porcelain and replaceable crowns, and partial-coverage prepared crowns were not observed on the recovered Japanese remains.

  15. Bioactive glass fillers reduce bacterial penetration into marginal gaps for composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Khvostenko, D.; Hilton, T. J.; Ferracane, J. L.; Mitchell, J. C.; Kruzic, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Bioactive glass (BAG) is known to possess antimicrobial and remineralizing properties; however, the use of BAG as a filler for resin based composite restorations to slow recurrent caries has not been studied. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of 15 wt% BAG additions to a resin composite on bacterial biofilms penetrating into marginal gaps of simulated tooth fillings in vitro during cyclic mechanical loading. Methods Human molars were machined into approximately 3 mm thick disks of dentin and 1.5–2 mm deep composite restorations were placed. A narrow 15–20 micrometer wide dentin-composite gap was allowed to form along half of the margin by not applying dental adhesive to that region. Two different 72 wt% filled composites were used, one with 15 wt% BAG filler (15BAG) and the balance silanated strontium glass and one filled with OX-50 and silanated strontium glass without BAG (0BAG – control). Samples of both groups had Streptococcus mutans biofilms grown on the surface and were tested inside a bioreactor for two weeks while subjected to periods of cyclic mechanical loading. After post-test biofilm viability was confirmed, each specimen was fixed in glutaraldehyde, gram positive stained, mounted in resin and cross-sectioned to reveal the gap profile. Depth of biofilm penetration for 0BAG and 15BAG was quantified as the fraction of gap depth. The data were compared using a Student’s t-test. Results The average depth of bacterial penetration into the marginal gap for the 15BAG samples was significantly smaller (~61%) in comparison to 0BAG, where 100% penetration was observed for all samples with the biofilm penetrating underneath of the restoration in some cases. Significance BAG containing resin dental composites reduce biofilm penetration into marginal gaps of simulated tooth restorations. This suggests BAG containing composites may have the potential to slow the development and propagation of secondary tooth

  16. Inequalities in preventive and restorative dental services in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Cheema, J; Sabbah, W

    2016-09-09

    Aims The objective of this study is to assess socioeconomic inequalities in the use of selected dental procedures.Methods Data is from the Adult Dental Health Survey 2009, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of England, Northern Ireland and Wales. Overall, 6,279 participants were included in the analysis. Occupational classification and education were used to assess variations in the use of preventive, restorative services and tooth extraction using a series of logistic regression models, adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, DMFT, self-reported oral health, dental visits and country.Results There were clear socioeconomic variations in the utilisation of preventive and restorative services. In the fully adjusted model those with no educational qualification were less likely to report ever having preventive services than those with a degree (OR 0.48, 95%CI: 0.36,0.65). Similarly, individuals in routine/manual occupation were significantly less likely to report ever having preventive services than those in managerial/professional occupation (OR 0.58, 95%CI: 0.46,0.74) in the fully adjusted model.Conclusion The findings imply that despite relatively equitable access and higher use of dental services in UK, the least educated and those at the bottom of social hierarchy are less likely to have preventive and restorative dental services.

  17. Monoenergetic computed tomography reconstructions reduce beam hardening artifacts from dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Stolzmann, Paul; Winklhofer, Sebastian; Schwendener, Nicole; Alkadhi, Hatem; Thali, Michael J; Ruder, Thomas D

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of monoenergetic computed tomography (CT) images to reduce beam hardening artifacts in comparison to standard CT images of dental restoration on dental post-mortem CT (PMCT). Thirty human decedents (15 male, 58 ± 22 years) with dental restorations were examined using standard single-energy CT (SECT) and dual-energy CT (DECT). DECT data were used to generate monoenergetic CT images, reflecting the X-ray attenuation at energy levels of 64, 69, 88 keV, and at an individually adjusted optimal energy level called OPTkeV. Artifact reduction and image quality of SECT and monoenergetic CT were assessed objectively and subjectively by two blinded readers. Subjectively, beam artifacts decreased visibly in 28/30 cases after monoenergetic CT reconstruction. Inter- and intra-reader agreement was good (k = 0.72, and k = 0.73 respectively). Beam hardening artifacts decreased significantly with increasing monoenergies (repeated-measures ANOVA p < 0.001). Artifact reduction was greatest on monoenergetic CT images at OPTkeV. Mean OPTkeV was 108 ± 17 keV. OPTkeV yielded the lowest difference between CT numbers of streak artifacts and reference tissues (-163 HU). Monoenergetic CT reconstructions significantly reduce beam hardening artifacts from dental restorations and improve image quality of post-mortem dental CT.

  18. Genotoxicity evaluation of dental restoration nanocomposite using comet assay and chromosome aberration test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Marahaini; Thirumulu Ponnuraj, Kannan; Mohamad, Dasmawati; Rahman, Ismail Ab

    2013-01-01

    Nanocomposite is used as a dental filling to restore the affected tooth, especially in dental caries. The dental nanocomposite (KelFil) for tooth restoration used in this study was produced by the School of Dental Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia and is incorporated with monodispersed, spherical nanosilica fillers. The aim of the study was to determine the genotoxic effect of KelFil using in vitro genotoxicity tests. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of KelFil was evaluated using MTT assay, comet assay and chromosome aberration tests with or without the addition of a metabolic activation system (S9 mix), using the human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5). Concurrent negative and positive controls were included. In the comet assay, no comet formation was found in the KelFil groups. There was a significant difference in tail moment between KelFil groups and positive control (p < 0.05). Similarly, no significant aberrations in chromosomes were noticed in KelFil groups. The mitotic indices of treatment groups and negative control were significantly different from positive controls. Hence, it can be concluded that the locally produced dental restoration nanocomposite (KelFil) is non-genotoxic under the present test conditions.

  19. ClinicAl Evaluation of Dental Restorative Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    and strength of the restoration to resist flexural occlusal stresses and acts as a secondary cause for fracture. Wear together with fracture...caries, accounting for 39.9 percent of failures. Wear further decreases the bulk and strength of the restoration to resist flexural occlusal stresses ...Machining of the surface during the finishing and polishing procedure may produce microdefects and/or residual stress in the surface which would

  20. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental... prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental materials to...

  1. Modeling dental composite shrinkage by digital image correlation and finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Terry Yuan-Fang; Huang, Pin-Sheng; Chuang, Shu-Fen

    2014-10-01

    Dental composites are light-curable resin-based materials with an inherent defect of polymerization shrinkage which may cause tooth deflection and debonding of restorations. This study aimed to combine digital image correlation (DIC) and finite element analysis (FEA) to model the shrinkage behaviors under different light curing regimens. Extracted human molars were prepared with proximal cavities for composite restorations, and then divided into three groups to receive different light curing protocols: regular intensity, low intensity, and step-curing consisting of low and high intensities. For each tooth, the composite fillings were consecutively placed under both unbonded and bonded conditions. At first, the shrinkage of the unbonded restorations was analyzed by DIC and adopted as the setting of FEA. The simulated shrinkage behaviors obtained from FEA were further validated by the measurements in the bonded cases. The results showed that different light curing regimens affected the shrinkage in unbonded restorations, with regular intensity showing the greatest shrinkage strain on the top surface. The shrinkage centers in the bonded cases were located closer to the cavity floor than those in the unbonded cases, and were less affected by curing regimens. The FEA results showed that the stress was modulated by the accumulated light energy density, while step-curing may alleviate the tensile stress along the cavity walls. In this study, DIC provides a complete description of the polymerization shrinkage behaviors of dental composites, which may facilitate the stress analysis in the numerical investigation.

  2. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Kammoun, Dorra; Hentati, Hajer; Janel, Sébastien; Popoff, Michka; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-08-01

    In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  3. A novel protein-repellent dental composite containing 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Chen, Chen; Melo, Mary As; Bai, Yu-Xing; Cheng, Lei; Xu, Hockin Hk

    2015-06-26

    Secondary caries due to biofilm acids is a primary cause of dental composite restoration failure. To date, there have been no reports of dental composites that can repel protein adsorption and inhibit bacteria attachment. The objectives of this study were to develop a protein-repellent dental composite by incorporating 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and to investigate for the first time the effects of MPC mass fraction on protein adsorption, bacteria attachment, biofilm growth, and mechanical properties. Composites were synthesized with 0 (control), 0.75%, 1.5%, 2.25%, 3%, 4.5% and 6% of MPC by mass. A commercial composite was also tested as a control. Mechanical properties were measured in three-point flexure. Protein adsorption onto the composite was determined by the microbicinchoninic acid method. A human saliva microcosm biofilm model was used. Early attachment at 4 h, biofilm at 2 days, live/dead staining and colony-forming units (CFUs) of biofilms grown on the composites were investigated. Composites with MPC of up to 3% had mechanical properties similar to those without MPC and those of the commercial control, whereas 4.5% and 6% MPC decreased the mechanical properties (P<0.05). Increasing MPC from 0 to 3% reduced the protein adsorption on composites (P<0.05). The composite with 3% MPC had protein adsorption that was 1/12 that of the control (P<0.05). Oral bacteria early attachment and biofilm growth were also greatly reduced on the composite with 3% MPC, compared to the control (P<0.05). In conclusion, incorporation of MPC into composites at 3% greatly reduced protein adsorption, bacteria attachment and biofilm CFUs, without compromising mechanical properties. Protein-repellent composites could help to repel bacteria attachment and plaque build-up to reduce secondary caries. The protein-repellent method might be applicable to other dental materials.

  4. A novel protein-repellent dental composite containing 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Chen, Chen; Melo, Mary AS; Bai, Yu-Xing; Cheng, Lei; Xu, Hockin HK

    2015-01-01

    Secondary caries due to biofilm acids is a primary cause of dental composite restoration failure. To date, there have been no reports of dental composites that can repel protein adsorption and inhibit bacteria attachment. The objectives of this study were to develop a protein-repellent dental composite by incorporating 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and to investigate for the first time the effects of MPC mass fraction on protein adsorption, bacteria attachment, biofilm growth, and mechanical properties. Composites were synthesized with 0 (control), 0.75%, 1.5%, 2.25%, 3%, 4.5% and 6% of MPC by mass. A commercial composite was also tested as a control. Mechanical properties were measured in three-point flexure. Protein adsorption onto the composite was determined by the microbicinchoninic acid method. A human saliva microcosm biofilm model was used. Early attachment at 4 h, biofilm at 2 days, live/dead staining and colony-forming units (CFUs) of biofilms grown on the composites were investigated. Composites with MPC of up to 3% had mechanical properties similar to those without MPC and those of the commercial control, whereas 4.5% and 6% MPC decreased the mechanical properties (P<0.05). Increasing MPC from 0 to 3% reduced the protein adsorption on composites (P<0.05). The composite with 3% MPC had protein adsorption that was 1/12 that of the control (P<0.05). Oral bacteria early attachment and biofilm growth were also greatly reduced on the composite with 3% MPC, compared to the control (P<0.05). In conclusion, incorporation of MPC into composites at 3% greatly reduced protein adsorption, bacteria attachment and biofilm CFUs, without compromising mechanical properties. Protein-repellent composites could help to repel bacteria attachment and plaque build-up to reduce secondary caries. The protein-repellent method might be applicable to other dental materials. PMID:25655010

  5. Mechanical benefits of conservative restoration for dental fissure caries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongpu; Zheng, Keke; Li, Eric; Li, Wei; Li, Qing; Swain, Michael V

    2016-01-01

    The principle of minimal intervention dentistry (MID) is to limit removal of carious tooth tissue while maximizing its repair and survival potential. The objective of this study is to explore the fracture resistance of a permanent molar tooth with a fissure carious lesion along with three clinical restoration procedures, namely one traditional and two conservative approaches, based upon MID. The traditional restoration employs extensive surgical removal of enamel and dentine about the cavity to eliminate potential risk of further caries development, while conservative method #1 removes significantly less enamel and infected dentine, and conservative method #2 only restores the overhanging enamel above the cavity and leaves the infected and affected dentine as it was. An extended finite element method (XFEM) is adopted here to analyze the fracture behaviors of both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of these four different scenarios. It was found that the two conservative methods exhibited better fracture resistance than the traditional restorative method. Although conservative method #2 has less fracture resistance than method #1, it had significantly superior fracture resistance compared to other restorations. More important, after cavity sealing it may potentially enhance the opportunity for remineralization and improved loading bearing capacity and fracture resistance.

  6. CHIPPING FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF DENTAL CAD/CAM RESTORATIVE MATERIALS: PART I, PROCEDURES AND RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, G. D.; Giuseppetti, A. A.; Hoffman, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The edge chipping test was used to measure the fracture resistance of CAD/CAM dental restoration ceramics and resin composites. Methods An edge chipping machine was used to evaluate six materials including one feldspathic porcelain, two glass ceramics, a filled resin-composite, a yttria-stabilized zirconia, and a new ceramic-resin composite material. Force versus edge distance data were collected over a broad range of forces and distances. Data were analyzed by several approaches and several chipping resistance parameters were evaluated. The effects of using different indenter types were explored. Results The force versus distance trends were usually nonlinear with good fits to a power law equation with exponents usually ranging from 1.2 to 1.9. The order of chipping resistance (from least to greatest) was: feldspathic porcelain and a leucite glass ceramic (which were similar), followed by the lithium disilicate glass ceramic and the two resin composites (which were similar), and finally the zirconia which had the greatest resistance to chipping. Chipping with a Vickers indenter required 28% to 45% more force than with the sharp conical 120° indenter. The two indenters rank materials approximately the same way. The power law exponents were very similar for the two indenters for a particular material, but the exponents varied with material. The Rockwell C indenter gives different power law trends and rankings. Significance Despite the variations in the trends and indenters, simple comparisons between materials can be made by chipping with sharp conical 120° or Vickers indenters at 0.50 mm. Broad distance ranges are recommended for trend evaluation. PMID:24685178

  7. Concordance between Responses to Questionnaire Scenarios and Actual Treatment to Repair or Replace Dental Restorations in the National Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Heaven, Tim J.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Litaker, Mark S.; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Rindal, D. Brad; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To quantify the agreement between treatment recommended during hypothetical clinical scenarios and actual treatment provided in comparable clinical circumstances. Methods A total of 193 practitioners in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network participated in both a questionnaire and a clinical study. The questionnaire included three hypothetical scenarios about treatment of existing restorations. Clinicians then participated in a clinical study about repair or replacement of existing restorations. We quantified the overall concordance between their questionnaire responses and what they did in actual clinical treatment. Results Practitioners who recommended repair (instead of replacement) of more scenario restorations also had higher repair percentages in clinical practice. Additionally, for each of the three hypothetical scenario restorations, practitioners who recommended repair had higher repair percentages in clinical practice. Conclusions The questionnaire scenarios were a valid measure of clinicians’ tendency to repair or replace restorations in actual clinical practice. Clinical implications Although there was substantial variation in practitioners’ tendency to repair or replace restorations, responses to questionnaire scenarios by individual practitioners were concordant with what they did in actual clinical practice. PMID:25998565

  8. Nano-sized aerosol classification, collection and analysis--method development using dental composite materials.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Axel; Buckett, Mary I; Japuntich, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a methodical approach for generating, collecting, and analyzing nano-size (1-100 nm) aerosol from abraded dental composite materials. Existing aerosol sampling instruments were combined with a custom-made sampling chamber to create and sample a fresh, steady-state aerosol size distribution before significant Brownian coagulation. Morphological, size, and compositional information was obtained by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). To create samples sizes suitable for TEM analysis, aerosol concentrations in the test chamber had to be much higher than one would typically expect in a dental office, and therefore, these results do not represent patient or dental personnel exposures. Results show that nano-size aerosol was produced by the dental drill alone, with and without cooling water drip, prior to abrasion of dental composite. During abrasion, aerosol generation seemed independent of the percent filler load of the restorative material and the operator who generated the test aerosol. TEM investigation showed that "chunks" of filler and resin were generated in the nano-size range; however, free nano-size filler particles were not observed. The majority of observed particles consisted of oil droplets, ash, and graphitic structures.

  9. Assuring restorative integrity in extensive posterior resin composite restorations: pushing the envelope.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, W H

    2000-03-01

    Clinicians are increasingly being called on to satisfy the restorative demands of patients who request tooth-colored restorations but are unable to afford an optimum indirect restorative option. Consequently, in clinical practice, the limits of the direct posterior resin composite technique are being stretched. There is a need for techniques that will satisfy the complex variables of clinical practice and allow for successful utilization of posterior resin composite in large cavity preparations. The objective of this article is to explain the rationale behind the materials and techniques involved in the delivery of these complicated restorations.

  10. Restoring proximal integrity in posterior composite resin restorations: innovations using Ceromers.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, W H

    1998-03-01

    Clinicians are increasingly being called upon to satisfy the restorative demands of patients requesting tooth coloured restorations but unable to afford an optimum indirect restorative option. Consequently, in clinical practice the envelope of what was hitherto considered the limit of appropriate application of the direct posterior composite resin technique is increasingly being stretched. Although our aesthetic endeavours are fairly easily accomplished in the posterior dentition, interproximal integrity is in many instances wanting and a major cause of restorative failure. This report highlights some of the authors innovations using Ceromers which satisfy the complex variables of clinical practice optimizing proximal contour, allowing for the successful utilization of posterior composite resin in the posterior dentition.

  11. Composition of Mineral Produced by Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Volponi, A.A.; Gentleman, E.; Fatscher, R.; Pang, Y.W.Y.; Gentleman, M.M.; Sharpe, P.T.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from different dental tissues have been described to have osteogenic/odontogenic-like differentiation capacity, but little attention has been paid to the biochemical composition of the material that each produces. Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to analyze the mineralized materials produced in vitro by different dental cell populations, and we compared them with the biochemical composition of native dental tissues. We show that different dental stem cell populations produce materials that differ in their mineral and matrix composition and that these differ from those of native dental tissues. In vitro, BCMP (bone chip mass population), SCAP (stem cells from apical papilla), and SHED (stem cells from human-exfoliated deciduous teeth) cells produce a more highly mineralized matrix when compared with that produced by PDL (periodontal ligament), DPA (dental pulp adult), and GF (gingival fibroblast) cells. Principal component analyses of Raman spectra further demonstrated that the crystallinity and carbonate substitution environments in the material produced by each cell type varied, with DPA cells, for example, producing a more carbonate-substituted mineral and with SCAP, SHED, and GF cells creating a less crystalline material when compared with other dental stem cells and native tissues. These variations in mineral composition reveal intrinsic differences in the various cell populations, which may in turn affect their specific clinical applications. PMID:26253190

  12. Determination of optical properties in dental restorative biomaterials using the inverse-adding-doubling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Rubiño, Manuel; Pérez, María. M.

    2013-11-01

    Light propagation in biological media is characterized by the absorption coefficient, the scattering coefficient, the scattering phase function, the refractive index, and the surface conditions (roughness). By means of the inverse-adding-doubling (IAD) method, transmittance and reflectance measurements lead to the determination of the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient. The additional measurement of the phase function performed by goniometry allows the separation of the reduced scattering coefficient into the scattering coefficient and the scattering anisotropy factor. The majority of techniques, such as the one utilized in this work, involve the use of integrating spheres to measure total transmission and reflection. We have employed an integrating sphere setup to measure the total transmittance and reflectance of dental biomaterials used in restorative dentistry. Dental biomaterials are meant to replace dental tissues, such as enamel and dentine, in irreversibly diseased teeth. In previous works we performed goniometric measurements in order to evaluate the scattering anisotropy factor for these kinds of materials. In the present work we have used the IAD method to combine the measurements performed using the integrating sphere setup with the results of the previous goniometric measurements. The aim was to optically characterize the dental biomaterials analyzed, since whole studies to assess the appropriate material properties are required in medical applications. In this context, complete optical characterizations play an important role in achieving the fulfillment of optimal quality and the final success of dental biomaterials used in restorative dentistry.

  13. Water absorption, dimensional change and radial pressure in resin matrix dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    McCabe, John F; Rusby, Sandra

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the relationship between water absorption, dimensional change (swelling) under cavity constraint and radial stress generation in resin matrix dental restorative materials. Water absorption was determined on disc specimens whilst swelling was determined on samples of materials restrained within cavities cut in cast polymethylmethacrylate and pressure generated was determined using a 'push-out' test. Four commercially available resin matrix materials were used. A giomer material gave significantly greater water absorption than two compomers and a fluoride releasing composite (p<0.05). The giomer material was the only material which produced a significant degree of swelling (p<0.05) when restrained within a cavity. The giomer product produced the greatest radial pressure (over 20 MPa in 1 month) following water storage, however a significant pressure generation was also observed for other materials despite their much lower water absorption values. The mechanism of water absorption and the amount of water absorbed determine the dimensional changes and radial pressure generated by resin matrix materials in a moist environment.

  14. Dental restorative biomaterials induce glutathione depletion in cultured human gingival fibroblast: protective effect of N-acetyl cysteine.

    PubMed

    Stanislawski, L; Soheili-Majd, E; Perianin, A; Goldberg, M

    2000-09-05

    Eight biomaterials eluted from four different types of dental restorative biomaterials, that is, from glass-ionomer cement (GIC: Ketac-fil and Fuji II), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC: Fuji II LC and Photac-fil), composite (Z100 MP and Tetric-flow), and compomer (Compoglass F and F-2000), were studied for their cytotoxic properties in relation to glutathione (GSH) content in cultured human gingival fibroblasts. Z100 MP, Tetric-flow, and Compoglass F were less cytotoxic than the others, with a toxic concentration of 50% (TC 50) > 24% (of eluate), as determined by the MTT test. F-2000, Tetric-flow, and the other biomaterials were relatively more cytotoxic (TC 50 = 9-16%). With the exception of Z100 MP, all the biomaterials induced a depletion of cellular glutathione (GSH) that was variable depending upon the biomaterial eluates. The strongest GSH depletion was with F-2000, Fuji II, and Photac-fil. GSH depletion, with Compoglass and F-2000, was rapid-detectable after one h of cell treatment and complete within 3 h-whereas a longer period of incubation was required for the other biomaterials. Interestingly, the drug cytotoxic effects induced by all the biomaterials were prevented by cell treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). This study provides evidence that the cytotoxic property of dental restorative biomaterials is associated with depletion of the glutathione level in gingival fibroblasts. While the molecular mechanisms of this phenomenon require further investigations, our data suggest that NAC may be useful in preventing the cellular damage induced by dental restorative biomaterials.

  15. Shrinkage of dental composite in simulated cavity measured with digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianying; Thakur, Preetanjali; Fok, Alex S L

    2014-07-21

    Polymerization shrinkage of dental resin composites can lead to restoration debonding or cracked tooth tissues in composite-restored teeth. In order to understand where and how shrinkage strain and stress develop in such restored teeth, Digital Image Correlation (DIC) was used to provide a comprehensive view of the displacement and strain distributions within model restorations that had undergone polymerization shrinkage. Specimens with model cavities were made of cylindrical glass rods with both diameter and length being 10 mm. The dimensions of the mesial-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavity prepared in each specimen measured 3 mm and 2 mm in width and depth, respectively. After filling the cavity with resin composite, the surface under observation was sprayed with first a thin layer of white paint and then fine black charcoal powder to create high-contrast speckles. Pictures of that surface were then taken before curing and 5 min after. Finally, the two pictures were correlated using DIC software to calculate the displacement and strain distributions. The resin composite shrunk vertically towards the bottom of the cavity, with the top center portion of the restoration having the largest downward displacement. At the same time, it shrunk horizontally towards its vertical midline. Shrinkage of the composite stretched the material in the vicinity of the "tooth-restoration" interface, resulting in cuspal deflections and high tensile strains around the restoration. Material close to the cavity walls or floor had direct strains mostly in the directions perpendicular to the interfaces. Summation of the two direct strain components showed a relatively uniform distribution around the restoration and its magnitude equaled approximately to the volumetric shrinkage strain of the material.

  16. Modelling the Longevity of Dental Restorations by means of a CBR System

    PubMed Central

    Aliaga, Ignacio J.; Vera, Vicente; García, Alvaro E.

    2015-01-01

    The lifespan of dental restorations is limited. Longevity depends on the material used and the different characteristics of the dental piece. However, it is not always the case that the best and longest lasting material is used since patients may prefer different treatments according to how noticeable the material is. Over the last 100 years, the most commonly used material has been silver amalgam, which, while very durable, is somewhat aesthetically displeasing. Our study is based on the collection of data from the charts, notes, and radiographic information of restorative treatments performed by Dr. Vera in 1993, the analysis of the information by computer artificial intelligence to determine the most appropriate restoration, and the monitoring of the evolution of the dental restoration. The data will be treated confidentially according to the Organic Law 15/1999 on 13 December on the Protection of Personal Data. This paper also presents a clustering technique capable of identifying the most significant cases with which to instantiate the case-base. In order to classify the cases, a mixture of experts is used which incorporates a Bayesian network and a multilayer perceptron; the combination of both classifiers is performed with a neural network. PMID:25866792

  17. Three-year clinical performance of two indirect composite inlays compared to direct composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Ozakar-Ilda, Nurcan; Zorba, Yahya O.; Yildiz, Mehmet; Erdem, Vildan; Seven, Nilgun

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Despite the incremental build-up of resin composite restorations, their polymerization shrinkage during curing presents a serious problem. Indirect composite resin systems represent an alternative in overcoming some of the deficiencies of direct composite restorations. The hypothesis of the present study states that the clinical performance of restorations may be affected by different generation and application techniques. Study Design: Sixty restorations (20 DI system (Coltène/Whaledent AG, Altstätten, Switzerland) composite inlays, 20 Tescera ATL system (BISCO Inc. Schaumburg, Illinois, USA) composite inlays, and 20 direct composites) were applied to premolar teeth in 49 patients. Restorations were clinically evaluated by two examiners. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon Signed Ranks, and X2 tests. Results: The Tescera ATL system performed significantly better than both direct composite restorations (p<0.001) and DI system (p<0.05). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this 3-year clinical study, indirect resin restorations showed better scores than direct restorations. In addition, the Tescera ATL system was found to be more successful than the DI system and direct composite restorations. Key words:Composite, inlay, direct composite restorations, indirect composite restorations. PMID:23524423

  18. Repair or replacement of restorations: a prospective cohort study by dentists in The National Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Valeria V.; Riley, Joseph L.; Rindal, D. Brad; Qvist, Vibeke; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Dilbone, Deborah A.; Brotman, Solomon G.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES (1) quantify 12-month failures of restorations that were repaired or replaced at baseline; (2) test the hypothesis that no significant differences exist in failure percentages between repaired and replaced restorations after 12 months; (3) test the hypothesis that certain dentist’s, patient’s and restoration’s characteristics are significantly associated with the incidence of restoration failure. METHODS This prospective cohort study included dentists in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network. Dentists recorded data for 50 or more consecutive defective restorations. The restorations that were either repaired or replaced were recalled after 12 months and characterized for developing defects. RESULTS 195 dentists recorded data on 5,889 restorations. 378 restorations required additional treatment (74 repaired, 171 replaced, 84 teeth received endodontic treatment, and 49 were extracted). Multivariable logistic regression analysis indicated that additional treatment was more likely to occur if the original restoration had been repaired (7%) compared to replaced (5%)(OR = 1.6, p < .001; 95% CI: 1.2, 2.1), if a molar tooth was restored (7%) compared to pre-molar or anterior teeth (5%, 6% respectively)(OR = 1.4, p = .010; 95% CI: 1.1, 1.7), and if the primary reason was a fracture (8%) compared to other reasons (6%)(OR = 1.3, p = .033; 95% CI: 1.1, 1.6). CONCLUSION An additional treatment was more likely to occur within the first year if the original restoration had been repaired (7%) compared to being replaced (5%). However, repaired restorations were less likely to need an aggressive treatment (replacement, endodontic treatment, or extraction) than replaced restorations. PMID:26610834

  19. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations--dental milling machines from a mechanical engineering viewpoint. Part B: labside milling machines.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Nicolas; Tapie, Laurent; Duret, Francois; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, dental numerical controlled (NC) milling machines are available for dental laboratories (labside solution) and dental production centers. This article provides a mechanical engineering approach to NC milling machines to help dental technicians understand the involvement of technology in digital dentistry practice. The technical and economic criteria are described for four labside and two production center dental NC milling machines available on the market. The technical criteria are focused on the capacities of the embedded technologies of milling machines to mill prosthetic materials and various restoration shapes. The economic criteria are focused on investment cost and interoperability with third-party software. The clinical relevance of the technology is discussed through the accuracy and integrity of the restoration. It can be asserted that dental production center milling machines offer a wider range of materials and types of restoration shapes than labside solutions, while labside solutions offer a wider range than chairside solutions. The accuracy and integrity of restorations may be improved as a function of the embedded technologies provided. However, the more complex the technical solutions available, the more skilled the user must be. Investment cost and interoperability with third-party software increase according to the quality of the embedded technologies implemented. Each private dental practice may decide which fabrication option to use depending on the scope of the practice.

  20. An in vitro Evaluation of Microleakage of Posterior Teeth Restored with Amalgam, Composite and Zirconomer – A Stereomicroscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Punia, Sandhya Kapoor; Bhat, Surekha; Singh, Gautam; Goyal, Pravesh; Oza, Swapnil; Raiyani, Chirag M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous restorative materials are being used in dentistry to achieve adequate strength and restore aesthetics. However, a perfect ideal restorative material has still eluded dentist. Dental amalgam is versatile material with self-sealing property, but is unaesthetic. Other restorative materials like, composites require conservative preparation, but exhibits polymerisation shrinkage resulting in microleakage. To overcome these drawbacks a high strength restorative material reinforced with ceramic and zirconia fillers known as zirconomer has been introduced. The aim of this study was to evaluate the micro-leakage of these three different restorative materials. Materials and Methods Thirty non-carious human permanent first and second molars were utilized in this study. Class I cavities were prepared on the occlusal surface; cavities were then restored with amalgam, composite and zirconomer as per manufacture’s instruction. All samples were stored for 24 hours in distilled water followed by thermocycling. The entire tooth surface was painted with two coats of varnish to within 1mm of the restoration margins. The teeth were immersed in dye. Teeth were sectioned and observed under stereomicroscope. Results In this study the zirconomer exhibited the highest micro leakage as compared to composite and amalgam but composite having higher micro leakage as compared to amalgam and lower micro leakage as compared to zirconomer. Conclusion Even though composite and amalgam are being marketed aggressively and new material like zirconomer are on origin, amalgam still proves to be one of the best materials. PMID:26393208

  1. Novel Dental Composites Reinforced with Zirconia-Silica Ceramic Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Guangqing; Fan, Yuwei; Zhang, Jian-Feng; Hagan, Joseph; Xu, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    Objective To fabricate and characterize dental composites reinforced with various amounts of zirconia-silica (ZS) or zirconia-yttria-silica (ZYS) ceramic nanofibers. Methods Control composites (70 wt% glass particle filler, no nanofibers) and experimental composites (2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 wt% ZS or ZYS nanofibers replacing glass particle filler) were prepared by blending 29 wt% dental resin monomers, 70 wt% filler, and 1.0 wt% initiator, and polymerized by either heat or dental curing light. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM), energy at break (EAB), and fracture toughness (FT) were tested after the specimens were stored in 37 °C deionized water for 24 h, 3 months, or 6 months. Degree of conversion (DC) of monomers in composites was measured using Fourier transformed near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy. Fractured surfaces were observed by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The data were analyzed using ANOVA with Tukey’s Honestly Significant Differences test used for post hoc analysis. Results Reinforcement of dental composites with ZS or ZYS nanofibers (2.5% or 5.0%) can significantly increase the FS, FM and EAB of dental composites over the control. Further increase the content of ZS nanofiber (7.5%), however, decreases these properties (although they are still higher than those of the control). Addition of nanofibers did not decrease the long-term mechanical properties of these composites. All ZS reinforced composites (containing 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5% ZS nanofibers) exhibit significantly higher fracture toughness than the control. The DC of the composites decreases with ZS nanofiber content. Significance Incorporation of ceramic nanofibers in dental composites can significantly improve their mechanical properties and fracture toughness and thus may extend their service life. PMID:22153326

  2. Microleakage resistance of minimally invasive Class I flowable composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Esteban D; Stevenson, Richard G; Caputo, Angelo A; White, Shane N

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive flowable composite Class I restorations are widely used. However, flowable composites are characterized by low filler contents, modified resin formulations, low moduli of elasticity, low viscosity, generally poor mechanical properties, and decreased long-term stability. The purpose of this study was to compare the microleakage resistance of a wide variety of flowable composites used with their manufacturers' recommended bonding systems to that of a long-used and widely studied microhybrid composite when placed as minimally invasive occlusal restorations. Molar teeth were prepared in a standardized manner, restored, artificially aged, stained, sectioned, evaluated, and analyzed. Microleakage varied substantially, by a whole order of magnitude, among the material groups tested. The control group, a conventional microhybrid composite material, leaked significantly less than all the flowable composite groups. Microleakage varied very slightly among measurement site locations. Tiny microscopic bubbles were seen within many of the flowable composite specimens, as were a few voids.

  3. Material properties and fractography of an indirect dental resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Janet B.; Quinn, George D.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Determination of material and fractographic properties of a dental indirect resin composite material. Methods A resin composite (Paradigm, 3M-ESPE, MN) was characterized by strength, static elastic modulus, Knoop hardness, fracture toughness and edge toughness. Fractographic analyses of the broken bar surfaces was accomplished with a combination of optical and SEM techniques, and included determination of the type and size of the failure origins, and fracture mirror and branching constants. Results The flexure test mean strength ± standard deviation was 145 MPA ± 17 MPa, and edge toughness, Te, was 172 N/mm ±12 N/mm. Knoop hardness was load dependent, with a plateau at 0.99 GPa ± .02 GPa. Mirrors in the bar specimens were measured with difficulty, resulting in a mirror constant of approximately 2.6 MPa·m1/2. Fracture in the bar specimens initiated at equiaxed material flaws that had different filler concentrations that sometimes were accompanied by partial microcracks. Using the measured flaw sizes, which ranged from 35 µm to 100 µm in size, and estimates of the stress intensity shape factors, fracture toughness was estimated to be 1.1 MPa·m1/2 ± 0.2 MPa·m1/2. Significance Coupling the flexure tests with fractographic examination enabled identification of the intrinsic strength limiting flaws. The same techniques could be useful in determining if clinical restorations of similar materials fail from the same causes. The existence of a strong load-dependence of the Knoop hardness of the resin composite is not generally mentioned in the literature, and is important for material comparisons and wear evaluation studies. Finally, the edge toughness test was found promising as a quantitative measure of resistance to edge chipping, an important failure mode in this class of materials. PMID:20304478

  4. Intraoral Digital Impressioning for Dental Implant Restorations Versus Traditional Implant Impression Techniques.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Brian L

    2015-01-01

    Over the course of the past two to three decades, intraoral digital impression systems have gained acceptance due to high accuracy and ease of use as they have been incorporated into the fabrication of dental implant restorations. The use of intraoral digital impressions enables the clinician to produce accurate restorations without the unpleasant aspects of traditional impression materials and techniques. This article discusses the various types of digital impression systems and their accuracy compared to traditional impression techniques. The cost, time, and patient satisfaction components of both techniques will also be reviewed.

  5. Priorities for future innovation, research, and advocacy in dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Watson, T; Fox, C H; Rekow, E D

    2013-11-01

    Innovations in materials science, both within and outside of dentistry, open opportunities for the development of exciting direct restorative materials. From rich dialog among experts from dental and non-dental academic institutions and industry, as well as those from policy, research funding, and professional organizations, we learned that capitalizing on these opportunities is multifactorial and far from straightforward. Beginning from the point when a restoration is needed, what materials, delivery systems, and skills are needed to best serve the most people throughout the world's widely varied economic and infrastructure systems? New research is a critical element in progress. Effective advocacy can influence funding and drives change in practice and policy. Here we articulate both research and advocacy priorities, with the intention of focusing the energy and expertise of our best scientists on making a difference, bringing new innovations to improve oral health.

  6. Biphenyl liquid crystalline epoxy resin as a low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Chang, Yuan-Ling; Chen, Min-Huey; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Su, Wei-Fang

    2012-11-01

    Low-shrinkage resin-based photocurable liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite has been investigated with regard to its application as a dental restoration material. The nanocomposite consists of an organic matrix and an inorganic reinforcing filler. The organic matrix is made of liquid crystalline biphenyl epoxy resin (BP), an epoxy resin consisting of cyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ECH), the photoinitiator 4-octylphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and the photosensitizer champhorquinone. The inorganic filler is silica nanoparticles (∼70-100 nm). The nanoparticles were modified by an epoxy silane of γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to be compatible with the organic matrix and to chemically bond with the organic matrix after photo curing. By incorporating the BP liquid crystalline (LC) epoxy resin into conventional ECH epoxy resin, the nanocomposite has improved hardness, flexural modulus, water absorption and coefficient of thermal expansion. Although the incorporation of silica filler may dilute the reinforcing effect of crystalline BP, a high silica filler content (∼42 vol.%) was found to increase the physical and chemical properties of the nanocomposite due to the formation of unique microstructures. The microstructure of nanoparticle embedded layers was observed in the nanocomposite using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This unique microstructure indicates that the crystalline BP and nanoparticles support each other and result in outstanding mechanical properties. The crystalline BP in the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite was partially melted during exothermic photopolymerization, and the resin expanded via an order-to-disorder transition. Thus, the post-gelation shrinkage of the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite is greatly reduced, ∼50.6% less than in commercialized methacrylate resin-based composites. This LC epoxy nanocomposite demonstrates good physical and chemical properties and good biocompatibility

  7. A systematic technique for carving amalgam and composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Kilistoff, A

    2011-01-01

    Both amalgam and composite restorations can quickly and accurately be carved using a systematic technique. By following the outlined steps, anatomically accurate restorations can be easily achieved. Inlay wax is used as a training medium to negate the setting constraints and as a high fidelity simulation.

  8. Effects of chemical composition on the corrosion of dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Galo, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Rocha, Luís Augusto; de Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the oral environment on the corrosion of dental alloys with different compositions, using electrochemical methods. The corrosion rates were obtained from the current-potential curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of artificial saliva on the corrosion of dental alloys was dependent on alloy composition. Dissolution of the ions occurred in all tested dental alloys and the results were strongly dependent on the general alloy composition. Regarding the alloys containing nickel, the Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Ti alloys released 0.62 mg/L of Ni on average, while the Co-Cr dental alloy released ions between 0.01 and 0.03 mg/L of Co and Cr, respectively.The open-circuit potential stabilized at a higher level with lower deviation (standard deviation: Ni-Cr-6Ti = 32 mV/SCE and Co-Cr = 54 mV/SCE). The potenciodynamic curves of the dental alloys showed that the Ni-based dental alloy with >70 wt% of Ni had a similar curve and the Co-Cr dental alloy showed a low current density and hence a high resistance to corrosion compared with the Ni-based dental alloys. Some changes in microstructure were observed and this fact influenced the corrosion behavior for the alloys. The lower corrosion resistance also led to greater release of nickel ions to the medium. The quantity of Co ions released from the Co-Cr-Mo alloy was relatively small in the solutions. In addition, the quantity of Cr ions released into the artificial saliva from the Co-Cr alloy was lower than Cr release from the Ni-based dental alloys.

  9. Evidence summary: which dental liners under amalgam restorations are more effective in reducing postoperative sensitivity?

    PubMed

    Nasser, Mona

    2011-06-10

    Since August 2009, members of the Primary Care Dentistry Research Forum (www.dentistryresearch.org) have taken part in an online vote to identify questions in day-to-day practice that they felt most needed to be answered with conclusive research. The question that receives the most votes each month forms the subject of a critical appraisal of the relevant literature. Each month a new round of voting takes place to decide which further questions will be reviewed. Dental practitioners and dental care professionals are encouraged to take part in the voting and submit their own questions to be included in the vote by joining the website. The paper below details a summary of the findings of the ninth critical appraisal. In order to address the question raised by dentistry research forum, first a search was conducted for systematic reviews on the topic. There was one systematic review retrieved comparing bonded amalgam restorations versus non-bonded amalgam restorations. However, there was no other systematic review identified assessing the effectiveness of dental liners under amalgam restorations in general. Therefore, a search was conducted for any randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing use of a lining under amalgam restorations versus no lining or RCTs comparing differing lining materials under amalgam against each other. There were eight relevant RCTs identified. Due to the low quality, small sample sizes or lack of adequate reporting of the outcome data, the evidence is inadequate to claim or refute a difference in postoperative sensitivity between different dental liners. Further well-conducted RCTs are needed to answer this question. These RCTs would be preferably included and synthesised in a systematic review.

  10. Enzymatic responses of human deciduous pulpal fibroblasts to dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chern-Chin; Chen, Robert Cheng-Shen; Huang, Shun-Te

    2002-06-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the responses of succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities of human deciduous teeth pulpal fibroblasts (HDPF) to dental restorative materials. Tested materials included Z100 (3M), Dyract (Dentsply), FujiII (GC), and FujiIILC (GC). IRM (Dentsply) and culture medium (MD) alone were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Specimens 6 mm (diameter) x 3 mm were prepared in accordance with manufacturers' instructions. For light-cured materials, specimens were light cured for 40 s on both sides under a celluloid strip. For chemical-cured materials, specimens were allowed to set at room temperature for 15 min. The specimens were immersed in 1 mL of culture medium without serum for 24 h at room temperature. The extracts were filtered through 0.22-mm filters. HDPF (10,000 cells/well) was incubated with 100 microL of extract and 20 % FBS in a 96-well plate for 24 h in a 37 degrees, 5 % CO(2) incubator. Six wells per material were prepared. Optical density (OD) of SDH and ALP of HDPF were measured by a spectrophotometer. The means were analyzed by ANOVA and then a Duncan Test. The ranking of OD of SDH was IRM < FujiIILC < FujiII = Z100 < Dyract < MD (p < 0.05). The ranking of OD of ALP was IRM < Z100 = Dyract < FujiII < FujiIILC < MD (p < 0.05). The result showed that all of the tested restorative materials were cytotoxic to human deciduous pulpal fibroblasts. The cytotoxicity of resin-modified glass ionomer cements (FujiIILC) was stronger than that of traditional glass ionomer cements (FujiII) and composite resin (Z100), and that of compomer (Dyract) was the weakest. On the contrary, ALP activities of resin-modified glass ionomer cements (FujiIILC) and composite resin (Z100) were higher than those of traditional glass ionomer cements (FujiII), while those of compomer (Dyract) were the lowest. It is concluded that, in this study, FujiIILC was the most cytotoxic material and the least

  11. Physicochemical characterization of three fiber-reinforced epoxide-based composites for dental applications.

    PubMed

    Bonon, Anderson J; Weck, Marcus; Bonfante, Estevam A; Coelho, Paulo G

    2016-12-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) biomedical materials are in contact with living tissues arising biocompatibility questions regarding their chemical composition. The hazards of materials such as Bisphenol A (BPA), phthalate and other monomers and composites present in FRC have been rationalized due to its potential toxicity since its detection in food, blood, and saliva. This study characterized the physicochemical properties and degradation profiles of three different epoxide-based materials intended for restorative dental applications. Characterization was accomplished by several methods including FTIR, Raman, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) Analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and degradation experiments. Physicochemical characterization revealed that although materials presented similar chemical composition, variations between them were more largely accounted by the different phase distribution than chemical composition.

