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Sample records for denture relining materials

  1. Wettability of denture relining materials under water storage over time

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Na-Young; Lee, Ho-Rim; Lee, Heesu

    2009-01-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM Poor wettability of denture relining materials may lead to retention problems and patient discomfort. PURPOSE Purpose of this study is to compare and evaluate wettability of nine denture relining materials using contact angle measurements under air and water storage over time. MATERIAL AND METHODS Nine denture relining materials were investigated in this study. Two heat-curing polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) denture base materials: Vertex RS, Lang, one self-curing polyethyl-methacrylate (PEMA) chairside reline resin: Rebase II, six silicone relining materials: Mucopren soft, Mucosoft, Mollosil® plus, Sofreliner Touch, GC Reline™ Ultrasoft, Silagum automix comfort were used in this experiment. Contact angles were measured using high-resolution drop shape analysis system (DSA 10-MK2, KRUESS, Germany) under three conditions (in air after setting, 1 hour water storage, and 24 hours water storage). Nine materials were classified into three groups according to material composition (Group 1: PMMA, Group 2: PEMA, Group 3: Silicone). Mean values of contact angles were compared using independent samples t-test and one-way ANOVA, followed by a Scheffe's post hoc analysis (α= 0.01). RESULTS Contact angles of materials tested after air and water storage increased in the following order: Group 1 (PMMA), Group 2 (PEMA), Group 3 (Silicone). Heat-cured acrylic denture base resins had more wettability than silicone relining materials. Lang had the highest wettability after 24 hours of water storage. Silicone relining materials had lower wettability due to their hydrophobicity. Wettability of all denture relining materials, except Rebase II and Mollosil® plus, increased after 24 hours of water storage. CONCLUSIONS Conventional heat-cured resin showed the highest wettability, therefore, it can be suggested that heat-cured acrylic resin is material of choice for denture relining materials. PMID:21165247

  2. The adhesion of modern soft relining materials to acrylic dentures.

    PubMed

    Więckiewicz, Włodzimierz; Kasperski, Jacek; Więckiewicz, Mieszko; Miernik, Marta; Król, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Silicone-based liners are widespread materials in prosthetic dentistry. Their mechanical properties have to meet several key requirements such as adequate adhesion to denture base polymers in order to provide right function of masticatory system and oral hygiene. The aim of this paper was to evaluate and compare tensile and shear bond strengths values of three modern autopolimeryzed silicone relining materials bonded to acrylic plates. Three silicone-based soft relining materials were investigated in this study (A-Soft Line 30, Bosworth Dentusil and Elite Super Soft). A total of 78 specimens were prepared: 13 of each material (total: 39) for testing tensile bond strength and 13 of each material for testing shear bond strength (total: 39). The obtained data were analyzed statistically. The average tensile bond strength results were 0.86 MPa for Bosworth Dentusil, 1.00 MPa for Elite Super Soft and 1.25 MPa for A-Soft Line 30. The silicone-based relining materials had different average values of shear bond strength: 0.67 MPa Elite Super Soft; 1.32 MPa A-Soft Line 30 and 1.57 MPa Bosworth Dentusil. As the result of the study it can be concluded that all tested materials have acceptable adhesion values to acrylic resin. According to tensile and shear bond strengths tests the best adhesive properties has A-Soft Line 30.

  3. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material in removable prosthodontics. Part 2: immediate denture and reline impressions.

    PubMed

    Cagna, David R; Massad, Joseph J

    2009-01-01

    Accurate impressions are important elements in both the fabrication and maintenance phases of complete denture therapy. For patients possessing nonrestorable, periodontally hopeless residual dentitions, immediate denture therapy is often the treatment of choice. An impression procedure capable of accurately registering functional vestibular anatomy facilitates successful therapy. For complete dentures currently in function, periodic assessment and correction of fit extends long-term prosthesis performance. To maintain optimal tissue-base relationships, use of specialized impressions, and subsequent laboratory reline procedures is often indicated. For both of these impression procedures (i.e., immediate denture impressions and denture reline impressions), vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression material offers distinct advantages. Part 2 of this article series reports on the use of VPS for immediate denture and reline impression procedures.

  4. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material in removable prosthodontics. Part 2: Immediate denture and reline impressions.

    PubMed

    Cagna, David R; Massad, Joseph J

    2007-09-01

    Accurate impressions are important elements in both the fabrication and maintenance phases of complete denture therapy. For patients possessing nonrestorable, periodontally hopeless residual dentitions, immediate denture therapy is often the treatment of choice. An impression procedure capable of accurately registering functional vestibular anatomy facilitates successful therapy. For complete dentures currently in function, periodic assessment and correction of fit extends long-term prosthesis performance. To maintain optimal tissue-base relationships, use of specialized impressions, and subsequent laboratory reline procedures is often indicated. For both of these impression procedures (ie, immediate denture impressions and denture reline impressions), vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression material offers distinct advantages. Part 2 of this article series reports on the use of VPS for immediate denture and reline impression procedures.

  5. 21 CFR 872.3560 - OTC denture reliner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3560 OTC denture reliner. (a) Identification. An OTC denture reliner is a device consisting of a material such as plastic resin that is intended to be...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3760 - Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3760 Denture relining... device composed of materials such as methylmethacrylate, intended to reline a denture surface that...

  7. Factors affecting the bond strength of denture base and reline acrylic resins to base metal materials

    PubMed Central

    TANOUE, Naomi; MATSUDA, Yasuhiro; YANAGIDA, Hiroaki; MATSUMURA, Hideo; SAWASE, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective The shear bond strengths of two hard chairside reline resin materials and an auto-polymerizing denture base resin material to cast Ti and a Co-Cr alloy treated using four conditioning methods were investigated. Material and Methods Disk specimens (diameter 10 mm and thickness 2.5 mm) were cast from pure Ti and Co-Cr alloy. The specimens were wet-ground to a final surface finish of 600 grit, air-dried, and treated with the following bonding systems: 1) air-abraded with 50-70-µm grain alumina (CON); 2) 1) + conditioned with a primer, including an acidic phosphonoacetate monomer (MHPA); 3) 1) + conditioned with a primer including a diphosphate monomer (MDP); 4) treated with a tribochemical system. Three resin materials were applied to each metal specimen. Shear bond strengths were determined before and after 10,000 thermocycles. Results The strengths decreased after thermocycling for all combinations. Among the resin materials assessed, the denture base material showed significantly (p<0.05) greater shear bond strengths than the two reline materials, except for the CON condition. After 10,000 thermocycles, the bond strengths of two reline materials decreased to less than 10 MPa for both metals. The bond strengths of the denture base material with MDP were sufficient: 34.56 MPa for cast Ti and 38.30 for Co-Cr alloy. Conclusion Bonding of reline resin materials to metals assessed was clinically insufficient, regardless of metal type, surface treatment, and resin composition. For the relining of metal denture frameworks, a denture base material should be used. PMID:24037070

  8. Changes in roughness of denture base and reline materials by chemical disinfection or microwave irradiation. Surface roughness of denture base and reline materials

    PubMed Central

    MACHADO, Ana Lucia; GIAMPAOLO, Eunice Teresinha; VERGANI, Carlos Eduardo; de SOUZA, Juliana Feltrin; JORGE, Janaina Habib

    2011-01-01

    Objective The effect of disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate solution and microwave irradiation on surface roughness of one denture base resin (Lucitone 550 -L), 3 hard chairside reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II-TR, New Truliner-NT, Ufi Gel hard-UH) and 3 resilient reline materials (Trusoft-T; Sofreliner-S, Dentusil-D) was evaluated. Material and methods Thirty specimens of each material were made and divided into 3 groups: Control - not disinfected; P - daily disinfection by immersing in sodium perborate solution (3.8%); MW - microwave disinfection (6 min/650 W). Roughness measurements were made after polymerization (baseline) and after 1, 3 and 28 days. Roughness differences relative to the baseline readings were analyzed by Student's t-test (P=0.05). Results At baseline, Trusoft showed the highest (P<0.001) mean surface roughness (3.54 µm), and its surface roughness was significantly reduced after 28 days of disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate (P=0.013). Roughness measurements of material Trusoft were not performed after microwave disinfection due to the severe alterations on the surface. In the 3 groups evaluated, changes in roughness were significant for materials Ufi Gel hard (from 0.11 to 0.26 µm; P≤0.041) and New Truliner (0.19 to 0.76 µm; P≤0.019). The roughness of materials Lucitone 550 (0.37 µm), Tokuyama Rebase II (0.37 µm), Sofreliner (0.49 µm) and Dentusil (0.38 µm) remained unaffected (P>0.05). Conclusions The roughness of the hard reline materials Ufi Gel hard and New Truliner was adversely affected by microwave disinfection, immersion in water or in sodium perborate. Microwave disinfection caused severe alterations on the surface of the resilient liner Trusoft. PMID:21986658

  9. Changes in roughness of denture base and reline materials by chemical disinfection or microwave irradiation: surface roughness of denture base and reline materials.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ana Lucia; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Souza, Juliana Feltrin de; Jorge, Janaina Habib

    2011-10-01

    The effect of disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate solution and microwave irradiation on surface roughness of one denture base resin (Lucitone 550 -L), 3 hard chairside reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II-TR, New Truliner-NT, Ufi Gel hard-UH) and 3 resilient reline materials (Trusoft-T; Sofreliner-S, Dentusil-D) was evaluated. Thirty specimens of each material were made and divided into 3 groups: Control - not disinfected; P - daily disinfection by immersing in sodium perborate solution (3.8%); MW - microwave disinfection (6 min/650 W). Roughness measurements were made after polymerization (baseline) and after 1, 3 and 28 days. Roughness differences relative to the baseline readings were analyzed by Student's t-test (P=0.05). At baseline, Trusoft showed the highest (P<0.001) mean surface roughness (3.54 µm), and its surface roughness was significantly reduced after 28 days of disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate (P=0.013). Roughness measurements of material Trusoft were not performed after microwave disinfection due to the severe alterations on the surface. In the 3 groups evaluated, changes in roughness were significant for materials Ufi Gel hard (from 0.11 to 0.26 µm; P<0.041) and New Truliner (0.19 to 0.76 µm; P<0.019). The roughness of materials Lucitone 550 (0.37 µm), Tokuyama Rebase II (0.37 µm), Sofreliner (0.49 µm) and Dentusil (0.38 µm) remained unaffected (P>0.05). The roughness of the hard reline materials Ufi Gel hard and New Truliner was adversely affected by microwave disinfection, immersion in water or in sodium perborate. Microwave disinfection caused severe alterations on the surface of the resilient liner Trusoft.

  10. Tensile and shear bond strength of hard and soft denture relining materials to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin: An In-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Mayank; Amarnath, G S; Muddugangadhar, B C; Swetha, M U; Das, Kopal Anshuraj Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The condition of the denture bearing tissues may be adversely affected by high stress concentration during function. Chairside Denture (Hard and Soft) reliners are used to distribute forces applied to soft tissues during function. Tensile and shear bond strength has been shown to be dependent on their chemical composition. A weak bond could harbor bacteria, promote staining and delamination of the lining material. To investigate tensile and shear bond strength of 4 different commercially available denture relining materials to conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin. Materials & Methods: 4 mm sections in the middle of 160 Acrylic cylindrical specimens (20 mm x 8 mm) were removed, packed with test materials (Mollosil, G C Reline Soft, G C Reline Hard (Kooliner) and Ufi Gel Hard and polymerized. Specimens were divided into 8 groups of 20 each. Tensile and shear bond strength to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin were examined by Instron Universal Tensile Testing Machine using the equation F=N/A (F-maximum force exerted on the specimen (Newton) and A-bonding area= 50.24 mm2). One-way ANOVA was used for multiple group comparisons followed by Bonferroni Test and Hsu’s MCB for multiple pairwise comparisons to asses any significant differences between the groups. Results: The highest mean Tensile bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (6.49+0.08 MPa) and lowest for G C Reline Soft (0.52+0.01 MPa). The highest mean Shear bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (16.19+0.1 MPa) and lowest for Mollosil (0.59+0.05 MPa). The Benferroni test showed a significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength and the mean shear bond strength when the two denture soft liners were compared as well as when the two denture hard liners were compared. Hsu’s MCB implied that Ufi gel hard is better than its other closest competitors. Conclusion: The Tensile and Shear bond strength values of denture soft reliners were

  11. Tensile and shear bond strength of hard and soft denture relining materials to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin: An In-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Lau, Mayank; Amarnath, G S; Muddugangadhar, B C; Swetha, M U; Das, Kopal Anshuraj Ashok Kumar

    2014-04-01

    The condition of the denture bearing tissues may be adversely affected by high stress concentration during function. Chairside Denture (Hard and Soft) reliners are used to distribute forces applied to soft tissues during function. Tensile and shear bond strength has been shown to be dependent on their chemical composition. A weak bond could harbor bacteria, promote staining and delamination of the lining material. To investigate tensile and shear bond strength of 4 different commercially available denture relining materials to conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin. 4 mm sections in the middle of 160 Acrylic cylindrical specimens (20 mm x 8 mm) were removed, packed with test materials (Mollosil, G C Reline Soft, G C Reline Hard (Kooliner) and Ufi Gel Hard and polymerized. Specimens were divided into 8 groups of 20 each. Tensile and shear bond strength to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin were examined by Instron Universal Tensile Testing Machine using the equation F=N/A (F-maximum force exerted on the specimen (Newton) and A-bonding area= 50.24 mm2). One-way ANOVA was used for multiple group comparisons followed by Bonferroni Test and Hsu's MCB for multiple pairwise comparisons to asses any significant differences between the groups. The highest mean Tensile bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (6.49+0.08 MPa) and lowest for G C Reline Soft (0.52+0.01 MPa). The highest mean Shear bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (16.19+0.1 MPa) and lowest for Mollosil (0.59+0.05 MPa). The Benferroni test showed a significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength and the mean shear bond strength when the two denture soft liners were compared as well as when the two denture hard liners were compared. Hsu's MCB implied that Ufi gel hard is better than its other closest competitors. The Tensile and Shear bond strength values of denture soft reliners were significantly lower than denture hard reliners. How to cite the

  12. Bonding strength between a hard chairside reline resin and a denture base material as influenced by surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Leles, C R; Machado, A L; Vergani, C E; Giampaolo, E T; Pavarina, A C

    2001-12-01

    Direct relining of dentures made with hard chairside reline resins is faster than laboratory-processed reline systems and the patient is not without the prosthesis for the time necessary to perform the laboratory procedures. However, a weak bond between the autopolymerizing acrylic reline resins and the denture base material has been observed. This study evaluated the effect of six different surface treatments on the bond strength between a hard chairside reline acrylic resin and a heat-cured acrylic resin. Specimens of the heat-cured acrylic resin were divided into seven groups. One of these groups remained intact. In the other groups, a 10-mm square section was removed from the centre of each specimen. The bonding surfaces were then treated with (i) methyl methacrylate monomer, (ii) isobutyl methacrylate monomer, (iii) chloroform, (iv) acetone, (v) experimental adhesive and (vi) no surface treatment -- control group. Kooliner acrylic resin was packed into the square sections and polymerized. The bonding strength was evaluated by a three-point loading test. The results were submitted to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by a Tukey multiple range test at a 5% level of significance. No significant difference was found between the surface treatment with Lucitone 550 monomer or chloroform, but both were stronger than the majority of the other groups. The bond strength provided by all the surface treatments was lower than that of the intact heat-cured resin.

  13. A comparison of three hard chairside denture reline materials. Part II. Changes in colour and hardness following immersion in three commonly used denture cleansers.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Janet; Wood, David J; Gilchrist, Alison; Basker, Robin M; Watson, Christopher J

    2003-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of daily use of three denture cleansers on three hard chairside reline materials over a 6-month period. Two controls were used; one dry and one involving storage in water. Colour and hardness were measured at 0 (baseline) and 6-months. There was no significant colour change with Tokuso Rebase Fast Set. Coe Kooliner and Total Hard changed colour more with the short acting peroxide cleanser (Steradent 3 Minutes) than with the overnight peroxide cleanser (Steradent Fresh) and the hypochlorite cleanser (Dentural). The hardness of all materials remained unchanged over the whole test period.

  14. Oral health-related quality of life of edentulous patients after complete dentures relining.

    PubMed

    Krunić, Nebojsa; Kostić, Milena; Petrović, Milica; Igić, Marko

    2015-04-01

    Tooth loss affects oral health-related life quality. More than a third of edentulous patients are not fully satisfied with their complete dentures and mainly complain of insufficient stability, retention, and pain during mastication. Solving the problem may include relining by materials that are based on silicone or acrylic. The aim of this study was to determine the level of patients' satisfaction before and after relining upper dentures with soft and rigid liners. The patients (n=24) were divided into two study groups. Maxillary denture relining of the first group of patients was performed with hard acrylic based resins while in the second group of patients complete denture was relined with a silicone-based soft liner. They were asked the questions from the specifically adapted the Oral Health Impact Profile Questionnaire for edentulous patients before and three months after relining dentures. After relining the patients showed a higher degree of satisfaction with their dentures in all the tested domains (masticatory function, psychological discomfort, social disability and retention and hygiene). The padents with soft denture relines were more satisfied. Refining of maxillary complete dentures significantly positively impacts the quality of life of patients in all the tested domains (masticatory function, psychological discomfort, social disability, pain and oral hygiene). Better results were achieved using a silicone-based soft liner, which recommends it as the material of choice for relining dentures.

  15. Analysis of stress on mucosa and basal bone underlying complete dentures with different reliner material thicknesses: a three-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Lima, J B G; Orsi, I A; Borie, E; Lima, J H F; Noritomi, P Y

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimal thickness of reliner material that provides the least amount of stress on thin mucosa and supporting bone in patients with complete removable dentures using a three-dimensional finite element analyses. The model was obtained from two CT scans of edentulous mandibles with dentures supported by the alveolar ridge. After virtual reconstruction, the three-dimensional models were exported to the solidworks cad software and divided into six groups based on the thickness of the reliner material as follows: (i) without material, (ii) 0·5 mm, (iii) 1 mm, (iv) 1·5 mm, (v) 2 mm and (vi) 2·5 mm. The applied load was 60 N and perpendicular to the long axis of the alveolar ridge of all the prosthetic teeth, and the mucosal thickness used was 1 mm. The analyses were based on the maximum principal stress in the fibromucosa and the minimum principal stress in the basal bone. Stress concentration was observed in the anterior zone of the mandible in the mucosa and in the bone. The maximum and minimum principal stress in the mucosa and bone, respectively, decreased, whereas the thickness of the reliner material increased until 2 mm, which transmitted the lowest stress, compared with the control. Reliner materials with a thickness of 2·5 mm showed higher stress values than those with a thickness of 2 mm. In conclusion, reliner material with a thickness of 2 mm transmitted the lowest amount of stress to the mucosa and bone in 1 mm of mucosa thickness.

  16. 21 CFR 872.3560 - OTC denture reliner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false OTC denture reliner. 872.3560 Section 872.3560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3560 OTC denture reliner. (a) Identification....

  17. 21 CFR 872.3560 - OTC denture reliner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false OTC denture reliner. 872.3560 Section 872.3560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3560 OTC denture reliner. (a) Identification....

  18. 21 CFR 872.3560 - OTC denture reliner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false OTC denture reliner. 872.3560 Section 872.3560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3560 OTC denture reliner. (a) Identification....

  19. Removable dentures with eclipse-repairing and relining.

    PubMed

    Bundevska, Jadranka; Panchevska, Sanja; Kovacevska, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    While utilizing removable dentures, regardless of whether the dentures are acrylic or fabricated of eclipse resin, the need for their filling-relining or their repair frequently arises. The purpose of this study is to display the technicalities of the procedure for rebasing and relining of removable light curing eclipse denture resin. This study presents cases of relining and repairing of removable dentures fabricated from light curing ECLIPSE resin on patients at the Department for Removable Prosthodontics at the University Dental Clinic Centre in Skopje. One of the most significant features of this method of fabrication of removable eclipse dentures and their relining and repairing is the shortened duration of work in the dental laboratory. The displayed mode of rebasing also allows us to maintain one of the advantages of this type of dentures--the absence of allergy stomatitis symptoms.

  20. 21 CFR 872.3560 - OTC denture reliner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false OTC denture reliner. 872.3560 Section 872.3560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... applied as a permanent coating or lining on the base or tissue-contacting surface of a denture. The...

  1. Colour stability of relined dentures after chemical disinfection. A randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Moffa, Eduardo Buozi; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha; Izumida, Fernanda Emiko; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Machado, Ana Lúcia; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    This randomised clinical study evaluated the effect of chemical disinfection with sodium perborate or chlorhexidine on the colour stability of a hard chairside reline resin during six months. Hard chairside reline resin (Tokuyama Rebase Fast II) was used to reline complete dentures. After baseline colour measurements, the patients were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 15) and allocation was concealed with the use of the BioStat program. The dentures were cleansed according to three methods: CG (control group)--brushing with coconut soap and soft toothbrush, PG (Perborate group)--brushing according to previous methods and disinfection with warmed sodium perborate solution (Corega Tabs) for 5 min, once a day for 6 months and ChxG (Chlorhexidine Group)--brushing according to CG and disinfection with chlorhexidine digluconate 2% for 5min once a day for 6 months. The data of ΔE*, ΔL*, Δa* and Δb* were analysed by 2-way repeated-measures ANOVAs and Tukey tests (α = 0.05). There were significant differences amongst groups for ΔL, Δa and Δb. The time had a significant effect on ΔE and ΔL, for all groups evaluated. Changes in some colour parameters (ΔL, Δa and Δb) of the reline resin Tokuyama Rebase were observed when the dentures were disinfected by perborate and chlorhexidine digluconate 2% solutions. The colour stability of was also influenced by time, regardless of disinfection or nondisinfection. Colour stability of the denture materials is one variable to be considered when choosing disinfection methods. The data in this study will be useful to clinicians when they are selecting disinfectant solutions for disinfection of relined denture. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of immersion cleansing in color stability and hardness of soft denture reliners.

    PubMed

    Niarchou, Artemis; Ntala, Polyxeni; Pantopoulos, Antonis; Polyzois, Gregory; Frangou, Mary

    2012-03-01

    Hygienic care of removable prostheses is important, and denture cleansers selected must be efficient and maintain the physicomechanical properties of soft reliners. Microwave energy has been reported to increase the sanitation effectiveness of denture cleansers. The purpose of the study was to evaluate hardness and color stability of some visible light polymerized and autopolymerized soft reliners after exposure in different denture-cleansing treatments. Six soft denture reliners (2 autopolymerized silicones, 1 autopolymerized acrylic, and 3 visible light polymerized ones) were exposed to 4 cleansing treatments (Corega Whitening, Polident 5-Minute, Corega Whitening + microwaving, Polident 5-Minute + microwaving). Hardness was measured with a Shore A durometer, and color changes were evaluated by a tristimulus colorimeter. The results were subjected to 2-way analysis of variance and Scheffé test for post hoc comparisons at a confidence level of α = 0.05. Sofreliner showed the smallest hardness change, and LightLiner the greatest. Versasoft and Sofreliner seem to have the lowest color change for every cleansing treatment examined, whereas LightLiner and Eversoft presented the greatest. Silicone-based materials demonstrated the smallest changes in both hardness and color, either when using water or with any of the other cleansing treatments.

  3. A Technique for Removing Implant-Retained Denture: Direct Relining Complication

    PubMed Central

    Duran, İbrahim; Yilmaz, Betül; Ural, Çağrı

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to present a technique for removing the denture which locked to ball-attachment because of excessive hard relining resin material flows around the ball-attachment. An alternative method was used in the present case. A cylindrical resin was removed with a diamond bur at the level of matrix and by this way the matrix was removed safely. The advantage of the presented method is that it may be extended to other clinical situations when facing a similar complication for implant supported dentures and also that the technique is simple and does not require special equipment. PMID:26199761

  4. A Technique for Removing Implant-Retained Denture: Direct Relining Complication.

    PubMed

    Duran, İbrahim; Yilmaz, Betül; Ural, Çağrı

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to present a technique for removing the denture which locked to ball-attachment because of excessive hard relining resin material flows around the ball-attachment. An alternative method was used in the present case. A cylindrical resin was removed with a diamond bur at the level of matrix and by this way the matrix was removed safely. The advantage of the presented method is that it may be extended to other clinical situations when facing a similar complication for implant supported dentures and also that the technique is simple and does not require special equipment.

  5. Evaluation of adhesion of reline resins to the thermoplastic denture base resin for non-metal clasp denture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hye; Choe, Han Cheol; Son, Mee Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the tensile and transverse bond strength of chairside reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II, Mild Rebaron LC) to a thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) used for non metal clasp denture. The results were compared with those of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20) and a thermoplastic polyamide resin (Biotone). The failure sites were examined by scanning electron microscopy to evaluate the mode of failure. As results, the bond strength of reline resins to a thermoplastic acrylic resin was similar to the value of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin. However, thermoplastic polyamide resin showed the lowest value. The results of this study indicated that a thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasps denture allows chairside reline and repair. It was also found that the light-polymerized reline resin had better bond strength than the autopolymerizing reline resin in relining for a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin and a thermoplastic acrylic resin.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3760 - Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin. 872.3760 Section 872.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... contacts tissue, to repair a fractured denture, or to form a new denture base. This device is not...

  7. The effect of bur preparation on the surface roughness and reline bond strength of urethane dimethacrylate denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mirza Rustum; Ariff, Fazrina T M; Yunus, Norsiah

    2011-01-01

    The clinical success of relining depends on the ability of reline resin to bond to denture base. Surface preparations may influence reline bond strength of urethane-based dimethacrylate denture base resin. To investigate the effect of bur preparation on the surface roughness (R a ) of eclipse denture base resin and its shear bond strength (SBS) to an intra-oral self-curing reline material. The mode of reline bonding failure was also examined. Twenty-four cylindrical Eclipse™ specimens were prepared and separated into three groups of eight specimens each. Two groups were subjected to mechanical preparation using standard and fine tungsten carbide (TC) burs and the third group (control) was left unprepared. The R a of all specimens was measured using a contact stylus profilometer. Subsequently, relining was done on the prepared surface and SBS testing was carried out a day later using a universal testing machine. One-way ANOVA revealed significant differences (P<0.05) in R a and SBS values for all the groups. Post-hoc Tukey's HSD test showed significant differences (P<0.05) between all the groups in the R a values. For SBS also there were significant differences (P<0.05), except between standard bur and control. 1) There was a statistically significant difference in the R a of Eclipse™ specimens prepared using different carbide burs (P<0.05). 2) There was a statistically significant difference in the relined SBS (P<0.05) when prepared using different burs, but the difference between the standard bur and the control group was not statistically significant.

  8. 21 CFR 872.3760 - Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin. 872.3760 Section 872.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3760 Denture...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3760 - Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin. 872.3760 Section 872.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3760 Denture...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3760 - Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin. 872.3760 Section 872.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3760 Denture...

  11. Effects of home and office care denture reliners on maxillary complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Udo-Yamakawa, Aiko; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of office (OR) and home (HR) care temporary denture reliners on satisfaction and functional outcomes in maxillary complete denture wearers. Thirty-four maxillary edentulous patients received application of either OR or HR to their maxillary complete dentures. Patient's ratings on satisfaction and functional aspects were measured on a 100-mm visual analogue scale at 4 days post-application. Associations between baseline ratings and improvement were also assessed. There were no significant differences between the two groups in satisfaction ratings or in the functional outcomes. The OR group showed a significant improvement in mastication and retention, whereas the HR group exhibited a significant improvement in general satisfaction and mastication. Improvement was negatively associated with baseline ratings of speech, ease of cleaning, stability and retention in the OR groups and across all variables, except ease of cleaning, in the HR group. When used correctly, home care denture therapy can be as effective as office applied temporary liner in improving satisfaction with problematic maxillary dentures.

  12. Hardness and surface roughness of reline and denture base acrylic resins after repeated disinfection procedures.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ana Lucia; Breeding, Larry C; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; da Cruz Perez, Luciano Elias

    2009-08-01

    Microwave irradiation and immersion in chemical solutions have been recommended for denture disinfection. However, the effect of these procedures on the surface characteristics of denture base and reline resins has not been completely evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of microwave and chemical disinfection on the Vickers hardness (VHN) and surface roughness (Ra, microm) of 2 hard chairside reline resins (Kooliner, DuraLiner II), and 1 heat-polymerizing denture base resin (Lucitone 550). Specimens (12 x 12 x 3 mm) were divided into 2 control and 4 test groups (n=8). Hardness and roughness measurements were performed after: polymerization and immersion in water (37 degrees C) for 7 days (controls), or repeated exposure to disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate (50 degrees C/10 min) or microwave irradiation (650 W/6 min). Measurements of surface roughness (Ra, microm) and hardness (kg/mm(2)) were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test (alpha=.05). Microwave and chemical disinfection increased the mean (SD) hardness of Kooliner (from 4.1 to 7.5 kg/mm(2)) and DuraLiner II (from 2.6 to 5.6 kg/mm(2)), whereas Lucitone 550 (14.4 kg/mm(2)) remained unaffected. Disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate increased the surface roughness of DuraLiner II (from 0.13 to 0.26 microm) and Kooliner (from 0.16 to 0.26 microm), regardless of the number of cycles. For Lucitone 550, an increase in roughness was observed after 2 cycles of chemical disinfection (from 0.12 to 0.26 microm). Two cycles of microwave disinfection increased the roughness of both reline resins (DuraLiner II: from 0.13 to 0.22 microm; Kooliner: from 0.16 to 0.24 microm), whereas repeated microwave disinfection increased the roughness of DuraLiner II (from 0.11 to 0.25 microm). Disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate or microwave irradiation did not adversely affect the hardness of all materials evaluated. The effect of both

  13. BOND STRENGTH OF HARD CHAIRSIDE RELINE RESINS TO A RAPID POLYMERIZING DENTURE BASE RESIN BEFORE AND AFTER THERMAL CYCLING

    PubMed Central

    Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Gomes, Mauricio Neves; Machado, Ana Lucia; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the shear bond strength of 4 hard chairside reline resins (Kooliner, Tokuso Rebase Fast, Duraliner II, Ufi Gel Hard) to a rapid polymerizing denture base resin (QC-20) processed using 2 polymerization cycles (A or B), before and after thermal cycling. Materials and Methods: Cylinders (3.5 mm x 5.0 mm) of the reline resins were bonded to cylinders of QC-20 polymerized using cycle A (boiling water–20 minutes) or B (boiling water; remove heat-20 minutes; boiling water–20 minutes). For each reline resin/polymerization cycle combination, 10 specimens (groups CAt e CBt) were thermally cycled (5 and 55 °C; dwell time 30 seconds; 2,000 cycles); the other 10 were tested without thermal cycling (groups CAwt ad CBwt). Shear bond tests (0.5 mm/min) were performed on the specimens and the failure mode was assessed. Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA and Newman-Keuls post-hoc test (α=.05). Results: QC-20 resin demonstrated the lowest bond strengths among the reline materials (P<.05) and mainly failed cohesively. Overall, the bond strength of the hard chairside reline resins were similar (10.09±1.40 to 15.17±1.73 MPa) and most of the failures were adhesive/cohesive (mixed mode). However, Ufi Gel Hard bonded to QC-20 polymerized using cycle A and not thermally cycled showed the highest bond strength (P<.001). When Tokuso Rebase Fast and Duraliner II were bonded to QC-20 resin polymerized using cycle A, the bond strength was increased (P=.043) after thermal cycling. Conclusions: QC-20 displayed the lowest bond strength values in all groups. In general, the bond strengths of the hard chairside reline resins were comparable and not affected by polymerization cycle of QC-20 resin and thermal cycling. PMID:19089244

  14. Effectiveness of chemical disinfection on biofilms of relined dentures: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Moffa, Eduardo B; Izumida, Fernanda E; Jorge, Janaina H; Mussi, Maria C M; Siqueira, Walter L; Giampaolo, Eunice T

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of disinfection with sodium perborate or chlorhexidine (when combined with brushing) on the removal of biofilm in relined dentures. Swabs were collected 48 hours after the relining procedure and at the follow-up time intervals of 7, 15, 30, 90, and 180 days. The dentures' surface roughness was measured at the same times. 45 subjects were randomly divided into three groups of 15 subjects each. The control group brushed with coconut soap and a soft toothbrush. The sodium perborate group followed the same procedure and also disinfected with sodium perborate solution for 5 minutes per day. The chlorhexidine group followed the control group procedure and disinfected with 2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution for 5 minutes per day. The number of colony forming units and the surface roughness were evaluated statistically by 2-way repeated-measure ANOVA (α = 0.05). The control group dentures exhibited similar levels of microbial cells throughout the experiment. However, after 15 days, no microbial growth was observed on the dentures for which either disinfection agent was used. There were no statistically significant differences in superficial roughness between the groups (P = 0.298). The disinfection agents used, combined with brushing, were able to remove the relined dentures' biofilm after 15 days of disinfection. Roughness was not a predominant factor in CFU reduction.

  15. Effect of direct relining on stresses at the denture base and the metal frame of removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghannam, N A; Fahmi, F M

    2005-02-15

    The Kennedy Class I removable partial denture (RPD) can cause stress to supporting hard and soft tissues and may lead to harmful effects. The purpose of this study is to investigate the pattern of these stresses in three different positions before and following a relining procedure. Ten patients, five males and five females, with a lower distal extension RPD and an opposing upper class III type RPD were selected for this study. Strain gauges together with a strain gauge indicator were used to study the pattern of stresses in three selected positions. Some changes were significantly different at the site of the denture base and at the metal frame near the direct retainer. After relining, the stresses were shared partially by the abutments and partially by the tissues. Maximum stresses were reported during swallowing. No significant difference was noticed between males and females.

  16. Impact strength of denture base and reline acrylic resins: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bochio, Bruna C; Wady, Amanda F; Jorge, Janaina H; Canevarolo, Sebastião V; Vergani, Carlos E

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact strength of a denture base resin (Lucitone 550—L) and four reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II—T; Ufi Gel Hard—U; New Truliner—NT, and Kooliner—K), both intact and in a reline combination (L/L, L/T, L/U, L/NT, and L/K). For each group (n = 20), half of the specimens were thermocycled before testing. Charpy tests were performed, and the impact strengths were calculated. Data were analyzed by two-way analyses of variance and Tukey’s test (p = 0.05). For the intact groups, mean impact strength values for L (1.65 and 1.50) were significantly higher than those of the reline resins (0.38–1.17). For the relined groups, the highest mean impact strength values were produced by L/T (5.76 and 5.12), L/NT (6.20 and 6.03), and L/K (5.60 and 5.31) and the lowest by L/U (0.76 and 0.78). There were no significant differences between L and L/L. Thermocycling reduced the impact strength of T (from 0.73 to 0.38) and L/L (from 1.82 to 1.56). PMID:22977461

  17. Bond strength of a chairside autopolymerizing reline resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength of a chairside autopolymerizing reline resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Four kinds of injection-molded thermoplastic resins (two polyamides, a polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and a polycarbonate) and PMMA, as a control, were tested. The eight types of surface treatment: ((1) no treatment, (2) air abrasion, (3) dichloromethane, (4) ethyl acetate, (5) 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (6) air abrasion and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (7) tribochemical silica coating, and (8) tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin) were applied to each specimen. The chairside autopolymerizing reline resins were bonded to disks of the injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. All of the specimens were immersed in water for 4 months and then thermocycled for 10,000 cycles in water between 5 and 55°C. The shear bond strengths were determined. The shear bond strengths of the two polyamides treated using air abrasion, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate and no treatment were exceedingly low. The greatest bond strength was recorded for the polyethylene terephthalate copolymer specimens treated with tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (22.5MPa). The bond strengths of the other injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins increased using 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. Tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin were the most effective surface treatments among all denture base resins tested. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Usefulness of a rotation-revolution mixer for mixing powder-liquid reline material.

    PubMed

    Yamaga, Yoshio; Kanatani, Mitsugu; Nomura, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the distribution of bubbles, degree of mixing, flowability and mechanical strength of powder-liquid reline material by manually and with a rotation-revolution (planetary) mixer, and to determine the usefulness of a rotation-revolution mixer for this application. Powder-liquid reline material (Mild Rebaron, GC, Tokyo, Japan) was mixed with a powder to liquid ratio of 1:0.62 according to the manufacturer's instruction. Two methods were used to mix it: mixed by manually ("manual-mixing") and automatically with a rotation-revolution mixer (Super Rakuneru Fine, GC, Tokyo, Japan; "automatic-mixing"). Disc-shaped specimens, 30 mm in diameter and 1.0mm in thickness, were used to observe the distribution of bubbles in at 10× magnifications. Flowability tests were carried out according to the JIS T6521 for denture base hard reline materials. A three point bending test was carried out by a universal testing machine. Elastic modulus and flexural stress at the proportional limit were calculated. A median of 4 bubbles and inhomogeneous were observed in manual-mixed specimens. However, no bubbles and homogeneous were observed in automatic-mixed specimens. Flowability was within the JIS range in all mixing conditions and did not differ significantly across conditions. The elastic modulus was the same for manual-mixed and automatic-mixed specimens. On the other hand, the flexural stress at the proportional limit differed significantly between manual-mixed and automatic-mixed specimens. The results confirm that rotation-revolution mixer is useful for mixing powder-liquid reline material. Automatic-mixing may be recommended for clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Materials and technologies for fabricating denture bases].

    PubMed

    Pietrokovski, Y; Pilo, R; Shmidt, A

    2010-10-01

    The materials and technologies for fabrication of denture bases have developed during the last 150 years. The requirements of the ideal material are versatile and include functional, physical and esthetical demands. The current manuscript classifies denture base materials according to their chemical characteristics into polymers, reinforced polymers and light cured polymers. Poly Methyl Metacrylate (PMMA) was developed 70 years ago, and is still the major material for fabrication of denture bases due to its esthetic characteristics, high processing and polishing abilities, relining and rebasing possibility and low cost. The main disadvantages of PMMA are its dimensional changes during polymerization, porosity and allergic/cytotoxic effects. PMMA may be reinforced by metal, polyethylene or glass fibers. Other materials used for fabrication of denture bases are Nylon and Urethane dimethacrylate. Their advantages are better esthetics, low modulus of elasticity and reduced cytotoxicity. This review presents the advances in materials and techniques used for denture bases, the different materials, their advantages and disadvantages, the chemical reactions associated with their production, and their allergic and cytotoxic side effects.

  20. Influence of methylmercaptan on the bonding strength of autopolymerizing reline resins to a heat-polymerized denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Takuya; Oizumi, Makoto; Kobayashi, Takuya

    2009-07-01

    Effects of methylmercaptan solution (MS), a volatile sulfur compound produced by gram-negative oral microorganisms, on the adhesion of reline denture resins were investigated. For this purpose, a total of 120 disk-shaped specimens prepared from a heat-polymerized denture base resin (Acron) immersed in MS of different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mol) as well as in purified water as a control at 37 degrees C for 4 weeks. Each of three commercial autopolymerizing reline resins (Rebaron, Mild Rebaron, and Tokuyama Rebase II) was bonded to a specimen. The shear bond strength tests were conducted for the specimens, with and without the application of a primer. The bond strength with 1.0 mol MS was significantly lower than those with other solutions (p < 0.05). The primer application had a significant positive effect on the bond strength. The debonded Acron surfaces showed evidence of incomplete polymerization. The results suggested a potential adhesion-inhibiting effect of the MS on relined dentures.

  1. Comparative evaluation of sodium hypochlorite and microwave disinfection on dimensional stability of denture bases

    PubMed Central

    Thombre, Ram; Kubasad, Girish

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare the effect of sodium hypochlorite and microwave disinfection on the dimensional stability of denture bases without and with relining. MATERIALS AND METHODS A brass die was prepared by simulating an edentulous maxillary arch. It was used to fabricate 1.5 mm and 3 mm of thickness denture bases (n = 40). The 1.5 mm of thickness-specimens (n = 20) were relined with 1.5 mm of autopolymerizing relining resin. Five holes were prepared over crest of ridge of brass die with intimately fitting stainless steel pins which were transferred to the intaglio surface of specimens during fabrication of denture bases. For calculation of dimensional changes in denture bases, differences between the baseline area before and after disinfection of the specimens were used. The denture bases without and with relining were divided into 2 groups (each n = 20). Data were analyzed using student paired 't' and unpaired 't' test. RESULTS Microwave disinfection produces significant shrinkage in both denture bases without relining (t = 17.16; P<.001) and with relining (t = 14.9; P<.001). Denture bases without relining showed more shrinkage when compared with relined denture bases after microwave disinfection (t = 6.09; P<.001). The changes in dimensional stability after sodium hypochlorite disinfection were not significant for both denture bases without relining (t = 2.19; P=.056) and denture bases with relining (t = 2.17; P=.058). CONCLUSION Microwave disinfection leads to increased shrinkage of denture bases without and with relining. Chemical disinfection with sodium hypochlorite seems to be a safer method of disinfection with regards to physical properties such as changes in dimensional stability. PMID:22439097

  2. Chronic Maxillary Sinusitis Caused by Denture Lining Material

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Nakashima, Chie; Murakami, Kazuhiro; Matsusue, Yumiko; Horita, Satoshi; Sakagami, Go; Kirita, Tadaaki

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of chronic maxillary sinusitis caused by denture lining material entering through an oroantral fistula after tooth extraction. The patient was an 80-year-old female who visited us with a complaint of pus discharge from the right posterior maxilla. She had extraction of the upper right second molar and had her upper denture relined with silicone lining material. The patient noticed swelling of the right cheek and purulent rhinorrhea 20 days before her first visit to our clinic. Oral examination showed an oroantral fistula with a diameter of 3 mm in the posterior alveolar ridge of the right maxilla. Computed tomography revealed a hyperdense foreign body in the right maxillary sinus and thickening of the mucosal lining. Under diagnosis of maxillary sinusitis caused by a foreign body, endoscopic maxillary surgery was performed simultaneously with the removal of the foreign body. The foreign body removed was 12 × 6 mm in size, oval in shape, light pink in color, and compatible with silicone denture lining material. During the follow-up it was observed that the oroantral fistula closed spontaneously after the removal of the foreign body. The maxillary sinus was in a good shape without recurrence of sinusitis seven months after surgery. PMID:27386012

  3. Chronic Maxillary Sinusitis Caused by Denture Lining Material.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Nakashima, Chie; Murakami, Kazuhiro; Matsusue, Yumiko; Horita, Satoshi; Sakagami, Go; Kirita, Tadaaki

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of chronic maxillary sinusitis caused by denture lining material entering through an oroantral fistula after tooth extraction. The patient was an 80-year-old female who visited us with a complaint of pus discharge from the right posterior maxilla. She had extraction of the upper right second molar and had her upper denture relined with silicone lining material. The patient noticed swelling of the right cheek and purulent rhinorrhea 20 days before her first visit to our clinic. Oral examination showed an oroantral fistula with a diameter of 3 mm in the posterior alveolar ridge of the right maxilla. Computed tomography revealed a hyperdense foreign body in the right maxillary sinus and thickening of the mucosal lining. Under diagnosis of maxillary sinusitis caused by a foreign body, endoscopic maxillary surgery was performed simultaneously with the removal of the foreign body. The foreign body removed was 12 × 6 mm in size, oval in shape, light pink in color, and compatible with silicone denture lining material. During the follow-up it was observed that the oroantral fistula closed spontaneously after the removal of the foreign body. The maxillary sinus was in a good shape without recurrence of sinusitis seven months after surgery.

  4. Influence of composition and powder/liquid ratio on setting characteristics and mechanical properties of autopolymerized hard direct denture reline resins based on methyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Yoshikazu; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Kurogi, Tadafumi; Watanabe, Ikuya; Murata, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of composition and powder/liquid (P/L) ratio on the setting characteristics and mechanical properties of autopolymerized hard direct denture reline resins composed of methyl methacrylate (MMA, monomethacrylate) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate [EGDMA, dimethacrylate (cross-linking agent)], with poly (ethyl methacrylate) used as the powder, and a mixture of MMA and EGDMA containing p-tolyldiethanolamine as the monomer. Setting times were determined using an oscillating rheometer and mechanical properties were based on ISO specifications. Setting time increased exponentially with an increase in the ratio of EGDMA to MMA and decrease in P/L ratio. Materials with a liquid component of approximately 75-85 wt% EGDMA and a higher P/L ratio showed higher ultimate flexural strength and flexural modulus. Our results suggest that setting characteristics are more influenced by the ratio of monomethacrylate and cross-linking agent, whereas mechanical properties are more influenced by P/L ratio.

  5. Histopathological Changes by the Use of Soft Reline Materials: A Rat Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Bail, Michele; Meister, Lissandra Matos Brol; Campagnoli, Eduardo Bauml; Jorge, Janaina Habib; Ban, Manuella de Cassia Iglesias; Sanchez-Ayala, Alfonso; Campanha, Nara Hellen

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the histopathological changes of rat palatal mucosa exposed to soft reline materials. Methods Forty-five adult female Wistar rats with controlled living conditions and fed ad libitum were employed. Palatal appliances of heat-polymerized acrylic resin Lucitone 550 were manufactured and worn by forty animals during 14 days. Five animals did not use the appliances (G1) and were used to control the appliance influence. One experimental group (n = 10) used the appliances without any relining material (G2) to control the material effect. Three experimental groups (n = 10) received the following soft reline materials below appliances: Dentusoft (G3), Dentuflex (G4), and Trusoft (G5). Appliances from half of each experimental group(n = 5) was immersed in water bath at 55°C for 10 min before use. Animals were slaughtered and the palates were fixed in 10% buffered formalin. Hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of 5 µm were analyzed by computerized planimetry. Cellular compartment, keratin and total epithelial thickness, and basement membrane length were measured to histopathological description.Analysis of variance and Tukey post-hoc test were used to data examination(α = 0.05). Results For heat-treatment groups, G4 showed less elongated ridges at the basal layer interface (p = 0.037) than G2. When comparing the conditions with and without heat-treatment, only G2 showed a significant decrease in the cellular compartment, keratin layer and total epithelium thickness (p<0.05). Conclusion The post-polymerization for Lucitone 550 was an effective method to reduce the changes in the rat palatal mucosa. The soft reline materials tested did not cause significant histopathological changes in the rat palatal mucosa. PMID:24963657

  6. A technique for using short term soft liners as complete dentures final impression material.

    PubMed

    Baslas, Varun; Singh, Saumyendra V; Aggarwal, Himanshi; Kaur, Simranjeet; Singh, Kamleshwar; Agarwal, Kaushal K

    2014-01-01

    Tissue conditioners can be used to condition abused tissues, record functional impressions, make temporary relining for surgical splints and obturators, and for other clinical applications, mainly because of their specific viscoelasticity. Their function in complete denture fabrication is debatable but their use as a functional impression material has been proved. The present article describes a technique for using tissue conditioners as functional impression materials. Correct method of usage, manipulation, specific properties as impression materials and precautions in different situations for obtaining accurate impressions has been highlightened.

  7. Electromyographic Evaluation of the Effect of Lined Dentures on Masticatory Muscle Activity in Edentulous Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shitij; Gaur, Abhishek; Dupare, Arun; Rastogi, Shiksha; Kamatagi, Laxmikant

    2015-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to examine changes in relative electromyographic (EMG) activities of temporal and masseter muscles after relining the dentures with silicone and acrylic-resin based denture liners. Materials and Methods Conventional complete dentures were fabricated for 20 edentulous patients. One month after completing adjustments of the dentures, electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscle during maximum intercuspation was recorded. The dentures were then relined with a silicone denture liner and after an adaptation period of one month, were again subjected for electromyographic evaluation. Further, the dentures were relined with acrylic denture liner and subjected to electromyographic evaluation. Data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15.0. Intergroup comparisons were done using ANOVA followed by post-hoc assessments using Tukey HSD test. Results Mean amplitude and duration with conventional dentures was found to be significantly lower as compared to silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures for all the comparisons. Statistically, no significant difference between silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures was observed for any of the comparisons. Conclusion Within the limitations of this experimental design, it was concluded that relining significantly increases electromyographic activity of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Thus, resulting in an improved biting force, chewing efficiency and masticatory performance. There were no significant differences between silicone and acrylic based denture liners for both electromyographic variables. PMID:26436054

  8. Comparative Evaluation of Physical Properties of Four Tissue Conditioners Relined to Modeling Plastic Material

    PubMed Central

    Monzavi, Abbas; Siadat, Hakimeh; Atai, Mohammad; Alikhasi, Marzieh; Nazari, Vahideh; Sheikhzadeh, Sadigheh

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about the interaction of tissue conditioners and modeling plastics. This study evaluates the influence of a variety of commercial tissue conditioners on alteration of viscoelastic properties of modeling plastics. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, the dynamic viscoelastic properties of four commercially available tissue conditioners (TC), Visco-gel (VG), GC Soft-Liner (SL), FITT (FT), and Coe Comfort (CC), relined to modeling plastics with a thickness of 2mm were evaluated after 1 and 7 days of water immersion with the use of storage modulus, loss modulus, and tan delta parameters. Values for these three parameters for each tissue conditioner were statistically analyzed by Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney tests with P value sets at<0.05. Results: Complex modulus and loss tangent values of TC were not significantly different among specimens containing 0, 2, 5 and 10 wt.%-SZ, respectively. In FT and TC containing 2 wt.%-SZ, these values were not significantly different between 1 and 28 days in both water- and saliva immersions. Conclusion: The results suggest that relining with modeling plastics does affect TC’s inherent dynamic viscoelastic properties, while the other tissue conditioners investigated may be found to have changed viscoelastic properties as a consequence of vicinity to the modeling plastics. PMID:24910661

  9. Shore hardness and tensile bond strength of long-term soft denture lining materials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong-Jun; Yang, Hong-So; Chun, Min-Geoung; Park, Yeong-Joon

    2014-11-01

    Reduced softness and separation from the denture base are the most significant problems of long-term soft lining materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the durometer Shore A hardness and tensile bond strength of long-term soft denture lining materials and to investigate the correlation between these 2 properties. A group of 7 soft lining materials, 6 silicone based (Dentusil, GC Reline Soft, GC Reline Ultrasoft, Mucopren Soft, Mucosoft, Sofreliner Tough) and 1 acrylic resin based (Durabase), were evaluated for durometer Shore A hardness and tensile bond strength to heat-polymerized denture base resin (Lucitone 199). A specially designed split mold and loading assembly with a swivel connector were used for the durometer Shore A hardness test and tensile bond strength test to improve accuracy and facilitate measurement. Three specimens of each product were stored in a 37°C water bath, and durometer Shore A hardness tests were carried out after 24 hours and 28 days. A tensile bond strength test was carried out for 10 specimens of each product, which were stored in a 37°C water bath for 24 hours before the test. Repeated-measures ANOVA, the Kruskal-Wallis and Duncan multiple range tests, and the Spearman correlation were used for statistical analyses. The repeated-measures ANOVA found significant durometer Shore A hardness differences for the materials (P<.001) and the interaction effect (aging×materials) (P<.001). GC Reline Ultrasoft showed the lowest mean durometer Shore A hardness (21.30 ±0.29 for 24 hours, 34.73 ±0.47 for 28 days), and GC Reline Soft showed the highest mean durometer Shore A hardness (50.13 ±0.48 for 24 hours, 57.20 ±0.28 for 28 days). The Kruskal-Wallis test found a significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength values (P<.001). GC Reline Ultrasoft (0.82 ±0.32 MPa) and Mucopren Soft (0.96 ±0.46 MPa) had a significantly lower mean tensile bond strength (P<.05). GC Reline Soft had the highest mean tensile bond

  10. Maxillomandibular relationship record for implant complete mouth rehabilitation with elastomeric material and facial surface index of existing denture

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Pravinkumar G.; Nimbalkar-Patil, Smita

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The maxillomandibular relationship (MMR) record is a critical step to establish the new occlusion in implant supported complete mouth rehabilitation. Using patients existing denture for recording the MMR requires implant definitive cast to be modified extensively to completely seat the denture (with unaltered flanges) on it. This may influence the correct seating of the denture on the implant definitive cast causing faulty recording of the MMR. Materials and Method: Elastomeric record bases, reinforced with the resin framework, are fabricated and relined with the light body elastomeric material when all the healing abutments are in place. The MMR is recorded with these elastomeric record bases using vacuum formed facial surface index of the occluded existing dentures as a guideline. Results: The elastomeric record bases with facial surface index of the existing dentures can allow clinicians to record MMR records without removing the healing abutments from the mouth with acceptable accuracy. This can save chair-side time of the procedure. The record of facial surfaces of existing complete denture in the form of vacuum formed sheet helps to set the occlusal vertical dimension. Conclusion: Use of facial surface index together with the elastomeric record bases can be the useful alternative technique to record the MMR in patients with implant supported full mouth rehabilitation. Further study is required to prove its routine clinical utility. PMID:26929537

  11. Survey of Impression Materials and Techniques in Fixed Partial Dentures among the Practitioners in India

    PubMed Central

    Moldi, Arvind; Puranik, Shivakumar; Karan, Smita; Deshpande, Sumit; Neela, Neelima

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Anecdotal evidence suggests that impression materials and techniques used in general dental practice for fixed partial dentures vary from those taught in dental schools. The aim of this survey was to integrate impression techniques evolved all over the years for fixed partial dentures and to know the techniques and materials which are used in the present day by the practitioners. Materials and Methods. A total of 1000 questionnaires were sent to various practitioners in India, out of which 807 questionnaires were filled. Results. The results showed that 84.8% of prosthodontists (65.56%, urban areas) use elastomeric impression materials as well as irreversible hydrocolloids and 15.2% use irreversible hydrocolloid only. Amongst other practitioners, 55.46% use irreversible hydrocolloid (45%, rural and semiurban areas) and 44.54% use elastomeric impression materials. Elastomeric impression technique practiced most commonly is putty reline with/without spacer (77.2%); other techniques are multiple-mix and monophase techniques. Conclusion. The ideal materials, technique, and armamentarium are required for the long-term success of the treatment for fixed partial denture. Also, if the ideal procedure is not followed, it will lead to a compromised fit of the final prosthesis and failure of the treatment. PMID:23691334

  12. Survey of Impression Materials and Techniques in Fixed Partial Dentures among the Practitioners in India.

    PubMed

    Moldi, Arvind; Gala, Vimal; Puranik, Shivakumar; Karan, Smita; Deshpande, Sumit; Neela, Neelima

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Anecdotal evidence suggests that impression materials and techniques used in general dental practice for fixed partial dentures vary from those taught in dental schools. The aim of this survey was to integrate impression techniques evolved all over the years for fixed partial dentures and to know the techniques and materials which are used in the present day by the practitioners. Materials and Methods. A total of 1000 questionnaires were sent to various practitioners in India, out of which 807 questionnaires were filled. Results. The results showed that 84.8% of prosthodontists (65.56%, urban areas) use elastomeric impression materials as well as irreversible hydrocolloids and 15.2% use irreversible hydrocolloid only. Amongst other practitioners, 55.46% use irreversible hydrocolloid (45%, rural and semiurban areas) and 44.54% use elastomeric impression materials. Elastomeric impression technique practiced most commonly is putty reline with/without spacer (77.2%); other techniques are multiple-mix and monophase techniques. Conclusion. The ideal materials, technique, and armamentarium are required for the long-term success of the treatment for fixed partial denture. Also, if the ideal procedure is not followed, it will lead to a compromised fit of the final prosthesis and failure of the treatment.

  13. CHIPPING FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF DENTURE TOOTH MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, G. D.; Giuseppetti, A. A.; Hoffman, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The applicability of the edge chipping method to denture tooth materials was assessed. These are softer materials than those usually tested by edge chipping. The edge chipping fracture resistances of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) based and two filled resin composite denture tooth materials were compared. Methods An edge chipping machine was used to chip rectangular blocks and flattened anterior denture teeth. Force versus edge distance data were collected over a broad range of forces and distances. Between 20 and 65 chips were made per condition depending upon the material, the scatter, and the indenter type. Different indenter types were used including Rockwell C, sharp conical 120°, Knoop, and Vickers. The edge toughness, Te, was evaluated for different indenter types. Results The edge chipping data collected on the blocks matched the data collected from flattened teeth. High scatter, particularly at large distances and loads, meant that many tests (up to 64) were necessary to compare the denture tooth materials and to ascertain the appropriate data trends. A linear force – distance trend analysis was adequate for comparing these materials. A power law trend might be more appropriate, but the large scatter obscured the definitive determination of the precise trend. Different indenters produce different linear trends, with the ranking of: sharp conical 120°, Rockwell C, and Knoop, from lowest to highest edge toughness. Vickers indenter data were extremely scattered and a sensible trend could not be obtained. Edge toughness was inversely correlated to hardness. Significance Edge chipping data collected either from simple laboratory scale test blocks or from actual denture teeth may be used to evaluate denture materials. The edge chipping method’s applicability has been extended to another class of restorative materials. PMID:24674342

  14. Maxillomandibular relationship record for implant complete mouth rehabilitation with elastomeric material and facial surface index of existing denture.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pravinkumar G; Nimbalkar-Patil, Smita

    2015-01-01

    The maxillomandibular relationship (MMR) record is a critical step to establish the new occlusion in implant supported complete mouth rehabilitation. Using patients existing denture for recording the MMR requires implant definitive cast to be modified extensively to completely seat the denture (with unaltered flanges) on it. This may influence the correct seating of the denture on the implant definitive cast causing faulty recording of the MMR. Elastomeric record bases, reinforced with the resin framework, are fabricated and relined with the light body elastomeric material when all the healing abutments are in place. The MMR is recorded with these elastomeric record bases using vacuum formed facial surface index of the occluded existing dentures as a guideline. The elastomeric record bases with facial surface index of the existing dentures can allow clinicians to record MMR records without removing the healing abutments from the mouth with acceptable accuracy. This can save chair-side time of the procedure. The record of facial surfaces of existing complete denture in the form of vacuum formed sheet helps to set the occlusal vertical dimension. Use of facial surface index together with the elastomeric record bases can be the useful alternative technique to record the MMR in patients with implant supported full mouth rehabilitation. Further study is required to prove its routine clinical utility.

  15. Evaluation of linear dimensional accuracy of hard chairside and laboratory heat cure reline resins at different time intervals after processing.

    PubMed

    Tewary, Shivsagar; Pawashe, Karuna G

    2014-01-01

    Relining with heat cure denture base resin is time-consuming and the patient has to remain without dentures within this period. Recently, some autopolymerizing resins marketed as hard chairside reline systems with low exothermic heat allow the dentists to reline prosthesis directly in the mouth. However, the decision to use these materials must be based on physical properties such as dimensional accuracy that directly influences the accuracy of fit of the denture base. The aim was to compare the linear dimensional changes of two hard chairside reline resins with two laboratory heat cure resins at 3 times intervals after processing. A stainless steel split mold (International Organization for Standardization 1567) was used for sample fabrication. Five measurements of the reference dimensions (AB and CD) were measured directly from the mold and the samples with a profile projector, and mean difference were calculated. Forty samples were fabricated by incorporating the split mold into first pour of denture flasks and packing each of the chairside reline resins ("Kooliner" and "Ufi Gel Hard") and laboratory heat cure resins ("Dental Products of India Heat Cure" and "Trevalon"). The mean difference in dimensional change at 3 times intervals (0 h, 4 days and 2 months) were calculated and subjected to statistical analysis. One-way ANOVA, RMANOVA and post hoc Tukey's tests. All resins showed different levels of significant shrinkage (P<0.001) after processing (T0) ranging from -0.128 to -0.310 mm. After 4 days (T1), there was significant shrinkage (P<0.001) ranging from -0.168 to -0.296 mm. After 2 months (T2), there was again significant shrinkage (P<0.001) ranging from -0.018 to -0.216 mm. Chairside reline resins showed less dimensional shrinkage at each time interval than the laboratory heat cure resins. Hard chairside resins are dimensionally accurate than the laboratory heat cure resins.

  16. Preliminary silicone putty casts: diagnosis to final impression for complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Kinderknecht, K E; Dominici, J T; Clark, E P

    1996-04-01

    Silicone putty casts are useful for articulating existing dentures for evaluation and problem solving before relining procedures are performed or a new prosthesis is made. Tissue health may require significant modification of the existing dentures and treatment with tissue-conditioning material before final impressions are made. This practical procedure uses a functional impression that substitutes for a quality preliminary impression and combines tissue conditioning, a functional impression, silicone putty cast, custom final impression tray, and a final impression for a complete denture.

  17. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Arafa, Khalid A. O.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244). PMID:27143970

  18. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Khalid A O

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244).

  19. Long-Term Soft Denture Lining Materials

    PubMed Central

    Chladek, Grzegorz; Żmudzki, Jarosław; Kasperski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Long-term soft denture lining (LTSDL) materials are used to alleviate the trauma associated with wearing complete dentures. Despite their established clinical efficacy, the use of LTSDLs has been limited due to the unfavorable effects of the oral environment on some of their mechanical and performance characteristics. The unresolved issue of LTSDL colonization by Candida albicans is particularly problematic. Silicone-based LTSDL (SLTSDL) materials, which are characterized by more stable hardness, sorption and solubility than acrylic-based LTSDLs (ALTSDLs), are currently the most commonly used LTSDLs. However, SLTSDLs are more prone to debonding from the denture base. Moreover, due to their limitations, the available methods for determining bond strength do not fully reflect the actual stability of these materials under clinical conditions. SLTSDL materials exhibit favorable viscoelastic properties compared with ALTSDLs. Furthermore, all of the lining materials exhibit an aging solution-specific tendency toward discoloration, and the available cleansers are not fully effective and can alter the mechanical properties of LTSDLs. Future studies are needed to improve the microbiological resistance of LTSDLs, as well as some of their performance characteristics. PMID:28788163

  20. Electron beam irradiation of denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Behr, M; Rosentritt, M; Faltermeier, A; Handel, G

    2005-02-01

    Electron beam irradiation can be used to influence the properties of polymers. It was the aim of this study to investigate whether PMMA denture base materials can benefit from irradiation in order to have increased fracture toughness, work of fracture or hardness. Rectangular specimens of heat-and auto-curing denture base materials were electron beam irradiated (post-cured) with 25, 100 and 200 kGy using an electron acceleration of 10 MeV or 4.5 MeV respectively. Fracture toughness, work of fracture, Vickers hardness and colour changes were measured and compared with not-irradiated specimens. The toughness, work of fracture and hardness increased using 10 MeV with a dose of 25 kGy and with 100 kGy using 4.5 MeV. However, the clinical use may not benefit from the observed small changes. Higher dosage (200 kGy) decreased the values significantly. The colour changes reached a level which was found to be not clinically acceptable. PMMA denture base materials do not benefit from post-curing with electron beam irradiation.

  1. Polyamide as a Denture Base Material: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Mahroo; Giti, Rashin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the biocompatibility, physical, and mechanical properties of the polyamide denture base materials. An electronic search of scientific papers from 1990-2014 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley Inter Science engines using the search terms “nylon denture base” and “polyamide denture base”. Searching the key words yielded a total of 82 articles. By application of inclusion criteria, the obtained results were further reduced to 24 citations recruited in this review. Several studies have evaluated various properties of polyamide (nylon) denture base materials. According to the results of the studies, currently, thermo-injectable, high impact, flexible or semi-flexible polyamide is thought to be an alternative to the conventional acrylic resins due to its esthetic and functional characteristics and physicochemical qualities. It would be justifiable to use this material for denture fabrication in some cases such as severe soft/ hard tissue undercuts, unexplained repeated fracture of denture, in aesthetic-concerned patients, those who have allergy to other denture base materials, and in patients with microstomia.  Although polyamide has some attractive advantages, they require modifications to produce consistently better properties than the current polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) materials. Moreover, since there is a very limited knowledge about their clinical performance, strict and careful follow-up evaluation of the patients rehabilitated with polyamide prosthesis is recommended. PMID:26106628

  2. Polyamide as a Denture Base Material: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Vojdani, Mahroo; Giti, Rashin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the biocompatibility, physical, and mechanical properties of the polyamide denture base materials. An electronic search of scientific papers from 1990-2014 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley Inter Science engines using the search terms "nylon denture base" and "polyamide denture base". Searching the key words yielded a total of 82 articles. By application of inclusion criteria, the obtained results were further reduced to 24 citations recruited in this review. Several studies have evaluated various properties of polyamide (nylon) denture base materials. According to the results of the studies, currently, thermo-injectable, high impact, flexible or semi-flexible polyamide is thought to be an alternative to the conventional acrylic resins due to its esthetic and functional characteristics and physicochemical qualities. It would be justifiable to use this material for denture fabrication in some cases such as severe soft/ hard tissue undercuts, unexplained repeated fracture of denture, in aesthetic-concerned patients, those who have allergy to other denture base materials, and in patients with microstomia.  Although polyamide has some attractive advantages, they require modifications to produce consistently better properties than the current polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) materials. Moreover, since there is a very limited knowledge about their clinical performance, strict and careful follow-up evaluation of the patients rehabilitated with polyamide prosthesis is recommended.

  3. Cytotoxicity of hard and soft denture lining materials.

    PubMed

    Atay, Ayse; Bozok Cetintas, Vildan; Cal, Ebru; Kosova, Buket; Kesercioglu, Atilla; Guneri, Pelin

    2012-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of nine soft and hard lining materials (Mollosil Plus, Ufi Gel SC, Visco-gel, Molloplast-B, GC Tissue Conditioner, Vertex Rapid Simplified, GC Reline Hard, Vertex Self-Curing, Ufi Gel hard C) was evaluated using human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Twelve disk samples per lining material were prepared and incubated for 24, 48, 72, and 96 h. Cytotoxicity of each lining material's extract on cultured HGFs was measured using XTT assay. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, post hoc Dunnett's T3 and Bonferroni tests at a significance level of p<0.05. At all incubation periods, all the hard lining materials (Vertex-SC, GC Reline Hard, Vertex-RS, and Ufi Gel hard C) showed cell viability higher than 90%. Among the soft lining materials, although there were no significant differences in cell viability among the different incubation periods for each lining material (p>0.05), autopolymerized acrylic-based GC Tissue Conditioner showed significantly lower cell viability than the other soft lining materials at each incubation period. Among the hard lining materials, there were no significant differences both among the materials and across all incubation periods for each lining material (p>0.05). In conclusion, all soft and hard liners exhibited good biocompatibility regardless of incubation time, except for GC Tissue Conditioner.

  4. Improvdent: Improving dentures for patient benefit. A crossover randomised clinical trial comparing impression materials for complete dentures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background According to the UK Adult Dental Health Survey (2009) 15% of adults aged 65–74, 30% aged 75–84 and 47% aged >85 years are edentulous and require complete dentures. Patients’ quality of life and nutrition status are affected by poor dentures. The quality of the dental impression is the most important issue for improving the fit and comfort of new dentures. There is paucity of RCT evidence for which impression material is best for complete dentures construction. This study aims to compare two impression materials for effectiveness and cost effectiveness. Methods/Design IMPROVDENT is a double-blind crossover trial comparing the use of alginate and silicone, two commonly used denture impression materials, in terms of patient preference and cost-effectiveness. Eighty five edentulous patients will be recruited and provided with two sets of dentures, similar in all aspects except for the impression material used (alginate or silicone). Patients will try both sets of dentures for a two-week period, unadjusted, to become accustomed to the feel of the new dentures (habituation period). Patients will then wear each set of dentures for a period of 8 weeks (in random order) during which time the dentures will be adjusted for optimum comfort. Finally, patients will be given both sets of dentures for a further two weeks to wear whichever denture they prefer (confirmation period). Patients will be asked about quality of life and to rate dentures on function and comfort at the end of each trial period and asked which set they prefer at the end of the habituation period (unadjusted denture preference) and confirmation period (adjusted denture preference). A health economic evaluation will estimate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of producing dentures from the two materials. A qualitative study will investigate the impact of dentures on behaviour and quality of life. Funding: IMPROVDENT is funded by NIHR RfPB (PB-PG-0408-16300). Discussion This trial aims to

  5. IMPROVDENT: improving dentures for patient benefit. A crossover randomised clinical trial comparing impression materials for complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Gray, Janine C; Navarro-Coy, Nuria; Pavitt, Sue H; Hulme, Claire; Godfrey, Mary; Craddock, Helen L; Brunton, Paul A; Brown, Sarah; Dillon, Sean; Dukanovic, Gillian; Fernandez, Catherine; Wright, Jonathan; Collier, Howard; Swithenbank, Shirley; Lee, Carol; Hyde, T Paul

    2012-08-31

    According to the UK Adult Dental Health Survey (2009) 15% of adults aged 65-74, 30% aged 75-84 and 47% aged >85 years are edentulous and require complete dentures. Patients' quality of life and nutrition status are affected by poor dentures. The quality of the dental impression is the most important issue for improving the fit and comfort of new dentures. There is paucity of RCT evidence for which impression material is best for complete dentures construction. This study aims to compare two impression materials for effectiveness and cost effectiveness. IMPROVDENT is a double-blind crossover trial comparing the use of alginate and silicone, two commonly used denture impression materials, in terms of patient preference and cost-effectiveness. Eighty five edentulous patients will be recruited and provided with two sets of dentures, similar in all aspects except for the impression material used (alginate or silicone). Patients will try both sets of dentures for a two-week period, unadjusted, to become accustomed to the feel of the new dentures (habituation period). Patients will then wear each set of dentures for a period of 8 weeks (in random order) during which time the dentures will be adjusted for optimum comfort. Finally, patients will be given both sets of dentures for a further two weeks to wear whichever denture they prefer (confirmation period).Patients will be asked about quality of life and to rate dentures on function and comfort at the end of each trial period and asked which set they prefer at the end of the habituation period (unadjusted denture preference) and confirmation period (adjusted denture preference). A health economic evaluation will estimate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of producing dentures from the two materials. A qualitative study will investigate the impact of dentures on behaviour and quality of life. IMPROVDENT is funded by NIHR RfPB (PB-PG-0408-16300). This trial aims to provide evidence on the costs and quality of dentures

  6. Evaluation of flexural strength and color stability of different denture base materials including flexible material after using different denture cleansers.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vrinda R; Shah, Darshana Nilesh; Chauhan, Chirag J; Doshi, Paras J; Kumar, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Present study aimed at evaluating the colour stability and flexural strength of flexible denture base materials (Valplast) and Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base material (Meliodent) processed by two different methods (Injection moulding and compression moulding) after immersing them in three different denture cleansers with acidic, basic and neutral PH. Total 120 specimens (65 × 10 × 3 mm3), 40 specimens of each material (Valplast, Meliodent compression moulding and injection moulding) were immersed in denture cleansers having different PH; Valclean (Acidic), Clinsodent (Basic) and Polident (Neutral) as well as Distilled Water. Color changes were measured with a spectrophotometer after 1 month, 3 months and 6 months of immersion cycle. A flexural 3-point bending test was carried out by using an Instron universal testing machine after 6 months of soaking. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Maximum effect on colour stability was noted with Clinsodent followed by Valclean. Least color changes were observed after immersion in Polident. Colour difference was increased significantly as the immersion time increased. For both Meliodent and Nylon resins, statistically significant change in flexural strength occurred with immersion in all denture cleansers. Clinsodent has greater effect as compared to Valclean and Polident. Polident and Valclean can be safely used as denture cleanser for both nylon and acrylic resin denture base materials as far as colour stability and flexural strength both are concerned.

  7. A Randomised Controlled Trial of complete denture impression materials

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, T.P.; Craddock, H.L.; Gray, J.C.; Pavitt, S.H.; Hulme, C.; Godfrey, M.; Fernandez, C.; Navarro-Coy, N.; Dillon, S.; Wright, J.; Brown, S.; Dukanovic, G.; Brunton, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Methods Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Dental Institute, UK. Each patient received two sets of dentures; made using either alginate or silicone impressions. Randomisations determined the order of assessment and order of impressions. The primary outcome was patient blinded preference for unadjusted dentures. Secondary outcomes were patient preference for the adjusted dentures, rating of comfort, stability and chewing efficiency, experience of each impression, and an OHIP-EDENT questionnaire. Results Seventy-eight (91.8%) patients completed the primary assessment. 53(67.9%) patients preferred dentures made from silicone impressions while 14(17.9%) preferred alginate impressions. 4(5.1%) patients found both dentures equally satisfactory and 7 (9.0%) found both equally unsatisfactory. There was a 50% difference in preference rates (in favour of silicone) (95%CI 32.7–67.3%, p < 0.0001). Conclusion There is significant evidence that dentures made from silicone impressions were preferred by patients. Clinical significance Given the strength of the clinical findings within this paper, dentists should consider choosing silicone rather than alginate as their material of choice for secondary impressions for complete dentures. Trial Registration: ISRCTN 01528038.

 This article forms part of a project for which the author (TPH) won the Senior Clinical Unilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental Research, Capetown, South Africa, June 2014. PMID:24995473

  8. A randomised controlled trial of complete denture impression materials.

    PubMed

    Hyde, T P; Craddock, H L; Gray, J C; Pavitt, S H; Hulme, C; Godfrey, M; Fernandez, C; Navarro-Coy, N; Dillon, S; Wright, J; Brown, S; Dukanovic, G; Brunton, P A

    2014-08-01

    There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Dental Institute, UK. Each patient received two sets of dentures; made using either alginate or silicone impressions. Randomisations determined the order of assessment and order of impressions. The primary outcome was patient blinded preference for unadjusted dentures. Secondary outcomes were patient preference for the adjusted dentures, rating of comfort, stability and chewing efficiency, experience of each impression, and an OHIP-EDENT questionnaire. Seventy-eight (91.8%) patients completed the primary assessment. 53(67.9%) patients preferred dentures made from silicone impressions while 14(17.9%) preferred alginate impressions. 4(5.1%) patients found both dentures equally satisfactory and 7 (9.0%) found both equally unsatisfactory. There was a 50% difference in preference rates (in favour of silicone) (95%CI 32.7-67.3%, p<0.0001). There is significant evidence that dentures made from silicone impressions were preferred by patients. Given the strength of the clinical findings within this paper, dentists should consider choosing silicone rather than alginate as their material of choice for secondary impressions for complete dentures. ISRCTN 01528038. This article forms part of a project for which the author (TPH) won the Senior Clinical Unilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental Research, Capetown, South Africa, June 2014. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. The Biomechanical Effect of Different Denture Base Materials on the Articular Disc in Complete Denture Wearers: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    El-Zawahry, Mohamed M.; El-Ragi, Ahmed A.; El-Anwar, Mohamed I.; Ibraheem, Eman M.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different denture base materials on the stress distribution in TMJ articular disc (AD) in complete denture wearers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A three dimensional Finite Element (FEA) models of an individual temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was built on the basis CT scan. The FEA model consisted of four parts: the condyle, the articular disc, the denture base, and the articular eminence skull. Acrylic resin and chrome-cobalt denture base materials were studied. Static loading of 300N was vertically applied to the central fossa of the mandibular second premolar. Stress and strain were calculated to characterize the stress/strain patterns in the disc. RESULTS: The maximum tensile stresses were observed in the anterior and posterior bands of (AD) on load application with the two denture base materials. The superior boundaries of the glenoid fossa showed lower stress than those on the inferior boundaries facing the condyle. CONCLUSIONS: Within the limitations of the present study it may be concluded that: The denture base material may have an effect in stress-strain pattern in TMJ articular disc. The stiffer denture base material, the better the distribution of the load to the underling mandibular supporting structures & reducing stresses induced in the articular disc. PMID:27275270

  10. Comparative evaluation of sodium hypochlorite and microwave disinfection on dimensional stability of denture bases.

    PubMed

    Nirale, Rutuja Madhukarrao; Thombre, Ram; Kubasad, Girish

    2012-02-01

    To compare the effect of sodium hypochlorite and microwave disinfection on the dimensional stability of denture bases without and with relining. A brass die was prepared by simulating an edentulous maxillary arch. It was used to fabricate 1.5 mm and 3 mm of thickness denture bases (n = 40). The 1.5 mm of thickness-specimens (n = 20) were relined with 1.5 mm of autopolymerizing relining resin. Five holes were prepared over crest of ridge of brass die with intimately fitting stainless steel pins which were transferred to the intaglio surface of specimens during fabrication of denture bases. For calculation of dimensional changes in denture bases, differences between the baseline area before and after disinfection of the specimens were used. The denture bases without and with relining were divided into 2 groups (each n = 20). Data were analyzed using student paired 't' and unpaired 't' test. Microwave disinfection produces significant shrinkage in both denture bases without relining (t = 17.16; P<.001) and with relining (t = 14.9; P<.001). Denture bases without relining showed more shrinkage when compared with relined denture bases after microwave disinfection (t = 6.09; P<.001). The changes in dimensional stability after sodium hypochlorite disinfection were not significant for both denture bases without relining (t = 2.19; P=.056) and denture bases with relining (t = 2.17; P=.058). Microwave disinfection leads to increased shrinkage of denture bases without and with relining. Chemical disinfection with sodium hypochlorite seems to be a safer method of disinfection with regards to physical properties such as changes in dimensional stability.

  11. Flexible thermoplastic denture base materials for aesthetical removable partial denture framework.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Aeran, Himanshu; Kumar, Narender; Gupta, Nidhi

    2013-10-01

    Conventional fixed partial dentures, implant supported Fixed Partial Dentures (FDPs) and removable partial dentures are the most common treatment modalities for the aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of partially edentulous patients. Although implants and FDP have certain advantages over removable partial dentures, in some cases, removable partial dentures may be the only choice which is available. Removable cast partial dentures are used as definitive removable prostheses when indicated, but location of clasps may affect aesthetics. So, when patient is concerned about aesthetics, flexible partial dentures which is aesthetically superior to flipper and cast partial dentures, may be considered. But for the success of flexible removable partial denture, proper diagnosis, treatment planning and insertion technique of this prosthesis is very important, which have been thoroughly described in this article.

  12. Spectrogram Analysis of Complete Dentures with Different Thickness and Palatal Rugae Materials on Speech Production

    PubMed Central

    Zaki Mahross, Hamada; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of reproduction of different thickness and palatal rugae materials on complete dentures speech using Computerized Speech Lab (CSL) (spectrogram). Materials and Methods. Three completely edentulous male patients (aged 50–60 years) were selected for reading a paragraph. Twelve upper dentures were constructed, four for each patient. The patients' speech groups were divided into five groups, Group I: patients without dentures; Group II: patients rehabilitated with conventional acrylic dentures; Group III: patients with conventional acrylic dentures with rugae reproduction; Group IV: patients with dentures with metallic framework of minimal thickness and direct ragged metallic palatal surface at rugae area; Group V: patients with dentures with palatal rugae constructed from resilient acrylic resin material with thickness less than conventional denture. Speech samples were recorded after insertion of each denture for groups using Computerized Speech Lab (CSL) (spectrogram). The sounds selected were lingopalatal /s/z/sh/t/d/ and /l/. Results. Group III produced high mean significant difference with /sh/t/ sound. For Group IV, the difference was noticed with /s/z/sh/t/ and /d/ sounds, while for Group V the difference was shown with /z/l/ sound (P < 0.05). Conclusion. It is recommended to reproduce the rugae area in complete denture because the phonetic quality of complete denture with rugae is superior to the conventional denture. PMID:25883655

  13. Effect of surface treatment on the bonding of an autopolymerizing soft denture liner to a denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shiro; Ohashi, Hirohumi; Kurashige, Hisanori; Tanaka, Takuo

    2004-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effects of surface treatments and thermocycling on the bonding of autopolymerizing silicone soft denture liner (Sofreliner) to denture base resin. The bonding surfaces of denture base cylinders were polished with 600-grit silicon carbide paper and pretreated with applications of Sofreliner Primer, Sofreliner Primer after air abrasion, Reline Primer, or Reline Primer after air abrasion. Failure loads and elongation at failure were measured after subjecting specimens to 0, 10,000, 20,000, and 30,000 thermocycles. Failure modes were assessed for all specimens. Seven specimens were fabricated for each of 16 groups, including four pretreatments and four thermocycle groups. Failure loads of the Sofreliner Primer group were significantly higher than those of the air-abrasion group up to 20,000 thermocycles; both groups showed cohesive failures of the soft denture liner. Failure loads of the Reline Primer group were significantly higher than with Reline Primer after air abrasion up to 10,000 thermocycles. Failure mode after 10,000 thermocycles was cohesive for the Reline Primer group and mixed cohesive/adhesive for Reline Primer after air abrasion. Failure loads of the Sofreliner Primer group were significantly higher than those of the Reline Primer group at each thermocycling interval. Elongation values decreased after 10,000 thermocycles for all groups. Air abrasion on the denture base resin surface was not effective in enhancing failure load. Cyclic thermal stress is one factor degrading the bond between soft denture liner and acrylic resin denture base.

  14. Allergic effects of the residual monomer used in denture base acrylic resins

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Haroon; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Vohra, Fahim

    2015-01-01

    Denture base resins are extensively used in dentistry for a variety of purposes. These materials can be classified as chemical, heat, light, and microwave polymerization materials depending upon the factor which starts the polymerization reaction. Their applications include use during denture base construction, relining existing dentures, and for fabrication of orthodontic removable appliances. There have been increased concerns regarding the safe clinical application of these materials as their biodegradation in the oral environment leads to harmful effects. Along with local side effects, the materials have certain occupational hazards, and numerous studies can be found in the literature mentioning those. The purpose of this article is to outline the cytotoxic consequences of denture base acrylic resins and clinical recommendations for their use. PMID:26929705

  15. Allergic effects of the residual monomer used in denture base acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Haroon; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Vohra, Fahim

    2015-01-01

    Denture base resins are extensively used in dentistry for a variety of purposes. These materials can be classified as chemical, heat, light, and microwave polymerization materials depending upon the factor which starts the polymerization reaction. Their applications include use during denture base construction, relining existing dentures, and for fabrication of orthodontic removable appliances. There have been increased concerns regarding the safe clinical application of these materials as their biodegradation in the oral environment leads to harmful effects. Along with local side effects, the materials have certain occupational hazards, and numerous studies can be found in the literature mentioning those. The purpose of this article is to outline the cytotoxic consequences of denture base acrylic resins and clinical recommendations for their use.

  16. Evaluate the Effect of Commercially Available Denture Cleansers on Surface Hardness and Roughness of Denture Liners at Various Time Intervals

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Hilal S.; Singh, Sumeet; Hari, Prasad A.; Amarnath, G. S.; Kundapur, Vinaya; Pasha, Naveed; Anand, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective: Chemical cleansing by denture cleansers is first choice for denture plaque control. The most common problems while using denture cleansers are hardening, porosity, odor sorption, water sorption, solubility, and colour change, bacterial and fungal growth. Chemical cleansing procedures have been found to have an effect on the physical and mechanical properties of denture liners. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of commercially available denture cleansers on surface hardness and roughness of acrylic and silicon based denture liners at various time interval. Method: Two autopolymerising denture liners Kooliner (acrylic) and GC reline soft (silicon) were tested with two commercially available denture cleansers, polident and efferdent plus. Total of 120 specimens were prepared and all the specimens were divided into six groups based on the relining materials and denture cleansers used. Surface hardness and surface roughness was tested using Shore A durometer and profilometer respectively at the end of day 1, day 7, day 30 and day 90. All the specimens were stored in artificial saliva throughout the study. Cleanser solution was prepared daily by adding Polident and Efferdent plus denture cleanser tablet into 250ml of enough very warm (not hot) water. Acrylic and silicon liner groups were cleansed in a solution of denture cleanser and water for 15 minutes daily, rinsed with water and stored in artificial saliva at room temperature. The data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and independent t-test. Result: The acrylic soft lining showed gradual hardening and increase in surface roughness after immersion in denture cleanser and also with time. Acrylic liner material showed maximum hardness and roughness with Polident followed by Efferdent plus and water (control group). Silicone lining material showed a slight difference in hardness and roughness between the test group and control group. There was a slight increase in hardness in

  17. Evaluate the Effect of Commercially Available Denture Cleansers on Surface Hardness and Roughness of Denture Liners at Various Time Intervals.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Hilal S; Singh, Sumeet; Hari, Prasad A; Amarnath, G S; Kundapur, Vinaya; Pasha, Naveed; Anand, M

    2016-12-01

    Chemical cleansing by denture cleansers is first choice for denture plaque control. The most common problems while using denture cleansers are hardening, porosity, odor sorption, water sorption, solubility, and colour change, bacterial and fungal growth. Chemical cleansing procedures have been found to have an effect on the physical and mechanical properties of denture liners. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of commercially available denture cleansers on surface hardness and roughness of acrylic and silicon based denture liners at various time interval. Two autopolymerising denture liners Kooliner (acrylic) and GC reline soft (silicon) were tested with two commercially available denture cleansers, polident and efferdent plus. Total of 120 specimens were prepared and all the specimens were divided into six groups based on the relining materials and denture cleansers used. Surface hardness and surface roughness was tested using Shore A durometer and profilometer respectively at the end of day 1, day 7, day 30 and day 90. All the specimens were stored in artificial saliva throughout the study. Cleanser solution was prepared daily by adding Polident and Efferdent plus denture cleanser tablet into 250ml of enough very warm (not hot) water. Acrylic and silicon liner groups were cleansed in a solution of denture cleanser and water for 15 minutes daily, rinsed with water and stored in artificial saliva at room temperature. The data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and independent t-test. The acrylic soft lining showed gradual hardening and increase in surface roughness after immersion in denture cleanser and also with time. Acrylic liner material showed maximum hardness and roughness with Polident followed by Efferdent plus and water (control group). Silicone lining material showed a slight difference in hardness and roughness between the test group and control group. There was a slight increase in hardness in all the groups with time. Very slight

  18. Digital immediate dentures treatment: A clinical report of two patients.

    PubMed

    Neumeier, Toni Tien; Neumeier, Harold

    2016-09-01

    The use of computer-aided engineering (CAE) and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology to fabricate complete dentures was introduced in 2011. Clinical procedures for digital immediate dentures can be identical to those for conventional immediate dentures and can be simplified by leaving all remaining dentition until the time of extraction and denture placement. Through the digital process, a single digital design and a definitive digital record are created which can be used to fabricate the immediate digital denture and surgical reduction guide for alveoloplasty. Digital immediate dentures can be relined using the same process as for conventional dentures. The definitive digital dentures can be fabricated with a reline impression and new centric relation record, using the existing digital immediate denture without additional clinical procedures. Providing patients with digital immediate dentures is a viable trend.

  19. Effect of surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of auto-polymerized resin to thermoplastic denture base polymer

    PubMed Central

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Polyamide polymers do not provide sufficient bond strength to auto-polymerized resins for repairing fractured denture or replacing dislodged denture teeth. Limited treatment methods have been developed to improve the bond strength between auto-polymerized reline resins and polyamide denture base materials. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of surface modification by acetic acid on surface characteristics and bond strength of reline resin to polyamide denture base. MATERIALS AND METHODS 84 polyamide specimens were divided into three surface treatment groups (n=28): control (N), silica-coated (S), and acid-treated (A). Two different auto-polymerized reline resins GC and Triplex resins were bonded to the samples (subgroups T and G, respectively, n=14). The specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test after they were stored in distilled water for 1 week and thermo-cycled for 5000 cycles. Data were analyzed with independent t-test, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (α=.05). RESULTS The bond strength values of A and S were significantly higher than those of N (P<.001 for both). However, statistically significant difference was not observed between group A and group S. According to the independent Student's t-test, the shear bond strength values of AT were significantly higher than those of AG (P<.001). CONCLUSION The surface treatment of polyamide denture base materials with acetic acid may be an efficient and cost-effective method for increasing the shear bond strength to auto-polymerized reline resin. PMID:28018569

  20. Assessment of clasp design and flexural properties of acrylic denture base materials for use in non-metal clasp dentures.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibilities of utilizing new acrylic denture base materials in resin clasps using three-point flexural tests and cantilever beam tests. Seven non-metal clasp denture (NMCD) materials and four acrylic denture base materials were used for three-point flexural tests and six NMCD materials and three acrylic denture base materials were used for cantilever beam tests. The flexural strength, elastic modulus, and 0.05% proof stress were measured by three-point flexural tests according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 20795-1. And load at 0.5mm deformation, elastic modulus were measured by Cantilever beam tests. For the three-point flexural tests, only materials that met the conditions for both flexural strength and elastic modulus were the polycarbonate Reigning N (REN) and the acrylics Acron (AC), Pro Impact (PI), Procast DSP (PC) and IvoBase High Impact (HI) which are required in ISO 20795-1, Type 3 denture base materials. And for cantilever beam tests there was no significant difference between PI and either EstheShot (ES), EstheShot Bright (ESB), REN or Acry Tone (ACT) in load at 0.5mm deformation, and no significant difference between PI and either Lucitone FRS (LTF), ES, ESB, REN or ACT in elastic modulus. The results thus suggested that some of the acrylic materials used as denture base materials may also be usable for NMCDs, and that the flexural properties of the acrylic material PI resemble those of ES, ESB and ACT, meaning that similar clasp designs may also be feasible. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of auto-polymerized resin to thermoplastic denture base polymer.

    PubMed

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Hafezeqoran, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Polyamide polymers do not provide sufficient bond strength to auto-polymerized resins for repairing fractured denture or replacing dislodged denture teeth. Limited treatment methods have been developed to improve the bond strength between auto-polymerized reline resins and polyamide denture base materials. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of surface modification by acetic acid on surface characteristics and bond strength of reline resin to polyamide denture base. 84 polyamide specimens were divided into three surface treatment groups (n=28): control (N), silica-coated (S), and acid-treated (A). Two different auto-polymerized reline resins GC and Triplex resins were bonded to the samples (subgroups T and G, respectively, n=14). The specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test after they were stored in distilled water for 1 week and thermo-cycled for 5000 cycles. Data were analyzed with independent t-test, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (α=.05). The bond strength values of A and S were significantly higher than those of N (P<.001 for both). However, statistically significant difference was not observed between group A and group S. According to the independent Student's t-test, the shear bond strength values of AT were significantly higher than those of AG (P<.001). The surface treatment of polyamide denture base materials with acetic acid may be an efficient and cost-effective method for increasing the shear bond strength to auto-polymerized reline resin.

  2. Impact of Denture Cleansing Solution Immersion on Some Properties of Different Denture Base Materials: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Al-Thobity, Ahmad M; Gad, Mohammed; ArRejaie, Aws; Alnassar, Talal; Al-Khalifa, Khalifa S

    2017-06-09

    To evaluate the effect of several denture cleansing solutions on the color stability, surface roughness, and flexural strength of three denture base materials. Twenty-seven specimens were prepared using heat-polymerized (HP) denture base material, 27 using autopolymerized (AP) denture base material, and 27 using visible-light-polymerized (VLP) denture base, creating a total of 81 specimens. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups (n = 27): the distilled water group (DWG), Corega group (CG), and Renew group (RG). Color changes (ΔE), surface roughness (Ra, nm), and flexural strength (MPa) of each specimen were measured using a spectrophotometer, an optical profilometer, and a universal testing machine, respectively. The results were statistically analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The only statistically significant color change detected was in the VLP resin treated with Corega and Renew. There was a significant increase in the surface roughness of all denture resin groups after immersion in Corega. Immersion in Renew significantly increased surface roughness only in the HP and AP specimens. The only significant reduction in flexural strength was detected in the HP resin after immersion in Corega (p < 0.05). Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that Corega has a significantly greater negative impact than distilled water on the flexural strength of HP resin base materials. Renew significantly increased the surface roughness of AP and HP, while Corega increased the surface roughness of all resin materials. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. Influence of educational materials on the hygiene and utilization habits of denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Ferruzzi, Fernanda; Martins, Julio Cesar Leonard Sabczak; Mori, Aline Akemi; Santin, Gabriela Cristina; Kurihara, Eduardo; Sabio, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of educational materials on the denture hygiene and utilization habits of 70 adult volunteers who had been using complete dentures for at least 5 years. On the day they received new dentures, 32 patients were provided with an illustrated leaflet and verbal instructions on oral hygiene and utilization habits, while the remaining 38 participants were advised to continue cleaning and wearing their new dentures as they had their previous dentures. After a 6- to 10-week period, 66 of 70 subjects were interviewed about socioeconomic factors, denture hygiene, and utilization habits. The percentage of patients with a proper denture care routine was low in both groups, suggesting that patients had a tendency not to change old habits. However, statistical analysis showed a positive correlation between receiving instruction and performing denture care in a way that is closer to the recommended method: brushing without toothpaste, using a specific brush; soaking in a sodium hypochlorite solution; and removing the prosthesis at night. Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that this approach to patient education could be applied to improve the hygiene and utilization habits of denture wearers as well as encourage the correct use of complete dentures.

  4. Ethanol Postpolymerization Treatment for Improving the Biocompatibility of Acrylic Reline Resins

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Cristina B.; Lopes, Luís P.; Ferrão, Helena F.; Miranda, Joana P.; Castro, Matilde F.; Bettencourt, Ana F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of postpolymerization treatment based on ethanol-aqueous solutions on the residual monomer (RM) content, flexural strength, microhardness, and cytotoxicity of hard chairside reline resins (Kooliner, Ufi Gel Hard). Methods. After polymerization, specimens were immersed in water, 20%, 50%, or 70% ethanol solutions at 23°C or 55°C for 10 minutes. Controls were left untreated. HPLC was used for the determination of RM content. Specimens were submitted to Vickers microhardness and 3-point loading flexural strength tests. Cytotoxicity of resin eluates was determined on human fibroblasts by assessing cellular mitochondrial function and lactate dehydrogenase release. Results. Higher concentrations of ethanol promoted lower RM content at 55°C in both materials. The mechanical properties were maintained after 50% and 20% ethanol treatments in Kooliner and Ufi Gel Hard, respectively. Specimens submitted to those treatments showed significant reduction on cytotoxicity compared to immersion in hot water, the treatment of choice in the recent literature. Significance. Immersion of relined dentures in specific ethanol solutions at 55°C for 10 minutes can be considered an effective postpolymerization treatment contributing to increase materials biocompatibility. The proposed protocol is expeditious and easy to achieve with simple equipment in a dental office. PMID:23971038

  5. Efficacy of denture cleaners on the surface roughness and Candida albicans adherence of sealant agent coupled denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Köroğlu, Ayşegül; Şahin, Onur; Dede, Doğu Ömür; Deniz, Şule Tuğba; Karacan Sever, Nurdan; Özkan, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of denture cleansers on the surface roughness and Candida albicans adherence of surface sealant agent coupled denture base resins. One hundred and twenty specimens were fabricated from 2 polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) (Meliodent; Acron MC) and 1 polyamide (Deflex) denture base materials, coated with a sealant agent (Palaseal) and divided into 4 groups (n=10) according to overnight cleaning procedures: distilled water (control), 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and two different sodium perborate (Corega; Rapident). The surface roughness values were measured with a profilometer before (Ra0) and after 90 days immersion in denture cleaners (Ra1). Specimens were incubated with Candida albicans suspension and Candida colony- forming units (CFU) (Cfu/mm) were counted. Significant differences were found, between the Ra0 and Ra1 values of 5% NaOCl applied Acron MC, Deflex and also Rapident applied Deflex groups (p<0.05). Denture cleaning procedures had no significant effects on the quantitiy of Candida albicans.

  6. Water sorption and solubility of polyamide denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Long G; Kopperud, Hilde M; Øilo, Marit

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Some patients experience adverse reactions to poly(methyl methacrylate)-based (PMMA) dentures. Polyamide (PA) as an alternative to PMMA has, however, not been well documented with regard to water sorption and water solubility. The aim of this in vitro study was to measure water sorption and water solubility of two PA materials compared with PMMA, and to evaluate the major components released from the PA materials and the effect on hardness of the materials. Methods: Ten discs (40.0 mm diameter, 2.0 mm thick) of each material (PA: Valplast and Breflex; PMMA: SR Ivocap HIP) were prepared according to manufacturers' recommendations. The specimens were tested for water sorption and water solubility, according to a modification of ISO 20795-1:2008. Released substances were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Results: There were statistically significant differences among the materials regarding water sorption, water solubility and time to water saturation. Breflex had the highest water sorption (30.4 μg/mm(3)), followed by PMMA-material (25.8 μg/mm(3)) and Valplast (13.6 μg/mm(3)). Both PA materials had statistically significant lower water solubility than the PMMA. Both PA had a net increase in weight. Analysis by GC/MS identified release of the compound 12-aminododecanolactam from the material Valplast. No release was found from the Breflex material. Conclusions: The PA denture materials show differences in water sorption and solubility, but within the limits of the standard requirements. The PA showed a net increase in weight after long-term water sorption. The clinical implications of the findings are not elucidated.

  7. Evaluation of chitosan quaternary ammonium salt-modified resin denture base material.

    PubMed

    Song, Rong; Zhong, Zhaohua; Lin, Lexun

    2016-04-01

    Chitosan quaternary ammonium salt displays good antioxidant and antibacterial characteristics and it shows appreciable solubility in water. When added to the traditional denture material to form a resin base, it could promote good oral health by improving the oral environment. In this study, chitosan quaternary ammonium salt was added to the denture material following two different methods. After three months of immersion in artificial saliva, the specimens were tested for tensile strength and were scanned by electron microscope. The murine fibroblast cytotoxicity and antibacterial properties were also tested. The result showed no significant differences in the tensile strength and in the proliferation of murine L929 fibroblast cells. The two structures of chitosan quaternary ammonium salt-modified denture material had different degrees of corrosion resistance and antimicrobial properties. These results indicate that chitosan quaternary ammonium salt-modified resin denture base material has the potential to become a new generation oral denture composite material.

  8. Randomized clinical evaluation of a light-cured base material for complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Bömicke, Wolfgang; Hassel, Alexander J; Rammelsberg, Peter; Stober, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare plaque adhesion, tissue reaction, and technical complications for complete dentures based on visible light-cured resin (VLCR) or on conventional poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). A stratified randomized cohort study was designed with 52 patients treated with a complete denture in the maxilla (n = 28), the mandible (n = 2), or both (n = 22). Seventy-four dentures were manufactured, 38 of PMMA and 36 of VLCR. Investigators and patients were unaware of the nature of the denture base material. Plaque adhesion, tissue reaction, and technical complications were investigated 4 weeks after denture insertion (baseline). Recall investigations were performed after 6, 12, and 24 months. After 6, 12, and 24 months, plaque adhesion was significantly higher for VLCR dentures than for PMMA dentures. Tissue reaction was comparable for both groups, however. After 6, 12, and 24 months, need for repair was significantly greater for VLCR prostheses. The mean number of additional aftercare sessions per patient after 24 months was 50 % higher for VLCR than for PMMA. Good oral hygiene must be established by patients treated with VLCR dentures, to remove biofilm from these dentures. Increased aftercare must also be taken into account when this material is used. VLCR might be a viable alternative to PMMA for patients with allergic reactions to residual monomer or benzoyl peroxide.

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Tensile Bond Strength between Silicon Soft Liners and Processed Denture Base Resin Conditioned by Three Modes of Surface Treatment: An Invitro Study.

    PubMed

    Surapaneni, Hemchand; Ariga, Padma; Haribabu, R; Ravi Shankar, Y; Kumar, V H C; Attili, Sirisha

    2013-09-01

    Soft denture liners act as a cushion for the denture bearing mucosa through even distribution of functional load, avoiding local stress concentrations and improving retention of dentures there by providing comfort to the patient. The objective of the present study was to compare and evaluate the tensile bond strengths of silicone-based soft lining materials (Ufi Gel P and GC Reline soft) with different surface pre treatments of heat cure PMMA denture base acrylic resin. Stainless steel dies measuring 40 mm in length; 10 mm in width and 10 mm in height (40 × 10 × 10) were machined to prepare standardized for the polymethyl methacrylate resin blocks. Stainless steel dies (spacer for resilient liner) measuring 3 mm thick; 10 mm long and 10 mm wide were prepared as spacers to ensure uniformity of the soft liner being tested. Two types of Addition silicone-based soft lining materials (room temperature polymerised soft lining materials (RTPSLM): Ufi Gel P and GC Reline soft) were selected. Ufi Gel P (VOCO, Germany), GC Reline soft (GC America) are resilient, chairside vinyl polysiloxane denture reliners of two different manufacturers. A total of 80 test samples were prepared of which 40 specimens were prepared for Group A (Ufi Gel P) and 40 specimens for Group B (GC Reline soft). In these groups, based on Pre-treatment of acrylic resin specimens each group was subdivided into four sub groups of 10 samples each. Sub-group I-without any surface treatment. Sub-group II-sand blasted Sub-group III-treated with Methyl Methacrylate monomer Sub-group IV-treated with chemical etchant Acetone. The results were statistically analysed by Kruscal Wallis test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Independent t test. The specimens treated with MMA monomer wetting showed superior and significant bond strength than those obtained by other surface treatments. The samples belonging to subgroups of GC Reline soft exhibit superior tensile bond strength than subgroups of Ufi Gel P. The modes

  10. EFFECT OF RELINING ON FIBER POST RETENTION TO ROOT CANAL

    PubMed Central

    Faria-E-Silva, André Luís; Pedrosa, Celso de Freitas; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; da Silveira, Daniele Machado; Martins, Luís Roberto Marcondes

    2009-01-01

    One of the clinically relevant problems dentists face when restoring endodontically treated teeth is the mismatch between fiber post and post space diameters, which results in an excessively thick resin cement layer. Fiber post relining appears as a solution for this problem. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fiber post relining with composite resin on push-out bond strength. Material and Methods: Twenty bovine incisors were selected to assess post retention. The crowns were removed below the cementoenamel junction and the root canals were treated endodontically and flared with diamond burs. The roots were allocated into two groups (n=10): G1: fiber posts without relining and G2: fiber posts relined with composite resin. The posts were cemented with a dual-cured resin cement and the specimens were sectioned transversally. Three 1.5-mm thick slabs were obtained per root and identified as cervical, medium and apical thirds. The push-out test was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement occurred. The failure mode of fractured specimens was analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed by split-plot ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. Results: Relined fiber posts presented higher retention values than non-relined post in all thirds. No statistically significant differences (p>0.05) were found among thirds for relined posts. All failures occurred at the interface between resin cement and root dentin. Conclusions: Relining with composite resin seems to be an effective method to improve the retention of fiber posts to flared root canals. PMID:20027434

  11. Biofilm formation and Candida albicans morphology on the surface of denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Susewind, Sabine; Lang, Reinhold; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Fungal biofilms may contribute to the occurrence of denture stomatitis. The objective of the study was to investigate the biofilm formation and morphology of Candida albicans in biofilms on the surface of denture base materials. Specimens were prepared from different denture base materials. After determination of surface properties and salivary pellicle formation, mono- and multispecies biofilm formation including Candida albicans ATCC 10231 was initiated. Relative amounts of adherent cells were determined after 20, 44, 68 and 188 h; C. albicans morphology was analysed employing selective fluorescence microscopic analysis. Significant differences were identified in the relative amount of cells adherent to the denture base materials. Highest blastospore/hyphae index suggesting an increased percentage of hyphae was observed in mono- and multispecies biofilms on the soft denture liner, which did not necessarily respond to the highest relative amount of adherent cells. For both biofilm models, lowest relative amount of adherent cells was identified on the methacrylate-based denture base material, which did not necessarily relate to a significantly lower blastospore/hyphae index. The results indicate that there are significant differences in both biofilm formation as well as the morphology of C. albicans cells in biofilms on the surface of different denture base materials.

  12. Evaluation of patch test results with denture material series.

    PubMed

    Gebhart, M; Geier, J

    1996-03-01

    791 patients, among them 59 dental technicians and 732 other patients, were tested with the denture material series (DMS) recommended by the German Contact Dermatitis Research Group (DKG) in the hospitals of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK) between January 1990 and July 1993. Most frequently, positive reactions occurred to cadmium chloride in both groups. However, there was no evidence at all for relevance of these reactions. Benzoyl peroxide (BPO) ranked 2nd in patch test positivity. Although not statistically significant, reactions were more frequent in dental technicians, who might be exposed to BPO the in working environment. Methyl methacrylate (MMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) were common sensitizers in dental technicians but not in other patients. This finding, too, has its explanation in the working process of manufacturing dental prostheses.

  13. A comparison of the dimensional accuracy of microwave and conventionally polymerized denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A; Huggett, R; Zissis, A; Vowles, R W

    1993-01-01

    This study compares the dimensional changes of microwave and conventionally polymerized denture bases and also establishes the degree of monomer conversion using gas-liquid chromatography. Dimensional changes of three denture base materials were assessed using an optical comparator and the results showed no significant differences between the materials employed or the curing method used. Efficient monomer conversion was demonstrated with levels of residual monomer of less than 1% for all materials.

  14. Effect of polyimide addition on mechanical properties of PMMA-based denture material.

    PubMed

    Yang, An; Zhao, Dan; Wu, Yaqin; Xu, Chun

    2017-09-26

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of modifying polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base material with polyimide (PI) on its flexural property and biocompatibility. Low molecular weight (1,500 g/mol) PI was synthesized and small amount of PI (0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1 wt%) was dispersed into the PMMA matrix. Three-point bending tests, scanning electron microscopy and thermal cycling were used to measure the mechanical properties, while MTT assay was used to evaluate the biocompatibility of the denture base material. The results showed that 0.6% addition of PI significantly increased flexural strength of PMMA denture base material by 13.5%, compared with the control group (p<0.05). Even after 5,000 hydrothermal cycling the reinforce effect still existed. However, when the PI content further increased, flexural strength of the denture base material decreased due to particle agglomeration. The MTT assay confirmed that the addition of PI did not change the biocompatibility of the PMMA denture base material. The present study suggested that blending polyimide in the proper proportion can be a potential method to strengthen the PMMA-based denture base material.

  15. Comparative evaluation of the effect of denture cleansers on the surface topography of denture base materials: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Jeyapalan, Karthigeyan; Kumar, Jaya Krishna; Azhagarasan, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to evaluate and compare the effects of three chemically different commercially available denture cleansing agents on the surface topography of two different denture base materials. Materials and Methods: Three chemically different denture cleansers (sodium perborate, 1% sodium hypochlorite, 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate) were used on two denture base materials (acrylic resin and chrome cobalt alloy) and the changes were evaluated at 3 times intervals (56 h, 120 h, 240 h). Changes from baseline for surface roughness were recorded using a surface profilometer and standard error of the mean (SEM) both quantitatively and qualitatively, respectively. Qualitative surface analyses for all groups were done by SEM. Statistical Analysis Used: The values obtained were analyzed statistically using one-way ANOVA and paired t-test. Results: All three denture cleanser solutions showed no statistically significant surface changes on the acrylic resin portions at 56 h, 120 h, and 240 h of immersion. However, on the alloy portion changes were significant at the end of 120 h and 240 h. Conclusion: Of the three denture cleansers used in the study, none produced significant changes on the two denture base materials for the short duration of immersion, whereas changes were seen as the immersion periods were increased. PMID:26538915

  16. Effect of silica coating and silane surface treatment on the bond strength of soft denture liner to denture base material.

    PubMed

    Atsü, Saadet; Keskın, Yasemin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of different surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of an autopolymerizing silicone denture liner to a denture base material after thermocycling. Fifty rectangular heat-polymerized acrylic resin (QC-20) specimens consisting of a set of 2 acrylic blocks were used in the tensile test. Specimens were divided into 5 test groups (n=10) according to the bonding surface treatment as follows: Group A, adhesive treatment (Ufi Gel P adhesive) (control); Group S, sandblasting using 50-µm Al2O3; Group SCSIL, silica coating using 30-µm Al2O3 modified by silica and silanized with silane agent (CoJet System); Group SCA, silica coating and adhesive application; Group SCSILA, silica coating, silane and adhesive treatment. The 2 PMMA blocks were placed into molds and the soft lining materials (Ufi Gel P) were packed into the space and polymerized. All specimens were thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before the tensile test. Bond strength data were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and Duncan tests. Fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (FTIR) analysis were used for the chemical analysis and a profilometer was used for the roughness of the sample surfaces. The highest bond strength test value was observed for Group A (1.35±0.13); the lowest value was for Group S (0.28±0.07) and Group SCSIL (0.34±0.03). Mixed and cohesive type failures were seen in Group A, SCA and SCSILA. Group S and SCSIL showed the least silicone integrations and the roughest surfaces. Sandblasting, silica coating and silane surface treatments of the denture base resin did not increase the bond strength of the silicone based soft liner. However, in this study, the chemical analysis and surface profilometer provided interesting insights about the bonding mechanism between the denture base resin and silicone soft liner.

  17. Immediate maxillary denture base extension for posterior palatal seal.

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Hosokawa, R; Tsuga, K; Yoshida, M

    2000-03-01

    A procedure for extension of the maxillary denture base for development of a posterior palatal seal is described. The technique involves provisional extension with paraffin wax and adding direct relining resin supported by a silicone putty core. This simple, quick procedure achieves immediate recovery of retention for underextended maxillary dentures without additional laboratory procedures.

  18. Objectives/construction of C-4 reline at Bethlehem`s Burns Harbor Div.

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.G.; Karcher, T.A.; Swanson, D.E.

    1995-07-01

    Hot metal for Bethlehem Steel`s Burns Harbor Div. is supplied by two blast furnaces. D furnace was blown in during 1969 and C furnace was blown in during 1972. These furnaces were designed to produce 5,000 NTHM/day. Due to improvements in raw material, equipment and operating practices, the two furnaces were each averaging 7,100 NTHM/day. The fourth reline of C furnace, was scheduled to start in Aug. 1994. There were four major objectives in planning for the reline: campaign length; coal injection; improved production; and lower maintenance costs. The reline was the most extensive undertaken to date by Bethlehem Steel. The original construction schedule was 95 days based on a 2-10-6 schedule. The actual schedule was 92 days working a 2-10-7 sequence most of the reline outage. The contractor took control of the furnace on Aug. 2, 1994 and the furnace was blown in Nov. 2, 1994. The critical path of the reline was the furnace proper followed closely by the casthouse and stockhouse areas. In conjunction with the reline, the No. 1 stove was rebuilt after 22 years of operation. This paper discusses the major work performed to accomplish the 92-day reline. Extensive pre-outage work was accomplished prior to blowdown. A successful blowdown, salamander tap and quench occurred. Reline activities are discussed. The furnace was returned to operation and within 10 days it was at 90% production.

  19. Structural analysis of bioceramic materials for denture application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Nurlaela; Tahir, Dahlang; Arbiansyah, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    Structural analysis has been performed on bioceramic materials for denture application by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). XRF is using for analysis chemical composition of raw materials. XRF shows the ratio 1 : 1 : 1 : 1 between feldspar, quartz, kaolin and eggshell, respectively, resulting composition CaO content of 56.78 %, which is similar with natural tooth. Sample preparation was carried out on temperature of 800 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C. X-ray diffraction result showed that the structure is crystalline with trigonal crystal system for SiO2 (a=b=4.9134 Å and c=5.4051 Å) and CaH2O2 (a=b=3.5925 Å and c=4.9082 Å). Based on the Scherrer's equation showed the crystallite size of the highest peak (SiO2) increase with increasing the temperature preparation. The highest hardness value (87 kg/mm2) and match with the standards of dentin hardness. The surface structure was observed by using SEM also discussed.

  20. Structural analysis of bioceramic materials for denture application

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, Nurlaela Tahir, Dahlang; Arbiansyah, Muhammad

    2016-03-11

    Structural analysis has been performed on bioceramic materials for denture application by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). XRF is using for analysis chemical composition of raw materials. XRF shows the ratio 1 : 1 : 1 : 1 between feldspar, quartz, kaolin and eggshell, respectively, resulting composition CaO content of 56.78 %, which is similar with natural tooth. Sample preparation was carried out on temperature of 800 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C. X-ray diffraction result showed that the structure is crystalline with trigonal crystal system for SiO{sub 2} (a=b=4.9134 Å and c=5.4051 Å) and CaH{sub 2}O{sub 2} (a=b=3.5925 Å and c=4.9082 Å). Based on the Scherrer’s equation showed the crystallite size of the highest peak (SiO{sub 2}) increase with increasing the temperature preparation. The highest hardness value (87 kg/mm{sup 2}) and match with the standards of dentin hardness. The surface structure was observed by using SEM also discussed.

  1. Comparison of Candida Albicans Adherence to Conventional Acrylic Denture Base Materials and Injection Molding Acrylic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Aslanimehr, Masoomeh; Rezvani, Shirin; Mahmoudi, Ali; Moosavi, Najmeh

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Candida species are believed to play an important role in initiation and progression of denture stomatitis. The type of the denture material also influences the adhesion of candida and development of stomatitis. Purpose: The aim of this study was comparing the adherence of candida albicans to the conventional and injection molding acrylic denture base materials. Materials and Method: Twenty injection molding and 20 conventional pressure pack acrylic discs (10×10×2 mm) were prepared according to their manufacturer’s instructions. Immediately before the study, samples were placed in sterile water for 3 days to remove residual monomers. The samples were then sterilized using an ultraviolet light unit for 10 minutes. 1×108 Cfu/ml suspension of candida albicans ATCC-10231 was prepared from 48 h cultured organism on sabouraud dextrose agar plates incubated at 37oC. 100 μL of this suspension was placed on the surface of each disk. After being incubated at 37oC for 1 hour, the samples were washed with normal saline to remove non-adherent cells. Attached cells were counted using the colony count method after shaking at 3000 rmp for 20 seconds. Finally, each group was tested for 108 times and the data were statistically analyzed by t-test. Results: Quantitative analysis revealed that differences in colony count average of candida albicans adherence to conventional acrylic materials (8.3×103) comparing to injection molding acrylic resins (6×103) were statistically significant (p<0.001). Conclusion: Significant reduction of candida albicans adherence to the injection acrylic resin materials makes them valuable for patients with high risk of denture stomatitis. PMID:28280761

  2. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of soft denture lining materials to an acrylic resin denture base.

    PubMed

    Gundogdu, Mustafa; Yesil Duymus, Zeynep; Alkurt, Murat

    2014-10-01

    Adhesive failure between acrylic resin and resilient liner material is commonly encountered in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength of 2 different resilient lining materials to an acrylic resin denture base. Ninety-six dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated from heat-polymerized acrylic resin, and 3 mm of the material was cut from the thin midsection. The specimens were divided into 6 groups according to their surface treatments: no surface treatment (control group), 36% phosphoric acid etching (acid group), erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (laser group), airborne-particle abrasion with 50-μm Al2O3 particles (abrasion group), an acid+laser group, and an abrasion+laser group. The specimens in each group were divided into 2 subgroups according to the resilient lining material used: heat-polymerized silicone based resilient liner (Molloplast B) and autopolymerized silicone-based resilient liner (Ufi Gel P). After all of the specimens had been polymerized, they were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 1 week. A tensile bond strength test was then performed. Data were analyzed with a 2-way ANOVA, and the Sidak multiple comparison test was used to identify significant differences (α=.05). The effects of the surface treatments and resilient lining materials on the surface of the denture base resin were examined with scanning electron microscopy. The tensile bond strength was significantly different between Molloplast B and Ufi Gel P (P<.001). The specimens of the acid group had the highest tensile bond strength, whereas those of the abrasion group had the lowest tensile bond strength. The scanning electron microscopy observations showed that the application of surface treatments modified the surface of the denture base resin. Molloplast B exhibited significantly higher bond strength than Ufi Gel P. Altering the surface of the acrylic resin denture base with 36

  3. Effect of denture cleanser on weight, surface roughness and tensile bond strength of two resilient denture liners.

    PubMed

    Huddar, Dayanand Ashok; Hombesh, M N; Sandhyarani, B; Chandu, G S; Nanjannawar, Girish Shankar; Shetty, Rohit

    2012-09-01

    Evaluating effects of a denture cleanser on weight, surface roughness and tensile bond strength on two resilient lining materials. Specimens of heat cure acrylic resin were prepared to verify weight change, surface roughness and tensile bond strength. Specimens were divided into four groups: Relined with resilient liner Visco-gel, soft liner immersed in Clinsodent denture cleanser and water and evaluated immediately, 24 hours, 7 and 15 days. Weight changes, roughness and tensile bond strength were determined and data submitted to statistical analysis. Visco-gel specimens immersed in water (group 1) have shown significant increased surface roughness than those immersed in Clinsodent (group 3) during 24 hours, 7 and 15 days. The soft liner specimens immersed in water (group 2) have shown increased surface roughness than those immersed in Clinsodent (group 4) during 24 hours and 7 days. Visco-gel specimens immersed in water have shown significant increased tensile bond strength during 7 and 15 days than those immersed in Clinsodent. The soft liner specimens immersed in water have shown increased tensile bond strength than those immersed in Clinsodent during immediately, 24 hours and 7 days. Within limitations of this study, specimens immersed in Clinsodent demonstrated increased weight changes compared with water. Specimens immersed in water demonstrated lesser surface roughness and tensile bond strength compared with specimens immersed in Clinsodent. Resilient denture liners and denture cleansers are most commonly used materials in prosthodontics. Caution should be taken while selecting the materials which cause the detrimental changes on properties of the materials.

  4. Biometric Denture Space- Concept of Neutral Zone Revisited Using A Hydrocolloid Impression Material

    PubMed Central

    Umamaheswaran, Aruna; Nayar, Sanjna

    2015-01-01

    Though the concept of neutral zone in making complete denture and its significance are well known, the material of choice has always been experimented to achieve better results. Recording of neutral zone using irreversible hydrocolloid (Alginate) as a material of choice would make the way of recording the neutral zone easier, as well as comfortable for the patient, when compared with other materials used for the purpose. This article describes the method of recording the biometric denture space (neutral zone) using hydrocolloid impression material which is most commonly used in everyday dental practice. PMID:26673250

  5. Effect of three investing materials on tooth movement during flasking procedure for complete denture construction

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Alaa’a M.

    2015-01-01

    Problem statement Tooth movement has been shown to occur during and after the processing of complete dentures. An understanding of this phenomenon may permit one to construct functional complete dentures that require less occlusal adjustment in the articulator and in the patient’s mouth. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of three different investing methods on tooth movement occurring during the processing of simulated maxillary complete dentures. Material and methods Forty-five similar maxillary dentures were made using heat-polymerized acrylic resin, and assigned randomly to three experimental groups (n = 15 each) according to investing method: plaster–plaster–plaster (P–P–P), plaster–stone–stone (P-S-S), and plaster–mix (P–M). Specimens in all experimental groups were compression molded with denture base resin. Transverse interincisor (I–I) and intermolar (M–M) distances, and anteroposterior incisor–molar (LI–LM and RI–RM) distances, were measured with digital calipers at the wax denture stage (pre-polymerization) and after denture decasting (post-polymerization). Analysis of variance and Tukey’s test were used to compare the results. Results M–M, LI–LM, and RI–RM movement was significantly greater in the P–P–P group than in the P–S–S and P–M groups; no significant difference in I–I movement was observed among groups. Transverse movement along M–M and I–I was significantly greater than anteroposterior movement in the P–P–P group; no significant difference among measurements was observed in the other two groups. Conclusion The study results indicate that the use of dental stone or a 50:50 mixture of plaster and stone for investing of dentures is an important factor in efforts to control the magnitude of tooth movement. PMID:26792971

  6. Effect of silica coating and silane surface treatment on the bond strength of soft denture liner to denture base material

    PubMed Central

    ATSÜ, Saadet; KESKİN, Yasemin

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the effects of different surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of an autopolymerizing silicone denture liner to a denture base material after thermocycling. Material and Methods Fifty rectangular heat-polymerized acrylic resin (QC-20) specimens consisting of a set of 2 acrylic blocks were used in the tensile test. Specimens were divided into 5 test groups (n=10) according to the bonding surface treatment as follows: Group A, adhesive treatment (Ufi Gel P adhesive) (control); Group S, sandblasting using 50-µm Al2O3; Group SCSIL, silica coating using 30-µm Al2O3 modified by silica and silanized with silane agent (CoJet System); Group SCA, silica coating and adhesive application; Group SCSILA, silica coating, silane and adhesive treatment. The 2 PMMA blocks were placed into molds and the soft lining materials (Ufi Gel P) were packed into the space and polymerized. All specimens were thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before the tensile test. Bond strength data were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and Duncan tests. Fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (FTIR) analysis were used for the chemical analysis and a profilometer was used for the roughness of the sample surfaces. Results The highest bond strength test value was observed for Group A (1.35±0.13); the lowest value was for Group S (0.28±0.07) and Group SCSIL (0.34±0.03). Mixed and cohesive type failures were seen in Group A, SCA and SCSILA. Group S and SCSIL showed the least silicone integrations and the roughest surfaces. Conclusion Sandblasting, silica coating and silane surface treatments of the denture base resin did not increase the bond strength of the silicone based soft liner. However, in this study, the chemical analysis and surface profilometer provided interesting insights about the bonding mechanism between the denture base resin and silicone soft liner

  7. Evaluating the efficacy of denture cleansing materials in removal of tea and turmeric stains: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Makhija, Priyanka P; Shigli, Kamal; Awinashe, Vaibhav

    2016-01-01

    Extrinsic staining of acrylic resin dentures could be a major esthetic problem for denture wearers. Tea, coffee, cola, turmeric, and tobacco often cause extrinsic staining of dentures. To evaluate the efficacy of various denture cleansing materials in the removal of tea and turmeric stains and to compare the efficacy of those denture cleansers with each other in the removal of tea and turmeric stains. Heat-cured acrylic resin specimens were stained using tea and turmeric solutions. The spectrophotometer was used to determine the reflectance values of the samples and to evaluate the efficacy of various denture cleansing materials in removal of tea and turmeric stains. Three denture cleansers, namely, sodium hypochlorite, Safe plus, and Clinsodent were used in the study. Water was used as a control. ANOVA test and post hoc Tukey's test were used to determine the statistical difference between the groups. A statistically significant difference was found (p ≤ 0.05) between the different denture cleansing materials used. Products containing sodium perborate along with trisodium phosphate had the highest stain removing capability. It was found that all the denture cleansing materials used in the study were effective in removing tea and turmeric stains. Products containing sodium perborate along with trisodium phosphate had a comparatively greater stain removal capability than products containing sodium perborate along with sodium bicarbonate followed by products containing sodium hypochlorite followed by water (control).

  8. Full Mouth Oral Rehabilitation by Maxillary Implant Supported Hybrid Denture Employing a Fiber Reinforced Material Instead of Conventional PMMA

    PubMed Central

    Qamheya, Ala Hassan A.; Yeniyol, Sinem; Arısan, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    Many people have life-long problems with their dentures, such as difficulties with speaking and eating, loose denture, and sore mouth syndrome. The evolution of dental implant supported prosthesis gives these patients normal healthy life for their functional and esthetic advantages. This case report presents the fabrication of maxillary implant supported hybrid prosthesis by using Nanofilled Composite (NFC) material in teeth construction to rehabilitate a complete denture wearer patient. PMID:26557392

  9. PMMA denture base material enhancement: a review of fiber, filler, and nanofiller addition

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Mohammed M; Fouda, Shaimaa M; Al-Harbi, Fahad A; Näpänkangas, Ritva; Raustia, Aune

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews acrylic denture base resin enhancement during the past few decades. Specific attention is given to the effect of fiber, filler, and nanofiller addition on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) properties. The review is based on scientific reviews, papers, and abstracts, as well as studies concerning the effect of additives, fibers, fillers, and reinforcement materials on PMMA, published between 1974 and 2016. Many studies have reported improvement of PMMA denture base material with the addition of fillers, fibers, nanofiller, and hybrid reinforcement. However, most of the studies were limited to in vitro investigations without bioactivity and clinical implications. Considering the findings of the review, there is no ideal denture base material, but the properties of PMMA could be improved with some modifications, especially with silanized nanoparticle addition and a hybrid reinforcement system. PMID:28553115

  10. Prevention and treatment of Candida colonization on denture liners: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Skupien, Jovito Adiel; Valentini, Fernanda; Boscato, Noéli; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana

    2013-11-01

    Denture liners are well known for their poor physical properties that favor the accumulation of plaque and colonization by Candida species, which can irritate the oral tissues and lead to denture stomatitis. A systematic review was conducted to determine the feasibility of a prevention protocol for Candida colonization in denture liners and an effective treatment after the fungi has colonized the material. Clinical and in vitro investigations that assessed the treatment and/or prevention of Candida colonization and biofilm formation in denture liners were selected according to the PRISMA statement. Seven electronic databases were searched from 1950 to April 2012 with the keywords "denture liner" OR "reline*" OR "tissue conditioner" AND "Candida" OR "denture stomatitis" OR "oral candidiasis" OR "antifungal agents" OR "denture clean*". The incorporation of nystatin (in general, 500 000 units) into tissue conditioners to prevent the onset of the disease and immersion in sodium hypochlorite for disinfection were the methods most often described in this systematic review, and both methods were able to prevent or inhibit Candida colonization, depending on their concentrations. The 0.5% sodium hypochlorite concentration can disinfect tissue conditioners and denture liners. Microwave irradiation has also been described an alternative method of disinfection. Because of a lack of standardized results (especially with regard to the method used to perform microbial counts), a meta-analysis could not be performed. The literature suggests that the use of 0.5% sodium hypochlorite can help disinfect denture liners and tissue conditioners. The incorporation of nystatin in those materials is also able to treat or prevent oral candidiasis. However, as most of the studies were in vitro, there is insufficient reliable evidence to truly provide recommendations regarding the ideal cleaning method or whether the addition of antifungal agents is worthwhile. Well-designed randomized

  11. Effect of denture cleansers on metal ion release and surface roughness of denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Davi, Letícia Resende; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz; Lovato-Silva, Cláudia Helena; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Chemical disinfectants are usually associated with mechanical methods to remove stains and reduce biofilm formation. This study evaluated the effect of disinfectants on release of metal ions and surface roughness of commercially pure titanium, metal alloys, and heat-polymerized acrylic resin, simulating 180 immersion trials. Disk-shaped specimens were fabricated with commercially pure titanium (Tritan), nickel-chromium-molybdenum-titanium (Vi-Star), nickel-chromium (Fit Cast-SB Plus), and nickel-chromium-beryllium (Fit Cast-V) alloys. Each cast disk was invested in the flasks, incorporating the metal disk to the heat-polymerized acrylic resin. The specimens (n=5) were immersed in these solutions: sodium hypochlorite 0.05%, Periogard, Cepacol, Corega Tabs, Medical Interporous, and Polident. Deionized water was used as a control. The quantitative analysis of metal ion release was performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ELAN DRC II). A surface analyzer (Surftest SJ-201P) was used to measure the surface roughness (µm). Data were recorded before and after the immersions and evaluated by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The nickel release proved most significant with the Vi-Star and Fit Cast-V alloys after immersion in Medical Interporous. There was a significant difference in surface roughness of the resin (p=0.011) after immersion. Cepacol caused significantly higher resin roughness. The immersion products had no influence on metal roughness (p=0.388). It could be concluded that the tested alloys can be considered safe for removable denture fabrication, but disinfectant solutions as Cepacol and Medical Interporous tablet for daily denture immersion should be used with caution because it caused greater resin surface roughness and greater ion release, respectively.

  12. A Comparison of Accuracy of Matrix Impression System with Putty Reline Technique and Multiple Mix Technique: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M Praveen; Patil, Suneel G; Dheeraj, Bhandari; Reddy, Keshav; Goel, Dinker; Krishna, Gopi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The difficulty in obtaining an acceptable impression increases exponentially as the number of abutments increases. Accuracy of the impression material and the use of a suitable impression technique are of utmost importance in the fabrication of a fixed partial denture. This study compared the accuracy of the matrix impression system with conventional putty reline and multiple mix technique for individual dies by comparing the inter-abutment distance in the casts obtained from the impressions. Materials and Methods: Three groups, 10 impressions each with three impression techniques (matrix impression system, putty reline technique and multiple mix technique) were made of a master die. Typodont teeth were embedded in a maxillary frasaco model base. The left first premolar was removed to create a three-unit fixed partial denture situation and the left canine and second premolar were prepared conservatively, and hatch marks were made on the abutment teeth. The final casts obtained from the impressions were examined under a profile projector and the inter-abutment distance was calculated for all the casts and compared. Results: The results from this study showed that in the mesiodistal dimensions the percentage deviation from master model in Group I was 0.1 and 0.2, in Group II was 0.9 and 0.3, and Group III was 1.6 and 1.5, respectively. In the labio-palatal dimensions the percentage deviation from master model in Group I was 0.01 and 0.4, Group II was 1.9 and 1.3, and Group III was 2.2 and 2.0, respectively. In the cervico-incisal dimensions the percentage deviation from the master model in Group I was 1.1 and 0.2, Group II was 3.9 and 1.7, and Group III was 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In the inter-abutment dimension of dies, percentage deviation from master model in Group I was 0.1, Group II was 0.6, and Group III was 1.0. Conclusion: The matrix impression system showed more accuracy of reproduction for individual dies when compared with putty reline

  13. A Comparative Clinical Study of the Effect of Denture Cleansing on the Surface Roughness and Hardness of Two Denture Base Materials.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Amani Ramadan; Dehis, Wessam Mohamed; Elboraey, Asmaa Nabil; ElGabry, Hisham Samir

    2016-09-15

    This study aimed to verify the influence of oral environment and denture cleansers on the surface roughness and hardness of two different denture base materials. A total of sixteen identical removable disc specimens (RDS) were processed. Eight RDS were made from heat-cured acrylic resin (AR) and the other eight were fabricated from thermoplastic injection moulded resin (TR). Surface roughness and hardness of DRS were measured using ultrasonic profilometry and Universal testing machine respectively. Then the four RDS (two AR and two of TR) were fixed to each maxillary denture, after three months RDS were retrieved. Surface roughness and hardness of RDS have measured again. The surface roughness measurements revealed no significant difference (p >0.05) for both disc groups at baseline. However, both groups showed a significant increase in the surface roughness after three months with higher mean value for (TR) group. On the other hand, the (AR) group showed higher hardness mean value than (TR) group at baseline with no significant decrease in the hardness values (p >0.05) following three months follow-up period. Denture cleansers have an effect on the denture's surface roughness and hardness concurrently with an oral condition which will consequently influence the complete dentures' lifetime and patients' satisfaction.

  14. Impact of Packing and Processing Technique on Mechanical Properties of Acrylic Denture Base Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nejatian, Touraj; Sefat, Farshid; Johnson, Tony

    2015-01-01

    The fracture resistance of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as the most popular denture base material is not satisfactory. Different factors can be involved in denture fracture. Among them, flexural fatigue and impact are the most common failure mechanisms of an acrylic denture base. It has been shown that there is a correlation between the static strength and fatigue life of composite resins. Therefore, the transverse strength of the denture base materials can be an important indicator of their service life. In order to improve the fracture resistance of PMMA, extensive studies have been carried out; however, only a few promising results were achieved, which are limited to some mechanical properties of PMMA at the cost of other properties. This study aimed at optimizing the packing and processing condition of heat-cured PMMA as a denture base resin in order to improve its biaxial flexural strength (BFS). The results showed that the plain type of resin with a powder/monomer ratio of 2.5:1 or less, packed conventionally and cured in a water bath for 2 h at 95 °C provides the highest BFS. Also, it was found that the performance of the dry heat processor is inconsistent with the number of flasks being loaded.

  15. A Comparison of Accuracy of Matrix Impression System with Putty Reline Technique and Multiple Mix Technique: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M Praveen; Patil, Suneel G; Dheeraj, Bhandari; Reddy, Keshav; Goel, Dinker; Krishna, Gopi

    2015-06-01

    The difficulty in obtaining an acceptable impression increases exponentially as the number of abutments increases. Accuracy of the impression material and the use of a suitable impression technique are of utmost importance in the fabrication of a fixed partial denture. This study compared the accuracy of the matrix impression system with conventional putty reline and multiple mix technique for individual dies by comparing the inter-abutment distance in the casts obtained from the impressions. Three groups, 10 impressions each with three impression techniques (matrix impression system, putty reline technique and multiple mix technique) were made of a master die. Typodont teeth were embedded in a maxillary frasaco model base. The left first premolar was removed to create a three-unit fixed partial denture situation and the left canine and second premolar were prepared conservatively, and hatch marks were made on the abutment teeth. The final casts obtained from the impressions were examined under a profile projector and the inter-abutment distance was calculated for all the casts and compared. The results from this study showed that in the mesiodistal dimensions the percentage deviation from master model in Group I was 0.1 and 0.2, in Group II was 0.9 and 0.3, and Group III was 1.6 and 1.5, respectively. In the labio-palatal dimensions the percentage deviation from master model in Group I was 0.01 and 0.4, Group II was 1.9 and 1.3, and Group III was 2.2 and 2.0, respectively. In the cervico-incisal dimensions the percentage deviation from the master model in Group I was 1.1 and 0.2, Group II was 3.9 and 1.7, and Group III was 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In the inter-abutment dimension of dies, percentage deviation from master model in Group I was 0.1, Group II was 0.6, and Group III was 1.0. The matrix impression system showed more accuracy of reproduction for individual dies when compared with putty reline technique and multiple mix technique in all the three

  16. Effect of Cigarette Smoke on Surface Roughness of Different Denture Base Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mahross, Hamada Zaki; Mohamed, Mahmoud Darwish; Hassan, Ahmed Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background Surface roughness is an important property of denture bases since denture bases are in contact with oral tissues and a rough surface may affect tissues health due to microorganism accumulation. Therefore, the effect of cigarette smoke on the surface roughness of two commercially available denture base materials was evaluated to emphasize which type has superior properties for clinical use. Materials and Methods A total numbers of 40 specimens were constructed from two commercially available denture base materials; heat-cured PMMA and visible light cured UDMA resins (20 for each). The specimens for each type were randomly divided into: Group I: Heat cured resin control group; Group II: Heat cured acrylic resin specimens exposed to cigarette smoking; Group III: Light cured resin control group; Group IV: Light cured resin specimens exposed to cigarette smoking. The control groups used for immersion in distilled water and the smoke test groups used for exposure to cigarette smoking. The smoke test groups specimens were exposed to smoking in a custom made smoking chamber by using 20 cigarettes for each specimen. The surface roughness was measured by using Pocket SurfPS1 profilometer and the measurements considered as the difference between the initial and final roughness measured before and after smoking. Results The t-test for paired observation of test specimens after exposure to smoking was indicated significant change in surface roughness for Group II (p< 0.05) but has no significance with Group IV. Otherwise, there were no significant differences with control groups (Group I and III). Conclusion The surface roughness of the dentures constructed from heat cured acrylic resin had been increased after exposure to cigarette smoke but had no impact on the dentures constructed from visible light cured resin. PMID:26501010

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF CANDIDA-ASSOCIATED DENTURE STOMATITIS: NEW INSIGHTS

    PubMed Central

    Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Cury, Altair Antoninha Del Bel; Crielaard, Wim; Cate, Jacob Martien ten

    2008-01-01

    Despite therapeutic progress, opportunistic oral fungal infectious diseases have increased in prevalence, especially in denture wearers. The combination of entrapment of yeast cells in irregularities in denture-base and denture-relining materials, poor oral hygiene and several systemic factors is the most probable cause for the onset of this infectious disease. Hence colonization and growth on prostheses by Candida species are of clinical importance. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss several key factors controlling the adhesion of Candida species which are relevant to denture-associated stomatitis. Although there is some consensus on the role of surface properties, studies on several other factors, as the use of denture liners, salivary properties and yeast-bacterial interactions, have shown contradictory findings. A comprehensive fundamental understanding is hampered by conflicting findings due to the large variations in experimental protocols, while other factors have never been thoroughly studied. Surface free energy and surface roughness control the initial adherence, but temporal changes have not been reported. Neither have in vivo studies shown if the substratum type is critical in dictating biofilm accumulation during longer periods in the oral environment. The contribution of saliva is unclear due to factors like variations in its collection and handling. Initial findings have disclosed that also bacteria are crucial for the successful establishment of Candida in biofilms, but the clinical significance of this observation is yet to be confirmed. In conclusion, there is a need to standardize experimental procedures, to bridge the gap between laboratory and in vivo methodologies and findings and – in general – to thoroughly investigate the factors that modulate the initial attachment and subsequent colonization of denture-base materials and the oral mucosa of patients subjected to Candida infections. Information on how these factors can

  18. Clinical performance of a light-cured denture base material compared to polymethylmethacrylate--a randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Gohlke-Wehrße, Hanna-Lena; Giese-Kraft, Katja; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term performance of a visible light-cured resin (VLCR) denture base material and to compare it to a well-established polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based denture acrylic in a randomized split-mouth clinical long-term study. One hundred removable partial dentures in 90 patients, with at least two saddles each, were investigated. One saddle was made of VLCR, while the other was made of PMMA at random. Plaque adhesion, tissue reaction, and technical parameters of the dentures were assessed 6, 12, and 18 months after treatment. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Though VLCR showed higher plaque adhesion than PMMA after 6, 12, and 18 months (p < 0.001), there were no important differences with regard to tissue reaction. Concerning plaque adhesion, surface quality with regard to the lower side, interfaces between denture acrylic and metal and the boundary between denture acrylic and denture tooth PMMA was rated higher than VLCR. The surface quality of the upper side of the denture saddles showed no significant differences (p > 0.05). Neither VLCR nor PMMA showed discoloration at any point in time (p > 0.05). It can be concluded that VLCR is a viable alternative for the production of removable dentures. Especially in patients with hypersensitivities to PMMA, VLCR is particularly suitable for clinical use.

  19. Oral Crest Lengthening for Increasing Removable Denture Retention by Means of CO2 Laser

    PubMed Central

    Nammour, Samir; Gerges, Elie; Bou Tayeh, Rima; Zeinoun, Toni

    2014-01-01

    The loss of teeth and their replacement by artificial denture is associated with many problems. The denture needs a certain amount of ridge height to give it retention and a long-term function. Crest lengthening procedures are performed to provide a better anatomic environment and to create proper supporting structures for more stability and retention of the denture. The purpose of our study is to describe and evaluate the effectiveness of CO2 laser-assisted surgery in patients treated for crest lengthening (vestibular deepening). There have been various surgical techniques described in order to restore alveolar ridge height by pushing muscles attaching of the jaws. Most of these techniques cause postoperative complications such as edemas, hemorrhage, pain, infection, slow healing, and rebound to initial position. Our clinical study describes the treatment planning and clinical steps for the crest lengthening with the use of CO2 laser beam (6–15 Watts in noncontact, energy density range: 84.92–212.31 J/cm2, focus, and continuous mode with a focal point diameter of 0.3 mm). At the end of each surgery, dentures were temporarily relined with a soft material. Patients were asked to mandatorily wear their relined denture for a minimum of 4–6 weeks and to remove it for hygienic purposes. At the end of each surgery, the deepest length of the vestibule was measured by the operator. No sutures were made and bloodless wounds healed in second intention without grafts. Results pointed out the efficiency of the procedure using CO2 laser. At 8 weeks of post-op, the mean of crest lengthening was stable without rebound. Only a loss of 15% was noticed. To conclude, the use of CO2 laser is an effective option for crest lengthening. PMID:25383385

  20. Effect of Cigarette Smoke on Surface Roughness of Different Denture Base Materials.

    PubMed

    Mahross, Hamada Zaki; Mohamed, Mahmoud Darwish; Hassan, Ahmed Mohammed; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-09-01

    Surface roughness is an important property of denture bases since denture bases are in contact with oral tissues and a rough surface may affect tissues health due to microorganism accumulation. Therefore, the effect of cigarette smoke on the surface roughness of two commercially available denture base materials was evaluated to emphasize which type has superior properties for clinical use. A total numbers of 40 specimens were constructed from two commercially available denture base materials; heat-cured PMMA and visible light cured UDMA resins (20 for each). The specimens for each type were randomly divided into: Group I: Heat cured resin control group; Group II: Heat cured acrylic resin specimens exposed to cigarette smoking; Group III: Light cured resin control group; Group IV: Light cured resin specimens exposed to cigarette smoking. The control groups used for immersion in distilled water and the smoke test groups used for exposure to cigarette smoking. The smoke test groups specimens were exposed to smoking in a custom made smoking chamber by using 20 cigarettes for each specimen. The surface roughness was measured by using Pocket SurfPS1 profilometer and the measurements considered as the difference between the initial and final roughness measured before and after smoking. The t-test for paired observation of test specimens after exposure to smoking was indicated significant change in surface roughness for Group II (p< 0.05) but has no significance with Group IV. Otherwise, there were no significant differences with control groups (Group I and III). The surface roughness of the dentures constructed from heat cured acrylic resin had been increased after exposure to cigarette smoke but had no impact on the dentures constructed from visible light cured resin.

  1. Further observations on high impact strength denture-base materials.

    PubMed

    Rodford, R A; Braden, M

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that high impact strength can be conferred on denture-base poly(methyl methacrylate) polymers by modification with acrylic-terminated butadiene-styrene block copolymers, and that the acrylic end-group was necessary for effective reinforcement. It is now shown that, by solvent extraction studies, grafting of the copolymer occurs both with acrylic-terminated and non-terminated block copolymers. It is therefore concluded that the mode of grafting is different, and some possible mechanisms are discussed.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Acrylic-Based Photopolymer as a Candidate for Denture Base Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicaksono, S. T.; Rasyida; Ardhyananta, H.

    2017-05-01

    Denture base is a denture part that rests on the soft tissue covering the jawbone and becomes an anchor of a denture. The material that commonly used for this purpose is poly (methyl methacrylate). However, it lacks in mechanical properties due to high water absorption. The aim of this research was to improve the physical and mechanical properties of poly (methyl methacrylate) by making a copolymer with styrene via photopolymerization process. In this method was used the addition of styrene monomer at 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 wt% into the acrylic resin to form copolymer materials via photopolymerization process. The amount of 1.5 wt% Irgacure 784’s photoinitiator was added as a photoinitiator. The results showed that the addition of 40% by weight of styrene copolymer is the best performance compare to the addition styrene of 10, 20, 30, and 50%. The samples with an addition styrene of 40 wt% showed excellent properties such as high water absorption value of 2.405 μg/mm3, the solubility of 0.434 μg/mm3, the flexural strength of 69.336 MPa, a flexural modulus of 1.236 GPa, and a hardness value of 82.583 HD. Poly (methyl methacrylate-co-styrene) copolymer with the addition of styrene 40 wt% has the closest value to the requirements for a denture base material.

  3. Tensile Bond Strength between Soft Liners and Two Chemically Different Denture Base Materials: Effect of Thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Tugut, Faik; Coskun, Mehmet Emre; Dogan, Derya Ozdemir; Kirmali, Omer; Akin, Hakan

    2016-06-01

    The bond strength of soft denture liner to a recently introduced denture base resin after thermocycling has not been compared to traditional denture base materials. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of thermocycling on the tensile bond strength of soft denture liners to two chemically different denture base resins, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA). A total of 48 PMMA and UDMA tensile test specimens were fabricated by attaching two different soft denture liners (Molloplast-B, Permaflex) according to the manufacturers' instructions and assigned to two groups. Half of the specimens for each group were stored in water for 1 week, and the other half were thermocycled (5000 cycles) between baths of 5°C and 55°C. Specimens were mounted on a universal testing machine with a 5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons tests (α = 0.05). The highest bond strength was measured in the specimens from the UDMA/Molloplast groups, and the lowest was seen in the PMMA/Permaflex group. No significant difference in bond strength was detected in PMMA/Permaflex groups after thermocycling (p = 0.082), whereas other groups exhibited significant differences after thermocycling (p < 0.05). Thermocycling decreased the bond strength values in both the PMMA and UDMA groups. Regardless of types of soft liners, PMMA specimens presented lower bond strength values than UDMA specimens, both before and after thermocycling. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  4. [Experimental basis of a new material for the manufacture of bases dentures].

    PubMed

    Shturminskiĭ, V G

    2013-10-01

    The author studied the problem of improving the quality of prosthetic removable prostheses through the development of new basic material based on polypropylene copolymer. To this end, we examined the physical and chemical structure and hygienic properties of the produced material. The studies found that the developed material of polypropylene optimal solution for the partial plate denture bases, without flaws acrylic prosthesis and improves the properties of the previously used polypropylene plastics.

  5. Antifungal activity, biofilm-controlling effect, and biocompatibility of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone)-grafted denture materials

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinbo; Cao, Zhengbing; Yeh, Chih-Ko; Sun, Yuyu

    2013-01-01

    Colonization and biofilm-formation of Candida species on denture surfaces cause Candida-associated denture stomatitis (CADS), a common, recurring disease affecting up to 67% of denture wearers. We developed poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone)-grafted denture materials that can be repeatedly recharged with various antifungal drugs to achieve long-term antifungal and biofilm-controlling effects. The monomer, N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NVP), was grafted onto poly(methyl methacrylate) denture resins through plasma-initiated grafting polymerization. The physical properties and biocompatibility of the resulting resins were not negatively affected by the presence of up to 7.92% of grafted poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone) (PNVP). Miconazole and chlorhexidine digluconate (CD) were used as model antifungal drugs. PNVP grafting significantly increased the drug absorption capability of the resulting denture materials. Further, the new materials showed sustained drug release and provided antifungal effects for weeks (in the case of CD) to months (in the case of miconazole). The drug-depleted resins could be recharged with the same or a different class of antifungal drug to further extend antifungal duration. If needed, drugs on the PNVP-grafted denture materials could be “washed out” (quenched) by treating with PNVP aqueous solutions to stop drug release. These results point to great potentials of the new materials in controlling biofilm-formation in a wide range of device-related applications. PMID:23708753

  6. [Stress releasing effect of tissue conditioning materials for interim dentures after implant installation].

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kazutomo; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Sogo, Motofumi; Tsugawa, Tsuyoshi; Ishii, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the influence of the thickness and its longitudinal change within the limited denture space on the stress releasing effect for installed implants during the healing period of a two-stage procedure. As for the tissue conditioning material, Tissue Conditioner (Shofu, Kyoto, Japan) with the designated powder liquid ratio was used. The force transmitted to the implant with the material 5 min after the mixing was measured by a miniature pressure sensor in the position of the implant head (Kyowa, Tokyo, Japan). Measurements were repeated with the material preserved in the water for one and two weeks. Load of 2 kg was applied with a 3-mm diameter round tip using a static loading machine for 2 min to the center of the flat type denture model. The model consisted of denture, mucosa, tissue conditioning material and implant where the first three variables were changed as in the oral cavity. Influence of thickness of each variable was examined longitudinally. Force measured with any thickness of tissue conditioning material was smaller than that without the material. The stress releasing effect did not change with change of the longitudinal material property up to two weeks. Within the limitations of our study, it was suggested that the stress releasing effect of the tissue conditioning material for the installed implant was not influenced by the thickness or change of longitudinal property.

  7. In vitro comparative evaluation of mechanical properties of temporary restorative materials used in fixed partial denture

    PubMed Central

    Saisadan, D.; Manimaran, P.; Meenapriya, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Materials used to fabricate provisional restorations can be classified as acrylics or resin composites. Provisional crows can be either prefabricated or custom made. Acrylics: These materials have been used to fabricate provisional restorations since the 1930s and usually available as powder and liquid. They are the most commonly used materials today for both single-unit and multiple-unit restorations. In general, their popularity is due to their low cost, acceptable esthetics, and versatility. Composites: Composite provisional materials use bis-acryl resin, a hydrophobic material that is similar to bis-GMA. Composites are available as auto-polymerized, dualpolymerized and visible light polymerized. Preformed Crowns: Preformed provisional crowns or matrices usually consist of tooth-shaped shells of plastic, cellulose acetate or metal. They are commercially available in various tooth sizes and are usually selected for a particular tooth anatomy. They are commonly relined with acrylic resin to provide a more custom fit before cementation, but the plastic and metal crown shells can also be cemented directly onto prepared teeth. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to choose a material to serve as a better interim prosthesis and to compare three different properties – flexural strength, compressive strength, and color stability. Materials and Methods: The samples were made with three different provisional materials (Revotek LC, Protemp 4, TemSpan). Result: It was inferred from the study that no one material was superior in all three tested parameters. PMID:27829758

  8. In vitro comparative evaluation of mechanical properties of temporary restorative materials used in fixed partial denture.

    PubMed

    Saisadan, D; Manimaran, P; Meenapriya, P K

    2016-10-01

    Materials used to fabricate provisional restorations can be classified as acrylics or resin composites. Provisional crows can be either prefabricated or custom made. These materials have been used to fabricate provisional restorations since the 1930s and usually available as powder and liquid. They are the most commonly used materials today for both single-unit and multiple-unit restorations. In general, their popularity is due to their low cost, acceptable esthetics, and versatility. Composite provisional materials use bis-acryl resin, a hydrophobic material that is similar to bis-GMA. Composites are available as auto-polymerized, dualpolymerized and visible light polymerized. Preformed provisional crowns or matrices usually consist of tooth-shaped shells of plastic, cellulose acetate or metal. They are commercially available in various tooth sizes and are usually selected for a particular tooth anatomy. They are commonly relined with acrylic resin to provide a more custom fit before cementation, but the plastic and metal crown shells can also be cemented directly onto prepared teeth. The aim of this study is to choose a material to serve as a better interim prosthesis and to compare three different properties - flexural strength, compressive strength, and color stability. The samples were made with three different provisional materials (Revotek LC, Protemp 4, TemSpan). It was inferred from the study that no one material was superior in all three tested parameters.

  9. Use of Candida-specific chicken egg yolk antibodies to inhibit the adhering of Candida to denture base materials: prevention of denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Yoshiaki; Fujisaki, Junichi; Nagayama, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Kiyotsugu; Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Hamada, Tomofumi; Sakamoto, Ryoich; Mukai, Hiroshi; Sugihara, Kazumasa

    2016-09-01

    Polyclonal anti-Candida chicken egg yolk antibodies (anti-IgY) were used to investigate the prevention of adherence of Candida species to denture base material in vitro. Candida is a potential virulence factor that can cause systemic infection and even death in immunocompromised individuals. Because long-term antifungal treatment may lead to the emergence of drug-resistant strains, it is necessary to develop novel preventive measures and treatments for candidiasis. Three types of chicken egg yolk antibodies were used in this study: non-specific antibody (control IgY), Candida albicans-specific antibody (anti-C.a.IgY) and Candida glabrata-specific antibody (anti-C.g.IgY). A mixture of different dilutions of each antibody with a suspension of Candida species and denture base material was incubated for 3 h, and then the colony-forming units of Candida on the denture base material were counted. Compared with control IgY, anti-C.a.IgY and anti-C.g.IgY significantly inhibited the adherence of C. albicans, but anti-C.a.IgY tended to be more potent than anti-C.g.IgY. The adherence of C. glabrata was also inhibited significantly by anti-C.a.IgY and anti-C.g.IgY with almost equivalent potency, indicating that their actions against C. glabrata were comparable. This study revealed the inhibitory effects of anti-C.a.IgY and anti-C.g.IgY against the adherence of C. albicans and C. glabrata to denture base material. This finding indicates the possibility of a beneficial effect of IgYs for the prevention of denture stomatitis and candidiasis in clinical settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A comparative evaluation of effect on water sorption and solubility of a temporary soft denture liner material when stored either in distilled water, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite or artificial saliva: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Aditi; Shenoy, K. Kamalakanth

    2016-01-01

    desiccation (W3). Water sorption and solubility was calculated: 1. Sorption (mg/cm2) = (W2−W1)/Surface area 2. Solubility (mg/cm2) = (W1−W3)/Surface area. Statistical Analysis: Statistical Analysis was done using one way analysis of variance and the intercomparison between each group was done using Tukey's honestly significance difference (HSD) test. Results: Within the limitations of this study it was concluded that water sorption of the GC RELINE™ soft denture liner material was highest in distilled water followed by 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and least in Shellis artificial saliva at 4, 7, and 11 day interval. However, on the 15th day, the results showed maximum water sorption in 5.25% sodium hypochlorite followed by distilled water and least in artificial saliva. The results on solubility showed highest solubility of GC RELINE soft denture liner in artificial saliva followed by distilled water and least in 5.25% sodium hypochlorite at 4, 7, 11, and 15 day interval. Discussion: The least water uptake of the soft liner in artificial saliva was due to its ionic properties and supports the theory that water uptake of these materials is osmotically driven. However, the solubility was highest in artificial saliva since it is a mix of various salts and other additives, so there is a possibility of interaction with soft denture lining material. PMID:27134429

  11. Pressure transmission area and maximum pressure transmission of different thermoplastic resin denture base materials under impact load.

    PubMed

    Nasution, Hubban; Kamonkhantikul, Krid; Arksornnukit, Mansuang; Takahashi, Hidekazu

    2017-06-09

    The purposes of the present study were to examine the pressure transmission area and maximum pressure transmission of thermoplastic resin denture base materials under an impact load, and to evaluate the modulus of elasticity and nanohardness of thermoplastic resin denture base. Three injection-molded thermoplastic resin denture base materials [polycarbonate (Basis PC), ethylene propylene (Duraflex), and polyamide (Valplast)] and one conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin (PMMA, SR Triplex Hot) denture base, all with a mandibular first molar acrylic resin denture tooth set in were evaluated (n=6). Pressure transmission area and maximum pressure transmission of the specimens under an impact load were observed by using pressure-sensitive sheets. The modulus of elasticity and nanohardness of each denture base (n=10) were measured on 15×15×15×3mm(3) specimen by using an ultramicroindentation system. The pressure transmission area, modulus of elasticity, and nanohardness data were statistically analyzed with 1-way ANOVA, followed by Tamhane or Tukey HSD post hoc test (α=.05). The maximum pressure transmission data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis H test, followed by Mann-Whitney U test (α=.05). Polymethyl methacrylate showed significantly larger pressure transmission area and higher maximum pressure transmission than the other groups (P<.001). Significant differences were found in modulus of elasticity and nanohardness among the four types of denture bases (P<.001). Pressure transmission area and maximum pressure transmission varied among the thermoplastic resin denture base materials. Differences in the modulus of elasticity and nanohardness of each type of denture base were demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A comparative evaluation of effect on water sorption and solubility of a temporary soft denture liner material when stored either in distilled water, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite or artificial saliva: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Garg, Aditi; Shenoy, K Kamalakanth

    2016-01-01

    was calculated: 1. Sorption (mg/cm2) = (W2-W1)/Surface area 2. Solubility (mg/cm2) = (W1-W3)/Surface area. Statistical Analysis was done using one way analysis of variance and the intercomparison between each group was done using Tukey's honestly significance difference (HSD) test. Within the limitations of this study it was concluded that water sorption of the GC RELINE™ soft denture liner material was highest in distilled water followed by 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and least in Shellis artificial saliva at 4, 7, and 11 day interval. However, on the 15th day, the results showed maximum water sorption in 5.25% sodium hypochlorite followed by distilled water and least in artificial saliva. The results on solubility showed highest solubility of GC RELINE soft denture liner in artificial saliva followed by distilled water and least in 5.25% sodium hypochlorite at 4, 7, 11, and 15 day interval. The least water uptake of the soft liner in artificial saliva was due to its ionic properties and supports the theory that water uptake of these materials is osmotically driven. However, the solubility was highest in artificial saliva since it is a mix of various salts and other additives, so there is a possibility of interaction with soft denture lining material.

  13. Effectiveness of microwave sterilization on three hard chairside reline resins.

    PubMed

    Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Spolidorio, Denise Madalena Palomari; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Machado, Ana Lúcia

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of microwave irradiation sterilization on hard chairside reline resins. Specimens of three reline resins (Kooliner, Tokuso Rebase, and Ufi Gel Hard) were fabricated and subjected to ethylene oxide sterilization. The specimens were then individually inoculated (10(7) cfu/mL) with Tryptic Soy Broth media containing one of the tested microorganisms (C albicans, S aureus, B subtilis, and P aeruginosa). After 48 hours at 37 degrees C, the samples were vortexed for 1 minute and allowed to stand for 9 minutes, followed by a short vortex to resuspend any organisms present. After inoculation, 40 specimens of each material were immersed in 200 mL of water and subjected to microwave irradiation at 650 W for 6 minutes. Forty non-irradiated specimens were used as positive controls. Replicate specimens (25 microL) of suspension were plated at dilutions of 10(-3) to 10(-6) on plates of selective media appropriate for each organism. All plates were incubated at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. After incubation, colonies were counted, and the data were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test. Twelve specimens of each material were prepared for SEM. All immersed specimens showed consistent sterilization of all the individual organisms after microwave irradiation. SEM examination indicated an alteration in cell morphology after microwave irradiation. Microwave sterilization for 6 minutes at 650 W proved to be effective for the sterilization of hard chairside reline resins.

  14. Effect of surface sealant agents on the surface roughness and color stability of denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Onur; Koroglu, Aysegül; Dede, Doğu Ömür; Yilmaz, Burak

    2016-10-01

    The effects of surface sealant agents on the surface roughness and color stability of denture base materials are unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of different polishing methods on the surface roughness and color stability of denture base materials. A total of 120 specimens were fabricated from 2 poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and 1 polyamide denture base materials and divided into 4 groups (n=10 in each group) according to the applied surface treatment procedure: conventional polishing (control) and 3 surface sealant coupling methods. Surface roughness average (Ra) values were measured using a profilometer. Color parameters were measured using a spectrophotometer before and after being stained with coffee. Color differences (CIEDE 2000 [ΔE00]) were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and Tukey honest significant difference test (α=.05). No statistically significant difference were found between surface roughness values of the control and those of the specimens treated using a surface sealant agent (P>.05). The highest color difference was calculated for the polyamide control group. Statistically significant differences were found between the control group and the group treated with the polyamide surface sealant agent (P<.05). All specimens had a surface roughness value higher than the plaque accumulation threshold (0.20 μm). The color changes observed were clinically unacceptable, except for conventionally polished and one type of surface sealant applied microwave polymerized PMMA denture base material. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Comparative Clinical Study of the Effect of Denture Cleansing on the Surface Roughness and Hardness of Two Denture Base Materials

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Amani Ramadan; Dehis, Wessam Mohamed; Elboraey, Asmaa Nabil; ElGabry, Hisham Samir

    2016-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to verify the influence of oral environment and denture cleansers on the surface roughness and hardness of two different denture base materials. METHODS: A total of sixteen identical removable disc specimens (RDS) were processed. Eight RDS were made from heat-cured acrylic resin (AR) and the other eight were fabricated from thermoplastic injection moulded resin (TR). Surface roughness and hardness of DRS were measured using ultrasonic profilometry and Universal testing machine respectively. Then the four RDS (two AR and two of TR) were fixed to each maxillary denture, after three months RDS were retrieved. Surface roughness and hardness of RDS have measured again. RESULTS: The surface roughness measurements revealed no significant difference (p >0.05) for both disc groups at baseline. However, both groups showed a significant increase in the surface roughness after three months with higher mean value for (TR) group. On the other hand, the (AR) group showed higher hardness mean value than (TR) group at baseline with no significant decrease in the hardness values (p >0.05) following three months follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS: Denture cleansers have an effect on the denture’s surface roughness and hardness concurrently with an oral condition which will consequently influence the complete dentures’ lifetime and patients’ satisfaction. PMID:27703578

  16. The effect of cleaning substances on the surface of denture base material

    PubMed Central

    Žilinskas, Juozas; Junevičius, Jonas; Česaitis, Kęstutis; Junevičiūtė, Gabrielė

    2013-01-01

    Bakcground The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of substances used for hygienic cleaning of dentures on the surface of the denture base material. Material/Methods Meliodent Heat Cure (Heraeus-Kulzer, Germany) heat-polymerized acrylic resin was used to produce plates with all the characteristics of removable denture bases (subsequently, “plates”). Oral-B Complete toothbrushes of various brush head types were fixed to a device that imitated tooth brushing movements; table salt and baking soda (frequently used by patients to improve tooth brushing results), toothpaste (“Colgate Total”), and water were also applied. Changes in plate surfaces were monitored by measuring surface reflection alterations on spectrometry. Measurements were conducted before the cleaning and at 2 and 6 hours after cleaning. Results No statistically significant differences were found between the 3 test series. All 3 plates used in the study underwent statistically significant (p<0.05changed) – the reflection became poorer. The plates were most affected by the medium-bristle toothbrush with baking soda – the total reflection reduction was 4.82±0.1%; among toothbrushes with toothpaste, the hard-type toothbrush had the greatest reflection-reducing effect – 4.6±0.05%, while the toothbrush with table salt inflicted the least damage (3.5 ± 0.16%) due to the presence of rounded crystals between the bristles and the resin surface. Toothbrushes with water had a uniform negative effect on the plate surface – 3.89±0.07%. Conclusions All substances used by the patients caused surface abrasion of the denture base material, which reduced the reflection; a hard toothbrush with toothpaste had the greatest abrasive effect, while soft toothbrushes inflicted the least damage. PMID:24326781

  17. Influence of two functional complete-denture impression techniques on patient satisfaction: dentist-manipulated versus patient-manipulated.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Kerstin; Zenginel, Martha; Buchtaleck, Jochen; Rehmann, Peter; Wostmann, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    This preliminary clinical study aimed to identify the impact of two border-molding techniques (dentist-manipulated and patient-manipulated) on patient satisfaction, the occlusal force at denture dislodgment, and number of pressure sores. Salivary flow rate and residual ridge resorption were analyzed as covariates. Thirty-six edentulous patients in need of a relining of their existing maxillary denture were included. After relining, no significant influence of the border-molding technique on any of the variables investigated could be identified. It can be concluded that the impact of the border-molding technique on patient satisfaction and denture function probably has been overestimated in the past.

  18. Effect of aging on tear strength and cytotoxicity of soft denture lining materials; in vitro.

    PubMed

    Landayan, Jordi Izzard Andaya; Manaloto, Adrian Carlos Francisco; Lee, Jeong-Yol; Shin, Sang-Wan

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of aging on the tear strength and cytotoxicity of four soft denture lining materials. Four commonly used soft denture lining materials, (Coe-Comfort™ GC America Inc., Alsip, IL, USA; Coe-Soft™ GC America Inc., Alsip, IL, USA; Visco-gel Dentsply Caulk Milford, DE, USA; and Sofreliner Tough M Tokuyama Dental Corporation Tokyo, Japan) were selected. Sixty trouser-leg designed specimens per lining material were fabricated using a stainless steel mold for tear strength testing. The specimens were divided into non-thermocycling and 1000-, and 3000- thermocycling groups. For the cytotoxicity test, twenty-four disk shaped specimens per material were fabricated using a stainless steel mold. The specimens were soaked in normal saline solution for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. Cytotoxicity was measured by XTT assay in L929 mouse fibroblasts. Data were analyzed by two way analysis of variance and Dunnett's test (P<.05). Before thermocycling, Sofreliner Tough M (10.36 ± 1.00 N) had the highest tear strength value while Coe-Comfort™ (0.46 ± 0.10 N) had the lowest. After 3000 cycles, Sofreliner Tough M (9.65 ± 1.66 N) presented the highest value and Coe-Comfort™ (0.42 ± 0.08 N) the lowest. Sofreliner Tough M, in all incubation periods was the least toxic with significant differences compared to all other materials (P<.05). Coe-Comfort™, Coe-Soft™, and Sofreliner Tough M did not show any significant differences within their material group for all incubation periods. This in vitro study revealed that aging can affect both the tear strength and cytotoxicity of soft denture materials depending on the composition.

  19. Evaluating the efficiency of humic acid to remove micro-organisms from denture base material.

    PubMed

    Meriç, Gökçe; Güvenir, Meryem; Süer, Kaya

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of humic acid substances on removing micro-organisms from denture base materials. Old denture wearer needs effective, easy-use and safe denture-cleaning material. Square-shaped, heat-polymerised acrylic resin specimens (n = 550) were prepared and divided into five groups (n = 110 for each) corresponding to the microbial contamination (Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Contaminated specimens were randomly assigned to the application of five different denture-cleaning agents as follows (n = 20 for each): Kloroben, Corsodyl, Steradent, Corega, experimental solution with humic acid. Ten specimens were assessed as an experimental control carried out simultaneously for the treatment groups for each micro-organism. It was divided into two groups: negative control and positive control (n = 5 for each). All acrylic specimens were incubated 37°C for 24 h (for bacterial strains) and 37°C for 48 h (for yeast strains). After incubation period, all brain-heart infusion broths (BHI) which contain disinfectant acrylic specimens were cultured on 5% sheep blood agar (for bacteria) and Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) for yeast using loop. The numbers of colony-forming units per millilitre (CFU/ml) were calculated. The results were analysed by Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis tests (p = 0.05). Corsodyl and Kloroben completely eliminated the adherence of all investigated micro-organisms (100%) and showed the highest removal activity compared with other cleaning agents (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between Corsodyl and Kloroben (p ≥ 0.05), and there was no statistically significant difference between Corega, Steradent and experimental solution (p ≥ 0.05). Humic acid could be used as an alternative 'natural' solution for denture-cleaning agent. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley

  20. Clinical application of removable partial dentures using thermoplastic resin. Part II: Material properties and clinical features of non-metal clasp dentures.

    PubMed

    Fueki, Kenji; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Yatabe, Masaru; Arakawa, Ichiro; Arita, Masahiro; Ino, Satoshi; Kanamori, Toshikazu; Kawai, Yasuhiko; Kawara, Misao; Komiyama, Osamu; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Hosoki, Maki; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Yamauchi, Mutsuo; Aita, Hideki; Ono, Takahiro; Kondo, Hisatomo; Tamaki, Katsushi; Matsuka, Yoshizo; Tsukasaki, Hiroaki; Fujisawa, Masanori; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2014-04-01

    This position paper reviews physical and mechanical properties of thermoplastic resin used for non-metal clasp dentures, and describes feature of each thermoplastic resin in clinical application of non-metal clasp dentures and complications based on clinical experience of expert panels. Since products of thermoplastic resin have great variability in physical and mechanical properties, clinicians should utilize them with careful consideration of the specific properties of each product. In general, thermoplastic resin has lower color-stability and higher risk for fracture than polymethyl methacrylate. Additionally, the surface of thermoplastic resin becomes roughened more easily than polymethyl methacrylate. Studies related to material properties of thermoplastic resin, treatment efficacy and follow-up are insufficient to provide definitive conclusions at this time. Therefore, this position paper should be revised based on future studies and a clinical guideline should be provided. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk factors associated with denture stomatitis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Shulman, J D; Rivera-Hidalgo, F; Beach, M M

    2005-07-01

    This study reports denture stomatitis (DS) prevalence from a large USA probability sample from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-1994 (NHANES III). Oral examinations were performed on 3450 individuals 18-90+ years of age (mean: 59.2; SD: 0.50 years), 57.7% male and 42.3% female. Multivariable logistic regression models were fitted for DS using sociodemographic, denture quality, blood analytes, alcohol and tobacco use, history of diabetes, and current antibiotic use as covariates. Odds ratios (OR), adjusted for other covariates in each model (AOR) are presented. Of 3450 removable denture wearers, 963 (27.9%) had DS. DS prevalence was associated with wearing maxillary (AOR: 6.20) and mandibular (AOR: 5.21) complete dentures continuously; smoking >/=15 cigarettes day (maxillary complete: AOR = 1.31; mandibular complete: AOR = 1.50; maxillary partial: AOR = 2.04); vitamin A deficiency (mandibular complete: AOR = 5.97; maxillary partial: AOR = 5.67; mandibular partial: AOR = 24.42). Maxillary dentures with inadequate relines had approximately half the OR of DS than those with adequate relines (maxillary complete: AOR = 0.42; mandibular complete: AOR = 0.50). Denture stomatitis prevalence is associated with the amount of tissue covered by dentures, low vitamin A levels, cigarette smoking, and constant denture wear.

  2. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of different resin teeth to complete denture base material.

    PubMed

    Meloto, Carolina B; Silva-Concílio, Laís R; Rodrigues-Garciai, Renata C M; Canales, Giancarlo T; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M

    2013-01-01

    Although different commercial brands of artificial teeth are available in the market, debonding from the denture base is still an issue when rehabilitating edentulous patients with conventional or implant-supported complete dentures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of four artificial teeth brands to a denture base material polymerized by microwave energy. Forty anterior artificial teeth of each brand (Biolux, Trilux, Biotone IPN, and Vipi Dent Plus) were bonded to denture base material (VipiWave). Before processing, groups often specimens of each brand received surface treatment: control, monomer application (MA), air abrasion (AA) or diatoric cavity (DC). After processing, a blinded examiner conducted the bond test by applying load to the specimens (0.5 mm/min, to 45 degrees). Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). Biolux teeth have stronger bonding to denture base than Trilux (p < 0.05) in control group; higher bond values than Biotone IPN (p < 0.05) in MA group; and higher bond strength than Vipi Dent Plus and Trilux (p < 0.01) in DC group; AA had no differential effect for any of the brands. With regard to the effect of the surface treatments on bond strength within groups of commercial brand, statistical analysis revealed no difference among them. According to results in general, Biolux teeth had the strongest bonding to the denture base material polymerized by microwave energy. Results may assist dentists in selecting denture teeth from the standpoint of shear bond strength.

  3. Effect of composition of experimental fluorinated soft lining materials on bond strength to denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Yoshihito; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Akiba, Norihisa; Hibino, Yasushi; Nagasawa, Yuko; Sumi, Yasunori; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of the composition of experimental fluorinated soft lining materials on bond strength to denture base resin. Vinylidene fluoride/hexafluoro propylene copolymer (2-6F), tridecafluorooctyl methacrylate (13FMA), methoxy diethylene glycol methacrylate (MDGMA), and silica (as filler) were used for fabrication of the experimental soft lining materials. Nine experimental soft lining materials having various compositions of 2-6F, 13FMA, and MDGMA were prepared. Shear and tensile bond strength tests were performed before and after immersion in water. The water sorption for the materials was also measured. An increase in the content of acrylic monomer, MDGMA, in the experimental materials increased the bond strength before immersion in water but reduced the bond strength after immersion in water as compared to that before immersion in water. The inclusion of fluorinated monomer (13FMA) in the materials appeared to affect water sorption.

  4. Effect of ageing and immersion in different beverages on properties of denture lining materials

    PubMed Central

    LEITE, Vanessa M. F.; PISANI, Marina X.; PARANHOS, Helena F. O.; SOUZA, Raphael F.; SILVA-LOVATO, Cláudia H.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the color stability and hardness of two denture liners obtained by direct and indirect techniques, after thermal cycling and immersion in beverages that can cause staining of teeth. Material and Methods Seventy disc-shaped specimens (18 x 3 mm) processed by direct (DT) and indirect techniques (IT) were made from elite soft (n=35) and Kooliner (n=35) denture liners. For each material and technique, 10 specimens were subjected to thermal cycling (3,000 cycles) and 25 specimens were stored in water, coffee, tea, soda and red wine for 36 days. The values of color change, Shore A hardness (elite soft) and Knoop hardness (Kooliner) were obtained. The data were subjected to ANOVA, Tukey’s multiple-comparison test, and Kruskal-Wallis test (P<0.05). Results The thermal cycling promoted a decrease on hardness of Kooliner regardless of the technique used (Initial: 9.09±1.61; Thermal cycling: 7.77±1.47) and promoted an increase in the hardness in the DT for elite Soft (Initial: 40.63±1.07; Thermal cycling: 43.53±1.03); hardness of Kooliner (DT: 8.76±0.95; IT: 7.70±1.62) and elite Soft (DT: 42.75±1.54; IT=39.30±2.31) from the DT suffered an increase after the immersion in the beverages. The thermal cycling promoted color change only for Kooliner in the IT. Immersion in the beverages did not promote color change for elite in both techniques. The control group of the DT of Kooliner showed a significant color change. Wine and coffee produced the greatest color change in the DT only for elite Soft when compared to the other beverages. Conclusion The three variation factors promoted alteration on hardness and color of the tested denture lining materials. PMID:20835572

  5. In vitro comparison of two different materials for the repair of urethan dimethacrylate denture bases

    PubMed Central

    Cilingir, Altug; Bilhan, Hakan; Sulun, Tonguc; Bozdag, Ergun; Sunbuloglu, Emin

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the flexural properties of a recently introduced urethane dimethacrylate denture base material (Eclipse) after being repaired with two different materials. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two repair groups and a control group consisting of 10 specimens each were generated. The ES group was repaired with auto-polymerizing polymer. The EE group was repaired with the Eclipse. The E group was left intact as a control group. A 3-point bending test device which was set to travel at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min was used. Specimens were loaded until fracture occurred and the mean displacement, maximum load, flexural modulus and flexural strength values and standard deviations were calculated for each group and the data were statistically analyzed. The results were assessed at a significance level of P<.05. RESULTS The mean "displacement", "maximum load before fracture", "flexural strength" and "flexural modulus" rates of Group E were statistically significant higher than those of Groups ES and EE, but no significant difference (P>.05) was found between the mean values of Group ES and EE. There was a statistically significant positive relation (P<.01) between the displacement and maximum load of Group ES (99.5%), Group EE (94.3%) and Group E (84.4%). CONCLUSION The more economic and commonly used self-curing acrylic resin can be recommended as an alternative repair material for Eclipse denture bases. PMID:24353876

  6. Evaluation of the rigidity of dentures made of injection-molded materials.

    PubMed

    Wadachi, Juro; Sato, Masayuki; Igarashi, Yoshimasa

    2013-01-01

    Dentures made of 2 different types of injection-molded thermoplastic resins (polyamide resin and polyester resin) and a denture made of conventional heat-polymerized resin were used to create an experimental model of a mandibular molar region with a two-tooth gap. In the experimental model, a force of 100 N was applied onto the mesial fossa of the first molars of the dentures, and comparisons were performed by measuring the pressure applied under the denture base and the subsidence rate of the denture. The polyamide resin denture showed the highest subsidence, exerted the highest pressure on the underlying mucosa, and showed significant differences with the other types of dentures. The findings showed that polyamide resins have the lowest degree of elasticity, and that when resins with such low elasticities are used in the denture base, they should preferably be reinforced with metals.

  7. Do CAD/CAM dentures really release less monomer than conventional dentures?

    PubMed

    Steinmassl, Patricia-Anca; Wiedemair, Verena; Huck, Christian; Klaunzer, Florian; Steinmassl, Otto; Grunert, Ingrid; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    Computer-aided design (CAD)/computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) dentures are assumed to have more favourable material properties than conventionally fabricated dentures, among them a lower methacrylate monomer release. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis. CAD/CAM dentures were generated from ten different master casts by using four different CAD/CAM systems. Conventional, heat-polymerised dentures served as control group. Denture weight and volume were measured; the density was calculated, and the denture surface area was assessed digitally. The monomer release after 7 days of water storage was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Whole You Nexteeth and Wieland Digital Dentures had significantly lower mean volume and weight than conventional dentures. Baltic Denture System and Whole You Nexteeth had a significantly increased density. Baltic Denture System had a significantly smaller surface area. None of the CAD/CAM dentures released significantly less monomer than the control group. All tested dentures released very low amounts of methacrylate monomer, but not significantly less than conventional dentures. A statistically significant difference might nevertheless exist in comparison to other, less recommendable denture base materials, such as the frequently used autopolymerising resins. CAD/CAM denture fabrication has numerous advantages. It enables the fabrication of dentures with lower resin volume and lower denture weight. Both could increase the patient comfort. Dentures with higher density might exhibit more favourable mechanical properties. The hypothesis that CAD/CAM dentures release less monomer than conventional dentures could, however, not be verified.

  8. Microspectral analysis with laser in microleakage evaluation between infrastructure and veneer materials in fixed partial dentures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Draganescu, Gheorghe; Todea, Carmen; Dodenciu, Dorin; Rominu, Roxana

    2008-02-01

    The microleakage at the interface between the metal infrastructure and the veneering part of the fixed partial dentures are a common problem of aesthetic dentistry. It is possible to use the method of laser microspectral analysis for investigations of microleakage at the metal-veneering material interfaces in fixed partial prostheses. The laser microspectral analysis device LMA-10 (Carl Zeiss, Jena) was used equipped with a diffraction spectrometer PGS-2 (Carl Zeiss, Jena). Different fixed partial dentures were used to determine the microleakage between the metal infrastructure and the veneering material. The distribution of chemical elements at interface infiltration was investigated, making a series of craters and establishing the spectra of the vapours emitted from the craters. Data was gathered in various tables of chemical elements showing the quality and the quantity of microleakage. The laser microspectral analysis is a punctual method of analysis, which allows to investigate small quantities of materials of around 0.1 μg. This method allows to establish the content of atoms and molecules and to perform semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis. By this method it is possible to establish trace elements, i. e. with concentration of ppm (parts per million).

  9. Complete-denture esthetics.

    PubMed

    Engelmeier, R L

    1996-01-01

    This review of complete denture esthetics addresses the process of tooth selection, tooth arrangement, and characterization of the denture bases. The guidelines discussed in this article are all gleaned from the classic prosthodontic literature. These principles, which were developed over the past century, coupled with state-of-the-art materials are artificial teeth enable contemporary dentists to fabricate complete dentures with a level of esthetics never before possible.

  10. 21 CFR 801.405 - Labeling of articles intended for lay use in the repairing and/or refitting of dentures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Administration of their concern regarding the safety of denture reliners, repair kits, pads, cushions, and other..., Drug, and Cosmetic Act, unless the labeling: (1)(i) Limits directions for use for denture repair kits... repair kits and the word “temporary” preceding and modifying each indication-for-use statement...

  11. 21 CFR 801.405 - Labeling of articles intended for lay use in the repairing and/or refitting of dentures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Administration of their concern regarding the safety of denture reliners, repair kits, pads, cushions, and other..., Drug, and Cosmetic Act, unless the labeling: (1)(i) Limits directions for use for denture repair kits... repair kits and the word “temporary” preceding and modifying each indication-for-use statement...

  12. Efficacy of bone substitute material in preserving volume when placing a maxillary immediate complete denture: study protocol for the PANORAMIX randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rignon-Bret, Christophe; Hadida, Alain; Aidan, