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Sample records for dental tissue types

  1. Prevalence, Type and Etiology of Dental and Soft Tissue Injuries in Children in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Škaričić, Josip; Vuletić, Marko; Hrvatin, Sandra; Jeličić, Jesenka; Čuković-Bagić, Ivana; Jurić, Hrvoje

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence, type and etiology of dental and soft tissue injuries and relationship between the time of arrival and sustaining soft tissue injury were analyzed in this retrospective study conducted at the Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University Dental Clinic in Zagreb, Croatia, during the 2010-2014 period using documentation on 447 patients (264 male and 183 female) aged 1-16 years with injuries of primary and permanent teeth. The highest prevalence of traumatic dental injury (TDI) was found in the 7-12 age group and maxillary central incisors were most frequently affected (80.9%) in both primary and permanent dentitions. Enamel-dentin fracture without pulp exposure (31.9%) was the most common TDI of dental hard tissue in both dentitions, whereas subluxation (27.3%) was the most common periodontal tissue injury type. The most frequent location, cause and seasonal variation of trauma were at home, falling and spring. Soft tissue injuries were observed in 203 (45.4%) patients. Soft tissue injuries were less likely when fewer teeth were traumatized (p<0.001). Comparison of children with and without soft tissue injuries yielded a statistically significant difference in the time to arrival between primary and permanent teeth (p<0.01). Because soft tissue injuries include bleeding and clinical presentation appears more dramatic, the time elapsed between injury and initial treatment was shorter than in non-bleeding injuries, pointing to the need of education focused on parents and school teachers regarding the importance of immediate therapy for both bleeding and non-bleeding TDIs.

  2. Heterodyne lock-in thermography of early demineralized in dental tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Jun-yan; Mohummad, Oliullah; Wang, Xiao-chun; Wang, Yang

    2017-12-01

    Heterodyne lock-in thermography (HeLIT) is a highly sensitive method to detect early demineralized in dental tissues, which is based on nonlinear photothermal phenomena of dental tissues. In this paper, the nonlinear photothermal phenomena of dental tissues was introduced, and then the system of HeLIT was developed. The relationship between laser modulated parameters (modulated frequency and laser intensity) and heterodyne lock-in thermal wave signal was investigated. The comparison between HeLIT and homodyne lock-in thermography (HoLIT) for detecting the different types of dental caries (smooth surface caries, proximal surface caries and occlusal surface caries) were carried out. Experimental results illustrate that the HeLIT has the merits of high sensitivity and high specificity in detecting different types of early caries.

  3. DENTAL PULP TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    Demarco, FF; Conde, MCM; Cavalcanti, B; Casagrande, L; Sakai, V; Nör, JE

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp is a highly specialized mesenchymal tissue, which have a restrict regeneration capacity due to anatomical arrangement and post-mitotic nature of odontoblastic cells. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial material cause loss of a significant amount of dentin leaving as life-lasting sequelae a non-vital and weakened tooth. However, regenerative endodontics is an emerging field of modern tissue engineering that demonstrated promising results using stem cells associated with scaffolds and responsive molecules. Thereby, this article will review the most recent endeavors to regenerate pulp tissue based on tissue engineering principles and providing insightful information to readers about the different aspects enrolled in tissue engineering. Here, we speculate that the search for the ideal combination of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenic factors for dental pulp tissue engineering may be extended over future years and result in significant advances in other areas of dental and craniofacial research. The finds collected in our review showed that we are now at a stage in which engineering a complex tissue, such as the dental pulp, is no longer an unachievable and the next decade will certainly be an exciting time for dental and craniofacial research. PMID:21519641

  4. The Neurovascular Properties of Dental Stem Cells and Their Importance in Dental Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ratajczak, Jessica; Bronckaers, Annelies; Dillen, Yörg; Gervois, Pascal; Vangansewinkel, Tim; Driesen, Ronald B.; Wolfs, Esther; Lambrichts, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of tissue engineering, natural tissues are reconstructed by combining growth factors, stem cells, and different biomaterials to serve as a scaffold for novel tissue growth. As adequate vascularization and innervation are essential components for the viability of regenerated tissues, there is a high need for easily accessible stem cells that are capable of supporting these functions. Within the human tooth and its surrounding tissues, different stem cell populations can be distinguished, such as dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human deciduous teeth, stem cells from the apical papilla, dental follicle stem cells, and periodontal ligament stem cells. Given their straightforward and relatively easy isolation from extracted third molars, dental stem cells (DSCs) have become an attractive source of mesenchymal-like stem cells. Over the past decade, there have been numerous studies supporting the angiogenic, neuroprotective, and neurotrophic effects of the DSC secretome. Together with their ability to differentiate into endothelial cells and neural cell types, this makes DSCs suitable candidates for dental tissue engineering and nerve injury repair. PMID:27688777

  5. Wnt and BMP Signaling Crosstalk in Regulating Dental Stem Cells: Implications in Dental Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fugui; Song, Jinglin; Zhang, Hongmei; Huang, Enyi; Song, Dongzhe; Tollemar, Viktor; Wang, Jing; Wang, Jinhua; Mohammed, Maryam; Wei, Qiang; Fan, Jiaming; Liao, Junyi; Zou, Yulong; Liu, Feng; Hu, Xue; Qu, Xiangyang; Chen, Liqun; Yu, Xinyi; Luu, Hue H.; Lee, Michael J.; He, Tong-Chuan; Ji, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Tooth is a complex hard tissue organ and consists of multiple cell types that are regulated by important signaling pathways such as Wnt and BMP signaling. Serious injuries and/or loss of tooth or periodontal tissues may significantly impact aesthetic appearance, essential oral functions and the quality of life. Regenerative dentistry holds great promise in treating oral/dental disorders. The past decade has witnessed a rapid expansion of our understanding of the biological features of dental stem cells, along with the signaling mechanisms governing stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. In this review, we first summarize the biological characteristics of seven types of dental stem cells, including dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from apical papilla, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, dental follicle precursor cells, periodontal ligament stem cells, alveolar bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and MSCs from gingiva. We then focus on how these stem cells are regulated by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and/or Wnt signaling by examining the interplays between these pathways. Lastly, we analyze the current status of dental tissue engineering strategies that utilize oral/dental stem cells by harnessing the interplays between BMP and Wnt pathways. We also highlight the challenges that must be addressed before the dental stem cells may reach any clinical applications. Thus, we can expect to witness significant progresses to be made in regenerative dentistry in the coming decade. PMID:28491933

  6. Surgical lasers and hard dental tissue.

    PubMed

    Parker, S

    2007-04-28

    The cutting of dental hard tissue during restorative procedures presents considerable demands on the ability to selectively remove diseased carious tissue, obtain outline and retention form and maintain the integrity of supporting tooth tissue without structural weakening. In addition, the requirement to preserve healthy tissue and prevent further breakdown of the restoration places the choice of instrumentation and clinical technique as prime factors for the dental surgeon. The quest for an alternative treatment modality to the conventional dental turbine has been, essentially, patient-driven and has led to the development of various mechanical and chemical devices. The review of the literature has endorsed the beneficial effects of current laser machines. However utopian, there is additional evidence to support the development of ultra-short (nano- and femto-second) pulsed lasers that are stable in use and commercially viable, to deliver more efficient hard tissue ablation with less risk of collateral thermal damage. This paper explores the interaction of laser energy with dental hard tissues and bone and the integration of current laser wavelengths into restorative and surgical dentistry.

  7. Tissue mimicking materials for dental ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rahul S.; Culjat, Martin O.; Grundfest, Warren S.; Brown, Elliott R.; White, Shane N.

    2008-01-01

    While acoustic tissue mimicking materials have been explored for a variety of soft and hard biological tissues, no dental hard tissue mimicking materials have been characterized. Tooth phantoms are necessary to better understand acoustic phenomenology within the tooth environment and to accelerate the advancement of dental ultrasound imaging systems. In this study, soda lime glass and dental composite were explored as surrogates for human enamel and dentin, respectively, in terms of compressional velocity, attenuation, and acoustic impedance. The results suggest that a tooth phantom consisting of glass and composite can effectively mimic the acoustic behavior of a natural human tooth. PMID:18396919

  8. Laser Ablatin of Dental Hard Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Seka, W.; Rechmann, P.; Featherstone, J.D.B.

    This paper discusses ablation of dental hard tissue using pulsed lasers. It focuses particularly on the relevant tissue and laser parameters and some of the basic ablation processes that are likely to occur. The importance of interstitial water and its phase transitions is discussed in some detail along with the ablation processes that may or may not directly involve water. The interplay between tissue parameters and laser parameters in the outcome of the removal of dental hard tissue is discussed in detail.

  9. Influence of different types of light on the response of the pulp tissue in dental bleaching: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Francine; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araújo; de Oliveira Gallinari, Marjorie; Terayama, Amanda Miyuki; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; de Castilho Jacinto, Rogério; Sivieri-Araújo, Gustavo; Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo

    2018-05-01

    This systematic review (PROSPERO register: CRD42016053140) investigated the influence of different types of light on the pulp tissue during dental bleaching. Two independent authors conducted a systematic search and risk of bias evaluations. An electronic search was undertaken (PubMed/Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other databases) until May 2017. The population, intervention, comparison, outcomes (PICO) question was: "Does the light in dental bleaching change the response of the pulp to the bleaching procedure?" The intervention involved pulp tissue/cells after bleaching with light, while the comparison involved pulp tissue/cells after bleaching without light. The primary outcome was the inflammation/cytotoxicity observed in pulp after bleaching. Out of 2210 articles found, 12 articles were included in the review; four were in vivo studies (one study in dogs/others in human), and eight were in vitro studies (cell culture/with artificial pulp chamber or not). The light source used was halogen, light-emitting diode (LED), and laser. Only one in vivo study that used heat to simulate light effects showed significant pulp inflammation. Only two in vitro studies demonstrated that light influenced cell metabolism; one using halogen light indicated negative effects, and the other using laser therapy indicated positive effects. Given that animal and in vitro studies have been identified, there remain some limitations for extrapolation to the human situation. Furthermore, different light parameters were used. The effects of dental bleaching on the pulp are not influenced by different types of light, but different light parameters can influence these properties. There is insufficient evidence about the influence of different types of light on inflammation/cytotoxicity of the pulp.

  10. Nanomaterials for Craniofacial and Dental Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Zhou, T; Lin, S; Shi, S; Lin, Y

    2017-07-01

    Tissue engineering shows great potential as a future treatment for the craniofacial and dental defects caused by trauma, tumor, and other diseases. Due to the biomimetic features and excellent physiochemical properties, nanomaterials are of vital importance in promoting cell growth and stimulating tissue regeneration in tissue engineering. For craniofacial and dental tissue engineering, the frequently used nanomaterials include nanoparticles, nanofibers, nanotubes, and nanosheets. Nanofibers are attractive for cell invasion and proliferation because of their resemblance to extracellular matrix and the presence of large pores, and they have been used as scaffolds in bone, cartilage, and tooth regeneration. Nanotubes and nanoparticles improve the mechanical and chemical properties of scaffold, increase cell attachment and migration, and facilitate tissue regeneration. In addition, nanofibers and nanoparticles are also used as a delivery system to carry the bioactive agent in bone and tooth regeneration, have better control of the release speed of agent upon degradation of the matrix, and promote tissue regeneration. Although applications of nanomaterials in tissue engineering remain in their infancy with numerous challenges to face, the current results indicate that nanomaterials have massive potential in craniofacial and dental tissue engineering.

  11. Long-term Hyperglycemia Naturally Induces Dental Caries but Not Periodontal Disease in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetic Rodents.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Yutaka; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Matsuura, Tetsuro

    2017-11-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) in patients with diabetes is described as the sixth complication of diabetes. We have previously shown that diabetes increases dental caries, and carious inflammation might have a strong effect on the adjacent periodontal tissue in diabetic rodent models. However, the possibility that hyperglycemia may induce PD in diabetic animals could not be completely eliminated. The goal of this study was to confirm the presence of PD in diabetic animal models by preventing carious inflammation with fluoride administration. F344 rats injected with alloxan (type 1 diabetic model) and db/db mice (type 2 diabetic model) were given either tap water alone or tap water containing fluoride. A cariostatic effect of fluoride was evident in the diabetic animals. Meanwhile, fluoride treatment drastically attenuated periodontal inflammation in addition to preventing dental caries. Furthermore, with fluoride treatment, periodontitis was notably nonexistent in the periodontal tissue surrounding the normal molars, whereas the caries-forming process was clearly observed in the teeth that were enveloped with persistent periodontitis, suggesting that enhanced periodontal inflammation might have been derived from the dental caries in the diabetic rodents rather than from the PD. In conclusion, long-term hyperglycemia naturally induces dental caries but not PD in type 1 and type 2 diabetic rodents. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  12. Soft tissue sealing around dental implants based on histological interpretation.

    PubMed

    Atsuta, Ikiru; Ayukawa, Yasunori; Kondo, Ryosuke; Oshiro, Wakana; Matsuura, Yuri; Furuhashi, Akihiro; Tsukiyama, Yoshihiro; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview on the biology and soft tissue sealing around dental implants and teeth. This is a narrative review performed through scientific articles published between 1977 and 2014, indexed in MEDLINE and PubMed databases. The study selected articles that focused on epithelial sealing around dental implant or teeth with cell biology and histology of soft tissue. Implant therapy has been widely applied in dental rehabilitation for many years, with predictable long-term results. The longevity and functionality of dental implants is dependent on both osseointegration around the implant body and the establishment of a soft tissue barrier that protects the underlying hard tissue structures and the implant itself. The health and stability of the peri-implant mucosa also affects the esthetics of the implant. The healing and maintenance of the epithelial and connective tissues around implants are increasingly recognized as being fundamental to implant success. However, there has been little research into the function or formation of the soft tissue seal around dental implants, and the roles of this unique mucosal interface remain unclear. This narrative review explores the extent of the current knowledge of soft tissue barriers around implants from both a basic and clinical perspective, and aims to consolidate this knowledge and highlight the most pertinent questions relating to this area of research. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. OCT aspects of dental hard tissue changes induced by excessive occlusal forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrieciu, Monica; Mercuţ, Veronica; Popescu, Sanda Mihaela; Tǎrâţǎ, Daniela; Osiac, Eugen

    2018-03-01

    The study purpose is to highlight dental hard tissues changes of a tooth with dental wear as a consequence of excessive occlusal forces, using OCT. Methods: a central incisor extracted for periodontal reason was cleaned and it was embedded in a black acrylic resin block. The block was sectioned along the longitudinal axis of the tooth and prepared for OCT analysis. Results: The OCT signal showed differences between the labial and palatal dental hard tissue structures, even in areas without excessive occlusal solicitations. Conclusion: The OCT signal highlights changes of dental hard tissues structures according to excessive occlusal solicitations areas.

  14. Timing of soft tissue management around dental implants: a suggested protocol.

    PubMed

    Kadkhodazadeh, Mahdi; Amid, Reza; Kermani, Mehdi Ekhlasmand; Mirakhori, Mahdieh; Hosseinpour, Sepanta

    2017-01-01

    Survival of dental implants depends on several factors; soft tissue (ST) management around dental implants is one of the foremost. Several studies have suggested techniques for ST management around dental implants, but none of them has discussed a suitable timetable for this process. This study aimed to review published articles related to the timing of ST management around dental implants and suggest a customized treatment protocol. A search of the PubMed database was conducted; the search was limited to English-language articles published from January 1995 to July 2015 with available full texts. Only in vivo studies and clinical trials in relation to the terms soft tissue management, management timing, keratinized mucosa, free gingival graft, connective tissue graft, soft tissue, augmentation, and dental implant were included. A total of 492 articles were reviewed, and eventually 42 articles were thoroughly evaluated. Those with treatment protocols in terms of the timing of ST grafting were selected and classified. ST management around dental implants may be done prior to the surgical phase, after the surgical phase, before loading, or even after loading. A thick gingival biotype is more suitable for implant placement, providing more favorable esthetic results. A treatment plan should be based on individual patient needs as well as the knowledge and experience of the clinician. The width and thickness of keratinized tissues, the need for bone management, and local risk factors that influence esthetic results determine the appropriate time for ST augmentation procedures.

  15. Current status of lasers in soft tissue dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Pick, R M; Colvard, M D

    1993-07-01

    The aims of this paper are to briefly describe laser physics, the types of lasers currently available for use on soft tissues focusing primarily on CO2 and Nd:YAG laser energies, the histological effects of lasers on oral tissues, laser safety, the clinical applications of lasers on oral soft tissues, and future directions. Of the two types of lasers currently available for dental applications, both the CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers can be used for frenectomies, ablation of lesions, incisional and excisional biopsies, gingivectomies, gingivoplasties, soft tissue tuberosity reductions, operculum removal, coagulation of graft donor sites, and certain crown lengthening procedures. The advantages of lasers include a relatively bloodless surgical and post-surgical course, minimal swelling and scarring, coagulation, vaporization, and cutting, minimal or no suturing, reduction in surgical time, and, in a majority of cases, much less or no post-surgical pain. CO2 lasers, compared to Nd:YAG are faster for most procedures, with less depth of tissue penetration and a well-documented history. There have been recent reports on the use of the Nd:YAG laser for periodontal scaling, gingival curettage, and root desensitization, but further research needs to be conducted. Both the CO2 and the Nd:YAG laser have limited use in conventional flap therapy.

  16. Wear measurement of dental tissues and materials in clinical studies: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wulfman, C; Koenig, V; Mainjot, A K

    2018-06-01

    This study aims to systematically review the different methods used for wear measurement of dental tissues and materials in clinical studies, their relevance and reliability in terms of accuracy and precision, and the performance of the different steps of the workflow taken independently. An exhaustive search of clinical studies related to wear of dental tissues and materials reporting a quantitative measurement method was conducted. MedLine, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Library and Web of Science databases were used. Prospective studies, pilot studies and case series (>10 patients), as long as they contained a description of wear measurement methodology. Only studies published after 1995 were considered. After duplicates' removal, 495 studies were identified, and 41 remained for quantitative analysis. Thirty-four described wear-measurement protocols, using digital profilometry and superimposition, whereas 7 used alternative protocols. A specific form was designed to analyze the risk of bias. The methods were described in terms of material analyzed; study design; device used for surface acquisition; matching software details and settings; type of analysis (vertical height-loss measurement vs volume loss measurement); type of area investigated (entire occlusal area or selective areas); and results. There is a need of standardization of clinical wear measurement. Current methods exhibit accuracy, which is not sufficient to monitor wear of restorative materials and tooth tissues. Their performance could be improved, notably limiting the use of replicas, using standardized calibration procedures and positive controls, optimizing the settings of scanners and matching softwares, and taking into account unusable data. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biomimetic extracellular matrix mediated somatic stem cell differentiation: applications in dental pulp tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Sriram; George, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most widely prevalent infectious diseases in the world. It affects more than half of the world's population. The current treatment for necrotic dental pulp tissue arising from dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality making it prone for secondary infections. Over the past decade, several tissue-engineering approaches have attempted regeneration of the dental pulp tissue. Although several studies have highlighted the potential of dental stem cells, none have transitioned into a clinical setting owing to limited availability of dental stem cells and the need for growth factor delivery systems. Our strategy is to utilize the intact ECM of pulp cells to drive lineage specific differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. From a clinical perspective, pulp ECM scaffolds can be generated using cell lines and patient specific somatic stem cells can be used for regeneration. Our published results have shown the feasibility of using pulp ECM scaffolds for odontogenic differentiation of non-dental mesenchymal cells. This focused review discusses the issues surrounding dental pulp tissue regeneration and the potential of our strategy to overcome these issues. PMID:25954205

  18. Dental hard tissue characterization using laser-based ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, David W.; Massey, Ward L.

    2003-07-01

    Dental health care and research workers require a means of imaging the structures within teeth in vivo. One critical need is the detection of tooth decay in its early stages. If decay can be detected early enough, the process can be monitored and interventional procedures, such as fluoride washes and controlled diet, can be initiated to help re-mineralize the tooth. Currently employed x-ray imaging is limited in its ability to visualize interfaces and incapable of detecting decay at a stage early enough to avoid invasive cavity preparation followed by a restoration. To this end, non-destructive and non-contact in vitro measurements on extracted human molars using laser-based ultrasonics are presented. Broadband ultrasonic waves are excited in the extracted sections by using a pulsed carbon-dioxide (CO2) laser operating in a region of high optical absorption in the dental hard tissues. Optical interferometric detection of the ultrasonic wave surface displacements in accomplished with a path-stabilized Michelson-type interferometer. Results for bulk and surface in-vitro characterization of caries are presented on extracted molars with pre-existing caries.

  19. Dental pulp stem cells. Biology and use for periodontal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ashri, Nahid Y; Ajlan, Sumaiah A; Aldahmash, Abdullah M

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors.

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells of Dental Origin for Inducing Tissue Regeneration in Periodontitis: A Mini-Review

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Monjaraz, Beatriz; Santiago-Osorio, Edelmiro; Monroy-García, Alberto; Ledesma-Martínez, Edgar; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic disease that begins with a period of inflammation of the supporting tissues of the teeth table and then progresses, destroying the tissues until loss of the teeth occurs. The restoration of the damaged dental support apparatus is an extremely complex process due to the regeneration of the cementum, the periodontal ligament, and the alveolar bone. Conventional treatment relies on synthetic materials that fill defects and replace lost dental tissue, but these approaches are not substitutes for a real regeneration of tissue. To address this, there are several approaches to tissue engineering for regenerative dentistry, among them, the use of stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can be obtained from various sources of adult tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose tissue, skin, and tissues of the orofacial area. MSC of dental origin, such as those found in the bone marrow, have immunosuppressive and immunotolerant properties, multipotency, high proliferation rates, and the capacity for tissue repair. However, they are poorly used as sources of tissue for therapeutic purposes. Their accessibility makes them an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells, so this review describes the field of dental stem cell research and proposes a potential mechanism involved in periodontal tissue regeneration induced by dental MSC. PMID:29565801

  1. Imunohistological aspects of the tissue around dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimigean, Victor; Nimigean, Vanda R.; Sǎlǎvǎstru, Dan I.; Moraru, Simona; BuÅ£incu, Lavinia; Ivaşcu, Roxana V.; Poll, Alexandru

    2016-03-01

    Objectives: study of soft and hard tissues around implants. Material and methods: For the immunohistochemical and histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface, we examined pieces of peri-implant mucosa harvested from 35 patients. The implant/bone interface was assessed using histologic and histomorphometric examination of hard tissues around unloaded, early loaded or delayed loaded dental implants with pre-established design, with a sandblasted and acid-etched surface, placed both in extraction sockets, or after bone healing following tooth removal. This study was performed on 9 common race dogs. Results: The histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface showed regenerative modifications and moderate chronic subepithelial inflammatory reactions. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the soft tissue biopsies revealed the presence of specific immunocompetent cells and proteins of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. Bone-implants contacts were more obvious in the apical half of the implants and at the edges of the threads, than between them. A mature, lamelliform bone containing lacunae with osteocytes and lack of connective tissue were noticed around implants that were late placed and loaded. The new-formed bone was also abundant in the crestal zone, not only in the apical part of the implants. Conclusions: A thorough understanding of the microstructure of dental implant/soft and hard tissue interface will improve the longevity of osseointegrated implants.

  2. Hard and soft tissue surgical complications in dental implantology.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Shahid R

    2015-05-01

    This article discusses surgical complications associated with the placement of dental implants, specifically focusing on how they occur (etiology), as well as their management and prevention. Dental implant surgical complications can be classified into those of hard and soft tissues. In general, complications can be avoided with thorough preoperative treatment planning and proper surgical technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A retrospective study on traumatic dental and soft-tissue injuries in preschool children in Zagreb, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Vuletić, Marko; Škaričić, Josip; Batinjan, Goran; Trampuš, Zdenko; Čuković Bagić, Ivana; Jurić, Hrvoje

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze data according to gender, age, cause, number of traumatized teeth, time elapsed before treatment and type of tooth from the records of traumatized children. A retrospective study was conducted in the Department of Paediatric Dentistry at the University Dental Clinic in Zagreb, Croatia using the documentation of 128 patients (61 males and 67 females) aged 1 month to 6 years with injuries of primary teeth between February 2009 and January 2013. Trauma was seen in 217 primary teeth, which implies that the number of injured primary teeth was 1.69 per child. The maxillary central incisors were the most frequently affected teeth (81.1%), they were followed by maxillary lateral incisors, while the least affected were mandibular central incisors. Traumatic dental injuries involved periodontal tissue 2.82 times more frequently than hard dental and pulp tissue. The main cause of teeth injury was fall (67.2%) and the majority of injuries occurred at home (51.6%) (p<0.05). Of 128 patients who received treatment 71 (55.5%) also had soft-tissue injuries. The distribution of soft-tissue injuries by gender (35 males, 36 females) was not statistically significant. Comparing children with soft-tissue injuries and those without them, a statistically significant difference was found in the time of arrival (p<0.01). The results of this study showed the need of informing about preventive measures against falls at home and the methods of providing first aid in dental trauma injuries.

  4. A retrospective study on traumatic dental and soft-tissue injuries in preschool children in Zagreb, Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Vuletić, Marko; Škaričić, Josip; Batinjan, Goran; Trampuš, Zdenko; Bagić, Ivana Čuković; Jurić, Hrvoje

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze data according to gender, age, cause, number of traumatized teeth, time elapsed before treatment and type of tooth from the records of traumatized children. A retrospective study was conducted in the Department of Paediatric Dentistry at the University Dental Clinic in Zagreb. Croatia using the documentation of 128 patients (61 males and 67 females) aged 1 month to 6 years with injuries of primary teeth between February 2009 and January 2013. Trauma was seen in 217 primary teeth, which implies that the number of injured primary teeth was 1.69 per child. The maxillary central incisors were the most frequently affected teeth (81.1%), they were followed by maxillary lateral incisors, while the least affected were mandibular central incisors. Traumatic dental injuries involved periodontal tissue 2.82 times more frequently than hard dental and pulp tissue. The main cause of teeth injury was fall (67.2%) and the majority of injuries occurred at home (51.6%) (p<0.05). Of 128 patients who received treatment 71 (55.5%) also had soft-tissue injuries. The distribution of soft-tissue injuries by gender (35 males, 36 females) was not statistically significant. Comparing children with soft-tissue injuries and those without them, a statistically significant difference was found in the time of arrival (p<0.01). The results of this study showed the need of informing about preventive measures against falls at home and the methods of providing first aid in dental trauma injuries. PMID:24579964

  5. Comparison of light-transmittance in dental tissues and dental composite restorations using incremental layering build-up with varying enamel resin layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Rocha Maia, Rodrigo; Oliveira, Dayane; D'Antonio, Tracy; Qian, Fang; Skiff, Frederick

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate and compare light-transmittance in dental tissues and dental composite restorations using the incremental double-layer technique with varying layer thickness. B1-colored natural teeth slabs were compared to dental restoration build-ups with A2D and B1E-colored nanofilled, supra-nanofilled, microfilled, and microhybrid composites. The enamel layer varied from 0.3, 0.5, or 1.2 mm thick, and the dentin layer was varied to provide a standardized 3.7 mm overall sample thickness ( n = 10). All increments were light-cured to 16 J/cm 2 with a multi-wave LED (Valo, Ultradent). Using a spectrophotometer, the samples were irradiated by an RGB laser beam. A voltmeter recorded the light output signal to calculate the light-transmittance through the specimens. The data were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance followed by the post hoc Tukey's test ( p = 0.05). Mean light-transmittance observed at thicker final layers of enamel were significantly lower than those observed at thinner final layers. Within 1.2 mm final enamel resin layer (FERL) thickness, all composites were similar to the dental tissues, with exception of the nanofilled composite. However, within 0.5 mm FERL thickness, only the supra-nanofilled composite showed no difference from the dental tissues. Within 0.3 mm FERL thickness, none of the composites were similar to the dental tissues. The supra-nanofilled composite had the most similar light-transmittance pattern when compared to the natural teeth. However, for other composites, thicker FERL have a greater chance to match the light-transmittance of natural dental tissues.

  6. Two Distinct Processes of Bone-like Tissue Formation by Dental Pulp Cells after Tooth Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yukita, Akira; Yoshiba, Kunihiko; Yoshiba, Nagako; Takahashi, Masafumi; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    Dental pulp is involved in the formation of bone-like tissue in response to external stimuli. However, the origin of osteoblast-like cells constructing this tissue and the mechanism of their induction remain unknown. We therefore evaluated pulp mineralization induced by transplantation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)–labeled tooth into a GFP-negative hypodermis of host rats. Five days after the transplantation, the upper pulp cavity became necrotic; however, cell-rich hard tissue was observed adjacent to dentin at the root apex. At 10 days, woven bone-like tissue was formed apart from the dentin in the upper pulp. After 20 days, these hard tissues expanded and became histologically similar to bone. GFP immunoreactivity was detected in the hard tissue-forming cells within the root apex as well as in the upper pulp. Furthermore, immunohistochemical observation of α–smooth muscle actin, a marker for undifferentiated cells, showed a positive reaction in cells surrounding this bone-like tissue within the upper pulp but not in those within the root apex. Immunoreactivities of Smad4, Runx2, and Osterix were detected in the hard tissue-forming cells within both areas. These results collectively suggest that the dental pulp contains various types of osteoblast progenitors and that these cells might thus induce bone-like tissue in severely injured pulp. PMID:22899860

  7. Comparison of gene expression profiles between dental pulp and periodontal ligament tissues in humans

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ai-Xiu; Zhang, Jing-Han; Li, Jing; Wu, Jun; Wang, Lin; Miao, Deng-Shun

    2017-01-01

    There are anatomical and functional differences between human dental pulp (DP) and periodontal ligament (PDL). However, the molecular biological differences and function of these tissues are poorly understood. In the present study, we employed a cDNA microarray array to screen for differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between human DP and PDL tissues, and used the online software WebGestalt to perform the functional analysis of the DEGs. In addition, the STRING database and KEGG pathway analysis were applied for interaction network and pathway analysis of the DEGs. DP and PDL samples were obtained from permanent premolars (n=16) extracted for orthodontic purposes. The results of the microarray assay were confirmed by RT-qPCR. The DEGs were found to be significantly associated with the extracellular matrix and focal adhesion. A total of 10 genes were selected to confirm the results. The mRNA levels of integrin alpha 4 (ITGA4), integrin alpha 8 (ITGA8), neurexin 1 (NRXN1) and contactin 1 (CNTN1) were significantly higher in the DP than in the PDL tissues. However, the levels of collagen type XI alpha 1 (COL11A1), aggrecan (ACAN), collagen type VI alpha 1 (COL6A1), chondroadherin (CHAD), laminin gamma 2 (LAMC2) and laminin alpha 3 (LAMA3) were higher in the PDL than in the DP samples. The gene expression profiles provide novel insight into the characterization of DP and PDL tissues, and contribute to our understanding of the potential molecular mechanisms of dental tissue mineralization and regeneration. PMID:28713908

  8. Dental Pulp and Dentin Tissue Engineering and Regeneration – Advancement and Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Huang, George T.-J.

    2012-01-01

    Hard tissue is difficult to repair especially dental structures. Tooth enamel is incapable of self-repairing whereas dentin and cememtum can regenerate with limited capacity. Enamel and dentin are commonly under the attack by caries. Extensive forms of caries destroy enamel and dentin and can lead to dental pulp infection. Entire pulp amputation followed by the pulp space disinfection and filled with an artificial rubber-like material is employed to treat the infection --commonly known as root canal or endodontic therapy. Regeneration of dentin relies on having vital pulps; however, regeneration of pulp tissue has been difficult as the tissue is encased in dentin without collateral blood supply except from the root apical end. With the advent of modern tissue engineering concept and the discovery of dental stem cells, regeneration of pulp and dentin has been tested. This article will review the recent endeavor on pulp and dentin tissue engineering and regeneration. The prospective outcome of the current advancement and challenge in this line of research will be discussed. PMID:21196351

  9. Automated classification and visualization of healthy and pathological dental tissues based on near-infrared hyper-spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenik, Peter; Bürmen, Miran; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2011-03-01

    Despite major improvements in dental healthcare and technology, dental caries remains one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of modern society. The initial stages of dental caries are characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals, commonly known as white spots which are difficult to diagnose. If detected early enough, such demineralization can be arrested and reversed by non-surgical means through well established dental treatments (fluoride therapy, anti-bacterial therapy, low intensity laser irradiation). Near-infrared (NIR) hyper-spectral imaging is a new promising technique for early detection of demineralization based on distinct spectral features of healthy and pathological dental tissues. In this study, we apply NIR hyper-spectral imaging to classify and visualize healthy and pathological dental tissues including enamel, dentin, calculus, dentin caries, enamel caries and demineralized areas. For this purpose, a standardized teeth database was constructed consisting of 12 extracted human teeth with different degrees of natural dental lesions imaged by NIR hyper-spectral system, X-ray and digital color camera. The color and X-ray images of teeth were presented to a clinical expert for localization and classification of the dental tissues, thereby obtaining the gold standard. Principal component analysis was used for multivariate local modeling of healthy and pathological dental tissues. Finally, the dental tissues were classified by employing multiple discriminant analysis. High agreement was observed between the resulting classification and the gold standard with the classification sensitivity and specificity exceeding 85 % and 97 %, respectively. This study demonstrates that NIR hyper-spectral imaging has considerable diagnostic potential for imaging hard dental tissues.

  10. Comparison of light-transmittance in dental tissues and dental composite restorations using incremental layering build-up with varying enamel resin layer thickness

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate and compare light-transmittance in dental tissues and dental composite restorations using the incremental double-layer technique with varying layer thickness. Materials and Methods B1-colored natural teeth slabs were compared to dental restoration build-ups with A2D and B1E-colored nanofilled, supra-nanofilled, microfilled, and microhybrid composites. The enamel layer varied from 0.3, 0.5, or 1.2 mm thick, and the dentin layer was varied to provide a standardized 3.7 mm overall sample thickness (n = 10). All increments were light-cured to 16 J/cm2 with a multi-wave LED (Valo, Ultradent). Using a spectrophotometer, the samples were irradiated by an RGB laser beam. A voltmeter recorded the light output signal to calculate the light-transmittance through the specimens. The data were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance followed by the post hoc Tukey's test (p = 0.05). Results Mean light-transmittance observed at thicker final layers of enamel were significantly lower than those observed at thinner final layers. Within 1.2 mm final enamel resin layer (FERL) thickness, all composites were similar to the dental tissues, with exception of the nanofilled composite. However, within 0.5 mm FERL thickness, only the supra-nanofilled composite showed no difference from the dental tissues. Within 0.3 mm FERL thickness, none of the composites were similar to the dental tissues. Conclusions The supra-nanofilled composite had the most similar light-transmittance pattern when compared to the natural teeth. However, for other composites, thicker FERL have a greater chance to match the light-transmittance of natural dental tissues. PMID:29765902

  11. Hematopoietic Stem Cells as a Novel Source of Dental Tissue Cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Katie R; Kang, In-Hong; Baliga, Uday; Xiong, Ying; Chatterjee, Shilpak; Moore, Emily; Parthiban, Beneta; Thyagarajan, Krishnamurthy; Borke, James L; Mehrotra, Shikhar; Kirkwood, Keith L; LaRue, Amanda C; Ogawa, Makio; Mehrotra, Meenal

    2018-05-23

    While earlier studies have suggested that cells positive for hematopoietic markers can be found in dental tissues, it has yet to be confirmed. To conclusively demonstrate this, we utilized a unique transgenic model in which all hematopoietic cells are green fluorescent protein + (GFP + ). Pulp, periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone (AvB) cell culture analysis demonstrated numerous GFP + cells, which were also CD45 + (indicating hematopoietic origin) and co-expressed markers of cellular populations in pulp (dentin matrix protein-1, dentin sialophosphoprotein, alpha smooth muscle actin [ASMA], osteocalcin), in PDL (periostin, ASMA, vimentin, osteocalcin) and in AvB (Runx-2, bone sialoprotein, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin). Transplantation of clonal population derived from a single GFP + hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), into lethally irradiated recipient mice, demonstrated numerous GFP + cells within dental tissues of recipient mice, which also stained for markers of cell populations in pulp, PDL and AvB (used above), indicating that transplanted HSCs can differentiate into cells in dental tissues. These hematopoietic-derived cells deposited collagen and can differentiate in osteogenic media, indicating that they are functional. Thus, our studies demonstrate, for the first time, that cells in pulp, PDL and AvB can have a hematopoietic origin, thereby opening new avenues of therapy for dental diseases and injuries.

  12. Dimensional soft tissue changes following soft tissue grafting in conjunction with implant placement or around present dental implants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Poskevicius, Lukas; Sidlauskas, Antanas; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2017-01-01

    To systematically review changes in mucosal soft tissue thickness and keratinised mucosa width after soft tissue grafting around dental implants. An electronic literature search was conducted of the MEDLINE database published between 2009 and 2014. Sequential screenings at the title, abstract, and full-text levels were performed. Clinical human studies in the English language that had reported changes in soft tissue thickness or keratinised mucosa width after soft tissue grafting at implant placement or around a present implant at 6-month follow-up or longer were included. The search resulted in fourteen articles meeting the inclusion criteria: Six of them reported connective tissue grafting around present dental implants, compared to eight at the time of implant placement. Better long-term soft tissue thickness outcomes were reported for soft tissue augmentation around dental implants (0.8-1.4 mm), compared with augmentation at implant placement (-0.25-1.43 mm). Both techniques were effective in increasing keratinised tissue width: at implant placement (2.5 mm) or around present dental implants (2.33-2.57 mm). The present systematic review discovered that connective tissue grafts enhanced keratinised mucosa width and soft tissue thickness for an observation period of up to 48 months. However, some shrinkage may occur, resulting in decreases in soft tissue, mostly for the first three months. Further investigations using accurate evaluation methods need to be done to evaluate the appropriate time for grafting. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Soft tissue wound healing around teeth and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Sculean, Anton; Gruber, Reinhard; Bosshardt, Dieter D

    2014-04-01

    To provide an overview on the biology and soft tissue wound healing around teeth and dental implants. This narrative review focuses on cell biology and histology of soft tissue wounds around natural teeth and dental implants. The available data indicate that: (a) Oral wounds follow a similar pattern. (b) The tissue specificities of the gingival, alveolar and palatal mucosa appear to be innately and not necessarily functionally determined. (c) The granulation tissue originating from the periodontal ligament or from connective tissue originally covered by keratinized epithelium has the potential to induce keratinization. However, it also appears that deep palatal connective tissue may not have the same potential to induce keratinization as the palatal connective tissue originating from an immediately subepithelial area. (d) Epithelial healing following non-surgical and surgical periodontal therapy appears to be completed after a period of 7–14 days. Structural integrity of a maturing wound between a denuded root surface and a soft tissue flap is achieved at approximately 14-days post-surgery. (e) The formation of the biological width and maturation of the barrier function around transmucosal implants requires 6–8 weeks of healing. (f) The established peri-implant soft connective tissue resembles a scar tissue in composition, fibre orientation, and vasculature. (g) The peri-implant junctional epithelium may reach a greater final length under certain conditions such as implants placed into fresh extraction sockets versus conventional implant procedures in healed sites. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Prevalence of developmental dental hard-tissue anomalies and association with caries and oral hygiene status of children in Southwestern, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Popoola, Bamidele O; Onyejaka, Nneka; Folayan, Morenike O

    2016-07-07

    Developmental dental hard tissue anomalies are often associated with oral health problems. This study determined the clinical prevalence of developmental dental hard tissue anomalies in the permanent dentition of children resident in southwestern Nigeria and its association with dental caries and poor oral hygiene status. This was a cross-sectional study recruiting 1565 school children, 12 to 15 year old attending schools in Ibadan, Oyo State and Ile-Ife, Osun State. All eligible study participants had oral examinations conducted to determine presence of developmental hard dental tissue anomalies, caries and oral hygiene status. The prevalence of developmental dental hard tissue anomalies was determined. Logistic Poisson regression was used to determine the association of between developmental dental hard tissue anomalies, caries and oral hygiene status. Only 65 (4.2 %) children had clinically diagnosed developmental dental hard tissue anomalies. The most prevalent anomaly was enamel hypoplasia (2.2 %). More females (p = 0.003) and more children with middle socioeconomic class (p = 0.001) had enamel hypoplasia. The probability of having poor oral hygiene was significantly increased for children with developmental dental anomalies (APR: 0.07; 95 % CI: 0.03 - 0.12; p = 0.002). The probability of having caries was insignificantly increased for children with developmental dental hard tissue anomalies (APR: 0.005; 95 % CI: -0.03 - 0.04; p = 0.08). The most prevalence clinically detectable developmental dental hard tissue anomalies for the study population was enamel hypoplasia. The presence of developmental dental hard tissue anomalies significantly increased the chances of having poor oral hygiene but not caries. Further studies are required to understand if poor oral hygiene is associated with dental caries in children with developmental dental hard tissue anomalies.

  15. Human dental pulp stem cells derived from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease demonstrate hepatic-like differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y K; Huang, Anderson H C; Chan, Anthony W S; Lin, L M

    2016-06-01

    Reviewing the literature, hepatic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease has not been studied. This study is aimed to evaluate the hypothesis that hDPSCs from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease could possess potential hepatic differentiation. Forty vital extracted teeth with disease recruited for hDPSCs isolation, stem cell characterization and hepatic differentiation were randomly and equally divided into group A (liquid nitrogen-stored dental pulp tissues) and group B (freshly derived dental pulp tissues). Samples of hDPSCs isolated from groups A and B but without hepatic growth factors formed negative controls. A well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma cell line was employed as a positive control. All the isolated hDPSCs from groups A and B showed hepatic-like differentiation with morphological change from a spindle-shaped to a polygonal shape and normal karyotype. Differentiated hDPSCs and the positive control expressed hepatic metabolic function genes and liver-specific genes. Glycogen storage of differentiated hDPSCs was noted from day 7 of differentiation-medium culture. Positive immunofluorescence staining of low-density lipoprotein and albumin was observed from day 14 of differentiation-medium culture; urea production in the medium was noted from week 6. No hepatic differentiation was observed for any of the samples of the negative controls. We not only demonstrated the feasibility of hepatic-like differentiation of hDPSCs from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease but also indicated that the differentiated cells possessed normal karyotype and were functionally close to normal hepatic-like cells. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Analysis of Artificial Radiocarbon in Different Skeletal and Dental Tissue Types to Evaluate Date of Death

    SciTech Connect

    Ubelaker, D H; Buchholz, B A; Stewart, J

    Radiocarbon dating, with special reference to the modern bomb-curve, can provide useful information to elucidate the date of death of skeletonized human remains. Interpretation can be enhanced with analysis of different types of tissues within a single skeleton because of the known variability of formation times and remodeling rates. Analysis of radiocarbon content of teeth, especially the enamel in tooth crowns provides information about the date of formation in the childhood years and in consideration of the known timing of tooth formation can be used to estimate the birth date after 1950 A.D. Radiocarbon analysis of modern cortical and trabecularmore » bone samples from the same skeleton may allow proper placement on the pre-1963 or post-1963 sides of the bomb-curve since most trabecular bone generally undergoes more rapid remodeling than does most cortical bone. Pre-1963 bone formation would produce higher radiocarbon values for most trabecular bone than for most cortical bone. This relationship is reversed for formation after 1963. Radiocarbon analysis was conducted in this study on dental, cortical and trabecular bone samples from two adult individuals of known birth (1925 and 1926) and death dates (1995 and 1959). As expected, the dental results correspond to pre-bomb bomb-curve values reflecting conditions during the childhoods of the individuals. The curve radiocarbon content of most bone samples reflected the higher modern bomb-curve values. Within the bone sample analyses, the values of the trabecular bone were higher than those of cortical bone and supported the known placement on the pre-1963 side of the bomb-curve.« less

  17. Comparative investigation of the penetration of different wavelength visible LED radiation into dental tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunov, Tz.; Uzunova, P.; Angelov, I.; Gisbrecht, A.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we report the results of measurement of the penetration of the radiation from different visible light emitting diodes (LEDs) inside dental tissue. The experiments are made using several different LEDs with wavelengths between 450 nm and 800 nm and power densities between 50 and 250 mW/cm2, which are the most frequently used in the clinical practice with proved clinical effect. The experimental results show that the penetration depends on the wavelength and the type of tissue. The results can be employed in the clinical practice for determining radiation dosage in the treatment of periodontal diseases.

  18. A tissue-dependent hypothesis of dental caries.

    PubMed

    Simón-Soro, A; Belda-Ferre, P; Cabrera-Rubio, R; Alcaraz, L D; Mira, A

    2013-01-01

    Current understanding of dental caries considers this disease a demineralization of the tooth tissues due to the acid produced by sugar-fermenting microorganisms. Thus, caries is considered a diet- and pH-dependent process. We present here the first metagenomic analysis of the bacterial communities present at different stages of caries development, with the aim of determining whether the bacterial composition and biochemical profile are specific to the tissue affected. The data show that microbial composition at the initial, enamel-affecting stage of caries is significantly different from that found at subsequent stages, as well as from dental plaque of sound tooth surfaces. Although the relative proportion of Streptococcus mutans increased from 0.12% in dental plaque to 0.72% in enamel caries, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus sanguinis were the dominant streptococci in these lesions. The functional profile of caries-associated bacterial communities indicates that genes involved in acid stress tolerance and dietary sugar fermentation are overrepresented only at the initial stage (enamel caries), whereas other genes coding for osmotic stress tolerance as well as collagenases and other proteases enabling dentin degradation are significantly overrepresented in dentin cavities. The results support a scenario in which pH and diet are determinants of the disease during the degradation of enamel, but in dentin caries lesions not only acidogenic but also proteolytic bacteria are involved. We propose that caries disease is a process of varying etiology, in which acid-producing bacteria are the vehicle to penetrate enamel and allow dentin degrading microorganisms to expand the cavity. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. In vitro effects of dental cements on hard and soft tissues associated with dental implants.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Lucas C; Saba, Juliana N; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Wadhwani, Chandur; Rodrigues, Danieli C

    2017-07-01

    Dental cements for cement-retained restorations are often chosen based on clinician preference for the product's material properties, mixing process, delivery mechanism, or viscosity. The composition of dental cement may play a significant role in the proliferation or inhibition of different bacterial strains associated with peri-implant disease, and the effect of dental cements on host cellular proliferation may provide further insight into appropriate cement material selection. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the cellular host response of bone cells (osteoblasts) and soft tissue cells (gingival fibroblasts) to dental cements. Zinc oxide (eugenol and noneugenol), zinc phosphate, and acrylic resin cements were molded into pellets and directly applied to confluent preosteoblast (cell line MC3T3 E1) or gingival fibroblast cell cultures (cell line HGF) to determine cellular viability after exposure. Controls were defined as confluent cell cultures with no cement exposure. Direct contact cell culture testing was conducted following International Organization for Standardization 10993 methods, and all experiments were performed in triplicate. To compare either the MC3T3 E1 cell line, or the HGF cell line alone, a 1-way ANOVA test with multiple comparisons was used (α=.05). To compare the MC3T3 E1 cell line results and the HGF cell line results, a 2-way ANOVA test with multiple comparisons was used (α=.05). The results of this study illustrated that while both bone and soft tissue cell lines were vulnerable to the dental cement test materials, the soft tissue cell line (human gingival fibroblasts) was more susceptible to reduced cellular viability after exposure. The HGF cell line was much more sensitive to cement exposure. Here, the acrylic resin, zinc oxide (eugenol), and zinc phosphate cements significantly reduced cellular viability after exposure with respect to HGF cells only. Within the limitation of this in vitro cellular study, the

  20. Metal elements in tissue with dental peri-implantitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fretwurst, Tobias; Buzanich, Guenter; Nahles, Susanne; Woelber, Johan Peter; Riesemeier, Heinrich; Nelson, Katja

    2016-09-01

    Dental peri-implantitis is characterized by a multifactorial etiology. The role of metal elements as an etiological factor for peri-implantitis is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of metal elements in bone and mucosal tissues around dental Grade 4 CP titanium implants with signs of peri-implantitis in human patients. In this prospective pilot study, all patients were enrolled consecutively in two study centers. Bone and soft tissue samples of patients with peri-implantitis with indication for explantation were analyzed for the incidence of different elements (Ca, P, Ti, Fe) by means of synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SRXRF) and polarized light microscopy (PLM). The existence of macrophages and lymphocytes in the histologic specimens was analyzed. Biopsies of 12 patients (seven bone samples, five mucosal samples) were included and analyzed. In nine of the 12 samples (75%), the SRXRF examination revealed the existence of titanium (Ti) and an associated occurrence with Iron (Fe). Metal particles were detected in peri-implant soft tissue using PLM. In samples with increased titanium concentration, lymphocytes were detected, whereas M1 macrophages were predominantly seen in samples with metal particles. Titanium and Iron elements were found in soft and hard tissue biopsies retrieved from peri-implantitis sites. Further histologic and immunohistochemical studies need to clarify which specific immune reaction metal elements/particles induce in dental peri-implant tissue. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Histological observation on dental hard tissue irradiated by ultrashort-pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchizono, Takeyuki; Awazu, Kunio; Igarashi, Akihiro; Kato, Junji; Hirai, Yoshito

    2006-04-01

    In the field of dentistry, effectiveness of USPL irradiation is researched because USPL has less thermal side effect to dental hard tissue. In this paper, we observed morphological change and optical change of dental hard tissue irradiated by USPL for discussing the safety and effectiveness of USPL irradiation to dental hard tissues. Irradiated samples were crown enamel and root dentin of bovine teeth. Lasers were Ti:sapphire laser, which had pulse duration (P d)of 130 fsec and pulse repetition rate (f) of 1kHz and wavelength (l) of 800nm, free electron laser (FEL), which had P d of 15 μsec and f of 10Hz and wavelength of 9.6μm, and Er:YAG laser, which had P d of 250 μsec and f of 10Hz and wavelength of 2.94μm. After laser irradiation, the sample surfaces and cross sections were examined with SEM and EDX. The optical change of samples was observed using FTIR. In SEM, the samples irradiated by USPL had sharp and accurate ablation with no crack and no carbonization. But, in FEL and Er:YAG laser, the samples has rough ablation with crack and carbonization. It was cleared that the P/Ca ratio of samples irradiated by USPL had same value as non-irradiated samples. There was no change in the IR absorption spectrum between samples irradiated by USPL and non-irradiated sample. But, they of samples irradiated by FEL and Er:YAG laser, however, had difference value as non-irradiated samples. These results showed that USPL might be effective to ablate dental hard tissue without thermal damage.

  2. The influence of parotid gland sparing on radiation damages of dental hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Hey, Jeremias; Seidel, Johannes; Schweyen, Ramona; Paelecke-Habermann, Yvonne; Vordermark, Dirk; Gernhardt, Christian; Kuhnt, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether radiation damage on dental hard tissue depends on the mean irradiation dose the spared parotid gland is subjected to or on stimulated whole salivary flow rate. Between June 2002 and October 2008, 70 patients with neck and cancer curatively irradiated were included in this study. All patients underwent dental treatment referring to the guidelines and recommendations of the German Society of Dental, Oral and Craniomandibular Sciences prior, during, and after radiotherapy (RT). During the follow-up period of 24 months, damages on dental hard tissues were classified according to the RTOG/EORTC guidelines. The mean doses (D(mean)) during spared parotid gland RT were determined. Stimulated whole saliva secretion flow rates (SFR) were measured before RT and 1, 6, 12, 24 months after RT. Thirty patients showed no carious lesions (group A), 18 patients developed sporadic carious lesions (group B), and 22 patients developed general carious lesions (group C). Group A patients received a D mean of 21.2 ± 11.04 Gy. Group B patients received a D(mean) of 26.5 ± 11.59 Gy and group C patients received a D(mean) of 33.9 ± 9.93 Gy, respectively. The D(mean) of group A was significantly lower than the D(mean) of group C (p < 0.001). Additionally, the mean SFR 6 months after RT of group A was significantly higher than the mean SFR of group C (p < 0.01). Irradiation damage on dental hard tissue correlates with increased mean irradiation doses as well as decreased salivary flow rates. Parotid gland sparing resulting in a dose below 20 Gy reduces radiation damage on dental hard tissues, and therefore, the dose may act as a predictor for the damage to be expected.

  3. Osteoblastic/Cementoblastic and Neural Differentiation of Dental Stem Cells and Their Applications to Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung-Chul; Bae, Hojae; Kwon, Il-Keun; Lee, Eun-Jun; Park, Jae-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Recently, dental stem and progenitor cells have been harvested from periodontal tissues such as dental pulp, periodontal ligament, follicle, and papilla. These cells have received extensive attention in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine due to their accessibility and multilineage differentiation capacity. These dental stem and progenitor cells are known to be derived from ectomesenchymal origin formed during tooth development. A great deal of research has been accomplished for directing osteoblastic/cementoblastic differentiation and neural differentiation from dental stem cells. To differentiate dental stem cells for use in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, there needs to be efficient in vitro differentiation toward the osteoblastic/cementoblastic and neural lineage with well-defined and proficient protocols. This would reduce the likelihood of spontaneous differentiation into divergent lineages and increase the available cell source. This review focuses on the multilineage differentiation capacity, especially into osteoblastic/cementoblastic lineage and neural lineages, of dental stem cells such as dental pulp stem cells (DPSC), dental follicle stem cells (DFSC), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC), and dental papilla stem cells (DPPSC). It also covers various experimental strategies that could be used to direct lineage-specific differentiation, and their potential applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:22224548

  4. Osteoblastic/cementoblastic and neural differentiation of dental stem cells and their applications to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Chul; Bae, Hojae; Kwon, Il-Keun; Lee, Eun-Jun; Park, Jae-Hong; Khademhosseini, Ali; Hwang, Yu-Shik

    2012-06-01

    Recently, dental stem and progenitor cells have been harvested from periodontal tissues such as dental pulp, periodontal ligament, follicle, and papilla. These cells have received extensive attention in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine due to their accessibility and multilineage differentiation capacity. These dental stem and progenitor cells are known to be derived from ectomesenchymal origin formed during tooth development. A great deal of research has been accomplished for directing osteoblastic/cementoblastic differentiation and neural differentiation from dental stem cells. To differentiate dental stem cells for use in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, there needs to be efficient in vitro differentiation toward the osteoblastic/cementoblastic and neural lineage with well-defined and proficient protocols. This would reduce the likelihood of spontaneous differentiation into divergent lineages and increase the available cell source. This review focuses on the multilineage differentiation capacity, especially into osteoblastic/cementoblastic lineage and neural lineages, of dental stem cells such as dental pulp stem cells (DPSC), dental follicle stem cells (DFSC), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC), and dental papilla stem cells (DPPSC). It also covers various experimental strategies that could be used to direct lineage-specific differentiation, and their potential applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  5. Water flow on erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser irradiation: effects on dental tissues.

    PubMed

    Colucci, Vivian; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2009-09-01

    Since lasers were introduced in dentistry, there has been considerable advancement in technology. Several wavelengths have been investigated as substitutes for high-speed air turbine. Owing to its high absorbability in water and hydroxyapatite, the erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser has been of great interest among dental practitioners and scientists. In spite of its great potential for hard tissue ablation, Er:YAG laser effectiveness and safety is directly related to an adequate setting of the working patterns. It is assumed that the ablation rate is influenced by certain conditions, such as water content of the target tissue, and laser parameters. It has been shown that Er:YAG irradiation with water coolant attenuates temperature rise and, hence, minimizes the risk of thermally induced pulp injury. It also increases ablation efficiency and enhances adhesion to the lased dental tissue. The aim of this review was to obtain insights into the ablation process and to discuss the effects of water flow on dental tissue ablation using Er:YAG laser.

  6. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental hard tissues with an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system.

    PubMed

    Braun, Andreas; Krillke, Raphael Franz; Frentzen, Matthias; Bourauel, Christoph; Stark, Helmut; Schelle, Florian

    2015-02-01

    Heat generation during the removal of dental hard tissues may lead to a temperature increase and cause painful sensations or damage dental tissues. The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental hard tissues following laser ablation using an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system. A total of 85 specimens of dental hard tissues were used, comprising 45 specimens of human dentine evaluating a thickness of 1, 2, and 3 mm (15 samples each) and 40 specimens of human enamel with a thickness of 1 and 2 mm (20 samples each). Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1,064 nm, a pulse duration of 9 ps, and a repetition rate of 500 kHz with an average output power of 6 W. Specimens were irradiated for 0.8 s. Employing a scanner system, rectangular cavities of 1-mm edge length were generated. A temperature sensor was placed at the back of the specimens, recording the temperature during the ablation process. All measurements were made employing a heat-conductive paste without any additional cooling or spray. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the dental hard tissue (enamel or dentine) and the thickness of the respective tissue (p < 0.05). Highest temperature increase could be observed in the 1-mm thickness group for enamel. Evaluating the 1-mm group for dentine, a significantly lower temperature increase could be measured (p < 0.05) with lowest values in the 3-mm group (p < 0.05). A time delay for temperature increase during the ablation process depending on the material thickness was observed for both hard tissues (p < 0.05). Employing the USPL system to remove dental hard tissues, heat generation has to be considered. Especially during laser ablation next to pulpal tissues, painful sensations and potential thermal injury of pulp tissue might occur.

  7. A Simplified and Systematic Method to Isolate, Culture, and Characterize Multiple Types of Human Dental Stem Cells from a Single Tooth.

    PubMed

    Bakkar, Mohammed; Liu, Younan; Fang, Dongdong; Stegen, Camille; Su, Xinyun; Ramamoorthi, Murali; Lin, Li-Chieh; Kawasaki, Takako; Makhoul, Nicholas; Pham, Huan; Sumita, Yoshinori; Tran, Simon D

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes a simplified method that allows the systematic isolation of multiple types of dental stem cells such as dental pulp stem cells (DPSC), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC), and stem cells of the apical papilla (SCAP) from a single tooth. Of specific interest is the modified laboratory approach to harvest/retrieve the dental pulp tissue by minimizing trauma to DPSC by continuous irrigation, reduction of frictional heat from the bur rotation, and reduction of the bur contact time with the dentin. Also, the use of a chisel and a mallet will maximize the number of live DPSC for culture. Steps demonstrating the potential for multiple cell differentiation lineages of each type of dental stem cell into either osteocytes, adipocytes, or chondrocytes are described. Flow cytometry, with a detailed strategy for cell gating and analysis, is described to verify characteristic markers of human mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells (MSC) from DPSC, PDLSC, or SCAP for subsequent experiments in cell therapy and in tissue engineering. Overall, this method can be adapted to any laboratory with a general setup for cell culture experiments.

  8. The importance of the biomimetic composites components for recreating the optical properties and molecular composition of intact dental tissues.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredin, P. V.; Goloshchapov, D. L.; Gushchin, M. S.; Ippolitov, Y. A.; Prutskij, T.

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this paper was to investigate whether it is possible to obtain biomimetic materials recreating the luminescent properties and molecular composition of intact dental tissues. Biomimetic materials were produced and their properties compared with native dental tissues. In addition, the overall contribution of the organic and non-organic components in the photoluminescence band was investigated. The results showed that it is possible to develop biomimetic materials with similar molecular composition and optical properties to native dental tissues for the early identification of dental caries.

  9. A Customized Self-Assembling Peptide Hydrogel for Dental Pulp Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.; Cavender, Adriana C.; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2012-01-01

    Root canal therapy is common practice in dentistry. During this procedure, the inflamed or necrotic dental pulp is removed and replaced with a synthetic material. However, recent research provides evidence that engineering of dental pulp and dentin is possible by using biologically driven approaches. As tissue engineering strategies hold the promise to soon supersede conventional root canal treatment, there is a need for customized scaffolds for stem cell delivery or recruitment. We hypothesize that the incorporation of dental pulp-derived stem cells with bioactive factors into such a scaffold can promote cell proliferation, differentiation, and angiogenesis. In this study, we used a cell adhesive, enzyme-cleavable hydrogel made from self-assembling peptide nanofibers to encapsulate dental pulp stem cells. The growth factors (GFs) fibroblast growth factor basic, transforming growth factor β1, and vascular endothelial growth factor were incorporated into the hydrogel via heparin binding. Release profiles were established, and the influence of GFs on cell morphology and proliferation was assessed to confirm their bioactivity after binding and subsequent release. Cell morphology and spreading in three-dimensional cultures were visualized by using cell tracker and histologic stains. Subcutaneous transplantation of the hydrogel within dentin cylinders into immunocompromised mice led to the formation of a vascularized soft connective tissue similar to dental pulp. These data support the use of this novel biomaterial as a highly promising candidate for future treatment concepts in regenerative endodontics. PMID:21827280

  10. The types and management of dental trauma during military service in Finland.

    PubMed

    Antikainen, Atte; Patinen, Pertti; Päkkilä, Jari; Tjäderhane, Leo; Anttonen, Vuokko

    2018-04-01

    All Finnish males must attend compulsory military service that lasts from 6 months to 1 year. About 25 000 males (approximately 80% of each age cohort) and 400 volunteer females complete the service annually. The aim of the study was to investigate the types of dental trauma occurring among Finnish conscripts during their military service. The article also focused on how dental trauma is treated in the Finnish Defence Forces. All dental records in the Defence Forces' patient register concerning dental trauma during the years 2011 and 2012 were analysed by tooth number, treatment procedures and number of visits. According to the patient register, 361 conscripts suffered an oral trauma during their military service; thus, the average annual incidence was 7.2 trauma per 1000 conscripts. A total of 483 teeth were traumatized in the 2-year period. The most frequently traumatized teeth were the maxillary central incisors (61%), and the most common findings were enamel or enamel-dentin fractures (63% of all findings). Severe trauma was not common, and the most severe ones occurred during off-duty hours. The most common treatment was direct filling (n = 189 patients). Only 53 patients had soft tissue injuries (bruises, wounds). Among patients with dental trauma, the mean number of visits to the Defence Forces' dental clinic was 1.9. Great variation exists in recording findings concerning dental and oral trauma. Minor trauma is common. In all cases, recording trauma and treatments should be performed carefully. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Investigation of ultrashort-pulsed laser on dental hard tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchizono, Takeyuki; Awazu, Kunio; Igarashi, Akihiro; Kato, Junji; Hirai, Yoshito

    2007-02-01

    Ultrashort-pulsed laser (USPL) can ablate various materials with precious less thermal effect. In laser dentistry, to solve the problem that were the generation of crack and carbonized layer by irradiating with conventional laser such as Er:YAG and CO II laser, USPL has been studied to ablate dental hard tissues by several researchers. We investigated the effectiveness of ablation on dental hard tissues by USPL. In this study, Ti:sapphire laser as USPL was used. The laser parameter had the pulse duration of 130 fsec, 800nm wavelength, 1KHz of repetition rate and the average power density of 90~360W/cm2. Bovine root dentin plates and crown enamel plates were irradiated with USPL at 1mm/sec using moving stage. The irradiated samples were analyzed by SEM, EDX, FTIR and roughness meter. In all irradiated samples, the cavity margin and wall were sharp and steep, extremely. In irradiated dentin samples, the surface showed the opened dentin tubules and no smear layer. The Ca/P ratio by EDX measurement and the optical spectrum by FTIR measurement had no change on comparison irradiated samples and non-irradiated samples. These results confirmed that USPL could ablate dental hard tissue, precisely and non-thermally. In addition, the ablation depths of samples were 10μm, 20μm, and 60μm at 90 W/cm2, 180 W/cm2, and 360 W/cm2, approximately. Therefore, ablation depth by USPL depends on the average power density. USPL has the possibility that can control the precision and non-thermal ablation with depth direction by adjusting the irradiated average power density.

  12. In situ X-ray scattering evaluation of heat-induced ultrastructural changes in dental tissues and synthetic hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Tan; Sandholzer, Michael A.; Lunt, Alexander J. G.; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Smith, Andrew; Landini, Gabriel; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2014-01-01

    Human dental tissues consist of inorganic constituents (mainly crystallites of hydroxyapatite, HAp) and organic matrix. In addition, synthetic HAp powders are frequently used in medical and chemical applications. Insights into the ultrastructural alterations of skeletal hard tissues exposed to thermal treatment are crucial for the estimation of temperature of exposure in forensic and archaeological studies. However, at present, only limited data exist on the heat-induced structural alterations of human dental tissues. In this paper, advanced non-destructive small- and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) synchrotron techniques were used to investigate the in situ ultrastructural alterations in thermally treated human dental tissues and synthetic HAp powders. The crystallographic properties were probed by WAXS, whereas HAp grain size distribution changes were evaluated by SAXS. The results demonstrate the important role of the organic matrix that binds together the HAp crystallites in responding to heat exposure. This is highlighted by the difference in the thermal behaviour between human dental tissues and synthetic HAp powders. The X-ray analysis results are supported by thermogravimetric analysis. The results concerning the HAp crystalline architecture in natural and synthetic HAp powders provide a reliable basis for deducing the heating history for dental tissues in the forensic and archaeological context, and the foundation for further development and optimization of biomimetic material design. PMID:24718447

  13. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  14. Dental pulp stem cells express tendon markers under mechanical loading and are a potential cell source for tissue engineering of tendon-like tissue.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Ying; He, Sheng-Teng; Yan, Fu-Hua; Zhou, Peng-Fei; Luo, Kai; Zhang, Yan-Ding; Xiao, Yin; Lin, Min-Kui

    2016-12-16

    Postnatal mesenchymal stem cells have the capacity to differentiate into multiple cell lineages. This study explored the possibility of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) for potential application in tendon tissue engineering. The expression of tendon-related markers such as scleraxis, tenascin-C, tenomodulin, eye absent homologue 2, collagens I and VI was detected in dental pulp tissue. Interestingly, under mechanical stimulation, these tendon-related markers were significantly enhanced when DPSCs were seeded in aligned polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibre scaffolds. Furthermore, mature tendon-like tissue was formed after transplantation of DPSC-PGA constructs under mechanical loading conditions in a mouse model. This study demonstrates that DPSCs could be a potential stem cell source for tissue engineering of tendon-like tissue.

  15. Comparison and evaluation of leakage flux on various types of dental magnetic attachment.

    PubMed

    Nishida, M; Tegawa, Y; Kinouchi, Y

    2008-01-01

    A dental magnetic attachment is a device to retain dental prostheses such as overdentures by magnetic attraction. As compared with mechanical attachments, the dental magnetic attachment has superior characteristics such as easy insertion, good esthetics and less lateral pressure to its abutment tooth. As a result, it has come to be used widely. There are various types of dental magnetic attachments. There are a cup type and a sandwich type in Japan, and several types of dental magnetic attachments in other countries. They are used for a long term in the mouth, it is necessary to clarify those leakage magnetic fields. Therefore, in this paper, we evaluate the leakage magnetic fields leaking out of sandwich type and open magnetic circuit type of dental magnetic attachment.

  16. Influence of different types of pulp treatment during isolation in the obtention of human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Viña-Almunia, Jose; Borras, Consuelo; Gambini, Juan; El Alamy, Marya; Viña, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Background Different methods have been used in order to isolate dental pulp stem cells. The aim of this study was to study the effect of different types of pulp treatment during isolation, under 3% O2 conditions, in the time needed and the efficacy for obtaining dental pulp stem cells. Material and Methods One hundred and twenty dental pulps were used to isolate dental pulp stem cells treating the pulp tissue during isolation using 9 different methods, using digestive, disgregation, or mechanical agents, or combining them. The cells were positive for CD133, Oct4, Nestin, Stro-1, CD34 markers, and negative for the hematopoietic cell marker CD-45, thus confirming the presence of mesenchymal stem cells. The efficacy of dental pulp stem cells obtention and the minimum time needed to obtain such cells comparing the 9 different methods was analyzed. Results Dental pulp stem cells were obtained from 97 of the 120 pulps used in the study, i.e. 80.8% of the cases. They were obtained with all the methods used except with mechanical fragmentation of the pulp, where no enzymatic digestion was performed. The minimum time needed to isolate dental pulp stem cells was 8 hours, digesting with 2mg/ml EDTA for 10 minutes, 4mg/ml of type I collagenase, 4mg/ml of type II dispase for 40 minutes, 13ng/ml of thermolysine for 40 minutes and sonicating the culture for one minute. Conclusions Dental pulp stem cells were obtained in 97 cases from a series of 120 pulps. The time for obtaining dental pulp stem cells was reduced maximally, without compromising the obtention of the cells, by combining digestive, disgregation, and mechanical agents. Key words:Dental pulp stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, isolation method. PMID:26946201

  17. Low-intensity lasers, modern filling materials, and bonding systems influence on mineral metabolism of hard dental tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunin, Anatoly A.; Yesaulenko, I. E.; Zoibelmann, M.; Pankova, Svetlana N.; Ippolitov, Yu. A.; Oleinik, Olga I.; Popova, T. A.; Koretskaya, I. V.; Shumilovitch, Bogdan R.; Podolskaya, Elana E.

    2001-10-01

    One of the main reasons of low quality filling is breaking Ca-P balance in hard tissues. Our research was done with the purpose of studying the influence of low intensity lasers, diodic radiation, the newest filling and bonding systems on the processes of mineral metabolism in hard dental tissues while filling a tooth. 250 patients having caries and its compli-cations were examined and treated. Our complex research included: visual and instrumental examination, finding out the level of oral cavity hygiene, acid enamel biopsy, scanning electronic microscopy and X-ray spectrum microanalysis. Filling processes may produce a negative effect on mineral metabolism of hard dental tissues the latter is less pronounced when applying fluoride-containing filling materials with bonding systems. It has also been found that bonding dentin and enamel systems are designed for both a better filling adhesion (i.e. mechanical adhesion) and migration of useful microelements present in them by their sinking into hard dental tissues (i.e. chemical adhesion). Our research showed a positive influence of low intensity laser and diodic beams accompanying the use of modern filling and bonding systems on mineral metabolism of hard dental tissues.

  18. Dental pulp stem cells in regenerative dentistry.

    PubMed

    Casagrande, Luciano; Cordeiro, Mabel M; Nör, Silvia A; Nör, Jacques E

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells constitute the source of differentiated cells for the generation of tissues during development, and for regeneration of tissues that are diseased or injured postnatally. In recent years, stem cell research has grown exponentially owing to the recognition that stem cell-based therapies have the potential to improve the life of patients with conditions that span from Alzheimer's disease to cardiac ischemia to bone or tooth loss. Growing evidence demonstrates that stem cells are primarily found in niches and that certain tissues contain more stem cells than others. Among these tissues, the dental pulp is considered a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells that are suitable for tissue engineering applications. It is known that dental pulp stem cells have the potential to differentiate into several cell types, including odontoblasts, neural progenitors, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. The dental pulp stem cells are highly proliferative. This characteristic facilitates ex vivo expansion and enhances the translational potential of these cells. Notably, the dental pulp is arguably the most accessible source of postnatal stem cells. Collectively, the multipotency, high proliferation rates, and accessibility make the dental pulp an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue regeneration. This review discusses fundamental concepts of stem cell biology and tissue engineering within the context of regenerative dentistry.

  19. Tissue types (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports ... binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue provides a covering (skin, the linings of the ...

  20. Dental caries-associated risk factors and type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Norma; Mello, Sandra; Alves, Cresio

    2011-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with various oral complications. However there is no consensus regarding the association of T1DM and caries. Critical revision of dental caries-associated risk factors and type 1 diabetes mellitus. Search of the MEDLINE and LILACS databases from 2000 to 2010, using, in different combination, the key words "dental caries", "diabetes mellitus" and "type 1 diabetes mellitus". The association between T1DM and dental caries remains controversial. Although some studies demonstrate a higher prevalence of caries due to the increased concentration of salivary glucose, acidity of the oral cavity, salivary viscosity, reduced salivary flow rate, and salivary gland dysfunction; other studies report a reduction of caries levels, probably caused by decreased ucrose ingestion. Although patients with uncontrolled T1DM and poor oral hygiene may present increased prevalence of dental caries, the literature does not describe a consistent relationship between T1DM and dental caries. Further investigations are warranted. If a true association is substantiated, intervention studies to prevent or reduce the occurrence of caries in this population should follow.

  1. Structure-mechanical function relations at nano-scale in heat-affected human dental tissue.

    PubMed

    Sui, Tan; Sandholzer, Michael A; Le Bourhis, Eric; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Landini, Gabriel; Korsunsky, Alexander M

    2014-04-01

    The knowledge of the mechanical properties of dental materials related to their hierarchical structure is essential for understanding and predicting the effect of microstructural alterations on the performance of dental tissues in the context of forensic and archaeological investigation as well as laser irradiation treatment of caries. So far, few studies have focused on the nano-scale structure-mechanical function relations of human teeth altered by chemical or thermal treatment. The response of dental tissues to thermal treatment is thought to be strongly affected by the mineral crystallite size, their spatial arrangement and preferred orientation. In this study, synchrotron-based small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques were used to investigate the micro-structural alterations (mean crystalline thickness, crystal perfection and degree of alignment) of heat-affected dentine and enamel in human dental teeth. Additionally, nanoindentation mapping was applied to detect the spatial and temperature-dependent nano-mechanical properties variation. The SAXS/WAXS results revealed that the mean crystalline thickness distribution in dentine was more uniform compared with that in enamel. Although in general the mean crystalline thickness increased both in dentine and enamel as the temperature increased, the local structural variations gradually reduced. Meanwhile, the hardness and reduced modulus in enamel decreased as the temperature increased, while for dentine, the tendency reversed at high temperature. The analysis of the correlation between the ultrastructure and mechanical properties coupled with the effect of temperature demonstrates the effect of mean thickness and orientation on the local variation of mechanical property. This structural-mechanical property alteration is likely to be due to changes of HAp crystallites, thus dentine and enamel exhibit different responses at different temperatures. Our results enable an improved understanding of

  2. Ultrashort pulse laser processing of hard tissue, dental restoration materials, and biocompatibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, A.; Strassl, M.; Beer, F.; Verhagen, L.; Wittschier, M.; Wintner, E.

    2007-07-01

    During the last few years, ultra-short laser pulses have proven their potential for application in medical tissue treatment in many ways. In hard tissue ablation, their aptitude for material ablation with negligible collateral damage provides many advantages. Especially teeth representing an anatomically and physiologically very special region with less blood circulation and lower healing rates than other tissues require most careful treatment. Hence, overheating of the pulp and induction of microcracks are some of the most problematic issues in dental preparation. Up till now it was shown by many authors that the application of picosecond or femtosecond pulses allows to perform ablation with very low damaging potential also fitting to the physiological requirements indicated. Beside the short interaction time with the irradiated matter, scanning of the ultra-short pulse trains turned out to be crucial for ablating cavities of the required quality. One main reason for this can be seen in the fact that during scanning the time period between two subsequent pulses incident on the same spot is so much extended that no heat accumulation effects occur and each pulse can be treated as a first one with respect to its local impact. Extension of this advantageous technique to biocompatible materials, i.e. in this case dental restoration materials and titanium plasma-sprayed implants, is just a matter of consequence. Recently published results on composites fit well with earlier data on dental hard tissue. In case of plaque which has to be removed from implants, it turns out that removal of at least the calcified version is harder than tissue removal. Therefore, besides ultra-short lasers, also Diode and Neodymium lasers, in cw and pulsed modes, have been studied with respect to plaque removal and sterilization. The temperature increase during laser exposure has been experimentally evaluated in parallel.

  3. Contribution of dental tissues to sex determination in modern human populations.

    PubMed

    García-Campos, Cecilia; Martinón-Torres, María; Martín-Francés, Laura; Martínez de Pinillos, Marina; Modesto-Mata, Mario; Perea-Pérez, Bernardo; Zanolli, Clément; Labajo González, Elena; Sánchez Sánchez, José Antonio; Ruiz Mediavilla, Elena; Tuniz, Claudio; Bermúdez de Castro, José María

    2018-02-20

    Accurate sex estimation is an essential step for the reconstruction of the biological profile of human remains. Earlier studies have shown that elements of the human permanent dentition are sexually dimorphic. The aims of this study are to determine the degree of sexual dimorphism in the dental tissue volumes and surface areas of mandibular canines and to explore its potential for reliable sex determination. The teeth included in this study (n = 69) were selected from anthropological collections from Spain, South Africa and Sudan. In all cases, the sex of the individuals was known. The teeth were scanned and three-dimensional (3D) measurements (volumes and surfaces areas) were obtained. Finally, a dsicriminant function analysis was applied. Our results showed that sexual dimorphism in canine size is due to males having greater amounts of dentine, whereas enamel volume does not contribute significantly to overall tooth size dimorphism. Classification accuracy of the multivariable equations tested on slightly worn teeth ranged from 78 to 90.2% for the crossvalidation, and from 71.43 to 84.62% for the hold-out sample validation. When all functions were applied together, the sex was correctly assigned 92.30% of the time. Our results suggest that the 3D variables from mandibular canine dental tissues are useful for sex determination as they present a high degree of dimorphism. The results obtained show the importance of 3D dental tissue measurements as a methodology in sex determination, which application should be considered as a supplemental method to others. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Improved classification and visualization of healthy and pathological hard dental tissues by modeling specular reflections in NIR hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenik, Peter; Bürmen, Miran; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-03-01

    Despite major improvements in dental healthcare and technology, dental caries remains one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of modern society. The initial stages of dental caries are characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals, commonly known as white spots, which are difficult to diagnose. Near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging is a new promising technique for early detection of demineralization which can classify healthy and pathological dental tissues. However, due to non-ideal illumination of the tooth surface the hyperspectral images can exhibit specular reflections, in particular around the edges and the ridges of the teeth. These reflections significantly affect the performance of automated classification and visualization methods. Cross polarized imaging setup can effectively remove the specular reflections, however is due to the complexity and other imaging setup limitations not always possible. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on modeling the specular reflections of hard dental tissues, which significantly improves the classification accuracy in the presence of specular reflections. The method was evaluated on five extracted human teeth with corresponding gold standard for 6 different healthy and pathological hard dental tissues including enamel, dentin, calculus, dentin caries, enamel caries and demineralized regions. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used for multivariate local modeling of healthy and pathological dental tissues. The classification was performed by employing multiple discriminant analysis. Based on the obtained results we believe the proposed method can be considered as an effective alternative to the complex cross polarized imaging setups.

  5. Dental histology of Coelophysis bauri and the evolution of tooth attachment tissues in early dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Fong, Raymond K M; LeBlanc, Aaron R H; Berman, David S; Reisz, Robert R

    2016-07-01

    Studies of dinosaur teeth have focused primarily on external crown morphology and thus, use shed or in situ tooth crowns, and are limited to the enamel and dentine dental tissues. As a result, the full suites of periodontal tissues that attach teeth to the jaws remain poorly documented, particularly in early dinosaurs. These tissues are an integral part of the tooth and thus essential to a more complete understanding of dental anatomy, development, and evolution in dinosaurs. To identify the tooth attachment tissues in early dinosaurs, histological thin sections were prepared from the maxilla and dentary of a partial skull of the early theropod Coelophysis bauri from the Upper Triassic (Rhaetian- 209-201 Ma) Whitaker Quarry, New Mexico, USA. As one of the phylogenetically and geologically oldest dinosaurs, it is an ideal candidate for examining dental tissues near the base of the dinosaurian clade. The teeth of C. bauri exhibited a fibrous tooth attachment in which the teeth possessed five tissues: enamel, dentine, cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL), and alveolar bone. Our findings, coupled with those of more recent studies of ornithischian teeth, indicate that a tripartite periodontium, similar to that of crocodilians and mammals, is the plesiomorphic condition for dinosaurs. The occurrence of a tripartite periodontium in dinosaurs adds to the growing consensus that the presence of these tissues is the plesiomorphic condition for the major amniote clades. Furthermore, this study establishes the relative timing of tissue development and growth directions of periodontal tissues and provides the first comparative framework for future studies of dinosaur periodontal development, tooth replacement, and histology. J. Morphol. 277:916-924, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Dental hard tissue ablation using mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed Cr:CdSe laser.

    PubMed

    Lin, Taichen; Aoki, Akira; Saito, Norihito; Yumoto, Masaki; Nakajima, Sadahiro; Nagasaka, Keigo; Ichinose, Shizuko; Mizutani, Koji; Wada, Satoshi; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-12-01

    Mid-infrared erbium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) and erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) lasers (2.94- and 2.78-μm, respectively) are utilized for effective dental hard tissue treatment because of their high absorption in water, hydroxide ion, or both. Recently, a mid-infrared tunable, nanosecond pulsed, all-solid-state chromium-doped: cadmium-selenide (Cr:CdSe) laser system was developed, which enables laser oscillation in the broad spectral range around 2.9 μm. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ablation of dental hard tissue by the nanosecond pulsed Cr:CdSe laser at a wavelength range of 2.76-3.00 μm. Enamel, dentin, and cementum tissue were irradiated at a spot or line at a fluence of 0-11.20 J/cm 2 /pulse (energy output: 0-2.00 mJ/pulse) with a repetition rate of 10 Hz and beam diameter of ∼150 μm on the target (pulse width ∼250 ns). After irradiation, morphological changes, ablation threshold, depth, and efficiency, and thickness of the structurally and thermally affected layer of irradiated surfaces were analyzed using stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and light microscopy of non-decalcified histological sections. The nanosecond pulsed irradiation without water spray effectively ablated dental hard tissue with no visible thermal damage such as carbonization. The SEM analysis revealed characteristic micro-irregularities without major melting and cracks in the lased tissue. The ablation threshold of dentin was the lowest at 2.76 μm and the highest at 3.00 μm. The histological analysis revealed minimal thermal and structural changes ∼20 μm wide on the irradiated dentin surfaces with no significant differences between wavelengths. The efficiency of dentin ablation gradually increased from 3.00 to 2.76 μm, at which point the highest ablation efficiency was observed. The nanosecond pulsed Cr:CdSe laser demonstrated an effective ablation ability of hard dental tissues

  7. How Dental Team Members describe Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Maramaldi, Peter; Walji, Muhammad F.; White, Joel; Etoulu, Jini; Kahn, Maria; Vaderhobli, Ram; Kwatra, Japneet; Delattre, Veronique F.; Hebballi, Nutan B.; Stewart, Denice; Kent, Karla; Yansane, Alfa; Ramoni, Rachel B.; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2016-01-01

    Background There is increased recognition that patients suffer adverse events (AEs) or harm caused by treatments in dentistry, and little is known about how dental providers describe these events. Understanding how providers view AEs is essential to building a safer environment in dental practice. Methods Dental providers and domain experts were interviewed through focus groups and in-depth interviews and asked to identify the types of AEs that may occur in dental settings. Results The first order listing of the interview and focus group findings yielded 1,514 items that included both causes and AEs. 632 causes were coded into one of the eight categories of the Eindhoven classification. 882 AEs were coded into 12 categories of a newly developed dental AE classification. Inter-rater reliability was moderate among coders. The list was reanalyzed and duplicate items were removed leaving a total of 747 unique AEs and 540 causes. The most frequently identified AE types were “Aspiration/ingestion” at 14% (n=142), “Wrong-site, wrong-procedure, wrong-patient errors” at 13%, “Hard tissue damage” at 13%, and “Soft tissue damage” at 12%. Conclusions Dental providers identified a large and diverse list of AEs. These events ranged from “death due to cardiac arrest” to “jaw fatigue from lengthy procedures”. Practical Implications Identifying threats to patient safety is a key element of improving dental patient safety. An inventory of dental AEs underpins efforts to track, prevent, and mitigate these events. PMID:27269376

  8. Composition of Mineral Produced by Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Volponi, A A; Gentleman, E; Fatscher, R; Pang, Y W Y; Gentleman, M M; Sharpe, P T

    2015-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from different dental tissues have been described to have osteogenic/odontogenic-like differentiation capacity, but little attention has been paid to the biochemical composition of the material that each produces. Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to analyze the mineralized materials produced in vitro by different dental cell populations, and we compared them with the biochemical composition of native dental tissues. We show that different dental stem cell populations produce materials that differ in their mineral and matrix composition and that these differ from those of native dental tissues. In vitro, BCMP (bone chip mass population), SCAP (stem cells from apical papilla), and SHED (stem cells from human-exfoliated deciduous teeth) cells produce a more highly mineralized matrix when compared with that produced by PDL (periodontal ligament), DPA (dental pulp adult), and GF (gingival fibroblast) cells. Principal component analyses of Raman spectra further demonstrated that the crystallinity and carbonate substitution environments in the material produced by each cell type varied, with DPA cells, for example, producing a more carbonate-substituted mineral and with SCAP, SHED, and GF cells creating a less crystalline material when compared with other dental stem cells and native tissues. These variations in mineral composition reveal intrinsic differences in the various cell populations, which may in turn affect their specific clinical applications. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  9. Interventions for replacing missing teeth: management of soft tissues for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Marco; Maghaireh, Hassan; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; Ziounas, Ioannis; Worthington, Helen V

    2012-02-15

    Dental implants are usually placed by elevating a soft tissue flap, but in some instances, they can also be placed flapless reducing patient discomfort. Several flap designs and suturing techniques have been proposed. Soft tissues are often manipulated and augmented for aesthetic reasons. It is often recommended that implants are surrounded by a sufficient width of attached/keratinised mucosa to improve their long-term prognosis. To evaluate whether (1a) flapless procedures are beneficial for patients, and (1b) which is the ideal flap design; whether (2a) soft tissue correction/augmentation techniques are beneficial for patients, and (2b) which are the best techniques; whether (3a) techniques to increase the peri-implant keratinised mucosa are beneficial for patients, and (3b) which are the best techniques; and (4) which are the best suturing techniques/materials. The following electronic databases were searched: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 9 June 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 2), MEDLINE via OVID (1950 to 9 June 2011), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 9 June 2011). Several dental journals were handsearched. There were no language restrictions. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of root-form osseointegrated dental implants, with a follow-up of at least 6 months after function, comparing various techniques to handle soft tissues in relation to dental implants. Outcome measures, according to the different hypotheses, were: prosthetic and implant failures, biological complications, aesthetics evaluated by patients and dentists, postoperative pain, marginal peri-implant bone level changes on periapical radiographs, patient preference, ease of maintenance by patient, soft tissue thickness changes and attached/keratinised mucosa height changes. Screening of eligible studies, assessment of the methodological quality of the trials and data extraction were conducted at least in

  10. Direct spectrometry: a new alternative for measuring the fluorescence of composite resins and dental tissues.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Tm; de Oliveira, Hpm; Severino, D; Balducci, I; Huhtala, Mfrl; Gonçalves, Sep

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluorescence intensity of different composite resins and compare those values with the fluorescence intensity of dental tissues. Different composite resins were used to make 10 discs (2 mm in depth and 4 mm in diameter) of each brand, divided into groups: 1) Z (Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE), 2) ES (Esthet-X, Dentsply), 3) A (Amelogen Plus, Ultradent), 4) DVS (Durafill-VS, Heraeus Kulzer) with 2 mm composite resin for enamel (A2), 5) OES ([Esthet-X] opaque-OA [1 mm] + enamel-A2 [1 mm]); 6) ODVSI ([Charisma-Opal/Durafill-VSI], opaque-OM (1 mm) + translucent [1mm]), and 7) DVSI ([Durafill- VSI] translucent [2 mm]). Dental tissue specimens were obtained from human anterior teeth cut in a mesiodistal direction to obtain enamel, dentin, and enamel/dentin samples (2 mm). The fluorescence intensity of specimens was directly measured using an optic fiber associated with a spectrometer (Ocean Optics USB 4000) and recorded in graphic form (Origin 8.0 program). Data were submitted to statistical analysis using Dunnet, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests. Light absorption of the composite resins was obtained in a spectral range from 250 to 450 nm, and that of dental tissues was between 250 and 300 nm. All composite resins were excited at 398 nm and exhibited maximum emissions of around 485 nm. Fluorescence intensity values for all of the resins showed statistically significant differences (measured in arbitrary units [AUs]), with the exception of groups Z and DVS. Group DVSI had the highest fluorescence intensity values (13539 AU), followed by ODVS (10440 AU), DVS (10146 AU), ES (3946 AU), OES (3841 AU), A (3540 AU), and Z (1146 AU). The fluorescence intensity values for the composite resins differed statistically from those of dental tissues (E=1380 AU; D=6262 AU; E/D=3251 AU). The opacity interfered with fluorescence intensity, and group Z demonstrated fluorescence intensity values closest to that of tooth enamel. It is concluded that the

  11. A retrospective evaluation of traumatic dental injury in children who applied to the dental hospital, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sari, M E; Ozmen, B; Koyuturk, A E; Tokay, U; Kasap, P; Guler, D

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze traumatic dental injuries in children visiting the dental hospital emergency department in Samsun of Turkey, in the period from 2007 to 2011. Data of age, gender, causes of dental trauma, injured teeth, type of dental injuries, the application period, the dental treatments, and traumatic dental injuries according to the seasons were obtained from the records at dental hospital. Of all 320 patients with traumatic dental injury, 205 were boys and 115 were girls with a boys/girls ratio 1.78:1. Traumatic dental injury was observed more frequently in the 7-12 age groups: 52.5% in girls and 67.8% in boys. Falls are the major cause of traumatic dental injury in the age group 6-12 (51.4%). Sport activities are a common cause of traumatic dental injury in the 7-12 age group (34.2%). Patients visited a dentist within approximately 2 h (57.1%). The upper anterior teeth were subjected to trauma more frequently than the lower anterior teeth. The maxillary central incisors were the most commonly affected teeth, and the mandibular canins were the least affected teeth. In primary teeth, avulsion was the most common type of dental injury (23%); on the other hand, enamel fractures were the most common type of dental injury (30.6%) observed in permanent teeth. In the primary dentition, the most commonly performed treatments were dental examination and prescribing (70%). The most common treatment choices in permanent teeth were restoration and dental examination (49.7 and 15.8%, respectively). The results of the study show that the emergency intervention to traumatized teeth is important for good prognosis of teeth and oral tissues. Therefore, the parents should be informed about dental trauma in schools, and dental hospital physicians should be subjected to postgraduate training.

  12. Surface modulation of dental hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantbirojn, Daranee

    Tooth surfaces play a central role in the equilibrium of dental hard tissues, in which contrasting processes lead to loss or deposition of materials. The central interest of this Thesis was the modulation of tooth surfaces to control such equilibrium. Four specific studies were carried out to investigate different classes of surface modulating agents. These are: (1) Ionic modulation of the enamel surface to enhance stain removal . Dental stain is the most apparent form of tooth surface deposit. The nature of extrinsic stain in terms of spatial chemical composition was studied by using electron probe microanalysis. An ionic surface modulating agent, sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP), was evaluated. Image analysis methodologies were developed and the ability of STPP in stain removal was proved. (2) Thin film modulation with substantive polymeric coating and the effect on in vitro enamel de/re-mineralization . A novel polymeric coating that formed a thin film on the tooth surface was investigated for its inhibitory effect on artificial enamel caries, without interfering with the remineralization process. The preventive effect was distinct, but the mineral redeposition was questionable. (3) Thick film modulation with fluoride containing sealants and the effect on in vitro enamel and root caries development. Fluoride incorporated into resin material is an example of combining different classes of surface modulating agents to achieve an optimal outcome. A proper combination, such as in resin modified glass ionomer, showed in vitro caries inhibitory effect beyond the material boundary in both enamel and dentin. (4) Thick film modulation with dental adhesives and the determination of adhesion to dentin. Dentin adhesives modulate intracoronal tooth surfaces by enhancing adhesion to restorative materials. Conventional nominal bond tests were inadequate to determine the performance of current high strength adhesives. It was shown that interfacial fracture toughness test was more

  13. The sound of dental tissue ablation as a possible parameter for conservative dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles, Fábio Renato P.; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Matos, Adriana Bona

    2007-02-01

    Studies in cariology have been struggling for the development of caries prevention techniques, precocious diagnoses of lesions, re-mineralization of incipient carious lesions and early restorative intervention with minimally invasive procedures. When removing caries, healthy dental structure is often removed inadvertently during its final phase, for being quite difficult to precise the limits between viable and decayed dental tissues clinically. With laser technologies, a subjective clinical hint, often used to indicate when tissue ablation should be stopped is that different sounds are perceptive whether in carious (bass) or in healthy (treble) dental structure; when sound produced by ablation turned treble it would mean that healthy tissue was reached. This study aims to classify those audio differences and to turn them into objective parameters for a conservative operative dentistry with minimally invasive tissue removal when using erbium lasers. Twenty freshly extracted human teeth were used (10 decayed and 10 sound teeth). Dentine was erbium laser irradiated under same parameters, distance and refrigeration and a mono directional microphone was set 10 cm far from the operative area in order to capture and record the ablation produced sounds when working either on carious or healthy dentine. Ten pulses per file were then analysed in a computer software (200 analyses). It was permitted to draw similarities among the patterns in each group (decayed and healthy teeth) as well as differences between decayed and healthy produced sounds. Audio analysis came out to be a technical reliable objective parameter to determine whether laser ablated dentine substrates are decayed or sound; therefore it can be proposed as a conservative parameter, avoiding unnecessary removal of healthy dentine and restricting it to carious one.

  14. Interaction of slow highly charged ions with hard dental tissue: studies of fluoride uptake and reminalization efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalova, A.; Kasperski, G.; Rousseau, P.; Domaracka, A.; Lawicki, A.

    2014-05-01

    TOF-SIMS mass spectroscopy data are presented on ion irradiation of hard dental tissue using a beam of 129Xe20+ (15 kV) ions delivered in the ARIBE facility by an ECR source. The investigation was focused on the mass distribution of the fragment ions. A comparison is made between the mass spectra from hard dental tissue treated by olaflur-(C27H60F2N2O3) and untreated hard dental tissue obtained under irradiation by low-energy highly-charged ions (HCIs). We found significant differences between the mass spectra of enamel after introducing amine fluoride (olaflur) and the mass spectra of pure untreated enamel. Further, we separated out the effects caused by radiation induced in the tooth enamel from those induced in dentin, which has not been performed before. In order to conduct a further detailed analysis, it is necessary to extend the research scope to include the influence of fluorine compounds on enamel and dentin.

  15. Composition of Mineral Produced by Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Volponi, A.A.; Gentleman, E.; Fatscher, R.; Pang, Y.W.Y.; Gentleman, M.M.; Sharpe, P.T.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from different dental tissues have been described to have osteogenic/odontogenic-like differentiation capacity, but little attention has been paid to the biochemical composition of the material that each produces. Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to analyze the mineralized materials produced in vitro by different dental cell populations, and we compared them with the biochemical composition of native dental tissues. We show that different dental stem cell populations produce materials that differ in their mineral and matrix composition and that these differ from those of native dental tissues. In vitro, BCMP (bone chip mass population), SCAP (stem cells from apical papilla), and SHED (stem cells from human-exfoliated deciduous teeth) cells produce a more highly mineralized matrix when compared with that produced by PDL (periodontal ligament), DPA (dental pulp adult), and GF (gingival fibroblast) cells. Principal component analyses of Raman spectra further demonstrated that the crystallinity and carbonate substitution environments in the material produced by each cell type varied, with DPA cells, for example, producing a more carbonate-substituted mineral and with SCAP, SHED, and GF cells creating a less crystalline material when compared with other dental stem cells and native tissues. These variations in mineral composition reveal intrinsic differences in the various cell populations, which may in turn affect their specific clinical applications. PMID:26253190

  16. Gene expression profile in mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental tissues and bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-Hwan; Kim, Young-Sung; Lee, Su-Yeon; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Lee, Yong-Moo; Kim, Won-Kyung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to compare the gene expression profile in mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental tissues and bone marrow for characterization of dental stem cells. Methods We employed GeneChip analysis to the expression levels of approximately 32,321 kinds of transcripts in 5 samples of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) (n=1), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) (n=2), and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) (n=2). Each cell was sorted by a FACS Vantage Sorter using immunocytochemical staining of the early mesenchymal stem cell surface marker STRO-1 before the microarray analysis. Results We identified 379 up-regulated and 133 down-regulated transcripts in BMSCs, 68 up-regulated and 64 down-regulated transcripts in PDLSCs, and 218 up-regulated and 231 down-regulated transcripts in DPSCs. In addition, anatomical structure development and anatomical structure morphogenesis gene ontology (GO) terms were over-represented in all three different mesenchymal stem cells and GO terms related to blood vessels, and neurons were over-represented only in DPSCs. Conclusions This study demonstrated the genome-wide gene expression patterns of STRO-1+ mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental tissues and bone marrow. The differences among the expression profiles of BMSCs, PDLSCs, and DPSCs were shown, and 999 candidate genes were found to be definitely up- or down-regulated. In addition, GOstat analyses of regulated gene products provided over-represented GO classes. These data provide a first step for discovering molecules key to the characteristics of dental stem cells. PMID:21954424

  17. Human dental pulp stem cells: Applications in future regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Potdar, Pravin D; Jethmalani, Yogita D

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are pluripotent cells, having a property of differentiating into various types of cells of human body. Several studies have developed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from various human tissues, peripheral blood and body fluids. These cells are then characterized by cellular and molecular markers to understand their specific phenotypes. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are having a MSCs phenotype and they are differentiated into neuron, cardiomyocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, liver cells and β cells of islet of pancreas. Thus, DPSCs have shown great potentiality to use in regenerative medicine for treatment of various human diseases including dental related problems. These cells can also be developed into induced pluripotent stem cells by incorporation of pluripotency markers and use for regenerative therapies of various diseases. The DPSCs are derived from various dental tissues such as human exfoliated deciduous teeth, apical papilla, periodontal ligament and dental follicle tissue. This review will overview the information about isolation, cellular and molecular characterization and differentiation of DPSCs into various types of human cells and thus these cells have important applications in regenerative therapies for various diseases. This review will be most useful for postgraduate dental students as well as scientists working in the field of oral pathology and oral medicine. PMID:26131314

  18. Antifungal Effect of a Dental Tissue Conditioner Containing Nystatin-Loaded Alginate Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Son, Jun Sik; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2018-02-01

    In this in vitro study, nystatin-alginate microparticles were successfully fabricated to control the release of nystatin from a commercial dental tissue conditioner. These nystatin-alginate microparticles were spherical and had a slightly rough surface. The microparticles incorporated into the tissue conditioner were distributed homogeneously throughout the tissue conditioner matrix. The incorporation of the microparticles did not deteriorate the mechanical properties of the original material. The agar diffusion test results showed that the tissue conditioner containing the microparticles had a good antifungal effect against Candida albicans. The nystatin-alginate microparticles efficiently controlled the release of nystatin from the tissue conditioner matrix over the experimental period of 14 days. Moreover, the nystatin-alginate microparticles incorporated in the tissue conditioner showed effective antifungal function even at lower concentrations of nystatin. The current study suggests that the tissue conditioner containing the nystatin-alginate microparticle carrier system has potential as an effective antifungal material.

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from inflamed dental pulpal and gingival tissue: a potential application for bone formation.

    PubMed

    Tomasello, Laura; Mauceri, Rodolfo; Coppola, Antonina; Pitrone, Maria; Pizzo, Giuseppe; Campisi, Giuseppina; Pizzolanti, Giuseppe; Giordano, Carla

    2017-08-01

    Chronic periodontal disease is an infectious disease consisting of prolonged inflammation of the supporting tooth tissue and resulting in bone loss. Guided bone regeneration procedures have become common and safe treatments in dentistry, and in this context dental stem cells would represent the ideal solution as autologous cells. In this study, we verified the ability of dental pulp mesenchymal stem cells (DPSCs) and gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) harvested from periodontally affected teeth to produce new mineralized bone tissue in vitro, and compared this to cells from healthy teeth. To characterize DPSCs and GMSCs, we assessed colony-forming assay, immunophenotyping, mesenchymal/stem cell phenotyping, stem gene profiling by means of flow cytometry, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The effects of proinflammatory cytokines on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation and differentiation potential were investigated. We also observed participation of several heat shock proteins (HSPs) and actin-depolymerizing factors (ADFs) during osteogenic differentiation. DPSCs and GMSCs were successfully isolated both from periodontally affected dental tissue and controls. Periodontally affected dental MSCs proliferated faster, and the inflamed environment did not affect MSC marker expressions. The calcium deposition was higher in periodontally affected MSCs than in the control group. Proinflammatory cytokines activate a cytoskeleton remodeling, interacting with HSPs including HSP90 and HSPA9, thioredoxin-1, and ADFs such as as profilin-1, cofilin-1, and vinculin that probably mediate the increased acquisition in the inflamed environment. Our findings provide evidence that periodontally affected dental tissue (both pulp and gingiva) can be used as a source of MSCs with intact stem cell properties. Moreover, we demonstrated that the osteogenic capability of DPSCs and GMSCs in the test group was not only preserved but increased by the overexpression of

  20. [Ru(bipy)3]2+ nanoparticle-incorporate dental light cure resin to promote photobiomodulation therapy for enhanced vital pulp tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosca, Rodrigo C.; Young, Nicholas; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Arany, Praveen R.

    2018-02-01

    The use of nanoparticle on dental light cure resin is not new, currently several compounds (nanoadditives) are used to promote better communication between the restorative material and biological tissues. The interest for this application is growing up to enhance mechanical proprieties to dental tissue cells regeneration. Bioactive nanoparticles and complex compounds with multiple functions are the major target for optimizing the restorative materials. In this work, we incorporate [Ru(bipy)3]2+ nanoparticles, that absorbs energy at 450 nm (blue-light) and emits strongly at 620 nm (red-light), in PLGA Microspheres and insert it in Dental Light Cure Resin to promote the Photobiomodulation Therapy (PBM) effects to accelerate dental pulp repair by in vitro using cytotoxicity and proliferation assay.

  1. Soft tissue adhesion of polished versus glazed lithium disilicate ceramic for dental applications.

    PubMed

    Brunot-Gohin, C; Duval, J-L; Azogui, E-E; Jannetta, R; Pezron, I; Laurent-Maquin, D; Gangloff, S C; Egles, C

    2013-09-01

    Ceramics are widely used materials for prosthesis, especially in dental fields. Despite multiple biomedical applications, little is known about ceramic surface modifications and the resulting cell behavior at its contact. The aim of this study is to evaluate the biological response of polished versus glazed surface treatments on lithium disilicate dental ceramic. We studied a lithium disilicate ceramic (IPS e.max(®) Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) with 3 different surface treatments: raw surface treatment, hand polished surface treatment, and glazed surface treatment (control samples are Thermanox(®), Nunc). In order to evaluate the possible modulation of cell response at the surface of ceramic, we compared polished versus glazed ceramics using an organotypic culture model of chicken epithelium. Our results show that the surface roughness is not modified as demonstrated by equivalent Ra measurements. On the contrary, the contact angle θ in water is very different between polished (84°) and glazed (33°) samples. The culture of epithelial tissues allowed a very precise assessment of histocompatibility of these interfaces and showed that polished samples increased cell adhesion and proliferation as compared to glazed samples. Lithium disilicate polished ceramic provided better adhesion and proliferation than lithium disilicate glazed ceramic. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time, how it is possible to use simple surface modifications to finely modulate the adhesion of tissues. Our results will help dental surgeons to choose the most appropriate surface treatment for a specific clinical application, in particular for the ceramic implant collar. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Lasers in dentistry. Part B--Interaction with biological tissues and the effect on the soft tissues of the oral cavity, the hard tissues of the tooth and the dental pulp].

    PubMed

    Moshonov, J; Stabholz, A; Leopold, Y; Rosenberg, I; Stabholz, A

    2001-10-01

    The interaction of laser energy with target tissue is mainly determined by two non operator-dependent factors: the specific wavelength of the laser and the optical properties of the target tissues. Power density, energy density, pulse repetition rate, pulse duration and the mode of energy transferring to the tissue are dictated by the clinician. Combination of these factors enables to control optimal response for the clinical application. Four responses are described when the laser beam hits the target tissue: reflection, absorption, transmission and scattering. Three main mechanisms of interaction between the laser and the biological tissues exist: photothermic, photoacoustic and photochemical. The effect of lasers on the soft tissues of the oral cavity is based on transformation of light energy into thermal energy which, in turn heats the target tissue to produce the desirable effect. In comparison to the scalpel used in surgical procedures, the laser beam is characterized by tissue natural sterility and by minimum bleeding during the surgical procedures due to blood vessels welding. The various effects achieved by the temperature elevation during the laser application on the soft tissue are: I. coagulation and hemostasis II. tissue sterilization III. tissue welding IV. incision and excision V. ablation and vaporization Ablation and melting are the two basic modalities by which the effect of lasers on the hard tissues of the tooth is produced. When discussing the effect of laser on dental hard tissues, the energy absorption in the hydroxyapatite plays a major role in addition to its absorption in water. When laser energy is absorbed in the water of the hard tissues, a rapid volume expansion of the evaporating water occurs as a result of a substantial temperature elevation in the interaction site. Microexplosions are produced causing hard tissue disintegration. If pulp temperatures are raised beyond 5 degrees C level, damage to the dental pulp is irreversible

  3. Relationships between tissue properties and operational parameters of a dental handpiece during simulated cavity preparation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongyan; Lau, Andrew; Heo, Young C; Lin, Lianshan; DeLong, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary study was conducted on the development of an intelligent dental handpiece with functionality to detect subtle changes in mechanical properties of tooth tissue during milling. Such equipment would be able to adopt changes in cutting parameters and make real-time measurements to avoid tooth tissue damage caused by overexertion and overextension of the cutting tool. A modified dental handpiece, instrumented with strain gauges, microphone, displacement sensor, and air pressure sensor, was mounted to a linear movement table and used to mill three to four cavities in >50 bovine teeth. Extracted sound frequency and density were analyzed along with force, air pressure, and displacement for correlations and trends. Experimental results showed a high correlation (coefficient close to 0.7) between the feed force, the rotational frequency, and the averaged gray scale. These results could form the basis of a feedback control system to improve the safety of dental cutting procedures. This article is written in memory of Dr Hongyan Sun, who passed away in 2011 at a young age of 37. PMID:23554848

  4. Relationships between tissue properties and operational parameters of a dental handpiece during simulated cavity preparation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongyan; Lau, Andrew; Heo, Young C; Lin, Lianshan; Delong, Ralph; Fok, Alex

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary study was conducted on the development of an intelligent dental handpiece with functionality to detect subtle changes in mechanical properties of tooth tissue during milling. Such equipment would be able to adopt changes in cutting parameters and make real-time measurements to avoid tooth tissue damage caused by overexertion and overextension of the cutting tool. A modified dental handpiece, instrumented with strain gauges, microphone, displacement sensor, and air pressure sensor, was mounted to a linear movement table and used to mill three to four cavities in >50 bovine teeth. Extracted sound frequency and density were analyzed along with force, air pressure, and displacement for correlations and trends. Experimental results showed a high correlation (coefficient close to 0.7) between the feed force, the rotational frequency, and the averaged gray scale. These results could form the basis of a feedback control system to improve the safety of dental cutting procedures. This article is written in memory of Dr Hongyan Sun, who passed away in 2011 at a young age of 37.

  5. Association of Dental Anomalies with Different Types of Malocclusions in Pretreatment Orthodontic Patients.

    PubMed

    Dwijendra, K S; Parikh, Vishal; George, Soja Sara; Kukkunuru, Gururam Tej; Chowdary, Gali Nagarjuna

    2015-06-01

    The study is planned to correlate the existence of dental anomalies with different types of malocclusion as the occurrence of anomalies is common in malocclusion. The present study was conducted among 430 patients with different types of malocclusion as 161 patients having Class I, 203 with Class II, and 66 with Class III malocclusion. The age of the patients ranged from 12 to 15 years. Diagnosis was done on the basis of history, clinical, cephalometric, radiographs, and dental cast examination. The level of significance was set at P = 0.05. Most common anomaly was rotation of teeth (18.80%), followed by hypodontia (10.90%), and least occurring was gemination, fusion, talon's cusp, and dilacerations. 31.4% showed one dental anomaly, whereas 11.9% exhibited two or more dental anomalies. The highest mean value of all the dental anomalies was seen with severe cases of malocclusion and also significant differences were observed according to gender. The present study investigated various dental anomalies in relation to malocclusion. It was found that 31.4% showed one dental anomaly, whereas 11.9% exhibited two or more dental anomalies. Hence, careful prior investigation of dental anomalies is necessary for better orthodontic treatment planning to reduce the complications.

  6. Effects of In Vitro Osteogenic Induction on In Vivo Tissue Regeneration by Dental Pulp and Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Cha, Yoonsun; Jeon, Mijeong; Lee, Hyo-Seol; Kim, Seunghye; Kim, Seong-Oh; Lee, Jae-Ho; Song, Je Seon

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of in vitro odontogenic/cementogenic differentiation on the in vivo tissue regeneration of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs). DPSCs and PDLSCs were predifferentiated for 0, 4, or 8 days with an odontogenic/cementogenic medium and then transplanted into subcutaneous pockets in immunocompromised mice. The transplants were harvested 9 weeks after transplantation, and the characteristics of the newly formed tissues in vivo were analyzed by histologic staining; examining alkaline phosphate activity; immunohistochemical staining for osteocalcin, dentin sialoprotein, and type XII collagen; and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to analyze the expression patterns of the following genes: RUNX2, OC, DMP1, DSPP, POSTN, CP23, and Col XII. In DPSC transplants, the amount of new tissues was similar in all groups, whereas in predifferentiated transplants the OC and DSPP expression were higher than undifferentiated transplants. Predifferentiated PDLSC transplants generated more hard tissue and expressed higher alkaline phosphatase activity than undifferentiated transplants. In particular, 8-day predifferentiated PDLSC transplants formed tissue closer to the cementum/PDL complex in vivo as confirmed by the higher expression levels of POSTN, CP23, and Col XII. Although there was no significant increase in tissue-forming ability among DPSCs after predifferentiation, predifferentiated DPSCs generated hard tissue closer to dentin. Also, predifferentiated PDLSCs appeared to be able to generate higher-quality and greater amounts of tissue for dental regeneration than undifferentiated PDLSCs. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anisotropic local physical properties of human dental enamel in comparison to properties of some common dental filling materials.

    PubMed

    Raue, Lars; Hartmann, Christiane D; Rödiger, Matthias; Bürgers, Ralf; Gersdorff, Nikolaus

    2014-11-01

    A major aspect in evaluating the quality of dental materials is their physical properties. Their properties should be a best fit of the ones of dental hard tissues. Manufacturers give data sheets for each material. The properties listed are characterized by a specific value. This assumes (but does not prove) that there is no direction dependence of the properties. However, dental enamel has direction-dependent properties which additionally vary with location in the tooth. The aim of this paper is to show the local direction dependence of physical properties like the elastic modulus or the thermal expansion in dental hard tissues. With this knowledge the 'perfect filling/dental material' could be characterized. Enamel sections of ∼400-500 μm thickness have been cut with a diamond saw from labial/buccal to palatal/lingual (canine, premolar and molar) and parallel to labial (incisor). Crystallite arrangements have been measured in over 400 data points on all types of teeth with x-ray scattering techniques, known from materials science. X-ray scattering measurements show impressively that dental enamel has a strong direction dependence of its physical properties which also varies with location within the tooth. Dental materials possess only little or no property direction dependence. Therefore, a mismatch was found between enamel and dental materials properties. Since dental materials should possess equal (direction depending) properties, worthwhile properties could be characterized by transferring the directional properties of enamel into a property 'wish list' which future dental materials should fulfil. Hereby the 'perfect dental material' can be characterized.

  8. Types of Dental Fear as Barriers to Dental Care among African American Adults with Oral Health Symptoms in Harlem

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Karolynn; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Kunzel, Carol; Wolfson, Natalie H.; Moon-Howard, Joyce; Moats, Harmon L.; Mitchell, Dennis A.

    2013-01-01

    To examine the types of dental fear experienced by African American adults and the role of these fears in the utilization of dental care, in-depth interviews were conducted with a street-intercept sample of 118 African Americans living in Harlem, New York City, who had experienced at least one oral health symptom in the past six months. Despite their oral symptoms, participants delayed or avoided dental care (often for years) due to a variety of dental fears, including fears of: 1) pain from needles; 2) the dental drill; 3) having teeth extracted; 4) contracting an illness (e.g., HIV/AIDS) from unsanitary instruments; 5) X-rays; 6) receiving poor quality care or mistreatment. These findings provide insights into the situations that provoke fears about dental treatment among African Americans and suggest strategies to address these fears in order to remove these barriers and increase the utilization of dental care by African American adults. PMID:24212175

  9. Experimental investigation on the caries characteristic of dental tissues by photothermal radiometry scanning imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Jun-yan; Wang, Xiao-chun; Wang, Yang

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a one-dimensional (1D) thermal-wave model coupled diffuse-photon-density-wave for three-layer dental tissues using modulated laser stimulation was employed to illustrate the relationship between dental caries characteristic (i.e. caries layer thickness, optical absorption coefficient and optical scattering coefficient) and photothermal radiometry (PTR) signal. Experimental investigation of artificial caries was carried out using PTR scanning imaging. The PTR amplitude and phase delay were increased with dental demineralized treatment. The local caries characteristic parameters were obtained by the best-fitting method based on the 1D thermal-wave model. The PTR scanning imaging measurements illustrated that the optical absorption coefficient and scattering coefficient of caries region were much higher than those of the healthy enamel area. The demineralization thickness of caries region was measured by PTR scanning imaging and its average value shows in good agreement with the digital microscope. Experimental results show that PTR scanning imaging has the merits of high contrast for local inhomogeneity of dental caries; furthermore, this method is an allowance to provide a flexibility for non-contact quantitative evaluation of dental caries.

  10. A mathematical model for calculation of 90Sr absorbed dose in dental tissues: elaboration and comparison to EPR measurements.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, E A; Lyubashevskii, N M; Tolstykh, E I; Ignatiev, E A; Betenekova, T A; Nikiforov, S V

    2001-09-01

    A mathematical model for calculation of the 90Sr absorbed doses in dental tissues is presented. The results of the Monte-Carlo calculations are compared to the data obtained by EPR measurements of dental tissues. Radiometric measurements of the 90Sr concentrations. TLD and EPR dosimetry investigations were performed in animal (dog) study. The importance of the irregular 90Sr distribution in the dentine for absorbed dose formation has been shown. The dominant dose formation factors (main source-tissues) were identified for the crown dentine and enamel. The model has shown agreement with experimental data which allows to determine further directions of the human tooth model development.

  11. Reconstruction of attached soft tissue around dental implants by acelluar dermal matrix grafts and resin splint

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changying; Su, Yucheng; Tan, Baosheng; Ma, Pan; Wu, Gaoyi; Li, Jun; Geng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to recommend a new method using acellular dermal matrix graft and resin splint to reconstruct the attached soft tissue around dental implants in patients with maxillofacial defects. Materials and methods: Total 8 patients (3 male and 5 female patients) diagnosed with maxillofacial defects and dentition defects caused by tumors, fractures or edentulous jaw, were selected for this study. Dental implants were routinely implanted at the edentulous area. Acellular dermal matrix heterografts and resin splint were used to increase the attached soft tissue. The width of attached gingiva in the labial or buccal surface at edentulous area was measured before surgical procedures and after the completion of superstructures. Paired t-test was applied to assess the change of quantitative variables. All tests were 2-tailed, and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The dense connective tissue around implants could be reconstructed one month after the completion of surgical procedures, and the epithelial cuff around the implant neck established very well. The width of attached gingival tissue in the patients increased significantly from a mean of 0.61 ± 0.75 mm to 6.25 ± 1.04 mm. The patients were fully satisfied with the esthetic and functional results achieved. Conclusions: The acellular dermal matrix graft could be used to increase the attached gingiva around dental implants in these patients with maxillofacial defects. The resin splint could facilitate the healing of graft. PMID:25663964

  12. Potential risk factors for dental caries in Type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Almusawi, M A; Gosadi, I; Abidia, R; Almasawi, M; Khan, H A

    2018-05-11

    Diabetic patients are known to be at higher risk for dental caries. However, the role of potential risk factors such as blood glucose, salivary glucose and glycaemic control in the occurrence of dental caries in type 2 diabetes (T2D) is not clearly understood so far, and therefore, it was evaluated in this study. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 100 T2D patients from Saudi Arabia. The caries risk assessment was evaluated using the guidelines of Caries Management by Risk Assessment (CAMBRA). Cariogenic bacteria load in saliva was determined by a chair-side test kit. The levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG), salivary glucose and HbA1c were analysed. Majority of the patients had dental caries (84%), exposed root surfaces (92%) and heavy plaque (73%), whereas 66% of patients suffered from xerostomia. The frequency of patients with high counts of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli (LB) were 78% and 42%, respectively. There were significant associations between dental caries risk and FBG, HbA1c and salivary glucose. After categorizing the patients into 3 categories of glycaemic control, we observed a significant association between glycaemic control and dental caries risk. Type 2 diabetes patients are at high risk for dental caries, which is directly associated with FBG, HbA1c and salivary glucose. This is the first study measuring dental caries and its risk factors in T2D patients from Saudi Arabia. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Effect of overdose fluoride on expression of bone sialoprotein in developing dental tissues of rats].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-ling; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Tian-lin; Guo, Li-ying; Jing, Feng-qiu; Liu, Hui

    2006-04-01

    To investigate the changes of bone sialoprotein (BSP) in developing dental tissues of rats exposed to fluoride. Twenty rats were randomly divided into two groups, one was with distilled water (control group), the other was with distilled water treated by fluoride (experimental group). When the fluorosis model was established, the changes of the expression of BSP were investigated and compared between the two groups. HE staining was used to observe the morphology of the cell, and immunohistochemisty assay was used to determine the expression of BSP in rat incisor. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. The ameloblasts had normal morphology and arranged orderly. Immunoreactivitis of BSP was present in matured ameloblasts, dentinoblasts, cementoblasts, and the matrix in the control group. But in the experimental group the ameloblasts arranged in multiple layers, the enamel matrix was confused and the expression of BSP was significantly lower than that of the control group. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between the two groups (P<0.01). Fluoride can inhibit the expression of BSP in developing dental tissues of rats, and then inhibit differentiation of the tooth epithelial cells and secretion of matrix. This is a probable intracellular mechanism of dental fluorosis.

  14. Dental stem cells: a future asset of ocular cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Yam, Gary Hin-Fai; Peh, Gary Swee-Lim; Singhal, Shweta; Goh, Bee-Tin; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2015-11-10

    Regenerative medicine using patient's own stem cells (SCs) to repair dysfunctional tissues is an attractive approach to complement surgical and pharmacological treatments for aging and degenerative disorders. Recently, dental SCs have drawn much attention owing to their accessibility, plasticity and applicability for regenerative use not only for dental, but also other body tissues. In ophthalmology, there has been increasing interest to differentiate dental pulp SC and periodontal ligament SC (PDLSC) towards ocular lineage. Both can commit to retinal fate expressing eye field transcription factors and generate rhodopsin-positive photoreceptor-like cells. This proposes a novel therapeutic alternative for retinal degeneration diseases. Moreover, as PDLSC shares similar cranial neural crest origin and proteoglycan secretion with corneal stromal keratoctyes and corneal endothelial cells, this offers the possibility of differentiating PDLSC to these corneal cell types. The advance could lead to a shift in the medical management of corneal opacities and endothelial disorders from highly invasive corneal transplantation using limited donor tissue to cell therapy utilizing autologous cells. This article provides an overview of dental SC research and the perspective of utilizing dental SCs for ocular regenerative medicine.

  15. Adhesion of Dental Materials to Tooth Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sumita B.

    2000-03-01

    The understanding and proper application of the principles of adhesion has brought forth a new paradigm in the realm of esthetic dentistry. Modern restorative tooth procedures can now conserve the remaining tooth-structure and also provide for the strengthening of the tooth. Adhesive restorative techniques call for the application and curing of the dental adhesive at the interface between the tooth tissue and the filling material. Hence the success of the restoration depends largely on the integrity of this interface. The mechanism of adhesion of the bonding materials to the dental hard tissue will be discussed in this paper. There are four main steps that occur during the application of the dental adhesive to the oral hard tissues: 1) The first step is the creation of a microstructure in the tooth enamel or dentin by means of an acidic material. This can be through the application of a separate etchant or can be accomplished in situ by the adhesive/primer. This agent has to be effective in removing or modifying the proteinaceous “smear” layer, which would otherwise act as a weak boundary layer on the surface to be bonded. 2) The primer/adhesive must then be able to wet and penetrate the microstructure created in the tooth. Since the surface energies of etched enamel and that of etched dentin are different finding one material to prime both types of dental tissues can be quite challenging. 3) The ionomer types of materials, particularly those that are carboxylate ion-containing, can chemically bond with the calcium ions of the hydroxyapatite mineral. 4) Polymerization in situ allows for micromechanical interlocking of the adhesive. The importance of having the right mechanical properties of the cured adhesive layer and its role in absorbing and dissipating stresses encountered by a restored tooth will also be discussed.

  16. Type 2 diabetes risk screening in dental practice settings: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wright, D; Muirhead, V; Weston-Price, S; Fortune, F

    2014-04-01

    Dental surgeries are highlighted in the 2012 NICE guidance Preventing type 2 diabetes: risk identification and interventions for individuals at high risk as a suitable setting in which to encourage people to have a type 2 diabetes risk assessment. To assess the feasibility of implementing a type 2 diabetes risk screening pathway in dental settings using the NICE guidance tool. The study was carried out over two weeks in June 2013. The validated tool in the NICE guidance was used to determine risk. This included a questionnaire and BMI measurement used to determine a risk score. Patients were rated low, increased, moderate or high risk. All patients were given written advice on healthy lifestyle. Patients who were moderate or high risk were referred to their general medical practitioners for further investigation. Participating dental teams were asked to nominate a member who would be responsible for overseeing the screening and training the other team members. A total of 166 patients took part in the pilot (58% male, 75% aged 49 years or younger and 77% were from BME groups). Twenty-six low risk patients (15.7%), 61 increased risk patients (36.7%), 49 moderate-risk patients (29.5%) and 30 high-risk patients (18.1%) were identified during the pilot. Fifteen of the 49 patients (30.6%) identified as moderate-risk and 6 of the 30 high-risk patients (20%) had visited their GP to discuss their type 2 diabetes risk in response to the screening. The pilot suggests that people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes could be identified in primary, community and secondary dental care settings. The main challenges facing dental staff were time constraints, limited manpower and the low number of patients who visited their GP for further advice.

  17. A finite element evaluation of mechanical function for 3 distal extension partial dental prosthesis designs with a 3-dimensional nonlinear method for modeling soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoshinori; Kanbara, Ryo; Ochiai, Kent T; Tanaka, Yoshinobu

    2014-10-01

    The mechanical evaluation of the function of partial removable dental prostheses with 3-dimensional finite element modeling requires the accurate assessment and incorporation of soft tissue behavior. The differential behaviors of the residual ridge mucosa and periodontal ligament tissues have been shown to exhibit nonlinear displacement. The mathematic incorporation of known values simulating nonlinear soft tissue behavior has not been investigated previously via 3-dimensional finite element modeling evaluation to demonstrate the effect of prosthesis design on the supporting tissues. The purpose of this comparative study was to evaluate the functional differences of 3 different partial removable dental prosthesis designs with 3-dimensional finite element analysis modeling and a simulated patient model incorporating known viscoelastic, nonlinear soft tissue properties. Three different designs of distal extension removable partial dental prostheses were analyzed. The stress distributions to the supporting abutments and soft tissue displacements of the designs tested were calculated and mechanically compared. Among the 3 dental designs evaluated, the RPI prosthesis demonstrated the lowest stress concentrations on the tissue supporting the tooth abutment and also provided wide mucosa-borne areas of support, thereby demonstrating a mechanical advantage and efficacy over the other designs evaluated. The data and results obtained from this study confirmed that the functional behavior of partial dental prostheses with supporting abutments and soft tissues are consistent with the conventional theories of design and clinical experience. The validity and usefulness of this testing method for future applications and testing protocols are shown. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. REE compositions in fossil vertebrate dental tissues indicate biomineral preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žigaite, Ž.; Kear, B.; Pérez-Huerta, A.; Jeffries, T.; Blom, H.

    2012-04-01

    Rare earth element (REE) abundances have been measured in a number of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic dental tissues using Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Fossil vertebrates analysed comprise scales and tesserae of Silurian and Devonian acanthodians, chondrichthyans, galeaspids, mongolepids, thelodonts, as well as teeth of Cretaceous lungfish and marine reptiles. The evaluation of fossil preservation level has been made by semi-quantitative spot geochemistry analyses on fine polished teeth and scale thin sections, using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Fossil teeth and scales with significant structure and colour alteration have shown elevated heavy element concentrations, and the silicification of bioapatite has been common in their tissues. Stable oxygen isotope measurements (δ18O) of bulk biomineral have been conducted in parallel, and showed comparatively lower heavy oxygen values in the same fossil tissues with stronger visible alteration. Significant difference in REE concentrations has been observed between the dentine and enamel of Cretaceous plesiosaurs, suggesting the enamel to be more geochemically resistant to diagenetic overprint.

  19. Dental pulp stem cell-derived chondrogenic cells demonstrate differential cell motility in type I and type II collagen hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Yao, Li; Flynn, Nikol

    2018-06-01

    Advances in the development of biomaterials and stem cell therapy provide a promising approach to regenerating degenerated discs. The normal nucleus pulposus (NP) cells exhibit similar phenotype to chondrocytes. Because dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) can be differentiated into chondrogenic cells, the DPSCs and DPSCs-derived chondrogenic cells encapsulated in type I and type II collagen hydrogels can potentially be transplanted into degenerated NP to repair damaged tissue. The motility of transplanted cells is critical because the cells need to migrate away from the hydrogels containing the cells of high density and disperse through the NP tissue after implantation. The purpose of this study was to determine the motility of DPSC and DPSC-derived chondrogenic cells in type I and type II collagen hydrogels. The time lapse imaging that recorded cell migration was analyzed to quantify the cell migration velocity and distance. The cell viability of DPSCs in native or poly(ethylene glycol) ether tetrasuccinimidyl glutarate (4S-StarPEG)-crosslinked type I and type II collagen hydrogels was determined using LIVE/DEAD cell viability assay and AlamarBlue assay. DPSCs were differentiated into chondrogenic cells. The migration of DPSCs and DPSC-derived chondrogenic cells in these hydrogels was recorded using a time lapse imaging system. This study was funded by the Regional Institute on Aging and Wichita Medical Research and Education Foundation, and the authors declare no competing interest. DPSCs showed high cell viability in non-crosslinked and crosslinked collagen hydrogels. DPSCs migrated in collagen hydrogels, and the cell migration speed was not significantly different in either type I collagen or type II collagen hydrogels. The migration speed of DPSC-derived chondrogenic cells was higher in type I collagen hydrogel than in type II collagen hydrogel. Crosslinking of type I collagen with 4S-StarPEG significantly reduced the cell migration speed of DPSC

  20. Multilineage potential and proteomic profiling of human dental stem cells derived from a single donor

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Rajreddy; Kumar, B. Mohana; Lee, Won-Jae

    Dental tissues provide an alternative autologous source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative medicine. In this study, we isolated human dental MSCs of follicle, pulp and papilla tissue from a single donor tooth after impacted third molar extraction by excluding the individual differences. We then compared the morphology, proliferation rate, expression of MSC-specific and pluripotency markers, and in vitro differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Finally, we analyzed the protein expression profiles of undifferentiated dental MSCs using 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS. Three types of dental MSCs largely shared similar morphology, proliferation potential, expression ofmore » surface markers and pluripotent transcription factors, and differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Upon hepatogenic induction, all MSCs were transdifferentiated into functional HLCs, and acquired hepatocyte functions by showing their ability for glycogen storage and urea production. Based on the proteome profiling results, we identified nineteen proteins either found commonly or differentially expressed among the three types of dental MSCs. In conclusion, three kinds of dental MSCs from a single donor tooth possessed largely similar cellular properties and multilineage potential. Further, these dental MSCs had similar proteomic profiles, suggesting their interchangeable applications for basic research and call therapy. - Highlights: • Isolated and characterized three types of human dental MSCs from a single donor. • MSCs of dental follicle, pulp and papilla had largely similar biological properties. • All MSCs were capable of transdifferentiating into functional hepatocyte-like cells. • 2DE proteomics with MALDI-TOF/MS identified 19 proteins in three types of MSCs. • Similar proteomic profiles suggest interchangeable applications of dental MSCs.« less

  1. Optical detection dental disease using polarized light

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Fried, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    A polarization sensitive optical imaging system is used to detect changes in polarization in dental tissues to aid the diagnosis of dental disease such as caries. The degree of depolarization is measured by illuminating the dental tissue with polarized light and measuring the polarization state of the backscattered light. The polarization state of this reflected light is analyzed using optical polarimetric imaging techniques. A hand-held fiber optic dental probe is used in vivo to direct the incident beam to the dental tissue and collect the reflected light. To provide depth-resolved characterization of the dental tissue, the polarization diagnostics may be incorporated into optical coherence domain reflectometry and optical coherence tomography (OCDR/OCT) systems, which enables identification of subsurface depolarization sites associated with demineralization of enamel or bone.

  2. Association of salivary triglycerides and cholesterol with dental caries in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Priya; Sharma, Akhliesh; Kaje, Keerthan

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disturbances in diabetes mellitus can affect oral health. Altered levels of salivary lipids have been suggested as a risk for dental caries. There has been lack of research in this regard and in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. To assess the salivary triglycerides and cholesterol levels in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and correlate them with their dental caries status. Thirty children aged 12-16 years with type 1 diabetes mellitus and 30 age- and gender-matched healthy children were included in the study. Unstimulated saliva was collected from each child and evaluated for salivary triglyceride and cholesterol levels. Dental caries status (DMFT) was recorded. Salivary cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (p ≤ 0.05). In comparison to controls, mean DMFT score was higher in the diabetic children. Salivary triglycerides showed a significant correlation with dental caries status in the study group (p = 0.035). In normal children, salivary cholesterol levels showed a significant association with dental caries. (p = 0.008). Both salivary cholesterol and triglycerides levels were significantly higher in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Salivary triglycerides showed a significant association with dental caries in these children. © 2014 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Dental hard tissue drilling by longitudinally excited CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2017-07-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser with a long optical cavity and investigated the drilling characteristics of dental hard tissue. The CO2 laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 13 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance, a spark gap, and a long optical cavity with a cavity length of 175 cm. The CO2 laser produced a short pulse that had a spike pulse with the width of 337 ns and the energy of 1.9 mJ, a pulse tail with the length of 180 μs and the energy of 37.6 mJ, and a doughnut-like beam. In the investigation, a sample was a natural drying human tooth (enamel and dentine). In a processing system, a ZnSe focusing lens with the focal length of 50 mm was used and the location of the focal plane was that of the sample surface. In 1 pulse irradiation, the drilling characteristics depended on the fluence was investigated. In the enamel and dentin drilling, the drilling depth increased with the fluence. The 1 pulse irradiation with the fluence of 21.5 J/cm2 produced the depth of 79.3 μm in the enamel drilling, and the depth of 152.7 μm in the dentin drilling. The short-pulse CO2 laser produced a deeper drilling depth at a lower fluence than long-pulse CO2 lasers in dental hard tissue processing.

  4. Effect of hydralazine on duration of soft tissue local anesthesia following dental treatment: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Fakheran Esfahani, Omid; Pouraboutaleb, Mohammad Fazel; Khorami, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged numbness following routine dental treatments can cause difficulties in speaking and swallowing and may result in inadvertent biting of soft tissues. Local injection of vasodilator agents may represent a solution to this problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of submucosal injection of hydralazine hydrochloride (HCl) on the duration of oral soft tissue anesthesia after routine dental treatment. This randomized, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial included 50 patients who received inferior alveolar nerve block (2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine) for simple restorative treatment. Upon completion of the dental treatment, patients randomly received a hydralazine HCl or sham injection in the same site as the local anesthetic injection. The reversal time to normal sensation of soft tissues (lips, tongue, and perioral skin) was evaluated and reported every 5 minutes by the patients, who followed an assessment protocol that they were taught in advance of treatment. Median recovery times in the hydralazine group and the sham group were 81.4 (SD, 3.6) and 221.8 (SD, 6.3) minutes, respectively. Based on Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the duration of soft tissue anesthesia in the 2 groups was significantly different (P < 0.0001). By 1 hour after the reversal injection, 76% of subjects receiving hydralazine HCl had returned to normal intraoral and perioral sensation, but none of the subjects in the sham group reported normal sensation. Based on these results, submucosal injection of hydralazine HCl can be considered a safe and effective method to reduce the duration of local anesthetic-induced soft tissue numbness and the related functional problems.

  5. Association between dental pulp stones and calcifying nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jinfeng; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Wei; Gong, Qimei; Du, Yu; Ling, Junqi

    2011-01-07

    The etiology of dental pulp stones, one type of extraskeletal calcification disease, remains elusive to date. Calcifying nanoparticles (CNPs), formerly referred to as nanobacteria, were reported to be one etiological factor in a number of extraskeletal calcification diseases. We hypothesized that CNPs are involved in the calcification of the dental pulp tissue, and therefore investigated the link between CNPs and dental pulp stones. Sixty-five freshly collected dental pulp stones, each from a different patient, were analyzed. Thirteen of the pulp stones were examined for the existence of CNPs in situ by immunohistochemical staining (IHS), indirect immunofluorescence staining (IIFS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The remaining 52 pulp stones were used for isolation and cultivation of CNPs; the cultured CNPs were identified and confirmed via their shape and growth characteristics. Among the dental pulp stones examined in situ, 84.6% of the tissue samples staines positive for CNPs antigen by IHS; the corresponding rate by IIFS was 92.3 %. In 88.2% of the cultured samples, CNPs were isolated and cultivated successfully. The CNPs were visible under TEM as 200-400 nm diameter spherical particles surrounded by a compact crust. CNPs could be detected and isolated from a high percentage of dental pulp stones, suggesting that CNPs might play an important role in the calcification of dental pulp.

  6. Stem/progenitor cells from inflamed human dental pulp retain tissue regeneration potential

    PubMed Central

    Alongi, Dominick J; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Song, Yingjie; Fouad, Ashraf F; Romberg, Elaine E; Shi, Songtao; Tuan, Rocky S; Huang, George T-J

    2011-01-01

    Background Potent stem/progenitor cells have been isolated from normal human dental pulps termed dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). However, it is unknown whether these cells exist in inflamed pulps (IPs). Aims To determine whether DPSCs can be identified and isolated from IPs; and if they can be successfully cultured, whether they retain tissue regeneration potential in vivo. Materials & methods DPSCs from freshly collected normal pulps (NPs) and IPs were characterized in vitro and their tissue regeneration potential tested using an in vivo study model. Results The immunohistochemical analysis showed that IPs expressed higher levels of mesenchymal stem cell markers STRO-1, CD90, CD105 and CD146 compared with NPs (p < 0.05). Flow cytometry analysis showed that DPSCs from both NPs and IPs expressed moderate to high levels of CD146, stage-specific embryonic antigen-4, CD73 and CD166. Total population doubling of DPSCs-IPs (44.6 ± 2.9) was lower than that of DPSCs-NPs (58.9 ± 2.5) (p < 0.05), and DPSCs-IPs appeared to have a decreased osteo/dentinogenic potential compared with DPSCs-NPs based on the mineral deposition in cultures. Nonetheless, DPSCs-IPs formed pulp/dentin complexes similar to DPSCs-NPs when transplanted into immunocompromised mice. Conclusion DPSCs-IPs can be isolated and their mesenchymal stem cell marker profiles are similar to those from NPs. Although some stem cell properties of DPSCs-IPs were altered, cells from some samples remained potent in tissue regeneration in vivo. PMID:20465527

  7. Tissue Engineering of Necrotic Dental Pulp of Immature Teeth with Apical Periodontitis in Dogs: Radiographic and Histological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    El Ashiry, Eman A; Alamoudi, Najlaa M; El Ashiry, Mahmoud K; Bastawy, Hagar A; El Derwi, Douaa A; Atta, Hazem M

    2018-05-15

    To evaluate tissue engineering technology to regenerate pulp-dentin like tissues in pulp canals of immature necrotic permanent teeth with apical periodontitis in dogs. The study was performed on 36 teeth in 12 dogs. The experiment was carried out using split mouth design. In each dog 3 teeth were selected for implementing the study procedure. Apical periodontitis was induced in Group A and B teeth. Group (A): immature upper left 2 nd permanent incisors that were transplanted with a construct of autologous dental pulp stem cells with growth factors seeded in a chitosn hydrogel scaffold. Group (B): immature upper right 2 nd permanent incisor that received only growth factors with scaffold. A third tooth in each dog was selected randomly for isolation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Both groups were closed with a double coronal seal of white MTA (Mineral trioxide aggregate) and glass ionomer cement. Both groups were monitored radiographically for 4 months and histologically after sacrificing the animals. There was no statistically significant difference in radiographic findings between group (A) and group (B) for healing of radiolucencies, while there was statistically significant difference between group (A) and group (B) regarding radicular thickening, root lengthening and apical closure. Histologically, group (A) teeth showed regeneration of pulp-dentin like tissue while group (B) teeth did not show any tissue regeneration. Dental pulp stem cells and growth factors incorporated in chitosan hydrogel are able to regenerate pulp-dentine like tissue and help in complete root maturation of non-vital immature permanent teeth with apical periodontitis in dogs.

  8. Microscopic study of dental hard tissues in primary teeth with Dentinogenesis Imperfecta Type II: Correlation of 3D imaging using X-ray microtomography and polarising microscopy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Graham R; Fearne, Janice M; Sabel, Nina; Norén, Jörgen G

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the histological appearance of dental hard tissues in primary teeth from children with DI using conventional polarised light microscopy and correlate that with 3D imaging using X-ray microtomograpy (XMT) to gain a further understanding of the dentine structure of teeth diagnosed with dentinogenesis imperfecta. Undecalcified sections of primary teeth from patients diagnosed with Dentinogenesis Imperfecta Type II were examined using polarised light microscopy. XMT was employed for 3D-imaging and analysis of the dentine. The polarised light microscopy and XMT revealed tubular structures in the dentine seen as vacuoles coinciding with the path of normal dentinal tubules but not continuous tubules. The size of the tubules was close to that of capillaries. The largest tubular structures had a direction corresponding to where the pulp tissue would have been located during primary dentine formation. The dysfunctional mineralisation of the dentine and obliteration of the pulp evidently leaves blood vessels in the dentine which have in the main been tied off and, in the undecalcified sections, appear as vacuoles. Although from radiographs, the pulp in teeth affected by Dentinogenesis Imperfect type II appears to be completely obliterated, a network of interconnected vessels may remain. The presence of large dentinal tubules and blood vessels, or the remnants of blood vessels, could provide a pathway for bacteria from the oral cavity. This might account for why some of these teeth develop periapical abscesses in spite of apparently having no pulp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dental optical coherence domain reflectometry explorer

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    2001-01-01

    A hand-held, fiber optic based dental device with optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) sensing capabilities provides a profile of optical scattering as a function of depth in the tissue at the point where the tip of the dental explorer touches the tissue. This system provides information on the internal structure of the dental tissue, which is then used to detect caries and periodontal disease. A series of profiles of optical scattering or tissue microstructure are generated by moving the explorer across the tooth or other tissue. The profiles are combined to form a cross-sectional, or optical coherence tomography (OCT), image.

  10. Properties and Clinical Application of Three Types of Dental Glass-Ceramics and Ceramics for CAD-CAM Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Ritzberger, Christian; Apel, Elke; Höland, Wolfram; Peschke, Arnd; Rheinberger, Volker M.

    2010-01-01

    The main properties (mechanical, thermal and chemical) and clinical application for dental restoration are demonstrated for three types of glass-ceramics and sintered polycrystalline ceramic produced by Ivoclar Vivadent AG. Two types of glass-ceramics are derived from the leucite-type and the lithium disilicate-type. The third type of dental materials represents a ZrO2 ceramic. CAD/CAM technology is a procedure to manufacture dental ceramic restoration. Leucite-type glass-ceramics demonstrate high translucency, preferable optical/mechanical properties and an application as dental inlays, onlays and crowns. Based on an improvement of the mechanical parameters, specially the strength and toughness, the lithium disilicate glass-ceramics are used as crowns; applying a procedure to machine an intermediate product and producing the final glass-ceramic by an additional heat treatment. Small dental bridges of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic were fabricated using a molding technology. ZrO2 ceramics show high toughness and strength and were veneered with fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. Machining is possible with a porous intermediate product.

  11. [Expression and significance of wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 5A/receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 2 in the rat dental follicle].

    PubMed

    Liping, Wang; Boqi, Li; Qi, Wang; Xiaomin, Tie; Yishan, Liu

    2016-08-01

    To observe the expression of wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 5A (Wnt5A)/receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 2 (Ror2) signal in the dental follicle cells during the normal eruption of the teeth as well as to explore the relationship between the expression of dental follicle cells and the formation of mature osteoclasts and eruption of the teeth. The mandibulars of 1-13 d old SD rats were separated to observe the growth and develop-ment of the teeth and alveolar bone through hematoxylin-eosin(HE) staining. Ror2 and Wnt5A expressions in rat dental follicle were also observed through immunohistochemistry. Dental follicle cells from the lower first intact molar germs of 5-6-day old SD rats were separated and cultured. On the second day after birth, the dental follicle began to differentiate into periodontal tissues, but no obvious changes were observed in the alveolar bone one to three days after birth. On the fourth day, the number of osteoclasts increased significantly. The results of immunohistochemistry showed that Wnt5A was not significantly expressed in rat dental follicle tissues before the fourth day, but positive expression was expressed in the next day and continued to express to thirteenth days. Ror2 was expressed in the rat dental follicle at postnatal days 1-3, but weak expression was found in days 4-13. Wnt5A and Ror2 expressions in the process of tooth eruption have specific time distributions, suggesting that these expressions may participate in the regulation of the eruption of the teeth.

  12. An Overview of Pathogen Recognition Receptors for Innate Immunity in Dental Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Hee Woong; Lee, Jung Min; Lee, Hyeon-Woo; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Park, Sang Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) are a class of germ line-encoded receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). The activation of PRRs is crucial for the initiation of innate immunity, which plays a key role in first-line defense until more specific adaptive immunity is developed. PRRs differ in the signaling cascades and host responses activated by their engagement and in their tissue distribution. Currently identified PRR families are the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), the C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs), the retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors (RLRs), and the AIM2-like receptor (ALR). The environment of the dental pulp is substantially different from that of other tissues of the body. Dental pulp resides in a low compliance root canal system that limits the expansion of pulpal tissues during inflammatory processes. An understanding of the PRRs in dental pulp is important for immunomodulation and hence for developing therapeutic targets in the field of endodontics. Here we comprehensively review recent finding on the PRRs and the mechanisms by which innate immunity is activated. We focus on the PRRs expressed on dental pulp and periapical tissues and their role in dental pulp inflammation. PMID:26576076

  13. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  14. Dental Anomalies in Different Types of Cleft Lip and Palate: Is There Any Relation?

    PubMed

    Germec Cakan, Derya; Nur Yilmaz, Rahime Burcu; Bulut, Feyza Nur; Aksoy, Ayca

    2018-02-26

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of dental anomalies in Turkish patients with different types of cleft lip and palate (CLP) and investigate the relationship between the type of cleft and the dental anomaly. Eighty-eight patients with cleft lip and/or palate (mean age: 14.1 ± 6.4 years) were enrolled in this retrospective study. Dental models, panoramic radiographs, and intraoral photographs of these patients were evaluated to detect any maxillary dental anomaly (number and size anomalies). Two hundred fifty unaffected subjects (mean age: 15.2 ± 7.2 years) composed the control group. Data were evaluated using the independent t test, χ, Fischer exact test, and the odds ratio. Dental anomaly frequency was significantly higher in the cleft group compared with the control group. Tooth agenesis was the most common dental anomaly, followed by microdontia and supernumerary tooth. Lateral incisor agenesis was seen in 69% of the unilateral CLP, in 78% of the bilateral CLP, and in 18% of the cleft palate patients. A significant association was revealed between the right unilateral CLP and the right lateral incisor agenesis (P = 0.0001), the left unilateral CLP and the left lateral incisor agenesis (P = 0.002), and the bilateral CLP and the bilateral lateral incisor agenesis (P = 0.0001). Dental anomalies are more frequently seen in patients with CLP compared with the general population. There is a relationship between the cleft type and the ipsilateral lateral incisor agenesis.

  15. Matrices and scaffolds for drug delivery in dental, oral and craniofacial tissue engineering☆

    PubMed Central

    Moioli, Eduardo K.; Clark, Paul A.; Xin, Xuejun; Lal, Shan; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2010-01-01

    Current treatments for diseases and trauma of dental, oral and craniofacial (DOC) structures rely on durable materials such as amalgam and synthetic materials, or autologous tissue grafts. A paradigm shift has taken place to utilize tissue engineering and drug delivery approaches towards the regeneration of these structures. Several prototypes of DOC structures have been regenerated such as temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle, cranial sutures, tooth structures and periodontium components. However, many challenges remain when taking in consideration the high demand for esthetics of DOC structures, the complex environment and yet minimal scar formation in the oral cavity, and the need for accommodating multiple tissue phenotypes. This review highlights recent advances in the regeneration of DOC structures, including the tooth, periodontium, TMJ, cranial sutures and implant dentistry, with specific emphasis on controlled release of signaling cues for stem cells, biomaterial matrices and scaffolds, and integrated tissue engineering approaches. PMID:17499385

  16. Wear of dental tissues and materials.

    PubMed

    Craig, R G; Powers, J M

    1976-06-01

    Wear may result from physiological or pathological conditions and may be desirable, as in the reduction of an overcontoured restoration, or undesirable as in the production of cervical abrasion cavities. A variety of methods, including clinical testing, the use of wear machines and the measurement of related properties such as hardness or coefficient of friction have been used to investigate wear of tooth tissue and of dental materials. Because these methods may not reveal the nature of the wear process recent work has been directed to the study of surface failure resulting from a single sliding contact. Many clinical studies have been conducted but they are time consuming and difficult to quantify, nor do they allow of evaluation of different parameters contributing to the wear. Laboratory simulation of wear has been shown to be valuable in comparing materials of the same group but between-group comparisons may give anomalous results. The most rewarding studies have been those using a single or small number of passes of a suitable abrading point over the material since these permit determination of the actual process by which wear is produced.

  17. Trunk dental tissue evolved independently from underlying dermal bony plates but is associated with surface bones in living odontode-bearing catfish

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Although oral dental tissue is a vertebrate attribute, trunk dental tissue evolved in several extinct vertebrate lineages but is rare among living species. The question of which processes trigger dental-tissue formation in the trunk remains open, and would shed light on odontogenesis evolution. Extra-oral dental structures (odontodes) in the trunk are associated with underlying dermal bony plates, leading us to ask whether the formation of trunk bony plates is necessary for trunk odontodes to emerge. To address this question, we focus on Loricarioidei: an extant, highly diverse group of catfish whose species all have odontodes. We examined the location and cover of odontodes and trunk dermal bony plates for all six loricarioid families and 17 non-loricarioid catfish families for comparison. We inferred the phylogeny of Loricarioidei using a new 10-gene dataset, eight time-calibration points, and noise-reduction techniques. Based on this phylogeny, we reconstructed the ancestral states of odontode and bony plate cover, and find that trunk odontodes emerged before dermal bony plates in Loricarioidei. Yet we discovered that when bony plates are absent, other surface bones are always associated with odontodes, suggesting a link between osteogenic and odontogenic developmental pathways, and indicating a remarkable trunk odontogenic potential in Loricarioidei. PMID:29046381

  18. Radiation-induced dental caries, prevention and treatment - A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nishtha; Pal, Manoj; Rawat, Sheh; Grewal, Mandeep S.; Garg, Himani; Chauhan, Deepika; Ahlawat, Parveen; Tandon, Sarthak; Khurana, Ruparna; Pahuja, Anjali K.; Mayank, Mayur; Devnani, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck cancers (HNCs) involves radiotherapy. Patients undergoing radiotherapy for HNCs are prone to dental complications. Radiotherapy to the head and neck region causes xerostomia and salivary gland dysfunction which dramatically increases the risk of dental caries and its sequelae. Radiation therapy (RT) also affects the dental hard tissues increasing their susceptibility to demineralization following RT. Postradiation caries is a rapidly progressing and highly destructive type of dental caries. Radiation-related caries and other dental hard tissue changes can appear within the first 3 months following RT. Hence, every effort should be focused on prevention to manage patients with severe caries. This can be accomplished through good preoperative dental treatment, frequent dental evaluation and treatment after RT (with the exception of extractions), and consistent home care that includes self-applied fluoride. Restorative management of radiation caries can be challenging. The restorative dentist must consider the altered dental substrate and a hostile oral environment when selecting restorative materials. Radiation-induced changes in enamel and dentine may compromise bonding of adhesive materials. Consequently, glass ionomer cements have proved to be a better alternative to composite resins in irradiated patients. Counseling of patients before and after radiotherapy can be done to make them aware of the complications of radiotherapy and thus can help in preventing them. PMID:27390489

  19. Radiation-induced dental caries, prevention and treatment - A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nishtha; Pal, Manoj; Rawat, Sheh; Grewal, Mandeep S; Garg, Himani; Chauhan, Deepika; Ahlawat, Parveen; Tandon, Sarthak; Khurana, Ruparna; Pahuja, Anjali K; Mayank, Mayur; Devnani, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck cancers (HNCs) involves radiotherapy. Patients undergoing radiotherapy for HNCs are prone to dental complications. Radiotherapy to the head and neck region causes xerostomia and salivary gland dysfunction which dramatically increases the risk of dental caries and its sequelae. Radiation therapy (RT) also affects the dental hard tissues increasing their susceptibility to demineralization following RT. Postradiation caries is a rapidly progressing and highly destructive type of dental caries. Radiation-related caries and other dental hard tissue changes can appear within the first 3 months following RT. Hence, every effort should be focused on prevention to manage patients with severe caries. This can be accomplished through good preoperative dental treatment, frequent dental evaluation and treatment after RT (with the exception of extractions), and consistent home care that includes self-applied fluoride. Restorative management of radiation caries can be challenging. The restorative dentist must consider the altered dental substrate and a hostile oral environment when selecting restorative materials. Radiation-induced changes in enamel and dentine may compromise bonding of adhesive materials. Consequently, glass ionomer cements have proved to be a better alternative to composite resins in irradiated patients. Counseling of patients before and after radiotherapy can be done to make them aware of the complications of radiotherapy and thus can help in preventing them.

  20. Tissue mimicking simulations for temporal enhanced ultrasound-based tissue typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Sharareh; Imani, Farhad; Gerardo, Carlos D.; Nir, Guy; Azizi, Shekoofeh; Yan, Pingkun; Tahmasebi, Amir; Wilson, Storey; Iczkowski, Kenneth A.; Lucia, M. Scott; Goldenberg, Larry; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Mousavi, Parvin; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2017-03-01

    Temporal enhanced ultrasound (TeUS) is an imaging approach where a sequence of temporal ultrasound data is acquired and analyzed for tissue typing. Previously, in a series of in vivo and ex vivo studies we have demonstrated that, this approach is effective for detecting prostate and breast cancers. Evidences derived from our experiments suggest that both ultrasound-signal related factors such as induced heat and tissue-related factors such as the distribution and micro-vibration of scatterers lead to tissue typing information in TeUS. In this work, we simulate mechanical micro-vibrations of scatterers in tissue-mimicking phantoms that have various scatterer densities reflecting benign and cancerous tissue structures. Finite element modeling (FEM) is used for this purpose where the vertexes are scatterers representing cell nuclei. The initial positions of scatterers are determined by the distribution of nuclei segmented from actual digital histology scans of prostate cancer patients. Subsequently, we generate ultrasound images of the simulated tissue structure using the Field II package resulting in a temporal enhanced ultrasound. We demonstrate that the micro-vibrations of scatterers are captured by temporal ultrasound data and this information can be exploited for tissue typing.

  1. Application of Stem Cell Technology in Dental Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ruoxue; Lengner, Chistopher

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding the isolation and characterization of dental tissue-derived stem cells and address the potential of these cell types for use in regenerative cell transplantation therapy. Looking forward, platforms for the delivery of stem cells via scaffolds and the use of growth factors and cytokines for enhancing dental stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are discussed. We aim to understand the developmental origins of dental tissues in an effort to elucidate the molecular pathways governing the genesis of somatic dental stem cells. The advantages and disadvantages of several dental stem cells are discussed, including the developmental stage and specific locations from which these cells can be purified. In particular, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth may act as a very practical and easily accessibly reservoir for autologous stem cells and hold the most value in stem cell therapy. Dental pulp stem cells and periodontal ligament stem cells should also be considered for their triple lineage differentiation ability and relative ease of isolation. Further, we address the potentials and limitations of induced pluripotent stem cells as a cell source in dental regenerative. From an economical and a practical standpoint, dental stem cell therapy would be most easily applied in the prevention of periodontal ligament detachment and bone atrophy, as well as in the regeneration of dentin-pulp complex. In contrast, cell-based tooth replacement due to decay or other oral pathology seems, at the current time, an untenable approach.

  2. Dental maturational sequence and dental tissue proportions in the early Upper Paleolithic child from Abrigo do Lagar Velho, Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Bayle, Priscilla; Macchiarelli, Roberto; Trinkaus, Erik; Duarte, Cidália; Mazurier, Arnaud; Zilhão, João

    2010-01-01

    Neandertals differ from recent and terminal Pleistocene human populations in their patterns of dental development, endostructural (internal structure) organization, and relative tissue proportions. Although significant changes in craniofacial and postcranial morphology have been found between the Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic modern humans of western Eurasia and the terminal Pleistocene and Holocene inhabitants of the same region, most studies of dental maturation and structural morphology have compared Neandertals only to later Holocene humans. To assess whether earlier modern humans contrasted with later modern populations and possibly approached the Neandertal pattern, we used high-resolution microtomography to analyze the remarkably complete mixed dentition of the early Upper Paleolithic (Gravettian) child from Abrigo do Lagar Velho, Portugal, and compared it to a Neandertal sample, the late Upper Paleolithic (Magdalenian) child of La Madeleine, and a worldwide extant human sample. Some aspects of the dental maturational pattern and tooth endostructural organization of Lagar Velho 1 are absent from extant populations and the Magdalenian specimen and are currently documented only among Neandertals. Therefore, a simple Neandertal versus modern human dichotomy is inadequate to accommodate the morphostructural and developmental variation represented by Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic populations. These data reinforce the complex nature of Neandertal-modern human similarities and differences, and document ongoing human evolution after the global establishment of modern human morphology. PMID:20080622

  3. Efficacy of soft tissue augmentation around dental implants and in partially edentulous areas: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Daniel S; Buranawat, Borvornwut; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Held, Ulrike; Jung, Ronald E

    2014-04-01

    To review the dental literature in terms of efficacy of soft tissue augmentation procedures around dental implants and in partially edentulous sites. A Medline search was performed for human studies augmenting keratinized mucosa (KM) and soft tissue volume around implants and in partially edentulous areas. Due to heterogeneity in between the studies, no meta-analyses could be performed. Nine (KM) and eleven (volume) studies met the inclusion criteria. An apically positioned flap/vestibuloplasty (APF/V) plus a graft material [free gingival graft (FGG)/subepithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG)/collagen matrix (CM)] resulted in an increase of keratinized tissue (1.4-3.3 mm). Statistically significantly better outcomes were obtained for APF/V plus FGG/SCTG compared with controls (APF/V alone; no treatment) (p < 0.05). For surgery time and patient morbidity, statistically significantly more favourable outcomes were reported for CM compared to SCTGs (p < 0.05) in two randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs), even though rendering less keratinized tissue. SCTGs were the best-documented method for gain of soft tissue volume at implant sites and partially edentulous sites. Aesthetically at immediate implant sites, better papilla fill and higher marginal mucosal levels were obtained using SCTGs compared to non-grafted sites. An APF/V plus FGG/SCTG was the best-documented and most successful method to increase the width of KM. APF/V plus CM demonstrated less gain in KM, but also less patient morbidity and surgery time compared to APF/V plus SCTG based on two RCTs. Autogenous grafts (SCTG) rendered an increase in soft tissue thickness and better aesthetics compared to non-grafted sites. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Responses of the pulp, periradicular and soft tissues following trauma to the permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Yu, C Y; Abbott, P V

    2016-03-01

    Trauma to the permanent teeth involves not only the teeth but also the pulp, the periodontal ligament, alveolar bone, gingiva and other associated structures. There are many variations in the types of injuries with varying severity and often a tooth may sustain more than one injury at the same time. In more severe trauma cases, there are many different cellular systems of mineralized hard and unmineralized soft tissues involved, each with varying potential for healing. Furthermore, the responses of the different tissues may be interrelated and dependent on each other. Hence, healing subsequent to dental trauma has long been known to be very complex. Because of this complexity, tissue responses and the consequences following dental trauma have been confusing and puzzling for many clinicians. In this review, the tissue responses are described under the tissue compartments typically involved following dental trauma: the pulp, periradicular and associated soft tissues. The factors involved in the mechanisms of trauma are analysed for their effects on the tissue responses. A thorough understanding of the possible tissue responses is imperative for clinicians to overcome the confusion and manage dental trauma adequately and conservatively in order to minimize the consequences following trauma. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  5. Effects of gamma radiation on hard dental tissues of albino rats: investigation by light microscopy.

    PubMed

    El-Faramawy, Nabil; Ameen, Reham; El-Haddad, Khaled; El-Zainy, Medhat

    2013-08-01

    The present work aims at studying the effect of gamma radiation on the hard dental tissues. Eighty adult male albino rats with weights of about 250 g were used. The rats were irradiated at 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 6.0 Gy whole-body gamma doses. The effects on hard dental tissue samples were investigated after 48 h in histological and ground sections using light microscopy. Areas of acid phosphatase activity were detected using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) stains. Observation of histological sections revealed disturbance in predentin thickness and odontoblastic layer as the irradiation dose increased. In cementum, widened cementocytes lacunae were occasionally detected even with low irradiated doses. On the other hand, relatively homogenous enamel was detected with darkened areas in enamel surface at doses over than 0.5 Gy. TRAP-positive cells were detected on the surface of the dentin of irradiated groups as well as cementum surface. Minimal detectable changes were observed in ground sections.

  6. Differences Among Older Adults in the Types of Dental Services Used in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Manski, Richard J.; Hyde, Jody Schimmel; Chen, Haiyan; Moeller, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore differences in the socioeconomic, demographic characteristics of older adults in the United States with respect to their use of different types of dental care services. The 2008 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) collected information about patterns of dental care use and oral health from individuals aged 55 years and older in the United States. We analyze these data and explore patterns of service use by key characteristics before modeling the relationship between service use type and those characteristics. The most commonly used service category was fillings, inlays, or bonding, reported by 43.6% of those with any utilization. Just over one third of those with any utilization reported a visit for a crown, implant, or prosthesis, and one quarter reported a gum treatment or tooth extraction. The strongest consistent predictors of use type are denture, dentate, and oral health status along with dental insurance coverage and wealth. Our results provide insights into the need for public policies to address inequalities in access to dental services among an older US population. Our findings show that lower income, less wealthy elderly with poor oral health are more likely to not use any dental services rather than using only preventive dental care, and that cost prevents most non-users who say they need dental care from going to the dentist. These results suggest a serious access problem and one that ultimately produces even worse oral health and expensive major procedures for this population in the future. PMID:27284127

  7. Ehlers–Danlos syndrome type VIII is clinically heterogeneous disorder associated primarily with periodontal disease, and variable connective tissue features

    PubMed Central

    Reinstein, Eyal; DeLozier, Celia Dawn; Simon, Ziv; Bannykh, Serguei; Rimoin, David L; Curry, Cynthia J

    2013-01-01

    Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VIII (periodontitis type) is a distinct form of EDS characterized by periodontal disease leading to precocious dental loss and a spectrum of joint and skin manifestations. EDS type VIII is transmitted in an autosomal dominant pattern; however, the mutated gene has not been identified. There are insufficient data on the spectrum of clinical manifestations and natural history of the disorder, and only a limited number of patients and pedigrees with this condition have been reported. We present a four-generation EDS type VIII kindred and show that EDS VIII is clinically variable and although some cases lack the associated skin and joint manifestations, microscopic evidence of collagen disorganization is detectable. We further propose that the diagnosis of EDS type VIII should be considered in familial forms of periodontitis, even when the associated skin and joint manifestations are unconvincing for the diagnosis of a connective tissue disorder. This novel observation highlights the uncertainty of using connective tissue signs in clinical practice to diagnose EDS type VIII. PMID:22739343

  8. Ontogeny reveals function and evolution of the hadrosaurid dinosaur dental battery.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Aaron R H; Reisz, Robert R; Evans, David C; Bailleul, Alida M

    2016-07-28

    Hadrosaurid dinosaurs, dominant Late Cretaceous herbivores, possessed complex dental batteries with up to 300 teeth in each jaw ramus. Despite extensive interest in the adaptive significance of the dental battery, surprisingly little is known about how the battery evolved from the ancestral dinosaurian dentition, or how it functioned in the living organism. We undertook the first comprehensive, tissue-level study of dental ontogeny in hadrosaurids using several intact maxillary and dentary batteries and compared them to sections of other archosaurs and mammals. We used these comparisons to pinpoint shifts in the ancestral reptilian pattern of tooth ontogeny that allowed hadrosaurids to form complex dental batteries. Comparisons of hadrosaurid dental ontogeny with that of other amniotes reveals that the ability to halt normal tooth replacement and functionalize the tooth root into the occlusal surface was key to the evolution of dental batteries. The retention of older generations of teeth was driven by acceleration in the timing and rate of dental tissue formation. The hadrosaurid dental battery is a highly modified form of the typical dinosaurian gomphosis with a unique tooth-to-tooth attachment that permitted constant and perfectly timed tooth eruption along the whole battery. We demonstrate that each battery was a highly dynamic, integrated matrix of living replacement and, remarkably, dead grinding teeth connected by a network of ligaments that permitted fine scale flexibility within the battery. The hadrosaurid dental battery, the most complex in vertebrate evolution, conforms to a surprisingly simple evolutionary model in which ancestral reptilian tissue types were redeployed in a unique manner. The hadrosaurid dental battery thus allows us to follow in great detail the development and extended life history of a particularly complex food processing system, providing novel insights into how tooth development can be altered to produce complex dentitions, the

  9. Idiopathic dental pulp calcifications in a tertiary care setting in South India

    PubMed Central

    Satheeshkumar, PS; Mohan, Minu P; Saji, Sweta; Sadanandan, Sudheesh; George, Giju

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dental pulp calcifications are unique and represent the dental pulp regenerative process. Dental pulp calcifications are sometimes routine findings in oral radiographs and may later serve as an important diagnostic criterion for a hidden aspect of systemic illness. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the patterns and prevalence of idiopathic dental pulp calcifications in a tertiary care setting in South India. Materials and Methods: A total of 227 patients were included in the study fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Age range of the study population was from 15 to 70 years. Teeth were examined under digital panoramic radiograph. The presence or absence of pulp stones was recorded. The presence of pulp stone were categorized according to the types classified as Type I, Type IA, Type II, Type IIA, Type II B, and Type III. The frequency of occurrence of pulp stones with sex, tooth type, dental arches, and types were compared with the types of calcification. Results: Total no. of patients with pulpal calcification were 227 [females 133 (58.59%) and males 94 (41.40%)]. The most common type between both sexes was Type I (48%). Total no. of teeth with calcification was 697; maxilla (48%), mandible (52%). The prevalence of pulp stone was found to be higher in the molars in both the arches. Most no. of pulp stones are reported at the third and fourth decade of life. Conclusion: Idiopathic dental pulp calcifications are incidental radiographic findings of the pulp tissue and also may be an indicator of underlying disease. PMID:23349577

  10. Idiopathic dental pulp calcifications in a tertiary care setting in South India.

    PubMed

    Satheeshkumar, P S; Mohan, Minu P; Saji, Sweta; Sadanandan, Sudheesh; George, Giju

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp calcifications are unique and represent the dental pulp regenerative process. Dental pulp calcifications are sometimes routine findings in oral radiographs and may later serve as an important diagnostic criterion for a hidden aspect of systemic illness. The purpose of this study was to assess the patterns and prevalence of idiopathic dental pulp calcifications in a tertiary care setting in South India. A total of 227 patients were included in the study fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Age range of the study population was from 15 to 70 years. Teeth were examined under digital panoramic radiograph. The presence or absence of pulp stones was recorded. The presence of pulp stone were categorized according to the types classified as Type I, Type IA, Type II, Type IIA, Type II B, and Type III. The frequency of occurrence of pulp stones with sex, tooth type, dental arches, and types were compared with the types of calcification. Total no. of patients with pulpal calcification were 227 [females 133 (58.59%) and males 94 (41.40%)]. The most common type between both sexes was Type I (48%). Total no. of teeth with calcification was 697; maxilla (48%), mandible (52%). The prevalence of pulp stone was found to be higher in the molars in both the arches. Most no. of pulp stones are reported at the third and fourth decade of life. Idiopathic dental pulp calcifications are incidental radiographic findings of the pulp tissue and also may be an indicator of underlying disease.

  11. The dental amalgam controversy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Feuer, George; Injeyan, H Stephen

    1996-01-01

    In spite of the long history of mercury amalgam as a dental restorative material, its use continues to be controversial. Mercury vapour is continuously released from dental amalgam and is ultimately absorbed into a variety of tissues. Experimental data have demonstrated that the uptake, tissue retention and excretion of mercury from dental amalgam is significant. Evidence has accumulated indicating a relationship between tissue mercury levels and a multitude of clinical manifestations. However, the clinical significance of mercury toxicity from dental amalgams is a matter for debate. The literature is devoid of randomized clinical trials that are rigorously designed to address this issue. Thus, although research data renders the notion of amalgam safety questionable, the dental community appears determined to continue its use as long as unequivocal evidence correlating amalgam mercury toxicity to specific clinical conditions is lacking.

  12. Dental pulp stem cells as a multifaceted tool for bioengineering and the regeneration of craniomaxillofacial tissues

    PubMed Central

    Aurrekoetxea, Maitane; Garcia-Gallastegui, Patricia; Irastorza, Igor; Luzuriaga, Jon; Uribe-Etxebarria, Verónica; Unda, Fernando; Ibarretxe, Gaskon

    2015-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells, or DPSC, are neural crest-derived cells with an outstanding capacity to differentiate along multiple cell lineages of interest for cell therapy. In particular, highly efficient osteo/dentinogenic differentiation of DPSC can be achieved using simple in vitro protocols, making these cells a very attractive and promising tool for the future treatment of dental and periodontal diseases. Among craniomaxillofacial organs, the tooth and salivary gland are two such cases in which complete regeneration by tissue engineering using DPSC appears to be possible, as research over the last decade has made substantial progress in experimental models of partial or total regeneration of both organs, by cell recombination technology. Moreover, DPSC seem to be a particularly good choice for the regeneration of nerve tissues, including injured or transected cranial nerves. In this context, the oral cavity appears to be an excellent testing ground for new regenerative therapies using DPSC. However, many issues and challenges need yet to be addressed before these cells can be employed in clinical therapy. In this review, we point out some important aspects on the biology of DPSC with regard to their use for the reconstruction of different craniomaxillofacial tissues and organs, with special emphasis on cranial bones, nerves, teeth, and salivary glands. We suggest new ideas and strategies to fully exploit the capacities of DPSC for bioengineering of the aforementioned tissues. PMID:26528190

  13. Allogenic banking of dental pulp stem cells for innovative therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Chaubron, Franck; De Vos, John; Cuisinier, Frédéric J

    2015-08-26

    Medical research in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapy has brought encouraging perspectives for the use of stem cells in clinical trials. Multiple types of stem cells, from progenitors to pluripotent stem cells, have been investigated. Among these, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are mesenchymal multipotent cells coming from the dental pulp, which is the soft tissue within teeth. They represent an interesting adult stem cell source because they are recovered in large amount in dental pulps with non-invasive techniques compared to other adult stem cell sources. DPSCs can be obtained from discarded teeth, especially wisdom teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons. To shift from promising preclinical results to therapeutic applications to human, DPSCs must be prepared in clinical grade lots and transformed into advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP). As the production of patient-specific stem cells is costly and time-consuming, allogenic biobanking of clinical grade human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typed DPSC lines provides efficient innovative therapeutic products. DPSC biobanks represent industrial and therapeutic innovations by using discarded biological tissues (dental pulps) as a source of mesenchymal stem cells to produce and store, in good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions, DPSC therapeutic batches. In this review, we discuss about the challenges to transfer biological samples from a donor to HLA-typed DPSC therapeutic lots, following regulations, GMP guidelines and ethical principles. We also present some clinical applications, for which there is no efficient therapeutics so far, but that DPSCs-based ATMP could potentially treat.

  14. Allogenic banking of dental pulp stem cells for innovative therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Chaubron, Franck; De Vos, John; Cuisinier, Frédéric J

    2015-01-01

    Medical research in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapy has brought encouraging perspectives for the use of stem cells in clinical trials. Multiple types of stem cells, from progenitors to pluripotent stem cells, have been investigated. Among these, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are mesenchymal multipotent cells coming from the dental pulp, which is the soft tissue within teeth. They represent an interesting adult stem cell source because they are recovered in large amount in dental pulps with non-invasive techniques compared to other adult stem cell sources. DPSCs can be obtained from discarded teeth, especially wisdom teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons. To shift from promising preclinical results to therapeutic applications to human, DPSCs must be prepared in clinical grade lots and transformed into advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP). As the production of patient-specific stem cells is costly and time-consuming, allogenic biobanking of clinical grade human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typed DPSC lines provides efficient innovative therapeutic products. DPSC biobanks represent industrial and therapeutic innovations by using discarded biological tissues (dental pulps) as a source of mesenchymal stem cells to produce and store, in good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions, DPSC therapeutic batches. In this review, we discuss about the challenges to transfer biological samples from a donor to HLA-typed DPSC therapeutic lots, following regulations, GMP guidelines and ethical principles. We also present some clinical applications, for which there is no efficient therapeutics so far, but that DPSCs-based ATMP could potentially treat. PMID:26328017

  15. The effect of dental bleaching on pulpal tissue response in a diabetic animal model.

    PubMed

    Cintra, L T A; Ferreira, L L; Benetti, F; Gastélum, A A; Gomes-Filho, J E; Ervolino, E; Briso, A L F

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate pulpal tissue response after dental bleaching in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Twenty-eight rats were divided into two groups of normoglycaemic and diabetic rats (n = 14). Diabetes mellitus (DM) was induced with alloxan. After DM confirmation, all rats were anaesthetized and dental bleaching was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) on the right maxillary molars for 30 min. Left molars were used as controls. Bleaching resulted in four hemimaxillae groups: normoglycaemic (N), N-bleached (NBle), diabetic (D) and D-bleached (DBle). After 2 or 30 days, the animals were euthanized and the hemimaxillae were removed, processed for histopathological analysis and stained with haematoxylin-eosin (HE), Masson's trichrome (MT) and picrosirius red (PSR). Results obtained within animals (normoglycaemic or diabetic rats) were submitted to Wilcoxon or paired t-tests, and between animal (normoglycaemic and diabetic rats), to Mann-Whitney test or t-tests. At 2 days, the NBle group had a mild inflammatory infiltration in the pulpal tissue, whilst the DBle had severe inflammation or necrosis (P < 0.05). At 30 days, no inflammation was present. However, a significant difference in pulp chamber area reduction by reactionary dentine deposition was found between the NBle and DBle groups (P < 0.05). At 2 days, fewer immature collagen fibres and more mature collagen fibres were noted in the NBle, D and DBle groups; this was significantly different when compared to the N group (P < 0.05). At 30 days, significantly fewer immature collagen fibres and more mature collagen fibres were noted in NBle compared with DBle group (P < 0.05). The inflammatory tissue response in rats' teeth after dental bleaching was greater in diabetic rats. Additionally, the increase in reactionary dentine deposition and mature collagen fibres observed in diabetic rats needs further evaluation to confirm the present results. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal

  16. The prevalence, pattern and clinical presentation of developmental dental hard-tissue anomalies in children with primary and mix dentition from Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Temilola, Dada Oluwaseyi; Folayan, Morenike Oluwatoyin; Fatusi, Olawunmi; Chukwumah, Nneka Maureen; Onyejaka, Nneka; Oziegbe, Elizabeth; Oyedele, Titus; Kolawole, Kikelomo Adebanke; Agbaje, Hakeem

    2014-10-16

    The study of dental anomalies is important because it generates information that is important for both the anthropological and clinical management of patients. The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence and pattern of presentation of dental hard-tissue developmental anomalies in the mix dentition of children residing in Ile-Ife, a suburban region of Nigeria. Information on age, sex and socioeconomic status was collected from 1,036 children aged four months to 12 years through a household survey. Clinical examination was conducted to assess the presence of dental anomalies. Associations between age, sex, socioeconomic status, prevalence, and pattern of presentation of the developmental hard-tissue dental anomalies were determined. Two hundred and seventy six (26.6%) children had dental anomalies. Of these, 23.8% had one anomaly, 2.5% had two anomalies, and 0.3% had more than two anomalies. Of the children with anomalies, 49.3%were male, 50.7%were female, and 47.8%, 28.6% and 23.6% were children from low, middle and high socioeconomic classes, respectively. More anomalies were seen in permanent than primary dentition. Anomalies of tooth structure were most prevalent (16.1%); anomalies which affect tooth number were least prevalent (1.3%). Dens evaginatus, peg-shaped lateral, macrodontia, and talon cusp were more prevalent in the permanent dentition, and dens evaginatus peg-shaped lateral and macrodontia were more prevalent in the maxilla. There were significantly more macrodontia anomalies in males and in children of high socioeconomic status. This large survey of dental hard-tissue anomalies found in the primary dentition and mixed dentition of children in Nigeria provides anthropological and clinical data that may aid the detection and management of dental problems of children in Nigeria.

  17. Influence of peak power in ablation rate of dental hard tissues: mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colojoara, Carmen; Gabay, Shimon; van der Meulen, Freerk W.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.

    1996-12-01

    Pulsed Er:YAG and CO2 lasers should be suitable instruments for dentin and enamel ablation because both tissues have absorption peaks for radiation at 2.9 and 9.6 micrometers wavelengths. This is the context of our research that emphasizes the way in which the diameter and the depth of the crater made in enamel and dentin with the laser Er:YAG and CO2 is influenced in quantity and quality. Freshly extracted human third molar were used for this experiment. The laser source is Er:YAG Kavo Key dental model 1240 and CO2 Laser Sonics LS 860. The dimensions of the obtained craters were measured using the optical microscopy method. The obtained results were modelled experimentally with programs: GRAPHER and STATGRAPHICS. After the mathematical processing to the results what we obtain is relevant regarding the influence of the key parameters in the efficiency of the ablation according to the type of laser. On the whole, from our research results that both lasers ablate efficiently the dentin when the laser energy is between 200 and 300 mJ.

  18. Express diagnostics of intact and pathological dental hard tissues by optical PNC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masychev, Victor I.; Alexandrov, Michail T.

    2000-03-01

    The results of hard tooth tissues research by the optical PNC- method in experimental and clinical conditions are presented. In the experiment under 90 test-sample of tooth slices with thickness about 1 mm (enamel, dentine and cement) were researched. The results of the experiment were processed by the method of correlation analyze. Clinical researches were executed on teeth of 210 patients. The regions of tooth tissue diseases with initial, moderate and deep caries were investigated. Spectral characteristics of intact and pathologically changed tooth tissues are presented and their peculiar features are discussed. The results the optical PNC- method application while processing tooth carious cavities are presented in order to estimate efficiency of the mechanical and antiseptic processing of teeth. It is revealed that the PNC-method can be used as for differential diagnostics of a degree dental carious stage, as for estimating of carefulness of tooth cavity processing before filling.

  19. [Compatibility between high-strength dental ceramic (type A) and vintage AL veneering porcelain].

    PubMed

    Cui, Jun; Chao, Yong-lie; Meng, Yu-kun

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the interface bond strength and compatibility between High-Strength Dental Ceramic (type A) and Vintage AL veneering porcelain. Twenty bar-shape specimens (ten Vintage AL and ten Vitadur alpha) were fabricated, and shear test was conducted to determine the bond strength. A bilayered composite (1 mm core ceramic and 0.8 mm Vintage AL) was prepared and then fractured for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. Ten all-ceramic anterior crowns were fabricated and the temperatures of thermal shock resistance were tested. The mean values of the bond strength measured were (55.52 +/- 14.64) MPa and (59.37 +/- 13.93) MPa for Vintage AL and Vitadur alpha respectively (P>0.05). SEM showed tight connection between the High-Strength Dental Ceramic (type A) and the veneering porcelain. Element diffusion was also confirmed by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. The temperature of thermal shock resistance of this system was (179 +/- 15) degrees C. Vintage AL veneering porcelain has good thermal and chemical compatibility with High-Strength Dental Ceramic (type A).

  20. Dental MRI using wireless intraoral coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Scheifele, Christian; Nelson, Katja; Bock, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Herdt, Olga; Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the gold standard for dental imaging is projection radiography or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). These methods are fast and cost-efficient, but exhibit poor soft tissue contrast and expose the patient to ionizing radiation (X-rays). The need for an alternative imaging modality e.g. for soft tissue management has stimulated a rising interest in dental magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which provides superior soft tissue contrast. Compared to X-ray imaging, however, so far the spatial resolution of MRI is lower and the scan time is longer. In this contribution, we describe wireless, inductively-coupled intraoral coils whose local sensitivity enables high resolution MRI of dental soft tissue. In comparison to CBCT, a similar image quality with complementary contrast was obtained ex vivo. In-vivo, a voxel size of the order of 250•250•500 μm3 was achieved in 4 min only. Compared to dental MRI acquired with clinical equipment, the quality of the images was superior in the sensitive volume of the coils and is expected to improve the planning of interventions and monitoring thereafter. This method may enable a more accurate dental diagnosis and avoid unnecessary interventions, improving patient welfare and bringing MRI a step closer to becoming a radiation-free alternative for dental imaging.

  1. Diabetes induces metabolic alterations in dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Leite, Mariana Ferreira; Ganzerla, Emily; Marques, Márcia Martins; Nicolau, José

    2008-10-01

    Diabetes can interfere in tissue nutrition and can impair dental pulp metabolism. This disease causes oxidative stress in cells and tissues. However, little is known about the antioxidant system in the dental pulp of diabetics. Thus, it would be of importance to study this system in this tissue in order to verify possible alterations indicative of oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate some parameters of antioxidant system of the dental pulp of healthy (n = 8) and diabetic rats (n = 8). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin in rats. Six weeks after diabetes induction, a pool of the dental pulp of the 4 incisors of each rat (healthy and diabetic) was used for the determination of total protein and sialic acid concentrations and catalase and peroxidase activities. Data were compared by a Student t test (p Dental pulps from both groups presented similar total protein concentrations and peroxidase activity. Dental pulps of diabetic rats exhibited significantly lower free, conjugated, and total sialic acid concentrations than those of control tissues. Catalase activity in diabetic dental pulps was significantly enhanced in comparison with that of control pulps. The result of the present study is indicative of oxidative stress in the dental pulp caused by diabetes. The increase of catalase activity and the reduction of sialic acid could be resultant of reactive oxygen species production.

  2. Development of highly porous scaffolds based on bioactive silicates for dental tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Goudouri, O.M., E-mail: menti.goudouri@ww.uni-erlangen.de; Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki; Theodosoglou, E.

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synthesis of an Mg-based glass-ceramic via the sol–gel technique. • The heat treatment of the glass-ceramic promoted the crystallization of akermanite. • Akermanite scaffolds coated with gelatin were successfully fabricated. • An HCAp layer was developed on the surface of all scaffolds after 9 days in SBF. - Abstract: Various scaffolding materials, ceramics and especially Mg-based ceramic materials, including akermanite (Ca{sub 2}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 7}) and diopside (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), have attracted interest for dental tissue regeneration because of their improved mechanical properties and controllable biodegradation. The aim of the present work was the synthesis ofmore » an Mg-based glass-ceramic, which would be used for the construction of workable akermanite scaffolds. The characterization of the synthesized material was performed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) X-Ray Diffractometry (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Finally, the apatite forming ability of the scaffolds was assessed by immersion in simulated body fluid. The scaffolds were fabricated by the foam replica technique and were subsequently coated with gelatin to provide a functional surface for increased cell attachment. Finally, SEM microphotographs and FTIR spectra of the scaffolds after immersion in SBF solution indicated the inorganic bioactive character of the scaffolds suitable for the intended applications in dental tissue engineering.« less

  3. Cryopreserved Dental Pulp Tissues of Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth Is a Feasible Stem Cell Resource for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Akiyama, Kentaro; Hoshino, Yoshihiro; Song, Guangtai; Kukita, Toshio; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Shi, Songtao; Yamaza, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Human exfoliated deciduous teeth have been considered to be a promising source for regenerative therapy because they contain unique postnatal stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) with self-renewal capacity, multipotency and immunomodulatory function. However preservation technique of deciduous teeth has not been developed. This study aimed to evaluate that cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of human exfoliated deciduous teeth is a retrievable and practical SHED source for cell-based therapy. SHED isolated from the cryopreserved deciduous pulp tissues for over 2 years (25–30 months) (SHED-Cryo) owned similar stem cell properties including clonogenicity, self-renew, stem cell marker expression, multipotency, in vivo tissue regenerative capacity and in vitro immunomodulatory function to SHED isolated from the fresh tissues (SHED-Fresh). To examine the therapeutic efficacy of SHED-Cryo on immune diseases, SHED-Cryo were intravenously transplanted into systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) model MRL/lpr mice. Systemic SHED-Cryo-transplantation improved SLE-like disorders including short lifespan, elevated autoantibody levels and nephritis-like renal dysfunction. SHED-Cryo amended increased interleukin 17-secreting helper T cells in MRL/lpr mice systemically and locally. SHED-Cryo-transplantation was also able to recover osteoporosis bone reduction in long bones of MRL/lpr mice. Furthermore, SHED-Cryo-mediated tissue engineering induced bone regeneration in critical calvarial bone-defect sites of immunocompromised mice. The therapeutic efficacy of SHED-Cryo transplantation on immune and skeletal disorders was similar to that of SHED-Fresh. These data suggest that cryopreservation of dental pulp tissues of deciduous teeth provide a suitable and desirable approach for stem cell-based immune therapy and tissue engineering in regenerative medicine. PMID:23251621

  4. Near-Infrared (NIR) Spectroscopy of Synthetic Hydroxyapatites and Human Dental Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kolmas, Joanna; Marek, Dariusz; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2015-08-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) was used to analyze synthetic hydroxyapatite calcined at various temperatures, synthetic carbonated hydroxyapatite, and human hard dental tissues (enamel and dentin). The NIR bands of those materials in the combination, first-overtone, and second-overtone spectral regions were assigned and evaluated for structural characterization. They were attributed to adsorbed and structural water, structural hydroxyl (OH) groups and surface P-OH groups. The NIR spectral features were quantitatively discussed in view of proton solid-state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H MAS NMR) results. We conclude that the NIR spectra of apatites are useful in the structural characterization of synthetic and biogenic apatites.

  5. Tissue engineering in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Salih, Vehid M; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    of this review is to inform practitioners with the most updated information on tissue engineering and its potential applications in dentistry. The authors used "PUBMED" to find relevant literature written in English and published from the beginning of tissue engineering until today. A combination of keywords was used as the search terms e.g., "tissue engineering", "approaches", "strategies" "dentistry", "dental stem cells", "dentino-pulp complex", "guided tissue regeneration", "whole tooth", "TMJ", "condyle", "salivary glands", and "oral mucosa". Abstracts and full text articles were used to identify causes of craniofacial tissue loss, different approaches for craniofacial reconstructions, how the tissue engineering emerges, different strategies of tissue engineering, biomaterials employed for this purpose, the major attempts to engineer different dental structures, finally challenges and future of tissue engineering in dentistry. Only those articles that dealt with the tissue engineering in dentistry were selected. There have been a recent surge in guided tissue engineering methods to manage periodontal diseases beyond the traditional approaches. However, the predictable reconstruction of the innate organisation and function of whole teeth as well as their periodontal structures remains challenging. Despite some limited progress and minor successes, there remain distinct and important challenges in the development of reproducible and clinically safe approaches for oral tissue repair and regeneration. Clearly, there is a convincing body of evidence which confirms the need for this type of treatment, and public health data worldwide indicates a more than adequate patient resource. The future of these therapies involving more biological approaches and the use of dental tissue stem cells is promising and advancing. Also there may be a significant interest of their application and wider potential to treat disorders beyond the craniofacial region. Considering the

  6. Aspects on dental hard tissues in primary teeth from patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klingberg, Gunilla; Hagberg, Catharina; Norén, Jörgen G; Nietzsche, Sandor

    2009-07-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare hereditary condition affecting connective tissues and dental hard tissues. Primary enamel and dentine from EDS patients were expected to differ from those of healthy subjects regarding morphology and chemical composition. Forty-seven exfoliated primary teeth from 25 patients with EDS were investigated. Morphology was studied using a polarized light microscope, scanning electron microscope, and X-ray microanalysis. Comparisons were made with 36 primary teeth from 36 healthy patients. Morphological analysis of enamel in EDS teeth showed a high frequency of postnatally hypomineralized enamel and postnatally located incremental lines, whereas dentine was normal in all patients. Chemical analysis could not reveal any differences between EDS and control patients except for lower content of C and a higher Ca/P ratio in the enamel in the EDS teeth, indicating porous enamel. Regarding dentine, EDS teeth had a lower content of C, and a higher content of Ca, P, and O. Ratios for Ca/C and Ca/O were also higher compared with controls. There are several aberrations of booth enamel and dentine in primary teeth from patients with EDS. These could explain the occurrence of both more dental caries and tooth fractures in patients with EDS.

  7. Effect of dental arch convexity and type of archwire on frictional forces.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Zacharias; Ozcan, Mutlu; Sandham, Andrew

    2009-07-01

    Friction measurements in orthodontics are often derived from models by using brackets placed on flat models with various straight wires. Dental arches are convex in some areas. The objectives of this study were to compare the frictional forces generated in conventional flat and convex dental arch setups, and to evaluate the effect of different archwires on friction in both dental arch models. Two stainless steel models were designed and manufactured simulating flat and convex maxillary right buccal dental arches. Five stainless steel brackets from the maxillary incisor to the second premolar (slot size, 0.22 in, Victory, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) and a first molar tube were aligned and clamped on the metal model at equal distances of 6 mm. Four kinds of orthodontic wires were tested: (1) A. J. Wilcock Australian wire (0.016 in, G&H Wire, Hannover, Germany); and (2) 0.016 x 0.022 in, (3) 0.018 x 0.022 in, and (4) 0.019 x 0.025 in (3M Unitek GmbH, Seefeld, Germany). Gray elastomeric modules (Power O 110, Ormco, Glendora, Calif) were used for ligation. Friction tests were performed in the wet state with artificial saliva lubrication and by pulling 5 mm of the whole length of the archwire. Six measurements were made from each bracket-wire combination, and each test was performed with new combinations of materials for both arch setups (n = 48, 6 per group) in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed: 20 mm/min). Significant effects of arch model (P = 0.0000) and wire types (P = 0.0000) were found. The interaction term between the tested factors was not significant (P = 0.1581) (2-way ANOVA and Tukey test). Convex models resulted in significantly higher frictional forces (1015-1653 g) than flat models (680-1270 g) (P <0.05). In the flat model, significantly lower frictional forces were obtained with wire types 1 (679 g) and 3 (1010 g) than with types 2 (1146 g) and 4 (1270 g) (P <0.05). In the convex model, the lowest friction was obtained with wire types 1 (1015 g

  8. Heat generated by Er:YAG laser in the pulp chamber of teeth submitted to removal of dental tissue and composite resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Pecora, Jesus D.; Pinheiro, Antonio; Spano, Julio; Barbin, Eduardo; Marchesan, Melissa A.

    2004-05-01

    The knowledge about and control of thermal energy produced by Er:YAG laser after irradiating hard dental tissues and compound resin is important because the pulp, like all vital biological tissue, has a certain capacity for supporting stimulus. The objective of this study was to analyze the thermal variation generated by Er:YAG laser (λ=2.94μm) during the preparation of a Class I cavity in the dental structure and in the removal of microhybrid Z100 (3M) compound resin. An evaluation was made of 30 maxillary human pre-molar teeth from the bank of the Endodontic Laboratory Center of Ribeirao Preto Dental School, Brasil. The sample was divided into 6 groups of 5 teeth each: Group 1, preparation of Class I cavity with Er:YAG laser (350mJ, 3Hz, 343 impulses, 120J, 113 seconds); Group 2, preparation of Class I cavity with Er:YAG laser (350mJ, 4Hz, 343 impulses, 120J, 81 seconds); Group 3, preparation of Class I cavity with Er:YAG laser (350mJ, 6Hz, 343 impulses, 120J, 58 seconds); Group 4, removal of compound resin from Class I preparation with Er:YAG laser (350mJ, 3Hz, 258 impulses, 90J, 85 seconds); Group 5, removal of compound resin from Class I preparation with Er:YAG laser (350mJ, 4Hz, 258 impulses, 90J, 67 seconds); Group 6, removal of compound resin from Class I preparation with Er:YAG laser (350mJ, 6Hz, 258 impulses, 42 seconds). The laser used was KaVo Key 2 (Biberach, Germany), λ=2,94μm, P=3 Watts, pulse duration of 250μs, with air-water cooling. The increase in temperature during dental preparation and the removal of the compound resin was evaluated by means of a Tektronix DMM916 Thermocouple (Consitec, Brasil). The results showed that the application of laser for the removal of the hard dental tissues and for the removal of compound resins with the pulse frequencies 3, 4 and 6 Hz did not generate heating greater than 3.1°C and remained within the histopathological limits permitted for pulp tissue (5.5°C) and there was a significant statistical

  9. Cytocompatibility, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity analysis of dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reigosa, M.; Labarta, V.; Molinari, G.; Bernales, D.

    2007-11-01

    Several types of materials are frequently used for dental prostheses in dental medicine. Different treatments with titanium are the most used. The aim of the present study was to analyze by means of cytotoxicity and cytocompatibility techniques the capacity of dental implants to integrate to the bone tissue. Cultures of UMR 106 cell line derived from an osteosarcoma were used for bioassays mainly because they show many of the properties of osteoblasts. Dental implant samples provided by B&W company were compared with others of recognized trademarks. The first ones contain ASTM titanium (8348 GR2) with acid printing. Cytotoxicity was analyzed by means of lysosome activity, using the neutral red technique and alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity. Cell variability was determined by means of the acridine ethidium-orange bromide technique. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni and Duncan post-ANOVA tests were used for the statistical analysis. The assays did not show significant differences among the dental implants analyzed. Our findings show that the dental prostheses studied present high biocompatibility, quantified by the bioassays performed. The techniques employed revealed that they can be a useful tool for the analysis of other materials for dental medicine use.

  10. Numerical simulation of electrically stimulated osteogenesis in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Acosta, J C; Garzón-Alvarado, D A; Lancellotti, V

    2014-04-01

    Cell behavior and tissue formation are influenced by a static electric field (EF). Several protocols for EF exposure are aimed at increasing the rate of tissue recovery and reducing the healing times in wounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of the EF action on cells and tissues are still a matter of research. In this work we introduce a mathematical model for electrically stimulated osteogenesis at the bone-dental implant interface. The model describes the influence of the EF in the most critical biological processes leading to bone formation at the bone-dental implant interface. The numerical solution is able to reproduce the distribution of spatial-temporal patterns describing the influence of EF during blood clotting, osteogenic cell migration, granulation tissue formation, displacements of the fibrillar matrix, and formation of new bone. In addition, the model describes the EF-mediated cell behavior and tissue formation which lead to an increased osteogenesis in both smooth and rough implant surfaces. Since numerical results compare favorably with experimental evidence, the model can be used to predict the outcome of using electrostimulation in other types of wounds and tissues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. DENTAL PULP STEM CELLS AND HUMAN PERIAPICAL CYST MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS IN BONE TISSUE REGENERATION: COMPARISON OF BASAL AND OSTEOGENIC DIFFERENTIATED GENE EXPRESSION OF A NEWLY DISCOVERED MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL LINEAGE.

    PubMed

    Tatullo, M; Falisi, G; Amantea, M; Rastelli, C; Paduano, F; Marrelli, M

    2015-01-01

    Bone regeneration is an interesting field of biomedicine. The most recent studies are aimed to achieve a bone regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) taken from more accessible sites: oral and dental tissues have been widely investigated as a rich accessible source of MSCs. Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs) and human Periapical Cysts Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hPCy-MSCs) represent the new generation MSCs. The aim of this study is to compare the gene expression of these two innovative cell types to highlight the advantages of their use in bone regeneration. The harvesting, culturing and differentiating of cells isolated from dental pulp as well as from periapical cystic tissue were carried out as described in previously published reports. qRT-PCR analyses were performed on osteogenic genes in undifferentiated and osteogenic differentiated cells of DPSC and hPCy-MSC lineage. Real-time RT-PCR data suggested that both DPSCs and hPCy-MSCs cultured in osteogenic media are able to differentiate into osteoblast/odontoblast-like cells: however, some differences indicated that DPSCs seem to be directed more towards dentinogenesis, while hPCy-MSCs seem to be directed more towards osteogenesis.

  12. Environmental lead pollution and its possible influence on tooth loss and hard dental tissue lesions.

    PubMed

    Cenić-Milosević, Desanka; Mileusnić, Ivan; Kolak, Veljko; Pejanović, Djordje; Ristić, Tamara; Jakovljević, Ankica; Popović, Milica; Pesić, Dragana; Melih, Irena

    2013-08-01

    Environmental lead (Pb) pollution is a global problem. Hard dental tissue is capable of accumulating lead and other hard metals from the environment. The aim of this study was to investigate any correlation between the concentration of lead in teeth extracted from inhabitants of Pancevo and Belgrade, Serbia, belonging to different age groups and occurrence of tooth loss, caries and non-carious lesions. A total of 160 volunteers were chosen consecutively from Pancevo (the experimental group) and Belgrade (the control group) and divided into 5 age subgroups of 32 subjects each. Clinical examination consisted of caries and hard dental tissue diagnostics. The Decayed Missing Filled Teeth (DMFT) Index and Significant Caries Index were calculated. Extracted teeth were freed of any organic residue by UV digestion and subjected to voltammetric analysis for the content of lead. The average DMFT scores in Pancevo (20.41) were higher than in Belgrade (16.52); in the patients aged 31-40 and 41-50 years the difference was significant (p < 0.05) and highly significant in the patients aged 51-60 (23.69 vs 18.5, p < 0.01). Non-carious lesions were diagnosed in 71 (44%) patients from Pancevo and 39 (24%) patients from Belgrade. The concentrations of Pb in extracted teeth in all the groups from Pancevo were statistically significantly (p < 0.05) higher than in all the groups from Belgrade. In the patients from Pancevo correlations between Pb concentration in extracted teeth and the number of extracted teeth, the number of carious lesions and the number of non-carious lesions showed a statistical significance (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 andp < 0.001, respectively). According to correlations between lead concentration and the number of extracted teeth, number of carious lesions and non-carious lesions found in the patients living in Pancevo, one possible cause of tooth loss and hard dental tissue damage could be a long-term environmental exposure to lead.

  13. Efficacy of Sex Determination from Human Dental Pulp Tissue and its Reliability as a Tool in Forensic Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Kaveri Surya

    2015-01-01

    Sex determination is one of the primary steps in forensics. Barr body can be used as a histological method for identification of sex as it is found to be specific to female somatic cells and rare in male cells. To demarcate human dental pulp as an important identification tool of sex in forensic odontology (FO) and to evaluate the time period till which sex can be determined from pulp tissue using three stains H and E, Feulgen, and acridine - orange under fluorescence so as. 90 pulp samples (45 males and 45 females) were subjected to Barr body analysis for determination of sex using light and fluorescent microscopy. Barr body was found to be positive for female samples and negative or rare in the male sample (<3%). Barr body from human dental pulp tissue can be used as a successful determinant of sex identification in FO.

  14. Uncovering dental implants using a new thermo-optically powered (TOP) technology with tissue air-cooling.

    PubMed

    Romanos, Georgios E; Belikov, Andrey V; Skrypnik, Alexei V; Feldchtein, Felix I; Smirnov, Michael Z; Altshuler, Gregory B

    2015-07-01

    Uncovering implants with lasers, while bloodless, has been associated with a risk of implant and bone overheating. The present study evaluated the effect of using a new generation of high-power diode lasers on the temperature of a dental implant and the surrounding tissues using an in vitro model. The implant temperature was measured at three locations using micro thermocouples. Collateral thermal damage of uncovered soft tissues was evaluated using NTBC stain. Implant temperature rise during and collateral thermal soft-tissue damage following implant uncovering with and without tissue air-cooling was studied using both the classic operational mode and the new thermo-optically powered (TOP) technology. For the classic surgical mode using a cork-initiated tip and constant laser power set at 3.4 W, the maximum temperature rise in the coronal and apical parts of the implant was 23.2 ± 4.1°С and 9.5 ± 1.8°С, respectively, while 1.5 ± 0.5 mm of collateral thermal damage of the soft tissue surrounding the implant model occurred. Using the TOP surgical tip with constant laser power reduced implant overheating by 30%; collateral thermal soft-tissue damage was 0.8 ± 0.2 mm. Using the TOP surgical mode with a tip temperature setting of 800°C and air-cooling reduced the implant temperature rise by more than 300%, and only 0.2 ± 0.1 mm of collateral thermal soft-tissue damage occurred, typical for optimized CO2 laser surgery. Furthermore, use of the new generation diode technology (TOP surgical mode) appeared to reduce the time required for implant uncovering by a factor of two, compared to the standard surgical mode. Use of the new generation diode technology (TOP surgical mode) may significantly reduce overheating of dental implants during uncovering and seems to be safer for the adjacent soft and hard tissues. Use of such diode lasers with air-cooling can radically reduce the rise in implant temperatures (by more than three times

  15. Methods to Improve Osseointegration of Dental Implants in Low Quality (Type-IV) Bone: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Hamdan S

    2018-01-13

    Nowadays, dental implants have become more common treatment for replacing missing teeth and aim to improve chewing efficiency, physical health, and esthetics. The favorable clinical performance of dental implants has been attributed to their firm osseointegration, as introduced by Brånemark in 1965. Although the survival rate of dental implants over a 10-year observation has been reported to be higher than 90% in totally edentulous jaws, the clinical outcome of implant treatment is challenged in compromised (bone) conditions, as are frequently present in elderly people. The biomechanical characteristics of bone in aged patients do not offer proper stability to implants, being similar to type-IV bone (Lekholm & Zarb classification), in which a decreased clinical fixation of implants has been clearly demonstrated. However, the search for improved osseointegration has continued forward for the new evolution of modern dental implants. This represents a continuum of developments spanning more than 20 years of research on implant related-factors including surgical techniques, implant design, and surface properties. The methods to enhance osseointegration of dental implants in low quality (type-IV) bone are described in a general manner in this review.

  16. Tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase production by human dental pulp stromal cells is enhanced by high density cell culture.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Matthew J; Dennis, Caitriona; Yang, Xuebin B; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    The cell surface hydrolase tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) (also known as MSCA-1) is used to identify a sub-population of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) with high mineralising potential and is found on subsets of cells within the dental pulp. We aim to determine whether TNAP is co-expressed by human dental pulp stromal cells (hDPSCs) alongside a range of BMSC markers, whether this is an active form of the enzyme and the effects of culture duration and cell density on its expression. Cells from primary dental pulp and culture expanded hDPSCs expressed TNAP. Subsequent analyses revealed persistent TNAP expression and co-expression with BMSC markers such as CD73 and CD90. Flow cytometry and biochemical assays showed that increased culture durations and cell densities enhanced TNAP expression by hDPSCs. Arresting the hDPSC cell cycle also increased TNAP expression. These data confirm that TNAP is co-expressed by hDPSCs together with other BMSC markers and show that cell density affects TNAP expression levels. We conclude that TNAP is a potentially useful marker for hDPSC selection especially for uses in mineralised tissue regenerative therapies.

  17. Dental Fluorosis and Catalase Immunoreactivity of the Brain Tissues in Rats Exposed to High Fluoride Pre- and Postnatally.

    PubMed

    Güner, Şirin; Uyar-Bozkurt, Süheyla; Haznedaroğlu, Eda; Menteş, Ali

    2016-11-01

    This study evaluated dental fluorosis of the incisors and immunoreactivity in the brain tissues of rats given chronic fluoride doses pre- and postnatally. Female rats were given drinking water with 0, 30 or 100 ppm fluoride ad libitum throughout gestation and the nursing period. In addition, 63 male offspring were treated with the same water regimens as the mothers after weaning and were followed for 1, 3 or 5 months. The upper and lower incisors were collected, and all teeth were examined under a stereomicroscope and scored by two blinded examiners using a modified rodent enamel fluorosis index. Cortical, hippocampal and cerebellar brain samples were evaluated morphologically and immunohistochemically. All fluoride-treated pups were born with low body weight (p = 0.001). All animals from the fluoride groups had enamel fluorosis with defects of various degrees. The increase in the dental fluorosis scores in the fluoride treatment groups was significant (p < 0.01). The catalase immunoreactivity in the 30- and 100-ppm fluoride groups was significantly higher than that in the controls after 1, 3 and 5 months (p < 0.001). In conclusion, this study showed that rats with dental fluorosis had catalase immunoreactivity in the brain tissues, which may reflect the neurobehavioral toxicity of fluoride.

  18. Dental Care Presents The Highest Level Of Financial Barriers, Compared To Other Types Of Health Care Services.

    PubMed

    Vujicic, Marko; Buchmueller, Thomas; Klein, Rachel

    2016-12-01

    The Affordable Care Act is improving access to and the affordability of a wide range of health care services. While dental care for children is part of the law's essential health benefits and state Medicaid programs must cover it, coverage of dental care for adults is not guaranteed. As a result, even with the recent health insurance expansion, many Americans face financial barriers to receiving dental care that lead to unmet oral health needs. Using data from the 2014 National Health Interview Survey, we analyzed financial barriers to a wide range of health care services. We found that irrespective of age, income level, and type of insurance, more people reported financial barriers to receiving dental care, compared to any other type of health care. We discuss policy options to address financial barriers to dental care, particularly for adults. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  19. Differentiation of Human Dental Stem Cells Reveal a Role for microRNA-218

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Isabel; Cavender, Adriana; Peto, David; Sun, Zhao; Speer, Aline; Cao, Huojun; Amendt, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Regeneration of the lost periodontium is the ultimate goal of periodontal therapy. Advances in tissue engineering have demonstrated the multilineage potential and plasticity of adult stem cells located in the periodontal apparatus. However, it remains unclear how epigenetic mechanisms controlling signals determine tissue specification and cell lineage decisions. To date, no data is available on micro-RNAs (miRNAs) activity behind human-derived dental stem cells. Methods In this study, we isolated periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), and gingival stem cells (GSCs) from extracted third molars; human bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) were used as a positive control. The expression of OCT4A and NANOG was confirmed in these undifferentiated cells. All cells were cultured under osteogenic inductive conditions and RUNX2 expression was analyzed as a marker of mineralized tissue differentiation. A miRNA expression profile was obtained at baseline and after osteogenic induction in all cell types. Results RUNX2 expression demonstrated the successful osteogenic induction of all cell types, which was confirmed by alizarin red stain. The analysis of 765 miRNAs demonstrated a shift in miRNA expression occurred in all four stem cell types, including a decrease in hsa-mir-218 across all differentiated cell populations. Hsa-mir-218 targets RUNX2 and decreases RUNX2 expression in undifferentiated human dental stem cells (DSCs). DSC mineralized tissue type differentiation is associated with a decrease in hsa-mir-218 expression. Conclusions These data reveal a miRNA regulated pathway for the differentiation of human DSCs and a select network of human microRNAs that control DSC osteogenic differentiation. PMID:23662917

  20. Anatomical sciences: A foundation for a solid learning experience in dental technology and dental prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Mahmoud M; Thompson, C Mark; Massadiq, Magdalena

    2017-07-01

    Basic science courses are extremely important as a foundation for scaffolding knowledge and then applying it in future courses, clinical situations as well as in a professional career. Anatomical sciences, which include tooth morphology, oral histology, oral embryology, and head and neck anatomy form a core part of the preclinical courses in dental technology programs. In this article, the importance and relevance of anatomical sciences to dental personnel with no direct contact with patients (dental technicians) and limited discipline related contact with patients (dental prosthetists) is highlighted. Some light is shed on the role of anatomical sciences in the pedagogical framework and its significance in the educational process and interprofessional learning of dental technicians and prosthetists using oral biology as an example in the dental curriculum. To conclude, anatomical sciences allow dental technicians and prosthetists to a gain a better insight of how tissues function, leading to a better understanding of diagnosis, comprehensive treatment planning and referrals if needed. Patient communication and satisfaction also increases as a result of this deep understanding of oral tissues. Anatomical sciences bridge the gap between basic science, preclinical, and clinical courses, which leads to a holistic approach in patient management. Finally, treatment outcomes are positively affected due to the appreciation of the macro and micro structure of oral tissues. Anat Sci Educ 10: 395-404. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  1. Future perspectives of resin-based dental materials.

    PubMed

    Jandt, Klaus D; Sigusch, Bernd W

    2009-08-01

    This concise review and outlook paper gives a view of selected potential future developments in the area of resin-based biomaterials with an emphasis on dental composites. A selection of key publications (1 book, 35 scientific original publications and 1 website source) covering the areas nanotechnology, antimicrobial materials, stimuli responsive materials, self-repairing materials and materials for tissue engineering with direct or indirect relations and/or implications to resin-based dental materials is critically reviewed and discussed. Connections between these fields and their potential for resin-based dental materials are highlighted and put in perspective. The need to improve shrinkage properties and wear resistance is obvious for dental composites, and a vast number of attempts have been made to accomplish these aims. Future resin-based materials may be further improved in this respect if, for example nanotechnology is applied. Dental composites may, however, reach a completely new quality by utilizing new trends from materials science, such as introducing nanostructures, antimicrobial properties, stimuli responsive capabilities, the ability to promote tissue regeneration or repair of dental tissues if the composites were able to repair themselves. This paper shows selected potential future developments in the area of resin-based dental materials, gives basic and industrial researchers in dental materials science, and dental practitioners a glance into the potential future of these materials, and should stimulate discussion about needs and future developments in the area.

  2. Selective preparation of hard dental tissue: classical and laser treatments comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostálova, Tat'jana; Jelínkova, Helena; Němec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Iwai, Katsumasa; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2006-02-01

    For the purpose of micro-selective preparation which is part of the modern dentistry four various methods were examined: ablation by Er:YAG laser radiation (free-running or Q-switching regime), preparation of tissues by ultrasonic round ball tip, and by the classical dental drilling machine using diamond round bur. In the case of Er:YAG laser application the interaction energy 40 mJ in pulse of 200 us yielding to the interaction intensity 62 kW/cm2, and 20 mJ in pulse of 100 ns yielding to the interaction intensity 62 MW/cm2 was used for the case of free running, and Q-switch regime, respectively. For comparisson with the classical methods the ultrasound preparation tip (Sonixflex cariex TC, D - Sonicsys micro) and dental driller together with usual preparation burrs and standard handpiece were used. For the interaction experiment the samples of extracted human teeth and ebony cut into longitudinal sections and polished were used. The thickness of the prepared samples ranged from 5 to 7 mm. The methods were compared from the point of prepared cavity shape (SEM), inner surface, and possibility of selective removal of carries. The composite filling material was used to reconstruct the cavities. The dye penetrating analysis was performed.

  3. Microtomography evaluation of dental tissue wear surface induced by in vitro simulated chewing cycles on human and composite teeth.

    PubMed

    Bedini, Rossella; Pecci, Raffaella; Notarangelo, Gianluca; Zuppante, Francesca; Persico, Salvatore; Di Carlo, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    In this study a 3D microtomography display of tooth surfaces after in vitro dental wear tests has been obtained. Natural teeth have been compared with prosthetic teeth, manufactured by three different polyceramic composite materials. The prosthetic dental element samples, similar to molars, have been placed in opposition to human teeth extracted by paradontology diseases. After microtomography analysis, samples have been subjected to in vitro fatigue test cycles by servo-hydraulic mechanical testing machine. After the fatigue test, each sample has been subjected again to microtomography analysis to obtain volumetric value changes and dental wear surface images. Wear surface images were obtained by 3D reconstruction software and volumetric value changes were measured by CT analyser software. The aim of this work has been to show the potential of microtomography technique to display very clear and reliable wear surface images. Microtomography analysis methods to evaluate volumetric value changes have been used to quantify dental tissue and composite material wear.

  4. Assessment of Dental Fluorosis in Mmp20+/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, R.; Tye, C.E.; Arun, A.; MacDonald, D.; Chatterjee, A.; Abrazinski, T.; Everett, E.T.; Whitford, G.M.; Bartlett, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie dental fluorosis are poorly understood. The retention of enamel proteins hallmarking fluorotic enamel may result from impaired hydrolysis and/or removal of enamel proteins. Previous studies have suggested that partial inhibition of Mmp20 expression is involved in the etiology of dental fluorosis. Here we ask if mice expressing only one functional Mmp20 allele are more susceptible to fluorosis. We demonstrate that Mmp20+/− mice express approximately half the amount of MMP20 as do wild-type mice. The Mmp20 heterozygous mice have normal-appearing enamel, with Vickers microhardness values similar to those of wild-type control enamel. Therefore, reduced MMP20 expression is not solely responsible for dental fluorosis. With 50-ppm-fluoride (F−) treatment ad libitum, the Mmp20+/− mice had F− tissue levels similar to those of Mmp20+/+ mice. No significant difference in enamel hardness was observed between the F−-treated heterozygous and wild-type mice. Interestingly, we did find a small but significant difference in quantitative fluorescence between these two groups, which may be attributable to slightly higher protein content in the Mmp20+/− mouse enamel. We conclude that MMP20 plays a nominal role in dental enamel fluorosis. PMID:21386097

  5. A prospective study of the validity of self-reported use of specific types of dental services.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Rose, John S; Shelton, Brent J

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the validity of self-reported receipt of dental services in 10 categories, using information from dental charts as the "gold standard." The Florida Dental Care Study was a prospective cohort study of a diverse sample of adults. In-person interviews were conducted at baseline and at 24 and 48 months following baseline, with telephone interviews at six-month intervals in between. Participants reported new dental visits, reason(s) for the visit(s), and specific service(s) received. For the present study, self-reported data were compared with data from patients' dental charts. Percent concordance between self-report and dental charts ranged from 82% to 100%, while Kappa values ranged from 0.33 to 0.91. Bivariate multiple logistic regressions were performed for each of the service categories, with two outcomes: self-reported service receipt and service receipt determined from the dental chart. Parameter estimate intervals overlapped for each of the four hypothesized predictors of service receipt (age group, sex, "race" defined as non-Hispanic African American vs. non-Hispanic white, and annual household income < 20,000 US dollars vs. > or = 20,000 US dollars), although for five of the 10 service categories, there were differences in conclusions about statistical significance for certain predictors. The validity of self-reported use of dental services ranged from poor to excellent, depending upon the service type. Regression estimates using either the self-reported or chart-validated measure yielded similar results overall, but conclusions about key predictors of service use differed in some instances. Self-reported dental service use is valid for some, but not all, service types.

  6. Efficacy of Sex Determination from Human Dental Pulp Tissue and its Reliability as a Tool in Forensic Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Kaveri Surya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sex determination is one of the primary steps in forensics. Barr body can be used as a histological method for identification of sex as it is found to be specific to female somatic cells and rare in male cells. To demarcate human dental pulp as an important identification tool of sex in forensic odontology (FO) and to evaluate the time period till which sex can be determined from pulp tissue using three stains H and E, Feulgen, and acridine - orange under fluorescence so as. Materials and Methods: 90 pulp samples (45 males and 45 females) were subjected to Barr body analysis for determination of sex using light and fluorescent microscopy. Results: Barr body was found to be positive for female samples and negative or rare in the male sample (<3%). Conclusion: Barr body from human dental pulp tissue can be used as a successful determinant of sex identification in FO. PMID:26668474

  7. Esthetic management of anterior dental anomalies: A clinical case.

    PubMed

    Chafaie, Amir

    2016-09-01

    Many types of dental abnormality can be observed in the anterior sectors, where they can cause genuine esthetic problems for our patients. While conventional prosthetic treatments offer the best solutions in terms of esthetic result and durability, they involve the sacrifice of significant quantities of mineralized dental material and cannot be undertaken before the periodontal tissues are mature. Other less invasive alternatives should be envisaged as transitional, or sometimes even permanent, solutions for the management of these anomalies in children and adolescents. This article discusses these options and presents a clinical case where composite resin veneers and microabrasion of the enamel were used to treat dental agenesis and enamel dysplasia. Copyright © 2016 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Scattering, absorption and transmittance of experimental graphene dental nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, María. M.; Salas, Marianne; Moldovan, Marionara; Dudea, Diana; Yebra, Ana; Ghinea, Razvan

    2017-08-01

    Optical properties of experimental graphene dental nanocomposites were studied. Spectral reflectance was measured and S and K coefficients as well as transmittance of samples were calculated using Kubelka-Munk's equations. The spectral behavior of S, K and T experimental graphene exhibited different trends compared with the commercial nanocomposites and they were statistically different. Experimental nanocomposites show higher scattering and lower transmittance when compared with commercial nanocomposite, probably, due to the shape, type and size of the filler. K for short wavelength of the pre-polymerized experimental nancomposites was very low. According to our results, hidroxypatite with graphene oxide used in dental nanocomposites needs to be improved to reproduce esthetic properties of natural dental tissues and to have potentially clinical applications.

  9. Heterogeneous dental follicle cells and the regeneration of complex periodontal tissues.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weihua; Chen, Lei; Gong, Kun; Ding, Bofu; Duan, Yinzhong; Jin, Yan

    2012-03-01

    Dental follicle cells (DFCs) are a heterogeneous population that exhibit a variety of phenotypes. However, it remains unclear whether DFCs can maintain stem cell characteristics, or mediate tissue-regeneration to form single or complex tissues in the periodontium, after long-term culturing. Therefore, DFCs were isolated from human impacted molars (HIM-DFCs), passaged >30 times, and then evaluated for their heterogeneity and multipotential differentiation. Morphology, proliferation, epitope profile, and mineralization characteristics of clones derived from single HIM-DFCs in vitro were also assayed. HIM-DFCs (passage #30) were found to be positive for the heterogeneous markers, Notch-1, stro-1, alkaline phosphomonoesterase (ALP), type I collagen (COL-I), type III collagen (COL-III), and osteocalcine. Moreover, passage #30 of the HDF1, 2, and 3 subclone classes identified in this study were found to express high levels of the mesenchymal stem cells markers, CD146 and Stro1. HDF3 subclones were also associated with the strongest ALP staining detected, and strongly expressed osteoblast and cementoblast markers, including COL-I, COL-III, bone sialoprotein (BSP), and Runx2. In contrast, HDF1 subclone analyzed strongly expressed COL-I and COL-III, yet weakly expressed BSP and Runx2. The HDF2 subclone was associated with the strongest proliferative capacity. To evaluate differentiation characteristics in vivo, these various cell populations were combined with ceramic bovine bone and implanted into subcutaneous pockets of nude mice. The 30th passage of subclone HDF1 and 3 were observed to contribute to fiber collagens and the mineralized matrix present, respectively, whereas HDF2 subclones were found to have a minimal role in these formations. The formation of a cementum-periodontal ligament (PDL) complex was observed 6 weeks after HIM-DFCs (passage #30) were implanted in vivo, thus suggesting that these cells maintain stem cell characteristics. Therefore, subclone HDF1

  10. Heterogeneous Dental Follicle Cells and the Regeneration of Complex Periodontal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Weihua; Chen, Lei; Gong, Kun; Ding, Bofu

    2012-01-01

    Dental follicle cells (DFCs) are a heterogeneous population that exhibit a variety of phenotypes. However, it remains unclear whether DFCs can maintain stem cell characteristics, or mediate tissue-regeneration to form single or complex tissues in the periodontium, after long-term culturing. Therefore, DFCs were isolated from human impacted molars (HIM-DFCs), passaged >30 times, and then evaluated for their heterogeneity and multipotential differentiation. Morphology, proliferation, epitope profile, and mineralization characteristics of clones derived from single HIM-DFCs in vitro were also assayed. HIM-DFCs (passage #30) were found to be positive for the heterogeneous markers, Notch-1, stro-1, alkaline phosphomonoesterase (ALP), type I collagen (COL-I), type III collagen (COL-III), and osteocalcine. Moreover, passage #30 of the HDF1, 2, and 3 subclone classes identified in this study were found to express high levels of the mesenchymal stem cells markers, CD146 and Stro1. HDF3 subclones were also associated with the strongest ALP staining detected, and strongly expressed osteoblast and cementoblast markers, including COL-I, COL-III, bone sialoprotein (BSP), and Runx2. In contrast, HDF1 subclone analyzed strongly expressed COL-I and COL-III, yet weakly expressed BSP and Runx2. The HDF2 subclone was associated with the strongest proliferative capacity. To evaluate differentiation characteristics in vivo, these various cell populations were combined with ceramic bovine bone and implanted into subcutaneous pockets of nude mice. The 30th passage of subclone HDF1 and 3 were observed to contribute to fiber collagens and the mineralized matrix present, respectively, whereas HDF2 subclones were found to have a minimal role in these formations. The formation of a cementum-periodontal ligament (PDL) complex was observed 6 weeks after HIM-DFCs (passage #30) were implanted in vivo, thus suggesting that these cells maintain stem cell characteristics. Therefore, subclone HDF1

  11. Dental Decay and Oral Findings in Children and Adolescents Affected by Different Types of Cerebral Palsy: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Juan Pablo Loyola; Ayala-Herrera, Jose Luis; Muñoz-Gomez, Noel; Martínez-Martínez, Rita E; Santos-Díaz, Miguel Angel; Olvera-Delgado, Jose Honorio; Loyola-Leyva, Alejandra

    To compare dental caries and oral findings in patients affected by different types of Cerebral Palsy (CP). This cross-sectional study involved 120 children and adolescents with a diagnosis of CP. WHO diagnostic criteria were used to determine DMFT (caries diagnosis), the pocket depth and attachment level (periodontitis diagnosis). Additionally, the study evaluated dental erosion, traumatic dental injuries, treatment needs index (TNI), oral habits, malocclusions, gingival overgrowth, and dental fluorosis. The most frequent CP type was spastic (62.5%), followed by mixed (18.3%), ataxic (10%), and athetoid (9.1). Patients affected by mixed CP showed a higher prevalence in decayed, DMFT index and TNI compared with the other types of CP (p<0.05). The frequency of malocclusion in the clinical evaluation was 87.5% and in plaster models was 49.2%. Dental caries was an important issue in mixed and athetoid CP groups. Oral habits and malocclusions were the most significant oral health problems in individuals with CP.

  12. Design and implementation of therapeutic ultrasound generating circuit for dental tissue formation and tooth-root healing.

    PubMed

    Woon Tiong Ang; Scurtescu, C; Wing Hoy; El-Bialy, T; Ying Yin Tsui; Jie Chen

    2010-02-01

    Biological tissue healing has recently attracted a great deal of research interest in various medical fields. Trauma to teeth, deep and root caries, and orthodontic treatment can all lead to various degrees of root resorption. In our previous study, we showed that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) enhances the growth of lower incisor apices and accelerates their rate of eruption in rabbits by inducing dental tissue growth. We also performed clinical studies and demonstrated that LIPUS facilitates the healing of orthodontically induced teeth-root resorption in humans. However, the available LIPUS devices are too large to be used comfortably inside the mouth. In this paper, the design and implementation of a low-power LIPUS generator is presented. The generator is the core of the final intraoral device for preventing tooth root loss and enhancing tooth root tissue healing. The generator consists of a power-supply subsystem, an ultrasonic transducer, an impedance-matching circuit, and an integrated circuit composed of a digital controller circuitry and the associated driver circuit. Most of our efforts focus on the design of the impedance-matching circuit and the integrated system-on-chip circuit. The chip was designed and fabricated using 0.8- ¿m high-voltage technology from Dalsa Semiconductor, Inc. The power supply subsystem and its impedance-matching network are implemented using discrete components. The LIPUS generator was tested and verified to function as designed and is capable of producing ultrasound power up to 100 mW in the vicinity of the transducer's resonance frequency at 1.5 MHz. The power efficiency of the circuitry, excluding the power supply subsystem, is estimated at 70%. The final products will be tailored to the exact size of teeth or biological tissue, which is needed to be used for stimulating dental tissue (dentine and cementum) healing.

  13. Analysis of dental hard tissues exposed to high temperatures for forensic applications: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Shekhawat, Kuldeep Singh; Chauhan, Arunima

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to observe and record the macroscopic, radiographic, and microscopic findings obtained after subjecting the teeth to high temperatures. Materials and Methods: An in vitro study was conducted to observe macroscopic, radiographic, and microscopic changes in dental hard tissues in 60 unrestored non carious extracted human teeth. The teeth were grouped based on age: Below 30 years, 30–40 years, and above 40 years The teeth from each age group were further divided into five subgroups, and each subgroup was subjected to a particular temperature: 200°C, 400°C, 600°C, 800°C, and 1000°C. [C = Celsius]. Results: Various degrees of changes in relation to temperature were observed macroscopically, radiographically, and microscopically. The histological examination was limited for teeth exposed to 200°C. Conclusion: This investigation was carried out to study the gross changes, radiographic changes and histological changes in dental hard tissues exposed to high temperatures, which is an important part of forensic science. The aforementioned alterations caused by heat may provide useful information about temperature ranges and duration of exposure to high temperatures. PMID:27555725

  14. Diabetes enhances dental caries and apical periodontitis in caries-susceptible WBN/KobSlc rats.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yasushi; Matsuura, Masahiro; Sano, Tomoya; Nakahara, Yutaka; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Narama, Isao; Matsuura, Tetsuro

    2011-02-01

    Many epidemiologic studies have suggested that diabetes may be an important risk factor for periodontal disease. To determine whether diabetes induces or enhances periodontal disease or dental caries, dental tissue from diabetic male and nondiabetic female WBN/KobSlc rats and male and female age-matched nondiabetic F344 rats was analyzed morphologically and morphometrically for these 2 types of lesions. Soft X-ray examination revealed that the incidence and severity of both molar caries and alveolar bone resorption were much higher in male WBN/KobSlc rats with chronic diabetes than in nondiabetic female rats of the same strain. Histopathologic examination showed that dental caries progressed from acute to subacute inflammation due to bacterial infections and necrosis in the pulp when the caries penetrated the dentin. In the most advanced stage of dental caries, inflammatory changes caused root abscess and subsequent apical periodontitis, with the formation of granulation tissue around the dental root. Inflammatory changes resulted in resorption of alveolar bone and correlated well with the severity of molar caries. Our results suggest that diabetic conditions enhance dental caries in WBN/KobSlc rats and that periodontal lesions may result from the apical periodontitis that is secondary to dental caries.

  15. Combined effect of fluoride and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on mouse dental hard tissue formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Salmela, Eija; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Partanen, Anna-Maija; Sahlberg, Carin; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-08-01

    Fluoride interferes with enamel matrix secretion and mineralization and dentin mineralization. The most toxic dioxin congener, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), also impairs dental hard tissue formation and mineralization in vitro and in vivo. Our aim was to investigate in vitro whether the combined effect of sodium fluoride (NaF) and TCDD on dental hard tissue formation is potentiative. For this purpose, mandibular first and second molar tooth germs of E18 mouse embryos were cultured for 5-12 days with NaF and TCDD alone at various concentrations (2.5, 5, 10, 12.5, 15, and 20 μM and 5, 10, 12.5, and 15 nM, respectively) to determine the highest concentrations, which alone cause no or negligible effects. Morphological changes were studied from the whole tooth photographs and histological tissue sections. The concentrations found were 15 μM for NaF and 10 nM for TCDD. While at these concentrations, the effects of NaF and TCDD alone were barely detectable, the effect of simultaneous exposure on dentin and enamel formation was overt; mineralization of predentin to dentin and enamel matrix secretion and mineralization were impaired. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the combined exposure modified amelogenin expression by odontoblasts. Morphology of ameloblasts and the expression of amelogenin indicated that ameloblasts were still secretory. The results show that NaF and TCDD have potentiative, harmful effects on the formation of dental hard tissues. Since children can be exposed to subclinical levels of fluoride and dioxins during early childhood, coincidently with mineralization of the first permanent teeth, this finding may have clinical significance.

  16. Dental Pulp Defence and Repair Mechanisms in Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Farges, Jean-Christophe; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Renard, Emmanuelle; Ducret, Maxime; Gaudin, Alexis; Smith, Anthony J.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is a chronic infectious disease resulting from the penetration of oral bacteria into the enamel and dentin. Microorganisms subsequently trigger inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. These events can lead to pulp healing if the infection is not too severe following the removal of diseased enamel and dentin tissues and clinical restoration of the tooth. However, chronic inflammation often persists in the pulp despite treatment, inducing permanent loss of normal tissue and reducing innate repair capacities. For complete tooth healing the formation of a reactionary/reparative dentin barrier to distance and protect the pulp from infectious agents and restorative materials is required. Clinical and in vitro experimental data clearly indicate that dentin barrier formation only occurs when pulp inflammation and infection are minimised, thus enabling reestablishment of tissue homeostasis and health. Therefore, promoting the resolution of pulp inflammation may provide a valuable therapeutic opportunity to ensure the sustainability of dental treatments. This paper focusses on key cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in pulp responses to bacteria and in the pulpal transition between caries-induced inflammation and dentinogenic-based repair. We report, using selected examples, different strategies potentially used by odontoblasts and specialized immune cells to combat dentin-invading bacteria in vivo. PMID:26538821

  17. Dental Pulp Defence and Repair Mechanisms in Dental Caries.

    PubMed

    Farges, Jean-Christophe; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Renard, Emmanuelle; Ducret, Maxime; Gaudin, Alexis; Smith, Anthony J; Cooper, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is a chronic infectious disease resulting from the penetration of oral bacteria into the enamel and dentin. Microorganisms subsequently trigger inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. These events can lead to pulp healing if the infection is not too severe following the removal of diseased enamel and dentin tissues and clinical restoration of the tooth. However, chronic inflammation often persists in the pulp despite treatment, inducing permanent loss of normal tissue and reducing innate repair capacities. For complete tooth healing the formation of a reactionary/reparative dentin barrier to distance and protect the pulp from infectious agents and restorative materials is required. Clinical and in vitro experimental data clearly indicate that dentin barrier formation only occurs when pulp inflammation and infection are minimised, thus enabling reestablishment of tissue homeostasis and health. Therefore, promoting the resolution of pulp inflammation may provide a valuable therapeutic opportunity to ensure the sustainability of dental treatments. This paper focusses on key cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in pulp responses to bacteria and in the pulpal transition between caries-induced inflammation and dentinogenic-based repair. We report, using selected examples, different strategies potentially used by odontoblasts and specialized immune cells to combat dentin-invading bacteria in vivo.

  18. Dental hard tissue modification and removal using sealed TEA lasers operating at λ=9.6 and 10.6 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel; Murray, Michael W.; Featherstone, John D. B.; Akrivou, Maria; Dickenson, Kevin M.; Duhn, Clifford W.; Ojeda, Orlando P.

    1999-05-01

    Pulsed CO2 lasers have been shown to be effective for both removal and modification of dental hard tissue for the treatment of dental caries. In this study, sealed TEA laser systems optimally tuned to the highly absorbed 9.6 μm wavelength were investigated for application on dental hard tissue. Conventional TEA lasers produce a laser pulse wit a 100-200 ns gain switched spike followed by a long tail of about 1-4 μs in duration. the pulse duration is well matched to the 1-2 μs thermal relaxation time of the deposited laser energy at 9.6 μm and effectively heats the enamel to temperatures required for surface modification for caries prevention at absorbed fluences of less than 0.5 J/cm2. Thus, the heat deposition in the tooth and the corresponding risk, of pulpal necrosis form excessive heat accumulation is minimized. At higher fluences the high peak power of the gain-switched spike rapidly initiates a plasma that markedly reduces the ablation rate and efficiency, severely limiting applicability for hard tissue ablation. By slightly stretching the pulse to reduce the energy distributed in the initial 100-200 ns of the laser pulse, the plasma threshold can be raised sufficiently to increase the ablation rate by an order of magnitude. This results in a practical and efficient CO2 laser system for caries ablation and surface modification.

  19. Do Dental Students' Personality Types and Group Dynamics Affect Their Performance in Problem-Based Learning?

    PubMed

    Ihm, Jung-Joon; An, So-Youn; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the personality types of dental students and their group dynamics were linked to their problem-based learning (PBL) performance. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) instrument was used with 263 dental students enrolled in Seoul National University School of Dentistry from 2011 to 2013; the students had participated in PBL in their first year. A four-session PBL setting was designed to analyze how individual personality types and the diversity of their small groups were associated with PBL performance. Overall, the results showed that the personality type of PBL performance that was the most prominent was Judging. As a group became more diverse with its different constituent personality characteristics, there was a tendency for the group to be higher ranked in terms of PBL performance. In particular, the overperforming group was clustered around three major profiles: Extraverted Intuitive Thinking Judging (ENTJ), Introverted Sensing Thinking Judging (ISTJ), and Extraverted Sensing Thinking Judging (ESTJ). Personality analysis would be beneficial for dental faculty members in order for them to understand the extent to which cooperative learning would work smoothly, especially when considering group personalities.

  20. Soft tissue augmentation around osseointegrated and uncovered dental implants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bassetti, Renzo G; Stähli, Alexandra; Bassetti, Mario A; Sculean, Anton

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to compile the current knowledge about the efficacy of different soft tissue correction methods around osseointegrated, already uncovered and/or loaded (OU/L) implants with insufficient soft tissue conditions. Procedures to increase peri-implant keratinized mucosa (KM) width and/or soft tissue volume were considered. Screening of two databases: MEDLINE (PubMed) and EMBASE (OVID), and manual search of articles were performed. Human studies reporting on soft tissue augmentation/correction methods around OU/L implants up to June 30, 2016, were considered. Quality assessment of selected full-text articles to weight risk of bias was performed using the Cochrane collaboration's tool. Overall, four randomized controlled trials (risk of bias = high/low) and five prospective studies (risk of bias = high) were included. Depending on the surgical techniques and graft materials, the enlargement of keratinized tissue (KT) ranged between 1.15 ± 0.81 and 2.57 ± 0.50 mm. The apically positioned partial thickness flap (APPTF), in combination with a free gingival graft (FGG), a subepithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG), or a xenogeneic graft material (XCM) were most effective. A coronally advanced flap (CAF) combined with SCTG in three, combined with allogenic graft materials (AMDA) in one, and a split thickness flap (STF) combined with SCTG in another study showed mean soft tissue recession coverage rates from 28 to 96.3 %. STF combined with XCM failed to improve peri-implant soft tissue coverage. The three APPTF-techniques combined with FGG, SCTG, or XCM achieved comparable enlargements of peri-implant KT. Further, both STF and CAF, both in combination with SCTG, are equivalent regarding recession coverage rates. STF + XCM and CAF + AMDA did not reach significant coverage. In case of soft tissue deficiency around OU/L dental implants, the selection of both an appropriate surgical technique and a suitable soft tissue graft material is of utmost clinical

  1. Dental caries and salivary alterations in Type I Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rai, K; Hegde, A M; Kamath, A; Shetty, S

    2011-01-01

    Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus is a severe disease that raises blood glucose levels because of hyperglycemia and insulinopenia. Fluctuations in water and electrolyte levels may result in xerostomia and other changes in the salivary composition. Since diabetes has an influence on oral health, it is important for the dentist to be aware of newer advances in the field of diabetes and to recognize specific oral problems related to diabetes. Thus, the dentist becomes an important part of the health care team for the patients with diabetes. The present study correlated salivary flow rate, salivary pH and total salivary antioxidant levels and dental caries in type I diabetic patients. A total of 200 children that included 100 known diabetic children (study group) and 100 healthy children (controls) of both the sexes and from similar socioeconomic backgrounds formed the part of this study. Dental caries was assessed using DMFT index. The salivary total anti-oxidant level was estimated using phospho molybdic acid using spectrophotometric method. The salivary flow rate was recorded using the Zunt method and the salivary pH using the pH indicating paper. The results were statistically analyzed using t-test. The analyzed parameters showed increase in salivary anti-oxidant levels, reduced salivary flow rate, increase incidence of dental caries, salivary pH was decreased when compared to the control group.

  2. A method for rapid measurement of laser ablation rate of hard dental tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perhavec, T.; Gorkič, A.; Bračun, D.; Diaci, J.

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the study reported here is the development of a new method which allows rapid and accurate in-vitro measurements of three-dimensional (3D) shape of laser ablated craters in hard dental tissues and the determination of crater volume, ablation rate and speed. The method is based on the optical triangulation principle. A laser sheet projector illuminates the surface of a tooth, mounted on a linear translation stage. As the tooth is moved by the translation stage a fast digital video camera captures series of images of the illuminated surface. The images are analyzed to determine a 3D model of the surface. Custom software is employed to analyze the 3D model and to determine the volume of the ablated craters. Key characteristics of the method are discussed as well as some practical aspects pertinent to its use. The method has been employed in an in-vitro study to examine the ablation rates and speeds of the two main laser types currently employed in dentistry, Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG. Ten samples of extracted human molar teeth were irradiated with laser pulse energies from 80 mJ to the maximum available energy (970 mJ with the Er:YAG, and 260 mJ with the Er,Cr:YSGG). About 2000 images of each ablated tooth surface have been acquired along a translation range of 10 mm, taking about 10 s and providing close to 1 million surface measurement points. Volumes of 170 ablated craters (half of them in dentine and the other half in enamel) were determined from this data and used to examine the ablated volume per pulse energy and ablation speed. The results show that, under the same conditions, the ablated volume per pulse energy achieved by the Er:YAG laser exceeds that of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser in almost all regimes for dentine and enamel. The maximum Er:YAG laser ablation speeds (1.2 mm 3/s in dentine and 0.7 mm 3/s in enamel) exceed those obtained by the Er,Cr:YSGG laser (0.39 mm 3/s in dentine and 0.12 mm 3/s in enamel). Since the presented method proves to be easy to

  3. Soft tissue management for dental implants: what are the most effective techniques? A Cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Marco; Maghaireh, Hassan; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; Ziounas, Ioannis; Worthington, Helen V

    2012-01-01

    This review is based on a Cochrane systematic review entitled 'Interventions for replacing missing teeth: management of soft tissues for dental implants' published in The Cochrane Library (see http:// www.cochrane.org/ for information). Cochrane systematic reviews are regularly updated to include new research, and in response to comments and criticisms from readers. If you wish to comment on this review, please send your comments to the Cochrane website or to Marco Esposito. The Cochrane Library should be consulted for the most recent version of the review. The results of a Cochrane review can be interpreted differently, depending on people's perspectives and circumstances. Please consider the conclusions presented carefully. They are the opinions of the review authors, and are not necessarily shared by the Cochrane Collaboration. To evaluate whether flapless procedures are beneficial for patients and which is the ideal flap design, whether soft tissue correction/augmentation techniques are beneficial for patients and which are the best techniques, whether techniques to increase the peri-implant keratinised mucosa are beneficial for patients and which are the best techniques, and which are the best suturing techniques/ materials. The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched up to the 9th of June 2011 for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of rootform osseointegrated dental implants, with a follow-up of at least 6 months after function, comparing various techniques to handle soft tissues in relation to dental implants. Primary outcome measures were prosthetic failures, implant failures and biological complications. Screening of eligible studies, assessment of the methodological quality of the trials and data extraction were conducted at least in duplicate and independently by two or more review authors. The statistical unit was the patient and not the prosthesis, the procedure or the implant. RESULTS were expressed

  4. Topographic characterisation of dental implants for commercial use.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Arnau, A; Vallecillo-Capilla, M-F; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M-Á; Rosales-Leal, J-I

    2016-09-01

    To characterize the surface topography of several dental implants for commercial use. Dental implants analyzed were Certain (Biomet 3i), Tissue Level (Straumann), Interna (BTI), MG-InHex (MozoGrau), SPI (Alphabio) and Hikelt (Bioner). Surface topography was ascertained using a confocal microscope with white light. Roughness parameters obtained were: Ra, Rq, Rv, Rp, Rt, Rsk and Rku. The results were analysed using single-factor ANOVA and Student-Neuman-Keuls (p<0.05) tests. Certain and Hikelt obtained the highest Ra and Rq scores, followed by Tissue Level. Interna and SPI obtained lower scores, and MG-InHex obtained the lowest score. Rv scores followed the same trend. Certain obtained the highest Rp score, followed by SPI and Hikelt, then Interna and Tissue Level. MG-InHex obtained the lowest scores. Certain obtained the highest Rt score, followed by Interna and Hikelt, then SPI and Tissue Level. The lowest scores were for MG-InHex. Rsk was negative (punctured surface) in the MG-InHex, SPI and Tissue Level systems, and positive (pointed surface) in the other systems. Rku was higher than 3 (Leptokurtic) in Tissue Level, Interna, MG-InHex and SPI, and lower than 3 (Platykurtic) in Certain and Hikelt. The type of implant determines surface topography, and there are differences in the roughness parameters of the various makes of implants for clinical use.

  5. Evaluation of erbium:YAG and holmium:YAG laser radiation and dental hard tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attrill, David Cameron

    Lasers have become increasingly established in medicine as effective alternatives or adjuncts to conventional techniques. In dentistry, several clinical laser systems have been developed and marketed, but their applications have been limited to soft tissue surgery. To date, no laser has been capable of effectively cutting or modifying the highly mineralised dental tissues of enamel and dentine. The aim of this study was to evaluate two new laser systems for use in dentistry through a series of in vitro experiments. Both generic erbium and holmium lasers have theoretically superior operating characteristics over currently established lasers for applications with dental hard tissues. The two lasers investigated in this study were pulsed Er:YAG (lambda=2.94) a.m. and Cr-Tm-Ho:YAG (lambda=2.1mu.m). Both operated with a macropulse duration of approximately 200lambdas, at pulse repetition rates of 2-8Hz and mean pulse energies up to 230mJ. Radiation was focused using CaF[2] lenses (f=50-120mm). The lasers could be operated with or without the addition of a surface water film at the interaction site. Tissue removal efficiency was expressed as a latent heat of ablation (LHA, kJ/cm[3]) using a modification of the technique described by Charlton et al. (1990). The mean LHA's for the Er:YAG laser were 6.24kJ/cm[3] and 22.99kJ/cm[3] with dentine and enamel respectively without water, and 10.07kJ/cm[3] and 18.73kJ/cm[3] for dentine and enamel with water. The Cr-Tm-Ho:YAG laser was unable to effectively remove enamel at the fluences and pulse energies available; the mean LHA's for the Cr-Tm- Ho:YAG laser with dentine were 82.79kJ/cm3 and 57.57kJ/cm3 with and without water respectively. The Cr-Tm-Ho;YAG was approximately 8-9 times less efficient for tissue removal than the Er:YAG system. Er:YAG tissue removal with water was characterised by clean "surgical" cuts, comparable in histological appearance to those obtained using conventional instrumentation. Some thermal disruption

  6. Association of Emotional Labor, Self-efficacy, and Type A Personality with Burnout in Korean Dental Hygienists

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between emotional labor and burnout, and whether the levels of self-efficacy and type A personality characteristics increase the risk of burnout in a sample of Korean female dental hygienists. Participants were 807 female dental hygienists with experience in performing customer service for one year or more in dental clinics, dental hospitals, or general hospitals in Korea. Data were collected using a structured self-administered questionnaire. A hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis was used to examine the effects of emotional labor on burnout, and to elucidate the additive effects of self-efficacy and type A personality on burnout. The results showed that “overload and conflict in customer service,” “emotional disharmony and hurt,” and “lack of a supportive and protective system in the organization” were positively associated with burnout. With reference to the relationship between personality traits and burnout, we found that personal traits such as self-efficacy and type A personality were significantly related to burnout, which confirmed the additive effects of self-efficacy and type A personality on burnout. These results indicate that engaging in excessive and prolonged emotional work in customer service roles is more likely to increase burnout. Additionally, an insufficient organizational supportive and protective system toward the negative consequences of emotional labor was found to accelerate burnout. The present findings also revealed that personality traits such as self-efficacy and type A personality are also important in understanding the relationship between emotional labor and burnout. PMID:28776336

  7. Association of Emotional Labor, Self-efficacy, and Type A Personality with Burnout in Korean Dental Hygienists.

    PubMed

    Jeung, Da Yee; Lee, Hyun Ok; Chung, Won Gyun; Yoon, Jin Ha; Koh, Sang Baek; Back, Chi Yun; Hyun, Dae Sung; Chang, Sei Jin

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between emotional labor and burnout, and whether the levels of self-efficacy and type A personality characteristics increase the risk of burnout in a sample of Korean female dental hygienists. Participants were 807 female dental hygienists with experience in performing customer service for one year or more in dental clinics, dental hospitals, or general hospitals in Korea. Data were collected using a structured self-administered questionnaire. A hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis was used to examine the effects of emotional labor on burnout, and to elucidate the additive effects of self-efficacy and type A personality on burnout. The results showed that "overload and conflict in customer service," "emotional disharmony and hurt," and "lack of a supportive and protective system in the organization" were positively associated with burnout. With reference to the relationship between personality traits and burnout, we found that personal traits such as self-efficacy and type A personality were significantly related to burnout, which confirmed the additive effects of self-efficacy and type A personality on burnout. These results indicate that engaging in excessive and prolonged emotional work in customer service roles is more likely to increase burnout. Additionally, an insufficient organizational supportive and protective system toward the negative consequences of emotional labor was found to accelerate burnout. The present findings also revealed that personality traits such as self-efficacy and type A personality are also important in understanding the relationship between emotional labor and burnout. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  8. Ablation by-products of dental materials from the Er:YAG laser and the dental handpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Visuri, Steven R.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1995-05-01

    Recently there has been much interest in lasers and their potential use to replace the dental drill. The research has been directed towards vital dental tissues. It must be understood that any laser to be used in dentistry which will replace the dental drill must also ablate and remove existing dental materials. Some concern exists about the ablation products when the Er:YAG laser is used to ablate dental materials. It is incumbent on the professionals using these lasers to understand the materials being produced by these lasers and protect themselves and their patients from possible toxic products. It is the intent of this paper to evaluate the products produced by the ablation of both dental amalgam and composite dental restorative materials and compare them with those produced by the traditional dental handpiece (drill).

  9. Bioactive and inert dental glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Montazerian, Maziar; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra

    2017-02-01

    The global market for dental materials is predicted to exceed 10 billion dollars by 2020. The main drivers for this growth are easing the workflow of dentists and increasing the comfort of patients. Therefore, remarkable research projects have been conducted and are currently underway to develop improved or new dental materials with enhanced properties or that can be processed using advanced technologies, such as CAD/CAM or 3D printing. Among these materials, zirconia, glass or polymer-infiltrated ceramics, and glass-ceramics (GCs) are of great importance. Dental glass-ceramics are highly attractive because they are easy to process and have outstanding esthetics, translucency, low thermal conductivity, high strength, chemical durability, biocompatibility, wear resistance, and hardness similar to that of natural teeth, and, in certain cases, these materials are bioactive. In this review article, we divide dental GCs into the following two groups: restorative and bioactive. Most restorative dental glass-ceramics (RDGCs) are inert and biocompatible and are used in the restoration and reconstruction of teeth. Bioactive dental glass-ceramics (BDGCs) display bone-bonding ability and stimulate positive biological reactions at the material/tissue interface. BDGCs are suggested for dentin hypersensitivity treatment, implant coating, bone regeneration and periodontal therapy. Throughout this paper, we elaborate on the history, processing, properties and applications of RDGCs and BDGCs. We also report on selected papers that address promising types of dental glass-ceramics. Finally, we include trends and guidance on relevant open issues and research possibilities. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 619-639, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Functionalized scaffolds to control dental pulp stem cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Piva, Evandro; Silva, Adriana F.; Nör, Jacques E.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging understanding about interactions between stem cells, scaffolds and morphogenic factors has accelerated translational research in the field of dental pulp tissue engineering. Dental pulp stem cells constitute a sub-population of cells endowed with self-renewal and multipotency. Dental pulp stem cells seeded in biodegradable scaffolds and exposed to dentin-derived morphogenic signals give rise to a pulp-like tissue capable of generating new dentin. Notably, dentin-derived proteins are sufficient to induce dental pulp stem cell differentiation into odontoblasts. Ongoing work is focused on developing ways of mobilizing dentin-derived proteins and disinfecting the root canal of necrotic teeth without compromising the morphogenic potential of these signaling molecules. On the other hand, dentin by itself does not appear to be capable of inducing endothelial differentiation of dental pulp stem cells, despite the well known presence of angiogenic factors in dentin. This is particularly relevant in the context of dental pulp tissue engineering in full root canals, where access to blood supply is limited to the apical foramina. To address this challenge, scientists are looking at ways to use the scaffold as a controlled release device for angiogenic factors. The aim of this manuscript is to present and discuss current strategies to functionalize injectable scaffolds and customize them for dental pulp tissue engineering. The long-term goal of this work is to develop stem cell-based therapies that enable the engineering of functional dental pulps capable of generating new tubular dentin in humans. PMID:24698691

  11. Effects of gamma radiation on hard dental tissues of albino rats using scanning electron microscope - Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Faramawy, Nabil; Ameen, Reham; El-Haddad, Khaled; Maghraby, Ahmed; El-Zainy, Medhat

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, 40 adult male albino rats were used to study the effect of gamma radiation on the hard dental tissues (enamel surface, dentinal tubules and the cementum surface). The rats were irradiated at 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 6.0 Gy gamma doses. The effects of irradiated hard dental tissues samples were investigated using a scanning electron microscope. For doses up to 0.5 Gy, there was no evidence of the existence of cracks on the enamel surface. With 1 Gy irradiation dose, cracks were clearly observed with localized erosive areas. At 2 Gy irradiation dose, the enamel showed morphological alterations as disturbed prismatic and interprismatic areas. An increase in dentinal tubules diameter and a contemporary inter-tubular dentine volume decrease were observed with higher irradiation dose. Concerning cementum, low doses,<0.5 Gy, showed surface irregularities and with increase in the irradiation dose to≥1 Gy, noticeable surface irregularities and erosive areas with decrease in Sharpey's fiber sites were observed. These observations could shed light on the hazardous effects of irradiation fields to the functioning of the human teeth.

  12. Characteristics of microRNAs enriched in specific cell types and primary tissue types in solid organs.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Alison J; Liu, Yong; Liu, Pengyuan; Baker, Maria Angeles; Hodges, Matthew R; Hua, Xing; Liang, Mingyu

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of miRNA expression and function in specific cell types in solid organs is limited because of difficulty in obtaining appropriate specimens. We used laser capture microdissection to obtain nine tissue regions from rats, including the nucleus of the solitary tract, hypoglossal motor nucleus, ventral respiratory column/pre-Bötzinger complex, and midline raphe nucleus from the brain stem, myocardium and coronary artery from the heart, and glomerulus, proximal convoluted tubule, and medullary thick ascending limb from the kidney. Each tissue region consists of or is enriched for a specific cell type. Differential patterns of miRNA expression obtained by deep sequencing of minute amounts of laser-captured cells were highly consistent with data obtained from real-time PCR analysis. miRNA expression patterns correctly clustered the specimens by tissue regions and then by primary tissue types (neural, muscular, or epithelial). The aggregate difference in miRNA profiles between tissue regions that contained the same primary tissue type was as large as one-half of the aggregate difference between primary tissue types. miRNAs differentially expressed between primary tissue types are more likely to be abundant miRNAs, while miRNAs differentially expressed between tissue regions containing the same primary tissue type were distributed evenly across the abundance spectrum. The tissue type-enriched miRNAs were more likely to target genes enriched for specific functional categories compared with either cell type-enriched miRNAs or randomly selected miRNAs. These data indicate that the role of miRNAs in determining characteristics of primary tissue types may be different than their role in regulating cell type-specific functions in solid organs.

  13. Dental hard tissue modification and removal using sealed transverse excited atmospheric-pressure lasers operating at lambda=9.6 and 10.6 um

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel; Ragadio, Jerome N.; Akrivou, Maria; Featherstone, John D.; Murray, Michael W.; Dickenson, Kevin M.

    2001-04-01

    Pulsed CO2 lasers have been shown to be effective for both removal and modification of dental hard tissue for the treatment of dental caries. In this study, sealed transverse excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) laser systems optimally tuned to the highly absorbed 9.6 micrometers wavelength were investigated for application on dental hard tissue. Conventional TEA lasers produce an initial high energy spike at the beginning of the laser pulse of submicrosecond duration followed by a long tail of about 1 - 4 microsecond(s) . The pulse duration is well matched to the 1 - 2 microsecond(s) thermal relaxation time of the deposited laser energy at 9.6 micrometers and effectively heats the enamel to the temperatures required for surface modification at absorbed fluences of less than 0.5 J/cm2. Thus, the heat deposition in the tooth and the corresponding risk of pulpal necrosis from excessive heat accumulation is minimized. At higher fluences, the high peak power of the laser pulse rapidly initiates a plasma that markedly reduces the ablation rate and efficiency, severely limiting applicability for hard tissue ablation. By lengthening the laser pulse to reduce the energy distributed in the initial high energy spike, the plasma threshold can be raised sufficiently to increase the ablation rate by an order of magnitude. This results in a practical and efficient CO2 laser system for caries ablation and surface modification.

  14. Evaluation of styloid process morphology and calcification types in both genders with different ages and dental status.

    PubMed

    Magat, Guldane; Ozcan, Sevgi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphology and calcification pattern of the styloid process (SP) and to determine their relations with subjects' age, gender, and dental status. 910 panoramic radiographs were stratified by age, dental status and gender. The distance between the points where SP leaves the tympanic plate of the temporal bone and the bony tip of SP was measured. Calcification patterns were classified as : (A) Region 1, tympanohyal alone (B) Region 2, stylohyal alone (C) Region 1 and 2, separate (D) Regions 1 and 2, continuous (E) Regions 1, 2, and 3, continuous (F) Regions 1, 2, and 3, separate (G) Regions 1 and 2, continuous, but separate from 3 (H) Regions 2 and 3, separate (I) Regions 2 and 3, continuous, but separate from 1 (J) Region 3 alone (K) Region 3 and 4, continuous (may include calcification in one other region) (L) No styloid process visible. The right SPs were found to be longer than the left (p<0.05). Types D (right 42.9%, left 42%) and E (right 33.3%, left 30.8%) were the most common morphological calcifications on both sides. No statistical difference was found for bilateral SP length between gender, age, and dental status groups. A significant difference was found only for right SP morphological calcification types as to age groups in both genders (p<0.05). No significant difference was found for SP morphological calcification types according to gender and dental status. The morphological types are formed at their present area. Even though SP calcification type was determined according to the length of SP, age was not an effective factor on the length, but the morphological calcification type of SP. Therefore, factors other than age may have a role in the development of morphological calcification types. Structural characteristics of SP are not associated with age, gender and dental status.

  15. Decellularized Swine Dental Pulp as a Bioscaffold for Pulp Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lei; Gao, Zhenhua; Zhu, Zhao; Zhang, Chunmei; Wang, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    Endodontic regeneration shows promise in treating dental pulp diseases; however, no suitable scaffolds exist for pulp regeneration. Acellular natural extracellular matrix (ECM) is a favorable scaffold for tissue regeneration since the anatomical structure and ECM of the natural tissues or organs are well-preserved. Xenogeneic ECM is superior to autologous or allogeneic ECM in tissue engineering for its unlimited resources. This study investigated the characteristics of decellularized dental pulp ECM from swine and evaluated whether it could mediate pulp regeneration. Dental pulps were acquired from the mandible anterior teeth of swine 12 months of age and decellularized with 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) combined with Triton X-100. Pulp regeneration was conducted by seeding human dental pulp stem cells into decellularized pulp and transplanted subcutaneously into nude mice for 8 weeks. The decellularized pulp demonstrated preserved natural shape and structure without any cellular components. Histological analysis showed excellent ECM preservation and pulp-like tissue, and newly formed mineralized tissues were regenerated after being transplanted in vivo. In conclusion, decellularized swine dental pulp maintains ECM components favoring stem cell proliferation and differentiation, thus representing a suitable scaffold for improving clinical outcomes and functions of teeth with dental pulp diseases. PMID:29387727

  16. [Dental implantation and soft tissue augmentation after ridge preservation in a molar site: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zhao, L P; Zhan, Y L; Hu, W J; Wang, H J; Wei, Y P; Zhen, M; Xu, T; Liu, Y S

    2016-12-18

    For ideal implant rehabilitation, an adequate bone volume, optical implant position, and stable and healthy soft tissue are required. The reduction of alveolar bone and changes in its morphology subsequent to tooth extraction will result in insufficient amount of bone and adversely affect the ability to optimally place dental implants in edentulous sites. Preservation of alveolar bone volume through ridge preservation has been demonstrated to reduce the vertical and horizontal contraction of the alveolar bone crest after tooth extraction and reduce the need for additional bone augmentation procedures during implant placement. In this case, a patient presented with a mandible molar of severe periodontal disease, the tooth was removed as atraumatically as possible and the graft material of Bio-Oss was loosely placed in the alveolar socket without condensation and covered with Bio-Gide to reconstruct the defects of the alveolar ridge. Six months later, there were sufficient height and width of the alveolar ridge for the dental implant, avoiding the need of additional bone augmentation and reducing the complexity and unpredictability of the implant surgery. Soft tissue defects, such as gingival and connective tissue, played crucial roles in long-term implant success. Peri-implant plastic surgery facilitated development of healthy peri-implant structure able to withstand occlusal forces and mucogingival stress. Six months after the implant surgery, the keratinized gingiva was absent in the buccal of the implant and the vestibular groove was a little shallow. The free gingival graft technique was used to solve the vestibulum oris groove supersulcus and the absence of keratinized gingiva around the implant. The deepening of vestibular groove and broadening of keratinized gingiva were conducive to the long-term health and stability of the tissue surrounding the implant. Implant installation and prosthetic restoration showed favorable outcome after six months.

  17. Dental plaque biofilm in oral health and disease.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Chaminda Jayampath; Zhang, Cheng Fei; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera

    2011-01-01

    Dental plaque is an archetypical biofilm composed of a complex microbial community. It is the aetiological agent for major dental diseases such as dental caries and periodontal disease. The clinical picture of these dental diseases is a net result of the cross-talk between the pathogenic dental plaque biofilm and the host tissue response. In the healthy state, both plaque biofilm and adjacent tissues maintain a delicate balance, establishing a harmonious relationship between the two. However, changes occur during the disease process that transform this 'healthy' dental plaque into a 'pathogenic' biofilm. Recent advances in molecular microbiology have improved the understanding of dental plaque biofilm and produced numerous clinical benefits. Therefore, it is imperative that clinicians keep abreast with these new developments in the field of dentistry. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind dental diseases will facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to establish a 'healthy dental plaque biofilm' by modulating both host and microbial factors. In this review, the present authors aim to summarise the current knowledge on dental plaque as a microbial biofilm and its properties in oral health and disease.

  18. Histological transformations of the dental pulp as possible indicator of post mortem interval: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Patricio A; Brizuela, Claudia I; Rodriguez, Ismael A; Muñoz, Samuel; Godoy, Marianela E; Inostroza, Carolina

    2017-10-01

    The correct estimation of the post mortem interval (PMI) can be crucial on the success of a forensic investigation. Diverse methods have been used to estimate PMI, considering physical changes that occur after death, such as mortis algor, livor mortis, among others. Degradation after death of dental pulp is a complex process that has not yet been studied thoroughly. It has been described that pulp RNA degradation could be an indicator of PMI, however this study is limited to 6 days. The tooth is the hardest organ of the human body, and within is confined dental pulp. The pulp morphology is defined as a lax conjunctive tissue with great sensory innervation, abundant microcirculation and great presence of groups of cell types. The aim of this study is to describe the potential use of pulp post mortem alterations to estimate PMI, using a new methodology that will allow obtainment of pulp tissue to be used for histomorphological analysis. The current study will identify potential histological indicators in dental pulp tissue to estimate PMI in time intervals of 24h, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months. This study used 26 teeth from individuals with known PMI of 24h, 1 month, 3 months or 6 months. All samples were manipulated with the new methodology (Carrasco, P. and Inostroza C. inventors; Universidad de los Andes, assignee. Forensic identification, post mortem interval estimation and cause of death determination by recovery of dental tissue. United State patent US 61/826,558 23.05.2013) to extract pulp tissue without the destruction of the tooth. The dental pulp tissues obtained were fixed in formalin for the subsequent generation of histological sections, stained with Hematoxylin Eosin and Masson's Trichrome. All sections were observed under an optical microscope using magnifications of 10× and 40×. The microscopic analysis of the samples showed a progressive transformation of the cellular components and fibers of dental pulp along PMI. These results allowed creating a

  19. A past medical history of gestational diabetes: its medical significance and its dental implications.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Arthur H; Chaudhuri, Gautam; Altman, Lisa

    2007-02-01

    Approximately 7% of pregnant women develop gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a usually transient form of diabetes mellitus, because of the production of some placental and maternal adipose tissue elaborated hormones that alter glucose metabolism. In most women the disorder resolves at delivery, but within 10 years 50% to 70% of these women go on to develop type 2 diabetes. The identification of women with past medical histories of GDM is a clinically useful marker for alerting the dentist to patients at heightened risk of occult type 2 diabetes, with a possible greater risk of developing periodontal disease and dental caries. Screening these patients for diabetes and establishing a preventative dental regimen may result in reducing the number of women with undiagnosed diabetes and diabetes-associated dental and cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Potential of Electrospun Nanofibers for Biomedical and Dental Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Muhammad; Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Vazirzadeh, Masoud; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Bilal; Sefat, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile technique that has gained popularity for various biomedical applications in recent years. Electrospinning is being used for fabricating nanofibers for various biomedical and dental applications such as tooth regeneration, wound healing and prevention of dental caries. Electrospun materials have the benefits of unique properties for instance, high surface area to volume ratio, enhanced cellular interactions, protein absorption to facilitate binding sites for cell receptors. Extensive research has been conducted to explore the potential of electrospun nanofibers for repair and regeneration of various dental and oral tissues including dental pulp, dentin, periodontal tissues, oral mucosa and skeletal tissues. However, there are a few limitations of electrospinning hindering the progress of these materials to practical or clinical applications. In terms of biomaterials aspects, the better understanding of controlled fabrication, properties and functioning of electrospun materials is required to overcome the limitations. More in vivo studies are definitely required to evaluate the biocompatibility of electrospun scaffolds. Furthermore, mechanical properties of such scaffolds should be enhanced so that they resist mechanical stresses during tissue regeneration applications. The objective of this article is to review the current progress of electrospun nanofibers for biomedical and dental applications. In addition, various aspects of electrospun materials in relation to potential dental applications have been discussed. PMID:28787871

  1. Decoronation followed by dental implants placement: fundamentals, applications and explanations

    PubMed Central

    Consolaro, Alberto; Ribeiro, Paulo Domingos; Cardoso, Maurício A.; Miranda, Dario A. Oliveira; Salfatis, Monica

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dental arches areas with teeth presenting dentoalveolar ankylosis and replacement root resorption can be considered as presenting normal bone, in full physiological remodeling process; and osseointegrated implants can be successfully placed. Bone remodeling will promote osseointegration, regardless of presenting ankylosis and/or replacement root resorption. After 1 to 10 years, all dental tissues will have been replaced by bone. The site, angulation and ideal positioning in the space to place the implant should be dictated exclusively by the clinical convenience, associated with previous planning. One of the advantages of decoronation followed by dental implants placement in ankylosed teeth with replacement resorption is the maintenance of bone volume in the region, both vertical and horizontal. If possible, the buccal part of the root, even if thin, should be preserved in the preparation of the cavity for the implant, as this will maintain gingival tissues looking fully normal for long periods. In the selection of cases for decoronation, the absence of microbial contamination in the region - represented by chronic periapical lesions, presence of fistula, old unconsolidated root fractures and active advanced periodontal disease - is important. Such situations are contraindications to decoronation. However, the occurrence of dentoalveolar ankylosis and replacement resorption without contamination should neither change the planning for implant installation, nor the criteria for choosing the type and brand of dental implant to be used. Failure to decoronate and use dental implants has never been reported. PMID:29791693

  2. Using the Monte Carlo method for assessing the tissue and organ doses of patients in dental radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, K. O.; Minenko, V. F.; Verenich, K. A.; Kuten, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    This work is dedicated to modeling dental radiographic examinations to assess the absorbed doses of patients and effective doses. For simulating X-ray spectra, the TASMIP empirical model is used. Doses are assessed on the basis of the Monte Carlo method by using MCNP code for voxel phantoms of ICRP. The results of the assessment of doses to individual organs and effective doses for different types of dental examinations and features of X-ray tube are presented.

  3. Cell-derived micro-environment helps dental pulp stem cells promote dental pulp regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuexin; Li, Hui; Sun, Jingjing; Luo, Xiangyou; Yang, Hefeng; Xie, Li; Yang, Bo; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2017-10-01

    The function of the dental pulp is closely connected to the extracellular matrix (ECM) structure, and ECM has received significant attention due to its biological functions for regulating cells. As such, the interaction between the ECM niche and cells is worth exploring for potential clinical uses. In this study, dental pulp stem cell (DPSC)-derived ECM (DPM) was prepared through cell culture and decellularization to function as the cell niche, and changes in DPSC behaviour and histological analysis of dental pulp tissue regeneration were evaluated following the DPM culture. DPM promoted the replication of DPSCs and exhibited retention of their mineralization. Then, the DPM-based culture strategy under odontogenic culture medium was further investigated, and the mineralization-related markers showed that DPSCs were regulated towards odontogenic differentiation. Dental pulp-like tissue with well-arranged ECM was harvested after a 2-month subcutaneous implantation in nude mice with DPM application. Additionally, DPSCs cultured on the plastic culture surface showed the up-regulation of mineralization makers in vitro, but there was a disorder in matrix formation and mineralization when the cells were cultured in vivo. DPM-based cultivation could serve as a cell niche and modulate DPSC behaviour, and this method also provided an alternative to harvest tissue-specific ECM and provided a strategy for ECM-cell interaction. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Proposal for internet-based Digital Dental Chart for personal dental identification in forensics.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Yoichi; Ueno, Asao; Tsuzuki, Tamiyuki; Kajiwara, Masahiro; Minaguchi, Kiyoshi; Sato, Yoshinobu

    2007-05-03

    A dental chart is very useful as a standard source of evidence in the personal identification of bodies. However, the kind of dental chart available will often vary as a number of types of odontogram have been developed where the visual representation of dental conditions has relied on hand-drawn representation. We propose the Digital Dental Chart (DDC) as a new style of dental chart, especially for open investigations aimed at establishing the identity of unknown bodies. Each DDC is constructed using actual oral digital images and dental data, and is easy to upload onto an Internet website. The DDC is a more useful forensic resource than the standard types of dental chart in current use as it has several advantages, among which are its ability to carry a large volume of information and reproduce dental conditions clearly and in detail on a cost-effective basis.

  5. Topographic characterisation of dental implants for commercial use

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Arnau, Amparo; Vallecillo-Capilla, Manuel-Francisco; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel-Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Background To characterize the surface topography of several dental implants for commercial use. Material and Methods Dental implants analyzed were Certain (Biomet 3i), Tissue Level (Straumann), Interna (BTI), MG-InHex (MozoGrau), SPI (Alphabio) and Hikelt (Bioner). Surface topography was ascertained using a confocal microscope with white light. Roughness parameters obtained were: Ra, Rq, Rv, Rp, Rt, Rsk and Rku. The results were analysed using single-factor ANOVA and Student-Neuman-Keuls(p<0.05) tests. Results Certain and Hikelt obtained the highest Ra and Rq scores, followed by Tissue Level. Interna and SPI obtained lower scores, and MG-InHex obtained the lowest score. Rv scores followed the same trend. Certain obtained the highest Rp score, followed by SPI and Hikelt, then Interna and Tissue Level. MG-InHex obtained the lowest scores. Certain obtained the highest Rt score, followed by Interna and Hikelt, then SPI and Tissue Level. The lowest scores were for MG-InHex. Rsk was negative (punctured surface) in the MG-InHex, SPI and Tissue Level systems, and positive (pointed surface) in the other systems. Rku was higher than 3 (Leptokurtic) in Tissue Level, Interna, MG-InHex and SPI, and lower than 3 (Platykurtic) in Certain and Hikelt. Conclusions The type of implant determines surface topography, and there are differences in the roughness parameters of the various makes of implants for clinical use. Key words:Implants for clinical use, topography, confocal microscopy. PMID:27475680

  6. Heterogeneity and Developmental Connections between Cell Types Inhabiting Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Krivanek, Jan; Adameyko, Igor; Fried, Kaj

    2017-01-01

    Every tissue is composed of multiple cell types that are developmentally, evolutionary and functionally integrated into the unit we call an organ. Teeth, our organs for biting and mastication, are complex and made of many different cell types connected or disconnected in terms of their ontogeny. In general, epithelial and mesenchymal compartments represent the major framework of tooth formation. Thus, they give rise to the two most important matrix–producing populations: ameloblasts generating enamel and odontoblasts producing dentin. However, the real picture is far from this quite simplified view. Diverse pulp cells, the immune system, the vascular system, the innervation and cells organizing the dental follicle all interact, and jointly participate in transforming lifeless matrix into a functional organ that can sense and protect itself. Here we outline the heterogeneity of cell types that inhabit the tooth, and also provide a life history of the major populations. The mouse model system has been indispensable not only for the studies of cell lineages and heterogeneity, but also for the investigation of dental stem cells and tooth patterning during development. Finally, we briefly discuss the evolutionary aspects of cell type diversity and dental tissue integration. PMID:28638345

  7. Femtosecond lasers as novel tool in dental surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbin, J.; Bauer, T.; Fallnich, C.; Kasenbacher, A.; Arnold, W. H.

    2002-09-01

    There is a proven potential of femtosecond lasers for medical applications like cornea shaping [1], ear surgery or dental surgery [2]. Minimal invasive treatment of carious tissue has become an increasingly important aspect in modern dentistry. State of the art methods like grinding using turbine-driven drills or ablation by Er:YAG lasers [3] generate mechanical and thermal stress, thus generating micro cracks of several tens of microns in the enamel [4]. These cracks are starting points for new carious attacks and have to be avoided for long term success of the dental treatment. By using femtosecond lasers (1 fs=10 -15 s) for ablating dental tissue, these drawbacks can be overcome. We have demonstrated that femtosecond laser ablation offers a tool for crack-free generation of cavities in dental tissue. Furthermore, spectral analysis of the laser induced plasma has been used to indicate carious oral tissue. Our latest results on femtosecond laser dentistry will be presented, demonstrating the great potential of this kind of laser technology in medicine.

  8. Tooth Eruption Results from Bone Remodelling Driven by Bite Forces Sensed by Soft Tissue Dental Follicles: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sarrafpour, Babak; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing; Zoellner, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent tongue, lip and cheek forces influence precise tooth position, so we here examine the possibility that tissue remodelling driven by functional bite-force-induced jaw-strain accounts for tooth eruption. Notably, although a separate true ‘eruptive force’ is widely assumed, there is little direct evidence for such a force. We constructed a three dimensional finite element model from axial computerized tomography of an 8 year old child mandible containing 12 erupted and 8 unerupted teeth. Tissues modelled included: cortical bone, cancellous bone, soft tissue dental follicle, periodontal ligament, enamel, dentine, pulp and articular cartilage. Strain and hydrostatic stress during incisive and unilateral molar bite force were modelled, with force applied via medial and lateral pterygoid, temporalis, masseter and digastric muscles. Strain was maximal in the soft tissue follicle as opposed to surrounding bone, consistent with follicle as an effective mechanosensor. Initial numerical analysis of dental follicle soft tissue overlying crowns and beneath the roots of unerupted teeth was of volume and hydrostatic stress. To numerically evaluate biological significance of differing hydrostatic stress levels normalized for variable finite element volume, ‘biological response units’ in Nmm were defined and calculated by multiplication of hydrostatic stress and volume for each finite element. Graphical representations revealed similar overall responses for individual teeth regardless if incisive or right molar bite force was studied. There was general compression in the soft tissues over crowns of most unerupted teeth, and general tension in the soft tissues beneath roots. Not conforming to this pattern were the unerupted second molars, which do not erupt at this developmental stage. Data support a new hypothesis for tooth eruption, in which the follicular soft tissues detect bite-force-induced bone-strain, and direct bone remodelling at the inner surface of

  9. Tooth eruption results from bone remodelling driven by bite forces sensed by soft tissue dental follicles: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Sarrafpour, Babak; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing; Zoellner, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent tongue, lip and cheek forces influence precise tooth position, so we here examine the possibility that tissue remodelling driven by functional bite-force-induced jaw-strain accounts for tooth eruption. Notably, although a separate true 'eruptive force' is widely assumed, there is little direct evidence for such a force. We constructed a three dimensional finite element model from axial computerized tomography of an 8 year old child mandible containing 12 erupted and 8 unerupted teeth. Tissues modelled included: cortical bone, cancellous bone, soft tissue dental follicle, periodontal ligament, enamel, dentine, pulp and articular cartilage. Strain and hydrostatic stress during incisive and unilateral molar bite force were modelled, with force applied via medial and lateral pterygoid, temporalis, masseter and digastric muscles. Strain was maximal in the soft tissue follicle as opposed to surrounding bone, consistent with follicle as an effective mechanosensor. Initial numerical analysis of dental follicle soft tissue overlying crowns and beneath the roots of unerupted teeth was of volume and hydrostatic stress. To numerically evaluate biological significance of differing hydrostatic stress levels normalized for variable finite element volume, 'biological response units' in Nmm were defined and calculated by multiplication of hydrostatic stress and volume for each finite element. Graphical representations revealed similar overall responses for individual teeth regardless if incisive or right molar bite force was studied. There was general compression in the soft tissues over crowns of most unerupted teeth, and general tension in the soft tissues beneath roots. Not conforming to this pattern were the unerupted second molars, which do not erupt at this developmental stage. Data support a new hypothesis for tooth eruption, in which the follicular soft tissues detect bite-force-induced bone-strain, and direct bone remodelling at the inner surface of the

  10. Therapeutic potential of dental stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Chalisserry, Elna Paul; Nam, Seung Yun; Park, Sang Hyug; Anil, Sukumaran

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell biology has become an important field in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering therapy since the discovery and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells. Stem cell populations have also been isolated from human dental tissues, including dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla, dental follicle progenitor cells, and periodontal ligament stem cells. Dental stem cells are relatively easily obtainable and exhibit high plasticity and multipotential capabilities. The dental stem cells represent a gold standard for neural-crest-derived bone reconstruction in humans and can be used for the repair of body defects in low-risk autologous therapeutic strategies. The bioengineering technologies developed for tooth regeneration will make substantial contributions to understand the developmental process and will encourage future organ replacement by regenerative therapies in a wide variety of organs such as the liver, kidney, and heart. The concept of developing tooth banking and preservation of dental stem cells is promising. Further research in the area has the potential to herald a new dawn in effective treatment of notoriously difficult diseases which could prove highly beneficial to mankind in the long run. PMID:28616151

  11. Noninvasive Assessment of Early Dental Lesion Using a Dual-Contrast Photoacoustic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Renxiang; Shao, Jiaojiao; Gao, Xiaoxiang; Tao, Chao; Ge, Jiuyu; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Dental hard tissue lesions, including caries, cracked-tooth, etc., are the most prevalent diseases of people worldwide. Dental lesions and correlative diseases greatly decrease the life quality of patients throughout their lifetime. It is still hard to noninvasively detect these dental lesions in their early stages. Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging hybrid technology combining the high spatial resolution of ultrasound in deep tissue with the rich optical contrasts. In this study, a dual-contrast photoacoustic tomography is applied to detect the early dental lesions. One contrast, named B-mode, is related to the optical absorption. It is good at providing the sharp image about the morphological and macro-structural features of the teeth. Another contrast, named S-mode, is associated with the micro-structural and mechanical properties of the hard tissue. It is sensitive to the change of tissue properties induced by the early dental lesions. Experiments show that the comprehensive analysis of dual-contrast information can provide reliable information of the early dental lesions. Moreover, the imaging parameter of S-mode is device-independent and it could measure tissue properties quantitatively. We expect that the proposed scheme could be beneficial for improving safety, accuracy and sensitivity of the clinical diagnosis of the dental lesion. PMID:26902394

  12. Noninvasive Assessment of Early Dental Lesion Using a Dual-Contrast Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Renxiang; Shao, Jiaojiao; Gao, Xiaoxiang; Tao, Chao; Ge, Jiuyu; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    Dental hard tissue lesions, including caries, cracked-tooth, etc., are the most prevalent diseases of people worldwide. Dental lesions and correlative diseases greatly decrease the life quality of patients throughout their lifetime. It is still hard to noninvasively detect these dental lesions in their early stages. Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging hybrid technology combining the high spatial resolution of ultrasound in deep tissue with the rich optical contrasts. In this study, a dual-contrast photoacoustic tomography is applied to detect the early dental lesions. One contrast, named B-mode, is related to the optical absorption. It is good at providing the sharp image about the morphological and macro-structural features of the teeth. Another contrast, named S-mode, is associated with the micro-structural and mechanical properties of the hard tissue. It is sensitive to the change of tissue properties induced by the early dental lesions. Experiments show that the comprehensive analysis of dual-contrast information can provide reliable information of the early dental lesions. Moreover, the imaging parameter of S-mode is device-independent and it could measure tissue properties quantitatively. We expect that the proposed scheme could be beneficial for improving safety, accuracy and sensitivity of the clinical diagnosis of the dental lesion.

  13. Polarization sensitive camera for the in vitro diagnostic and monitoring of dental erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossen, Anke; Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Lussi, Adrian; Meier, Christoph

    Due to a frequent consumption of acidic food and beverages, the prevalence of dental erosion increases worldwide. In an initial erosion stage, the hard dental tissue is softened due to acidic demineralization. As erosion progresses, a gradual tissue wear occurs resulting in thinning of the enamel. Complete loss of the enamel tissue can be observed in severe clinical cases. Therefore, it is essential to provide a diagnosis tool for an accurate detection and monitoring of dental erosion already at early stages. In this manuscript, we present the development of a polarization sensitive imaging camera for the visualization and quantification of dental erosion. The system consists of two CMOS cameras mounted on two sides of a polarizing beamsplitter. A horizontal linearly polarized light source is positioned orthogonal to the camera to ensure an incidence illumination and detection angles of 45°. The specular reflected light from the enamel surface is collected with an objective lens mounted on the beam splitter and divided into horizontal (H) and vertical (V) components on each associate camera. Images of non-eroded and eroded enamel surfaces at different erosion degrees were recorded and assessed with diagnostic software. The software was designed to generate and display two types of images: distribution of the reflection intensity (V) and a polarization ratio (H-V)/(H+V) throughout the analyzed tissue area. The measurements and visualization of these two optical parameters, i.e. specular reflection intensity and the polarization ratio, allowed detection and quantification of enamel erosion at early stages in vitro.

  14. Flemish general dental practitioners' knowledge of dental radiology

    PubMed Central

    Aps, J K M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess general dental practitioners' knowledge of dental radiography and radiation protection in order to alert the Belgian authorities and dental professional societies. Prior to attending a postgraduate course on intraoral radiology, general dental practitioners in Flanders, Belgium, were asked to fill in a questionnaire regarding the radiological equipment and the techniques they used for intraoral radiography. The availability and type of dental panoramic equipment were also assessed. A total of 374 questionnaires were available for this study. 15% of the attendants used radiographic equipment that was more than 27 years old and 43% reported equipment that operated with a clockwork timer. 32% and 75% respectively had no idea what the kV or mA settings were on their intraoral equipment. 5% were unaware which cone geometry or geometric technique (paralleling or bisecting angle technique) they were using. 81% claimed to be using a short cone technique. 47% did not know what collimation meant, whereas 40% stated that they were using circular collimation. 38% used digital intraoral image detectors (63% were photostimulable storage phosphorplate (PSPP)), but 16% were not sure about the type of sensor they were using (PSPP or solid-state sensors). 61% also had dental panoramic equipment available, 25% of which was digital (10% charge coupled device (CCD) and 15% PSPP). These results clearly indicate the need for continued education on this subject. The latter is an important signal to Belgian authorities and dental professional societies. PMID:20100924

  15. Retinal tissue thickness in type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Pritchard, Nicola; Sampson, Geoff P; Edwards, Katie; Vagenas, Dimitrios; Russell, Anthony W; Malik, Rayaz A; Efron, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to investigate full retinal and inner retinal thickness in individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Eighty-four individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), 67 individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and 42 non-diabetic individuals (control group) were enrolled. Participants underwent full retinal thickness evaluation in the central retinal, parafoveal and perifoveal zones and in the retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) and ganglion cell complex (GCC), using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. As a preliminary step, the key variables of interest - age, sex, diabetic retinopathy (DR), duration of diabetes and HbA1c levels - were analysed and compared between the three groups. Full retinal thickness, RNFL and GCC thicknesses were also compared between the groups. The relationship between the type of diabetes and retinal tissue thickness was explored, adjusting for the five potential confounders. Compared to individuals with T1DM, individuals with T2DM had significantly reduced full retinal thickness in the parafovea and perifovea and reduced RNFL and GCC thickness. The mean differences were six (p = 0.020), seven (p = 0.008), six (p = 0.021) and four micrometres (p = 0.013) for the parafovea, perifovea, RNFL and GCC thicknesses, respectively. Thicknesses within the central zone (p = 0.018) and at the parafovea (p = 0.007) were significantly reduced in T2DM when compared to the control group. After adjusting for age, sex, diabetic retinopathy, duration of diabetes and HbA1c levels, the relationship between type of diabetes and retinal tissue thickness was not statistically significant (p > 0.056). Retinal tissue thickness is not significantly different between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, when adjusted for age, sex, diabetic retinopathy, duration of diabetes and HbA1c levels. © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  16. Unilateral and bilateral dental transpositions in the maxilla-dental and skeletal findings in 63 individuals.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, J C; Karimian, K; Ciarlantini, R; Melsen, B; Kjær, I

    2015-12-01

    This was to elucidate dental and skeletal findings in individuals with unilateral and bilateral maxillary dental transpositions. The sample comprised of radiographic materials from 63 individuals with maxillary dental transpositions from the Departments of Odontology at the Universities of Copenhagen and Aarhus and by the Danish municipal orthodontic service. The cases were divided into three groups: unilateral transposition of the canine and first premolar (Type 1U), bilateral transposition of canine and first premolar (Type 1B), and unilateral transposition of canine and lateral incisor (Type 2). The dentitions were analysed regarding agenesis and dental morphological anomalies on panoramic radiographs, and craniofacial aspects were cephalometrically analysed on profile images The results were statistically evaluated. All groups demonstrated increased occurrences of agenesis (Type 1U and Type 1B: 31 agenesis in 15 patients; and Type 2 three agenesis in three patients). Taurodontic root morphology was most dominant in Type 1U. Peg-shaped lateral incisors showed an increased occurrence, though not in Type 1U. Skeletally, Type 1B and Type 1U demonstrated maxillary retrognathia (more pronounced in Type 1B). Type 2 showed a significant posterior inclination of the maxilla. Transpositions of maxillary canines involve dental and skeletal deviations. Dental deviations were predominantly taurodontic root morphology and agenesis. Regarding skeletal deviations, bilateral transpositions of the canines and the first premolars are associated with skeletal changes. Unilateral transpositions are possibly a localised deviation with minor or no skeletal involvements. The results indicate a possible difference in the aetiologies of unilateral and bilateral transpositions.

  17. Assessing patterns of restorative and preventive care among children enrolled in Medicaid, by type of dental care provider.

    PubMed

    Taichman, L Susan; Sohn, Woosung; Lim, Sungwoo; Eklund, Stephen; Ismail, Amid

    2009-07-01

    The authors investigate the relationship of preventive dental treatment to subsequent receipt of comprehensive treatment among Medicaid-enrolled children. The authors analyzed Medicaid dental claims data for 50,485 children residing in Wayne County, Mich. The study sample included children aged 5 through 12 years in 2002 who had been enrolled in Medicaid for at least one month and had had at least one dental visit each year from 2002 through 2005. The authors assessed dental care utilization and treatment patterns cross-sectionally for each year and longitudinally. Among the Medicaid-enrolled children in 2002, 42 percent had had one or more dental visits during the year. At least 20 percent of the children with a dental visit in 2002 were treated by providers who billed Medicaid exclusively for diagnostic and preventive (DP) services. Children treated by DP care providers were less likely to receive restorative and/or surgical services than were children who were treated by dentists who provided a comprehensive mix of dental services. The logistic model showed that children who visited a DP-care provider were about 2.5 times less likely to receive restorative or surgical treatments than were children who visited comprehensive-care providers. Older children and African-American children were less likely to receive restorative and surgical treatments from both types of providers. The study results show that the type of provider is a significant determinant of whether children received comprehensive restorative and surgical services. The results suggest that current policies that support preventive care-only programs may achieve increased access to preventive care for Medicaid-enrolled children in Wayne County, but they do not provide access to adequate comprehensive dental care.

  18. Expression of high mobility group box 1 in inflamed dental pulp and its chemotactic effect on dental pulp cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xufang, E-mail: xufang.zhang@student.qut.edu.au; Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4059; Jiang, Hongwei, E-mail: jianghw@163.com

    Highlights: • HMGB1 translocated from nucleus to cytoplasm during dental pulp inflammation. • HMGB1and its receptor RAGE were up-regulated in hDPCs under LPS stimulation. • HMGB1 enhanced hDPCs migration and induces cytoskeleton reorganization. • HMGB1 may play a critical role in dental pulp repair during inflamed state. - Abstract: High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a chromatin protein which can be released extracellularly, eliciting a pro-inflammatory response and promoting tissue repair process. This study aimed to examine the expression and distribution of HMGB1 and its receptor RAGE in inflamed dental pulp tissues, and to assess its effects onmore » proliferation, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured human dental pulp cells (DPCs). Our data demonstrated that cytoplasmic expression of HMGB1 was observed in inflamed pulp tissues, while HMGB1 expression was confined in the nuclei in healthy dental pulp. The mRNA expression of HMGB1 and RAGE were significantly increased in inflamed pulps. In in vitro cultured DPCs, expression of HMGB1 in both protein and mRNA level was up-regulated after treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exogenous HMGB1 enhanced DPCs migration in a dose-dependent manner and induced the reorganization of f-actin in DPCs. Our results suggests that HMGB1 are not only involved in the process of dental pulp inflammation, but also play an important role in the recruitment of dental pulp stem cells, promoting pulp repair and regeneration.« less

  19. The Psychosomatic Disorders Pertaining to Dental Practice with Revised Working Type Classification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Psychosomatic disorders are defined as disorders characterized by physiological changes that originate partially from emotional factors. This article aims to discuss the psychosomatic disorders of the oral cavity with a revised working type classification. The author has added one more subset to the existing classification, i.e., disorders caused by altered perception of dentofacial form and function, which include body dysmorphic disorder. The author has also inserted delusional halitosis under the miscellaneous disorders classification of psychosomatic disorders and revised the already existing classification proposed for the psychosomatic disorders pertaining to dental practice. After the inclusion of the subset (disorders caused by altered perception of dentofacial form and function), the terminology "psychosomatic disorders of the oral cavity" is modified to "psychosomatic disorders pertaining to dental practice". PMID:24478896

  20. The psychosomatic disorders pertaining to dental practice with revised working type classification.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2014-01-01

    Psychosomatic disorders are defined as disorders characterized by physiological changes that originate partially from emotional factors. This article aims to discuss the psychosomatic disorders of the oral cavity with a revised working type classification. The author has added one more subset to the existing classification, i.e., disorders caused by altered perception of dentofacial form and function, which include body dysmorphic disorder. The author has also inserted delusional halitosis under the miscellaneous disorders classification of psychosomatic disorders and revised the already existing classification proposed for the psychosomatic disorders pertaining to dental practice. After the inclusion of the subset (disorders caused by altered perception of dentofacial form and function), the terminology "psychosomatic disorders of the oral cavity" is modified to "psychosomatic disorders pertaining to dental practice".

  1. Waardenburg syndrome type I: Dental phenotypes and genetic analysis of an extended family.

    PubMed

    Sólia-Nasser, L; de Aquino, S-N; Paranaíba, L-M R; Gomes, A; Dos-Santos-Neto, P; Coletta, R-D; Cardoso, A-F; Frota, A-C; Martelli-Júnior, H

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of inheritance and the clinical features in a large family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1), detailing the dental abnormalities and screening for PAX3 mutations. To characterize the pattern of inheritance and clinical features, 29 family members were evaluated by dermatologic, ophthalmologic, otorhinolaryngologic and orofacial examination. Molecular analysis of the PAX3 gene was performed. The pedigree of the family,including the last four generations, was constructed and revealed non-consanguineous marriages. Out of 29 descendants, 16 family members showed features of WS1, with 9 members showing two major criteria indicative of WS1. Five patients showed white forelock and iris hypopigmentation, and four showed dystopia canthorum and iris hypopigmentation. Two patients had hearing loss. Dental abnormalities were identified in three family members, including dental agenesis, conical teeth and taurodontism. Sequencing analysis failed to identify mutations in the PAX3 gene. These results confirm that WS1 was transmitted in this family in an autosomal dominant pattern with variable expressivity and high penetrance. The presence of dental manifestations, especially tooth agenesis and conical teeth which resulted in considerable aesthetic impact on affected individuals was a major clinical feature. This article reveals the presence of well-defined dental changes associated with WS1 and tries to establish a possible association between these two entities showing a new spectrum of WS1.

  2. Zirconia in dental implantology: A review

    PubMed Central

    Apratim, Abhishek; Eachempati, Prashanti; Krishnappa Salian, Kiran Kumar; Singh, Vijendra; Chhabra, Saurabh; Shah, Sanket

    2015-01-01

    Background: Titanium has been the most popular material of choice for dental implantology over the past few decades. Its properties have been found to be most suitable for the success of implant treatment. But recently, zirconia is slowly emerging as one of the materials which might replace the gold standard of dental implant, i.e., titanium. Materials and Methods: Literature was searched to retrieve information about zirconia dental implant and studies were critically analyzed. PubMed database was searched for information about zirconia dental implant regarding mechanical properties, osseointegration, surface roughness, biocompatibility, and soft tissue health around it. The literature search was limited to English language articles published from 1975 to 2015. Results: A total of 45 papers met the inclusion criteria for this review, among the relevant search in the database. Conclusion: Literature search showed that some of the properties of zirconia seem to be suitable for making it an ideal dental implant, such as biocompatibility, osseointegration, favourable soft tissue response and aesthetics due to light transmission and its color. At the same time, some studies also point out its drawbacks. It was also found that most of the studies on zirconia dental implants are short-term studies and there is a need for more long-term clinical trials to prove that zirconia is worth enough to replace titanium as a biomaterial in dental implantology. PMID:26236672

  3. Factors Influencing Dental Patient Participation in Biobanking and Biomedical Research.

    PubMed

    Hassona, Yazan; Ahram, Mamoun; Odeh, Noorah; Abu Gosh, Mais; Scully, Crispian

    To study the willingness of dental patients to donate biospecimens for research purpose and to examine factors that may influence such a decision. A face-to-face interview was conducted using a pretested structured survey instrument on 408 adult dental patients attending a university hospital for dental care. Descriptive statistics were generated, and the x03C7;2 test was used to examine differences between groups. p values ≤0.5 were considered statistically significant. Of the 408 participants, only 71 (17.4%) had heard of the terms biobanking/biospecimens, but 293 (71.9%) approved of the idea of using biospecimens for biomedical research, and 228 (55.9%) were willing to donate biospecimens and give personal information for research purposes. In participants who were unwilling to participate in biobanking, fear of information leakage was the most frequently reported reason, while in participants who were willing to donate biospecimens, the potential to provide more effective and less costly treatments was the most frequently reported reason. The preferences of the 228 participants who were willing to donate biospecimens were as follows: give a sample of removed oral tissues including extracted teeth (n = 105, 46.1%), donate a blood sample (n = 52, 23%), donate a sample of saliva (n = 43, 18.6%), and give a urine sample (n = 28, 12.3%). Dental patients had a generally positive attitude towards biomedical research and biobanking. The most preferred types of biospecimens to donate in a dental setting were removed tissues, including extracted teeth and blood samples. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Do Dental X-Rays Induce Genotoxicity and Cytotoxicity in Oral Mucosa Cells? A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Angelieri, Fernanda; Yujra, Veronica Quispe; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2017-10-01

    Dental X-rays are widely used in clinical practice, since the technique is an important approach for diagnosing diseases in dental and periodontal tissues. However, it is widely known that radiation is capable of causing damage to cellular systems, such as genotoxicity or cytotoxicity. Thus, the aim of this review was to present a critical analysis regarding the studies published on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity induced by dental X-rays in oral mucosa cells. Such studies have revealed that some oral cell types are more sensitive than others following exposure to dental X-rays. Certainly, this review will contribute to a better understanding of this matter as well as to highlighting perspectives for further studies. Ultimately, such data will promote better safety for both patients and dental professionals. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  5. Burnout, depression and suicidal ideation in dental and dental hygiene students.

    PubMed

    Deeb, George R; Braun, Sarah; Carrico, Caroline; Kinser, Patricia; Laskin, Daniel; Golob Deeb, Janina

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between burnout, depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation in dental and dental hygiene students and to evaluate the influence of gender, programme type and year of study. Third- and fourth-year dental (DS) and first- and second-year hygiene students (DHS) completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and an abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory online as measures of depressive symptoms/suicidality and burnout, respectively. The statistical analyses included summary statistics and tests for intergroup comparisons (chi-square) to evaluate the influence of gender, programme type (DHS or DS) and year of study. Correlations between depression, suicidality and burnout were also conducted. A total of 32 dental hygiene and 119 dental students participated. 40% of the dental and 38% of the hygiene students met criteria for burnout. No differences were found between years or between programmes. Nine per cent of both dental and hygiene students were above the cut-off for moderate depressive symptoms, but there were no statistical differences between the third- and fourth-year dental and the first- and second-year hygiene students. Six per cent of the dental and 9% of the dental hygiene students were above the cut-off for clinically significant suicidal ideation, but there were no statistical differences between dental and hygiene students. There were no differences noted in the dental students based on gender for any of the measures. Depression was significantly associated with all three subscales of burnout. Suicidal ideation was only significantly related to the lack of personal accomplishment subscale of burnout. These findings suggest the need for introducing preventive measures for such affective states in dental and dental hygiene training programmes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Influence of the mechanical environment on the engineering of mineralised tissues using human dental pulp stem cells and silk fibroin scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Woloszyk, Anna; Holsten Dircksen, Sabrina; Bostanci, Nagihan; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra; Mitsiadis, Thimios A

    2014-01-01

    Teeth constitute a promising source of stem cells that can be used for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine purposes. Bone loss in the craniofacial complex due to pathological conditions and severe injuries could be treated with new materials combined with human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) that have the same embryonic origin as craniofacial bones. Optimising combinations of scaffolds, cells, growth factors and culture conditions still remains a great challenge. In the present study, we evaluate the mineralisation potential of hDPSCs seeded on porous silk fibroin scaffolds in a mechanically dynamic environment provided by spinner flask bioreactors. Cell-seeded scaffolds were cultured in either standard or osteogenic media in both static and dynamic conditions for 47 days. Histological analysis and micro-computed tomography of the samples showed low levels of mineralisation when samples were cultured in static conditions (0.16±0.1 BV/TV%), while their culture in a dynamic environment with osteogenic medium and weekly µCT scans (4.9±1.6 BV/TV%) significantly increased the formation of homogeneously mineralised structures, which was also confirmed by the elevated calcium levels (4.5±1.0 vs. 8.8±1.7 mg/mL). Molecular analysis of the samples showed that the expression of tooth correlated genes such as Dentin Sialophosphoprotein and Nestin were downregulated by a factor of 6.7 and 7.4, respectively, in hDPSCs when cultured in presence of osteogenic medium. This finding indicates that hDPSCs are able to adopt a non-dental identity by changing the culture conditions only. Also an increased expression of Osteocalcin (1.4x) and Collagen type I (1.7x) was found after culture under mechanically dynamic conditions in control medium. In conclusion, the combination of hDPSCs and silk scaffolds cultured under mechanical loading in spinner flask bioreactors could offer a novel and promising approach for bone tissue engineering where appropriate and rapid bone

  7. Periodontal Diseases and Dental Caries in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Novotna, Marta; Podzimek, Stepan; Broukal, Zdenek; Lencova, Erika; Duskova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease of an autoimmune origin with early manifestation predominantly in the childhood. Its incidence has been rising in most European countries. Diabetes has been intensively studied by all branches of medicine. There were a number of studies investigating oral consequences of diabetes; however, unambiguous conclusions were drawn only for the relationship between diabetes and periodontal impairment. Many studies confirmed higher plaque levels and higher incidence of chronic gingivitis both in adults and in children with diabetes. Juvenile periodontitis is rare both in healthy subjects and in those with type 1 diabetes. Yet certain findings from well-conducted studies, for example, differences in oral microflora or the impact of metabolic control of diabetes on periodontal health, indicate a higher risk of periodontitis in children with type 1 diabetes. As for the association of diabetes and dental caries, the results of the studies are inconsistent. However, it was found that some risk factors for dental caries are either more or less prevalent in the diabetic population. Despite an extensive research in this area we have to acknowledge that many questions have remained unanswered. There is a need for continued, thorough research in this area.

  8. Periodontal Diseases and Dental Caries in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Novotna, Marta; Lencova, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease of an autoimmune origin with early manifestation predominantly in the childhood. Its incidence has been rising in most European countries. Diabetes has been intensively studied by all branches of medicine. There were a number of studies investigating oral consequences of diabetes; however, unambiguous conclusions were drawn only for the relationship between diabetes and periodontal impairment. Many studies confirmed higher plaque levels and higher incidence of chronic gingivitis both in adults and in children with diabetes. Juvenile periodontitis is rare both in healthy subjects and in those with type 1 diabetes. Yet certain findings from well-conducted studies, for example, differences in oral microflora or the impact of metabolic control of diabetes on periodontal health, indicate a higher risk of periodontitis in children with type 1 diabetes. As for the association of diabetes and dental caries, the results of the studies are inconsistent. However, it was found that some risk factors for dental caries are either more or less prevalent in the diabetic population. Despite an extensive research in this area we have to acknowledge that many questions have remained unanswered. There is a need for continued, thorough research in this area. PMID:26347009

  9. Drawing Links within Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, J.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines results of a practical drawing task given to a cohort of first year dental surgery students at Kings College Dental Institute, London. It compares and relates their success in drilling and removing caries and pulp tissue from a virtual tooth using the hapTEL virtual learning system, with each individuals' drawing skills.…

  10. Characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from human dental pulp, preapical follicle and periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Navabazam, Ali Reza; Sadeghian Nodoshan, Fatemeh; Sheikhha, Mohammad Hasan; Miresmaeili, Sayyed Mohsen; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Fesahat, Farzaneh

    2013-03-01

    Human dental stem cells have high proliferative potential for self-renewal that is important to the regenerative capacity of the tissue. Objective : The aim was to isolate human dental pulp stem cells (DPSC), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC) and periapical follicle stem cells (PAFSC) for their potential role in tissue regeneration. In this experimental study, the postnatal stem cells were isolated from dental pulp, preapical follicle and periodontal ligament .The cells were stained for different stem cell markers by immunocytochemistry. To investigate the mesenchymal nature of cells, differentiation potential along osteoblastic and adipogenic lineages and gene expression profile were performed. For proliferation potential assay, Brdu staining and growth curve tests were performed. Finally, all three cell types were compared together regarding their proliferation, differentiation and displaying phenotype. The isolated cell populations have similar fibroblastic like morphology and expressed all examined cell surface molecule markers. These cells were capable of differentiating into osteocyte with different capability and adipocyte with the same rate. PAFSCs showed more significant proliferation rate than others. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) for nanog, oct4, Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenease (GADPH) as control gene showed strong positive expression of these genes in all three isolated cell types. PDLSCs, DPSCs and PAFSCs exist in various tissues of the teeth and can use as a source of mesenchymal stem cells for developing bioengineered organs and also in craniomaxillofacial reconstruction with varying efficiency in differentiation and proliferation.

  11. Scaffolds to Control Inflammation and Facilitate Dental Pulp Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, John S.; Moore, Amanda N.; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.; D’Souza, Rena N.

    2014-01-01

    In dentistry, the maintenance of a vital dental pulp is of paramount importance, as teeth devitalized by root canal treatment may become more brittle and prone to structural failure over time. Advanced carious lesions can irreversibly damage the dental pulp by propagating a sustained inflammatory response throughout the tissue. While the inflammatory response initially drives tissue repair, sustained inflammation has an enormously destructive effect on the vital pulp, eventually leading to total necrosis of the tissue and necessitating its removal. The implications of tooth devitalization have driven significant interest in the development of bioactive materials that facilitate the regeneration of damaged pulp tissues by harnessing the capacity of the dental pulp for self-repair. In considering the process by which pulpitis drives tissue destruction, it is clear that an important step in supporting the regeneration of pulpal tissues is the attenuation of inflammation. Macrophages, key mediators of the immune response, may play a critical role in the resolution of pulpitis due to their ability to switch to a pro-resolution phenotype. This process can be driven by the resolvins, a family of molecules derived from fatty acids that show great promise as therapeutic agents. In this review, we outline the importance of preserving the capacity of the dental pulp to self-repair through the rapid attenuation of inflammation. Potential treatment modalities, such as shifting macrophages to a pro-resolving phenotype with resolvins are described, and a range of materials known to support the regeneration of dental pulp are presented. PMID:24698696

  12. Mesenchymal stem cell characteristics of dental pulp and periodontal ligament stem cells after in vivo transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ming; Li, Kun; Li, Bei; Gao, Li-Na; Chen, Fa-Ming; Jin, Yan

    2014-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from human postnatal dental pulp and periodontal ligament (PDL) tissues can give rise to multilineage differentiation in vitro and generate related dental tissues in vivo. However, the cell properties of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and PDL stem cells (PDLSCs) after in vivo implantation remain largely unidentified. In this study, cells were re-isolated from in vivo-generated dental pulp-like and PDL-like tissues (termed re-DPCs and re-PDLCs, respectively) as a result of ectopic transplantation of human DPSC and PDLSC sheets. The cell characteristics in terms of colony-forming ability, cell surface antigens and multi-differentiation potentials were all evaluated before and after implantation. It was found that re-DPCs and re-PDLCs were of human and mesenchymal origin and positive for MSC markers such as STRO-1, CD146, CD29, CD90 and CD105; and, to some extent, re-DPCs could maintain their colony forming abilities. Moreover, both cell types were able to form mineral deposits and differentiate into adipocytes and chondrocytes; however, quantitative analysis and related gene expression determination showed that the osteo-/chondro-differentiation capabilities of re-DPCs and re-PDLCs were significantly reduced compared to those of DPSCs and PDLSCs, respectively (P < 0.05); re-PDLCs showed a greater reduction potential than re-DPCs. We conclude that DPSCs and PDLSCs may maintain their MSC characteristics after in vivo implantation and, compared to PDLSCs, DPSCs appear much more stable under in vivo conditions. These findings provide additional cellular and molecular evidence that supports expanding the use of dental tissue-derived stem cells in cell therapy and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Combined spectroscopic imaging and chemometric approach for automatically partitioning tissue types in human prostate tissue biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Kidder, Linda H.; Lewis, E. Neil

    2001-07-01

    We have applied Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging, coupling a mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) focal plane array detector (FPA) and a Michelson step scan interferometer, to the investigation of various states of malignant human prostate tissue. The MCT FPA used consists of 64x64 pixels, each 61 micrometers 2, and has a spectral range of 2-10.5 microns. Each imaging data set was collected at 16-1 resolution, resulting in 512 image planes and a total of 4096 interferograms. In this article we describe a method for separating different tissue types contained within FTIR spectroscopic imaging data sets of human prostate tissue biopsies. We present images, generated by the Fuzzy C-Means clustering algorithm, which demonstrate the successful partitioning of distinct tissue type domains. Additionally, analysis of differences in the centroid spectra corresponding to different tissue types provides an insight into their biochemical composition. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to partition tissue type regions in a different data set using centroid spectra calculated from the original data set. This has implications for the use of the Fuzzy C-Means algorithm as an automated technique for the separation and examination of tissue domains in biopsy samples.

  14. Familial polythelia associated with dental anomalies: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Gabriel M; Cantín, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Polythelia has been defined as the presence of supernumerary nipples without accessory glandular tissue. Usually, these growths follow imaginary mammary lines running from the armpits to the groin. Although the presence of dental anomalies may occasion only a simple cosmetic problem with specific clinical considerations, the association with familial polythelia has been scarcely reported. This paper reports on a case of polythelia that is associated with dental anomalies in an Argentine family and discusses suggestions for a thorough dental history and medical consultation to prevent possible pathological conditions or potential malignant transformation of mammary tissues.

  15. Tooth Tissue Engineering: The Importance of Blood Products as a Supplement in Tissue Culture Medium for Human Pulp Dental Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Pisciolaro, Ricardo Luiz; Duailibi, Monica Talarico; Novo, Neil Ferreira; Juliano, Yara; Pallos, Debora; Yelick, Pamela Crotty; Vacanti, Joseph Phillip; Ferreira, Lydia Masako; Duailibi, Silvio Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    One of the goals in using cells for tissue engineering (TE) and cell therapy consists of optimizing the medium for cell culture. The present study compares three different blood product supplements for improved cell proliferation and protection against DNA damage in cultured human dental pulp stem cells for tooth TE applications. Human cells from dental pulp were first characterized as adult stem cells (ectomesenchymal mixed origin) by flow cytometry. Next, four different cell culture conditions were tested: I, supplement-free; II, supplemented with fetal bovine serum; III, allogeneic human serum; and IV, autologous human serum. Cultured cells were then characterized for cell proliferation, mineralized nodule formation, and colony-forming units (CFU) capability. After 28 days in culture, the comet assay was performed to assess possible damage in cellular DNA. Our results revealed that Protocol IV achieved higher cell proliferation than Protocol I (p = 0.0112). Protocols II and III resulted in higher cell proliferation than Protocol I, but no statistical differences were found relative to Protocol IV. The comet assay revealed less cell damage in cells cultured using Protocol IV as compared to Protocols II and III. The damage percentage observed on Protocol II was significantly higher than all other protocols. CFUs capability was highest using Protocol IV (p = 0.0018) and III, respectively, and the highest degree of mineralization was observed using Protocol IV as compared to Protocols II and III. Protocol IV resulted in significantly improved cell proliferation, and no cell damage was observed. These results demonstrate that human blood product supplements can be used as feasible supplements for culturing adult human dental stem cells.

  16. Soft tissue volume augmentation at dental implant sites using a volume stable three-dimensional collagen matrix - histological outcomes of a preclinical study.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Daniel S; Naenni, Nadja; Benic, Goran I; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Jung, Ronald E

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether or not soft tissue augmentation with a collagen matrix (VCMX) leads to a similar increase in ridge width around dental implants compared to the use of an autogenous subepithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG). In 12 dogs, immediate dental implants were placed with simultaneous guided bone regeneration. Three months later, soft tissue volume augmentation was performed by randomly allocating three treatment modalities to these sites [VCMX, SCTG, sham-operated group (control)]. Dogs were sacrificed at 1 (n = 4), 2 (n = 4) or 6 months (n = 4). Descriptive histology and histomorphometric measurements for soft tissue thickness were performed on non-decalcified sections. The horizontal soft tissue thickness was maximal at the most coronal level (alveolar crest) at 1 month (VCMX: 2.1 ± 1.6 mm; SCTG: 2.5 ± 1.7 mm; p = 0.877) and decreased until 6 months. At 6 months, the greatest mucosal thickness was at a level 3.5 mm below the crest (VCMX: 0.8 ± 0.3 mm; SCTG: 0.7 ± 0.2 mm) (p = 0.754). Control sites revealed no relevant soft tissue augmentation at any level and any time-point. Tissue integration for VCMX and SCTG were favourable with minimal inflammatory reactions. Soft tissue volume augmentation at implant sites was obtained to a similar extent using VCMX and SCTG up to 2 months. Thereafter, degradation and remodelling processes were enhanced leading to a minimal increase in soft tissue thickness at 6 months for VCMX and SCTG. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Is dental erosion really a problem?

    PubMed

    Schlueter, N; Jaeggi, T; Lussi, A

    2012-09-01

    Dental erosion is the non-carious dental substance loss induced by direct impact of exogenous or endogenous acids. It results in a loss of dental hard tissue, which can be serious in some groups, such as those with eating disorders, in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, and also in persons consuming high amounts of acidic drinks and foodstuffs. For these persons, erosion can impair their well-being, due to changes in appearance and/or loss of function of the teeth, e.g., the occurrence of hypersensitivity of teeth if the dentin is exposed. If erosion reaches an advanced stage, time- and money-consuming therapies may be necessary. The therapy, in turn, poses a challenge for the dentist, particularly if the defects are diagnosed at an advanced stage. While initial and moderate defects can mostly be treated non- or minimally invasively, severe defects often require complex therapeutic strategies, which often entail extensive loss of dental hard tissue due to preparatory measures. A major goal should therefore be to diagnose dental erosion at an early stage, to avoid functional and esthetic impairments as well as pain sensations and to ensure longevity of the dentition.

  18. Investigation of the structure of human dental tissue at multiple length scales using high energy synchrotron X-ray SAXS/WAXS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Tan; Landini, Gabriel; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2011-10-01

    High energy (>50keV) synchrotron X-ray scattering experiments were carried out on beamline I12 JEEP at the Diamond Light Source (DLS, Oxford, UK). Although a complete human tooth could be studied, in the present study attention was focused on coupons from the region of the Dentin-Enamel Junction (DEJ). Simultaneous high energy SAXS/WAXS measurements were carried out. Quantitative analysis of the results allows multiple length scale characterization of the nano-crystalline structure of dental tissues. SAXS patterns analysis provide insight into the mean thickness and orientation of hydroxyapatite particles, while WAXS (XRD) patterns allow the determination of the crystallographic unit cell parameters of the hydroxyapatite phase. It was found that the average particle thickness determined from SAXS interpretation varies as a function of position in the vicinity of the DEJ. Most mineral particles are randomly orientated within dentin, although preferred orientation emerges and becomes stronger on approach to the enamel. Within the enamel, texture is stronger than anywhere in the dentin, and the determination of lattice parameters can be accomplished by Pawley refinement of the multiple peak diffraction pattern. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using high energy synchrotron X-ray beams for the characterization of human dental tissues. This opens up the opportunity of studying thick samples (e.g., complete teeth) in complex sample environments (e.g., under saline solution). This opens new avenues for the application of high energy synchrotron X-ray scattering to dental research.

  19. Dental materials for cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Faiza; Ur Rehman, Ihtesham; Muhammad, Nawshad; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-04-01

    Numerous bone and soft tissue grafting techniques are followed to repair cleft of lip and palate (CLP) defects. In addition to the gold standard surgical interventions involving the use of autogenous grafts, various allogenic and xenogenic graft materials are available for bone regeneration. In an attempt to discover minimally invasive and cost effective treatments for cleft repair, an exceptional growth in synthetic biomedical graft materials have occurred. This study gives an overview of the use of dental materials to repair cleft of lip and palate (CLP). The eligibility criteria for this review were case studies, clinical trials and retrospective studies on the use of various types of dental materials in surgical repair of cleft palate defects. Any data available on the surgical interventions to repair alveolar or palatal cleft, with natural or synthetic graft materials was included in this review. Those datasets with long term clinical follow-up results were referred to as particularly relevant. The results provide encouraging evidence in favor of dental and other related biomedical materials to fill the gaps in clefts of lip and palate. The review presents the various bones and soft tissue replacement strategies currently used, tested or explored for the repair of cleft defects. There was little available data on the use of synthetic materials in cleft repair which was a limitation of this study. In conclusion although clinical trials on the use of synthetic materials are currently underway the uses of autologous implants are the preferred treatment methods to date. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Waardenburg syndrome type I: Dental phenotypes and genetic analysis of an extended family

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino, Sibele-Nascimento; Paranaíba, Lívia-Maris-R.; Gomes, Andreia; dos-Santos-Neto, Pedro; Coletta, Ricardo-D.; Cardoso, Aline-Francoise; Frota, Ana-Cláudia; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of inheritance and the clinical features in a large family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1), detailing the dental abnormalities and screening for PAX3 mutations. Material and Methods To characterize the pattern of inheritance and clinical features, 29 family members were evaluated by dermatologic, ophthalmologic, otorhinolaryngologic and orofacial examination. Molecular analysis of the PAX3 gene was performed. Results The pedigree of the family,including the last four generations, was constructed and revealed non-consanguineous marriages. Out of 29 descendants, 16 family members showed features of WS1, with 9 members showing two major criteria indicative of WS1. Five patients showed white forelock and iris hypopigmentation, and four showed dystopia canthorum and iris hypopigmentation. Two patients had hearing loss. Dental abnormalities were identified in three family members, including dental agenesis, conical teeth and taurodontism. Sequencing analysis failed to identify mutations in the PAX3 gene. Conclusions These results confirm that WS1 was transmitted in this family in an autosomal dominant pattern with variable expressivity and high penetrance. The presence of dental manifestations, especially tooth agenesis and conical teeth which resulted in considerable aesthetic impact on affected individuals was a major clinical feature. Clinical relevance: This article reveals the presence of well-defined dental changes associated with WS1 and tries to establish a possible association between these two entities showing a new spectrum of WS1. Key words:Waardenburg syndrome, hearing loss, oral manifestations, mutation. PMID:27031059

  1. Production of colony-stimulating factor in human dental pulp fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Y; Horie, Y; Yamaoka, Y; Ebata, N; Kim, T; Yoshida, S

    2003-02-01

    Class II major histocompatilibity complex (MHC)-expressing cells are usually distributed in dental pulp, and it was postulated that the colony-stimulating factor (CSF) derived from dental pulp fibroblasts contributes to the migration of class II MHC-expressing cells into pulp tissue. This study aimed to investigate the CSF production of human dental pulp fibroblasts. In pulp tissue sections, granulocyte (G)-CSF was detected from normal teeth, while G-CSF, macrophage (M)-CSF, and granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF were detected from teeth with dentinal caries. In cultured dental pulp fibroblasts, G-CSF was detected by immunostaining, immunoprecipitation, and ELISA, and mRNAs of G-CSF, M-CSF, and GM-CSF were detected by RT-PCR. The dental pulp fibroblasts cultured with TNF-alpha were found to increase the G-CSF expression and to produce M-CSF and GM-CSF. These findings suggest that dental pulp fibroblasts usually produce G-CSF. In the presence of TNF-alpha, dental pulp fibroblast express M-CSF and GM-CSF.

  2. [Vital pulp therapy of damaged dental pulp].

    PubMed

    Xuedong, Zhou; Dingming, Huang; Jianguo, Liu; Zhengwei, Huang; Xin, Wei; Deqin, Yang; Jin, Zhao; Liming, Chen; Lin, Zhu; Yanhong, Li; Jiyao, Li

    2017-08-01

    The development of an expert consensus on vital pulp therapy can provide practical guidance for the improvement of pulp damage care in China. Dental pulp disease is a major type of illness that adversely affects human oral health. Pulp capping and pulpotomy are currently the main methods for vital pulp therapy. Along with the development of minimal invasion cosmetic dentistry, using different treatment technologies and materials reasonably, preserving healthy tooth tissue, and extending tooth save time have become urgent problems that call for immediate solution in dental clinics. This paper summarizes the experiences and knowledge of endodontic experts. We develop a clinical path of vital pulp therapy for clinical work by utilizing the nature, approach, and degree of pulp damage as references, defense and self-repairing ability of pulp as guidance, and modern technologies of diagnosis and treatment as means.

  3. Integrating photo-stimulable phosphor plates into dental and dental hygiene radiography curricula.

    PubMed

    Tax, Cara L; Robb, Christine L; Brillant, Martha G S; Doucette, Heather J

    2013-11-01

    It is not known whether the integration of photo-stimulable phosphor (PSP) plates into dental and dental hygiene curricula creates unique learning challenges for students. The purpose of this two-year study was to determine if dental hygiene students had more and/or different types of errors when using PSP plates compared to film and whether the PSP imaging plates had any particular characteristics that needed to be addressed in the learning process. Fifty-nine first-year dental hygiene students at one Canadian dental school were randomly assigned to two groups (PSP or film) before exposing their initial full mouth series on a teaching manikin using the parallel technique. The principal investigator determined the number and types of errors based on a specific set of performance criteria. The two groups (PSP vs. film) were compared for total number and type of errors made. Results of the study indicated the difference in the total number of errors made using PSP or film was not statistically significant; however, there was a difference in the types of errors made, with the PSP group having more horizontal errors than the film group. In addition, the study identified a number of unique characteristics of the PSP plates that required special consideration for teaching this technology.

  4. Analysis of dental treatment performed by dental residents at General Dentistry Department of Tokyo Dental College Chiba Hospital over 6 years following introduction of mandatory dental clinical training system.

    PubMed

    Yamakura, Daiki; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Kameyama, Atsushi; Noro, Akio; Sugiyama, Toshiko; Kondo, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Setsuko; Haruyama, Akiko; Takeda, Tomotaka; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Six years have passed since the introduction of legislation mandating at least 1 year of clinical training for those who have passed the national dentist examination. To determine whether clinical training has been appropriately implemented at the General Dentistry Department of Tokyo Dental College Chiba Hospital, a managed-type clinical training facility, the number of patients treated and types of dental and dental technical work performed by dental residents trained by the department were summarized and analyzed. The number of patients treated per dental resident increased from 11 in 2006 to 15 in 2011. By treatment type, periodontic treatment was the most frequently performed throughout the study period, followed by endodontic treatment. Conservation treatment, prosthodontic treatment with crowns/bridges, and prosthodontic treatment with dentures were performed at a similar moderate frequency, while oral surgical treatment was performed least frequently throughout the study period. The frequency of periodontic treatment increased slightly, whereas that of endodontic treatment decreased slightly or remained almost unchanged after introduction of the mandatory clinical training system. When the distribution of dental treatment performed at our department was compared with that of dental treatment performed by general dentists across Japan in 2011, our department showed a slightly lower frequency of periodontic treatment and higher frequency of endodontic treatment than the national total, whereas the frequency of other types of treatment was similar between the two populations. These results demonstrated that appropriate clinical training has been provided by our department to meet the purpose of offering dentists the opportunity to acquire the basic diagnostic and treatment abilities that would enable them to provide appropriate treatment for injuries and diseases frequently encountered in daily practice. The study also revealed some problems, such as a

  5. Osteogenic differentiation of human dental papilla mesenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Etsuko; Hirose, Motohiro; Kotobuki, Noriko

    We isolated dental papilla from impacted human molar and proliferated adherent fibroblastic cells after collagenase treatment of the papilla. The cells were negative for hematopoietic markers but positive for CD29, CD44, CD90, CD105, and CD166. When the cells were further cultured in the presence of {beta}-glycerophosphate, ascorbic acid, and dexamethasone for 14 days, mineralized areas together with osteogenic differentiation evidenced by high alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin contents were observed. The differentiation was confirmed at both protein and gene expression levels. The cells can also be cryopreserved and, after thawing, could show in vivo bone-forming capability. These results indicate thatmore » mesenchymal type cells localize in dental papilla and that the cells can be culture expanded/utilized for bone tissue engineering.« less

  6. Injectable scaffolds: Preparation and application in dental and craniofacial regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bei; Ahuja, Neelam; Ma, Chi; Liu, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Injectable scaffolds are appealing for tissue regeneration because they offer many advantages over pre-formed scaffolds. This article provides a comprehensive review of the injectable scaffolds currently being investigated for dental and craniofacial tissue regeneration. First, we provide an overview of injectable scaffolding materials, including natural, synthetic, and composite biomaterials. Next, we discuss a variety of characteristic parameters and gelation mechanisms of the injectable scaffolds. The advanced injectable scaffolding systems developed in recent years are then illustrated. Furthermore, we summarize the applications of the injectable scaffolds for the regeneration of dental and craniofacial tissues that include pulp, dentin, periodontal ligament, temporomandibular joint, and alveolar bone. Finally, our perspectives on the injectable scaffolds for dental and craniofacial tissue regeneration are offered as signposts for the future advancement of this field. PMID:28649171

  7. Automated classification of tissue by type using real-time spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaron, David A.; Cheong, Wai-Fung; Duckworth, Joshua L.; Noles, Kenneth; Nezhat, Camran; Seidman, Daniel; Hintz, Susan R.; Levinson, Carl J.; Murphy, Aileen L.; Price, John W., Jr.; Liu, Frank W.; Stevenson, David K.; Kermit, Eben L.

    1997-12-01

    Each tissue type has a unique spectral signature (e.g. liver looks distinct from bowel due to differences in both absorbance and in the way the tissue scatters light). While differentiation between normal tissues and tumors is not trivial, automated discrimination among normal tissue types (e.g. nerve, artery, vein, muscle) is feasible and clinically important, as many medical errors in medicine involve the misidentification of normal tissues. In this study, we have found that spectroscopic differentiation of tissues can be successfully applied to tissue samples (kidney and uterus) and model systems (fruit). Such optical techniques may usher in use of optical tissue diagnosis, leading to automated and portable diagnostic devices which can identify tissues, and guide use of medical instruments, such as during ablation or biopsy.

  8. The erosive effect of herbal tea on dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Brunton, P A; Hussain, A

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether conventional black tea and a herbal tea were capable of eroding dental enamel. A further aim was to investigate whether herbal tea of the type tested eroded dental hard tissues to a greater or lesser extent than conventional black tea. Three groups of 21 teeth were exposed to a conventional black tea Typhoo (Group A), a herbal tea Twinings Blackcurrant, Ginsing and Vanilla (Group B) and water, which acted as a control (Group C). Sequential profilometric tracings of the specimens were taken, superimposed and the degree of enamel loss calculated as the area of disparity between the tracings before and after exposure. Conventional black tea and herbal tea, of the type tested, both resulted in tooth surface loss. Tooth surface loss, which resulted from exposure to herbal tea (mean 0.05mm(2), s.d. 0.02), however, was significantly greater (P=0.00) than that which resulted from exposure to conventional black tea (mean 0.01mm(2), s.d. 0.00) and water (mean 0.00mm(2), s.d. 0.00). It was concluded that herbal tea and conventional black tea of the type tested result in erosion of dental enamel. The erosive effect of the herbal tea of the type tested was five times more severe than that of the conventional black tea tested. The cumulative effects of regular consumption of herbal tea of the type tested are likely, therefore, to be of clinical significance.

  9. Clinical applications of laser therapy on the dental practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2004-09-01

    Dental practice consists of a series of laboring procedures which demands the use of several types of equipment and materials. Usually patient"s fears brings additional burden to the Dentists. The use of Lasers for treating and diagnosis in Dentistry is quite new comparing to other medical areas. Initially Laser technology was used as an alternative method for treating dental caries in order to substitute the use of the drill. Lately surgical Lasers have shown themselves very useful for treating several pathologies and began to be used as a powerful tool on the treatment of several conditions affecting the maxillofacial complex and later on, the era of the use of Laser therapy began. The advent of the diode Lasers made possible the introduction of small units at the dental office and Laser therapy was used to improve healing and later included also caries diagnosis. This paper discuss the use of Laser therapy on Restorative Dentistry, Periodondology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Oral implantology and other. Clinical and laboratorial experience has demonstrated that Laser therapy does improve the healing of both mineralized and soft tissues, reduces pain and inflammation, and also reduces both cost and length of the dental treatment.

  10. Familial Polythelia associated with dental anomalies: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Cantín, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Polythelia has been defined as the presence of supernumerary nipples without accessory glandular tissue. Usually, these growths follow imaginary mammary lines running from the armpits to the groin. Although the presence of dental anomalies may occasion only a simple cosmetic problem with specific clinical considerations, the association with familial polythelia has been scarcely reported. This paper reports on a case of polythelia that is associated with dental anomalies in an Argentine family and discusses suggestions for a thorough dental history and medical consultation to prevent possible pathological conditions or potential malignant transformation of mammary tissues. PMID:24970959

  11. Evaluation of the medical exposure doses regarding dental examinations with different X-ray instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Chi; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Yu, Cheng-Ching; Chao, Jiunn-Hsing; Hsu, Fang-Yuh

    2015-11-01

    Modern dental X-ray examination that consists of traditional form, panorama, and cone-beamed 3D technologies is one of the most frequent diagnostic applications nowadays. This study used the Rando Phantom and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) to measure the absorbed doses of radiosensitive organs recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and whole body effective doses which were delivered due to dental X-ray examination performed with different types of X-ray instrument. Besides, enamel samples which performed reading with Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) procedure were also used to estimate the tooth doses. EPR is a dose reconstruction method of measuring free radicals induced by radiation exposure to the calcified tissue (mainly in the tooth enamel or bone) to evaluate the accepted high dose. The tooth doses estimated by TLD and EPR methods were compared. Relationships between the tooth doses and effective doses by dental X-ray examinations with different types of X-ray equipment were investigated in this work.

  12. Federal role in dental public health: dental care for special populations.

    PubMed

    Reifel, Nancy

    2005-07-01

    California is home to more than 70 dental clinics operated or funded by the U.S. government. They operate on annual appropriations from Congress to serve a specific population and regulations that specify the type of dental services provided are usually promulgated at the national level. Dental clinics have the challenge of creating a program that delivers high-quality care within these financial and programmatic constraints. In California, U.S. government appropriations are the main source of funding dental clinics of immigration services, the Veterans Administration, the Bureau of Prisons, the Coast Guard, and American Indian clinics. The evolution and current practices of these five dental public health programs are described.

  13. Enamel tissue engineering using subcultured enamel organ epithelial cells in combination with dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Honda, Masaki J; Shinmura, Yuka; Shinohara, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    We describe a strategy for the in vitro engineering of enamel tissue using a novel technique for culturing enamel organ epithelial (EOE) cells isolated from the enamel organ using 3T3-J2 cells as a feeder layer. These subcultured EOE cells retain the capacity to produce enamel structures over a period of extended culture. In brief, enamel organs from 6-month-old porcine third molars were dissociated into single cells and subcultured on 3T3-J2 feeder cell layers. These subcultured EOE cells were then seeded onto a collagen sponge in combination with primary dental pulp cells isolated at an early stage of crown formation, and these constructs were transplanted into athymic rats. After 4 weeks, complex enamel-dentin structures were detected in the implants. These results show that our culture technique maintained ameloblast lineage cells that were able to produce enamel in vivo. This novel subculture technique provides an important tool for tooth tissue engineering. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Development of β Type Ti23Mo-45S5 Bioglass Nanocomposites for Dental Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jurczyk, Karolina; Miklaszewski, Andrzej; Jurczyk, Mieczyslawa U.; Jurczyk, Mieczyslaw

    2015-01-01

    Titanium β-type alloys attract attention as biomaterials for dental applications. The aim of this work was the synthesis of nanostructured β type Ti23Mo-x wt % 45S5 Bioglass (x = 0, 3 and 10) composites by mechanical alloying and powder metallurgy methods and their characterization. The crystallization of the amorphous material upon annealing led to the formation of a nanostructured β type Ti23Mo alloy with a grain size of approximately 40 nm. With the increase of the 45S5 Bioglass contents in Ti23Mo, nanocomposite increase of the α-phase is noticeable. The electrochemical treatment in phosphoric acid electrolyte resulted in a porous surface, followed by bioactive ceramic Ca-P deposition. Corrosion resistance potentiodynamic testing in Ringer solution at 37 °C showed a positive effect of porosity and Ca-P deposition on nanostructured Ti23Mo 3 wt % 45S5 Bioglass nanocomposite. The contact angles of glycerol on the nanostructured Ti23Mo alloy were determined and show visible decrease for bulk Ti23Mo 3 wt % 45S5 Bioglass and etched Ti23Mo 3 wt % 45S5 Bioglass nanocomposites. In vitro tests culture of normal human osteoblast cells showed very good cell proliferation, colonization, and multilayering. The present study demonstrated that porous Ti23Mo 3 wt % 45S5 Bioglass nanocomposite is a promising biomaterial for bone tissue engineering. PMID:28793695

  15. Changes in the cutting efficiency of different types of dental diamond rotary instrument with repeated cuts and disinfection.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jin-Hyuk; Yi, Jaeyoung; Kim, Sungtae; Shim, June-Sung; Lee, Keun-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Cutting efficiency is one of the most important factors to consider when a specific dental diamond rotary instrument is selected. However, the selection of a dental diamond rotary instrument is based on clinical experience rather than any scientific evidence. The purpose of this study was to identify how the cutting efficiency of different types of dental diamond rotary instrument changed with repeated cuts and disinfection. Four types of diamond rotary instrument from 2 dental manufacturers (Shofu, Jin Dental) were investigated with a high-speed air-turbine handpiece. The groups were as follows: S cham group (n=10): chamfer design from Shofu; J cham group (n=10): chamfer design from Jin Dental; S thin group (n=10): thin tapered design from Shofu; J thin group (n=10): thin tapered design from Jin Dental. Changes in the cutting efficiency of diamond rotary instruments on glass ceramic blocks were measured after repeated cuts. Changes in cutting efficiency also were measured for 30 diamond rotary instruments, the same type as those used in group J cham after disinfection with ethylene oxide gas, immersion in solution, or autoclaving. One-way ANOVA, 2-way ANOVA, and repeated-measures ANOVA were used to identify differences in cutting efficiency, in total cutting efficiency, and change trend in cutting efficiency (α=.05). The Tukey honestly significant difference method was used for the post hoc tests. The principal metal components of the diamond rotary instruments were detected with x-ray spectrometry. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) total cutting efficiency after 10 cuts in the 4 groups was in the following order: J cham group (0.210 ± 0.064 g/min) > S cham group (0.170 ± 0.064 g/min) > J thin group (0.130 ± 0.042 g/min) > S thin group (0.010 ± 0.040 g/min) (P<.05).The decrease in the cutting efficiency was greatest after the first cut. The cutting efficiency was not influenced by repeated disinfection. The cutting efficiencies of diamond rotary instruments

  16. Histological evidence for a dynamic dental battery in hadrosaurid dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Bramble, Katherine; LeBlanc, Aaron R H; Lamoureux, Denis O; Wosik, Mateusz; Currie, Philip J

    2017-11-17

    The first histological study of an entire hadrosaurid dental battery provides a comprehensive look at tooth movement within this complex structure. Previous studies have focused on isolated teeth, or in-situ batteries, but this is the first study to examine an entire dental battery of any dinosaur. The absence of direct tooth-to-tooth contact across the entire battery and a unique arrangement of the dental tissues in hadrosaurids led us to compare their teeth with the ever-growing incisors of mammals. The similarity in the distributions of tissues along the incisor, coupled with continuous eruption, make for helpful comparisons to hadrosaurid teeth. The mammalian ever-growing incisor can be used as a model to extrapolate the soft tissue connections and eruptive mechanisms within the hadrosaurid dental battery. Serial sections across the adult dental battery reveal signs of gradual ontogenetic tooth migration. Extensive remodeling of the alveolar septa and the anteroposterior displacement of successive generations of teeth highlight the gradual migration of tooth generations within the battery. These eruptive and ontogenetic tooth movements would not be possible without a ligamentous connection between successive teeth and the jaws, underscoring the dynamic nature of one of the most unique and complex dental systems in vertebrate history.

  17. Dental Age Difference in Children with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Puneet; Yu, Qingzhao; Zhu, Han; Townsend, Janice A

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if changes in dental development are associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or ADHD medications. This retrospective chart review evaluated the dental age of 128 patients between 6 and 16 years of age using the Demirjian method from the following two groups a) children with ADHD b) unaffected children. The ADHD group was further stratified into four groups according to the medication type. The impact of ADHD on dental age difference (the difference between dental age and chronologic age) was analyzed using T-test and the association between medication type and dental age difference was analyzed through one way ANOVA. The mean difference between estimated dental age and chronologic age (dental age difference) for all subjects was 0.80 years. There was no significant dental age difference in subjects with ADHD and the control group (0.78±1.28vs. 0.84 ±1.09 years respectively; P=0.75) and there was no significant difference in dental age difference and type of medication (P=0.84). No significant difference was found between children with ADHD and unaffected children with respect to dental age difference. No significant differences were found in dental age difference in the four medication groups.

  18. DNA methylation age of human tissues and cell types

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is not yet known whether DNA methylation levels can be used to accurately predict age across a broad spectrum of human tissues and cell types, nor whether the resulting age prediction is a biologically meaningful measure. Results I developed a multi-tissue predictor of age that allows one to estimate the DNA methylation age of most tissues and cell types. The predictor, which is freely available, was developed using 8,000 samples from 82 Illumina DNA methylation array datasets, encompassing 51 healthy tissues and cell types. I found that DNA methylation age has the following properties: first, it is close to zero for embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells; second, it correlates with cell passage number; third, it gives rise to a highly heritable measure of age acceleration; and, fourth, it is applicable to chimpanzee tissues. Analysis of 6,000 cancer samples from 32 datasets showed that all of the considered 20 cancer types exhibit significant age acceleration, with an average of 36 years. Low age-acceleration of cancer tissue is associated with a high number of somatic mutations and TP53 mutations, while mutations in steroid receptors greatly accelerate DNA methylation age in breast cancer. Finally, I characterize the 353 CpG sites that together form an aging clock in terms of chromatin states and tissue variance. Conclusions I propose that DNA methylation age measures the cumulative effect of an epigenetic maintenance system. This novel epigenetic clock can be used to address a host of questions in developmental biology, cancer and aging research. PMID:24138928

  19. Electrophysiologic and functional evaluations of regenerated facial nerve defects with a tube containing dental pulp cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ryo; Matsumine, Hajime; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Miyata, Mariko; Ando, Tomohiro

    2014-11-01

    Dental pulp tissue contains Schwann and neural progenitor cells. Tissue-engineered nerve conduits with dental pulp cells promote facial nerve regeneration in rats. However, no nerve functional or electrophysiologic evaluations were performed. This study investigated the compound muscle action potential recordings and facial functional analysis of dental pulp cell regenerated nerve in rats. A silicone tube containing rat dental pulp cells in type I collagen gel was transplanted into a 7-mm gap of the buccal branch of the facial nerve in Lewis rats; the same defect was created in the marginal mandibular branch, which was ligatured. Compound muscle action potential recordings of vibrissal muscles and facial functional analysis with facial palsy score of the nerve were performed. Tubulation with dental pulp cells showed significantly lower facial palsy scores than the autograft group between 3 and 10 weeks postoperatively. However, the dental pulp cell facial palsy scores showed no significant difference from those of autograft after 11 weeks. Amplitude and duration of compound muscle action potentials in the dental pulp cell group showed no significant difference from those of the intact and autograft groups, and there was no significant difference in the latency of compound muscle action potentials between the groups at 13 weeks postoperatively. However, the latency in the dental pulp cell group was prolonged more than that of the intact group. Tubulation with dental pulp cells could recover facial nerve defects functionally and electrophysiologically, and the recovery became comparable to that of nerve autografting in rats.

  20. Tissue type determination by impedance measurement: A bipolar and monopolar comparison

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Jack; Bouazza-Marouf, Kaddour; Noronha, Dorita; Gaur, Atul

    2017-01-01

    Background: In certain medical applications, it is necessary to be able to determine the position of a needle inside the body, specifically with regards to identifying certain tissue types. By measuring the electrical impedance of specific tissue types, it is possible to determine the type of tissue the tip of the needle (or probe) is at. Materials and Methods: Two methods have been investigated for electric impedance detection; bipolar and monopolar. Commercially available needle electrodes are of a monopolar type. Although many patents exist on the bipolar setups, these have not as yet been commercialized. This paper reports a comparison of monopolar and bipolar setups for tissue type determination. In vitro experiments were carried out on pork to compare this investigation with other investigations in this field. Results: The results show that both monopolar and bipolar setups are capable of determining tissue type. However, the bipolar setup showed slightly better results; the difference between the different soft tissue type impedances was greater compared to the monopolar method. Conclusion: Both monopolar and bipolar electrical impedance setups work very similarly in inhomogeneous volumes such as biological tissue. There is a clear potential for clinical applications with impedance-based needle guidance, with both the monopolar and bipolar setups. It is, however, worth noting that the bipolar setup is more versatile. PMID:28217047

  1. Oral manifestations, dental management, and a rare homozygous mutation of the PRDM12 gene in a boy with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VIII: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Elhennawy, Karim; Reda, Seif; Finke, Christian; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Jost-Brinkmann, Paul-Georg; Bartzela, Theodosia

    2017-08-15

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VIII is a rare autosomal recessive inherited disorder. Chen et al. recently identified the causative gene and characterized biallelic mutations in the PR domain-containing protein 12 gene, which plays a role in the development of pain-sensing nerve cells. Our patient's family was included in Chen and colleagues' study. We performed a literature review of the PubMed library (January 1985 to December 2016) on hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type I to VIII genetic disorders and their orofacial manifestations. This case report is the first to describe the oral manifestations, and their treatment, of the recently discovered hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VIII in the medical and dental literature. We report on the oral manifestations and dental management of an 8-month-old white boy with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy-VIII over a period of 16 years. Our patient was homozygous for a mutation of PR domain-containing protein 12 gene and was characterized by insensitivity to pain and thermal stimuli, self-mutilation behavior, reduced sweat and tear production, absence of corneal reflexes, and multiple skin and bone infections. Oral manifestations included premature loss of teeth, associated with dental traumata and self-mutilation, severe soft tissue injuries, dental caries and submucosal abscesses, hypomineralization of primary teeth, and mandibular osteomyelitis. The lack of scientific knowledge on hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy due to the rarity of the disease often results in a delay in diagnosis, which is of substantial importance for the prevention of many complications and symptoms. Interdisciplinary work of specialized medical and dental teams and development of a standardized treatment protocols are essential for the management of the disease. There are many knowledge gaps concerning the management of patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy

  2. Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: A Comparative Analysis Between Human Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue and Dental Pulp.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Giuliani, Patricia; Pierdomenico, Laura; Marchisio, Marco; Zuccarini, Mariachiara; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Quaresima, Raimondo; Caciagli, Francesco; Ciccarelli, Renata

    2017-06-01

    White adipose tissue is a source of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) that are actively studied for their possible therapeutic use in bone tissue repair/remodeling. To better appreciate the osteogenic potential of these cells, we compared some properties of MSCs from human subcutaneous adipose tissue [subcutaneous-adipose stromal cells (S-ASCs)] and dental pulp stem cell (DPSCs) of third-impacted molars, the latter representing a well-established MSC source. Both undifferentiated cell types showed similar fibroblast-like morphology and mesenchymal marker expression. However, undifferentiated S-ASCs displayed a faster doubling time coupled to greater proliferation and colony-forming ability than DPSCs. Also, the osteogenic differentiation of S-ASCs was greater than that of DPSCs, as evaluated by the higher levels of expression of early osteogenic markers Runt-related transcription factor-2 (RUNX2) and alkaline phosphatase at days 3-14 and of extracellular matrix mineralization at days 14-21. Moreover, S-ASCs showed a better colonization of the titanium scaffold. In addition, we investigated whether S-ASC osteogenic commitment was enhanced by adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) stimulation, as previously shown for DPSCs. Although A1R expression was constant during DPSC differentiation, it increased in S-ASC at day 21 from osteogenesis induction. Accordingly, A1R stimulation by the agonist 2-chloro-N 6 -cyclopentyl-adenosine, added to the cultures at each medium change, stimulated proliferation only in differentiating DPSC and enhanced the osteogenic differentiation earlier in DPSCs than in S-ASCs. These effects were counteracted by cell pretreatment with a selective A1R antagonist. Thus, our findings suggest that S-ASCs could be advantageously used in regenerative orthopedics/dentistry, and locally released or exogenously added purines may play a role in bone repair/remodeling, even though this aspect should be more thoroughly evaluated.

  3. Stem Cells from Dental Pulp: What Epigenetics Can Do with Your Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Rodas-Junco, Beatriz A.; Canul-Chan, Michel; Rojas-Herrera, Rafael A.; De-la-Peña, Clelia; Nic-Can, Geovanny I.

    2017-01-01

    Adult stem cells have attracted scientific attention because they are able to self-renew and differentiate into several specialized cell types. In this context, human dental tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hDT-MSCs) have emerged as a possible solution for repairing or regenerating damaged tissues. These cells can be isolated from primary teeth that are naturally replaced, third molars, or other dental tissues and exhibit self-renewal, a high proliferative rate and a great multilineage potential. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that determine lineage specification are still largely unknown. It is known that a change in cell fate requires the deletion of existing transcriptional programs, followed by the establishment of a new developmental program to give rise to a new cell lineage. Increasing evidence indicates that chromatin structure conformation can influence cell fate. In this way, reversible chemical modifications at the DNA or histone level, and combinations thereof can activate or inactivate cell-type-specific gene sequences, giving rise to an alternative cell fates. On the other hand, miRNAs are starting to emerge as a possible player in establishing particular somatic lineages. In this review, we discuss two new and promising research fields in medicine and biology, epigenetics and stem cells, by summarizing the properties of hDT-MSCs and highlighting the recent findings on epigenetic contributions to the regulation of cellular differentiation. PMID:29270128

  4. Dental caries.

    PubMed

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D; Ekstrand, Kim; Weintraub, Jane A; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Tagami, Junji; Twetman, Svante; Tsakos, Georgios; Ismail, Amid

    2017-05-25

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries, acknowledging the historical era dominated by restoration of tooth decay by surgical means, but focuses on current, progressive and more holistic long-term, patient-centred, tooth-preserving preventive care.

  5. A survey of dental treatment under general anesthesia in a Korean university hospital pediatric dental clinic

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Bisol; Yoo, Seunghoon; Kim, Jongsoo; Kim, Seungoh

    2016-01-01

    Background In South Korea, the number of cases of dental treatment for the disabled is gradually increasing, primarily at regional dental clinics for the disabled. This study investigated pediatric patients at a treatment clinic for the disabled within a university hospital who received dental treatment under general anesthesia. This data could assist those that provide dental treatment for the disabled and guide future treatment directions and new policies. Methods This study was a retrospective analysis of 263 cases in which patients received dental treatment under general anesthesia from January 2011 to May 2016. The variables examined were gender, age, reason for anesthesia, type of disability, time under anesthesia, duration of treatment, type of procedure, treatment details, and annual trends in the use of general anesthesia. Results Among pediatric patients with disabilities who received dental treatment under general anesthesia, the most prevalent age group was 5–8 years old (124 patients, 47.1%), and the primary reason for administering anesthesia was dental anxiety or phobia. The mean time under anesthesia was 132.7 ± 77.6 min, and the mean duration of treatment was 101.9 ± 71.2 min. The most common type of treatment was restoration, accounting for 158 of the 380 treatments performed. Conclusions Due to increasing demand, the number of cases of dental treatment performed under general anesthesia is expected to continue increasing, and it can be a useful method of treatment in patients with dental anxiety or phobia. PMID:28884154

  6. A survey of dental treatment under general anesthesia in a Korean university hospital pediatric dental clinic.

    PubMed

    Shin, Bisol; Yoo, Seunghoon; Kim, Jongsoo; Kim, Seungoh; Kim, Jongbin

    2016-09-01

    In South Korea, the number of cases of dental treatment for the disabled is gradually increasing, primarily at regional dental clinics for the disabled. This study investigated pediatric patients at a treatment clinic for the disabled within a university hospital who received dental treatment under general anesthesia. This data could assist those that provide dental treatment for the disabled and guide future treatment directions and new policies. This study was a retrospective analysis of 263 cases in which patients received dental treatment under general anesthesia from January 2011 to May 2016. The variables examined were gender, age, reason for anesthesia, type of disability, time under anesthesia, duration of treatment, type of procedure, treatment details, and annual trends in the use of general anesthesia. Among pediatric patients with disabilities who received dental treatment under general anesthesia, the most prevalent age group was 5-8 years old (124 patients, 47.1%), and the primary reason for administering anesthesia was dental anxiety or phobia. The mean time under anesthesia was 132.7 ± 77.6 min, and the mean duration of treatment was 101.9 ± 71.2 min. The most common type of treatment was restoration, accounting for 158 of the 380 treatments performed. Due to increasing demand, the number of cases of dental treatment performed under general anesthesia is expected to continue increasing, and it can be a useful method of treatment in patients with dental anxiety or phobia.

  7. Precise femtosecond laser ablation of dental hard tissue: preliminary investigation on adequate laser parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikov, Todor; Pecheva, Emilia; Montgomery, Paul; Antoni, Frederic; Leong-Hoi, Audrey; Petrov, Todor

    2017-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the possibility of introducing state-of-the-art commercial femtosecond laser system in restorative dentistry by maintaining well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also in overcoming disadvantages such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. Femtosecond ablation of dental hard tissue is investigated by changing the irradiation parameters (pulsed laser energy, scanning speed and pulse repetition rate), assessed for enamel and dentin. The femtosecond laser system used in this work may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, due to the expected effective ablation and low temperature increase when using ultra short laser pulses. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this system seems to be promising for promoting a laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach in restorative dentistry.

  8. [The application of universal adhesives in dental bonding].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingmei; Lei, Wenlong; Yang, Hongye; Huang, Cui

    2016-03-01

    The bonding restoration has become an important clinical technique for the development of dental bonding technology. Because of its easy operation and the maximum preservation of tooth tissues, bonding repair is widely used in dental restoration. The recent multi-mode universal adhesives have brought new progress in dental bonding restoration. In this article the universal adhesives were reviewed according to its definition, development, improvement, application features and possible problems.

  9. The in vitro and in vivo influence of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin components on dental pulp tissues.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Miyakoshi, S; Shimono, M

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to qualitate the penetration of the major components of 4-META/MMA-TBB adhesive resin (4-META resin) and to characterize their influence on the in vitro and in vivo wound healing of dental pulp tissues. Fresh 4-META resin was applied to rabbit mesentery; its components penetrated the mesentery to form three of layers, depending on the amounts of monomer components in the tissue. The superficial layer was a soft-tissue hybrid layer (STHL), the intermediate layer contained small particles of polymerized 4-META resin, while the deepest layer contained unpolymerized monomer components including MMA and butanol, which were detected by gas chromatography (GC). To characterize the in vivo effects of the deepest layer, we immersed the pulp tissue in MMA or in 5% 4-META/MMA and autotransplanted it to placement beneath a rabbit kidney capsule. The MMA-immersed pulp was positive for osteocalcin and presented osteodentin formation at 7 days, as did the untreated control pulp tissue. In contrast, the 5% 4-META/MMA-immersed pulp collapsed into the cell-deficient fibrous connective tissue, with slight calcification by 7 days and less osteodentin formation at 14 days. Analysis of these data suggests that MMA does not inhibit osteogenic activity of pulp tissue, while 5% 4-META/MMA does inhibit osteogenic activity to some extent.

  10. [Physical behavior of 5 autopolymerizing dental resins].

    PubMed

    Laredo Sánchez, G C; Pérez de Alba, M del C

    1990-01-01

    The Tests described in the American Dental Association Standard No. 27 were carried out with five commercial dental resins available in mexican market. These are: Adaptic, Concise, Miradapt, Degufill and Finesse. Two of them are of the macrofilled type (II), one is of the hybrid type (mix of macro and micro particles; type II) and two of the microfilled type (I). All the resins tested met satisfactorily the specifications of the A.D.A. standard No. 27 for dental componsed resins, according with their classification.

  11. Dual ECM Biomimetic Scaffolds for Dental Pulp Regenerative Applications

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Chieh; Narayanan, Raghuvaran; Warshawsky, Noah; Ravindran, Sriram

    2018-01-01

    Dental pulp is a highly vascularized and innervated tissue that provides sensitivity and vitality to the tooth. Chronic caries results in an infected pulp tissue prone to necrosis. Existing clinical treatments replace the living pulp tissue with a non-responsive resin filling resulting in loss of tooth vitality. Tissue engineering approaches to dental pulp tissue regeneration have been investigated to preserve tooth vitality and function. However, a critical criterion is the choice of growth factors that may promote mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and more importantly, vascularization. But, the problems associated with growth factor dosage, delivery, safety, immunological and ectopic complications affect their translatory potential severely. The purpose of this study is to develop, characterize and evaluate a biomimetic native extracellular matrix (ECM) derived dual ECM scaffold that consists of a pulp-specific ECM to promote MSC attachment, proliferation and differentiation and an endothelial ECM to promote migration of host endothelial cells and eventual vascularization in vivo. Our results show that the dual ECM scaffolds possess similar properties as a pulp-ECM scaffold to promote MSC attachment and odontogenic differentiation in vitro. Additionally, when implanted subcutaneously in a tooth root slice model in vivo, the dual ECM scaffolds promoted robust odontogenic differentiation of both dental pulp and bone marrow derived MSCs and also extensive vascularization when compared to respective controls. These scaffolds are mass producible for clinical use and hence have the potential to replace root canal therapy as a treatment for chronic dental caries. PMID:29887803

  12. Oral health needs and barriers to dental care in hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Nicopoulos, Martine; Brennan, Michael T; Kent, M Louise; Brickhouse, Tegwyn H; Rogers, Mary K; Fox, Philip C; Lockhart, Peter B

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the oral health status and utilization of dental care reported by hospitalized children. A bedside oral examination was performed on hospitalized children. Past dental treatment and current oral health needs were assessed. The mean age (+/- SD) of 120 enrolled patients was 6.7 (+/- 2.9) years (range 3 to 12); 60% were males. The age of the patients' first dental office visit was 3.5 +/- 1.8 years, with 28% having never seen a dentist. Unmet oral health needs (e.g., untreated dental caries) were noted in 42% of children, and soft tissue (mucosal) abnormalities in 59% of children. Children with chronic medical conditions reported barriers to receiving dental care more often (24%) than children with acute medical conditions (3.5%) (p=0.04). A high prevalance of unmet oral health needs and soft tissue abnormalities was identified in a hospitalized pediatric population. Children with chronic medical conditions were more likely to experience barriers to obtaining dental care.

  13. Dental stories for children with autism.

    PubMed

    Marion, Ian W; Nelson, Travis M; Sheller, Barbara; McKinney, Christy M; Scott, JoAnna M

    2016-07-01

    To investigate caregivers' preference regarding dental stories to prepare children with autism for dental visits. Caregivers of children with autism were allowed use of dental stories available via different media (paper, tablet computer, computer) and image types (comics or drawings, photographs, video). Caregivers completed pre- and postintervention surveys. Fisher's exact tests were used to determine associations between predictive factors and preferences. Forty initial and 16 follow-up surveys were completed. Subjects were primarily male (85%). Mean child age was 6.7 years. Nine (64%) caregivers found the dental story useful for themselves and their child. Two (14%) caregivers found the aid only helpful for themselves. Preferred media type was associated with language understanding (p = .038) and home media preference (p = .002). Practitioners should consider using dental stories to help prepare families and children for dental visits. Individual preferences for dental stories vary; using prior history can aid in selection. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Is liberal independent dental practice in danger? Assessing forms of dental practice in the European Regional Organization (ERO) zone of the FDI World Dental Federation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Thomas Gerhard; Seeberger, Gerhard Konrad; Callaway, Angelika; Briseño-Marroquín, Benjamín; Rusca, Philippe; Frank, Michael; Otterbach, Ernst-Jürgen

    2018-02-26

    A trend towards increasingly new forms of dental practice has been observed in the FDI World Dental Federation. Elementary foundations such as the free dentist and therapy choice, and independent, free, self-responsible professional practice may be undermined. The current study is aimed at analyzing the general training framework, organization, and professional types of dental practice in the European Regional Organization (ERO) zone and at critically discussing selected aspects of changes in the dental profession. A questionnaire was developed by the ERO Working-Group "Liberal Dental Practice." Information about dental schools, professional organizations, dental practice regulations, and ambulatory healthcare centers was analyzed. Self-employed dental practice is the most common type of practice (51.7%). Dentists are allowed to work independently immediately after graduation (72.7%). Approximately one-third are organized as compulsory members in chambers/corporations. The density of dentists has a mean of 1,570 inhabitants per dentist. In most countries, there are no special rules for founding dental ambulatory healthcare centers. In a total of 353 universities of the ERO countries surveyed, 16,619 dentists per year were trained, with a trend toward a higher percentage of female students (63%). Despite modern forms of dental practice, the charter of the individual liberal dental profession (CED et al, 2013) should be respected and taken into account on the basis of ethical principles. The commercialization of the dental profession can be neutralized only by establishing and following well-defined ethical principles; oral healthcare quality can thus be ensured without the influence of third parties.

  15. Dental injuries in autistic patients.

    PubMed

    Altun, Ceyhan; Guven, Gunseli; Yorbik, Ozgur; Acikel, Cengizhan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of traumatic dental injury among Turkish children and young adults with autism and compare this to the general population of Turkish children and young adults without autism. This study was comprised of 186 children and young adults (138 males and 48 females), 93 with autism (autistic group, or AG) and 93 without autism (control group, or CG). Dental injuries were classified according to drawings and texts based on the WHO classification system, as modified by Andreasen and Andreasen. The rate of injury was higher among the AG (23%) than the CG (15%). The difference between the 2 groups, however, was not statistically significant (P<.19). The most common type of dental injury was enamel fracture. The rate of enamel fracture was higher in the CG (59%) than in the AG (33%), and the distribution of types of traumatic injury differed significantly between the AG and CG (P>.01). There were no significant differences in the rates of traumatic dental injuries among children and young adults with and without autistic disorder. The most frequently injured teeth were the permanent maxillary central incisors, and the frequency of injury to these teeth differed significantly (P>.01) between AG (56%) and CG (91%). The most common type of dental injury, enamel fracture, was more common in CG (59%) than AG (33%). The distribution of types of traumatic dental injuries differed significantly between the 2 groups (P>.01).

  16. Epigenetic regulation in dental pulp inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hui, T; Wang, C; Chen, D; Zheng, L; Huang, D; Ye, L

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries, trauma, and other possible factors could lead to injury of the dental pulp. Dental infection could result in immune and inflammatory responses mediated by molecular and cellular events and tissue breakdown. The inflammatory response of dental pulp could be regulated by genetic and epigenetic events. Epigenetic modifications play a fundamental role in gene expression. The epigenetic events might play critical roles in the inflammatory process of dental pulp injury. Major epigenetic events include methylation and acetylation of histones and regulatory factors, DNA methylation, and small non-coding RNAs. Infections and other environmental factors have profound effects on epigenetic modifications and trigger diseases. Despite growing evidences of literatures addressing the role of epigenetics in the field of medicine and biology, very little is known about the epigenetic pathways involved in dental pulp inflammation. This review summarized the current knowledge about epigenetic mechanisms during dental pulp inflammation. Progress in studies of epigenetic alterations during inflammatory response would provide opportunities for the development of efficient medications of epigenetic therapy for pulpitis. PMID:26901577

  17. Salivary flow and dental caries in Brazilian youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Alves, Cresio; Menezes, Rafaela; Brandão, Marcia

    2012-01-01

    Although type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) has a significant impact on oral health, its association with dental caries is yet not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the salivary flow rate and caries in Brazilian youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus. A Cross-sectional study was performed in a tertiary university hospital. Fifty-one age matched subjects suffering from type 1 diabetes mellitus were selected for the study and evaluated for the following: salivary flow rate, number of decayed, missing and filled tooth in permanent dentition (DMF-T) and decayed, extracted, filled tooth index in the deciduous dentition (def-t); visible plaque index (VPI) and gingival bleeding index (GBI). STATISTICS AND ANALYSIS: The t test was utilized when the variables showed normal distribution. The Mann-Whitney test was utilized for comparing non-normal variables. Kolmorgorov-Smirnov test was used to assess the normality assumption. The differences were considered significant when P < 0.05. The age and gender distribution of patients and controls was 11.3 ± 3.4 years (56% males) and 11.9 ± 3.4 years (37% males). The mean glycated hemoglobin value in the diabetics was 9.7 ± 1.9%. Salivary flow rate was lower in the diabetic patients as compared to controls (P = 0.02). No differences were found in the DMF-T/def-t indices of diabetic and non-diabetic patients (P = 0.43/0.14). VPI was similar in both the groups (P = 0.15). GBI was higher in the diabetics (8.1 vs. 5.18; P = 0.11). There were no differences in the dental caries experience and dental plaque in the two groups. The lower salivary flow rate in diabetics could have been related to their higher GBI. The higher GBI in the diabetics is a matter of concern in the diabetics and is a sign for higher chances of developing periodontal problems.

  18. Effect of different types of prosthetic platforms on stress-distribution in dental implant-supported prostheses.

    PubMed

    Minatel, Lurian; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Kudo, Guilherme Abu Halawa; de Faria Almeida, Daniel Augusto; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araujo; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Santiago, Joel Ferreira

    2017-02-01

    A biomechanical analysis of different types of implant connections is relevant to clinical practice because it may impact the longevity of the rehabilitation treatment. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the Morse taper connections and the stress distribution of structures associated with the platform switching (PSW) concept. It will do this by obtaining data on the biomechanical behavior of the main structure in relation to the dental implant using the 3-dimensional finite element methodology. Four models were simulated (with each containing a single prosthesis over the implant) in the molar region, with the following specifications: M1 and M2 is an external hexagonal implant on a regular platform; M3 is an external hexagonal implant using PSW concept; and M4 is a Morse taper implant. The modeling process involved the use of images from InVesalius CT (computed tomography) processing software, which were refined using Rhinoceros 4.0 and SolidWorks 2011 CAD software. The models were then exported into the finite element program (FEMAP 11.0) to configure the meshes. The models were processed using NeiNastram software. The main results are that M1 (regular diameter 4mm) had the highest stress concentration area and highest microstrain concentration for bone tissue, dental implants, and the retaining screw (P<0.05). Using the PSW concept increases the area of the stress concentrations in the retaining screw (P<0.05) more than in the regular platform implant. It was concluded that the increase in diameter is beneficial for stress distribution and that the PSW concept had higher stress concentrations in the retaining screw and the crown compared to the regular platform implant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Association Between Dentist-Dental Hygienist Communication and Dental Treatment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Tomoko; Kato, Hiroaki; Kumagai, Takashi; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-03-01

    Communication between physician and patient is critical in all fields of medicine, and various types of communication exist in healthcare settings. Cooperation among healthcare professionals is thought to be essential in providing high-quality services. Dental hygienists are key team members in the provision of dental care, and are known to play an important role in the health of their patients. This study aimed to determine the effect of communication between dentists and hygienists on patient satisfaction. Study subjects were dentists, patients, and dental hygienists, and we examined how dentist-dental hygienist communication affected patient outcome indices. A significant difference was observed only for satisfaction in terms of meeting expectations (p = 0.035). Results for patient satisfaction indicated significant differences in explanatory behavior in dentist-dental hygienist evaluations (p = 0.001). The results showed improved health and reduced fear, indicating significant differences for the dentist-dental hygienist evaluations in explanation behavior (p = 0.016). Our evaluation of the effects of dentist-dental hygienist communication on patient outcomes indicated a significant correlation, suggesting that inter-professional communication in the field of dentistry affects patient satisfaction.

  1. Optical coherence tomography guided dental drill

    DOEpatents

    DaSilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A dental drill that has one or multiple single mode fibers that can be used to image in the vicinity of the drill tip. It is valuable to image below the surface being drilled to minimize damage to vital or normal tissue. Identifying the boundary between decayed and normal enamel (or dentine) would reduce the removal of viable tissue, and identifying the nerve before getting too close with the drill could prevent nerve damage. By surrounding a drill with several optical fibers that can be used by an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) to image several millimeters ahead of the ablation surface will lead to a new and improved dental treatment device.

  2. Dental radiographic guidelines: a review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Irene H; Mupparapu, Muralidhar

    2009-05-01

    The 2004 American Dental Association (ADA)/US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) radiographic selection criteria and guidelines were reviewed and compared with the prior radiographic selection criteria and guidelines. The authors reviewed the publications from the US FDA, US Department of Health and Human Services, and National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. The positions outlined by the Canadian Dental Association and the European Commission were also reviewed and compared to US guidelines. The FDA guidelines were first published in 1987, and several changes have been made to them over the years. Recent literature reveals that the general compliance of these guidelines is very low, especially within dental schools in the United States and Canada. Little is known about the compliance outside of the dental school environment; however, it is expected to be low for various reasons. In 2007, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) revised its estimates of tissue radiosensitivity, which resulted in effective doses of dental radiographs 32% to 422% higher than the 1990 ICRP guidelines. Flow charts summarizing the latest guidelines were developed to facilitate general compliance among practitioners. Based on the literature reviewed and the recent ICRP findings, it would be prudent for dental health care professionals to follow dental radiographic guidelines.

  3. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadeethi, Y; Al-Jedani, S; Razvi, M A N; Saeed, A; Abdel-Daiem, A M; Ansari, M Shahnawaze; Babkair, Saeed S; Salah, Numan A; Al-Mujtaba, A

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased.

  4. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Daiem, A. M.; Ansari, M. Shahnawaze; Babkair, Saeed S.; Salah, Numan A.; Al-Mujtaba, A.

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased. PMID:27228169

  5. Prevalence of dental trauma and use of mouthguards in rugby union players.

    PubMed

    Ilia, E; Metcalfe, K; Heffernan, M

    2014-12-01

    There is a high prevalence of orofacial trauma in rugby union players. Mouthguards reduce complications following dental injuries, should dental injuries occur. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of oral trauma and the significance of mouthguard use in adult amateur rugby union players in New South Wales, Australia. Questionnaires were distributed to players in rugby union clubs. It questioned players about their mouthguard use and orofacial trauma experience; the type of injury, complications, if a mouthguard was worn, where treatment was sought and outcome. The prevalence of orofacial trauma in rugby union players is 64.9%. The most common injury was laceration to intraoral and extraoral soft tissues at 44.5%. Of all orofacial injuries reported, 41.9% were to the dentition. Following dental injury, loss of the tooth was the most common complication (34.7%). 76.9% of players wore mouthguards. By wearing a mouthguard, the risk reduction for ongoing complications following dental injuries was 18.5% (p-value = 0.009). Of these, 10.4% (p-value = 0.45) represented loss of the tooth. Rates of orofacial trauma and complications in amateur rugby union players are high in Australia. Use of mouthguards results in significant risk reduction for complications following dental injuries, including loss of tooth. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  6. Bio-inspired dental fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyhle, Hans; Bunk, Oliver; Buser, Stefan; Krastl, Gabriel; Zitzmann, Nicola U.; Ilgenstein, Bernd; Beckmann, Felix; Pfeiffer, Franz; Weiger, Roland; Müller, Bert

    2009-08-01

    Human teeth are anisotropic composites. Dentin as the core material of the tooth consists of nanometer-sized calcium phosphate crystallites embedded in collagen fiber networks. It shows its anisotropy on the micrometer scale by its well-oriented microtubules. The detailed three-dimensional nanostructure of the hard tissues namely dentin and enamel, however, is not understood, although numerous studies on the anisotropic mechanical properties have been performed and evaluated to explain the tooth function including the enamel-dentin junction acting as effective crack barrier. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) with a spatial resolution in the 10 μm range allows determining the size and orientation of the constituents on the nanometer scale with reasonable precision. So far, only some dental materials, i.e. the fiber reinforced posts exhibit anisotropic properties related to the micrometer-size glass fibers. Dental fillings, composed of nanostructures oriented similar to the natural hard tissues of teeth, however, do not exist at all. The current X-ray-based investigations of extracted human teeth provide evidence for oriented micro- and nanostructures in dentin and enamel. These fundamental quantitative findings result in profound knowledge to develop biologically inspired dental fillings with superior resistance to thermal and mechanical shocks.

  7. Volumetric and linear changes at dental implants following grafting with volume-stable three-dimensional collagen matrices or autogenous connective tissue grafts: 6-month data.

    PubMed

    Naenni, Nadja; Bienz, Stefan P; Benic, Goran I; Jung, Ronald E; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Thoma, Daniel S

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to test whether or not soft tissue augmentation with a volume-stable collagen matrix (VCMX) leads to similar volume gain around dental implants compared to autogenous subepithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG). In 12 adult beagle dogs, immediate implants were placed with simultaneous guided bone regeneration. After 25-45 weeks, soft tissue augmentation was randomly performed using VCMX, SCTG, or a sham-operated control. Impressions were taken pre-op and post-op (tissue augmentation) and again at sacrifice after healing periods of 4, 8, and 24 weeks. They were then digitized to allow for superimposition. Values of linear and volumetric changes were calculated. The median increase (pre-op to post-op) in buccal volume measured 0.92 mm for VCMX, 1.47 mm for SCTG, and 0.24 mm for SH. The values (pre-op to sacrifice) were - 0.25 mm for VCMX, 0.52 mm for SCTG, and - 0.06 mm for group SH. The median ridge width 2 mm below the crest measured - 0.26 mm for VCMX, 0.53 mm for SCTG, and - 0.15 mm for SH (pre-op to sacrifice). Volume augmentation using VCMX and SCTG resulted in an increase in ridge dimension (pre- to post-op). During the follow-up, the volume decreased in all three groups to a level close to the situation prior to surgery. Soft tissue volume augmentation around dental implants is usually performed using the patient's own tissue. This therapy is associated with an increased morbidity due to a second surgical site. Soft tissue volume at implant sites can be augmented using VCMX and SCTG. The gain on top of the ridge appears not to be stable during the follow-up in both groups.

  8. Adipose Tissue Angiogenesis: Impact on Obesity and Type-2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Corvera, Silvia; Gealekman, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The growth and function of tissues is critically dependent on their vascularization. Adipose tissue is capable of expanding many-fold during adulthood, therefore requiring the formation of new vasculature to supply growing and proliferating adipocytes. The expansion of the vasculature in adipose tissue occurs through angiogenesis, where new blood vessels develop from those pre-existing within the tissue. Inappropriate angiogenesis may underlie adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity, which in turn increases type-2 diabetes risk. In addition, genetic and developmental factors involved in vascular patterning may define the size and expandability of diverse adipose tissue depots, which are also associated with type-2 diabetes risk. Moreover, the adipose tissue vasculature appears to be the niche for pre-adipocyte precursors, and factors that affect angiogenesis may directly impact the generation of new adipocytes. Here we review recent advances on the basic mechanisms of angiogenesis, and on the role of angiogenesis in adipose tissue development and obesity. A substantial amount of data point to a deficit in adipose tissue angiogenesis as a contributing factor to insulin resistance and metabolic disease in obesity. These emerging findings support the concept of the adipose tissue vasculature as a source of new targets for metabolic disease therapies. PMID:23770388

  9. Long-Wave Infrared Thermophotonic Imaging of Demineralization in Dental Hard Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojaghi, A.; Parkhimchyk, A.; Tabatabaei, N.

    2016-08-01

    Dental caries remains the most prevalent chronic disease in both children and adults worldwide. To address this prevalence through disease prevention and management, dentists need tools capable of detecting caries at early stages of formation. Looking into the physics of light propagation in teeth, this study presents a clinically and commercially viable platform technology for thermophotonic detection of early dental caries using an inexpensive long-wavelength infrared (LWIR; 8 μm to 14 μm) camera. The developed system incorporates intensity-modulated light to generate a thermal-wave field inside enamel and uses the subsequent infrared emission of the thermal-wave field to detect early caries. It was found that the greater light absorption at caries sites shifts the thermal-wave field centroid, providing contrast between early caries and intact enamel. Use of LWIR detection band in dental samples is novel and beneficial over the conventional mid-wavelength infrared band (3 μm to 5 μm) as it suppresses the masking effect of the instantaneous radiative emission from subsurface features due to the minimal transmittance of enamel in the LWIR band. The efficacy of the LWIR system is verified though experiments carried out on nonbiological test samples as well as on teeth with natural and artificially induced caries. The results suggest that the developed LWIR technology is an affordable early dental caries detection system suitable for commercialization/translation to Dentistry.

  10. Digital sorting of complex tissues for cell type-specific gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yi; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Pang, Kaifang; Chow, Lionel M L; Liu, Zhandong

    2013-03-07

    Cellular heterogeneity is present in almost all gene expression profiles. However, transcriptome analysis of tissue specimens often ignores the cellular heterogeneity present in these samples. Standard deconvolution algorithms require prior knowledge of the cell type frequencies within a tissue or their in vitro expression profiles. Furthermore, these algorithms tend to report biased estimations. Here, we describe a Digital Sorting Algorithm (DSA) for extracting cell-type specific gene expression profiles from mixed tissue samples that is unbiased and does not require prior knowledge of cell type frequencies. The results suggest that DSA is a specific and sensitivity algorithm in gene expression profile deconvolution and will be useful in studying individual cell types of complex tissues.

  11. Proteomic analysis of human dental cementum and alveolar bone.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Cristiane R; Tomazela, Daniela M; Ruiz, Karina Gonzales Silvério; Foster, Brian L; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Sallum, Enilson Antonio; Somerman, Martha J; Nociti, Francisco H

    2013-10-08

    Dental cementum (DC) is a bone-like tissue covering the tooth root and responsible for attaching the tooth to the alveolar bone (AB) via the periodontal ligament (PDL). Studies have unsuccessfully tried to identify factors specific to DC versus AB, in an effort to better understand DC development and regeneration. The present study aimed to use matched human DC and AB samples (n=7) to generate their proteomes for comparative analysis. Bone samples were harvested from tooth extraction sites, whereas DC samples were obtained from the apical root portion of extracted third molars. Samples were denatured, followed by protein extraction reduction, alkylation and digestion for analysis by nanoAcquity HPLC system and LTQ-FT Ultra. Data analysis demonstrated that a total of 318 proteins were identified in AB and DC. In addition to shared proteins between these tissues, 105 and 83 proteins exclusive to AB or DC were identified, respectively. This is the first report analyzing the proteomic composition of human DC matrix and identifying putative unique and enriched proteins in comparison to alveolar bone. These findings may provide novel insights into developmental differences between DC and AB, and identify candidate biomarkers that may lead to more efficient and predictable therapies for periodontal regeneration. Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent disease affecting the world population, which involves breakdown of the tooth supporting tissues, the periodontal ligament, alveolar bone, and dental cementum. The lack of knowledge on specific factors that differentiate alveolar bone and dental cementum limits the development of more efficient and predictable reconstructive therapies. In order to better understand cementum development and potentially identify factors to improve therapeutic outcomes, we took the unique approach of using matched patient samples of dental cementum and alveolar bone to generate and compare a proteome list for each tissue. A potential

  12. The current status of 3D imaging in dental practice.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Clare; House, Kate; Davies, Rebecca; Barker, Chris S; Chawla, Ourvinder; Sandy, Jonathan R; Ireland, Anthony J

    2011-12-01

    This article aims to describe the current status of 3-dimensional (3D) imaging in dental practice. Advances in this field have made 3D imaging far more accessible in all dental fields. This paper describes methods of imaging dental hard and soft tissues and their clinical uses. In addition, the potential advantages and disadvantages of various systems are discussed, as well as expected future developments.

  13. Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Dental Pulp Stem Cells: Future Potential for Bladder Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bing; Jiang, Wenkai; Alraies, Amr; Liu, Qian; Gudla, Vijay; Oni, Julia; Wei, Xiaoqing; Sloan, Alastair; Ni, Longxing; Agarwal, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines, thus providing an alternative source of cell for tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) regeneration is a crucial step in tissue engineering of the urinary bladder. It is known that DPSCs have the potential to differentiate into a smooth muscle phenotype in vitro with differentiation agents. However, most of these studies are focused on the vascular SMCs. The optimal approaches to induce human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs are still under investigation. We demonstrate in this study the ability of human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs in a growth environment containing bladder SMCs-conditioned medium with the addition of the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). After 14 days of exposure to this medium, the gene and protein expression of SMC-specific marker (α-SMA, desmin, and calponin) increased over time. In particular, myosin was present in differentiated cells after 11 days of induction, which indicated that the cells differentiated into the mature SMCs. These data suggested that human DPSCs could be used as an alternative and less invasive source of stem cells for smooth muscle regeneration, a technology that has applications for bladder tissue engineering. PMID:26880982

  14. Frequency and characteristics of occupational dental trauma.

    PubMed

    Trullás, J M; Ballester, M L; Bolíbar, I; Parellada, N; Berástegui, E

    2013-03-01

    Dental trauma at the workplace may have important clinical and occupational consequences, but little is known about its profile. To describe the frequency and characteristics of work-related dental injuries. For all patients with occupational dental trauma seen at the FREMAP Hospital of Barcelona (Spain) between January 2000 and December 2006, we recorded their characteristics, type of work and nature of the trauma, including cause of the accident, extent of trauma, reason for referral to a dentist, and days of sick leave. The frequency of dental trauma was 1.71 per 1000 occupational accidents attended and was related to the worker's occupation. In security services, it was 7.37 per 1000 and 2.01 in transport services. The frequency was similar in both genders. The most common causal mechanisms were direct impact (38%), traffic accidents (29%) and falls at the same level (16%). Causal mechanisms differed according to gender and type of job. Most injuries consisted of dental fracture (54%), and 67% of the patients required referral to a dental surgery. Injuries were limited to the mouth in 52% of cases, 8% of which required sick leave, with a mean duration of 23.0±21.8 days. The frequency of dental trauma in this working population was low and was related to the worker's occupation. Causal mechanisms differed according to gender and type of job. Most dental injuries were severe and required referral to a dental surgery. Frequency of sick leave was low.

  15. Dental therapists: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Nash, David A; Friedman, Jay W; Kardos, Thomas B; Kardos, Rosemary L; Schwarz, Eli; Satur, Julie; Berg, Darren G; Nasruddin, Jaafar; Mumghamba, Elifuraha G; Davenport, Elizabeth S; Nagel, Ron

    2008-04-01

    In 1921, New Zealand began training school dental nurses, subsequently deploying them throughout the country in school-based clinics providing basic dental care for children. The concept of training dental nurses, later to be designated dental therapists, was adopted by other countries as a means of improving access to care, particularly for children. This paper profiles six countries that utilise dental therapists, with a description of the training that therapists receive in these countries, and the context in which they practice. Based on available demographic information, it also updates the number of dental therapists practising globally, as well as the countries in which they practice. In several countries, dental therapy is now being integrated with dental hygiene in training and practice to create a new type of professional complementary to a dentist. Increasingly, dental therapists are permitted to treat adults as well as children. The paper also describes the status of a current initiative to introduce dental therapy to the United States. It concludes by suggesting that dental therapists can become valued members of the dental team throughout the world, helping to improve access to care and reducing existing disparities in oral health.

  16. Classifying Adverse Events in the Dental Office.

    PubMed

    Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Obadan-Udoh, Enihomo; Maramaldi, Peter; Etolue, Jini; Yansane, Alfa; Stewart, Denice; White, Joel; Vaderhobli, Ram; Kent, Karla; Hebballi, Nutan B; Delattre, Veronique; Kahn, Maria; Tokede, Oluwabunmi; Ramoni, Rachel B; Walji, Muhammad F

    2017-06-30

    Dentists strive to provide safe and effective oral healthcare. However, some patients may encounter an adverse event (AE) defined as "unnecessary harm due to dental treatment." In this research, we propose and evaluate two systems for categorizing the type and severity of AEs encountered at the dental office. Several existing medical AE type and severity classification systems were reviewed and adapted for dentistry. Using data collected in previous work, two initial dental AE type and severity classification systems were developed. Eight independent reviewers performed focused chart reviews, and AEs identified were used to evaluate and modify these newly developed classifications. A total of 958 charts were independently reviewed. Among the reviewed charts, 118 prospective AEs were found and 101 (85.6%) were verified as AEs through a consensus process. At the end of the study, a final AE type classification comprising 12 categories, and an AE severity classification comprising 7 categories emerged. Pain and infection were the most common AE types representing 73% of the cases reviewed (56% and 17%, respectively) and 88% were found to cause temporary, moderate to severe harm to the patient. Adverse events found during the chart review process were successfully classified using the novel dental AE type and severity classifications. Understanding the type of AEs and their severity are important steps if we are to learn from and prevent patient harm in the dental office.

  17. Managing dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Donald A; Jayanetti, Jay; Chu, Raymond; Staninec, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The clinical signs of dental erosion are initially subtle, yet often progress because the patient remains asymptomatic, unaware and uninformed. Erosion typically works synergistically with abrasion and attrition to cause loss of tooth structure, making diagnosis and management complex. The purpose of this article is to outline clinical examples of patients with dental erosion that highlight the strategy of early identification, patient education and conservative restorative management. Dental erosion is defined as the pathologic chronic loss of dental hard tissues as a result of the chemical influence of exogenous or endogenous acids without bacterial involvement. Like caries or periodontal disease, erosion has a multifactorial etiology and requires a thorough history and examination for diagnosis. It also requires patient understanding and compliance for improved outcomes. Erosion can affect the loss of tooth structure in isolation of other cofactors, but most often works in synergy with abrasion and attrition in the loss of tooth structure (Table 1). Although erosion is thought to be an underlying etiology of dentin sensitivity, erosion and loss of tooth structure often occurs with few symptoms. The purpose of this article is threefold: first, to outline existing barriers that may limit early management of dental erosion. Second, to review the clinical assessment required to establish a diagnosis of erosion. And third, to outline clinical examples that review options to restore lost tooth structure. The authors have included illustrations they hope will be used to improve patient understanding and motivation in the early management of dental erosion.

  18. [Comparison of machinability of two types of dental machinable ceramic].

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Zhao, Yunfeng; Li, Yong; Fan, Xinping; Li, Yan; Lin, Xuefeng

    2002-11-01

    In terms of the problems of now available dental machinable ceramics, a new type of calcium-mica glass-ceramic, PMC-I ceramic, was developed, and its machinability was compared with that of Vita MKII quantitatively. Moreover, the relationship between the strength and the machinability of PMC-I ceramic was studied. Samples of PMC-I ceramic were divided into four groups according to their nucleation procedures. 600-seconds drilling tests were conducted with high-speed steel tools (Phi = 2.3 mm) to measure the drilling depths of Vita MKII ceramic and PMC-I ceramic, while constant drilling speed of 600 rpm and constant axial load of 39.2 N were used. And the 3-point bending strength of the four groups of PMC-I ceramic were recorded. Drilling depth of Vita MKII was 0.71 mm, while the depths of the four groups of PMC-I ceramic were 0.88 mm, 1.40 mm, 0.40 mm and 0.90 mm, respectively. Group B of PMC-I ceramic showed the largest depth of 1.40 mm and was statistically different from other groups and Vita MKII. And the strength of the four groups of PMC-I ceramic were 137.7, 210.2, 118.0 and 106.0 MPa, respectively. The machinability of the new developed dental machinable ceramic of PMC-I could meet the need of the clinic.

  19. Access to dental care and the capacity of the California dental care system.

    PubMed

    Brown, Timothy T; Pourat, Nadereh; Glassman, Paul; Chung, Jessica; Nicholson, Gina; Hong, Juliette S

    2012-03-01

    The authors estimated the following levels of technical efficiency for three types of dental practices in California where technical efficiency is defined as the maximum output that can be produced from a given set of inputs: generalists (including pediatric dentists), 96.5 percent; specialists, 77.1 percent; community dental clinics, 83.6 percent. Combining this with information on access, it is estimated that the California dental care system in 2009-10 could serve approximately 74 percent of the population.

  20. Regenerative endodontics as a tissue engineering approach: past, current and future.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Mala, Kundabala

    2012-12-01

    With the reported startling statistics of high incidence of tooth decay and tooth loss, the current interest is focused on the development of alternate dental tissue replacement therapies. This has led to the application of dental tissue engineering as a clinically relevant method for the regeneration of dental tissues and generation of bioengineered whole tooth. Although, tissue engineering approach requires the three main key elements of stem cells, scaffold and morphogens, a conductive environment (fourth element) is equally important for successful engineering of any tissue and/or organ. The applications of this science has evolved continuously in dentistry, beginning from the application of Ca(OH)(2) in vital pulp therapy to the development of a fully functional bioengineered tooth (mice). Thus, with advances in basic research, recent reports and studies have shown successful application of tissue engineering in the field of dentistry. However, certain practical obstacles are yet to be overcome before dental tissue regeneration can be applied as evidence-based approach in clinics. The article highlights on the past achievements, current developments and future prospects of tissue engineering and regenerative therapy in the field of endodontics and bioengineered teeth (bioteeth). © 2012 The Authors. Australian Endodontic Journal © 2012 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  1. Epigenome overlap measure (EPOM) for comparing tissue/cell types based on chromatin states.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei Vivian; Razaee, Zahra S; Li, Jingyi Jessica

    2016-01-11

    The dynamics of epigenomic marks in their relevant chromatin states regulate distinct gene expression patterns, biological functions and phenotypic variations in biological processes. The availability of high-throughput epigenomic data generated by next-generation sequencing technologies allows a data-driven approach to evaluate the similarities and differences of diverse tissue and cell types in terms of epigenomic features. While ChromImpute has allowed for the imputation of large-scale epigenomic information to yield more robust data to capture meaningful relationships between biological samples, widely used methods such as hierarchical clustering and correlation analysis cannot adequately utilize epigenomic data to accurately reveal the distinction and grouping of different tissue and cell types. We utilize a three-step testing procedure-ANOVA, t test and overlap test to identify tissue/cell-type- associated enhancers and promoters and to calculate a newly defined Epigenomic Overlap Measure (EPOM). EPOM results in a clear correspondence map of biological samples from different tissue and cell types through comparison of epigenomic marks evaluated in their relevant chromatin states. Correspondence maps by EPOM show strong capability in distinguishing and grouping different tissue and cell types and reveal biologically meaningful similarities between Heart and Muscle, Blood & T-cell and HSC & B-cell, Brain and Neurosphere, etc. The gene ontology enrichment analysis both supports and explains the discoveries made by EPOM and suggests that the associated enhancers and promoters demonstrate distinguishable functions across tissue and cell types. Moreover, the tissue/cell-type-associated enhancers and promoters show enrichment in the disease-related SNPs that are also associated with the corresponding tissue or cell types. This agreement suggests the potential of identifying causal genetic variants relevant to cell-type-specific diseases from our identified

  2. Epidemiology of dental professional liability.

    PubMed

    Montagna, F; Cortesini, C; Manca, R; Montagna, L; Piras, A; Manfredini, D

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this article is to collect data relating to dental professional liability in Italy and provide a common platform for discussions among clinicians, legal medicine practitioners, and experts in law. On the basis of two different dental-legal statistical samples (1,670 reports of legal dental experts and 320 civil court decisions) we analyzed the dental professional liability lawsuit in the areas of distribution of lawsuits among the different dental specialties, recurrence and type of errors, outcome of civil suits, parameters of compensation. Some ideas are also proposed for possible strategies in the management of clinical risk (prevention of errors) and court proceedings.

  3. Dental x-ray image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Eyad; Fahmy, Gamal F.; Nassar, Diaa; Ammar, Hany

    2004-08-01

    Law enforcement agencies have been exploiting biometric identifiers for decades as key tools in forensic identification. With the evolution in information technology and the huge volume of cases that need to be investigated by forensic specialists, it has become important to automate forensic identification systems. While, ante mortem (AM) identification, that is identification prior to death, is usually possible through comparison of many biometric identifiers, postmortem (PM) identification, that is identification after death, is impossible using behavioral biometrics (e.g. speech, gait). Moreover, under severe circumstances, such as those encountered in mass disasters (e.g. airplane crashers) or if identification is being attempted more than a couple of weeks postmortem, under such circumstances, most physiological biometrics may not be employed for identification, because of the decay of soft tissues of the body to unidentifiable states. Therefore, a postmortem biometric identifier has to resist the early decay that affects body tissues. Because of their survivability and diversity, the best candidates for postmortem biometric identification are the dental features. In this paper we present an over view about an automated dental identification system for Missing and Unidentified Persons. This dental identification system can be used by both law enforcement and security agencies in both forensic and biometric identification. We will also present techniques for dental segmentation of X-ray images. These techniques address the problem of identifying each individual tooth and how the contours of each tooth are extracted.

  4. [Investigation of dental manpower in non-public dental institutions in Liaoning province].

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Zhang, Ying; Cheng, Rui-bo; Xu, Yan-mei; Lu, Zhen-fu

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the non-public oral medical institutions in Liaoning province in 2011, and to analyze the status of dental manpower in non-public dental institutions in Liaoning province. A mass survey on dental manpower was made in non-public dental institutions in Liaoning province in 2011 by means of questionnaire investigation, which included the institution type, dental devices, and the number, structure, composition, distribution of dental manpower in non-public dental institutions in Liaoning province. Data was entered with EpiData 3.0 and analyzed with SPSS 13.0 software package. There were 1649 non-public dental institutions with 3132 dentists, 1265 nurses, 540 technicians and 3490 dental chairs in Liaoning province. 85.69% of the dental manpower were young and middle-aged. 33.17% of the dentists had primary professional titles, 42.53% of them had college degree and 87.96% of the dentists was general dentistry. In the dental auxiliaries, the primary professional title accounted for the majority. 95.97% of the nurses majored in general dentistry and 60.40% of the nurses' educational background were below junior college degree. 72.59% of the technicians majored in prosthetic dentistry and 67.78% of their educational background were below junior college degree. The ratio of the dentists to nurses to technicians was 6:2:1. The ratio of the nurses to dental chairs was 1:2.76. The distribution and composition of dental manpower are not reasonable in non-public dental institutions in Liaoning province. We should strengthen effective utilization of oral health resources and the oral health service ability of non -public dental institutions in Liaoning province. Supported by Key Science and Technology Projects of Liaoning Province (2012225015).

  5. Exogenous mineralization of hard tissues using photo-absorptive minerals and femto-second lasers; the case of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Anastasiou, A D; Strafford, S; Thomson, C L; Gardy, J; Edwards, T J; Malinowski, M; Hussain, S A; Metzger, N K; Hassanpour, A; Brown, C T A; Brown, A P; Duggal, M S; Jha, A

    2018-04-15

    A radical new methodology for the exogenous mineralization of hard tissues is demonstrated in the context of laser-biomaterials interaction. The proposed approach is based on the use of femtosecond pulsed lasers (fs) and Fe 3+ -doped calcium phosphate minerals (specifically in this work fluorapatite powder containing Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles (NP)). A layer of the synthetic powder is applied to the surface of eroded bovine enamel and is irradiated with a fs laser (1040 nm wavelength, 1 GHz repetition rate, 150 fs pulse duration and 0.4 W average power). The Fe 2 O 3 NPs absorb the light and may act as thermal antennae, dissipating energy to the vicinal mineral phase. Such a photothermal process triggers the sintering and densification of the surrounding calcium phosphate crystals thereby forming a new, dense layer of typically ∼20 μm in thickness, which is bonded to the underlying surface of the natural enamel. The dispersed iron oxide NPs, ensure the localization of temperature excursion, minimizing collateral thermal damage to the surrounding natural tissue during laser irradiation. Simulated brushing trials (pH cycle and mechanical force) on the synthetic layer show that the sintered material is more acid resistant than the natural mineral of enamel. Furthermore, nano-indentation confirms that the hardness and Young's modulus of the new layers are significantly more closely matched to enamel than current restorative materials used in clinical dentistry. Although the results presented herein are exemplified in the context of bovine enamel restoration, the methodology may be more widely applicable to human enamel and other hard-tissue regenerative engineering. In this work we provide a new methodology for the mineralisation of dental hard tissues using femtosecond lasers and iron doped biomaterials. In particular, we demonstrate selective laser sintering of an iron doped fluorapatite on the surface of eroded enamel under low average power and mid

  6. Applications of Nanomaterials in Dental Science: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Jitendra; Singh, Shivani; Lale, Shantanu V; Mishra, Monu; Koul, Veena; Kharbanda, P

    2017-04-01

    Nanotechnology has revolutionized health care industry in a large scale and its applications are a boon to modern medicine and dental science. It is expected to pervade and further revolutionize the art and science of dentistry and may well have important applications spanning all the aspects of oral diseases, diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Materials science in dentistry has embraced the technology to produce nanomaterials that are being used in caries inhibitors, antimicrobial resins, hard tissue remineralizing agents, targeted drug delivery, scaffolds, bio-membranes, nanocrystalline hydroxyl apatite, restorative cements, adhesion promoters and boosters, bioactive glass, tissue conditioners, reinforced methacrylate resins, root canal disinfectants, friction free orthodontic arch wires and nano composites life. These upcoming technologies have potential to bring about significant benefits in the form of improvement in dental science and to society. The present review presents the latest recent developments in this interdisciplinary field bridging nanotechnology and dental science.

  7. Cryopreservation Method for the Effective Collection of Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Takebe, Yusuke; Tatehara, Seiko; Fukushima, Tatsuhiro; Tokuyama-Toda, Reiko; Yasuhara, Rika; Mishima, Kenji; Satomura, Kazuhito

    2017-05-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are an attractive cell source for use in cell-based therapy, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering because DPSCs have a high cell proliferation ability and multidifferentiation capacity. However, several problems are associated with the collection and preservation of DPSCs for use in future cell-based therapy. In particular, the isolation of DPSCs for cryopreservation is time consuming and expensive. In this study, we developed a novel cryopreservation method (NCM) for dental pulp tissues to isolate suitable DPSCs after thawing cryopreserved tissue. Using the NCM, dental pulp tissues were cultured on adhesion culture dishes for 5 days and then cryopreserved. After thawing, the cryopreserved dental pulp tissue fragments exhibited cell migration. We evaluated each property of DPSCs isolated using the NCM (DPSCs-NCM) and the explant method alone without cryopreservation (DPSCs-C). DPSCs-NCM had the same proliferation capacity as DPSCs-C. Flow cytometry (FACS) analysis indicated that both DPSCs-NCM and DPSCs-C were positive for mesenchymal stem cell markers at the same level but negative for hematopoietic cell markers. Moreover, both DPSCs-NCM and DPSCs-C could differentiate into osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic cells during culture in each induction medium. These results suggest that DPSCs-NCM may be mesenchymal stem cells. Therefore, our novel method might facilitate the less expensive cryopreservation of DPSCs, thereby providing suitable DPSCs for use in patients in future cell-based therapies.

  8. Peri-Implantitis Associated with Type of Cement: A Retrospective Analysis of Different Types of Cement and Their Clinical Correlation to the Peri-Implant Tissue.

    PubMed

    Korsch, Michael; Walther, Winfried

    2015-10-01

    The cementation of fixed implant-supported dental restorations involves the risk of leaving excess cement in the mouth which can promote biofilm formation in the peri-implant sulcus. As a result, an inflammation may develop. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical effect of two different luting cements on the peri-implant tissue. Within the scope of a retrospective clinical follow-up study, the prosthetic structures of 22 patients with 45 implants were revised. In all cases, a methacrylate cement (Premier Implant Cement [PIC], Premier® Dental Products Company, Plymouth Meeting, PA, USA) had been used for cementation. In 16 additional patients with 28 implants, the suprastructures were retained with a zinc oxide-eugenol cement (Temp Bond [TB], Kerr Sybron Dental Specialities, Glendora, CA, USA). These patients were evaluated in the course of routine treatment. In both populations, the retention time of the suprastructures was similar (TB 3.77 years, PIC 4.07 years). In the PIC cases, 62% of all implants had excess cement. In the TB cases, excess cement was not detectable on any of the implants. Bleeding on probing was significantly more frequent on implants cemented with PIC (100% with and 94% without excess cement) than on implants cemented with TB (46%). Pocket suppuration was observed on 89% of the PIC-cemented implants with excess cement (PIC without excess cement 24%), whereas implants with TB were not affected by it at all. The peri-implant bone loss was significantly greater in the PIC patients (with excess cement 1.37 mm, without excess cement 0.41 mm) than it was in the TB patients (0.07 mm). The frequency of undetected excess cement depends essentially on the type of cement used. Cements that tend to leave more undetected excess have a higher prevalence for peri-implant inflammation and cause a more severe peri-implant bone loss. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of different types of dental cement on normal cultured human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bakopoulou, A; Mourelatos, D; Tsiftsoglou, A S; Giassin, N P; Mioglou, E; Garefis, P

    2009-01-31

    In this study we have investigated the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of eluates derived from different types of commercially available dental cements, including glass ionomer cements (GICs) (Ketac Cem/3M ESPE and GC Fuji I/GC Corp), resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RM-GICs) (RelyX Luting/3M ESPE and Vitrebond/3M ESPE) and dual-cure resin cements (RCs) (Variolink II/ Ivoclar-Vivadent and Panavia F 2.0/Kuraray) on normal cultured human lymphocytes. Lymphocyte primary cultures obtained from blood samples of three healthy donors were exposed to serial dilutions of eluates derived from specimens of each material tested. Metaphases were induced with phytohaemagglutinin, collected after 72h treatment by use of colchicine and stained according to the fluorescence plus giemsa (FPG) procedure. Preparations were scored for sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs), while the proliferation rate index (PRI) was also calculated. Our results show that eluates derived from the RM-GICs and RCs caused severe genotoxic effects by significantly increasing the frequencies of SCEs and CAs in cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes and by decreasing the relevant PRI values in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the two GICs caused only minor cytogenetic effects. Eluates of the two RM-GICs (Vitrebond and RelyX) were also very cytotoxic, as the first serial dilutions of both materials caused a complete mitotic arrest in lymphocyte cultures. Overall, the degree of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity caused by dental cements decreased as follows: Viterbond>Rely X>Panavia F 2.0>Variolink II>Ketac Cem=GC Fuji I. These results indicate that different types of dental cement differ extensively in their genotoxic and cytotoxic potential and their ability to affect chromosomal integrity, cell-cycle progression, DNA replication and repair. Although these results cannot be directly extrapolated to the clinical situation, the potential occurrence of adverse effects caused by the

  10. Exploring Current and Future Roles of Non-Dental Professionals: Implications for Dental Hygiene Education.

    PubMed

    Maxey, Hannah L; Farrell, Christine; Gwozdek, Anne

    2017-09-01

    The health care system is undergoing transformation in which oral health is not only valued as an aspect of overall health, but health care delivery systems are aligning to better deliver total patient care. As a result of this transformation, education for many non-dental professionals incorporates oral health content to prepare them to practice in comprehensive delivery models. While some non-dental professionals already incorporate oral health care in their service, many opportunities exist for expansion of oral health care delivery by other non-dental professionals, including radiologic technicians, nursing staff, and human services professionals. As non-dental professionals take on expanded roles in oral health care, the dental hygiene workforce must be prepared to practice in settings with new types of professionals. Dental hygiene curricula should prioritize interprofessional education to best prepare these students for practice in evolved delivery models. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  11. Classification review of dental adhesive systems: from the IV generation to the universal type

    PubMed Central

    Sofan, Eshrak; Sofan, Afrah; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Romeo, Umberto; Migliau, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Summary Adhesive dentistry has undergone great progress in the last decades. In light of minimal-invasive dentistry, this new approach promotes a more conservative cavity design, which relies on the effectiveness of current enamel-dentine adhesives. Adhesive dentistry began in 1955 by Buonocore on the benefits of acid etching. With changing technologies, dental adhesives have evolved from no-etch to total-etch (4th and 5th generation) to self-etch (6th, 7th and 8th generation) systems. Currently, bonding to dental substrates is based on three different strategies: 1) etch-and-rinse, 2) self-etch and 3) resin-modified glass-ionomer approach as possessing the unique properties of self-adherence to the tooth tissue. More recently, a new family of dentin adhesives has been introduced (universal or multi-mode adhesives), which may be used either as etch-and-rinse or as self-etch adhesives. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on the current knowledge for each adhesive system according to their classification that have been advocated by many authorities in most operative/restorative procedures. As noted by several valuable studies that have contributed to understanding of bonding to various substrates helps clinicians to choose the appropriate dentin bonding agents for optimal clinical outcomes. PMID:28736601

  12. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    PubMed Central

    Levrini, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction) studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp), to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders). It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction. PMID:25548769

  13. Cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema associated with dental laser treatment.

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga, S; Iwai, T; Kitajima, H; Yajima, Y; Ohya, T; Hirota, M; Mitsudo, K; Aoki, N; Yamashita, Y; Omura, S; Tohnai, I

    2013-12-01

    Cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema is a rare complication of dental procedures. Although most cases of emphysema occur incidentally with the use of a high-speed air turbine handpiece, there have been some reports over the past decade of cases caused by dental laser treatment. Emphysema as a complication caused by the air cooling spray of a dental laser is not well known, even though dental lasers utilize compressed air just as air turbines and syringes do. In this study, we comprehensively reviewed cases of emphysema attributed to dental laser treatment that appeared in the literature between January 2001 and September 2012, and we included three such cases referred to us. Among 13 cases identified in total, nine had cervicofacial subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema. Compared with past reviews, the incidence of mediastinal emphysema caused by dental laser treatment was higher than emphysema caused by dental procedure without dental laser use. Eight patients underwent CO2 laser treatment and two underwent Er:YAG laser treatment. Nine patients had emphysema following laser irradiation for soft tissue incision. Dentists and oral surgeons should be cognizant of the potential risk for iatrogenic emphysema caused by the air cooling spray during dental laser treatment and ensure proper usage of lasers. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  14. Dental caries, age and anxiety: factors influencing sedation choice for children attending for emergency dental care.

    PubMed

    Carson, P; Freeman, R

    2001-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine how physical (dental caries) and psychosocial (age, dental anxiety and dental health behaviour) factors, associated with child and parent, influenced dentists' sedation choice when a child presents in pain. 600 parents whose children were aged between 5 and 11 years took part: 200 attended for routine dental care (RDC); the remaining 400 attended as emergency patients and were offered either dental general anaesthesia (DGA) or relative analgesia (RA). The subjects were approached and invited to take part. The researcher was blind as to the child's pattern of dental attendance and the type of sedation offered. All parents and children completed self-reported ratings of dental anxiety. The children's teeth were examined to determine past and present dental caries experience. The results showed that children who were offered DGA had greater experience of dentinal caries, were younger and dentally anxious. The children offered RA were older, had a higher frequency of brushing their teeth with fluoride toothpaste and were also dentally anxious. Discriminant analysis showed that 2 canonical functions provided clear categorisation of the three treatment groups. Function 1 was a physical (dental caries) factor, which was related to the child's experience of dentinal caries. Function 2 was a psychosocial factor, which was related to the child's age, dental anxiety and frequency of tooth brushing. A greater proportion of the variance in the treatment offered was explained by Function 1, suggesting that the most important factor in the decision to offer DGA was dentinal caries. Function 2 was of lesser importance. The findings have implications for the type of sedation offered to children presenting for emergency care. These children may not otherwise receive treatment and the need to provide less anxiety provoking forms of sedation must be promoted. By doing so, parents who have only brought their children when in pain may take advantage

  15. Current update on portable dental equipment.

    PubMed

    Charlton, David G; Ehrlich, A D; Miniotis, Nicholas J

    2007-02-01

    The dental care needs of the elderly are increasing as their population grows. For some of the elderly (eg, the nonambulatory, homebound, institutionalized), accessing dental care is a problem because they are unable to visit a traditional dental clinic. In the past, dental care has been taken to the homebound or institutionalized elderly by dentists using portable dental equipment. However, the perception that such equipment is difficult or impossible to obtain has limited the availability of on-site care. The purpose of this article is to describe various types of portable dental equipment and their features so that dentists interested in providing care to this group of patients are aware of them.

  16. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  17. Mycoplasma detection and elimination are necessary for the application of stem cell from human dental apical papilla to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Chul; Kim, So Yeon; Kwon, Yong-Dae; Choe, Sung Chul; Han, Dong-Wook; Hwang, Yu-Shik

    2015-01-01

    Recently, postnatal stem cells from dental papilla with neural crest origin have been considered as one of potent stem cell sources in regenerative medicine regarding their multi-differentiation capacity and relatively easy access. However, almost human oral tissues have been reported to be infected by mycoplasma which gives rise to oral cavity in teeth, and mycoplasma contamination of ex-vivo cultured stem cells from such dental tissues and its effect on stem cell culture has received little attention. In this study, mycoplama contamination was evaluated with stem cells from apical papilla which were isolated from human third molar and premolars from various aged patients undergoing orthodontic therapy. The ex-vivo expanded stem cells from apical papilla were found to express stem cell markers such as Stro-1, CD44, nestin and CD133, but mycoplama contamination was detected in almost all cell cultures of the tested 20 samples, which was confirmed by mycoplasma-specific gene expression and fluorescence staining. Such contaminated mycoplasma could be successfully eliminated using elimination kit, and proliferation test showed decreased proliferation activity in mycoplasma-contaminated cells. After elimination of contaminated mycoplasma, stem cells from apical papilla showed osteogenic and neural lineage differentiation under certain culture conditions. Our study proposes that the evaluation of mycoplasma contamination and elimination process might be required in the use of stem cells from apical papilla for their potent applications to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  18. Fiber optic-based optical coherence tomography (OCT) for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Otis, Linda L.

    1998-09-01

    We have developed a hand-held fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for scanning of the oral cavity. We have produced, using this scanning device, in vivo cross-sectional images of hard and soft dental tissues in human volunteers. Clinically relevant anatomical structures, including the gingival margin, periodontal sulcus, and dento- enamel junction, were visible in all the images. The cemento- enamel junction and the alveolar bone were identified in approximately two thirds of the images. These images represent, or our knowledge, the first in vivo OCT images of human dental tissue.

  19. Odontoblast-Like Cells Differentiated from Dental Pulp Stem Cells Retain Their Phenotype after Subcultivation

    PubMed Central

    Baldión, Paula A.; Velandia-Romero, Myriam L.

    2018-01-01

    Odontoblasts, the main cell type in teeth pulp tissue, are not cultivable and they are responsible for the first line of response after dental restauration. Studies on dental materials cytotoxicity and odontoblast cells physiology require large quantity of homogenous cells retaining most of the phenotype characteristics. Odontoblast-like cells (OLC) were differentiated from human dental pulp stem cells using differentiation medium (containing TGF-β1), and OLC expanded after trypsinization (EXP-21) were evaluated and compared. Despite a slower cell growth curve, EXP-21 cells express similarly the odontoblast markers dentinal sialophosphoprotein and dentin matrix protein-1 concomitantly with RUNX2 transcripts and low alkaline phosphatase activity as expected. Both OLC and EXP-21 cells showed similar mineral deposition activity evidenced by alizarin red and von Kossa staining. These results pointed out minor changes in phenotype of subcultured EXP-21 regarding the primarily differentiated OLC, making the subcultivation of these cells a useful strategy to obtain odontoblasts for biocompatibility or cell physiology studies in dentistry. PMID:29670655

  20. Comparative bone tissue integration of nanostructured and microroughened dental implants.

    PubMed

    Salou, Laëtitia; Hoornaert, Alain; Stanovici, Julien; Briand, Sylvain; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to compare osteointegration of nanostructured implants to a microsurface widely used for titanium dental implants. Commercial titanium dental implants with smooth or microroughened surfaces were nanostructured. Implants were inserted into the femoral condyles of rabbits. After 2 and 4 weeks, histomorphometry calculation was performed. Nanotubes measuring 60 nm in diameter were observed on both S-NANO (roughness: 0.05 μm) and R-NANO (roughness: 0.40 μm) surfaces. The MICRO surface exhibited typical random cavities (roughness: 2.09 μm). At 4 weeks, bone-to-implant contact values were significantly higher for the R-NANO than for the MICRO surface while no differences were observed at 2 weeks. Overall, this study shows that the nanostructured surfaces improved osteointegration similar or higher than the MICRO.

  1. General Anesthesia Time for Pediatric Dental Cases

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Anna R.; Seminario, Ana Lucia; Scott, JoAnna; Berg, Joel; Ivanova, Iskra; Lee, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe the use of operating room (OR) time for pediatric dental procedures performed under general anesthesia (GA) at a regional children’s hospital over a 2-year period. Methods A cross-sectional review of a pediatric dental GA records was performed at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Data were collected for 709 0- to 21-year-old patients from January 2008 to December 2009. Demographic data, dental and anesthesia operator types, and procedures were recorded. Utilization of OR time was analyzed. Results The mean age of patients was 7.1 years (±4.2 SD), and 58% were male. Distribution by American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) classifications were: ASA I 226 (32%); ASA II 316 (45%); ASA III 167 (24%). Cases finished earlier than the scheduled time by an average of 14 minutes (±28). Overrun time was significantly associated with: patient age (P=.01); ASA classification (P=.006); treatment type (P<.001); number of teeth treated (P<.001); and dentist operator type (P=.005). Conclusions Overall, 73% of dental procedures under GA finished early or on time. Significant variables included patient age, medical status, treatment type and extent, and dentist operator type. Assessing factors that impact the time needed in GA may enhance efficiency for pediatric dental procedures. PMID:23211897

  2. Prevalence of dental anomalies in Saudi orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Jabaa, Aljazi H; Aldrees, Abdullah M

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies and study the association of these anomalies with different types of malocclusion in a random sample of Saudi orthodontic patients. Six hundred and two randomly selected pretreatment records including orthopantomographs (OPG), and study models were evaluated. The molar relationship was determined using pretreatment study models, and OPG were examined to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies among the sample. The most common types of the investigated anomalies were: impaction followed by hypodontia, microdontia, macrodontia, ectopic eruption and supernumerary. No statistical significant correlations were observed between sex and dental anomalies. Dental anomalies were more commonly found in class I followed by asymmetric molar relation, then class II and finally class III molar relation. No malocclusion group had a statistically significant relation with any individual dental anomaly. The prevalence of dental anomalies among Saudi orthodontic patients was higher than the general population. Although, orthodontic patients have been reported to have high rates of dental anomalies, orthodontists often fail to consider this. If not detected, dental anomalies can complicate dental and orthodontic treatment; therefore, their presence should be carefully investigated during orthodontic diagnosis and considered during treatment planning.

  3. First Aid for Sports-Related Dental Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castaldi, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    Sports-related dental injuries are common but first aid is usually performed by non-dental personnel. This article describes basic procedures to be followed in order to diagnose the type and severity of the injury and to determine whether emergency treatment is required. Prevention of dental injuries is addressed. (Author/MT)

  4. Orthodontic treatment mediates dental pulp microenvironment via IL17A.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenjing; Zhang, Yueling; Jiang, Chunmiao; He, Wei; Yi, Yating; Wang, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Orthodontic treatment induces dental tissue remodeling; however, dental pulp stem cell (DPSC)-mediated pulp micro-environmental alteration is still largely uncharacterized. In the present study, we identified elevated interleukin-17A (IL17A) in the dental pulp, which induced the osteogenesis of DPSCs after orthodontic force loading. Tooth movement animal models were established in Sprague-Dawley rats, and samples were harvested at 1, 4, 7, 14, and 21 days after orthodontic treatment loading. DPSC self-renewal and differentiation at different time points were examined, as well as the alteration of the microenvironment of dental pulp tissue by histological analysis and the systemic serum IL17A expression level by an ELISA assay. In vitro recombinant IL17A treatment was used to confirm the effect of IL17A on the enhancement of DPSC self-renewal and differentiation. Orthodontic treatment altered the dental pulp microenvironment by activation of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL17A in vivo. Orthodontic loading significantly promoted the self-renewal and differentiation of DPSCs. Inflammation and elevated IL17A secretion occurred in the dental pulp during orthodontic tooth movement. Moreover, in vitro recombinant IL17A treatment mimicked the enhancement of the self-renewal and differentiation of DPSCs. Orthodontic treatment enhanced the differentiation and self-renewal of DPSCs, mediated by orthodontic-induced inflammation and subsequent elevation of IL17A level in the dental pulp microenvironment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Deep learning classifier with optical coherence tomography images for early dental caries detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimian, Nima; Salehi, Hassan S.; Mahdian, Mina; Alnajjar, Hisham; Tadinada, Aditya

    2018-02-01

    Dental caries is a microbial disease that results in localized dissolution of the mineral content of dental tissue. Despite considerable decline in the incidence of dental caries, it remains a major health problem in many societies. Early detection of incipient lesions at initial stages of demineralization can result in the implementation of non-surgical preventive approaches to reverse the demineralization process. In this paper, we present a novel approach combining deep convolutional neural networks (CNN) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging modality for classification of human oral tissues to detect early dental caries. OCT images of oral tissues with various densities were input to a CNN classifier to determine variations in tissue densities resembling the demineralization process. The CNN automatically learns a hierarchy of increasingly complex features and a related classifier directly from training data sets. The initial CNN layer parameters were randomly selected. The training set is split into minibatches, with 10 OCT images per batch. Given a batch of training patches, the CNN employs two convolutional and pooling layers to extract features and then classify each patch based on the probabilities from the SoftMax classification layer (output-layer). Afterward, the CNN calculates the error between the classification result and the reference label, and then utilizes the backpropagation process to fine-tune all the layer parameters to minimize this error using batch gradient descent algorithm. We validated our proposed technique on ex-vivo OCT images of human oral tissues (enamel, cortical-bone, trabecular-bone, muscular-tissue, and fatty-tissue), which attested to effectiveness of our proposed method.

  6. Unmet dental needs and barriers to dental care among children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Lai, Bien; Milano, Michael; Roberts, Michael W; Hooper, Stephen R

    2012-07-01

    Mail-in pilot-tested questionnaires were sent to a stratified random sample of 1,500 families from the North Carolina Autism Registry. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the significance of unmet dental needs and other predictors. Of 568 surveys returned (Response Rate = 38%), 555 were complete and usable. Sixty-five (12%) children had unmet dental needs. Of 516 children (93%) who had been to a dentist, 11% still reported unmet needs. The main barriers were child's behavior, cost, and lack of insurance. The significant predictor variables of unmet needs were child's behavior (p = 0.01), child's dental health (p < 0.001), and caregiver's last dental visit greater than 6 months (p = 0.002). Type of ASD did not have an effect on having unmet dental needs.

  7. The influence of steam cleaning procedures on the surface roughness of commonly used type III dental stone for the fabrication of removable dentures.

    PubMed

    Cilingir, Altug; Geckili, Onur; Parlar, Zeynep; Gencel, Burc; Bozdag, Ergun; Temiz, Vedat

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the possible detrimental effects of steam treatment on the surface of type III dental stone, which is a common laboratory material used for the construction of removable dentures. Forty dental stone specimens were prepared and divided into four groups (A, B, C and D), and group A was used as the control group. The other groups were treated with steam from a standard distance for varying durations (30, 60 and 120 s). The duration of steam cleaning significantly increased Ra values (F = 63.150, p = 0.000). Similarly, the duration of steam application was directly correlated with the weight changes (F = 17.721, p = 0.000). A significant amount of dental stone can be removed from the surface while treating with steam. These studies demonstrated that expanded periods of steam cleaning cause weight loss and abrade the surface of type III dental stones; therefore, these devices should be used with caution during denture fabrication procedures. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Comparison of Gingiva, Dental Pulp, and Periodontal Ligament Cells From the Standpoint of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Properties.

    PubMed

    Otabe, Koji; Muneta, Takeshi; Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Suda, Hideaki; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    The specific properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in oral tissues still remain unknown though their existence has been previously reported. We collected gingiva, dental pulp, and periodontal ligament tissues from removed teeth and isolated MSCs. These MSCs were compared in terms of their yields per tooth, surface epitopes, and differentiation potentials by patient-matched analysis. For in vivo calcification analysis, rat gingival and dental pulp cells mounted on β-tricalcium phospateTCP were transplanted into the perivertebral muscle of rats for 6 weeks. Gingival cells and dental pulp cells showed higher yield per tooth than periodontal ligament cells (n=6, p<0.05). Yields of periodontal ligament cells were too low for further analysis. Gingival and dental pulp cells expressed MSC markers such as CD44, CD90, and CD166. Gingival and dental pulp cells obtained phenotypes of chondrocytes and adipocytes in vitro. Approximately 60% of the colonies of gingival cells and 40% of the colonies of dental pulp cells were positively stained with alizarin red in vitro, and both gingival and dental pulp cells were calcified in vivo. We clarified properties of MSCs derived from removed teeth. We could obtain a high yield of MSCs with osteogenic potential from gingiva and dental pulp. These results indicate that gingiva and dental pulp are putative cell sources for hard tissue regeneration.

  9. Comparison of Gingiva, Dental Pulp, and Periodontal Ligament Cells From the Standpoint of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Properties

    PubMed Central

    Otabe, Koji; Muneta, Takeshi; Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Suda, Hideaki; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    The specific properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in oral tissues still remain unknown though their existence has been previously reported. We collected gingiva, dental pulp, and periodontal ligament tissues from removed teeth and isolated MSCs. These MSCs were compared in terms of their yields per tooth, surface epitopes, and differentiation potentials by patient-matched analysis. For in vivo calcification analysis, rat gingival and dental pulp cells mounted on β-tricalcium phospateTCP were transplanted into the perivertebral muscle of rats for 6 weeks. Gingival cells and dental pulp cells showed higher yield per tooth than periodontal ligament cells (n=6, p<0.05). Yields of periodontal ligament cells were too low for further analysis. Gingival and dental pulp cells expressed MSC markers such as CD44, CD90, and CD166. Gingival and dental pulp cells obtained phenotypes of chondrocytes and adipocytes in vitro. Approximately 60% of the colonies of gingival cells and 40% of the colonies of dental pulp cells were positively stained with alizarin red in vitro, and both gingival and dental pulp cells were calcified in vivo. We clarified properties of MSCs derived from removed teeth. We could obtain a high yield of MSCs with osteogenic potential from gingiva and dental pulp. These results indicate that gingiva and dental pulp are putative cell sources for hard tissue regeneration. PMID:26858852

  10. Invesigation of prevalence of dental anomalies by using digital panoramic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Nebiha Hilal; Yeşiltepe, Selin; Törenek Ağırman, Kübra; Çağlayan, Fatma; Bilge, Osman Murat

    2017-09-21

    This study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of all types and subtypes of dental anomalies among 6 to 40 year-old patients by using panoramic radiographs. This cross-sectional study was conducted by analyzing digital panoramic radiographs of 1200 patients admitted to our clinic in 2014. Dental anomalies were examined under 5 types and 16 subtypes. Dental anomalies were divided into five types: (a) number (including hypodontia, oligodontia and hyperdontia); (b) size (including microdontia and macrodontia); (c) structure (including amelogenesis imperfecta, dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentin dysplasia); (d) position (including transposition, ectopia, displacement, impaction and inversion); (e) shape (including fusion-gemination, dilaceration and taurodontism); RESULTS: The prevalence of dental anomalies diagnosed by panoramic radiographs was 39.2% (men (46%), women (54%)). Anomalies of position (60.8%) and shape (27.8%) were the most common types of abnormalities and anomalies of size (8.2%), structure (0.2%) and number (17%) were the least in both genders. Anomalies of impaction (45.5%), dilacerations (16.3%), hypodontia (13.8%) and taurodontism (11.2%) were the most common subtypes of dental anomalies. Taurodontism was more common in the age groups of 13-19 years. The age range of the most frequent of all other anomalies was 20-29. Anomalies of tooth position were the most common type of dental anomalies and structure anomalies were the least in this Turkish dental population. The frequency and type of dental anomalies vary within and between populations, confirming the role of racial factors in the prevalence of dental anomalies. Digital panoramic radiography is a very useful method for the detection of dental anomalies.

  11. Dental Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Ho, Yi-Ching; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Tsai, Jui-che; Lin, Kun-Feng; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT) in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed. PMID:23857261

  12. Levels of career satisfaction amongst dental healthcare professionals: comparison of dental therapists, dental hygienists and dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Newton, J T; Gibbons, D E

    2001-09-01

    To compare the levels of career satisfaction expressed by three professional groups working in dental health: dental therapists, dental hygienists and dental practitioners. Level of career satisfaction was assessed using a ten point scale in three surveys. Postal surveys were conducted of all dental therapists and dental hygienists registered with the General Dental Council. Data for dental practitioners were collected as part of the British Dental Association Omnibus Survey 2000. Data are reported for 227 dental therapists, 2,251 dental hygienists and 970 dental practitioners. Significant differences were found between groups in the level of career satisfaction expressed. Dental practitioners were less likely to express high levels of satisfaction in comparison with the other two professional groups. Within each group characteristics of the respondents were associated with satisfaction levels. Younger dental therapists and dental hygienists expressed lower levels of career satisfaction. The level of career satisfaction expressed by dental practitioners was associated with gender, place of work (North vs South UK), year of qualification, size of practice and system of remuneration. Dental practitioners express lower levels of job satisfaction in comparison to other groups of dental health care professionals. Job dissatisfaction among dental practitioners is related to a number of socio-demographic factors.

  13. Pre-Radiation dental considerations and management for head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kufta, Kenneth; Forman, Michael; Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Sollecito, Thomas P; Panchal, Neeraj

    2018-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) is accompanied by a high rate of morbidity, and complications can have a lifelong, profound impact on both patients and caregivers. Radiation-related injury to the hard and soft tissue of the head and neck can significantly decrease patients' quality of life. The purpose of this study is to provide patent-specific guidelines for managing the oral health and related side effects of HNC patients treated with radiation therapy. Based on reviewed articles retrieved on the PubMed database, guidelines for management of the oral health of this patient population were organized into three separate categories: cancer, patient, and dentition. The location, type, and staging of the cancer, along with the radiation used to treat the cancer significantly impact dental treatment. Several unique patient characteristics such as motivation, presence of support system, socioeconomic status, nutrition, and race have all been found to affect outcomes. Dental disease and available supportive dental management was found to significantly impact treatment and quality of life in this patient population. By comprehensively assessing unique cancer, patient, and dental-related factors, this review provides individualized evidence-based guidelines on the proper management of this complex and vulnerable patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dental technician pneumoconiosis mimicking pulmonary tuberculosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tan, Han Loong; Faisal, Mohamed; Soo, Chun Ian; Ban, Andrea Y L; Manap, Roslina Abdul; Hassan, Tidi M

    2016-09-07

    Dental laboratory technicians are at risk of developing occupational respiratory diseases due to exposure to various potentially toxic substances in their working environment. Since 1939, few cases of silicosis among dental technician have been reported. We illustrate a 38 year-old female, who worked in a dental laboratory for 20 years, initially treated as pulmonary tuberculosis and chronic necrotising aspergillosis without much improvement. Computed tomography guided lung biopsy and bronchoscopic transbronchial lung biopsy were performed. Lung tissue biopsies showed presence of refractile dental materials within the areas of histiocyte proliferation. The diagnosis of dental technician pneumoconiosis was obtained and our patient underwent pulmonary rehabilitation. This case highlights the importance of obtaining a detailed occupational history in tuberculosis endemic area, as pulmonary tuberculosis is a great mimicker of other respiratory diseases.

  15. Managing pediatric dental trauma in a hospital emergency department.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan; Sheller, Barbara; Velan, Elizabeth; Caglar, Derya; Scott, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) examine types of dental trauma presenting to a hospital emergency department (ED); (2) describe the medical services provided to these patients; and (3) quantify time spent during ED encounters for dental trauma emergencies. Records of 265 patients who presented to the ED with dental trauma over a three-year period were reviewed. Demographics, injury types, triage acuity, pain scores, and dental/medical treatment and times were analyzed. Patient demographics and injury types were similar to previous studies. Eighty-two percent of patients received mid-level triage scores; 41 percent of patients had moderate to severe pain. The most frequently provided medical services were administration of analgesics and/or prescriptions (78 percent). The mean times were: 51 minutes waiting for a physician; 55 minutes with dentists; and 176 minutes total time. Higher triage acuity and pain levels resulted in significantly longer wait times for physician assessment. Dental evaluation, including treatment, averaged 32 percent of time spent at the hospital. A dental clinic is the most efficient venue for treating routine dental trauma. Patients in this study spent the majority of time waiting for physicians and receiving nondental services. Most patients required no medical intervention beyond prescriptions commonly used in dental practice.

  16. Dental services advertising: does it affect consumers?

    PubMed

    Sanchez, P M; Bonner, P G

    1989-12-01

    Dental services advertising appears to be increasing. Despite their negative attitude toward advertising, as many as 20% of all dentists may now be advertising to meet changing conditions in a highly competitive market. Research on dental services advertising has provided a useful starting point for developing dental advertising strategies. However, it affords little understanding of how consumers may respond to the many types of information provided in dental services advertisements. The authors extend knowledge in this area by examining consumer response to dental advertising in an experimental setting.

  17. Differential cholinoceptor modulation of nitric oxide isoforms in experimentally-induced inflammation of dental pulp tissue.

    PubMed

    De Couto Pita, A; Passafaro, D; Ganzinelli, S; Borda, E; Sterin-Borda, L

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the role of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activity in the regulation of endothelial (e), neuronal (n) and inducible (i) nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and expression in experimentally induced inflammation of rat dental pulp tissue. Inflammation was induced by application of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to the pulp. Extirpated pulp-tissue samples were incubated in saline solution until the various experiments were performed. Saline-treated pulp and healthy pulp tissues were used as controls. NOS activity was measured by the production of [U-(14)C]-citrulline from [U-(14)C]-arginine. Nitrite/nitrate assay was evaluated by the conversion of nitrate to nitrite in the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. i-nos, e-nos and n-nos mRNA levels were measured using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction by co-amplification of target cDNA with a single set of primers. Application of LPS to the pulp increased NOS activity and nitrate production (P < 0.001), generated by iNOS over-activity and expression. Pilocarpine acting on mAChRs triggered a biphasic action on NOS activity and NO accumulation. At low concentrations, pilocarpine induced a negative effect associated with a decrease in i-nos mRNA level, whilst at high concentration, it produced a positive effect associated with increased e-nos and n-nos mRNA levels. In control pulp tissue, only the positive effect of pilocarpine was observed. Irreversible pulpitis changes mAChR conformation increasing its efficiency of coupling to transducing molecules that in turn induce activate iNOS. The capacity of pilocarpine to prevent NO accumulation and iNOS activity, by acting on mAChR mutation induced by pulpitis, might be useful therapeutically as a local treatment.

  18. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program.

    PubMed

    Shoffstall-Cone, Sarah; Williard, Mary

    2013-01-01

    In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska's Tribal Health Organizations (THO) developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA) Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  19. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    PubMed Central

    Shoffstall-Cone, Sarah; Williard, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Background In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska's Tribal Health Organizations (THO) developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA) Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities. PMID:23984306

  20. Examination of social networking professionalism among dental and dental hygiene students.

    PubMed

    Henry, Rachel K; Molnar, Amy L

    2013-11-01

    Becoming a dental professional requires one to apply ethical decision making skills and demonstrate high standards of professionalism in practice, including the way professionals present themselves to the public. With social media as an evergrowing part of personal and professional communications, this study aimed to determine the accessibility, amount, and type of unprofessional content on Facebook profiles of dental hygiene and dental students in a college of dentistry. The authors evaluated the online profiles of all 499 dental and dental hygiene students at The Ohio State University using objective measures that included existence of a profile, current privacy settings, and access to personally identifiable information. A sample of profiles were evaluated for unprofessional content including photos, comments, and wall posts. The majority of these students were found to use Facebook, with 61 percent having Facebook profiles. Dental hygiene students were more likely to have a Facebook profile than were dental students: 72.6 percent and 59.1 percent, respectively (p=0.027). The majority of the students' profiles had some form of privacy setting enabled, with only 4 percent being entirely open to the public. Fewer than 2 percent of the students allowed non-friends access to personal information. Based on in-depth analysis of the profiles, fourteen (5.8 percent) instances of unprofessionalism were recorded; the most common unprofessional content involved substance abuse. This study found that these dental and dental hygiene students frequently possessed an identifiable Facebook account and nearly half had some kind of personal information on their profile that could potentially be shared with the public. In some instances, the students gave patients, faculty, and potential employers access to content that is not reflective of a dental professional. Academic institutions should consider implementing policies that bring awareness to and address the use of social media

  1. Tissue engineering: state of the art in oral rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    SCHELLER, E. L.; KREBSBACH, P. H.; KOHN, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY More than 85% of the global population requires repair or replacement of a craniofacial structure. These defects range from simple tooth decay to radical oncologic craniofacial resection. Regeneration of oral and craniofacial tissues presents a formidable challenge that requires synthesis of basic science, clinical science and engineering technology. Identification of appropriate scaffolds, cell sources and spatial and temporal signals (the tissue engineering triad) is necessary to optimize development of a single tissue, hybrid organ or interface. Furthermore, combining the understanding of the interactions between molecules of the extracellular matrix and attached cells with an understanding of the gene expression needed to induce differentiation and tissue growth will provide the design basis for translating basic science into rationally developed components of this tissue engineering triad. Dental tissue engineers are interested in regeneration of teeth, oral mucosa, salivary glands, bone and periodontium. Many of these oral structures are hybrid tissues. For example, engineering the periodontium requires growth of alveolar bone, cementum and the periodontal ligament. Recapitulation of biological development of hybrid tissues and interfaces presents a challenge that exceeds that of engineering just a single tissue. Advances made in dental interface engineering will allow these tissues to serve as model systems for engineering other tissues or organs of the body. This review will begin by covering basic tissue engineering principles and strategic design of functional biomaterials. We will then explore the impact of biomaterials design on the status of craniofacial tissue engineering and current challenges and opportunities in dental tissue engineering. PMID:19228277

  2. Tissue engineering: state of the art in oral rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Scheller, E L; Krebsbach, P H; Kohn, D H

    2009-05-01

    More than 85% of the global population requires repair or replacement of a craniofacial structure. These defects range from simple tooth decay to radical oncologic craniofacial resection. Regeneration of oral and craniofacial tissues presents a formidable challenge that requires synthesis of basic science, clinical science and engineering technology. Identification of appropriate scaffolds, cell sources and spatial and temporal signals (the tissue engineering triad) is necessary to optimize development of a single tissue, hybrid organ or interface. Furthermore, combining the understanding of the interactions between molecules of the extracellular matrix and attached cells with an understanding of the gene expression needed to induce differentiation and tissue growth will provide the design basis for translating basic science into rationally developed components of this tissue engineering triad. Dental tissue engineers are interested in regeneration of teeth, oral mucosa, salivary glands, bone and periodontium. Many of these oral structures are hybrid tissues. For example, engineering the periodontium requires growth of alveolar bone, cementum and the periodontal ligament. Recapitulation of biological development of hybrid tissues and interfaces presents a challenge that exceeds that of engineering just a single tissue. Advances made in dental interface engineering will allow these tissues to serve as model systems for engineering other tissues or organs of the body. This review will begin by covering basic tissue engineering principles and strategic design of functional biomaterials. We will then explore the impact of biomaterials design on the status of craniofacial tissue engineering and current challenges and opportunities in dental tissue engineering.

  3. Long noncoding RNAs related to the odontogenic potential of dental mesenchymal cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yunfei; Jia, Lingfei

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the lncRNAs that are associated with the odontogenic potential in mouse dental mesenchymal cells. The odontogenic potential of dental mesenchymal cells was found to be lost in the course of in vitro culture, so the lncRNA profiles were subsequently compared between freshly-isolated and cultured dental mesenchymal cells using RNA-sequencing. A co-expression analysis of differentially expressed lncRNAs and coding RNAs was performed to understand their potential functions. The expression of several selected lncRNAs was also examined in developing tooth germs. Compared with cultured dental mesenchymal cells, 108 lncRNAs were upregulated and 36 lncRNAs were downregulated in freshly-isolated dental mesenchymal cells. Coding genes correlated with the lncRNAs were mainly associated with DNA and protein metabolic processes and cytoskeletal anchorage. Meg3, Malat1, Xist, and Dlx1as were significantly downregulated in cultured dental mesenchymal cells but were upregulated in odontogenic dental mesenchymal tissues. Moreover, the levels of Dlx1as were negatively correlated with that of Dlx1 in dental mesenchymal cells and dental mesenchymal tissues. The lncRNA profiles of dental mesenchymal cells are significantly changed during culturing, and the dysregulation of lncRNAs is associated with the loss of odontogenic potential. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. A modified efficient method for dental pulp stem cell isolation.

    PubMed

    Raoof, Maryam; Yaghoobi, Mohammad Mehdi; Derakhshani, Ali; Kamal-Abadi, Ali Mohammadi; Ebrahimi, Behnam; Abbasnejad, Mehdi; Shokouhinejad, Noushin

    2014-03-01

    Dental pulp stem cells can be used in regenerative endodontic therapy. The aim of this study was to introduce an efficient method for dental pulp stem cells isolation. In this in-vitro study, 60 extracted human third molars were split and pulp tissue was extracted. Dental pulp stem cells were isolated by the following three different methods: (1) digestion of pulp by collagenase/dispase enzyme and culture of the released cells; (2) outgrowth of the cells by culture of undigested pulp pieces; (3) digestion of pulp tissue pieces and fixing them. The cells were cultured in minimum essential medium alpha modification (αMEM) medium supplemented with 20% fetal bovine serum(FBS) in humid 37°C incubator with 5% CO 2. The markers of stem cells were studied by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The student t-test was used for comparing the means of independent groups. P <0.05 was considered as significant. The results indicated that by the first method a few cell colonies with homogenous morphology were detectable after 4 days, while in the outgrowth method more time was needed (10-12 days) to allow sufficient numbers of heterogeneous phenotype stem cells to migrate out of tissue. Interestingly, with the improved third method, we obtained stem cells successfully with about 60% efficiency after 2 days. The results of RT-PCR suggested the expression of Nanog, Oct-4, and Nucleostemin markers in the isolated cells from dental pulps. This study proposes a new method with high efficacy to obtain dental pulp stem cells in a short time.

  5. Pulse granuloma as a complication following dental trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Makkada Yuvaraj; Aparna, Radhakrishnan; Karthikeyani, Shanmugasundaram; Dinakar, Jayakumar; Manickaraj, Menaka

    2013-01-01

    Contamination and subsequent retention of foreign bodies within wound surfaces may negatively influence healing following maxillofacial injuries. Larger foreign bodies that produce embedded or impalement injuries of soft tissues are easily detected. However, smaller contaminants, such as sand, gravel, food particles, wood splinters, and glass fibers, may not be easily identified in the initial examination, and their remnants may remain within the injury site even after debridement. Tissue reactions depend on the host response, type of foreign body, and nature of the wound surface. The purposes of this report are to: (1) detail the diagnosis and management of a peripheral pulse granuloma following retention of food particles within gingival sulci during a dental injury; and (2) provide a brief review of the diagnosis of foreign body-induced granulomas following maxillofacial injuries in children.

  6. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Paul H; Rams, Thomas E

    An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  7. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  8. Surgical management of lateral incisor with type II dens invaginatus and a periapical pathosis: A case report with 1-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, V Naga; Varma, K Madhu; Sajjan, Girija S; Rambabu, Tanikonda

    2017-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a relatively common dental malformation resulting from an infolding of enamel organ into the dental papilla varying in depth into the tooth tissues. Complex morphological anatomy associated with the pulpal pathology presents inaccessibility to completely remove the necrotic pulp tissues and hence poses challenges in rendering endodontic treatment. A combination of nonsurgical and surgical management in treating such cases is advisable depending on the presented variations. The present case reports the surgical endodontic treatment of an immature maxillary lateral incisor with type II dens invaginatus and periapical pathology.

  9. Surgical management of lateral incisor with type II dens invaginatus and a periapical pathosis: A case report with 1-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, V. Naga; Varma, K. Madhu; Sajjan, Girija S.; Rambabu, Tanikonda

    2017-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a relatively common dental malformation resulting from an infolding of enamel organ into the dental papilla varying in depth into the tooth tissues. Complex morphological anatomy associated with the pulpal pathology presents inaccessibility to completely remove the necrotic pulp tissues and hence poses challenges in rendering endodontic treatment. A combination of nonsurgical and surgical management in treating such cases is advisable depending on the presented variations. The present case reports the surgical endodontic treatment of an immature maxillary lateral incisor with type II dens invaginatus and periapical pathology. PMID:28761255

  10. Adult Dental Health Survey 2009: relationships between dental attendance patterns, oral health behaviour and the current barriers to dental care.

    PubMed

    Hill, K B; Chadwick, B; Freeman, R; O'Sullivan, I; Murray, J J

    2013-01-01

    The importance of understanding barriers to dental attendance of adults in the UK was acknowledged in the first Adult Dental Health Survey in 1968 and has been investigated in all subsequent ADH surveys. In 1968, approximately 40% of dentate adults said they attended for a regular check-up; by 2009 this was 61%. Attendance patterns were associated with greater frequency of toothbrushing, use of additional dental hygiene products, lower plaque and calculus levels. Just under three-fifths of adults said they had tried to make an NHS dental appointment in the previous five years. The vast majority (92%) successfully received and attended an appointment, while a further 1% received an appointment but did not attend. The remaining 7% of adults were unable to make an appointment with an NHS dentist. The majority of adults were positive about their last visit to the dentist, with 80% of adults giving no negative feedback about their last dentist visit. Cost and anxiety were important barriers to care. Twenty-six percent of adults said the type of treatment they had opted for in the past had been affected by the cost and 19% said they had delayed dental treatment for the same reason. The 2009 survey data demonstrated a relationship between dental anxiety and dental attendance. Adults with extreme dental anxiety were more likely to attend only when they had trouble with their teeth (22%) than for a regular check-up.

  11. Role of Angiogenesis in Endodontics: Contributions of Stem Cells and Proangiogenic and Antiangiogenic Factors to Dental Pulp Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Asatourian, Armen; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dental pulp regeneration is a part of regenerative endodontics, which includes isolation, propagation, and re-transplantation of stem cells inside the prepared root canal space. The formation of new blood vessels through angiogenesis is mandatory to increase the survival rate of re-transplanted tissues. Angiogenesis is defined as the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting capillaries, which has great importance in pulp regeneration and homeostasis. Here the contribution of human dental pulp stem cells and proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors to angiogenesis process and regeneration of dental pulp is reviewed. Methods A search was performed on the role of angiogenesis in dental pulp regeneration from January 2005 through April 2014. The recent aspects of the relationship between angiogenesis, human dental pulp stem cells, and proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors in regeneration of dental pulp were assessed. Results Many studies have indicated an intimate relationship between angiogenesis and dental pulp regeneration. The contribution of stem cells and mechanical and chemical factors to dental pulp regeneration has been previously discussed. Conclusions Angiogenesis is an indispensable process during dental pulp regeneration. The survival of inflamed vital pulp and engineered transplanted pulp tissue are closely linked to the process of angiogenesis at sites of application. However, the detailed regulatory mechanisms involved in initiation and progression of angiogenesis in pulp tissue require investigation. PMID:25649306

  12. In vitro evaluation of microleakage of various types of dental cements.

    PubMed

    Medić, Vesna; Obradović-Djuricić, Kosovka; Dodić, Slobodan; Petrović, Renata

    2010-01-01

    Microleakage is defined as the clinically undetectable seepage of oral fluids containing bacteria and debris between cement layer and tooth restoration. This in vitro study investigated the effect of different dental cements (zinc-phosphate, polycarboxylate, glass-ionomer and resin cement) on microleakage in different ceramic crown systems (metal ceramic crown, metal ceramic crown with a porcelain margin, Empress 2 and in Ceram all-ceramic crowns) fixed on extracted human teeth. One hundred and sixty intact human premolars were randomized to four groups of forty teeth each, according to the different ceramic crown systems. They were prepared in a standardized manner for metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns. Crowns were made following a standard laboratory technique, and each group of crowns were divided into four groups according to the different cement agents and cemented on their respective abutments. The specimens were subjected to thermocycling, placed in methylene blue solutions, embedded in resin blocks and vertically cut in the bucco-oral and meso-distal direction. The microleakage in the area of tooth-cement interface was defined as linear penetration of methylene blue and was determined with a microscope to assign microleakage scores using a five-point scale. A significant association was found between a cement type and degree of microleakage (p = 0.001). No statistically significant differences were found among the different ceramic crown systems luted with the same dental cement. The smallest degree of microleakage was observed in specimens luted with resin cement (X = 1.73), followed by glass-ionomer cement (X=2.45) and polycarboxylate cement (X = 3.20). The greatest degree of microleakage was detected in the crowns fixed with zincphosphate cement (X = 3.33). The investigated dental cements revealed different sealing abilities. The use of resin cement resulted in the percentage of 0 microleakage scores. Due to this feature, the resin cement is to be

  13. Parallelized Bayesian inversion for three-dimensional dental X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Kolehmainen, Ville; Vanne, Antti; Siltanen, Samuli; Järvenpää, Seppo; Kaipio, Jari P; Lassas, Matti; Kalke, Martti

    2006-02-01

    Diagnostic and operational tasks based on dental radiology often require three-dimensional (3-D) information that is not available in a single X-ray projection image. Comprehensive 3-D information about tissues can be obtained by computerized tomography (CT) imaging. However, in dental imaging a conventional CT scan may not be available or practical because of high radiation dose, low-resolution or the cost of the CT scanner equipment. In this paper, we consider a novel type of 3-D imaging modality for dental radiology. We consider situations in which projection images of the teeth are taken from a few sparsely distributed projection directions using the dentist's regular (digital) X-ray equipment and the 3-D X-ray attenuation function is reconstructed. A complication in these experiments is that the reconstruction of the 3-D structure based on a few projection images becomes an ill-posed inverse problem. Bayesian inversion is a well suited framework for reconstruction from such incomplete data. In Bayesian inversion, the ill-posed reconstruction problem is formulated in a well-posed probabilistic form in which a priori information is used to compensate for the incomplete information of the projection data. In this paper we propose a Bayesian method for 3-D reconstruction in dental radiology. The method is partially based on Kolehmainen et al. 2003. The prior model for dental structures consist of a weighted l1 and total variation (TV)-prior together with the positivity prior. The inverse problem is stated as finding the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate. To make the 3-D reconstruction computationally feasible, a parallelized version of an optimization algorithm is implemented for a Beowulf cluster computer. The method is tested with projection data from dental specimens and patient data. Tomosynthetic reconstructions are given as reference for the proposed method.

  14. Prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of dental anxiety among a group of adult patients attending a dental institution in Vadodara city, Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Malvania, Ekta A; Ajithkrishnan, C G

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety is a subjective state of feelings. Dental anxiety is often reported as a cause of irregular dental attendance, delay in seeking dental care or even avoidance of dental care, resulting in poor oral health related quality of life. To assess the prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of dental anxiety among a group of adult patients attending a dental institution in Vadodara, Gujarat. A total of 150 adult patients waiting in the out-patient Department of Oral Diagnosis of K.M. Shah Dental College and Hospital were included in the study. Subjects were selected by convenience sampling. Dental anxiety was assessed by using Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) and self-designed, semi-structured questionnaire incorporating various demographic variables, type and nature of dental treatment. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 16. Descriptive analysis, unpaired t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test and multiple logistic regression were applied for statistical analysis. 46% of the participants were dentally anxious. Females were found to be significantly more anxious than males. Subjects residing in villages had significantly more score than those residing in city. Relative influence of age, education, type of dental treatment, and previous dental visit were not significantly associated with dental anxiety. However, those subjects who had past negative dental experience were found to be significantly more anxious. The study shows that dental anxiety was high among study subjects. It is recommended that this issue should be given due importance and addressed in a practical and meaningful manner.

  15. Irx1 regulates dental outer enamel epithelial and lung alveolar type II epithelial differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wenjie; Li, Xiao; Eliason, Steven; Romero-Bustillos, Miguel; Ries, Ryan J.; Cao, Huojun; Amendt, Brad A.

    2017-01-01

    The Iroquois genes (Irx) appear to regulate fundamental processes that lead to cell proliferation, differentiation, and maturation during development. In this report, the Iroquois homeobox 1 (Irx1) transcription factor was functionally disrupted using a LacZ insert and LacZ expression demonstrated stage-specific expression during embryogenesis. Irx1 is highly expressed in the brain, lung, digits, kidney, testis and developing teeth. Irx1 null mice are neonatal lethal and this lethality it due to pulmonary immaturity. Irx1−/− mice show delayed lung maturation characterized by defective surfactant protein secretion and Irx1 marks a population of SP-C expressing alveolar type II cells. Irx1 is specifically expressed in the outer enamel epithelium (OEE), stellate reticulum (SR) and stratum intermedium (SI) layers of the developing tooth. Irx1 mediates dental epithelial cell differentiation in the lower incisors resulting in delayed growth of the lower incisors. Irx1 is specifically and temporally expressed during developmental stages and we have focused on lung and dental development in this report. Irx1+ cells are unique to the development of the incisor outer enamel epithelium, patterning of Lef-1+ and Sox2+ cells as well as a new marker for lung alveolar type II cells. Mechanistically, Irx1 regulates Foxj1 and Sox9 to control cell differentiation during development. PMID:28746823

  16. Irx1 regulates dental outer enamel epithelial and lung alveolar type II epithelial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenjie; Li, Xiao; Eliason, Steven; Romero-Bustillos, Miguel; Ries, Ryan J; Cao, Huojun; Amendt, Brad A

    2017-09-01

    The Iroquois genes (Irx) appear to regulate fundamental processes that lead to cell proliferation, differentiation, and maturation during development. In this report, the Iroquois homeobox 1 (Irx1) transcription factor was functionally disrupted using a LacZ insert and LacZ expression demonstrated stage-specific expression during embryogenesis. Irx1 is highly expressed in the brain, lung, digits, kidney, testis and developing teeth. Irx1 null mice are neonatal lethal and this lethality it due to pulmonary immaturity. Irx1 -/- mice show delayed lung maturation characterized by defective surfactant protein secretion and Irx1 marks a population of SP-C expressing alveolar type II cells. Irx1 is specifically expressed in the outer enamel epithelium (OEE), stellate reticulum (SR) and stratum intermedium (SI) layers of the developing tooth. Irx1 mediates dental epithelial cell differentiation in the lower incisors resulting in delayed growth of the lower incisors. Irx1 is specifically and temporally expressed during developmental stages and we have focused on lung and dental development in this report. Irx1+ cells are unique to the development of the incisor outer enamel epithelium, patterning of Lef-1+ and Sox2+ cells as well as a new marker for lung alveolar type II cells. Mechanistically, Irx1 regulates Foxj1 and Sox9 to control cell differentiation during development. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Human dental pulp stem cells: from biology to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    d'Aquino, Riccardo; De Rosa, Alfredo; Laino, Gregorio; Caruso, Filippo; Guida, Luigi; Rullo, Rosario; Checchi, Vittorio; Laino, Luigi; Tirino, Virginia; Papaccio, Gianpaolo

    2009-07-15

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) can be found within the "cell rich zone" of dental pulp. Their embryonic origin, from neural crests, explains their multipotency. Up to now, two groups have studied these cells extensively, albeit with different results. One group claims that these cells produce a "dentin-like tissue", whereas the other research group has demonstrated that these cells are capable of producing bone, both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, it has been reported that these cells can be easily cryopreserved and stored for long periods of time and still retain their multipotency and bone-producing capacity. Moreover, recent attention has been focused on tissue engineering and on the properties of these cells: several scaffolds have been used to promote 3-D tissue formation and studies have demonstrated that DPSCs show good adherence and bone tissue formation on microconcavity surface textures. In addition, adult bone tissue with good vascularization has been obtained in grafts. These results enforce the notion that DPSCs can be used successfully for tissue engineering. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Satisfaction of active duty soldiers with family dental care.

    PubMed

    Chisick, M C

    1997-02-01

    In the fall of 1992, a random, worldwide sample of 6,442 married and single parent soldiers completed a self-administered survey on satisfaction with 22 attributes of family dental care. Simple descriptive statistics for each attribute were derived, as was a composite overall satisfaction score using factor analysis. Composite scores were regressed on demographics, annual dental utilization, and access barriers to identify those factors having an impact on a soldier's overall satisfaction with family dental care. Separate regression models were constructed for single parents, childless couples, and couples with children. Results show below-average satisfaction with nearly all attributes of family dental care, with access attributes having the lowest average satisfaction scores. Factors influencing satisfaction with family dental care varied by family type with one exception: dependent dental utilization within the past year contributed positively to satisfaction across all family types.

  19. The Experimental Study of the Performance of Nano-Thin Polyelectrolyte Shell for Dental Pulp Stem Cells Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Grzeczkowicz, A; Granicka, L H; Maciejewska, I; Strawski, M; Szklarczyk, M; Borkowska, M

    2015-12-01

    Carious is the most frequent disease of mineralized dental tissues which might result in dental pulp inflammation and mortality. In such cases an endodontic treatment is the only option to prolong tooth functioning in the oral cavity; however, in the cases of severe pulpitis, especially when complicated with periodontal tissue inflammation, the endodontic treatment might not be enough to protect against tooth loss. Thus, keeping the dental pulp viable and/or possibility of the reconstruction of a viable dental pulp complex, appears to become a critical factor for carious and/or pulp inflammation treatment. The nowadays technologies, which allow handling dental pulp stem cells (DPSC), seem to bring us closer to the usage of dental stem cells for tooth tissues reconstruction. Thus, DPSC immobilized within nano-thin polymeric shells, allowing for a diffusion of produced factors and separation from bacteria, may be considered as a cover system supporting technology of dental pulp reconstruction. The DPSC were immobilized using a layer-by-layer technique within nano-thin polymeric shells constructed and modified by nanostructure involvement to ensure the layers stability and integrity as well as separation from bacterial cells. The cytotoxity of the material used for membrane production was assessed on the model of adherent cells. The performance of DPSC nano-coating was assessed in vitro. Membrane coatings showed no cytotoxicity on the immobilized cells. The presence of coating shell was confirmed with flow cytometry, atomic force microscopy and visualized with fluorescent microscopy. The transfer of immobilized DPSC within the membrane system ensuring cells integrity, viability and protection from bacteria should be considered as an alternative method for dental tissues transportation and regeneration.

  20. [Prevalence of Dental Caries in Type 1 Diabetic Patients Treated with Insulin Pump].

    PubMed

    Garcia, Rosana; Coelho, Ana; Paula, Anabela; Marques Ferreira, Manuel; Caramelo, Francisco; Barros, Luísa; Batista, Carla; Melo, Miguel; Silva, Mário Jorge; Carrilho, Eunice

    2016-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus and oral health are strictly related on a reciprocal basis, and an increased susceptibility to a wide variety of oral diseases is recognised in these patients. The aim of the present study was to establish a relationship between the prevalence of dental caries in Type 1 diabetic patients treated with insulin pump and that of non-diabetic patients. An observational clinical study of analytical and cross-sectional nature was conducted. The sample consisted of 30 adults with diabetes mellitus treated with insulin pump (selected from the Coimbra Hospital and Universitary Centre) and 30 nondiabetic adults (selected from the ones accompanying the diabetic patients). One dentist evaluated all of the patients between January and May of 2015 in the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Coimbra. During the clinical evaluation a case report form adapted to the objectives of the investigation was completed. Data analysis was performed and the significance level was set at 5%. Diabetic patients showed similar levels on the caries and plaque index to non-diabetic patients. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups as regards oral hygiene habits and frequency of visits to the dentist. Discussão: Although diabetics' diet is less abundant in carbohydrates, which provides a smaller exposure to cariogenic food, the regularity of meals can increase the risk of caries since the critical pH for demineralization is reached frequently throughout the day. However, the existence of a chronic condition may determine a high concern for general preventive care, resulting in an overall improvement of their oral health, which could justify the results. Type 1 diabetic patients treated with insulin pump don't have a higher prevalence of dental caries.

  1. Diode laser soft-tissue surgery: advancements aimed at consistent cutting, improved clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Romanos, Georgios E

    2013-01-01

    Laser dentistry and soft-tissue surgery, in particular, have become widely adopted in recent years. Significant cost reductions for dental lasers and the increasing popularity of CADCAM, among other factors, have contributed to a substantial increase in the installed base of dental lasers, especially soft-tissue lasers. New development in soft-tissue surgery, based on the modern understanding of laser-tissue interactions and contact soft-tissue surgery mechanisms, will bring a higher quality and consistency level to laser soft-tissue surgery. Recently introduced diode-laser technology enables enhanced control of side effects that result from tissue overheating and may improve soft-tissue surgical outcomes.

  2. Paleoproteomics of the Dental Pulp: The plague paradigm.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Rémi; Mekni, Rania; Levasseur, Anthony; Chabrière, Eric; Signoli, Michel; Tzortzis, Stéfan; Aboudharam, Gérard; Drancourt, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Chemical decomposition and fragmentation may limit the detection of ancient host and microbial DNA while some proteins can be detected for extended periods of time. We applied paleoproteomics on 300-year-old dental pulp specimens recovered from 16 individuals in two archeological funeral sites in France, comprising one documented plague site and one documented plague-negative site. The dental pulp paleoproteome of the 16 teeth comprised 439 peptides representative of 30 proteins of human origin and 211 peptides representative of 27 proteins of non-human origin. Human proteins consisted of conjunctive tissue and blood proteins including IgA immunoglobulins. Four peptides were indicative of three presumable Yersinia pestis proteins detected in 3/8 dental pulp specimens from the plague-positive site but not in the eight dental pulp specimens collected in the plague-negative site. Paleoproteomics applied to the dental pulp is a new and innovative approach to screen ancient individuals for the detection of blood-borne pathogens and host inflammatory response.

  3. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  4. 1.4 Research and the dental student.

    PubMed

    DePaola, Dominick; Howell, Howard; Baker, Charles G; Boy-Lefevre, Marie Laure; Hull, Peter; Holmstrup, Palle; Jerolimov, Vjekoslav; Hardwick, Kevin; Lamster, Ira B; Lopez, Nestor J; Rifkin, Barry

    2002-01-01

    There has been significant concern that the dental curriculum and system of clinical education, in particular, is not designed to take advantage of the explosion in knowledge in biomedical science and its application to the health of the public. Although there are some examples of innovations in dental education on a global scale that have the capacity to increase the assimilation of basic and clinical knowledge, most of the dental education models are mired in the traditional '2 + 2' approach to education. This can be seen in North America and the European '2 + 3' model or the stomatological '4 + 2' approach. In each of these systems, the basic and behavioural science courses continue to be perceived as hurdles over which students must leap in order to reach the clinical programmes where there is little opportunity to use basic science information to advance patient care and treatment. Examples of issues that are not well represented include: innovations in imaging; diagnosis; bio-materials; science-based approaches to clinical practice; novel approaches to therapeutics; interactions between the oral, dental and craniofacial complex and systemic health and disorders; the role of oral infections and systemic disease; the increasing appreciation of chronic diseases and disorders such as osteoporosis and diabetes that affect oral tissues; the promise of bioengineering, tissue engineering and biomimetics; the potential use of saliva as a diagnostic tool; the understanding of oral complications of cancer treatment; the treatments of HIV/AIDS diseases and hepatitis; the use of dental and dental hygiene staff on health-care teams to deal with issues such as birth defects, orofacial trauma, head and neck cancer, chronic pain management and so on. There seems to be an excessive emphasis on restorative dentistry and, to a lesser extent, on the more biological approaches to diagnosis, prevention and therapeutics. This continued lack of integration of basic and clinical

  5. Rugometric and microtopographic non-invasive inspection in dental-resin composites and zirconia ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Costa, Manuel F. M.; Pecho, Oscar E.; Rubiño, Manuel; Pérez, María. M.

    2013-11-01

    Surface properties are essential for a complete characterization of biomaterials. In restorative dentistry, the study of the surface properties of materials meant to replace dental tissues in an irreversibly diseased tooth is important to avoid harmful changes in future treatments. We have experimentally analyzed the surface characterization parameters of two different types of dental-resin composites and pre-sintered and sintered zirconia ceramics. We studied two shades of both composite types and two sintered zirconia ceramics: colored and uncolored. Moreover, a surface treatment was applied to one specimen of each dental-resin. All the samples were submitted to rugometric and microtopographic non-invasive inspection with the MICROTOP.06.MFC laser microtopographer in order to gather meaningful statistical parameters such as the average roughness (Ra), the root-mean-square deviation (Rq), the skewness (Rsk), and the kurtosis of the surface height distribution (Rku). For a comparison of the different biomaterials, the uncertainties associated to the surface parameters were also determined. With respect to Ra and Rq, significant differences between the composite shades were found. Among the dental resins, the nanocomposite presented the highest values and, for the zirconia ceramics, the pre-sintered sample registered the lowest ones. The composite performance may have been due to cluster-formation variations. Except for the composites with the surface treatment, the sample surfaces had approximately a normal distribution of heights. The surface treatment applied to the composites increased the average roughness and moved the height distribution farther away from the normal distribution. The zirconia-sintering process resulted in higher average roughness without affecting the height distribution.

  6. Quality of linear incisions performed by dental students using Er:YAG laser in soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novelli, Moacyr Domingos; Vasques, Mayra Torres; Meneguzzo, Daiane Thaís; Aranha, Ana Cecília Corrêa; Corrêa, Luciana

    2008-02-01

    Introduction: New technologies in dental practice, such as laser, have enabled new strategies to be established in dental education. The aim of this study was to analyze the difficulties that dental students encountered with performing surgical incisions using Er:YAG laser (LE), and the morphology of these incisions. Material and Methods: Sixteen undergraduate dental students and ten dental professionals (DP) enrolled at The Master of Science Program in Laser Dentistry were asked to perform 15 incisions using an LE and 15 with a conventional scalpel. The incisions were compared, based on the shape factor (relation between area and perimeter), which was obtained by a digital image system and by a morphometry software. Data was submitted to statistical analysis of variance (p 0.05). Results: Considering the incisions performed by scalpel, DP showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.01) in relation to control group (CG). Considering the LE, all groups showed significant differences (p<0.0001) in relation to CG, especially the DP group. The main laser technical failures were performing an incision that was not in a straight line, without defined borders, using an inconstant cutting speed, and absence of suction and water jet appliances. None of the groups performed adequate incisions using LE. Conclusion: Greater emphasis is required in relating laser therapy practice to the physical properties of laser, particularly for dental professionals that specialize in laser.

  7. Redefining the potential applications of dental stem cells: An asset for future

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Shalu; Kaur, Mandeep; Kaur, Sandeep; Arora, Sapna Panjwani

    2012-01-01

    Recent exciting discoveries isolated dental stem cells from the pulp of the primary and permanent teeth, from the periodontal ligament, and from associated healthy tissues. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) represent a kind of adult cell colony which has the potent capacity of self-renewing and multilineage differentiation. Stem cell-based tooth engineering is deemed as a promising approach to the making of a biological tooth (bio-tooth) or engineering of functional tooth structures. Dental professionals have the opportunity to make their patients aware of these new sources of stem cells that can be stored for future use as new therapies are developed for a range of diseases and injuries. The aim of this article is to review and understand how dental stem cells are being used for regeneration of oral and conversely nonoral tissues. A brief review on banking is also done for storing of these valuable stem cells for future use. PMID:23716933

  8. Dental Cell Sheet Biomimetic Tooth Bud Model

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Nelson; Smith, Elizabeth E.; Angstadt, Shantel; Zhang, Weibo; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine technologies offer promising therapies for both medicine and dentistry. Our long-term goal is to create functional biomimetic tooth buds for eventual tooth replacement in humans. Here, our objective was to create a biomimetic 3D tooth bud model consisting of dental epithelial (DE) – dental mesenchymal (DM) cell sheets (CSs) combined with biomimetic enamel organ and pulp organ layers created using GelMA hydrogels. Pig DE or DM cells seeded on temperature-responsive plates at various cell densities (0.02, 0.114 and 0.228 cells 106/cm2) and cultured for 7, 14 and 21 days were used to generate DE and DM cell sheets, respectively. Dental CSs were combined with GelMA encapsulated DE and DM cell layers to form bioengineered 3D tooth buds. Biomimetic 3D tooth bud constructs were cultured in vitro, or implanted in vivo for 3 weeks. Analyses were performed using micro-CT, H&E staining, polarized light (Pol) microscopy, immunofluorescent (IF) and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses. H&E, IHC and IF analyses showed that in vitro cultured multilayered DE-DM CSs expressed appropriate tooth marker expression patterns including SHH, BMP2, RUNX2, tenascin and syndecan, which normally direct DE-DM interactions, DM cell condensation, and dental cell differentiation. In vivo implanted 3D tooth bud constructs exhibited mineralized tissue formation of specified size and shape, and SHH, BMP2 and RUNX2and dental cell differentiation marker expression. We propose our biomimetic 3D tooth buds as models to study optimized DE-DM cell interactions leading to functional biomimetic replacement tooth formation. PMID:27565550

  9. Soft tissue around three different implant types after 1.5 years of functional loading without oral hygiene: a preliminary study in baboons.

    PubMed

    Watzak, Georg; Zechner, Werner; Tangl, Stefan; Vasak, Christoph; Donath, Karl; Watzek, Georg

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the peri-implant soft tissue dimension (PSD) and peri-implant bone level (BL) of dental implants with different designs and surface modifications after functional loading without oral hygiene. Three types of dental implants were placed in the posterior jaws of adult baboons, three of the same design per quadrant, and fitted with fixed partial dentures. After 1.5 years of functional loading and plaque accumulation, all implants showed severe peri-implant mucositis and comparatively high BL. A histomorphometric evaluation of the sulcus depth (SD), the dimension of the junctional epithelium (JE) and the connective tissue contact (CTC) resulted in no significant differences between the three implant designs, neither in the maxilla nor in the mandible (P>0.05). The sum of SD, JE and CTC forming the PSD was nearly the same in the maxilla (commercially pure titanium, CpTi: 3.5 mm 2.9/4.1 confidence interval (CI); titanium plasma sprayed (TPS): 3.5 mm 2.9/4.2 CI; sand blasted acid-etched (GBAE): 3.2 mm 2.7/3.9 CI) and in the mandible (CpTi: 3.2 mm 2.6/3.8 CI; TPS: 3.2 mm 2.6/3.8 CI; GBAE: 3.2 mm 2.7/3.9 CI; P>0.05). There was no difference in BL around the three implant designs (maxilla: CpTi: 0.9 mm 0.5/1.6 CI; TPS: 0.9 mm 0.5/1.5CI; GBAE: 0.9 mm 0.5/1.6 CI; mandible: CpTi: 0.8 mm 0.5/1.2 CI; TPS: 0.6 mm 0.4/0.9 CI; GBAE: 0.7 mm 0.5/1.1 CI; P>0.05). Overall, the data presented did not show any significant differences in peri-implant soft tissue conditions in baboons. Moreover, plaque accumulation and propagation of peri-implant mucositis after 1.5 years of functional loading was not influenced by implant design and surface modifications in baboons.

  10. Research on optical properties of dental enamel for early caries diagnostics using a He-Ne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Liu, Li; Li, Song-zhan

    2008-12-01

    A new and non-invasive method adapted for optical diagnosis of early caries is proposed by researching on the interaction mechanism of laser with dental tissue and relations of remitted light with optical properties of the tissue. This method is based on simultaneous analyses of the following parameters: probing radiation, backscattering and auto-fluorescence. Investigation was performed on 104 dental samples in vitro by using He-Ne laser (λ=632.8nm, 2.0+/-0.1mW) as the probing. Spectrums of all samples were obtained. Characteristic spectrums of dental caries in various stages (intact, initial, moderate and deep) were given. Using the back-reflected light to normalize the intensity of back-scattering and fluorescence, a quantitative diagnosis standard for different stages of caries is proposed. In order to verify the test, comparison research was conducted among artificial caries, morphological damaged enamel, dental calculus and intact tooth. Results show that variations in backscattering characteristic changes in bio-tissue morphological and the quantity of auto-fluorescence is correlated with concentration of anaerobic microflora in hearth of caries lesion. This method poses a high potential of diagnosing various stages of dental caries, and is more reliability to detect early caries, surface damage of health enamel and dental calculus.

  11. Research on dental implant and its industrialization stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongjoon, Yang; Sukyoung, Kim

    2017-02-01

    Bone cell attachment to Ti implant surfaces is the most concerned issue in the clinical implant dentistry. Many attempts to achieve the fast and strong integration between bone and implant have been tried in many ways, such as selection of materials (for example, Ti, ZrO2), shape design of implant (for example, soft tissue level, bone level, taped or conical, etc), and surface modification of implants (for example, roughed. coated, hybrid), etc. Among them, a major consideration is the surface design of dental implants. The surface with proper structural characteristics promotes or induces the desirable responses of cells and tissues. To obtain such surface which has desirable cell and tissue response, a variety of surface modification techniques has been developed and employed for many years. In this review, the method and trend of surface modification will be introduced and explained in terms of the surface topography and chemistry of dental implants.

  12. R&D on dental implants breakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croitoru, Sorin Mihai; Popovici, Ion Alexandru

    2017-09-01

    Most used dental implants for human dental prostheses are of two steps type: first step means implantation and, after several months healing and osseointegration, second step is prosthesis fixture. For sure, dental implants and prostheses are meant to last for a lifetime. Still, there are unfortunate cases when dental implants break. This paper studies two steps dental implants breakage and proposes a set of instruments for replacement and restoration of the broken implant. First part of the paper sets the input data of the study: structure of the studied two steps dental implants based on two Romanian patents and values of the loading forces found in practice and specialty papers. In the second part of the paper, using DEFORM 2D™ FEM simulation software, worst case scenarios of loading dental implants are studied in order to determine which zones and components of the dental implant set are affected (broken). Last part of the paper is dedicated to design and presentation of a set for extracting and cutting tools used to restore the broken implant set.

  13. Photoacoustic detection of blood in dental pulp by using short-time Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Azusa; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    A method based on photoacoustic analysis is proposed to diagnose dental pulp vitality. Photoacoustic analysis enables to get signal from deeper tissues than other optical analyses and therefore, signal detection from root canal of thick dental tissues such as molar teeth is expected. As a light source for excitation of photoacoustic waves, a microchip Q-switched YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm was used and owing to large penetration depth of the near infrared laser, photoacoustic signals from dental root were successfully obtained. It was found that the photoacoustic signals from the teeth containing hemoglobin solution in the pulp cavity provide vibration in high frequency region. It was also shown that the intensities of the high frequency component have correlation with the hemoglobin concentration of solution. We applied short-time Fourier transform for evaluation of photoacoustic signals and this analysis clearly showed photoacoustic signals from dental root.

  14. Dental caries increments and related factors in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Siudikiene, J; Machiulskiene, V; Nyvad, B; Tenovuo, J; Nedzelskiene, I

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse possible associations between caries increments and selected caries determinants in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and their age- and sex-matched non-diabetic controls, over 2 years. A total of 63 (10-15 years old) diabetic and non-diabetic pairs were examined for dental caries, oral hygiene and salivary factors. Salivary flow rates, buffer effect, concentrations of mutans streptococci, lactobacilli, yeasts, total IgA and IgG, protein, albumin, amylase and glucose were analysed. Means of 2-year decayed/missing/filled surface (DMFS) increments were similar in diabetics and their controls. Over the study period, both unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rates remained significantly lower in diabetic children compared to controls. No differences were observed in the counts of lactobacilli, mutans streptococci or yeast growth during follow-up, whereas salivary IgA, protein and glucose concentrations were higher in diabetics than in controls throughout the 2-year period. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that children with higher 2-year DMFS increments were older at baseline and had higher salivary glucose concentrations than children with lower 2-year DMFS increments. Likewise, higher 2-year DMFS increments in diabetics versus controls were associated with greater increments in salivary glucose concentrations in diabetics. Higher increments in active caries lesions in diabetics versus controls were associated with greater increments of dental plaque and greater increments of salivary albumin. Our results suggest that, in addition to dental plaque as a common caries risk factor, diabetes-induced changes in salivary glucose and albumin concentrations are indicative of caries development among diabetics. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Fibroblast growth factor-2 regulates the cell function of human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Shimabukuro, Yoshio; Ueda, Maki; Ozasa, Masao; Anzai, Jun; Takedachi, Masahide; Yanagita, Manabu; Ito, Masako; Hashikawa, Tomoko; Yamada, Satoru; Murakami, Shinya

    2009-11-01

    Homeostasis and tissue repair of dentin-pulp complex are attributed to dental pulp tissue and several growth factors. Dental pulp cells play a pivotal role in homeostasis of dentin-pulp complex and tissue responses after tooth injury. Among these cytokines, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 has multifunctional biologic activity and is known as a signaling molecule that induces tissue regeneration. In this study, we examined the effects of FGF-2 on growth, migration, and differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPC). HDPC were isolated from healthy dental pulp. Cellular response was investigated by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA. Cytodifferentiation was examined by alkaline phosphatase (ALPase) assay and cytochemical staining of calcium by using alizarin red. Migratory activity was determined by counting the cells migrating into cleared area that had introduced with silicon block. FGF-2 activated HDPC growth and migration but suppressed ALPase activity and calcified nodule formation. Interestingly, HDPC, which had been pretreated with FGF-2, showed increased ALPase activity and calcified nodule formation when subsequently cultured without FGF-2. These results suggest that FGF-2 potentiates cell growth and accumulation of HDPC that notably did not disturb cytodifferentiation of the cells later. Thus, FGF-2 is a favorable candidate for pulp capping agent. These results provide new evidence for the possible involvement of FGF-2 not only in homeostasis but also in regeneration of dentin-pulp complex.

  16. Perception of dental esthetics: influence of restoration type, symmetry, and color in four different countries.

    PubMed

    Mehl, Christian; Harder, Sönke; Lin, Jun; Vollrath, Oliver; Kern, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the influence of restoration type, symmetry, and color on the perception of dental appearance was evaluated. An esthetic questionnaire was completed by 29 patients before and after esthetic rehabilitation. In addition, 94 dentists from four countries (Germany, the United Kingdom [UK], China, and Switzerland) evaluated the influence of the above factors using before-and-after rehabilitation pictures. The most invasive treatment was recommended by Chinese dentists, while German, Swiss, and UK dentists recommended comparable treatment options. As for restorative symmetry, restoration type, and color, significant differences could be found among and within the dentists of the four countries (P ± .05).

  17. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from dental school clinic surfaces and students.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Marilyn C; Soge, Olusegun O; Horst, Jeremy A; Ly, Kiet A; Milgrom, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from frequently touched dental school clinic surfaces were compared with MRSA isolated nasal cultures of dental students. Sixty-one dental students and 95 environmental surfaces from 7 clinics were sampled using SANICULT (Starplex Scientific Inc, Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada) swabs. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis, the mecA gene, multilocus sequence type, and SCCmec type were determined by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. Thirteen (21%) dental students and 8 (8.4%) surfaces were MRSA positive. Three MRSA strains were SCCmec type IV, whereas 3 were nontypeable isolates and Panton-Valentine leukocidin positive (PVL+), and none were USA300. One surface and 1 student isolate shared the same multilocus sequence type ST 8 and were 75% related. Two groups of students carried the same MRSA strains. The MRSA-positive samples were from 4 of 7 dental clinics. In addition, 21% of the dental students carried MRSA, which is > 10 times higher than the general public and twice as frequent as in other university students. This is the first study to characterize MRSA from dental clinic surfaces and dental students and suggests that both may be reservoirs for MRSA. Further studies are needed to verify this premise. Copyright © 2011 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ethics instruction in the dental hygiene curriculum.

    PubMed

    Kacerik, Mark G; Prajer, Renee G; Conrad, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    Dental hygiene ethics is an essential component of the dental hygiene curriculum. The accreditation standards for dental hygiene education state that graduates must be competent in applying ethical concepts to the provision and/or support of oral health care services. Although the standards for entry into the profession of dental hygiene emphasize the importance of ethical reasoning, there is little published research specific to ethics instruction in dental hygiene programs. The purpose of this study was to assess how ethics is taught in the dental hygiene curriculum. A 17-item survey was designed and distributed to 261 accredited dental hygiene programs in the United States for a response rate of 56% (N=147). The survey requested that participants provide information on teaching and evaluation methodologies, didactic and clinical hours of instruction, individuals responsible for providing instruction, and the degree of emphasis placed on ethics and integration of ethical reasoning within the dental hygiene curriculum. Results of the survey reflect that dental hygiene programs devote a mean of 20. hours to teaching dental hygiene ethics in the didactic component of the curriculum. With regard to the clinical component of the curriculum, 63% of respondents indicated that 10 or less hours are devoted to ethics instruction. These results show an increase in didactic hours of instruction from previous studies where the mean hours of instruction ranged from 7 to 11.7 hours. Results showed 64% of respondents offered a separate course in ethics; however, 82% of programs surveyed indicated that ethics was incorporated into one or more dental hygiene courses with 98% utilizing dental hygiene faculty to provide instruction. Most programs utilized a variety of instructional methods to teach ethics with the majority employing class discussion and lecture (99% and 97% respectively). The type of institution-technical college, community college, four-year university with a

  19. Electron microscopy of octacalcium phosphate in the dental calculus.

    PubMed

    Kakei, Mitsuo; Sakae, Toshiro; Yoshikawa, Masayoshi

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to morphologically demonstrate the presence of octacalcium phosphate in the dental calculus by judging from the crystal lattice image and its rapid transformation into apatite crystal, as part of our serial studies on biomineral products. We also aimed to confirm whether the physical properties of octacalcium phosphate are identical with those of the central dark lines observed in crystals of ordinary calcifying hard tissues. Electron micrographs showed that crystals of various sizes form in the dental calculus. The formation of each crystal seemed to be closely associated with the organic substance, possibly originating from degenerated microorganisms at the calcification front. Many crystals had an 8.2-A lattice interval, similar to that of an apatite crystal. Furthermore, some crystals clearly revealed an 18.7-A lattice interval and were vulnerable to electron bombardment. After electron beam exposure, this lattice interval was quickly altered to about half (i.e. 8.2 A), indicating structural conversion. Consequently, a number of apatite crystals in the dental calculus are possibly created by a conversion mechanism involving an octacalcium phosphate intermediate. However, we also concluded that the calcification process in the dental calculus is not similar to that of ordinary calcifying hard tissues.

  20. Reduced dental calcium expression and dental mass in chronic sleep deprived rats: Combined EDS, TOF-SIMS, and micro-CT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yi-Jie; Huang, Yung-Kai; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Pai, Man-Hui; Lee, Ai-Wei; Mai, Fu-Der; Chang, Hung-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Teeth are the hardest tissue in the body. The growth of teeth is closely regulated by circadian rhythmicity. Considering that sleep deprivation (SD) is a severe condition that disrupts normal circadian rhythmicity, this study was conducted to determine whether calcium expression (the major element participating in teeth constitution), and dental mass would be significantly impaired following SD. Adolescent rats subjected to 3 weeks of SD were processed for energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analyses. The EDS and TOF-SIMS results indicated that high calcium intensity was detected in both the upper and lower incisors of untreated rats. Micro-CT analysis corresponded closely with spectral data in which an enhanced dental mass was calculated in intact animals. However, following SD, both calcium expression and the dental mass were remarkably decreased to nearly half those of the untreated values. Because SD plays a detrimental role in impairing dental structure, establishing satisfactory sleep behavior would therefore serve as a crucial strategy for preventing or improving prevalent dental dysfunctions.

  1. Endodontic applications of a short pulsed FR Nd:YAG dental laser: photovaporization of extruded pulpal tissue following traumatic fractures of two maxillary central incisors--a clinical trial repor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Robert H., II

    1992-06-01

    Historically, many techniques have been attempted in the search for a satisfactory and consistent treatment of inflamed, painful, hyperemic pulpal tissue. Present techniques attempting to achieve profound local anesthesia in such tissue, have not been satisfactory. Local anesthesia techniques acceptable to the patient with painful hyperemic pulpal tissue, has eluded previous technology. The subsequent treatment of hyperemic tissue without sufficient anesthesia primarily involves undesirable invasive mechanical/surgical procedures. Described in this clinical trial is a technique using free running (FR) pulsed, Nd:YAG laser energy to ablate soft tooth pulpal tissue--a technique employed after conventional endodontic methods failed. A free running pulsed, FR Nd:YAG dental laser was successfully used at 20 pulses per second and 1.25 watts to photovaporize endodontic pulpal tissue (pulpectomy) to allow a conventional endodontic file to extirpate the remaining soft tissue remnants and access the root apex. Also described in this paper is the 'hot-tip' effect of contact fiber laser surgery. This clinical trial achieved the immediate, short term objective of endodontic soft tissue removal via photovaporization, without pain reported by the patient. The pulsed FR Nd:YAG dental laser used as described in this clinical report appears to be a very safe and very effective technique; offers a treatment alternative to traditional therapy that suggests high patient acceptance; and is significantly less stressful for the doctor and staff than traditional treatment options. Long-term, controlled scientific and clinical studies are necessary to establish the safety and efficacy of both the helium-neon energy for visualization and the low-watt pulsed FR Nd:YAG energy for photovaporization of soft endodontic pulpal tissue within the root canal. Research is especially needed to understand the effects of a low-watt, pulsed FR, Nd:YAG laser on the activity of osteoclasts and odontoclasts

  2. Reconstruction of the maxilla following hemimaxillectomy defects with scapular tip grafts and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Christian; Freudlsperger, Christian; Bodem, Jens; Engel, Michael; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Freier, Kolja

    2016-11-01

    Treatment of post-resective defects of the maxilla can be challenging and usually requires dental obturation or microvascular reconstruction. As compared to soft-tissue microvascular grafts, bone reconstruction can additionally allow for facial support and retention of dental implants. The aim of this study was to evaluate scapular tip grafts with respect to their applicability for maxillary reconstruction and their potential to retain dental implants for later dental rehabilitation. In this retrospective study, 14 patients with hemimaxillectomy defects were reconstructed with free scapular tip grafts, oriented horizontally, to rebuild the palate and alveolar ridge. After bone healing, three-dimensional virtual implant planning was performed, and a radiographic guide was fabricated to enable implant placement in the optimal anatomic and prosthetic position. All patients' mastication and speech were evaluated, along with the extent of defect closure, suitability of the graft sites for implant placement, and soft-tissue stability. Pre- and postsurgical radiographs were also evaluated. A good postoperative outcome was achieved in all patients, with complete closure of maxillary defects that were class II, according to the system of Brown and Shaw. Additional bone augmentation was necessary in two patients in order to increase vertical bone height. Patients were subsequently treated with 50 dental implants to retain dental prostheses. In all cases, additional soft-tissue surgery was necessary to achieve a long-term stable periimplant situation. No implants were lost during the mean observation period of 34 months. Due to its specific form, the scapular tip graft is well suited to reconstruct the palate and maxillary alveolar ridge and to enable subsequent implant-retained rehabilitation. Due to the limited bone volume, an accurate three-dimensional graft orientation is essential. Furthermore, most cases require additional soft-tissue surgery to achieve a long

  3. Common dental anomalies in cleft lip and palate patients.

    PubMed

    Haque, Sanjida; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is the most common orofacial congenital malformation in live births. CLP can occur individually or in combination with other congenital deformities. Affected patients experience a number of dental, aesthetic, speech, hearing, and psychological complications and have a higher incidence of severe dental conditions. The purpose of this study is to characterise the different types of dental anomalies that are frequently associated with CLP patients based on a literature survey. By literature survey, this study characterises the different types of dental anomalies that are frequently associated with cleft lip and palate patients. Common dental anomalies associated with CLP are supernumerary tooth, congenitally missing tooth, delayed tooth development, morphological anomalies in both deciduous and permanent dentition, delayed eruption of permanent maxillary incisors, microdontia, and abnormal tooth number. The incidence of certain dental anomalies is strongly correlated with Cleft lip and palate, a finding that is consistent with previous studies.

  4. Failure of non-vacuum steam sterilization processes for dental handpieces.

    PubMed

    Winter, S; Smith, A; Lappin, D; McDonagh, G; Kirk, B

    2017-12-01

    Dental handpieces are used in critical and semi-critical operative interventions. Although some dental professional bodies recommend that dental handpieces are sterilized between patient use there is a lack of clarity and understanding of the effectiveness of different steam sterilization processes. The internal mechanisms of dental handpieces contain narrow lumens (0.8-2.3 mm) which can impede the removal of air and ingress of saturated steam required to achieve sterilization conditions. To identify the extent of sterilization failure in dental handpieces using a non-vacuum process. In-vitro and in-vivo investigations were conducted on widely used UK bench-top steam sterilizers and three different types of dental handpieces. The sterilization process was monitored inside the lumens of dental handpieces using thermometric (TM; dataloggers), chemical indicator (CI), and biological indicator (BI) methods. All three methods of assessing achievement of sterility within dental handpieces that had been exposed to non-vacuum sterilization conditions demonstrated a significant number of failures [CI: 8/3024 (fails/no. of tests); BI: 15/3024; TM: 56/56] compared to vacuum sterilization conditions (CI: 2/1944; BI: 0/1944; TM: 0/36). The dental handpiece most likely to fail sterilization in the non-vacuum process was the surgical handpiece. Non-vacuum sterilizers located in general dental practice had a higher rate of sterilization failure (CI: 25/1620; BI: 32/1620; TM: 56/56) with no failures in vacuum process. Non-vacuum downward/gravity displacement, type N steam sterilizers are an unreliable method for sterilization of dental handpieces in general dental practice. The handpiece most likely to fail sterilization is the type most frequently used for surgical interventions. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Isolation and morphology of Stem Cells from Deciduous Tooth (SHED) and Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells (hDPSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham Zainal; Manogaran, Thanaletchumi; Abidin, Intan Zarina Zainol; Senafi, Sahidan; Wahab, Rohaya Megat Abdul

    2016-11-01

    Dental pulp is a tissue obtained from pulp chamber of deciduous and permanent tooth which contain stem cells. Stem cell isolation procedure is performed to obtain cells from tissue using enzymatic digestion. The aim of this study is to isolate and observe the morphology of stem cells during passage 0 and passage 3. Dental pulp from deciduous and permanent tooth was enzymatically digested using collagenase Type I and cells obtained were cultured in DMEM-KO that contains 10% fetal bovine serum, 1% antibiotic-antimycotic solution and 0.001× GlutaMax®. During culture, cell morphology was observed under the microscope on day 3, 16 and 33 and captured using cellB software. Giemsa staining was conducted on cells at passage 3. Cells attached at the bottom of the flask on day 3 and started forming small colonies. Cells became confluent after approximately 4 weeks. Both Stem Cells from Deciduous Tooth (SHED) and Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells (hDPSC) exhibited fibroblast-like morphology during passage 0 and passage 3. Meanwhile, Giemsa staining at passage 3 revealed single intact nucleus surrounded by fibroblastic cytoplasm structure. It can be concluded that SHED and hDPSC showed consistent fibroblast-like morphology throughout culture period.

  6. New Design for Rapid Prototyping of Digital Master Casts for Multiple Dental Implant Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Luis; Jiménez, Mariano; Espinosa, María del Mar; Domínguez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study proposes the replacement of all the physical devices used in the manufacturing of conventional prostheses through the use of digital tools, such as 3D scanners, CAD design software, 3D implants files, rapid prototyping machines or reverse engineering software, in order to develop laboratory work models from which to finish coatings for dental prostheses. Different types of dental prosthetic structures are used, which were adjusted by a non-rotatory threaded fixing system. Method From a digital process, the relative positions of dental implants, soft tissue and adjacent teeth of edentulous or partially edentulous patients has been captured, and a maser working model which accurately replicates data relating to the patients oral cavity has been through treatment of three-dimensional digital data. Results Compared with the conventional master cast, the results show a significant cost savings in attachments, as well as an increase in the quality of reproduction and accuracy of the master cast, with the consequent reduction in the number of patient consultation visits. The combination of software and hardware three-dimensional tools allows the optimization of the planning of dental implant-supported rehabilitations protocol, improving the predictability of clinical treatments and the production cost savings of master casts for restorations upon implants. PMID:26696528

  7. New Design for Rapid Prototyping of Digital Master Casts for Multiple Dental Implant Restorations.

    PubMed

    Romero, Luis; Jiménez, Mariano; Espinosa, María Del Mar; Domínguez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes the replacement of all the physical devices used in the manufacturing of conventional prostheses through the use of digital tools, such as 3D scanners, CAD design software, 3D implants files, rapid prototyping machines or reverse engineering software, in order to develop laboratory work models from which to finish coatings for dental prostheses. Different types of dental prosthetic structures are used, which were adjusted by a non-rotatory threaded fixing system. From a digital process, the relative positions of dental implants, soft tissue and adjacent teeth of edentulous or partially edentulous patients has been captured, and a maser working model which accurately replicates data relating to the patients oral cavity has been through treatment of three-dimensional digital data. Compared with the conventional master cast, the results show a significant cost savings in attachments, as well as an increase in the quality of reproduction and accuracy of the master cast, with the consequent reduction in the number of patient consultation visits. The combination of software and hardware three-dimensional tools allows the optimization of the planning of dental implant-supported rehabilitations protocol, improving the predictability of clinical treatments and the production cost savings of master casts for restorations upon implants.

  8. Trends in dental and allied dental education.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Laura M

    2004-09-01

    Educational programs play an important role in preparing a qualified dental work force. This article reviews the current status and trends in dental, advanced dental and allied dental education programs in the United States and examines their impact on the dental work force. This analysis focuses on survey data collected by the American Dental Association during the past 10 to 15 years and compares recent patterns in applications, enrollment and graduation with previous trends. The numbers of educational programs, applicants, enrollees and graduates have increased in dentistry, dental hygiene and dental assisting, while dental laboratory technology has declined in all measures. The proportion of women in dentistry has increased, while the ethnic profile of dental and allied personnel has shown little change. Both the cost of dental education and student debt continue to increase. Despite increases in the number of educational programs and overall numbers of graduates from dental and allied dental education programs, the proportion of underrepresented groups still lags behind their representation in the overall population, and the number of allied personnel falls short of practice needs. Patterns in applications, enrollment and graduation are important determinants of the dental and allied dental work force. The cost and funding of education significantly affect the attractiveness of dental careers and the sustainability of educational programs and should be monitored carefully by the profession.

  9. Relationship Between Dietary Patterns and Dental Health in Type I Diabetic Children Compared With Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Bassir, Leila; Amani, Reza; Khaneh Masjedi, Mashalla; Ahangarpor, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dietary habits are established in childhood and will persist until adulthood, being one of the human health pillars. Many diseases of humans have roots in the individuals’ diet, of which dental caries are one of the common infectious diseases. Diabetes Mellitus is also considered as the most common metabolic disorder in children. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the dietary patterns of children with type I Diabetes Mellitus with that of non-diabetic children, in relation to dental caries. Materials/Patients and Methods: In this study, 31 patients (13 boys and 18 girls, mean age of 11 ± 5.4 years) with type I Diabetes Mellitus referred to the Diabetes Mellitus Center and university hospitals were selected. Controls were 31 healthy students matched for age and sex. The study was based on the data obtained from the questionnaire containing information about dietary patterns and oral hygiene habits, social class and decayed/missing/filled teeth (DMFT) index. Dietary patterns were assessed using a food frequency questionnaire developed on the basis of caries preventing or inducing foods and then scored. Data were analyzed by using the t-test and McNamara’s test. Results: Diabetic children had less frequent cariogenic snacks than their controls. The mean diet scores for diabetic and healthy subjects were 7.65 ± 3.27 and 11.9 ± 2.03 (P < 0.05), respectively. There was no significant difference in DMFT between the diabetics and controls (3.71 ± 2.48 vs. 4.35 ± 2.74, respectively). There were also no differences in frequency of tooth brushing and use of mouth washes. However, more diabetics reported that they have never used dental floss compared to controls (42.2% vs. 71%, P < 0.05). Having cheese with bread as snack was more prevalent in diabetics (P < 0.05).There was a positive correlation between DMFT and dietary scores (r = 0.3, P < 0.05). Conclusions: Controls scored higher in their dietary habits and dental flossing but lower

  10. Examining dental expenditure and dental insurance accounting for probability of incurring expenses.

    PubMed

    Teusner, Dana; Smith, Valerie; Gnanamanickam, Emmanuel; Brennan, David

    2017-04-01

    dental service expenditures than uninsured adults. The analytical approach adopted in this study is useful for estimating effects on dental expenditure when a variable is associated with both the probability of visiting for care, and with the types of services received. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Differences in utilization of dental procedures by children enrolled in Wisconsin Medicaid and Delta Dental insurance plans.

    PubMed

    Bhagavatula, Pradeep; Xiang, Qun; Szabo, Aniko; Eichmiller, Fredrick; Okunseri, Christopher

    2017-12-01

    Few studies have directly compared dental procedures provided in public and private insurance plans for enrollees living in dental health professional shortage areas (DHPSAs). We examined the rates for the different types of dental procedures received by 0-18-year-old children living in DHPSAs and non-DHPSAs who were enrolled in Medicaid and those enrolled under Delta Dental of Wisconsin (DDW) for years 2002 to 2008. Medicaid and DDW dental claims data for 2002 to 2008 was analyzed. Enrollees were divided into DDW-DHPSA and non-DHPSA and Medicaid-DHPSA and non-DHPSA groups. Descriptive and multivariable analyses using over-dispersed Poisson regression were performed to examine the effect of living in DHPSAs and insurance type in relation to the number of procedures received. Approximately 49 and 65 percent of children living in non-DHPSAs that were enrolled in Medicaid and DDW received at least one preventive dental procedure annually, respectively. Children in DDW non-DHPSA group had 1.79 times as many preventive, 0.27 times fewer complex restorative and 0.51 times fewer endodontic procedures respectively, compared to those in Medicaid non-DHPSA group. Children enrolled in DDW-DHPSA group had 1.53 times as many preventive and 0.25 times fewer complex restorative procedures, compared to children in Medicaid-DHPSA group. DDW enrollees had significantly higher utilization rates for preventive procedures than children in Medicaid. There were significant differences across Medicaid and DDW between non-DHPSA and DHPSA for most dental procedures received by enrollees. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of dental composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djustiana, Nina; Greviana, Nadia; Faza, Yanwar; Sunarso

    2018-02-01

    During the last few decades, the increasing demands in esthetic dentistry have led to the development of dental composites material that provide similar appearance to the natural teeth. Recently, esthetic trend was an issue which increase the demand for teeth restorations that is similar with the origin. The esthetics of dental composite are more superior compared to amalgam, since its color look similar with natural teeth. Various dental composites have been developed using many type of fillers such as amorphous silica, quartz), borosilicate, Li-Sr-Ba-Al glass and oxide: zirconia and alumina. Researchers in Faculty of Dentistry University of Padjadjaran have prepared dental composites using zirconia-alumina-silica (ZAS) system as the filler. The aim is to improve the mechanical properties and the esthetic of the dental composites. The ZAS was obtained from chemical grade purity chemicals and Indonesia's natural sand as precursors its characterization were also presented. This novel method covers the procedure to synthesis and characterize dental composites in Padjadjaran University and some review about dental composites in global research.

  13. Variant Carvajal syndrome with additional dental anomalies.

    PubMed

    Barber, Sophy; Day, Peter; Judge, Mary; Toole, Edell O'; Fayle, Stephen

    2012-09-01

    This paper aims to review the case of a girl who presented with a number of dental anomalies, in addition to unusual skin, nail and hair conditions. Tragically an undiagnosed cardiomyopathy caused unexpected sudden death. The case is discussed with reference to a number of dermatological and oral conditions which were considered as possible diagnoses. AW had been under long term dental care for prepubertal periodontitis, premature root resorption of primary teeth, soft tissue and dental anomalies, and angular cheilitis. Separately she had also been seen by several dermatologists with respect to palmar plantar keratosis, striae keratoderma, wiry hair and abnormal finger nails. Tragically the patient suffered a sudden unexpected death and the subsequent post mortem identified an undiagnosed dilated cardiomyopathy. The most likely diagnosis is that this case is a variant of Carvajal Syndrome with additional dental anomalies. To date we have been unable to identify mutations in the desoplakin gene. We aim to emphasise the importance of recognising these dental and dermatological signs when they present together as a potential risk factor for cardiac abnormalities. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2012 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Successful Tissue Plasminogen Activator for a Patient with Stroke After Stanford Type A Aortic Dissection Treatment.

    PubMed

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Suzuki, Masayuki; Arai, Naoto; Kim, Younhee; Ozawa, Tadashi; Mashiko, Takafumi; Shimazaki, Haruo; Koide, Reiji; Fujimoto, Shigeru

    2018-07-01

    Some stroke patients with the acute aortic dissection receiving thrombolysis treatment resulted in fatalities. Thus, the concurrent acute aortic dissection is the contraindication for the intravenous recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator. However, the safety and the effectiveness of the intravenous recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator therapy are not known in patients with stroke some days after acute aortic dissection treatment. Here, we first report a case of a man with a cardioembolism due to the nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, who received the intravenous recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator therapy 117 days after the traumatic Stanford type A acute aortic dissection operation. Without the intravenous recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator therapy, the prognosis was expected to be miserable. However, the outcome was good with no complication owing to the intravenous recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator therapy. Our case suggests the effectiveness and the safety of the intravenous recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator therapy to the ischemic stroke some days after acute aortic dissection treatment. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Statistical Analysis in Dental Research Papers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-08

    AD A136, 019 STATISTICAL ANALYSS IN DENTAL RESEARCH PAPERS(Ul ARMY I INS OF DENTAL NESEARCH WASHINGTON DC L LORTON 0R AUG983 UNCL ASS FED F/S 6/5 IEE...BEFORE COSTL’,..G FORM 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO 3. RECIPIENTS CATALOG NUbER d Ste S. TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVERED ,cistical Analysis in Dental Research ...Papers Submission of papaer Jan- Aue 1983 X!t AUTHOR(&) ". COTACO.RATN Lewis Lorton 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  16. Digital Dental X-ray Database for Caries Screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rad, Abdolvahab Ehsani; Rahim, Mohd Shafry Mohd; Rehman, Amjad; Saba, Tanzila

    2016-06-01

    Standard database is the essential requirement to compare the performance of image analysis techniques. Hence the main issue in dental image analysis is the lack of available image database which is provided in this paper. Periapical dental X-ray images which are suitable for any analysis and approved by many dental experts are collected. This type of dental radiograph imaging is common and inexpensive, which is normally used for dental disease diagnosis and abnormalities detection. Database contains 120 various Periapical X-ray images from top to bottom jaw. Dental digital database is constructed to provide the source for researchers to use and compare the image analysis techniques and improve or manipulate the performance of each technique.

  17. Effects of early dental office visits on dental caries experience.

    PubMed

    Beil, Heather; Rozier, R Gary; Preisser, John S; Stearns, Sally C; Lee, Jessica Y

    2014-10-01

    We determined the association between timing of a first dentist office visit before age 5 years and dental disease in kindergarten. We used North Carolina Medicaid claims (1999-2006) linked to state oral health surveillance data to compare caries experience for kindergarten students (2005-2006) who had a visit before age 60 months (n=11,394) to derive overall exposure effects from a zero-inflated negative binomial regression model. We repeated the analysis separately for children who had preventive and tertiary visits. Children who had a visit at age 37 to 48 and 49 to 60 months had significantly less disease than children with a visit by age 24 months (incidence rate ratio [IRR]=0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.81, 0.95; IRR=0.75; 95% CI=0.69, 0.82, respectively). Disease status did not differ between children who had a tertiary visit by age 24 months and other children. Medicaid-enrolled children in our study followed an urgent care type of utilization, and access to dental care was limited. Children at high risk for dental disease should be given priority for a preventive dental visit before age 3 years.

  18. Oral and dental lesions in HIV infected Nigerian children.

    PubMed

    Oyedeji, Olusola Adetunji; Gbolahan, Olalere Omoyosola; Abe, Elizabeth Oluwatoyin; Agelebe, Efeturi

    2015-01-01

    Oral diseases in the HIV infected children though commonly encountered are under researched and often overlooked by physicians in developing countries. The aim of this study is to document the types and frequency of oral lesions in HIV infected children and examine the effects of management with HAART on their rates. A cross sectional study designed to identify the oral lesions in consecutive HIV infected children and their distribution at a Paediatric Anti-retroviral clinic. Information on oral disease and clinical features of the subjects were obtained by history and clinical examination and laboratory investigations by the pediatricians and dental surgeons. The 58 children studied consisted of 34 boys and 24 girls with their ages ranging from 3 months to 13 years. Thirty seven (63.8%) of the 58 children had oral diseases. Enamel hypoplasia, candidiasis, caries, angular chelitis, and herpes labialis were the most common oral lesions found in the patients. Oral soft tissue lesions were less frequently encountered among children on HAART. Statistical significance was recorded among those infected with candidiasis. More than 60% of the children diagnosed with oral disease had no knowledge of the state of their oral health before the study. Oral diseases are very common amongst the children studied. Awareness of oral disease among the children and their caregivers is low. Administration of HAART may have a preventive effect on the development of oral soft tissue disease. There is a need to integrate dental care into the paediatric HIV care programs.

  19. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, H.; Razak, I. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS) questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht's DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates' of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%). However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%). Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P = 0.004). “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services. PMID:25386615

  20. Advances and Perspectives on Tissue Repair and Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Marques, Aparecida M. C.; de Sousa, Ana Paula C.; Aciole, Jouber M. S.; Soares, Luiz G. P.

    2011-08-01

    Wound healing involves local and systemic responses that reflect the etiology of the lesion, type of tissue, systemic condition and others. Despite being essentially the same for different wounds, the pattern of healing may change due to intrinsic and/or extrinsic factors. The type of tissue has also to be considered. Several therapeutic approaches have been used to improve healing including phototherapies such as Laser, LEDs and Lamps. Their effects on soft and mineralized tissues are well reported. The choice of appropriated parameters is essential for the results of the treatment and includes wavelength, power density, energy, duration and frequency of application and others. We studied the effects of different types of light on the healing of both soft and mineralized tissues using different models. We found that the use of Laser and polarized light are effective on improving the healing of diabetic and undernourished animals. We also found that Laser light is capable of improving the healing of drug-induced impairment and on increasing the survival rate of flaps on both diabetic and non-diabetic animals. We have also studied and shown the influence of the laser parameters on the healing of surgical and laser wounds. Lately we verified the positive effect of LEDs on healing. We used Laser/LED light for improving bone healing in conditions such as in dental implants, autologous grafts, biomaterials and fractures. From these reports and our own experience we have no doubt whatsoever that the use of phototherapies, carried out with appropriate parameters, promotes quicker tissue repair.

  1. UNITED STATES DENTAL PROFESSIONALS’ PERCEPTIONS OF DENTAL ANXIETY AND NEED FOR SEDATION IN PATIENTS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Lisa J.; Hyatt, Halee A.; Huggins, Kimberly Hanson; Milgrom, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Dental fear is a barrier to receiving dental care, particularly for those patients who also suffer from mental illnesses. The current study examined United States dental professionals’ perceptions of dental fear experienced by patients with mental illness, and frequency of sedation of patients with and without mental illness. Dentists and dental staff members (n = 187) completed a survey about their experiences in treating patients with mental illness. More participants agreed (79.8%) than disagreed (20.2%) that patients with mental illness have more anxiety regarding dental treatment (p < .001) than dental patients without mental illness. Further, significantly more participants reported mentally ill patients’ anxiety is “possibly” or “definitely” a barrier to both receiving (96.8%; p < .001) and providing (76.9%; p < .01) dental treatment. Despite reporting more fear in these patients, there were no significant differences in frequency of sedation procedures between those with and without mental illness, regardless of type of sedation (p’s > .05). This lack of difference in sedation for mentally ill patients suggests hesitancy on the part of dental providers to sedate patients with mental illness and highlights a lack of clinical guidelines for this population in the US. Suggestions are given for the assessment and clinical management of patients with mental illness. PMID:24876662

  2. FEM evaluation of cemented-retained versus screw-retained dental implant single-tooth crown prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cicciu, Marco; Bramanti, Ennio; Matacena, Giada; Guglielmino, Eugenio; Risitano, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of partial or total edentulous patients is today a challenge for clinicians and dental practitioners. The application of dental implants in order to recover areas of missing teeth is going to be a predictable technique, however some important points about the implant angulation, the stress distribution over the bone tissue and prosthetic components should be well investigated for having final long term clinical results. Two different system of the prosthesis fixation are commonly used. The screw retained crown and the cemented retained one. All of the two restoration techniques give to the clinicians several advantages and some disadvantages. Aim of this work is to evaluate all the mechanical features of each system, through engineering systems of investigations like FEM and Von Mises analyses. The FEM is today a useful tool for the prediction of stress effect upon material and biomaterial under load or strengths. Specifically three different area has been evaluated through this study: the dental crown with the bone interface; the passant screw connection area; the occlusal surface of the two different type of crown. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed an adequate response for both type of prostheses, although cemented retained one showed better results over the occlusal area. PMID:24955150

  3. Potential feasibility of dental stem cells for regenerative therapies: stem cell transplantation and whole-tooth engineering.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Taka

    2011-07-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow are expected to be a somatic stem cell source for the development of new cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, dental clinicians are unlikely to carry out autologous cell/tissue collection from patients (i.e., marrow aspiration) as a routine procedure in their clinics; hence, the utilization of bone marrow stem cells seems impractical in the dental field. Dental tissues harvested from extracted human teeth are well known to contain highly proliferative and multipotent stem cell compartments and are considered to be an alternative autologous cell source in cell-based medicine. This article provides a short overview of the ongoing studies for the potential application of dental stem cells and suggests the utilization of 2 concepts in future regenerative medicine: (1) dental stem cell-based therapy for hepatic and other systemic diseases and (2) tooth replacement therapy using the bioengineered human whole tooth, called the "test-tube dental implant." Regenerative therapies will bring new insights and benefits to the fields of clinical medicine and dentistry.

  4. Dental Disease: A Continuing Education Problem for the Disabled Individual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, William P.

    1983-01-01

    The author cites the incidence and types of dental diseases among disabled persons; discusses such contributing factors as low income and absence of comprehensive dental services; and describes a low-cost model interdisciplinary dental hygiene program involving special education, rehabilitation, and dentistry. (MC)

  5. Nanotechnology in Dental Sciences: Moving towards a Finer Way of Doing Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Uskoković, Vuk; Bertassoni, Luiz Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnologies are predicted to revolutionize: (a) the control over materials properties at ultrafine scales; and (b) the sensitivity of tools and devices applied in various scientific and technological fields. In this short review, we argue that dentistry will be no exception to this trend. Here, we present a dynamic view of dental tissues, an adoption of which may lead to finer, more effective and minimally invasive reparation approaches. By doing so, we aim at providing insights into some of the breakthroughs relevant to understanding the genesis of dental tissues at the nanostructural level or generating dental materials with nanoscale critical boundaries. The lineage of the progress of dental science, including the projected path along the presumed nanotechnological direction of research and clinical application is mentioned too. We conclude by claiming that dentistry should follow the trend of probing matter at nanoscale that currently dominates both materials and biological sciences in order to improve on the research strategies and clinical techniques that have traditionally rested on mechanistic assumptions. PMID:27103959

  6. Dental calculus image based on optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Ho, Yi-Ching; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Wang, Chun-Yang; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the dental calculus was characterized and imaged by means of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT). The refractive indices of enamel, dentin, cementum and calculus were measured as 1.625+/-0.024, 1.534+/-0.029, 1.570+/-0.021 and 1.896+/-0.085, respectively. The dental calculus lead strong scattering property and thus the region can be identified under enamel with SSOCT imaging. An extracted human tooth with calculus was covered by gingiva tissue as in vitro sample for SSOCT imaging.

  7. Fate of the Molar Dental Lamina in the Monophyodont Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Dosedělová, Hana; Dumková, Jana; Lesot, Hervé; Glocová, Kristýna; Kunová, Michaela; Tucker, Abigail S.; Veselá, Iva; Krejčí, Pavel; Tichý, František; Hampl, Aleš; Buchtová, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    The successional dental lamina (SDL) plays an essential role in the development of replacement teeth in diphyodont and polyphyodont animals. A morphologically similar structure, the rudimental successional dental lamina (RSDL), has been described in monophyodont (only one tooth generation) lizards on the lingual side of the developing functional tooth. This rudimentary lamina regresses, which has been proposed to play a role in preventing the formation of future generations of teeth. A similar rudimentary lingual structure has been reported associated with the first molar in the monophyodont mouse, and we show that this structure is common to all murine molars. Intriguingly, a lingual lamina is also observed on the non-replacing molars of other diphyodont mammals (pig and hedgehog), initially appearing very similar to the successional dental lamina on the replacing teeth. We have analyzed the morphological as well as ultrastructural changes that occur during the development and loss of this molar lamina in the mouse, from its initiation at late embryonic stages to its disappearance at postnatal stages. We show that loss appears to be driven by a reduction in cell proliferation, down-regulation of the progenitor marker Sox2, with only a small number of cells undergoing programmed cell death. The lingual lamina was associated with the dental stalk, a short epithelial connection between the tooth germ and the oral epithelium. The dental stalk remained in contact with the oral epithelium throughout tooth development up to eruption when connective tissue and numerous capillaries progressively invaded the dental stalk. The buccal side of the dental stalk underwent keratinisation and became part of the gingival epithelium, while most of the lingual cells underwent programmed cell death and the tissue directly above the erupting tooth was shed into the oral cavity. PMID:26010446

  8. Fiducial-based fusion of 3D dental models with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Amir H; Hannam, Alan G; Fels, Sidney

    2018-04-16

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used in study of maxillofacial structures. While MRI is the modality of choice for soft tissues, it fails to capture hard tissues such as bone and teeth. Virtual dental models, acquired by optical 3D scanners, are becoming more accessible for dental practice and are starting to replace the conventional dental impressions. The goal of this research is to fuse the high-resolution 3D dental models with MRI to enhance the value of imaging for applications where detailed analysis of maxillofacial structures are needed such as patient examination, surgical planning, and modeling. A subject-specific dental attachment was digitally designed and 3D printed based on the subject's face width and dental anatomy. The attachment contained 19 semi-ellipsoidal concavities in predetermined positions where oil-based ellipsoidal fiducial markers were later placed. The MRI was acquired while the subject bit on the dental attachment. The spatial position of the center of mass of each fiducial in the resultant MR Image was calculated by averaging its voxels' spatial coordinates. The rigid transformation to fuse dental models to MRI was calculated based on the least squares mapping of corresponding fiducials and solved via singular-value decomposition. The target registration error (TRE) of the proposed fusion process, calculated in a leave-one-fiducial-out fashion, was estimated at 0.49 mm. The results suggest that 6-9 fiducials suffice to achieve a TRE of equal to half the MRI voxel size. Ellipsoidal oil-based fiducials produce distinguishable intensities in MRI and can be used as registration fiducials. The achieved accuracy of the proposed approach is sufficient to leverage the merged 3D dental models with the MRI data for a finer analysis of the maxillofacial structures where complete geometry models are needed.

  9. Exploring Hominin and Non-hominin Primate Dental Fossil Remains with Neutron Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanolli, Clément; Schillinger, Burkhard; Beaudet, Amélie; Kullmer, Ottmar; Macchiarelli, Roberto; Mancini, Lucia; Schrenk, Friedemann; Tuniz, Claudio; Vodopivec, Vladimira

    Fossil dental remains are an archive of unique information for paleobiological studies. Computed microtomography based on X-ray microfocus sources (X-μCT) and Synchrotron Radiation (SR-μCT) allow subtle quantification at the micron and sub-micron scale of the meso- and microstructural signature imprinted in the mineralized tissues, such as enamel and dentine, through high-resolution ;virtual histology;. Nonetheless, depending on the degree of alterations undergone during fossilization, X-ray analyses of tooth tissues do not always provide distinct imaging contrasts, thus preventing the extraction of essential morphological and anatomical details. We illustrate here by three examples the successful application of neutron microtomography (n-μCT) in cases where X-rays have previously failed to deliver contrasts between dental tissues of fossilized specimen.

  10. The Influence of Tactile Perception on Classification of Bone Tissue at Dental Implant Insertion.

    PubMed

    Linck, Gláucia Kelly Silva Barbosa; Ferreira, Geovane Miranda; De Oliveira, Rubelisa Cândido Gomes; Lindh, Christina; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues; Ribeiro-Rotta, Rejane Faria

    2016-06-01

    Various ways of using the Lekholm and Zarb (L&Z) classification have added to the lack of scientific evidence of the effectiveness of this clinical method in the evaluation of implant treatment. The study aims to assess subjective jawbone classifications in patients referred for implant treatment, using L&Z classification with and without surgeon's hand perception at implant insertion. The association between bone type classifications and quantitative parameters of primary implant stability was also assessed. One hundred thirty-five implants were inserted using conventional loading protocol. Three surgeons classified bone quality at implant sites using two methods: one based on periapical and panoramic images (modified L&Z) and one based on the same images associated with the surgeon's tactile perception during drilling (original L&Z). Peak insertion torque and implant stability quotient (ISQ) were recorded. The modified and original L&Z were strongly correlated (rho = 0.79; p < .001); Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed no significant difference in the distribution of bone type classification between pairs using the two methods (p = .538). Spearman correlation tested the association between primary stability parameters and bone type classifications (-0.34 to -0.57 [p < .001]). Tactile surgical perception has a minor influence on rating of subjective bone type for dental implant treatment using the L&Z classification. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Priming Dental Pulp Stem Cells With Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Increases Angiogenesis of Implanted Tissue-Engineered Constructs Through Hepatocyte Growth Factor and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gorin, Caroline; Rochefort, Gael Y.; Bascetin, Rumeyza; Ying, Hanru; Lesieur, Julie; Sadoine, Jérémy; Beckouche, Nathan; Berndt, Sarah; Novais, Anita; Lesage, Matthieu; Hosten, Benoit; Vercellino, Laetitia; Merlet, Pascal; Le-Denmat, Dominique; Marchiol, Carmen; Letourneur, Didier; Nicoletti, Antonino; Vital, Sibylle Opsahl; Poliard, Anne; Salmon, Benjamin; Germain, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies based on implanting cellularized biomaterials are promising therapeutic approaches for the reconstruction of large tissue defects. A major hurdle for the reliable establishment of such therapeutic approaches is the lack of rapid blood perfusion of the tissue construct to provide oxygen and nutrients. Numerous sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) displaying angiogenic potential have been characterized in the past years, including the adult dental pulp. Establishment of efficient strategies for improving angiogenesis in tissue constructs is nevertheless still an important challenge. Hypoxia was proposed as a priming treatment owing to its capacity to enhance the angiogenic potential of stem cells through vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release. The present study aimed to characterize additional key factors regulating the angiogenic capacity of such MSCs, namely, dental pulp stem cells derived from deciduous teeth (SHED). We identified fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) as a potent inducer of the release of VEGF and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) by SHED. We found that FGF-2 limited hypoxia-induced downregulation of HGF release. Using three-dimensional culture models of angiogenesis, we demonstrated that VEGF and HGF were both responsible for the high angiogenic potential of SHED through direct targeting of endothelial cells. In addition, FGF-2 treatment increased the fraction of Stro-1+/CD146+ progenitor cells. We then applied in vitro FGF-2 priming to SHED before encapsulation in hydrogels and in vivo subcutaneous implantation. Our results showed that FGF-2 priming is more efficient than hypoxia at increasing SHED-induced vascularization compared with nonprimed controls. Altogether, these data demonstrate that FGF-2 priming enhances the angiogenic potential of SHED through the secretion of both HGF and VEGF. Significance The results from the present study show that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) priming is more

  12. Dental and oral anomalies in incontinentia pigmenti: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Minić, Snežana; Trpinac, Dušan; Gabriel, Heinz; Gencik, Martin; Obradović, Miljana

    2013-01-01

    Incontinentia pigmenti (IP) is an X-linked genodermatosis caused by a mutation of the IKBKG gene. The objective of this study was to present a systematic review of the dental and oral types of anomalies, to determine the total number and sex distribution of the anomalies, and to analyze possible therapies. We analyzed the literature data from 1,286 IP cases from the period 1993-2010. Dental and/or oral anomalies were diagnosed for 54.38% of the investigated IP patients. Most of the anomaly types were dental, and the most frequent of these were dental shape anomalies, hypodontia, and delayed dentition. The most frequent oral anomaly types were cleft palate and high arched palate. IKBKG exon 4-10 deletion was present in 86.36% of genetically confirmed IP patients. According to the frequency, dental and/or oral anomalies represent the most frequent and important IP minor criteria. The most frequent mutation was IKBKG exon 4-10 deletion. The majority of dental anomalies and some of the oral anomalies could be corrected. Because of the presence of cleft palate and high arched palate in IP patients, these two anomalies may be considered as diagnostic IP minor criteria as well.

  13. Dental therapy practice patterns in Minnesota: a baseline study.

    PubMed

    Blue, Christine M; Kaylor, Mary Beth

    2016-10-01

    A chronic shortage of dentists, the importance of oral health, and the lack of access to care led to the introduction of a new oral health practitioner in Minnesota, the dental therapist. Dental therapy graduates from the University of Minnesota have been in practice since 2012. To date, there has been no formal study of how they have been incorporated into dental practice. The purpose of this study was to obtain baseline knowledge of dental therapists' practice patterns in Minnesota and determine if dentists' patterns of work changed after a dental therapist was employed. Four dental practices were sampled purposefully to obtain various practice types and geographic locations within Minnesota. Secondary data were collected from practice management software databases in each practice between January-March, 2015. Data were used to describe the work undertaken by dental therapists, the types of patients seen and payer mix. Additionally, data from 6 months before and after employment of the dental therapist were collected to determine whether dentists' practice patterns changed after a dental therapist was employed. Dental therapists were employed full-time, seeing an average of 6.8 patients per day. No distinct pattern emerged with regard to ages of patients seen by dental therapists. Dental therapists saw up to 90% of uninsured patients or patients on public assistance. Restorative services across practices comprised an average of 68% of work undertaken by dental therapists. Dentists delegated a full range of procedures within the dental therapy scope of practice indicating trust and acceptance of dental therapists. Dentists in two practices began to take on more complex dental procedures after a dental therapist joined the practice. Dental therapists are treating a high number of uninsured and underinsured patients, suggesting that they are expanding access to dental care in rural and metropolitan areas of Minnesota. Dentists appear to have an adequate workload for

  14. Eye protection in dental laboratories.

    PubMed

    Palenik, C J

    1997-09-01

    Many dental laboratory procedures increase the chances of serious eye injury. This would include traumatic injuries due to projectiles or through exposure to harsh chemicals or heat and infections from contact with patient body fluids. To help assure a safer working environment, awareness of the need for eye protection must be established and maintained by all laboratory personnel. The purpose of this article are: 1) to list the applicable federal regulations concerning eye safety in dental laboratory workplaces; 2) to describe the various types of appropriate eyewear; and 3) to identify which protective devices best prevent exposure to specific types of hazards. The goal of this article is to help dental laboratories with their employee safety programs, especially concerning the selection of protective eyewear. Such programs must include engineering controls and work practice controls plus appropriate personal protective equipment. Laboratories today must comply with safety mandates in the most effective and efficient manner.

  15. Anatomy, Physiology and Non-dental Disorders of the Mouth of Pet Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Thomas M; Vella, David

    2016-09-01

    The first part of this review focuses on the anatomy and physiology of the rabbit mouth. Practical understanding is critical to comprehend the dynamic pathologic changes of dental disease, which is one of the most common presenting problems in rabbits. The major theories of the etiopathogenesis of dental disease are presented. The second part focuses on non-dental oral disorders, which encompass only a small incidence of stomatognathic diseases when compared with dental disease. These diseases are primarily composed of infections (treponematosis, oral papillomatosis), neoplasia (frequently involving calcified tissue proliferation), and congenital abnormalities (mandibular prognathism, absent peg teeth, supernumerary peg teeth). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Surfing for history: dental library and dental school websites.

    PubMed

    Kreinbring, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Library and academic websites are among the most reliable Internet resources available today. Schools of all types use the Internet as a means of sharing information; and libraries provide broader access to their collections via the Web. For researchers seeking specific, authoritative resources on dental history, library and dental school websites are most helpful in identifying print and online resources, in describing manuscript collections, and in presenting a history of the host institution. A library site often can provide sufficient information online to eliminate the need for an in-person visit to the library. On the other hand, a library site may tantalize the historian with enough information on unique collections that a trip can be justified.

  17. Capsaicin-evoked iCGRP release from human dental pulp: a model system for the study of peripheral neuropeptide secretion in normal healthy tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fehrenbacher, Jill C.; Sun, Xiaoling X.; Locke, Erin E.; Henry, Michael A.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying trigeminal pain conditions are incompletely understood. In vitro animal studies have elucidated various targets for pharmacological intervention; however, a lack of clinical models that allow evaluation of viable innervated human tissue has impeded successful translation of many preclinical findings into clinical therapeutics. Therefore, we developed and characterized an in vitro method that evaluates the responsiveness of isolated human nociceptors by measuring basal and stimulated release of neuropeptides from collected dental pulp biopsies. Informed consent was obtained from patients presenting for extraction of normal wisdom teeth. Patients were anesthetized using nerve block injection, teeth were extracted and bisected, and pulp was removed and superfused in vitro. Basal and capsaicin-evoked peripheral release of immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide (iCGRP) was analyzed by enzyme immunoassay. The presence of nociceptive markers within neurons of the dental pulp was characterized using confocal microscopy. Capsaicin increased the release of iCGRP from dental pulp biopsies in a concentration-dependent manner. Stimulated release was dependent on extracellular calcium, reversed by a TRPV1 receptor antagonist, and desensitized acutely (tachyphylaxis) and pharmacologically by pretreatment with capsaicin. Superfusion with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) increased basal and stimulated release, whereas PGE2 augmented only basal release. Compared with vehicle treatment, pretreatment with PGE2 induced competence for DAMGO to inhibit capsaicin-stimulated iCGRP release, similar to observations in animal models where inflammatory mediators induce competence for opioid inhibition. These results indicate the release of iCGRP from human dental pulp provides a novel tool to determine the effects of pharmacological compounds on human nociceptor sensitivity. PMID:19428185

  18. Crystalline structure of pulverized dental calculus induces cell death in oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ziauddin, S M; Yoshimura, A; Montenegro Raudales, J L; Ozaki, Y; Higuchi, K; Ukai, T; Kaneko, T; Miyazaki, T; Latz, E; Hara, Y

    2018-06-01

    Dental calculus is a mineralized deposit attached to the tooth surface. We have shown that cellular uptake of dental calculus triggers nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation, leading to the processing of the interleukin-1β precursor into its mature form in mouse and human phagocytes. The activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome also induced a lytic form of programmed cell death, pyroptosis, in these cells. However, the effects of dental calculus on other cell types in periodontal tissue have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine whether dental calculus can induce cell death in oral epithelial cells. HSC-2 human oral squamous carcinoma cells, HOMK107 human primary oral epithelial cells and immortalized mouse macrophages were exposed to dental calculus or 1 of its components, hydroxyapatite crystals. For inhibition assays, the cells were exposed to dental calculus in the presence or absence of cytochalasin D (endocytosis inhibitor), z-YVAD-fmk (caspase-1 inhibitor) or glyburide (NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor). Cytotoxicity was determined by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and staining with propidium iodide. Tumor necrosis factor-α production was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Oral epithelial barrier function was examined by permeability assay. Dental calculus induced cell death in HSC-2 cells, as judged by LDH release and propidium iodide staining. Dental calculus also induced LDH release from HOMK107 cells. Following heat treatment, dental calculus lost its capacity to induce tumor necrosis factor-α in mouse macrophages, but could induce LDH release in HSC-2 cells, indicating a major role of inorganic components in cell death. Hydroxyapatite crystals also induced cell death in both HSC-2 and HOMK107 cells, as judged by LDH release, indicating the capacity of crystal particles to induce cell death. Cell death induced by dental

  19. Children acceptance of laser dental treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazea, Andreea; Todea, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the dental anxiety level and the degree of acceptance of laser assisted pedodontic treatments from the children part. Also, we want to underline the advantages of laser use in pediatric dentistry, to make this technology widely used in treating dental problems of our children patients. Methods: Thirty pediatric dental patients presented in the Department of Pedodontics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Victor Babeş", Timişoara were evaluated using the Wong-Baker pain rating scale, wich was administered postoperatory to all patients, to assess their level of laser therapy acceptance. Results: Wong-Baker faces pain rating scale (WBFPS) has good validity and high specificity; generally it's easy for children to use, easy to compare and has good feasibility. Laser treatment has been accepted and tolerated by pediatric patients for its ability to reduce or eliminate pain. Around 70% of the total sample showed an excellent acceptance of laser dental treatment. Conclusions: Laser technology is useful and effective in many clinical situations encountered in pediatric dentistry and a good level of pacient acceptance is reported during all laser procedures on hard and soft tissues.

  20. Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II: clinical findings and dental management of a child patient

    PubMed Central

    Terlemez, Arslan; Altunsoy, Mustafa; Celebi, Hakki

    2015-01-01

    Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) is an unusual autosomal recessive inherited form of primordial dwarfism, which is characterized by a small head diameter at birth, but which also progresses to severe microcephaly, progressive bony dysplasia, and characteristic facies and personality. This report presents a case of a five-year-old girl with MOPD II syndrome. The patient was referred to our clinic with the complaint of severe tooth pain at the left mandibular primary molar teeth. Clinical examination revealed that most of the primary teeth had been decayed and all primary teeth were hypoplastic. Patient’s history revealed delayed development in the primary dentition and radiographic examination showed rootless primary molar teeth and short-rooted incisors. The treatment was not possible due to the lack of root of the left mandibular primary molars; so the teeth were extracted. Thorough and timely dental evaluation is crucial for the prevention of dental problems and the maintenance of oral health in patients with MOPD II syndrome is of utmost importance. PMID:28955524

  1. Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II: clinical findings and dental management of a child patient.

    PubMed

    Terlemez, Arslan; Altunsoy, Mustafa; Celebi, Hakki

    2015-01-01

    Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) is an unusual autosomal recessive inherited form of primordial dwarfism, which is characterized by a small head diameter at birth, but which also progresses to severe microcephaly, progressive bony dysplasia, and characteristic facies and personality. This report presents a case of a five-year-old girl with MOPD II syndrome. The patient was referred to our clinic with the complaint of severe tooth pain at the left mandibular primary molar teeth. Clinical examination revealed that most of the primary teeth had been decayed and all primary teeth were hypoplastic. Patient's history revealed delayed development in the primary dentition and radiographic examination showed rootless primary molar teeth and short-rooted incisors. The treatment was not possible due to the lack of root of the left mandibular primary molars; so the teeth were extracted. Thorough and timely dental evaluation is crucial for the prevention of dental problems and the maintenance of oral health in patients with MOPD II syndrome is of utmost importance.

  2. Unified Approach to the Biomechanics of Dental Implantology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenoble, D. E.; Knoell, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    The human need for safe and effective dental implants is well-recognized. Although many implant designs have been tested and are in use today, a large number have resulted in clinical failure. These failures appear to be due to biomechanical effects, as well as biocompatibility and surgical factors. A unified approach is proposed using multidisciplinary systems technology, for the study of the biomechanical interactions between dental implants and host tissues. The approach progresses from biomechanical modeling and analysis, supported by experimental investigations, through implant design development, clinical verification, and education of the dental practitioner. The result of the biomechanical modeling, analysis, and experimental phases would be the development of scientific design criteria for implants. Implant designs meeting these criteria would be generated, fabricated, and tested in animals. After design acceptance, these implants would be tested in humans, using efficient and safe surgical and restorative procedures. Finally, educational media and instructional courses would be developed for training dental practitioners in the use of the resulting implants.

  3. Network-Based Method for Identifying Co-Regeneration Genes in Bone, Dentin, Nerve and Vessel Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hongying; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Feng, Kaiyan; Kong, XiangYin; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Bone and dental diseases are serious public health problems. Most current clinical treatments for these diseases can produce side effects. Regeneration is a promising therapy for bone and dental diseases, yielding natural tissue recovery with few side effects. Because soft tissues inside the bone and dentin are densely populated with nerves and vessels, the study of bone and dentin regeneration should also consider the co-regeneration of nerves and vessels. In this study, a network-based method to identify co-regeneration genes for bone, dentin, nerve and vessel was constructed based on an extensive network of protein–protein interactions. Three procedures were applied in the network-based method. The first procedure, searching, sought the shortest paths connecting regeneration genes of one tissue type with regeneration genes of other tissues, thereby extracting possible co-regeneration genes. The second procedure, testing, employed a permutation test to evaluate whether possible genes were false discoveries; these genes were excluded by the testing procedure. The last procedure, screening, employed two rules, the betweenness ratio rule and interaction score rule, to select the most essential genes. A total of seventeen genes were inferred by the method, which were deemed to contribute to co-regeneration of at least two tissues. All these seventeen genes were extensively discussed to validate the utility of the method. PMID:28974058

  4. Network-Based Method for Identifying Co- Regeneration Genes in Bone, Dentin, Nerve and Vessel Tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Pan, Hongying; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Feng, Kaiyan; Kong, XiangYin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2017-10-02

    Bone and dental diseases are serious public health problems. Most current clinical treatments for these diseases can produce side effects. Regeneration is a promising therapy for bone and dental diseases, yielding natural tissue recovery with few side effects. Because soft tissues inside the bone and dentin are densely populated with nerves and vessels, the study of bone and dentin regeneration should also consider the co-regeneration of nerves and vessels. In this study, a network-based method to identify co-regeneration genes for bone, dentin, nerve and vessel was constructed based on an extensive network of protein-protein interactions. Three procedures were applied in the network-based method. The first procedure, searching, sought the shortest paths connecting regeneration genes of one tissue type with regeneration genes of other tissues, thereby extracting possible co-regeneration genes. The second procedure, testing, employed a permutation test to evaluate whether possible genes were false discoveries; these genes were excluded by the testing procedure. The last procedure, screening, employed two rules, the betweenness ratio rule and interaction score rule, to select the most essential genes. A total of seventeen genes were inferred by the method, which were deemed to contribute to co-regeneration of at least two tissues. All these seventeen genes were extensively discussed to validate the utility of the method.

  5. Tissue Integration of a Volume-Stable Collagen Matrix in an Experimental Soft Tissue Augmentation Model.

    PubMed

    Ferrantino, Luca; Bosshardt, Dieter; Nevins, Myron; Santoro, Giacomo; Simion, Massimo; Kim, David

    Reducing the need for a connective tissue graft by using an efficacious biomaterial is an important task for dental professionals and patients. This experimental study aimed to test the soft tissue response to a volume-stable new collagen matrix. The device demonstrated good stability during six different time points ranging from 0 to 90 days of healing with no alteration of the wound-healing processes. The 90-day histologic specimen demonstrates eventual replacement of most of the matrix with new connective tissue fibers.

  6. Fifty years of Brazilian Dental Materials Group: scientific contributions of dental materials field evaluated by systematic review

    PubMed Central

    ROSA, Wellington Luiz de Oliveira; SILVA, Tiago Machado; LIMA, Giana da Silveira; SILVA, Adriana Fernandes; PIVA, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective A systematic review was conducted to analyze Brazilian scientific and technological production related to the dental materials field over the past 50 years. Material and Methods This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (Prisma) statement. Searches were performed until December 2014 in six databases: MedLine (PubMed), Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, BBO, and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, the Brazilian patent database (INPI - Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial) was screened in order to get an overview of Brazilian technological development in the dental materials field. Two reviewers independently analyzed the documents. Only studies and patents related to dental materials were included in this review. Data regarding the material category, dental specialty, number of documents and patents, filiation countries, and the number of citations were tabulated and analyzed in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States). Results A total of 115,806 studies and 53 patents were related to dental materials and were included in this review. Brazil had 8% affiliation in studies related to dental materials, and the majority of the papers published were related to dental implants (1,137 papers), synthetic resins (681 papers), dental cements (440 papers), dental alloys (392 papers) and dental adhesives (361 papers). The Brazilian technological development with patented dental materials was smaller than the scientific production. The most patented type of material was dental alloys (11 patents), followed by dental implants (8 patents) and composite resins (7 patents). Conclusions Dental materials science has had a substantial number of records, demonstrating an important presence in scientific and technological development of dentistry. In addition, it is important to approximate the relationship between academia and industry to expand the technological development in

  7. Fifty years of Brazilian Dental Materials Group: scientific contributions of dental materials field evaluated by systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Wellington Luiz de Oliveira; Silva, Tiago Machado; Lima, Giana da Silveira; Silva, Adriana Fernandes; Piva, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to analyze Brazilian scientific and technological production related to the dental materials field over the past 50 years. This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (Prisma) statement. Searches were performed until December 2014 in six databases: MedLine (PubMed), Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, BBO, and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, the Brazilian patent database (INPI - Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial) was screened in order to get an overview of Brazilian technological development in the dental materials field. Two reviewers independently analyzed the documents. Only studies and patents related to dental materials were included in this review. Data regarding the material category, dental specialty, number of documents and patents, filiation countries, and the number of citations were tabulated and analyzed in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States). A total of 115,806 studies and 53 patents were related to dental materials and were included in this review. Brazil had 8% affiliation in studies related to dental materials, and the majority of the papers published were related to dental implants (1,137 papers), synthetic resins (681 papers), dental cements (440 papers), dental alloys (392 papers) and dental adhesives (361 papers). The Brazilian technological development with patented dental materials was smaller than the scientific production. The most patented type of material was dental alloys (11 patents), followed by dental implants (8 patents) and composite resins (7 patents). Dental materials science has had a substantial number of records, demonstrating an important presence in scientific and technological development of dentistry. In addition, it is important to approximate the relationship between academia and industry to expand the technological development in countries such as Brazil.

  8. Use of the erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser on human enamel tissues. Influence of the air-water spray on the laser-tissue interaction: scanning electron microscope evaluations.

    PubMed

    Olivi, Giovanni; Angiero, Francesca; Benedicenti, Stefano; Iaria, Giuseppe; Signore, Antonio; Kaitsas, Vassilios

    2010-11-01

    The study investigated the influence of varying amounts of air/water spray and the energy used by an erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) 2,780 nm laser when treating dental tissues. The morphological effects produced by the laser interaction on healthy human enamel were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The vestibular and lingual surfaces of ten molars were treated with laser at different power settings; each surface was subdivided into cervical, median, and occlusal parts and treated with different proportions of water spray; the series contained 60 tooth portions. Treatment differed in terms of power setting and air/water percentage. All specimens were then subjected to dehydration and metallisation. At SEM evaluation, the classic aspect of laser-treated enamel was visible: grooves, flakes, shelves and sharp edges, indicative of micro-explosion rather than melting. Vaporisation of the tissue created a clear delimitation from surrounding healthy tissue, with partial respect to the prismatic structure of the treated enamel. The aspect of the enamel was rarely type 1 Silverstone but more frequently type 2 or 3, with prismatic structure not respected and/or completely disordered. These morphological differences appeared to be correlated with the inclination of the laser beam aimed at the enamel prisms and with the percentage of air/water used. The laser system analysed showed itself to be effective at removing human dental enamel. The results appeared to be closely correlated with the variation of the percentage of the laser's water-air spray.

  9. Dental Calculus and the Evolution of the Human Oral Microbiome.