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Sample records for dental wear caused

  1. DENTAL WEAR CAUSED BY ASSOCIATION BETWEEN BRUXISM AND GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE: A REHABILITATION REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Naila Aparecida de Godoi; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Branco, Carolina Assaf; Barbosa, Gustavo Augusto Seabra; Fernandes, Alfredo Júlio; Soares, Carlos José

    2007-01-01

    Bruxism is a pathological activity of the stomatognathic system that involves tooth grinding and clenching during parafunctional jaw movements. Clinical signs of bruxism are mostly related to dental wear and muscular and joint discomforts, but a large number of etiological factors can be listed, as local, systemic, psychological and hereditary factors. The association between bruxism, feeding and smoking habits and digestive disorders may lead to serious consequences to dental and related structures, involving dental alterations (wear, fractures and cracks), periodontal signs (gingival recession and tooth mobility) and muscle-joint sensivity, demanding a multidisciplinary treatment plan. This paper presents a case report in which bruxism associated with acid feeding, smoking habit and episodes of gastric reflow caused severe tooth wear and great muscular discomfort with daily headache episodes. From the diagnosis, a multidisciplinary treatment plan was established. The initial treatment approach consisted of medical follow up with counseling on diet and smoking habits and management of the gastric disorders. This was followed by the installation of an interocclusal acrylic device in centric relation of occlusion (CRO) for reestablishment of the occlusal stability, vertical dimension of occlusion, anterior guides and return to normal muscle activity (90-day use approximately). After remission of initial symptoms, oral rehabilitation was implemented in CRO by means of full resin composite restorations and new interocclusal device for protection of restorations. Satisfactory esthetics, improved function and occlusal stability were obtained after oral rehabilitation. The patient has attended annual follow-ups for the past 2 years. The multidisciplinary treatment seems to be the key for a successful rehabilitation of severe cases of dental wear involving the association of different health disorders. PMID:19089153

  2. Diagnosis and management of dental wear.

    PubMed

    Harpenau, Lisa A; Noble, Warden H; Kao, Richard T

    2011-04-01

    Dental wear is loss of tooth structure resulting from erosion, attrition, abrasion, and, possibly, abfraction. Clinical/experimental data suggest no single damaging mechanism but rather simultaneous interaction of these destructive processes. The most important interaction is abrasion/attrition potentiated by dental erosion. Awareness of this pathosis is not well-appreciated by the public and dental professionals because the signs may be subtle. This article focuses on the recognition, diagnosis, and management of dental wear.

  3. Diagnosis and management of dental wear.

    PubMed

    Harpenau, Lisa A; Noble, Warden H; Kao, Richard T

    2012-01-01

    Dental wear is loss of tooth structure resulting from erosion, attrition, abrasion and, possibly, abfraction. Clinical/experimental data suggest no single damaging mechanism, but rather simultaneous interaction of these destructive processes. The most important interaction is abrasion/attrition potentiated by dental erosion. Awareness of this pathosis is not well-appreciated by the public and dental professionals because the signs may be subtle. This article focuses on recognizing, diagnosing and managing dental wear. Dental wear is a challenging problem for clinicians because of the subtlety of early changes; confusion about the etiology of the problem; and the dilemma of when or how to manage the etiology. Unfortunately, failure to recognize and manage the process often results in inaction until the breakdown is severe. At that point, the structural breakdown is so advanced that major rehabilitative treatment often is needed. This introductory article discusses diagnosing and managing dental wear.

  4. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    PubMed Central

    Levrini, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction) studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp), to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders). It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction. PMID:25548769

  5. Dental wear: a scanning electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Levrini, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giulia; Raspanti, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction) studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp), to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders). It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction.

  6. Interaction of dental erosion and bruxism: the amplification of tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Pettengill, Craig A

    2011-04-01

    Bruxism and erosion are important to identify during a dental examination. By understanding the etiologies of both processes, a management strategy can be implemented to decrease their effects. Management for bruxism, clenching, and parafunction can include medications, cognitive behavioral therapy, and dental appliances. Bruxism, clenching, and parafunction combined with dental erosion can cause dental wear to increase faster than any component alone.

  7. Extramasticatory dental wear reflecting habitual behavior and health in past populations.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Petra

    2011-10-01

    In skeletal remains, teeth are valuable sources of information regarding age, diet, and health. Dental wear is especially helpful in reconstructions of dietary patterns in populations of varying subsistence. In past societies, teeth have also been used as "a third hand" or as a "tool." The present article examines this type of dental wear and traits attributed to habitual behavior during prehistoric and historic times. Terminology and classification of habitual dental wear are described mainly by appearance, for instance, notching, grooving, cuts, scrapes, and polished surfaces, and their characteristics are illuminated by different case studies. Secondary health effects caused by the extramasticatory use of teeth, such as periapical lesions, tilting, skeletal changes at the temporomandibular joint, chipping, and antemortem tooth loss are also examined. During the examination of extramasticatory dental wear, information should be recorded on morphology, size, frequency, intensity, and location within the dental arch, as well as descriptions and detailed photographic documentation. The advantage of using a low- to medium-resolution microscope in all dental examination is emphasized. By categorizing the wear marks, characteristics are emphasized rather than an exact causing agent. In this way, tentative analogies for the origin of different extramasticatory wear, and consequently for human behavior in the past, can be avoided.

  8. Agave Chewing and Dental Wear: Evidence from Quids

    PubMed Central

    Hammerl, Emily E.; Baier, Melissa A.; Reinhard, Karl J.

    2015-01-01

    Agave quid chewing is examined as a potential contributing behavior to hunter-gatherer dental wear. It has previously been hypothesized that the contribution of Agave quid chewing to dental wear would be observed in communities wherever phytolith-rich desert succulents were part of subsistence. Previous analysis of coprolites from a prehistoric agricultural site, La Cueva de los Muertos Chiquitos in Durango, Mexico, showed that Agave was a consistent part of a diverse diet. Therefore, quids recovered at this site ought to be useful materials to test the hypothesis that dental wear was related to desert succulent consumption. The quids recovered from the site were found to be largely derived from chewing Agave. In this study, the quids were found to be especially rich in phytoliths, and analysis of dental casts made from impressions left in the quids revealed flat wear and dental attrition similar to that of Agave-reliant hunter-gatherers. Based on evidence obtained from the analysis of quids, taken in combination with results from previous studies, it is determined that Agave quid chewing was a likely contributing factor to dental wear in this population. As such, our method provides an additional avenue of dental research in areas where quids are present. PMID:26230855

  9. Agave Chewing and Dental Wear: Evidence from Quids.

    PubMed

    Hammerl, Emily E; Baier, Melissa A; Reinhard, Karl J

    2015-01-01

    Agave quid chewing is examined as a potential contributing behavior to hunter-gatherer dental wear. It has previously been hypothesized that the contribution of Agave quid chewing to dental wear would be observed in communities wherever phytolith-rich desert succulents were part of subsistence. Previous analysis of coprolites from a prehistoric agricultural site, La Cueva de los Muertos Chiquitos in Durango, Mexico, showed that Agave was a consistent part of a diverse diet. Therefore, quids recovered at this site ought to be useful materials to test the hypothesis that dental wear was related to desert succulent consumption. The quids recovered from the site were found to be largely derived from chewing Agave. In this study, the quids were found to be especially rich in phytoliths, and analysis of dental casts made from impressions left in the quids revealed flat wear and dental attrition similar to that of Agave-reliant hunter-gatherers. Based on evidence obtained from the analysis of quids, taken in combination with results from previous studies, it is determined that Agave quid chewing was a likely contributing factor to dental wear in this population. As such, our method provides an additional avenue of dental research in areas where quids are present.

  10. Clinical assessment of enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns.

    PubMed

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Schwindling, F S; Schmitter, M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure enamel wear caused by antagonistic monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia full molar crowns were placed in 20 patients. Patients with high activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were excluded. For analysis of wear, vinylpolysiloxane impressions were prepared after crown incorporation and at 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up. Wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists, and of two contralateral natural antagonists (control teeth) was measured by use of plaster replicas and a 3D laser-scanning device. Differences of wear between the zirconia crown antagonists and the control teeth were investigated by means of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and linear regression analysis. After 2 years, mean vertical loss was 46 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 19-26 μm for contralateral control teeth and 14 μm for zirconia crowns. Maximum vertical loss was 151 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 75-115 μm for control teeth and 60 μm for zirconia crowns. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between wear of enamel by zirconia-opposed teeth and by control teeth. Gender, which significantly affected wear, was identified as a possible confounder. Monolithic zirconia crowns generated more wear of opposed enamel than did natural teeth. Because of the greater wear caused by other dental ceramics, the use of monolithic zirconia crowns may be justified.

  11. Wear resistance of a pressable low-fusing ceramic opposed by dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Faria, Adriana Cláudia Lapria; de Oliveira, André Almeida; Alves Gomes, Erica; Silveira Rodrigues, Renata Cristina; Faria Ribeiro, Ricardo

    2014-04-01

    Dental alloys have increasingly replaced by dental ceramics in dentistry because of aesthetics. As both dental alloys and ceramics can be present in the oral cavity, the evaluation of the wear resistance of ceramics opposed by dental alloys is important. The aim of the present study was to evaluate wear resistance of a pressable low-fusing ceramic opposed by dental alloys as well as the microhardness of the alloys and the possible correlation of wear and antagonist microhardness. Fifteen stylus tips samples of pressable low-fusing ceramic were obtained, polished and glazed. Samples were divided into three groups according to the disk of alloy/metal to be used as antagonist: Nickel-Chromium (Ni-Cr), Cobalt-Chromium (Co-Cr) and commercially pure titanium (cp Ti). Vickers microhardness of antagonist disks was evaluated before wear tests. Then, antagonist disks were sandblasted until surface roughness was adjusted to 0.75μm. Wear tests were performed at a speed of 60 cycles/min and distance of 10mm, in a total of 300,000 cycles. Before and after wear tests, samples were weighted and had their profile designed in an optical comparator to evaluate weight and height loss, respectively. Ni-Cr and cp Ti caused greater wear than Co-Cr, presenting greater weight (p=.009) and height (p=.002) loss. Cp Ti microhardness was lower than Ni-Cr and Co-Cr (p<.05). There is a positive correlation between weight and height loss (p<.05), but weight (p=.204) and height (p=.05) loss are not correlated to microhardness. The results suggest that pressable low-fusing ceramic presents different wear according to the dental alloy used as antagonist and the wear is not affected by antagonist microhardness.

  12. Surface texture measurement for dental wear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, R. S.; Mullen, F.; Bartlett, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    The application of surface topography measurement and characterization within dental materials science is highly active and rapidly developing, in line with many modern industries. Surface measurement and structuring is used extensively within oral and dental science to optimize the optical, tribological and biological performance of natural and biomimetic dental materials. Although there has historically been little standardization in the use and reporting of surface metrology instrumentation and software, the dental industry is beginning to adopt modern areal measurement and characterization techniques, especially as the dental industry is increasingly adopting digital impressioning techniques in order to leverage CAD/CAM technologies for the design and construction of dental restorations. As dental treatment becomes increasingly digitized and reliant on advanced technologies such as dental implants, wider adoption of standardized surface topography and characterization techniques will become evermore essential. The dental research community welcomes the advances that are being made in surface topography measurement science towards realizing this ultimate goal.

  13. An Anthropological Perspective: Another Dimension to Modern Dental Wear Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Kaidonis, John A.; Ranjitkar, Sarbin; Lekkas, Dimitra; Townsend, Grant C.

    2012-01-01

    For many years, research on tooth wear by dental academics has been diametrically opposite to that of anthropological research, with each discipline having a different understanding as to the nature of the wear processes. Dental focus revolved around preventive and restorative considerations while the anthropological focus was a biological understanding related to human evolution, diet, environment, form, and function and included all the craniofacial structures. Introducing the anthropological perspective into modern dentistry gives an insight into the “bigger picture” of the nature and extent of tooth wear. By combining anthropological evidence with clinical knowledge and experience, it is most likely to provide the best-informed and biologically based approach to the management of tooth wear in modern societies. PMID:23304146

  14. Casing wear caused by tooljoint hardfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Best, B.

    1986-02-01

    Casing wear caused by new tooljoint hardfacings, such as fine-mesh tungsten-carbide hardfacing and a hardfacing covered with a layer of relatively soft material, has been investigated in the laboratory. The tests were performed on a full-scale test facility with field conditions-forces, motions, and fluids-simulated as closely as possible. It was found that the major mechanisms responsible for casing wear by tooljoints are adhesive wear, abrasive wear, and ploughing. Wear mechanisms can be classified as mild, normal, and severe. A thorough understanding of these mechanisms could lead to measures for lessening casing wear. This can be achieved with (1) tooljoints that have a sufficiently large, smooth, round, and uniform surface and (2) an appropriate mud that has a sufficiently high content of soft solid particles, such as barites, to form a layer in the tooljoint/casing contact area so that metal-to-metal contact is avoided and small, hard mud particles are embedded.

  15. Wear of nanofilled dental composites in a newly-developed in vitro testing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C.

    Purpose. In vivo wear of dental composites can lead to loss of individual tooth function and the need to replace a composite restoration. To evaluate the wear performance of new and existing dental composites, we developed a novel system for measuring in vitro wear and we used this system to analyze the mechanisms of wear of nanofilled composite materials. Methods. A modified wear testing device was designed based on the Alabama wear testing machine. The new device consists of: (1) an antagonist which is lowered to and raised from the composite specimen by weight loading, (2) a motorized stage to cause the antagonist to slide 2mm on the composite surface, and (3) pumps for applying lubricant to the specimens. Various testing parameters of the device were examined before testing, including the impulse force, the third-body medium, the lubricant and antagonist. The parameters chosen for this study were 20N at 1Hz with a 33% glycerine lubricant and stainless steel antagonist. Three nano-composites were fabricated with a BisGMA polymer matrix and 40nm SiO2 filler particles at three filler loads (25%, 50% and 65%). The mechanical properties of the composites were measured. The materials were then tested in the modified wear testing device under impact wear, sliding wear and a combination of impact and sliding wear. The worn surfaces were then analyzed with a non-contact profilometer and SEM. Results. The volumetric wear data indicated that increasing filler content beyond 25% decreased the wear resistance of the composites. Increasing filler content increased hardness and decreased toughness. SEM evaluation of the worn specimens indicated that the 25% filled materials failed by fatigue and the 50% and 65% filled materials failed by abrasive wear. Impact wear produced fretting in this device and sliding wear is more aggressive than impact wear. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study and previous studies on this topic, manufacturers are recommended to use a filler

  16. Enamel formation genes associated with dental erosive wear.

    PubMed

    Søvik, Jenny B; Vieira, Alexandre R; Tveit, A B; Mulic, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Dental erosive wear is a multifactorial condition that is greatly affected by environmental factors. So far, no study has investigated how dental erosive wear is influenced by variations in enamel formation genes. The aim of the present study was to investigate polymorphisms in genes involved in enamel formation and their influence on enamel susceptibility to dental erosion. DNA samples were collected from 795 Norwegian adolescents aged 16-18 years. Five single-nucleotide polymorphism markers were genotyped in selected candidate genes (ameloblastin, amelogenin, enamelin, tuftelin 1 and tuftelin interacting protein 11), reported to influence enamel formation. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared within two patient groups with dental erosions; all participants with dental erosion and only those with severe dental erosion (erosion extending into dentine). Overrepresentation of the G allele of the enamelin marker was seen in the erosion group compared to the unaffected group (p = 0.047). When erosion severity was considered, statistical significant difference in allele frequency was observed for amelogenin, with the C allele suggesting a protective role (p = 0.02). A suggestive overrepresentation of the TT genotype of the amelogenin marker was also seen in cases with severe erosion (p = 0.049) when compared to cases with no dentine erosion. Amelogenin was also associated with severe erosion in the recessive model; the TT genotype was significantly more frequent in the affected group than in the unaffected group (p = 0.01). The present study suggests that polymorphisms in enamel formation genes are statistically associated with an individual's susceptibility to dental erosive wear.

  17. Changes in food processing and occlusal dental wear during the early agricultural period in northwest Mexico.

    PubMed

    Watson, James T

    2008-01-01

    Crown dimensions and occlusal surface wear rate and wear plane were evaluated using paired first and second mandibular molars from a sample of 84 Early Agricultural period (1600 B.C.-A.D. 200) skeletons from northwest Mexico. Although this period represents a major shift in subsistence strategies in the Sonoran Desert, from food-foraging to agriculture, archaeological and dental pathology studies have identified this period as one of relative dietary stability. It was therefore predicted that very little variation in occlusal wear would have occurred between the early phase (San Pedro: 1600-800 B.C.) and late phase (Cienega: 800 B.C.-A.D. 200). Comparison of crown diameters identified some phenotypic differences between sexes but not between archaeological phases. Molar occlusal surfaces were then divided into four quadrants, and wear scores recorded for each quadrant. Principle axis analysis was performed between total wear scores of paired, adjacent first and second mandibular molars to assess rate and occlusal wear plane over time. The analysis demonstrated that both wear rate and wear plane increased from the early to the late phase of the Early Agricultural period. These results indicate that although diet may have indeed remained stable during this period in the Sonoran Desert increases in the rate of wear and wear plane may reflect changes in food-processing techniques. It is suggested that more intensive processing of agricultural products during the Cienega phase simultaneously softened the diet to create more tooth-contact wear and introduced more grit to cause faster and more angled wear on the molar occlusal surfaces.

  18. Wear of nanofilled dental composites at varying filler concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of nanofiller concentration on the mechanisms of wear of a dental composite. Nanofilled composites were fabricated with a bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate polymer and 40 nm SiO2 filler particles at three filler loads (25, 50, and 65 wt %). The elastic modulus, flexural strength, and hardness of the composites and the unfilled resin were measured. The materials (n = 8) were tested in the modified wear testing device at 50,000, 100,000, and 200,000 cycles with 20N force at 1 Hz. A 33% glycerine lubricant and stainless steel antagonist were used. The worn composite and antagonist surfaces were analyzed with noncontact profilometry and SEM. The volumetric wear data indicated that there are significant differences between filler concentrations and cycles (p < 0.05). A trend was noted that increasing filler content beyond 25% decreased the wear resistance of the composites. Increasing filler content increased hardness and modulus and increased flexural strength up to 50% fill. SEM evaluation of the worn specimens indicated that the resin and 25% filled materials exhibited cracking and failed by fatigue and the 50 and 65% filled materials exhibited microcutting and failed by abrasive wear. Based on the results of this study, composite manufacturers are recommended to use a filler concentration between 25 and 50% when using nanosized filler particles.

  19. Prevalence, severity and etiology of dental wear in patients with eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena; Araújo, Juliana J.; Marsicano, Juliane A.; Santos, José E.; Bastos, José R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, distribution and associated factors of dental wear among patients with eating disorders (EDs). Materials and Methods: An epidemiological cross-sectional survey was conducted by trained, calibrated examiners, using the dental wear index. The sample was composed of 30 patients with EDs (experimental group – G1) and 30 control patients without current or previous history of EDs (G2). A questionnaire was used to assess the etiological factors of dental wear. The univariate analyses using the Chi-square (χ2) test were used to compare the tooth wear prevalence between groups according to the surface and tooth (P > 0.05). Results: The dental wear was similar for both group; however, the G1 presented more moderate wear in molars when compared with G2 (P = 0.048). The majority of EDs patients related have one or more oral habits (n = 26; 86.6%) and only 13.4% (n = 4) affirmed did not have oral habits. The etiological factors of tooth wear related with dental wear were biting objects (P = 0.04) and pain in temporomandibular disorders (P = 0.03). Conclusion: The highest prevalence of dental wear was observed in the molars teeth. Differences in the extent and pattern of dental wear were found in an individual, emphasized the relevance of clinical parameter. PMID:24966749

  20. Casing wear caused by tooljoint hardfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Best, B.

    1983-10-01

    Casing wear due to new tooljoint hardfacings such as fine-mesh tungsten-carbide hardfacing and a hardfacing covered with a layer of relatively soft material have been tested in the laboratory. The tests have been performed on a full-scale test facility simulating field conditions in terms of forces, motions and fluids as closely as possible. The test equipment and procedure are described. The major casing wear mechanisms by tooljoints are given. Wear mechanisms can be classified in terms of mild, normal and severe. In this paper it is shown that proper understanding of these mechanisms could lead to measures to achieve mild casing wear. These mechanisms are illustrated with test results.

  1. Patterns of dental wear in the Lengua Indians of Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Kieser, J A; Groeneveld, H T; Preston, C B

    1985-01-01

    Wear patterns were examined on dental casts of 202 living Lengua Indians from the Chaco area of Paraguay. Consideration was given to the development of the molar helicoidal plane, age-related changes in occlusal attrition, coalescence of dentine exposures, interproximal attrition, and erupted crown height. This study lends support to Osborn's theory of the helicoidal plane development by showing that attrition enhances rather than modifies posteruption molar occlusal planes. The rate of interproximal attrition was found to slow down with the eruption and functional initiation of the third molars. Sinuous and cavo-convex interproximal contact areas that are generated with age, however, appeared to be less abrasion resistant than straight surfaces, hence leading to an increase in interproximal attrition rates with advanced age. Maximum crown height reduction occurred between the ages of 20 and 40 years in central incisors, canines, and first molars. Kruskal-Wallis tests and log linera models failed to demonstrate significant sexually dimorphic or antimeric differences in wear patterns of Lengua teeth.

  2. Dental Surface Texture Characterization Based on Erosive Tooth Wear Processes.

    PubMed

    Hara, A T; Livengood, S V; Lippert, F; Eckert, G J; Ungar, P S

    2016-05-01

    The differential diagnosis of dental wear lesions affects their clinical management. We hypothesized that surface texture parameters can differentiate simulated erosion, abrasion, and erosion-abrasion lesions on human enamel and dentin. This in vitro study comprised 2 parts (both factorial 4 × 2), with 4 lesion types (erosion, abrasion, erosion-abrasion, and sound [no lesion; control]) and 2 substrates (enamel and dentin). Flattened/polished dental specimens were used in part 1, whereas natural dental surfaces were used in part 2. Testing surfaces were evaluated in blind conditions, using average surface roughness (Sa) and the following scale-sensitive fractal analysis parameters: area-scale fractal complexity (Asfc), exact proportion length-scale anisotropy of relief (eplsar), scale of maximum complexity (Smc), and textural fill volume (Tfv). Two-way analyses of variance, followed by Fisher's protected least significant difference tests (α = 0.05), were used to evaluate the effects of lesion and substrate. Classification trees were constructed to verify the strength of potential associations of the tested parameters. In part 1,Asfc, Sa, and Tfv were able to differentiate erosion and erosion-abrasion lesions from the sound (no lesion) control in both substrates; only Asfc differentiated erosion and erosion-abrasion enamel lesions (allP< 0.05). The best association of parameters correctly classified up to 84% and 94% of the lesions on enamel and dentin, respectively. In part 2, only Asfc differentiated erosion and erosion-abrasion lesions from the sound (no lesion) control in both substrates, whereas eplsar was able to differentiate erosion from erosion-abrasion (allP< 0.05). The association of parameters correctly classified up to 81% and 91% of the lesions in enamel and dentin, respectively.Asfc, Sa, and Tfv were able to differentiate erosion and erosion-abrasion lesions, despite their complicated surface textures. The association of parameters improved the

  3. Mechanisms and causes of wear in tooth enamel: implications for hominin diets

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Peter W.; Omar, Ridwaan; Al-Fadhalah, Khaled; Almusallam, Abdulwahab S.; Henry, Amanda G.; Michael, Shaji; Thai, Lidia Arockia; Watzke, Jörg; Strait, David S.; Atkins, Anthony G.

    2013-01-01

    The wear of teeth is a major factor limiting mammalian lifespans in the wild. One method of describing worn surfaces, dental microwear texture analysis, has proved powerful for reconstructing the diets of extinct vertebrates, but has yielded unexpected results in early hominins. In particular, although australopiths exhibit derived craniodental features interpreted as adaptations for eating hard foods, most do not exhibit microwear signals indicative of this diet. However, no experiments have yet demonstrated the fundamental mechanisms and causes of this wear. Here, we report nanowear experiments where individual dust particles, phytoliths and enamel chips were slid across a flat enamel surface. Microwear features produced were influenced strongly by interacting mechanical properties and particle geometry. Quartz dust was a rigid abrasive, capable of fracturing and removing enamel pieces. By contrast, phytoliths and enamel chips deformed during sliding, forming U-shaped grooves or flat troughs in enamel, without tissue loss. Other plant tissues seem too soft to mark enamel, acting as particle transporters. We conclude that dust has overwhelming importance as a wear agent and that dietary signals preserved in dental microwear are indirect. Nanowear studies should resolve controversies over adaptive trends in mammals like enamel thickening or hypsodonty that delay functional dental loss. PMID:23303220

  4. On the wear mechanism of human dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Arsecularatne, J A; Hoffman, M

    2010-05-01

    The mechanisms and controlling factors in human enamel wear are not fully understood yet. To address this problem, we have used focused ion beam (FIB) milling and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) to investigate the processes taking place below the wear surface of enamel specimens from in vitro wear tests. These reveal the generation of subsurface cracks during wear of enamel. An analysis of published qualitative and quantitative experimental wear results for enamel as well as for ceramics shows the similarities of the wear processes taking place under similar contact conditions, despite the differences that exist between these two materials. It is shown that, for the considered conditions, fracture under elastic contact is responsible for enamel wear.

  5. Dental wear patterns in early modern humans from Skhul and Qafzeh: A response to Sarig and Tillier.

    PubMed

    Fiorenza, Luca; Kullmer, Ottmar

    2015-10-01

    The use of teeth as tools for manipulating objects and simple food-processing methods was common among prehistoric and modern hunter-gatherer human populations. Paramasticatory uses of teeth frequently produce enamel chipping and distinctive types of dental wear that can readily be related to specific tool functions. In particular, the presence of unusual occlusal wear areas (named para-facets) on maxillary teeth of prehistoric, historic and modern hunter-gatherers has been associated with cultural habits involving extensive use of teeth (Fiorenza et al., 2011; Fiorenza and Kullmer, 2013). However, Sarig and Tillier (2014) believe that this wear had been caused by pathological occlusal relationships rather than by the use of teeth as tools. In this contribution, we show how occlusal contacts are created and how it is possible to distinguish between masticatory and non-masticatory wear facets by using an innovative digital approach called Occlusal Fingerprint Analysis. Statistical results from the analysis of comparative modern samples clearly demonstrate that described para-facets in Skhul and Qafzeh could not have been produced by dental occlusal anomalies such as malocclusions and crossbites. Moreover, dental pathologies in prehistoric humans were extremely rare. Only with the adoption of the modern lifestyle between 18th and 19th centuries, did the emergence of malocclusions become significantly more common. Because more than 50% of the Skhul and Qafzeh individuals analysed in our study are characterised by this distinctive type of wear, it is highly unlikely that their para-facets occurred as a result of dental pathologies.

  6. Dental topography and molar wear in Alouatta palliata from Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Dennis, John C; Ungar, Peter S; Teaford, Mark F; Glander, Kenneth E

    2004-10-01

    Paleoprimatologists depend on relationships between form and function of teeth to reconstruct the diets of fossil species. Most of this work has been limited to studies of unworn teeth. A new approach, dental topographic analysis, allows the characterization and comparison of worn primate teeth. Variably worn museum specimens have been used to construct species-specific wear sequences so that measurements can be compared by wear stage among taxa with known differences in diet. This assumes that individuals in a species tend to wear their molar teeth in similar ways, a supposition that has yet to be tested. Here we evaluate this assumption with a longitudinal study of changes in tooth form over time in primates. Fourteen individual mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata) were captured and then recaptured after 2, 4, and 7 years when possible at Hacienda La Pacifica in Costa Rica between 1989-1999. Dental impressions were taken each time, and molar casts were produced and analyzed using dental topographic analysis. Results showed consistent decreases in crown slope and occlusal relief. In contrast, crown angularity, a measure of surface jaggedness, remained fairly constant except with extreme wear. There were no evident differences between specimens collected in different microhabitats. These results suggest that different individual mantled howling monkeys wear their teeth down in similar ways, evidently following a species-specific wear sequence. Dental topographic analysis may therefore be used to compare morphology among similarly worn individuals from different species.

  7. Frequency of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Dental Patients with Tooth Wear

    PubMed Central

    Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Martínez-Null, Cristina; Aguirre, Jose Javier; Guinea, Elena Rubio; Anitua, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To estimate the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in dental patients with tooth wear, and to assess the role of dentists in the identification of patients at risk of OSAS. Methods: Dental patients with tooth wear and treated with occlusal splint were prospectively recruited to perform sleep study. The severity of tooth wear was established by the treating dentist before patient referral to sleep disorders unit. Sleep questionnaires, anthropometric measurements, and validated respiratory polygraphy were performed. Results: All patients with dental wear were offered a sleepiness analysis. Of 31 recruited patients, 30 (77% males) participated in this study. Patients' mean age was 58.5 ± 10.7 years (range: 35–90 years) and the body mass index was 27.9 ± 3.4 kg/m2. Tooth wear was mild in 13 patients, moderate in 8 and severe in 9. The mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 32.4 ± 24.9. AHI < 5 was reported in 2 patients, AHI of 5–29 in 17, and AHI ≥ 30 in 11. A statistically significant association was found between AHI severity and tooth wear severity (Spearman R = 0.505; p = 0.004). Conclusions: Tooth wear could be a tool to identify those patients at risk of having OSAS. This highlights the importance of dental professionals to identify and refer patients with OSAS. Citation: Durán-Cantolla J, Alkhraisat MH, Martínez-Null C, Aguirre JJ, Guinea ER, Anitua E. Frequency of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in dental patients with tooth wear. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(4):445–450. PMID:25665693

  8. Ceramic-like wear behaviour of human dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Arsecularatne, J A; Hoffman, M

    2012-04-01

    This paper reports a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of subsurfaces of enamel specimens following in vitro reciprocating wear tests with an enamel cusp sliding on a flat enamel specimen under hydrated conditions. The obtained results show that crack formation occurred in the wear scar subsurface. The path followed by these cracks seems to be dictated either by the histological structure of enamel or by the contact stress field. Moreover, the analysis of a set of enamel wear results obtained from the literature and application of fracture-based models, originally developed for ceramics, correlate well, confirming the similar wear processes taking place in these materials. This analysis also reveals a marked influence of coefficient of friction on the enamel wear rate: for a higher coefficient of friction value, enamel wear can be severe even under forces generated during normal operation of teeth.

  9. [Dental materials can cause oral allergic reactions].

    PubMed

    Røn Larsen, Kristine; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Arenholt-Bindslev, Dorthe; Reibel, Jesper; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge

    2013-06-17

    A large number of materials used in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of dental, periodontal and oral mucosal diseases may induce acute or chronic reactions in the oral cavity including allergic reactions. Clinically, it may be difficult to discriminate oral mucosal changes caused by dental materials from changes related to oral mucosal diseases. Diagnosis and management of allergic reactions in the oral mucosa may therefore be a major challenge. The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to commonly used dental materials, which can trigger typical, but also atypical, symptoms and clinical signs of an allergic reaction.

  10. Two-body wear of dental porcelain and substructure oxide ceramics.

    PubMed

    Rosentritt, Martin; Preis, Verena; Behr, Michael; Hahnel, Sebastian; Handel, Gerhard; Kolbeck, Carola

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the two-body wear of different ceramics. Two-body wear tests were performed in a chewing simulator with steatite and enamel antagonists, respectively. Specimens were loaded in a pin-on-block design with a vertical load of 50 N for 1.2 × 10(5) cycles; (f = 1.6 Hz; lateral movement, 1 mm; mouth opening: 2 mm). Human enamel was used as a reference. Three zirconia ceramics, three veneering porcelains, two glass-infiltrated and one lithium disilicate ceramic were investigated. Veneering and lithium disilicate ceramics were glazed before testing. Surface roughness Ra (SP6, Perthen-Feinprüf, G) and wear depth were determined using a 3D scanner (Laserscan 3D, Willytec, G). SEM (Quanta FEG 400, FEI, USA) pictures of the worn specimens and antagonists were made for evaluating wear performance. Veneering porcelain provided wear traces between 71.2 and 124.1 μm (enamel antagonist) and 117.4 and 274.1 μm (steatite). Wear of the steatite antagonists varied between 0.618 and 2.85 mm². No wear was found for zirconia and glass-infiltrated substructure ceramics. Also, no wear was found for the corresponding antagonists. Wear of specimens and antagonists was strongly material dependent. No visible wear was found on zirconia and glass-infiltrated ceramics. Porcelain and lithium disilicate ceramic showed a comparable or lower wear than the enamel reference. Antagonist wear was found to be lower when specimens were made of substructure oxide ceramics instead of veneering porcelain. From the point of wear testing, zirconia may be used for the fabrication of fixed dental prosthesis without veneering.

  11. Wearing complete dental prostheses - Effects on perioral morphology

    PubMed Central

    Eberl, Philipp; Thompson, Geoffrey A.; Güntsch, Arndt; Peisker, Andre; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan; Gomez-Dammeier, Marta; Djedovic, Gabriel; Rieger, Ulrich M.; Beuer, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background To adequately perform rehabilitation of edentulous patients by a complete removable dental prosthesis (CRDP) is from basic interest to dentists to understand the morphologic changes caused by re-establishment of a physiologic jaw relationship. Anthropometric analyses of standardized frontal view and profile photographs may help elucidate such changes. Material and Methods Photographs of 31 edentulous patients were compared in relaxed lip closure and after insertion of a CRDP in stable occlusion. 2232 anthropometric distances were raised. Eighteen anthropometric indices reflecting the perioral morphology and its integration in the vertical facial harmony were investigated. Results The intercanthal – mouth width index (p<.001), medial - lateral cutaneous upper lip height index (p=.007), lower vermilion contour index (p=.022), vermilion - total upper lip height index (p=.018), cutaneous - total upper lip height index (p=.023), upper lip - nose height index (p=.001), nose - upper face height index (p=.002), chin - mandible height index (p=.013), upper lip - mandible height index (p=.045), nose - lower face height index (p=.018), and nose - face height index (p=.029) showed significant pre- to post-treatment changes. Conclusions The investigated anthropometric indices presented reproducible results related to an increase in occlusal vertical dimension. Their application may be helpful in assessment, planning, and explanation of morphologic effects of CRDPs on the perioral and overall facial morphology, which may helps to improve the aesthetic outcome. Key words:Dentures, removable dentures, anthropometry, perioral morphology. PMID:27031069

  12. Tooth wear, Neanderthal facial morphology and the anterior dental loading hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Clement, Anna F; Hillson, Simon W; Aiello, Leslie C

    2012-03-01

    The Anterior Dental Loading Hypothesis states that the unique Neanderthal facial and dental anatomy was an adaptive response to the regular application of heavy forces resulting from both the masticatory and cultural use of the anterior teeth. Heavy anterior tooth wear frequently observed in Neanderthal specimens is cited as a main source of evidence for heavy forces being applied to these teeth. From this, it might be predicted that the wear shown on the anterior teeth of Neanderthals would greatly exceed that of the posterior teeth and that this differential would be greater than in other hominins with different facial morphologies. In this paper, a new method of examining tooth wear patterns is used to test these predictions in a large assemblage of Late Pleistocene hominins and a group of recent hunter-gatherers from Igloolik, Canada. The results show that all Late Pleistocene hominins, including Neanderthals, had heavily worn anterior teeth relative to their posterior teeth but, contrary to expectations, this was more pronounced in the modern humans than in the Neanderthals. The Igloolik Inuit showed heavier anterior tooth wear relative to their posterior teeth than any Late Pleistocene hominins. There was, however, a characteristic Neanderthal pattern in which wear was more evenly spread between anterior teeth than in modern humans. Overall, the evidence presented here suggests that all Late Pleistocene hominins habitually applied heavy forces between their anterior teeth and that Neanderthals were not exceptional in this regard. These results therefore does not support the Anterior Dental Loading Hypothesis.

  13. Hardness and modulus of elasticity of primary and permanent teeth after wear against different dental materials

    PubMed Central

    Galo, Rodrigo; Contente, Marta Maria Martins Giamatei; Galafassi, Daniel; Borsatto, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the Young's modulus and the hardness of deciduous and permanent teeth following wear challenges using different dental materials. Materials and Methods: Wear challenges were performed against four dental materials: A resin-based fissure sealant (Fluoroshield®), a glass ionomer based fissure sealant (Vitremer®), and two microhybrid composite resins (Filtek Z250 and P90®). Using the pin-on-plate design, a deciduous or a permanent tooth was made into a pin (4 mm × 4 mm × 2 mm) working at a 3 N vertical load, 1 Hz frequency, and 900 cycles (15 min) with Fusayama artificial saliva as a lubricant. Before and after the tribological tests, the hardness and elasticity modulus of the tooth samples were measured by creating a nanoindentation at load forces up to 50 mN and 150 mN. All of the results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and post-hoc Duncan's tests (P < 0.05). Results: No difference in hardness was encountered between deciduous and permanent teeth (P < 0.05) or modulus of elasticity (P < 0.05) before or after the wear challenges for all of the dental materials tested. Conclusions: Wear challenges against the studied dental materials did not alter the properties of permanent or deciduous teeth after the application of a 3 N load. PMID:26929700

  14. A comparative evaluation of wear of enamel caused by ceramics with different fusion temperatures.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Meenakshi; Jain, Deshraj

    2013-12-01

    Dental ceramics are the most used esthetic fixed Prosthodontic restorative material today. However, dentists remain suspicious about their potential abrasivity. Lower-fusing ceramic materials developed, are claimed to be wear friendly. This study was conducted to compare the wear of enamel of extracted teeth against one conventionally used ceramic VMK-95 (fusing temperature 930 °C) and two new lower-fusing ceramics-Omega 900 and Finesse with fusing temperatures 900 and 760 °C respectively, used for metal-ceramic restorations. Metal disks were prepared from ceramic alloy and divided into three groups of 10 disks each on which VMK-95, Omega 900 and Finesse ceramics were applied respectively. Ceramic disks and tooth specimen were mounted on custom-made wear simulator and subjected to predefined masticatory test. Each tooth specimen was profiled by laser triangulation sensor before and after masticatory test. Difference in height was calculated. The results showed that mean loss of height of tooth was least against Finesse (0.3431 + 0.0177 mm) followed by Omega 900 (0.4076 + 0.0135 mm) and VMK-95 (0.6177 + 0.014 mm). Statistical analysis revealed statistically significant difference between VMK-95 & Omega 900 and VMK-95 & Finesse. The difference in loss of height of tooth against Finesse & Omega 900 is statistically insignificant (P < 0.001). The results of this study indicate that lower-fusing dental ceramics cause less wear of opposing enamel.

  15. Effect of Occlusal Splints on the Temporomandibular Disorders, Dental Wear and Anxiety of Bruxist Children

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Claudia C.; Medina, Isabel; Patiño, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of occlusal splints to reduce the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), dental wear and anxiety in a group of bruxist children. Methods: All of the subjects were 3 to 6 years old, had complete primary dentition, class I occlusion and were classified as bruxist according to the minimal criteria of the ICSD for bruxism. For each child, anxiety was evaluated with the Conners’ Parent Rating Scales (CPRS). The TMD were evaluated using the RDC/TMD. The dental wear was processed in digital format with Mat Lab® and Lab view® software to determine its size and form. The children were randomized into an experimental (n=19) and a control (n=17) group. The children in the experimental group used rigid bite plates for a two-year period, until mixed dentition. Afterwards, the CPRS and the RDC/TMD were applied again and dental casts were taken. Comparisons of the variables regarding dental wear, signs and symptoms of TMD and anxiety before and after treatment among the groups were analyzed using the t-test, the Wilcoxon rank sum test and the Mann-Whitney test. Results: The subjects in the experimental group showed no statistically significant difference regarding anxiety levels and dental wear when compared with the control group. The signs and symptoms of TMD were not reduced except for the deviation in mouth opening. Conclusions: The use of rigid occlusal bite plates was not efficient in reducing the signs of bruxism as a whole but did reduce the deviation in mouth opening. PMID:21912500

  16. A new application of dental wear analyses: estimation of duration of hominid occupations in archaeological localities.

    PubMed

    Rivals, Florent; Schulz, Ellen; Kaiser, Thomas M

    2009-04-01

    Characterization of settlement patterns is one of the core concepts in archeological research. The duration of an occupation is usually estimated through zooarchaeology (e.g., density of remains, cementochronology) and is limited by taphonomic processes and sample size. We propose a new application of dental wear methods for estimating the relative duration of hominid settlements in Paleolithic sites. Dental microwear is known to be sensitive to seasonal changes in diet. In this new application we use microwear scratch counts to estimate the variation in the dietary signal of various ungulate species. We propose that this variation is correlated to the duration of site occupation. Each season presents a limited and different set of food resources available in the environment. If animals are sampled only during a specific season (i.e., during a short term occupation) then they would be expected to have a dental wear signal with little variation. On the other hand, a greater diversity of food is available across different seasons. Therefore, if game animals are hunted through various seasons during long occupation periods, then they would be expected to have more variable dental wear. The application of this technique to the Middle Paleolithic site of Arago Cave (France), where various types of occupations occurred, supports this hypothesis. When combined with multidisciplinary studies of archaeological localities (seasonality in particular), this new application of dental wear analysis presents valuable information about hominid settlements and behavior. We contextualize our data with results from lithic and zooarchaeological analyses from Arago. These results reveal the presence of both high and low mobility groups of Homo heidelbergensis throughout the sequence of the Arago Cave.

  17. Advancements in all-ceramics for dental restorations and their effect on the wear of opposing dentition

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Haroon; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Misbahuddin, Syed; Kazmi, Murtaza Raza; Qureshi, Sameer; Uddin, Muhammad Zuhaib

    2016-01-01

    Tooth wear is a process that is usually a result of tooth to tooth and/or tooth and restoration contact. The process of wear essentially becomes accelerated by the introduction of restorations inside the oral cavity, especially in case of opposing ceramic restorations. The newest materials have vastly contributed toward the interest in esthetic dental restorations and have been extensively studied in laboratories. However, despite the recent technological advancements, there has not been a valid in vivo method of evaluation involving clinical wear caused due to ceramics upon restored teeth and natural dentition. The aim of this paper is to review the latest advancements in all-ceramic materials, and their effect on the wear of opposing dentition. The descriptive review has been written after a thorough MEDLINE/PubMed search by the authors. It is imperative that clinicians are aware of recent advancements and that they should always consider the type of ceramic restorative materials used to maintain a stable occlusal relation. The ceramic restorations should be adequately finished and polished after the chair-side adjustment process of occlusal surfaces. PMID:28042280

  18. Towards using spectral domain optical coherence tomography for dental wear monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mǎrcǎuteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topalǎ, Florin I.; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that fast spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging systems have the potential to monitor the evolution of pathological dental wear. On 10 caries free teeth, four levels of artificially defects similar to those observed in the clinic were created. After every level of induced defect, OCT scanning was performed. B-scans were acquired and 3D reconstructions were generated.

  19. Enamel wear caused by three different restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J D; Goldstein, G R; Georgescu, M

    1995-12-01

    The ideal restorative material should cause minimal wear of opposing enamel. This study compared the effects of gold alloy, glazed porcelain, and a laboratory-processed composite on opposing enamel. Ten samples of a type III gold alloy, a porcelain, and a visible-light, heat, and vacuum-processed composite were abraded against cusps of extracted molars for 10,000 cycles on an abrading machine. Pretest and posttest profilometric measurements of the restorative materials demonstrated no statistical difference. Pretest and posttest tracings of the cusps were made on an optical comparator to determine loss of vertical height and surface area. The porcelain caused significantly more loss of vertical height and surface area than the gold alloy or the composite, which were similar.

  20. On dental wear, dental work, and oral health in the type specimen (LB1) of Homo floresiensis.

    PubMed

    Jungers, William L; Kaifu, Yousuke

    2011-06-01

    The claim that the lower left first mandibular molar of LB1, the type specimen of Homo floresiensis, displays endodontic work, and a filling is assessed by digital radiography and micro-CT scanning. The M(1) tooth crown is heavily worn and exhibits extensive dentine exposure that is stained white, but there is no trace of endodontic treatment or a dental filling in this Indonesian fossil dated to 17.1-19.0 kya. Dental calculus (commonly observed in foragers) is present on the teeth of LB1, but there are no observable caries. The pattern of dental attrition in the mandibles of both LB1/2 and LB6/1 (moderate to extensive flat wear across the entire arch) is consistent with that seen in Plio-Pleistocene Homo fossils and in modern hunter-gatherers, and is not typical of most agriculturalists. We conclude that the dental-work and farming hypotheses are falsified and therefore irrelevant to the debate over the taxonomy and phylogeny of H. floresiensis.

  1. Tooth wear and dental pathology at the advent of agriculture: new evidence from the Levant.

    PubMed

    Eshed, Vered; Gopher, Avi; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2006-06-01

    Differences in patterns of diet and subsistence through the analysis of dental pathology and tooth wear were studied in skeletal populations of Natufian hunter-gatherers (10,500-8300 BC) and Neolithic populations (8300-5500 BC, noncalibrated) from the southern Levant. 1,160 Natufians and 804 Neolithic teeth were examined for rate of attrition, caries, antemortem tooth loss, calculus, periapical lesions, and periodontal processes. While the Natufian people manifest a higher rate of dental attrition and periodontal disease (36.4% vs. 19%), Neolithic people show a higher rate of calculus. Both populations manifested low and similar rates of caries (6.4% in the Natufian vs. 6.7% in the Neolithic), periapical lesions (not over 1.5%), and antemortem tooth loss (3.7% vs. 4.5%, respectively). Molar wear pattern in the Neolithic is different than in the Natufian. The current study shows that the dental picture obtained from the two populations is multifactorial in nature, and not exclusively of dietary origin, i.e., the higher rate and unique pattern of attrition seen in the Natufian could result from a greater consumption of fibrous plants, the use of pestles and mortars (which introduce large quantities of stone-dust to the food), and/or the use of teeth as a "third hand." The two major conclusions of this study are: 1) The transition from hunting and gathering to a food-producing economy in the Levant did not promote changes in dental health, as previously believed. This generally indicates that the Natufians and Neolithic people of the Levant may have differed in their ecosystem management (i.e., gathering vs. growing grains), but not in the type of food consumed. 2) Changes in food-preparation techniques and nondietary usage of the teeth explain much of the variation in tooth condition in populations before and after the agricultural revolution.

  2. Measurement of the rate of wear of dental composite resins by a /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Moores, G.E.; Glentworth, P.; Harrison, A.

    1983-09-01

    The wear rate of restorative dental composite resins is an important parameter in the assessment of their in vivo performance. The two more widely used methods of quantifying wear are measuring the dimensional change and measuring the change in the mass of the specimen. The former method is complicated by uneven wear of specimens and presents difficulties with samples of irregular shape, and the latter method involves measurements of changes in mass as small as tens of micrograms with specimens of sizes similar to those encountered clinically. A /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge has been designed and constructed to enable the wear rate of small specimens of dental composite resins to be measured. The /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge enables indirect measurements of changes in mass to be made and overcomes some of the difficulties inherent in the direct measurement of mass and length. Applications of the /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge to the measurement of wear rates are given for restorative dental resins having a range of inorganic filler contents and types. The results show that the /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge is capable of measuring the rate of wear to a degree of precision similar to that of micrometer-derived measurements.

  3. A comparative study of sliding wear of nonmetallic dental restorative materials with emphasis on micromechanical wear mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dupriez, Nataliya Deyneka; von Koeckritz, Ann-Kristin; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the in vitro tribological behavior of modern nonmetallic restorative materials. Specimen prepared of IPS e.max Press lithium disilicate glass ceramic, IPS Empress Esthetic leucite-reinforced glass ceramic, Everest ZS Blanks yttria-stabilized zirconia and Lava Ultimate composite were subjected to wear using a wear machine designed to simulate occlusal loads. The wear of the investigated materials and antagonists were evaluated by a three-dimensional surface scanner. The quantitative wear test results were used to compare and rank the materials. Specimens were divided into two groups with steatite and alumina antagonists. For each antagonist material an analysis of variance was applied. As a post hoc test of the significant differences, Tukey's honest significant difference test was used. With steatite antagonist: wear of zirconia < wear of leucite-reinforced ceramic < wear of lithium disilicate ceramic < wear of Lava Ultimate composite. No significant wear difference was found for steatite antagonist. The wear of IPS e.max Press and Lava Ultimate against hard alumina was found to be twice lower as compared to their wear when opposing to steatite. The differences were associated with materials mechanical properties (hardness and fracture toughness) and with materials microstructure. Wear mechanisms are discussed.

  4. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Eugênia; Álvares, Pâmella; Silva, Luciano; Silva, Leorik; Caubi, Antônio; Silveira, Marcia; Sobral, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections. PMID:27375905

  5. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction.

    PubMed

    Arruda, José Alcides; Figueiredo, Eugênia; Álvares, Pâmella; Silva, Luciano; Silva, Leorik; Caubi, Antônio; Silveira, Marcia; Sobral, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections.

  6. Division of labor by sex and age in Neandertals: an approach through the study of activity-related dental wear.

    PubMed

    Estalrrich, Almudena; Rosas, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of activity-related dental wear patterns in prehistoric anatomically modern humans and modern hunter-gatherers has shown sex differences attributable to a gendered division of labor. Neandertals are known to have extensive anterior dental wear related to the use of their front teeth as a tool. In this study we analyze the i) cultural striations (scratches on the labial surface of the anterior teeth with a cut-mark morphology), and ii) dental chipping (ante-mortem microfracture involving enamel or both enamel and dentine) in 19 Neandertal individuals from the l'Hortus (France), Spy (Belgium), and El Sidrón (Spain) sites, and compare the characteristics of those traits with the age and sex estimation for the individuals and among samples. The study reveals that all individuals have cultural striations, but those detected on the adult females are longer than the striations found in adult males. Regarding the distribution of dental chipping, the prevalence of this trait is higher in the maxillary dentition of males whereas females have the majority of dental chipping on their mandibular teeth. The differences detected on the overall activity-related dental wear pattern denote a difference or a division of labor by age and sex in Neandertals while using the mouth as a third hand, i.e., in activities other than the provisioning of food, and provide new evidence for the lifestyle of this Pleistocene fossil human species.

  7. Wear and fatigue behavior of nano-structured dental resin composites.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia P; Ferracane, Jack L; Ferracane, Lucas L

    2006-07-01

    Theoretically, nano-structured dental resin composites are purported to have increased wear and fatigue resistance compared with microfill composites and may favor the achievement of restoratives with better long-term performance. This study sought to assess the behavior of nano-structured composites resulting from either abrasion and fatigue loading. Ten specimens (12 x 5 x 2.5 mm) were prepared from each of five composites: Ceram-X mono, Filtek Supreme, Grandio, Premise, and Heliomolar (serving as the microfill control). A surface profile was recorded using a three-dimensional profiling system, and the specimens were subjected to 10(5) cycles of three-body abrasion in the new OHSU oral wear simulator. A second profile was generated and the before and after profiles were fit and analyzed. The volume loss and maximum depth of the wear facet on each specimen were calculated. Another 30 specimens (25 x 2 x 2 mm) were tested for flexural fatigue limit (FFL) in four-point bending via the staircase method. The test was carried out until 10(4) cycles were completed or until fracturing the specimen. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test demonstrated greater volumetric loss for Grandio and Ceram-X than that observed for the remaining composites. Kruskal-Wallis and the least significant difference test ascertained that Heliomolar, Grandio, and Supreme showed significantly higher FFL than Ceram-X and Premise. In terms of wear and fatigue resistance, nano-structured composites may perform either similarly or comparatively worse than a microfilled composite.

  8. A study on the in-vitro wear of the natural tooth structure by opposing zirconia or dental porcelain

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yu-Seok; Lee, Jae-Whang; Choi, Yeon-Jo; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Shin, Sang-Wan

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was conducted to evaluate clinical validity of a zirconia full-coverage crown by comparing zirconia's wear capacity over antagonistic teeth with that of feldspathic dental porcelain. MATERIALS AND METHODS The subject groups were divided into three groups: the polished feldspathic dental porcelain group (Group 1), the polished zirconia group (Group 2), and the polished zirconia with glazing group (Group 3). Twenty specimens were prepared from each group. Each procedure such as plasticity, condensation, and glazing was conducted according to the manufacturer's manual. A wear test was conducted with 240,000 chewing cycles using a dual-axis chewing simulator. The degree of wear of the antagonistic teeth was calculated by measuring the volume loss using a three-dimensional profiling system and ANSUR 3D software. The statistical significance of the measured degree of wear was tested with a significant level of 5% using one-way ANOVA and the Tukey test. RESULTS The degrees of wear of the antagonistic teeth were 0.119 ± 0.059 mm3 in Group 1, 0.078 ± 0.063 mm3 in Group 3, and 0.031 ± 0.033 mm3 in Group 2. Statistical significance was found between Group 1 and Groups 2 and between Group 2 and 3, whereas no statistical significance was found between Group 1 and Group 3. CONCLUSION Despite the limitations of this study on the evaluation of antagonistic teeth wear, the degree of antagonistic tooth wear was less in zirconia than feldspathic dental porcelain, representing that the zirconia may be more beneficial in terms of antagonistic tooth wear. PMID:21165280

  9. Human tooth wear in the past and the present: tribological mechanisms, scoring systems, dental and skeletal compensations.

    PubMed

    d'Incau, Emmanuel; Couture, Christine; Maureille, Bruno

    2012-03-01

    This review of human tooth wear describes the fundamental mechanisms underlying this process. Using the tribological approach they can be systematised and this in turn aids our understanding of them. In past populations wear was ubiquitous, intense, abrasive and physiological as it was related to their food and their technologies. In these populations, it affected the proximal surfaces, and the occlusal surfaces which modified the occlusal plane profoundly. To categorise this wear many different classification systems are used, from which we can determine diet, cultural changes and the age at death of individuals. They also illustrate the evolution of certain functional dental and skeletal compensations in the masticatory apparatus such as continuous dental eruption, mesial drift of the arches and incisor lingual tipping which can then be monitored. These physiological adaptations related mainly to function and ontogenesis can also be found in present-day populations where wear is moderate, although they are much less obtrusive. Apart from certain pathological cases associated with a specific parafunction, iatrogenic tooth brushing or an eating disorder and encouraged by an acid environment, they are the result of a physiological process that should not be halted. To ensure this, it is essential to prevent lesions related to tooth wear, to detect them early and establish a reliable diagnosis. Types of tooth wear that had remained unchanged since the origin of humanity have undergone profound changes in a very short space of time. Today's tribochemical pathological model has replaced the abrasive physiological model of the past.

  10. Tooth wear and dental pathology of the Bronze-Iron Age people in Xinjiang, Northwest China: Implications for their diet and lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Zhang, Q C; Wu, X J; Zhu, H

    2010-04-01

    Tooth wear and dental pathology related to diet and lifestyle were investigated in the human dental remains unearthed from three archaeological sites of Bronze Age and Iron Age in Xinjiang of northwest China, and in comparative samples from two Neolithic sites in Henan and Shanxi in central China along the Yellow River. Our results indicate that the average tooth wear on most tooth types in the three Xinjiang sites was close to those of the Neolithic samples from central China. The variation within the Xinjiang samples was also explored. Some special wear patterns such as severe wear on the first molar and relatively heavy wear of anterior teeth were observed on the specimens from the Xinjiang sites. Obvious differences in caries and antemortem tooth loss were found between Xinjiang and comparative samples with higher frequencies of caries observed in samples from central China and higher antemortem tooth loss in samples from the Xinjiang sites. Strongly developed exostoses (tori) were also identified on mandibles and maxillae of the specimens from Xinjiang. The authors believe that the differences in tooth wear and dental pathology between Xinjiang and central China were caused by differences in diet and lifestyle. Food of a harder texture was consumed by the people who lived in Xinjiang than by the people in Henan and Shanxi of central China. The higher occurrence of heavily worn anterior teeth and some other special wear patterns, antemortem tooth loss and presence of exostoses on jaw bones in Xinjiang suggest that the people in Xinjiang lived in a relatively harsh environment, frequently gnawing hard objects, or using teeth as some kind of tools. All these activities put masticatory organs under a heavy load. The differences in caries frequencies between the frontier and central areas of China indicate that food richer in carbohydrates was consumed by the people in the central areas. It is proposed that about 3000-2000 years BP in many areas of frontier

  11. Enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns after 6 months of clinical use.

    PubMed

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Rammelsberg, P; Schmitter, M

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia crowns were placed in 20 patients requiring full molar crowns. For measurement of wear, impressions of both jaws were made at baseline after crown cementation and at 6-month follow-up. Mean and maximum wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists and of the two contralateral natural antagonists were measured by the use of plaster replicas and 3D laser scanning methods. Wear differences were investigated by the use of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and by linear regression analysis. Mean vertical loss (maximum vertical loss in parentheses) was 10 (43) μm for the zirconia crowns, 33 (112) μm for the opposing enamel, 10 (58) μm for the contralateral teeth and 10 (46) μm for the contralateral antagonists. Both mean and maximum enamel wear were significantly different between the antagonists of the zirconia crowns and the contralateral antagonists. Gender and activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were identified as possible confounders which significantly affected wear. Under clinical conditions, monolithic zirconia crowns seem to be associated with more wear of opposed enamel than are natural teeth. With regard to wear behaviour, clinical application of monolithic zirconia crowns is justifiable because the amount of antagonistic enamel wear after 6 months is comparable with, or even lower than, that caused by other ceramic materials in previous studies.

  12. Wear pattern, dental function, and jaw mechanism in the Late Cretaceous ankylosaur Hungarosaurus.

    PubMed

    Osi, Attila; Barrett, Paul M; Földes, Tamás; Tokai, Richárd

    2014-07-01

    Feeding in thyreophoran dinosaurs is poorly understood. Although the group existed for over 130 million years, only the Early Jurassic basal thyreophoran Scelidosaurus harrisonii and the Late Cretaceous ankylosaurid Euoplocephalus tutus have been studied from this perspective in detail. In contrast to the earlier, conservative hypothesis of a simple "orthal pulping" feeding mode with no or limited tooth-tooth contact, recent studies have demonstrated precise dental occlusion with differing jaw mechanisms in these two species. Here, we describe the first detailed study of feeding related characters in a nodosaurid ankylosaur, Hungarosaurus tormai, from the Late Cretaceous of Hungary. Dental wear patterns comprising small, apical, and low-angled facets on the maxillary and steep, extended, and bowl-like facets on the dentary teeth reveal sophisticated tooth-tooth contact in this basal nodosaurid. The presence of two different scratch generations (vertical and low-angled) on the dentary teeth unambiguously demonstrate a multiphasic powerstroke, which is further supported by the morphology of the quadrate-articular and mandibular symphyseal joints and by the architecture of the reconstructed jaw adductors. Chewing started with an initial slicing phase associated with orthal movement that was followed by a retractive powerstroke with significant occlusal contact. Because of the curved tooth rows, these movements were probably facilitated by some mediolateral translation and/or axial rotation of the mandibles to produce precise shearing along the whole tooth row. These results demonstrate that complex jaw mechanisms and dental occlusion were more widespread among thyreophorans than thought previously and that palinal movement was present in at least two ankylosaurian lineages.

  13. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Infection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chi-Woong; Yoon, Hyun-Joong; Jung, Da-Woon; Lee, Sang-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is defined as rapidly progressive necrosis of subcutaneous fat and fascia. Although NF of the face is rare, its mortality rate is nearly 30%. It usually originates from dental infection and can lead to involvement of the neck, mediastinum, and chest wall. Complications resulting from pre-existing systemic diseases can increase the mortality rate. Known complication factors for NF include diabetes, malnutrition, advanced age, peripheral vascular disease, renal failure, and obesity. Here, we report a case of NF originating from dental infection in an 88-year-old woman already diagnosed with hypertension, thoracic aortic aneurysm, and renal diseases. Such conditions limited adequate surgical and antibiotic treatment. However, interdisciplinary treatment involving multiple departments was implemented with good results. PMID:27489813

  14. Dust accumulation in the canopy: a potential cause of dental microwear in primates.

    PubMed

    Ungar, P S; Teaford, M F; Glander, K E; Pastor, R F

    1995-06-01

    Dental microwear researchers consider exogenous grit or dust to be an important cause of microscopic wear on primate teeth. No study to date has examined the accumulation of such abrasives on foods eaten by primates in the forest. This investigation introduces a method to collect dust at various heights in the canopy. Results from dust collection studies conducted at the primate research stations at Ketambe in Indonesia, and Hacienda La Pacifica in Costa Rica indicate that 1) grit collects throughout the canopy in both open country and tropical rain forest environments; and 2) the sizes and concentrations of dust particles accumulated over a fixed period of time differ depending on site location and season of investigation. These results may hold important implications for the interpretation of microwear on primate teeth.

  15. Mechanical wear of pacemaker lead insulation. A cause of loss of pacing.

    PubMed

    Kruse, I M; Mark, J; Rydén, L

    1980-03-01

    A pacemaker-treated patient is described in whom lead insulation defect caused sudden loss of capture. The defect was caused by mechanical wear of the posterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve and resulted in shunting of the pulse generator with a current drain exceeding the capacity of the pacemaker. In three further cases a similar explanation to sudden loss of pacing was highly suspected.

  16. Opportunistic Feeding Strategy for the Earliest Old World Hypsodont Equids: Evidence from Stable Isotope and Dental Wear Proxies

    PubMed Central

    Tütken, Thomas; Kaiser, Thomas M.; Vennemann, Torsten; Merceron, Gildas

    2013-01-01

    Background The equid Hippotherium primigenium, with moderately hypsodont cheek teeth, rapidly dispersed through Eurasia in the early late Miocene. This dispersal of hipparions into the Old World represents a major faunal event during the Neogene. The reasons for this fast dispersal of H. primigenium within Europe are still unclear. Based on its hypsodonty, a high specialization in grazing is assumed although the feeding ecology of the earliest European hipparionines within a pure C3 plant ecosystem remains to be investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings A multi-proxy approach, combining carbon and oxygen isotopes from enamel as well as dental meso- and microwear analyses of cheek teeth, was used to characterize the diet of the earliest European H. primigenium populations from four early Late Miocene localities in Germany (Eppelsheim, Höwenegg), Switzerland (Charmoille), and France (Soblay). Enamel δ13C values indicate a pure C3 plant diet with small (<1.4‰) seasonal variations for all four H. primigenium populations. Dental wear and carbon isotope compositions are compatible with dietary differences. Except for the Höwenegg hipparionines, dental microwear data indicate a browse-dominated diet. By contrast, the tooth mesowear patterns of all populations range from low to high abrasion suggesting a wide spectrum of food resources. Conclusions/Significance Combined dental wear and stable isotope analysis enables refined palaeodietary reconstructions in C3 ecosystems. Different H. primigenium populations in Europe had a large spectrum of feeding habits with a high browsing component. The combination of specialized phenotypes such as hypsodont cheek teeth with a wide spectrum of diet illustrates a new example of the Liem’s paradox. This dietary flexibility associated with the capability to exploit abrasive food such as grasses probably contributed to the rapid dispersal of hipparionines from North America into Eurasia and the fast replacement of the brachydont

  17. A silver staining technique for investigating wear of restorative dental composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.; Cobb, E.N.

    1981-05-01

    A silver staining technique was developed to demonstrate microdefects in dental restorative composites. Fine silver particles were preferentially introduced into the damaged region to provide optical contrast between the damaged and the undamaged regions. The amount of silver deposition determined with an electron probe microanalyzer, provided an indication of the extent of damage within the dental composites. Examples to demonstrate this technique were given with one clinically worn dental composite restoration and one in vitro worn composite sample.

  18. Wear of primary teeth caused by opposed all-ceramic or stainless steel crowns

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Ik-Hyun; Noh, Tae-Hwan; Ju, Sung-Won; Lee, Tae-Kyoung; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Tae-Sung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of full-coverage all-ceramic zirconia, lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, leucite glass-ceramic, or stainless steel crowns on antagonistic primary tooth wear. MATERIALS AND METHODS There were four study groups: the stainless steel (Steel) group, the leucite glass-ceramic (Leucite) group, the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (Lithium) group, and the monolithic zirconia (Zirconia) group. Ten flat crown specimens were prepared per group; opposing teeth were prepared using primary canines. A wear test was conducted over 100,000 chewing cycles using a dual-axis chewing simulator and a 50 N masticating force, and wear losses of antagonistic teeth and restorative materials were calculated using a three-dimensional profiling system and an electronic scale, respectively. Statistical significance was determined using One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P<.05). RESULTS The Leucite group (2.670±1.471 mm3) showed the greatest amount of antagonist tooth wear, followed by in decreasing order by the Lithium (2.042±0.696 mm3), Zirconia (1.426±0.477 mm3), and Steel groups (0.397±0.192 mm3). Mean volume losses in the Leucite and Lithium groups were significantly greater than in the Steel group (P<.05). No significant difference was observed between mean volume losses in the Zirconia and Steel groups (P>.05). CONCLUSION Leucite glass-ceramic and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic cause more primary tooth wear than stainless steel or zirconia. PMID:26949487

  19. Variation in dental wear and tooth loss among known-aged, older ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta): a comparison between wild and captive individuals.

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L; Gould, Lisa; Sussman, Robert W; Villers, Lynne M; Lent, Cheryl

    2010-11-01

    Tooth wear is generally an age-related phenomenon, often assumed to occur at similar rates within populations of primates and other mammals, and has been suggested as a correlate of reduced offspring survival among wild lemurs. Few long-term wild studies have combined detailed study of primate behavior and ecology with dental analyses. Here, we present data on dental wear and tooth loss in older (>10 years old) wild and captive ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta). Among older ring-tailed lemurs at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve (BMSR), Madagascar (n=6), the percentage of severe dental wear and tooth loss ranges from 6 to 50%. Among these six individuals, the oldest (19 years old) exhibits the second lowest frequency of tooth loss (14%). The majority of captive lemurs at the Indianapolis Zoo (n=7) are older than the oldest BMSR lemur, yet display significantly less overall tooth wear for 19 of 36 tooth positions, with only two individuals exhibiting antemortem tooth loss. Among the captive lemurs, only one lemur (a nearly 29 year old male) has lost more than one tooth. This individual is only missing anterior teeth, in contrast to lemurs at BMSR, where the majority of lost teeth are postcanine teeth associated with processing specific fallback foods. Postcanine teeth also show significantly more overall wear at BMSR than in the captive sample. At BMSR, degree of severe wear and tooth loss varies in same aged, older individuals, likely reflecting differences in microhabitat, and thus the availability and use of different foods. This pattern becomes apparent before "old age," as seen in individuals as young as 7 years. Among the four "older" female lemurs at BMSR, severe wear and/or tooth loss do not predict offspring survival.

  20. Inferring parrotfish (Teleostei: Scaridae) pharyngeal mill function from dental morphology, wear, and microstructure.

    PubMed

    Carr, Andrew; Tibbetts, Ian R; Kemp, Anne; Truss, Rowan; Drennan, John

    2006-10-01

    Morphology, occlusal surface topography, macrowear, and microwear features of parrotfish pharyngeal teeth were investigated to relate microstructural characteristics to the function of the pharyngeal mill using scanning electron microscopy of whole and sectioned pharyngeal jaws and teeth. Pharyngeal tooth migration is anterior in the lower jaw (fifth ceratobranchial) and posterior in the upper jaw (paired third pharyngobranchials), making the interaction of occlusal surfaces and wear-generating forces complex. The extent of wear can be used to define three regions through which teeth migrate: a region containing newly erupted teeth showing little or no wear; a midregion in which the apical enameloid is swiftly worn; and a region containing teeth with only basal enameloid remaining, which shows low to moderate wear. The shape of the occlusal surface alters as the teeth progress along the pharyngeal jaw, generating conditions that appear suited to the reduction of coral particles. It is likely that the interaction between these particles and algal cells during the process of the rendering of the former is responsible for the rupture of the latter, with the consequent liberation of cell contents from which parrotfish obtain their nutrients.

  1. Improved single- and multi-contact life-time testing of dental restorative materials using key characteristics of the human masticatory system and a force/position-controlled robotic dental wear simulator.

    PubMed

    Raabe, D; Harrison, A; Ireland, A; Alemzadeh, K; Sandy, J; Dogramadzi, S; Melhuish, C; Burgess, S

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a new in vitro wear simulator based on spatial parallel kinematics and a biologically inspired implicit force/position hybrid controller to replicate chewing movements and dental wear formations on dental components, such as crowns, bridges or a full set of teeth. The human mandible, guided by passive structures such as posterior teeth and the two temporomandibular joints, moves with up to 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) in Cartesian space. The currently available wear simulators lack the ability to perform these chewing movements. In many cases, their lack of sufficient DOF enables them only to replicate the sliding motion of a single occlusal contact point by neglecting rotational movements and the motion along one Cartesian axis. The motion and forces of more than one occlusal contact points cannot accurately be replicated by these instruments. Furthermore, the majority of wear simulators are unable to control simultaneously the main wear-affecting parameters, considering abrasive mechanical wear, which are the occlusal sliding motion and bite forces in the constraint contact phase of the human chewing cycle. It has been shown that such discrepancies between the true in vivo and the simulated in vitro condition influence the outcome and the quality of wear studies. This can be improved by implementing biological features of the human masticatory system such as tooth compliance realized through the passive action of the periodontal ligament and active bite force control realized though the central nervous system using feedback from periodontal preceptors. The simulator described in this paper can be used for single- and multi-occlusal contact testing due to its kinematics and ability to exactly replicate human translational and rotational mandibular movements with up to 6 DOF without neglecting movements along or around the three Cartesian axes. Recorded human mandibular motion and occlusal force data are the reference inputs of the simulator

  2. [Noise-induced hearing loss caused by dental turbines].

    PubMed

    Praml, G J; Sonnabend, E

    1980-03-01

    Sound level measurements and third octave analyses were carried out to estimate the risk of hearing impairment caused by working the turbine drills. Idling noise of two turbines equipped with ball-bearings and air-bearings respectively and the effects of different burs under varying load conditions in particular were examined. Finally, the background sound level in a great consulting room of a dental clinic at medium activity was looked at. Without any exception the sound levels were situated below 85 dB (A). The sound level exceeded 80 dB in only a few third octave bands; this was the case only with the antiquated ball-bearing turbine. Working with turbine drills requires only a fraction of the total treatment duration, resulting in a very low equivalent sound level. As a consequence a hearing impairment risk may be excluded within the reach of this investigation.

  3. Effect of In-Office Carbamide Peroxide-Based Tooth Bleaching System on Wear Resistance of Silorane-Based and Methacrylate-Based Dental Composites

    PubMed Central

    Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoumeh; Sheikhzadeh, Sedigheh; Ghasemi Monfared Rad, Hamidreza; Beygi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Several studies have assessed the characteristics and properties of silorane-based composites and adhesive systems. Considering the extensive application of tooth-whitening agents, possible deteriorative effects of tooth bleaching agents on these restorative materials must be studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an in-office carbamide peroxide-based tooth bleaching agent on the wear resistance of a silorane-based and a conventional microhybrid dimethyl methacrylate-based dental composite with two different application times. Materials and Methods: Thirty cylindrical specimens were made of Z250 and P90 dental composite resins (n=15 for each composite). Samples made of each composite were divided into three groups (n=5) for immersion in an in-office bleaching agent (Opalescence® Quick 45%) for either three or eight hours or saline solution (control). Wear tests were conducted after bleaching using a pin-on disk apparatus under the load of 40N at a constant sliding speed of 0.5 ms−1 for a sliding distance of 300 m. The samples were weighed before and after the wear test. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to statistically analyze the obtained data (α=0.05). Results: There was a significant decrease in the weight of samples after the wear test (P<0.001). However, no significant difference was found among groups in the mean weight of samples before and after the wear test (P>0.05). Conclusion: Bleaching for three or eight hours using 45% carbamide peroxide had no deteriorative effect on the wear resistance of Z250 and P90 composites. PMID:27123014

  4. Efficacy of Specific Plant Products on Microorganisms Causing Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Kanth, M Rajini; Prakash, A Ravi; Sreenath, G; Reddy, Vikram Simha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dental caries and periodontal diseases are the most common oral diseases seen globally, both in developed and developing countries. Oral microorganisms that is gram positive and gram negative bacteria are known to be involved in causation of these diseases. Nowadays commercially available dentrifices and mouth rinses are known to contain ingredients that can alter the oral microbial flora and have undesirable side effects such as vomiting, diarrhoea, disarrangement of oral, intestinal flora and tooth staining. Naturally available plant products are known to be less harmful with fewer side effects and also economical for the patient. Aim The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial properties of 10 naturally available plant products against oral microorganisms causing caries and to check the efficacy of these products in-vitro and to use these in mouth washes and dentrifices. Materials and Methods Sample of caries material was scrapped out from the extracted teeth and transferred to liquid broth, streaked over the agar media to allow for the growth of microorganisms. Plant products like clove oil, neem, ginger-garlic paste, tea tree oil, ginger, garlic, cinnamon oil, green tea, eucalyptus oil and turmeric were used. Antimicrobial efficacy of these products, was estimated by measuring zones of inhibition in the nutrient agar media. Results Clove oil was the most effective of all products against microorganisms causing caries with zone of inhibition - 30mm followed by ginger-garlic paste - 25mm, Neem - 15mm, tea tree oil - 15mm. Conclusion Based on the above results, it can be inferred that these natural products have the maximum efficacy against microorganisms and can be recommended in dentifrices, mouth rinses, topical gels, etc. PMID:28209019

  5. Assessment of exposures and potential risks to the US adult population from wear (attrition and abrasion) of gold and ceramic dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Richardson, G Mark; Clemow, Scott R; Peters, Rachel E; James, Kyle J; Siciliano, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Little has been published on the chemical exposures and risks of dental restorative materials other than from dental amalgam and composite resins. Here we provide the first exposure and risk assessment for gold (Au) alloy and ceramic restorative materials. Based on the 2001-2004 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we assessed the exposure of US adults to the components of Au alloy and ceramic dental restorations owing to dental material wear. Silver (Ag) is the most problematic component of Au alloy restorations, owing to a combination of toxicity and proportional composition. It was estimated that adults could possess an average of four tooth surfaces restored with Au alloy before exceeding, on average, the reference exposure level (REL) for Ag. Lithium (Li) is the most problematic component of dental ceramics. It was estimated that adults could possess an average of 15 tooth surfaces restored with ceramics before exceeding the REL for Li. Relative risks of chemical exposures from dental materials decrease in the following order: Amalgam>Au alloys>ceramics>composite resins.

  6. Dental Erosion and Medical Conditions An Overview of Aetiology, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Paryag, A; Rafeek, R

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tooth wear or tooth surface loss is a normal physiological process and occurs throughout life but is considered pathological when the degree of destruction is excessive or the rate of loss is rapid, causing functional, aesthetic or sensitivity problems. The importance of tooth wear as a dental problem has been increasingly recognized. The findings of a study in Trinidad indicate that the prevalence of tooth wear in a Trinidadian population is comparable to the United Kingdom (UK) and, indeed, that the level of moderate and severe wear is nearly twice as high. The aetiology of tooth wear is attributed to four causes: erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is generally considered to be the most prevalent cause of tooth wear in the UK and Europe. Acids that cause dental erosion originate mainly from the diet or the stomach and, to a lesser extent, the environment. Underlying medical problems can contribute to influence the progress of tooth wear due to erosion and the patient may not be aware of these conditions. Moderate to severe tooth wear poses a significant clinical challenge to dental practitioners and may result in treatment that is more complex and costly to the patient, both in terms of finances and time spent in the dental chair. This paper provides an overview of aetiology and diagnosis of tooth wear, in particular tooth wear due to erosion, so that medical and dental practitioners may recognize tooth wear early, institute preventive measures and manage patients appropriately. PMID:25781289

  7. Dental Erosion and Medical Conditions: An Overview of Aetiology, Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Paryag, A; Rafeek, R

    2014-09-01

    Tooth wear or tooth surface loss is a normal physiological process and occurs throughout life but is considered pathological when the degree of destruction is excessive or the rate of loss is rapid, causing functional, aesthetic or sensitivity problems. The importance of tooth wear as a dental problem has been increasingly recognized. The findings of a study in Trinidad indicate that the prevalence of tooth wear in a Trinidadian population is comparable to the United Kingdom (UK) and, indeed, that the level of moderate and severe wear is in fact nearly twice as high. The aetiology of tooth wear is attributed to four causes: erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is generally considered to be the most prevalent cause of tooth wear in the UK and Europe. Acids that cause dental erosion originate mainly from the diet or the stomach and to a lesser extent, the environment. Underlying medical problems can contribute to the progress of tooth wear due to erosion and the patient may not be aware of these conditions. Moderate to severe tooth wear poses a significant clinical challenge to dental practitioners and may result in treatment that is more complex and costly to the patient both in terms of finances and time spent in the dental chair. This paper provides an overview of aetiology and diagnosis of tooth wear, in particular tooth wear due to erosion, so that medical and dental practitioners may recognize tooth wear early, institute preventive measures and manage patients appropriately.

  8. The comparison of manual lymph drainage and ultrasound therapy on the leg swelling caused by wearing high heels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Yeop; Han, Ji-Su; Jang, Eun-Ji; Seo, Dong-Kwon; Hong, Ji-Heon; Lee, Sang-Sook; Lee, Dong-Geol; Yu Lee, Jae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    One of the major symptoms when women are wearing high heels for a long time is leg swelling. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of manual lymph drainage with ultrasound therapy. The forty-five healthy women of twenties were participated in this study and divided randomly into three groups; manual lymph drainage group (n=15), ultrasound therapy group (n=15) and control group (n=15). Swelling was measured before wearing the high heels (10 cm-height), after one-hour of wearing the high heels, wearing the high heels of one-hour after the intervention of 15 minutes. Also swelling was calculated by using a tape measure, volumeter and body composition analyzer. Statistical analysis of the comparison between the three groups was performed by one-way ANOVA. Also comparison to the mean value in swelling according to the time was performed by repeated measure ANOVA. As the result of this study, a significant changes have emerged within each of manual lymph drainage, ultrasound therapy and control group (p< 0.05). However, there were no significant differences between each group (p> 0.05). But the mean value of manual lymph drainage group showed the tendency of fast recovering before causing swelling. Therefore, we consider that the clinical treatment of manual lymph drainage and ongoing studies will be made since manual lymph drainage is very effective in releasing the leg swelling caused by wearing high heels and standing for a long time at work.

  9. Cervicofacial subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema caused by air cooling spray of dental laser.

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga, Sachiyo; Iwai, Toshinori; Aoki, Noriaki; Yamashita, Yosuke; Omura, Susumu; Matsui, Yoshiro; Maegawa, Jiro; Hirota, Makoto; Mitsudo, Kenji; Tohnai, Iwai

    2013-06-01

    Cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema is a rare complication of dental procedures with an air turbine or syringe, and dentists and oral surgeons sometimes encounter mediastinal emphysema following the presentation of extensive subcutaneous emphysema. Most emphysema occurs incidentally during tooth extraction, restorative treatment, or endodontic treatment, with only a few cases reported of cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema associated with dental laser treatment. We report a case of cervicofacial subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema caused by the air cooling spray of dental laser during dental treatment in a 76-year-old woman. After she underwent dental laser treatment, cervicofacial swelling was noted and she was referred to our department. Computed tomography showed both cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema and mediastinal emphysema. Antibiotics were administered prophylactically and the emphysema disappeared 5 days after the dental laser treatment, without any complications.

  10. A Case Report of Tooth Wear Associated with a Patient's Inappropriate Efforts to Reduce Oral Malodor Caused by Endodontic Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Masahiro; Uchida, Hatsumi; Suzuki, Nao; Mine, Mariko; Iwamoto, Tomoyuki; Masuo, Yosuke; Naito, Toru; Hatano, Yuko; Hirofuji, Takao

    2009-01-01

    Here, we report a case of severe tooth wear associated with a patient's inappropriate efforts to reduce oral malodor. A 72-year-old male patient visited our breath clinic complaining of strong breath odor. Former dentists had performed periodontal treatments including scaling and root planing, but his oral malodor did not decrease. His own subsequent breath odor-reducing efforts included daily use of lemons and vinegar to reduce or mask the odor, eating and chewing hard foods to clean his teeth, and extensive tooth brushing with a hard-bristled toothbrush. Oral malodor was detected in our breath clinic by several tests, including an organoleptic test, portable sulphide monitor, and gas chromatography. Although patient's oral hygiene and periodontal condition were not poor on presentation, his teeth showed heavy wear and hypersensitiving with an unfitted restoration on tooth 16. Radiographic examination of the tooth did not reveal endodontic lesion, but when the metal crown was removed, severe pus discharge and strong malodor were observed. When this was treated, his breath odor was improved. After dental treatment and oral hygiene instruction, no further tooth wear was observed; he was not concerned about breath odor thereafter. PMID:20339568

  11. Dental prosthesis aspiration: An uncommon cause of respiratory distress.

    PubMed

    De Wilde, Belphine A L; Malfait, Thomas L; Bonte, Katrien; Malfait, Thomas L A

    2016-12-01

    We present a case of a 66-year-old Caucasian man with acute respiratory distress. The patient had a history of multiple cerebrovascular accidents which resulted in left hemiplegia, swallowing problems, and aphasia. He was tentatively diagnosed with aspiration pneumonia. However, because of clinical deterioration further investigations concluded to the aspiration of a dental prosthesis. After intubation and stabilization, the prosthesis could be manually extracted. However, the patient developed a Staphylococcus epidermidis sepsis and despite adequate antibiotic therapy, he eventually died. Dental prosthesis aspiration is a medical situation associated with a higher morbidity and mortality rate compared to ingested foreign bodies. It requires a high level of suspicion to ensure a timely diagnosis and life-saving treatment. Thorough history taking is of great importance in case of tracheobronchial aspiration, which is in the adult population mostly secondary to an underlying disorder. In impaired adults with missing dental prostheses there should be extra awareness for this problem. This case report illustrates the importance of a detailed history in case of tracheobronchial aspiration and shows the limitations in the diagnostic usefulness of bedside chest radiography.

  12. Esthetic restorative materials and opposing enamel wear.

    PubMed

    Olivera, Anna Belsuzarri; Marques, Márcia Martins

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study compared the effects of a gold alloy (Degulor M), four dental ceramics (IPS Empress, IPS Empress 2, Duceram Plus, Duceram LFC) and a laboratory-processed composite (Targis) on the wear of human enamel. The amount of wear of the enamel (dental cusps) and restorative materials (disks) were tested in water at 37 degrees C under standard load (20 N), with a chewing rate of 1.3 Hz and was determined after 150,000 and 300,000 cycles. Before the test, the average surface roughness of the restorative materials was analyzed using the Ra parameter. The results of this study indicate that Targis caused enamel wear similar to Degulor M and resulted in significantly less wear than all the ceramics tested. IPS Empress provoked the greatest amount of enamel wear and Degulor M caused less vertical dimension loss. Targis could be an appropriate alternative material to ceramic, because it is esthetic and produces opposing enamel wear comparable to gold alloy.

  13. Artifacts In Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography Caused By Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Klinke, Thomas; Daboul, Amro; Maron, Juliane; Gredes, Tomasz; Puls, Ralf; Jaghsi, Ahmad; Biffar, Reiner

    2012-01-01

    Background Artifacts caused by dental restorations, such as dental crowns, dental fillings and orthodontic appliances, are a common problem in MRI and CT scans of the head and neck. The aim of this in-vitro study was to identify and evaluate the artifacts produced by different dental restoration materials in CT and MRI images. Methods Test samples of 44 materials (Metal and Non-Metal) commonly used in dental restorations were fabricated and embedded with reference specimens in gelatin moulds. MRI imaging of 1.5T and CT scan were performed on the samples and evaluated in two dimensions. Artifact size and distortions were measured using a digital image analysis software. Results In MRI, 13 out of 44 materials produced artifacts, while in CT 41 out of 44 materials showed artifacts. Artifacts produced in both MRI and CT images were categorized according to the size of the artifact. Significance Metal based restoration materials had strong influence on CT and less artifacts in MRI images. Rare earth elements such as Ytterbium trifluoride found in composites caused artifacts in both MRI and CT. Recognizing these findings would help dental materials manufacturers and developers to produce materials which can cause less artifacts in MRI and CT images. PMID:22384071

  14. The effects of three different food acids on the attrition-corrosion wear of human dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yichi; Arsecularatne, Joseph A.; Hoffman, Mark

    2015-07-01

    With increased consumption of acidic drinks and foods, the wear of human teeth due to attrition in acidic environments is an increasingly important issue. Accordingly, the present paper investigates in vitro the wear of human enamel in three different acidic environments. Reciprocating wear tests in which an enamel cusp slides on an enamel flat surface were carried out using acetic, citric and lactic acid lubricants (at pH 3-3.5). Distilled water was also included as a lubricant for comparison. Focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy imaging were then used to investigate the enamel subsurfaces following wear tests. Nanoindentation was used to ascertain the changes in enamel mechanical properties. The study reveals crack generation along the rod boundaries due to the exposure of enamel to the acidic environments. The wear mechanism changes from brittle fracture in distilled water to ploughing or shaving of the softened layer in acidic environments, generating a smooth surface with the progression of wear. Moreover, nanoindentation results of enamel samples which were exposed to the above acids up to a duration of the wear tests show decreasing hardness and Young’s modulus with exposure time.

  15. Structural changes in cuticles on violin bow hair caused by wear.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    A bow with horse tail hair is used to play the violin. New and worn-out bow hairs were observed by atomic force microscopy. The cuticles of the new bow hair were already damaged by bleach and delipidation, however the worn-out bow hairs were much more damaged and broken off by force, which relates to wearing out.

  16. Enamel wear opposing polished and aged zirconia.

    PubMed

    Burgess, J O; Janyavula, S; Lawson, N C; Lucas, T J; Cakir, D

    2014-01-01

    Aging of dental zirconia roughens its surface through low temperature degradation. We hypothesized that age-related roughening of zirconia crowns may cause detrimental wear to the enamel of an opposing tooth. To test our hypothesis, we subjected artificially aged zirconia and reference specimens to simulated mastication in a wear device and measured the wear of an opposing enamel cusp. Additionally, the roughness of the pretest surfaces was measured. The zirconia specimens, artificially aged by autoclave, showed no significant increase in roughness compared to the nonaged specimens. Furthermore, no significant difference in material or opposing enamel wear between the aged and nonaged zirconia was seen. All zirconia specimens showed less material and opposing enamel wear than the enamel to enamel control or veneering porcelain specimens. Scanning electron micrographs showed relatively smooth surfaces of aged and nonaged zirconia following wear testing. The micrographs of the veneering ceramic showed sharp fractured edges and fragments of wear debris. Zirconia may be considered a wear-friendly material for restorations opposing enamel, even after simulated aging.

  17. Dental wear estimation using a digital intra-oral optical scanner and an automated 3D computer vision method.

    PubMed

    Meireles, Agnes Batista; Vieira, Antonio Wilson; Corpas, Livia; Vandenberghe, Bart; Bastos, Flavia Souza; Lambrechts, Paul; Campos, Mario Montenegro; Las Casas, Estevam Barbosa de

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to propose an automated and direct process to grade tooth wear intra-orally. Eight extracted teeth were etched with acid for different times to produce wear and scanned with an intra-oral optical scanner. Computer vision algorithms were used for alignment and comparison among models. Wear volume was estimated and visual scoring was achieved to determine reliability. Results demonstrated that it is possible to directly detect submillimeter differences in teeth surfaces with an automated method with results similar to those obtained by direct visual inspection. The investigated method proved to be reliable for comparison of measurements over time.

  18. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Reduces Cytotoxic Effects Caused by Dental Monomers: A Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Ma, Sai; Wang, Yirong; Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Chen, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Resin monomers from dental composite materials leached due to incomplete polymerization or biodegradation may cause contact allergies and damage dental pulp. The cytotoxicity of dental resin monomers is due to a disturbance of intracellular redox equilibrium, characterized by an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH). Oxidative stress caused by dental resin monomers leads to the disturbance of vital cell functions and induction of cell apoptosis in affected cells. The nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway plays a key role in the cellular defense system against oxidative and electrophilic stress. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) can activate the Nrf2 pathway and induce expression of a multitude of antioxidants and phase II enzymes that can restore redox homeostasis. Therefore, here, we tested the hypothesis that EGCG-mediated protection against resin monomer cytotoxicity is mediated by activation of the Nrf2 pathway. This study will help to elucidate the mechanism of resin monomer cytotoxicity and provide information that will be helpful in improving the biocompatibility of dental resin materials. PMID:26489899

  19. Infective endocarditis caused by Veillonella of dental origin.

    PubMed

    Prpić-Mehicić, G; Marsan, T; Miletić, I; Buntak-Kobler, D

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether Veillonella could cause transitory bacteriemia and endocarditis in both pure and mixed cultures when the port of entrance for infection was made in rats' incisors. Incisors of 54 male Zgr: whistar conventional rats were inoculated with pure culture of Veillonella (18 animals) and with mixed culture of S. mutans and Veillonella (18 animals). Remaining 18 incisors (the control group) were treated with saline solution. The animals were sacrificed after 7, 21 and 52 days respectively. Two positive hemocultures were obtained in mixed infection after 21 days of experimental procedure. Histopatological analysis of endocardial tissue revealed changes in 7 (12.96%) cases. Occurrence of acute endocarditis (one case) and chronical (four cases) ones depended on duration of mixed infections. For chronical endocarditis that appears in two animals with pure Veillonela culture we are at a loss of explanation. In conclusion, on the rats model Veillonella can penetrate into circulation in association with S. mutans via the pulp tissue and could be involved in infective endocarditis.

  20. [Causes of interruption of dental studies and subsequent change in careers].

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, N

    1989-08-01

    During recent years an increasing number of dental students at the University of Oslo used prolonged student time and graduated with mediocre results, or interrupted studies without graduation Jacobsen, Acta Odontol Scand 45:399-408, 1987). The present investigation aimed at clarifying the reasons for interrupted studies and at getting information about subsequent career. Semistructured questionnaires on curricular and socioeconomic causes for drop-out and on subsequent career were mailed to 98 persons who had quit dental studies during a 10-year period. Free comments on circumstances relevant to their drop-out were encouraged. The following findings are based on 68 replies (69 per cent): Sixty-three students (93 per cent) quit dental school for different curricular reasons, a majority of which was "more interest in other subjects". Contributory factors of socioeconomic nature, mostly future unemployment concern, were often mentioned. Forty-five (66 per cent) later graduated with university degrees in medicine, economics, veterinary medicine, science, technology, law etc, and the remainder, except two persons, finished up to 4 years of studies at regional colleges or similar institutions. Free comments focused on curricular, pedagogical, and social shortcomings at the dental faculty. The findings indicated that a large majority of the students who dropped out did so for lack of stimulation by the dental curriculum and not for lack of academic potential. Only a few students quit because, in their own description, they were immature for university studies at the time, or because they had "academic" difficulties with the early science/biology courses or with the preclinical technique courses.

  1. THE PECULIARITIES OF TREATMENT OF UNCOMPLICATED AND COMPLICATED DENTAL INJURIES CAUSED BY TRAUMA.

    PubMed

    Mamaladze, M; Nizharadze, N; Vadachkoria, O

    2017-01-01

    Trauma related injuries of permanent teeth occur frequently and are the most pressing issue the dentists are facing today. In different age groups the same type of trauma affects the teeth with different frequencies. For instance, accident related dental trauma in children and adults affected permanent teeth in 30% and deciduous teeth in 20%, respectively. It should also be noted that front teeth are more susceptible to traumatic injuries compared to the incisors. Upper front teeth were injured in 72% of cases, while lower central, upper lateral incisors, canines and premolars only in 6-8%. The severity of dental injury depends on the type and extent of the trauma. Dental injury can be result of either direct or indirect trauma. A strong, «fast as lightning» impact most often affects the dental crown. A weak and dull impact (thump) extends toward the root apical direction resulting in avulsion of the tooth and root fracture. Dental injury caused by trauma has been always considered as an emergency condition. It requires prompt complex treatment methods from maintaining pulp vitality to tooth extraction option. Treatment plan always depends on the type and severity of the injury and on current clinical condition of tooth. In all cases, the combined treatment includes: care of visible wound, fixation of teeth, performance of surgical manipulations, determining of the need of endodontic treatment, restorations and orthodontic consultation. The recorded clinical cases include descriptions of dental injuries of various types, as well as performed diagnostic and treatment procedures. In both cases root was fractured by impact. In Clinical Case 1 the tooth 2.1 vertical partial displacement of the tooth (extrusion) with root fracture in the apical third was observed; Clinical Case 2 - 1.1 dental root fracture in its middle third and vertical extrusion. Treatment strategy is dictated by pulp condition (Assessment of pulp vitality and status). In both cases, the

  2. Equine dental disease. Part 3: A long-term study of 400 cases: disorders of wear, traumatic damage and idiopathic fractures, tumours and miscellaneous disorders of the cheek teeth.

    PubMed

    Dixon, P M; Tremaine, W H; Pickles, K; Kuhns, L; Hawe, C; McCann, J; McGorum, B C; Railton, D I; Brammer, S

    2000-01-01

    Of 400 horses referred because of dental disorders, 349 cases were diagnosed as suffering from primary disorders of their cheek teeth. Details of 104 of these cases are presented, including 44 cases with abnormalities of wear, 26 cases with traumatic damage, 24 cases with idiopathic fractures and 10 cases with miscellaneous cheek teeth disorders including oral tumours. The long-term response to treatment was excellent in most cases, even in cases with residual secondary periodontal disease.

  3. [Destructive and protective factors in the development of tooth-wear].

    PubMed

    Máté, Jász; Gábor, Varga; Zsuzsanna, Tóth

    2006-12-01

    The experience of the past decade proves that tooth wear occurs in an increasing number of cases in general dental practice. Tooth wear may have physical (abrasion and attrition) and/or chemical (erosion) origin. The primary physical causes are inadequate dental hygienic activities, bad oral habits or occupational harm. As for dental erosion, it is accelerated by the highly erosive foods and drinks produced and sold in the past decades, and the number of cases is also boosted by the fact that bulimia, anorexia nervosa and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease prevalence have become more common. The most important defensive factor against tooth wear is saliva, which protects teeth from the effect of acids. Tertiary dentin formation plays an important role in the protection of the pulp. Ideally, destructive and protective factors are in balance. Both an increase in the destructive forces, and the insufficiency of defense factors result in the disturbance of the equilibrium. This results in tooth-wear, which means an irreversible loss of dental hard tissue. The rehabilitation of the lost tooth material is often very difficult, irrespectively of whether it is needed because of functional or esthetic causes. For that reason, the dentist should carry out primary and secondary dental care and prevention more often, i.e. dental recall is indispensable every 4-6 months.

  4. Can a Tight Saree Wear Cause Cancer? – A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Balasundaram, Subathira; Ramadas, Rathnadevi; Stumpf, Janos; Hussain, Khader A K

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is rare in India with an incidence of about less than 1% of all cancers. Saree Cancer, a kind of skin cancer is rarer entity, which arises from the frequent abrasion over skin caused by tying the rope in inskirts, often tied tightly so that the saree does not slip. This causes hyperpigmented abrasion, ulcer and then may lead to cancer. This report is about a 40-year-old female with non-healing ulcer of six months duration with rapid increase in size over the past one month. The ulcer measured 4x2 cm in size. The patient underwent excision of the tumour and the margins were positive. Re-excision was done for positive margins and re-growth of the tumour. This is one the first few reports on saree cancer. PMID:25478425

  5. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental hard tissues with an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system.

    PubMed

    Braun, Andreas; Krillke, Raphael Franz; Frentzen, Matthias; Bourauel, Christoph; Stark, Helmut; Schelle, Florian

    2015-02-01

    Heat generation during the removal of dental hard tissues may lead to a temperature increase and cause painful sensations or damage dental tissues. The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental hard tissues following laser ablation using an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system. A total of 85 specimens of dental hard tissues were used, comprising 45 specimens of human dentine evaluating a thickness of 1, 2, and 3 mm (15 samples each) and 40 specimens of human enamel with a thickness of 1 and 2 mm (20 samples each). Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1,064 nm, a pulse duration of 9 ps, and a repetition rate of 500 kHz with an average output power of 6 W. Specimens were irradiated for 0.8 s. Employing a scanner system, rectangular cavities of 1-mm edge length were generated. A temperature sensor was placed at the back of the specimens, recording the temperature during the ablation process. All measurements were made employing a heat-conductive paste without any additional cooling or spray. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the dental hard tissue (enamel or dentine) and the thickness of the respective tissue (p < 0.05). Highest temperature increase could be observed in the 1-mm thickness group for enamel. Evaluating the 1-mm group for dentine, a significantly lower temperature increase could be measured (p < 0.05) with lowest values in the 3-mm group (p < 0.05). A time delay for temperature increase during the ablation process depending on the material thickness was observed for both hard tissues (p < 0.05). Employing the USPL system to remove dental hard tissues, heat generation has to be considered. Especially during laser ablation next to pulpal tissues, painful sensations and potential thermal injury of pulp tissue might occur.

  6. First aid for dental trauma caused by sports activities: state of knowledge, treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Emerich, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Jan

    2010-05-01

    In view of the widespread lack of knowledge of first aid procedures in cases of dental trauma, this article describes the current state of knowledge and highlights the need for education of those likely to witness or be victims of dental trauma while practising sports. Dental and oral injuries, the commonest type of orofacial injuries, are often sustained by athletes playing contact sports; indeed, they represent the most frequent type of sporting injury. Studies of a large group of children and adults have shown that as many as 31% of all orofacial injuries are caused by sporting activities. Furthermore, current literature on the subject emphasizes that awareness of appropriate triage procedures following dental trauma is unsatisfactory. Delay in treatment is the single most influential factor affecting prognosis. What should we know and, more importantly, what should we do? Immediate replantation of an avulsed tooth is the best treatment option at the site of the accident. If replantation is impossible, milk is the preferred transport medium for the avulsed tooth. There is a general low level of awareness about the need for prompt triage of traumatic dental injuries sustained in sports, despite their relative frequency. When a cohort of Swiss basketball players was interviewed, only half were aware that an avulsed tooth could be replanted. Cheap, commercially available tooth storage devices containing an isotonic transport medium (so-called 'Save-a-Tooth boxes'), can maintain the viability of an avulsed tooth for up to 72 hours, prior to replantation. More readily available storage media such as milk, sterile saline or even saliva may be used, but knowledge of this information is rare among sports participants. For example, just 6.6% of the Swiss basketball players interviewed were aware of the 'Tooth Rescue box' products. Sporting organizations seem to offer very little information about sports-related risks or preventive strategies for orodental trauma. Having

  7. An unusual infection of cervicofacial area caused by dental pathology: flesh-eating syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozdinc, Serife; Unlu, Ebru; Oruc, Oya; User, Nese Nur; Karakaya, Zeynep

    2015-10-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the cervicofacial area is highly rare, but physicians should be familiar with the presentation of this situation owing to the suddenness of its beginning, the rapidness of its spread, and ending with high mortality and morbidity. In this article, 5 patients with NF admitted to emergency department with dental pathology history were discussed with a review of the literature. The purpose of this case series is to raise awareness about NF of the cervicofacial area caused by dental pathologies. Five patients admitted to our emergency department between January 2012 and March 2015 and diagnosed as having cervicofacial NF were identified. All patients had dental pathologies. The parameters of the study were patients' age, sex, complaints, self- and family histories, physical examinations' findings, routine laboratory-computed tomographic findings, treatment, and complications. Two of the patients were older than 70 years. One of the patients was healthy but he lost time because of an inappropriate treatment. These 3 patients died. The remaining patients were discharged at the end of the prolonged and intensive treatment. Necrotizing fasciitis should always be remembered in the diagnosis of the infection of the cervicofacial area. Because of difficulty in its diagnosis, a delay in the treatment may result in a horrific outcome.

  8. Saliva and dental erosion

    PubMed Central

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  9. The Inter-Relationship between Dietary and Environmental Properties and Tooth Wear: Comparisons of Mesowear, Molar Wear Rate, and Hypsodonty Index of Extant Sika Deer Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Mugino Ozaki; Yamada, Eisuke

    2014-01-01

    In reference to the evolutionary trend of increasing cheek tooth height in herbivorous ungulates, the causes of dental abrasion have long been debated. Interspecific comparisons of extant ungulates have revealed that both phytoliths in grass and external abrasive matter may play important roles. Using analysis of extant sika deer living in various environments and showing continuous latitudinal variation in food habits from northern grazing to southern browsing, we quantitatively evaluated the influence of dietary and environmental properties on three dental variables: mesowear score (MS), molar wear rate, and M3 hypsodonty index. We used 547 skulls and 740 mandibles from 16 populations of sika deer to obtain the dental measurements. We found that only graminoid proportion in diet correlated with MS and the molar wear rate, implying that phytoliths in grass abrade dental tissues. In contrast, annual precipitation in habitat was not correlated with any of the dental variables. We also found a significant correlation between the molar wear rate (selective pressure for high-crowned molars) and the M3 hypsodonty index of extant sika deer, implying an evolutionary increment in molar height corresponding to the molar wear rate. Our intraspecific comparative analyses provide further support for use of mesowear analysis as a paleodiet estimation method; it not only reveals staple food types (graminoids or dicots) but also implies regional or seasonal variation in the diet of the species. PMID:24603896

  10. The dental occlusion as a suspected cause for TMDs: epidemiological and etiological considerations.

    PubMed

    Türp, J C; Schindler, H

    2012-07-01

    The relationship between the dental occlusion and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) has been one of the most controversial topics in the dental community. In a large epidemiological cross-sectional survey - the Study of Health in Pomerania (Germany) - associations between 15 occlusion-related variables and TMD signs or symptoms were found. In other investigations, additional occlusal variables were identified. However, statistical associations do not prove causality. By using Hill's nine criteria of causation, it becomes apparent that the evidence of a causal relationship is weak. Only bruxism, loss of posterior support and unilateral posterior crossbite show some consistency across studies. On the other hand, several reported occlusal features appear to be the consequence of TMDs, not their cause. Above all, however, biological plausibility for an occlusal aetiology is often difficult to establish, because TMDs are much more common among women than men. Symptom improvement after insertion of an oral splint or after occlusal adjustment does not prove an occlusal aetiology either, because the amelioration may be due to the change of the appliance-induced intermaxillary relationship. In addition, symptoms often abate even in the absence of therapy. Although patients with a TMD history might have a specific risk for developing TMD signs, it appears more rewarding to focus on non-occlusal features that are known to have a potential for the predisposition, initiation or perpetuation of TMDs.

  11. Tooth wear among patients suffering from mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Luca; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Cassetta, Michele; Migliau, Guido; Di Carlo, Stefano; Pompa, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim Assess oral health, treatment needs and the correlation between tooth wear and medications in patients with psychiatric disease. Methodology 92 patients (40 male and 52 female) admitted in the Department of Neurology and Psychiatry of the Umberto I Hospital of Rome underwent an oral and dental clinical examination in accordance according to World Health Organization Basic Methods Criteria. One dentist performed all clinical examinations, training and calibration was carried out by an experienced clinical examiner. To measure the degree of inter-examiner agreement Kappa statistics was calculated. Level of tooth wear was assessed using the tooth wear classification of Johansson et al. Exact psychiatric pathology and medications of each patient were registrated. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Ill.) was used to analyze the data. A value of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results 34.78% of the sample regarding tooth wear demonstrated score 2. Men demonstrated 30% score 2, and 20% score 3 and 4 whereas female patients 38.46% score 2, 7.69% score 3 and none score 4. Conclusions Chronic exposure to neuroleptic drugs can cause phenomena of bruxism. There is a direct correlation between tooth wear, psychiatric disorders and administration of certain drugs. Poor oral hygiene and extensive unmet needs for dental treatment were widespread among psychiatric patients. PMID:25002918

  12. Antibiotic resistance in general dental practice--a cause for concern?

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Louise C; Dave, Jayshree; Chambers, Philip A; Heritage, John

    2004-04-01

    This review examines the contribution dental prescribing makes to the selection of antibiotic resistance in bacteria of the oral flora. The antibiotics commonly used in dental prescribing in the UK are discussed, together with the problems of resistance in members of the oral flora. The antibiotic prescribing habits of general dental practitioners are then reviewed with respect to therapeutic prescriptions and those drugs that are prescribed prophylactically. Not all antibiotic prescriptions for dental problems are written by dentists; prescribing outside the dental profession is also considered. The review then considers the support available to dentists from clinical diagnostic microbiology laboratories. It concludes that better use of diagnostic services, surveillance and improvements in dental education are required now to lessen the impact of antibiotic resistance in the future.

  13. Dental senescence in a long-lived primate links infant survival to rainfall.

    PubMed

    King, Stephen J; Arrigo-Nelson, Summer J; Pochron, Sharon T; Semprebon, Gina M; Godfrey, Laurie R; Wright, Patricia C; Jernvall, Jukka

    2005-11-15

    Primates tend to be long-lived, and, except for humans, most primate females are able to reproduce into old age. Although aging in most mammals is accompanied by dental senescence due to advanced wear, primates have low-crowned teeth that wear down before old age. Because tooth wear alters crown features gradually, testing whether early dental senescence causes reproductive senescence has been difficult. To identify whether and when low-crowned teeth compromise reproductive success, we used a 20-year field study of Propithecus edwardsi, a rainforest lemur from Madagascar with a maximum lifespan of >27 years. We analyzed tooth wear in three dimensions with dental topographic analysis by using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) technology. We report that tooth wear exposes compensatory shearing blades that maintain dental function for 18 years. Beyond this age, female fertility remains high; however infants survive only if lactation seasons have elevated rainfall. Therefore, low-crowned teeth accommodate wear to a point, after which reproductive success closely tracks environmental fluctuations. These results suggest a tooth wear-determined, but rainfall-mediated, onset of reproductive senescence. Additionally, our study indicates that even subtle changes in climate may affect reproductive success of rainforest species.

  14. Dental senescence in a long-lived primate links infant survival to rainfall

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephen J.; Arrigo-Nelson, Summer J.; Pochron, Sharon T.; Semprebon, Gina M.; Godfrey, Laurie R.; Wright, Patricia C.; Jernvall, Jukka

    2005-01-01

    Primates tend to be long-lived, and, except for humans, most primate females are able to reproduce into old age. Although aging in most mammals is accompanied by dental senescence due to advanced wear, primates have low-crowned teeth that wear down before old age. Because tooth wear alters crown features gradually, testing whether early dental senescence causes reproductive senescence has been difficult. To identify whether and when low-crowned teeth compromise reproductive success, we used a 20-year field study of Propithecus edwardsi, a rainforest lemur from Madagascar with a maximum lifespan of >27 years. We analyzed tooth wear in three dimensions with dental topographic analysis by using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) technology. We report that tooth wear exposes compensatory shearing blades that maintain dental function for 18 years. Beyond this age, female fertility remains high; however infants survive only if lactation seasons have elevated rainfall. Therefore, low-crowned teeth accommodate wear to a point, after which reproductive success closely tracks environmental fluctuations. These results suggest a tooth wear-determined, but rainfall-mediated, onset of reproductive senescence. Additionally, our study indicates that even subtle changes in climate may affect reproductive success of rainforest species. PMID:16260727

  15. Numerical modelling of sliding wear caused by pin-on-disk method over copper coated ABS plastic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, S.; Mahapatra, S. S.; Patel, S. K.

    2016-09-01

    The coating of metal increases the face value of the plastic and inhibits other properties like conductivity, hardness and lustre. Thus the combination of plastic and metal coating results in a material that is light in weight because of the presence of plastic as the base material and; electrical and thermal conductive because of the presence of metal on the surface. The requirement of such materials is growing day by day. Copper coated plastic has various applications such as in fabrication of printed circuit boards (PCB's) and various automobile parts and in electromagnetic interference shielding. It is important to analyse the tribological aspect of the same in order to broaden its range of application. The present work contains 3D modelling of thermally sprayed copper on ABS plastic and simulation of sliding wear test by pin-on-disc method. The Johnson cook flow stress model is selected for the coating material. Archard's wear model has provided the best results for calculating the wear rate. The results obtained are in good agreement with the experimental values.

  16. An ultrastructural study on indirect injury of dental pulp caused by high-speed missile projectile to mandible in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ren, Changqun; Liu, Ruifeng; Tian, Lei; Chen, Peng; Zhou, Shuxia

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of indirect injury of dental pulp caused by high-speed missile projectile to mandible in dogs. Eighteen dogs aged 12-13 months were divided equally into six groups (n = 3 in each group) with random allocation, then a high-speed missile projectile (a ball bearing of stainless steel, phi6.0 mm, 0.88 g) was shot at right mandible body (the wound tract was below the fourth premolar, 1 cm or so to the root tips) of each dog, but the teeth were not wounded directly. The dogs were killed 6 h (n = 3), 24 h (n = 3), 3 days (n = 3), 7 days (n = 3), 2 weeks (n = 3) and 4 weeks (n = 3) after the wound, respectively; then ultrastructural change of dental pulp of the fourth premolar and the second premolar of right mandible, and the second premolar of left mandible was observed through transmission electron microscope. The results showed that mean initial velocity of projectiles was 778.0 +/- 33.2 m s(-1) and mean projection energy was 266.1 +/- 19.1 J, which were in conformity with parameters of gunshot wound. On the wound side, dental pulp of the fourth mandibular premolar was injured seriously and irreversible necrosis happened in the end; yet, dental pulp of the second mandibular premolar was injured less seriously, reversibly; on the opposite side, dental pulp of the second mandibular premolar was injured slightly and temporarily. It may be concluded that there are several characteristics in indirect injury of dental pulp caused by high-speed missile projectile to dogs' mandible: the injured area is relatively extensive; traumatic degree decreases progressively and sharply with the distance to the wound tract increasing; ultrastructural change of nerval damage takes place in early stage after wound, etc.

  17. Industrial Noise and Tooth Wear - Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Cavacas, Maria Alzira; Tavares, Vitor; Borrecho, Gonçalo; Oliveira, Maria João; Oliveira, Pedro; Brito, José; Águas, Artur; dos Santos, José Martins

    2015-01-01

    Tooth wear is a complex multifactorial process that involves the loss of hard dental tissue. Parafunctional habits have been mentioned as a self-destructive process caused by stress, which results in hyperactivity of masticatory muscles. Stress manifests itself through teeth grinding, leading to progressive teeth wear. The effects of continuous exposure to industrial noise, a “stressor” agent, cannot be ignored and its effects on the teeth must be evaluated. Aims: The aim of this study was to ascertain the effects of industrial noise on dental wear over time, by identifying and quantifying crown area loss. Material and Methods: 39 Wistar rats were used. Thirty rats were divided in 3 experimental groups of 10 animals each. Animals were exposed to industrial noise, rich in LFN components, for 1, 4 and 7 months, with an average weekly exposure of 40 hours (8h/day, 5 days/week with the weekends in silence). The remaining 9 animals were kept in silence. The areas of the three main cusps of the molars were measured under light microscopy. Statistical analysis used: A two-way ANOVA model was applied at significance level of 5%. Results: The average area of the molar cusps was significantly different between exposed and non-exposed animals. The most remarkable differences occurred between month 1 and 4. The total crown loss from month 1 to month 7 was 17.3% in the control group, and 46.5% in the exposed group, and the differences between these variations were significant (p<0.001). Conclusions: Our data suggest that industrial noise is an important factor in the pathogenesis of tooth wear. PMID:25798052

  18. Clinical evaluation of a newly developed method for avoiding artifacts caused by dental fillings on X-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Yasuo; Sakamoto, Kiyoshi; Minamoto, Takahiro; Kamakura, Toshiko; Ogata, Yuji; Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Johkou, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of gantry tilt scanning as an image reconstruction technique for avoiding artifacts caused by metallic dental fillings. Gantry tilt scanning was used with multidetector-row computed tomography for imaging in patients with dental fillings. Using a novel PC-based program, the oblique images obtained were reconstructed to transverse images using nearest neighbor and bilinear interpolation methodologies in order to avoid metallic streak artifacts. Coronal images were reformatted with the reconstructed transverse images, and the continuity of the reconstructed images was evaluated. Gantry tilt scanning was performed in 12 patients with metal artifacts, and the original and reconstructed images were classified into four grades and assessed by two radiologists. Results of the clinical evaluation indicated that the original images with artifacts, only 4% had good image quality in the region around the medial pterygoid muscle, only 8% depicted areas around the internal carotid artery and internal jugular vein, and only 12% could depict the areas around the parotid gland in the clinical evaluation. These values were improved to 60, 96, and 100%, respectively, in the reconstructed transverse images. Gantry tilt scanning as an image reconstruction technique improves image quality and removes most, if not all, artifacts caused by metallic dental fillings. The resulting images can be used in the evaluation of oropharyngeal lesions in patients with dental fillings.

  19. A study on a dental device for the prevention of mucosal dose enhancement caused by backscatter radiation from dental alloy during external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Katsura, Kouji; Utsunomiya, Satoru; Abe, Eisuke; Sakai, Hironori; Kushima, Naotaka; Tanabe, Satoshi; Yamada, Takumi; Hayakawa, Takahide; Yamanoi, Yoshihiko; Kimura, Syuhei; Wada, Shinichi; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Hayashi, Takafumi

    2016-11-01

    The changes in dose distribution caused by backscatter radiation from a common commercial dental alloy (Au-Ag-Pd dental alloy; DA) were investigated to identify the optimal material and thicknesses of a dental device (DD) for effective prevention of mucositis. To this end, 1 cm(3) of DA was irradiated with a 6-MV X-ray beam (100 MU) in a field size of 10 × 10 cm(2) using a Novalis TX linear accelerator. Ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, polyolefin elastomer, and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were selected as DD materials. The depth dose along the central axis was determined with respect to the presence/absence of DA and DDs at thicknesses of 1-10 mm using a parallel-plate ionization chamber. The dose in the absence of DDs showed the lowest value at a distance of 5 mm from the DA surface and gradually increased with distance between the measurement point and the DA surface for distances of ≥5 mm. Except for PET, no significant difference between the DA dose curves for the presence and absence of DDs was observed. In the dose curve, PET showed a slightly higher dose for DA with DD than for DA without DD for thicknesses of ≥4 mm. The findings herein suggest that the optimal DD material for preventing local dose enhancement of the mucosa caused by DA backscatter radiation should have a relatively low atomic number and physical density and that optimal DD thickness should be chosen considering backscatter radiation and percentage depth dose.

  20. A study on a dental device for the prevention of mucosal dose enhancement caused by backscatter radiation from dental alloy during external beam radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Katsura, Kouji; Utsunomiya, Satoru; Abe, Eisuke; Sakai, Hironori; Kushima, Naotaka; Tanabe, Satoshi; Yamada, Takumi; Hayakawa, Takahide; Yamanoi, Yoshihiko; Kimura, Syuhei; Wada, Shinichi; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Hayashi, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    The changes in dose distribution caused by backscatter radiation from a common commercial dental alloy (Au–Ag–Pd dental alloy; DA) were investigated to identify the optimal material and thicknesses of a dental device (DD) for effective prevention of mucositis. To this end, 1 cm3 of DA was irradiated with a 6-MV X-ray beam (100 MU) in a field size of 10 × 10 cm2 using a Novalis TX linear accelerator. Ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, polyolefin elastomer, and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were selected as DD materials. The depth dose along the central axis was determined with respect to the presence/absence of DA and DDs at thicknesses of 1–10 mm using a parallel-plate ionization chamber. The dose in the absence of DDs showed the lowest value at a distance of 5 mm from the DA surface and gradually increased with distance between the measurement point and the DA surface for distances of ≥5 mm. Except for PET, no significant difference between the DA dose curves for the presence and absence of DDs was observed. In the dose curve, PET showed a slightly higher dose for DA with DD than for DA without DD for thicknesses of ≥4 mm. The findings herein suggest that the optimal DD material for preventing local dose enhancement of the mucosa caused by DA backscatter radiation should have a relatively low atomic number and physical density and that optimal DD thickness should be chosen considering backscatter radiation and percentage depth dose. PMID:27702778

  1. Wearing gloves in the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Infection control - wearing gloves; Patient safety - wearing gloves; Personal protective equipment - wearing gloves; PPE - wearing gloves; Nosocomial infection - wearing gloves; Hospital acquired infection - wearing gloves

  2. What is dental ecology?

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context.

  3. Childhood Obesity & Dental Disease: Common Causes, Common Solutions. Oral Health & Obesity Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Now, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Too many California children suffer from high rates of preventable chronic conditions associated with childhood obesity and dental disease. The state is experiencing a crisis in both areas. Fortunately, common factors that contribute to both conditions--including the rates of breastfeeding, access to healthy food and the consumption of…

  4. Sources of tooth wear variation early in life among known-aged wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) at the Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Head, Brian R; Sauther, Michelle L; Ungar, Peter S; O'Mara, M Teague

    2014-11-01

    Ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) at the Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve (BMSR), Madagascar display a high frequency of individuals with notable and sometimes extreme tooth wear. Adult lemurs display a range of tooth wear even among individuals of the same age, but we do not know at what age this variation first appears. This study's goal was to determine whether wear variation occurs in younger wild lemurs. Based on the decade-long study of ring-tailed lemur feeding and dental ecology at BMSR, we hypothesized that younger, natal lemurs (under 5 years of age), would display variation in their degree of tooth wear that would correspond to microhabitat differences, given differences in food availability in different troops' home ranges. We also hypothesized that wear would differ between sexes at this young age, given differences in feeding between males and females in this population. Hypotheses were tested using dental topographic analyses using dental impressions collected from known-aged lemurs across 10 years at BMSR. Results illustrate significant differences in wear-related tooth topography (i.e., relief and slope, presented here as "occlusal lift") for microhabitat, sex and troop affiliation among lemurs under 5 years of age in this population. Although, all lemurs in this population consume mechanically challenging tamarind fruit, those in more disturbed habitats eat additional introduced foods, some of which are also mechanically challenging. Thus, dietary variation is the likely cause of variation in tooth wear. The wear variation we show at a young age suggests caution when assigning age based on tooth wear in living and fossil primates. These wear-related tooth shape changes early in life, which reflects sex, habitat variation and levels of anthropogenic disturbance, may potentially impact reproductive fitness later in life.

  5. The interactions between attrition, abrasion and erosion in tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Shellis, R Peter; Addy, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Tooth wear is the result of three processes: abrasion (wear produced by interaction between teeth and other materials), attrition (wear through tooth-tooth contact) and erosion (dissolution of hard tissue by acidic substances). A further process (abfraction) might potentiate wear by abrasion and/or erosion. Knowledge of these tooth wear processes and their interactions is reviewed. Both clinical and experimental observations show that individual wear mechanisms rarely act alone but interact with each other. The most important interaction is the potentiation of abrasion by erosive damage to the dental hard tissues. This interaction seems to be the major factor in occlusal and cervical wear. The available evidence is insufficient to establish whether abfraction is an important contributor to tooth wear in vivo. Saliva can modulate erosive/abrasive tooth wear, especially through formation of pellicle, but cannot prevent it.

  6. Wear resistant valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A valve which is resistant to wear caused by particles trapped between the valve seat and the valve member or poppet when the valve closes, including an outlet for directing washing fluid at the valve seat and/or sealing face of the poppet and means for supplying pressured fluid to the outlet at the time when the valve is closing.

  7. Cavernous sinus thrombosis caused by a dental infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gi-Sung; Kim, Hyun Young; Kwak, Eun-Jung; Jung, Young-Soo; Park, Hyung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis not only presents with constitutional symptoms including fever, pain and swelling but also with specific findings such as proptosis, chemosis, periorbital swelling, and cranial nerve palsies. It is known to occur secondary to the spread of paranasal sinus infections in the nose, ethmoidal and sphenoidal sinuses. However, paranasal sinus infection of dental origin is rare. The following is a case of cavernous sinus thrombosis due to the spread of an abscess in the buccal and pterygomandibular spaces via buccal mucosal laceration. PMID:25247150

  8. Antimicrobial efficacy of green synthesized drug blended silver nanoparticles against dental caries and periodontal disease causing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, R; Palanisamy, Selvakumar; Chen, Shen-Ming; Chelladurai, K; Padmavathy, S; Saravanan, M; Prakash, P; Ajmal Ali, M; Al-Hemaid, Fahad M A

    2015-11-01

    Development of biologically inspired green synthesis of silver nanoparticles is evolving into an important branch of nano-biotechnology. In the present investigation, we report the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) employing the leaf extract of Justicia glauca. Water-soluble organics present in the leaf extract are mainly responsible for the reduction of silver nitrate (AgNO3) solution to AgNPs. The AgNPs are 10-20nm in dimensions as determined by TEM images. The antimicrobial activities of green synthesized AgNPs and drug blended AgNPs have been evaluated against the dental caries and periodontal disease causing microorganisms such as Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. The AgNPs and drug blended AgNPs show a significant antibacterial and antifungal activity. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of AgNPs determined against the selected dental caries and periodontal disease causing microorganisms are noticeable between the range of 25-75μg/mL.

  9. Prevalence, causes, and correlates of traumatic dental injuries among seven-to-twelve-year-old school children in Dera Bassi

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Rohini; Sharma, Sunila

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The paper aims to present a study conducted in Dera Bassi, Mohali, India. The purpose of the study was to ascertain the prevalence of traumatic dental injuries (TDI) in children of age group 7-12 years in private schools in Gulabgarh village. Material & Method: Age & sex distribution, etiological factors, risk factors and cause of injury were the parameters taken into consideration. The data collected was processed and analyzed using the SPSS statistical software program. Results: The overall prevalence of dental trauma was 14.5%, amongst the 880 subjects examined, out of which, 63.2% males and 36.4% females were found to be affected. The maxillary central incisor was found to be most commonly affected tooth (43.8%). The most common cause of injury reported was fall during playing (37.5%). Conclusion: Enamel fracture was most prevalent (50%). No risk factor was significantly higher than others; however children with Angle's class II div 1 malocclusion exhibited greater risk factor for traumatic injuries. PMID:22557895

  10. [Occupational skin problems among dental personnel].

    PubMed

    Morken, T; Augustson, T; Helland, S

    1999-10-20

    Occupational dermatological problems are common among dental health personnel. We conducted a questionnaire survey to investigate the frequency of occupational dermatological problems among dental health personnel in Hordaland county, Norway. 333 of 394 employees (85%) answered the questionnaire. 148 of 333 respondents (44%) reported skin complaints. The proportion of respondents with skin complaints was lower among those with more than 20 years experience in dental health care. Hands were almost always involved. Use of gloves were reported to be the main cause of skin problems, especially the use of powdered gloves. Other frequently reported causes were soaps and methacrylates. Skin complaints from methacrylates occurred more often among employees wearing gloves most past of the working day. 3% of the respondents reported test-proven rubber allergy and 1% a methacrylate allergy. Our study confirm that occupational dermatological problems among dental health personnel are frequent. Irritant reactions are probably much more common than allergy. The most important allergens causing allergic contact dermatitis are rubber and methacrylates. Dental personnel should use non-powdered non-latex gloves and use non-touch techniques while handling methacrylates.

  11. Surface kinetic roughening caused by dental erosion: An atomic force microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartarone, Eliana; Mustarelli, Piercarlo; Poggio, Claudio; Lombardini, Marco

    2008-05-01

    Surface kinetic roughening takes place both in case of growth and erosion processes. Teeth surfaces are eroded by contact with acid drinks, such as those used to supplement mineral salts during sporting activities. Calcium-phosphate based (CPP-ACP) pastes are known to reduce the erosion process, and to favour the enamel remineralization. In this study we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the surface roughening during dental erosion, and the mechanisms at the basis of the protection role exerted by a commercial CPP-ACP paste. We found a statistically significant difference (p<0.01) in the roughness of surfaces exposed and not exposed to the acid solutions. The treatment with the CPP-ACP paste determined a statistically significant reduction of the roughness values. By interpreting the AFM results in terms of fractal scaling concepts and continuum stochastic equations, we showed that the protection mechanism of the paste depends on the chemical properties of the acid solution.

  12. Distinguishing and diagnosing contemporary and conventional features of dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Bassiouny, Mohamed A

    2014-01-01

    The vast number and variety of erosion lesions encountered today require reconsideration of the traditional definition. Dental erosion associated with modern dietary habits can exhibit unique features that symbolize a departure from the decades-old conventional image known as tooth surface loss. The extent and diversity of contemporary erosion lesions often cause conflicting diagnoses. Specific examples of these features are presented in this article. The etiologies, genesis, course of development, and characteristics of these erosion lesions are discussed. Contemporary and conventional erosion lesions are distinguished from similar defects, such as mechanically induced wear, carious lesions, and dental fluorosis, which affect the human dentition.

  13. Interaction between attrition,abrasion and erosion in tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; Shellis, R P

    2006-01-01

    Tooth wear is the result of three processes: abrasion (wear produced by interaction between teeth and other materials), attrition (wear through tooth-tooth contact) and erosion (dissolution of hard tissue by acidic substances). A further process (abfraction) might potentiate wear by abrasion and/or erosion. Both clinical and experimental observations show that individual wear mechanisms rarely act alone but interact with each other. The most important interaction is the potentiation of abrasion by erosive damage to the dental hard tissues. This interaction seems to be the major factor in occlusal and cervical wear. The available evidence seems insufficient to establish whether abfraction is an important contributor to tooth wear in vivo. Saliva can modulate erosive/abrasive tooth wear through formation of pellicle and by remineralisation but cannot prevent it.

  14. Paleoenvironments and climatic changes in the Italian Peninsula during the Early Pleistocene: evidence from dental wear patterns of the ungulate community of Coste San Giacomo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strani, Flavia; DeMiguel, Daniel; Sardella, Raffaele; Bellucci, Luca

    2015-08-01

    Quaternary glacial/interglacial alternations, influenced by orbital obliquity cycles with a 41-ka long periodicity, started in the northern hemisphere around 2.6 Ma ago. Such alternations affected the terrestrial ecosystems, especially those of the Mediterranean region, with changes in the floristic communities and the dispersal and radiation of a number of large mammal open dwellers. Analyses of tooth wear patterns of ungulates from the Early Pleistocene site of Coste San Giacomo allow for a more objective reconstruction on the paleoenvironments and the climate in the Italian Peninsula during this epoch. Our results show that this area was composed by a mosaic of biomes, in particular by steppe and woodlands/wetlands. Evidence of such heterogeneity is provided by the wide spectrum of feeding behaviours found among the numerous ungulate herbivores here recorded, with cervids (Axis cf. lyra, Croizetoceros cf. ramosus and Eucladoceros sp.) exhibiting browser diets, most of the bovids (Gazella borbonica and Leptobos sp. and Gallogoral meneghinii) being intermediate feeders and the equid Equus stenonis showing a strict grazer behaviour. These results provide new insights for a timing of changing ecosystems in Southern Europe and reveal the environmental legacy of this global climatic shift, which is essential for understanding the early occupation of Homo in Europe. Thus, our data provide new evidence that such an environmental heterogeneity and a wide spectrum of available food resources could have been the main factors favouring the settlement of early species of Homo in this area.

  15. Bruxism: its multiple causes and its effects on dental implants - an updated review.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Van Der Zaag, J; Naeije, M

    2006-04-01

    There is a growing interest in bruxism, as evidenced by the rapidly increasing number of papers about this subject during the past 5 years. The aim of the present review was to provide an update of two previous reviews from our department (one about the aetiology of bruxism and the other about the possible role of this movement disorder in the failure of dental implants) and to describe the details of the literature search strategies used, thus enabling the readers to judge the completeness of the review. Most studies that were published about the etiology during the past 5 years corroborate the previously drawn conclusions. Similarly, the update of the review about the possible causal relationship between bruxism and implant failure reveals no new points of view. Thus, there is no reason to assume otherwise than that bruxism is mainly regulated centrally, not peripherally, and that there is still insufficient evidence to support or refute a causal relationship between bruxism and implant failure. This illustrates that there is a vast need for well-designed studies to study both the aetiology of bruxism and its purported relationship with implant failure.

  16. Quantitative evaluation of susceptibility effects caused by dental materials in head magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strocchi, S.; Ghielmi, M.; Basilico, F.; Macchi, A.; Novario, R.; Ferretti, R.; Binaghi, E.

    2016-03-01

    This work quantitatively evaluates the effects induced by susceptibility characteristics of materials commonly used in dental practice on the quality of head MR images in a clinical 1.5T device. The proposed evaluation procedure measures the image artifacts induced by susceptibility in MR images by providing an index consistent with the global degradation as perceived by the experts. Susceptibility artifacts were evaluated in a near-clinical setup, using a phantom with susceptibility and geometric characteristics similar to that of a human head. We tested different dentist materials, called PAL Keramit, Ti6Al4V-ELI, Keramit NP, ILOR F, Zirconia and used different clinical MR acquisition sequences, such as "classical" SE and fast, gradient, and diffusion sequences. The evaluation is designed as a matching process between reference and artifacts affected images recording the same scene. The extent of the degradation induced by susceptibility is then measured in terms of similarity with the corresponding reference image. The matching process involves a multimodal registration task and the use an adequate similarity index psychophysically validated, based on correlation coefficient. The proposed analyses are integrated within a computer-supported procedure that interactively guides the users in the different phases of the evaluation method. 2-Dimensional and 3-dimensional indexes are used for each material and each acquisition sequence. From these, we drew a ranking of the materials, averaging the results obtained. Zirconia and ILOR F appear to be the best choice from the susceptibility artefacts point of view, followed, in order, by PAL Keramit, Ti6Al4V-ELI and Keramit NP.

  17. Incidence and possible causes of dental pain during simulated high altitude flights.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, W

    1993-03-01

    Of 11,617 personnel participating in simulated high altitude flights up to 43,000 feet, only 30 (0.26%) complained of toothache (barodontalgia). The cause of the barodontalgia in 28 episodes of pain in 25 of these subjects was investigated. Chronic pulpitis was suspected as the cause in 22 cases and maxillary sinusitis in 2. No pathosis was detected in the other four. In 10 cases in which the pulpitis was treated by root filling or replacing a deep filling, subsequent exposure to low pressure caused no pain.

  18. [Causes of occupational allergy in dental nurses. An analysis based on the material collected at The Institute of Occupational Medicine in Lódź].

    PubMed

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, M; Krecisz, B

    2000-01-01

    The causes of occupational dermatosis were analysed in 27 dental nurses examined at The Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine during the years 1995-99. Contact sensitisation (at least one positive epidermal test) was found in 18 subjects (66.7%). Occupational allergic dermatitis was induced most frequently by: glutaraldehyde (7 positive patch tests), nickel (7), benzalkonium (4), formaldehyde (4), fragrances (4), chromium compounds (3), glyoxal (3), and thiuram (3). In the authors' opinion, dental nurses are nowadays sensitised to other chemical compounds than it used to be in the past. The present components of disinfectants (aldehydes, quaternary ammonium bases), metals and rubber are the major etiologic agents that induce occupational allergy.

  19. Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth wear indices

    PubMed Central

    López-Frías, Francisco J.; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Llamas-Carreras, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification corresponds to a different process with specific clinical features. Classifications made so far have no accurate prevalence data because the indexes do not necessarily measure a specific etiology, or because the study populations can be diverse in age and characteristics. Tooth wears (attrition, erosion and abrasion) is perceived internationally as a growing problem. However, the interpretation and comparison of clinical and epidemiological studies, it is increasingly difficult because of differences in terminology and the large number of indicators/indices that have been developed for the diagnosis, classification and monitoring of the loss of dental hard tissue. These indices have been designed to identify increasing severity and are usually numerical, none have universal acceptance, complicating the evaluation of the true increase in prevalence reported. This article considers the ideal requirements for an erosion index. A literature review is conducted with the aim of analyzing the evolution of the indices used today and discuss whether they meet the clinical needs and research in dentistry. Key words:Tooth wear, tooth wear indices, attrition, erosion, abrasion, abfraction. PMID:24558525

  20. Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth wear indices.

    PubMed

    López-Frías, Francisco J; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Llamas-Carreras, José M; Segura-Egea, Juan J

    2012-02-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification corresponds to a different process with specific clinical features. Classifications made so far have no accurate prevalence data because the indexes do not necessarily measure a specific etiology, or because the study populations can be diverse in age and characteristics. Tooth wears (attrition, erosion and abrasion) is perceived internationally as a growing problem. However, the interpretation and comparison of clinical and epidemiological studies, it is increasingly difficult because of differences in terminology and the large number of indicators/indices that have been developed for the diagnosis, classification and monitoring of the loss of dental hard tissue. These indices have been designed to identify increasing severity and are usually numerical, none have universal acceptance, complicating the evaluation of the true increase in prevalence reported. This article considers the ideal requirements for an erosion index. A literature review is conducted with the aim of analyzing the evolution of the indices used today and discuss whether they meet the clinical needs and research in dentistry. Key words:Tooth wear, tooth wear indices, attrition, erosion, abrasion, abfraction.

  1. Wear mechanisms in a nonrotating wire rope

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, K.K.; Dogan, C.P.; Hawk, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    A nonrotating wire rope used in main hoist operations is being examined by the US Bureau of Mines to determine operative wear mechanisms. Typically, bending and loading the ropes during service cause small, localized movements at interwire contacts, leading to material loss through wear.The cumulative effect of both material loss by wear and wire breakage by fatigue failure accelerates rope retirement. If the macroscopic mechanics of wire rope failure are to be understood, microscopic deformation and degradation processes must be identified and quantified. As a first step in this study, interwire wear and deformation were studied using a combination of scanning electron microscopy and hardness measurements. Both fretting and abrasive wear were identified as wear mechanisms. Preferential sites for fretting and abrasive wear were identified and are discussed regarding rope construction and geometry and the tribo-system.

  2. Corrosive wear principles

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    The dual effects of corrosion and wear operate together in such industries as paper and pulp, coal handling, mining, and sugar beet extraction. There is a synergistic effect that causes far greater wastage to carbon steels, alloy steels, and even much more abrasion resistant cast irons. Several laboratory and in situ studies have been conducted to better understand the contributions of corrosion and wear to the wastage process. The environmental conditions are usually set by the process. However, there are a few instances where inhibitors as sodium nitrite, sodium chromate, and sodium metasilicate have been successfully used to reduce metal wastage of carbon steels. Hardness has been found to be an unreliable guide to performance under wet sliding conditions. Heat treated alloy steels and cast irons are inferior to stainless steels. Even distilled water is too severe a corrodent for steels. While the austenitic stainlesses perform the best, cold rolling to increase hardness does not further improve their performance. The surface roughness of stainless steels gets smoother during corrosive wear testing while it gets rougher for the alloy steels. This observation substantiated the reputation of improved slideability for stainless alloys over alloy steels.

  3. Scattering effects of irradiation on surroundings calculated for a small dental implant.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Reinhard E; Todorovic, Manuel; Heiland, Max; Scheuer, Hanna A; Krüll, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    A fundamental improvement of restorative dentistry is the compensation of missing teeth by insertion of artificial dental roots allowing retention of dental prosthesis. The function of dental implants conserves a permanent perforation of the mucosa and upholds a non-physiological contact of bone with foreign material and oral micro-organisms. Occasionally head and neck cancer patients are scheduled to receive radiotherapy but are wearing dental implants. An earlier study had shown that the distribution of x-rays is noteworthily changed when dental implants are present in the irradiation field. New implants of smaller size are currently being designed that allow sufficient retention for dental prosthesis. The aim of this consecutive study was to calculate alterations in the irradiated bone caused by a foreign body, representing an implant of reduced size and physical qualities equivalent to titanium, using a stochastic (Monte Carlo) simulation. A clinical linear accelerator was simulated using BEAM/EGS4. The calculations showed that the presence of a dimension-reduced implant results in remarkable differences of the dose distribution all around the implant. Titanium dental implants of reduced size located in the field of irradiation were capable of causing significant radiation scattering. Similar to standard implants, the risk for dose enhancement was notably important for the bone in direct contact with the implant. All therapists involved in the therapy of cancer patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy should consider the impact of dental implants on the radiation beam as a catalyst of osteoradionecrosis.

  4. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  5. Wear of engineering materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    Nearly 60 papers discuss fundamental and applied research in the areas of wear, erosion and wear-corrosion of materials. Focus is on ceramics, ceramic and polymer-matrix composites, and coatings; the effect of sliding wear and wear-corrosion of materials in manufacturing processes, automobiles and bearings; and wear and erosion of materials used in fossil-fuel power plants, minerals processing and heavy manufacturing.

  6. Mechanical food properties and dental topography differentiate three populations of Lemur catta in southwest Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Nayuta; Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L; Fitzgerald, Emily; Riemenschneider, Andrea; Ungar, Peter S

    2016-09-01

    Determining the proximate causes of tooth wear remains a major focus of dental study. Here we compare the diets of three ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) populations and examine how different dietary components may contribute to patterns of wear-related tooth shape. Casts were made from dental impressions collected between 2003 and 2010 from lemurs in the gallery and spiny/mixed forests of the Bezá Mahafaly Special Reserve (BMSR; Parcels 1 and 2) and the spiny/mixed forests of Tsimanampesotse National Park (TNP), Madagascar. Tooth shape variables (occlusal relief and slope, angularity) were analyzed using dental topographic analysis. Focal observations and food mechanical properties (FMPs: toughness, hardness, elastic modulus) were conducted and tested, respectively, during wet and dry seasons from 2008 to 2012. We found that FMPs correlate with patterns of dental topography in these three populations. Specifically, food toughness and elastic modulus correlate with the dental variables, but hardness does not. Average food toughness and elastic modulus, but not hardness, are highest in BMSR Parcel 2, followed by BMSR Parcel 1 and TNP. Occlusal relief and slope, which serve as proxies for tooth wear, show the greatest wear in Parcel 2 and the least in TNP. Angularity is also more pronounced in TNP. Further, dental topographic patterns correspond to reliance on Tamarindus indica (tamarind) fruit. Both BMSR populations consume tamarind at high frequencies in the dry season, but the fruits are rare at TNP and only occasionally consumed. Thus, high seasonal tamarind consumption and its mechanical values help explain the low dental relief and slope among BMSR lemurs. By investigating the ecology of a single widespread species across a variety of habitats, we have been able to link specific components of diet to patterns of dental topography in this species. This provides a context for interpreting wear-related tooth shape changes more generally, illustrating that

  7. Tooth wear in captive giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis): mesowear analysis classifies free-ranging specimens as browsers but captive ones as grazers.

    PubMed

    Clauss, Marcus; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A; Brasch, Juliane; Castell, Johanna C; Kaiser, Thomas

    2007-09-01

    Captive giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) mostly do not attain the longevity possible for this species and frequently have problems associated with low energy intake and fat storage mobilization. Abnormal tooth wear has been among the causes suggested as an underlying problem. This study utilizes a tooth wear scoring method ("mesowear") primarily used in paleobiology. This scoring method was applied to museum specimens of free-ranging (n=20) and captive (n=41) giraffes. The scoring system allows for the differentiation between attrition--(typical for browsers, as browse contains little abrasive silica) and abrasion--(typical for grazers, as grass contains abrasive silica) dominated tooth wear. The dental wear pattern of the free-ranging population is dominated by attrition, resembles that previously published for free-ranging giraffe, and clusters within browsing herbivores in comparative analysis. In contrast, the wear pattern of the captive population is dominated by abrasion and clusters among grazing herbivores in comparative analyses. A potential explanation for this difference in tooth wear is likely related to the content of abrasive elements in zoo diets. Silica content (measured as acid insoluble ash) is low in browse and alfalfa. However, grass hay and the majority of pelleted compound feeds contain higher amounts of silica. It can be speculated that the abnormal wear pattern in captivity compromises tooth function in captive giraffe, with deleterious long-term consequences.

  8. Friction, wear, transfer, and wear surface morphology of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Tribological studies at 25 C in a 50-percent-relative-humidity air atmosphere were conducted using hemispherically tipped 440 C HT (high temperature) stainless steel pins sliding against ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disks. The results indicate that sliding speed, sliding distance, contact stress and specimen geometry can markedly affect friction, UHMWPE wear, UHMWPE transfer and the type of wear mechanisms that occur. Adhesion appears to be the predominant wear mechanism; but after long sliding distances at slow speeds, heavy ridges of transfer result which can induce fatigue-like wear on the UHMWPE disk wear track. In one instance, abrasive wear to the metallic pin was observed. This was caused by a hard particle embedded in the UHMWPE disk wear track.

  9. Friction, wear, transfer and wear surface morphology of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Tribological studies at 25 C in a 50-percent-relative-humidity air atmosphere were conducted using hemispherically tipped 440 C HT (high temperature) stainless steel pins sliding against ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disks. The results indicate that sliding speed, sliding distance, contact stress and specimen geometry can markedly affect friction, UHMWPE wear, UHMWPE transfer and the type of wear mechanisms that occur. Adhesion appears to be the predominant wear mechanism; but after long sliding distances at slow speeds, heavy ridges of transfer result which can induce fatigue-like wear on the UHMWPE disk wear track. In one instance, abrasive wear to the metallic pin was observed. This was caused by a hard particle embedded in the UHMWPE disk wear track.

  10. Wear and Tear - Mechanical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this chapter is on the long term wear and tear, or aging, of the mechanical subsystem of a spacecraft. The mechanical subsystem is herein considered to be the primary support structure (as in a skeleton or exoskeleton) upon which all other spacecraft systems rest, and the associated mechanisms. Mechanisms are devices which have some component that moves at least once, in response to some type of passive or active control system. For the structure, aging may proceed as a gradual degradation of mechanical properties and/or function, possibly leading to complete structural failure over an extended period of time. However, over the 50 years of the Space Age such failures appear to be unusual. In contrast, failures for mechanisms are much more frequent and may have a very serious effect on mission performance. Just as on Earth, all moving devices are subject to normal (and possibly accelerated) degradation from mechanical wear due to loss or breakdown of lubricant, misalignment, temperature cycling effects, improper design/selection of materials, fatigue, and a variety of other effects. In space, such environmental factors as severe temperature swings (possibly 100's of degrees C while going in and out of direct solar exposure), hard vacuum, micrometeoroids, wear from operation in a dusty or contaminated environment, and materials degradation from radiation can be much worse. In addition, there are some ground handling issues such as humidity, long term storage, and ground transport which may be of concern. This chapter addresses the elements of the mechanical subsystem subject to wear, and identifies possible causes. The potential impact of such degradation is addressed, albeit with the recognition that the impact of such wear often depends on when it occurs and on what specific components. Most structural elements of the mechanical system typically are conservatively designed (often to a safety factor of greater than approximately 1.25 on yield for

  11. Studies of the Nature of Wear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-28

    hemispherical particles. Investigations using Ferrography have shown that most sliding wear is caused by the exfoliation or flaking off of the Beilby...parts as gear teeth and ball bearing balls and races. Such particles are not always generated as a result of the wear of hard steels and the

  12. Thoracoscopic removal of dental prosthesis impacted in the upper thoracic esophagus.

    PubMed

    Bonavina, Luigi; Aiolfi, Alberto; Siboni, Stefano; Rausa, Emanuele

    2014-01-14

    Dental appliances are the most common cause of accidental foreign body esophageal impaction, especially in the elderly population with decreased oral sensory perception. A 47-year-old man with history of oligophrenia and recurrent epileptic seizures was referred to our hospital following dislocation and ingestion of his upper dental prosthesis. Endoscopic removal and clipping of an esophageal tear had been unsuccessfully attempted. A chest CT scan confirmed entrapment of the dental prosthesis in the upper thoracic esophagus, the presence of pneumomediastinum, and the close proximity of one of the metal clasps of the prosthesis to the left subclavian artery. A video-assisted right thoracoscopy in the left lateral decubitus position was performed and the foreign body was successfully removed. The patient was then allowed to wear the retrieved prosthesis after dentistry consultation and repair of the wire clasps by a dental technician. At the 6-month follow-up visit the patient was doing very well without any trouble in swallowing.

  13. The effect of glazed and polished ceramics on human enamel wear.

    PubMed

    Olivera, Anna Belsuzarri; Matson, Edmir; Marques, Márcia Martins

    2006-01-01

    This in vitro study compared the effect of glazed and polished dental ceramic on the wear of human enamel. Five ceramics were tested under standard load after 150,000 and 300,000 simulated chewing cycles. Wear was determined from collected digital data and analyzed before and after loading. Statistical comparisons were analyzed. Polished ceramics produced less enamel wear. The amount of enamel wear for opposing IPS Empress ceramic was significantly higher (P < .001) than wear provoked by the other ceramics. The enamel wear rate was higher at the first 150,000 cycles, and polishing increased ceramic roughness, except for the IPS Empress ceramic. Polishing of dental ceramics at the contact area produces less antagonistic enamel wear.

  14. Early detection of tooth wear by en-face optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mărcăuteanu, Corina; Negrutiu, Meda; Sinescu, Cosmin; Demjan, Eniko; Hughes, Mike; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2009-02-01

    Excessive dental wear (pathological attrition and/or abfractions) is a frequent complication in bruxing patients. The parafunction causes heavy occlusal loads. The aim of this study is the early detection and monitoring of occlusal overload in bruxing patients. En-face optical coherence tomography was used for investigating and imaging of several extracted tooth, with a normal morphology, derived from patients with active bruxism and from subjects without parafunction. We found a characteristic pattern of enamel cracks in patients with first degree bruxism and with a normal tooth morphology. We conclude that the en-face optical coherence tomography is a promising non-invasive alternative technique for the early detection of occlusal overload, before it becomes clinically evident as tooth wear.

  15. Wear behavior of pressable lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhongxiao; Izzat Abdul Rahman, Muhammad; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Ling

    2016-07-01

    This article reports effects of surface preparation and contact loads on abrasive wear properties of highly aesthetic and high-strength pressable lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (LDGC). Abrasive wear testing was performed using a pin-on-disk device in which LDGC disks prepared with different surface finishes were against alumina pins at different contact loads. Coefficients of friction and wear volumes were measured as functions of initial surface finishes and contact loads. Wear-induced surface morphology changes in both LDGC disks and alumina pins were characterized using three-dimensional laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results show that initial surface finishes of LDGC specimens and contact loads significantly affected the friction coefficients, wear volumes and wear-induced surface roughness changes of the material. Both wear volumes and friction coefficients of LDGC increased as the load increased while surface roughness effects were complicated. For rough LDGC surfaces, three-body wear was dominant while for fine LDGC surfaces, two-body abrasive wear played a key role. Delamination, plastic deformation, and brittle fracture were observed on worn LDGC surfaces. The adhesion of LDGC matrix materials to alumina pins was also discovered. This research has advanced our understanding of the abrasive wear behavior of LDGC and will provide guidelines for better utilization and preparation of the material for long-term success in dental restorations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 968-978, 2016.

  16. Wear Behaviour of Pressible Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhongxiao; Rahman, Muhammad Izzat Abdul; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports effects of surface preparation and contact loads on abrasive wear properties of highly aesthetic and high-strength pressible lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (LDGC). Abrasive wear testing was performed using a pin-on-disk device in which LDGC disks prepared with different surface finishes were against alumina pins at different contact loads. Coefficients of friction and wear volumes were measured as functions of initial surface finishes and contact loads. Wear-induced surface morphology changes in both LDGC disks and alumina pins were characterized using 3D laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results show that initial surface finishes of LDGC specimens and contact loads significantly affected the friction coefficients, wear volumes and wear-induced surface roughness changes of the material. Both wear volumes and friction coefficients of LDGC increased as the load increased while surface roughness effects were complicated. For rough LDGC surfaces, three-body wear was dominant while for fine LDGC surfaces, two-body abrasive wear played a key role. Delamination, plastic deformation and brittle fracture were observed on worn LDGC surfaces. The adhesion of LDGC matrix materials to alumina pins was also discovered. This research has advanced our understanding of the abrasive wear behaviour of LDGC and will provide guidelines for better utilisation and preparation of the material for long-term success in dental restorations. PMID:25980530

  17. Wear of materials 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Ludema, K.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on wear resistance. Topics considered at the conference included erosion in aluminium oxides, abrasive wear tests, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, wear tests of low-cobalt alloys for hardfacing nuclear components, microstructure, the elevated temperature erosion of steels, and steels under cyclic operation in corrosive liquids.

  18. Wear of materials - 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Ludema, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on materials testing to determine wear resistance. Topics considered at the conference included the wear of metals in a magnetic field, ceramics in advanced heat engine applications, wear tests of silicon carbides, microstructure, hardfacing alloys, sliding friction, coated systems, abrasion, erosion, test methods, tribology, stacking fault energy, and adhesion.

  19. Wear-mechanism modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, M.F. . Dept. of Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    Goals of the program are to calculate the surface temperatures in dry sliding, develop a soft wear tester for ceramics, survey the wear mechanisms in brittle solids, and couple the temperature calculations with models to give wear maps for brittle solids. (DLC)

  20. Effect of low temperature annealing on the wear properties of NITINOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukunda, Sriram; Nath. S, Narendra; Herbert, Mervin A.; Mukunda, P. G.

    2016-02-01

    NiTi shape memory alloy is a wonder material that is a solution looking for problems. The material finds wide biomedical applications like endodontic files for root canal treatment and cardiovascular stents. This material has rendered the surgical procedure simple compared to that with the existing Stainless Steel (SS) or titanium ones. NiTi as an endodontic file would cause less discomfort to the patients in comparison to that with far stiffer SS or titanium ones. Here nearly equi-atomic 50:50 commercial NiTi rods were subjected to low temperature aging at 300 to 450°C. The wear resistance of the as-received and the heat-treated samples was studied using adhesive wear tests on hardened steel counter face. Abrasive wear tests were run against Alumina disc to simulate the working of endodontic drills and files against dental hard and soft tissues. The abrasive wear resistance is expected to be proportional to the Vickers Hardness of the material and is high for the 450°C heat-treated sample. A correlation between the mechanical properties and microstructures of this material is attempted

  1. Age-related tooth wear differs between forest and savanna primates.

    PubMed

    Galbany, Jordi; Romero, Alejandro; Mayo-Alesón, Mercedes; Itsoma, Fiacre; Gamarra, Beatriz; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Willaume, Eric; Kappeler, Peter M; Charpentier, Marie J E

    2014-01-01

    Tooth wear in primates is caused by aging and ecological factors. However, comparative data that would allow us to delineate the contribution of each of these factors are lacking. Here, we contrast age-dependent molar tooth wear by scoring percent of dentine exposure (PDE) in two wild African primate populations from Gabonese forest and Kenyan savanna habitats. We found that forest-dwelling mandrills exhibited significantly higher PDE with age than savanna yellow baboons. Mandrills mainly feed on large tough food items, such as hard-shell fruits, and inhabit an ecosystem with a high presence of mineral quartz. By contrast, baboons consume large amounts of exogenous grit that adheres to underground storage organs but the proportion of quartz in the soils where baboons live is low. Our results support the hypothesis that not only age but also physical food properties and soil composition, particularly quartz richness, are factors that significantly impact tooth wear. We further propose that the accelerated dental wear in mandrills resulting in flatter molars with old age may represent an adaptation to process hard food items present in their environment.

  2. New model to explain tooth wear with implications for microwear formation and diet reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing; Zheng, Jing; Huang, Diaodiao; Tian, Z Ryan; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Zhongrong; Ungar, Peter S; Qian, Linmao

    2015-08-25

    Paleoanthropologists and vertebrate paleontologists have for decades debated the etiology of tooth wear and its implications for understanding the diets of human ancestors and other extinct mammals. The debate has recently taken a twist, calling into question the efficacy of dental microwear to reveal diet. Some argue that endogenous abrasives in plants (opal phytoliths) are too soft to abrade enamel, and that tooth wear is caused principally by exogenous quartz grit on food. If so, variation in microwear among fossil species may relate more to habitat than diet. This has important implications for paleobiologists because microwear is a common proxy for diets of fossil species. Here we reexamine the notion that particles softer than enamel (e.g., silica phytoliths) do not wear teeth. We scored human enamel using a microfabrication instrument fitted with soft particles (aluminum and brass spheres) and an atomic force microscope (AFM) fitted with silica particles under fixed normal loads, sliding speeds, and spans. Resulting damage was measured by AFM, and morphology and composition of debris were determined by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Enamel chips removed from the surface demonstrate that softer particles produce wear under conditions mimicking chewing. Previous models posited that such particles rub enamel and create ridges alongside indentations without tissue removal. We propose that although these models hold for deformable metal surfaces, enamel works differently. Hydroxyapatite crystallites are "glued" together by proteins, and tissue removal requires only that contact pressure be sufficient to break the bonds holding enamel together.

  3. Age-Related Tooth Wear Differs between Forest and Savanna Primates

    PubMed Central

    Galbany, Jordi; Romero, Alejandro; Mayo-Alesón, Mercedes; Itsoma, Fiacre; Gamarra, Beatriz; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Willaume, Eric; Kappeler, Peter M.; Charpentier, Marie J. E.

    2014-01-01

    Tooth wear in primates is caused by aging and ecological factors. However, comparative data that would allow us to delineate the contribution of each of these factors are lacking. Here, we contrast age-dependent molar tooth wear by scoring percent of dentine exposure (PDE) in two wild African primate populations from Gabonese forest and Kenyan savanna habitats. We found that forest-dwelling mandrills exhibited significantly higher PDE with age than savanna yellow baboons. Mandrills mainly feed on large tough food items, such as hard-shell fruits, and inhabit an ecosystem with a high presence of mineral quartz. By contrast, baboons consume large amounts of exogenous grit that adheres to underground storage organs but the proportion of quartz in the soils where baboons live is low. Our results support the hypothesis that not only age but also physical food properties and soil composition, particularly quartz richness, are factors that significantly impact tooth wear. We further propose that the accelerated dental wear in mandrills resulting in flatter molars with old age may represent an adaptation to process hard food items present in their environment. PMID:24732967

  4. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  5. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  6. Investigation on the Tribological Behavior and Wear Mechanism of Five Different Veneering Porcelains

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jie; Zhang, Qianqian; Qiu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Minhao; Yu, Haiyang; Gao, Shanshan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this research was to investigate the wear behavior and wear mechanism of five different veneering porcelains. Methods Five kinds of veneering porcelains were selected in this research. The surface microhardness of all the samples was measured with a microhardness tester. Wear tests were performed on a ball-on-flat PLINT fretting wear machine, with lubrication of artificial saliva at 37°C. The friction coefficients were recorded by the testing system. The microstructure features, wear volume, and damage morphologies were recorded and analyzed with a confocal laser scanning microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The wear mechanism was then elucidated. Results The friction coefficients of the five veneering porcelains differ significantly. No significant correlation between hardness and wear volume was found for these veneering porcelains. Under lubrication of artificial saliva, the porcelain with higher leucite crystal content exhibited greater wear resistance. Additionally, leucite crystal size and distribution in glass matrix influenced wear behavior. The wear mechanisms for these porcelains were similar: abrasive wear dominates the early stage, whereas delamination was the main damage mode at the later stage. Furthermore, delamination was more prominent for porcelains with larger crystal sizes. Significance Wear compatibility between porcelain and natural teeth is important for dental restorative materials. Investigation on crystal content, size, and distribution in glass matrix can provide insight for the selection of dental porcelains in clinical settings. PMID:26368532

  7. Hyperglycemia simultaneously induces initial caries development and enhances spontaneous occlusal surface wear in molar teeth related to parotid gland disorder in alloxan-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Nishimoto, Taiki; Kodama, Yasushi; Matsuura, Tetsuro; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Taniguchi, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and salivary gland dysfunction are major factors that induce dental caries in experimental animals, but there are no reports analyzing the association of dental caries and salivary glands in an animal model of diabetes mellitus (DM). To clarify the initial development of dental caries and preceding salivary gland disorder, we performed a histopathological analysis on teeth and salivary glands in diabetic Wistar rats 7 weeks after alloxan treatment (DM group) in comparison with nondiabetic rats (Non-DM group) and functional analysis on saliva secretion during the experimental period. Pilocarpine-induced salivary fluid secretion in diabetic rats gradually decreased with continuous hyperglycemia from immediately after alloxan treatment to the time of autopsy. Histopathologically, Oil Red O-positive lipid droplets accumulated in the acinar cells of the parotid gland. No tooth was stereoscopically defined as having dental caries in any of the rats in either group; however, the external appearance remarkably changed owing to occlusal wear in almost all molars in the DM group. The initial lesions of dental caries, appearing as micro-defects in dentin with bacterial colonization on the molar surface, were identified using histopathological analysis, and the incidence in the DM group was more than twice that in the Non-DM group. In conclusion, hyperglycemia simultaneously induces initial caries development and enhances spontaneous occlusal wear in molar teeth of Wistar rats 7 weeks after alloxan treatment. The parotid gland dysfunction caused by hyperglycemia may be mostly involved in the pathogenesis of occlusal wear as well as in dental caries in this diabetic model. PMID:28190924

  8. How to qualify and validate wear simulation devices and methods.

    PubMed

    Heintze, S D

    2006-08-01

    The clinical significance of increased wear can mainly be attributed to impaired aesthetic appearance and/or functional restrictions. Little is known about the systemic effects of swallowed or inhaled worn particles that derive from restorations. As wear measurements in vivo are complicated and time-consuming, wear simulation devices and methods had been developed without, however, systematically looking at the factors that influence important wear parameters. Wear simulation devices shall simulate processes that occur in the oral cavity during mastication, namely force, force profile, contact time, sliding movement, clearance of worn material, etc. Different devices that use different force actuator principles are available. Those with the highest citation frequency in the literature are - in descending order - the Alabama, ACTA, OHSU, Zurich and MTS wear simulators. When following the FDA guidelines on good laboratory practice (GLP) only the expensive MTS wear simulator is a qualified machine to test wear in vitro; the force exerted by the hydraulic actuator is controlled and regulated during all movements of the stylus. All the other simulators lack control and regulation of force development during dynamic loading of the flat specimens. This may be an explanation for the high coefficient of variation of the results in some wear simulators (28-40%) and the poor reproducibility of wear results if dental databases are searched for wear results of specific dental materials (difference of 22-72% for the same material). As most of the machines are not qualifiable, wear methods applying the machine may have a sound concept but cannot be validated. Only with the MTS method have wear parameters and influencing factors been documented and verified. A good compromise with regard to costs, practicability and robustness is the Willytec chewing simulator, which uses weights as force actuator and step motors for vertical and lateral movements. The Ivoclar wear method run on

  9. Opinions on Dental Erosive Lesions, Knowledge of Diagnosis, and Treatment Strategies among Norwegian Dentists: A Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Mulic, Aida; Vidnes-Kopperud, Simen; Skaare, Anne B.; Tveit, Anne Bjørg; Young, Alix

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate dentists' general experience, knowledge about diagnosis, and treatment of dental erosive wear in young adults. A questionnaire was sent to 1262 Norwegian public dental health-employed dentists. The response rate was 60%. Results indicated that most dentists recorded erosive wear, half of them used a specific scoring system, and half registered lesions at the tooth surface level. Lesions were reported most often on palatal surfaces of upper anterior teeth (79% of dentists), on occlusal surfaces of lower 1st molars (74%), and on upper 1st molars (32%). Half the dentists used clinical photographs for documentation and 60% made study models. While 40% reported more erosive lesions in males, 36% reported no gender differences. High intake of carbonated beverages and acidic juices were reported as the most common cause by 97% and 72% of the dentists, respectively. Only 21% of dentists recorded the patient's dietary history, and 73% never measured saliva secretion. The majority (78%) of the dentists treated patients with erosive wear themselves. In general, the survey suggests that the dentists are relatively up to date regarding the clinical recording, diagnosis, and treatment of dental erosive wear. However, dietary and salivary analyses were not given priority, and early, preventive treatment was lacking. PMID:22927855

  10. Paleo-tribology: development of wear measurement techniques and a three-dimensional model revealing how grinding dentitions self-wear to enable functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Gregory M.; Sidebottom, Mark A.; Curry, John F.; Kay, David Ian; Kuhn-Hendricks, Stephen; Norell, Mark A.; Sawyer, W. Gregory; Krick, Brandon A.

    2016-06-01

    In most mammals and a rare few reptilian lineages the evolution of precise dental occlusion led to the capacity to form functional chewing surfaces due to pressures generated while feeding. The complex dental architectures of such teeth and the biomechanics of their self-wearing nature are poorly understood. Our research team composed of paleontologists, evolutionary biologists, and engineers have developed a protocol to: (1) determine the histological make-up of grinding dentitions in extant and fossil taxa; (2) ascertain wear-relevant material properties of the tissues; (3) determine how those properties relate to inter-tissue-biomechanics leading the dental functionality using a three-dimensional Archard’s wear model developed specifically for dental applications; (4) analyze those data in phylogenetic contexts to infer evolutionary patterns as they relate to feeding. Finally we discuss industrial applications that are emerging from our paleontologically-inspired research.

  11. Preventative measures for bulimic patients with dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, G; Bartlett, D

    2001-03-01

    The preventative techniques suggested to bulimic patients are frequently undervalued and ignored in favour of restorative treatment, possibly because the dentist may not be aware of the eating disorder. Educating bulimic patients about fluoride application, the use of brushing techniques, antacids, cheese, xylitol chewing gum and the possible use of mouth guards may minimise the effect of acids. Together with attempts at improving patient compliance they can be a valuable adjunct to treatment of bulimic patients with dental problems. Monitoring the wear on teeth by comparing study casts is a good way to maintain control but there are circumstances when restorations are indicated, perhaps when further delay may result in the prognosis of the teeth being compromised. Following a brief introduction to causes of bulimia and the consequences to the dentition, this paper, based on a literature review, considers patient-orientated techniques for prevention and provisional management of erosion of dental hard tissues for patients with bulimia nervosa.

  12. Degradation of experimental composite materials and in vitro wear simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givan, Daniel Allen

    2001-12-01

    The material, mechanical, and clinical aspects of surface degradation of resin composite dental restorative materials by in vitro wear simulation continues to be an area of active research. To investigate wear mechanisms, a series of experimental resin composites with variable and controlled filler particle shape and loading were studied by in vitro wear simulation. The current investigation utilized a simulation that isolated the wear environment, entrapped high and low modulus debris, and evaluated the process including machine and fluid flow dynamics. The degradation was significantly affected by filler particle shape and less by particle loading. The spherical particle composites demonstrated wear loss profiles suggesting an optimized filler loading may exist. This was also demonstrated by the trends in the mechanical properties. Very little difference in magnitude was noted for the wear of irregular particle composites as a function of particulate size; and as a group they were more wear resistant than spherical particle composites. This was the result of different mechanisms of wear that were correlated with the three-dimensional particle shape. The abrasive effects of the aggregate particles and the polymeric stabilization of the irregular shape versus the destabilization and "plucking" of the spherical particles resulted in an unprotected matrix that accounted for significantly greater wear of spherical composite. A model and analysis was developed to explain the events associated with the progressive material wear loss. The initial phase was explained by fatigue-assisted microcracking and loss of material segments in a zone of high stress immediately beneath a point of high stress contact. The early phase was characterized by the development of a small facet primarily by fatigue-assisted microcracking. Although the translation effects were minimal, some three-body and initial two-body wear events were also present. In the late phases, the abrasive effects

  13. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  14. Extravascular compression of the femoral vein due to wear debris-induced iliopsoas bursitis: a rare cause of leg swelling after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Beksaç, Burak; Tözün, Remzi; Baktiroglu, Selcuk; Sener, Nadir; Gonzalez Della Valle, Alejandro

    2007-04-01

    We present a patient with unilateral, spontaneous, late leg swelling that developed 4 years after total hip arthroplasty. The etiology was the compression of the internal iliac vein by a voluminous iliopsoas bursitis caused by polyethylene debris. The expansive lesion was detected by ultrasound, arthrography, and magnetic resonance imaging. An ultrasound-guided aspiration provided transient relief of the patient's symptoms. The patient later required surgical excision through an abdominal approach. A second recurrence was detected and treated with revision surgery. We present the diagnosis and the treatment of this rare cause of late, unilateral leg swelling after total hip arthroplasty together with a review of the literature.

  15. Wear Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Lewis Research Center developed a tribometer for in-house wear tests. Implant Sciences Corporation (ISC), working on a NASA contract to develop coatings to enhance the wear capabilities of materials, adapted the tribometer for its own use and developed a commercial line of user-friendly systems. The ISC-200 is a pin-on-disk type of tribometer, functioning like a record player and creating a wear groove on the disk, with variables of speed and load. The system can measure the coefficient of friction, the wear behavior between materials, and the integrity of thin films or coatings. Applications include measuring wear on contact lenses and engine parts and testing disk drives.

  16. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  17. Nuclear fuel assembly wear sleeve

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwell, D.J.; Kmonk, S.

    1983-03-08

    An improved control rod guide tube for use in a fuel assembly in a nuclear reactor. The guide tube extends the complete length of the fuel assembly and has its upper end fastened in a cylindrical housing by swaging the guide tube material into grooves formed in the housing walls. To eliminate wear on the guide tube inner walls caused by hydraulic induced vibratory forces on a control rod adapted to move therein, a thin-walled chrome plated sleeve is threaded into the top end of the guide thimble and extends downwardly a distance sufficient to be engaged by the control rod during reactor operation. The sleeve serves as a highly resistant wear surface between the control rod and walls on the guide tube in the fuel assembly.

  18. Polymer wear and its control

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Recent advances in polymer (P) tribology are discussed in reviews and reports based on contributions to a symposium held by the Division of Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering of the Americal Chemical Society in St. Louis in spring 1984. Topics examined are mechanisms of P wear, controls of P wear, the tribological behavior of Ps, wear of biomaterials and P composites, characterization and measurements of P wear, and degradation and wear of polymeric films and filaments. Consideration is given to the fracture and surface energetics of P wear, fatigue-abrasive mechanisms of P wear, plasma modification of P surfaces, the wear characteristics of articular cartilage, the role of fillers in the wear of high-density polyethylene, the tribology of fiber-reinforced polyimides sliding against steel and Si3N4, laboratory and in-service wear tests of Ps, and the effect of degree of crystallinity on wear of poly(ethylene terephthalate).

  19. First molar size and wear within and among modern hunter-gatherers and agricultural populations.

    PubMed

    Górka, Katarzyna; Romero, Alejandro; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro

    2015-08-01

    Apart from reflecting modern human dental variation, differences in dental size among populations provide a means for studying continuous evolutionary processes and their mechanisms. Dental wear, on the other hand, has been widely used to infer dietary adaptations and variability among or within diverse ancient human populations. Few such studies have focused on modern foragers and farmers, however, and diverse methods have been used. This research aimed to apply a single, standardized, and systematic quantitative procedure to measure dental size and dentin exposure in order to analyze differences among several hunter-gatherer and agricultural populations from various environments and geographic origins. In particular, we focused on sexual dimorphism and intergroup differences in the upper and lower first molars. Results indicated no sexual dimorphism in molar size and wear within the studied populations. Despite the great ethnographic variation in subsistence strategies among these populations, our findings suggest that differences in sexual division of labor do not affect dietary wear patterns.

  20. Dental Care in Scleroderma

    MedlinePlus

    ... a side effect • Avoid the spiral of depression – depression causes worse oral health and poor oral health worsens depression. Suggestions for your dental appointments: • Tell the dentist ...

  1. Fretting wear behaviour of hydroxyapatite-titanium composites in simulated body fluid, supplemented with 5 g l-1 bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Alok; Biswas, Krishanu; Basu, Bikramjit

    2013-10-01

    Damaged articulating joints can be repaired or replaced with synthetic biomaterials, which can release wear debris due to articulation, leading to the osteolysis. In a recent work, it has been shown that it is possible to achieve a better combination of flexural strength/fracture toughness as well as in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility properties in spark plasma sintered hydroxyapatite-titanium (HA-Ti) composites. Although hydroxyapatite and titanium are well documented for their good biocompatibility, nanosized hydroxyapatite (HA) and titanium (Ti) particles can cause severe toxicity to cells. In order to address this issue, fretting wear study of HA-Ti composites under dry and wet (1× SBF, supplemented with 5 g l-1 bovine serum albumin (BSA)) condition was performed to assess the wear resistance as well as wear debris formation, in vitro. The experimental results reveal one order of magnitude lower wear rate for HA-10 wt% Ti (7.5 × 10-5 mm3 N-1 m-1) composite than monolithic HA (3.9 × 10-4 mm3 N-1 m-1) in simulated body fluid. The difference in the tribological properties has been analyzed in the light of phase assemblages and mechanical properties. Overall, the results suggest the potential use of HA-Ti composites over existing HA-based biocomposites in orthopedic as well as dental applications.

  2. Drugs that promote dental caries.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries result from erosion of tooth enamel or cementum by acidic substances produced by bacteria found in dental plaque. Caries can lead to pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Risk factors include certain dietary habits, poor oral hygiene, and dry mouth. Diabetes and Sjogren's syndrome can also promote dental caries. Psychotropic substances such as cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin and cannabis can promote dental caries. Many medicinal drugs facilitate the formation of dental caries, through various mechanisms; they include formulations with a high sugar content; drugs that cause dry mouth (especially antimuscarinics); drugs that lower the buccal pH (inhaled powders, etc.); and drugs that cause demineralisation (tetracyclines, etc.). In practice, patients (and parents) should be informed that some drugs can increase the risk of dental caries. They should be encouraged to adapt and reinforce dental hygiene, and advised to visit a dentist regularly.

  3. Corneal epithelial permeability during extended wear of disposable contact lenses versus daily wear of soft contact lenses.

    PubMed Central

    Schurmans, L R; Boets, E P; van Best, J A

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--The corneal epithelial permeability during extended wear of disposable contact lenses was compared with that during daily wear of soft contact lenses. The study was performed to verify whether the extended wear of disposable contact lenses would result in a higher permeability value than the daily wear of soft contact lenses. A higher permeability makes the cornea more vulnerable for bacterial infections and thus could explain the higher incidence of bacterial keratitis found in extended wear of disposable contact lenses in comparison with the daily wear of soft contact lenses. METHOD--The corneal epithelial permeability was determined by fluorophotometry in 33 healthy volunteers after the wear of soft, daily wear contact lenses for at least 6 months. Thereafter the determination was repeated in each volunteer after extended wear of disposable contact lenses for 1 month. The permeability in 34 healthy non-contact lens wearing volunteers was determined as a control. The permeability value was calculated from the amount of fluorescein that passed into the cornea after application by means of an eyebath. RESULTS--The mean permeability values after daily and extended wear were 0.032 nm/s and 0.031 nm/s, respectively. The values were not significantly different (Wilcoxon paired test p > 0.5). The mean permeability for the non-contact lens wearing controls was 0.042 nm/s. CONCLUSION--The results do not sustain the explanation that a difference in permeability value is the main cause of the increased incidence of keratitis during extended wear of disposable contact lenses in comparison with daily wear. PMID:7742282

  4. Dental injuries in water polo, a survey of players in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Hersberger, Silvan; Krastl, Gabriel; Kühl, Sebastian; Filippi, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Water polo is a sporting activity which has a medium risk of causing dental trauma. Owing to the high speed, close body contact, and the combination of throwing and swimming that is inherent to the sport, the general injury potential is high. Using a standardized questionnaire for a total of 415 water polo players from Switzerland, this study examines the frequency of dental and facial injuries in water polo, athletes' habits regarding the wearing of mouthguards, and the general level of knowledge about emergency procedures following dental trauma. The participating players came from 6 divisions: Swiss national leagues A and B, first and second leagues, as well as the women's, and junior's league. The data were evaluated according to division and gender. Of the 415 interviewees, 185 (44.6%) had witnessed a dental injury in water polo. Eighty-seven (21.0%) players reported having suffered a tooth injury when playing water polo. Tooth fracture was the most stated dental injury [86 (16.4%)]. A similar number of tooth injuries were experienced by both male [355 (21.1%)] and female [60 (20.0%)] players. The interviewees over the age of 50 showed a higher incidence of tooth injuries than younger players (>50 years = 41.7%). Slightly more than half of the interviewed players [228 (54.9%)] were aware of the possibility of replanting avulsed teeth. As few as 43 (10.4%) players were familiar with tooth rescue boxes. Only 32 (7.7%) water polo players wore a mouthguard; the most common reason for not wearing a mouthguard was that it was seen to be unnecessary [169 (40.7%)]. This survey highlights the potential for improvement in the level of knowledge about dental injury prevention in water polo. In addition to information and guidelines from the relevant sports' associations, and coaches, dentists could also play a role in the provision of this education.

  5. Creating a Successful School-Based Mobile Dental Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, David M.; Jahnke, Lauren R.; Kerber, Lisa; Nyer, Genie; Siemens, Kammi; Clark, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Background: Dental disease is one of the leading causes of school absenteeism for children. This article describes the creation and evolution of the St. David's Dental Program, a mobile school-based dental program for children. Methods: The dental program is a collaboration of community partners in Central Texas that provides free dental care to…

  6. Fret wear mediation of NIRCam filter wheel assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privári, Béla I.

    2011-10-01

    We will discuss a fret wear solution developed for the James Webb Space Telescope NIRCam filter wheel assembly by implementation of a hard coating. With mechanisms and structures designed for space flight application, titanium is often selected as the choice material of construction. Titanium offers a low-density high strength material that is good for use with many optical instruments due to its' favorable thermal properties. An important factor to consider with titanium mechanisms and structures are component fits and the vibration environment that must be survived during launch. In many instances, small (slip) fits between titanium components can cause fret wear during launch induced vibration. Titanium is particularly susceptible to fret wear, although other materials also demonstrate the fret wear. Fretting is adhesive failure of a material that experiences impact and micro-slip with an adjacent part. The mechanism of fret wear involves small particles that are pulled from the surface of parts that turn into hard oxides that further accelerate the wear between the parts. To mitigate fret wear, the mechanism or structure can be designed to eliminate all slip fits altogether, lubricants may be added to the wear surfaces or hard coatings can be applied to the wear surfaces when the other approaches are not feasible. For the NIRCam filter wheel assembly, which must operate at 35K and remain optically clean, only hard coatings are feasible. A discussion of several coating alternatives and associated wear testing will be presented along with the selection of an optimal solution.

  7. Corrosive wear of cast iron under reciprocating lubrication

    SciTech Connect

    Yahagi, Y.; Nagasawa, Y.; Hotta, S.; Mizutani, Y.

    1986-01-01

    In order to study the wear of cylinder bore fundamentally, a reciprocating friction tester was produced and utilized. The friction between a cast iron and a piston-ring and the wear of the cast iron were examined under the corrosive oil with sulphuric acid. The findings indicate that the friction and wear around TDC and BDC was confirmed to be greater than between these reversal points and the friction and wear around the reversal points increased with the sulphuric acid which has caused the deficiency of oil film and the corrosion of the cast iron.

  8. Wear characterization of abrasive waterjet nozzles and nozzle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanduri, Madhusarathi

    Parameters that influence nozzle wear in the abrasive water jet (AWJ) environment were identified and classified into nozzle geometric, AWJ system, and nozzle material categories. Regular and accelerated wear test procedures were developed to study nozzle wear under actual and simulated conditions, respectively. Long term tests, using garnet abrasive, were conducted to validate the accelerated test procedure. In addition to exit diameter growth, two new measures of wear, nozzle weight loss and nozzle bore profiles were shown to be invaluable in characterizing and explaining the phenomena of nozzle wear. By conducting nozzle wear tests, the effects of nozzle geometric, and AWJ system parameters on nozzle wear were systematically investigated. An empirical model was developed for nozzle weight loss rate. To understand the response of nozzle materials under varying AWJ system conditions, erosion tests were conducted on samples of typical nozzle materials. The effect of factors such as jet impingement angle, abrasive type, abrasive size, abrasive flow rate, water pressure, traverse speed, and target material was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on eroded samples as well as worn nozzles to understand the wear mechanisms. The dominant wear mechanism observed was grain pullout. Erosion models were reviewed and along the lines of classical erosion theories a semi-empirical model, suitable for erosion of nozzle materials under AWJ impact, was developed. The erosion data correlated very well with the developed model. Finally, the cutting efficiency of AWJ nozzles was investigated in conjunction with nozzle wear. The cutting efficiency of a nozzle deteriorates as it wears. There is a direct correlation between nozzle wear and cutting efficiency. The operating conditions that produce the most efficient jets also cause the most wear in the nozzle.

  9. Fretting Wear of Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Lerch, Bradley A.; Draper, Susan L.

    2001-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the wear behavior of gamma titanium aluminide (Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb in atomic percent) in contact with a typical nickel-base superalloy under repeated microscopic vibratory motion in air at temperatures from 296-823 K. The surface damage observed on the interacting surfaces of both Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb and superalloy consisted of fracture pits, oxides, metallic debris, scratches, craters, plastic deformation, and cracks. The Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb transferred to the superalloy at all fretting conditions and caused scuffing or galling. The increasing rate of oxidation at elevated temperatures led to a drop in Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb wear at 473 K. Mild oxidative wear was observed at 473 K. However, fretting wear increased as the temperature was increased from 473-823 K. At 723 and 823 K, oxide disruption generated cracks, loose wear debris, and pits on the Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb wear surface. Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb wear generally decreased with increasing fretting frequency. Both increasing slip amplitude and increasing load tended to produce more metallic wear debris, causing severe abrasive wear in the contacting metals. Keywords

  10. New model to explain tooth wear with implications for microwear formation and diet reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jing; Zheng, Jing; Huang, Diaodiao; Tian, Z. Ryan; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Zhongrong; Ungar, Peter S.; Qian, Linmao

    2015-01-01

    Paleoanthropologists and vertebrate paleontologists have for decades debated the etiology of tooth wear and its implications for understanding the diets of human ancestors and other extinct mammals. The debate has recently taken a twist, calling into question the efficacy of dental microwear to reveal diet. Some argue that endogenous abrasives in plants (opal phytoliths) are too soft to abrade enamel, and that tooth wear is caused principally by exogenous quartz grit on food. If so, variation in microwear among fossil species may relate more to habitat than diet. This has important implications for paleobiologists because microwear is a common proxy for diets of fossil species. Here we reexamine the notion that particles softer than enamel (e.g., silica phytoliths) do not wear teeth. We scored human enamel using a microfabrication instrument fitted with soft particles (aluminum and brass spheres) and an atomic force microscope (AFM) fitted with silica particles under fixed normal loads, sliding speeds, and spans. Resulting damage was measured by AFM, and morphology and composition of debris were determined by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Enamel chips removed from the surface demonstrate that softer particles produce wear under conditions mimicking chewing. Previous models posited that such particles rub enamel and create ridges alongside indentations without tissue removal. We propose that although these models hold for deformable metal surfaces, enamel works differently. Hydroxyapatite crystallites are “glued” together by proteins, and tissue removal requires only that contact pressure be sufficient to break the bonds holding enamel together. PMID:26240350

  11. Tribological behaviour of unveneered and veneered lithium disilicate dental material.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo-Pina, C G; Patas, N; Canhoto, J; Cláudio, R; Olhero, S M; Serro, A P; Ferro, A C; Guedes, M

    2016-01-01

    The friction and wear behaviour of a lithium disilicate dental ceramic against natural dental enamel is studied, including the effect of the presence of a fluorapatite veneering upon the tribological properties of the material. The tribological behaviour was assessed using reciprocating pin-on-plate test configuration, at pH 3 and pH 7. The surface energy of the plates was determined, as well as the zeta potential of fluorapatite, lithium disilicate and enamel particles in artificial saliva. It was found that the friction and wear behaviour of the tested enamel/plate material tribocouples is less severe in unveneered plates. Initial surface roughness of the plate does not affect wear results. However the topography of the resulting wear track affects the corresponding wear loss: a smoother final wear track is associated with lower wear. The surface topography of the wear track, and thus the tribological performance of the tested materials, is very sensitive to the pH of the sliding solution. This is because the dissolution trend, wettability and surface charge of the used materials are pH dependent. Overall friction and wear are higher under basic pH conditions, especially when plates are veneered. A wear model is proposed that correlates the effect of the described parameters with the observed tribological behaviour at pH 7. Attained results show that fluorapatite coating of lithium disilicate dental crowns affects tooth/crown wear behaviour, resulting in increased wear of both the artificial crown and the opposing natural teeth. Coating should therefore be avoided in occlusal crown surfaces.

  12. Dental Assistants

    MedlinePlus

    ... help keep the dental office running smoothly. Important Qualities Detail oriented. Dental assistants must follow specific rules and protocols, such as infection control procedures, when helping dentists treat patients. Assistants also ...

  13. Optical wear monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kidane, Getnet S; Desilva, Upul P.; He, Chengli; Ulerich, Nancy H.

    2016-07-26

    A gas turbine includes first and second parts having outer surfaces located adjacent to each other to create an interface where wear occurs. A wear probe is provided for monitoring wear of the outer surface of the first part, and includes an optical guide having first and second ends, wherein the first end is configured to be located flush with the outer surface of the first part. A fiber bundle includes first and second ends, the first end being located proximate to the second end of the optical guide. The fiber bundle includes a transmit fiber bundle comprising a first plurality of optical fibers coupled to a light source, and a receive fiber bundle coupled to a light detector and configured to detect reflected light. A processor is configured to determine a length of the optical guide based on the detected reflected light.

  14. Nickel-based (Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Be) alloys used in dental restorations may be a potential cause for immune-mediated hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yin; Chen, Weiqing; Ke, Wei; Wu, Shaohua

    2009-11-01

    Although nickel-based (Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Be) alloy prothesis is widely used in orthodontics, its potential biologic hazards, hypersensitivity in particular, are still uncertain as yet. And only a few studies in vivo have considered the biocompatibility. However, several case reports show adverse effects of immunologic alterations, such as urticaria, respiratory disease, nickel contact dermatitis, microscopic hematuria and proteinuria, and even exacerbated to hepatocyte injury and renal injury. So nickel-based alloy used in dental restorations may be a potential cause for immune-mediated hypersensitivity. The metal surface would occur electrochemical corrosion as metal edge of porcelain-fused-to-nichrome crown exposed to oral cavity rich in electrolytes after restoration, and metal ion would release to oral cavity then come into contact with cells and tissues in the immediate environment, or be distributed throughout the body, mainly to the intestine canal. Once these ions are not biocompatible, the human system may be injured (toxicity and risk of sensitization) if they are absorbed in sufficient quantity. Thus, it is necessary to determine the long-term biocompatibility properties of nickel-based alloy, reduce sensitization, and grasp the information of individual differences in the appearance of adverse reactions in further research.

  15. Not of African Descent: Dental Modification among Indigenous Caribbean People from Canímar Abajo, Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Roksandic, Mirjana; Alarie, Kaitlynn; Rodríguez Suárez, Roberto; Huebner, Erwin; Roksandic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Dental modifications in the Caribbean are considered to be an African practice introduced to the Caribbean archipelago by the influx of enslaved Africans during colonial times. Skeletal remains which exhibited dental modifications are by default considered to be Africans, African descendants, or post-contact indigenous people influenced by an African practice. Individual E-105 from the site of Canímar Abajo (Cuba), with a direct 14C AMS date of 990–800 cal BC, provides the first unequivocal evidence of dental modifications in the Antilles prior to contact with Europeans in AD 1492. Central incisors showing evidence of significant crown reduction (loss of crown volume regardless of its etiology) were examined macroscopically and with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine if the observed alterations were due to deliberate modification or other (unintentional) factors considered: postmortem breakage, violent accidental breakage, non-dietary use of teeth, and wear caused by habitual or repeated actions. The pattern of crown reduction is consistent with deliberate dental modification of the type commonly encountered among African and African descendent communities in post-contact Caribbean archaeological assemblages. Six additional individuals show similar pattern of crown reduction of maxillary incisors with no analogous wear in corresponding mandibular dentition. PMID:27071012

  16. Sliding Wear and Fretting Wear of DLC-Based, Functionally Graded Nanocomposite Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Pohlchuck, B.; Street, Kenneth W.; Zabinski, J. S.; Sanders, J. H.; Voevodin, A. a.; Wu, R. L. C.

    1999-01-01

    Improving the tribological functionality of diamondlike carbon (DLC) films--developing, good wear resistance, low friction, and high load-carrying capacity-was the aim of this investigation. Nanocomposite coatings consisting of an amorphous DLC (a-DLC) top layer and a functionally graded titanium-titanium carbon-diamondlike carbon (Ti-Ti(sub x) C(sub y)-DLC) underlayer were produced on AISI 440C stainless steel substrates by the hybrid technique of magnetron sputtering and pulsed-laser deposition. The resultant DLC films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and surface profilometry. Two types of wear experiment were conducted in this investioation: sliding friction experiments and fretting wear experiments. Unidirectional ball-on-disk sliding friction experiments were conducted to examine the wear behavior of an a-DLC/Ti-Ti(sub x) C(sub y)-DLC-coated AISI 440C stainless steel disk in sliding contact with a 6-mm-diameter AISI 440C stainless steel ball in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, and humid air. Although the wear rates for both the coating and ball were low in all three environments, the humid air and dry nitrogen caused mild wear with burnishing, in the a-DLC top layer, and the ultrahigh vacuum caused relatively severe wear with brittle fracture in both the a-DLC top layer and the Ti-Ti(sub x) C(sub y)-DLC underlayer. For reference, amorphous hydrogenated carbon (H-DLC) films produced on a-DLC/Ti-Ti(sub x) C(sub y)-DLC nanocomposite coatings by using an ion beam were also examined in the same manner. The H-DLC films markedly reduced friction even in ultrahigh vacuum without sacrificing wear resistance. The H-DLC films behaved much like the a-DLC/Ti-Ti(sub x) C(sub y)-DLC nanocomposite coating in dry nitrogen and humid air, presenting low friction and low wear. Fretting wear experiments were conducted in humid air (approximately 50% relative humidity) at a frequency of 80 Hz and an amplitude of 75 micron on an a

  17. Wear Modalities and Mechanisms of the Mining Non-asbestos Composite Brake Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jiusheng; Yin, Yan; Zhu, Zhencai; Tong, Minming; Lu, Yuhao; Peng, Yuxing

    2013-08-01

    The mining brake material is generally made of composite materials and its wear has important influences on the braking performance of disc brakes. In order to improve the braking reliability of mine hoisters, this paper did some tribological investigations on the mining brake material to reveal its wear modalities and mechanisms. The mining non-asbestos brake shoe and 16Mn steel were selected as braking pairs and tested on a pad-on-disc friction tester. And a SEM was used to observe the worn surface of the brake shoe. It is shown that the non-asbestos brake material has mainly five wear modalities: adhesive wear, abrasive wear, cutting wear, fatigue wear and high heat wear. At the front period of a single braking the wear modality is mainly composed of some light mechanical wear such as abrasive, cutting and point adhesive. With the temperature rising at the back period it transforms to some heavy mechanical wear such as piece adhesive and fatigue. While in several repeated brakings once the surface temperature rises beyond the thermal-decomposition point of the bonding material, the strong destructive high heat wear takes leading roles on the surface. And a phenomenon called friction catastrophe (FC) occurs easily, which as a result causes a braking failure. It is considered that the friction heat has important influences on the wear modalities of the brake material. And the reduction of friction heat must be an effective technical method for decreasing wear and avoiding braking failures.

  18. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  19. Employees Wearing Religious Attire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry

    2004-01-01

    While adherents to many religions can be identified by distinctive clothing or accessories, the wearing of such garb by teachers is not necessarily related to evangelism in the classroom. The following case and the accompanying question-and-answer discussion illustrate the problem of the principal caught between the rock of First Amendment…

  20. Antibacterial Dental Composites with Chlorhexidine and Mesoporous Silica

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J.F.; Wu, R.; Fan, Y.; Liao, S.; Wang, Y.; Wen, Z.T.; Xu, X.

    2014-01-01

    One of the leading causes for the failure of dental composite restorations is secondary caries. Effectively inhibiting cariogenic biofilms and reducing secondary caries could extend the service life of composite restorations. Dental composites releasing antibacterial agents such as chlorhexidine (CHX) have shown biofilm-inhibitory efficacy, but they usually have poor physical and mechanical properties. Herein, we present a study of a new method to encapsulate and release CHX from dental composite using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). SBA-15 MSNs were synthesized according to a reported procedure. CHX (62.9 wt%) was encapsulated into dried MSN from 0.3 M CHX ethanol solution. The dental composites containing 0% (control), 3%, 5%, and 6.3% CHX or the same amounts of CHX entrapped in MSN (denoted as CHX@MSN) were fabricated with methacrylate monomers and silanized glass fillers (CHX or CHX@MSN + glass filler particle = 70 wt%). The monomer mixture consisted of bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (BisGMA), hexanediol dimethacrylate (HDDMA), ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA), and urethane dimethacrylates (UEDMA) at a weight ratio of 40:30:20:10. The composites were tested for CHX release and recharge, flexural strength and modulus (at 24 hr and 1 mo), surface roughness, in vitro wear, and antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei (in both planktonic growth and biofilm formation). The results showed that the composites with CHX@MSN largely retained mechanical properties and smooth surfaces and showed controlled release of CHX over a long time. In contrast, the composites with directly mixed CHX showed reduced mechanical properties, rough surfaces, and burst release of CHX in a short time. The composites with CHX either directly mixed or in MSN showed strong inhibition to S. mutans and L. casei. This research has demonstrated the successful application of MSNs as a novel nanotechnology in dental materials to inhibit

  1. Antibacterial dental composites with chlorhexidine and mesoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J F; Wu, R; Fan, Y; Liao, S; Wang, Y; Wen, Z T; Xu, X

    2014-12-01

    One of the leading causes for the failure of dental composite restorations is secondary caries. Effectively inhibiting cariogenic biofilms and reducing secondary caries could extend the service life of composite restorations. Dental composites releasing antibacterial agents such as chlorhexidine (CHX) have shown biofilm-inhibitory efficacy, but they usually have poor physical and mechanical properties. Herein, we present a study of a new method to encapsulate and release CHX from dental composite using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). SBA-15 MSNs were synthesized according to a reported procedure. CHX (62.9 wt%) was encapsulated into dried MSN from 0.3 M CHX ethanol solution. The dental composites containing 0% (control), 3%, 5%, and 6.3% CHX or the same amounts of CHX entrapped in MSN (denoted as CHX@MSN) were fabricated with methacrylate monomers and silanized glass fillers (CHX or CHX@MSN + glass filler particle = 70 wt%). The monomer mixture consisted of bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (BisGMA), hexanediol dimethacrylate (HDDMA), ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA), and urethane dimethacrylates (UEDMA) at a weight ratio of 40:30:20:10. The composites were tested for CHX release and recharge, flexural strength and modulus (at 24 hr and 1 mo), surface roughness, in vitro wear, and antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei (in both planktonic growth and biofilm formation). The results showed that the composites with CHX@MSN largely retained mechanical properties and smooth surfaces and showed controlled release of CHX over a long time. In contrast, the composites with directly mixed CHX showed reduced mechanical properties, rough surfaces, and burst release of CHX in a short time. The composites with CHX either directly mixed or in MSN showed strong inhibition to S. mutans and L. casei. This research has demonstrated the successful application of MSNs as a novel nanotechnology in dental materials to inhibit

  2. Role of Aqueous Extract of Morinda Citrifolia (Indian Noni) Ripe Fruits in Inhibiting Dental Caries-Causing Streptococcus Mutans and Streptococcus Mitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumarasamy, Barani; Manipal, Sunayana; Duraisamy, Prabu; Ahmed, Adil; Mohanaganesh, SP; Jeevika, C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Use of alternative medicine to control oral streptococci is a new topic worthy of further investigation. This study aimed to elucidate the dose-dependent anti-bacterial activity of crude aqueous extract of ripe Morinda citrifolia L. (Family: Rubiaceae) fruits against oral streptococci i.e. Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus mitis, that cause dental caries in humans. Methods: Fresh ripe M. citrifolia fruits (750g) were ground in an electronic blender with sterile water (500ml). The crude aqueous extract was lyophilized to yield a brown colored powder. Various concentrations (1000-100μg/ ml) of the extract were tested for its antibacterial activity (Kirby and Bauer method) against whole cells of S. mutans and S. mitis. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was determined by micro-dilution method, using serially diluted (2 folds) fruit extract, according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). Results: Crude aqueous extract (1000μg/ ml) of ripe M. citrifolia fruits effectively inhibited the growth of S. mutans (19±0.5 mm) and S. mitis (18.6±0.3 mm) compared to the streptomycin control (21.6±0.3 mm). The growth inhibition was clearly evident with “nil” bacteriostasis, even after 48 hours of incubation at 37°C. The MIC of the extract for S. mutans and S. mitis was 125 μg and 62.5 μg, respectively. Conclusion: Our results suggest that phytochemicals naturally synthesized by M. citrifolia have an inhibitory effect on oral streptococci. Furthermore, purification and molecular characterization of the “bioactive principle” would enable us to formulate a sustainable oral hygiene product. PMID:25628701

  3. Wear Resistance and Wear Mechanism of a Hot Dip Aluminized Steel in Sliding Wear Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiyong; Hao, Xiaoyang; Huang, Yao; Gu, Lingyun; Ren, Yu; Zheng, Ruipeng

    2016-12-01

    Sliding wear experiments were conducted on a hot dip aluminized steel to investigate its wear resistance and wear mechanism. The wear tests were also carried out on a hot dip galvanized steel and the base material (steel Q345) as a comparison. Results show that the wear resistance and hardness of the hot dip aluminized steel are significantly higher than that of the hot dip galvanized steel and the steel Q345 at room temperature. The better wear resistance of the hot dip aluminized steel attributes mainly to the formation of a transition layer containing abundant Fe-Al intermetallic compounds and the transformation of wear-resisting oxides during the friction process. The main phase in the transition layer is Fe2Al5. The thickness of the transition layer is about 90-120 μm. When the wear load increases from 3 N to 19 N, the wear type of the aluminized layer transform from adhesive wear (3 N) into abrasive wear (7 N) and finally into slight wear mixed with oxidation (higher than 11 N).

  4. Friction and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomey, Jacques

    1952-01-01

    From the practical point of view, this analysis shows that each problem of friction or wear requires its particular solution. There is no universal solution; one or other of the factors predominates and defines the choice of the solution. In certain cases, copper alloys of great thermal conductivity are preferred; in others, plastics abundantly supplied with water. Sometimes, soft antifriction metals are desirable to distribute the load; at other times, hard metals with high resistance to abrasion or heat.

  5. Polymer Wear Modes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    first was the rubbing of Nylon 6—6, Nylon 11, Delrin 500, Delrin AF, and ultra—high molecular weight polyethylene ( UHMWPE ) against 440C stainless steel...strength at* T T Measured Time to Temperature ofPolymer . room temp. _~~ _i ~2!~ U severe wear counterface substrate UHMWP E 24.1 MPa 140°C 400°C -1.47 rn/s

  6. Dental and General Trauma in Team Handball.

    PubMed

    Petrović, Mateja; Kühl, Sebastian; Šlaj, Martina; Connert, Thomas; Filippi, Andreas

    Handball has developed into a much faster and high-impact sport over the past few years because of rule changes. Fast sports with close body contact are especially prone to orofacial trauma. Handball belongs to a category of sports with medium risk for dental trauma. Even so, there is only little literature on this subject. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and the type of injuries, especially the occurrence of orofacial trauma, habits of wearing mouthguards, as well as degree of familiarity with the tooth rescue box. For this purpose, 77.1% (n=542/703) of all top athletes and coaches from the two highest Swiss leagues (National League A and National League B), namely 507 professional players and 35 coaches, were personally interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. 19.7% (n=100/507) of the players experienced dental trauma in their handball careers, with 40.8% (n=51/125) crown fractures being the most frequent by far. In spite of the relatively high risk of lip or dental trauma, only 5.7% (n=29/507) of the players wear mouthguards. The results of this study show that dental trauma is common among Swiss handball players. In spite of the high risk of dental trauma, the mouthguard as prevention is not adequately known, and correct procedure following dental trauma is rarely known at all.

  7. Dental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mueller, P O; Lowder, M Q

    1998-08-01

    Dental sepsis or periapical abscess formation constitutes a large percentage of dental conditions that afflict horses. Dental sepsis occurs when the pulp chamber of the tooth is exposed to the oral cavity or external environment, allowing bacterial localization with resulting infection. Although acute, primary, septic pulpitis in horses is rare, dental sepsis often results from colonization of the pulp chamber with pathogenic bacteria secondary to maleruption or impaction of teeth with secondary alveolar bone lysis, primary fractures of the tooth, mandible, or maxilla, periodontal disease, or infundibular necrosis. The sequela to pulpal infection are extensions into the periradicular tissues and mandibular or maxillary periapical abscess formation.

  8. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Hu, Jian; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function) implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation.

  9. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ning; Hu, Jian; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function) implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation. PMID:26241942

  10. Ultralow wear of gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Guosong; Tan, Chee-Keong; Tansu, Nelson; Krick, Brandon A.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we reveal a remarkable (and surprising) physical property of GaN: it is extremely wear resistant. In fact, we measured the wear rate of GaN is approaching wear rates reported for diamond. Not only does GaN have an ultralow wear rate but also there are quite a few experimental factors that control the magnitude of its wear rate, further contributing to the rich and complex physics of wear of GaN. Here, we discovered several primary controlling factors that will affect the wear rate of III-Nitride materials: crystallographic orientation, sliding environment, and coating composition (GaN, InN and InGaN). Sliding in the ⟨ 1 2 ¯ 10 ⟩ is significantly lower wear than ⟨ 1 1 ¯ 00 ⟩ . Wear increases by 2 orders of magnitude with increasing humidity (from ˜0% to 50% RH). III-Nitride coatings are promising as multifunctional material systems for device design and sliding wear applications.

  11. A review of equine dental disorders.

    PubMed

    Dixon, P M; Dacre, I

    2005-03-01

    Equine dentistry is a very important but until recently rather neglected area of equine practice, with many horses suffering from undiagnosed, painful dental disorders. A thorough clinical examination using a full mouth speculum is a pre-requisite to performing any equine dental procedure. Common incisor disorders include: prolonged retention of deciduous incisors, supernumerary incisors and overjet--the latter usually accompanied by cheek teeth (CT) overgrowths. Overjet can be surgically corrected, but perhaps should not be in breeding animals. In younger horses, traumatically fractured incisors with pulpar exposure may survive by laying down tertiary dentine. Loss or maleruption of incisors can cause uneven occlusal wear that can affect mastication. Idiopathic fractures and apical infection of incisors are rare. The main disorder of canine teeth is the development of calculus of the lower canines, and occasionally, developmental displacements and traumatic fractures. The main indications for extraction of "wolf teeth" (Triadan 05s) are the presence of displaced or enlarged wolf teeth, or their presence in the mandible. Developmental abnormalities of the CT include; rostral positioning of the upper CT rows in relation to the lower CT rows--with resultant development of focal overgrowths on the upper 06s and the lower 11s. Displaced CT develop overgrowths on unopposed aspects of the teeth and also develop periodontal disease in the inevitable abnormal spaces (diastemata) that are present between displaced and normal teeth. Diastemata of the CT due to excessive developmental spacing between the CT or to inadequate compression of the CT rows is a common but under diagnosed problem in many horses and causes very painful periodontal disease and quidding. Supernumerary CT mainly occur at the caudal aspect of the CT rows and periodontal disease commonly occurs around these teeth. Eruption disorders of CT include prolonged retention of remnants of deciduous CT ("caps

  12. Dental crowns

    MedlinePlus

    ... off when the child loses the baby tooth. Metal crowns: Hold up to chewing and teeth grinding ... porcelain crowns: Wear down opposing teeth more than metal crowns Match the color of other teeth May ...

  13. Dental therapists in general dental practices: an economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Beazoglou, Tryfon J; Lazar, Vickie F; Guay, Albert H; Heffley, Dennis R; Bailit, Howard L

    2012-08-01

    Dental access disparities are well documented and have been recognized as a national problem. Their major cause is the lack of reasonable Medicaid reimbursement rates for the underserved. Specifically, Medicaid reimbursement rates for children average 40 percent below market rates. In addition, most state Medicaid programs do not cover adults. To address these issues, advocates of better oral health for the underserved are considering support for a new allied provider--a dental therapist--capable of providing services at a lower cost per service and in low-income and rural areas. Using a standard economic analysis, this study estimated the potential cost, price, utilization, and dentist's income effects of dental therapists employed in general dental practices. The analysis is based on national general dental practice data and the broadest scope of responsibility for dental therapists that their advocates have advanced, including the ability to provide restorations and extractions to adults and children, training for three years, and minimum supervision. Assuming dental therapists provide restorative, extraction, and pulpal services to patients of all ages and dental hygienists continue to deliver all hygiene services, the mean reduction in a general practice costs ranges between 1.57 and 2.36 percent. For dental therapists treating children only, the range is 0.31 to 0.47 percent. The effects on price and utilization are even smaller. In addition, the effects on most dentists' gross income, hours of work, and net income are negative. The estimated economic impact of dental therapists in the United States on private dental practice is very limited; therefore, the demand for dental therapists by private practices also would probably be very limited.

  14. Metal wear in Lillehei-Kaster heart valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Silver, M D; Koppenhoefer, H; Heggtveit, H A; Reif, T H

    1985-08-01

    Ten Lillehei-Kaster heart valve prostheses, in situ for up to 10 years and recovered at surgery or necropsy, were examined by light and scanning electron microscopy. All showed metal wear on the luminal aspect of their struts. The volume of wear related to the duration a prosthesis had been in situ. The worn metal showed distinct, transverse surface corrugations, which became more obvious with time. Aortic prostheses wore more and faster than mitral ones. One strut usually showed more wear than the other, a change likely due to specific manufacturing methods. It is believed that the pattern of wear is caused by a velocity-controlled stick-slip abrasive wear process, resulting from an interaction between the edge of the moving pyrolytic carbon disc, the struts' titanium surface, and the protein coat covering that surface. None of the patients had prosthesis dysfunction attributable to metal wear. Disc escape seems unlikely considering the degree of wear observed after 10 years. Furthermore, the surface corrugations did not appear to cause disc sticking or other problems. However, clinicians might consider monitoring patients who have borne these prostheses for greater than 10 years.

  15. Dental abnormalities in the osteopetrotic rat mutation microphthalmia blanc.

    PubMed

    Cielinski, M J; Iizuka, T; Marks, S C

    1994-11-01

    Dental manifestations of the mild, transient osteopetrosis in the rat mutation microphthalmia blanc (mib) were examined. Eruption of all teeth was delayed in mib rats compared to normal littermates. The delays ranged from 5 days for incisors to 3 and 2 days for the first and second molars. Normal rats had straight incisors in the sagittal plane that exhibited signs of wear, but in mib littermates the incisors were maloccluded, distorted, and showed no signs of wear. Radiographic and histological examination of the dentition of 1- and 4-week-old rats revealed that the apical end of incisors in mib rats failed to extend posteriorly to the third molar region as in normal siblings, but ended at the first molar. Histological examination of longitudinal sections of mandibles through the incisors of neonatal normal and mib rats showed that in 1-day-old mutants the incisor was closely surrounded by alveolar bone to which it was ankylosed. The incisor body in mib rats was also malformed, with an indented apical end. This ankylosis was temporary, being resolved by 3 days. These findings show that neonatal reductions in bone resorption cause incisor defects and delay the eruption of all teeth in mib rats. The malocclusion and distortion of incisors of mib rats are likely caused by temporary ankylosis of incisor matrices to alveolar bone. Taken together, these findings illustrate the concept that bone resorption is an essential and rate-limiting element of tooth eruption.

  16. Dental Hygienist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  17. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  18. Wearing someone else's shoes.

    PubMed

    Rae, Kym

    2010-06-01

    This paper recounts a journey of discovery by a scientist who inadvertently takes on coordination of an ArtsHealth programme. The dynamics of role change are explored showcasing the vulnerabilities and fears that often accompany these career adjustments. The associated ArtsHealth programme (Gomeroi gaaynggal) works with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in Australia throughout their pregnancy to improve understanding of issues that impact the health of themselves and their developing baby. By wearing someone else shoes, the scientist is immersed in the project and must confront issues including skill mix, learning and cultural diversity.

  19. Low-shrink monomers for dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Palin, W M; Fleming, G J P

    2003-04-01

    The main disadvantages of resin-based composites (RBCs) for use in load-bearing posterior restorations include the polymerization shrinkage following curing and inadequate wear resistance in service. These properties are largely influenced by the monomer system and research is currently being undertaken to decrease polymerization shrinkage and improve resin wear characteristics in an attempt to increase RBC restoration longevity. The scope of the current review will identify the development of resin-based restoratives, indicating the reported advantages and disadvantages of resin types routinely used in dental practice today and review the most recent advancements in resin technology.

  20. Sour sweets and acidic beverage consumption are risk indicators for dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Søvik, Jenny Bogstad; Skudutyte-Rysstad, Rasa; Tveit, Anne B; Sandvik, Leiv; Mulic, Aida

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between dental erosive wear and potential background, behavioural and dietary risk indicators and to assess whether there is a dose-response relationship between the level of acidic beverage consumption and dental erosive wear among adolescents. Of 846 adolescents (aged 16-18 years) scheduled for dental recall examinations, 795 (94%) accepted to participate. All participants completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding their background (gender and age), tooth-brushing frequency and dietary habits (the amount and frequency of acidic food and beverage consumption as well as the chosen method and manner of consuming acidic drinks). The association between the presence of erosive lesions and the possible risk indicators was assessed by logistic regression analyses. Of all participants examined, 37% had ≥3 surfaces with dental erosions and were considered to be affected individuals. In the present study, multivariate logistic analyses revealed a significant association between the dental erosive wear and high consumption of sour sweets and sports drinks. The tooth-brushing frequency was not significantly associated with dental erosive wear. Additionally, to the best of our knowledge, the results are the first to indicate a dose-response relationship between the daily consumption of acidic drinks and dental erosive wear.

  1. Wear mechanisms and improvements of wear resistance in cobalt-chromium alloy femoral components in artificial total knee joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Que, Like

    Wear is one of the major causes of artificial total knee arthroplasty (TKA) failure. Wear debris can cause adverse reactions to the surrounding tissue which can ultimately lead to loosening of the prosthesis. The wear behavior of UHMWPE tibial components have been studied extensively, but relatively little attention has been paid to the CoCrMo femoral component. The goal of the present study was to investigate the wear mechanisms of CoCrMo femoral components, to study the effect of CoCrMo alloy surface roughness on the wear of UHMWPE, and to determine the effect of heat treatments on the wear resistance of the CoCrMo implant alloys. The surface roughness of twenty-seven retrieved CoCrMo femoral components was analyzed. A multiple station wear testing machine and a wear fixture attached to an MTS 858 bionix system were built and used for in vitro wear studies of the CoCrMo/UHMWPE bearing couple. Solution and aging treatments were applied to the CoCrMo alloys. A white light interference surface profilometer (WLISP) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to measure the surface roughness and to study wear mechanisms of CoCrMo alloy. An optical microscope was used for alloy microstructure study. X-ray diffraction tests were performed to identify alloy phase transformation after aging. The micro-structure, hardness, and wear resistance of the alloys were studied. Surface roughness was used to quantify alloy wear, and the minimum number of surface roughness measurements required to obtain a reliable and repeatable characterization of surface roughness for a worn alloy surface was determined. The surfaces of the retrieved CoCrMo femoral components appeared to be damaged by metal particles embedded in the UHMWPE tibial component and metal-on-metal wear due to UHMWPE tibial component through-wear. Surface roughness of the femoral components was not correlated with patient age, weight, sex, or length of implantation. In vitro wear tests showed that when the Co

  2. Elucidation of wear mechanisms by ferrographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ferrographic analysis in conjunction with light and scanning electron microscopy is described for the elucidation of wear mechanisms taking place in operating equipment. Example of adhesive wear, abrasive wear, corrosive wear, rolling element fatigue, lubricant breakdown, and other wear modes are illustrated. In addition, the use of magnetic solutions to precipitate nonmagnetic debris from aqueous and nonaqueous fluids is described.

  3. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  4. Dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ashri, Nahid Y.; Ajlan, Sumaiah A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors. PMID:26620980

  5. TOPICAL REVIEW: Tribology of dental materials: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z. R.; Zheng, J.

    2008-06-01

    The application of tribology in dentistry is a growing and rapidly expanding field. Intensive research has been conducted to develop an understanding of dental tribology for successful design and selection of artificial dental materials. In this paper, the anatomy and function of human teeth is presented in brief, three types of current artificial dental materials are summarized, and their advantages and disadvantages, as well as typical clinical applications, are compared based on the literature. Possible tribological damage of tooth structure, which is induced by complex interfacial motion, and friction-wear test methods are reported. According to results obtained by the authors and from the literature, the main progress in the area of dental tribology on both natural teeth and artificial dental materials is reviewed. Problems and challenges are discussed and future research directions for dental tribology are recommended.

  6. Registered Dental Hygienists as Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Janet; Shugars, Daniel A.

    1985-01-01

    Surveys conducted to (1) investigate why dental hygienists choose to become dentists, (2) evaluate their success in dental school, (3) assess the experience of those who had entered dental school, and (4) gauge the level of interest among dental hygienists in applying to dental school are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  7. Tool wear mechanisms in the machining of Nickel based super-alloys: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Waseem; Sun, Jianfei; Sun, Pengfei; Chen, Wuyi; Saleem, Zawar

    2014-06-01

    Nickel based super-alloys are widely employed in aircraft engines and gas turbines due to their high temperature strength, corrosion resistance and, excellent thermal fatigue properties. Conversely, these alloys are very difficult to machine and cause rapid wear of the cutting tool, frequent tool changes are thus required resulting in low economy of the machining process. This study provides a detailed review of the tool wear mechanism in the machining of nickel based super-alloys. Typical tool wear mechanisms found by different researchers are analyzed in order to find out the most prevalent wear mechanism affecting the tool life. The review of existing works has revealed interesting findings about the tool wear mechanisms in the machining of these alloys. Adhesion wear is found to be the main phenomenon leading to the cutting tool wear in this study.

  8. Risk Assessment for Tooth Wear.

    PubMed

    Kontaxopoulou, Isavella; Alam, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    Tooth wear has an increasing prevalence in the UK population. The aetiology is commonly multifactorial, and the aetiopathology is through a combination of erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is associated with intrinsic or extrinsic acids, and therefore subjects with reflux disease and eating disorders are at increased risk. Fruit juice, fruits and carbonated drink consumption, frequency of consumption and specific habits are also risk factors. Attrition is more prevalent in bruxists. Other habits need to be considered when defining the risk of tooth wear. Abrasion is usually associated with toothbrushing and toothpastes, especially in an already acidic environment. Patients with extensive lesions that affect dentin may be at higher risk, as well as those presenting with unstained lesions. Monitoring of the progress of tooth wear is recommended to identify those with active tooth wear. Indices for tooth wear are a helpful aid.

  9. Relationship of children's anxiety to their potential dental health behaviour.

    PubMed

    Wright, F A

    1980-08-01

    In this study of 200 New Zealand schoolchildren aged 7-13 years, a questionnaire interview was used to gain information related to estimating dental anxiety and general illness anxiety. Information related to sociodemographic differences, belief differences, and an estimate of potential health behaviour was also collected. Oral examinations were performed and the number of dental restorations present recorded. Dental anxiety was associated with memory of pain during a dental visit. The number of restorations present, and a history of pain during a dental visit, were important predictors of illness anxiety. Neither dental anxiety nor illness anxiety operating alone provided an estimate of future dental health behaviour. Dental anxiety and illness anxiety operated through a complex interplay of variables. A stepwise multiple regression technique was used to determine the possible pathways to potential dental health behaviour. Perceived vulnerability to dental caries and perceived severity of dental disease were important in the prediction of potential denture wearing; school attended and ethnic background were useful predictors of potential extraction seeking; and school grade and level of perceived internal control were predictors of potential preventive visitation.

  10. Dental sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... few quick steps. There is no drilling or scraping of the molars. Your dentist will: Clean the ... Dental sealants. Updated October 19, 2016. ADA.org Web site. www.ada.org/en/member-center/oral- ...

  11. Dental Sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... form does not collect any actual information. External Web Site Policy This graphic notice ( ) means that you are ... the link. Home Contact Us Viewers and Players Site Map FOIA Web Policies Privacy Policy National Institute of Dental and ...

  12. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental... prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental materials to...

  13. Low friction wear resistant graphene films

    DOEpatents

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Berman, Diana; Erdemir, Ali

    2017-02-07

    A low friction wear surface with a coefficient of friction in the superlubric regime including graphene and nanoparticles on the wear surface is provided, and methods of producing the low friction wear surface are also provided. A long lifetime wear resistant surface including graphene exposed to hydrogen is provided, including methods of increasing the lifetime of graphene containing wear surfaces by providing hydrogen to the wear surface.

  14. Dental Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Symington, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Patients with dental emergencies sometimes present to their physician. This article outlines the role of the physician in the management of dental patients who have suffered traumatic injuries, postoperative hemorrhage, pain, and infection. It deals with those difficulties for which the physician may easily prescribe treatment and outlines the treatment that would be undertaken by a dentist who receives such a patient on referral. PMID:21253249

  15. Switch wear leveling

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  16. Tooth wear and the role of salivary measures in general practice patients

    PubMed Central

    Rothen, Marilynn; Scott, JoAnna; Cunha-Cruz, Joana

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to investigate the association between tooth wear and salivary measures in a random sample of patients from practices of dentist members of a practice-based research network. Materials and methods Patients completed a questionnaire on oral self-care, health, dietary habits, medications, and socio-demographic variables. Six salivary characteristics (consistency, resting salivary flow, resting salivary pH, stimulated salivary flow, stimulated salivary pH, and buffering capacity) were measured, and a dental examination included categorizing patients according to the dentist’s judgment of the degree of tooth wear (i.e., none/minimal, some, or severe/extreme). Bivariate and multinomial logistic regression models were used to relate salivary characteristics and other factors to the outcome of tooth wear. Results Data are reported from 1,323 patients (age range 16–97 years) from 61 practices. Patient age, gender, number of teeth, and perception of dry mouth were associated with tooth wear, but salivary and dietary factors were either weakly or not related. Conclusions The findings of this cross-sectional assessment suggest that using these salivary tests and dietary assessments in real-life clinical settings is unlikely to be useful in assessing tooth wear risk. Suggestions are offered about risk assessment for tooth wear. Clinical relevance Assessing a dental patient’s risk of tooth wear using salivary measures and dietary assessments as described is not recommended for general dental practice until stronger evidence exists indicating its utility. PMID:24647789

  17. Wear resistance and wear mechanisms in polymer + metal composites.

    PubMed

    Olea-Mejia, Oscar; Brostow, Witold; Buchman, Eli

    2010-12-01

    We have investigated composites containing metallic micro-size and nano-sized particles as the 10 wt% dispersed phase. Branched low density polyethylene (LDPE) was the matrix. Microsized metals were Al, Ag and Ni; nanosized metals were Al and Ag. Several mechanisms of wear are observed in function of the kind and size of metal used: deformation, delamination, abrasion, adhesion and rolls formation. The presence of Ag particles increases the wear rate as compared to neat LDPE. The presence of Al particles lowers the wear of LDPE significantly; nanoparticles are more effective than microparticles.

  18. Dynamic superlubricity and the elimination of wear on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Mark A; Wiesmann, Dorothea; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2009-09-01

    One approach to ultrahigh-density data storage involves the use of arrays of atomic force microscope probes to read and write data on a thin polymer film, but damage to the ultrasharp silicon probe tips caused by mechanical wear has proved problematic. Here, we demonstrate the effective elimination of wear on a tip sliding on a polymer surface over a distance of 750 m by modulating the force acting on the tip-sample contact. Friction measurements as a function of modulation frequency and amplitude indicate that a reduction of friction is responsible for the reduction in wear to below our detection limit. In addition to its relevance to data storage, this approach could also reduce wear in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems and other applications of scanning probe microscopes.

  19. Dynamic superlubricity and the elimination of wear on the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, Mark A.; Wiesmann, Dorothea; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2009-09-01

    One approach to ultrahigh-density data storage involves the use of arrays of atomic force microscope probes to read and write data on a thin polymer film, but damage to the ultrasharp silicon probe tips caused by mechanical wear has proved problematic. Here, we demonstrate the effective elimination of wear on a tip sliding on a polymer surface over a distance of 750 m by modulating the force acting on the tip-sample contact. Friction measurements as a function of modulation frequency and amplitude indicate that a reduction of friction is responsible for the reduction in wear to below our detection limit. In addition to its relevance to data storage, this approach could also reduce wear in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems and other applications of scanning probe microscopes.

  20. [Allergies to dental materials and dental pharmacologic agents].

    PubMed

    Gall, H

    1983-07-01

    Allergic reactions to dental materials and remedies cause stomatitis in the patient and a contact dermatitis in the dental personnel. Topical contact (acrylic resin denture materials, heat accumulation, plaques on the denture) and endogenic (symptom of internal and psychiatric illnesses) factors are the cause for denture sore mouth. In metallic alloys corrosions and electric currents can effect an irritation to the oral mucosa. The application of amalgam fillings can possibly result in a mercurialism. Dental remedies used for treatment of wounds and dental roots are potent sensitizers. Surface anesthetics with tetracaine are the most frequent contact allergens for dentists. Injectable local anesthetics produce anaphylactic type reactions as well as toxic side-effects in the patient.

  1. Wear Behavior and Mechanism of H13 Steel in Different Environmental Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinxing; Zhou, Yin; Cao, Huan; Li, Yixian; Wang, Lan; Wang, Shuqi

    2016-10-01

    Sliding wear tests were performed for H13 steel in atmosphere, distilled water, 3.5% NaCl, and 5% NaOH water solutions under various loads on a pin-on-disk wear tester. The results showed that for different environmental media, the wear rate of H13 steel in atmosphere was the maximum and that in 3.5% NaCl solution was the minimum. The maximum wear rate in atmosphere was caused by a larger quantity of heat produced in the friction process. In this case, the adhesive wear prevailed. In three wet environments, the mild wear prevailed due to the good lubrication and cooling capacity of media as well as corrosion product film on worn surface. In distilled water, the wear mechanism was a typical fatigue wear. On the other hand, in 3.5% NaCl and 5% NaOH solutions, corrosive wear prevailed. The minimum wear rate in 3.5% NaCl solution was attributed to the protective function of corrosion product film. On the contrary, noncompact corrosion product film in 5% NaOH solution resulted in higher wear rate.

  2. The Central Role of Wear Debris in Periprosthetic Osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Koulouvaris, Panagiotis; Nestor, Bryan J.; Sculco, Thomas P.

    2006-01-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis remains the leading complication of total hip arthroplasty, often resulting in aseptic loosening of the implant, and a requirement for revision surgery. Wear-generated particular debris is the main cause of initiating this destructive process. The purpose of this article is to review recent advances in our understanding of how wear debris causes osteolysis, and emergent strategies for the avoidance and treatment of this disease. The most important cellular target for wear debris is the macrophage, which responds to particle challenge in two distinct ways, both of which contribute to increased bone resorption. First, it is well known that wear debris activates proinflammatory signaling, which leads to increased osteoclast recruitment and activation. More recently, it has been established that wear also inhibits the protective actions of antiosteoclastogenic cytokines such as interferon gamma, thus promoting differentiation of macrophages to bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Osteoblasts, fibroblasts, and possibly lymphocytes may also be involved in responses to wear. At a molecular level, wear particles activate MAP kinase cascades, NFκB and other transcription factors, and induce expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling. Strategies to reduce osteolysis by choosing bearing surface materials with reduced wear properties (such as metal-on-metal) should be balanced by awareness that reducing particle size may increase biological activity. Finally, although therapeutic agents against proinflammatory mediators [such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)] and osteoclasts (bisphosphonates and molecules blocking RANKL signaling) have shown promise in animal models, no approved treatments are yet available to osteolysis patients. Considerable efforts are underway to develop such therapies, and to identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:18751821

  3. Roughness Measurement of Dental Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulev, Assen; Roussev, Ilia; Karpuzov, Simeon; Stoilov, Georgi; Ignatova, Detelina; See, Constantin von; Mitov, Gergo

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a roughness measurement of zirconia ceramics, widely used for dental applications. Surface roughness variations caused by the most commonly used dental instruments for intraoral grinding and polishing are estimated. The applied technique is simple and utilizes the speckle properties of the scattered laser light. It could be easily implemented even in dental clinic environment. The main criteria for roughness estimation is the average speckle size, which varies with the roughness of zirconia. The algorithm used for the speckle size estimation is based on the normalized autocorrelation approach.

  4. [Outcomes of Infection Control Team Inspections at the Dental Hospital, Tokyo Medical and Dental University].

    PubMed

    Sunakawa, Mitsuhiro; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Okihata, Rie; Tsuruoka, Hiromi; Yamada, Yuichi; Adachi, Toshiko; Izumi, Yuichi

    2015-07-01

    In the Dental Hospital, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, an infection control team (ICT) has been formed to inspect each diagnosis department of clinics and wards in order to identify problems regarding nosocomial infection control. In this study, we analyzed the inspection reports and highlighted the following serious problems: 1) inadequate hygienic hand-washing for out- and in-patient treatment, 2) incomplete wearing of personal protective equipment (PPE) by dental health care workers, 3) necessity of environmental improvement in the clinics, and 4) cross-infection risk induced by. the continuous use of treatment devices without appropriate disinfection. The ICT provided feedback to the inspected departments, suggesting solutions to problems regarding nosocomial infection control. In order to enhance infection control in our hospital, dental healthcare practitioners must make further efforts on nosocomial infection control and prevention, and act according to their position by continuously educating students and enlightening hospital staff about the importance of infection control.

  5. Graphitic polymer nanocomposites: Wear performance and wear debris analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tian

    With the addition of appropriate nanofillers, nanocomposites have been shown to be an effective avenue to achieve a multitude of enhanced properties, even extending to multi-functionalities not normally considered possible for conventional polymer materials. However, the structure and properties of polymeric nanocomposites can be influenced by some environmental factors in practical use, such as wear and temperature, due to the nature of viscoelasticity of polymer matrix. The large interfacial areas exist between matrix and nanofillers are also susceptible to the wear/temperature-related changes. In this work, I was devoted to developing high wear and/or thermal performance graphitic nanofiller reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. Two critical issues, including appropriate filler-matrix interactions and proper dispersion of the nano-reinforcement, were addressed through the effective nanofiller surface modification. Wear, thermal and mechanical properties of the resultant nanocomposites were systematically investigated. Meanwhile, the wear debris generated on the sliding surface of composite materials was analyzed morphologically and quantitatively. In particular, the research regarding the possibility of determining the effects of wear and thermal processes on the nanocomposites by detecting dielectric signals over the lifetime of polymeric materials was conducted. Correlations that exist between effects of wear or thermal processes and dielectric properties of the nanocomposites were then explored. Based on the studies of HDPE nanocomposites, high quality ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) nanocomposite reinforced by graphitic nanofillers was finally extended in this thesis. UHMWPE is an extremely viscous polymer and thus cannot be processed conventionally, typically resulting in dispersion issues far worse than that of other composite systems. The research presented aims at solving the issue by using ultrasonication-assisted melt

  6. A study of the abrasive resistance of metal alloys with applications in dental prosthetic fixators.

    PubMed

    Gil, F J; Fernández, E; Manero, J M; Planell, J A; Sabrià, J; Cortada, M; Giner, L

    1995-01-01

    Wear is one of the main surface failure mechanisms in materials and it will play a leading role in substitutive dental biomaterials. The aim of the present study is to compare the abrasive wear of different metallic materials used in dental applications. The results show that the abrasive wear of alloys based on precious metals such as Pt, Pd, Au and Ag is higher than for Ti and Ti based alloys. The alloy with the highest wear resistance is the Co-Cr which exhibits as well the highest hardness and Young's modulus. Since the method corresponds to a well-established abrasive wear standard, the behaviour of the different materials can be easily compared.

  7. Hardfacing fights wear in oil sands operation

    SciTech Connect

    Llewellyn, R.; Tuite, C.

    1995-03-01

    Wear attack is responsible for high production losses and over $40 million per year in equipment repairs and replacement costs at Syncrude`s synthetic crude oil plant near Fort McMurray in Northern Alberta. Most of this damage is caused by the fine quartz particle constituents which predominate in oil sands. It occurs in a multiplicity of forms which can be classified into three primary mechanisms: Sliding abrasive wear and sporadic impact, which affects mainly mining equipment; Slurry abrasion and erosion, which occur in bitumen extraction, separation plants, and in tailings lines; and High-temperature erosion, which is often augmented by corrosion in bitumen upgrading operations. Process streams in this area also contain fine coke particles and catalyst debris. The paper gives an overview of Syncrude`s operations in mining, extraction, and upgrading, then describes the following: wear materials and protection systems, surface engineering systems, weld deposited hardfacing, benefits, surface modification system experience, thermal spray coating experience, disk centrifuge bowls, investigation of plasma arc spraying, and combating pump erosion.

  8. They shall wear fringes.

    PubMed

    Sugar, M

    1999-01-01

    The multiple functions of clothes include utility, protection, rivalry, disguise, camouflage, display for seduction purposes, aggression, totemism, and status. Here the focus is on a decorative and distinctive hierarchical aspect of ancient dress, the tsitsit or fringes, whose original function is long absent, but that has endured for 3,500 years in Judaism. The beginning of their use beyond the totemic appears related to issues of changing identity from slavery to liberty, endowing noble status, exhibitionism, a symbol of identity, identification with the aggressor, a talisman, and potency. It is conceptualized that they became a symbol, or a specifier, that helped promote group cohesion in ex-slaves who were frightened, dependent, anxious, and not hopeful about their future. The tsitsit aided the development of a new identity and made all Israelites equal and noble to the observer. The durability of this symbol to the present is evident in its daily wear, as an accompaniment to daily prayers, as well as in its use as a burial shroud for males. It appears that the tsitsit have additional multiple functions. These are the promise of oral and genital satisfaction, and the pleasure of the after-life, superego warnings and control of sexual impulses, protection, survival value, and affirmation. Since they offer sublimation with acceptable gratification of instincts, the tsitsit have become ritualized and endure.

  9. Wear properties of a novel resin composite compared to human enamel and other restorative materials.

    PubMed

    D'Arcangelo, C; Vanini, L; Rondoni, G D; Pirani, M; Vadini, M; Gattone, M; De Angelis, F

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the two-body wear resistance of human enamel, a pressable glass-ceramic (Imagine PressX), a type 3 gold alloy (Aurocast8), three resins composites currently available on the market (Enamel plus HRi, Filtek Supreme XTE, Ceram.X duo), and one recently introduced resin composite (Enamel plus HRi-Function). Resin composites were tested after simple light curing and after a further heat polymerization cycle. Ten cylindrical specimens (7 mm in diameter) were manufactured with each dental material according to standard laboratory procedures. Ten flat enamel specimens were obtained from freshly extracted human molars and included in the control group. All samples were subjected to a two-body wear test in a dual-axis chewing simulator over up to 120,000 loading cycles, against yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal cusps. Wear resistance was analyzed by measuring the vertical substance loss (mm) and the volume loss (mm(3)). Antagonist wear (mm) was also recorded. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (wear depth and volume loss) and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA on ranks (antagonist wear). Heat-cured HRi function and Aurocast8 showed similar mean values for wear depth and volumetric loss, and their results did not statistically differ in comparison with the human enamel.

  10. Intelligent Detection of Drill Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. I.; Chen, W. Y.; Anatharaman, K. S.

    1998-11-01

    Backpropagation neural networks (BPNs) were used for on-line detection of drill wear. The neural network consisted of three layers: input, hidden, and output. The input vector comprised drill size, feed rate, spindle speed, and eight features obtained by processing the thrust and torque signals. The output was the drill wear state which either usable or failure. Drilling experiments with various drill sizes, feed rates and spindle speeds were carried out. The learning process was performed effectively by utilising backpropagation with smoothing and an activation function slope. The on-line detection of drill wear states using BPNs achieved 100% reliability even when the drill size, feed rate and spindle speed were changed. In other words, the developed on-line drill wear detection systems have very high robustness and hence can be used in very complex production environments, such as flexible manufacturing systems.

  11. Wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Y. S.; Kingsbury, G. R.

    1998-02-01

    A detailed review of wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI) was undertaken to examine the potential applications of this material for wear parts, as an alternative to steels, alloyed and white irons, bronzes, and other competitive materials. Two modes of wear were studied: adhesive (frictional) dry sliding and abrasive wear. In the rotating dry sliding tests, wear behavior of the base material (a stationary block) was considered in relationship to countersurface (steel shaft) wear. In this wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was only one-fourth that of pearlitic ductile iron (DI) grade 100-70-03; the wear rates of aluminum bronze and leaded-tin bronze, respectively, were 3.7 and 3.3 times greater than that of ADI. Only quenched DI with a fully martensitic matrix slightly outperformed ADI. No significant difference was observed in the wear of steel shafts running against ADI and quenched DI. The excellent wear performance of ADI and its countersurface, combined with their relatively low friction coefficient, indicate potential for dry sliding wear applications. In the abrasive wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was comparable to that of alloyed hardened AISI 4340 steel, and approximately one-half that of hardened medium-carbon AISI 1050 steel and of white and alloyed cast irons. The excellent wear resistance of ADI may be attributed to the strain-affected transformation of high-carbon austenite to martensite that takes place in the surface layer during the wear tests.

  12. Gaze Tracking System for User Wearing Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Su Yeong; Cho, Chul Woo; Lee, Hyeon Chang; Lee, Won Oh; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2014-01-01

    Conventional gaze tracking systems are limited in cases where the user is wearing glasses because the glasses usually produce noise due to reflections caused by the gaze tracker's lights. This makes it difficult to locate the pupil and the specular reflections (SRs) from the cornea of the user's eye. These difficulties increase the likelihood of gaze detection errors because the gaze position is estimated based on the location of the pupil center and the positions of the corneal SRs. In order to overcome these problems, we propose a new gaze tracking method that can be used by subjects who are wearing glasses. Our research is novel in the following four ways: first, we construct a new control device for the illuminator, which includes four illuminators that are positioned at the four corners of a monitor. Second, our system automatically determines whether a user is wearing glasses or not in the initial stage by counting the number of white pixels in an image that is captured using the low exposure setting on the camera. Third, if it is determined that the user is wearing glasses, the four illuminators are turned on and off sequentially in order to obtain an image that has a minimal amount of noise due to reflections from the glasses. As a result, it is possible to avoid the reflections and accurately locate the pupil center and the positions of the four corneal SRs. Fourth, by turning off one of the four illuminators, only three corneal SRs exist in the captured image. Since the proposed gaze detection method requires four corneal SRs for calculating the gaze position, the unseen SR position is estimated based on the parallelogram shape that is defined by the three SR positions and the gaze position is calculated. Experimental results showed that the average gaze detection error with 20 persons was about 0.70° and the processing time is 63.72 ms per each frame. PMID:24473283

  13. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  14. Influence of dental materials on dental MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, AJ; Proff, PC; Richter, E-J; Jakob, PM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. Methods: A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5 T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. Results: The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus® (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold–ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200 ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient’s mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. Conclusions: A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research. PMID:23610088

  15. Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Ralph C.

    1988-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most prevalent diseases afflicting mankind. It reached a peak in the 1950s but has been declining drastically in recent years in children and young adults. This article describes the three contributing factors in dental caries: microbial plaque, tooth susceptibility, and diet, and discusses practical preventive measures which help to reduce caries incidence. Some of these, such as vaccines and antimicrobial varnishes, are still in the research stages, while others, such as sucrose substitutes, low-calorie sweeteners, and limitation of frequency of sugar snacks are well established and can be promoted by family physicians. PMID:21253193

  16. Factors affecting polyethylene wear in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Markus S; Stachowiak, Gwidon W

    2002-02-01

    A complication of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is fatigue-type wear, which can destroy a tibial inlay in <10 years. This deleterious wear mechanism occurs during cyclic loading if the yield stress of polyethylene is exceeded. Because increased stress on and within the polyethylene inlay is associated with increased wear, it is important to reduce the inlay stress by either activity restrictions or conformity changes of design. All stress parameters are more sensitive to conformity changes (eg, design changes) than to load changes (eg, activity restrictions). However, the reduction of stress on and within the polyethylene through increased conformity will increase the stress at the tibial fixation interfaces. An attempt was made to solve this problem with the introduction of mobile-bearing designs. Many mobile-bearing designs exist with good long-term results. One important difference among the various designs is the amount of flexion range with full conformity between the femoral component and the tibial inlay. Although a single radius design reduces polyethylene stress throughout the flexion range, it may be disadvantageous for a revision design to intraoperatively adapt to different degrees of constraint. Aseptic loosening and osteolysis due to small abrasive and adhesive wear particles have also been reported as a cause of failure. The design and material parameters affecting polyethylene wear in TKAs, as well as the potential detrimental effects of wear particle size, are the key issues in defining the life of a TKA.

  17. Fractal characterization of wear-erosion surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.; Tylczak, J.

    1999-12-01

    Wear erosion is a complex phenomenon resulting in highly distorted and deformed surface morphologies. Most wear surface features have been described only qualitatively. In this study wear surfaces features were quantified using fractal analysis. The ability to assign numerical values to wear-erosion surfaces makes possible mathematical expressions that will enable wear mechanisms to be predicted and understood. Surface characterization came from wear-erosion experiments that included varying the erosive materials, the impact velocity, and the impact angle. Seven fractal analytical techniques were applied to micrograph images of wear-erosion surfaces. Fourier analysis was the most promising. Fractal values obtained were consistent with visual observations and provided a unique wear-erosion parameter unrelated to wear rate. In this study stainless steel was evaluated as a function of wear erosion conditions.

  18. Wear Assessment of Conical Pick used in Coal Cutting Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, Saurabh; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath; Hloch, Sergej

    2015-09-01

    Conical pick is a widely used tool for cutting coal in mines. It has a cemented carbide tip inserted in a steel body. Cemented carbide has been in use for many years for coal/rock cutting because it has the optimum combination of hardness, toughness and resistance against abrasive wear. As coal/rock is a heterogeneous substance, the cutting tool has to undergo various obstructions at the time of excavation that cause the tool to wear out. The cracks and fractures developing in the cemented carbide limit the life of the tool. For a long time, different wear mechanisms have been studied to develop improved grades of cemented carbide with high wear resistance properties. The research is still continuing. Moreover, due to the highly unpredictable nature of coal/rock, it is not easy to understand the wear mechanisms. In the present work, an attempt has been made to understand the wear mechanisms in four conical picks, which were used in a continuous miner machine for underground mining of coal. The wearing pattern of the conical pick indicates damage in its cemented carbide tip as well as the steel body. The worn out parts of the tools have been critically examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) point analysis. Mainly four types of wear mechanisms, namely, coal/rock intermixing, plastic deformation, rock channel formation and crushing and cracking, have been detected. The presence of coal/rock material and their respective concentrations in the selected area of worn out surface were observed using the spectra generated by EDX analysis.

  19. The wear of cross-linked polyethylene against itself.

    PubMed

    Joyce, T J; Ash, H E; Unsworth, A

    1996-01-01

    Cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) may have an application as a material for an all-plastic surface replacement finger joint. It is inexpensive, biocompatible and can be injection-moulded into the complex shapes that are found on the ends of the finger bones. Further, the cross-linking of polyethylene has significantly improved its mechanical properties. Therefore, the opportunity exists for an all-XLPE joint, and so the wear characteristics of XLPE sliding against itself have been investigated. Wear tests were carried out on both reciprocating pin-on-plate machines and a finger function simulator. The reciprocating pin-on-plate machines had pins loaded at 10 N and 40 N. All pin-on-plate tests show wear factors from the plates very much greater than those of the pins. After 349 km of sliding, a mean wear factor of 0.46 x 10(-6) mm3/N m was found for the plates compared with 0.021 x 10(-6) mm3/N m for the pins. A fatigue mechanism may be causing this phenomenon of greater plate wear. Tests using the finger function simulator give an average wear rate of 0.22 x 10(-6) mm3/N m after 368 km. This sliding distance is equivalent to 12.5 years of use in vivo. The wear factors found were comparable with those of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) against a metallic counterface and, therefore, as the loads across the finger joint are much less than those across the knee or the hip, it is probable that an all-XLPE finger joint will be viable from a wear point of view.

  20. Assessment of Tooth Wear Among Glass Factory Workers: WHO 2013 Oral Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Nagesh; Asawa, Kailash; Tak, Mridula; Bapat, Salil; Gupta, Vivek Vardhan

    2015-01-01

    Background Glass factory workers are often exposed to the hazardous environment that leads to deleterious oral health and subsequently, general health. We planned to determine the effects of the particulates present in the milieu on the tooth wear among workers. Aim To assess tooth wear among glass factory workers in Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. Settings and Design A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted among 936 glass workers in Jaipur, Rajasthan, India from January-June 2014. Materials and Methods A survey proforma was designed for tooth wear evaluation with the help of WHO Oral Health Assessment form 2013 (for adults). Information regarding oral health practices, adverse habits and dietary habits, demographic details was gathered and clinical parameters were recorded. Statistical Analysis The Chi–square test, t–test, One-way Analysis of Variance and a Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. Results The most prevalent form of erosion was enamel erosion (589, 62.93%) with few subjects of deeper dentinal erosion and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.001). Dental erosion was found to be higher among males compared to females. Years of experience and educational status were identified as best predictors for dental erosion. Conclusion It was concluded that there was considerable evidence of dental erosion found among the factory workers. Due to ignorance on social, cultural and health aspects, professional approach with regular dental care services for detection of early symptoms and planning of preventive strategies is warranted. PMID:26436050

  1. Contact dermatitis from beryllium in dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Haberman, A L; Pratt, M; Storrs, F J

    1993-03-01

    An increasing number of metals with the potential to cause allergic contact dermatitis have found their way into dental alloys for economic and practical reasons. 2 patients are reported who developed gingivitis adjacent to the Rexillium III alloy in their dental prostheses. Patch testing demonstrated positive reactions to beryllium sulfate, a component of the alloy. Components of dental alloys and the mechanism of the contact dermatitis are discussed.

  2. Holography And Holometry Applications In Dental Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenborg, George C.

    1987-06-01

    The earliest reference to holographic applications appeared in the dental literature in 1972 when Wictorin, Bjelkhagen and Abramson described a method to study elastic deformation of defective gold solder joints in simulated fixed bridges. Their paper, published in the Swedish dental literature, offered a concise presentation of the interferometry technique which led to the development of other research applications of holographic interferometry(holometry) in dentistry. In this presentation, the development and application of the interferometry technique in the dental field will be discussed. Various interesting and potentially useful applications of holography have appeared in the dental literature over the past decade. Some of these, which will be discussed, include the use of holograms as a storage medium for dental study models, multiplexing of computer(CT) scan sections to form white light viewable holograms and the potential application of holographic training aids in the teaching of the basic courses of dental anatomy and restorative dentistry. In addition, some unique related applications will be mentioned including a laser reflection method for accurate non-contact measurement of tooth mobility/movement and a technique for contour mapping of occlusal surfaces to measure wear of restorative materials.

  3. Ignition of a Combustible Atmosphere by Incandescent Carbon Wear Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Swikert, Max A.; Johnson, Robert L.

    1960-01-01

    A study was made to determine whether carbon wear particles from carbon elements in sliding contact with a metal surface were sufficiently hot to cause ignition of a combustible atmosphere. In some machinery, electric potential differences and currents may appear at the carbon-metal interface. For this reason the effect of these voltages and currents on the ability of carbon wear particles to cause ignition was evaluated. The test specimens used in the investigation were carbon vanes taken from a fuel pump and flat 21-inch-diameter 2 metal disks (440-C stainless steel) representing the pump housing. During each experiment a vane was loaded against a disk with a 0.5-pound force, and the disk was rotated to give a surface speed of 3140 feet per minute. The chamber of the apparatus that housed the vane and the disk was filled with a combustible mixture of air and propane. Various voltages and amperages were applied across the vane-disk interface. Experiments were conducted at temperatures of 75, 350, 400, and 450 F. Fires were produced by incandescent carbon wear particles obtained at conditions of electric potential as low as 106 volts and 0.3 ampere at 400 F. Ignitions were obtained only with carbon wear particles produced with an electric potential across the carbon-vane-disk interface. No ignitions were obtained with carbon wear particles produced in the absence of this potential; also, the potential difference produced no ignitions in the absence of carbon wear particles. A film supplement showing ignition by incandescent wear particles is available.

  4. Selected fretting-wear-resistant coatings for Ti-6 pct Al-4 pct V alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The ability of several wear-resistant coatings to reduce fretting in the Ti-6Al-4V alloy is investigated. The experimental apparatus and procedures for evaluating fretting in uncoated Ti-6Al-4V alloy and in the alloy with plasma-sprayed coatings, polymer-bonded coating, and surface treatments are described. The wear volume and wear rate for the alloys are measured and compared. It is concluded that Al2O3 with 13 percent TiO2, preoxidation and nitride surface treatments, and MoS2 sputtering result in wear-resistant surfaces; however, the polyimide coating is the most wear resistant coating in both dry and moist air, and it causes the least wear to the uncoated alloy surface.

  5. Comparative investigation of smooth polycrystalline diamond films on dental burs by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sein, Htet; Ahmed, Waqar; Rego, Christopher; Jackson, Mark; Polini, Riccardo

    2006-04-01

    Depositions of hot filament chemical vapor-deposited diamond on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) rotary cutting dental burs are presented. Conventional dental tools made of sintered polycrystalline diamond have a number of problems associated with the heterogeneity of the crystallite, decreased cutting efficiency, and short life. A preferential (111) faceted diamond was obtained after 15 h of deposition at a growth rate of 1.1 µm/h. Diamond-coated WC-Co dental burs and conventional sintered burs are mainly used in turning, milling, and drilling operations for machining metal ceramic hard alloys such as CoCr, composite teeth, and aluminum alloy in the dental laboratory. The influence of structure, the mechanical characteristics of both diamond grains and hard alloys on the wear behavior, as well as the regimen of grinding on diamond wear are considered. Erosion wear properties are also investigated under air-sand erosion testing. After machining with excessive cutting performance, calculations can be made on flank and crater wear areas. Diamond-coated WC-Co dental burs offered significantly better erosion and wear resistance compared with uncoated WC-Co tools and sintered burs.

  6. Dental Training Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  7. Finding Dental Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Finding Dental Care Where can I find low-cost dental care? Dental schools often have clinics that allow dental ... can I find more information? See Finding Low Cost Dental Care . ​​​​ WWNRightboxRadEditor2 Contact Us 1-866-232-4528 nidcrinfo@ ...

  8. Fractal characterization of wear-erosion surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, James C.; Tylczak, Joseph H.

    1999-12-01

    Wear erosion is a complex phenomenon resulting in highly distorted and deformed surface morphologies. Most wear surface features have been described only qualitatively. In this study wear surfaces features were quantified using fractal analysis. The ability to assign numerical values to wear-erosion surfaces makes possible mathematical expressions that will enable wear mechanisms to be predicted and understood. Surface characterization came from wear-erosion experiments that included varying the erosive materials, the impact velocity, and the impact angle. Seven fractal analytical techniques were applied to micrograph images of wear-erosion surfaces. Fourier analysis was the most promising. Fractal values obtained were consistent with visual observations and provided a unique wear-erosion parameter unrelated to wear rate.

  9. Wear resistance of ductile irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Y. S.

    1994-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the wear resistance of different grades of ductile iron as alterna-tives to high- tensile- strength alloyed and inoculated gray irons and bronzes for machine- tool and high-pressure hydraulic components. Special test methods were employed to simulate typical conditions of reciprocating sliding wear with and without abrasive- contaminated lubricant for machine and press guideways. Quantitative relationships were established among wear rate, microstructure and micro-hardness of structural constituents, and nodule size of ductile iron. The frictional wear resistance of duc-tile iron as a bearing material was tested with hardened steel shafts using standard test techniques under continuous rotating movement with lubricant. Lubricated sliding wear tests on specimens and compo-nents for hydraulic equipment and apparatus were carried out on a special rig with reciprocating motion, simulating the working conditions in a piston/cylinder unit in a pressure range from 5 to 32 MPa. Rig and field tests on machine- tool components and units and on hydraulic parts have confirmed the test data.

  10. Dental education and dental practice.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J R

    1984-01-01

    This paper relates recent modes of dental practice to changes that the public and government are likely to ask the health care professions to make in the future. As usual they are asking for the best of all worlds. First, that we maintain the clinical model to the highest standards of personal dental care based and tested against the best research at our disposal, whilst we ensure there is no reduction in the high technical standards for which british dentists have a reputation. Second, that the profession is required to consider ways of providing care on the medicosocial model for the whole community at an economic level the country will afford. The broad changes in dental education have been reviewed, from the technical apprenticeship to the establishment of strong university departments in teaching hospitals. The importance of a sound biomedical foundation and of research both to education and the credibility of dental practice as a primary health care profession is stressed if the profession is to retain its position as a sister to medicine and not slide down to that of a technical ancillary. PMID:6374141

  11. Dermatitis from a chromium dental plate.

    PubMed

    Hubler, W R; Hubler, W R

    1983-09-01

    Systemic absorption of metal or metallic salts from dental and orthopedic surgical implants can produce a cutaneous allergic dermatitis in susceptible individuals. Mercury, nickel and cobalt are the most common metals to elicit such systemic allergic reactions from chronic internal exposure. A case is presented of a generalized eczematoid dermatitis apparently caused by allergy to chromium liberated from a metal dental plate.

  12. Special cluster issue on tribocorrosion of dental materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Mathew T.; Stack, Margaret M.

    2013-10-01

    Tribocorrosion affects all walks of life from oil and gas conversion to biomedical materials. Wear can interact with corrosion to enhance it or impede it; conversely, corrosion can enhance or impede wear. The understanding of the interactions between physical and chemical phenomena has been greatly assisted by electrochemical and microscopic techniques. In dentistry, it is well recognized that erosion due to dissolution (a term physicists use to denote wear) of enamel can result in tooth decay; however, the effects of the oral environment, i.e. pH levels, electrochemical potential and any interactions due to the forces involved in chewing are not well understood. This special cluster issue includes investigations on the fundamentals of wear-corrosion interactions involved in simulated oral environments, including candidate dental implant and veneer materials. The issue commences with a fundamental study of titanium implants and this is followed by an analysis of the behaviour of commonly used temporomandibular devices in a synovial fluid-like environment. The analysis of tribocorrosion mechanisms of Ti6Al4V biomedical alloys in artificial saliva with different pHs is addressed and is followed by a paper on fretting wear, on hydroxyapatite-titanium composites in simulated body fluid, supplemented with protein (bovine serum albumin). The effects of acid treatments on tooth enamel, and as a surface engineering technique for dental implants, are investigated in two further contributions. An analysis of the physiological parameters of intraoral wear is addressed; this is followed by a study of candidate dental materials in common beverages such as tea and coffee with varying acidity and viscosity and the use of wear maps to identify the safety zones for prediction of material degradation in such conditions. Hence, the special cluster issue consists of a range of tribocorrosion contributions involving many aspects of dental tribocorrosion, from analysis of physiological

  13. DENTAL ABNORMALITIES OF EIGHT WILD QINLING GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA QINLINGENSIS), SHAANXI PROVINCE, CHINA.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yipeng; Chen, Si; Chao, Yanqiao; Pu, Tianchun; Xu, Hongqian; Liu, Xiaobin; Zhao, Kaihui; Nie, Yonggang; Wei, Wei; Lin, Degui

    2015-10-01

    Eight adult (six male and two female) wild Qinling giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca qinlingensis) from China National Foping Nature Reserve were tracked, and their dental data collected and recorded from October 2010 to April 2014. Each panda had dental abnormalities of varying severity. Dental wear and fracture were the most common conditions. Absent teeth were common, with premolars missing most often. Mild caries were present in five molar teeth between two animals. Different degrees of dental plaque and calculus occurred in all animals but without severe periodontal disease. Two animals with severe dental abnormalities died due to intestinal problems. Large segments of bamboo were found in their intestinal tracts, and intestinal perforation and ulcers were evident, indicating dental abnormalities can be an important factor in the health of wild giant pandas and may lead to death. Further research with larger sample sizes of wild and captive giant pandas will be required to substantiate the relationship between dental abnormalities and mortality in giant pandas.

  14. Dental Implant Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Dental implant surgery Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Dental implant surgery is a procedure that replaces tooth roots with ... look and function much like real ones. Dental implant surgery can offer a welcome alternative to dentures ...

  15. Dental Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  16. Morbidly obese patient with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis-related cirrhosis who died from sepsis caused by dental infection of Porphyromonas gingivalis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yuno; Kitamoto, Mikiya; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Yamanoue, Takao; Tada, Yoshihiro; Boku, Noriko; Nishisaka, Takashi; Miyauchi, Mutsumi; Takata, Takashi; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2016-03-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is associated with increased risks of developing lifestyle-related diseases including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cerebral vessel disease. While the two-hit hypothesis and, recently, multiple parallel hits hypothesis of NASH pathogenesis were proposed, further details have not emerged. Recently, dental infection of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) has been reported as a critical risk factor for NASH progression, which acts as multiple parallel hits to induce inflammation and fibrogenic responses in steatosis. We describe here a 54-year-old woman who died from sepsis and was diagnosed with NASH. Briefly, her body mass index (BMI) at the age of 35 years old had been 25.6 kg/m(2) , but she became obese after withdrawing into her home at the age of 45 years. Severe obesity continued over 19 years without diabetes mellitus. She was admitted to our hospital due to a sudden disturbance of consciousness. On admission, her BMI was 48.5 kg/m(2) . Computed tomography revealed cirrhotic liver with massive ascites, and laboratory data indicated increased inflammatory responses, renal failure and C grade Child-Pugh classification, suggesting the diagnosis of sepsis. Also, severe periodontal disease was present, because the patient's front teeth fell out easily during intubation. Although the focus of infection was not specified, the oral flora Parvimonas micra, a periodontal pathogen, was detected in venous blood. In spite of intensive care including artificial respiration management and continuous hemodiafiltration, she died on the 43rd day after admission. Surprisingly, P. gingivalis was detected in her hepatocytes. This case may represent the significance of P. gingivalis in the progress to cirrhosis in NASH patients.

  17. Wear of two pit and fissure sealants in contact with primary teeth

    PubMed Central

    Galo, Rodrigo; Contente, Marta Maria Martins Giamatei; Borsatto, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Wear simulations may provide an indication of the clinical performance of pit-and-fissure sealants when associated with primary teeth as counterbody, restricting the involved variables. The aim of this study was to evaluate wear of dental materials used as pit-and-fissure sealants in contact with primary teeth. Materials and Methods: A resinous sealant (Fluroshield®) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer®) were selected in a post-plate design, using as counterbody primary tooth pins (4 × 4 × 2 mm) at 3 and 10 N vertical load, 1 Hz frequency, 900 wear cycles in artificial saliva (n = 15). Attrition coefficient values were obtained and the material and primary tooth volumes were analyzed. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Duncan's test (P < 0.05). Results: Fluroshield® presented the highest attrition coefficient values for the 3 N but these values decreased significantly for the 10 N load. The means for volume loss (3 mm) of the different samples after the wear test were not statistically different for the materials. The volume loss values for the primary teeth were statistically different and there was an increase in volume loss with the increase of the load applied in the wear tests. Conclusions: Differences were also observed with regard to the surface deformation characteristics. The wear rates of primary tooth enamel vary according to the type of material and the load applied during mastication. PMID:24966777

  18. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the performance of centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W. G.; Li, Y. B.; Wang, X. Y.; Sun, J. P.; Wu, G. X.

    2012-11-01

    In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the performance of centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump was simulated with three variable styles of the wear-rings: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Numerical results agree well with the experimental results. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the performance of centrifugal pump. The existence of wear-ring not only has an effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump. Relative to the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some advantages, such as low cost, fast and efficient, and easy to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the performance of centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump was simulated with three variable styles of the wear-rings: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Numerical results agree well with the experimental results. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the performance of centrifugal pump.

  19. Primate dental ecology: How teeth respond to the environment.

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Ungar, Peter S; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth are central for the study of ecology, as teeth are at the direct interface between an organism and its environment. Recent years have witnessed a rapid growth in the use of teeth to understand a broad range of topics in living and fossil primate biology. This in part reflects new techniques for assessing ways in which teeth respond to, and interact with, an organism's environment. Long-term studies of wild primate populations that integrate dental analyses have also provided a new context for understanding primate interactions with their environments. These new techniques and long-term field studies have allowed the development of a new perspective-dental ecology. We define dental ecology as the broad study of how teeth respond to, or interact with, the environment. This includes identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, as they reflect feeding ecology, behavior, and habitat variation, including areas impacted by anthropogenic disturbance, and how dental development can reflect environmental change and/or stress. The dental ecology approach, built on collaboration between dental experts and ecologists, holds the potential to provide an important theoretical and practical framework for inferring ecology and behavior of fossil forms, for assessing environmental change in living populations, and for understanding ways in which habitat impacts primate growth and development. This symposium issue brings together experts on dental morphology, growth and development, tooth wear and health, primate ecology, and paleontology, to explore the broad application of dental ecology to questions of how living and fossil primates interact with their environments.

  20. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  1. Characterization of polyethylene wear particle: The impact of methodology.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Christian; Reinders, Jörn; Zietz, Carmen; Utzschneider, Sandra; Bader, Rainer; Kretzer, J Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Due to the prevalence of problems caused by wear particles, the reduced durability of total joint replacements is well documented. The characterization of wear debris enables the size and morphology of these wear particles to be measured and provides an assessment of the biological response in vivo. However, the impact of different methodologies of particle analysis is not yet clear. Hence, the aim of this investigation was to analyze the influence of different particle characterization methods performed by three research centers within the scope of a "round robin test". To obtain knowledge about possible pitfalls, single steps of the particle characterization process (storage, pore size of the filter, coating durations by gold sputtering and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) magnification) were analyzed. The round robin test showed significant differences between the research groups, especially for the morphology of the particles. The SEM magnification was identified as having the greatest influence on the size and shape of the particles, followed by the storage conditions of the wear particle containing lubricant. Gold sputter coating and filter pore size also exhibit significant effects. However, even though they are statistically significant, it should be emphasized that the differences are small. In conclusion, particle characterization is a complex analytical method with a multiplicity of influencing factors. It becomes apparent that a comparison of wear particle results between different research groups is challenging.

  2. Should School Nurses Wear Uniforms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of School Health, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This 1958 paper questions whether school nurses should wear uniforms (specifically, white uniforms). It concludes that white uniforms are often associated with the treatment of ill people, and since many people have a fear reaction to them, they are not necessary and are even undesirable. Since school nurses are school staff members, they should…

  3. Rigid gas permeable extended wear.

    PubMed

    Maehara, J R; Kastl, P R

    1994-04-01

    We have reviewed the pertinent literature on rigid gas permeable (RGP) extended wear contact lenses, and we discuss the benefits and adverse reactions of this contact lens modality, drawing conclusions from reviewed studies. We suggest parameters for success with these lenses and guidelines for the prevention of adverse reactions.

  4. Investigation of the time-dependent wear behavior of veneering ceramic in porcelain fused to metal crowns during chewing simulations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiawen; Tian, Beimin; Wei, Ran; Wang, Weiguo; Zhang, Hongyun; Wu, Xiaohong; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2014-12-01

    The excessive abrasion of occlusal surfaces in ceramic crowns limits the service life of restorations and their clinical results. However, little is known about the time-dependent wear behavior of ceramic restorations during the chewing process. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the dynamic evolution of the wear behavior of veneering porcelain in PFM crowns as wear progressed, as tested in a chewing simulator. Twenty anatomical metal-ceramic crowns were prepared using Ceramco III as the veneering porcelain. Stainless steel balls served as antagonists. The specimens were dynamically loaded in a chewing simulator with 350N up to 2.4×10(6) loading cycles, with additional thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C. During the testing, several checkpoints were applied to measure the substance loss of the crowns' occlusal surfaces and to evaluate the microstructure of the worn areas. After 2.4×10(6) cycles, the entire wear process of the veneering porcelain in the PFM crowns revealed three wear stages (running-in, steady and severe wear stages). The occlusal surfaces showed traces of intensive wear on the worn areas during the running-in wear stage, and they exhibited the propagation of cracks in the subsurface during steady wear stage. When the severe wear stage was reached, the cracks penetrated the ceramic layer, causing the separation of porcelain pieces. It also exhibited a good correlation among the microstructure, the wear loss and the wear rate of worn ceramic restorations. The results suggest that under the conditions of simulated masticatory movement, the wear performance of the veneering porcelain in PFM crowns indicates the apparent similarity of the tribological characteristics of the traditional mechanical system. Additionally, the evaluation of the wear behavior of ceramic restorations should be based on these three wear stages.

  5. The chewing robot: a new biologically-inspired way to evaluate dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Raabe, D; Alemzadeh, K; Harrison, A L; Ireland, A J

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel in vitro dental wear simulator based on 6-6 parallel kinematics to replicate mechanical wear formation on dental materials and components, such as individual teeth, crowns or bridges. The human mandible, guided by a range of passive structures moves with up to six degrees of freedom (DOF). Currently available wear simulators lack the ability to perform these complex chewing movements. In addition simulators are unable to replicate the normal range of chewing forces as they have no control system able to mimic the natural muscle function controlled by the human central nervous system. Such discrepancies between true in vivo and simulated in vitro movements will influence the outcome and reliability of wear studies using such approaches. This paper summarizes the development of a new dynamic jaw simulator based on the kinematics of the human jaw.

  6. Dental microwear textures: reconstructing diets of fossil mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSantis, Larisa R. G.

    2016-06-01

    Dietary information of fossil mammals can be revealed via the analysis of tooth morphology, tooth wear, tooth geochemistry, and the microscopic wear patterns on tooth surfaces resulting from food processing. Although dental microwear has long been used by anthropologists and paleontologists to clarify diets in a diversity of mammals, until recently these methods focused on the counting of wear features (e.g., pits and scratches) from two-dimensional surfaces (typically via scanning electron microscopes or low-magnification light microscopes). The analysis of dental microwear textures can instead reveal dietary information in a broad range of herbivorous, omnivorous, and carnivorous mammals by characterizing microscopic tooth surfaces in three-dimensions, without the counting of individual surface features. To date, dental microwear textures in ungulates, xenarthrans, marsupials, carnivorans, and primates (including humans and their ancestors) are correlated with known dietary behavior in extant taxa and reconstruct ancient diets in a diversity of prehistoric mammals. For example, tough versus hard object feeding can be characterized across disparate phylogenetic groups and can distinguish grazers, folivorous, and flesh consumers (tougher food consumers) from woody browsers, frugivores, and bone consumers (harder object feeders). This paper reviews how dental microwear textures can be useful to reconstructing diets in a broad array of living and extinct mammals, with commentary on areas of future research.

  7. Wear particle analysis using the ferrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The use of the Ferrograph in analyzing wear particles from a variety of different sources is reported. Examples of wear particles from gas turbine engines, bearing tests, friction and wear tests, hydraulic systems, and human joints are illustrated. In addition, the separation of bacteria and human cells is described.

  8. Needs and challenges in precision wear measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.

    1996-01-10

    Accurate, precise wear measurements are a key element in solving both current wear problems and in basic wear research. Applications range from assessing durability of micro-scale components to accurate screening of surface treatments and thin solid films. Need to distinguish small differences in wear tate presents formidable problems to those who are developing new materials and surface treatments. Methods for measuring wear in ASTM standard test methods are discussed. Errors in using alterate methods of wear measurement on the same test specimen are also described. Human judgemental factors are a concern in common methods for wear measurement, and an experiment involving measurement of a wear scar by ten different people is described. Precision in wear measurement is limited both by the capabilities of the measuring instruments and by the nonuniformity of the wear process. A method of measuring wear using nano-scale indentations is discussed. Current and future prospects for incorporating advanced, higher-precision wear measurement methods into standards are considered.

  9. Bioactive and inert dental glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Montazerian, Maziar; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra

    2017-02-01

    The global market for dental materials is predicted to exceed 10 billion dollars by 2020. The main drivers for this growth are easing the workflow of dentists and increasing the comfort of patients. Therefore, remarkable research projects have been conducted and are currently underway to develop improved or new dental materials with enhanced properties or that can be processed using advanced technologies, such as CAD/CAM or 3D printing. Among these materials, zirconia, glass or polymer-infiltrated ceramics, and glass-ceramics (GCs) are of great importance. Dental glass-ceramics are highly attractive because they are easy to process and have outstanding esthetics, translucency, low thermal conductivity, high strength, chemical durability, biocompatibility, wear resistance, and hardness similar to that of natural teeth, and, in certain cases, these materials are bioactive. In this review article, we divide dental GCs into the following two groups: restorative and bioactive. Most restorative dental glass-ceramics (RDGCs) are inert and biocompatible and are used in the restoration and reconstruction of teeth. Bioactive dental glass-ceramics (BDGCs) display bone-bonding ability and stimulate positive biological reactions at the material/tissue interface. BDGCs are suggested for dentin hypersensitivity treatment, implant coating, bone regeneration and periodontal therapy. Throughout this paper, we elaborate on the history, processing, properties and applications of RDGCs and BDGCs. We also report on selected papers that address promising types of dental glass-ceramics. Finally, we include trends and guidance on relevant open issues and research possibilities. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 619-639, 2017.

  10. [Phenomenon of dental fear].

    PubMed

    Moore, R; Birn, H

    1990-01-01

    Odontophobia is a rather unique phobia with special psychosomatic components that impact on the dental health of odontophobic persons. It also has psychosocial components largely as a result of destruction of the teeth and subsequent embarrassment that can affect a person and cause a vicious cycle of dental fear. The phenomenon is facilitated by misunderstandings and myths generated by both patients and dentists. The most common reasons given in the literature for such strong fears of dental treatment are: 1) bad experiences in childhood for 85% of cases, 2) feeling of powerlessness and lack of control over personal emotional reactions and over the social situation in the dental chair, 3) social learning processes in which the image of the dentist is cast in a negative light by the mass media or by the person's relatives or friends and 4) that the person has other psychologic problems (in 20% of cases), such as serious phobias and/or neuroses. A strategy of researching and thus tackling the problem is presented which focuses on three essential targets that require studying and change: 1) the community at large and their image of the dentist, 2) the patient role and 3) the dentist role. Various model projects are presented along with their diagnostic systems. These are seen to focus in varying degrees on different elements of the target groups that effect the dentist-patient relationship but the need to come out into the community and make the social environment right for these patients is an important factor in all strategies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Dental indicators of ancient dietary patterns: dental analysis in archaeology.

    PubMed

    Forshaw, R

    2014-05-01

    What can the study of ancient teeth tell us about the dietary habits of our ancestors? Diet plays a prominent role in the organisation and evolution of human cultures and an increasingly diverse array of analytical techniques are available to help reconstruct diet in ancient populations. Dental palaeopathology is particularly important as it can provide direct evidence of the type of diet an individual consumed during life. Heavy occlusal tooth wear is the most frequent condition recognisable and an examination of both macro and microscopic patterns of wear can establish the differences between the hard fibrous diet typical of a hunter-gatherer, and a diet primarily consisting of softer plant foods consumed by an agriculturist. The distributions of trace elements and stable isotopes in food webs make it possible to use them as natural tracers of foodstuffs. Through a consideration of photosynthetic pathways, the ratios of the different stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen can determine which specific groups of plants and animals were dominant in the food chains of various populations - a fact that has been used to trace the spread of agriculture in ancient civilisations.

  12. Dental extraction during dicumarol therapy.

    PubMed

    ASKEY, J M; CHERRY, C B

    1956-01-01

    Extraction of 14 teeth in six patients taking dicumarol caused no unusual bleeding. Discontinuance of dicumarol prior to dental extraction should not necessarily be a routine procedure; in certain persons with a demonstrated strong tendency to recurrent thrombosis, dicumarol should be continued, based on the decision that the danger of clotting without the drug is greater than the danger of bleeding with the drug.

  13. Child Indicators: Dental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewit, Eugene M.; Kerrebrock, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Reviews measures of dental health in children and the evidence on child dental health. Although children's dental health has improved over the past two decades, many poor children do not receive necessary dental health services, and reasons for this failure are summarized. (SLD)

  14. Corrosive Wear in Wet Ore Grinding Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Denny A.

    1985-06-01

    Wear processes in ball and rod mills have recently received increased attention in order to increase efficiency and conserve grinding media. Direct removal of metal from the grinding media surface by abrasive wear occurs in both dry and wet grinding. Additional corrosive wear is apparent during wet grinding, in which less resistant corrosion product films are abraded away. Inhibitors and higher pH solutions, in which corrosion product films are more tenacious, improve wear resistance during wet grinding. Softer surfaces are less resistant to corrosive wear, suggesting that film formation and subsequent film abrasion on newly furrowed surfaces must be a factor.

  15. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  16. Dental education in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núñez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  17. Investigation of contact allergy to dental materials by patch testing

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Reena; Dinakar, Devina; Kurian, Swetha S.; Bindoo, Y. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental products are widely used by patients and dental personnel alike and may cause problems for both. Dental materials could cause contact allergy with varying manifestations such as burning, pain, stomatitis, cheilitis, ulcers, lichenoid reactions localized to the oral mucosa in patients, and hand dermatitis in dental personnel. Patch testing with the dental series comprising commonly used materials can be used to detect contact allergies to dental materials. Aim: This study aimed to identify contact allergy among patients who have oral mucosal lesions after dental treatment and among dental personnel who came in contact with these materials. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients who had undergone dental procedures with symptoms of oral lichen planus, oral stomatitis, burning mouth, and recurrent aphthosis, were included in the study. Dental personnel with history of hand dermatitis were also included in the study. Patch testing was performed using Chemotechnique Dental Series and results interpreted as recommended by the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG). Results: Out of 13 patients who had undergone dental treatment/with oral symptoms, six patients with stomatitis, lichenoid lesions, and oral ulcers showed positive patch tests to a variety of dental materials, seven patients with ulcers had negative patch tests, seven dental personnel with hand dermatitis showed multiple allergies to various dental materials, and most had multiple positivities. Conclusion: The patch test is a useful, simple, noninvasive method to detect contact allergies among patients and among dental personnel dealing with these products. Long term studies are necessary to establish the relevance of these positive patch tests by eliminating the allergic substances, identifying clinical improvement, and substituting with nonallergenic materials. PMID:25165644

  18. The influence of dental gloves on the setting of impression materials.

    PubMed

    Baumann, M A

    1995-08-19

    The increased wearing of gloves during dental treatment has created new problems for general dental practitioners. One of these is the retarded set or total inhibition of addition silicones caused by natural latex gloves. This study was designed to test different gloves and impression materials in common use. Eight latex gloves, selected with different properties representing all possible types, together with four non-latex gloves, made of neoprene, styrene-butadiene, polyethylene and polyvinylchloride, were tested. As a control, mixing with bare hands and with maize starch was carried out. The viscosity changes of five types of impression materials (polyvinylsiloxanes, condensation silicones, alginates, polyether and polysulphides) were measured with a Zwick hardness tester to give the Shore A hardness. No impression materials other than polyvinylsiloxanes were affected by pure latex gloves and those only by two brands. All other impression materials can be mixed and handled with gloved hands without affecting their setting time. The retarded set of polyvinylsiloxanes caused by natural latex gloves is not so widespread as had previously been thought.

  19. Wear testing of crosslinked polyethylene: wear rate variability and microbial contamination.

    PubMed

    Brandt, J-M; Vecherya, A; Guenther, L E; Koval, S F; Petrak, M J; Bohm, E R; Wyss, U P

    2014-06-01

    The wear performance of two types of crosslinked polyethylene (Marathon™ and XLK™, DePuy Synthes Inc., Warsaw, IN) was evaluated in a pin-on-disc wear tester, a hip wear simulator, and a knee wear simulator. Sodium azide was used as the microbial inhibitor in the calf serum-based lubricant. In the pin-on-disc wear tester, the Marathon wear rate of 5.33±0.54mm(3)/Mc was significantly lower (p=0.002) than the wear rate of 6.43±0.60mm(3)/Mc for XLK. Inversely, the Marathon wear rate of 15.07±1.03mm(3)/Mc from the hip wear simulator was 2.2-times greater than the XLK wear rate of 6.71±1.03mm(3)/Mc from the knee wear simulator. Differences in implant design, conformity, GUR type, and kinematic test conditions were suggested to account for the difference between the wear rates generated in the different types of wear testing apparati. In all wear tests, sodium azide was ineffective at inhibiting microbial growth in the lubricant. Eight different organisms were identified in the lubricant samples from the wear tests, which suggested the necessity of using an alternative, more effective microbial inhibitor. Careful sample preparation and thorough cleaning has shown to improve the consistency of the wear results. The wear rates generated in the hip and knee wear simulators closely reflected the wear behaviour of Marathon and XLK reported in published data that were tested under similar conditions.

  20. Atypical Forensic Dental Identifications.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, Anthony R; Wood, James D

    2015-06-01

    Forensic dental identification specialists are typically the last conventional option for postmortem identification. Forensic dental identification is most often accomplished by comparing radiographs of the decedent's teeth with the dental radiographs obtained from the dentist of the suspected victim. Unfortunately, antemortem dental radiographs are not always available. When presented with this challenge, the authors of this article have been successful in completing identifications using means other than dental radiographic comparison.

  1. Silicon-based plant defences, tooth wear and voles.

    PubMed

    Calandra, Ivan; Zub, Karol; Szafrańska, Paulina A; Zalewski, Andrzej; Merceron, Gildas

    2016-02-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions are hypothesized to drive vole population cycles through the grazing-induced production of phytoliths in leaves. Phytoliths act as mechanical defences because they deter herbivory and lower growth rates in mammals. However, how phytoliths impair herbivore performance is still unknown. Here, we tested whether the amount of phytoliths changes tooth wear patterns. If confirmed, abrasion from phytoliths could play a role in population crashes. We applied dental microwear texture analysis (DMTA) to laboratory and wild voles. Lab voles were fed two pelleted diets with differing amounts of silicon, which produced similar dental textures. This was most probably due to the loss of food mechanical properties through pelletization and/or the small difference in silicon concentration between diets. Wild voles were trapped in Poland during spring and summer, and every year across a population cycle. In spring, voles feed on silica-rich monocotyledons, while in the summer they also include silica-depleted dicotyledons. This was reflected in the results; the amount of silica therefore leaves a traceable record in the dental microwear texture of voles. Furthermore, voles from different phases of population cycles have different microwear textures. We tentatively propose that these differences result from grazing-induced phytolith concentrations. We hypothesize that the high amount of phytoliths in response to intense grazing in peak years may result in malocclusion and other dental abnormalities, which would explain how these silicon-based plant defences help provoke population crashes. DMTA could then be used to reconstruct vole population dynamics using teeth from pellets or palaeontological material.

  2. Low wear partially fluorinated polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.; Hady, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    Tribological studies were conducted on five different polyimide solid bodies formulated from the diamine 2,2-bis 4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl hexafluoropropane (4-BDAF) and the dianhydrides pyromellitic acid (PMDS) and benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDA). The following polyimides were evaluated 4-BDAF/PMDA, 4-BDAF/BTDA, 4-BDAF/80 mole percent PMDA, 20 mole percent BTDA, 4-BDAF/60 mole percent BTDA. Friction coefficients, polyimide wear rates, polyimide surface morphology and transfer films were evaluated at sliding speeds of 0.31 to 11.6 m/s and at temperatures of 25 C to 300 C. The results indicate that the tribological properties are highly dependent on the composition of the polyimide and on the experimental conditions. Two polyimides were found which produced very low wear rates but very high friction coefficients (greater than 0.85) under ambient conditions. They offer considerable potential for high traction types of application such as brakes.

  3. Coatings for wear and lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in the tribological uses of rf-sputtered and ion plated films of solid film lubricants (laminar solids, soft metals, organic polymers) and wear resistant refractory compounds (carbides, nitrides, silicides) are reviewed. The sputtering and ion plating potentials and the corresponding coatings formed were evaluated relative to the friction coefficient, wear endurance life and mechanical properties. The tribological and mechanical properties for each kind of film are discussed in terms of film adherence, coherence, density, grain size, morphology, internal stresses, thickness, and substrate conditions such as temperature, topography, chemistry and dc-biasing. The ion plated metallic films in addition to improved tribological properties also have better mechanical properties such as tensile strength and fatigue life.

  4. Coatings for wear and lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper we review the recent advances in the tribological uses of R.F.-sputtered and ion-plated films of solid film lubricants (laminar solids, soft metals, organic polymers) and wear-resistant refractory compounds (carbides, nitrides, silicides). The sputtering and ion-plating potentials and the corresponding coatings formed are evaluated relative to the friction coefficient, wear endurance life and mechanical properties. The tribological and mechanical properties of each kind of film are discussed in terms of film adherence, coherence, density, grain size, morphology, internal stresses and thickness and substrate conditions such as temperature, topography, chemistry and d.c. biasing. The ion-plated metallic films in addition to improved tribological properties also have better mechanical properties such as tensile strength and fatigue life.

  5. Hydraulic System Wear Debris Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-03

    drawn. Each one-=L sample was drawn with a clean plastic pipette of one-mL capacity. The samples were placed in clean Ferrogram preparation bottles ...and from cavities in a block which held linear seals into sampling bottles . Several photographs of this debris , which was deposited on Ferro- grams...silicon in the glass overshadowed the elements of the wear debris . To overcome this difficulty, the Ferrogram should be pre- pared on a carbon-filled

  6. Wear of steel by rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.; Pulford, C. T. R.

    1978-01-01

    Wear of a steel blade used as a scraper to abrade rubber surfaces has been found to take place much more rapidly on a cis-polyisoprene (natural rubber) surface than on a cis-polybutadiene surface, and much more rapidly in an inert atmosphere than in air. These observations are attributed to the direct attack upon steel of free-radical species generated by mechanical rupture of elastomer molecules during abrasion.

  7. Enhancing Fracture and Wear Resistance of Dentures/Overdentures Utilizing Digital Technology: A Case Series Report.

    PubMed

    Afify, Ahmed; Haney, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    Since it was first introduced into the dental world, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has improved dramatically in regards to both data acquisition and fabrication abilities. CAD/CAM is capable of providing well-fitting intra- and extraoral prostheses when sound guidelines are followed. As CAD/CAM technology encompasses both surgical and prosthetic dental applications as well as fixed and removable aspects, it could improve the average quality of dental prostheses compared with the results obtained by conventional manufacturing methods. The purpose of this article is to provide an introduction into the methods in which this technology may be used to enhance the wear and fracture resistance of dentures and overdentures. This article will also showcase two clinical reports in which CAD/CAM technology has been implemented.

  8. Dental health and disease in ancient Egypt.

    PubMed

    Forshaw, R J

    2009-04-25

    In ancient Egypt the exceptionally dry climate together with the unique burial customs has resulted in the survival of large numbers of well-preserved skeletal and mummified remains. Examinations of these remains together with an analysis of the surviving documentary, archaeological and ethnographic evidence has enabled a detailed picture of the dental health of these ancient people to be revealed, perhaps more so than for any other civilisation in antiquity. In this, the first of two articles, the dental pathological conditions that afflicted the ancient Egyptians is considered. The commonest finding is that of tooth wear, which was often so excessive that it resulted in pulpal exposure. Multiple abscesses were frequently seen, but caries was not a significant problem. Overall the findings indicate that the various pathological conditions and non-pathological abnormalities of teeth evident in dentitions in the twenty-first century were also manifest in ancient Egypt, although the incidences of these conditions varies considerably between the civilisations.

  9. Aesthetic management of dental fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Vishal; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Nayak, Prathibha Anand; Ninawe, Nupur

    2013-05-22

    Significant numbers of patients visiting the paediatric dental clinics have aesthetically objectionable brown stains and desire treatment for them. Intrinsic tooth discolouration can be a significant aesthetic, and in some instances, functional, problem. Dental fluorosis, tetracycline staining, localised and chronological hypoplasia, and both amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta can all produce a cosmetically unsatisfactory dentition. The aetiology of intrinsic discolouration of enamel may sometimes be deduced from the patient's history, and one factor long associated with the problem has been a high level of fluoride intake. Optimal use of topical fluorides leads to a decrease in the caries prevalence but may show an increase in the prevalence of fluorosis staining because of metabolic alterations in the ameloblasts, causing a defective matrix formation and improper calcification. A 12-year-old male patient was screened at the dental clinic for routine dental care. He wanted us to remove and/or minimise the noticeable brown/yellow staining of his teeth. He requested the least invasive and most cost-effective treatment to change his smile. Various treatment modalities are present for the treatment of fluorosis stains. This report discusses the microabrasion technique in the patient having dental fluorosis.

  10. Aesthetic management of dental fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Vishal; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Nayak, Prathibha Anand; Ninawe, Nupur

    2013-01-01

    Significant numbers of patients visiting the paediatric dental clinics have aesthetically objectionable brown stains and desire treatment for them. Intrinsic tooth discolouration can be a significant aesthetic, and in some instances, functional, problem. Dental fluorosis, tetracycline staining, localised and chronological hypoplasia, and both amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta can all produce a cosmetically unsatisfactory dentition. The aetiology of intrinsic discolouration of enamel may sometimes be deduced from the patient's history, and one factor long associated with the problem has been a high level of fluoride intake. Optimal use of topical fluorides leads to a decrease in the caries prevalence but may show an increase in the prevalence of fluorosis staining because of metabolic alterations in the ameloblasts, causing a defective matrix formation and improper calcification. A 12-year-old male patient was screened at the dental clinic for routine dental care. He wanted us to remove and/or minimise the noticeable brown/yellow staining of his teeth. He requested the least invasive and most cost-effective treatment to change his smile. Various treatment modalities are present for the treatment of fluorosis stains. This report discusses the microabrasion technique in the patient having dental fluorosis. PMID:23704468

  11. Thalassemias and their dental implications.

    PubMed

    Cutando Soriano, Antonio; Gil Montoya, José Antonio; López-González Garrido, Juan de Dios

    2002-01-01

    Thalassemias constitute a form of anemia that pose clear problems in relation to dental treatment. Dental professionals must be aware of the treatment adaptations required in patients with severe forms of beta-thalassemia. Until medical research is able to afford a definitive solution to these diseases (thereby greatly simplifying the dental management of such patients), effort will continue to center on the improvement of available therapeutic modalities, with the aim of obtaining effective and inexpensive oral chelators and drugs that either individually or in combination allow increases in fetal hemoglobin levels. Undoubtedly, the use of such measures together with serial blood transfusions has made it possible for an ever increasing number of patients with beta-thalassemia to reach adult age, where the provision of integral rather than merely palliative dental treatment must be seriously considered. At present, the clinical orofacial manifestations caused by the erythroid mass expanding the facial bones - resulting in dental malocclusions and protrusions tend to be less intense as a result of early medical treatment. In the future, gene therapy may be expected to allow a normal facial appearance thanks to complete healing of the patient.

  12. Assessment of wear coefficients of nuclear zirconium claddings without and with pre-oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    Qu, Jun; Cooley, Kevin M.; Shaw, Austin H.; ...

    2016-03-16

    In the cores of pressurized water nuclear reactors, water-flow induced vibration is known to cause claddings on the fuel rods to rub against their supporting grids. Such grid-to-rod-fretting (GTRF) may lead to fretting wear-through and the leakage of radioactive species. The surfaces of actual zirconium alloy claddings in a reactor are inevitably oxidized in the high-temperature pressurized water, and some claddings are even pre-oxidized. As a result, the wear process of the surface oxide film is expected to be quite different from the zirconium alloy substrate. In this paper, we attempt to measure the wear coefficients of zirconium claddings withoutmore » and with pre-oxidation rubbing against grid samples using a bench-scale fretting tribometer. Results suggest that the volumetric wear coefficient of the pre-oxidized cladding is 50 to 200 times lower than that of the untreated cladding. In terms of the linear rate of wear depth, the pre-oxidized alloy wears about 15 times more slowly than the untreated cladding. Finally, fitted with the experimentally-determined wear rates, a stage-wise GTRF engineering wear model demonstrates good agreement with in-reactor experience in predicting the trend of cladding lives.« less

  13. Assessment of wear coefficients of nuclear zirconium claddings without and with pre-oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Cooley, Kevin M.; Shaw, Austin H.; Lu, Roger Y.; Blau, Peter J.

    2016-03-16

    In the cores of pressurized water nuclear reactors, water-flow induced vibration is known to cause claddings on the fuel rods to rub against their supporting grids. Such grid-to-rod-fretting (GTRF) may lead to fretting wear-through and the leakage of radioactive species. The surfaces of actual zirconium alloy claddings in a reactor are inevitably oxidized in the high-temperature pressurized water, and some claddings are even pre-oxidized. As a result, the wear process of the surface oxide film is expected to be quite different from the zirconium alloy substrate. In this paper, we attempt to measure the wear coefficients of zirconium claddings without and with pre-oxidation rubbing against grid samples using a bench-scale fretting tribometer. Results suggest that the volumetric wear coefficient of the pre-oxidized cladding is 50 to 200 times lower than that of the untreated cladding. In terms of the linear rate of wear depth, the pre-oxidized alloy wears about 15 times more slowly than the untreated cladding. Finally, fitted with the experimentally-determined wear rates, a stage-wise GTRF engineering wear model demonstrates good agreement with in-reactor experience in predicting the trend of cladding lives.

  14. Comparison of wear and clinical performance between amalgam, composite and open sandwich restorations: 2-year results.

    PubMed

    Sachdeo, A; Gray, Gordon B; Sulieman, M A; Jagger, Daryll C

    2004-03-01

    There has been some disquiet over the use of mercury containing restorative materials. The most commonly used alternative is composite resin but this has the potential disadvantage associated with wear and marginal leakage, which in turn, has proven to result in secondary caries and sensitivity. To overcome the shortcomings of a directly placed composite restoration, the glass-ionomer/composite open sandwich technique was introduced followed by the subsequent introduction of compomer systems. The aims of this study were to evaluate the wear and clinical performance of a control group of amalgam restorations compared with that of a group of posterior composite resin restorations fillings and a group of compomer/composite open sandwich restorations placed by a single general dental practitioner. The duration of the study was 2 years. One hundred and thirty three (71.4%) patients were successfully recalled and the wear and clinical performance of each restoration after 6, 12 and 24 months was measured, indirectly. There was no statistically significant difference recorded between the groups at 6 months or 1 year (p > 0.05). However, at the end of the 2-year study, there was a significantly lower rate of wear recorded for the control amalgam restorations compared with other two groups (p = 0.033). There was no statistically significant difference in wear recorded between the two groups of tooth-coloured restorations (p > 0.05). With regards to clinical performance of the restorations, occlusal and proximal contacts in each group of restoration remained satisfactory throughout the study.

  15. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Task 3, Traditional approaches to wear prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Contamination of the lube-oil with hard abrasive particles leads to a three-body abrasive wear mechanism that highly accelerates piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-fueled diesel engines. One approach to reducing that wear is to modify the size and orientation of surface asperities on the cylinder to enhance the formation of a hydrodynamic film, and to provide avenues of escape for particles that would otherwise be trapped in the wear zone. Another approach is to introduce additives into the contaminated lube-oil that further enhance hydrodynamic film formation, form chemical films on the wearing surfaces, or form films on the contaminant particles. This work focuses on defining the effects of cylinder liner surface finish, various configurations of slots in the cylinder liner surface, and various additives in the contaminated lube-oil on the wear process. Wear tests were initiated in a bench apparatus using coal-ash contaminated lube-oil to test the various wear configurations. The results of these tests indicate that the formation of a hydrodynamic film between the ring and cylinder specimens is enhanced by increasing surface roughness, and by orienting the surface asperities normal to the direction of ring travel but modifications to the cylinder liner surface did not greatly reduce the wear rate. Additives to the lubricant seemed to have a much more significant effect on wear, with a dispersant additive highly accelerating the wear, while a detergent additive was able to reduce the wear almost to the rate achieved where there was no contaminant.

  16. Wear evaluation of a cross-linked medical grade polyethylene by ultra thin layer activation compared to gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroosnijder, Marinus F.; Hoffmann, Michael; Sauvage, Thierry; Blondiaux, Gilbert; Vincent, Laetitia

    2005-01-01

    Most of today's artificial joints rely on an articulating couple consisting of a CoCrMo alloy and a medical grade polyethylene. The wear of the polyethylene component is the major cause for long-term failure of these prostheses since the wear debris leads to adverse biological reactions. The polyethylene wear is usually measured by gravimetric methods, which are limited due to a low sensitivity and accuracy. To demonstrate the reliability of ultra thin layer activation (UTLA) as an alternative technique, wear tests on a cross-linked ultra-high-molecular weight polyethylene (XLPE) sliding against CoCrMo were performed on a wear tester featuring multi-directional sliding motion. The amount of polyethylene wear was evaluated by both UTLA and gravimetry. The particular TLA method used in this work employed the implantation of 7Be radioactive recoils into the polyethylene surface by means of a light mass particle beam. The results indicate that apart from its relatively high sensitivity, UTLA also offers the possibility for on-line measurements of polyethylene wear. This makes it a viable and complementary technique in wear test studies for medical implant purposes especially for those involving wear resistant materials and for rapid wear screening.

  17. Alternate paddle configuration for improved wear resistance in the saltstone mixer

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Fowley, M.

    2013-09-23

    same way. The wear rate from wear test 2a was approximately double the wear rate from wear test 2b for paddle pairs 4 and 5. For both configurations, there was little or no wear on paddle pairs 1, 2, 3 and 6 based on mass change, indicating that the un-wetted and fully wetted premix materials cause less wear than the partially wetted premix. Additionally, inspection of the wear surface of the paddles showed more deformation on the flat paddles than the helical paddles which was consistent with the wear rates. Aligning of the auger discharge flight with paddle pair 1 resulted in a lower wear rate paddle pair 1 rather than having them misaligned with the feed augers. During the paddle wear tests, polishing wear was observed on the inside barrel of the mixer. The polishing wear is evident on the upper housing clamshell and the lower housing clamshell primarily at paddle pairs 4 and 5, which is the transition region of the mixer. Wear on the mixer barrel increases the space between the paddles and the barrel, resulting in increased grout build up on the barrel. Since the mixer barrel cannot be reconfigured or replaced in the SPF, the method for mitigating wear on the barrel is to move the more viscous grout through the transition region as quickly as possible. In addition, the location of the liquid inlet does not allow for sufficient cleaning of the mixer since residual grout remains on paddle pairs 1 - 4. As the paddles continue to wear and the self-cleaning capability of the paddles is lost, the lack of sufficient flushing would aid in grout build up between the barrel and the paddles which could eventually lead to decreased throughput capacity of the dry feeds. Changing the paddle configuration from flat to helical resulted in no change to the rheological properties of the grout mixture. Both tests produced a grout that is within the processing range of the SPF. Based on the results of this testing, it is recommended for the currently installed SPF mixer that paddle

  18. Conjoint corrosion and wear in titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Williams, R L; Williams, D F

    1999-04-01

    When considering titanium alloys for orthopaedic applications it is important to examine the conjoint action of corrosion and wear. In this study we investigate the corrosion and wear behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-7Nb and Ti-13Nb-13Zr in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), bovine albumin solutions in PBS and 10% foetal calf serum solutions in PBS. The tests were performed under four different conditions to evaluate the influence of wear on the corrosion and corrosion on the wear behaviour as follows: corrosion without wear, wear-accelerated corrosion, wear in a non-corrosive environment and wear in a corrosive environment. The corrosion behaviour was investigated using cyclic polarisation studies to measure the ability of the surface to repassivate following breakdown of the passive layer. The properties of the repassivated layer were evaluated by measuring changes in the surface hardness of the alloys. The amount of wear that had occurred was assessed from weight changes and measurement of the depth of the wear scar. It was found that in the presence of wear without corrosion the wear behaviour of Ti-13Nb-13Zr was greater than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb or Ti-6Al-4V and that in the presence of proteins the wear of all three alloys is reduced. In the presence of corrosion without wear Ti-13Nb-13Zr was more corrosion resistant than Ti-6Al-7Nb which was more corrosion resistant than Ti-6Al-4V without proteins whereas in the presence of protein the corrosion resistance of Ti-13Nb-13Zr and Ti-6Al-7Nb was reduced and that of Ti-6Al-4V increased. In the presence of corrosion and wear the corrosion resistance of Ti-13Nb-13Zr is higher than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb or Ti-6Al-4V in PBS but in the presence of proteins the corrosion resistance of Ti-13Nb-13Zr and Ti-6Al-7Nb are very similar but higher than that of Ti-6Al-4V. The wear of Ti-13Nb-13Zr is lower than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb and Ti-6Al-4V with or without the presence of proteins in a corrosive environment. Therefore the overall

  19. Study on effects of scan parameters on the image quality and tip wear in AFM tapping mode.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bo; Yan, Yongda; Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen

    2014-01-01

    Due to the tip-sample interaction which is the measurement principle of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), tip wear constantly occurs during scanning. The blunt tip caused by the wear process makes more tip geometry information involved in the image, and correspondingly it increases the measurement error. In the present study, the scan parameters of AFM in tapping mode which affect the wear of single crystal silicon tips, such as the approaching rate, the scan rate, the scan amplitude, and the integral gain are investigated. By proposing a parameter reflecting the imaging quality, the tip state tracing the sample surface is evaluated quantitatively. The influences of scan parameters on this imaging quality parameter are obtained by experiments. Finally, in order to achieve the perfect images with little tip wear influence, tip wear experiments are carried out and then the optimal parameter settings which can lighten the tip wear are obtained.

  20. Wear rate control of peek surfaces modified by femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouti, S.; Pascale-Hamri, A.; Faure, N.; Beaugiraud, B.; Guibert, M.; Mauclair, C.; Benayoun, S.; Valette, S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the effect of laser texturing on the tribological properties of PEEK surfaces under a ball-on-flat contact configuration. Thus, surfaces with circular dimples of various diameters and depth were created. Tests were conducted with a normal load of 5 N and a sliding velocity of 0.01 m s-1, using bovine calf serum at 37.5 °C as a lubricant. The tribological conditions including the sliding frequency and the lubricant viscosity indicate that tests were performed under boundary lubrication regime. Results showed that discs with higher dimple depth exhibited higher friction coefficient and caused more abrasive wear on the ball specimen. Nevertheless, tribosystems (ball and disc) with dimpled disc surfaces showed a higher wear resistance. In the frame of our experiments, wear rates obtained for tribosystems including dimpled surfaces were 10 times lower than tribosystems including limited patterned or untextured surfaces. Applications such as design of spinal implants may be concerned by such a surface treatment to increase wear resistance of components.

  1. The Concomitant Evolution of Wear and Squeaking in Dual-Severity, Lubricated Wear Testing of Ceramic-on-Ceramic Hip Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Anthony; Tibbitts, Ira; Brannon, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic hip bearings were tested in short-term wear tests with a systematically varied contact force. Continuous vibration and intermittent surface roughness measurements were obtained to elucidate potential causes of in vivo hip joint squeaking. The three-phase test comprised alternating cycles of edge loading and concentric articulation, always using ample serum lubricant. A 50,000-cycle wear trial in which the contact force during concentric articulation was distant from the head’s wear patch yielded no squeaking and practically no liner roughening. In 10-cycle trials of an edge-worn head coupled with a pristine liner, the contact force was varied in magnitude and point of application; immediate, recurrent squeaking occurred only when the contact force exceeded a critical threshold value and was centered upon the head’s wear patch. In a 27,000-cycle wear trial with the contact force applied near the margin of the head’s wear patch, recurrent squeaking emerged progressively as the liner’s inner surface was roughened via its articulation with the worn portion of the head. The results reveal key conditions that yield recurrent squeaking in vitro in various scenarios without resorting to implausible dry conditions. A fundamental theory explains that hip squeaking is induced by myriad stress waves emanating from asperity collisions; yet, the root cause is edge loading. PMID:22354674

  2. Failure mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament prostheses: in vitro wear study.

    PubMed

    Poddevin, N; King, M W; Guidoin, R G

    1997-01-01

    Previous retrieval studies analyzing the cause of failure of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) prostheses identified a wear mechanism. However, the relative importance of yarn on bone compared to yarn on yarn wear has not been clearly understood. Therefore, the objective of this study was to elucidate which type of wear is the dominant cause of clinical failure. A variety of ACL prosthetic structures were exposed to two in vitro tests: one for yarn on yarn and the other for a novel yarn on bone wear test system. The latter included the use of both smooth (uncut) and rough (cut) bone surfaces to simulate the conditions around the condyle and at the exit of the tibial tunnel, respectively. The damaged textile structures were viewed by SEM. The various fiber fracture morphologies were identified and classified for the two types of wear tests; for the smooth and rough bone surfaces; for the braided, knitted, woven, and twisted textile structures; and for the three types of fibers that were included: polyethylene terephthalate, polypropylene, and ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene. The results confirmed that yarn on bone and yarn on yarn wear phenomena are associated with significantly different failure mechanisms. While the more aggressive rough (or cut) bone causes more rapid and intense fiber damage and faster ACL failure than the smooth (uncut) osseous surface, both abradants cause the same type of abrasive wear phenomenon. Differences in failure mechanisms were identified between the different textile structures and the different fiber types. By interpreting the damaged fiber images from clinically failed and retrieved ACL prostheses, we are now able to confirm that the predominant cause of synthetic ACL failure is yarn on bone abrasion. Improvements in future ACL prosthesis designs will only be possible by eliminating or minimizing the effect of this type of abrasive wear.

  3. In Vitro Evaluation of the Effects of Multiple Oral Factors on Dental Implants Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Sathyanarayanan; Abidi, Zain; Wilson, Thomas G; Valderrama, Pilar; Wadhwani, Chandur; Palmer, Kelli; Rodrigues, Danieli C

    2016-06-01

    Presence of metal ions and debris resulting from corrosion processes of dental implants in vivo can elicit adverse tissue reactions, possibly leading to peri-implant bone loss and eventually implant failure. This study hypothesized that the synergistic effects of bacterial biofilm and micromotion can cause corrosion of dental implants and release of metal ions in vivo. The goal is to simulate the oral environment where an implant will be exposed to a combination of acidic electrochemical environment and mechanical forces. Four conditions were developed to understand the individual and synergistic effects of mechanical forces and bacterial biofilm on the surface of dental implants; In condition 1, it was found that torsional forces during surgical insertion did not generate wear particle debris or metal ions. In condition 2, fatigue tests were performed in a wet environment to evaluate the effect of cyclic occlusal forces. The mechanical forces applied on the implants were able to cause implant fracture as well as surface corrosion features such as discoloration, delamination, and fatigue cracks. Immersion testing (condition 3) showed that bacteria ( Streptococcus mutans ) were able to create an acidic condition that triggered surface damage such as discoloration, rusting, and pitting. A novel testing setup was developed to understand the conjoint effects of micromotion and bacterial biofilm (condition 4). Surface damage initiated by acidic condition due to bacteria (condition 3), can be accelerated in tandem with mechanical forces through fretting-crevice corrosion. Permanent damage to surface layers can affect osseointegration and deposition of metal ions in the surrounding tissues can trigger inflammation.

  4. Surface Wear Measurement Using Optical Correlation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acinger, Kresimir

    1983-12-01

    The coherent optical correlation technique was applied for measuring the surface wear of a tappet (part of car engine), worn by friction with the camshaft. It was found that maximum correlation intensity decays exponentially with the number of wear cycles (i.e. camshaft revolutions). Tappets of the same make have an identical rate of correlation decay. Tappets of different makes have different rates of correlation decay which are in agreement with observed long term wear.

  5. Investigation of wear phenomena by microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The various wear mechanisms involved in the loss of material from metallic and nonmetallic surfaces are discussed. The results presented indicate how various microscopy techniques used in conjunction with other analytical tools can assist in the elucidation of a wear mechanism. Without question, microscopy is the single most important tool for the study of the wear of surfaces, to assess and address inherent mechanisms of the material removal process.

  6. Excessive strut wear allowing ball-poppet embolization in a DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, R D; Guynes, W A; Nichols, C T; Martinez, H E

    1982-01-01

    Excessive cage strut wear allowing ball-poppet embolization caused the sudden death of a 47 year old lady in whom a DeBakey-Surgitool aortic prosthesis had been implanted nine years earlier. Patients with this type of prosthesis should have periodic valvular cine fluoroscopy with image intensification to allow visualization of significant strut wear or fracture, and appropriate prosthetic valve replacement.

  7. Dental Auxiliary Occupations. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Richard D.

    As part of a dental auxiliaries project, a Dental Auxiliary National Technical Advisory Committee was established, and its major undertaking was to assist in the development of a functional inventory for each of the three dental auxiliary occupations (dental assisting, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology). The analysis consisted of…

  8. Cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema associated with dental laser treatment.

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga, S; Iwai, T; Kitajima, H; Yajima, Y; Ohya, T; Hirota, M; Mitsudo, K; Aoki, N; Yamashita, Y; Omura, S; Tohnai, I

    2013-12-01

    Cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema is a rare complication of dental procedures. Although most cases of emphysema occur incidentally with the use of a high-speed air turbine handpiece, there have been some reports over the past decade of cases caused by dental laser treatment. Emphysema as a complication caused by the air cooling spray of a dental laser is not well known, even though dental lasers utilize compressed air just as air turbines and syringes do. In this study, we comprehensively reviewed cases of emphysema attributed to dental laser treatment that appeared in the literature between January 2001 and September 2012, and we included three such cases referred to us. Among 13 cases identified in total, nine had cervicofacial subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema. Compared with past reviews, the incidence of mediastinal emphysema caused by dental laser treatment was higher than emphysema caused by dental procedure without dental laser use. Eight patients underwent CO2 laser treatment and two underwent Er:YAG laser treatment. Nine patients had emphysema following laser irradiation for soft tissue incision. Dentists and oral surgeons should be cognizant of the potential risk for iatrogenic emphysema caused by the air cooling spray during dental laser treatment and ensure proper usage of lasers.

  9. Wear Performance of Laser Processed Tantalum Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Dittrick, Stanley; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2011-01-01

    This first generation investigation evaluates the in vitro tribological performance of laser-processed Ta coatings on Ti for load-bearing implant applications. Linear reciprocating wear tests in simulated body fluid showed one order of magnitude less wear rate, of the order of 10−4mm3(N.m)−1, for Ta coatings compared to Ti. Our results demonstrate that Ta coatings can potentially minimize the early-stage bone-implant interface micro-motion induced wear debris generation due to their excellent bioactivity comparable to that of hydroxyapatite (HA), high wear resistance and toughness compared to popular HA coatings. PMID:22058608

  10. Wear Characteristics of Polymer -Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Y.; Mirzayev, H.

    2015-11-01

    The dry wear of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-based composites, including bronze-filled composites (B60), glass-filled composites (G15), and carbon-filled composites (C25), produced by the mold casting method were investigated under different sliding conditions. The Taguchi L27 method and the analysis of variance were used to identify the effect of process parameters on the wear of tested materials. Experimental results showed that the wear resistance of G15 polymer composites was better than those of C25 and B60 ones. The specific wear rate decreased with increasing sliding distance and load, but partly decreased with increasing tensile strength.

  11. Nutrition, diet and dental public health.

    PubMed

    Rugg-Gunn, A J

    1993-09-01

    Nutrition and diet can affect teeth in three ways: by affecting the structure of teeth (and thus appearance), by causing dental caries and by eroding teeth. The importance of dietary sugars in causing dental caries is clearly established and a reduction in consumption of non-milk extrinsic sugars recommended by government. The Health Education Authority has played a major role in promoting this aspect of dietary advice. The structure of teeth is influenced by nutrition; much of the evidence for this being published by Mellanby and colleagues in this country. Interest in this topic has increased recently and it seems probable that malnutrition enhances susceptibility to dental caries, and possible that it increases susceptibility to enamel defects especially in areas with moderate to high levels of fluoride ingestion. The prevalence and severity of dental erosion is likely to be increasing in Britain. Preliminary studies indicated that fluoride helps to protect teeth against erosion, but more research is needed.

  12. Effect of acetabular cup abduction angle on wear of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene in hip simulator testing.

    PubMed

    Korduba, Laryssa A; Essner, Aaron; Pivec, Robert; Lancin, Perry; Mont, Michael A; Wang, Aiguo; Delanois, Ronald E

    2014-10-01

    The effect of acetabular component positioning on the wear rates of metal-on-polyethylene articulations has not been extensively studied. Placement of acetabular cups at abduction angles of more than 40° has been noted as a possible reason for early failure caused by increased wear. We conducted a study to evaluate the effects of different acetabular cup abduction angles on polyethylene wear rate, wear area, contact pressure, and contact area. Our in vitro study used a hip joint simulator and finite element analysis to assess the effects of cup orientation at 4 angles (0°, 40°, 50°, 70°) on wear and contact properties. Polyethylene bearings with 28-mm cobalt-chrome femoral heads were cycled in an environment mimicking in vivo joint fluid to determine the volumetric wear rate after 10 million cycles. Contact pressure and contact area for each cup abduction angle were assessed using finite element analysis. Results were correlated with cup abduction angles to determine if there were any differences among the 4 groups. The inverse relationship between volumetric wear rate and acetabular cup inclination angle demonstrated less wear with steeper cup angles. The largest abduction angle (70°) had the lowest contact area, largest contact pressure, and smallest head coverage. Conversely, the smallest abduction angle (0°) had the most wear and most head coverage. Polyethylene wear after total hip arthroplasty is a major cause of osteolysis and aseptic loosening, which may lead to premature implant failure. Several studies have found that high wear rates for cups oriented at steep angles contributed to their failure. Our data demonstrated that larger cup abduction angles were associated with lower, not higher, wear. However, this potentially "protective" effect is likely counteracted by other complications of steep cup angles, including impingement, instability, and edge loading. These factors may be more relevant in explaining why implants fail at a higher rate if

  13. Dental compression syndrome and TMD: examining the relationship.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Gene

    2007-07-01

    Fifty years ago, McCollum and Stuart described a subtle pathology of function in the human masticatory system that was difficult to understand. That subtle pathology is the damage that results from compression of teeth. It is subtle because often the patient is unaware. It is pathologic because it applies untoward stress to the dentition, alveolar bone, and the TMJ. It is difficult to understand for many reasons: multiple etiology, few patient complaints, poor understanding of the deformations caused by DCS, the role of equilibration during treatment is unclear, and the dissimilar ways it takes its toll. For proper management of DCS, the general dentist should monitor for signs of compression and wear, educate the patient about the problem, and provide treatment. While every patient with a flattened dentition should not have their teeth dramatically altered or reconstructed, the dental profession should form a consensus that the natural, sharp morphology of teeth is superior to a flattened dentition, and should be preserved throughout one's lifetime.

  14. Wear mechanisms found in angular contact ball bearings of the SSME's LOX turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive experimental investigations were carried out on used flight bearings of the Phase 2 high-pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) in order to determine the wear mechanisms, dominant wear modes, and their extent and causes. The report shows methodology, surface analysis techniques used, result, and discussion. The mode largely responsible for heavy bearing wear in LOX was identified as adhesive/shear peeling of the upper layers of bearing balls and rings. The mode relies on the mechanisms of scale formation, breakdown, and removal, all of which are greatly enhanced by the heavy oxidation environment of the HPOTP. Major causes of the high wear in bearings appear to be lubrication and cooling, both inadequate for the imposed conditions of operation. Numerous illustrations and evidence are given.

  15. Aspects of wear and tear of tooth structure.

    PubMed

    Kahler, Bill

    2010-03-01

    Lifestyle factors and the increased longevity of the dentition due to greater life expectancy have resulted in greater wear and tear (cracking) of teeth. Often there exists interplay between damage and repair. An understanding of these mechanisms of damage and repair will assist the clinician in correct diagnosis and treatment planning. Preventive strategies as well as interdisciplinary measures are required for optimal outcomes. However, are some of our restorative interventions causing further damage to tooth structure?

  16. Enamel surface changes caused by hydrogen sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Takao; Hanabusa, Masao; Hosoya, Noriyasu; Chiba, Toshie; Yoshida, Takumasa; Morito, Akiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) produced inside the mouth are a well-known cause of halitosis. Recent studies have suggested that VSCs modify the pathology of periodontitis by encouraging the migration of bacterial toxins associated with increased permeability of gingival epithelia, and enhancing the production of matrix metalloproteinases in gingival connective tissue. Nonetheless, the effects on the enamel of direct exposure to VSCs within the oral cavity remain unclear. In the present study, we observed the effects of VSCs in the form of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on enamel surfaces and determined their effects on restorations. Materials and Methods: Extracted human tooth and bovine tooth samples were divided into the H2S experimental side and the control side. We observed the effects of H2S on enamel surfaces using electron microscopy and conducted a shear test. Results: We found that exposure to H2S obscured the enamel surface's crystal structure. The surface also exhibited coarseness and reticular changes. Shear testing did not reveal any differences in bond strength. Conclusions: Our findings suggested that H2S occurring inside the mouth causes changes to the crystal structure of the enamel surface that can lead to tooth wear, but that it does not diminish the effects of dental bonding in adhesive restorations. PMID:26752833

  17. Causes of wear of PDC bits and ways of improving their wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timonin, VV; Smolentsev, AS; Shakhtorin, I. O.; Polushin, NI; Laptev, AI; Kushkhabiev, AS

    2017-02-01

    The scope of the paper encompasses basic factors that influence PDC bit efficiency. Feasible ways of eliminating the negatives are illustrated. The wash fluid flow in a standard bit is modeled, the resultant pattern of the bit washing is analyzed, and the recommendations are made on modification of the PDC bit design.

  18. Dental Exam for Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... and thumb sucking Toddlers, school-age children and adolescents During each regular checkup, the dentist or hygienist ... dental hygienist about proper oral health care for adolescents. American Dental Hygienists' Association. http://www.adha.org/ ...

  19. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    MedlinePlus

    ... documents in the Related Resources section. Why is mercury used in dental amalgam? Approximately half of a ... about bioaccumulation, please see Related Resources. Is the mercury in dental amalgam the same as the mercury ...

  20. Orthodontic First Aid for General Dental Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Sodipo, Ibukunoluwa; Birdsall, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    Orthodontic emergencies occasionally arise and although they can cause discomfort to the patient, they can usually be stabilized by a general dentist and then followed up by the orthodontist. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Patients undergoing orthodontic treatment may initially present to their general dental practitioner with an orthodontic emergency as opposed to their orthodontist. It is therefore important that general dental practitioners are aware of common orthodontic emergencies and their management.

  1. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ...-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food... classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II,...

  2. Fault Wear and Friction Evolution: Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneh, Y.; Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Wear is an inevitable product of frictional sliding of brittle rocks as evidenced by the ubiquitous occurrence of fault gouge and slickenside striations. We present here experimental observations designed to demonstrate the relationship between wear and friction and their governing mechanisms. The experiments were conducted with a rotary shear apparatus on solid, ring-shaped rock samples that slipped for displacements up to tens of meters. Stresses, wear and temperature were continuously monitored. We analyzed 86 experiments of Kasota dolomite, Sierra White granite, Pennsylvania quartzite, Karoo gabbro, and Tennessee sandstone at slip velocities ranging from 0.002 to 0.97 m/s, and normal stress from 0.25 to 6.9 MPa. We conducted two types of runs: short slip experiments (slip distance < 25 mm) primarily on fresh, surface-ground samples, designed to analyze initial wear mechanisms; and long slip experiments (slip distance > 3 m) designed to achieve mature wear conditions and to observe the evolution of wear and friction as the fault surfaces evolved. The experiments reveal three wear stages: initial, running-in, and steady-state. The initial stage is characterized by (1) discrete damage striations, the length of which is comparable to total slip , and local pits or plow features; (2) timing and magnitude of fault-normal dilation corresponds to transient changes of normal and shear stresses; and (3) surface roughness increasing with the applied normal stress. We interpret these observations as wear mechanisms of (a) plowing into the fresh rock surfaces; (b) asperity breakage; and (c) asperity climb. The running-in stage is characterized by (1) intense wear-rate over a critical wear distance of Rd = 0.3-2 m; (2) drop of friction coefficient over a weakening distance of Dc = 0.2-4 m; (3) Rd and Dc display positive, quasi-linear relation with each other. We interpret these observations as indicating the organizing of newly-created wear particles into a 'three

  3. Wear of highly crosslinked polyethylene acetabular components

    PubMed Central

    Callary, Stuart A; Solomon, Lucian B; Holubowycz, Oksana T; Campbell, David G; Munn, Zachary; Howie, Donald W

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Wear rates of highly crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) acetabular components have varied considerably between different published studies. This variation is in part due to the different techniques used to measure wear and to the errors inherent in measuring the relatively low amounts of wear in XLPE bearings. We undertook a scoping review of studies that have examined the in vivo wear of XLPE acetabular components using the most sensitive method available, radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Methods A systematic search of the PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane databases was performed to identify published studies in which RSA was used to measure wear of XLPE components in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Results 18 publications examined 12 primary THA cohorts, comprising only 260 THAs at 2–10 years of follow-up. The mean or median proximal wear rate reported ranged from 0.00 to 0.06 mm/year. However, differences in the manner in which wear was determined made it difficult to compare some studies. Furthermore, differences in RSA methodology between studies, such as the use of supine or standing radiographs and the use of beaded or unbeaded reference segments, may limit future meta-analyses examining the effect of patient and implant variables on wear rates. Interpretation This scoping review confirmed the low wear rates of XLPE in THA, as measured by RSA. We make recommendations to enhance the standardization of reporting of RSA wear results, which will facilitate early identification of poorly performing implants and enable a better understanding of the effects of surgical and patient factors on wear. PMID:25301435

  4. Interproximal wear versus incisors extraction to solve anterior lower crowding: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Natália Valli; Silveira, Giordani Santos; Pereira, Daniele Masterson Tavares; Mattos, Claudia Trindade; Mucha, José Nelson

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine by means of a systematic review the best treatment, whether interproximal wear or incisor extraction, to correct anterior lower crowding in Class I patients in permanent dentition. METHODS: A literature review was conducted using MEDLINE, Scopus and Web of Science to retrieve studies published between January 1950 and October 2013. In selecting the sample, the following inclusion criteria were applied: studies involving interproximal wear and/or extraction of mandibular incisors, as well as Class I cases with anterior lower crowding in permanent dentition. RESULTS: Out of a total of 943 articles found after excluding duplicates, 925 were excluded after abstract analysis. After full articles were read, 13 were excluded by the eligibility criteria and one due to methodological quality; therefore, only fours articles remained: two retrospective and two randomized prospective studies. Data were collected, analyzed and organized in tables. CONCLUSION: Both interproximal wear and mandibular incisor extraction are effective in treating Class I malocclusion in permanent dentition with moderate anterior lower crowding and pleasant facial profile. There is scant evidence to determine the best treatment option for each case. Clinical decision should be made on an individual basis by taking into account dental characteristics, crowding, dental and oral health, patient's expectations and the use of set-up models. PMID:25741827

  5. Wear biomechanics in the slicing dentition of the giant horned dinosaur Triceratops

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Gregory M.; Sidebottom, Mark A.; Kay, David I.; Turner, Kevin T.; Ip, Nathan; Norell, Mark A.; Sawyer, W. Gregory; Krick, Brandon A.

    2015-01-01

    Herbivorous reptiles rarely evolve occluding dentitions that allow for the mastication (chewing) of plant matter. Conversely, most herbivorous mammals have occluding teeth with complex tissue architectures that self-wear to complex morphologies for orally processing plants. Dinosaurs stand out among reptiles in that several lineages acquired the capacity to masticate. In particular, the horned ceratopsian dinosaurs, among the most successful Late Cretaceous dinosaurian lineages, evolved slicing dentitions for the exploitation of tough, bulky plant matter. We show how Triceratops, a 9-m-long ceratopsian, and its relatives evolved teeth that wore during feeding to create fullers (recessed central regions on cutting blades) on the chewing surfaces. This unique morphology served to reduce friction during feeding. It was achieved through the evolution of a complex suite of osseous dental tissues rivaling the complexity of mammalian dentitions. Tribological (wear) properties of the tissues are preserved in ~66-million-year-old teeth, allowing the creation of a sophisticated three-dimensional biomechanical wear model that reveals how the complexes synergistically wore to create these implements. These findings, along with similar discoveries in hadrosaurids (duck-billed dinosaurs), suggest that tissue-mediated changes in dental morphology may have played a major role in the remarkable ecological diversification of these clades and perhaps other dinosaurian clades capable of mastication. PMID:26601198

  6. Wear biomechanics in the slicing dentition of the giant horned dinosaur Triceratops.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Gregory M; Sidebottom, Mark A; Kay, David I; Turner, Kevin T; Ip, Nathan; Norell, Mark A; Sawyer, W Gregory; Krick, Brandon A

    2015-06-01

    Herbivorous reptiles rarely evolve occluding dentitions that allow for the mastication (chewing) of plant matter. Conversely, most herbivorous mammals have occluding teeth with complex tissue architectures that self-wear to complex morphologies for orally processing plants. Dinosaurs stand out among reptiles in that several lineages acquired the capacity to masticate. In particular, the horned ceratopsian dinosaurs, among the most successful Late Cretaceous dinosaurian lineages, evolved slicing dentitions for the exploitation of tough, bulky plant matter. We show how Triceratops, a 9-m-long ceratopsian, and its relatives evolved teeth that wore during feeding to create fullers (recessed central regions on cutting blades) on the chewing surfaces. This unique morphology served to reduce friction during feeding. It was achieved through the evolution of a complex suite of osseous dental tissues rivaling the complexity of mammalian dentitions. Tribological (wear) properties of the tissues are preserved in ~66-million-year-old teeth, allowing the creation of a sophisticated three-dimensional biomechanical wear model that reveals how the complexes synergistically wore to create these implements. These findings, along with similar discoveries in hadrosaurids (duck-billed dinosaurs), suggest that tissue-mediated changes in dental morphology may have played a major role in the remarkable ecological diversification of these clades and perhaps other dinosaurian clades capable of mastication.

  7. Accreditation in Dental Hygiene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Accrediting, Washington, DC.

    The Council on Dental Education cooperates with the American Dental Hygienists' Association in developing educational requirements for schools of dental hygiene. To be eligible for accreditation, schools must operate on a non-profit basis. A school applying for accreditation completes a previsitation questionnaire concerning its program. The…

  8. Dental Manpower Fact Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ake, James N.; Johnson, Donald W.

    Statistical data on many aspects of dental and allied dental personnel supply, distribution, characteristics, and education and on certain other aspects of dental services are presented and discussed. The data on dentist supply show the national trend in the supply of active dentists since 1950 and the concurrent changes in dentist-to-population…

  9. Dental Laboratory Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC.

    The Air Force dental laboratory technology manual is designed as a basic training text as well as a reference source for dental laboratory technicians, a specialty occupation concerned with the design, fabrication, and repair of dental prostheses. Numerous instructive diagrams and photographs are included throughout the manual. The comprehensive…

  10. DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GALAGAN, DONALD J.

    THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

  11. Dental Assisting Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiel, Sandra J.

    Compiled to introduce the dental assisting student to various techniques used in the dental office and to present theoretical information essential for the student's professional development, this laboratory guide consists of three units of instruction. The first unit is an introduction to dental assisting and contains five topics of study. The…

  12. Perspectives from Dental Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Bruce J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper responds to the Institute of Medicine's 1995 report concerning the present status and future needs of dental education in the United States. It examines whether real reform is occurring at the National Institute of Dental Research, within the academic dental community, and within the practicing profession. It concludes that very little…

  13. Mechanisms for fatigue and wear of polysilicon structural thinfilms

    SciTech Connect

    Alsem, Daniel Henricus

    2006-01-01

    Fatigue and wear in micron-scale polysilicon structural films can severely impact the reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Despite studies on fatigue and wear behavior of these films, there is still an on-going debate regarding the precise physical mechanisms for these two important failure modes. Although macro-scale silicon does not fatigue, this phenomenon is observed in micron-scale silicon. It is shown that for polysilicon devices fabricated in the MUMPs foundry and SUMMiT process stress-lifetime data exhibits similar trends in ambient air, shorter lifetimes in higher relative humidity environments and no fatigue failure at all in high vacuum. Transmission electron microscopy of the surface oxides of the samples show an approximate four-fold thickening of the oxide at stress concentrations after fatigue failure, but no thickening after fracture in air or after fatigue cycling in vacuo. It is found that such oxide thickening and fatigue failure (in air) occurs in devices with initial oxide thicknesses of ~4-20 nm. Such results are interpreted and explained by a reaction layer fatigue mechanism; specifically, moisture-assisted subcritical cracking within a cyclic stress-assisted thickened oxide layer occurs until the crack reaches a critical size to cause catastrophic failure. Polysilicon specimens from the SUMMiT process are used to study wear mechanisms in micron-scale silicon in ambient air. Worn parts are examined by analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy, while temperature changes are monitored using infrared microscopy. These results are compared with the development of values of static coefficients of friction (COF) with number of wear cycles. Observations show amorphous debris particles (~50-100 nm) created by fracture through the silicon grains (~500 nm), which subsequently oxidize, agglomerate into clusters and create plowing tracks. A nano-crystalline layer (~20-200 nm) forms at worn regions. No dislocations or

  14. Mechanisms for fatigue and wear of polysilicon structural thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsem, Daniel Henricus

    Fatigue and wear in micron-scale polysilicon structural films can severely impact the reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Despite studies on fatigue and wear behavior of these films, there is still an on-going debate regarding the precise physical mechanisms for these two important failure modes. Although macro-scale silicon does not fatigue, this phenomenon is observed in micron-scale silicon. It is shown that for polysilicon devices fabricated in the MUMPs foundry and SUMMiT(TM) process stress-lifetime data exhibits similar trends in ambient air, shorter lifetimes in higher relative humidity environments and no fatigue failure at all in high vacuum. Transmission electron microscopy of the surface oxides of the samples show an approximate four-fold thickening of the oxide at stress concentrations after fatigue failure, but no thickening after fracture in air or after fatigue cycling in vacuo . It is found that such oxide thickening and fatigue failure (in air) occurs in devices with initial oxide thicknesses of ˜4-20 nm. Such results are interpreted and explained by a reaction-layer fatigue mechanism; specifically, moisture-assisted subcritical cracking within a cyclic stress-assisted thickened oxide layer occurs until the crack reaches a critical size to cause catastrophic failure. Polysilicon specimens from the SUMMiT(TM) process are used to study wear mechanisms in micron-scale silicon in ambient air. Worn parts are examined by analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy, while temperature changes are monitored using infrared microscopy. These results are compared with the development of values of static coefficients of friction (COF) with number of wear cycles. Observations show amorphous debris particles (˜50-100 nm) created by fracture through the silicon grains (˜500 nm), which subsequently oxidize, agglomerate into clusters and create plowing tracks. A nano-crystalline layer (˜20-200 nm) forms at worn regions. No

  15. Weaker Dental Enamel Explains Dental Decay

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Gibson, Carolyn W.; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is “weaker” while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution. PMID:25885796

  16. The Evolutionary Paradox of Tooth Wear: Simply Destruction or Inevitable Adaptation?

    PubMed Central

    Benazzi, Stefano; Nguyen, Huynh Nhu; Schulz, Dieter; Grosse, Ian R.; Gruppioni, Giorgio; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Kullmer, Ottmar

    2013-01-01

    Over the last century, humans from industrialized societies have witnessed a radical increase in some dental diseases. A severe problem concerns the loss of dental materials (enamel and dentine) at the buccal cervical region of the tooth. This “modern-day” pathology, called non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs), is ubiquitous and worldwide spread, but is very sporadic in modern humans from pre-industrialized societies. Scholars believe that several factors are involved, but the real dynamics behind this pathology are far from being understood. Here we use an engineering approach, finite element analysis (FEA), to suggest that the lack of dental wear, characteristic of industrialized societies, might be a major factor leading to NCCLs. Occlusal loads were applied to high resolution finite element models of lower second premolars (P2) to demonstrate that slightly worn P2s envisage high tensile stresses in the buccal cervical region, but when worn down artificially in the laboratory the pattern of stress distribution changes and the tensile stresses decrease, matching the results obtained in naturally worn P2s. In the modern industrialized world, individuals at advanced ages show very moderate dental wear when compared to past societies, and teeth are exposed to high tensile stresses at the buccal cervical region for decades longer. This is the most likely mechanism explaining enamel loss in the cervical region, and may favor the activity of other disruptive processes such as biocorrosion. Because of the lack of dental abrasion, our masticatory apparatus faces new challenges that can only be understood in an evolutionary perspective. PMID:23638020

  17. Two Cases of Eating Disorders in Adolescents with Dental Braces Fitted Prior to the Onset of Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Yeon; Kim, Sung-Wan; Kim, Jae-Min; Shin, Il-Seon; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2015-07-01

    Orthodontic treatment typically occurs during early childhood and adolescence but the wearing of dental braces is often associated with sudden changes in eating patterns that prolong treatment into the teenage years. Despite these changes, psychological assessments related to eating disorders during the course of orthodontic treatment are often ignored. Based on the findings of the present case report, it is suggested that adolescent patients who wear braces and exhibit severe weight loss should be carefully monitored for psychiatric problems, including eating disorders.

  18. Does ultra-mild wear play any role for dry friction applications, such as automotive braking?

    PubMed

    Osterle, Werner; Dmitriev, A I; Kloss, H

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructured third body films and/or storage of wear debris at the surfaces of the first bodies are deemed as prerequisites of sliding under ultra-mild wear conditions. Since such features have been observed experimentally on brake pads and discs, attempts were undertaken to study their sliding behaviour by modelling on the nanoscopic scale with an approach based on Movable Cellular Automata (MCA). The model rendered the possibility to study the influence of different nanostructures systematically and to assess the impact of different brake pad ingredients on the sliding behaviour, velocity accommodation and friction force stabilization at a sliding contact. Besides providing a review on previously published modelling results, some additional new graphs enabling better visualization of dynamic processes are presented. Although ultra-mild wear conditions were considered to be essential for achieving the desired tribological properties, transitions to mesoscopic and macroscopic wear mechanisms were studied as well. The final conclusion is that ultra-mild wear and corresponding smooth sliding behaviour play an important role during automotive braking, even though temporarily and locally events of severe wear may cause friction instabilities, surface damage and release of coarse wear particles.

  19. Initial enamel wear of glazed and polished leucite-based porcelains with different fusing temperatures.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa; Saiki, Mitiko; de Campos, Tomie Nakakuki; Adachi, Eduardo Makoto; Shinkai, Rosemary Sadami

    2009-01-01

    This study used the radiotracer method to measure the initial enamel wear caused by low- and high-fusing porcelains after glazing or polishing. It also tested the correlation between enamel wear and porcelain surface roughness (Ra). Surface morphology was assessed by optical microscopy. Cylindrical specimens of three porcelains (two high-fusing, one low-fusing) were either autoglazed or polished. Flattened enamel specimens were irradiated with neutrons and submitted to the wear assay for 2,500 cycles in distilled water using a 285 g load; the released beta 32P particles were measured for 10 minutes. For all samples, Ra was recorded with a profilometer before and after testing. Enamel wear was not significantly different for porcelain or finishing method but there was a trend of interaction between the two variables (p = 0.08). A positive correlation was found between enamel wear and the initial Ra of porcelain (r = 0.71). The glazed surfaces of high-fusing porcelains were wavy and had a greater Ra, while the polished surfaces had grooves and pores prior to wear testing. The low-fusing porcelain demonstrated lower Ra and a more homogeneous surface. All abraded surfaces had similar morphology after the wear assay.

  20. Individual tooth macrowear pattern guides the reconstruction of Sts 52 (Australopithecus africanus) dental arches.

    PubMed

    Benazzi, Stefano; Kullmer, Ottmar; Schulz, Dieter; Gruppioni, Giorgio; Weber, Gerhard W

    2013-02-01

    The functional restoration of the occlusal relationship between maxillary and mandibular tooth rows is a major challenge in modern dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. Similar technical challenges are present in paleoanthropology when considering fragmented and deformed mandibular and maxillary fossils. Sts 52, an Australopithecus africanus specimen from Sterkfontein Member 4, represents a typical case where the original shape of the dental arches is no longer preserved. It includes a partial lower face (Sts 52a) and a fragmented mandible (Sts 52b), both incomplete and damaged to such an extent to thwart attempts at matching upper and lower dentitions. We show how the preserved macro wear pattern of the tooth crowns can be used to functionally reconstruct Sts 52's dental arches. High-resolution dental stone casts of Sts 52 maxillary and mandibular dentition were mounted and repositioned in a dental articulator. The occlusal relationship between antagonists was restored based on the analysis of the occlusal wear pattern of each preserved tooth, considering all dental contact movements represented in the occlusal compass. The reconstructed dental arches were three-dimensional surface scanned and their occlusal kinematics tested in a simulation. The outcome of this contribution is the first functional restoration of A. africanus dental arches providing new morphometric data for specimen Sts 52. It is noteworthy that the method described in this case study might be applied to several other fossil specimens.

  1. Dynamic and kinematic effects in the friction and wear of rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerrard, David Peter

    Research is presented which focuses on the micro-mechanical processes that dominate the friction and wear of rubber. New test concepts and equipment were developed to study the dynamic and kinematic effects involved in these processes. Several new analytical tools were presented to explain the observed results in quantifiable terms. Experiments conducted on filled NR confirmed that a transition in wear behavior does not occur across a wide range of power inputs. Examination of the debris distributions across the contact revealed that an agglomeration process of intrinsic particles occurs, the extent of which is purely a function of distance from the contact's leading edge. This revelation is used to explain the commonly reported bimodal size distribution of debris generated during rubber wear and to expose the mechanical process that generates intrinsic debris as the primary cause of wear. The effect of contact length (i.e. extent of agglomeration) on corresponding friction and wear levels was studied. The effects of dynamically changing slip orientation on the properties of a coated abrasive and the friction and wear of a filled SBR were studied. The process of removal of intrinsic debris from a rubber surface was described in terms of a micro-mechanical fatigue fracture process that occurs at varying rates that are dependent on the frictional work acting on the average intrinsic nodule. The model was successfully tested against previously published data and new data and was shown to account for pressure and abrasive effects with one set of two constants. The potential effects of pattern morphologies on rubber friction and wear were examined as well. The wear patterns showed a clear tendency to roll up as opposed to peeling back. The intrinsic wear model was then applied to a description of pattern wear by assuming that the rate of intrinsic abrasion across a pattern is simply a function of the local pressure distribution which varies from the front to the back

  2. Contact lens wear and microbial keratitis.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Markanday

    2002-11-01

    Common types of contact lens are hard, rigid gas-permeable or soft lenses. Most lenses are worn on a daily basis. Cosmetic lenses are worn for non-medical indications. Microbial keratitis, a rare but most significant complication is discussed in this article. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococci are the most common organisms cause infective keratitis. Fungi and acanthamoeba are also responsible. The causes of increased susceptibility to infection are poor lens hygiene, adhesion of bacteria to lens surface and hypoxia. Preventing measures to be taken while wearing contact lens are discussed in a nutshell. Ocular pain, conjunctival infection, photophobia, epiphora and reduced vision are some of the symptoms of corneal infection. Diagnostic laboratory investigations are to be carried out immediately when a microbial corneal ulcer is suspected. Acanthamoeba can be cultured from corneal scrapes. Immunologically based fluorescein labelling techniques appear to be more sensitive than simple staining. The treatment consists of medical and surgical intervention. Corneal thinning, descemetocele formation and perforation are possible complications.

  3. Modeling wear of cast Ti alloys.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kwai S; Koike, Marie; Okabe, Toru

    2007-05-01

    The wear behavior of Ti-based alloys was analyzed by considering the elastic-plastic fracture of individual alloys in response to the relevant contact stress field. Using the contact stresses as the process driving force, wear was computed as the wear rate or volume loss as a function of hardness and tensile ductility for Ti-based cast alloys containing an alpha, alpha+beta or beta microstructure with or without the intermetallic precipitates. Model predictions indicated that wear of Ti alloys increases with increasing hardness but with decreasing fracture toughness or tensile ductility. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data to elucidate the roles of microstructure in wear and contrasted against those in grindability.

  4. Biologically Based Restorative Management of Tooth Wear

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Martin G. D.; Bomfim, Deborah I.; Austin, Rupert S.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of tooth wear is increasing in industrialised nations. Yet, there is no high-level evidence to support or refute any therapeutic intervention. In the absence of such evidence, many currently prevailing management strategies for tooth wear may be failing in their duty of care to first and foremost improve the oral health of patients with this disease. This paper promotes biologically sound approaches to the management of tooth wear on the basis of current best evidence of the aetiology and clinical features of this disease. The relative risks and benefits of the varying approaches to managing tooth wear are discussed with reference to long-term follow-up studies. Using reference to ethical standards such as “The Daughter Test”, this paper presents case reports of patients with moderate-to-severe levels of tooth wear managed in line with these biologically sound principles. PMID:22315608

  5. Modeling wear of cast Ti alloys

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kwai S.; Koike, Marie; Okabe, Toru

    2007-01-01

    The wear behavior of Ti-based alloys was analyzed by considering the elastic–plastic fracture of individual alloys in response to the relevant contact stress field. Using the contact stresses as the process driving force, wear was computed as the wear rate or volume loss as a function of hardness and tensile ductility for Ti-based cast alloys containing an α, α+β or β microstructure with or without the intermetallic precipitates. Model predictions indicated that wear of Ti alloys increases with increasing hardness but with decreasing fracture toughness or tensile ductility. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data to elucidate the roles of microstructure in wear and contrasted against those in grindability. PMID:17224314

  6. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets. [friction and wear experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined, and etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the tungsten carbide (WC) and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation, and the wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation, and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  7. Techniques to Evaluate Dental Erosion: A Systematic Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mahasweta; Joshi, Nikhil; Kathariya, Rahul; Angadi, Prabhakar; Raikar, Sonal

    2016-10-01

    This article reviews different techniques for evaluating dental erosion, weighs the advantages and disadvantages of these techniques, and presents the latest trends in the study of dental erosion. In May 2014, an initial search was carried out in the PubMed/MEDLINE database of indexed journals from 1975 to 2013 using the following keywords: dental erosion; dental erosion In-vitro; and dental erosion in-vivo. Bibliographic citations from the papers found were then used to find other useful sources. The authors categorize the techniques into three classes: in-vitro, in-vivo and in-vitro/in-vivo. The article discusses the instrumentation required to use each of these techniques, as well as their rationale, merits and applications. The emergence of in-vitro/in-vivo techniques offers the potential to accurately quantify tooth wear in clinical situations. Cross-sectional as well as longitudinal studies show that these techniques will improve diagnosis, treatment planning and management of dental erosion.

  8. Techniques to Evaluate Dental Erosion: A Systematic Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Mahasweta; Joshi, Nikhil; Angadi, Prabhakar; Raikar, Sonal

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews different techniques for evaluating dental erosion, weighs the advantages and disadvantages of these techniques, and presents the latest trends in the study of dental erosion. In May 2014, an initial search was carried out in the PubMed/MEDLINE database of indexed journals from 1975 to 2013 using the following keywords: dental erosion; dental erosion In-vitro; and dental erosion in-vivo. Bibliographic citations from the papers found were then used to find other useful sources. The authors categorize the techniques into three classes: in-vitro, in-vivo and in-vitro/in-vivo. The article discusses the instrumentation required to use each of these techniques, as well as their rationale, merits and applications. The emergence of in-vitro/in-vivo techniques offers the potential to accurately quantify tooth wear in clinical situations. Cross-sectional as well as longitudinal studies show that these techniques will improve diagnosis, treatment planning and management of dental erosion. PMID:27891489

  9. Effects of rigid gas permeable contact lens extended wear on rabbit cornea assessed by LDH activity, MDH activity, and albumin levels in tear fluid.

    PubMed

    Imayasu, M; Moriyama, T; Ohashi, J; Cavanagh, H D

    1993-07-01

    We used noninvasive biochemical techniques to study the effects on rabbit corneas of 7-day extended wear of rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lenses of varying oxygen transmissibilities. Corneal effects were assessed through measurement of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activities and albumin levels in tears. The RGP contact lenses used had Dk/Ltotal values ranging from 33 to 64 x 10(-9) (cm/sec) (mL O2/mL mmHg) and were of uniform 0.15 mm center thickness. Extended wear of high Dk (Dk/Ltotal = 34) and super high Dk (Dk/Ltotal = 56) lenses caused an increase in tear LDH activity from 1,190 U/L (before lens wear) to over 18,000 U/L during 7 days of continuous wear. These contact lenses also caused gradual increases in tear MDH activity from 431 U/L (before lens wear) to over 750 U/L after 7 days of continuous wear. Extended wear of the ultra high Dk lens (Dk/Ltotal = 64), however, caused no significant increase in LDH or MDH activity in tears. Tear albumin levels in all contact lens wearing eyes increased after 1 day of lens wear, then gradually recovered to normal values after 2 days of continuous wear. The changes in albumin levels did not correlate with Dk/Ltotal values of lenses worn.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. A Multidirectional Tribo-System: Wear of UHMWPE under Sliding, Rolling, and Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patten, Elias Wolfgang

    Total knee replacements (TKR) have become a successful surgical procedure for addressing end-stage osteoarthritis, with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and cobalt chrome alloy (UHMWPE/Co-Cr) serving as the bearing materials of choice for decades. However, more than 10% of TKRs fail and require revision surgery. The predominant challenge with UHMWPE is the particulate debris generated through wear-mediated processes; wear debris from the UHMWPE tibial bearing surface leading to loosening is still the main cause for post-fifth-year revisions. UHMWPE wear in hip arthroplasty has been linked to microstructural evolution at the surface from multidirectional sliding in the hip joint but little is known about how the microstructure responds to clinically relevant sliding conditions in the knee. This is likely because wear tests are typically performed under basic motion parameters with simplified geometry (pin-on-disk tests) while the knee has more complex kinematics: it is neither a ball-and-socket joint nor a simple hinge joint, but has 2D sliding, rolling/slip motion, and rotation. There is also disagreement over how to best quantify cross-shear and how to model how much wear it will cause. A custom multidirectional tribo-system was used to investigate the individual and combined effects of the different motions in TKR: 2D sliding, rolling, and rotation, for a total of eight separate kinematic conditions. The trends in wear rates and wear factors for these different motions were compared with many different definitions for magnitudes and ratios of cross-shear. Additionally, the wear surfaces were examined for wear mechanism and the microstructural changes in lamellae orientation for the different motions were analyzed. To mimic the tribological conditions of a condyle in a TKR, polished Co-Cr spheres were articulated against flat, smooth UHMWPE disks with physiologically relevant loading, speed, and lubrication conditions. The motion parameters were selected

  11. Adhesive Wear of Rollers in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaeef, Iqbal; Krantz, Timothy L.

    2012-01-01

    This work was done to support NASA's James Webb Space Telescope that is equipped with a Near Infrared Camera and Spectrograph and Micro Shutter Assembly (MSA). A MSA mechanism's qualification test in cryogenic vacuum at 30deg K for 96K cycles resulted in roller wear and formation of some debris. Lab tests in vacuum were conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to understand the wear of Ti6Al4V mated with 440F steel rollers. Misalignment angle was found to have the most significant effect on debris formation. At misalignment angle of 1.4deg, significant amount of wear debris were formed within 50,000 cycles. Very few wear particles were found for a zero misalignment angle, and the total wear was small even after 367,000 cycles. The mode of wear in all the tests was attributed to adhesion, which was clearly evident from video records as well as the plate-like amalgamated debris material from both rollers. The adhesive wear rate was found to be approximately proportional to the misalignment angle. The wear is a two-way phenomenon, and the mixing of both roller materials in wear debris was confirmed by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and EDX spectra. While there was a net loss of mass from the steel rollers, XRF and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectra showed peaks of Ti on steel rollers, and peaks of Fe on Ti rollers. These results are useful for designers in terms of maintaining appropriate tolerances to avoid misalignment of rolling elements and the resulting severe wear

  12. Wear of connector contacts exposed to relative motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilk, R. A.

    Connectors play a significant role in the performance, cost, and reliability of electronic equipment. In connection with the development of the system interconnection design, a factor which is often overlooked is related to the importance of connector selection and mounting to minimize relative motion between contacts during vibration encountered in handling, transportation, and service. This motion can lead to the loss of protective coatings (gold and nickel) due to frictional wear. If this happens, fretting corrosion of the base metals may occur. The produced damage can adversely affect performance due to increased joint resistance, eventually causing intermittent contacts. The present investigation is concerned with the study of different style contacts (tuning fork, box, and circular) to determine their endurance and wear characteristics when exposed to relative motion created by vibration. All contacts investigated were fabricated from brass, beryllium copper, or phosphor bronze, and had .00127 mm minimum gold plating over .00127 mm minimum nickel plating.

  13. On the influence of strain rate sensitivity on wear in the Archard regime

    SciTech Connect

    Brechet, Y. . Lab. de Thermodynamique et Physico-Chimie Metallurgique); Estrin, Y. . Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Relating wear characteristics of a metallic material to its mechanical properties (yield strength, strain hardening coefficient) and its microstructural features (size and volume fraction of inclusions) is a long-standing problem. The diversity of mechanisms which are involved during wear processes makes it practically impossible to have a general theory which would encompass all thinkable situations corresponding to various loads and various regimes of sliding. Different regimes and the conditions for their occurrence have been systematized in wear mechanism maps. In this communication the authors are going to restrict their consideration to plasticity dominated wear which is expected to occur in the low velocity range where surface heating is negligible. In this regime, the prevalent wear mechanism is the removal of slivers of metal by plastic failure due to shearing of contact asperities. The classic works by Rabinowicz have demonstrated clearly that solid friction is a rate dependent problem and that the velocity dependence of dynamic solid friction is nothing else than a consequence of the increase of static solid friction with time during which normal load was applied prior to the commencement of sliding. Creep under normal compression stress leads to flattening of the junctions causing their strength to increase with time. Like solid friction, wear appears to be a rate dependent phenomenon, and the strain rate sensitivity of the flow stress can be expected to be relevant for wear resistance. The strain rate sensitivity is known to play an important role in other damage related properties, such as ductility and fracture toughness. The authors felt that it would be of interest to evaluate the effect of strain rate sensitivity on the wear rate as part of an attempt to relate the wear properties to a bulk constitutive equation, and as a guideline for assessing the influence of alloying elements known to affect the strain rate sensitivity.

  14. Dental students' familiarity with the medical management of dental patients at Brazilian dental schools.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Paula Caetano; Garbín, Cléa Adas Saliba; Moimaz, Suzely Adas Saliba; Saliba, Nemre Adas; Arcieri, Renato Moreira

    2013-05-01

    Drug therapy in dentistry is essential for patients' treatment and requires special care by dentists, so it must be part of a well-grounded education for predoctoral dental students. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of undergraduate students at dental schools in Brazil about the use of drugs in dental practice. The sample universe was comprised of all undergraduates enrolled in the last year of the dentistry course in three universities in 2010 (n=253). Inclusion criteria were students in their last year of enrollment and who agreed to participate in the research. The results were analyzed on Epi Info 3.5.1 software. Analyses were conducted with chi-square, Friedman, and Wilcoxon tests. Slightly more than half of the participants (51.9 percent) reported the ideal dose of anesthetic for a normal patient. However, their difficulties increased when asked about the relationship between the anesthetic and patients with systemic disease or those needing special care. Regarding drugs that usually cause allergic attack, only 29.2 percent and 36.6 percent, respectively, cited methyl methacrylate and latex. This study found that the knowledge of these undergraduates about the questions was deficient, so dental education should include more theoretical and clinical practice in recognizing the patient's medical needs.

  15. A clinician guide to patients afraid of dental injections and numbness.

    PubMed

    Armfield, Jason M; Milgrom, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Fears of dental injections remain a clinical problem often requiring cognitive behavioural psychology counselling and sedation in order to carry out needed dental treatment. This study, based on a national survey in Australia, compared patient concerns about numbness caused by local anaesthesia and fears of the injection itself. It also examined associations between dental fearfulness and avoidance associated with patient self-reported negative experiences and treatment need. Clinical advice on how to approach such patients is offered. Relatively high levels of dental anxiety and fear have been reported in several industrialised Western societies (McGrath & Bedi, 2004; Armfield, Spencer & Stewart, 2006; Lahti et al., 2007; Enkling, Marwinski Jöhren, 2006). In the U.K., almost one in three adults consider themselves to always be anxious about going to the dentist (Nuttall et al., 2001). Of concern is that this dental fear may be passed on to the children of anxious adults (Nuttall, Gilbert & Morris, 2008), leading to an inter-generational perpetuation of the problem. There is considerable evidence that dental fear is related to poorer oral health, reduced dental attendance and increased treatment stress for the attending dentist. There are many aspects of going to a dentist that might elicit feelings of apprehension, concern or anxiety in prospective patients (Liddell & Gosse, 1998; Oosterink, de Jongh & Aartman, 2008). One of the most commonly reported concerns relates to receiving injections. Indeed, fear of needles and the treatment of injection fear has been an important focus of a research in the U.K. (Boyle, Newton & Milgrom, 2010). Needle fear, in particular, is a major issue given that the delivery of local anaesthesia via injection is the central plank of pain relief techniques in dentistry (Malamed, 2009) and dentists as well as patients often avoid difficult injections as a consequence, resulting in poor pain control. A less well described anxiety of

  16. Fatal intracerebral hemorrhage during dental treatment.

    PubMed

    Massalha, R; Valdman, S; Farkash, P; Merkin, L; Herishanu, Y

    1996-09-01

    Although chronic arterial hypertension is the leading cause of intracranial hemorrhage, an abrupt rise in systemic arterial pressure in normotensive people may sometimes induce a hemorrhagic stroke. Dental treatment is rarely associated with such an event. We report here on two middle-aged women, apparently healthy, who suffered from a fatal intracerebral hemorrhage following a dental treatment. On admission, high levels of arterial hypertension were found. It seems that trigeminal manipulation during dental treatment as well as increased serum levels of induced epinephrine mainly by stress and pain, and the small amounts absorbed from the site of local anesthesia might produce abrupt elevation of blood pressure, subsequent increase in cerebral blood flow and severe, even fatal intracerebral hemorrhage. The addition of catecholamines to local anesthetics should be considered. We recommend the use of benzodiazepin as a premedication drug to reduce stress during dental treatment.

  17. Electron spectroscopy analysis of contact surfaces in the wear of carbon brushes against copper commutators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Schrader, M. E.

    Carbon brushes and copper commutator strips have been analyzed by a combination of techniques to investigate possible surface-related phenomena in the excessive wear of carbon brushes in motors and generators. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning Auger microscopy, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis were used in this study. A thin SiO 2 film, of the order of 30 Å on the brushes, and of the order of several hundred Å on the commutators, was correlated with high wear and is believed to be the chief cause of the excessive wear. Possible models for the effect of SiO 2 on carbon brush wear are discussed.

  18. A thermal, thermoelastic, and wear analysis of high-energy disk brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, F. E., Jr.; Wu, J. J.; Ling, F. F.

    1974-01-01

    A thermomechanical investigation of the sliding contact problem encountered in high-energy disk brakes is described. The analysis includes a modelling, using the finite element method of the thermoelastic instabilities that cause transient changes in contact area to occur on the friction surface. In order to include the effect of wear at the contact surface, a wear criterion is proposed that results in the prediction of wear rates for disk brakes that are quite close to experimentally determined wear rates. The thermal analysis shows that the transient temperature distribution in a disk brake assembly can be determined more accurately by use of this thermomechanical analysis than by a more conventional analysis that assumes constant contact conditions. It also shows that lower, more desirable, temperatures in disk brakes can be attained by increasing the volume, the thermal conductivity, and, especially, the heat capacity of the brake components.

  19. Effect of Mechanical Loads and Surface Roughness on Wear of Silorane and Methacrylate-Based Posterior Composites

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaei, Masomeh Hasani; Arami, Sakineh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Dental composite wear in posterior restorations is a concern and is affected by different factors. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of polishing and mechanical loads on wear of silorane-based and methyl methacrylate-based composites resins. Materials and Methods: Of each dental composite (Filtek P90 and Filtek P60), 40 samples were fabricated in a polyethylene mold (4mm diameter, 10mm height). According to the finishing and/or polishing protocols (180-grit or 2500-grit silicon carbide papers), the samples of each composite were divided into two groups. Surface roughness (R ә ) was measured and recorded using a contact profilometer. The weight of each sample was also measured in grams. The wear test was performed in a pin-on-disc device under two different loads (70N, 150N). Afterwards, samples were subjected to profilometry and their weight was measured again. Data were analyzed using t-test and univariate ANOVA. P <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Higher mechanical load resulted in greater weight loss (P<0.001). Samples polished with 2500-grit papers showed significantly lower Ra changes compared to those polished with 180-grit papers (P<0.001). Filtek P90 had greater weight loss than Filtek P60 except in one condition (180-grit, 70N). Conclusions: Results showed that wear of posterior composite restorations depends on mechanical load, type of composite resin and surface properties. PMID:28243302

  20. Predominant factor determining wear properties of β-type and (α+β)-type titanium alloys in metal-to-metal contact for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Narita, Kengo; Cho, Ken

    2015-01-01

    The predominant factor determining the wear properties of a new titanium alloy, Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr (TNTZ) and a conventional titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V extra-low interstitial (Ti64) was investigated for TNTZ and Ti64 combinations in metal-to-metal contacting bio-implant applications. The worn surfaces, wear debris, and subsurface damages were analyzed using a scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron-back scattered diffraction analysis. The volume loss of TNTZ is found to be larger than that of Ti64, regardless of the mating material. The wear track of TNTZ exhibits the galled regions and severe plastic deformation with large flake-like debris, indicative of delamination wear, which strongly suggests the occurrence of adhesive wear. Whereas, the wear track of Ti64 have a large number of regular grooves and microcuttings with cutting chip-like wear debris and microfragmentation of fine oxide debris, indicative of abrasive wear combined with oxidative wear. This difference in the wear type is caused by severe and mild subsurface deformations of TNTZ and Ti64, respectively. The lower resistance to plastic shearing for TNTZ compared to that of Ti64 induces delamination, resulting in a higher wear rate.

  1. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130–135, 86.6–124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  2. Simplifying fixed implant dental prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Through following the FPPD protocol for multiple adjacent implants, and delivering final abutments, picking up the metal framework, and delivering provisionals, many benefits are gained. The benefits of following the FPPD protocol are as follows: The restorative dentist is trying-in and delivering the final abutments in one visit as opposed to removing them and placing them multiple times. This requires less chair time and time for the patient. It also reduces the mechanical stress on the abutment screw and implant body due to the elimination of multiple try-in appointments. When the metal framework is tried-in and verified for fit, the restorative dentist has the opportunity check the retention, check the margins, and make any corrections that might be needed. The abutments will be staying in the mouth when the framework is picked up. This metal try-in allows for a verification of the bite to be given to the dental lab. The delivery of provisionals manufactured by the dental laboratory offers many advantages in the FPPD technique. The patient has a form of tooth much earlier in the traditional appointment sequence. The patient can now offer feedback to the doctor and laboratory for fabrication of the permanent prosthesis with regards to shape and color. The laboratory-fabricated provisionals offer progressive loading to the implants through having a reduced occlusion yet allowing food to stimulate the implants. Overall, the FPPD technique offers shorter appointment times, more rapid delivery of fixed supported teeth, improved doctor-technician communication, and less mechanical wear on the implant parts.

  3. Exposure to volatile methacrylates in dental personnel.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, Stig; Ljungkvist, Göran; Andreasson, Harriet; Karlsson, Stig; Barregård, Lars

    2005-06-01

    Dental personnel are exposed to acrylates due to the acrylic resin-based composites and bonding agents used in fillings. It is well known that these compounds can cause contact allergy in dental personnel. However, in the 1990s, reports emerged on asthma also caused by methacrylates. The main volatile acrylates in dentistry are 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and methyl methacrylate. The aim of this study was to quantify the exposure to these acrylates in Swedish dental personnel. We studied the exposure to 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and methyl methacrylate in five randomly selected public dental clinics and at the Faculty of Odontology at Göteborg University. In total, 21 whole-day and 46 task-specific short-term (1-18 min) measurements were performed. The median 8-hour time-weighted averages were 2.5 microg/m3 (dentists) and 2.9 microg/m3 (dental nurses) for 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and 0.8 microg/m3 (dentists) and 0.3 microg/m3 (dental nurses) for methyl methacrylate. The maximum short-term exposure levels were 79 microg/m3 for 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and 15 microg/m3 for methyl methacrylate, similar in dentists and dental nurses. The observed levels are much lower than in complete denture fabrication. We found only one previous study in dentistry and it showed similar results (though it reported short-term measurements only). Irritant effects would not be expected in healthy people at these levels. Nevertheless, occupational respiratory diseases due to methacrylates may occur in dental personnel, and improvements in the handling of these chemicals in dentistry are warranted. This includes better vials for the bonding agents and avoiding evaporation from discarded materials.

  4. Wear characteristics of UHMW polyethylene: a method for accurately measuring extremely low wear rates.

    PubMed

    McKellop, H; Clarke, I C; Markolf, K L; Amstutz, H C

    1978-11-01

    The wear of UHMW polyethylene bearing against 316 stainless steel or cobalt chrome alloy was measured using a 12-channel wear tester especially developed for the evaluation of candidate materials for prosthetic joints. The coefficient of friction and wear rate was determined as a function of lubricant, contact stress, and metallic surface roughness in tests lasting two to three million cycles, the equivalent of several years' use of a prosthesis. Wear was determined from the weight loss of the polyethylene specimens corrected for the effect of fluid absorption. The friction and wear processes in blood serum differed markedly from those in saline solution or distilled water. Only serum lubrication produced wear surfaces resembling those observed on removed prostheses. The experimental method provided a very accurate reproducible measurement of polyethylene wear. The long-term wear rates were proportional to load and sliding distance and were much lower than expected from previously published data. Although the polyethylene wear rate increased with increasing surface roughness, wear was not severe except with very coarse metal surfaces. The data obtained in these studies forms a basis for the subsequent comparative evaluation of potentially superior materials for prosthetic joints.

  5. Characterization of Wear Particles Generated from CoCrMo Alloy under Sliding Wear Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pourzal, R.; Catelas, I.; Theissmann, R.; Kaddick, C.; Fischer, A.

    2011-01-01

    Biological effects of wear products (particles and metal ions) generated by metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements made of CoCrMo alloy remain a major cause of concern. Periprosthetic osteolysis, potential hypersensitivity response and pseudotumour formation are possible reactions that can lead to early revisions. To accurately analyse the biological response to wear particles from MoM implants, the exact nature of these particles needs to be characterized. Most previous studies used energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis for characterization. The present study used energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction pattern analysis to allow for a more precise determination of the chemical composition and to gain knowledge of the crystalline structure of the wear particles. Particles were retrieved from two different test rigs: a reciprocating sliding wear tribometer (CoCrMo cylinder vs. bar) and a hip simulator according to ISO 14242-1 (CoCrMo head vs. CoCrMo cup). All tests were conducted in bovine serum. Particles were retrieved from the test medium using a previously published enzymatic digestion protocol. Particles isolated from tribometer samples had a size of 100 – 500 nm. Diffraction pattern analysis clearly revealed the lattice structure of strain induced hcp ε-martensite. Hip simulator samples revealed numerous particles of 15 – 30 nm and 30 – 80 nm size. Most of the larger particles appeared to be only partially oxidized and exhibited cobalt locally. The smallest particles were Cr2O3 with no trace of cobalt. It optically appeared that these Cr2O3 particles were flaking off the surface of larger particles that depicted a very high intensity of oxygen, as well as chromium, and only background noise of cobalt. The particle size difference between the two test rigs is likely related to the conditions of the two tribosystems, in particular the difference in the sample geometry and in the type of sliding

  6. Infection control practices in public dental care services: findings from one South African Province.

    PubMed

    Mehtar, S; Shisana, O; Mosala, T; Dunbar, R

    2007-05-01

    Infection control practices which increase the risk of blood-borne virus transmission with associated dental practice in one South African province were studied. All 24 state dental clinics were observed for adequate provision to carry out good infection prevention and control (IPC) practice, 75 staff including dentists, nurses and dental assistants were interviewed to assess IPC knowledge and 23 dental procedures were observed. Significant findings were the difference between knowledge and practice, despite adequate provisions for safe infection control practice. The lack of protective eye wear during a dental procedure, not washing hands between patients, not disassembling an item prior to disinfection or sterilization, and not using a sterile drill for each patient were identified. A rapid method for detection of occult blood was used as a marker for inadequate IPC practice. Contaminated dental items of equipment just prior to patient use in 25% of equipment tested and 37% of surfaces and surrounding areas in the dental clinics and units were recorded. This study concludes that, despite provision for safe dental practice available in state dental clinics, there was a lack of knowledge application in clinical practice. The risk of blood-borne virus transmission in a population with high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence cannot be ignored.

  7. Dental hygiene in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Luciak-Donsberger, C; Krizanová, M

    2004-08-01

    This article reports on the development of the dental hygiene profession in Slovakia from a global perspective. The aim is to inform about current developments and to examine, how access to qualified dental hygiene care might be improved and how professional challenges might be met. For an international study on dental hygiene, secondary source data were obtained from members of the House of Delegates of the International Federation of Dental Hygienists (IFDH) or by fax and e-mail from experts involved in the national professional and educational organization of dental hygiene in non-IFDH member countries, such as Slovakia. Responses were followed-up by interviews, e-mail correspondence, visits to international universities, and a review of supporting studies and reference literature. Results show that the introduction of dental hygiene in Slovakia in 1992 was inspired by the delivery of preventive care in Switzerland. Initiating local dentists and dental hygienists strive to attain a high educational level, equitable to that of countries in which dental hygiene has an established tradition of high quality care. Low access to qualified dental hygiene care may be a result of insufficient funding for preventive services, social and cultural lack of awareness of the benefits of preventive care, and of limitations inherent in the legal constraints preventing unsupervised dental hygiene practice. These may be a result of gender politics affecting a female-dominated profession and of a perception that dental hygiene is auxiliary to dental care. International comparison show that of all Eastern European countries, the dental hygiene profession appears most advanced in Slovakia. This is expressed in high evidence-based academic goals, in extensive work with international consultants from the Netherlands and Switzerland, in annual congresses of high professional quality, and in the establishment of a profession, which has not been introduced in all Western EU countries.

  8. Short term wear of high Dk soft contact lenses does not alter corneal epithelial cell size or viability

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, F.; Kasses, S.; Bolis, S.; Keay, L.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Current contact lenses (CLs) when worn on an extended wear basis cause corneal epithelial alterations. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in corneal epithelial cell morphology and physiology following short term (3 months) wear of highly oxygen permeable CLs and to compare this with disposable CLs.
METHODS—Subjects were wearers of highly oxygen permeable CLs (n=11, wearing CLs on a 30 night schedule), disposable CL users (n=6, wearing CLs on a 6 night schedule), and non-CL wearers (n=20). Mean CL wear experience was 3 months. Epithelial cells were harvested using corneal cytology and were stained using acridine orange and ethidium bromide. Epithelial cell size and viability were determined.
RESULTS—The majority of epithelial cells recovered were non-viable (71%), and the mean longest cell diameter was 38 (SD 8) µm. Disposable CLs caused an increase in cell size (42 (7) µm) compared with both non-wear (39 (7) µm, p=0.01) and wear of highly oxygen permeable CLs (37 (10) µm, p=0.0049). There was no difference in cell viability between groups.
CONCLUSIONS—Extended wear of disposable CLs caused an 8% increase in cell diameter in harvested corneal epithelial cells following 3 months of CL wear. Cells harvested following 3 months' wear of highly oxygen permeable CLs were indistinguishable from those recovered from non-CL wearers.

 PMID:11159475

  9. Employment of Dental Hygienists as Dental Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Cynthia; Odrich, Johanna

    1987-01-01

    A study of the use of dental hygienists to teach periodontics, preventive dentistry, community dentistry, and public health courses looked at employment patterns and practices and the qualifications of the teachers. (MSE)

  10. The contributions of Edward H. Angle to dental public health.

    PubMed

    Peck, S

    2009-09-01

    The genius of Edward Hartley Angle, (1855-1930), the founder of the dental specialty of orthodontics, to create order from chaos in the study and treatment of positional discrepancies of the teeth, jaws and face advanced greatly the cause of dental public health. Angle's innovations that had the most public health impact were (1) his identification of dental occlusion, not simply tooth irregularity, as a prime concern, (2) his development of an uncomplicated classification system for occlusal conditions, (3) his introduction of prefabricated orthodontic appliances and (4) his framing of orthodontics as a dental specialty by organizing the world's first educational program to train orthodontists.

  11. Use and Application of Structural Models in Dental Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Rosario H. Yap; McDonald, Ralph E.

    1985-01-01

    Latent abilities of dental students were analyzed as causes and professional achievements as effects, with preadmission performances as indicators of latent abilities. The results demonstrate that structural analysis focuses on the direct impact of the quality of dental school education. (Author/MLW)

  12. Anxiety and quality of life in phobic dental patients.

    PubMed

    Crofts-Barnes, N P; Brough, E; Wilson, K E; Beddis, A J; Girdler, N M

    2010-03-01

    Little is known about the anxiety patients experience before attending for dental treatment. The aim of this study was to determine, in dentally phobic patients, the temporal relationship of pre-operative anxiety levels, and the disruption to daily life caused by this. Twenty-four phobic and 19 comparison (non-phobic) dental patients were recruited. Four validated questionnaires were used to assess anxiety and quality of life, which each patient completed for 5 days prior to, and on the day of, treatment. Those in the experimental group were found to have significantly greater levels of dental and general anxiety, and a significantly lower quality of life compared with those in the comparison group. Significant temporal relationships were found with all of the questionnaires. Dental and general anxiety scores were significantly correlated with quality-of-life measures. This study suggests that phobic dental patients are experiencing significant increased anxiety, and significant negative quality-of-life effects, in this period.

  13. Effect of beverages on bovine dental enamel subjected to erosive challenge with hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Amoras, Dinah Ribeiro; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Rodrigues, Antonio Luiz; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated by an in vitro model the effect of beverages on dental enamel previously subjected to erosive challenge with hydrochloric acid. The factor under study was the type of beverage, in five levels: Sprite® Zero Low-calorie Soda Lime (positive control), Parmalat® ultra high temperature (UHT) milk, Ades® Original soymilk, Leão® Ice Tea Zero ready-to-drink low-calorie peach-flavored black teaand Prata® natural mineral water (negative control). Seventy-five bovine enamel specimens were distributed among the five types of beverages (n=15), according to a randomized complete block design. For the formation of erosive wear lesions, the specimens were immersed in 10 mL aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid 0.01 M for 2 min. Subsequently, the specimens were immersed in 20 mL of the beverages for 1 min, twice daily for 2 days at room temperature. In between, the specimens were kept in 20 mL of artificial saliva at 37ºC. The response variable was the quantitative enamel microhardness. ANOVA and Tukey's test showed highly significant differences (p<0.00001) in the enamel exposed to hydrochloric acid and beverages. The soft drink caused a significantly higher decrease in microhardness compared with the other beverages. The black tea caused a significantly higher reduction in microhardness than the mineral water, UHT milk and soymilk, but lower than the soft drink. Among the analyzed beverages, the soft drink and the black tea caused the most deleterious effects on dental enamel microhardness.

  14. Dental gemination: report of case.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Guisado, J M; Torres-Lagares, D; Infante-Cossio, P; Gutierrez-Perez, J L

    2002-01-01

    Dental anomalies can be classified in different groups: anomalies of volume, anomalies of number, anomalies of form, anomalies of position and anomalies by union. Of the latter, we distinguish between fusion, alveolus-dental gemination, concrescence, coalescence and anchylosis. Gemination is more frequent in the anterior teeth, although it can also affect the bicuspids and molars, being an anomaly of infrequent union (prevalence 0.5%). We present the case of a young male patient age 19, without medical antecedents of interest, that goes to consultation for repeated inflammatory accidents at level of the inferior left retromolar area. These episodes are caused by a semi-impacted inferior third molar that is fused to a supernumerary fourth molar, sharing its roots, crown, pulp chambers and canals. After the appropriate radiologic study and suitable planning, the semi-impacted third molar was extracted under local anaesthesia and without any other complications during or after the operation.

  15. Pathways in dental public health.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Steven J

    2005-07-01

    Dental public health is one of the nine specialties of dentistry recognized by the American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation. Dental public health has been defined as the "science and art of preventing and controlling dental diseases and promoting dental health through organized community efforts. It is that form of dental practice which serves the community as a patient rather than as an individual. It is concerned with the dental health education of the public, with applied dental research, and with the administration of group dental care programs as well as the prevention and control of dental diseases on a community basis." This article will describe the many career and educational pathways dentists may follow to become irvolved in the practice of dental public health.

  16. Influence of gag reflex on dental attendance, dental anxiety, self-reported temporomandibular disorders and prosthetic restorations.

    PubMed

    Akarslan, Z Z; Yıldırım Biçer, A Z

    2013-12-01

    To assess the influence of gag reflex severity, assessed according to the short form of the patient part of Gagging Problem Assessment Questionnaire (GPA-pa SF), on the dental attendance, dental anxiety, self-reported temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms and presence of prosthetic restorations among patients requiring prosthodontic treatment in Turkey. A total of 505 patients (305 women; mean age: 46·35 years, SD: 28·2 years) undergoing dental examination were administered a questionnaire containing questions regarding their age, gender, education level, dental attendance, TMD symptoms (limitation in jaw opening, muscle pain, pain/sounds in the temporomandibular jaw), the Turkish version of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) and the GPA-pa SF. Subsequently, any prosthetic restoration was recorded by a dentist. Descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance (anova) and the chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. Differences were found between GPA-pa SF scores 0, 1 and 2 for education level (P = 0·001), MDAS scores (P = 0·003), self-reported TMD (P = 0·000) and prosthesis wear (P = 0·000), but not for attendance patterns (P = 0·826). Patients with gag reflex had lower education levels, higher levels of dental anxiety, more self-reported TMD symptoms and fewer fixed or removable prosthetic restorations than patients without gag reflex. Gag reflex has impacts on dental anxiety, self-reported TMD and prosthetic restorations, but not on dental attendance patterns, according to the results of the GPA-pa SF.

  17. Variations in the corneal surface temperature with contact lens wear.

    PubMed

    Ooi, E H; Ng, E Y K; Purslow, C; Acharya, R

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents the two-dimensional simulation of heat propagation in the human eye model during contact lens wear with finite element analysis. Three types of contact lens are studied: Lotrafilcon A, Balafilcon A, and Etafilcon A. The models are solved for both steady and transient solutions. The corneal surface temperature during contact lens wear is found to decrease (average, 0.52 +/- 0.05 degrees C compared with a bare cornea for all lens types). A contact lens with a higher water content has a lower steady state temperature than a contact lens with a lower water content does. Various initial temperatures for the contact lens are found to affect the first 400 s of the temperature variation. When the initial temperature is lower than the corneal temperature, a reduction in temperature is observed during contact lens insertion while the opposite is observed when the initial temperature is higher than the corneal temperature. The increase in evaporation rate when a contact lens is worn increases the cooling effect on the ocular surface. This is suggested to be the cause of lower corneal surface temperature when wearing a contact lens.

  18. Critical Investigation of Wear Behaviour of WC Drill Bit Buttons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anurag; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath; Hloch, Sergej

    2013-01-01

    Mining and petroleum drill bits are subjected to highly abrasive rock and high-velocity fluids that cause severe wear and erosion in service. To augment the rate of penetration and minimize the cost per foot, such drill bits are subjected to increasing rotary speeds and weight. A rotary/percussive drill typically hits the rock 50 times per second with hydraulic impact pressure of about 170-200 bar and feed pressure of about 90-100 bar, while rotating at 75-200 rpm. The drill rig delivers a high-velocity flow of drilling fluid onto the rock surface to dislodge cuttings and cool the bit. The impingement of high-velocity drilling fluid with entrained cuttings accelerates the erosion rate of the bit. Also, high service temperature contributes to softening of the rock for increased penetration. Hence, there is a need to optimize the drilling process and balance the wear rate and penetration rate simultaneously. This paper presents an experimental scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study of electroplated (nickel-bonded) diamond drills for different wear modes.

  19. International dental standards.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek W

    2007-09-22

    International dental standards are vital in maintaining the safety and quality of both the products and materials used by dental professionals and the many oral health products used by members of the general public, yet many dentists will be unaware of the role standards play in their daily practice. In this article, Derek W. Jones outlines the vital work of the International Standards Organization and highlights how standards pervade nearly every dental procedure.

  20. Dental radiology for children

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The benefit for the child from the judicious use of diagnostic dental radiography is improved dental health. The risk to the child from dental diagnostic radiation exposure appears to be extremely low. Despite the low risk, the dentist must minimize the child's exposure to ionizing radiation by using sound clinical judgment to determine what radiographs are necessary and to provide children with optimal protection from ionizing radiation.

  1. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Contamination of the lube-oil with hard abrasive particles leads to a three-body abrasive wear mechanism that highly accelerates piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-fueled diesel engines. One approach to reducing that wear is to modify the size and orientation of surface asperities on the cylinder to enhance the formation of a hydrodynamic film, and to provide avenues of escape for particles that would otherwise be trapped in the wear zone. Another approach is to introduce additives into the contaminated lube-oil that further enhance hydrodynamic film formation, form chemical films on the wearing surfaces, or form films on the contaminant particles. This work focuses on defining the effects of cylinder liner surface finish, various configurations of slots in the cylinder liner surface, and various additives in the contaminated lube-oil on the wear process. Wear tests were initiated in a bench apparatus using coal-ash contaminated lube-oil to test the various wear configurations. The results of these tests indicate that the formation of a hydrodynamic film between the ring and cylinder specimens is enhanced by increasing surface roughness, and by orienting the surface asperities normal to the direction of ring travel but modifications to the cylinder liner surface did not greatly reduce the wear rate. Additives to the lubricant seemed to have a much more significant effect on wear, with a dispersant additive highly accelerating the wear, while a detergent additive was able to reduce the wear almost to the rate achieved where there was no contaminant.

  2. Chronic fluoride toxicity: dental fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Denbesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2-3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface. With more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the dose-related decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffle-ended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As further

  3. Chronic Fluoride Toxicity: Dental Fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    DenBesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2–3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface; with more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix/mineral interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the doserelated decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffleended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As

  4. The Wearing Out of Genre Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ, Joanna

    1971-01-01

    Scenes and plots wear out in three distinct stages: Innocence, Plausibility, and Decadence. Examines westerns, spy stories, nurse novels, detective stories, science fiction, pornography, avant-garde fiction, etc. (Author/RB)

  5. The wear behavior between hardfacing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.; Wu, L.T.

    1996-11-01

    Hardface weld cladding in industry most commonly uses cobalt-based STELLITE Nos. 6 and 12 and nickel-based Colmonoy Nos. 56, 83, and 88 for plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding of 4140 steel. Frictional and abrasion wear of weld layers are compared with that of the widely used nitridized, low-level SKD6, SACM1 steel alloys and with centrifugal-cast nickel-based Colmonoy No. 68 bimetal. Experimental results show that cobalt alloys are not suitable for low-alloy steel frictional wear. However, nickel alloys are quite compatible. Resistance to abrasive wear increased in the experimental materials according to the level of hardness. Wear resistance was compromised in experimental materials when the hard phase was too dispersed.

  6. New Oxide Ceramic Developed for Superior High-Temperature Wear Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Farmer, Serene C.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramics, for the most part, do not have inherently good tribological properties. For example friction coefficients in excess of 0.7 have been reported for silicon nitride sliding on silicon nitride or on bearing steel (ref. 1). High friction is always accompanied by considerable wear. Despite their inherently poor tribological properties, the high strength and high toughness of silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramics has led to their successful use in tribological applications (refs. 1 to 4). The upper temperature limit for the application of Si3N4 as wear-resistant material is limited by reaction with the tribological environment (ref. 3). Silicon nitride is known to produce a thin silicon dioxide film with easy shear capability that results in low friction and low wear in a moist environment (ref. 5). At elevated temperatures, the removal of the reaction product that acts as lubricant causes the friction coefficient to increase and, consequently, the wear performance to become poor. New materials are sought that will have wear resistance superior to that of Si3N4 at elevated temperatures and in harsh environments. A new class of oxide ceramic materials has been developed with potential for excellent high-temperature wear resistance. The new material consists of a multicomponent oxide with a two-phase microstructure, in which the wear resistance of the mixed oxide is significantly higher than that of the individual constituents. This is attributed to the strong constraining effects provided by the interlocking microstructures at different length scales, to the large aspect ratio of the phases, to the strong interphase bonding, and to the residual stresses. Fretting wear tests were conducted by rubbing the new ceramic material against boron carbide (B4C). The new ceramic material produced a wear track groove on B4C, suggesting significantly higher wear resistance for the oxide ceramic. The new material did not suffer from any microstructural degradation after the wear

  7. 19 CFR 10.35 - Models of women's wearing apparel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Models of women's wearing apparel. 10.35 Section... Temporary Importations Under Bond § 10.35 Models of women's wearing apparel. (a) Models of women's wearing... the importer or his employees. (b) Invoices covering models of women's wearing apparel entered...

  8. Dental erosion, summary.

    PubMed

    ten Cate, J M; Imfeld, T

    1996-04-01

    Although reports on dental erosion have always appeared in the dental literature, there is currently a growing interest among researchers and clinicians. Potential risk factors for dental erosion are changed lifestyle and eating patterns, with increased consumption of acidic foods and beverages. Various gastrointestinal and eating disorders expose the dentition to frequent contacts with very acidic gastric content, which may lead to erosion. Whether these factors indeed lead, on a population scale, to a higher prevalence and incidence of erosion is yet to be established. This article summarizes the different aspects of the prevalence, pathology, etiology, assessment, prevention and treatment of dental erosion, and concludes with recommendations for future research.

  9. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  10. Wear of iron and nickel in corrosive liquid environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Rengstorff, George W. P.

    1987-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior of Fe and Ni sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid and hydrochloric acid were investigated. The results show that the concentration of acid is an important factor in controlling the metal loss caused by wear corrosion processes in the acids. At very dilute acid concentration (10 to the -4 N), Fe behaves differently from Ni. Fe develops a soft, friable deposit, while Ni develops no corrosion layer. The formation and removal of the corrosion deposit on Fe resulted in high metal loss and coefficient of friction, as compared to the relatively low metal loss and coefficient of friction observed for Ni. At slightly higher acid concentration (10 to the -3 and 10 to the -2 N), no corrosion products were produced on both Fe and Ni. Wear of Fe and Ni was generally at a minimum. At higher acid concentration (10 to the -1 N and above), loss of Fe and Ni increased as the acid concentration increased. In sulfuric acid the maximum loss of both Fe and Ni was at 7.5 N (30%) concentration, and the metal losses of both Fe and Ni dropped markedly at 15 N (50%) and above. In hydrochloric acid, however, the Fe loss continued to increase with the increase of acid concentration, and the maximum Fe loss occurred in the most concentrated acid (12.1 N, 37%). There were variations in loss with Ni from specimen to specimen examined in hydrochloric acids (10 to the -1 N and above). The coefficient of friction for Ni increased slightly with an increase in acid concentration up to 10 to the -2 N. When corrosion started to dominate in the wear-corrosion process, the coefficient of friction decreased in both sulfuric and hydrochloric acids at 10 to the -1 N and above.

  11. Wear behavior of austenite containing plate steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Christina E.

    As a follow up to Wolfram's Master of Science thesis, samples from the prior work were further investigated. Samples from four steel alloys were selected for investigation, namely AR400F, 9260, Hadfield, and 301 Stainless steels. AR400F is martensitic while the Hadfield and 301 stainless steels are austenitic. The 9260 exhibited a variety of hardness levels and retained austenite contents, achieved by heat treatments, including quench and tempering (Q&T) and quench and partitioning (Q&P). Samples worn by three wear tests, namely Dry Sand/Rubber Wheel (DSRW), impeller tumbler impact abrasion, and Bond abrasion, were examined by optical profilometry. The wear behaviors observed in topography maps were compared to the same in scanning electron microscopy micrographs and both were used to characterize the wear surfaces. Optical profilometry showed that the scratching abrasion present on the wear surface transitioned to gouging abrasion as impact conditions increased (i.e. from DSRW to impeller to Bond abrasion). Optical profilometry roughness measurements were also compared to sample hardness as well as normalized volume loss (NVL) results for each of the three wear tests. The steels displayed a relationship between roughness measurements and observed wear rates for all three categories of wear testing. Nanoindentation was used to investigate local hardness changes adjacent to the wear surface. DSRW samples generally did not exhibit significant work hardening. The austenitic materials exhibited significant hardening under the high impact conditions of the Bond abrasion wear test. Hardening in the Q&P materials was less pronounced. The Q&T microstructures also demonstrated some hardening. Scratch testing was performed on samples at three different loads, as a more systematic approach to determining the scratching abrasion behavior. Wear rates and scratch hardness were calculated from scratch testing results. Certain similarities between wear behavior in scratch testing

  12. The use of analytical surface tools in the fundamental study of wear. [atomic nature of wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Various techniques and surface tools available for the study of the atomic nature of the wear of materials are reviewed These include chemical etching, x-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe. Properties of the surface and wear surface regions which affect wear, such as surface energy, crystal structure, crystallographic orientation, mode of dislocation behavior, and cohesive binding, are discussed. A number of mechanisms involved in the generation of wear particles are identified with the aid of the aforementioned tools.

  13. ClinicAl Evaluation of Dental Restorative Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    and strength of the restoration to resist flexural occlusal stresses and acts as a secondary cause for fracture. Wear together with fracture...caries, accounting for 39.9 percent of failures. Wear further decreases the bulk and strength of the restoration to resist flexural occlusal stresses ...Machining of the surface during the finishing and polishing procedure may produce microdefects and/or residual stress in the surface which would

  14. Consideration of Wear Rates at High Velocities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    evaluations were performed for different velocity ranges depending on the interest of the individual researcher. As a result, an inconsistency 4 W L...together will produce heat. The slipper-rail interaction being studied is no different . The amount of heat generated is a function of the frictional...the one which provides the highest wear rate. To correlate specimens from different sources and of varying sizes and shapes, the wear rate, normal

  15. Characterization and measurement of polymer wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Aron, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical tools which characterize the polymer wear process are discussed. The devices discussed include: visual observation of polymer wear with SEM, the quantification with surface profilometry and ellipsometry, to study the chemistry with AES, XPS and SIMS, to establish interfacial polymer orientation and accordingly bonding with QUARTIR, polymer state with Raman spectroscopy and stresses that develop in polymer films using a X-ray double crystal camera technique.

  16. Characterization and measurement of polymer wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Aron, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical tools which characterize the polymer wear process are discussed. The devices discussed include: visual observation of polymer wear with SEM, the quantification with surface profilometry and ellipsometry, to study the chemistry with AES, XPS and SIMS, to establish interfacial polymer orientation and accordingly bonding with QUARTIR, polymer state with Raman spectroscopy and stresses that develop in polymer films using a X-ray double crystal camera technique.

  17. [Dental technician's pneumoconiosis; a case report].

    PubMed

    Karaman Eyüboğlu, Canan; Itil, Oya; Gülşen, Aşkin; Kargi, Aydanur; Cimrin, Arif

    2008-01-01

    Since 1939, it has been known that, silicosis and extrinsic allergic alveolitis can be seen among dental technicians. The interstitial disease caused by the exposure to complex substances used by dental technicians is classified as a special group called dental technician's pneumoconiosis. A 36-year-old man, who has no smoking history, presented with severe dyspnea. He had worked in different dental laboratories for 22 years, but he did not have respiratory symptoms until five years ago. After that date, he had hospitalized and had been examined for respiratory pathologies for many times. He had came to our clinic, because of the progression of his dyspnea. Diffuse pulmonary parenchymal infiltrates which can be related with pneumoconiosis and chronic type 1 respiratory deficiency had been diagnosed as the result of the examinations. While he has no history of smoking or any other risk factors or diseases in his medical history, the case was accepted as dental technician's pneumoconiosis. The factors related with the pathogenesis of dental technician's pneumoconiosis are; the complex compound of the substances (metal dusts, silica, plaster, wax and resins, chemical liquids, methyl methacrylate) used in this sector and their effects on the lung parenchyma. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis related with methyl methacrylate has been reported. The most important factor to acquire an occupational lung disease is a complex occupational exposure. The insufficient workplace airing and the lack of preventive measures added on this exposure, the risks become much more greater.

  18. Severe tooth wear in Prader-Willi syndrome. A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare complex multsystemic genetic disorder characterized by severe neonatal hypotonia, endocrine disturbances, hyperphagia and obesity, mild mental retardation, learning disabilities, facial dysmorphology and oral abnormalities. The purpose of the present study was to explore the prevalence of tooth wear and possible risk factors in individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome. Methods Forty-nine individuals (6-40 years) with PWS and an age- and sex-matched control group were included. Tooth wear was evaluated from dental casts and intraoral photographs and rated by four examiners using the Visual Erosion Dental Examination (VEDE) scoring system and the individual tooth wear index IA. In accordance with the VEDE scoring system, tooth wear was also evaluated clinically. Whole saliva was collected. Results Mean VEDE score was 1.70 ± 1.44 in the PWS group and 0.46 ± 0.36 in the control group (p < 0.001). Median IA was 7.50 (2.60-30.70) in the PWS group and 2.60 (0.90-4.70) among controls (p < 0.001). In the PWS group tooth wear correlated significantly with age (VEDE; r = 0.79, p < 0.001, IA; r = 0.82, p < 0.001) and saliva secretion (VEDE; r = 0.46, p = 0.001, IA; r = 0.43, p = 0.002). Tooth grinding was also associated with tooth wear in the PWS group, as indicated by the mean VEDE 2.67 ± 1.62 in grinders and 1.14 ± 0.97 in non-grinders (p = 0.001) and median IA values 25.70 (5.48-68.55) in grinders and 5.70 (1.60-9.10) in non-grinders (p = 0.003). Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed with tooth wear as the dependent variable and PWS (yes/no), age, tooth grinding and saliva secretion as independent variables. PWS (yes/no), age and tooth grinding retained a significant association with tooth wear, VEDE (p < 0.001) and log IA (p < 0.001). The only factor significantly associated with tooth wear in the control group was age. Conclusions

  19. Diamond coated dental bur machining of natural and synthetic dental materials.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M J; Sein, H; Ahmed, W

    2004-12-01

    Diamond coatings are attractive for cutting processes due to their high hardness, low friction coefficient, excellent wear resistance and chemical inertness. The application of diamond coatings on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) burs has been the subject of much attention in recent years in order to improve cutting performance and tool life. WC-Co burs containing 6% Co and 94% WC with an average grain size 1-3 micron were used in this study. In order to improve the adhesion between diamond and the bur it is necessary to etch away the surface Co to prepare it for subsequent diamond growth. Hot filament chemical vapour deposition (H.F.C.V.D.) with a modified vertical filament arrangement has been employed for the deposition of diamond films. Diamond film quality and purity has been characterised using scanning electron microscopy (S.E.M.) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The performance of diamond coated WC-Co burs, uncoated WC-Co burs, and diamond embedded (sintered) burs have been compared by drilling a series of holes into various materials such as human teeth, and model tooth materials such as borosilicate glass and acrylic. Flank wear has been used to assess the wear rates of the burs when machining natural and synthetic dental materials such as those described above.

  20. Low stress abrasive wear behavior of a hardfaced steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Prasad, B. K.; Jha, A. K.; Modi, O. P.; Das, S.; Yegneswaran, A. H.

    1998-04-01

    A plain carbon steel was overlayed with a wear-resistant hardfacing alloy by manual arc welding. Low stress abrasive wear tests were conducted with an ASTM rubber wheel abrasion tester using crushed silica and as the abrasive medium. The wear rate decreased with sliding distance, and there was an overall improvement in the abrasive wear resistance as a result of overlaying. The wear behavior of the samples has been discussed in terms of microstructural features while the examination of wear surface and subsurface regions provides insight into the wear mechanisms.

  1. Baleen wear reveals intraoral water flow patterns of mysticete filter feeding.

    PubMed

    Werth, Alexander J; Straley, Janice M; Shadwick, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    A survey of macroscopic and microscopic wear patterns in the baleen of eight whale species (Cetacea: Mysticeti) discloses structural, functional, and life history properties of this neomorphic keratinous tissue, including evidence of intraoral water flow patterns involved in filter feeding. All baleen demonstrates wear, particularly on its medial and ventral edges, as flat outer layers of cortical keratin erode to reveal horn tubes, also of keratin, which emerge as hair-like fringes. This study quantified five additional categories of specific wear: pitting of plates, scratching of plates, scuffing of fringes, shortening of fringes, and reorientation of fringes (including fringes directed between plates to the exterior of the mouth). Blue whale baleen showed the most pitting and sei whale baleen the most scratching; gray whale baleen had the most fringe wear. The location of worn baleen within the mouth suggests that direct contact with the tongue is not responsible for most wear, and that flowing water as well as abrasive prey or sediment carried by the flowing water likely causes pitting and scratching of plates as well as fringe fraying, scuffing, shortening, and reorientation. Baleen also has elevated vertical and horizontal ridges that are unrelated to wear; these are probably related to growth and may allow for age determination.

  2. Influence of Lubricant Additives on Friction and Wear Characteristics of Compressor parts under the Alternative Refrigerant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hidehiro; Imai, Hachiro; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Tsutomu; Ueki, Yutaka; Takizawa, Kikuo; Fukushima, Kiyoshi

    From the standpoint of lubricative deficit under the alternative refrigerant/lubricants coexistence, the influence of additives on friction and wear characteristics for compressor parts have been investigated by the wear tester reappeared on friction condition similarly to actual compressor. It has been shown that an ester type base oil containing TCP (tricresyl phosphate) as an extreme pressure agents indicates satisfactory lubrication because of its EP effect. However owning to the deterioration of base oil caused by a cresol which is a reactant of TCP, a hydrolysis inhibitor must be necessary. The results indicates that a hydrolysis inhibitor added to POE is able to not only prevent the base oil from deteriorating but also feed the strength into oil films. On the other hands, in such a case that TCP concentration added in an alkylbenzen type base oil is excess or wear track temperature is higher, wear amounts of compressor parts are increased on account of corrosion wear. The reactivity of TCP depends on wear track temperature and its concentration. Consequently, it is possible that EP effect of TCP has been considered in terms of its concentration and temperature to be appropriated.

  3. Are there biological markers of wear?

    PubMed

    Bauer, Thomas W; Shanbhag, Arun S

    2008-01-01

    Potential systemic markers of implant wear include products of the wear process (particles and ions) and mediators of the inflammatory reaction that can be induced by wear. Ions from polymers used in arthroplasty are not specific, but high metal ion levels may help identify patients with unexpectedly high wear of metal-on-metal implants. The kinetics of ion production, transport, and excretion are complex, however, so it is currently difficult to interpret the significance of mild elevations in metal ions. Indices of bone turnover (eg, collagen fragments) and mediators involved in the inflammatory reaction to particles (eg, osteoprotegerin, RANKL, interleukins) may be associated with osteolysis, but systemic disorders (eg, osteoarthritis) and the use of medications that influence bone remodeling limit the predictive value of these analytes with respect to the consequences of implant wear. Using genomic and proteomic methods to measure multiple analytes offers promise, but the challenge is to identify markers specifically associated with wear that are not elevated by other conditions that often coexist in this patient population.

  4. Predicting abrasive wear with coupled Lagrangian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Florian; Eberhard, Peter

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a mesh-less approach for the simulation of a fluid with particle loading and the prediction of abrasive wear is presented. We are using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method for modeling the fluid and the discrete element method (DEM) for the solid particles, which represent the loading of the fluid. These Lagrangian methods are used to describe heavily sloshing fluids with their free surfaces as well as the interface between the fluid and the solid particles accurately. A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations model is applied for handling turbulences. We are predicting abrasive wear on the boundary geometry with two different wear models taking cutting and deformation mechanisms into account. The boundary geometry is discretized with special DEM particles. In doing so, it is possible to use the same particle type for both the calculation of the boundary conditions for the SPH method as well as the DEM and for predicting the abrasive wear. After a brief introduction to the SPH method and the DEM, the handling of the boundary and the coupling of the fluid and the solid particles are discussed. Then, the applied wear models are presented and the simulation scenarios are described. The first numerical experiment is the simulation of a fluid with loading which is sloshing inside a tank. The second numerical experiment is the simulation of the impact of a free jet with loading to a simplified pelton bucket. We are especially investigating the wear patterns inside the tank and the bucket.

  5. INSIGHTS INTO PREVENTIVE MEASURES FOR DENTAL EROSION

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Wiegand, Annette; Rios, Daniela; Honório, Heitor Marques; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2009-01-01

    Dental erosion is defined as the loss of tooth substance by acid exposure not involving bacteria. The etiology of erosion is related to different behavioral, biological and chemical factors. Based on an overview of the current literature, this paper presents a summary of the preventive strategies relevant for patients suffering from dental erosion. Behavioral factors, such as special drinking habits, unhealthy lifestyle factors or occupational acid exposure, might modify the extent of dental erosion. Thus, preventive strategies have to include measures to reduce the frequency and duration of acid exposure as well as adequate oral hygiene measures, as it is known that eroded surfaces are more susceptible to abrasion. Biological factors, such as saliva or acquired pellicle, act protectively against erosive demineralization. Therefore, the production of saliva should be enhanced, especially in patients with hyposalivation or xerostomia. With regard to chemical factors, the modification of acidic solutions with ions, especially calcium, was shown to reduce the demineralization, but the efficacy depends on the other chemical factors, such as the type of acid. To enhance the remineralization of eroded surfaces and to prevent further progression of dental wear, high-concentrated fluoride applications are recommended. Currently, little information is available about the efficacy of other preventive strategies, such as calcium and laser application, as well as the use of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors. Further studies considering these factors are required. In conclusion, preventive strategies for patients suffering from erosion are mainly obtained from in vitro and in situ studies and include dietary counseling, stimulation of salivary flow, optimization of fluoride regimens, modification of erosive beverages and adequate oral hygiene measures. PMID:19274390

  6. [Dental care, dental diseases and dentistry in antiquity].

    PubMed

    Józsa, László

    2009-01-01

    Numerous written relicts, belletristic works (poems of Martial, Juvenal, Ovid etc.) indicate that oral hygiene and its tools (toothbrush, toothpick, use of tooth pastes and tooth-powder) were used long before our times. Already ancient people started to remove, file, dye and inlay teeth. The teeth were dyed red, green or black in Egypt, red or brown (with henna or betel) in India, white by Romans. The teeth decoration has a long but forgotten history. The most skillful and artistic work was done by the Maya's between 900 BC and 1500 AD. The modification of contours (more than fifty forms) of the incisors were practiced also in Mesoamerica. Dentistry was surely practiced in ancient Egypt, India, China, Greece and Rome, while odontology and especially suitable dental appliances arose only by Etruscan. Dental prosthesis, including bridges and simple retention bands were invented by the Etruscans 2500 years ago. These Etruscan bridges were worn mostly by females, suggesting that cosmetics was the principal dental concern. Some,--if not all--of the Roman and other prostheses have been purely ornamental. Orthodontic appliances are also Etruscan invention. The holes caused by caries were filled with garlic, incense, caraway seed in Egypt, with wood or lead in Rome, and with "silver-paste" (amalgam) in ancient China. The toothache was cured with poppy-tee, or hashish and nightshade plants (Solanaceae) in Egypt, Greece, Roman Empire while with coca (Erythroxylon coca) in South-America.

  7. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  8. Equine dental disease part 1: a long-term study of 400 cases: disorders of incisor, canine and first premolar teeth.

    PubMed

    Dixon, P M; Tremaine, W H; Pickles, K; Kuhns, L; Hawe, C; McCann, J; McGorum, B; Railton, D I; Brammer, S

    1999-09-01

    A review of 400 horses referred because of dental disorders showed 44 cases to suffer from primary disorders of their incisors and 11 from canine or 1st premolar teeth disorders. The remaining 345 horses suffered from primary disorders of the cheek teeth. Disorders of incisors included traumatic damage to teeth and their supporting bones, retained deciduous, displaced and supernumerary incisors; brachygnathia and abnormalities of wear, with most of the latter disorders being secondary to primary disorders of the cheek teeth Only 3 cases of apical infection of incisors were recognised. Most cases of fractured incisors responded well to conservative therapy. Retained deciduous incisors were extracted, but most cases with supernumerary and displaced incisors, or brachygnathia were treated conservatively. Most disorders of the canine and 1st premolar were developmental displacements that caused bitting problems (abnormalities of head movement associated with the bit), and these cases responded well to extraction of the displaced teeth.

  9. Dental Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

  10. Dental Assisting Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental assisting curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level dental assistants, and includes job skills in the technical areas of preventive dentistry; four-handed dentistry; chairside assisting with emphasis in diagnostics,…

  11. Clinical feline dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Lemmons, Matthew

    2013-05-01

    Dental radiography is a necessary diagnostic modality in small animal practice. It is not possible to accurately assess and diagnose tooth resorption, periodontal disease, endodontic disease, neoplasia and injury without it. Dental radiography is also necessary for treatment and assessment of the patient postoperatively.

  12. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  13. Workbook for Dental Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Corinne K.; Volpe, Margaret E.

    This workbook contains l8 units of instruction for dental assistant students, each designed to give students practical experience in completing forms that simulate realistic situations in a dental office. Units are: (1) The Appointment Record, (2) The Recall System, (3) Clinical Records, (4) Estimates, (5) Daily Record Sheet, (6) Patient's…

  14. Dental Fear Among University Employees: Implications for Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaakko, Tarja; Milgrom, Peter; Coldwell, Susan E.; Getz, Tracy; Weinstein, Philip; Ramsay, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 270 University of Washington permanent employees who were potential candidates for teaching clinics, found dental anxiety prevalent, correlating with poorer perceived dental health, longer intervals between dental appointments, higher frequency of past fear behaviors, more physical symptoms during last dental injection, and more…

  15. [The developmental history of the dental filling materials].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi

    2008-10-01

    Caries may cause substantial defects in the hard tissue of teeth. The dental filling for defects is an effective method to resume teeth complete form and masticatory function as well as aesthetic effects. The filling material is artificial restorative material to fill the dental defects. Tracing back the developing process of dental filling materials, we can see the advancement of stomotology of human beings. There was a revolutionary change in the filling materials from filling dental cavity with Chinese medicinal herbs to silver paste, from establishing the composition and proportion standardization of the silver amalgam filling materials to the application of new macromolecule compound resin. This is a continuous improvement and renewal in the idea and technology of dental filling treatment so that perfects the dental filling method and enables the retention of more healthy dental tissue. In addition, it pushes the development of dental aesthetics, adhesives and technology. With the improvement of people's health standard, aesthetic demands and environmental awareness, compound resin restorative materials has become clinically preferred dental filling materials of doctors and patients in clinic.

  16. Improvement of the wear resistance of electroplated Au-Ni coatings by Zr ion bombardment of Ni-B sublayer

    SciTech Connect

    Lyazgin, Alexander Shugurov, Artur Sergeev, Viktor Neufeld, Vasily; Panin, Alexey; Shesterikov, Evgeny

    2015-10-27

    The effect of bombardment of the Ni-B sublayer by Zr ion beams on the surface morphology and tribomechanical properties of Au-Ni coatings was investigated. It was found that the treatment has no significant effect on the surface roughness and grain size of the Au-Ni coatings, while it provides essential reducing of their friction coefficient and improvement of wear resistance. It is shown that increased wear resistance of these coatings was caused by their strain hardening resulted from localization of plastic strain. The optimal Zr fluence were determined that provide the maximum reduction of linear wear of the coatings.

  17. Analysis of tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation caused by accelerated artificial aging and the effects of microstructure in stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Thomas J.

    This investigation addresses the issue that yttria stabilized zirconia is being used as a dental biomaterial without substantial evidence of its long-term viability. Furthermore, stabilized zirconia (SZ) undergoes low temperature degradation (LTD), which can lead to roughening of the surface. A rougher exterior can lead to increased wear of the antagonist in the oral environment. Despite the LTD concerns, SZ is now widely used in restorative dentistry, including full contour crowns. A comparison of aging methods to determine the role of artificial aging on inducing the transformation has not been extensively studied. Therefore, simulations of the transformation process were investigated by comparing different methods of accelerated aging. The rejected null hypothesis is that the temperature of aging treatment will not affect the time required to cause measurable monoclinic transformation of yttria stabilized zirconia. The transformation of SZ starts at the surface and progresses inward; however, it is unclear whether the progression is constant for different aging conditions. This investigation analyzed the depth of transformation as a function of aging conditions for stabilized zirconia in the top 5-6 mum from the surface. The rejected null hypothesis is that the transformation amount is constant throughout the first six micrometers from the surface. The effects of grain size on the amount of monoclinic transformation were also investigated. This study aimed to determine if the grain size of partially stabilized zirconia affects the amount of monoclinic transformation, surface roughness, and property degradation due to aging. The rejected null hypothesis is that the grain size will not affect the amount of monoclinic transformation, thus have no effect on surface roughening or property degradation. The final part of this study addresses the wear of enamel when opposing zirconia by observing how grain size and aging affected the wear rate of an enamel antagonist

  18. Association Between Causal Beliefs and Shoe Wearing to Prevent Podoconiosis: A Baseline Study.

    PubMed

    Ayode, Desta; Tora, Abebayehu; Farrell, David; Tadele, Getnet; Davey, Gail; McBride, Colleen M

    2016-05-04

    Podoconiosis is a neglected tropical disease caused by long-term barefoot exposure to volcanic clay soil. Our previous qualitative research identified various domains of beliefs about the causes of podoconiosis held by members of the community. This cross-sectional survey, conducted in southern Ethiopia, aimed to quantitatively evaluate the prevalence of these beliefs and to assess their association with observed shoe-wearing behavior. A total of 1,800 adult respondents (600 from affected families and 1,200 from unaffected families of an index child aged between 3 and 6 years) took part in the survey. Two standardized versions of an enumerator-administered survey were created, with "all day, everyday" shoe-wearing status of the index child assessed in parallel for the affected and unaffected household respondents. Associations between measures were assessed using logistic regression. Accuracy of understanding about podoconiosis was significantly lower among respondents from unaffected than affected households (P < 0.001). Among affected respondents, beliefs about heredity were negatively associated with reported shoe wearing of the index child (odds ratio = 0.67, 95% confidence interval = 0.55-0.83). In both groups, associations of causal beliefs with shoe wearing were moderated by risk perceptions. Interventions aimed at preventing podoconiosis and improving shoe wearing should consider family-oriented education on hereditary susceptibility that targets affected and unaffected families in resource-limited settings.

  19. Multiple Hollow Cathode Wear Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been baselined for use on the Space Station to reduce station charging. The plasma contactor provides a low impedance connection to space plasma via a plasma produced by an arc discharge. The hollow cathode of the plasma contactor is a refractory metal tube, through which xenon gas flows, which has a disk-shaped plate with a centered orifice at the downstream end of the tube. Within the cathode, arc attachment occurs primarily on a Type S low work function insert that is next to the orifice plate. This low work function insert is used to reduce cathode operating temperatures and energy requirements and, therefore, achieve increased efficiency and longevity. The operating characteristics and lifetime capabilities of this hollow cathode, however, are greatly reduced by oxygen bearing contaminants in the xenon gas. Furthermore, an optimized activation process, where the cathode is heated prior to ignition by an external heater to drive contaminants such as oxygen and moisture from the insert absorbed during exposure to ambient air, is necessary both for cathode longevity and a simplified power processor. In order to achieve the two year (approximately 17,500 hours) continuous operating lifetime requirement for the plasma contactor, a test program was initiated at NASA Lewis Research Center to demonstrate the extended lifetime capabilities of the hollow cathode. To date, xenon hollow cathodes have demonstrated extended lifetimes with one test having operated in excess of 8000 hours in an ongoing test utilizing contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey. The objectives of this study were to verify the transportability of the contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey and to evaluate cathode contamination control procedures, activation processes, and cathode-to-cathode dispersions in operating characteristics with time. These were accomplished by conducting a 2000 hour wear test of four hollow

  20. REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Matthews

    2005-05-01

    This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston

  1. Oral findings and dental treatment in a child with West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Regis, Rômulo Rocha; Rocha, Cristiane Tomaz; Torres, Carolina Paes; Queiroz, Ivna Fernandes; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino

    2009-01-01

    West syndrome (WS) is a rare, severe form of epilepsy that typically manifests early in infancy. It is considered a malignant condition that combines episodes of spasms that occur in clusters (infantile spasm), hypsarrhythmia on the electroencephalogram, and neuropsychomotor delay. Although WS has been widely investigated from a medical standpoint, few reports have focused on the oral findings in patients with this syndrome. This article reports the case history of a 7-year-old child diagnosed with WS. The major clinical features were generalized tooth wear and gingival enlargement, altered chronology and sequence of dental eruption, primary canine cusp-to-cusp relationship, ectopic dental eruption, and mildly arched palate. Multiple white spot lesions were also observed, possibly associated with poor oral hygiene, due to a fermentable carbohydrate-rich diet, and continuous use of sugar-containing medications. Dental care management of patients with special needs is discussed and the dental treatment for this child with WS is described.

  2. Caries, Periodontal Disease, Supernumerary Teeth and Other Dental Disorders in Swedish Wild Boar (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Malmsten, A; Dalin, A-M; Pettersson, A

    2015-07-01

    Between January and December 2013, the dental and periodontal health of 99 Swedish wild boars (Sus scrofa) was investigated. Sampling occurred in conjunction with routine hunting at six large estates in the southern and middle parts of Sweden. All six of the estates use supplemental feeding. The weight of the animals, their sex and their dates of death were noted. Age was estimated using tooth eruption and tooth replacement patterns. The oral cavity was inspected and abnormalities were recorded on a dental chart modified for wild boars. The findings included supernumerary teeth, absence of teeth, mild class II malocclusion, severe tooth wear, periodontitis, calculus, caries, tooth fractures and the presence of enamel defects. Swedish wild boars suffer from different dental lesions and the impact of supplemental feeding on dental and periodontal health is still to be investigated.

  3. Fatal anaphylactic shock due to a dental impression material.

    PubMed

    Gangemi, Sebastiano; Spagnolo, Elvira Ventura; Cardia, Giulio; Minciullo, Paola L

    2009-01-01

    Materials used for dental impressions are usually safe. This study describes a case of fatal anaphylaxis that appeared immediately after the oral mucosa came into contact with an alginate paste used for dental impressions. The cadaveric examination and the postmortem toxicology report confirmed that the cause of death was anaphylactic shock. The patient was affected by both cardiovascular and lung diseases that worsened the condition and forbade the use of epinephrine. To the authors' knowledge, dental impression materials, and alginate in particular, have not been reported previously as being a cause of anaphylaxis.

  4. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth"…

  5. A WEAR MODEL FOR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST VALVES

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2009-11-01

    run for hundreds of hours in heavy-duty diesels provided insights into the kinds of complexity that the contact conditions in engines can produce, and suggested the physical basis for the current approach to modeling. The model presented here involves four terms, two representing the valve response and two for its mating seat material. The model's structure assumes that wear that takes place under a complex combination of plastic deformation, tangential shear, and oxidation. Tribolayers form, are removed, and may reform. Layer formation affects the friction forces in the interface, and in turn, the energy available to do work on the materials to cause wear. To provide friction data for the model at various temperatures, sliding contact experiments were conducted from 22 to 850 C in a pin-on-disk apparatus at ORNL. In order to account for the behavior of different materials and engine designs, parameters in all four terms of the model can be adjusted to account for wear-in and incubation periods before the dominant wear processes evolve to their steady-state rates. For example, the deformation rate is assumed to be maximum during the early stages of operation, and then, due to material work-hardening and the increase in nominal contact area (which reduces the load per unit area), decreases to a lower rate at long times. Conversely, the rate of abrasion increases with time or number of cycles due to the build-up of oxides and tribo-layers between contact surfaces. The competition between deformation and abrasion results in complex, non-linear behavior of material loss per cycle of operation. Furthermore, these factors are affected by valve design features, such as the angle of incline of the valve seat. Several modeling scenarios are presented to demonstrate how the wear profile versus number of cycles changes in response to: (a) different relative abrasion rates of the seat and valve materials, (b) the friction coefficient as a function of temperature, (c) the relative

  6. Magnetic Fluid Friction and Wear Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The friction and wear properties of two groups of magnetic fluids, one developed at NASA Lewis Research Center and a commercial fluid, were evaluated for boundary lubrication. Friction and wear measurements were made using a pin-on-disk apparatus. Three different ball materials were evaluated, (1) 440C, (2) Al2O3, and (3) Si3N4 against 440C disks. The first class of magnetic fluids have a low vapor pressure hydrocarbon base oil and are suitable for space application. Four variations of this fluid were evaluated: (1) the base oil, (2) base oil with anti-wear additives, (3) a 100 Gauss strength magnetic fluid, and (4) a 400 gauss magnetic fluid. The commercial fluid base oil and four different magnetic particle concentration levels have been evaluated. A space qualified fluorinated lubricant was tested for base line comparison. Hardness, optical microscopy, surface profilometry, and surface analysis were used to characterize the test specimens. Friction was unaffected by the concentration of magnetic particles. Wear rates for magnetic fluids were slightly higher than the base oil. The low vapor pressure magnetic fluid has better wear characteristics than the space qualified fluorinated lubricant.

  7. Tooth wear: diet analysis and advice.

    PubMed

    Young, William George

    2005-04-01

    Diet analysis and advice for patients with tooth wear is potentially the most logical intervention to arrest attrition, erosion and abrasion. It is saliva that protects the teeth against corrosion by the acids which soften enamel and make it susceptible to wear. Thus the lifestyles and diet of patients at risk need to be analysed for sources of acid and reasons for lost salivary protection. Medical conditions which put patients at risk of tooth wear are principally: asthma, bulimia nervosa, caffeine addiction, diabetes mellitus, exercise dehydration, functional depression, gastroesophageal reflux in alcoholism, hypertension and syndromes with salivary hypofunction. The sources of acid are various, but loss of salivary protection is the common theme. In healthy young Australians, soft drinks are the main source of acid, and exercise dehydration the main reason for loss of salivary protection. In the medically compromised, diet acids and gastroesophageal reflux are the sources, but medications are the main reasons for lost salivary protection. Diet advice for patients with tooth wear must: promote a healthy lifestyle and diet strategy that conserves the teeth by natural means of salivary stimulation; and address the specific needs of the patients' oral and medical conditions. Individualised, patient-empowering erosion WATCH strategies; on Water, Acid, Taste, Calcium and Health, are urgently required to combat the emerging epidemic of tooth wear currently being experienced in westernised societies.

  8. Incisor wear and age in Yellowstone bison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christianson, D.A.; Gogan, P.J.P.; Podruzny, K.M.; Olexa, E.M.

    2005-01-01

    Biologists commonly use tooth eruption and wear patterns or cementum annuli techniques to estimate age of ungulates. However, in some situations the accuracy or sampling procedures of either approach are undesirable. We investigated the progression of several quantitative measures of wear with age, using permanent first incisors from Yellowstone bison (Bison bison), and tested for differences between sexes and herds. We further investigated the relationship of wear and age to explore an age-estimation method. Labial-lingual width (LLW) correlated best with assigned age (r2=0.66, males; r2=0.76 females). Labial-lingual width differed between sexes, with females showing ∼0.2 mm more wear than males. Additionally, differences in rate of wear existed between bison of the northern and central Yellowstone herds (1.2 and 0.9 mm/year, respectively). We developed a regression formula to test the power of LLW as an estimator of Yellowstone bison age. Our method provided estimated ages within 1 year of the assigned age 73% and 82% of the time for female and male bison, respectively.

  9. Chronic Cutaneous Draining Sinus of Dental Origin

    PubMed Central

    Sisodia, N; Manjunath, MK

    2014-01-01

    Extra oral sinus of odontogenic origin occurs when the purulent by-products of dental pulp necrosis spread along the path of least resistance from the root apex to the skin on the face. Patients presenting with cutaneous sinus usually visit a general physician or dermatologist first, as the lesion can mimic various dermatologic pathologies, ranging from an infected sebaceous cysts to a basal cell carcinoma. Despite systemic antibiotics, symptoms often persist causing further confusion, and at times leading to unnecessary surgical interventions. The location of this sinus in the head and neck region should lead the physician to seek a dental opinion in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:25506495

  10. Material properties and fractography of an indirect dental resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Janet B.; Quinn, George D.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Determination of material and fractographic properties of a dental indirect resin composite material. Methods A resin composite (Paradigm, 3M-ESPE, MN) was characterized by strength, static elastic modulus, Knoop hardness, fracture toughness and edge toughness. Fractographic analyses of the broken bar surfaces was accomplished with a combination of optical and SEM techniques, and included determination of the type and size of the failure origins, and fracture mirror and branching constants. Results The flexure test mean strength ± standard deviation was 145 MPA ± 17 MPa, and edge toughness, Te, was 172 N/mm ±12 N/mm. Knoop hardness was load dependent, with a plateau at 0.99 GPa ± .02 GPa. Mirrors in the bar specimens were measured with difficulty, resulting in a mirror constant of approximately 2.6 MPa·m1/2. Fracture in the bar specimens initiated at equiaxed material flaws that had different filler concentrations that sometimes were accompanied by partial microcracks. Using the measured flaw sizes, which ranged from 35 µm to 100 µm in size, and estimates of the stress intensity shape factors, fracture toughness was estimated to be 1.1 MPa·m1/2 ± 0.2 MPa·m1/2. Significance Coupling the flexure tests with fractographic examination enabled identification of the intrinsic strength limiting flaws. The same techniques could be useful in determining if clinical restorations of similar materials fail from the same causes. The existence of a strong load-dependence of the Knoop hardness of the resin composite is not generally mentioned in the literature, and is important for material comparisons and wear evaluation studies. Finally, the edge toughness test was found promising as a quantitative measure of resistance to edge chipping, an important failure mode in this class of materials. PMID:20304478

  11. Effect of gamma irradiation on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Ping; Huang, Shengbin; Gao, Shanshan; Qian, Linmao; Yu, Haiyang

    2015-06-01

    Radiotherapy is a frequently used treatment for oral cancer. Extensive research has been conducted to detect the mechanical properties of dental hard tissues after irradiation at the macroscale. However, little is known about the influence of irradiation on the tribological properties of enamel at the micro- or nanoscale. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel in relation to prism orientation. Nanoscratch tests, surface profilometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis were used to evaluate the friction behaviour of enamel slabs before and after treatment with identical irradiation procedures. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were performed to analyse the changes in crystallography and chemical composition induced by irradiation. Surface microhardness (SMH) alteration was also evaluated. The results showed that irradiation resulted in different scratch morphologies, friction coefficients and remnant depth and width at different loads. An inferior nanoscratch resistance was observed independent of prism orientation. Moreover, the variation of wear behaviours was closely related to changes in the crystallography, chemical composition and SMH of the enamel. Together, these measures indicated that irradiation had a direct deleterious effect on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel.

  12. Effect of gamma irradiation on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Ping; Huang, Shengbin; Gao, ShanShan; Qian, LinMao; Yu, HaiYang

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a frequently used treatment for oral cancer. Extensive research has been conducted to detect the mechanical properties of dental hard tissues after irradiation at the macroscale. However, little is known about the influence of irradiation on the tribological properties of enamel at the micro- or nanoscale. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel in relation to prism orientation. Nanoscratch tests, surface profilometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis were used to evaluate the friction behaviour of enamel slabs before and after treatment with identical irradiation procedures. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were performed to analyse the changes in crystallography and chemical composition induced by irradiation. Surface microhardness (SMH) alteration was also evaluated. The results showed that irradiation resulted in different scratch morphologies, friction coefficients and remnant depth and width at different loads. An inferior nanoscratch resistance was observed independent of prism orientation. Moreover, the variation of wear behaviours was closely related to changes in the crystallography, chemical composition and SMH of the enamel. Together, these measures indicated that irradiation had a direct deleterious effect on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel. PMID:26099692

  13. Effect of gamma irradiation on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Qing, Ping; Huang, Shengbin; Gao, ShanShan; Qian, LinMao; Yu, HaiYang

    2015-06-23

    Radiotherapy is a frequently used treatment for oral cancer. Extensive research has been conducted to detect the mechanical properties of dental hard tissues after irradiation at the macroscale. However, little is known about the influence of irradiation on the tribological properties of enamel at the micro- or nanoscale. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel in relation to prism orientation. Nanoscratch tests, surface profilometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis were used to evaluate the friction behaviour of enamel slabs before and after treatment with identical irradiation procedures. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were performed to analyse the changes in crystallography and chemical composition induced by irradiation. Surface microhardness (SMH) alteration was also evaluated. The results showed that irradiation resulted in different scratch morphologies, friction coefficients and remnant depth and width at different loads. An inferior nanoscratch resistance was observed independent of prism orientation. Moreover, the variation of wear behaviours was closely related to changes in the crystallography, chemical composition and SMH of the enamel. Together, these measures indicated that irradiation had a direct deleterious effect on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel.

  14. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  15. Wear materials; 2: Optimizing liner alloy choice

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanovic, T. )

    1993-12-01

    This paper describes a new liner designed for a copper ore crusher in Yugoslavia. The experience gained over the past ten years of operation at the Bor copper mines has shown that correct selection of wear material for crusher liners is critical to successful plant performance. With the new wear resistant liners, the crusher development program has increased the concentrator throughput from 8.0 to 9.6 million tons/year. The ultimate goal of the project is to identify the proper liner material that will extend liner life, reduce cyclic stress on major crusher components, and simplify crusher control and adjustment. This paper describes the various liners materials and the mechanisms of wear.

  16. Overview of surface engineering and wear

    SciTech Connect

    Budinski, K.G.

    1996-12-31

    Surface engineering is a multidiscipline activity aimed at tailoring the properties or surfaces of engineering materials to improve their function or service life. As applied to metals, surface engineering includes processes such as plating, diffusion treatment, physical and chemical vapor deposition, ion implantation, thermal spray coatings, selective hardening, hardfacing, and a variety of less-used and proprietary processes. These processes will be described briefly and it is shown that each process has a niche where it works better or is more cost effective than competing surface engineering treatments or bulk materials. This paper reviews the various forms of wear that occur in industrial environments. Techniques are described to match available surface engineering processes with wear situations. The goal is to present selection guidelines for machine designers and industrial operating personnel on the use of surface engineering to solve wear problems.

  17. Hardfacing and wear plates battle abrasion

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.F.

    1983-06-01

    This article examines abrasion-resistant steels and hardfacing as two effective weapons at the disposal of material handlers. It points out that abrasion is probably the single most destructive form of wear in the mixing and processing of coal. Particulate matter such as quartz sand and other minerals including coal curtail in-service life of dragline buckets, chute, crusher rolls, gates and valves, exhauster fan blades, target plates, truck beds, hoppers, vibrating pans, grinding mills, piping elbows, etc. The advantages of abrasion-resistant steels and hardfacing can be obtained in the form of a composite wear plate-hardfacing on a carbon steel backup plate. It concludes that the composite wear plate represents a major innovation since its advantages include ease of handling, low cost and easy installation, minimum on-site welding time and versatility. Its use is limited only to the consumer's creativity in application.

  18. Some wear studies on aircraft brake systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    An initial investigation of worn surfaces in friction pads and steel rotors used in current aircraft brakes was carried out using electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction analysis. It consists of the topographical study and the analysis of chemical element distribution. Based upon this initial examination, two approaches, microscopic and macroscopic have been conducted to interpret and formulate the wear mechanism of the aircraft brake materials. Microscopically, the wear particles were examined. The initiation and growth of surface cracks and the oxidation were emphasized in this investigation. Macroscopically, it has been found that, for the current copper based brake material sliding against 17-22 AS steel in a caliper brake, the surface temperature raised due to frictional heat is nonlinearly proportional to the load applied and slide time with speed at 1750 rpm. The wear of brake materials is then proportional to this temperature and is also a function of the melting temperature for copper.

  19. Adhesion and wear resistance of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies into the nature of bonding at the interface between two solids in contact or a solid and deposited film have provided a better understanding of those properties important to the adhesive wear resistance of materials. Analytical and experimental progress are reviewed. For simple metal systems the adhesive bond forces are related to electronic wave function overlap. With metals in contact with nonmetals, molecular-orbital energy, and density of states, respectively can provide insight into adhesion and wear. Experimental results are presented which correlate adhesive forces measured between solids and the electronic surface structures. Orientation, surface reconstruction, surface segregation, adsorption are all shown to influence adhesive interfacial strength. The interrelationship between adhesion and the wear of the various materials as well as the life of coatings applied to substrates are discussed. Metallic systems addressed include simple metals and alloys and these materials in contact with themselves, both oxide and nonoxide ceramics, diamond, polymers, and inorganic coating compounds, h as diamondlike carbon.

  20. Dental Compressed Air Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    I AL-TR-IWI-0uuu AD-A249 954 DENTAL COMPRESSED AIMYTM R Curtis D. Weyrmuch, Mejor, USAP, D Samuel P.Dvs iueatclpi SF.O N AEROSPACE MwaEDIN mwr~ComA G...FUNDING NUMBERS Dental Compressed Air Systems PE - 87714F PR - 7350 TA - 22 D. Weyrauch WU - XX Samuel P. Davis George W. Gaines 7. PERFORMING...words) The purpose of this report is to update guidelines on dental compressed air systems (DCA). Much of the information was obtained from a survey

  1. Standing equine dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Robert A; Easley, Jack

    2014-04-01

    Dental surgeries refer to procedures that affect the dental tissues or their supporting structures. With the development of specific, efficacious, and conservative treatments, morbidity risks have been lowered and chances of benefiting the health of equids improved. Advances in quality of sedation, analgesia, and locoregional anesthesia allow a majority of dental surgeries to be performed in the standing patient. This update focuses on an orthograde endodontic technique, a minimally invasive buccotomy technique, with the potential to combine it with a transbuccal screw extraction technique, and revisits the AO pinless external fixator for fractures of the body of the mandible.

  2. Feline dental disease.

    PubMed

    Frost, P; Williams, C A

    1986-09-01

    Periodontal disease and chronic gingivitis/stomatitis are the most common feline dental diseases. With routine dental care and increased emphasis on home oral hygiene, these diseases can be controlled. Cats can be seen with a number of other dental disorders, and improved treatment methods such as restorations of early subgingival resorptive lesions, endodontic therapy, and orthodontic therapy can be performed successfully. More study and research are necessary about the gingivitis/stomatitis syndrome and subgingival resorptive lesions so that improved prevention and treatment recommendations can be made.

  3. Dental material artifacts on MR images.

    PubMed

    Hinshaw, D B; Holshouser, B A; Engstrom, H I; Tjan, A H; Christiansen, E L; Catelli, W F

    1988-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the head and neck is becoming an important aid in evaluating pathologic conditions of the brain, midface, and pharynx. Certain dental materials cause artifacts during MR imaging of the lower midface. These artifacts can obscure the normal anatomy. This study describes the degree of artifact production caused by various materials commonly used in dental restorations. Of the materials tested, those causing artifacts were made of stainless steel, such as orthodontic bands used for braces, and pins or posts that are commonly drilled into teeth to provide structure or stability before filling. Materials used as temporary or permanent fillings or crowns--such as amalgam, gold alloy, aluminum, microfilled resin, and polyvinyl acrylics--did not cause artifacts in the images.

  4. Diamond wheel wear sensing with acoustic emission --wheel wear mechanisms and the effects of process variables

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jianshe; Dornfeld, D.; Syoji, Katsuo

    1996-12-31

    The wear of diamond wheels has significant influence on the surface finish of ground ceramics and the resulting subsurface fracture damage. For optimization and control of the grinding process it is necessary to monitor the wear states of the grinding wheels. A project on diamond wheel wear sensing with acoustic emission was started recently in the Laboratory of Manufacturing Automation at the University of California at Berkeley. The main aims of the project are: (a) to identify the possible wheel wear patterns at different combinations of bond materials, grits, and grinding conditions; (b) to develop suitable AE signal processing methods to extract the AE features to represent the wheel wear characteristics, and establish a strategy for using AE for in-process monitoring of diamond wheel wear in grinding of ceramics. This paper presents the results of part of the project. It mainly focuses on the diamond wheel wear mechanisms, the effects of process variables including basic wheel elements and grinding parameters, and the relationship with AErms and AE frequency content.

  5. Wear and wear mechanism simulation of heavy-duty engine intake valve and seat inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. S.; Narasimhan, S.; Larson, J. M.; Schaefer, S. K.

    1998-02-01

    A silicon-chromium alloy frequently used for heavy-duty diesel engine intake valves was tested against eight different insert materials with a valve seat wear simulator. Wear resistance of these combinations was ranked. For each test, the valve seat temperature was controlled at approximately 510 °C, the number of cycles was 864,000 (or 24 h), and the test load was 17,640 N. The combination of the silicon-chromium valve against a cast iron insert produced the least valve seat wear, whereas a cobalt-base alloy insert produced the highest valve seat wear. In the overall valve seat recession ranking, however, the combination of the silicon-chromium valve and an iron-base chromium-nickel alloy insert had the least total seat recession, whereas the silicon-chromium valve against cobalt-base alloy, cast iron, and nickel-base alloy inserts had significant seat recession. Hardness and microstructure compatibility of valve and insert materials are believed to be significant factors in reducing valve and insert wear. The test results indicate that the mechanisms of valve seat and insert wear are a complex combination of adhesion and plastic deformation. Adhesion was confirmed by material transfer, while plastic deformation was verified by shear strain (or radial flow) and abrasion. The oxide films formed during testing also played a significant role. They prevented direct metal-to-metal contact and reduced the coefficient of friction on seat surfaces, thereby reducing adhesive and deformation-controlled wear.

  6. Disposable hydrogel contact lenses for extended wear.

    PubMed

    Donshik, P; Weinstock, F J; Wechsler, S; Asbell, P; Atwood, J; Davis, H; Farkas, B; Farris, R L; Gruber, E; Hartstein, J

    1988-01-01

    Nine ophthalmologists and nine optometrists conducted a premarket study of the Acuvue disposable contact lens manufactured by Vistakon, Inc. Of the 812 patients offered the lens, 733 accepted it and were enrolled in the study. These patients were fitted with the lens and followed for a period of 8 months. Over 98% of these patients had 20/25 or better vision on initial fitting; and subjective ratings of lens comfort were very good. Only 3.7% (27 of 733) discontinued wearing their lenses during the study period. Thirty-four patients (5.6%) experienced a problem while wearing their contact lenses.

  7. Saliva parameters and erosive wear in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zwier, N; Huysmans, M C D N J M; Jager, D H J; Ruben, J; Bronkhorst, E M; Truin, G J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between several parameters of saliva and erosive wear in adolescents. (Un-)stimulated saliva was collected from 88 adolescents with erosion and 49 controls (age 16 ± 1 years). Flow rate, pH and buffer capacity were determined immediately. Total protein content, carbonic anhydrase VI, amylase, albumin, calcium, phosphate, urea, sodium, chloride and potassium were measured at a later time. Unstimulated flow rate was found to be significantly lower in subjects with erosive wear (p = 0.016). The chloride concentration in unstimulated saliva was found to be significantly higher in the erosion group (p = 0.019).

  8. Wear Analysis of Wind Turbine Gearbox Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Walker, Larry R; Xu, Hanbing; Parten, Randy J; Qu, Jun; Geer, Tom

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this effort was to investigate and characterize the nature of surface damage and wear to wind turbine gearbox bearings returned from service in the field. Bearings were supplied for examination by S. Butterfield and J. Johnson of the National Wind Technology Center (NREL), Boulder, Colorado. Studies consisted of visual examination, optical and electron microscopy, dimensional measurements of wear-induced macro-scale and micro-scale features, measurements of macro- and micro-scale hardness, 3D imaging of surface damage, studies of elemental distributions on fracture surfaces, and examinations of polished cross-sections of surfaces under various etched and non-etched conditions.

  9. Consideration of wear rates at high velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Chad S.

    The development of the research presented here is one in which high velocity relative sliding motion between two bodies in contact has been considered. Overall, the wear environment is truly three-dimensional. The attempt to characterize three-dimensional wear was not economically feasible because it must be analyzed at the micro-mechanical level to get results. Thus, an engineering approximation was carried out. This approximation was based on a metallographic study identifying the need to include viscoplasticity constitutive material models, coefficient of friction, relationships between the normal load and velocity, and the need to understand wave propagation. A sled test run at the Holloman High Speed Test Track (HHSTT) was considered for the determination of high velocity wear rates. In order to adequately characterize high velocity wear, it was necessary to formulate a numerical model that contained all of the physical events present. The experimental results of a VascoMax 300 maraging steel slipper sliding on an AISI 1080 steel rail during a January 2008 sled test mission were analyzed. During this rocket sled test, the slipper traveled 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s. This type of environment was never considered previously in terms of wear evaluation. Each of the features of the metallography were obtained through micro-mechanical experimental techniques. The byproduct of this analysis is that it is now possible to formulate a model that contains viscoplasticity, asperity collisions, temperature and frictional features. Based on the observations of the metallographic analysis, these necessary features have been included in the numerical model, which makes use of a time-dynamic program which follows the movement of a slipper during its experimental test run. The resulting velocity and pressure functions of time have been implemented in the explicit finite element code, ABAQUS. Two-dimensional, plane strain models

  10. Application of Ultrasonic Dental Scaler for Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Takasaki, Masaya; Kutami, Tomonori; Mizuno, Takeshi

    Ultrasonic dental scaler is an instrument to remove dental calculi using ultrasonic vibration of a transducer. The conventional transducer has a hose to provide water to scaling point. The hose causes attenuation of the ultrasonic vibration. This paper describes a new transducer design to avoid the attenuation. Design decision by comparison of two types of transducer designs is reported. Additionally, the ultrasonic transducer is used in resonance condition. The resonance frequency, however, is shifted according to value of input voltage to the transducer and condition of contact with tooth or gum. This paper presents a resonance frequency tracing system to solve the frequency shift. Step responses are specified as evaluation of the system. Application of the system to diagnosis is also discussed. Experiments on measurement of object properties are reported. The results indicate possibility that dental health can be investigated by observing the frequency shift during the scaler operation.

  11. Is it safe to wear contact lenses with a full-facepiece respirator

    SciTech Connect

    Da Roza, R.A.; Weaver, C.

    1985-08-16

    The Federal OSHA regulation that prohibits the wearing of contact lenses while using a respirator is being challenged by users. We surveyed 9100 fire fighters around the US and Canada to determine if the wearing of contacts while using a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) had caused any serious problems to warrant this strict regulation. Of the 1405 questionnaires returned, 403 fire fighters do wear contacts with SCBA, despite the regulation. Of these, only six responded that contact-lens related problems had caused them to remove the facepiece in an environment in which the facepiece would normally be worn. In contrast, the safety-related problems caused by eyeglasses in SCBA - which are legal - are proportionately higher. Over half of the supervisors returning the questionnaire admitted that some of their employees wear contacts with SCBA; however, these supervisors knew of only eight cases when contact-lens problems had caused the facepiece to be removed when it should not have been. Our investigation has indicated that these problems were not significantly hazardous. We believe that the use of contacts with a respirator should not be prohibited. 7 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Friction and wear of iron and nickel in sodium hydroxide solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    A loaded spherical aluminum oxider rider was made to slide, while in various solutions, on a flat iron or nickel surface reciprocate a distance of 1 cm. Time of experiments was 1 hr during which the rider passed over the rider passed over the center section of the track 540 times. Coefficients of friction were measured throughout the experiments. Wear was measured by scanning the track with a profilometer. Analysis of some of the wear tracks included use of the SEM (scanning electron microscrope) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). Investigated were the effect of various concentractions of NaOH and of water. On iron, increasing NaOH concentration above 0.01 N caused the friction and wear to decrease. This decrease is accompanied by a decrease in surface concentration of ferric oxide (Fe2O3) while more complex iron-oxygen compounds, not clearly identified, also form. At low concentrations of NaOH, such as 0.01 N, where the friction is high, the wear track is badely torn up and the surface is broken. At high concentration, such as 10 N, where the friction is low, the wear track is smooth. The general conclusion is that NaOH forms a protective, low friction film on iron which is destroyed by wear at low concentrations but remains intact at high concentrations of NaOH. Nickel behaves differently than iron in that only a little NaOH gives a low coefficient of friction and a surface which, although roughened in the wear track, remains intact.

  13. No compelling positive association between ovarian hormones and wearing red clothing when using multinomial analyses.

    PubMed

    Blake, Khandis R; Dixson, Barnaby J W; O'Dean, Siobhan M; Denson, Thomas F

    2017-03-14

    Several studies report that wearing red clothing enhances women's attractiveness and signals sexual proceptivity to men. The associated hypothesis that women will choose to wear red clothing when fertility is highest, however, has received mixed support from empirical studies. One possible cause of these mixed findings may be methodological. The current study aimed to replicate recent findings suggesting a positive association between hormonal profiles associated with high fertility (high estradiol to progesterone ratios) and the likelihood of wearing red. We compared the effect of the estradiol to progesterone ratio on the probability of wearing: red versus non-red (binary logistic regression); red versus neutral, black, blue, green, yellow, multi-color, and gray (multinomial logistic regression); and each of these same colors in separate binary models (e.g., green versus non-green). Red versus non-red analyses showed a positive trend between a high estradiol to progesterone ratio and wearing red, but the effect only arose for younger women and was not robust across samples. We found no compelling evidence for ovarian hormones increasing the probability of wearing red in the other analyses. However, we did find that the probability of wearing neutral was positively associated with the estradiol to progesterone ratio, though the effect did not reach conventional levels of statistical significance. Findings suggest that although ovarian hormones may affect younger women's preference for red clothing under some conditions, the effect is not robust when differentiating amongst other colors of clothing. In addition, the effect of ovarian hormones on clothing color preference may not be specific to the color red.

  14. Effect of QPQ nitriding time on microstructure and wear resistance of SAF2906 duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Wu, G. X.; Shen, L. X.

    2017-01-01

    QPQ salt bath treatment of SAF2906 duplex stainless steel was conducted at 570 °C for 60 min, 90 min,120 min,150 min and 180 min, followed by post-oxidation process with heating temperature of 400°C and holding duration of 30 min. The effect of QPQ nitriding time on microstructure and wear resistance of SAF2906 duplex stainless steel was investigated by means of OM, SEM, XRD, microhardness test, adhesion strength test and wear resistance test. Microstructure observation showed outer layer was composed of Fe3O4. The main phase of the intermediate layer was CrN, αN and Fe2-3N. The main phase of the inner layer was CrN and S. The adhesion strength test of the surface layer-substrate showed the QPQ treated samples have favorable adhesion strength of HF-1 level. With the increase of nitriding time, the growth rate of the compound layer gradually slowed down and the surface hardness first increased and then decreased, and the maximum hardness was 1283 HV0.2 at 150 min. The dry siliding results showed that the wear resistance of the QPQ treated samples was at least 20 times than that of the substrate, and the optimum nitriding time to obtain the best wear resistance is 150 min. The worn surface morphology observation showed the main wear mechanism of the substrate was plough wear, while micro-cutting is the main wear mechanism that causes the damage of the QPQ treated samples.

  15. Numerical analysis of human dental occlusal contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, F. S.; Las Casas, E. B.; Godoy, G. C. D.; Meireles, A. B.

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain real contact areas, forces, and pressures acting on human dental enamel as a function of the nominal pressure during dental occlusal contact. The described development consisted of three steps: characterization of the surface roughness by 3D contact profilometry test, finite element analysis of micro responses for each pair of main asperities in contact, and homogenization of macro responses using an assumed probability density function. The inelastic deformation of enamel was considered, adjusting the stress-strain relationship of sound enamel to that obtained from instrumented indentation tests conducted with spherical tip. A mechanical part of the static friction coefficient was estimated as the ratio between tangential and normal components of the overall resistive force, resulting in μd = 0.057. Less than 1% of contact pairs reached the yield stress of enamel, indicating that the occlusal contact is essentially elastic. The micro-models indicated an average hardness of 6.25GPa, and the homogenized result for macroscopic interface was around 9GPa. Further refinements of the methodology and verification using experimental data can provide a better understanding of processes related to contact, friction and wear of human tooth enamel.

  16. Prototyping a robotic dental testing simulator.

    PubMed

    Alemzadeh, K; Hyde, R A; Gao, J

    2007-05-01

    A parallel robot based on the Stewart platform is being developed to simulate jaw motion and investigate its effect on jaw function to test the wearing away of dental components such as individual teeth, crowns, bridges, full set of dentures, and implant-supported overdentures by controlling chewing motion. The current paper only describes the comparison between an alternative configuration proposed by Xu and the Stewart platform configuration. The Stewart platform was chosen as an ideal structure for simulating human mastication as it is easily assembled, has high rigidity, high load-carrying capacity, and accurate positioning capability. The kinematics and singularities of the Stewart platform have been analysed and software developed to (a) test the control algorithms/strategy of muscle movement for the six degree of freedom of mastication cycle and (b) simulate and observe various design options to be able to make the best judgement in product development. The human replica skull has been analysed and reverse engineered with further simplification before integration with the Stewart platform computer-aided design (CAD) to develop the robotic dental testing simulator. Assembly modelling of the reproduced skull was critically analysed for good occlusion in CAD environment. A pulse-width modulation (PWM) circuit plus interface was built to control position and speed of the chosen actuators. A computer numerical control (CNC) machine and wire-electro-discharge machining (wire EDM) were used to manufacture the critical parts such as lower mandible, upper maxilla, and universal joints.

  17. Dental fluorosis: exposure, prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Abanto Alvarez, Jenny; Rezende, Karla Mayra P C; Marocho, Susana María Salazar; Alves, Fabiana B T; Celiberti, Paula; Ciamponi, Ana Lidia

    2009-02-01

    Dental fluorosis is a developmental disturbance of dental enamel, caused by successive exposures to high concentrations of fluoride during tooth development, leading to enamel with lower mineral content and increased porosity. The severity of dental fluorosis depends on when and for how long the overexposure to fluoride occurs, the individual response, weight, degree of physical activity, nutritional factors and bone growth. The risk period for esthetic changes in permanent teeth is between 20 and 30 months of age. The recommended level for daily fluoride intake is 0.05 - 0.07 mg F/Kg/day, which is considered of great help in preventing dental caries, acting in remineralization. A daily intake above this safe level leads to an increased risk of dental fluorosis. Currently recommended procedures for diagnosis of fluorosis should discriminate between symmetrical and asymmetrical and/or discrete patterns of opaque defects. Fluorosis can be prevented by having an adequate knowledge of the fluoride sources, knowing how to manage this issue and therefore, avoid overexposure.

  18. Dental Occlusion and Ophthalmology: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Marchili, Nicola; Ortu, Eleonora; Pietropaoli, Davide; Cattaneo, Ruggero; Monaco, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Stomatognathic system is strictly correlated to other anatomical regions; many studies investigated relationship between temporomandibular joint and posture, several articles describe cranio-facial pain from dental causes, such as trigger points. Until now less interest has been given to connections between dental occlusion and ophthalmology, even if they are important and involving. Clinical experience in dental practice claims that mandibular latero-deviation is connected both to eye dominance and to defects of ocular convergence. The trigeminal nerve is the largest and most complex of the twelve cranial nerves. The trigeminal system represents the connection between somitic structures and those derived from the branchial arches, collecting the proprioception from both somitic structures and oculomotor muscles. The intermedius nucleus of the medulla is a small perihypoglossal brainstem nucleus, which acts to integrate information from the head and neck and relays it on to the nucleus of the solitary tract where autonomic responses are generated. This intriguing neurophysiological web led our research group to investigate anatomical and functional associations between dental occlusion and vision. In conclusion, nervous system and functional pathways strictly connect vision and dental occlusion, and in the future both dentists and oculists should be more and more aware of this correlation for a better diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27733873

  19. Quantitative evaluation of dental abfraction and attrition using a swept-source optical coherence tomography system.

    PubMed

    Marcauteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin Ionel; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-02-01

    A fast swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system is employed to acquire volumes of dental tissue, in order to monitor the temporal evolution of dental wear. An imaging method is developed to evaluate the volume of tissue lost in ex vivo artificially induced abfractions and attritions. The minimal volume (measured in air) that our system could measure is 2352 μm3. A volume of 25,000 A-scans is collected in 2.5 s. All these recommend the SS-OCT method as a valuable tool for dynamic evaluation of the abfraction and attrition with remarkable potential for clinical use.

  20. Economic impact of dental hygienists on solo dental practices.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Vickie F; Guay, Albert H; Beazoglou, Tryfon J

    2012-08-01

    The fact that a significant percentage of dentists employ dental hygienists raises an important question: Are dental practices that utilize a dental hygienist structurally and operationally different from practices that do not? This article explores differences among dental practices that operate with and without dental hygienists. Using data from the American Dental Association's 2003 Survey of Dental Practice, a random sample survey of U.S. dentists, descriptive statistics were used to compare selected characteristics of solo general practitioners with and without dental hygienists. Multivariate regression analysis was used to estimate the effect of dental hygienists on the gross billings and net incomes of solo general practitioners. Differences in practice characteristics--such as hours spent in the practice and hours spent treating patients, wait time for a recall visit, number of operatories, square feet of office space, net income, and gross billings--were found between solo general practitioners who had dental hygienists and those who did not. Solo general practitioners with dental hygienists had higher gross billings. Higher gross billings would be expected, as would higher expenses. However, net incomes of those with dental hygienists were also higher. In contrast, the mean waiting time for a recall visit was higher among dentists who employed dental hygienists. Depending on personal preferences, availability of qualified personnel, etc., dentists who do not employ dental hygienists but have been contemplating that path may want to further research the benefits and opportunities that may be realized.

  1. Comparison of the effects of first and second generation silicone hydrogel contact lens wear on tear film osmolarity

    PubMed Central

    Iskeleli, Guzin; Karakoc, Yunus; Ozkok, Ahmet; Arici, Ceyhun; Ozcan, Omer; Ipcioglu, Osman

    2013-01-01

    AIM To compare the effects of first and second generation silicone hydrogel (SiH) contact lens wear on tear film osmolarity. METHODS The healthy subjects who have never used contact lenses before were enrolled in the study. Tear film osmolarity values of 16 eyes (group 1) who wore first generation SiH contact lenses were compared with those of 18 eyes (group 2) who wore second generation SiH contact lenses after three months follow-up. RESULTS Before contact lens wear, tear film osmolarity of groups 1 and 2 were 305.02±49.08 milliosmole (mOsm) and 284.66±30.18mOsm, respectively. After three months of contact lens wear, osmolarity values were found 317.74±60.23mOsm in group 1 and 298.40±37.77mOsm in group 2. Although osmolarity values for both groups of SiH contact lens wear after three months periods were slightly higher than before the contact lens wear, the difference was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION Contact lens wear may cause evaporation from the tear film and can increase tear film osmolarity leading to symptoms of dry eye disease. In the current study, there is a tendency to increase tear film osmolarity for both groups of SiH contact lens wear, but the difference is not statistically significant. PMID:24195046

  2. Access to dental care: a historical review of medicaid eligibility growth and dental productivity decline.

    PubMed

    Kinlaw, D H

    2001-09-01

    The present dilemma in providing dental services to the indigent and Medicaid recipients throughout this nation has generated considerable controversy as to the evolution of the problem. Most states recognize that there are deficiencies in the provision of dental services to these populations and are seeking resolutions. While state licensing board practices and dental professional society politics have been the object of criticism as contributing to if not causing of this problem, other rational and statistically valid explanations for the current difficulty exist. As an explanation for access to care issues, this paper explores the decline in the national numbers of dental practitioners and concomitant dental productivity. Furthermore, it relates those parameters to the dramatic rise in the utilization and demand for dental services resulting from a robust economy, population growth trends, and changes in state and federal Medicaid legislation that increase numbers of Medicaid-eligible recipients. While these general trends are national in scope and application, the state of North Carolina and its experience will be used to fully explore the impact of these trends at the state and local level.

  3. CASL Virtual Reactor Predictive Simulation: Grid-to-Rod Fretting Wear

    SciTech Connect

    Roger, Lu Y.; Karoutas, Zeses; Sham, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Grid-to-Rod Fretting (GTRF) wear is currently one of the main causes of fuel rod leaking in pressurized water reactors. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) has identified GTRF as one of the Challenge Problems that drive the requirement for the development and application of a modeling and simulation computational environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors. This paper presents fretting wear simulation methodology currently employed by Westinghouse, a CASL industrial partner, to address GTRF. The required advancements in the computational and materials science modeling areas to develop a predictive simulation environment by CASL to address GTRF are outlined.

  4. CASL virtual reactor predictive simulation: Grid-to-Rod Fretting wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Roger Y.; Karoutas, Zeses; Sham, T.-L.

    2011-08-01

    Grid-to-Rod Fretting (GTRF) wear is currently one of the main causes of fuel rod leaking in pressurized water reactors. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) has identified GTRF as one of the Challenge Problems that drive the requirement for the development and application of a modeling and simulation computational environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors. This paper presents fretting wear simulation methodology currently employed by Westinghouse, a CASL industrial partner, to address GTRF. The required advancements in the computational and materials science modeling areas to develop a predictive simulation environment by CASL to address GTRF are outlined.

  5. Spur Gear Wear Investigated in Support of Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy L.; Oswald, Fred B.

    2005-01-01

    As part of NASA s Return-To-Flight efforts, the Space Operations Program investigated the condition of actuators for the orbiter s rudder speed brake. The actuators control the position of the rudder panels located in the tail of the orbiter, providing both steering control and braking during reentry, approach, and landing. Inspections of flight hardware revealed fretting and wear damage to the critical working surfaces of the actuator gears. To best understand the root cause of the observed damage and to help establish an appropriate reuse and maintenance plan for these safety critical parts, researchers completed a set of gear wear experiments at the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  6. Glossary of Dental Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... of entire communities, and can design and administer large-scale prevention and dental care programs by compiling and analyzing statistics Radiosurgery surgery technique that uses radio waves to produce a pressureless, ...

  7. Interpretation of dental radiographs.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Interpretation of dental radiographs is fairly straightforward, with a handful of common patterns making up the majority of pathology. This article covers normal radiographic anatomy, endodontic disease, periodontal disease, neoplastic changes, tooth resorption, caries, and radiographic signs of oral trauma.

  8. American Dental Education Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... ADEA Application Services ADEA AADSAS® ADEA CAAPID® ADEA PASS® ADEA DHCAS® Career Resources DentEd Jobs Placing Ads ... Students & Residents Prospective Students Application Services AADSAS CAAPID PASS DHCAS ADEA AADSAS Applicants Prospective applicants to dental ...

  9. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Working Column Journal of Dental Hygiene Author Guidelines Advertising Subscribe Resources Resources About ADHA About Promo (DO ... Member Benefits Footer Copy Legal Inquiries | Contact Us | Advertising | Media Inquiries | Staff / Board Login ©2012-2017 ADHA. ...

  10. Dental Treatment Considerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... and modifying dental treatment to accommodate altered muscle strength. Appointment Scheduling It is important to realize that ... and take advantage of the typically greater muscle strength during the morning hours. Appointments are best scheduled ...

  11. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePlus

    ... form does not collect any actual information. External Web Site Policy This graphic notice ( ) means that you are ... the link. Home Contact Us Viewers and Players Site Map FOIA Web Policies Privacy Policy National Institute of Dental and ...

  12. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... form does not collect any actual information. External Web Site Policy This graphic notice ( ) means that you are ... the link. Home Contact Us Viewers and Players Site Map FOIA Web Policies Privacy Policy National Institute of Dental and ...

  13. Effect of addition of Nano hydroxyapatite particles on wear of resin modified glass ionomer by tooth brushing simulation

    PubMed Central

    Poorzandpoush, Kiana; Jafarnia, Shiva H.; Golkar, Parisa; Atai, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Background Recently, incorporation of nanohydroxyapatite (NHA) has been suggested to improve the mechanical properties of glass ionomers (GIs). This study aimed to assess the effect of addition of NHA on wear of resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) by tooth brushing simulation. Material and Methods In this in vitro, experimental study, NHA in 1, 2, 5, 7 and 10wt% concentrations was added to Fuji II LC RMGI powder, and 48 samples (5×5mm) in five experimental and one control group (n=8) were fabricated. After polishing, cleaning and incubation at 37°C for three weeks, the samples were weighed and subjected to tooth brushing simulation in a toothpaste slurry according to ISO14569-1. Then, they were weighed again and the weight loss was calculated. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results The highest and the lowest weight loss was found in the 0% NHA (-1.052±0.176) and 5% NHA (-0.370±0.143) groups, respectively. Wear was significantly higher in 0% NHA group (P<0.05). No difference was detected in wear between 2 and 5wt% NHA or among 1, 7 and 10wt% NHA groups. Significant differences were noted in wear between 2 and 5wt% NHA and 1, 7 and 10wt% NHA groups (P<0.001). Conclusions Incorporation of up to 10wt% of NHA increases the wear resistance of Fuji II LC RMGI. This increase was the highest when 2 and 5wt% NHA were added. Key words:Glass ionomer, hydroxyapatites, nanoparticles, dental restoration wear. PMID:28298977

  14. Portable Dental System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Portable dental system provides dental care in isolated communities. System includes a patient's chair and a dentist's stool, an X-ray machine and a power unit, all of which fold into compact packages. A large yellow "pumpkin" is a collapsible compressed air tank. Portable system has been used successfully in South America in out of the way communities with this back-packable system, and in American nursing homes. This product is no longer manufactured.

  15. Dental physical examination.

    PubMed

    Baker, G J

    1998-08-01

    The objectives of the equine dental physical examination are to detect and quantify oral and dental disorders, to propose and carry out their treatment, and to implement management programs. The veterinarian should be able to offer a prognosis and to detail any future treatment or management plans that may be required. These objectives should take into account the cost of these procedures, and the veterinarian should be prepared to offer a cost-benefit analysis of the problem and the proposed cures.

  16. Dental considerations in anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dental trauma as a result of anaesthesia practice is a relevant issue concerning morbidity and litigation. The investigator aimed to consolidate pertinent information on this issue to aid in the redressal of such an occurrence. A review of this relevant literature alongwith the author’s suggestions towards the management of the various kinds of dental trauma sustained as a result of anaesthesia practice is presented. PMID:27974970

  17. TRICARE Dental Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    enrollee – $1,500 lifetime maximum for orthodontics – Contractor: Delta Dental of California 2011 MHS Conference TRICARE Retiree Dental Program...Benefits Comprehensive benefits 12-month waiting period for crowns, prosthetics and orthodontics No waiting period if enroll within 120 days of...retiring from active duty or transfer to Retired Reserve status from National Guard or Reserve  Orthodontics for children and adults Accident coverage

  18. Dental arch asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubair, Nabil Muhsen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to assess the dental arch asymmetry in a Yemeni sample aged (18-25) years. Materials and Methods: The investigation involved clinical examination of 1479 adults; only 253 (129 females, 124 males) out of the total sample were selected to fulfill the criteria for the study sample. Study models were constructed and evaluated to measure mandibular arch dimensions. Three linear distances were utilized on each side on the dental arch: Incisal-canine distance, canine-molar distance and incisal-molar distance, which represent the dental arch segmental measurements. Results: When applying “t-test” at P < 0.05, no significant differences were found between the right and left canine-molar, incisal-canine and incisal-molar distances in both dental arches for both sexes. The greater variation (0.30 mm) was observed between right and left canine-molar distance in the maxillary dental arch in male and the smaller (0.04 mm) in the mandibular dental arch between the right and left canine-molar distance in females. Conclusion: The findings of the present study revealed a symmetrical pattern of dental arches, since the right and left sides showed no statistically significant difference. In general, it can be observed that the measurements related to the central incisors and canines have the widest range of reading and give the impression that the location of central incisor and canines to each other and to other teeth is the strongest factor in determining the dental arch asymmetry. PMID:24966774

  19. Interactions between nonlinear spur gear dynamics and surface wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Huali; Kahraman, Ahmet

    2007-11-01

    In this study, two different dynamic models, a finite elements-based deformable-body model and a simplified discrete model, and a surface wear model are combined to study the interaction between gear surface wear and gear dynamic response. The proposed dynamic gear wear model includes the influence of worn surface profiles on dynamic tooth forces and transmission error as well as the influence of dynamic tooth forces on wear profiles. This paper first introduces the nonlinear dynamic models that include gear backlash and time-varying gear mesh stiffness, and a wear model separately. It presents a comparison to experiments for validation of the dynamic models. The dynamic models are combined with the wear model to study the interaction of surface wear and dynamic behavior in both linear and nonlinear response regimes. At the end, several sets of simulation results are used to demonstrate the two-way relationship between nonlinear gear dynamics and surface wear.

  20. Wear mechanism and tribological characteristics of porous NiTi shape memory alloy for bone scaffold.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuilin; Liu, Xiangmei; Wu, Guosong; Yeung, Kelvin W K; Zheng, Dong; Chung, C Y; Xu, Z S; Chu, Paul K

    2013-09-01

    The abraded debris might cause osteocytic osteolysis on the interface between implants and bone tissues, thus inducing the subsequent mobilization of implants gradually and finally resulting in the failure of bone implants, which imposes restrictions on the applications of porous NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. In this work, the effects of the annealing temperature, applied load, and porosity on the tribological behavior and wear resistance of three-dimensional porous NiTi SMA are investigated systematically. The porous structure and phase transformation during the exothermic process affect the tribological properties and wear mechanism significantly. In general, a larger porosity leads to better tribological resistance but sometimes, SMAs with small porosity possess better wear resistance than ones with higher porosity during the initial sliding stage. It can be ascribed to the better superelasticity of the former at the test temperature. The porous NiTi phase during the exothermic reaction also plays an important role in the wear resistance. Generally, porous NiTi has smaller friction coefficients under high loads due to stress-induced superelasticity. The wear mechanism is discussed based on plastic deformation and microcrack propagation.

  1. Effect of carbon nanotube addition on the wear behavior of basalt/epoxy woven composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, M T; Rhee, K Y; Lee, B H; Kim, C J

    2013-08-01

    The effect of acid-treated carbon nanotube (CNT) addition on the wear and dynamic mechanical thermal properties of basalt/epoxy woven composites was investigated in this study. Basalt/CNT/epoxy composites were fabricated by impregnating woven basalt fibers into epoxy resin mixed with 1 wt% CNTs which were acid-treated. Wear and DMA (dynamic mechanical analyzer) tests were performed on basalt/epoxy composites and basalt/CNT/epoxy composites. The results showed that the addition of the acid-treated CNTs improved the wear properties of basalt/epoxy woven composites. Specifically, the friction coefficient of the basalt/epoxy composite was stabilized in the range of 0.5-0.6 while it fell in the range of 0.3-0.4 for basalt/CNT/epoxy composites. The wear volume loss of the basalt/CNT/epoxy composites was approximately 68% lower than that of the basalt/epoxy composites. The results also showed that the glass transition temperature of basalt/CNT/epoxy composites was higher than that of basalt/epoxy composites. The improvement of wear properties of basalt/epoxy composites by the addition of acid-treated CNTs was caused by the homogeneous load transfer between basalt fibers and epoxy matrix due to the reinforcement of CNTs.

  2. Investigation of diamond-impregnated drill bit wear while drilling under Earth and Mars conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacny, K. A.; Cooper, G. A.

    2004-07-01

    Experiments conducted on a dry and a water-saturated rock under Martian and Earth atmospheric pressures revealed two different wear behaviors in diamond-impregnated drill bits. When the rock was saturated, drilling under Martian pressure caused the water in contact with the rotating bit to vaporize. Since the volumetric expansion of the liquid water or ice as it turned into a vapor was 170,000, the continuous flow of water vapor cleared the cuttings out of the hole. Thus the bit matrix was always exposed to abrasive wear by the rock cuttings and was continually wearing down and exposing new diamonds to the rock. When the rock was dry, an accumulation of rock cuttings protected the matrix from abrasive wear. Since fresh diamonds were not exposed in a timely manner, the rate of penetration dropped. Both rock conditions, namely, dry or water saturated, may exist on Mars. This adds to the complexity of the drill bit design as, ideally, a bit should penetrate the rock irrespective of whether it is dry or water saturated. The ``fail-safe'' bit would have a very soft matrix to always produce some rock penetration at the expense of potential excessive bit wear and shallower than anticipated hole depth.

  3. Experimental study the effect of speeds in wear using fourball tribotester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ing, Tiong Chiong; Mohammed Rafiq, A. K.; Wira, Y. J.; Syahrullail, S.

    2012-06-01

    Tribology is a multi-discipline field of knowledge. The understanding is on the changes of speeds that occur in the bulk materials as the materials surface move relative to each other. The researchers are required to better understand the phenomena occurring in the different subsystems, the complex reactions occurring on the surface and in the fluid present between the moving surfaces. Today, the materials used in machinery, automotive and aerospace industry require high performance in wear resistance and friction, especially, for the material surface that meets with the outside environment. In the industry sector, the different sliding speeds may cause different damage to the machines. Thus, in this research, the author would like to investigate the effect of different sliding speeds on wear and friction. Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of the sliding speed in wear and friction by using fourball tester. The sliding speeds in the range of 800rpm to 1400 rpm were studied through experiments in wear and friction lubricated with Refined, Bleached, and Deodorized (RBD) Palm Olein. The duration time for the experiment was one hour at 75degree Celsius with applied load of 40kg. RBD Palm Olein is known as refined, bleached and deodorized oil which exists in liquid state at room temperature. From the result, author found out that the wear scar diameter is increased as the sliding speeds increased.

  4. On the Problem of Wear Resistant Coatings Separation From Tools and Machine Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrushin, S. I.; Gubaidulina, R. H.; Gruby, S. V.; Likholat, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    The article considers separation of wear resistant coatings of tool and engineering materials which arises both during coating fabrication and use of the product. The cause of this phenomenon is assumed to be related to thermal residual stresses generating on the coating- substrate border. These stresses have been analyzed and methods are provided to calculate it after produced composite material is cooled down from the temperature of coating synthesis to the ambient temperature. A no-fracture condition has been stated in relation to coating- substrate thicknesses, temperature differences and physical and mechanical properties of combined materials. The issue of intermediate layer incorporation with pre-set parameters has been discussed. A co-effect of thermal residual and functional stresses on the strength of the boundary layer has been considered when heating, tension and compression of a product with wear resistant coating. Conclusions have been made, as well as recommendations to improve fracture strength of products with thin wear resistant coatings.

  5. Wear Behavior of Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Prepared from Industrial Waste

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, L. Francis; Suresh, Paramasivam

    2016-01-01

    With an increase in the population and industrialization, a lot of valuable natural resources are depleted to prepare and manufacture products. However industrialization on the other hand has waste disposal issues, causing dust and environmental pollution. In this work, Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite is prepared by reinforcing 10 wt% and 20 wt% of wet grinder stone dust particles an industrial waste obtained during processing of quarry rocks which are available in nature. In the composite materials design wear is a very important criterion requiring consideration which ensures the materials reliability in applications where they come in contact with the environment and other surfaces. Dry sliding wear test was carried out using pin-on-disc apparatus on the prepared composites. The results reveal that increasing the reinforcement content from 10 wt% to 20 wt% increases the resistance to wear rate. PMID:26989764

  6. Wear behavior and microstructure of hypereutectic Al-Si alloys prepared by selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Nan; Coddet, Pierre; Liao, Hanlin; Baur, Tiphaine; Coddet, Christian

    2016-08-01

    This work investigates the microstructure and wear behavior of hypereutectic Al-Si alloys, in-situ fabricated using selective laser melting of a mixture of eutectic Al-12Si (wt.%) and pure Si powders. The first observation was that the size and morphology of the Si phase are strongly influenced by the laser power. In addition, it was also observed that a high laser power causes serious evaporation of aluminum during the remelting process. Dry sliding wear test and Vickers microhardness measurements were employed to characterize the mechanical properties of the material. The lowest wear rate of about 7.0 × 10-4 mm3 N-1 m-1 was observed for samples having the highest value of relative density (96%) and microhardness (105 Hv0.3).

  7. Dental Evidence in Forensic Identification – An Overview, Methodology and Present Status

    PubMed Central

    Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj; Garg, Arun K

    2015-01-01

    Forensic odontology is primarily concerned with the use of teeth and oral structures for identification in a legal context. Various forensic odontology techniques help in the identification of the human remains in incidents such as terrorists’ attacks, airplane, train and road accidents, fires, mass murders, and natural disasters such as tsunamis, earth quakes and floods, etc. (Disaster Victim Identification-DVI). Dental structures are the hardest and well protected structures in the body. These structures resist decomposition and high temperatures and are among the last ones to disintegrate after death. The principal basis of the dental identification lies in the fact that no two oral cavities are alike and the teeth are unique to an individual. The dental evidence of the deceased recovered from the scene of crime/occurrence is compared with the ante-mortem records for identification. Dental features such as tooth morphology, variations in shape and size, restorations, pathologies, missing tooth, wear patterns, crowding of the teeth, colour and position of the tooth, rotations and other peculiar dental anomalies give every individual a unique identity. In absence of ante-mortem dental records for comparison, the teeth can help in the determination of age, sex, race/ethnicity, habits, occupations, etc. which can give further clues regarding the identity of the individuals. This piece of writing gives an overview of dental evidence, its use in forensic identification and its limitations. PMID:26312096

  8. Dental Evidence in Forensic Identification - An Overview, Methodology and Present Status.

    PubMed

    Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj; Garg, Arun K

    2015-01-01

    Forensic odontology is primarily concerned with the use of teeth and oral structures for identification in a legal context. Various forensic odontology techniques help in the identification of the human remains in incidents such as terrorists' attacks, airplane, train and road accidents, fires, mass murders, and natural disasters such as tsunamis, earth quakes and floods, etc. (Disaster Victim Identification-DVI). Dental structures are the hardest and well protected structures in the body. These structures resist decomposition and high temperatures and are among the last ones to disintegrate after death. The principal basis of the dental identification lies in the fact that no two oral cavities are alike and the teeth are unique to an individual. The dental evidence of the deceased recovered from the scene of crime/occurrence is compared with the ante-mortem records for identification. Dental features such as tooth morphology, variations in shape and size, restorations, pathologies, missing tooth, wear patterns, crowding of the teeth, colour and position of the tooth, rotations and other peculiar dental anomalies give every individual a unique identity. In absence of ante-mortem dental records for comparison, the teeth can help in the determination of age, sex, race/ethnicity, habits, occupations, etc. which can give further clues regarding the identity of the individuals. This piece of writing gives an overview of dental evidence, its use in forensic identification and its limitations.

  9. Occupational safety among dental health-care workers.

    PubMed

    Shimoji, Shigehiro; Ishihama, Kohji; Yamada, Hidefumi; Okayama, Masaki; Yasuda, Kouichi; Shibutani, Tohru; Ogasawara, Tadashi; Miyazawa, Hiroo; Furusawa, Kiyofumi

    2010-01-01

    Compared to other health-care workers, dental health-care workers come in close contact with patients and use a variety of sharp and high-speed rotating instruments. It is important to understand the characteristics of the occupational accidents that occur. We reviewed incident reports from April 1, 2005, to March 31, 2010, at Matsumoto Dental University Hospital. In addition, questionnaires dealing with identification of occupational safety issues, especially splash exposures, were conducted for dentists, dental hygienists, and nurses. Thirty-two occupational injuries were reported during the study period, including 23 sharp instrument injuries (71.9%), 6 splash exposures (18.8%), and 3 others. Of the six splash exposures, only two cases involved potential contamination with blood or other potentially infectious patient material. Of the 66 workers who experienced sharps injuries, 20 workers (30.3%, 20/66) reported them to the hospital work safety team. The questionnaire revealed high incident of splash exposures and conjunctiva exposures: 87.9% (51/58) and 60.3% (35/58) in dentists and 88.6% (39/44) and 61.4% (27/44) in dental hygienists. The compliance rate for routine use of protective eyewear was 60.3% (35/58) for dentists and 34.1% (15/44) for hygienists. Of the presented informational items included in the questionnaire, those that strongly persuaded respondents to use protective eyewear were 'splatters from the patient's mouth contain blood' (90%, 99/110) and 'dental operations at our clinic are performed based only on a questionnaire without serious examinations for HBV, HCV, and HIV' (71.8%, 79/110). The reason of low compliance of protective eyewear among dentists might relate to fine dental procedures. Appropriate information is important for the motive of wearing personal protective equipment, and an early educational program may have a potential to increase compliance with the use of that equipment.

  10. Wear-Out Sensitivity Analysis Project Abstract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Adam

    2015-01-01

    During the course of the Summer 2015 internship session, I worked in the Reliability and Maintainability group of the ISS Safety and Mission Assurance department. My project was a statistical analysis of how sensitive ORU's (Orbital Replacement Units) are to a reliability parameter called the wear-out characteristic. The intended goal of this was to determine a worst case scenario of how many spares would be needed if multiple systems started exhibiting wear-out characteristics simultaneously. The goal was also to determine which parts would be most likely to do so. In order to do this, my duties were to take historical data of operational times and failure times of these ORU's and use them to build predictive models of failure using probability distribution functions, mainly the Weibull distribution. Then, I ran Monte Carlo Simulations to see how an entire population of these components would perform. From here, my final duty was to vary the wear-out characteristic from the intrinsic value, to extremely high wear-out values and determine how much the probability of sufficiency of the population would shift. This was done for around 30 different ORU populations on board the ISS.

  11. Long-wearing TFE/metal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brass, R. A.; Gillon, W. A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Method for making metal/polytetrafluoroethylene (TFE) bearing surfaces embeds long-wearing layer of TFE in microscopic pits in metal. Technique has potential applications in automotive gears, ball joints, and roller chain components. Other applications are in use of unlubricated bearings in chemical, pharmaceutical, and food-processing equipment.

  12. Interdisciplinary Research Project on Sliding Wear.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-31

    fracture in the hard surface layer. In contrast, less a’ formed in samples of 316, and the debris were larger and consisted mostly of austenite. V. Shende ...Friction and Wear of Cu-Ni Alloys. 6. Vijay A. Shende , M.S. Degree, Met. E., OSU, 1980. Thesis Title: A Study of the Effect of Metastability on the

  13. Friction and wear of human hair fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, James; Johnson, Simon A.; Avery, Andrew R.; Adams, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental study of the tribological properties of hair fibres is reported, and the effect of surface treatment on the evolution of friction and wear during sliding. Specifically, orthogonally crossed fibre/fibre contacts under a compressive normal load over a series of 10 000 cycle studies are investigated. Reciprocating sliding at a velocity of 0.4 mm s-1, over a track length of 0.8 mm, was performed at 18 °C and 40%-50% relative humidity. Hair fibres retaining their natural sebum were studied, as well as those stripped of their sebum via hexane cleaning, and hair fibres conditioned using a commercially available product. Surface topography modifications resulting from wear were imaged using scanning electron microscopy and quantified using white light interferometry. Hair fibres that presented sebum or conditioned product at the fibre/fibre junction exhibited initial coefficients of friction at least 25% lower than those that were cleaned with hexane. Coefficients of friction were observed to depend on the directionality of sliding for hexane cleaned hair fibres after sufficient wear cycles that cuticle lifting was present, typically on the order 1000 cycles. Cuticle flattening was observed for fibre/fibre junctions exposed to 10 mN compressive normal loads, whereas loads of 100 mN introduced substantial cuticle wear and fibre damage.

  14. Tribology: Friction, lubrication, and wear technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blau, Peter J.

    1993-06-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: introduction and definitions of terms; friction concepts; lubrication technology concepts; wear technology concepts; and tribological transitions. This document is designed for educators who seek to teach these concepts to their students.

  15. Tribology: Friction, lubrication, and wear technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blau, Peter J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: introduction and definitions of terms; friction concepts; lubrication technology concepts; wear technology concepts; and tribological transitions. This document is designed for educators who seek to teach these concepts to their students.

  16. Clinical pulmonary function and industrial respirator wear

    SciTech Connect

    Raven, P.B.; Moss, R.F.; Page, K.; Garmon, R.; Skaggs, B.

    1981-12-01

    This investigation was the initial step in determining a clinical pulmonary test which could be used to evaluate workers as to their suitability to industrial respirator wear. Sixty subjects, 12 superior, 37 normal, and 11 moderately impaired with respect to lung function tests were evaluated with a battery of clinical pulmonary tests while wearing an industrial respirator. The respirator was a full-face mask (MSA-Ultravue) demand breathing type equipped with an inspiratory resistance of 85mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow and an expiratory resistance of 25mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow. Comparisons of these tests were made between the three groups of subjects both with and without a respirator. It appears that those lung tests which measure the flow characteristics of the lung especially those that are effort dependant are more susceptible to change as a result of respirator wear. Hence, the respirator affects the person with superior lung function to a greater degree than the moderately impaired person. It was suggested that the clinical test of 15 second maximum voluntary ventilations (MVV./sub 25/) may be the test of choice for determining worker capability in wearing an industrial respirator.

  17. Powdered Hexagonal Boron Nitride Reducing Nanoscale Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chkhartishvili, L.; Matcharashvili, T.; Esiava, R.; Tsagareishvili, O.; Gabunia, D.; Margiev, B.; Gachechiladze, A.

    2013-05-01

    A morphology model is suggested for nano-powdered hexagonal boron nitride that can serve as an effective solid additive to liquid lubricants. It allows to estimate the specific surface, that is a hard-to-measure parameter, based on average size of powder particles. The model can be used also to control nanoscale wear processes.

  18. Wear particle analysis from grease lubricated bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenlieb, W.; Maciejewski, A.S.

    1980-11-01

    Ferrographic analysis has been shown to be useful in evaluating the wear/state condition of grease lubricated components. The major achievement was the successful application of dissolving the grease utilizing a solvent mixture and making ferrograms of equal quality as to that found in oil analysis. The types of wear particles found in used grease samples are comparative to those found in oil lubricated systems. Work is presently being performed on grease lubricated taper roller bearings, similar to the test conditions utilized in this study. The analysis of the grease samples was qualitative vs quantitative. Due to the uneven distribution of wear particulate in the grease and the relatively small amount of grease used in making the ferrograms. The primary emphasis was placed upon size distribution, morphology and elemental composition. The results of the ferrogram analysis showed a good correlation to those of the SKF personnel in terms of monitoring the wear state/condition of the bearings throughout their life. However, the on-condition monitoring of grease lubricated components in the field, is complicated by the physical location of the components and inaccessibility by maintenance personnel to remove grease samples. Where accessibility is no problem, this technique is highly recommended. As it appears presently, this analysis technique seems best suited to the examination of grease obtained from dismantled grease lubricated components or in design applications.

  19. A panorama of tooth wear during the medieval period.

    PubMed

    Esclassan, Rémi; Hadjouis, Djillali; Donat, Richard; Passarrius, Olivier; Maret, Delphine; Vaysse, Frédéric; Crubézy, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Tooth wear is a natural phenomenon and a universal occurrence that has existed from the origin of humankind and depends on the way of life, especially diet. Tooth wear was very serious in ancient populations up to the medieval period. The aim of this paper is to present a global view of tooth wear in medieval times in Europe through different parameters: scoring systems, quantity and direction of wear, gender, differences between maxilla and mandible, relations with diet, caries, tooth malpositions and age.

  20. The WAFTER: A versatile wear and friction tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewsbury, P.

    1987-06-01

    Described are the design and use of a pins-on-disc wear and friction testing machine, constructed for use in the Wear Technology Group. The tester is capable of assessing sliding wear at speeds up to 4 m/sec and loads up to 40 N. During a wear run the friction and contact resistance are constantly monitored giving a clear picture of the condition of the surfaces.