  12. Fibre reinforced composite dental bridge. Part I: Experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Swain, M V; Li, Q; Ironside, J; Steven, G P

    2004-09-01

    This experimental investigation aims at revealing the mechanical behaviour and failure pattern of direct fibre-reinforced resin-bonded dental bridge with various designs. To evaluate the overall effects of some newly developed dental materials, in the experiment, genuine composite dental bridge specimens are prepared and tested. The ultimate load, stiffness and mode at the failure of the bridges are measured and compared with the design variations. A good agreement between test and some clinical observations is demonstrated. It is verified that the weakest region appears across the pontic-abutment interface in the composite bridges. This study suggests that the composite bridges reinforced by fibres and supported by adjacent teeth could be of a higher structural strength and stiffness; therefore would provide better clinical performances.

  13. Optimizing tooth form with direct posterior composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Raghu, Ramya; Srinivasan, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Advances in material sciences and technology have provided today's clinicians the strategies to transform the mechanistic approach of operative dentistry into a biologic philosophy. In the last three decades, composite resins have gone from being just an esthetically pleasing way of restoring Class III and Class IV cavities to become the universal material for both anterior and posterior situations as they closely mimic the natural esthetics while restoring the form of the human dentition. In order to enhance their success, clinicians have to rethink their protocol instead of applying the same restorative concepts and principles practiced with metallic restorations. Paralleling the evolution of posterior composite resin materials, cavity designs, restorative techniques and armamentarium have also developed rapidly to successfully employ composite resins in Class II situations. Most of the earlier problems with posterior composites such as poor wear resistance, polymerization shrinkage, postoperative sensitivity, predictable bonding to dentin, etc., have been overcome to a major extent. However, the clinically relevant aspect of achieving tight contacts in Class II situations has challenged clinicians the most. This paper reviews the evolution of techniques and recent developments in achieving predictable contacts with posterior composites. A Medline search was performed for articles on “direct posterior composite contacts.” The keywords used were “contacts and contours of posterior composites.” The reference list of each article was manually checked for additional articles of relevance. PMID:22144797

  14. Restoration of posterior teeth in clinical practice: evidence base for choosing amalgam versus composite.

    PubMed

    Kovarik, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the current use of amalgam versus resin composite in posterior restorations and the evidence-base for choosing between these two treatment options. While much research has been published on the issue of the clinical use of amalgam versus resin composite, there are several issues that limit the true evidence-base on the subject. Furthermore, while the majority of published studies on posterior composites would seem to indicate equivalent clinical performance of resin composite to amalgam restorations, the studies that should be weighted much more heavily (randomized controlled trials) do not support the slant of the rest of the literature. As part of an evidence-based approach to private practice, clinicians need to be aware of the levels of evidence in the literature and need to properly inform patients of the true clinical outcomes that are associated with the use of amalgam versus resin composite for posterior restorations, so that patients are themselves making informed decisions about their dental care.

  15. Influence of composite restorative materials and light-curing units on diametrical tensile strength.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Maria Cecília Caldas Giorgi; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Giannini, Marcelo; Santos, Alex José Souza dos; Dias, Carlos Tadeu dos Santos

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diametrical tensile strength (DTS) of three light-curing photo-activated composites with two different light curing units (LCU). Three types of dental restorative composites were used in this study: micro filled A110 (3M Espe); P60 (3M Espe) for posterior restorations, and micro-hybrid Charisma (Heraeus-Kulzer). The two LCUs were: halogen light (HAL) (Degulux, Degussa) and blue light emitting diode (LED) (Ultrablue, DMC). Resin composite specimens were inserted incrementally into a Teflon split mold measuring 3 mm in depth and 6 mm in internal diameter, and cured using either LCU (n = 10). Specimens were placed into a dark bottle containing distilled water at 37 degrees C for 7 days. DTS tests were performed in a Universal Testing Machine (0.5 mm/min). Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results were (MPa): A110/HAL: 276.50 +/- 62.94a; A110/LED: 306.01 +/- 65.16a; P60/HAL: 568.29 +/- 60.77b and P60/LED: 543.01 +/- 83.65b; Charisma/HAL: 430.94 +/- 67.28c; Charisma/LED: 435.52 +/- 105.12c. Results suggested that no significant difference in DTS was obtained with LCUs for the same composite. However, resin composite restorative materials presented different DTS.

  16. Effect of thermal cycling on whisker-reinforced dental resin composites.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hockin H K; Eichmiller, Frederick C; Smith, Douglas T; Schumacher, Gary E; Giuseppetti, Anthony A; Antonucci, Joseph M

    2002-09-01

    The mechanical properties of dental resin composites need to be improved in order to extend their use to high stress-bearing applications such as crown and bridge restorations. Recent studies used single crystal ceramic whiskers to reinforce dental composites. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of thermal cycling on whisker-reinforced composites. It was hypothesized that the whisker composites would not show a reduction in mechanical properties or the breakdown of whisker-resin interface after thermal cycling. Silicon carbide whiskers were mixed with silica particles, thermally fused, then silanized and incorporated into resin to make flexural specimens. The filler mass fraction ranged from 0% to 70%. The specimens were thermal cycled in 5 degrees C and 60 degrees C water baths, and then fractured in three-point bending to measure strength. Nano-indentation was used to measure modulus and hardness. No significant loss in composite strength, modulus and hardness was found after 10(5) thermal cycles (family confidence coefficient=0.95; Tukey's multiple comparison test). The strength of whisker composite increased with filler level up to 60%, then plateaued when filler level was further increased to 70%; the modulus and hardness increased monotonically with filler level. The strength and modulus of whisker composite at 70% filler level were significantly higher than the non-whisker controls both before and after thermal cycling. SEM revealed no separation at the whisker-matrix interfaces, and observed resin remnants on the pulled-out whiskers, indicating strong whisker-resin bonding even after 10(5) thermal cycles. In conclusion, novel dental resin composites containing silica-fused whiskers possessed superior strength and modulus compared to non-whisker composites both before and after thermal cycling. The whisker-resin bonding appeared to be resistant to thermal cycling in water, so that no loss in composite strength or stiffness occurred after

  17. Effects of composite restorations on nitric oxide and uric acid levels in saliva

    PubMed Central

    Akgul, Nilgun; Gul, Pinar; Alp, Hamit Hakan; Kiziltunc, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, and should, therefore, not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances capable of causing side effects. This study was intended to investigate the effects on salivary nitric oxide (NO) and uric acid (UA) levels after application of dental composite filling materials to healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods: A total of 52 individuals (32 female and 20 male) participated in the study. Filtek Z250 composite filling material (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA) was applied to healthy volunteers. Saliva samples were collected before restoration (baseline) and 1 h, 1-day, 7 days, and 30 days after restoration. NO concentrations were measured using the Griess reaction method, and UA was measured using an enzymatic method. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and the Bonferroni post-hoc test (α =5%). Results: NO values increased statistically significant after 7 days (P < 0.05). In addition, lower UA levels were determined compared to the baseline levels, but the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). There was no correlation between NO and UA levels in saliva (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Composite resins activated the antioxidant system in saliva. However, further studies are now needed to confirm our findings and to permit a definitive conclusion. PMID:26321839

  18. Rugometric and microtopographic non-invasive inspection in dental-resin composites and zirconia ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Costa, Manuel F. M.; Pecho, Oscar E.; Rubiño, Manuel; Pérez, María. M.

    2013-11-01

    Surface properties are essential for a complete characterization of biomaterials. In restorative dentistry, the study of the surface properties of materials meant to replace dental tissues in an irreversibly diseased tooth is important to avoid harmful changes in future treatments. We have experimentally analyzed the surface characterization parameters of two different types of dental-resin composites and pre-sintered and sintered zirconia ceramics. We studied two shades of both composite types and two sintered zirconia ceramics: colored and uncolored. Moreover, a surface treatment was applied to one specimen of each dental-resin. All the samples were submitted to rugometric and microtopographic non-invasive inspection with the MICROTOP.06.MFC laser microtopographer in order to gather meaningful statistical parameters such as the average roughness (Ra), the root-mean-square deviation (Rq), the skewness (Rsk), and the kurtosis of the surface height distribution (Rku). For a comparison of the different biomaterials, the uncertainties associated to the surface parameters were also determined. With respect to Ra and Rq, significant differences between the composite shades were found. Among the dental resins, the nanocomposite presented the highest values and, for the zirconia ceramics, the pre-sintered sample registered the lowest ones. The composite performance may have been due to cluster-formation variations. Except for the composites with the surface treatment, the sample surfaces had approximately a normal distribution of heights. The surface treatment applied to the composites increased the average roughness and moved the height distribution farther away from the normal distribution. The zirconia-sintering process resulted in higher average roughness without affecting the height distribution.

  19. Adjunctive role of dental restorations in personal identification of burnt victims

    PubMed Central

    Vandrangi, Sameer Kumar; Radhika, MB; Paremala, K; Reshma, V; Sudhakara, M; Hosthor, Sreelatha S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fire remains one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world and identification of a body from the fatal fire remains a daunting task. Several forensic cases involve interpretation of burnt human bodies from airline and automobile accidents, bombings and unlawful cremation. Fire is also involved in homicides, suicides, accidental death, arson and in attempts to destroy forensic evidence in criminal cases. Soft tissue destruction from fire can be so extensive that conventional methods of identification may be impossible. However, teeth survive even high temperatures due to their resistant composition and so, obviously, the restorative material housed in the teeth are even more secure and can yield valuable information in personal identification. Aim: To assess the usefulness of most common restorations in personal identification in burnt cases. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 40 extracted teeth which were divided into four groups (Group 1 - Unrestored teeth, Group 2 - Amalgam restored, Group 3 - Glass ionomer restored and Group 4 - Composite resin restored teeth. The effect of incineration at 200°C, 400°C, 600°C, 800°C, 1000°C for 15 min at each target temperature followed by subsequent cooling was studied. Results: Amalgam restoration was resistant and intact even at 1000°C, whereas GIC and composite restoration are identifiable till 600°C, the residual cavity preparation leaves a clue for narrowing down the spectrum of identification. PMID:27194881

  20. A new approach to influence contact angle and surface free energy of resin-based dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Rüttermann, Stefan; Trellenkamp, Taina; Bergmann, Nora; Raab, Wolfgang H-M; Ritter, Helmut; Janda, Ralf

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify novel delivery systems and active agents which increase the water contact angle and reduce the surface free energy when added to resin-based dental restorative materials. Two delivery systems based on zeolite or novel polymeric hollow beads (Poly-Pore), loaded with two low surface tension active agents (hydroxy functional polydimethylsiloxane and polydimethylsiloxane) or a polymerizable active agent (silicone polyether acrylate) were used to modify commonly formulated experimental dental resin composites. The non-modified resin was used as a standard (ST). Flexural strength, flexural modulus, water sorption, solubility, polymerization shrinkage, surface roughness Ra, contact angle θ, total surface free energy γS, and the apolar γSLW, polar γSAB, Lewis acid γS+ and base γS- components, and the active agents surface tensions γL were determined (P<0.05). The active agents did not differ in γL. The modified materials had significantly higher θ but significantly lower γS, γSAB and γS- than the ST. A Poly-Pore/polydimethyl siloxane delivery system yielded the highest θ (110.9±3.5°) acceptable physical properties and the lowest values for γSLW and γS-. Among the modified materials the polymerizable materials containing active agents had the lowest γAB and the highest γS+ and γS-. Although not significant, both of the zeolite delivery systems yielded higher γSLW, γS+ and γS- but lower γSAB than the Poly-Pore delivery systems. Poly-Pore based delivery systems highly loaded with low surface tension active agents were found not to influence the physical properties but to significantly increase the water contact angle and thus reduce surface free energy of dental resin composites.

  1. New Design for Rapid Prototyping of Digital Master Casts for Multiple Dental Implant Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Luis; Jiménez, Mariano; Espinosa, María del Mar; Domínguez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study proposes the replacement of all the physical devices used in the manufacturing of conventional prostheses through the use of digital tools, such as 3D scanners, CAD design software, 3D implants files, rapid prototyping machines or reverse engineering software, in order to develop laboratory work models from which to finish coatings for dental prostheses. Different types of dental prosthetic structures are used, which were adjusted by a non-rotatory threaded fixing system. Method From a digital process, the relative positions of dental implants, soft tissue and adjacent teeth of edentulous or partially edentulous patients has been captured, and a maser working model which accurately replicates data relating to the patients oral cavity has been through treatment of three-dimensional digital data. Results Compared with the conventional master cast, the results show a significant cost savings in attachments, as well as an increase in the quality of reproduction and accuracy of the master cast, with the consequent reduction in the number of patient consultation visits. The combination of software and hardware three-dimensional tools allows the optimization of the planning of dental implant-supported rehabilitations protocol, improving the predictability of clinical treatments and the production cost savings of master casts for restorations upon implants. PMID:26696528

  2. Indirect aesthetic adhesive restoration with fibre-reinforced composite resin.

    PubMed

    Corona, S A M; Garcia, P P N S; Palma-Dibb, R G; Chimello, D T

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes the restoration of an endodontically treated upper first molar with a fibre-reinforced onlay indirect composite resin restoration. The clinical and radiographic examination confirmed that the tooth had suffered considerable loss of structure. Therefore, an indirect restoration was indicated. First, a core was built with resin-modified glass ionomer cement, followed by onlay preparation, mechanical/chemical gingival retraction and impression with addition-cured silicone. After the laboratory phase, the onlay was tried in, followed by adhesive bonding and occlusal adjustment. It can be concluded that fibre-reinforced aesthetic indirect composite resin restoration represented, in the present clinical case, an aesthetic and conservative treatment option. However, the use of fibres should be more extensively studied to verify the real improvement in physical and mechanical properties.

  3. Recommendations for conducting controlled clinical studies of dental restorative materials. Science Committee Project 2/98--FDI World Dental Federation study design (Part I) and criteria for evaluation (Part II) of direct and indirect restorations including onlays and partial crowns.

    PubMed

    Hickel, Reinhard; Roulet, Jean-François; Bayne, Stephen; Heintze, Siegward D; Mjör, Ivar A; Peters, Mathilde; Rousson, Valentin; Randall, Ros; Schmalz, Gottfried; Tyas, Martin; Vanherle, Guido

    2007-01-01

    About 35 years ago, Ryge provided a practical approach to the evaluation of the clinical performance of restorative materials. This systematic approach was soon universally accepted. While that methodology has served us well, a large number of scientific methodologies and more detailed questions have arisen that require more rigor. Current restorative materials have vastly improved clinical performance, and any changes over time are not easily detected by the limited sensitivity of the Ryge criteria in short-term clinical investigations. However, the clinical evaluation of restorations not only involves the restorative material per se but also different operative techniques. For instance, a composite resin may show good longevity data when applied in conventional cavities but not in modified operative approaches. Insensitivity, combined with the continually evolving and nonstandard investigator modifications of the categories, scales, and reporting methods, has created a body of literature that is extremely difficult to interpret meaningfully. In many cases, the insensitivity of the original Ryge methods leads to misinterpretation as good clinical performance. While there are many good features of the original system, it is now time to move on to a more contemporary one. The current review approaches this challenge in two ways: (1) a proposal for a modern clinical testing protocol for controlled clinical trials, and (2) an in-depth discussion of relevant clinical evaluation parameters, providing 84 references that are primarily related to issues or problems for clinical research trials. Together, these two parts offer a standard for the clinical testing of restorative materials/procedures and provide significant guidance for research teams in the design and conduct of contemporary clinical trials. Part 1 of the review considers the recruitment of subjects, restorations per subject, clinical events, validity versus bias, legal and regulatory aspects, rationales for

  4. Multispectral near-infrared imaging of composite restorations in extracted teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Cooper M.; Co, Katrina U.; Fried, William A.; Simon, Jacob C.; Staninec, Michal; Fried, Daniel; Darling, Cynthia L.

    2014-02-01

    One major advantage of composite restoration materials is that they can be color matched to the tooth. However, this presents a challenge when composites fail and they need to be replaced. Dentists typically spend more time repairing and replacing composites than placing new restorations. Previous studies have shown that near-infrared imaging can be used to distinguish between sound enamel and decay due to the differences in light scattering. The purpose of this study was to use a similar approach and exploit differences in light scattering to attain high contrast between composite and tooth structure. Extracted human teeth with composites (n=16) were imaged in occlusal transmission mode at wavelengths of 1300-nm, 1460-nm and 1550-nm using an InGaAs image sensor with a tungsten halogen light source with spectral filters. All samples were also imaged in the visible range using a high definition 3D digital microscope. Our results indicate that NIR wavelengths at 1460-nm and 1550-nm, coincident with higher water absorption yield the highest contrast between dental composites and tooth structure.

  5. The decision to repair or replace a defective restoration is affected by who placed the original restoration: findings from the National Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Valeria V; Riley, Joseph; Geraldeli, Saulo; Williams, O. Dale; Spoto, Joseph C; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate how restoration characteristics are associated with the decision to repair or replace an existing restoration. The following hypotheses were studied: Dentists who placed the original restoration are more likely to repair instead of replace restorations (H1) that are in molar teeth; (H2) that are in the upper arch; (H3) that have amalgam restorative material; (H4) if a fracture is not the primary reason for the defect; and (H5) when the restoration comprises more than one surface. Methods This cross-sectional study used a consecutive patient/restoration recruitment design. 194 dentists members of a dental practice-based research network recorded data on restorations in permanent teeth that needed repair or replacement. Results For 6,623 of the 8,770 defective restorations in 6,643 patients, the treatment was provided by the dentist who had not placed the original restoration (75%). The 2-way interaction revealed that dentists who had placed the original restoration often chose to repair when the defective restoration was in a molar, relative to premolar or anterior teeth (OR = 2.2, p < .001); and chose to replace when the restoration had amalgam (OR = 0.5, p < .001), and when it was a fracture compared to another reason (OR = 0.8, p = 001). Conclusion Most dentists are not conservative when they revisit a restoration that they originally placed regardless of type of failure, number of surfaces or material used. However, dentists who had placed the original restoration were significantly more likely to repair it when the defective restoration was in a molar tooth. PMID:25223822

  6. [Black or white--Which choice for the molars? Part 2. Which does one choose for the restoration of posterior teeth: amalgam or composite?].

    PubMed

    De Moor, Roeland; Delmé, Katleen

    2008-01-01

    The two direct dental restorative materials most commonly used today are silver-mercury amalgam and resin-based composite. The survival of dental amalgam restorations is twice as high than for composite fillings: polymerisation shrinkage, deficient marginal adaptation, higher wear rates, defective contact points leading to food impaction, insufficiently converted composite at the bottom of the cavity are problems that cannot be underestimated when using resin-composite. This does not imply that there is no weakness for amalgam: the need for retentive cavities at the cost of healthy tooth substance, weakening of the tooth's strength by cutting through the tooth crown's ridges, the risk of fracture of remaining tooth substance (mostly buccal and lingual surfaces) as the result of the cavity design, and the lack of adhesion between amalgam and tooth substance. Retaining a tooth's strength by the replacement of amalgam by resin-composites is not always the correct solution. In this respect, it can be questioned whether it is not appropriate to repair failing (extensive) amalgam restorations as to replace them with resin-composites. Research in this respect has demonstrated that dentists still are not convinced of this treatment option. Restoring a tooth in its original build-up or structure and function within the oral cavity is the basis of the biomimetic principle: the use of composite appears to be more obvious than restoring with amalgam. In the present survey pro's and con's of amalgams and resin-composites for the restoration of posterior teeth are weighted. The conclusion demonstrates that there is still a place for dental amalgam in modern restorative dentistry when plastic filling materials are used for the direct tooth repair or restoration.

  7. Base deflection and microleakage of composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Paulillo, L A; de Goes, M F; Consani, S

    1994-06-01

    The flexural deflections of human dentin, Herculite XR, Dycal, Vidrion F, zinc phosphate base, and combinations of composite-base were determined. The influence of the flexural deflections in the marginal microleakage was also determined for the composite-base combinations. The flexural deflection test for dentin showed no statistically significant differences between the two floor cavity depths studied. There were significant differences among cements when the thickness of the base was 1 mm whereas no differences occurred at 2 mm. The composite-base combinations did not present statistical differences. There were no statistically significant differences in the microleakage levels among loaded and non-loaded specimens; however, dye penetration was visually greater in loaded samples.

  8. Impact of Technique-Specific Operative Videos on First-Year Dental Students' Performance of Restorative Procedures.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shalizeh A; Barros, Juliana A; Clark, Christina M; Frey, Gary N; Streckfus, Charles F; Quock, Ryan L

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of psychomotor operative video demonstrations on first-year dental students who are performing specific procedures for the first time in a preclinical setting. The class was randomly divided into two groups, and three restorative procedures were selected. On the date on which each procedure was to be performed in the preclinical laboratory for the first time, one group (experimental, n=50) was shown a technique video for that specific procedure immediately before commencing the exercise; the control cohort (n=50) did not view the video. Technical performance on procedures was evaluated by students and two calibrated and blinded examiners. The students' perceptions of the experience were also collected in a survey. All first-year students participated in the study, for a 100% response rate. A Mann-Whitney U test did not show any group differences in technical performance (mean values on preparation: 77.1 vs. 77.8; amalgam: 82.7 vs. 82.8; composite: 79.7 vs. 78.0). A Spearman rho test revealed a significantly higher correlation in 13 out of 25 evaluation categories between student self-assessment and blinded examiner assessment for the experimental group. A chi-square test of questionnaire responses revealed a positive student perception of administering these videos for the preparation (X(2)=4.8, p<0.03), the amalgam restoration (X(2)=12.4, p<0.001), and the composite restoration (X(2)=11.3, p<0.001). The psychomotor video demonstrations did not immediately improve student performance on preclinical operative procedures, but they were well received by students and augmented self-assessment ability. These findings suggest that videos can be a useful teaching aid in a preclinical environment, especially regarding comprehension of concepts.

  9. Computer-Assisted System to Automate Production of Posterior Dental Restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekow, E. Dianne; Erdman, Arthur G.; Speidel, T. Michael

    1986-07-01

    The feasibility of a system which is capable of automating production of posterior dental restorations has been investigated. Data acquisition can be accomplished in a clinical setting using standard equipment to obtain stereoscopic views of the prepared tooth, adjacent and opposing teeth, and the jaw in motion. Data from the patient is digitized with a very high resolution digitizer. Stereophotogrammetric reconstruction and kinematic analysis establish the three-dimensional envelope in which the restoration must function. Ideal tooth profiles have been digitized for each of the fourteen unique teeth. Each tooth profile is represented by B-spline or Bezier curves and surfaces. Utilizing local influence properties of these curves and surfaces, the ideal profile can be modified to provide proper function and fill the available space, yielding a morphologically correct restor-ation which meets the unique design requirements for a specific patient. Spline curves and surfaces also ensure that the surfaces are well behaved, without discontinuities. This property facilitates generation of tool paths for numerically controlled machining. The latest version of Control Data Corporation's ICEM-DDN package, with its interface with the newly developed graphics programming language (GPL) is used to create those tool paths. Special consideration is given to unique requirements of mating internal and external sur-faces as well as to high precision, small size manufacturing.

  10. Cementation of prosthetic restorations: from conventional cementation to dental bonding concept.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Marcela Filié; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves

    2011-05-01

    The cementation procedure of metal-free fixed partial dentures exhibits special characteristics about the porcelains and cementation agents, which turns the correct association between these materials necessary. Our purpose in this literature review was to point the main groups of cements associated to metal-free restoration and discuss about the advantages, disadvantages, and recommendations of each one. Our search was confined to the electronic databases PubMed and SciELO and to books about this matter. There are essentially 3 types of hard cement: conventional, resin, or a hybrid of the two. The metal-free restorations can be fixed with conventional or resin cements. The right choice of luting material is of vital importance to the longevity of dental restorative materials. Conventional cements are advantageous when good compressive straight, good film thickness, and water dissolution resistance are necessary. However, they need an ideal preparation, and they are not acid dissolution resistant. Conventional cements are indicated to porcelains that cannot be acid etched. Resin cements represent the choice to metal-free restoration cementation because they present better physical properties and aesthetic than conventional agents.

  11. Biomechanical model produced from light-activated dental composite resins: a holographic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelić, Dejan; Vasiljević, Darko; Blažić, Larisa; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Murić, Branka; Nikolić, Marko

    2013-11-01

    Light-activated dental composites, commonly applied in dentistry, can be used as excellent material for producing biomechanical models. They can be cast in almost any shape in an appropriate silicone mold and quickly solidified by irradiation with light in the blue part of the spectrum. In that way, it is possible to obtain any number of nearly identical casts. The models can be used to study the behavior of arbitrary structure under mechanical loads. To test the technique, a simple mechanical model of the tooth with a mesio-occluso-distal cavity was manufactured. Composite resin restoration was placed inside the cavity and light cured. Real-time holographic interferometry was used to analyze the contraction of the composite resin and its effect on the surrounding material. The results obtained in the holographic experiment were in good agreement with those obtained using the finite element method.

  12. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and infection control for restorative dental treatment in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Hall, David L

    2003-01-01

    The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in nursing home residents now averages 20-35%. This includes both numerous asymptomatic mostly unidentified carriers, and the occasional patient with an active infection. Among the most common sites for positive MRSA colonization are the nares and mouth (saliva). Ohio State University (OSU) dental students perform routine restorative dental care onsite in local nursing homes using portable equipment including handpieces that can generate aerosols. Using a series of cultured test swabs and plates, this pilot study suggests that protection for both dental health care personnel and patients are provided by the following: 1. universal barrier precautions (for example, gloves, gowns, masks, hats, facial shields, glasses), 2. surface disinfectants, 3. pre-op 0.12% chlorhexidene mouth rinses, 4. high volume evacuation, 5. perioral skin scrubs. Additional infection control methods, techniques and equipment were evaluated and compared including rubber dam isolation, hand excavation and bond technique, high-speed air turbine and electric "high" speed handpiece. There was no indication of a special tendency or heightened ability of MRSA to aerosolize.

  13. Identification through X-ray fluorescence analysis of dental restorative resin materials: a comprehensive study of noncremated, cremated, and processed-cremated individuals.

    PubMed

    Bush, Mary A; Miller, Raymond G; Prutsman-Pfeiffer, Jennifer; Bush, Peter J

    2007-01-01

    Tooth-colored restorative materials are increasingly being placed in the practice of modern dentistry, replacing traditional materials such as amalgam. Many restorative resins have distinct elemental compositions that allow identification of brand. Not only are resins classifiable by elemental content, but they also survive extreme conditions such as cremation. This is of significance to the forensic odontologist because resin uniqueness adds another level of certainty in victim identification, especially when traditional means are exhausted. In this three-part study, unique combinations of resins were placed in six human cadavers (total 70 restorations). Simulated ante-mortem dental records were created. In a blind experiment, a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) unit was used to locate and identify the resin brands placed in the dentition. The technique was successful in location and brand identification of 53 of the restorations, which was sufficient to enable positive victim identification among the study group. This part of the experiment demonstrated the utility of portable XRF in detection and analysis of restorative materials for victim identification in field or morgue settings. Identification of individuals after cremation is a more difficult task, as the dentition is altered by shrinkage and fragmentation, and may not be comparable with a dental chart. Identification of processed cremains is a much greater challenge, as comminution obliterates all structural relationships. Under both circumstances, it is the nonbiological artifacts that aid in identification. Restorative resin fillings can survive these conditions, and can still be named by brand utilizing elemental analysis. In a continuation of the study, the cadavers were cremated in a cremation retort under standard mortuary conditions. XRF was again used to analyze retrieved resins and to identify the individuals based on restorative materials known to exist from dental records. The cremains were

  14. Influence of Different Drinks on the Colour Stability of Dental Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Topcu, Fulya Toksoy; Sahinkesen, Gunes; Yamanel, Kivanc; Erdemir, Ugur; Oktay, Elif Aybala; Ersahan, Seyda

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the discolouration effects of artificial saliva, granule lemon juice, coffee (without sugar), coca cola, sour cherry juice, fresh carrot juice and red wine on resin-based composite materials that are commonly used in restorative dentistry. Methods Colour of four brands of resin composites (Filtek Z 250 (3M Espe), Filtek Supreme (3M Espe), Quadrant (Cavex), Charisma (Heraeus-Kulzer)) of A2 shade was measured after one day of immersion in eight different solutions. Colour measurements were obtained by using a XL-20 Trismus Colourimeter and colour differences (ΔE) were estimated. For statistical evaluation, analysis of variance (ANOVA), Dunnett and Tukey tests were used at a significance level of 0.05. Results For the four restorative materials tested, the lowest ΔE values were observed in the artificial saliva, while ΔE values were the highest in red wine group. When comparing the four different restorative materials, Filtek Supreme exhibited the least colour changes whereas Filtek Z250 was the least colour-stable. Conclusions Dental resin composites and drinking solutions were significant factors that may affect the colour stability. After immersion for one day, all materials showed visible colour changes. The red wine solution exhibited more staining than others in three groups. Filtek Supreme showed significantly the least colour change due to its nano particle sizes. PMID:19262731

  15. Staining of in vivo subsurface degradation in dental composites with silver nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Mair, L.H. )

    1991-03-01

    A previously reported technique for staining areas of degradation in dental composite restorations was evaluated in 51 removed restorations. The staining reagent was silver nitrate, which penetrated the degraded subsurface as ionic silver and was subsequently developed into colored deposits of metallic silver. Several artefacts were recognized that resulted in an apparent image of subsurface stain. Most importantly, the presence of a layer of adsorbed silver on the edge of the specimen exaggerated the extent of staining. In order for the true depth of stain to be determined, thin sections of the materials should first be examined with a stereomicroscope to distinguish any contribution from adsorbed silver on the specimen edge. With this regimen, no stain was present in 41% of the restorations, and in a further 30%, the depth of stain was less than 50 microns. In two composites, the depth of stain was greater than 900 microns, and in a number of specimens, localized stain was found in association with attrition scars. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis indicated that the amount of silver present in the degraded layers was very small. Overall, the results indicated that the staining technique is useful in the study of composite degradation.

  16. Accuracy of intraoral and extraoral digital data acquisition for dental restorations

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Heike; Salmen, Harald; Moldan, Matthias; Kuhn, Katharina; Sichwardt, Viktor; Wöstmann, Bernd; Luthardt, Ralph Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) process chain for dental restorations starts with taking an impression of the clinical situation. For this purpose, either extraoral digitization of gypsum models or intraoral digitization can be used. Despite the increasing use of dental digitizing systems, there are only few studies on their accuracy. Objective This study compared the accuracy of various intraoral and extraoral digitizing systems for dental CAD/CAM technology. Material and Methods An experimental setup for three-dimensional analysis based on 2 prepared ceramic master dies and their corresponding virtual CAD-models was used to assess the accuracy of 10 extraoral and 4 intraoral optical non-contact dental digitizing systems. Depending on the clinical procedure, 10 optical measurements of either 10 duplicate gypsum dies (extraoral digitizing) or directly of the ceramic master dies (intraoral digitizing) were made and compared with the corresponding CAD-models. Results The digitizing systems showed differences in accuracy. However, all topical systems were well within the benchmark of ±20 µm. These results apply to single tooth measurements. Conclusions Study results are limited, since only single teeth were used for comparison. The different preparations represent various angles and steep and parallel opposing tooth surfaces (incisors). For most digitizing systems, the latter are generally the most difficult to capture. Using CAD/CAM technologies, the preparation angles should not be too steep to reduce digitizing errors. Older systems might be limited to a certain height or taper of the prepared tooth, whereas newer systems (extraoral as well as intraoral digitization) do not have these limitations. PMID:27008261

  17. Prosthetic outcome of cement-retained implant-supported fixed dental restorations: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chaar, M S; Att, W; Strub, J R

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the article is to assess the current literature in terms of the prosthetic outcome of cement-retained implant-supported fixed restorations, as well as to determine the type of cement that can be recommended for clinical application. A review of the literature published up to May 2010 was conducted to identify clinical studies about cement-retained implant-supported fixed restorations. The search strategy applied was a combination of MeSH terms and free text words, including the following keywords: implants, implant-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs), bridges, implant-supported single crowns (SCs), cement-retained, cement fixation, cement, cementation, cement failure, retention, and loss of retention, technical complications, mechanical complications, prosthetic complication, retrievability and maintenance. Thirty-two studies met the inclusion criteria. The studies were divided into two categories: 15 short-term clinical studies with an observation period of less than 5 years, and 17 long-term clinical studies with an observation period of 5 years and more. The most common technical complications of cement-retained implant-supported fixed restorations were loss of retention, chipping and abutment screw loosening. The results of the current review revealed no guidelines about cement or cementation procedures. It may be stated that despite the questionable retrievability of cement-retained implant-supported fixed restorations, this treatment modality is a reliable and effective option, especially for implant-supported SCs and short-span FDPs. The literature does not provide accurate information about the clinical outcome of cement-retained implant-supported fixed restorations nor about the ideal type of cement that facilitates stability and maintains retrievability. Standardised randomised clinical trials will provide valuable information to this issue.

  18. Class I and Class II silver amalgam and resin composite posterior restorations: teaching approaches in Canadian faculties of dentistry.

    PubMed

    McComb, Dorothy

    2005-06-01

    A 10-question survey was mailed to the 10 Canadian faculties of dentistry to determine current approaches to teaching undergraduates about silver amalgam and resin composite for posterior restorations in adults and children. Responses were received from all 10 pedodontic programs and from 8 of the 10 operative and restorative programs. The use of silver amalgam and posterior composite for restorations of primary and permanent teeth is covered in the curricula of all dental schools, but the relative emphasis on the 2 materials varies. In the operative and restorative programs, curriculum time devoted to silver amalgam is either greater than or equal to that devoted to posterior composite. Five of the 8 schools reported greater educational emphasis on silver amalgam for the permanent dentition; however, course directors noted that the preference among patients seen in clinics is tending toward composite restorations. Curricula appear designed to educate students about the optimal use of both materials. Requirements for performance of restorations during training generally do not specify the type of material; these requirements range from 60 restorations to 250 surfaces. Five of the 8 schools conduct clinical competency tests with both materials. The responses from the pedodontic programs were more diverse. The proportion of curriculum time devoted to each type of material in these programs ranged from less than 25% to more than 75%. Five schools reported more emphasis on silver amalgam, 3 schools reported equal emphasis, and 2 schools reported more emphasis on posterior composite. No clinical requirements were specified in any of the undergraduate pedodontic programs. Within some of the faculties, there were differences between the operative and restorative program and the pedodontic program with respect to emphasis on different materials for the posterior dentition.

  19. Fibre reinforced composite dental bridge. Part II: Numerical investigation.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Swain, M V; Li, Q; Ironside, J; Steven, G P

    2004-09-01

    Motivated by the clinical success and limitations on experimental investigation of the fibre-reinforced composite dental bridge, this paper aims at providing a numerical investigation into the bridge structure. The finite element (FE) model adopted here is constructed from computer tomography images of a physical bridge specimen. The stress and strain distributions in the bridge structure especially in the bonding interfaces are analyzed in detail. The peak stresses and their variations with the different bridge designs are evaluated. Due to the lower bond strengths of adhesives and the high stress concentration in the pontic-abutment interface, the likelihood of failure in the interface is predicted by finite element analysis. The validity of the numerical results is established by a good agreement between the FE prediction and the tests in the load-deflection responses, the structural stiffness as well as the failure location of the composite dental bridge.

  20. Effects of Incorporating Nanosized Calcium Phosphate Particles on Properties of Whisker-Reinforced Dental Composites

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hockin H. K.; Sun, Limin; Weir, Mike D.; Takagi, Shozo; Chow, Laurence C.; Hockey, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Clinical data indicate that secondary caries and restoration fracture are the most common problems facing tooth restorations. Our ultimate goal was to develop mechanically-strong and caries-inhibiting dental composites. The specific goal of this pilot study was to understand the relationships between composite properties and the ratio of reinforcement filler/releasing filler. Nanoparticles of monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) were synthesized and incorporated into a dental resin for the first time. Silicon carbide whiskers were fused with silica nanoparticles and mixed with the MCPM particles at MCPM/whisker mass ratios of 1:0, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 0:1. The composites were immersed for 1–56 days to measure Ca and PO4 release. When the MCPM/whisker ratio was changed from 0:1 to 1:2, the composite flexural strength (mean ± SD; n = 5) decreased from 174 ± 26 MPa to 138 ± 9 MPa (p < 0.05). A commercial nonreleasing composite had a strength of 112 ± 14 MPa. When the MCPM/whisker ratio was changed from 1:2 to 1:1, the Ca concentration at 56 days increased from 0.77 ± 0.04 mmol/L to 1.74 ± 0.06 mmol/L (p < 0.05). The corresponding PO4 concentration increased from 3.88 ± 0.21 mmol/L to 9.95 ± 0.69 mmol/L (p < 0.05). Relationships were established between the amount of release and the MCPM volume fraction vMCPM in the resin: [Ca]= 42.9 vMCPM2.7, and [PO4] = 48.7 vMCPM1.4. In summary, the method of combining nanosized releasing fillers with reinforcing fillers yielded Ca- and PO4-releasing composites with mechanical properties matching or exceeding a commercial stress-bearing, nonreleasing composite. This method may be applicable to the use of other Ca–PO4 fillers in developing composites with high stress-bearing and caries-preventing capabilities, a combination not yet available in any dental materials. PMID:16924611

  1. Influence of artificial ageing on surface properties and Streptococcus mutans adhesion to dental composite materials.

    PubMed

    Hahnel, Sebastian; Henrich, Anne; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Bürgers, Ralf

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of artificial ageing on the surface properties and early Streptococcus mutans adhesion to current dental composites for the direct restoration of class II defects. Three hundred and thirty specimens each were prepared from five dental composites, and were randomly allotted to various artificial ageing protocols (storage in distilled water/ethanol/artificial saliva for 7/90/365 days; thermal cycling, 6,000 cycles 5/55 degrees C). Prior and after each treatment, surface roughness (R(a)) and hydrophobicity were determined, and S. mutans adhesion (ATCC 25175; 2.5 h, 37 degrees C) was simulated with and without prior exposition to human whole saliva (2 h, 37 degrees C). Adherence of S. mutans was determined fluorometrically. Means and standard deviations were calculated, and analyzed using three-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis (alpha = 0.05). For both R(a) and S. mutans adherence to uncoated and saliva-coated specimens, significant influences of the composite material, the ageing medium and the ageing duration have been observed; for surface hydrophobicity, significant influences of the composite material and the ageing duration were found. For uncoated specimens, significant increases in S. mutans adhesion were observed with prolonged artificial ageing, whereas significant decreases in S. mutans adhesion were found for the saliva-coated specimens. The data indicate influences of the artificial ageing method on surface parameters such as R(a) and hydrophobicity as well as microbial adhesion. The results underline the relevance of saliva coating on the outcome of studies simulating microbial adhesion, and highlight differences in the susceptibility of dental composites for the adhesion of oral bacteria.

  2. Restoration of nonlinear motion-distorted composite frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Stern, Adrian; Kopeika, Norman S.

    2000-12-01

    A composite frame image is an interlaced composition of two sub-image odd and even fields. Such image type is common in many imaging systems that produce video sequences. When relative motion between the camera and the scene occurs during the imaging process, two types of distortion degrade the image: the edge 'staircase effect' due to the shifted appearances of the objects in successive fields, and blur due to the scene motion during each field exposure. This paper deals with restoration of composite frame images degraded by motion. In contrast to other previous works that dealt with only uniform velocity motion, here we consider a more general case of nonlinear motion. Since conventional motion identification techniques used in other works can not be employed in the case of nonlinear motion, a new method for identification of the motion from each field is used. Results of motion identification and image restoration for various motion types are presented.

  3. Retention of composite resin restorations in class IV preparations.

    PubMed

    Eid, Hani

    2002-01-01

    Clinicians often utilized composite resin restorations in combination with different types of preparation to restore class IV fractures on anterior incisors. A new preparation technique called (stair-step chamfer technique) is investigated in this study to detect bond strength to tooth structure. Eighty-eight bovine teeth were divided into 4 groups. Group I had twenty-three samples with a 45 degree bevel that extended 2 millimeters beyond the fracture line. Group II had twenty-three samples with a circumferential chamfer, which extended 2 mm beyond the fracture line and half the enamel thickness in depth. Group III had twenty-three samples with a facial stair-step chamfer, which followed the anatomical contour and extended 2 mm beyond the fracture line with a lingual plain chamfer. Group IV had eighteen samples as controls, which were untreated teeth. The first three groups were prepared and restored with hybrid composite resin in conjunction with a single step bonding agent and as surface penetrating sealer, then tested for shear-bond strength on the Instron machine. The results were that there was no significant difference found between the treated teeth when tested for shear-bond strength. However, according to the site of the fracture, the stair-step chamfer technique gave significantly better results. It can be concluded that, the stir-step chamfer technique provides the clinician better environment to place a composite resin restoration resulting in good shear-bond strength and better esthetics.

  4. Streptococcus mutans-induced secondary caries adjacent to glass ionomer cement, composite resin and amalgam restorations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gama-Teixeira, Adriana; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzeti; Elian, Silvia Nagib; Sobral, Maria Angela Pita; Luz, Maria Aparecida Alves de Cerqueira

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define, in vitro, the potential to inhibit secondary caries of restorative materials currently used in dental practice. Standard cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of fifty extracted human third molars. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups, each one restored with one of the following materials: glass ionomer cement (GIC); amalgam; light-cured composite resin; ion-releasing composite; and light-cured, fluoride-containing composite resin. The teeth were thermocycled, sterilized with gamma irradiation, exposed to a cariogenic challenge using a bacterial system using Streptococcus mutans, and then prepared for microscopic observation. The following parameters were measured in each lesion formed: extension, depth, and caries inhibition area. The outer lesions developed showed an intact surface layer and had a rectangular shape. Wall lesions were not observed inside the cavities. After Analysis of Variance and Component of Variance Models Analysis, it was observed that the GIC group had the smallest lesions and the greatest number of caries inhibition areas. The lesions developed around Amalgam and Ariston pHc restorations had an intermediate size and the largest lesions were observed around Z-100 and Heliomolar restorations. It may be concluded that the restorative materials GIC, amalgam and ion-releasing composites may reduce secondary caries formation.

  5. Zirconium dioxide based dental restorations. Studies on clinical performance and fracture behaviour.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Christel

    2011-01-01

    Loss of teeth can affect a person's appearance and functions such as eating and speaking. There is thus a need for prosthetic rehabilitation to improve quality of life. For many patients, a fixed dental restoration is preferred, and a common restoration is a porcelain-fused-to-metal bridge retained by teeth or implants. Metal-based restorations can potentially cause adverse reactions though, and this is cause for the search for alternative materials. All-ceramic materials are characterized by strong atomic bonds that make them reluctant to react with the environment, and thus unlikely to cause adverse reactions. All-ceramic materials have other attractive material properties and excellent aesthetic properties and have been successfully used in dentistry, mostly for smaller anterior restorations. Ceramics, however, do not withstand tensile forces as well as metals, and are susceptible to brittle fractures with the connector area being especially prone to fracture. More recently, a new type of ceramic material, based on zirconium dioxide, has been developed. Yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal, Y-TZP, has a unique ability to resist crack propagation by being able to transform from one crystalline phase to another, and the resultant volume increase stops the crack and prevents it from propagating. This material has the potential to be used for larger restorations and in the molar area. Not enough information, however, is available on clinical follow-up of zirconia-based restorations, especially long-term, and information about all-ceramic restorations supported by implants is lacking. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate designs of zirconia-based restorations in relation to achieving increased fracture resistance and evaluate the clinical performance of implant-supported zirconia-based restorations. In paper I implant-supported all-ceramic fixed partial dentures of two different ceramic materials were compared; a zirconia-toughened alumina material

  6. The Use of Micro-CT with Image Segmentation to Quantify Leakage in Dental Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Carola A.; Lan, Caixia; Escobar-Sanabria, David; Li, Yuping; Rudney, Joel; Aparicio, Conrado; Fok, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a method for quantifying leakage in composite resin restorations after curing, using non-destructive X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and image segmentation. Methods Class-I cavity preparations were made in 20 human third molars, which were divided into 2 groups. Group I was restored with Z100 and Group II with Filtek LS. Micro-CT scans were taken for both groups before and after they were submerged in silver nitrate solution (AgNO3 50%) to reveal any interfacial gap and leakage at the tooth restoration interface. Image segmentation was carried out by first performing image correlation to align the before- and after-treatment images and then by image subtraction to isolate the silver nitrate penetrant for precise volume calculation. Two-tailed Student’s t-test was used to analyze the results, with the level of significance set at p<0.05. Results All samples from Group I showed silver nitrate penetration with a mean volume of 1.3 ± 0.7 mm3. In Group II, only 2 out of the 10 restorations displayed infiltration along the interface, giving a mean volume of 0.3 ± 0.3 mm3. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The infiltration showed non-uniform patterns within the interface. Significance We have developed a method to quantify the volume of leakage using non-destructive micro-CT, silver nitrate infiltration and image segmentation. Our results confirmed that substantial leakage could occur in composite restorations that have imperfections in the adhesive layer or interfacial debonding through polymerization shrinkage. For the restorative systems investigated in this study, this occurred mostly at the interface between the adhesive system and the tooth structure. PMID:25649496

  7. Electrospun nanofiber reinforcement of dental composites with electromagnetic alignment approach.

    PubMed

    Uyar, Tansel; Çökeliler, Dilek; Doğan, Mustafa; Koçum, Ismail Cengiz; Karatay, Okan; Denkbaş, Emir Baki

    2016-05-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is commonly used as a base acrylic denture material with benefits of rapid and easy handling, however, when it is used in prosthetic dentistry, fracturing or cracking problems can be seen due to the relatively low strength issues. Besides, acrylic resin is the still prominent material for denture fabrication due to its handy and low cost features. Numerous proposed fillers that are used to produce PMMA composites, however electrospun polyvinylalcohol (PVA) nanofiber fillers for production of PMMA composite resins are not studied as much as the others. The other focus of the practice is to compare both mechanical properties and efficiency of aligned fibers versus non-aligned PVA nanofibers in PMMA based dental composites. Field-controlled electrospinning system is manufactured and provided good alignment in lab scale as one of contributions. Some novel auxiliary electrodes in controlled structure are augmented to obtain different patterns of alignment with a certain range of fiber diameters. Scanning electron microscopy is used for physical characterization to determine the range of fiber diameters. Non-woven fiber has no unique pattern due to chaotic nature of electrospinning process, but aligned fibers have round pattern or crossed lines. These produced fibers are structured as layer-by-layer form with different features, and these features are used in producing PMMA dental composites with different volume ratios. The maximum flexural strength figure shows that fiber load by weight of 0.25% w/w and above improves in the maximum level. As a result, mechanical properties of PMMA dental composites are improved by using PVA nanofibers as a filler, however the improvement was higher when aligned PVA nanofibers are used. The maximum values were 5.1 MPa (flexural strength), 0.8 GPa (elastic modulus), and 170 kJ/m(3) (toughness) in three-point bending test. In addition to the positive results of aligned and non-aligned nanofibers it was found

  8. Properties of methacrylate-thiol-ene formulations as dental restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Neil B.; Couch, Charles L.; Schreck, Kathleen M.; Boulden, Jordan E.; Wydra, Robert; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate ternary methacrylate-thiol-ene systems, with varying thiol-ene content and thiol:ene stoichiometry, as dental restorative resin materials. It was hypothesized that an off-stoichiometric thiol-ene component would enhance interactions between the methacrylate and thiol-ene processes to reduce shrinkage stress while maintaining equivalent mechanical properties. Methods Polymerization kinetics and functional group conversions were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Cured resin mechanical properties were evaluated using a three-point flexural test, carried out with a hydraulic universal test system. Polymerization shrinkage stress was measured with a tensometer coupled with simultaneous real-time conversion monitoring. Results The incorporation of thiol-ene mixtures as reactive diluents into conventional dimethacrylate resins previously was shown to combine synergistically advantageous methacrylate mechanical properties with the improved polymerization kinetics and reduced shrinkage stress of thiol-ene systems. In these systems, due to thiol consumption resultant from both the thiol-ene reaction and chain transfer involving the methacrylate polymerization, the optimum thiol:ene stoichiometry deviates from the traditional 1:1 ratio. Increasing the thiol:ene stoichiometry up to 3:1 results in systems with equivalent flexural modulus, 6 – 20 % reduced flexural strength, and 5 – 33 % reduced shrinkage stress relative to 1:1 stoichiometric thiol:ene systems. Significance Due to their improved overall functional group conversion, and shrinkage stress reduction while maintaining equivalent flexural modulus, methacrylate-thiol-ene resins, particularly those with excess thiol, beyond the conventional 1:1 thiol:ene molar ratio, yield superior dental restorative materials compared with purely dimethacrylate resins. PMID:20553973

  9. Effectiveness of benzocaine in reducing deep cavity restoration and post-extraction stress in dental patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samadani, Khalid H.; Gazal, Giath

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of topical anesthetic, 20% benzocaine in relieving pain and stress in patients following deep cavity restoration and extraction of teeth under local anesthesia (LA). Methods: A prospective clinical trial was conducted from October 2014 until April 2015 at Taibah University, Al Madinah Al Munawarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Forty-five patients were included in the 20% benzocaine group, and 46 in the normal saline group. Evaluation of the dental stress was made pre-operatively and immediately post-operative treatment using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Furthermore, discomfort of the injections were recorded by the patients after each treatment on standard 100 mm VAS, tagged at the endpoints with “no pain” (0 mm) and “unbearable pain” (100 mm). Results: There were statistically significant differences between the mean stress scores for patients in the benzocaine and normal saline groups post-operatively (p=0.002). There were significant differences between the mean pain scores for patients in the post buccal injection (p=0.001), post palatal injection (p=0.01), and the post inferior alveolar nerve block groups (p=0.02). Buccal, palatal, and inferior alveolar nerve block injections were more painful for patients in the normal saline group than the benzocaine group. Conclusion: This investigation has demonstrated that post-operative stress associated with deep cavity restoration and dental extractions under LA can be reduced by the application of topical anesthetic (20% benzocaine) at the operative site for intra-oral injections. PMID:26593169

  10. Whisker-reinforced dental core buildup composites: effect of filler level on mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Smith, D T; Schumacher, G E; Eichmiller, F C

    2000-12-15

    The strength and toughness of dental core buildup composites in large stress-bearing restorations need to be improved to reduce the incidence of fracture due to stresses from chewing and clenching. The aims of the present study were to develop novel core buildup composites reinforced with ceramic whiskers, to examine the effect of filler level, and to investigate the reinforcement mechanisms. Silica particles were fused onto the whiskers to facilitate silanization and to roughen the whisker surface for improved retention in the matrix. Filler level was varied from 0 to 70%. Flexural strength, compressive strength, and fracture toughness of the composites were measured. A nano-indentation system was used to measure elastic modulus and hardness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the fracture surfaces of specimens. Whisker filler level had significant effects on composite properties. The flexural strength in MPa (mean +/- SD; n = 6) increased from (95+/-15) for the unfilled resin to (193+/- 8) for the composite with 50% filler level, then slightly decreased to (176+/-12) at 70% filler level. The compressive strength increased from (149+/-33) for the unfilled resin to (282+/-48) at 10% filler level, and remained equivalent from 10 to 70% filler level. Both the modulus and hardness increased monotonically with filler level. In conclusion, silica particle-fused ceramic single-crystalline whiskers significantly reinforced dental core buildup composites. The reinforcement mechanisms appeared to be crack deflection and bridging by the whiskers. Whisker filler level had significant effects on the flexural strength, compressive strength, elastic modulus, and hardness of composites.

  11. Marginal behaviour of self-etch adhesive/composite and combined amalgam-composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Kournetas, Nikos; Kakaboura, Afrodite; Giftopoulos, Dimitrios; Chakmachi, Magdad; Rahiotis, Christos; Geis-Gerstorfer, J

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the marginal and internal adaptation in self-etching adhesive (SEA)/composite restorations with combined amalgam-resin-based composite restorations in the proximal box with and without bonding agent beneath amalgam both before and after load-cycling. Class II restorations, were manufactured as following a) Bonding agent (Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, Kuraray) beneath amalgam (Tytin, SDS Kerr) and resin-based composite (Clearfil APX, Kuraray) with SEA, b) Amalgam without bonding agent and resin-based composite with SEA and c) Resin-based composite with SEA. Each group divided into two equal subgroups (n=8). Marginal and internal adaptation of first subgroup evaluated after 7-day water storage and of the second after load-cycling in chewing simulator for 1.2 x 10(6) cycles. Marginal and internal adaptation at cervical and amalgam-composite sites evaluated by videomicroscope and ranked as "excellent"/"non-excellent". Slices of restorations examined under optical microscope to determine the quality of bonding layer. Defects in cervical adaptation observed in the three restorative techniques examined prior loading. Amalgam-composite combination in proximal surface provided comparable marginal and internal adaptation results at cervical wall, to self-etching-composite combination. Portion (25-37.5%) of amalgam-resin-based composite interfaces in proximal box presented no perfect sealing. The application of bonding agent beneath amalgam resulted in relatively inferior cervical adaptation. Loading resulted in fewer excellent restorations in all three restorative techniques but not in a statistically significant level.

  12. Restoration of a large class IV fracture using direct composite resin: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Romero, Mario F; Austin Grant, Jamie; Todd, Megan

    2017-04-03

    Restoration of anterior tooth fractures is a common dental procedure. Both direct and indirect options are clinically acceptable to repair fractured teeth. For a large class IV fracture, treatment planning is time consuming, and the artistic skills necessary to achieve optimal results can be daunting. This clinical report describes a step-by-step protocol for achieving highly esthetic direct anterior restorations.

  13. Dental Composites with Calcium / Strontium Phosphates and Polylysine

    PubMed Central

    Panpisut, Piyaphong; Liaqat, Saad; Zacharaki, Eleni; Xia, Wendy; Petridis, Haralampos; Young, Anne Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study developed light cured dental composites with added monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), tristrontium phosphate (TSrP) and antimicrobial polylysine (PLS). The aim was to produce composites that have enhanced water sorption induced expansion, can promote apatite precipitation and release polylysine. Materials and Methods Experimental composite formulations consisted of light activated dimethacrylate monomers combined with 80 wt% powder. The powder phase contained a dental glass with and without PLS (2.5 wt%) and/or reactive phosphate fillers (15 wt% TSrP and 10 wt% MCPM). The commercial composite, Z250, was used as a control. Monomer conversion and calculated polymerization shrinkage were assessed using FTIR. Subsequent mass or volume changes in water versus simulated body fluid (SBF) were quantified using gravimetric studies. These were used, along with Raman and SEM, to assess apatite precipitation on the composite surface. PLS release was determined using UV spectroscopy. Furthermore, biaxial flexural strengths after 24 hours of SBF immersion were obtained. Results Monomer conversion of the composites decreased upon the addition of phosphate fillers (from 76 to 64%) but was always higher than that of Z250 (54%). Phosphate addition increased water sorption induced expansion from 2 to 4% helping to balance the calculated polymerization shrinkage of ~ 3.4%. Phosphate addition promoted apatite precipitation from SBF. Polylysine increased the apatite layer thickness from ~ 10 to 20 μm after 4 weeks. The novel composites showed a burst release of PLS (3.7%) followed by diffusion-controlled release irrespective of phosphate addition. PLS and phosphates decreased strength from 154 MPa on average by 17% and 18%, respectively. All formulations, however, had greater strength than the ISO 4049 requirement of > 80 MPa. Conclusion The addition of MCPM with TSrP promoted hygroscopic expansion, and apatite formation. These properties are expected to help

  14. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated premolars with direct composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Moezizadeh, Maryam; Mokhtari, Nastaran

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the fatigue resistance and failure mode of endodontically treated premolars using direct composite resin restorations. Materials and Methods: Eighty-four human premolars were divided into seven groups of 12, prepared as follows: Intact teeth used in Group 1 as control, the second group covers the endodontically treated teeth, restored with direct onlays using Z250 composite resin, the next two groups (i.e. 3,4) were similar to the second group, but subjected to 1 and 2 million fatigue load cycles, respectively. Groups 5, 6, 7 were similar to groups 2, 3, 4, however, in these groups Tetric Ceram was used as the restorative material. All specimens were loaded using a Universal Testing Machine until fracture occurred. One-way Anova andTukey's HSD tests were used to analyze the data of onlay groups. Results: All specimens withstood the masticating simulation. The mean fracture strength for Goups 1 to 7 was: 1276.92, 1373.47, 1269/70, 486/35, 484/12, 1130/49, 1113/79 Newton, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups in fracture strength and failure mode. Conclusions: No statistically significant differences in fracture strength were found between sound teeth and composite onlays that were subjected to 1 and 2 million fatigue load cycles. PMID:22025833

  15. 78 FR 24761 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... Emphasis Panel; Design and Development of Novel Dental Composite Restorative Systems Review Panel....

  16. Ester-free Thiol-ene Dental Restoratives – Part A: Resin Development

    PubMed Central

    Podgórski, Maciej; Becka, Eftalda; Claudino, Mauro; Flores, Alexander; Shah, Parag K.; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To detail the development of ester-free thiol-ene dental resins with enhanced mechanical performance, limited potential for water uptake/leachables/degradation and low polymerization shrinkage stress. Methods Thiol-terminated oligomers were prepared via a thiol-Michael reaction and a bulky tetra-allyl monomer containing urethane linkages was synthesized. The experimental oligomers and/or monomers were photopolymerized using visible light activation. Several thiol-ene formulations were investigated and their performance ranked by comparisons of the thermo-mechanical properties, polymerization shrinkage stress, water sorption/solubility, and reactivity with respect to a control comprising a conventional BisGMA/TEGDMA dental resin. Results The ester-free thiol-ene formulations had significantly lower viscosities, water sorption and solubility than the BisGMA/TEGDMA control. Depending on the resin, the limiting functional conversions were equivalent to or greater than that of BisGMA/TEGDMA. At comparable conversions, lower shrinkage stress values were achieved by the thiol-ene systems. The polymerization shrinkage stress was dramatically reduced when the tetra-allyl monomer was used as the ene in ester-free thiol-ene mixtures. Although exhibiting lower Young’s modulus, flexural strength, and glass transition temperatures, the toughness values associated with thiol-ene resins were greater than that of the BisGMA/TEGDMA control. In addition, the thiol-ene polymerization resulted in highly uniform polymer networks as indicated by the narrow tan delta peak widths. Significance Employing the developed thiol-ene resins in dental composites will reduce shrinkage stress and moisture absorption and form tougher materials. Furthermore, their low viscosities are expected to enable higher loadings of functionalized micro/nano-scale filler particles relevant for practical dental systems. PMID:26360013

  17. Influence of photoactivation method and mold for restoration on the Knoop hardness of resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Brandt, William Cunha; Silva-Concilio, Lais Regiane; Neves, Ana Christina Claro; de Souza-Junior, Eduardo Jose Carvalho; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the Knoop hardness in the top and bottom of composite photo activated by different methods when different mold materials were used. Z250 (3M ESPE) and XL2500 halogen unit (3M ESPE) were used. For hardness test, conical restorations were made in extracted bovine incisors (tooth mold) and also metal mold (approximately 2 mm top diameter × 1.5 mm bottom diameter × 2 mm in height). Different photoactivation methods were tested: high-intensity continuous (HIC), low-intensity continuous (LIC), soft-start, or pulse-delay (PD), with constant radiant exposure. Knoop readings were performed on top and bottom restoration surfaces. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p = 0.05). On the top, regardless of the mold used, no significant difference in the Knoop hardness (Knoop hardness number, in kilograms-force per square millimeter) was observed between the photoactivation methods. On the bottom surface, the photoactivation method HIC shows higher means of hardness than LIC when tooth and metal were used. Significant differences of hardness on the top and in the bottom were detected between tooth and metal. The photoactivation method LIC and the material mold can interfere in the hardness values of composite restorations.

  18. Information system analysis of an e-learning system used for dental restorations simulation.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Crenguţa M; Popovici, Dorin M

    2012-09-01

    The goal of using virtual and augmented reality technologies in therapeutic interventions simulation, in the fixed prosthodontics (VirDenT) project, is to increase the quality of the educational process in dental faculties, by assisting students in learning how to prepare teeth for all-ceramic restorations. Its main component is an e-learning virtual reality-based software system that will be used for the developing skills in grinding teeth, needed in all-ceramic restorations. The complexity of the domain problem that the software system dealt with made the analysis of the information system supported by VirDenT necessary. The analysis contains the following activities: identification and classification of the system stakeholders, description of the business processes, formulation of the business rules, and modelling of business objects. During this stage, we constructed the context diagram, the business use case diagram, the activity diagrams and the class diagram of the domain model. These models are useful for the further development of the software system that implements the VirDenT information system.

  19. Processing and properties of ceramic matrix-polymer composites for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hsuan Yao

    The basic composite structure of natural hard tissue was used to guide the design and processing of dental restorative materials. The design incorporates the methodology of using inorganic minerals as the main structural phase reinforced with a more ductile but tougher organic phase. Ceramic-polymer composites were prepared by slip casting a porous ceramic structure, heating and chemical treating the porous preform, infiltrating with monomer and then curing. The three factors that determined the mechanical properties of alumina-polymer composites were the type of polymer used, the method of silane treatments, and the type of bond between particles in the porous preforms. Without the use of silane coupling agents, the composites were measured to have a lower strength. The composite with a more "flexible" porous alumina network had a greater ability to plastically dissipate the energy of propagating cracks. However, the aggressive nature of the alumina particles on opposing enamel requires that these alumina-polymer composites have a wear compatible coating for practical application. A route to dense bioactive apatite wollastonite glass ceramics (AWGC)-polymer composites was developed. The problems associated with glass dissolution into the aqueous medium for slip casting were overcome with the use of silane. The role of heating rate and development of ceramic compact microstructure on composite properties was explored. In general, if isothermal heating was not applied, decreasing heating rate increased glass crystallinity and particle-particle fusion, but decreased pore volume. Also composite strength and fracture toughness decreased while modulus and hardness increased with decreasing heating rate. If isothermal heating was applied, glass crystallinity, pore content, and composite mechanical properties showed relatively little change regardless of the initial heating rate. The potential of AWGC-polymer composites for dental and implant applications was explored

  20. MARGINAL ADAPTATION AND PERFORMANCE OF BIOACTIVE DENTAL RESTORATIVE MATERIALS IN DECIDUOUS AND YOUNG PERMANENT TEETH

    PubMed Central

    Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Nicholson, John W.; Iljovska, Snezana; Slipper, Ian J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the adaptation of different types of restorations towards deciduous and young permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared in deciduous and young permanent teeth and filled with different materials (a conventional glass-ionomer, a resin-modified glass-ionomer, a poly-acid-modified composite resin and a conventional composite resin). Specimens were aged in artificial saliva for 1, 6, 12 and 18 months, then examined by SEM. Results: The composite resin and the polyacid-modified composite had better marginal adaptation than the glass-ionomers, though microcracks developed in the enamel of the tooth. The glass-ionomers showed inferior marginal quality and durability, but no microcracking of the enamel. The margins of the resin-modified glass-ionomer were slightly superior to the conventional glass-ionomer. Conditioning improved the adaptation of the composite resin, but the type of tooth made little or no difference to the performance of the restorative material. All materials were associated with the formation of crystals in the gaps between the filling and the tooth; the quantity and shape of these crystals varied with the material. Conclusions: Resin-based materials are generally better at forming sound, durable margins in deciduous and young permanent teeth than cements, but are associated with microcracks in the enamel. All fluoride-releasing materials give rise to crystalline deposits. PMID:19089281

  1. Improving flexural strength of dental restorative ceramics using laser interference direct structuring

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus; Drummond, James; Giordano, Russell A.

    2008-01-01

    Zirconia and alumina ceramics restorative materials were treated with laser interference direct structuring using the third harmonic of a short pulse Nd:YAG and tested in a three-point bending test to measure the flexural strength. The surface was restructured in a periodic line like pattern with controlled surface porosity and a surface composite pattern. The composite consist of two different defect states rather than different phase compositions. The resulting mechanical properties are a function of the number of laser pulses, laser energy, and angle in between the laser beams defining the periodic feature distance. This composite effect is comparable with a laminate showing increasing stiffness with decreasing layer thickness. The material s fracture strength could be controlled through the three mentioned laser parameters and in an initial study significantly improved by up to 50% from initial 422 MPa to 630 MPa for alumina and 833 MPa to 1250 MPa for zirconia.

  2. Assessment of exposures and potential risks to the US adult population from the leaching of elements from gold and ceramic dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Richardson, G Mark; James, Kyle Jordan; Peters, Rachel Elizabeth; Clemow, Scott Richard; Siciliano, Steven Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the 2001 to 2004 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) on the number and placement of tooth restorations in adults, we quantified daily doses due to leaching of elements from gold (Au) alloy and ceramic restorative materials. The elements with the greatest leaching rates from these materials are often the elements of lowest proportional composition. As a result, exposure due to wear will predominate for those elements of relatively high proportional composition, while exposure due leaching may predominate for elements of relatively low proportional composition. The exposure due to leaching of silver (Ag) and palladium (Pd) from Au alloys exceeded published reference exposure levels (RELs) for these elements when multiple full surface crowns were present. Six or more molar crowns would result in exceeding the REL for Ag, whereas three or more crowns would be necessary to exceed the REL for Pd. For platinum (Pt), the majority of tooth surfaces, beyond just molar crowns, would be necessary to exceed the REL for Pd. Exposures due to leaching of elements from ceramic dental materials were less than published RELs for all components examined here, including having all restorations composed of ceramic.

  3. Measurement of the rate of wear of dental composite resins by a /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Moores, G.E.; Glentworth, P.; Harrison, A.

    1983-09-01

    The wear rate of restorative dental composite resins is an important parameter in the assessment of their in vivo performance. The two more widely used methods of quantifying wear are measuring the dimensional change and measuring the change in the mass of the specimen. The former method is complicated by uneven wear of specimens and presents difficulties with samples of irregular shape, and the latter method involves measurements of changes in mass as small as tens of micrograms with specimens of sizes similar to those encountered clinically. A /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge has been designed and constructed to enable the wear rate of small specimens of dental composite resins to be measured. The /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge enables indirect measurements of changes in mass to be made and overcomes some of the difficulties inherent in the direct measurement of mass and length. Applications of the /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge to the measurement of wear rates are given for restorative dental resins having a range of inorganic filler contents and types. The results show that the /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge is capable of measuring the rate of wear to a degree of precision similar to that of micrometer-derived measurements.

  4. Microleakage of Four Dental Cements in Metal Ceramic Restorations With Open Margins

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar Ashtiani, Reza; Farzaneh, Babak; Azarsina, Mohadese; Aghdashi, Farzad; Dehghani, Nima; Afshari, Aisooda; Mahshid, Minu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fixed prosthodontics is a routine dental treatment and microleakage is a major cause of its failure. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the marginal microleakage of four cements in metal ceramic restorations with adapted and open margins. Materials and Methods: Sixty sound human premolars were selected for this experimental study performed in Tehran, Iran and prepared for full-crown restorations. Wax patterns were formed leaving a 300 µm gap on one of the proximal margins. The crowns were cast and the samples were randomly divided into four groups based on the cement used. Copings were cemented using zinc phosphate cement (Fleck), Fuji Plus resin-modified glass ionomer, Panavia F2.0 resin cement, or G-Cem resin cement, according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue solution. After 24 hours, dye penetration was assessed under a stereomicroscope and analyzed using the respective software. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, paired t-tests, and Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon, and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: The least microleakage occurred in the Panavia F2.0 group (closed margin, 0.18 mm; open margin, 0.64 mm) and the maximum was observed in the Fleck group (closed margin, 1.92 mm; open margin, 3.32 mm). The Fleck group displayed significantly more microleakage compared to the Fuji Plus and Panavia F2.0 groups (P < 0.001) in both closed and open margins. In open margins, differences in microleakage between the Fuji Plus and G-Cem as well as between the G-Cem and Panavia F2.0 groups were significant (P < 0.001). In closed margins, only the G-Cem group displayed significantly more microleakage as compared to the Panavia F2.0 group (P < 0.05). Paired t-test results showed significantly more microleakage in open margins compared to closed margins, except in the Fuji Plus group (P = 0.539). Conclusions: Fuji Plus cement exhibited better sealing ability in closed and open margins compared to G-Cem and Fleck

  5. Wear of nanofilled dental composites at varying filler concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of nanofiller concentration on the mechanisms of wear of a dental composite. Nanofilled composites were fabricated with a bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate polymer and 40 nm SiO2 filler particles at three filler loads (25, 50, and 65 wt %). The elastic modulus, flexural strength, and hardness of the composites and the unfilled resin were measured. The materials (n = 8) were tested in the modified wear testing device at 50,000, 100,000, and 200,000 cycles with 20N force at 1 Hz. A 33% glycerine lubricant and stainless steel antagonist were used. The worn composite and antagonist surfaces were analyzed with noncontact profilometry and SEM. The volumetric wear data indicated that there are significant differences between filler concentrations and cycles (p < 0.05). A trend was noted that increasing filler content beyond 25% decreased the wear resistance of the composites. Increasing filler content increased hardness and modulus and increased flexural strength up to 50% fill. SEM evaluation of the worn specimens indicated that the resin and 25% filled materials exhibited cracking and failed by fatigue and the 50 and 65% filled materials exhibited microcutting and failed by abrasive wear. Based on the results of this study, composite manufacturers are recommended to use a filler concentration between 25 and 50% when using nanosized filler particles.

  6. In vitro wear of flowable resin composite for posterior restorations.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, Koichi; Taira, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shiro; Suzuki, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine three- and two-body wear values of flowable resin composites for posterior restorations, using a mechanical loading device. The cavities prepared on flattened extracted molars were restored with flowable resin composites (Clearfil Majesty LV: MLV, Estelite Flow Quick: EFQ, Beautifil Flow Plus F00: BFP, and MI Fill: MIF) using accompanying adhesive systems. A universal resin composite (Clearfil Majesty) was used as a control. The specimens were subjected to in vitro three- and two-body wear testing. MLV showed high wear value (three-body: 14.69 µm, two-body: 0.268 mm(3)) compared with other materials tested in both three- and two-body wear tests. BFP showed high three-body wear value (5.78 µm), whereas low two-body wear value (0.008 mm(3)). MIF and EFQ showed equivalent wear values (MIF, three-body: 0.42 µm, two-body: 0.026 mm(3); EFQ, three-body: 1.15 µm, two-body: 0.14 mm(3)) to that of the control in both wear tests.

  7. Microleakage of high-strength glass ionomer: resin composite restorations in minimally invasive treatment.

    PubMed

    Platt, J A; Rhodes, B

    Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) has been investigated as an alternative caries treatment. The technique involves removal of loose tooth structure with a spoon excavator, followed by placement of an adhesive restorative material, often a high-strength glass ionomer. This study compares the microleakage of a high-strength glass ionomer/resin composite and two occlusal resin composite restoration techniques.

  8. Repairability of aged resin composites mediated by different restorative systems.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Cleidiel Aa; Mauro, Sílvio J; de Campos, Renata A; Dos Santos, Paulo H; Machado, Lucas S; Fagundes, Ticiane C

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of resin composite repairs with and without aging of the surface to be repaired, using different adhesive systems and resin composites. Ninety specimens were prepared: 10 for the Control Group (GC - without repair); 40 for Group I (GI - repairs after 7 days) and 40 for Group II (GII - repairs after 180 days). Groups I and II were divided into 4 subgroups of 10 specimens each, according to the adhesive system and composite resin used: A) Adper Scotch Bond Multipurpose + Filtek Z350 XT; B) Adper Single Bond Plus + Filtek Z350 XT; C) Adper Scotch Bond Multipurpose + Esthet-X; D) Adper Single Bond Plus + Esthet-X. The specimens were tested for shear strength in a universal testing machine. The results were analyzed by two-factor one-way ANOVA and Fisher's post hoc tests (alpha=0.05). The control group had better performance than the other groups. There was no significant difference when comparing different adhesive systems and composite resins. Repairs performed at 7 days were better than those performed at 180 days. The composite repairs decreased the mechanical strength of the restoration. Aging of the resin substrate may decrease repair bond strength over time, regardless of the type of adhesive systems and resin composites used.

  9. Tooth Retrospective Dosimetry Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance: Influence of Irradiated Dental Composites

    PubMed Central

    Desmet, Céline M.; Djurkin, Andrej; Dos Santos-Goncalvez, Ana Maria; Dong, Ruhong; Kmiec, Maciej M.; Kobayashi, Kyo; Rychert, Kevin; Beun, Sébastien; Leprince, Julian G.; Leloup, Gaëtane; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In the aftermath of a major radiological accident, the medical management of overexposed individuals will rely on the determination of the dose of ionizing radiations absorbed by the victims. Because people in the general population do not possess conventional dosimeters, after the fact dose reconstruction methods are needed. Free radicals are induced by radiations in the tooth enamel of victims, in direct proportion to dose, and can be quantified using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrometry, a technique that was demonstrated to be very appropriate for mass triage. The presence of dimethacrylate based restorations on teeth can interfere with the dosimetric signal from the enamel, as free radicals could also be induced in the various composites used. The aim of the present study was to screen irradiated composites for a possible radiation-induced EPR signal, to characterize it, and evaluate a possible interference with the dosimetric signal of the enamel. We investigated the most common commercial composites, and experimental compositions, for a possible class effect. The effect of the dose was studied between 10 Gy and 100 Gy using high sensitivity X-band spectrometer. The influence of this radiation-induced signal from the composite on the dosimetric signal of the enamel was also investigated using a clinical L-Band EPR spectrometer, specifically developed in the EPR center at Dartmouth College. In X-band, a radiation-induced signal was observed for high doses (25-100 Gy); it was rapidly decaying, and not detected after only 24h post irradiation. At 10 Gy, the signal was in most cases not measurable in the commercial composites tested, with the exception of 3 composites showing a significant intensity. In L-band study, only one irradiated commercial composite influenced significantly the dosimetric signal of the tooth, with an overestimation about 30%. In conclusion, the presence of the radiation-induced signal from dental composites should not

  10. Evaluation of low-contrast perceptibility in dental restorative materials under the influence of ambient light conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, I C; Lemos, A L B; Aguiar, M F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess how details on dental restorative composites with different radio-opacities are perceived under the influence of ambient light. Methods: Resin composite step wedges (six steps, each 1-mm thick) were custom manufactured from three materials, respectively: (M1) Filtek™ Z350 (3M/ESPE, Saint Paul, MN); (M2) Prisma AP.H™ (Dentsply International Inc., Brazil) and (M3) Glacier® (SDI Limited, Victoria, Australia). Each step of the manufactured wedge received three standardized drillings of different diameters and depths. An aluminium (Al) step wedge with 12 steps (1-mm thick) was used as an internal standard to calculate the radio-opacity as pixel intensity values. Standardized digital images of the set were obtained, and 11 observers independently recorded the images, noting the number of noticeable details (drillings) under 2 dissimilar conditions: in a light environment (light was turned on in the room) and in low-light conditions (light in the room was turned off). The differences between images in terms of the number of details that were observed were statistically compared using ANOVA, Cronbach's alpha coefficient and Wilcoxon and Kruskal–Wallis tests, with a significance level setting of 5% (α = 0.05). Results: The M2 showed higher radio-opacity, the M1 displayed intermediate radio-opacity and the M3 showed lower radio-opacity, respectively; however, all three were without significance (p > 0.05) compared with each other. The differences in radio-opacity resulted in a significant variation (p < 0.05) in the number of noticeable details in the image, which were influenced by characteristics of details, in addition to the ambient-light level. Conclusions: The radio-opacity of materials and ambient light can affect the perception of details in digital radiographic images. PMID:25629721

  11. Influence of silanization and filler fraction on aged dental composites.

    PubMed

    Lin, C T; Lee, S Y; Keh, E S; Dong, D R; Huang, H M; Shih, Y H

    2000-11-01

    The effect of silanization and filler fraction on the mechanical properties of aged dental composites was investigated. Experimental composites (75/25 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin reinforced with 0, 12.6, 30.0, and 56.5 vol% 8 microm silanized/unsilanized BaSiO6) were fabricated into 4.7 mm diameter x 2.2 mm thick discs and 3.5 mm diameter x 7.3 mm thick discs for diametral tensile and compressive tests, respectively. The effect of immersion in 75% ethanol at 37 degrees C for 0-30 days on the diametral tensile strength (DTS) and compressive strength (CS) of the samples was evaluated and analysed by ANOVA and Tukey LSD test. The fracture interface between filler and resin matrix was then examined by scanning electron microscope. Results and subsequent statistical evidence from DTS (18.6+/-7.6 MPa, silanized versus 11.7+/-2.6 MPa, unsilanized) and CS (85.1+/-29.7 MPa, silanized versus 56.0+/-11.3 MPa, unsilanized) strongly implies that silanization may greatly enhance the mechanical properties of the resin composites. Furthermore, it also shows that both DTS and CS increased proportionally as the filler fraction of the composites increased. However, in the unsilanized groups, DTS decreased (up to 40%) as the filler fraction increased, and CS showed no relevance to the filler fraction at all. As for the influence of aging, it was found that both DTS and CS showed a significant decrease after immersion in 75% ethanol, and silanization heavily correlated with the filler fraction of aged-resin composites. Microscopic examination of the fractured samples showed that failure primarily occurred within the resin matrix per se for silanized composites and adjacent to the filler particles for unsilanized composites. All the evidence points to the conclusion that mechanical properties of aged-resin composites can be greatly influenced by silanization and the filler fraction.

  12. Effect of the curing method and composite volume on marginal and internal adaptation of composite restoratives.

    PubMed

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo José; de Souza-Régis, Marcos Ribeiro; Alonso, Roberta Caroline Bruschi; de Freitas, Anderson Pinheiro; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Cunha, Leonardo Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of curing methods and composite volumes on the marginal and internal adaptation of composite restoratives. Two cavities with different volumes (Lower volume: 12.6 mm(3); Higher volume: 24.5 mm(3)) were prepared on the buccal surface of 60 bovine teeth and restored using Filtek Z250 in bulk filling. For each cavity, specimens were randomly assigned into three groups according to the curing method (n=10): 1) continuous light (CL: 27 seconds at 600 mW/cm(2)); 2) soft-start (SS: 10 seconds at 150 mW/cm(2)+24 seconds at 600 mW/cm(2)); and 3) pulse delay (PD: five seconds at 150 mW/cm(2)+three minutes with no light+25 seconds at 600 mW/cm(2)). The radiant exposure for all groups was 16 J/cm(2). Marginal adaptation was measured with the dye staining gap procedure, using Caries Detector. Outer margins were stained for five seconds and the gap percentage was determined using digital images on a computer measurement program (Image Tool). Then, specimens were sectioned in slices and stained for five seconds, and the internal gaps were measured using the same method. Data were submitted to two-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (p<0.05). Composite volume had a significant influence on superficial and internal gap formation, depending on the curing method. For CL groups, restorations with higher volume showed higher marginal gap incidence than did the lower volume restorations. Additionally, the effect of the curing method depended on the volume. Regarding marginal adaptation, SS resulted in a significant reduction of gap formation, when compared to CL, for higher volume restorations. For lower volume restorations, there was no difference among the curing methods. For internal adaptation, the modulated curing methods SS and PD promoted a significant reduction of gap formation, when compared to CL, only for the lower volume restoration. Therefore, in similar conditions of the cavity configuration, the higher the

  13. Effects of mercury release from amalgam dental restorations during cremation on soil mercury levels of three New Zealand crematoria

    SciTech Connect

    Nieschmidt, A.K.; Kim, N.D.

    1997-05-01

    A vast amount of research has been undertaken in the last 15-20 years on the corrosion reactions occurring in dental amalgam, release of mercury from amalgam restorations, and the toxic effects of this released mercury on the human body. However, one environmental aspect of amalgam dental restorations that has not received a great deal of attention is the release of mercury during cremation. Mercury is liberated during cremation both because dental amalgams are unstable at cremation temperatures (650-700{degrees}C) and because the free mercury metal is highly volatile. In New Zealand, 58% of deaths are followed by cremation and this figure is likely to rise in the future. This increasing use of cremation as the method of corpse disposal, coupled with the fact that each amalgam restoration is approximately 50% mercury, implies that a significant amount of mercury may be emitted into the environment every year. This study examines mercury released from crematoria in New Zealand. 20 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Advancements in all-ceramics for dental restorations and their effect on the wear of opposing dentition

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Haroon; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Misbahuddin, Syed; Kazmi, Murtaza Raza; Qureshi, Sameer; Uddin, Muhammad Zuhaib

    2016-01-01

    Tooth wear is a process that is usually a result of tooth to tooth and/or tooth and restoration contact. The process of wear essentially becomes accelerated by the introduction of restorations inside the oral cavity, especially in case of opposing ceramic restorations. The newest materials have vastly contributed toward the interest in esthetic dental restorations and have been extensively studied in laboratories. However, despite the recent technological advancements, there has not been a valid in vivo method of evaluation involving clinical wear caused due to ceramics upon restored teeth and natural dentition. The aim of this paper is to review the latest advancements in all-ceramic materials, and their effect on the wear of opposing dentition. The descriptive review has been written after a thorough MEDLINE/PubMed search by the authors. It is imperative that clinicians are aware of recent advancements and that they should always consider the type of ceramic restorative materials used to maintain a stable occlusal relation. The ceramic restorations should be adequately finished and polished after the chair-side adjustment process of occlusal surfaces. PMID:28042280

  15. Discoloration of dental cements and composites in a sulfide solution.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, A; Antonucci, J M; Paffenbarger, G C; Nishiyama, M

    1991-03-01

    In an early study the discoloration of certain hardened silicate cements, after exposure to an atmosphere of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) for 24 h at room temperature, was ascribed to the formation of dark-colored sulfides of base metal impurities (Paffenbarger et al. JADA 25,32,1938). A recent study noted that, in general, silicate and glass ionomer cements were more prone to color shifts than composites after exposure to H2S for 9 weeks (Sugawara, Ph. D. Thesis, Nihon Univ.). The aim of the present study was to devise a simple, aqueous sulfide exposure test for esthetic restorative materials. The general procedure was to expose specimen disks to a 0.1% (w/v) sodium sulfide solution, adjusted to pH 9, for 1-7 days at 37 degrees or 55 degrees C. The 55 degrees C-Na2S exposure was designed as an accelerated test. Materials studied included: 1 silicate and 2 silicophosphate cements of known lead content, a glass ionomer cement (FIIF), several commercial composites and an experimental, hydrophilic composite. Known amounts of base metal contaminants in the form of appropriate salt solutions were added to the liquid components of FIIF and the composites. Specimens exposed to distilled water under the same conditions served as controls. Exposure to the aqueous sulfide medium resulted in the following ranking in order of decreasing discoloration: Glass ionomer cement greater than silicophosphate cement greater than silicate cement greater than hydrophilic composite greater than hydrophobic composite. Generally, the results of the aq. Na2S test paralleled those obtained with H2S. The degree of discoloration is dependent on a number of factors: the nature, concentration and leachability of the metal impurities, and the hydrophilicity and permeability to sulfide of the esthetic restoratives.

  16. Decisions of practitioners regarding placement of amalgam and composite restorations in general practice settings.

    PubMed

    Pink, F E; Minden, N J; Simmonds, S

    1994-01-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze the current reasons practitioners in general practice settings choose to place amalgam and composite restorations. Data were gathered on individual restorations in the clinical setting to provide information on reasons practitioners state that restorations are placed, the type of material most often placed in different restoration classifications, and the age of restorations at the time of replacement. The results of this study indicate that approximately one-half of all restorations, both amalgam and composite, were placed to treat primary caries. One-half of the remaining restorations placed, i.e., not including those with primary caries, were placed to treat recurrent caries. With respect to restorative materials, amalgam was most often placed in class 1 and class 2 situations (88.9% of the amalgam restorations reported), while composite was most often placed in class 3, 4, or 5 situations (77.4% of the composite restorations reported). From the total data set returned for replaced restorations, only 20% of the data forms reported on verified longevity of the restoration being replaced. Analysis of these data gave a calculated median longevity for amalgam and composite restorations of 10 years and 5 years respectively.

  17. Wear of nanofilled dental composites in a newly-developed in vitro testing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C.

    Purpose. In vivo wear of dental composites can lead to loss of individual tooth function and the need to replace a composite restoration. To evaluate the wear performance of new and existing dental composites, we developed a novel system for measuring in vitro wear and we used this system to analyze the mechanisms of wear of nanofilled composite materials. Methods. A modified wear testing device was designed based on the Alabama wear testing machine. The new device consists of: (1) an antagonist which is lowered to and raised from the composite specimen by weight loading, (2) a motorized stage to cause the antagonist to slide 2mm on the composite surface, and (3) pumps for applying lubricant to the specimens. Various testing parameters of the device were examined before testing, including the impulse force, the third-body medium, the lubricant and antagonist. The parameters chosen for this study were 20N at 1Hz with a 33% glycerine lubricant and stainless steel antagonist. Three nano-composites were fabricated with a BisGMA polymer matrix and 40nm SiO2 filler particles at three filler loads (25%, 50% and 65%). The mechanical properties of the composites were measured. The materials were then tested in the modified wear testing device under impact wear, sliding wear and a combination of impact and sliding wear. The worn surfaces were then analyzed with a non-contact profilometer and SEM. Results. The volumetric wear data indicated that increasing filler content beyond 25% decreased the wear resistance of the composites. Increasing filler content increased hardness and decreased toughness. SEM evaluation of the worn specimens indicated that the 25% filled materials failed by fatigue and the 50% and 65% filled materials failed by abrasive wear. Impact wear produced fretting in this device and sliding wear is more aggressive than impact wear. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study and previous studies on this topic, manufacturers are recommended to use a filler

  18. Teaching atraumatic restorative treatment in U.S. dental schools: a survey of predoctoral pediatric dentistry program directors.

    PubMed

    Kateeb, Elham T; Warren, John J; Damiano, Peter; Momany, Elizabeth; Kanellis, Michael; Weber-Gasparoni, Karin; Ansley, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The International Dental Federation and World Health Organization have promoted the use of Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) in modern clinical settings worldwide. In the United States, the practice of ART is not believed to be widely used, which may be a result of little attention given to ART training in predoctoral pediatric dentistry curricula in U.S. dental schools. This study investigated the extent of clinical and didactic instruction on ART provided in U.S. dental schools by surveying the predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs in 2010. Of the fifty-seven directors asked to complete the survey, forty-four responded for a response rate of 77 percent. Of these forty-four programs, 66 percent reported providing clinical training on ART, though only 14 percent provide this training often or very often. The types of ART training provided often or very often included interim treatment (18 percent) and single-surface cavities (14 percent) in primary teeth. However, ART was said to be rarely taught as a definitive treatment in permanent teeth (2 percent). Attitude was a major predictor, for clinical training provided and using professional guidelines in treatment decisions were associated with a positive attitude towards ART. These predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs used ART mainly in primary, anterior, and single-surface cavities and as interim treatment. As ART increases access of children to dental care, the incorporation of the ART approach into the curricula of U.S. dental schools should be facilitated by professional organizations.

  19. [The method of esthetic crown restoration with composite resin jacket crown in primary molars].

    PubMed

    Doi, K; Shibui, N; Suda, M; Uehara, M; Karibe, H; Kondou, K

    1990-10-01

    The term "esthetics" has recently been also used in the dental field, and a field called esthetic dentistry is increasingly being noted. The number of not only adult but also pediatric patients who visit for treatment aiming at esthetic recovery is being increased. Inpedodontics, composite resin of the coronal color is generally used in the restoration of deciduous incisors. However, the method using metal crowns for the deciduous teeth is used for the deciduous molars at present. We applied a composite resin jacket crown to the deciduous molar in a way similar to that of esthetic crown restoration for the anterior teeth. The surgical procedure before crown preparation varied slightly according to the presence or absence of pulpal treatment of vital teeth and with non-vital teeth, but the application was performed as follows: 1) Desensitization of pulp, pulpal treatment and core construction. 2) Preparation of crown. 3) Selection, trial set and occlusal equilibration of a metal crown for the deciduous tooth. 4) Precision impression with a silicone impression material. 5) Removal of the metal crown for the deciduous tooth from the impression material. 6) Making of an under-cut to the abutment tooth on the buccal lingual side. 7) Filling of the impression with chemical polymerization resin. 8) Application of pressure in the oral cavity. 9) Adjustment of edge and crown forms. Thus, the preparation method for the composite resin jacket crown was relatively simple. Since this surgery, the patient has been followed up for 1 year and 6 months, and no specifically troublesome points have been observed clinically. The patient and her parents are satisfied with the results.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. A novel technique for preparing dental CAD/CAM composite resin blocks using the filler press and monomer infiltration method.

    PubMed

    Okada, Koichi; Kameya, Takehiro; Ishino, Hiroshige; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    The authors have developed a new technique for preparing dental CAD/CAM composite resin blocks (CRBs): the filler press and monomer infiltration (FPMI) method. In this method, surface-treated filler is molded into a green body in which the filler particles are compressed to form an agglomeration. The green body is then infiltrated with a monomer mixture before being polymerized. It is possible to produce CRBs using this method through which densely packed nanofiller is uniformly dispersed. The greater the pressure of the filler molding, the more filler in the CRB, resulting at high pressure in a very dense CRB. A CRB obtained by applying 170 MPa of pressure contained up to 70 wt% of nano-silica filler and had a flexural strength of 200 MPa, as well. It is anticipated that CRBs obtained using the FPMI method will be useful as a dental CAD/CAM material for the fabrication of permanent crown restorations.

  1. [Restoration of composite on etched stainless steel crowns. (1)].

    PubMed

    Goto, G; Zang, Y; Hosoya, Y

    1990-01-01

    Object of investigation The retention of composite resin to etched stainless steel crowns was tested as a possible method for restoring primary anterior teeth. Method employed 1) SEM observation Stainless steel crowns (Sankin Manufacture Co.) were etched with an aqua resia to create surface roughness and undercut to retain the composite resin to the crowns. Etching times were 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 20 minutes, then washed in a 70% alcohol solution using an ultrasonic washer and dried. A total of 96 etched samples and non etched control samples were observed through the scanning electron microscope (Hitachi 520). 2) Shear bond strength test Stainless steel crowns were etched in an aqua resia from 1 to 20 minutes, then washed and dried. Composite resin (Photo Clearfil A, Kuraray Co.) with the bonding agent was placed on the crowns and the shear bond strength was tested in 56 samples using an Autograph (DCS-500, Shimazu). Results 1) SEM observation showed that the etching surface of stainless steel crowns created surface roughness and undercut. The most desirable surface was obtained in the 3 to 5 minute etching time specimens. 2) The highest bond strength was obtained in a 3 minute etching specimen. It was 42.12 MPa, although 29.26 MPa in mean value. Conclusion Etching with an aqua resia increased the adherence of composite resin to the surface of stainless steel crowns.

  2. The stamp technique for direct Class II composite restorations: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Alshehadat, Saaid Ayesh; Halim, Mohamad Syahrizal; Carmen, Koh; Fung, Chew Shi

    2016-01-01

    Background: “Stamp” technique is a new method for placing large composite restorations with accurate occlusal topography. It was introduced mainly to restore Class I cavities and erosively damaged teeth. This technique is indicated when the preoperative anatomy of the tooth is intact and not lost due to the carious lesion. A precise tooth-like filling an accurate functional occlusion is obtained when the stamp technique is applied. However, using this technique to restore Class II cavities is not established yet. Aim: To introduce modifications of the stamp technique that make it applicable to restore Class II composite restorations. Materials and Methods: The traditional materials and tools used for direct composite restorations are needed with no additional instruments. Clinical illustrations and step-by-step description are provided in this paper. Results and Conclusion: Using the stamp technique to restore Class II cavities is achievable, simple and practical, and result in a very accurate anatomical restoration. PMID:27656074

  3. Curing units' ability to cure restorative composites and dual-cured composite cements under composite overlay.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Ho; Kim, Su-Sun; Cho, Yong-Sik; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Noh, Byng-Duk

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of using conventional low-power density QTH (LQTH) units, high-power density QTH (HQTH) units, argon (Ar) laser and Plasma arc curing (PAC) units for curing dual-cured resin cements and restorative resin composites under a pre-cured resin composite overlay. The microhardness of the two types of restorative resins (Z100 and Tetric Ceram) and a dual-cured resin cement (Variolink II) were measured after they were light cured for 60 seconds in a 2 mm Teflon mold. The recorded microhardness was determined to be the optimum microhard-ness (OM). Either one of the two types of restorative resins (Z100, Tetric Ceram) or the dual cured resin cement (Variolink II) were placed under a 1.5-mm thick and 8 mm diameter pre-cured Targis (Vivadent/Ivoclar AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein) overlay. The specimens that were prepared for each material were divided into four groups depending upon the curing units used (HQTH, PAC, Laser or LQTH) and were further subdi-vided into subgroups according to light curing time. The curing times used were 30, 60, 90 and 120 seconds for HQTH; 12, 24, 36 and 48 seconds for the PAC unit; 15, 30, 45 and 60 for the Laser and 60, 120 or 180 seconds for the LQTH unit. Fifteen specimens were assigned to each sub- group. The microhardness of the upper and and lower composite surfaces under the Targis overlay were measured using an Optidur Vickers hardness-measuring instrument (Göttfert Feinwerktechnik GmbH, Buchen, Germany). In each material, for each group, a three-way ANOVA with Tukey was used at the 0.05 level of significance to compare the microhardnesses of the upper and lower composite surfaces and the previously measured OM of the material. From the OM of each material, 80% OM was calculated and the time required for the microhardness of the upper and lower surface of the specimen to reach 100% and 80% of OM was determined. In Z100 and Tetric Ceram, when the composites were light cured for 120 seconds using the HQTH lamp

  4. Digital data acquisition for a CAD/CAM-fabricated titanium framework and zirconium oxide restorations for an implant-supported fixed complete dental prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Metz, Michael J; Pollini, Adrien; Ntounis, Athanasios; Morton, Dean

    2014-12-01

    This dental technique report describes a digital workflow with digital data acquisition at the implant level, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing fabricated, tissue-colored, anodized titanium framework, individually luted zirconium oxide restorations, and autopolymerizing injection-molded acrylic resin to fabricate an implant-supported, metal-ceramic-resin fixed complete dental prosthesis in an edentulous mandible. The 1-step computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing fabrication of titanium framework and zirconium oxide restorations can provide a cost-effective alternative to the conventional metal-resin fixed complete dental prosthesis.

  5. Wear and fatigue behavior of nano-structured dental resin composites.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia P; Ferracane, Jack L; Ferracane, Lucas L

    2006-07-01

    Theoretically, nano-structured dental resin composites are purported to have increased wear and fatigue resistance compared with microfill composites and may favor the achievement of restoratives with better long-term performance. This study sought to assess the behavior of nano-structured composites resulting from either abrasion and fatigue loading. Ten specimens (12 x 5 x 2.5 mm) were prepared from each of five composites: Ceram-X mono, Filtek Supreme, Grandio, Premise, and Heliomolar (serving as the microfill control). A surface profile was recorded using a three-dimensional profiling system, and the specimens were subjected to 10(5) cycles of three-body abrasion in the new OHSU oral wear simulator. A second profile was generated and the before and after profiles were fit and analyzed. The volume loss and maximum depth of the wear facet on each specimen were calculated. Another 30 specimens (25 x 2 x 2 mm) were tested for flexural fatigue limit (FFL) in four-point bending via the staircase method. The test was carried out until 10(4) cycles were completed or until fracturing the specimen. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test demonstrated greater volumetric loss for Grandio and Ceram-X than that observed for the remaining composites. Kruskal-Wallis and the least significant difference test ascertained that Heliomolar, Grandio, and Supreme showed significantly higher FFL than Ceram-X and Premise. In terms of wear and fatigue resistance, nano-structured composites may perform either similarly or comparatively worse than a microfilled composite.

  6. BisGMA/TEGDMA dental composite containing high aspect-ratio hydroxyapatite nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong; Li, Hao

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study are to investigate the properties of high aspect-ratio hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanofibers and the reinforcing effect of such fibers on bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (BisGMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) dental resins (without silica microparticle filler) and dental composites (with silica microparticle filler) with various mass fractions (loading rates). Methods HAP nanofibers were synthesized using a wet-chemical method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of the HAP nanofibers reinforced dental resins without any microsized filler and dental composites with silica microparticle filler was tested and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for the statistically analysis of acquired data. The morphology of fracture surface of tested dental composite samples was examined by SEM. Results The HAP nanofibers with aspect-ratios of 600 to 800 can be successfully fabricated with a simple wet-chemical method in aqueous solution. Impregnation of small mass fractions of the HAP nanofibers (5 wt% or 10 wt%) into the BisGMA/TEGDMA dental resins or impregnation of small mass fractions of the HAP nanofibers (2 wt% or 3 wt%) into the dental composites can substantially improve the biaxial flexural strength of the resulting dental resins and composites. A percolation threshold of HAP nanofibers, beyond which more nanofibers will no longer further increase the mechanical properties of dental composites containing HAP nanofibers, was observed for the dental composites with or without silica microparticle filler. Our mechanical testing and fractographic analysis indicated that the relatively good dispersion of HAP nanofibers at low mass fraction is the key reason for the significantly improved biaxial flexural strength, while higher mass fraction of HAP nanofibers tends to lead to bundles that cannot effectively

  7. Optical coherence tomography based imaging of dental demineralisation and cavity restoration in 840 nm and 1310 nm wavelength regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damodaran, Vani; Rao, Suresh Ranga; Vasa, Nilesh J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a study of in-house built optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with a wavelength of 840 nm for imaging of dental caries, progress in demineralisation and cavity restoration is presented. The caries when imaged with the 840 nm OCT system showed minute demineralisation in the order of 5 μm. The OCT system was also proposed to study the growth of lesion and this was demonstrated by artificially inducing caries with a demineralisation solution of pH 4.8. The progress of carious lesion to a depth of about 50-60 μm after 60 hours of demineralisation was clearly observed with the 840 nm OCT system. The tooth samples were subjected to accelerated demineralisation condition at pH of approximately 2.3 to study the adverse effects and the onset of cavity formation was clearly observed. The restoration of cavity was also studied by employing different restorative materials (filled and unfilled). In the case of restoration without filler material (unfilled), the restoration boundaries were clearly observed. Overall, results were comparable with that of the widely used 1310 nm OCT system. In the case of restoration with filler material, the 1310 nm OCT imaging displayed better imaging capacity due to lower scattering than 840 nm imaging.

  8. Effect of artificial saliva contamination on adhesion of dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Kisaki; Karibe, Hiroyuki; Ogata, Kiyokazu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of artificial saliva contamination on three restorative materials, namely, a glass ionomer cement (GIC), a resin-modified GIC (RMGIC), and a composite resin (CR), for which two different etching adhesive systems were used. Thus, three surface conditions were created on bovine teeth using artificial saliva: control, mild saliva contamination, and severe saliva contamination. The dentin bond strength for CR was significantly lower after artificial saliva contamination. There were, however, no significant differences among the three surface conditions in terms of the dentin and enamel bond strengths of GIC and RMGIC. Moreover, CR exhibited significantly greater microleakage after artificial saliva contamination, whereas no significant differences were found in GIC and RMGIC. The results showed that artificial saliva contamination did not affect the shear bond strengths of GIC and RMGIC or their degrees of microleakage.

  9. Effect of a CO2 Laser on the Inhibition of Root Surface Caries Adjacent to Restorations of Glass Ionomer Cement or Composite Resin: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, L. C.; Araújo, F. C.; Zancopé, B. R.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; Youssef, M. N.; Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of CO2 laser irradiation on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement (GIC) or composite resin (CR) restorations. 40 dental blocks were divided into 4 groups: G1 (negative control): cavity preparation + adhesive restoration with CR; G2: (positive control) cavity preparation + GIC restoration; G3: equal to group 1 + CO2 laser with 6 J/cm2; G4: equal to group 2 + CO2 laser. The blocks were submitted to thermal and pH cycling. Dental demineralization around restorations was quantified using microhardness analyses and Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF). The groups showed no significant differences in mineral loss at depths between 20 μm and 40 μm. At 60 μm, G2 and G3 ≠ G1, but G4 = G1, G2 and G3. At 80 μm, G4 ≠ G1, and at 100 μm, G4 = G2 = G1. At 140 and 220 μm, G2, G3, and G4 = G1. The averages obtained using QFL in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 0.637, 0.162, 0.095, and 0.048, respectively. QLF and microhardness analyses showed that CO2 laser irradiation reduced mineral loss around the CR restorations but that it did not increase the anticariogenic effect of GIC restorations. PMID:26347900

  10. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with indirect composite inlay and onlay restorations – An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Alshiddi, Ibraheem F.; Aljinbaz, Amjad

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the fracture resistance and fracture mode of extensive indirect inlay and onlay composite resin restorations performed for endodontically treated premolars. Materials and methods A total of 55 extracted maxillary premolars were randomly divided into four groups. The first group (n = 15) remained untreated to serve as a positive control; the second group (n = 15) was endodontically treated with inlay cavities prepared and restored with indirect composite inlay restorations; the third group (n = 15) was also endodontically treated with onlay cavities prepared and restored with indirect composite onlay restorations; and the fourth group (n = 10) was endodontically treated with mesio-occlusodistal (MOD) cavities prepared and left unrestored to serve as negative controls. Dual cure indirect composite resin was used to fabricate the inlay and onlay restorations performed for the second and third groups, respectively. All teeth were subjected to compressive axial loading test using a metal ball (6 mm in diameter) in a universal testing machine (Instron 1195) with a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min until a fracture occurred. Statistical analysis of fracture resistance and fracture mode were performed with analysis of variance (ANOVA) (α = 0.05) and Kruskal–Wallis (α = 0.05) tests, respectively. Results For the four treatment groups, the mean fracture resistance values were 1326.9 N, 1500.1 N, 1006.1 N, and 702.7 N, respectively. Statistical analyses showed no significant differences between the mean fracture resistance of the intact tooth group and the inlay restoration group (p > 0.05), while significant differences were observed between the mean fracture resistance of all the other groups (p < 0.05). The Kruskal–Wallis test showed statistically significant differences between the fracture modes of the four groups. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study

  11. Temperature Rise during Resin Composite Polymerization under Different Ceramic Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Yondem, Isa; Altintas, Subutay Han; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to measure temperature increase induced by various light polymerizing units during resin composite polymerization beneath one of three types of ceramic restorations. Methods: The resin composite (Variolink II) was polymerized between one of three different ceramic specimens (zirconium oxide, lithium disilicate, feldspathic) (diameter 5 mm, height 2 mm) and a dentin disc (diameter 5 mm, height 1 mm) with a conventional halogen light, a high intensity halogen light, or an LED unit. The temperature rise was measured under the dentin disc with a J-type thermocouple wire connected to a data logger. Ten measurements were carried out for each group. The difference between the initial and highest temperature readings was taken and the 10 calculated temperature changes were averaged to determine the mean value in temperature rise. Two way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the data (polymerizing unit, ceramic brand) for significant differences. The Tukey HSD test was used to perform multiple comparisons (α=.05). Results: Temperature rise did not vary significantly depending on the light polymerizing unit used (P=.16), however, the type of ceramic system showed a significant effect on temperature increases (P<.01). There were no statistically significant differences between lithium disilicate and feldspathic ceramic systems (P >.05); in comparison, the resin composite polymerized under the zirconium oxide ceramic system induced a significantly lower temperature increase than the other ceramic systems tested (P<.05) Conclusions: The resin composite polymerized beneath zirconium oxide ceramic system induced significantly smaller temperature changes. The maximal temperature increase detected in all groups in this study was not viewed as critical for pulpal health. PMID:21769272

  12. The Efficacy of Noncontingent Escape for Decreasing Children's Disruptive Behavior during Restorative Dental Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Callaghan, Patrick M.; Allen, Keith D.; Powell, Shawn; Salama, Fouad

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a dentist-implemented behavioral intervention in which brief escape from dental treatment was provided on a regular basis, independent of the child's behavior. Within a multiple baseline design across subjects, 5 children, ages 4 to 7 years, were provided with temporary escape from dental treatment on a fixed-time…

  13. Fabrication and characterisation of composites materials similar optically and in composition to native dental tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredin, P. V.; Goloshchapov, D. L.; Prutskij, T.; Ippolitov, Yu. A.

    This study investigated the luminescence characteristics of synthesized biocomposites similar in organic and mineral composition to native dental tissues, enamel and dentine. It was found that the luminescence spectrum of intact enamel is similar to that of calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP) used to synthesize biomimetic materials. Despite the morphological differences between the synthesized biocomposite and native tissue, their luminescence spectra suggest that the shape of the luminescence spectrum is more influenced by defects in the crystal structure of the employed hydroxyapatite than by the structure and order of the apatite nanocrystals typical of native dental tissues. The spectrum of intact human dentine possessed a wider luminescence band, unlike that of enamel, with a maximum typical of intact dentine. Analysis of the spectra of biomimetic material modelling the properties of dentine indicated that both the organic and non-organic components contribute to their luminescence.

  14. Application of color image processing and low-coherent optical computer tomography in evaluation of adhesive interfaces of dental restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Shlyapnikova, Olga A.; Venig, Sergey B.; Genina, Elina A.; Sadovnikov, Alexandr V.

    2015-03-01

    Durability of bonded interfaces between dentin and a polymer material in resin-based composite restorations remains a clinical dentistry challenge. In the present study the evolution of bonded interfaces in biological active environment is estimated in vivo. A novel in vivo method of visual diagnostics that involves digital processing of color images of composite restorations and allows the evaluation of adhesive interface quality over time, has been developed and tested on a group of volunteers. However, the application of the method is limited to the analysis of superficial adhesive interfaces. Low-coherent optical computer tomography (OCT) has been tested as a powerful non-invasive tool for in vivo, in situ clinical diagnostics of adhesive interfaces over time. In the long-term perspective adhesive interface monitoring using standard methods of clinical diagnostics along with colour image analysis and OCT could make it possible to objectivise and prognosticate the clinical longevity of composite resin-based restorations with adhesive interfaces.

  15. Relief hologram replication using a dental composite as an embossing tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savić Šević, Svetlana; Pantelić, Dejan

    2005-04-01

    A simplified method for holographic embossing tool production is presented. Surface relief diffraction gratings are holographically recorded in pullulan sensitized with ammonium dichromate (DCP). The surface structure is copied into dental photopolymer composite by direct contact and subsequent photo-polymerization. It was found that arbitrary surface micropattern can be replicated. Due to its excellent mechanical and thermal properties, micro-patterned dental composite can be further used as an embossing tool for mass production of holograms.

  16. Relief hologram replication using a dental composite as an embossing tool.

    PubMed

    Savić Sević, Svetlana; Pantelić, Dejan

    2005-04-04

    A simplified method for holographic embossing tool production is presented. Surface relief diffraction gratings are holographically recorded in pullulan sensitized with ammonium dichromate (DCP). The surface structure is copied into dental photopolymer composite by direct contact and subsequent photo-polymerization. It was found that arbitrary surface micropattern can be replicated. Due to its excellent mechanical and thermal properties, micro-patterned dental composite can be further used as an embossing tool for mass production of holograms.

  17. Clinical approach to anterior adhesive restorations using resin composite veneers.

    PubMed

    Mangani, Francesco; Cerutti, Antonio; Putignano, Angelo; Bollero, Raffaele; Madini, Lorenzo

    2007-01-01

    Scientific progress in adhesive dentistry has led to more conservative techniques, both direct and indirect, to solve esthetic problems in anterior teeth. This article will discuss only indirect techniques, which are clearly superior in complex cases in which it will be difficult to recreate harmonious tooth shape and color. After reviewing the literature and highlighting the properties of this technique, the indications and benefits compared to the direct technique will be assessed. This is followed by a step-by-step description of operative procedures, from treatment planning to relining and polishing of the cemented adhesive restoration. The long-term success of veneers depends mainly on the tooth preparation, which should be confined to enamel, involve proximal contact areas, maintain the cervical enamel margin, and incorporate the incisal edge to increase veneer resistance and enable correct placement. Although no clinical follow-up similar to that of ceramic materials is available, the latest-generation resin composites offer interesting features. They can withstand mechanical stress, have excellent esthetic properties, and, most importantly, can be repaired intraorally without impairing their physicochemical and mechanical properties.

  18. Failure Rate of Direct High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomer Versus Hybrid Resin Composite Restorations in Posterior Permanent Teeth - a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Traditionally, resin composite restorations are claimed by reviews of the dental literature as being superior to glass-ionomer fillings in terms of restoration failures in posterior permanent teeth. The aim of this systematic review is to answer the clinical question, whether conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer restorations, in patients with single and/or multi-surface cavities in posterior permanent teeth, have indeed a higher failure rate than direct hybrid resin composite restorations. Methods Eight databases were searched until December 02, 2013. Trials were assessed for bias risks, in-between datasets heterogeneity and statistical sample size power. Effects sizes were computed and statistically compared. A total of 55 citations were identified through systematic literature search. From these, 46 were excluded. No trials related to high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus resin composite restorations for direct head-to-head comparison were found. Three trials related to high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus amalgam and three trials related to resin composite versus amalgam restorations could be included for adjusted indirect comparison, only. Results The available evidence suggests no difference in the failure rates between both types of restoration beyond the play of chance, is limited by lack of head-to-head comparisons and an insufficient number of trials, as well as by high bias and in-between-dataset heterogeneity risk. The current clinical evidence needs to be regarded as too poor in order to justify superiority claims regarding the failure rates of both restoration types. Sufficiently large-sized, parallel-group, randomised control trials with high internal validity are needed, in order to justify any clinically meaningful judgment to this topic. PMID:26962372

  19. Optimizing the design of bio-inspired functionally graded material (FGM) layer in all-ceramic dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chang; Sun, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Due to elastic modulus mismatch between the different layers in all-ceramic dental restorations, high tensile stress concentrates at the interface between the ceramic core and cement. In natural tooth structure, stress concentration is reduced by the functionally graded structure of dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) which interconnects enamel and dentin. Inspired by DEJ, the aim of this study was to explore the optimum design of a bio-inspired functionally graded material (FGM) layer in all-ceramic dental restorations to achieve excellent stress reduction and distribution. Three-dimensional finite element model of a multi-layer structure was developed, which comprised bilayered ceramic, bio-inspired FGM layer, cement, and dentin. Finite element method and first-order optimization technique were used to realize the optimal bio-inspired FGM layer design. The bio-inspired FGM layer significantly reduced stress concentration at the interface between the crown and cement, and stresses were evenly distributed in FGM layer. With the optimal design, an elastic modulus distribution similar to that in DEJ occurred in the FGM layer.

  20. Restoration of extensive erosion areas using an indirect composite technique.

    PubMed

    Knight, J S; Sneed, W D

    2000-01-01

    Cervical erosion defects, particularly those of extensive size that are located in an area where control of the operative field is difficult, can present a significant restorative challenge. This article describes an indirect restorative technique to solve this problem. Following tooth preparation, an indirect restoration is luted to the tooth and the margins are finished and polished. Using an indirect technique minimizes operative field isolation time and the total chairside time required to restore the tooth. Clinical cases are presented to illustrate this technique.

  1. Effect of a novel commercial potassium-oxalate containing tooth-desensitizing mouthrinse on the microhardness of resin composite restorative materials with different monomer compositions

    PubMed Central

    Karabulut, Barış; Güleç, Serkan; Doğan, Cem M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The effects of mouthrinses on dental resin composites have been investigated extensively. However, there is little information available regarding the effects of ‘newly developed mouthrinse’ formulations on the microhardness of different monomer based composite systems. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a novel potassium-oxalate containing desensitizing mouthrinse on the microhardness of different monomer based composite materials. Material and Methods A hundred and twenty specimens (6mm in diameter and 2mm in height) were prepared for composite resin groups (methacrylate based, DX-511 monomer based and silorane monomer based) and for storage solution groups (artificial saliva and potassium oxalate-containing tooth-desensitizing mouthrinse). After allowing post-polimerization the baseline Knoop microhardness measurements for all specimens were recorded. The specimens were stored in 20 mL mouthwash and artificial saliva for 12 hours at 37ºC. The post-immersion microhardness values of all specimens were also recorded. Data were subjected to ANOVA/Scheffe’s test at a significance level of 0.05. The intra group (pre and post immersion values) comparison of the mean microhardness values of the specimens was done using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results The microhardness of the silorane based composite was not affected significantly (p>0.05). The hardness values of the DX-511 monomer based composite and the methacrylate based composite exhibited a slight but not significant microhardness change compared to the baseline values (p>0.05). Conclusions Studies reported that the effect of mouthrinses on microhardness changes of composite resins may be material dependent, and the hardness change susceptibility of a restorative material may be attributed to its resin matrix or filler type. However, dental monomers as well as the oral care products have an ever-evolving technology and future studies should consider newer products

  2. Measurement of J-integral in CAD/CAM dental ceramics and composite resin by digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanxia; Akkus, Anna; Roperto, Renato; Akkus, Ozan; Li, Bo; Lang, Lisa; Teich, Sorin

    2016-09-01

    Ceramic and composite resin blocks for CAD/CAM machining of dental restorations are becoming more common. The sample sizes affordable by these blocks are smaller than ideal for stress intensity factor (SIF) based tests. The J-integral measurement calls for full field strain measurement, making it challenging to conduct. Accordingly, the J-integral values of dental restoration materials used in CAD/CAM restorations have not been reported to date. Digital image correlation (DIC) provides full field strain maps, making it possible to calculate the J-integral value. The aim of this study was to measure the J-integral value for CAD/CAM restorative materials. Four types of materials (sintered IPS E-MAX CAD, non-sintered IPS E-MAX CAD, Vita Mark II and Paradigm MZ100) were used to prepare beam samples for three-point bending tests. J-integrals were calculated for different integral path size and locations with respect to the crack tip. J-integral at path 1 for each material was 1.26±0.31×10(-4)MPam for MZ 100, 0.59±0.28×10(-4)MPam for sintered E-MAX, 0.19±0.07×10(-4)MPam for VM II, and 0.21±0.05×10(-4)MPam for non-sintered E-MAX. There were no significant differences between different integral path size, except for the non-sintered E-MAX group. J-integral paths of non-sintered E-MAX located within 42% of the height of the sample provided consistent values whereas outside this range resulted in lower J-integral values. Moreover, no significant difference was found among different integral path locations. The critical SIF was calculated from J-integral (KJ) along with geometry derived SIF values (KI). KI values were comparable with KJ and geometry based SIF values obtained from literature. Therefore, DIC derived J-integral is a reliable way to assess the fracture toughness of small sized specimens for dental CAD/CAM restorative materials; however, with caution applied to the selection of J-integral path.

  3. Forensic or archaeological issue: is chemical analysis of dental restorations helpful in assessing time since death and identification of skeletonized human remains?

    PubMed

    Zelic, Ksenija; Djonic, Danijela; Neskovic, Olivera; Stoiljkovic, Milovan; Nikolic, Slobodan; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Djuric, Marija

    2013-09-01

    In 2011, small mass grave with completely skeletonized remains was discovered in Belgrade suburb. An eyewitness claimed that skeletons belonged to German soldiers killed in WWII. Anthropologists were engaged to investigate whether the skeletal remains correspond to the indicated German group or represent more recent case requiring court trial. Numerous dental restorations were noticed. Owing to the fact that different dental materials were used in dental practice at certain times, the aim of this study was to explore whether analysis of dental restorations could help in identification and estimation of time since death. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry revealed that dental fillings corresponded to copper amalgam, conventional silver amalgam, silicophosphate cement, and zinc phosphate cement. Chemical results combined with anthropological and historical facts suggest that the individuals lived before the 1960s in country with well-developed dental service at that time. Therefore, chemical analysis of dental fillings was useful to distinguish between skeletal remains that are too old to be of forensic interest and the remains relevant to legal investigations.

  4. Effect of various treatment and glazing (coating) techniques on the roughness and wettability of ceramic dental restorative surfaces.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, G; Polat, H; Polat, M; Coskun, G

    2006-12-01

    Surface treatment procedures such as grinding and polishing are needed to provide the ceramic dental restorative materials with proper fitting and occlusion. The treated surfaces are customarily glazed to improve the strength and smoothness. Though smoothness and wetting of the dental surfaces are important to minimize bacterial plaque retention, influence of the surface treatment and glazing procedures on the final surface roughness and its correlation to wettability are overlooked. In this work, effect of various treatment (diamond fraising, stoning, sanding and aluminum oxide and rubber polishing) and glazing (auto and overglazing) techniques on the final roughness and the resulting wettability of dental ceramic surfaces were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations and atomic force microscopy (AFM) scans, 75 scans per sample. The surfaces were characterized and assigned an average roughness measure, R(a). The wettability of the same surfaces was evaluated using micro-contact angle measurements (25 micro-bubbles placed on a grid on each surface) to correlate the final surface roughness and wettability. The results show that overglazing prevails over surface irregularities from different treatment procedures and provides homegeneously smooth surfaces with mean R(a)<10 nm. It also produces uniformly wetted surfaces with low contact angles around 20 degrees . The autoglazed surfaces are less smooth (mean R(a) around 50 nm) and displays sporadic topographic irregularities. They display larger and less uniform contact angles ranging between 35 degrees and 50 degrees . The results suggest that overglazing should be preferred after surface treatment to obtain a smooth and well-wetted dental ceramic surface.

  5. Ensuring the global availability of high-quality dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Ferracane, J; Fisher, J; Eiselé, J L; Fox, C H

    2013-11-01

    The Minamata Convention, a global legally binding instrument (treaty) on mercury, has been the catalyst for the emerging agenda on global dental materials research. If the current and future challenges of oral health maintenance and healing on a global scale are to be met, a logical and effective research agenda for the discovery and introduction of new, environmentally sustainable, dental materials must be developed through a coordinated effort involving materials scientists, dental clinicians, representatives of industry, members of regional and national regulatory bodies, and advocacy from research organizations. For universal impact, this agenda should be created with awareness of several important ongoing initiatives, such as the WHO non-communicable diseases action plan, the UN sustainable development agenda, and the IADR Global Oral Health In Inequalities Research Agenda (GOHIRA). A significant contributor to this cause is the FDI and its membership, who, through their Vision 2020 initiative, acknowledge their role and responsibility in globally preventing and managing dental disease and providing leadership to the profession in terms of information dissemination and affecting change. Dental researchers also have an obligation to advocate for appropriate funding to match the identified research needs, thus enhancing the possibility that key decision-makers will provide the needed support to achieve the research agenda agreed upon by this diverse group of stakeholders.

  6. Microleakage of class V resin composite restorations after bur, air-abrasion or Er:YAG laser preparation.

    PubMed

    Corona, S A; Borsatto, M; Dibb, R G; Ramos, R P; Brugnera, A; Pécora, J D

    2001-01-01

    This in vitro study compared the microleakage of Class V resin composite restorations placed in cavities prepared with a high-speed dental bur, air-abrasion or Er:YAG laser. Twenty sound extracted human third molars were selected and randomly assigned to four equal Groups (n=10): Group I, cavities were cut by dental drill at high-speed; Group II, aluminum oxide air-abrasion was used for cavity preparation, and in Groups III and IV, cavities were prepared by Er:YAG laser. Following cavity preparation, Groups I and II were acid-etched, Group III was treated only by Er:YAG laser and Group IV was conditioned by Er:YAG laser followed by acid-etching. Cavities were restored (Single Bond + Z-100) and the teeth stored for seven days in distilled water. Then, the restorations were polished and the specimens thermocycled, immersed in a 0.2% Rhodamine solution, sectioned and analyzed for leakage at the occlusal (enamel) and cervical (dentin/cementum) interfaces using an optical microscope connected to a video camera. The images were digitized and software was utilized for microleakage assessment. Upon analyzing the results, statistically significant differences (p<0.01) between the occlusal and cervical regions for all groups was observed, and, as a rule, there was better marginal sealing at the enamel margins. The highest degree of infiltration was observed for cavities prepared and treated exclusively by Er:YAG (Group III). The other experimental groups showed statistical similarities in the amount of marginal leakage at the enamel margins. However, at the cervical margins, there was a significant difference (p<0.05) between Group I and the remaining groups. None of the techniques completely eliminated marginal microleakage at the dentin/ cementum margins.

  7. Influence of light polymerization modes on degree of conversion and crosslink density of dental composites.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; Poskus, Laiza Tatiana; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes; de Araújo Lima Barcellos, Alexandre; Fellows, Carlos Eduardo

    2008-03-01

    This study analyzed the influence of light polymerization modes on crosslink density (CD) and the degree of conversion (DC) of dental composites. A minifilled hybrid and a nanofilled dental composite were photoactivated with two light polymerization modes: Conventional-850 mW/cm2 for 20 s and Gradual-50 up to 1,000 mW/cm2 for 10 s+1,000 mW/cm2 for 10 s. DC was determined by the use of FT-Raman-spectrometer. A softening test, using Knoop diamond indentation, was carried out at the top and bottom of 2 mm thick dental composite disks, before and after storage in 100% ethanol for 24 h, in order to represent the amount of crosslink density. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' multiple range test (alpha=0.05). The DC was influenced by light polymerization modes, with Gradual mode presenting lower DC. On bottom surfaces, the nanofilled dental composite was more susceptible to softening by ethanol than minifilled hybrid, and gradual light polymerization of nanofilled dental composite resulted in more softening than when conventional light polymerization was used. The results suggest that nanofilled composites are capable undergoing more plasticization if applied in thick increments.

  8. A 3-year randomized clinical trial evaluating two different bonded posterior restorations: Amalgam versus resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Pamir, Tijen; Tezel, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the performance and postoperative sensitivity of a posterior resin composite with that of bonded amalgam in 40 (n = 20) large sized cavities and to evaluate whether resin composite could be an alternative for bonded amalgam. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial. Twenty patients in need of at least two posterior restorations were recruited. Authors randomly assigned one half of the restorations to receive bonded amalgam and the other half to composite restorations. Forty bonded amalgams (n = 20) and composites (n = 20) were evaluated for their performance on modified-US Public Health Service criteria and postoperative sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) for 36-months. Results: Success rate of this study was 100%. First clinical alterations were rated as Bravo after 1 year in marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, and surface roughness for both amalgam and composite. At the 3rd year, overall “Bravo” rated restorations were 12 for bonded amalgam and 13 for resin composites. There were no significant differences among the VAS scores of composites and bonded amalgams for all periods (P > 0.05) except for the comparisons at the 3rd year evaluation (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Within the limitation of this study, both resin composite and bonded amalgam were clinically acceptable. Postoperative sensitivity results tend to decrease more in composite restorations rather than amalgams. Therefore, it was concluded that posterior resin composite can be used even in large sized cavities. PMID:27011734

  9. The Efficacy of Noncontingent Escape for Decreasing Children's Disruptive Behavior During Restorative Dental Treatment

    PubMed Central

    O'Callaghan, Patrick M; Allen, Keith D; Powell, Shawn; Salama, Fouad

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a dentist-implemented behavioral intervention in which brief escape from dental treatment was provided on a regular basis, independent of the child's behavior. Within a multiple baseline design across subjects, 5 children, ages 4 to 7 years, were provided with temporary escape from dental treatment on a fixed-time schedule. The intervals were signaled by an electronic timer worn by the dentist. Clinically significant reductions were observed in physically disruptive behavior across all 5 children with the introduction of noncontingent escape, and verbally disruptive behavior was markedly reduced in 4 of the 5 children. In addition, the dental staff's use of physical restraint was reduced to near zero across all 5 children. The research extends the literature in both clinical dentistry and in applied behavior analysis by demonstrating that a dentist can easily and effectively implement noncontingent reinforcement to produce clinically significant and socially important changes in children's health behavior. PMID:16813038

  10. Synthesis and characterization of hybrid silica/PMMA nanoparticles and their use as filler in dental composites.

    PubMed

    Canché-Escamilla, G; Duarte-Aranda, S; Toledano, M

    2014-09-01

    The effect of hybrid silica/poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) nanoparticles on the properties of composites for dental restoration was evaluated. Hybrid nanoparticles with silica as core and PMMA as shell were obtained by a seeded emulsion polymerization process. Fourier transform infrared spectrum of the hybrid nanoparticles shows an intense peak at 1,730 cm(-1), corresponding to carbonyl groups (CO) of the ester. The thermal stability of the hybrid particles decreases with increasing amounts of PMMA and the residual mass at 700°C corresponds to the silica content in the hybrid particles. Composites were obtained by dispersing nanoparticles (silica or hybrid), as fillers, in a resin-bis glycidyl dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) (40%/60% (w/w)). The paste was then placed in a mold and polymerized under light irradiation. During the preparation of the composites, with the hybrid nanoparticles, the monomers swell the PMMA shell and after photo-curing, a semi-interpenetrating network (semi-IPN) is obtained around the silica core. The properties of the composites, obtained using the hybrid nanoparticles, depend on the filler content and the amount of PMMA in the semi-IPN matrix. For composites with similar inorganic filler contents, the composites with low amounts of PMMA shell had higher modulus than those in which silica was used as the filler.

  11. Physical Properties of a New Sonically Placed Composite Resin Restorative Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-06

    Material 7. Intended publication/meeting : General Dentistry (the journal of the Academy of General Dentistry) 8. "Required by" date: 15 July 2013...mechanical behaviour of dental composites. Clin Oral Invest 2009;13:427-438. 17. Ferracane JL, Moser JB, Greener EH. Rheology of composite...pressure bar. Dent Mat Journal 2006;25(2):234-240. 20. Opdam N, Roeters J, Peters T, Burgersdijk R, Kuijs R. Consistency of resin composites for

  12. Fabrication and Evaluation of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA Dental Resins/Composites Containing Nano Fibrillar Silicate

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ming; Gao, Yi; Liu, Yi; Liao, Yiliang; Hedin, Nyle E.; Fong, Hao

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the reinforcement of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resins (without conventional glass filler) and composites (with conventional glass filler) with various mass fractions of nano fibrillar silicate (FS). Methods Three dispersion methods were studied to separate the silanized FS as nano-scaled single crystals and uniformly distribute them into dental matrices. The photo-curing behaviors of the Bis-GMA/TEGDMA/FS resins were monitored in situ by RT-NIR to study the photopolymerization rate and the vinyl double bond conversion. Mechanical properties (flexural strength, elastic modulus and work of fracture) of the nano FS reinforced resins/composites were tested, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used for the statistical analysis of the acquired data. The morphology of nano FS and the representative fracture surfaces of its reinforced resins/composites were examined by SEM/TEM. Results Impregnation of small mass fractions (1 % and 2.5 %) of nano FS into Bis-GMA/TEGDMA (50/50 mass ratio) dental resins/composites improved the mechanical properties substantially. Larger mass fraction of impregnation (7.5 %), however, did not further improve the mechanical properties (one way ANOVA, P > 0.05) and may even reduce the mechanical properties. The high degree of separation and uniform distribution of nano FS into dental resins/composites was a challenge. Impregnation of nano FS into dental resins/composites could result in two opposite effects: a reinforcing effect due to the highly separated and uniformly distributed nano FS single crystals, or a weakening effect due to the formation of FS agglomerates/particles. Significance Uniform distribution of highly separated nano FS single crystals into dental resins/composites could significantly improve the mechanical properties of the resins/composites. PMID:17572485

  13. Human enamel veneer restoration: an alternative technique to restore anterior primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luciana Butini; Tamay, Tereza Keiko; Oliveira, Marta Dutra Machado; Rodrigues, Célia Martins Delgado; Wanderley, Marcia Turolla

    2006-01-01

    Restoration of severely decayed primary teeth is a clinical challenge in Pediatric Dentistry. Among the restorative treatment options, the use of prefabricated crowns and resin composite restorations, either by means of direct or indirect techniques is mentioned in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe the rehabilitation of primary anterior teeth in a 5-year-old patient. Dental treatment consisted on an anterior space maintainer prosthesis made with natural primary teeth, plus human dental enamel veneer (facet) restorations. The advantages of this technique are better esthetics and the natural enamel has physiologic wear and offers superficial smoothness and cervical adaptation compatible with those of the surrounding teeth.

  14. Techniques used to fabricate all-ceramic restorations in the dental practice.

    PubMed

    Puri, Sameer

    2005-07-01

    Porcelain is an increasingly popular material to use for restorations. This article will discuss the 3 main ways to fabricate porcelain restorations. The first method involves waxing up the restoration to the proper form and casting it in molten porcelain similar to the lost wax technique for gold. The second technique requires the use of porcelain in a powder form to be stacked on top of a refractory die or a platinum foil and then fired in the oven. The third main technique is the use of a CAD/CAM system to mill the porcelain restoration from a solid block of porcelain. All 3 techniques are valid and the clinician should have a thorough understanding of which techniques are appropriate in various clinical situations.

  15. [Adhesion as criterion of choice of materials for dental restorations of defects in cervical area].

    PubMed

    Rusanov, F S; Poiurovskaia, I Ia; Krechina, E K; Sogachev, G V

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of comparative in vitro evaluation of classical and flow consistency restorative polymeric materials (Japan and Russia) adhesion to dentin in cervical area. The adhesive properties of these materials were compared with the experimental systems of "sandwich" type, combining layers of classic and flow consistency, glass-ionomer cement Fuji 8 (Japan) and material SMARTCEM 2 (Switzerland). The highest dentin adhesion strength showed Fuji 8, restoration materials of classical consistency proved to have advantage in adhesion properties.

  16. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulkfill flowable material and a resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Isufi, Almira; Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola Maria; Ioppolo, Pietro; Testarelli, Luca; Bedini, Rossella; Al-Sudani, Dina; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aim To determine and compare the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulk fill flowable material (SDR) and a traditional resin composite. Methods Thirty maxillary and 30 mandibular first molars were selected based on similar dimensions. After cleaning, shaping and filling of the root canals and adhesive procedures, specimens were assigned to 3 subgroups for each tooth type (n=10): Group A: control group, including intact teeth; Group B: access cavities were restored with a traditional resin composite (EsthetX; Dentsply-Italy, Rome, Italy); Group C: access cavities were restored with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR; Dentsply-Italy), except 1.5 mm layer of the occlusal surface that was restored with the same resin composite as Group B. The specimens were subjected to compressive force in a material static-testing machine until fracture occurred, the maximum fracture load of the specimens was measured (N) and the type of fracture was recorded as favorable or unfavorable. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni tests (P<0.05). Results No statistically significant differences were found among groups (P<0.05). Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a traditional resin composite and with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR) was similar in both maxillary and mandibular molars and showed no significant decrease in fracture resistance compared to intact specimens. Conclusions No significant difference was observed in the mechanical fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars restored with traditional resin composite restorations compared to bulk fill flowable composite restorations. PMID:27486505

  17. Measurement of the fluorescence of restorative dental materials using a 655-nm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Souza-Campos, Dilma H.; Zanin, Sissi; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Pecora, Jesus D.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Harari, Sonia

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of fluorescence of seven restorative materials using 655 nm diode laser. The laser fluorescence system has ben used as an auxiliary method for the detection of carious lesions. This new diagnostic method increases information which are important for the choice of treatment by the Dentist. The characteristic of restorative materials and sealers interferes in the values obtained by the apparatus during the detection of secondary carious lesions. The optical properties of each biological tissue or material are related to the interaction with the laser beam. Aware of that, the fluorescence of healthy dentin and enamel is 0-15, the authors determined the fluorescence of seven restorative materials with 10 teeth in each group. The laser reading scale differed according to the materia, ranging from 1 to 22 with several materials, for example the sealer without inorganic filler and the glass ionomer, showing fluorescence values similar to carious enamel which interferes with the readings around the restorations resulting in a false positive. Knowledge of restoration material fluorescence can aid in the detection of secondary carious lesions around the restorations.

  18. Ultra-high-resolution dual-source CT for forensic dental visualization-discrimination of ceramic and composite fillings.

    PubMed

    Jackowski, C; Wyss, M; Persson, A; Classens, M; Thali, M J; Lussi, A

    2008-07-01

    Dental identification is the most valuable method to identify human remains in single cases with major postmortem alterations as well as in mass casualties because of its practicability and demanding reliability. Computed tomography (CT) has been investigated as a supportive tool for forensic identification and has proven to be valuable. It can also scan the dentition of a deceased within minutes. In the present study, we investigated currently used restorative materials using ultra-high-resolution dual-source CT and the extended CT scale for the purpose of a color-encoded, in scale, and artifact-free visualization in 3D volume rendering. In 122 human molars, 220 cavities with 2-, 3-, 4- and 5-mm diameter were prepared. With presently used filling materials (different composites, temporary filling materials, ceramic, and liner), these cavities were restored in six teeth for each material and cavity size (exception amalgam n = 1). The teeth were CT scanned and images reconstructed using an extended CT scale. Filling materials were analyzed in terms of resulting Hounsfield units (HU) and filling size representation within the images. Varying restorative materials showed distinctively differing radiopacities allowing for CT-data-based discrimination. Particularly, ceramic and composite fillings could be differentiated. The HU values were used to generate an updated volume-rendering preset for postmortem extended CT scale data of the dentition to easily visualize the position of restorations, the shape (in scale), and the material used which is color encoded in 3D. The results provide the scientific background for the application of 3D volume rendering to visualize the human dentition for forensic identification purposes.

  19. Development of dental composites with reactive fillers that promote precipitation of antibacterial-hydroxyapatite layers.

    PubMed

    Aljabo, Anas; Abou Neel, Ensanya A; Knowles, Jonathan C; Young, Anne M

    2016-03-01

    The study aim was to develop light-curable, high strength dental composites that would release calcium phosphate and chlorhexidine (CHX) but additionally promote surface hydroxyapatite/CHX co-precipitation in simulated body fluid (SBF). 80 wt.% urethane dimethacrylate based liquid was mixed with glass fillers containing 10 wt.% CHX and 0, 10, 20 or 40 wt.% reactive mono- and tricalcium phosphate (CaP). Surface hydroxyapatite layer thickness/coverage from SEM images, Ca/Si ratio from EDX and hydroxyapatite Raman peak intensities were all proportional to both time in SBF and CaP wt.% in the filler. Hydroxyapatite was, however, difficult to detect by XRD until 4 weeks. XRD peak width and SEM images suggested this was due to the very small size (~10 nm) of the hydroxyapatite crystallites. Precipitate mass at 12 weeks was 22 wt.% of the sample CaP total mass irrespective of CaP wt.% and up to 7 wt.% of the specimen. Early diffusion controlled CHX release, assessed by UV spectrometry, was proportional to CaP and twice as fast in water compared with SBF. After 1 week, CHX continued to diffuse into water but in SBF, became entrapped within the precipitating hydroxyapatite layer. At 12 weeks CHX formed 5 to 15% of the HA layer with 10 to 40 wt.% CaP respectively. Despite linear decline of strength and modulus in 4 weeks from 160 to 101 MPa and 4 to 2.4 GPa, respectively, upon raising CaP content, all values were still within the range expected for commercial composites. The high strength, hydroxyapatite precipitation and surface antibacterial accumulation should reduce tooth restoration failure due to fracture, aid demineralised dentine repair and prevent subsurface carious disease respectively.

  20. 56-month clinical performance of Class I and II resin composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    PAZINATTO, Flavia Bittencourt; GIONORDOLI NETO, Ranulfo; WANG, Linda; MONDELLI, José; MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; NAVARRO, Maria Fidela de Lima

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the 56-month clinical performance of Class I and II resin composite restorations. Filtek P60 was compared with Filtek Z250, which are both indicated for posterior restorations but differ in terms of handling characteristics. The null hypothesis tested was that there is no difference in the clinical performance of the two resin composites in posterior teeth. Material and Methods Thirty-three patients were treated by the same operator, who prepared 48 Class I and 42 Class II cavities, which were restored with Single Bond/Filtek Z250 or Single Bond/Filtek P60 restorative systems. Restorations were evaluated by two independent examiners at baseline and after 56 months, using the modified USPHS criteria. Data were analyzed statistically using Chi-square and Fisher's Exact tests (a=0.05). Results After 56 months, 25 patients (31 Class I and 36 Class II) were analyzed. A 3% failure rate occurred due to secondary caries and excessive loss of anatomic form for P60. For both restorative systems, there were no significant differences in secondary caries and postoperative sensitivity. However, significant changes were observed with respect to anatomic form, marginal discoloration, and marginal adaptation. Significant decreases in surface texture were observed exclusively for the Z250 restorations. Conclusions Both restorative systems can be used for posterior restorations and can be expected to perform well in the oral environment. PMID:22858698

  1. Multidisciplinary treatment of a subgingivally fractured tooth with indirect composite restoration: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Ayca T; Tunc, Emine Sen; Cil, Feride; Isci, Devrim; Lutfioglu, Muge

    2012-01-01

    In pediatric patients, anterior teeth with fractures that extend subgingivally require a complex treatment plan that addresses biologic, esthetic, and functional factors, such as mastication and speech. The purpose of this clinical report was to describe a technique using indirect composite restoration to restore a subgingivally fractured permanent maxillary right central incisor in a 10-year-old boy. Due to the complex nature of the treatment, a multidisciplinary approach was used to restore the tooth. The crown fragment was removed, and endodontic treatment was performed. The tooth was then extruded orthodontically. A glass fiber post was placed to improve retention, and an indirect composite restoration was placed. A clinical and radiographic evaluation at a follow-up appointment 1 year later confirmed that the technique used in this case can be a good option for restoring anterior teeth with subgingival fractures.

  2. Knowledge and Awareness among Parents and General Dental Practitioners regarding Rehabilitation with Full Coverage Restoration in Children: A Multi-centric Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saroj, Gyanendra; Sharma, Swati; Gupta, Basant

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and awareness among parents and general dental practitioners regarding rehabilitation with full coverage restoration in children following pulp therapy. Materials and methods: A multiple choice questionnaire was given to 1,000 parents and 400 general practitioners in this multicentric trial. The questionnaire assessed their beliefs, knowledge regarding care of primary teeth, assessment of treating children, and knowledge regarding importance of primary teeth. All the questionnaires were then compiled and statistically analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Results and discussion: 53% parents did not know the importance of primary teeth and 73% parents also thought that no treatment is possible for pulpally involved primary teeth. 20% parents believed that root canal treatment can be possible for children and only 10% knew about full coverage restorations. 40% of the general dentists felt that the best treatment in the case of primary necrotic teeth is extraction and only 13% knew about stainless steel crowns. 62% of general dental practitioners pointed out patients’ noninterest in providing crowns whereas 68% parents reported non-information by dentists. Conclusion: Both parents and general dental practitioners have incomplete and inadequate knowledge regarding full coverage restorations, and we need to improve the knowledge and dental awareness of the parents and the general dental practitioners. How to cite this article: Moda A, Saroj G, Sharma S, Gupta B. Knowledge and Awareness among Parents and General Dental Practitioners regarding Rehabilitation with Full Coverage Restoration in Children: A Multi-centric Trial. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):177-180. PMID:27365944

  3. Effects of Fiber-reinforced Composite Bases on Microleakage of Composite Restorations in Proximal Locations

    PubMed Central

    A, Tezvergil-Mutluay; P.K, Vallittu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of direct restorative composite resin upon the addition of an intermediate glass fiber-reinforced composite (GFRC) layer of various fiber orientations between tooth and particulate filler composite resin (PFRC). Materials and Methods: Cavities were prepared both on the mesial and distal surfaces of sixty extracted human molars with one margin placed below and the other above the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). Teeth were assigned to five different groups. Four of the groups received a layer of semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) resin system impregnated E-glass GFRC at the bottom of the cavity: Group 1; unidirectional continuous GFRC (EVS) in buccolingual direction (EVS-BL), Group 2; EVS in mesiodistal direction (EVS-MD), Group 3; bidirectional woven GFRC (EVN), Group 4; multidirectional short GFRC (EXP-MLT), Group 5; PRFC only (control). After acid etching and priming of the cavities and insertion of GFRC layer with the adhesive resin (Scotchbond Multipurpose 3M-ESPE), the cavities were filled incrementally with PRFC (Filtek Z250, 3M-ESPE) and each layer was light cured for 20 s. After finishing and polishing, the restored teeth were water-stored for 24 h at 37 °C and then thermocycled for 6000 cycles between 5-55 °C, before immersion in 0.5 % basic fuchsin dye for 24 h. After sectioning by 3-5 sagittal cuts, each sequential section was imaged and digitally analyzed to determine the stain depth. Results: All GFRC groups in dentin revealed significantly lower microleakage compared to control (p<0.05). The orientation of FRC intermediate layer did not reveal significant differences in microleakage (p>0.05). The microleakeage in enamel was not different between the groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: Use of intermediate GFRC layer between tooth and PFRC could provide alternative method to minimize microleakage. Clinical Relevance: Use of GFRC intermediate layer underneath the particulate filler

  4. "Struggle to obtain redress": Women's experiences of living with symptoms attributed to dental restorative materials and/or electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Mårell, Lena; Lindgren, Monica; Nyhlin, Kerstin Ternulf; Ahlgren, Christina; Berglund, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of illness and the encounters with health care professionals among women who attributed their symptoms and illness to either dental restorative materials and/or electromagnetic fields, despite the fact that research on health effects from dental fillings or electricity has failed to substantiate the reported symptoms. Thirteen women (aged 37-63 years) were invited to the study and a qualitative approach was chosen as the study design, and data were collected using semi-structured interviews. The analysis was conducted with a constant comparative method, according to Grounded Theory. The analysis of the results can be described with the core category, "Struggle to obtain redress," the two categories, "Stricken with illness" and "A blot in the protocol," and five subcategories. The core category represents the women's fight for approval and arose in the conflict between their experience of developing a severe illness and the doctors' or dentists' rejection of the symptoms as a disease, which made the women feel like malingerers. The informants experienced better support and confirmation from alternative medicine practitioners. However, sick-leave certificates from alternative medicine practitioners were not approved and this led to a continuous cycle of visits in the health care system. To avoid conflicting encounters, it is important for caregivers to listen to the patient's explanatory models and experience of illness, even if a medical answer cannot be given.

  5. The chewing robot: a new biologically-inspired way to evaluate dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Raabe, D; Alemzadeh, K; Harrison, A L; Ireland, A J

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel in vitro dental wear simulator based on 6-6 parallel kinematics to replicate mechanical wear formation on dental materials and components, such as individual teeth, crowns or bridges. The human mandible, guided by a range of passive structures moves with up to six degrees of freedom (DOF). Currently available wear simulators lack the ability to perform these complex chewing movements. In addition simulators are unable to replicate the normal range of chewing forces as they have no control system able to mimic the natural muscle function controlled by the human central nervous system. Such discrepancies between true in vivo and simulated in vitro movements will influence the outcome and reliability of wear studies using such approaches. This paper summarizes the development of a new dynamic jaw simulator based on the kinematics of the human jaw.

  6. Recent advances in dental optics - Part I: 3D intraoral scanners for restorative dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logozzo, Silvia; Zanetti, Elisabetta M.; Franceschini, Giordano; Kilpelä, Ari; Mäkynen, Anssi

    2014-03-01

    Intra-oral scanning technology is a very fast-growing field in dentistry since it responds to the need of an accurate three-dimensional mapping of the mouth, as required in a large number of procedures such as restorative dentistry and orthodontics. Nowadays, more than 10 intra-oral scanning devices for restorative dentistry have been developed all over the world even if only some of those devices are currently available on the market. All the existing intraoral scanners try to face with problems and disadvantages of traditional impression fabrication process and are based on different non-contact optical technologies and principles. The aim of this publication is to provide an extensive review of existing intraoral scanners for restorative dentistry evaluating their working principles, features and performances.

  7. Evaluation of Marginal Integrity of Four Bulk-Fill Dental Composite Materials: In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Orłowski, Mirosław; Tarczydło, Bożena; Chałas, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to compare under in vitro conditions marginal sealing of 4 different bulk-fill materials composite restorations of class II. Methods. Comparative evaluation concerned 4 composites of a bulk-fill type: SonicFill, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, Filtek Bulk Fill, and SDR. The study used 30 third molars without caries. In each tooth 4 cavities of class II were prepared. The prepared tooth samples were placed in a 1% methylene blue solution for 24 h, and after that in each restoration the depth of dye penetration along the side walls was evaluated. Results. The highest rating (score 0, no dye penetration) was achieved by 93.33% of the restorations made of the SDR material, 90% of restorations of SonicFill system, 86.66% of restorations of the composite Filtek Bulk Fill, and 73.33% of restorations of the Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill. Conclusion. The performed study showed that bulk-fill flowable or sonic-activated flowable composite restorations have better marginal sealing (lack of discoloration) in comparison with bulk-fill paste-like composite. PMID:25874254

  8. Evaluation of surface roughness of different restorative composites after polishing using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, C Meena; Bhat, K Manohar; Bansal, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Resin based composites are widely used aesthetic restorative materials in clinical restorative dentistry. The filler size and the percentage of fillers affects smooth surface, clinical durability, aesthetics, better optical properties, compatibility with natural enamel tissue, surface gloss, and preventing the discoloration of the restoration. The finishing and polishing of tooth-coloured restorations are necessary clinical steps for better aesthetics and longevity of restored teeth. Aim: In this study nano composites were chosen, because these contain nano particles which provide better overall composites features, including the quality of polished surface. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness of different newer posterior composites. Material and Method: Five commercially available posterior restorative composite were tested in this study. All the specimens were polished with shofu multi step polishing system. After polishing the samples were all analyzed by atomic force microscopy which is used to study surface topography and surface morphology of materials. Results: The values of surface roughness of each specimen were statistically analyzed using Kruskal Wallis ANOVA, and Pair wise comparisons by Mann-Whitney U test setting the statistical significance at p ≤ 0.05. Conclusion: Tetric Evo Ceram, Z350 exhibited less surface roughness compared to Ever X, Clearfil Majesty and Sure fil SDR. There was no statistical difference between groups regarding surface rough ness between groups. PMID:26957795

  9. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy for monitoring the curing of dental composites

    PubMed Central

    Schwerdtfeger, Michael; Lippert, Sina; Koch, Martin; Berg, Andreas; Katletz, Stefan; Wiesauer, Karin

    2012-01-01

    We apply terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy for monitoring the curing process of three different light-curing dental composites. Exact knowledge of the sample thickness is required for a precise determination of the THz dielectric parameters, as the materials exhibit shrinkage when they are cured. We find very small but significant changes of the THz refractive index and absorption coefficient during stepwise light exposure. The changes in the refractive index are correlated with changes in the density of the materials. Furthermore, the refractive index and the sample thickness are found to give the most reliable result for monitoring the curing process of the dental composites. PMID:23162722

  10. Dental composite resins: measuring the polymerization shrinkage using optical fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottevaere, H.; Tabak, M.; Chah, K.; Mégret, P.; Thienpont, H.

    2012-04-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of dental composite materials is recognized as one of the main reasons for the development of marginal leakage between a tooth and filling material. As an alternative to conventional measurement methods, we propose optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based sensors to perform real-time strain and shrinkage measurements during the curing process of dental resin cements. We introduce a fully automated set-up to measure the Bragg wavelength shift of the FBG strain sensors and to accurately monitor the linear strain and shrinkage of dental resins during curing. Three different dental resin materials were studied in this work: matrix-filled BisGMA-based resins, glass ionomers and organic modified ceramics.

  11. Dental resin composites containing silica-fused whiskers--effects of whisker-to-silica ratio on fracture toughness and indentation properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hockin H K; Quinn, Janet B; Smith, Douglas T; Antonucci, Joseph M; Schumacher, Gary E; Eichmiller, Frederick C

    2002-02-01

    Dental resin composites need to be strengthened in order to improve their performance in large stress-bearing applications such as crowns and multiple-unit restorations. Recently, silica-fused ceramic whiskers were used to reinforce dental composites, and the whisker-to-silica ratio was found to be a key microstructural parameter that determined the composite strength. The aim of this study was to further investigate the effects of whisker-to-silica ratio on the fracture toughness, elastic modulus, hardness and brittleness of the composite. Silica particles and silicon carbide whiskers were mixed at whisker:silica mass ratios of 0:1, 1:5. 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, 5:1, and 1:0. Each mixture was thermally fused, silanized and combined with a dental resin at a filler mass percentage of 60%. Fracture toughness was measured with a single-edge notched beam method. Elastic modulus and hardness were measured with a nano-indentation system. Whisker:silica ratio had significant effects on composite properties. The composite toughness (mean+/-SD; n = 9) at whisker:silica = 2:1 was (2.47+/-0.28) MPa m(1/2), significantly higher than (1.02+/-0.23) at whisker:silica = 0:1, (1.13+/-0.19) of a prosthetic composite control, and (0.95+/-0.11) of an inlay/onlay composite control (Tukey's at family confidence coefficient = 0.95). Elastic modulus increased monotonically and hardness plateaued with increasing the whisker:silica ratio. Increasing the whisker:silica ratio also decreased the composite brittleness, which became about 1/3 of that of the inlay:onlay control. Electron microscopy revealed relatively flat fracture surfaces for the controls, but much rougher ones for the whisker composites, with fracture steps and whisker pullout contributing to toughness. The whiskers appeared to be well-bonded with the matrix, probably due to the fused silica producing rough whisker surfaces. Reinforcement with silica-fused whiskers resulted in novel dental composites that possessed fracture toughness

  12. Bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of short fiber-reinforced resin composite in comparison with other composite restoratives.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) and surface free-energy (SFE) of short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC), using different adhesive systems, in comparison with other composite restoratives. The resin composites used were everX Posterior (EP), Clearfil AP-X (CA), and Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal Restorative (FS). The adhesive systems used were Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and G-Premio Bond (GB). Resin composite was bonded to dentin, and SBS was determined after 24 h of storage in distilled water and after 10,000 thermal cycles (TCs). The SFEs of the resin composites and the adhesives were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. The SFE values and SFE characteristics were not influenced by the type of resin composite, but were influenced by the type of adhesive system. The results of this study suggest that the bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of SFRC are the same as for other composite restoratives, but that these parameters are affected by the type of adhesive system. The bonding performance of SFRC was enhanced by thermal cycling in a manner similar to that for other composite restoratives.

  13. Sealing of adhesive systems in ferric sulfate-contaminated dentinal margins in class V composite resin restorations.

    PubMed

    Shadman, Niloofar; Farzin Ebrahimi, Shahram; Mollaie, Najmeh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hemostatic agents are applied to prepare an isolated bleeding-free condition during dental treatments and can influence adhesive restorations. This study evaluated the effect of a hemostatic agent (ViscoStat) on microleakage of contaminated dentinal margin of class V composite resin restorations with three adhesives. Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human molars were selected and class V cavities (3×3×1.5 mm) were prepared on buccal and lingual surfaces. Gingival margins of the cavities were placed below the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were divided into six groups randomly. The adhesives were Excite, AdheSE and AdheSE One. In three groups, the gingival walls of the cavities were contaminated with ViscoStat and then rinsed. The cavities were restored with composite resin and light-cured. After storage in distilled water (37°C) for 24 hours and polishing, the samples were thermocycled and sealed with nail varnish. Then they were stored in 1% basic fuchsin for 24 hours, rinsed and mounted in self-cured acryl resin, followed by sectioning buccolingually. Dye penetration was observed under a stereomicroscope and scored. Data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. P<0.05 was set as the level of significance. Results. Only in the Excite group, contamination did not have adverse effects on dentin microleakage (P > 0.05). In the contaminated groups, Excite had significantly less microleakage than the others (P = 0.003). AdheSE and AdheSE One did not exhibit significant difference in microleakage (P > 0.05). Conclusion. ViscoStat hemostatic agent increased dentinal microleakage in AdheSE and AdheSE One adhesives with no effect on Excite.

  14. Sealing of adhesive systems in ferric sulfate-contaminated dentinal margins in class V composite resin restorations

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Niloofar; Farzin Ebrahimi, Shahram; Mollaie, Najmeh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hemostatic agents are applied to prepare an isolated bleeding-free condition during dental treatments and can influence adhesive restorations. This study evaluated the effect of a hemostatic agent (ViscoStat) on microleakage of contaminated dentinal margin of class V composite resin restorations with three adhesives. Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human molars were selected and class V cavities (3×3×1.5 mm) were prepared on buccal and lingual surfaces. Gingival margins of the cavities were placed below the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were divided into six groups randomly. The adhesives were Excite, AdheSE and AdheSE One. In three groups, the gingival walls of the cavities were contaminated with ViscoStat and then rinsed. The cavities were restored with composite resin and light-cured. After storage in distilled water (37°C) for 24 hours and polishing, the samples were thermocycled and sealed with nail varnish. Then they were stored in 1% basic fuchsin for 24 hours, rinsed and mounted in self-cured acryl resin, followed by sectioning buccolingually. Dye penetration was observed under a stereomicroscope and scored. Data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. P<0.05 was set as the level of significance. Results. Only in the Excite group, contamination did not have adverse effects on dentin microleakage (P > 0.05). In the contaminated groups, Excite had significantly less microleakage than the others (P = 0.003). AdheSE and AdheSE One did not exhibit significant difference in microleakage (P > 0.05). Conclusion. ViscoStat hemostatic agent increased dentinal microleakage in AdheSE and AdheSE One adhesives with no effect on Excite. PMID:27092210

  15. Effect of different adhesive strategies on the post-operative sensitivity of class I composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Sancakli, Hande Sar; Yildiz, Esra; Bayrak, Isil; Ozel, Sevda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the post-operative sensitivity of occlusal restorations using different dentin adhesives performed by an undergraduate and a post-doctorate dentist. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty-eight molar occlusal restorations were placed in 39 patients (ages between 18 and 30) using 3 different kind of adhesive systems; Optibond FL (OBF), Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB), and iBond (IB) by a post-doctorate dentist or a fifth-year dental student according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Post-operative sensitivity to cold and air was evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) after 24 hours, 30, 90, and 180 days. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U and Friedman tests (P < 0.05). Results: Post-operative sensitivity scores for OBF and CPB were higher for the dental student (P < 0.05), while IB scores did not differ statistical significantly according to the operator (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Operator skill and experience appears to play a role in determining the outcome of post-operative sensitivity of multi-step adhesive systems although the post-operative sensitivity was low. It is suggested that the less experienced clinicians (rather than experienced clinicians) should better use the self-etching dentin bonding systems with reduced application steps to minimize the potential risk of post-operative sensitivity of dental adhesives. PMID:24966741

  16. [Atraumatic restorative treatment: a dental alternative well-received by children].

    PubMed

    Aguirre Aguilar, Antonio Armando; Rios Caro, Teresa Etelvina; Huamán Saavedra, Jorge; França, Cristiane Miranda; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) with the conventional rotational restorative method (CM) to determine in both cases the total time required for the procedure, the cost, the presence of pain, and the behavior of pediatric patients in Peru. Of the 30 children selected for the study, half received ART and restoration with glass ionomer cement and the other half, CM and restoration with amalgam. The study parameters were the times required to remove the decayed tissue and to complete the entire procedure, the total cost of the procedure, the presence of pain, and the patient's behavior during treatment. Significant differences were found between the two techniques in all parameters, except for the patient's behavior. Although removing the decayed tissue was faster with the CM, the entire procedure was faster with ART, which, moreover, was significantly less expensive and less painful than the CM. The results indicated that ART is a very good alternative due to its low cost and acceptance by the children.

  17. Optical approach in characterizing dental biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demoli, Nazif; Vučić, Zlatko; Milat, Ognjen; Gladić, Jadranko; Lovrić, Davorin; Pandurić, Vlatko; Marović, Danijela; Moguš-Milanković, Andrea; Ristić, Mira; Čalogović, Marina; Tarle, Zrinka

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the current activities of a research collaborative program between three institutions from Zagreb (School of Dental Medicine, Institute of Physics, and Institute Ruđer Bo\\vsković). Within the scope of this program, it is planned to investigate and find guidelines for the refinement of the properties of dental biomaterials (DBs) and of procedures in restorative dental medicine. It is also planned to identify and model the dominant mechanisms which control polymerization of DBs. The materials to be investigated include methacrylate based composite resins, new composite materials with amorphous calcium phosphate, silorane based composite resins, glass-ionomer cements, and giomer.

  18. Evaluation of an experimental Ti-Co alloy for dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Russell; Welsch, Gerhard

    2013-11-01

    Precision and surface quality of pure titanium (Ti) castings for dental and biomedical uses are limited because of the high melting temperature and the violent reactivity of Ti with mold materials during casting procedures. This feasibility study evaluates an experimental low-melting Ti-Co alloy in term of its microstructure and physical and mechanical properties. Tensile samples of Ti-12 wt % Co alloy were cast under a protective argon atmosphere. The melting range of the cast samplers was determined. Cast samples were annealed at 1010°C for various time intervals in order to homogenize microstructures. Microstructures were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Tensile strength and microhardness tests were performed and correlated with microstructures resulting from annealing processes. Ti2Co intermetallic compound coexisted with Ti-Co solid solution in all samples. The melting range of the alloy was 1062-1088°C, which is 568°C lower than that of Ti. The thickness of the surface oxide scale on cast samples was dramatically reduced to 1-3 μm because of the low-melting nature of the alloy. Solution treatment at 1010°C for 100 h yields the highest tensile strength. Ultimate tensile strength is measured from 852 to 1240 MPa which is stronger than currently used dental alloys. Microhardness values were ranged from 341 to 488 KHN and elongation was from 1.2 to 1.8%. Both microhardness and percentage elongation are similar to those of dental Co-Cr alloys. One hundred hours of annealing dissolved dendritic boundaries and transformed the alloy to a more microductitle matrix, however, the intermetallic compound of Ti2Co remained.

  19. Rapid and non-destructive analysis of metallic dental restorations using X-ray fluorescence spectra and light-element sampling tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuhashi, K.; Uo, M.; Kitagawa, Y.; Watari, F.

    2012-12-01

    IntroductionRecently, allergic diseases caused by dental metals have been increasing. Therefore, rapid and accurate analytical methods for the metal restorations in the oral cavities of patients are required. The purpose of this study was to develop a non-destructive extraction method for dental alloys, along with a subsequent, rapid and accurate elemental analysis. Materials and methodSamples were obtained by polishing the surfaces of metal restorations using a dental rotating tool with disposable buffs and polishing pastes. As materials for the analysis, three dental alloys were used. To compare the sampling and analysis efficiencies, two buffs and seven pastes were used. After polishing the surface of a metal restoration, the buff was analyzed using X-ray scanning analytical microscopy (XSAM). ResultsThe efficiency of the analysis was judged based on the sampling rate achieved and the absence of disturbing elements in the background in fluorescence X-ray spectra. The best results were obtained for the combination of TexMet as a buff with diamond as a paste. This combination produced a good collection efficiency and a plain background in the fluorescence X-ray spectra, resulting in a high precision of the analysis.

  20. In vivo and in vitro evaluations of microleakage around Class I amalgam and composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Alptekin, Tuncay; Ozer, Fusan; Unlu, Nimet; Cobanoglu, Nevin; Blatz, Markus B

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated and compared microleakage values of in vivo and in vitro placed Class I amalgam restorations with or without three different lining materials and posterior composite restorations with two dentin bonding agents. For the in vivo group, 72 standardized Class I cavities were prepared on the occlusal surfaces of molars scheduled for extraction. The test groups (n = 12) were: amalgam without lining (A), amalgam with cavity varnish (A+C), amalgam with Clearfil SE Bond (A+CSE), amalgam with Clearfil 2V (A+C2V), composite with Clearfil SE Bond (C+CSE) and composite with Protect Bond (C+PB). The restored teeth were extracted after seven days. The same grouping, materials and techniques were used in 72 extracted molars for the in-vitro part of the study. The specimens were immersed in basic fuchsin for 24 hours and sectioned. Microleakage was examined and scored at 20x magnification. Statistical analyses were performed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests with the 5% level of significance. Overall, the in vivo and in vitro test groups were not different from each other. No significant differences in microleakage values were observed between the unlined and lined amalgam groups (p > 0.05). However, since lined amalgam restorations did not reveal any marginal leakage, the application of an adhesive bonding material under the amalgam restorations can be considered. In general, cavity varnish was not as effective as adhesive bonding agents in preventing microleakage in amalgam restorations. Composite restorations demonstrated higher leakage values than amalgam restorations (p < 0.05), except for A+C (p > 0.05) in the in vivo group. There was no significant difference between the two composite groups for in vitro and in vivo conditions (p > 0.05).

  1. Endodontic complications in teeth with vital pulps restored with composite resins: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dawson, V S; Amjad, S; Fransson, H

    2015-07-01

    Composite resin is used extensively for restoration of teeth with vital pulps. Although cell culture studies have disclosed harmful effects on pulpal cells, any untoward clinical effects, manifest as adverse pulpal responses, have yet to be determined. This study comprises a systematic review, designed to address the question of whether the risk of endodontic complications is greater with composite resin restorations than with other restorative materials, such as amalgam. The study methodology involved (i) formulation of the research question, (ii) construction and conduct of an extensive literature search with (iii) interpretation and assessment of the retrieved literature. A search of the medical database PubMed was complemented with a search of the Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL). The initial search yielded 1043 publications, the abstracts of which were read independently by the authors. After additional searches, 10 studies were included in the review. In all the included studies, the level of evidence was assessed as low. No conclusions could therefore be drawn. The included studies reported few, if any, endodontic complications. Little or no differences emerged between teeth restored with composite resins and those restored with amalgam. To determine whether composite resin restorations of teeth with vital pulps are associated with an increased risk for development of endodontic complications such as apical periodontitis, further evidence is needed, from well-constructed studies with a large number of participants.

  2. Comparison of acceptance, preference and efficacy between pressure anesthesia and classical needle infiltration anesthesia for dental restorative procedures in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Makade, Chetana Sachin; Shenoi, Pratima R; Gunwal, Mohit K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Intraoral local anesthesia is essential for delivering dental care. Needless devices have been developed to provide anesthesia without injections. Little controlled research is available on its use in dental restorative procedures in adult patients. The aims of this study were to compare adult patients acceptability and preference for needleless jet injection with classical local infiltration as well as to evaluate the efficacy of the needleless anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Twenty non fearful adults with no previous experience of dental anesthesia were studied using split-mouth design. The first procedure was performed with classical needle infiltration anesthesia. The same amount of anesthetic solution was administered using MADA jet needleless device in a second session one week later, during which a second dental restorative procedure was performed. Patients acceptance was assessed using Universal pain assessment tool while effectiveness was recorded using soft tissue anesthesia and pulpal anesthesia. Patients reported their preference for the anesthetic method at the third visit. The data was evaluated using chi square test and student's t-test. Results: Pressure anesthesia was more accepted and preferred by 70% of the patients than traditional needle anesthesia (20%). Both needle and pressure anesthesia was equally effective for carrying out the dental procedures. Conclusion: Patients experienced significantly less pain and fear (p<0.01) during anesthetic procedure with pressure anesthesia. However, for more invasive procedures needle anesthesia will be more effective. PMID:24778516

  3. Microflora and chemical composition of dental plaque from subjects with hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Hoover, C I; Newbrun, E; Mettraux, G; Graf, H

    1980-06-01

    We compared the microbiological and chemical composition of dental plaque from subjects with hereditary fructose intolerance who restrict their dietary sugar intake with that of control subjects who do not. The two groups showed no significant differences in chemical composition of plaque: the mean protein, carbohydrate, calcium, magnesium, and phosphate contents were similar. Dental plaque from both groups contained similar numbers of total colony-forming units per microgram of plaque protein, and Streptococcus sanguis, an indigenous nonpathogen, was isolated with equal frequency from plaque samples of both groups. However, potentially odontopathic Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus were isolated three to four times more frequently from plaque samples of control subjects than from plaque samples of subjects with hereditary fructose intolerance. Clearly, diet (sucrose in particular) influences the colonization and multiplication of specific cariogenic organisms in dental plaque.

  4. X-ray diffraction analysis of residual stress in zirconia dental composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahkarami, Masoud

    Dental restoration ceramic is a complex system to be characterized. Beside its essential biocompatibility, and pleasant appearance, it requires being mechanically strong in a catastrophic loading environment. Any design is restricted with geometry boundary and material property limits. Inspired by natural teeth, a multilayer ceramic is a smart way of achieving an enhanced restoration. Bi-layers of zirconia core covered by porcelain are known as one of the best multilayer restorations. Residual stresses may be introduced into a bi-layer dental ceramic restoration during its entire manufacturing process due to thermal expansion and elastic property mismatch. It is impossible to achieve a free of residual stresses bi-layer zirconia-porcelain restoration. The idea is to take the advantage of residual stress in design in such a way to prevent the crack initiation and progression. The hypothesis is a compressive residual stress at external contact surface would be enabling the restoration to endure a greater tensile stress. Optimizing the layers thickness, manufacturing process, and validating 3D simulations require development of new techniques of thickness, residual stresses and phase transformation measurement. In the present work, a combined mirco-tomography and finite element based method were adapted for thickness measurement. Two new 2D X-ray diffraction based techniques were adapted for phase transformation area mapping and combined phase transformation and residual stress measurement. Concerning the complex geometry of crown, an efficient method for X-ray diffraction data collection mapping on a given curved surface was developed. Finally a novel method for 3D dimensional x-ray diffraction data collection and visualization were introduced.

  5. Fracture Toughness of Veneering Ceramics for Fused to Metal (PFM) and Zirconia Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Janet B.; Quinn, George D.; Sundar, Veeraraghaven

    2010-01-01

    Veneering ceramics designed to be used with modern zirconia framework restorations have been reported to fracture occasionally in vivo. The fracture toughness of such veneering ceramics was measured and compared to that of conventional feldspathic porcelain veneering ceramics for metal framework restorations. The fracture toughness of the leucite free veneer was measured to be 0.73 MPa m ± 0.02 MPa m, which is less than that for the porcelain fused to metal (PFM) veneering ceramic: 1.10 MPa ± 0.2 MPa. (Uncertainties are one standard deviation unless otherwise noted.) The surface crack in flexure (SCF) method was suitable for both materials, but precrack identification was difficult for the leucite containing feldspathic porcelain PFM veneer. PMID:21833158

  6. Composition and production rate of dental solid waste and associated management practices in Hamadan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Nabizadeh, Ramin; Koolivand, Ali; Jafari, Ahmad Jonidi; Yunesian, Massoud; Omrani, Gasemali

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the components, composition and production rate of dental solid waste and associated management practices in dental offices in Hamadan. A total of 28 offices, including ten general dentist offices, eight specialist dentist offices, five practical dentist offices and five denture maker offices were selected in a random way. Three samples from each selected type were taken and the waste was manually separated into 74 sub-fractions and each sub-fraction was weighed. The results showed that the total annual dental waste production in dental offices was 41947.43 kg. Domestic type, potentially infectious, chemical and pharmaceutical and toxic waste constituted 71.15, 21.40, 7.26 and 0.18%, respectively of this amount. Only seven fractions including gypsum, latex gloves, nylon, dental impression material, used medicine ampoules, saliva-contaminated paper towels and saliva ejectors constituted about 80% of the waste. It was also indicated that there were no effective activity for waste minimization, separation, reuse and recycling in dental offices and the management of sharps, potentially infectious waste and other hazardous waste was poor.

  7. Use of glass fiber post and composite resin in restoration of a vertical fractured tooth.

    PubMed

    Fidel, Sandra Rivera; Sassone, Luciana; Alvares, Gustavo Ribeiro; Guimarães, Rodrigo Prada Sant'anna; Fidel, Rivail Antônio Sérgio

    2006-12-01

    Combined coronal and vertical root fractures are difficult to treat and extraction of the affected tooth is quite often indicated. In anterior teeth, esthetics and function must be reestablished immediately. This case describes the restoration of a fractured upper right central incisor using a glass fiber post and adhesive composite. At the follow-up appointment, 13 months later, clinical and radiographical examinations revealed the glass fiber post and restoration in place, suggesting the efficacy of the treatment in maintaining fractured tooth.

  8. In Vitro Evaluation of Veneering Composites and Fibers on the Color of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoomeh; Hasani, Zahra; Ahmadi, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Color match between fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) restorations and teeth is an imperative factor in esthetic dentistry. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of veneering composites and fibers on the color change of FRC restorations. Materials and Methods: Glass and polyethylene fibers were used to reinforce a direct microhybrid composite (Z250, 3M ESPE) and a microfilled composite (Gradia Indirect, GC). There were eight experimental groups (n=5 disks per group). Four groups were used as the controls (non-FRC control) and the others were used as experimental groups. CIELAB parameters (L*, a* and b*) of specimens were evaluated against a white background using a spectrophotometer to assess the color change. The color difference (ΔE*) and color coordinates were (L*, a* and b*) analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: Both types of composite and fiber influenced the color parameters (ΔL*, Δa*). The incorporation of fibers into the composite in the experimental groups made them darker than the control groups, except in the Gradia Indirect+ glass fibers group. Δb* is affected by types of fibers only in direct fiber reinforced composite. No statistically significant differences were recognized in ΔE* among the groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that the tested FRC restorations exhibited no difference in color in comparison with non-FRC restoration. Hence, the types of veneering composites and fibers did not influence the color change (ΔE*) of FRC restorations. PMID:25584060

  9. Intraoral environment conditions and their influence on marginal leakage in composite resin restorations.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Paula; Rocha, Viviane; Saraiva, Letícia; Cavalcanti, Andrea N; Azevedo, Juliana F; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre M S

    2010-01-01

    Color matching in the anterior superior incisor region (ASIR) is very difficult when using a rubber dam during restorative procedures. This study measured temperature/relative humidity parameters in the ASIR and evaluated the influence of the inhalation/downtime/exhalation mouth-breathing cycle on microleakage in composite resin restorations performed in the region, using three different adhesive systems. Sixty bovine incisors were randomly assigned to six groups (n=10) according to environmental conditions (laboratory environment or intraoral conditions) and the three adhesive systems being tested (Prime & Bond NT (PB), Single Bond (SB) and Clearfil SE Bond (CL)). The composite resin restored specimens were thermocycled (800 cycles, 5-55 degrees C), immersed in a 2% methylene blue-buffered solution and sectioned longitudinally The dye penetration on the margin of the restoration was evaluated and non-parametric statistical analyses were performed. The temperature and humidity parameters in the ASIR showed significant differences when compared to the laboratory environment. Restorations performed in the ASIR environment showed no increases in microleakage. As it was shown that temperature/humidity in ASIR do not affect marginal sealing in direct composite resin restorations negatively, better color matching can be safely achieved without the use of a rubber dam.

  10. Open photoacoustic cell for thermal diffusivity measurements of a fast hardening cement used in dental restoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrath, F. B. G.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Baesso, M. L.; Bento, A. C.; Moraes, J. C. S.; Santos, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity and conductivity of dental cements have been studied using open photoacoustic cell (OPC). The samples consisted of fast hardening cement named CER, developed to be a root-end filling material. Thermal characterization was performed in samples with different gel/powder ratio and particle sizes and the results were compared to the ones from commercial cements. Complementary measurements of specific heat and mass density were also performed. The results showed that the thermal diffusivity of CER tends to increase smoothly with gel volume and rapidly against particle size. This behavior was linked to the pores size and their distribution in the samples. The OPC method was shown to be a valuable way in deriving thermal properties of porous material.

  11. FDI World Dental Federation - clinical criteria for the evaluation of direct and indirect restorations. Update and clinical examples.

    PubMed

    Hickel, Reinhard; Peschke, Arnd; Tyas, Martin; Mjör, Ivar; Bayne, Stephen; Peters, Mathilde; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Randall, Ross; Vanherle, Guido; Heintze, Siegward D

    2010-08-01

    In 2007, new clinical criteria were approved by the FDI World Dental Federation and simultaneously published in three dental journals. The criteria were categorized into three groups: esthetic parameters (four criteria), functional parameters (six criteria), and biological parameters (six criteria). Each criterion can be expressed with five scores, three for acceptable and two for non-acceptable (one for reparable and one for replacement). The criteria have been used in several clinical studies since 2007, and the resulting experience in their application has led to a requirement to modify some of the criteria and scores. The two major alterations involve staining and approximal contacts. As staining of the margins and the surface have different causes, both phenomena do not appear simultaneously. Thus, staining has been differentiated into marginal staining and surface staining. The approximal contact now appears under the name "approximal anatomic form" as the approximal contour is a specific, often non-esthetic issue that cannot be integrated into the criterion "esthetic anatomical form". In 2008, a web-based training and calibration tool called e-calib (www.e-calib.info) was made available. Clinical investigators and other research workers can train and calibrate themselves interactively by assessing clinical cases of posterior restorations, which are presented as high quality pictures. Currently, about 300 clinical cases are included in the database which is regularly updated. Training for 8 of the 16 clinical criteria is available in the program: "Surface luster"; "Staining (surface, margins)"; "Color match and translucency"; "Esthetic anatomical form"; "Fracture of material and retention"; "Marginal adaptation"; "Recurrence of caries, erosion, abfraction"; and "Tooth integrity (enamel cracks, tooth fractures)". Typical clinical cases are presented for each of these eight criteria and their corresponding five scores.

  12. FDI World Dental Federation: clinical criteria for the evaluation of direct and indirect restorations-update and clinical examples.

    PubMed

    Hickel, Reinhard; Peschke, Arnd; Tyas, Martin; Mjör, Ivar; Bayne, Stephen; Peters, Mathilde; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Randall, Ross; Vanherle, Guido; Heintze, Siegward D

    2010-08-01

    In 2007, new clinical criteria were approved by the FDI World Dental Federation and simultaneously published in three dental journals. The criteria were categorized into three groups: esthetic parameters (four criteria), functional parameters (six criteria) and biological parameters (six criteria). Each criterion can be expressed with five scores, three for acceptable and two for non-acceptable (one for reparable and one for replacement). The criteria have been used in several clinical studies since 2007, and the resulting experience in their application has led to a requirement to modify some of the criteria and scores. The two major alterations involve staining and approximal contacts. As staining of the margins and the surface has different causes, both phenomena do not appear simultaneously. Thus, staining has been differentiated into marginal staining and surface staining. The approximal contact now appears under the name "approximal anatomic form" as the approximal contour is a specific, often non-esthetic issue that cannot be integrated into the criterion "esthetic anatomical form". In 2008, a web-based training and calibration tool called e-calib ( www.e-calib.info ) was made available. Clinical investigators and other research workers can train and calibrate themselves interactively by assessing clinical cases of posterior restorations which are presented as high-quality pictures. Currently, about 300 clinical cases are included in the database which is regularly updated. Training for eight of the 16 clinical criteria is available in the program: "Surface lustre"; "Staining (surface, margins)"; "Color match and translucency"; Esthetic anatomical form"; "Fracture of material and retention"; "Marginal adaptation"; "Recurrence of caries, erosion, abfraction"; and "Tooth integrity (enamel cracks, tooth fractures)". Typical clinical cases are presented for each of these eight criteria and their corresponding five scores.

  13. Secondary caries formation in vitro around glass ionomer-lined amalgam and composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Dionysopoulos, P; Kotsanos, N; Papadogianis, Y

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this in vitro secondary caries study was to examine the glass-ionomer liner's effect on wall-lesion inhibition when a conventional and a light-cured glass ionomer liner was placed under amalgam and composite resin restorations. Class V preparations in extracted upper premolars were used and ten restorations were used for each of the following groups: (i) two layers of copal varnish and amalgam; (ii) conventional glass-ionomer and amalgam; (iii) light-cured glass-ionomer and amalgam; (iv) bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; (v) conventional glass-ionomer, bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; (vi) light-cured glass-ionomer, extended 0.3 mm short of the enamel margin bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; and (vii) light-cured glass-ionomer, extended 1 mm short of the enamel margin, bonding agent and light-cured composite resin. The teeth were thermocycled and artificial caries were created using an acid-gel. The results of this study showed that artificial recurrent caries can be reduced significantly (P < 0.05) with a glass-ionomer liner under amalgam restorations. The results also showed that when the light-cured glass-ionomer liner was placed 0.3 mm from the cavosurface margin under composite resin restoration, the artificial recurrent caries reduced significantly (P < 0.05).

  14. [Microbiological composition of dental plaque using Sprague Dawley rats as an experimental model].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, F R; Perrone, M; Acevedo, A M

    1990-01-01

    In this study, the microbiological composition of the dental plaque in 12 male Sprague-Dawley rats was determined. Analysis using the light microscope showed the presence of nine colonies which suggested the presence of cocci, (6) diplococci (1) and rods. (2) Five of the bacteria were Gram positive and three were Gram negative. The morphological characteristic suggested the presence of Actinomyces in the case of Gram positive rods; Fusobacterium in the case of Gram negative rods; Neisseria and Veillonella in the of Gram negative cocci and Streptococci for the rest of the colonies. The biochemical characterization of the bacteria suggested the absence of Streptococcus mutans in the dental plaque of this animals.

  15. The assessment of surface roughness and microleakage of eroded tooth-colored dental restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Thulfiqar Ali; Bakar, Wan Zaripah Wan; Ghani, Zuryati Ab; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of acidic solution on surface roughness and microleakage of tooth-colored restorative materials. Materials and Methods: A 160 box-shaped cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 160 human molars, and assigned to four groups: Group A restored with Ketac™ Molar Easymix, Group B with Fuji II™ LC, Group C with Ketac™ N100, and Group D with Filtek™ Z250, and subdivided into study and control groups (n = 20). Study groups were immersed in lemon juice (pH = 2.79) for 24 h, whilst controlgroups in deionized distilled water. All samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue dye, sectioned into two equal halves for surface roughness, and microleakage tests. Data were analyzed using Mann–Whitney and Kruskal–Wallis tests at P < 0.05. Results: There was a significant difference in surface roughness of Ketac™ Molar, Fuji II™ LC, and Ketac™ N100. No significant difference was found in microleakage of Ketac™ Molar and Fuji II™ LC; however, there were significant differences in the gingival margin of Ketac™ N100, and the occlusal margin of Filtek™ Z250. Conclusions: All glass ionomer cements were eroded after exposure to the acidic drink. Filtek™ Z250 and Ketac™ Molar Easymix showed more microleakage. All materials showed more microleakage at the gingival margins. PMID:25506139

  16. Composition of enamel pellicle from dental erosion patients.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, G; Cotroneo, E; Moazzez, R; Rojas-Serrano, M; Donaldson, N; Austin, R; Zaidel, L; Bartlett, D; Proctor, G

    2014-01-01

    Oral health is dependent upon a thin mobile film of saliva on soft and hard tissues. Salivary proteins adhere to teeth to form the acquired enamel pellicle which is believed to protect teeth from acid erosion. This study investigated whether patients suffering diet-induced dental erosion had altered enamel pellicles. Thirty patients suffering erosion were compared to healthy age-matched controls. Subjects wore a maxillary splint holding hydroxyapatite and human enamel blocks for 1 h. The acquired enamel pellicle was removed from the blocks and compared to the natural incisor pellicle. Basic Erosive Wear Examination scores confirmed that dental erosion was present in erosion patients and absent from healthy age-matched controls. Erosion patients had half the amount of proteins (BCA assay) within the acquired pellicle forming on splint blocks compared to normal controls (p < 0.05). In particular, statherin, a calcium-binding protein, was 35% less abundant (p < 0.05). Calcium concentration within the acquired pellicle was also reduced by 50% in erosion patients (p < 0.001). In contrast, the natural pellicle on the incisor had similar amounts of total protein in erosion patients and healthy controls. In summary, the formation of new acquired pellicles on surfaces was reduced in erosion patients, which may explain their greater susceptibility to acid erosion of teeth.

  17. Dental applications of nanostructured bioactive glass and its composites

    PubMed Central

    Polini, Alessandro; Bai, Hao; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2013-01-01

    To improve treatments for bone or dental trauma, and for diseases such as osteoporosis, cancer, and infections, scientists who perform basic research are collaborating with clinicians to design and test new biomaterials for the regeneration of lost or injured tissue. Developed some 40 years ago, bioactive glass (BG) has recently become one of the most promising biomaterials, a consequence of discoveries that its unusual properties elicit specific biological responses inside the body. Among these important properties are the capability of BG to form strong interfaces with both hard and soft tissues, and its release of ions upon dissolution. Recent developments in nanotechnology have introduced opportunities for materials sciences to advance dental and bone therapies. For example, the applications for BG expand as it becomes possible to finely control structures and physicochemical properties of materials at the molecular level. Here we review how the properties of these materials have been enhanced by the advent of nanotechnology; and how these developments are producing promising results in hard-tissue regeneration and development of innovative BG-based drug-delivery systems. PMID:23606653

  18. Dental applications of nanostructured bioactive glass and its composites.

    PubMed

    Polini, Alessandro; Bai, Hao; Tomsia, Antoni P

    2013-01-01

    To improve treatments of bone or dental trauma and diseases such as osteoporosis, cancer, and infections, scientists who perform basic research are collaborating with clinicians to design and test new biomaterials for the regeneration of lost or injured tissue. Developed some 40 years ago, bioactive glass (BG) has recently become one of the most promising biomaterials, a consequence of discoveries that its unusual properties elicit specific biological responses inside the body. Among these important properties are the capability of BG to form strong interfaces with both hard and soft tissues, and its release of ions upon dissolution. Recent developments in nanotechnology have introduced opportunities for materials sciences to advance dental and bone therapies. For example, the applications for BG expand as it becomes possible to finely control structures and physicochemical properties of materials at the molecular level. Here, we review how the properties of these materials have been enhanced by the advent of nanotechnology, and how these developments are producing promising results in hard-tissue regeneration and development of innovative BG-based drug delivery systems.

  19. Indirect composite restorations luted with two different procedures: A ten years follow up clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Preti, Alessandro; Vano, Michele; Derchi, Giacomo; Mangani, Francesco; Cerutti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate posterior indirect composite resin restoration ten years after placement luted with two different procedures. Study Design: In 23 patients 22 inlays/onlays (Group A) were luted using a dual-cured resin composite cement and 26 inlays/onlays (Group B) were luted using a light cured resin composite for a total of 48 Class I and Class II indirect composite resin inlays and onlays. The restorations were evaluated at 2 time points: 1) one week after placement (baseline evaluation) and 2) ten years after placement using the modified USPHS criteria. The Mann-Whitney and the Wilcoxon tests were used to examine the difference between the results of the baseline and 10 years evaluation for each criteria. Results: Numerical but not statistically significant differences were noted on any of the recorded clinical parameters (p>0.05) between the inlay/onlays of Group A and Group B. 91% and 94 % of Group A and B respectively were rated as clinically acceptable in all the evaluated criteria ten years after clinical function. Conclusions: Within the limits of the study the results showed after ten years of function a comparable clinical performance of indirect composite resin inlays/onlays placed with a light cure or dual cure luting procedures. Key words:Light curing composite, dual curing composite, indirect composite restoration, inlays/onlays, clinical trial. PMID:25810842

  20. Synthesis and characterizations of a fluoride-releasing dental restorative material.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Samad; Aamer, Sidra; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Wong, Ferranti S L; Ur Rehman, Ihtesham

    2013-08-01

    The aim was to develop an obturating material which has the tendency to release fluoride and minimize interfaces with tooth. Nano-fluorapatite (nFA) powder was synthesized by sol-gel. The composite based on polyurethane (PU) was obtained by chemically binding the nFA (10, 15, 20%wt/wt) to the diisocyanate component by utilizing in-situ polymerization. The procedure involved stepwise addition of monomeric units of PU, and optimizing the reagent concentrations to synthesize composite. The structural, phase and morphological analysis of nFA was evaluated. The structural, fluoride release and in-vitro adhesion analysis with tooth structure of PU/nFA was conducted. For fluoride release analysis the samples were stored in artificial saliva and deionized water for periodical time intervals. Bond strength of composites was analyzed by push-out test. Chemical linkage was achieved between PU and nFA without intermediate coupling agent. The insignificant difference of fluoride release pattern was observed in artificial saliva and (p≥0.05) deionized water. The PU/nFA composite provided sustained release of fluoride over a long period of time. The composite showed more adhesion toward tooth structure with the increase in concentration of nFA. Bond strength of composite was in accordance with root canal filling material, hence, the material with anti-cariogenic properties can be used as an obturating material.

  1. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  2. Effect of 38% carbamide peroxide on the microleakage of silorane-based versus methacrylate-based composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Ghavam, Maryam; Mahinfar, Nazanin; Pourhashemi, Seyed Jalal

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to assess the effect of 38% carbamide peroxide on the microleakage of class V cavities restored with either a silorane-based composite or two methacrylate-based composites. Materials and Methods A total of 96 class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface of extracted human teeth with both enamel and dentin margins and were randomly assigned into three groups of Filtek P90 (3M-ESPE) + P90 system adhesive (3M-ESPE)(group A), Filtek Z250 (3M-ESPE) + Adper Prompt L-Pop (3M-ESPE)(group B) and Filtek Z350XT (3M-ESPE) + Adper Prompt L-Pop (group C). Half of the teeth were randomly underwent bleaching (38% carbamide peroxide, Day White, Discus Dental, applying for 15 min, twice a day for 14 day) while the remaining half (control) were not bleached. Dye penetration was measured following immersion in basic fuchsine. Data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at a level of 0.05. Results No significant differences were found between composites in the control groups in enamel (p = 0.171) or dentin (p = 0.094) margins. After bleaching, microleakage of Z250 (in enamel [p = 0.867] or dentin [p = 0.590] margins) and Z350 (in enamel [p = 0.445] or dentin [p = 0.591] margins) did not change significantly, but the microleakage of P90 significantly increased in both enamel (p = 0.042) and dentin (p = 0.002) margins. Conclusions No significant differences were noted between the bleached and control subgroups of two methacrylate-based composites in enamel or dentin margins. Microleakage of silorane-based composite significantly increased after bleaching. PMID:25110640

  3. Three-dimensional visualization of composite fillings for dental identification using CT images

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, A; Saitoh, H; Makino, Y; Inokuchi, G; Hayakawa, M; Yajima, D; Iwase, H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to discriminate between enamel and composite resins by differences in Hounsfield units shown on 16 section multidetector CT (MDCT) images taken of unidentified bodies. Methods First, we determined the Hounsfield units of composite resins in 15 extracted human teeth. We then filled a single cavity prepared in each of the teeth with one of five different types of composite resins, and scanned the teeth using our routine post-mortem CT protocol for the head and neck. Obtained data were transferred to a radiological workstation and reconstructed. Furthermore, post-mortem CT images of the head of three unidentified bodies were reconstructed in the same manner. Results Four types of composite resins containing radio-opaque fillers showed a constant value of 4000 HU, and one radiolucent composite resin showed values in the range of 660–800 HU in the extracted teeth. Pixels at 4000 HU indicated that the composite resins were selected and visualized as three-dimensional colour images. Composite resins could be visualized on reconstructed images of the three unidentified bodies, and the sites visualized matched those noted on the forensic dental charts. Conclusions Discriminating enamel and composite resins containing radio-opaque materials was difficult because of their similar Hounsfield unit values. However, we did succeed in visualizing the composite resins despite limitations of the CT scale. CT reconstructed images can contribute to dental identification, particularly in cases where it is difficult to detect composite resins on external investigation, and these images can be prepared during routine dental identification work. PMID:22868297

  4. Towards automated 3D finite element modeling of direct fiber reinforced composite dental bridge.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Swain, Michael V; Li, Qing; Steven, Grant P

    2005-07-01

    An automated 3D finite element (FE) modeling procedure for direct fiber reinforced dental bridge is established on the basis of computer tomography (CT) scan data. The model presented herein represents a two-unit anterior cantilever bridge that includes a maxillary right incisor as an abutment and a maxillary left incisor as a cantilever pontic bonded by adhesive and reinforced fibers. The study aims at gathering fundamental knowledge for design optimization of this type of innovative composite dental bridges. To promote the automatic level of numerical analysis and computational design of new dental biomaterials, this report pays particular attention to the mathematical modeling, mesh generation, and validation of numerical models. To assess the numerical accuracy and to validate the model established, a convergence test and experimental verification are also presented.

  5. Bonding of flowable resin composite restorations to class 1 occlusal cavities with and without cyclic load stress.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Takatoshi; Maseki, Toshio; Nara, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    To examine the bonding of flowable resin composite restorations (F-restoration) to class 1 occlusal cavities with and without cyclic load stress, compared with that of a universal resin composite restoration (U-restoration). Two flowable composites and one universal composite (control) were applied with an adhesive system to 42 standardized class 1 occlusal cavities. The restored specimens were subjected to cyclic load stress and no stress modes. The microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) of the dentin floor was measured. The U-restoration did not show pretesting failure. The F-restorations exhibited pretesting failure, regardless of the stress mode. The μ-TBS was not significantly different among the three restorations, regardless of the stress mode. The cyclic load stress did not influence the μ-TBS of the F-restorations; however, it significantly reduced μ-TBS in the U-restoration. The bonding reliability of the F-restorations was inferior to that of the U-restoration, for both stress modes.

  6. Highly-translucent, strong and aging-resistant 3Y-TZP ceramics for dental restoration by grain boundary segregation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Vanmeensel, Kim; Batuk, Maria; Hadermann, Joke; Inokoshi, Masanao; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Naert, Ignace; Vleugels, Jef

    2015-04-01

    Latest trends in dental restorative ceramics involve the development of full-contour 3Y-TZP ceramics which can avoid chipping of veneering porcelains. Among the challenges are the low translucency and the hydrothermal stability of 3Y-TZP ceramics. In this work, different trivalent oxides (Al2O3, Sc2O3, Nd2O3 and La2O3) were selected to dope 3Y-TZP ceramics. Results show that dopant segregation was a key factor to design hydrothermally stable and high-translucent 3Y-TZP ceramics and the cation dopant radius could be used as a controlling parameter. A large trivalent dopant, oversized as compared to Zr(4+), exhibiting strong segregation at the ZrO2 grain boundary was preferred. The introduction of 0.2 mol% La2O3 in conventional 0.1-0.25 wt.% Al2O3-doped 3Y-TZP resulted in an excellent combination of high translucency and superior hydrothermal stability, while retaining excellent mechanical properties.

  7. Chipping fracture resistance of dental CAD/CAM restorative materials: Part 2. Phenomenological model and the effect of indenter type

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, G.D.; Giuseppetti, A.A.; Hoffman, K.H.

    2014-01-01

    The edge chipping resistances of six CAD/CAM dental restoration materials are analyzed and correlated to other mechanical properties. A new quadratic relationship that is based on a phenomenological model is presented. Objective The purpose of this study was to further analyze the edge chipping resistance of the brittle materials evaluated in Part 1. One objective was to determine why some force-distance trends were linear and others were nonlinear. A second objective was to account for differences in chipping resistance with indenter type. Methods Edge chipping experiments were conducted with different indenters, including some custom-made sharp conical indenters. A new force – distance quadratic expression was correlated to the data and compared to the linear and power law trends. Results The new quadratic function was an excellent fit in every instance. It can account for why some materials can be fit by a linear trend, while others can be fit by the power law trend. The effects of indenter type are accounted for variations in crack initiation and by the wedging stresses once an indentation hole is created. Significance The new quadratic force – edge distance function can be used with edge chipping data for all brittle materials, not just those evaluated in this study. The data trends vary from linear to nonlinear depending upon the material’s hardness, fracture toughness, and elastic modulus. PMID:24685179

  8. Fluorescence properties of commercial composite resin restorative materials in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Meller, Christian; Klein, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to assess the fluorescence properties of current commercial resin composites. Sixteen light-curing resin composites, representing a total number of 241 shades, were analyzed. Fluorescence measurements of all samples were taken using the monochromator-based fluorescence reader Synergy(TM )Mx (BioTek Instruments Inc. ). Additionally, samples of dentin and enamel were analyzed for comparison. The mean of the maximum excitation wavelength was (398±5) nm and the mean of the resulting emission wavelength was (452±9) nm for all composite shades. The maximum fluorescence varied widely between 50 and 70,808 RFU with a mean of (28,948±15,380) RFU. The maximum for dentin was (9,308±3,676) RFU and enamel (5,467±506) RFU. The results showed that the analyzed composites fluoresced at nearly the same excitation-emission wavelengths combination but with varying optical intensities. These results provide useful reference for optimal fluorescence induction and may help to develop better fluorescence diagnostic methods needed for treatment, forensic investigations and epidemiological research/analyses.

  9. Hydrothermal and mechanical stresses degrade fiber-matrix interfacial bond strength in dental fiber-reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Bouillaguet, Serge; Schütt, Andrea; Alander, Pasi; Schwaller, Patrick; Buerki, Gerhard; Michler, Johann; Cattani-Lorente, Maria; Vallittu, Pekka K; Krejci, Ivo

    2006-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) show great promise as long-term restorative materials in dentistry and medicine. Recent evidence indicates that these materials degrade in vivo, but the mechanisms are unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate mechanisms of deterioration of glass fiber-polymer matrix bond strengths in dental fiber-reinforced composites during hydrothermal and mechanical aging. Conventional three-point bending tests on dental FRCs were used to assess flexural strengths and moduli. Micro push-out tests were used to measure glass fiber-polymer matrix bond strengths, and nanoindentation tests were used to determine the modulus of elasticity of fiber and polymer matrix phases separately. Bar-shaped specimens of FRCs (EverStick, StickTech, and Vectris Pontic, Ivoclar-Vivadent) were either stored at room temperature, in water (37 and 100 degrees C) or subjected to ageing (10(6) cycles, load: 49 N), then tested by three-point bending. Thin slices were prepared for micro push-out and nanoindentation tests. The ultimate flexural strengths of both FRCs were significantly reduced after aging (p < 0.05). Both water storage and mechanical loading reduced the interfacial bond strengths of glass fibers to polymer matrices. Nanoindentation tests revealed a slight reduction in the elastic modulus of the EverStick and Vectris Pontic polymer matrix after water storage. Mechanical properties of FRC materials degrade primarily by a loss of interfacial bond strength between the glass and resin phases. This degradation is detectable by micro push-out and nanoindentation methods.

  10. The effects of glass ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of open-sandwich class II restorations.

    PubMed

    Güray Efes, Begüm; Yaman, Batu Can; Gümüştaş, Burak; Tıryakı, Murat

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the effects of glass-ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of Class II amalgam and composite restorations. Group 1 cavities were restored with amalgam and Group 4 cavities with nanofill composite after the application of a dentin-bonding agent. For the remaining groups, light-cured-glass-ionomer liner was used in a gingival floor proximal box (Groups 2, 5) or flowable composite was used as a liner (Groups 3, 6), the remainder of the cavity was restored with amalgam (Groups 2, 3) or composite (Groups 5, 6). The restorations were loaded in compression to failure. The data was analyzed using Tukey's multiple comparison test. The fracture resistance was significantly higher (p<0.05) in Group 3 than in all other groups, except Group 2 (p>0.05). Flowable composite, glass-ionomer liners increased the fracture resistance of open-sandwich Class II amalgam restorations.

  11. Comparison of the marginal adaptation of direct and indirect composite inlay restorations with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    TÜRK, Ayşe Gözde; SABUNCU, Metin; ÜNAL, Sena; ÖNAL, Banu; ULUSOY, Mübin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of the study was to use the photonic imaging modality of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to compare the marginal adaptation of composite inlays fabricated by direct and indirect techniques. Material and Methods Class II cavities were prepared on 34 extracted human molar teeth. The cavities were randomly divided into two groups according to the inlay fabrication technique. The first group was directly restored on cavities with a composite (Esthet X HD, Dentsply, Germany) after isolating. The second group was indirectly restored with the same composite material. Marginal adaptations were scanned before cementation with an invisible infrared light beam of OCT (Thorlabs), allowing measurement in 200 µm intervals. Restorations were cemented with a self-adhesive cement resin (SmartCem2, Dentsply), and then marginal adaptations were again measured with OCT. Mean values were statistically compared by using independent-samples t-test and paired samples t-test (p<0.05), before and after cementation. Results Direct inlays presented statistically smaller marginal discrepancy values than indirect inlays, before (p=0.00001442) and after (p=0.00001466) cementation. Marginal discrepancy values were increased for all restorations after cementation (p=0.00008839, p=0.000000952 for direct and indirect inlays, respectively). The mean marginal discrepancy value of the direct group increased from 56.88±20.04 µm to 91.88±31.7 µm, whereas the indirect group increased from 107.54±35.63 µm to 170.29±54.83 µm. Different techniques are available to detect marginal adaptation of restorations, but the OCT system can give quantitative information about resin cement thickness and its interaction between tooth and restoration in a nondestructive manner. Conclusions Direct inlays presented smaller marginal discrepancy than indirect inlays. The marginal discrepancy values were increased for all restorations that refer to cement thickness after cementation

  12. [Surface modification and microstructure of single-walled carbon nanotubes for dental composite resin].

    PubMed

    Xia, Yang; Zhang, Feimin; Xu, Li'na; Gu, Ning

    2006-12-01

    In order to improve its dispersion condition in dental composite resin and enhance its interaction with the matrix, single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) were refluxed and oxidized, then treated by APTE. Their outer surface were coated by nano-SiO2 particles using sol-gel process, then further treated by organosilanes ATES. IR and TEM were used to analyze modification results. TEM pictures showed nano-particles were on the surface of SWNTs; IR showed characteristic adsorbing bands of SiO2. Composite resin specimen with modified SWNTs was prepared and examined by TEM. SWNTs were detected in composite resin matrix among other inorganic fillers.

  13. 3D-WOVEN FIBER-REINFORCED COMPOSITE FOR CAD/CAM DENTAL APPLICATION

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard; Liu, Perng-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D)-woven noncrimp fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) was tested for mechanical properties in the two principal directions of the main XY plane and compared to different Computer-Aided-Design/Computer-Aided-Machining (CAD/CAM) Dental Materials. The Dental Materials included ceramic with Vitablock Mark II®, ProCAD®, InCeram® Spinel, InCeram® Alumina and InCeram® Zirconia in addition to a resin-based 3M Corp. Paradigm® particulate-filled composite. Alternate material controls included Coors 300 Alumina Ceramic and a tungsten carbide 22% cobalt cermet. The 3D-woven FRC was vacuum assisted resin transfer molding processed as a one-depth-thickness ~19-mm preform with a vinyl-ester resin and cut into blocks similar to the commercial CAD/CAM Dental Materials. Mechanical test samples prepared for a flexural three-point span length of 10.0 mm were sectioned for minimum-depth cuts to compare machinability and fracture resistance between groups. 3D-woven FRC improved mechanical properties with significant statistical differences over all CAD/CAM Dental Materials and Coors Alumina Ceramic for flexural strength (p<0.001), resilience (p<0.05), work of fracture (p<0.001), strain energy release (p<0.05), critical stress intensity factor (p<0.001) and strain (p<0.001). PMID:27642198

  14. 3D-WOVEN FIBER-REINFORCED COMPOSITE FOR CAD/CAM DENTAL APPLICATION.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Richard; Liu, Perng-Ru

    2016-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D)-woven noncrimp fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) was tested for mechanical properties in the two principal directions of the main XY plane and compared to different Computer-Aided-Design/Computer-Aided-Machining (CAD/CAM) Dental Materials. The Dental Materials included ceramic with Vitablock Mark II®, ProCAD®, InCeram® Spinel, InCeram® Alumina and InCeram® Zirconia in addition to a resin-based 3M Corp. Paradigm® particulate-filled composite. Alternate material controls included Coors 300 Alumina Ceramic and a tungsten carbide 22% cobalt cermet. The 3D-woven FRC was vacuum assisted resin transfer molding processed as a one-depth-thickness ~19-mm preform with a vinyl-ester resin and cut into blocks similar to the commercial CAD/CAM Dental Materials. Mechanical test samples prepared for a flexural three-point span length of 10.0 mm were sectioned for minimum-depth cuts to compare machinability and fracture resistance between groups. 3D-woven FRC improved mechanical properties with significant statistical differences over all CAD/CAM Dental Materials and Coors Alumina Ceramic for flexural strength (p<0.001), resilience (p<0.05), work of fracture (p<0.001), strain energy release (p<0.05), critical stress intensity factor (p<0.001) and strain (p<0.001).

  15. Bee communities along a prairie restoration chronosequence: similar abundance and diversity, distinct composition.

    PubMed

    Tonietto, Rebecca K; Ascher, John S; Larkin, Daniel J

    2017-04-01

    Recognition of the importance of bee conservation has grown in response to declines of managed honey bees and some wild bee species. Habitat loss has been implicated as a leading cause of declines, suggesting that ecological restoration is likely to play an increasing role in bee conservation efforts. In the midwestern United States, restoration of tallgrass prairie has traditionally targeted plant community objectives without explicit consideration for bees. However, restoration of prairie vegetation is likely to provide ancillary benefits to bees through increased foraging and nesting resources. We investigated community assembly of bees across a chronosequence of restored eastern tallgrass prairies and compared patterns to those in control and reference habitats (old fields and prairie remnants, respectively). We collected bees for 3 yr and measured diversity and abundance of in-bloom flowering plants, vegetation structure, ground cover, and surrounding land use as predictors of bee abundance and bee taxonomic and functional diversity. We found that site-level variables, but not site type or restoration age, were significant predictors of bee abundance (bloom diversity, P = 0.004; bare ground cover, P = 0.02) and bee diversity (bloom diversity, P = 0.01). There were significant correlations between overall composition of bee and blooming plant communities (Mantel test, P = 0.002), and both plant and bee assemblages in restorations were intermediate between those of old fields and remnant prairies. Restorations exhibited high bee beta diversity, i.e., restored sites' bee assemblages were taxonomically and functionally differentiated from each other. This pattern was strong in younger restorations (<20 yr old), but absent from older restorations (>20 yr), suggesting restored prairie bee communities become more similar to one another and more similar to remnant prairie bee communities over time with the arrival of more species and functional groups of

  16. Marginal and internal fit of nano-composite CAD/CAM restorations

    PubMed Central

    Park, So-Hyun; Shin, Yoo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal and internal fit of nano-composite CAD-CAM restorations. Materials and Methods A full veneer crown and an mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) inlay cavity, which were prepared on extracted human molars, were used as templates of epoxy resin replicas. The prepared teeth were scanned and CAD-CAM restorations were milled using Lava Ultimate (LU) and experimental nano-composite CAD/CAM blocks (EB) under the same milling parameters. To assess the marginal and internal fit, the restorations were cemented to replicas and were embedded in an acrylic mold for sectioning at 0.5 mm intervals. The measured gap data were pooled according to the block types and measuring points for statistical analysis. Results Both the block type and measuring point significantly affected gap values, and their interaction was significant (p = 0.000). In crowns and inlays made from the two blocks, gap values were significantly larger in the occlusal area than in the axial area, while gap values in the marginal area were smallest (p < 0.001). Among the blocks, the restorations milled from EB had a significantly larger gap at all measuring points than those milled from LU (p = 0.000). Conclusions The marginal and internal gaps of the two nano-composite CAD/CAM blocks differed according to the measuring points. Among the internal area of the two nano-composite CAD/CAM restorations, occlusal gap data were significantly larger than axial gap data. The EB crowns and inlays had significantly larger gaps than LU restorations. PMID:26877989

  17. Fabrication and characterization of bioactive and antibacterial composites for dental applications.

    PubMed

    Chatzistavrou, Xanthippi; Fenno, J Christopher; Faulk, Denver; Badylak, Stephen; Kasuga, Toshihiro; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Papagerakis, Petros

    2014-08-01

    There is an increasing clinical need to design novel dental materials that combine regenerative and antibacterial properties. In this work the characterization of a recently developed sol-gel-derived bioactive glass ceramic containing silver ions (Ag-BG) is presented. The microstructural characteristics, ion release profile, zeta potential value and changes in weight loss and pH value as a function of the immersion time of Ag-BG in Tris buffer are evaluated. Ag-BG is also incorporated into natural extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel to further enhance its regenerative properties. Then, the micro and macro architectures of these new composites (ECM/Ag-BG) are characterized. In addition, the antibacterial properties of these new composites are tested against Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis, a bacterium commonly implicated in the pathogenesis of dental pulp infections. Cell-material interaction is also monitored in a primary culture of dental pulp cells. Our study highlights the benefits of the successful incorporation of Ag in the bioactive glass, resulting in a stable antibacterial material with long-lasting bactericidal activity. Furthermore, this work presents for the first time the fabrication of new Ag-doped composite materials, with inductive pulp-cell proliferation and antibacterial properties (ECM/Ag-BG). This advanced composite made of Ag-BG incorporated into natural ECM possesses improved properties that may facilitate potential applications in tooth regeneration approaches.

  18. Curing kinetics of visible light curing dental resin composites investigated by dielectric analysis (DEA).

    PubMed

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Hausnerova, Berenika; Haenel, Thomas; Großgarten, Mandy; Möginger, Bernhard

    2014-03-01

    During the curing process of light curing dental composites the mobility of molecules and molecule segments is reduced leading to a significant increase of the viscosity as well as the ion viscosity. Thus, the kinetics of the curing behavior of 6 different composites was derived from dielectric analysis (DEA) using especially redesigned flat sensors with interdigit comb electrodes allowing for irradiation at the top side and measuring the ion viscosity at the bottom side. As the ion viscosities of dental composites change 1-3 orders of magnitude during the curing process, DEA provides a sensitive approach to evaluate their curing behavior, especially in the phase of undisturbed chain growth. In order to determine quantitative kinetic parameters a kinetic model is presented and examined for the evaluation of the ion viscosity curves. From the obtained results it is seen that DEA might be employed in the investigation of the primary curing process, the quality assurance of ingredients as well as the control of processing stability of the light curing dental composites.

  19. The incorporation of nanoparticles into conventional glass-ionomer dental restorative cements.

    PubMed

    Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Nicholson, John W; Coleman, Nichola J; Slipper, Ian J; Booth, Samantha

    2015-04-01

    Conventional glass-ionomer cements (GICs) are popular restorative materials, but their use is limited by their relatively low mechanical strength. This paper reports an attempt to improve these materials by incorporation of 10 wt% of three different types of nanoparticles, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, and titanium dioxide, into two commercial GICs (ChemFil® Rock and EQUIA™ Fil). The results indicate that the nanoparticles readily dispersed into the cement matrix by hand mixing and reduced the porosity of set cements by filling the empty spaces between the glass particles. Both cements showed no significant difference in compressive strength with added alumina, and ChemFil® Rock also showed no significant difference with zirconia. By contrast, ChemFil® Rock showed significantly higher compressive strength with added titania, and EQUIA™ Fil showed significantly higher compressive strength with both zirconia and titania. Fewer air voids were observed in all nanoparticle-containing cements and this, in turn, reduced the development of cracks within the matrix of the cements. These changes in microstructure provide a likely reason for the observed increases in compressive strength, and overall the addition of nanoparticles appears to be a promising strategy for improving the physical properties of GICs.

  20. Resin Composite Restorations: Effect of Energy Density on Properties and Marginal Integrity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    dissolving effect on gingival margin integrity at very low degrees of conversion. Gingival marginal defects were maximized at 25% of maximum...recommended lower limit of gingival margin acceptability in a bulk-filled resin composite restoration was created by 80% of maximum conversion, 73% of maximum...hardness and approximately 70% of maximum flexural strength and modulus in the gingival marginal area.

  1. Analysis of composites for restorative dentistry by PIXE, XRF and ERDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preoteasa, E. A.; Ciortea, C.; Constantinescu, B.; Fluerasu, D.; Enescu, S.-E.; Pantelica, D.; Negoita, F.; Preoteasa, E.

    2002-04-01

    Composites used in dentistry bring into the organism elements that may induce adverse biological effects. We applied 3 MeV proton particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and photon-excited X-ray fluorescence (XRF) in the qualitative analysis of 10 dental composites and we tested copper-beam elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) on one material. PIXE, and partly XRF, evidenced Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ag, Zr, Cd, In, Ba, Yb, Y, Ho, Hf and Pb, many of them at trace levels, while ERDA detected H, B, C, N, O, F, Na, Al and Si.

  2. Bisphenol A and Other Metabolites in Human Saliva and Urine Associated with the Placement of Composite Restorations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    grooves of molars, and on any anterior surfaces needing restorative care. No randomization of patients will be performed as the background...Urine Associated with the Placement of Composite Restorations " 3. Principal Investigator (PI): William J. Dunn, Col, USAF, DC, 81 DS/SGD, Phone: (228...Human Saliva and Urine Associated with the Placement of Composite Restorations 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Y1-DE-7002-01 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  3. Effect of LED curing on the microleakage, shear bond strength and surface hardness of a resin-based composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Oberholzer, Theunis G; Du Preez, Ignatius C; Kidd, M

    2005-06-01

    To determine the effect of Light emitting diode (LED) curing on dental resins, microleakage, shear bond strength and surface hardness of a dental composite cured with different LEDs were determined and compared with conventional halogen curing. For microleakage, Class V cavities were restored with Esthet-X, divided into groups, and exposed to one of the curing protocols (Elipar Freelight in soft start and standard modes; Ultra-Lume 2; Spectrum 800). Standard dye penetration tests were performed and the data summarised in a 2-way contingency table of observed frequencies. The Chi-square test was used (p<0.05) to test for significant differences between the lights. For surface hardness, samples of Esthet-X were exposed to the light-curing units (LCUs). Vickers hardness was determined on the upper and the bottom surfaces. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using ANOVA (p<0.05). Shear bond strength was determined using a push out method. Comparisons (ANOVA, p<0.05) were made between the different curing protocols. No significant difference in microleakage could be demonstrated between the different LCUs at the enamel side (p=0.60). At the dentin side only the Elipar Freelight (soft start), could significantly reduce microleakage (p<0.01). The hardness score for the halogen light was significantly lower than for the LED lights (p<0.01). The Spectrum 800 and the Elipar Freelight (soft start) have significantly higher shear bond strengths than the others (p<0.01). It was concluded that the LED source is more efficient for a comparable overall power output.

  4. REE compositions in fossil vertebrate dental tissues indicate biomineral preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žigaite, Ž.; Kear, B.; Pérez-Huerta, A.; Jeffries, T.; Blom, H.

    2012-04-01

    Rare earth element (REE) abundances have been measured in a number of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic dental tissues using Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Fossil vertebrates analysed comprise scales and tesserae of Silurian and Devonian acanthodians, chondrichthyans, galeaspids, mongolepids, thelodonts, as well as teeth of Cretaceous lungfish and marine reptiles. The evaluation of fossil preservation level has been made by semi-quantitative spot geochemistry analyses on fine polished teeth and scale thin sections, using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Fossil teeth and scales with significant structure and colour alteration have shown elevated heavy element concentrations, and the silicification of bioapatite has been common in their tissues. Stable oxygen isotope measurements (δ18O) of bulk biomineral have been conducted in parallel, and showed comparatively lower heavy oxygen values in the same fossil tissues with stronger visible alteration. Significant difference in REE concentrations has been observed between the dentine and enamel of Cretaceous plesiosaurs, suggesting the enamel to be more geochemically resistant to diagenetic overprint.

  5. [Tooth color matching systems and communication with dental laboratory in indirect restorations: 2011 update].

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, M; Gilboa, I

    2012-01-01

    There has been many technological developments in the last decade. Today's shade-matching technologies have been developed in an effort to increase the success of color matching, communication, reproduction and verification in clinical dentistry and, ultimately, to increase the efficiency of esthetic restorative work within any practice. In general, the output of the color measurements can be classified and specified in several ways. The most common systems for describing color are Munsell's System and the international Commission on Illumination (CIE) L a b color system. Albert Munsell described color as a three-dimensional phenomenon. He described the three dimensions as hue, value (brightness), and chroma (saturation). Visual colour determination by comparison of teeth and shade guides is the most frequently applied method in dentistry. Vitapan Classical (Vita Zahnfabrik, Germany) and its derivations(evidence-based Vitapan 3D-Master shade guide and Linearguide) are the most commonly used shade guides. However, several factors can influence consistency of visual colour selection and specification: individual colour matching ability may vary, the colour perception of any individual may show temporal variation, the range of shades available is inadequate and does not cover the complete colour space of natural teeth, the shade guide tabs are not systematically distributed in their colour space, and changes in lighting conditions can cause alterations in perceived colour. instruments for clinical shade-matching encompass spectrophotometers, colorimeters and digital imaging systems. It can be concluded that different devices have different accuracy and precision. Colorimeters are significantly less reliable than spectrophotometers and digital cameras. Benefits and limitations exist, and the clinician must consider how the technology relates to expectations and needs. Combination of visual colour determination (Vitapan 3D-Master shade guide and Linearguide) with

  6. Ablation by-products of dental materials from the Er:YAG laser and the dental handpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Visuri, Steven R.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1995-05-01

    Recently there has been much interest in lasers and their potential use to replace the dental drill. The research has been directed towards vital dental tissues. It must be understood that any laser to be used in dentistry which will replace the dental drill must also ablate and remove existing dental materials. Some concern exists about the ablation products when the Er:YAG laser is used to ablate dental materials. It is incumbent on the professionals using these lasers to understand the materials being produced by these lasers and protect themselves and their patients from possible toxic products. It is the intent of this paper to evaluate the products produced by the ablation of both dental amalgam and composite dental restorative materials and compare them with those produced by the traditional dental handpiece (drill).

  7. Tooth bleaching effects 
on the adhesive interface 
of composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lorena; Thedei, Geraldo; Menezes-Oliveira, Maria Angélica; Nogueira, Ruchele D; Geraldo-Martins, Vinicius

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different bleaching techniques on the tooth-restoration interface of composite restorations. Cavities (3 x 3 x 2 mm) were prepared in 100 bovine incisor fragments, which were etched with a conventional adhesive system and restored with a nanocomposite. The fragments were randomly divided into five groups (n = 20): Control (no bleaching), At-home bleaching (HB) (10% hydrogen peroxide [HP]), In-office bleaching (OB) (35% HP), LED-activated bleaching (LB) (35% HP activated by LED), and Laser-activated bleaching (LaB) (35% HP activated by diode laser, λ = 880 nm). After bleaching, 10 samples per group were thermocycled (500 cycles, 5°C to 55°C), immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution, sectioned, evaluated under a stereomicroscope, and scored for microleakage. The other samples were pH cycled for 14 consecutive days, sectioned, and the enamel adjacent to the adhesive interface assessed by cross-sectional Knoop hardness. The data were compared using the one-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). No differences between the microleakage indexes found for the control and experimental groups were observed. The enamel of the bleached groups located near the adhesive interface presented the same Knoop hardness numbers as the samples of the control group. Tooth bleaching does not damage the tooth-restoration interface of composite restorations.

  8. Effect of random/aligned nylon-6/MWCNT fibers on dental resin composite reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alexandre L S; Münchow, Eliseu A; de Oliveira Souza, Ana Carolina; Yoshida, Takamitsu; Vallittu, Pekka K; Bottino, Marco C

    2015-08-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to synthesize and characterize random and aligned nanocomposite fibers of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/nylon-6 and (2) to determine their reinforcing effects on the flexural strength of a dental resin composite. Nylon-6 was dissolved in hexafluoropropanol (10 wt%), followed by the addition of MWCNT (hereafter referred to as nanotubes) at two distinct concentrations (i.e., 0.5 or 1.5 wt%). Neat nylon-6 fibers (without nanotubes) were also prepared. The solutions were electrospun using parameters under low- (120 rpm) or high-speed (6000 rpm) mandrel rotation to collect random and aligned fibers, respectively. The processed fiber mats were characterized by scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopies, as well as by uni-axial tensile testing. To determine the reinforcing effects on the flexural strength of a dental resin composite, bar-shaped (20×2×2 mm(3)) resin composite specimens were prepared by first placing one increment of the composite, followed by one strip of the mat, and one last increment of composite. Non-reinforced composite specimens were used as the control. The specimens were then evaluated using flexural strength testing. SEM was done on the fractured surfaces. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and the Tukey׳s test (α=5%). Nanotubes were successfully incorporated into the nylon-6 fibers. Aligned and random fibers were obtained using high- and low-speed electrospinning, respectively, where the former were significantly (p<0.001) stronger than the latter, regardless of the nanotubes׳ presence. Indeed, the dental resin composite tested was significantly reinforced when combined with nylon-6 fibrous mats composed of aligned fibers (with or without nanotubes) or random fibers incorporated with nanotubes at 0.5 wt%.

  9. Microleakage around Class V Composite Restorations after Ultrasonic Scaling and Sonic Toothbrushing around their Margin

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Suruchi; Lawson, Nathaniel C.; Beck, Preston; Oster, Robert A.; Burgess, John O.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To measure microleakage around class V composite restorations after piezoelectric ultrasonic scaling and sonic toothbrushing. Methods 3 mm × 2 mm × 1.5 mm boxes were prepared on buccal and lingual surfaces of extracted molars centered on the cementum‐enamel junction. Half the preparations were beveled (0.5 mm). Preparations were restored with composite and polished. Restorations on one side of the teeth were either traced with an ultrasonic scaler (60 seconds, n = 16) or brushed in a sonic toothbrushing machine (2 hours, n = 16). After thermocycling (10,000 cycles/5–55°C), specimens were immersed in 5 wt% Fuchsine solution (24 hours). Samples were sectioned and evaluated for percentage of dye penetration. Data were analyzed with an exact Wilcoxon rank‐sum test and exact Wilcoxon signed‐rank test (alpha = 0.05). Results Microleakage was observed at the cementum‐composite interface but not the enamel‐composite interface. There was not a statistically significant effect of the bevel for ultrasonic scaling or for sonic toothbrushing. Data obtained with and without a bevel were combined and a statistically significant difference in microleakage between the treatment and control sides of the tooth were found for ultrasonic scaling (32.5%±44.9%, n = 16; p = 0.016) but not sonic toothbrushing (2.5% ± 41.2%, n = 16; p = 1.0). Conclusions Piezoelectric ultrasonic scaling increased microleakage at cementum‐composite interface and there was no difference in microleakage with the use of a bevel. Clinical Significance Piezoelectric sonic scaling around Class V composite restorations with margins in cementum should be avoided. Beveled margins will not reduce the incidence of microleakge resulting from ultrasonic scaling in Class V restorations. Placing the apical margin of the restoration in enamel should be attempted whenever possible to prevent future microleakage. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:41–48, 2017

  10. The effect of CO2 laser irradiation plus fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement or composite resin restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, S. R.; Moraes, M.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Youssef, M. N.; Brugnera Junior, A.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; de Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2016-02-01

    Although the cariostatic effects of CO2 laser on the root surface have been shown, there is scarce information regarding its effects on root secondary caries. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the association of CO2 laser and a fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to composite-resin or glass-ionomer-cement restorations. Dental blocks of human roots were divided into two groups: composite resin (CR) or glass ionomer cement (GIC). Subsequently, the blocks were divided into four subgroups (n  =  10): C, non-fluoride dentifrice; FD, fluoride dentifrice; L, CO2 laser with an energy density of 6.0 J cm-2  +  non-fluoride dentifrice; and L  +  FD, CO2 laser  +  fluoride dentifrice. The blocks were subjected to pH cycling to simulate a high cariogenic challenge. Dental demineralization around the restorations was quantified by microhardness analysis. The results were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-Kramer test (p  ⩽  0.05). As for mineral loss, it can be observed that all the groups that were treated with a fluoride dentifrice and laser, used alone or not, were statistically similar and superior to the RC-C group. It was concluded that CO2 laser irradiation and a fluoride dentifrice used alone or combined with each other are efficient surface treatments for preventing secondary root caries, regardless of the restorative material used.

  11. Cyclic mechanical loading promotes bacterial penetration along composite restoration marginal gaps

    PubMed Central

    Khvostenko, D.; Salehi, S.; Naleway, S. E.; Hilton, T. J.; Ferracane, J. L.; Mitchell, J. C.; Kruzic, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Secondary caries is the most common reason for composite restoration replacement and usually forms between dentin and the filling. The objective of this study was to investigate the combined effect of cyclic loading and bacterial exposure on bacterial penetration into gaps at the interface between dentin and resin composite restorative material using a novel bioreactor system and test specimen design. Methods Human molars were machined into 3 mm thick disks with 2 mm deep × 5 mm diameter cavity preparations into which composite restorations were placed. A ∼15-30 micrometer (small) or ∼300 micrometer wide (large) dentin-restoration gap was introduced along half of the interface between the dentin and restoration. Streptococcus mutans UA 159 biofilms were grown on each sample prior to testing in a bioreactor both with and without cyclic loading. Both groups of samples were tested for 2 weeks and post-test biofilm viability was confirmed with a live-dead assay. Samples were fixed, mounted and cross-sectioned to reveal the gaps and observe the depth of bacterial penetration. Results It was shown that for large gap samples the bacteria easily penetrated to the full depth of the gap independent of loading or non-loading conditions. The results for all cyclically loaded small gap samples show a consistently deep bacterial penetration down 100% of the gap while the average penetration depth was only 67% for the non-loaded samples with only two of six samples reaching 100%. Significance A new bioreactor was developed that allows combining cyclic mechanical loading and bacterial exposure of restored teeth for bacterial biofilm and demineralization studies. Cyclic loading was shown to aid bacterial penetration into narrow marginal gaps, which could ultimately promote secondary caries formation. PMID:25900624

  12. Shear test of composite bonded to dentin: Er:YAG laser versus dental handpiece preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visuri, Steven R.; Gilbert, Jeremy L.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.; Wigdor, Harvey A.

    1995-05-01

    The erbium:YAG laser coupled with a cooling stream of water appears to be an effective means of removing dental hard tissues. However, before the procedure is deemed clinically viable, there are several important issues of safety and efficacy that need to be explored. In this study we investigated the surface that remains following laser ablation of dentin and compared the results to the use of a dental handpiece. Specifically, we studied the effect the laser radiation had on the bonding of composite to dentin. The crowns of extracted human molars were removed revealing the underlying dentin. An additional thickness of material was removed with either a dental handpiece or an Er:YAG laser by raster scanning the samples under a fixed handpiece or laser. Comparable surface roughnesses were achieved. A cylinder of composite was bonded onto the prepared surfaces following the manufacturer's directions. The dentin-composite bond was then shear stressed to failure on a universal testing apparatus and the maximum load recorded. Preliminary results indicated that laser irradiated samples had improved bond strengths. SEM photographs of the surfaces were also taken to compare the two methods of tooth preparation.

  13. Effects of pulp capping materials on fracture resistance of Class II composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Kucukyilmaz, Ebru; Yasa, Bilal; Akcay, Merve; Savas, Selcuk; Kavrik, Fevzi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cavity design and the type of pulp capping materials on the fracture resistance of Class II composite restorations. Materials and Methods: Sixty freshly extracted, sound molar teeth were selected for the study. A dovetail cavity on the mesio-occlusal and a slot cavity on disto-occlusal surfaces of each tooth were prepared, and the teeth were divided 4 groups which one of them as a control group. The pulp capping materials (TheraCal LC, Calcimol LC, Dycal) applied on pulpo-axial wall of each cavity, and the restoration was completed with composite resin. The teeth were subjected to a compressive load in a universal mechanical testing machine. The surfaces of the tooth and restoration were examined under a stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed using factorial analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Results: For pulp capping materials, the highest fracture load (931.15 ± 203.81 N) and the lowest fracture load (832.28 ± 245.75 N) were calculated for Control and Dycal group, respectively. However, there were no statistically significant differences among all groups (P > 0.05). The fracture load of the dovetail groups was significantly higher than those of the slot cavity groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Dovetail cavity design shows better fracture resistance in Class II composite restorations, independent of used or not used pulp capping materials. PMID:26038653

  14. Fracture resistance curves and toughening mechanisms in polymer based dental composites.

    PubMed

    De Souza, J A; Goutianos, S; Skovgaard, M; Sørensen, B F

    2011-05-01

    The fracture resistance (R-curve behaviour) of two commercial dental composites (Filtek Z350(®) and Concept Advanced(®)) were studied using Double Cantilever Beam sandwich specimens loaded with pure bending moments to obtain stable crack growth. The experiments were conducted in an environmental scanning electron microscope to (a) accurately measure the applied energy-release rate for crack initiation, (b) measure the early (rising) part of the R-curve, and (c) provide direct microscopic evidence of the toughening mechanisms ahead of and/or in the wake of the crack tip. The two tested composites displayed distinctly different R-curve behaviours. The difference was related to different toughening mechanisms as the two composites had markedly different microstructures. Contrary to common experience, the composite with the finer microstructure (smaller particles), the Concept Advanced(®), showed significantly higher fracture resistance than the composite with the coarser microstructure. The fracture properties were related to the flexural strength of the dental composites. The method, thus, can provide useful insight into how the microstructure enhances toughness, which is necessary for the future development of such materials.

  15. Single anterior tooth restoration using a self-etching adhesive system and a reinforced microfill composite.

    PubMed

    Feigenbaum, Norman

    2003-08-01

    Treatment for a single discolored anterior tooth may involve placement of a direct composite veneer to enhance a patient's smile and mask underlying discoloration. Among the challenges clinicians may face in this endeavor are the selection of suitable composite materials, application of an adhesive bonding system, and re-creation of the natural shade variations inherent in natural teeth. This article discusses the characteristics and placement protocol for a recently introduced self-etching adhesive system and a reinforced microfill composite when they are used to restore a single discolored central incisor.

  16. Finite element analysis of weakened roots restored with composite resin and posts.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Carla Santina de Miranda; Biffi, João Carlos Gabrielli; Silva, Gisele Rodrigues da; Abrahão, Anthony; Campos, Roberto Elias; Soares, Carlos José

    2009-11-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the influence of different post systems on the stress distribution of weakened teeth under oblique-load application. A maxillary central incisor root obtained from a sound tooth was weakened by partial removal of dentin inside the root canal. Seven two-dimensional numerical models, one from the sound tooth and six from the weakened root restored with composite resin and post systems were created as follows - ST: sound tooth; CPC: cast CuAl post and core; SSP: stainless steel post + composite core; GP: fiberglass + composite core; CP: carbon fiber + composite core; ZP: zirconium dioxide post + composite core; TP: titanium post + composite core. The numerical models were considered to be restored with a leucite-reinforced all-ceramic crown and received a 45 masculine occlusal load (10 N) on the lingual surface.All the materials and structures were considered linear elastic, homogeneous, and isotropic, with the exception of fiberglass and carbon fiber posts which assumed orthotropic behavior. The numerical models were plotted and meshed with isoparametric elements, and the results were analyzed using von Mises and Sy stress criteria. When compared with the sound tooth, FEA revealed differences in stress distribution when post systems were used. Among the restored teeth, the use of CPC, SSP, ZP, and TP resulted in higher stress concentration in the post itself when compared to GP and CP. Therefore, results from the FEA images suggested that the use of non-metallic post systems could result in improved mechanical behavior for the weakened restored teeth.

  17. Increased mercury release from dental amalgam restorations after exposure to electromagnetic fields as a potential hazard for hypersensitive people and pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Ghazal; Mortazavi, S M J

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, the use of common sources of electromagnetic fields such as Wi-Fi routers and mobile phones has been increased enormously all over the world. There is ongoing concern that exposure to electromagnetic fields can lead to adverse health effects. It has recently been shown that even low doses of mercury are capable of causing toxicity. Therefore, efforts are initiated to phase down or eliminate the use of mercury amalgam in dental restorations. Increased release of mercury from dental amalgam restorations after exposure to electromagnetic fields such as those generated by MRI and mobile phones has been reported by our team and other researchers. We have recently shown that some of the papers which reported no increased release of mercury after MRI, may have some methodological errors. Although it was previously believed that the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam cannot be hazardous, new findings indicate that mercury, even at low doses, may cause toxicity. Based on recent epidemiological findings, it can be claimed that the safety of mercury released from dental amalgam fillings is questionable. Therefore, as some individuals tend to be hypersensitive to the toxic effects of mercury, regulatory authorities should re-assess the safety of exposure to electromagnetic fields in individuals with amalgam restorations. On the other hand, we have reported that increased mercury release after exposure to electromagnetic fields may be risky for the pregnant women. It is worth mentioning that as a strong positive correlation between maternal and cord blood mercury levels has been found in some studies, our findings regarding the effect of exposure to electromagnetic fields on the release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings lead us to this conclusion that pregnant women with dental amalgam fillings should limit their exposure to electromagnetic fields to prevent toxic effects of mercury in their fetuses. Based on these findings, as infants

  18. Bond strength of dental nanocomposites repaired with a bulkfill composite

    PubMed Central

    Kerimova, Leyla; Baltacioglu, İsmail H.; Kiremitçi, Arlin

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze the bond strength of aged resin based nanocomposites repaired with the same and bulk fill composites. Material and Methods Seventy-two disc shaped resin composites consisted of three different nanocomposite resins (Filtek Ultimate/FU, Herculite XRV Ultra/HXRV, and Reflectys/R) were produced. After storing the samples for 8 weeks in distilled water, each material was combined with the same material or the bulk-fill composite resin system (Filtek Ultimate+Filtek Ultimate/Group-1; Filtek Ultimate+Tetric BF/Group-2; Herculite XRV+Herculite XRV/Group-3; Herculite XRV+Tetric BF/ Group-4; Reflectys+Reflectys/Group 5; Reflectys+Tetric BF/Group-6), for repair. Then specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing(SBS), and the debonded surfaces were examined. Results There was a significant difference among three materials(repaired with itself+bulk fill) for SBS testing values (p=0.001). FU and R were found to be similar, while HXRV was significantly different from them. A significant difference between group-1 and 2 (p=0.006) was detected, while there were no differences between group 3 and 4 (p= 0.142), and 5 and 6 (p=0.346). Among the six groups, repair SBS testing values with TBF were higher than repair with itself except for FU. Conclusions The bulk-fill repaired materials showed higher bond strength except for FU, which showed the highest SBS value when repaired with itself. An increased incidence of adhesive fracture was observed at low strengths. Key words:Resin-based composites, nanofillers, surface treatment, macro-shear, repair. PMID:28298988

  19. Monomer Release from Nanofilled and Microhybrid Dental Composites after Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaee, Masumeh Hasani; Arami, Sakineh; Ghavam, Maryam; Rezaii, Asieh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bleaching on elution of monomers from nanofilled and microhybrid composites. Materials and Methods: 80 samples (5mm diameter and 3mm thickness) of each composite were prepared. After curing, half of them were randomly polished. Each group was divided into 8 subgroups and immersed in water or 10%, 20% and 30% H2O2 for 3 or 8 hours. Eluted Bis-GMA (Bis-phenol A Glycidyl Dimethacrylate), TEGDMA (Triethyleneglycol Dimethacrylate), UDMA (Urethane Dimethacrylate) and BisEMA (Bis-phenol A ethoxylate Dimethacrylate) were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography and the results were analyzed by univariate ANOVA and t-test (P<0.05). Results: Bleach significantly increased the overall release of monomers (P<0.001); TEGDMA was released more than Bis-GMA (P<0.001). Supreme released more TEGDMA compared to Z250 (P<0.001). Bleaching increased the release of this monomer (P<0.001). Increasing both the concentration of H2O2, and the immersion time, increased the release of TEGDMA (P<0.001). Polishing had no effect on release of this monomer (P=0.952). Supreme released more Bis-GMA than Z250 (P=0.000). The more concentrated H2O2 caused more elution of Bis-GMA (P= 0.003); while the effect of immersion time was not significant (P=0.824). Polishing increased the release of Bis-GMA (P=0.001). Neither the type of composite nor Bleaching had any effect on release of UDMA (P=0.972) and (P=0.811) respectively. Immersion duration increased the release of UDMA (P=0.002), as well as polishing (P=0.024). Conclusion: Bleaching increased the release of monomers. Nanofilled composites released more monomer than the microfilled. PMID:24910677

  20. Scanning electron microscopy and roughness study of dental composite degradation.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Cortez, Louise Ribeiro; Zarur, Raquel de Oliveira; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-04-01

    Our aim was to test the hypothesis that the use of mouthwashes, consumption of soft drinks, as well as the type of light curing unit (LCU), would change the surface roughness (Ra) and morphology of a nanofilled composite resin (Z350® 3M ESPE). Samples (80) were divided into eight groups: Halogen LCU, group 1, saliva (control); group 2, Pepsi Twist®; group 3, Listerine®; group 4, Colgate Plax®; LED LCU, group 5, saliva; group 6, Pepsi Twist®; group 7, Listerine®; group 8, Colgate Plax®. Ra values were measured at baseline, and after 7 and 14 days. One specimen of each group was prepared for scanning electron microscopy analysis after 14 days. The data were subjected to multifactor analysis of variance at a 95% confidence followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference post-hoc test. All the treatments resulted in morphological changes in composite resin surface, and the most significant change was in Pepsi Twist® groups. The samples of G6 had the greatest increase in Ra. The immersion of nanofilled resin in mouthwashes with alcohol and soft drink increases the surface roughness. Polymerization by halogen LCU (reduced light intensity) associated with alcohol contained mouthwash resulted in significant roughness on the composite.

  1. An in vitro evaluation of microleakage in class V preparations restored with Hybrid versus Silorane composites

    PubMed Central

    Umer, Fahad; Naz, Farah; Khan, Farhan Raza

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To compare the difference in microleakage values using conventional and new low-shrink Silorane composites using the dye penetration method. Background: With improvement in adhesive technology, problems associated with composites have been largely overcome. However, microleakage due to polymerization shrinkage still remains a challenge. New Silorane-based composites are alleged to have less than 1% polymerization shrinkage, which would potentially decrease the microleakage, and hence, resolve this longstanding issue. Materials and Methods: The teeth were randomly divided into three groups (A,B, and C). Group A was restored with conventional composite (Valux™ Plus), with a total-etch protocol, Group B was restored with conventional composite, with a self-etch protocol, and group C were restored with a silorane-based composite (Filtek TMP90). Thermocycling at 200 cycles between 5 and 55°C ± 2°C with a dwell time of 60 seconds was conducted. The teeth were stained with methylene blue dye and then sectioned and viewed under a dissection microscope, afer which the microleakage was evaluated. Results: The interexaminer reliability was evaluated using the kappa score, which was acceptable (61 – 78%). The total-etch group performed statistically and significantly better (P < 0.001) at the occlusal margin and was marginally and statistically significant (P = 0.05) at the gingival margin compared to the self-etch conventional and Silorane groups. Conclusions: The Silorane composite did not perform better than the conventional composites, however, it may have its uses and requires further research. PMID:21814346

  2. Dynamic measurement of local displacements within curing resin-based dental composite using optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlins, Peter H.; Rahman, Mohammed Wahidur; Donnan, Robert S.

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the feasibility of using optical coherence elastography to measure internal displacements during the curing phase of a light-activated, resin-based composite material. Displacement vectors were spatially mapped over time within a commercial dental composite. Measurements revealed that the orientation of cure-induced displacement vectors varied spatially in a complex manner; however, each vector showed a systematic evolution with time. Precision of individual displacements was estimated to be ˜1 to 2 μm, enabling submicrometer time-varying displacements to be detected.

  3. Effect of thickness of flowable resins on marginal leakage in class II composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Hans S; Schlueter, Marc; Roach, Terence; Moss, Mark E

    2002-01-01

    Despite limited scientific evaluation, there is an increased use of low elastic modulus flowable resin composite (FRC) as a stress-relieving gingival increment in Class II restorations. This study compared marginal leakage in preparations with gingival margins in enamel or dentin/cementum (sub-CEJ and supra-CEJ) after FRC was used as a gingival increment to hybrid resin composite used alone. In addition, the extent of leakage around restorations with or without the use of FRC gingival increments when light curing the resin composites from occlusal direction only or buccal, lingual and occlusal directions was compared. Sixty extracted human molars were prepared with two identical Class II (MO and OD) preparations (30 were 1 mm sub-CEJ and 30 were 1 mm supra-CEJ) and randomly assigned to six groups. After etching, dentin-bonding agent was applied to all prepared tooth surfaces according to the manufacturer's specifications. One of three different thicknesses of FRC (0.5 mm, 1 mm or 2 mm) was placed on the gingival floor, cured and a hybrid resin composite was placed occlusally to complete the restoration. The control preparation on each tooth was restored in the same manner, except that a hybrid resin composite was used for both the gingival and occlusal increments. The restored teeth were thermocycled (300 cycles), then immersed in 50% silver nitrate prior to the hemi-section and measured for leakage under a light microscope. The data were evaluated using paired measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Most of the occlusal margins showed no leakage, while almost every gingival margin demonstrated some silver nitrate penetration regardless of whether it was located sub or supra-CEJ, although significantly less leakage was found in restorations with supra-CEJ margins (p=0.0001). Among supra-CEJ restorations, there was a pronounced reduction in leakage as FRC thickness increased (p=0.0005). In the teeth restored with the gingival-margin located supra-CEJ, the 2 mm

  4. Floristic composition, beta diversity, and nestedness of reference sites for restoration of xeroriparian areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beauchamp, Vanessa B.; Shafroth, P.B.

    2011-01-01

    In restoration ecology, reference sites serve as models for areas to be restored and can provide a standard of comparison for restoration project outcomes. When reference sites are located a relatively long distance from associated restoration projects, differences in climate, disturbance history, and biogeography can increase beta diversity and may decrease the relevance of reference sites. Variation in factors at the scale of individual reference sites such as patch size, microclimate, barriers to dispersal, or soil chemistry can result in reference site species composition that is a nested subset of the regional species pool. In the western United States, restoration of riparian areas, particularly those occupied by Tamarix spp., has become a priority; however, little is known about suitable native replacement vegetation communities for relatively dry and saline riparian terraces that comprise many of the sites where Tamarix is removed prior to restoration activities. We studied plant communities on riparian terraces along five rivers in New Mexico, USA, to (1) determine whether the floristic composition of reference sites can be predicted by easily measured soil variables such as pH, salinity (electric conductivity), and texture; (2) examine the extent of distance decay in the compositional similarity of xeroriparian plant communities in the southwestern United States; and (3) determine the degree of nestedness in xeroriparian plant communities in relationship to soil variables. We found that sites clustered into groups based largely on variation in soil salinity and texture. Vegetation across all sites was highly nested with dominant, salt-tolerant species found on most soil groups and salt-intolerant subordinate species restricted to lowsalinity soils. The identity of subordinate species was largely site dependent, causing all sites to have the same low degree of similarity regardless of the distance between them. We conclude that, when planning restoration

  5. Floristic composition, beta diversity, and nestedness of reference sites for restoration of xeroriparian areas.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Vanessa B; Shafroth, Patrick B

    2011-03-01

    In restoration ecology, reference sites serve as models for areas to be restored and can provide a standard of comparison for restoration project outcomes. When reference sites are located a relatively long distance from associated restoration projects, differences in climate, disturbance history, and biogeography can increase beta diversity and may decrease the relevance of reference sites. Variation in factors at the scale of individual reference sites such as patch size, microclimate, barriers to dispersal, or soil chemistry can result in reference site species composition that is a nested subset of the regional species pool. In the Western United States, restoration of riparian areas, particularly those occupied by Tamarix spp., has become a priority; however, little is known about suitable native replacement vegetation communities for relatively dry and saline riparian terraces that comprise many of the sites where Tamarix is removed prior to restoration activities. We studied plant communities on riparian terraces along five rivers in New Mexico, USA, to (1) determine whether the floristic composition of reference sites can be predicted by easily measured soil variables such as pH, salinity (electric conductivity), and texture; (2) examine the extent of distance decay in the compositional similarity of xeroriparian plant communities in the southwestern United States; and (3) determine the degree of nestedness in xeroriparian plant communities in relationship to soil variables. We found that sites clustered into groups based largely on variation in soil salinity and texture. Vegetation across all sites was highly nested with dominant, salt-tolerant species found on most soil groups and salt-intolerant subordinate species restricted to low-salinity soils. The identity of subordinate species was largely site dependent, causing all sites to have the same low degree of similarity regardless of the distance between them. We conclude that, when planning restoration

  6. Chemistry of Silanes: Interfaces in Dental Polymers and Composites1

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Joseph M.; Dickens, Sabine H.; Fowler, Bruce O.; Xu, Hockin H. K.; McDonough, Walter G.

    2005-01-01

    The performance and service life of glass-or ceramic-filled polymeric composites depend on the nature of their resin, filler and interfacial phases as well as the efficacy of the polymerization process. The synergy that exists between the organic polymer matrix and the usually inorganic reinforcing filler phase is principally mediated by the interfacial/interphasial phase. This latter phase develops as a result of the dual reactivity of a silane coupling agent, (YRSiX3), a bifunctional molecule capable of reacting with the silanol groups of glass or ceramic fillers via its silane functional group (–SiX3) to form Si-O-Si- bonds to filler surfaces, and also with the resin phase by graft copolymerization via its Y functional group, usually a methacrylic vinyl group. In this paper, we explore some of the chemistry of organosilanes, especially that of functional organosilanes (or silane coupling agents as they are commonly known) that are used to mediate interfacial bonding in mineral reinforced polymeric composites. The chemistry of organosilanes can be quite complex involving hydrolytically initiated self-condensation reactions in solvents (including monomers) that can culminate in polymeric silsesquioxane structures, exchange reactions with hydroxylated or carboxylated monomers to form silyl ethers and esters, as well as the formation of silane derived interfaces by adhesive coupling with siliceous mineral surfaces. PMID:27308178

  7. Marginal integrity of restorations produced with a model composite based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)

    PubMed Central

    CORREA, Luciano Ribeiro; BORGES, Alexandre Luiz Souto; GUIMARÃES, Heloisa Bailly; ALMEIDA, Elis Regina Nunes; POSKUS, Laiza Tatiana; SILVA, Eduardo Moreira

    2015-01-01

    Marginal integrity is one of the most crucial aspects involved in the clinical longevity of resin composite restorations. Objective To analyze the marginal integrity of restorations produced with a model composite based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). Material and Methods A base composite (B) was produced with an organic matrix with UDMA/TEGDMA and 70 wt.% of barium borosilicate glass particles. To produce the model composite, 25 wt.% of UDMA were replaced by POSS (P25). The composites P90 and TPH3 (TP3) were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Marginal integrity (%MI) was analyzed in bonded class I cavities. The volumetric polymerization shrinkage (%VS) and the polymerization shrinkage stress (Pss - MPa) were also evaluated. Results The values for %MI were as follows: P90 (100%) = TP3 (98.3%) = B (96.9%) > P25 (93.2%), (p<0.05). The %VS ranged from 1.4% (P90) to 4.9% (P25), while Pss ranged from 2.3 MPa (P90) to 3.9 MPa (B). For both properties, the composite P25 presented the worst results (4.9% and 3.6 MPa). Linear regression analysis showed a strong positive correlation between %VS and Pss (r=0.97), whereas the correlation between Pss and %MI was found to be moderate (r=0.76). Conclusions The addition of 25 wt.% of POSS in methacrylate organic matrix did not improve the marginal integrity of class I restorations. Filtek P90 showed lower polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress when compared to the experimental and commercial methacrylate composite. PMID:26537714

  8. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lassila, Lippo V.J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. Materials and Methods. Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37°C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results. Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). Conclusions. Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion than

  9. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Lippo V J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-12-04

    OBJECTIVES.: The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS.: Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37 degrees C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS.: Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS.: Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion

  10. N-vinylpyrrolidone modified glass-ionomer resins for improved dental restoratives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Dong

    :IA:NVP) was considered as the best molar ratio for these copolymers, based on the DTS and CS tests. The fifth study formulated the NVP-containing RM GICs using a statistical design of experiment. The results indicated that the best graft ratio for 2-isocyanatoethyl methacrylate (IEM) in this system was 15% of the terpolymer by a molar ratio. The optimal formulation was found to be at the weight ratio of 55:15:30 (RM NVP-containing terpolymer: 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA): Hsb2O). Stress-strain curves showed that a relatively high amount of water in the formulation led to higher elastic modulus and proportional limit and lower malleability, whereas a relatively high amount of HEMA gave the opposite results. The sixth study evaluated the NVP modified GICs (NVPM GICs) with the best molar ratios and optimal formulations in the mechanical, thermal and working properties. The results showed that the effect of molecular weight on mechanical properties of the NVPM GICs were evident. Different glass powders exhibited different effects on properties of the NVPM GICs, due to different compositions, size and affinity. Powder/liquid ratios had significant effects on the mechanical properties of NVPM GICs, especially on FS. P/W ratios are only beneficial to the NVPM GICs mixed with the Fuji II glass powders. The NVPM GICs showed a higher WT than the models, due to water retention of the NVP ring. Thermal expansion coefficients for the NVPM GICs were close to those for the natural tooth. Mismatch between the glass powders used and the polymer matrix was a big concern in this study and should be solved in the future.

  11. Randomized Clinical Trial of Composite Restorations in Primary Teeth: Effect of Adhesive System after Three Years

    PubMed Central

    Donmez, Secil Bektaş; Uysal, Serdar; Ozdemir, Pinar; Tekcicek, Meryem; Zimmerli, Brigitte; Lussi, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical performance of composite restorations placed with different adhesive systems in primary teeth. In 32 patients, 128 composite restorations were placed using a split-mouth design as follows (4 groups/patient): three-step etch-and-rinse (Group 1), two-step etch-and-rinse (Group 2), two-step self-etch (Group 3), and one-step self-etch (Group 4). The restorations were clinically evaluated at baseline and at 6, 18, and 36 months according to the FDI criteria. There was no significant difference between the adhesive systems in retention of the restorations (p > 0.05). Over time, there was a statistically significant decrease in marginal adaptation in all groups, whereas surface and marginal staining significantly increased in Groups 3 and 4 (p < 0.05). The etch-and-rinse adhesive systems resulted in better marginal adaptation than the self-etch adhesive systems (p < 0.05). It was concluded that preetching of the primary enamel might help improve the clinical performance of the self-etch adhesive systems in primary teeth. PMID:27833917

  12. Mechanochemically synthesized kalsilite based bioactive glass-ceramic composite for dental vaneering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pattem Hemanth; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2015-08-01

    Kalsilite glass-ceramic composites have been prepared by a mechanochemical synthesis process for dental veneering application. The aim of the present study is to prepare bioactive kalsilite composite material for application in tissue attachment and sealing of the marginal gap between fixed prosthesis and tooth. Mechanochemical synthesis is used for the preparation of microfine kalsilite glass-ceramic. Low temperature frit and bioglass have been prepared using the traditional quench method. Thermal, microstructural and bioactive properties of the composite material have been examined. The feasibility of the kalsilite to be coated on the base commercial opaque as well as the bioactive behavior of the coated specimen has been confirmed. This study indicates that the prepared kalsilite-based composites show similar structural, morphological and bioactive behavior to that of commercial VITA VMK95 Dentin 1M2.

  13. A Conservative Esthetic Approach Using Enamel Recontouring and Composite Resin Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Aline Silva

    2016-01-01

    Conservative clinical solutions, predictable esthetic, and immediate outcomes are important concepts of restorative dentistry. The aim of this case study was to recognize the selective enamel removal as an interesting conservative alternative to achieve optimal esthetic results and discuss the clinical protocol. This clinical report described an alternative esthetic and conservative treatment to transform the long and sharp aspect of the maxillary canines with a slightly aggressive aspect into features of slightly curved teeth with delicate lines. An accurate diagnostic and esthetic analysis of the smile was initially performed. The selective enamel removal was performed, and direct composite restoration was strategically placed. Clinical assessment showed good esthetic outcomes, enabling a smile harmony with an immediate, simple, and lower-cost technique. Practitioners should be exposed to conservative approaches to create esthetic smiles based on the selective enamel removal technique combined with composite resin. PMID:27812389

  14. Dynamic cure measurement of dental polymer composites using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlins, Peter H.; Palin, Will M.; Shortall, Adrian C.

    2008-02-01

    Dental amalgam is being increasingly replaced by Light-activated resin-based dental composites. However, these materials are limited by inefficient setting reactions as a function of depth, constraining the maximum extent of cure and reducing biocompatibility. In this paper we demonstrate a novel metrological tool for dynamic monitoring of refractive index and thickness change through curing resins using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. We present real-time measurements from pre- to post-cure of a series of un-filled bisphenol-A diglycidyl ether dimethacrylate (bisGMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resins with different inhibitor concentrations. Our results demonstrate that refractive index measurements are sensitive to the extent of cure of such resins and that the inhibitor concentration strongly affects the cure dynamics and final extent of cure.

  15. [Light-induced control of polymerization shrinkage of dental composites by generating temporary hardness gradients].

    PubMed

    Sommer, A P; Gente, M

    1999-10-01

    Irradiation of light-curing dental filling materials in a single direction results in a temporary hardness gradient in the direction of the irradiation. The photoactivated polymerisation process begins at the site of the highest light intensity. In the simplest possible model, the polymerizing composites irradiated in a single direction shows three adjacent co-existing phases: an almost hardened, a gelled and a still plastic phase. As long as all three phases are present, any shrinking of the contracting phases can be compensated by the plastic phase. A knowledge of the distribution of these phases and their spatial and temporal modulation by the selection of suitable curing light parameters provides simple techniques for reducing shrinkage gaps around voluminous fillings in large dental cavities.

  16. A comparative study of sliding wear of nonmetallic dental restorative materials with emphasis on micromechanical wear mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dupriez, Nataliya Deyneka; von Koeckritz, Ann-Kristin; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the in vitro tribological behavior of modern nonmetallic restorative materials. Specimen prepared of IPS e.max Press lithium disilicate glass ceramic, IPS Empress Esthetic leucite-reinforced glass ceramic, Everest ZS Blanks yttria-stabilized zirconia and Lava Ultimate composite were subjected to wear using a wear machine designed to simulate occlusal loads. The wear of the investigated materials and antagonists were evaluated by a three-dimensional surface scanner. The quantitative wear test results were used to compare and rank the materials. Specimens were divided into two groups with steatite and alumina antagonists. For each antagonist material an analysis of variance was applied. As a post hoc test of the significant differences, Tukey's honest significant difference test was used. With steatite antagonist: wear of zirconia < wear of leucite-reinforced ceramic < wear of lithium disilicate ceramic < wear of Lava Ultimate composite. No significant wear difference was found for steatite antagonist. The wear of IPS e.max Press and Lava Ultimate against hard alumina was found to be twice lower as compared to their wear when opposing to steatite. The differences were associated with materials mechanical properties (hardness and fracture toughness) and with materials microstructure. Wear mechanisms are discussed.

  17. Material and clinical considerations for full-coverage indirect restorations.

    PubMed

    Martin, Margaret P

    2012-11-01

    Because dental ceramics have been used for decades and continuously improved over the years, there is a plethora of information regarding their material characteristics, applications, and contraindications. Each restorative ceramic material demonstrates benefits and disadvantages, making it difficult for dentists to research, retain, and apply the ideal material for individual restorations and/or combination cases. This article outlines the applications and benefits of dental ceramics in general and examines and reviews the current ceramic alternatives available for restorative dentistry today. It also discusses the material composition and properties of a recently introduced new classification of indirect material: resin nano-ceramic.

  18. Cytotoxicity of dental composite (co)monomers and the amalgam component Hg(2+) in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Reichl, Franz-Xaver; Simon, Sabine; Esters, Magalie; Seiss, Mario; Kehe, Kai; Kleinsasser, Norbert; Hickel, Reinhard

    2006-08-01

    Unpolymerized resin (co)monomers or mercury (Hg) can be released from restorative dental materials (e.g. composites and amalgam). They can diffuse into the tooth pulp or the gingiva. They can also reach the gingiva and organs by the circulating blood after the uptake from swallowed saliva. The cytotoxicity of dental composite components hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethanedimethacrylate (UDMA), and bisglycidylmethacrylate (Bis-GMA) as well as the amalgam component Hg(2+) (as HgCl(2)) and methyl mercury chloride (MeHgCl) was investigated on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) at two time intervals. To test the cytotoxicity of substances, the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assay and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay were used. The test substances were added in various concentrations and cells were incubated for 24 or 48 h. The EC(50) values were obtained as half-maximum-effect concentrations from fitted curves. Following EC(50) values were found [BrdU: mean (mmol/l); SEM in parentheses; n=12]: (24 h/48 h) HEMA 8.860 (0.440)/6.600(0.630), TEGDMA 1.810(0.130)/1.220(0.130), UDMA 0.120(0.010)/0.140(0.010), BisGMA 0.060(0.004)/0.040(0.002), HgCl(2) 0.015(0.001)/0.050(0.006), and MeHgCl 0.004(0.001)/0.005(0.001). Following EC(50) values were found [LDH: mean (mmol/l); SEM in parentheses; n=12]: (24 h/48 h) HEMA 9.490(0.300)/7.890(1.230), TEGDMA 2.300(0.470)/1.950(0.310), UDMA 0.200(0.007)/0.100(0.007), BisGMA 0.070(0.005)/0.100(0.002), and MeHgCl 0.014(0.006)/0.010(0.003). In both assays, the following range of increased toxicity was found for composite components (24 and 48 h): HEMA < TEGDMA < UDMA < BisGMA. In both assays, MeHgCl was the most toxic substance. In the BrdU assay, Hg(2+) was about fourfold less toxic than MeHgCl but Hg(2+) was about fourfold more toxic than BisGMA. In the BrdU test, a significantly (P<0.05) decreased toxicity was observed for Hg(2+) at 48 h, compared to the 24 h Hg(2+)-exposure. A time depending

  19. The application of indirect composite onlays in the restoration of severely broken down posterior teeth.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ray

    2015-12-01

    Increasing interest has developed among dentists regarding alternatives to traditional full-coverage crowns for the restoration of extensively broken-down teeth that are both aesthetic and less destructive of remaining tooth structure. Indirectly fabricated resin composite onlays may offer a viable and cost-effective treatment option in such cases. This paper describes the clinical rationale for resin-based onlays, and includes a case report illustrating the author's experience with the technique to date.

  20. Reduction of bacterial adhesion on dental composite resins by silicon-oxygen thin film coatings.

    PubMed

    Mandracci, Pietro; Mussano, Federico; Ceruti, Paola; Pirri, Candido F; Carossa, Stefano

    2015-01-29

    Adhesion of bacteria on dental materials can be reduced by modifying the physical and chemical characteristics of their surfaces, either through the application of specific surface treatments or by the deposition of thin film coatings. Since this approach does not rely on the use of drugs or antimicrobial agents embedded in the materials, its duration is not limited by their possible depletion. Moreover it avoids the risks related to possible cytotoxic effects elicited by antibacterial substances released from the surface and diffused in the surrounding tissues. In this work, the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus mitis was studied on four composite resins, commonly used for manufacturing dental prostheses. The surfaces of dental materials were modified through the deposition of a-SiO(x) thin films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The chemical bonding structure of the coatings was analyzed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The morphology of the dental materials before and after the coating deposition was assessed by means of optical microscopy and high-resolution mechanical profilometry, while their wettability was investigated by contact angle measurements. The sample roughness was not altered after coating deposition, while a noticeable increase of wettability was detected for all the samples. Also, the adhesion of S. mitis decreased in a statistically significant way on the coated samples, when compared to the uncoated ones, which did not occur for S. mutans. Within the limitations of this study, a-SiO(x) coatings may affect the adhesion of bacteria such as S. mitis, possibly by changing the wettability of the composite resins investigated.

  1. Effect of Different Polymerization Methods on the Cytotoxicity of Dental Composites

    PubMed Central

    Beriat, Nilufer Celebi; Ertan, Ahmet Atila; Canay, Senay; Gurpinar, Aylin; Onur, Mehmet Ali

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the cytotoxic effects of various dental composites polymerized with two different curing units. Methods: Disc-shaped test samples of composites Filtek Z250, Filtek A110, Filtek P60, Filtek Supreme, and SDI Rok were polymerized using one quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) and one light emitting diode (LED) light curing unit (LCU), namely Optilux 501 (QTH) and Elipar Freelight 2 (LED). L-929 mouse fibroblast cultures (3x104 cells/ml) were incubated with the samples in 96 well culture plates for evaluation after 8, 24, 48, 72 h. At the end of each period, the cells were counted and examined under a light microscope, and a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was performed. The degree of cytotoxicity for each sample was determined according to the reference value represented by the cells in a control group (a culture without sample). Results: A significant 3 factor interaction occurred among LCUs, composites, and time factors (P<.005). In general, the test materials cured with the LED LCU demonstrated higher cell survival rates when compared with those cured with halogen LCUs. Conclusions: This study shows that polymerization of dental composites with a light emitting diode LCU positively influences the L-929 mouse fibroblast cell viability. PMID:20613917

  2. Comparative study between Fortify and Nd:YAG laser used for marginal sealing in composite restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Ricardo S.; Esteves, Grazia V.; Oliveira, Wilson T., Jr.; Matos, Adriana B.; Turbino, Mirian L.; Youssef, Michel N.; Matson, Edmir

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate microleakage of composite restorations submitted to marginal treatment. Class V preparations with walls located in enamel were performed at buccal and lingual surfaces of eighteen recently extracted, non-carious human premolars. Cavities were restored with composite resins and adhesive system. Samples were stored in distilled water for 48h and polished with Sof-Lex discs. Teeth were randomly divide in six groups: G1 - Control; G2 - marginal treatment with surface sealant; G3 - Nd:YAG 25 Hz, 80mJ, 2W; G4 - Nd:YAG 20Hz, 100mJ, 2W; G5 - Nd:YAG 30Hz, 60mJ, 1.8W; G6 - Nd:YAG 30Hz, 40mJ, 1.2W. Contact fiberoptic (300μm) pulsed (1.064 μm) Nd:YAG laser was used for 30sec, under air cooling. Teeth were impermeabilized, immersed in a dye (Rhodamine B) for 4h at 37°, and sectioned. Specimens were evaluated under light microscopy and evaluated with scores. Results were analyzed with Kruskal- Wallis test (p=0.05) and showed that there were significant differences between marginal treatments; there were no significant differences beaten groups 1, 2, 4 and 3, 5, 6; lower values of microleakage were at groups 3, 5, 6. Nd:YAG laser showed marginal sealing ability and decreased microleakage of composite resins restorations.

  3. Salivary bisphenol A levels and their association with composite resin restoration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Ha; Yi, Seung-Kyoo; Kim, Se-Yeon; Kim, Ji-Soo; Son, Sung-Ae; Jeong, Seung-Hwa; Kim, Jin-Bom

    2017-04-01

    Composite resin has been increasingly used in an effort to remove minimal amount of tooth structure and are used for restoring not just carious cavities but also cervical abrasion. To synthesize composite resin, bisphenol A (BPA) is used. The aim of the study was to measure the changes in salivary BPA level related with composite resin restoration. ELISA was used to examine the BPA levels in the saliva collected from 30 volunteers whose teeth were filled with composite resin. Salivary samples were collected immediately before filling and 5 min and 7 d after filling. Wilcoxon signed-ranks test and linear regression were performed to test the significant differences of the changes in BPA levels in saliva. Before a new composite resin filling, there was no significant difference between with and without existing filling of composite resin and BPA level in the saliva was not correlated to the number of filled surfaces with composite resin. However, BPA level in the saliva increased to average 3.64 μg/L from average 0.15 μg/L after filling 5 min. BPA level increased in proportion with the number of filled surfaces. BPA level decreased to average 0.59 after filling 7 d. However it was higher than the BPA level before a new composite resin filling. Considering 50 μg/kg/day as the Tolerable Daily Intake of BPA suggested by European Food Safety Authority, the amount of BPA eluted in saliva after the composite resin filling is considered a safe level that is not a hazard to health at all.

  4. Restoration of endodontically treated anterior teeth: an evaluation of coronal microleakage of glass ionomer and composite resin materials.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Arnold, A M; Wilcox, L R

    1990-12-01

    A glass ionomer material was evaluated for coronal microleakage in permanent lingual access restorations of endodontically treated anterior teeth. The material was tested as a restoration, placed over a zinc oxide-eugenol base, and as a base with an acid-etched composite resin veneer and a dentinal bonding agent. Restored teeth were thermocycled, immersed in silver nitrate, developed, and sectioned to assess microleakage. Significant coronal leakage was observed with all materials used.

  5. Effects of water-aging on self-healing dental composite containing microcapsules

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junling; Weir, Michael D.; Melo, Mary Anne S.; Strassler, Howard E.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to develop a self-healing dental composite containing poly(urea-formaldehyde) (PUF) shells with triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and N,N-dihydroxyethyl-p-toluidine (DHEPT) as healing liquid, and to investigate the mechanical properties of the composite and its self-healing efficacy after water-aging for 6 months. Methods PUF microspheres were synthesized encapsulating a TEGDMA-DHEPT healing liquid. Composite containing 30% of a resin matrix and 70% of glass fillers by mass was incorporated with 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10% of microcapsules. A flexural test was used to measure flexural strength and elastic modulus. A single edge V-notched beam method was used to measure fracture toughness (KIC) and self-healing efficacy. Specimens were water-aged at 37 °C for 1 d to 6 months and then tested for self-healing. Fractured specimens were healed while being immersed in water to examine self-healing efficacy, in comparison with that in air. Results Incorporation of up to 7.5% of microcapsules into the resin composite achieved effective self-healing, without adverse effects on the virgin mechanical properties of the composite (p > 0.1). An excellent self-healing efficacy of 64%–77% recovery was obtained (mean ± sd; n = 6). Six months of water-aging did not decrease the self-healing efficacy compared to 1 d (p > 0.1). Exposure to water did not decrease the healing efficacy, compared to that healed in air (p > 0.1). Conclusions A composite was developed with excellent self-healing efficacy even while being immersed in water. The self-healing efficacy did not decrease with increasing water-aging time for 6 months. Clinical significance The novel self-healing composite may be promising for dental applications to heal cracks, resist fracture, and increase the durability and longevity. PMID:26808158

  6. Effect of In-Office Carbamide Peroxide-Based Tooth Bleaching System on Wear Resistance of Silorane-Based and Methacrylate-Based Dental Composites

    PubMed Central

    Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoumeh; Sheikhzadeh, Sedigheh; Ghasemi Monfared Rad, Hamidreza; Beygi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Several studies have assessed the characteristics and properties of silorane-based composites and adhesive systems. Considering the extensive application of tooth-whitening agents, possible deteriorative effects of tooth bleaching agents on these restorative materials must be studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an in-office carbamide peroxide-based tooth bleaching agent on the wear resistance of a silorane-based and a conventional microhybrid dimethyl methacrylate-based dental composite with two different application times. Materials and Methods: Thirty cylindrical specimens were made of Z250 and P90 dental composite resins (n=15 for each composite). Samples made of each composite were divided into three groups (n=5) for immersion in an in-office bleaching agent (Opalescence® Quick 45%) for either three or eight hours or saline solution (control). Wear tests were conducted after bleaching using a pin-on disk apparatus under the load of 40N at a constant sliding speed of 0.5 ms−1 for a sliding distance of 300 m. The samples were weighed before and after the wear test. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to statistically analyze the obtained data (α=0.05). Results: There was a significant decrease in the weight of samples after the wear test (P<0.001). However, no significant difference was found among groups in the mean weight of samples before and after the wear test (P>0.05). Conclusion: Bleaching for three or eight hours using 45% carbamide peroxide had no deteriorative effect on the wear resistance of Z250 and P90 composites. PMID:27123014

  7. Evaluation of the effect of tooth and dental restoration material on electron dose distribution and production of photon contamination in electron beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Akbari, Fatemeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Sobhkhiz Sabet, Leila

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of tooth and dental restoration materials on electron dose distribution and photon contamination production in electron beams of a medical linac. This evaluation was performed on 8, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams of a Siemens Primus linac. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized and a 10 × 10 cm(2) applicator was simulated in the cases of tooth and combinations of tooth and Ceramco C3 ceramic veneer, tooth and Eclipse alloy and tooth and amalgam restoration materials in a soft tissue phantom. The relative electron and photon contamination doses were calculated for these materials. The presence of tooth and dental restoration material changed the electron dose distribution and photon contamination in phantom, depending on the type of the restoration material and electron beam's energy. The maximum relative electron dose was 1.07 in the presence of tooth including amalgam for 14 MeV electron beam. When 100.00 cGy was prescribed for the reference point, the maximum absolute electron dose was 105.10 cGy in the presence of amalgam for 12 MeV electron beam and the maximum absolute photon contamination dose was 376.67 μGy for tooth in 14 MeV electron beam. The change in electron dose distribution should be considered in treatment planning, when teeth are irradiated in electron beam radiotherapy. If treatment planning can be performed in such a way that the teeth are excluded from primary irradiation, the potential errors in dose delivery to the tumour and normal tissues can be avoided.

  8. Resin composite restoration in primary anterior teeth using short-post technique and strip crowns: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; De Benedetto, Monique Saveriano; del Conte Zardetto, Cristina Giovannetti; Wanderley, Marcia Turolla; Correa, Maria Salete Nahás Pires

    2004-10-01

    A case report describing a technique for the restoration of endodontically treated primary maxillary incisors with resin composite short posts and celluloid strip crowns in a 3-year-old boy is presented. The technique offers the advantages of using one restorative material, improving esthetics, and reducing chairtime and costs.

  9. Effect of Lactic Acid on Microleakage of Class V Low-Shrinkage Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Hashemikamangar, Sedigheh Sadat; Pourhashemi, Seyed Jalal; Nekooimehr, Zohre; Dehaki, Mehrzad Gholampur; Kharazifard, Mohamad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of lactic acid (LA) on microleakage of silorane-based composite restorations and methacrylate-based composites with self-etch and etch-and-rinse bonding systems. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared in 120 extracted human teeth, divided into four groups and restored as follows: 1. Silorane-based composite+P90 adhesive system (P90); 2. Filtek Z250+SE Bond (Z250SE); 3. Filtek Z350+SE Bond (Z350SE) and 4. Filtek Z250+Single Bond (Z250SB). Half of the samples in each group were immersed in LA and the other half in distilled water (DW) for seven days. Degree of microleakage was determined by dye penetration. Data were analyzed using Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney-U tests (type 1 error was considered 0.05 for primary and 0.017 for post-hoc tests). Results: No significant difference was found in microleakage between LA and DW groups. The difference among groups in gingival margin microleakage was significant (P<0.05). The highest degree of microleakage was seen in Z250SB; which was significantly higher than Z250SE (DW: P=0.012 and LA: P=0.002) and Z350SE (DW: P=0.002 and LA: P=0.014). Microleakage was not significantly different between Z250SE and Z350SE (DW: P=0.683 and LA: P=0.533). The degree of microleakage of P90 in both media was lower than Z250SB and higher than that of Z250SE and Z350SE; but these differences were not significant. Conclusions: Immersion in LA has no effect on microleakage of class V composite restorations regardless of the type of composite and adhesive system. At gingival margins, the highest microleakage occurred in Z250SB followed by P90 and self-etch groups. PMID:28127313

  10. Light-Curing Volumetric Shrinkage in Dimethacrylate-Based Dental Composites by Nanoindentation and PAL Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpotyuk, Olha; Adamiak, Stanislaw; Bezvushko, Elvira; Cebulski, Jozef; Iskiv, Maryana; Shpotyuk, Oleh; Balitska, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    Light-curing volumetric shrinkage in dimethacrylate-based dental resin composites Dipol® is examined through comprehensive kinetics research employing nanoindentation measurements and nanoscale atomic-deficient study with lifetime spectroscopy of annihilating positrons. Photopolymerization kinetics determined through nanoindentation testing is shown to be described via single-exponential relaxation function with character time constants reaching respectively 15.0 and 18.7 s for nanohardness and elastic modulus. Atomic-deficient characteristics of composites are extracted from positron lifetime spectra parameterized employing unconstrained x3-term fitting. The tested photopolymerization kinetics can be adequately reflected in time-dependent changes observed in average positron lifetime (with 17.9 s time constant) and fractional free volume of positronium traps (with 18.6 s time constant). This correlation proves that fragmentation of free-volume positronium-trapping sites accompanied by partial positronium-to-positron traps conversion determines the light-curing volumetric shrinkage in the studied composites.

  11. Marginal adaptation of class V composite restorations submitted to thermal and mechanical cycling

    PubMed Central

    CASSELLI, Denise Sá Maia; FARIA-E-SILVA, André Luis; CASSELLI, Henrique; MARTINS, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effect of the margin location and an adhesive system on the marginal adaptation of composite restorations. Material and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared in bovine teeth with the gingival margin on the dentin and the incisal margin on the enamel. The cavities were restored with a micro-hybrid composite resin using an etch-and-rinse [Single Bond 2 (SB)] or a self-etching adhesive [Clearfil SE Bond (CL)]. After finishing and polishing the restorations, epoxy replicas were prepared. The marginal adaptation was analyzed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM, 500 x magnification). The higher gap width in each margin was recorded (T0). After the first evaluation, the samples were submitted to thermal cycling (2,000 cycles of 5ºC±2ºC followed by 55ºC±2ºC - T1) and mechanical cycling (100,000 cycles of 50 kN and 2 Hz - T2). Replicas of samples were rebuilt after each cycling and analyzed under SEM. The data were submitted to Mann-Whitney, Wilcoxon and Friedman testing (a=0.05). Results: The SB presented higher gaps in the dentin than the enamel, while there was no difference between the substrate for the CL. In the dentin, the CL showed better marginal sealing than the SB. The opposite occurred in the enamel. There were no significant differences between the baseline, thermal and mechanical cycling for any experimental condition. Conclusions: The outcomes of the present study showed that the adhesive system and margin location have an important effect on the marginal adaptation of composite restorations. PMID:23559115

  12. Effect of Re-Etching of Oxalate-Occluded Dentin on Microleakage of Composite Resin Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Saffarpour, Aida; Ghavam, Maryam; Saffarpour, Anna; Sadighi, Kimiya; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of re-etching of desensitized dentin for five and 10 seconds on marginal microleakage of composite restorations. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities (4×2×2mm) were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 64 third molars and randomly divided into four groups of 16. In the control group, Single Bond (SB) adhesive was applied after etching. In BB+SB group, after application of BisBlock (BB) desensitizer agent (which needs etching), SB adhesive was used. In BB+5E+SB group, re-etching of dentin was done for five seconds after application of desensitizer, and then the adhesive was applied. The process in BB+10E+SB was the same as BB+5E+SB group except for re-etching time, which was 10 seconds. The cavities were restored with composite resin. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water and 10,000 thermal cycles, all samples were subjected to dye penetration test. The teeth were sectioned buccolingually in the middle of restorations. A blind examiner observed the sections under a stereomicroscope. Results: At the occlusal margins, no significant difference in microleakage was observed among the groups (P>0.05). Application of BB in combination with SB had no effect in comparison to the control group (P>0.05); while there were significant differences in microleakage scores between BB+10E+SB and control (P=0.002), BB+10E+SB and BB+SB (P<0.001) and BB+5E+SB and BB+SB groups (P=0.009). Conclusions: Dentin re-etching after application of BB desensitizer increased the gingival microleakage of class V composite restorations. Application of BB desensitizer combined with SB adhesive enhanced marginal seal. PMID:28127325

  13. Comparison between experimental and computational methods for scattering anisotropy coefficient determination in dental-resin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Carrasco, Irene M.; Ghinea, Razvan; Pérez, María M.; Rubiño, Manuel

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of light propagation in biological materials is essential for biomedical engineering and its applications. Among the key optical properties of biological media is the angular distribution of the scattered light, characterized by the average cosine of the scattering angle, called the scattering anisotropy coefficient (g). The value of g can be determined by experimentally irradiating the material with a laser beam and making angular-scattering measurements in a goniometer. In this work, an experimental technique was used to determine g by means of goniometric measurements of the laser light scattered off two different dental-resin composites (classified as nano and hybrid). To assess the accuracy of the experimental method, a Mie theory-based computational model was used. Independent measurements were used to determine some of the required input parameters for computation of the theoretical model. The g values estimated with the computational method (nano-filled: 0.9399; hybrid: 0.8975) and the values calculated with the experimental method presented (nano-filled: 0.98297 +/- 0.00021; hybrid: 0.95429 +/- 0.00014) agreed well for both dental resins, with slightly higher experimental values. The higher experimental values may indicate that the scattering particle causes more narrow-angle scattering than does a perfect sphere of equal volume, assuming that with more spherical scattering particles the scattering anisotropy coefficient increases. Since g represents the angular distribution of the scattered light, values provided by both the experimental and the computational methods show a strongly forward-directed scattering in the dental resins studied, more pronounced in the nano-filled composite than in the hybrid composite.

  14. Characterization of a Low Shrinkage Dental Composite Containing Bismethylene Spiroorthocarbonate Expanding Monomer

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jing; Liu, Wenjia; Hao, Zhichao; Wu, Xiangnan; Yin, Jian; Panjiyar, Anil; Liu, Xiaoqing; Shen, Jiefei; Wang, Hang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a novel dental composite based on the unsaturated bismethylene spiroorthocarbonate expanding monomer 3,9-dimethylene-1,3,5,7-tetraoxa-spiro[5,5]undecane (BMSOC) and bisphenol-S-bis(3-meth acrylate-2-hydroxypropyl)ether (BisS-GMA) was prepared. CQ (camphorquinone) of 1 wt % and DMAEMA (2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) of 2 wt % were used in a photoinitiation system to initiate the copolymerization of the matrix resins. Distilled water contact angle measurements were performed for the wettability measurement. Degree of conversion, volumetric shrinkage, contraction stress and compressive strength were measured using Fourier Transformation Infrared-FTIR spectroscopy, the AccuVol and a universal testing machine, respectively. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the resin composites modified by bismethylene spiroorthocarbonate and BisS-GMA showed a low volumetric shrinkage at 1.25% and a higher contact angle. The lower contraction stress, higher degree of conversion and compressive strength of the novel dental composites were also observed. PMID:24518683

  15. A new fluorinated urethane dimethacrylate with carboxylic groups for use in dental adhesive compositions.

    PubMed

    Buruiana, Tinca; Melinte, Violeta; Aldea, Horia; Pelin, Irina M; Buruiana, Emil C

    2016-05-01

    A urethane macromer containing hexafluoroisopropylidene, poly(ethylene oxide) and carboxylic moieties (UF-DMA) was synthesized and used in proportions varying between 15 and 35 wt.% (F1-F3) in dental adhesive formulations besides BisGMA, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. The FTIR and (1)H ((13)C) NMR spectra confirmed the chemical structure of the UF-DMA. The experimental adhesives were characterized with regard to the degree of conversion, water sorption/solubility, contact angle, diffusion coefficient, Vickers hardness, and morphology of the crosslinked networks and compared with the specimens containing 10 wt.% hydroxyapatite (HAP) or calcium phosphate (CaP). The conversion degree (after 180 s of irradiation with visible light) ranged from 59.5% (F1) to 74.8% (F3), whereas the water sorption was between 23.15 μg mm(-3) (F1) and 40.52 μg mm(-3) (F3). Upon the addition of HAP or CaP this parameter attained values of 37.82-49.14 μg mm(-3) (F1-F3-HAP) and 34.58-45.56 μg mm(-3), respectively. Also, the formation of resin tags through the infiltration of a dental composition (F3) was visualized by SEM analysis. The results suggest that UF-DMA taken as co-monomer in dental adhesives of acrylic type may provide improved properties in the moist environment of the mouth.

  16. [The study on chemical composition and crystalline structure of hypoplastic primary dental enamel].

    PubMed

    Zheng, S; Deng, H; Gao, X

    1997-11-01

    The present study, firstly, analyzed chemical composition of hypoplastic primary teeth by electron probe analyzer and compared the hypoplastic part with the normal part in the same tooth; secondly, by X-ray diffraction analyzer, studied the hypoplastic dental enamel and the normal dental enamel, and compared the crystalline structure between different dental enamel and with that of the hydroxyapatite. The aim was to find out any change of crystalline structure. Two exfoliated hypoplastic deciduous anterior teeth were used for the electron probe study. The normal part of each tooth served as control. Determinations of weight percentage (wt%) were made for P, Al, Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn, Sr, Na, K and F. Four exfoliated hypoplastic deciduous anterior teeth and eight exfoliated normal deciduous anterior teeth were used for the X-ray diffraction study. We found by X-ray diffraction that the length of the alpha-axis of enamel crystallite and the distance of lattice plane (corresponding 300) were increased in defective enamel and could be associated with the increased content of magnesium detected by electron probe. Thus, the present study demonstrated that there were both quantity and quality changes in the enamel hypoplasia lesion, which may increase the susceptibility of the defective teeth to caries.

  17. Effect of thermocycling and varying polymerization techniques on the restorative interface of class V cavities restored with different composite resin systems

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Lindomar-Corrêa; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis; Júnior, Newton-Fahl

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate marginal microleakage of two composite resins - a methacrylate- and a silorane-based submitted to different polymerization techniques and thermocycling. Material and Methods Ninety-six class V cavities were prepared in sound human molars and restored under different polymerization and thermocycling regimens. The adhesive systems employed were Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose and Filtek P-90 for cavities restored with Z250 and P-90. The specimens were restored with Z250 or P-90, and divided into 3 subgroups with different polymerization techniques. The data were analyzed by Three way Analysis of Variance Test (p<0.05). Results Micro infiltration lower scores were found in groups which were used silorane-based resin with significant statistical difference compared with the specimens restored with methacrylate-based resin, independently of polymerization type used and thermocycling (P>0.001). Conclusions Silorane-based composite resins present lower marginal microleakage values when compared to methacrylate-based composites resins. Key words:Composite resin, microleakage, polymerization. PMID:28298983

  18. Fracture Resistance of Premolars Restored by Various Types and Placement Techniques of Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Horieh; Zeynali, Mahsa; Pour, Zahra Hosseini

    2012-01-01

    To verify the fracture resistance of premolars with mesioocclusodistal preparations restored by different resin composites and placement techniques. Sixty premolars were randomly divided into two groups based on type of composite resin: Filtek P60 or Nulite F, and then each group was separated into three subgroups: bulk, centripetal, and fiber insert according to the type of placement method (n = 10). Single-bond adhesive system was used as composite bonding according to the manufacturer's instructions. Specimens were restored in Groups 1, 2, and 3 with Filtek P60 and in Groups 4, 5, and 6 with Nulite F. After being stored 24 hours at 37°C, a 4 mm diameter steel sphere in a universal testing machine was applied on tooth buccal and lingual cusps at a cross-head speed of 5 mm/min until fracture occurred. Groups 3 and 6 showed higher fracture resistance than Groups 1, 2, 4, and 5. Among the placement techniques, the fiber insert method had a significant effect, but the type of composite was ineffective. The insertion technique in contrast to the type of material had a significant influence on the fracture resistance of premolar teeth. PMID:22666255

  19. Effect of curing unit and adhesive system on marginal adaptation of composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Casselli, Denise Sa Maia; Faria-e-Silva, Andre Luis; Casselli, Henrique; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate how a curing unit and adhesive system affected the marginal adaptation of resin composite restorations. Class V cavities were prepared in bovine teeth with a gingival margin in dentin and an incisal margin in enamel. The cavities were restored with a micro-hybrid resin composite using one of four adhesives: Single Bond 2, Prime & Bond NT, Clearfil SE Bond, Xeno IV. The light-activations were performed using a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) lamp or a second-generation light-emitting diode (LED). Restorations were finished and polished and epoxy replicas were prepared. Marginal adaptation was analyzed by using scanning electronic microscopy (magnification 500X). The widest gaps in each margin were recorded, and data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests (α = 0.05). Differences between the adhesives were observed only when the dentin margins were evaluated: Clearfil SE Bond demonstrated better marginal adaptation than Prime & Bond NT or Single Bond 2 (which demonstrated the widest gaps in the dentin margin). The type of curing unit only affected the results for Xeno IV when the enamel margin was analyzed; the LED lamp promoted smaller gaps than the QTH lamp.

  20. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Rodrigo Vieira; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Kaneshima, Edmilson Nobumitu; Barbosa, Aline Silvestre; Picolotto, Cassiana Pedrotti; Lima, Ana Eliza de Souza; Gonini Júnior, Alcides; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED). Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10) followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa) were submitted to Student's t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x). Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites. PMID:26457322

  1. Acceleration and novelty: community restoration speeds recovery and transforms species composition in Andean cloud forest.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sarah Jane; Rhemtulla, Jeanine M

    2016-01-01

    Community-based tropical forest restoration projects, often promoted as a win-win solution for local communities and the environment, have increased dramatically in number in the past decade. Many such projects are underway in Andean cloud forests, which, given their extremely high biodiversity and history of extensive clearing, are understudied. This study investigates the efficacy of community-based tree-planting projects to accelerate cloud forest recovery, as compared to unassisted natural regeneration. This study takes place in northwest Andean Ecuador, where the majority of the original, highly diverse cloud forests have been cleared, in five communities that initiated tree-planting projects to restore forests in 2003. In 2011, we identified tree species along transects in planted forests (n = 5), naturally regenerating forests (n = 5), and primary forests (n = 5). We also surveyed 120 households about their restoration methods, tree preferences, and forest uses. We found that tree diversity was higher in planted than in unplanted secondary forest, but both were less diverse than primary forests. Ordination analysis showed that all three forests had distinct species compositions, although planted forests shared more species with primary forests than did unplanted forests. Planted forests also contained more animal-dispersed species in both the planted canopy and in the unplanted, regenerating understory than unplanted forests, and contained the highest proportion of species with use value for local people. While restoring forest increased biodiversity and accelerated forest recovery, restored forests may also represent novel ecosystems that are distinct from the region's previous ecosystems and, given their usefulness to people, are likely to be more common in the future.

  2. Diagnostic value of DIAGNOdent in detecting caries under composite restorations of primary molars

    PubMed Central

    Sichani, Ava Vali; Javadinejad, Shahrzad; Ghafari, Roshanak

    2016-01-01

    Background: Direct observation cannot detect caries under restorations; therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of radiographs and DIAGNOdent in detecting caries under restorations in primary teeth using histologic evaluation. Materials and Methods: A total of 74 previously extracted primary molars (37 with occlusal caries and 37 without caries) were used. Class 1 cavity preparations were made on each tooth by a single clinician and then the preparations were filled with composite resin. The accuracy of radiographs and DIAGNOdent in detecting caries was compared using histologic evaluation. The data were analyzed by SPSS version 21 using Chi-square, Mc Namara statistical tests and receiver operating characteristic curve. The significance was set at 0.05. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for DIAGNOdent were 70.97 and 83.72, respectively. Few false negative results were observed, and the positive predictive value was high (+PV = 75.9) and the area under curve was more than 0.70 therefore making DIAGNOdenta great method for detecting caries (P = 0.0001). Two observers evaluated the radiographs and both observers had low sensitivity ( first observer: 48.39) (second observer: 51.61) and high specificity (both observers: 79.07). The +PV was lower than DIAGNOdent and the area under curve for both observers was less than 0.70. However, the difference between the two methods was not significant. Conclusion: DIAGNOdent showed a greater accuracy in detecting secondary caries under primary molar restorations, compared to radiographs. Although DIAGNOdent is an effective method for detecting caries under composite restorations, it is better to be used as an adjunctive method alongside other detecting procedures. PMID:27605990

  3. Dental composite resins containing silica-fused ceramic single-crystalline whiskers with various filler levels.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H

    1999-07-01

    Currently available direct-filling composite resins are susceptible to fracture and hence are not recommended for use in large stress-bearing posterior restorations involving cusps. The glass fillers in composites provide only limited reinforcement because of the brittleness and low strength of glass. The aim of the present study was to use ceramic single-crystalline whiskers as fillers to reinforce composites, and to investigate the effect of whisker filler level on composite properties. Silica particles were fused onto the whiskers to facilitate silanization and to roughen the whiskers, thereby improving retention in the matrix. The composite flexural strength, elastic modulus, hardness, and degree of polymerization conversion were measured as a function of whisker filler mass fraction, which ranged from 0% to 70%. Selected composites were polished simulating clinical procedures, and the surface roughness was measured with profilometry. The whisker composite with a filler mass fraction of 55% had a flexural strength (mean +/- SD; n = 6) of 196+/-10 MPa, significantly higher than 83+/-14 MPa of a microfill and 120+/-16 MPa of a hybrid composite control (family confidence coefficient = 0.95; Tukey's multiple comparison). The composite modulus and hardness increased monotonically with filler level. The flexural strength first increased, then plateaued with increasing filler level. The degree of conversion decreased with increasing filler level. The whisker composite had a polished surface roughness similar to that of a conventional hybrid composite (p>0.1; Student's t). To conclude, ceramic whisker reinforcement can significantly improve the mechanical properties of composite resins; the whisker filler level plays a key role in determining composite properties; and the reinforcement mechanisms appear to be crack pinning by whiskers and friction from whisker pullout resisting crack propagation.

  4. Effect of polishing techniques and time on surface roughness, hardness and microleakage of resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Venturini, Daniela; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Camacho, Guilherme Brião; Powers, John M

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of immediate and delayed polishing on the surface roughness, microhardness and microleakage of a microfilled (Filtek A110) and a hybrid (Filtek Z250) resin composite. Standardized preparations were made on the buccal surfaces of 256 bovine teeth; half were restored with each composite (128 teeth per composite). Immediately after curing, gross finishing was carried out with #280 sandpaper. The specimens restored with each composite were divided into two subgroups. The first group (IM) was polished immediately after gross finishing, using three different systems (n=16): Sequence A, Sof-Lex; Sequence B, Flexicups and Sequence C, Flexicups + Jiffy Polishing Brush + Flexibuffs. The specimens were then stored for three weeks in saline 37 degrees C. The second group (DE) was stored for two weeks, then polished with the same systems and stored for one additional week. The controls (n=16) were analyzed without polishing. Five readings per specimen were taken for surface roughness and hardness. After immersion in basic fuchsin, microleakage was evaluated (40x) using standardized scores. The data were analyzed at a significance level of 0.05, with analysis of variance and an SNK test (surface roughness and microhardness) or with Kruskal-Wallis (microleakage). In both composites, only for the sequential technique was there an influence of delay in polishing on roughness (Ra). Flexicups exhibited the highest Ra of the three systems. The IM and Filtek Z-250 groups showed higher hardness than the DE and Filtek A-110 groups, respectively. Dentin margins showed more leakage than enamel margins; the sequential technique produced more leakage than the other techniques in dentin (p<0.05) and delay of polishing was not significant in the majority of situations. In conclusion, several conditions--composite, time and polishing technique--had a significant influence on surface roughness, hardness and microleakage. Generally, immediate polishing produced no

  5. Minimally invasive use of coloured composite resin in aesthetic restoration of periodontially involved teeth: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Wahbi, M.A.; Al Sharief, H.S.; Tayeb, H.; Bokhari, A.

    2013-01-01

    Gingival recession causes not only aesthetic problems, but problems with oral hygiene, plaque accumulation, speech, and tooth sensitivity. Replacing the missing gingival tissue with composite resin, when indicated, can be a time- and cost-effective solution. Here we report the case of a 25-year-old female who presented with generalized gingival recession. Black triangles were present between the maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth due to loss of interdental tissues, caused by recent periodontal surgery. She also had slightly malposed maxillary anterior teeth. The patient elected to replace gingival tissue with pink composite resin and to alter the midline with composite resin veneers. The first treatment phase involved placement of pink gingival composite to restore the appearance of interdental papilla to her upper (16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 21, 22, 23, and 24) and lower (34, 33, 32, 31, 41, 42, 43, and 44) teeth. Phase two was to place direct composite resin bonded veneers on her upper (16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 21, 22, 23, and 24) teeth to alter the midline and achieve desired colour. The third treatment phase was to level the lower incisal edge shape by enameloplasty (31, 32, 41, and 42) to produce a more youthful and attractive smile. This case report and brief review attempt to describe the clinical obstacles and the current treatment options along with a suggested protocol. Use of contemporary materials such as gingival coloured composite to restore lost gingival tissue and improve aesthetics can be a simple and cost-effective way to manage patients affected by generalized aggressive periodontitis (AgP). PMID:23960560

  6. Minimally invasive use of coloured composite resin in aesthetic restoration of periodontially involved teeth: Case report.

    PubMed

    Wahbi, M A; Al Sharief, H S; Tayeb, H; Bokhari, A

    2013-04-01

    Gingival recession causes not only aesthetic problems, but problems with oral hygiene, plaque accumulation, speech, and tooth sensitivity. Replacing the missing gingival tissue with composite resin, when indicated, can be a time- and cost-effective solution. Here we report the case of a 25-year-old female who presented with generalized gingival recession. Black triangles were present between the maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth due to loss of interdental tissues, caused by recent periodontal surgery. She also had slightly malposed maxillary anterior teeth. The patient elected to replace gingival tissue with pink composite resin and to alter the midline with composite resin veneers. The first treatment phase involved placement of pink gingival composite to restore the appearance of interdental papilla to her upper (16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 21, 22, 23, and 24) and lower (34, 33, 32, 31, 41, 42, 43, and 44) teeth. Phase two was to place direct composite resin bonded veneers on her upper (16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 21, 22, 23, and 24) teeth to alter the midline and achieve desired colour. The third treatment phase was to level the lower incisal edge shape by enameloplasty (31, 32, 41, and 42) to produce a more youthful and attractive smile. This case report and brief review attempt to describe the clinical obstacles and the current treatment options along with a suggested protocol. Use of contemporary materials such as gingival coloured composite to restore lost gingival tissue and improve aesthetics can be a simple and cost-effective way to manage patients affected by generalized aggressive periodontitis (AgP).

  7. Clinical performance of Class I nanohybrid composite restorations with resin-modified glass-ionomer liner and flowable composite liner: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Suhasini, Krishtipati; Madhusudhana, Koppolu; Suneelkumar, Chinni; Lavanya, Anumula; Chandrababu, K. S.; Kumar, Perisetty Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Liners play a vital role in minimizing polymerization shrinkage stress by elastic bonding concept and increase the longevity and favorable outcome for composite restorations. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of nanohybrid composite restorations using resin-modified glass-ionomer and flowable composite liners. Settings and Design: A single-centered, double-blinded randomized clinical trial, with split-mouth design and equal allocation ratio that was conducted in the Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics. Materials and Methods: In forty patients, a total of eighty Class I restorations were placed with resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) liner (FUJI II LC, GC America) in one group and flowable composite liner (smart dentin replacement/SDR, Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA) in another group. All restorations were clinically evaluated by two examiners, immediately (baseline), 3, 6, and 12 months using US Public Health Service modified criteria. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using McNemar's test (P < 0.05). Results: There was no significant difference in the color match, marginal discoloration, surface roughness, and marginal adaptation. Restorations with RMGIC liner group show 20% Bravo scores on anatomic form at 12 months but are still clinically acceptable. Conclusion: Nanohybrid composite restorations with RMGIC (Fuji II LC) and flowable composite liner (SDR) demonstrated clinically acceptable performance after 12 months. PMID:27994310

  8. Assessment of Microleakage of a Composite Resin Restoration in Primary Teeth Following Class III Cavity Preparation Using Er, Cr: YSGG laser: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Priya; Pandey, Annu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Marginal seal integrity is important for a successful adhesive dental restoration. Alterations caused by laser irradiation in the enamel and dentin surface can affect the marginal integrity of adhesive restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of a composite resin restoration in primary teeth following laser irradiation of enamel and dentin. Methods: Forty freshly extracted sound human primary maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth were used in this study. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups (I and II), with 20 teeth in each. In group I, proximal cavities (Class III) were prepared using an airotor hand –piece and diamond bur. The cavities were etched for 15 seconds with 35% phosphoric acid gel, rinsed with water for 15 seconds, air dried and a bonding agent was applied onto the cavity surfaces and light cured for 20 seconds. The cavities were restored with composite resin and light cured for 40 seconds. In group II, proximal (Class III) cavities were prepared using Erbium, Chromium: Yttrium Scandium Gallium Garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) (Er,Cr:YSGG) (Biolaseiplus, wave length 2.78 μm). The cavity was then rinsed, air dried and without etching, a bonding agent was applied and light cured for 20 seconds. The cavities were restored in the same manner as that of group I. The treated teeth were mounted on acrylic resin blocks and were subjected to a thermocycling regimen. Following, the teeth were immersed in 2% methylene blue for 24 hours. The teeth were sectioned longitudinally in a bucco-lingual direction using a diamond disc at slow speed. The sections of all the groups were examined under a stereomicroscope for micro-leakage. Results: The mean scores for microleakage in group I was 1.95 ± 1.31 and in group II it was 1.4 ± 1.27. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.882). Conclusion: No significant difference in microleakage was noticed between the composite resin bonded to lased enamel and

  9. Bisphenol A Release: Survey of the Composition of Dental Composite Resins

    PubMed Central

    Dursun, Elisabeth; Fron-Chabouis, Hélène; Attal, Jean-Pierre; Raskin, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disruptor with potential toxicity. Composite resins may not contain pure BPA, but its derivatives are widely used. Several studies found doses of BPA or its derivatives in saliva or urine of patients after composite resin placement. Objective: The aims of this study were to establish an exhaustive list of composite resins marketed in Europe and their composition, and to assess the extent of BPA derivatives used. Methods: A research on manufacturers' websites was performed to reference all composite resins marketed in Europe, then their composition was determined from both material safety data sheets and a standardized questionnaire sent to manufacturers. Manufacturers had to indicate whether their product contained the monomers listed, add other monomers if necessary, or indicate “not disclosed”. Results: 160 composite resins were identified from 31 manufacturers and 23 manufacturers (74.2%) responded to the survey. From the survey and websites, the composition of 130 composite resins (81.2%) was: 112 (86.2%) based on BPA derivatives, 97 (74.7%) on bis-GMA, 17 (13.1%) without monomer derived from BPA (UDMA, sometimes with TEGDMA) and 6 (4.6%) with UDMA (only); 1 (0.8%) did not contain a BPA derivative or UDMA or TEGDMA. Pure BPA was never reported. Conclusion: This work has established a list of 18 composite resins that contain no BPA derivative. Manufacturers should be required to report the exact composition of their products as it often remains unclear or incomplete. PMID:27708726

  10. Effect of alloy surface composition on release of elements from dental casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Wataha, J C; Malcolm, C T

    1996-09-01

    The release of elements from dental casting alloys is a continuing concern because of the potentially harmful biological effects the elements may have on local tissues. The surfaces of the alloys appear to be most important in controlling the release of these elements. In the current study, the surfaces of high-, reduced-, and no-gold dental alloys were analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy before and after they were exposed to a biological medium for up to 96 h. The goal was to relate the release of elements from these alloys to their surface composition, and to determine the depth of the effect of the medium. The depth of the effect of the exposure was determined by argon milling of the alloy surface after exposure to the medium. Elements that were released into the medium were measured by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy. The release of elements from alloys was greater when the atomic ratio of noble to non-noble elements at the surface was less than 1. The depth of the effect of the medium varied with the alloy, but was always less than 100 A. The surface composition was significantly different from layers only 5 A below. It was concluded that the surface concentration of noble elements is important in controlling the release of non-noble elements from these alloys, and the surface composition appeared to be only one or two atomic layers thick. Of the three types of alloys, the high-gold alloy appeared to develop the most stable surface composition which released the lowest levels of elements.

  11. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  12. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  13. Selective removal of dental composite with a diode-pumped Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, William A.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Selective removal of dental composite with high precision is best accomplished using lasers operating at high pulse repetition rates focused to a small spot size. Conventional flash-lamp pumped Er:YAG lasers are poorly suited for this purpose, but new diode-pumped Er:YAG lasers have become available operating at high pulse repetition rates. The purpose of this study was to compare the ablation rates and selectivity of enamel and composite for a 30 W diode-pumped Er:YAG laser operating with a pulse duration of 30-50-μs and evaluate it's suitability for the selective removal of composite from tooth surfaces. The depth of ablation and changes in surface morphology were assessed using digital microscopy. The fluence range of 30-50 J/cm2 appeared optimal for the removal of composite, and damage to sound enamel was limited to less than 100-μm after the removal of composite as thick as 700-800-μm. Future studies will focus on the use of methods of feedback to further increase selectivity.

  14. Effect of alcoholic beverages on surface roughness and microhardness of dental composites.

    PubMed

    DA Silva, Marcos Aurélio Bomfim; Vitti, Rafael Pino; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Silva-Júnior, José Ginaldo da; Tonholo, Josealdo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microhardness and surface roughness of composite resins immersed in alcoholic beverages. Three composite resins were used: Durafill (Heraeus Kulzer), Z250 (3M-ESPE) and Z350 XT (3M-ESPE). The inital surface roughness and microhardness were measured. The samples were divided into four groups (n=30): G1-artificial saliva; G2-beer; G3-vodka; G4-whisky. The samples were immersed in the beverages 3× a day for 15 min and 30 days. The surface roughness and microhardness assays were repeated after immersion period. The data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey-HSD test (p<0.05). Surface roughness increased for all composite resins immersed in beer and whisky. Microhardness of all groups decreased after immersion in alcoholic beverages. The effect of these beverages on dental composites is depended upon the chemical composition, immersion time, alcohol content and pH of solutions.

  15. Composite resin restorations of non-carious cervical lesions in patients with diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Carlos A; Nassar, Patrícia O; Secundes, Mayron B; Busato, Priscilla do Monte Ribeiro; Camilotti, Veridiana

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a set of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from absolute or relative deficiency in insulin secretion by the pancreas and/or impaired insulin action in target tissues. Oral health maintenance through health care, as well as metabolic control are important measures for the overall health of diabetic patients. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between biocompatibility of composite resin restorations with different nanoparticles, polishing in abfraction lesions in anterior and posterior teeth with periodontal tissues in patients with diabetes mellitus. We selected 20 patients--10 patients with diabetes mellitus and 10 patients without diabetes mellitus-, but with a total of 30 restorations in each group receiving composite resin restorations, who were evaluated for periodontal purposes: Plaque Index, Gingival Index; Probing Depth, Clinical Attachment Level and Bleeding on Probing. In addition, the restorations will receive assessments according to criteria for Marginal Adaptation, Anatomical Shape, Marginal Discoloration, ormation of caries, Post-operative Sensitivity and Retention. The total period was 90 days. The results showed a significant improvement in periodontal parameters assessed (p < 0.05) in both groups. With regard to assessments of the restorations, it was observed that there was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) among all criteria evaluated within the 90-day period. Thus, we conclude that in a short period (90 days) there is clinical biocompatibility of composite resin with nanoparticles restorations in abfraction lesions and periodontal tissues of patients with diabetes mellitus, regardless the type of polish these restorations receive.

  16. The effect of polishing systems on microleakage of tooth-coloured restoratives. Part 2: composite and polyacid-modified composite resins.

    PubMed

    Yap, A U; Wong, M L; Lim, A C

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of polishing systems on the microleakage of composite and polyacid-modified composite resins. Class V cavities were prepared at the cemento-enamel junction of 80 freshly extracted posterior teeth. The prepared teeth were randomly divided into two groups and restored with conventional or polyacid-modified composite resins. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 week after removal of excess restorative with diamond finishing burs. The restored teeth were then divided into four groups of ten and finished/polished using the following systems: Two Striper micron finishing system (MFS), Sof-Lex XT (Sof-Lex), Enhance composite finishing and polishing system (Enhance), and Shofu composite finishing kit (Shofu). The finished restorations were subjected to dye penetration testing. Results showed that the microleakage resistance at both enamel and dentin margins of composite and polyacid-modified composite resins are not significantly affected by the different polishing systems.

  17. Difference in color and color parameters between dental porcelain and porcelain-repairing resin composite.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hee; Lee, Yong-Keun; Lim, Bum-Soon; Rhee, Sang-Hoon; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the differences in color and color parameters between dental porcelain and porcelain-repairing resin composites. The colors of three shades (A2, A3, A3.5) of one brand of dental porcelain, three original shades (A2, A3, A3.5), and three combinations (A2/A3, A3/3.5, A2/A3.5) of three brands of porcelain-repairing resin composites (ABT, FSP, TCR) were measured. The specimens were 2 mm thick, and 1 mm of each shade was layered to make combined shades. Differences in color (DeltaE(ab) (*)), lightness (DeltaL*), chroma (DeltaC(ab) (*)), and hue (DeltaH(*)) between porcelain and resin composite were calculated. Color difference was calculated as DeltaE(ab) (*) = (DeltaL*(2) + Deltaa*(2) + Deltab*(2))(1/2), chroma difference was calculated as DeltaC(ab) (*) = (Deltaa*(2) + Deltab*(2))(1/2), and hue difference was calculated as DeltaH(ab) (*) = (DeltaE(ab) (*2) - DeltaL*(2) - DeltaC(ab) (*2))(1/2). The influence of porcelain shade, brand of resin composites, and shade of resin composites were analyzed by three-way analyses of variance, and the differential influence of color parameters on color difference was analyzed with multiple regression analysis (alpha = 0.05). Differences in color and color parameters were influenced by the porcelain shade, brand and shade of resin composites. The DeltaE(ab) (*) value was in the range of 2.2-16.9. The DeltaE(ab) (*) value was correlated with DeltaC(ab) (*) (standardized correlation coefficient, beta = - 0.85), DeltaL* (beta = - 0.52), and DeltaH(ab) (*) (beta = 0.08). Between the same shade designated pairs of porcelain and repairing composite, color difference was perceptible. Therefore, studies to improve the color matching between porcelain and repairing resin are recommended.

  18. Nanoleakage Evaluation of Posterior Teeth Restored with Low Shrinkable Resin Composite- An invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Labib, Labib Mohamed; Nabih, Sameh Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The effect of nanoleakage on the integrity of resin–dentin bond has been in interest for long-term adhesion. Aim This study evaluated the nanoleakage in premolar teeth restored with low shrinkable resin composite. Materials and Methods A total of 40 human premolars were used for nanoleakage evaluation in this study. Each group was divided into four equal groups; Group A: using silorane with its adhesive system. Group B: using silorane with G-bond. Group C: using Filtek supreme composite with G-bond. Group D: using Filtek supreme composite with AdheSE adhesive. Nanoleakage analysed using Scaning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometery (EDX). Results The amount of silver present in hybrid layer depend on the adhesive used; this indicated different nanoleakage expressions in different adhesive systems. Filtek Z350 composite with G-bond showed clear silver uptake in both the adhesive and hybrid layer. Low shrinkable resin composite (silorane) with its adhesive system showed less silver penetration and slight silver peak on the elemental energy spectroscopy of energy dispersive X-Ray spectrometry (EDS) as compared to other samples. Conclusion Adhesives used between different groups, influence the location and degree of nanoleakage. There is difference in nanoleakage patterns between two-step and one-step adhesives and also among the one-step adhesives themselves. PMID:27630943

  19. Wear properties of a novel resin composite compared to human enamel and other restorative materials.

    PubMed

    D'Arcangelo, C; Vanini, L; Rondoni, G D; Pirani, M; Vadini, M; Gattone, M; De Angelis, F

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the two-body wear resistance of human enamel, a pressable glass-ceramic (Imagine PressX), a type 3 gold alloy (Aurocast8), three resins composites currently available on the market (Enamel plus HRi, Filtek Supreme XTE, Ceram.X duo), and one recently introduced resin composite (Enamel plus HRi-Function). Resin composites were tested after simple light curing and after a further heat polymerization cycle. Ten cylindrical specimens (7 mm in diameter) were manufactured with each dental material according to standard laboratory procedures. Ten flat enamel specimens were obtained from freshly extracted human molars and included in the control group. All samples were subjected to a two-body wear test in a dual-axis chewing simulator over up to 120,000 loading cycles, against yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal cusps. Wear resistance was analyzed by measuring the vertical substance loss (mm) and the volume loss (mm(3)). Antagonist wear (mm) was also recorded. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (wear depth and volume loss) and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA on ranks (antagonist wear). Heat-cured HRi function and Aurocast8 showed similar mean values for wear depth and volumetric loss, and their results did not statistically differ in comparison with the human enamel.

  20. Three-year randomised clinical trial to evaluate the clinical performance, quantitative and qualitative wear patterns of hybrid composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Palaniappan, Senthamaraiselvi; Elsen, Liesbeth; Lijnen, Inge; Peumans, Marleen; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Lambrechts, Paul

    2010-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the clinical performance, quantitative and qualitative wear patterns of conventional hybrid (Tetric Ceram), micro-filled hybrid (Gradia Direct Posterior) and nano-hybrid (Tetric EvoCeram, TEC) posterior composite restorations in a 3-year randomised clinical trial. Sixteen Tetric Ceram, 17 TEC and 16 Gradia Direct Posterior restorations were placed in human molars and evaluated at baseline, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months of clinical service according to US Public Health Service criteria. The gypsum replicas at each recall were used for 3D laser scanning to quantify wear, and the epoxy resin replicas were observed under scanning electron microscope to study the qualitative wear patterns. After 3 years of clinical service, the three hybrid restorative materials performed clinically well in posterior cavities. Within the observation period, the nano-hybrid and micro-hybrid restorations evolved better in polishability with improved surface gloss retention than the conventional hybrid counterpart. The three hybrid composites showed enamel-like vertical wear and cavity-size dependant volume loss magnitude. Qualitatively, while the micro-filled and nano-hybrid composite restorations exhibited signs of fatigue similar to the conventional hybrid composite</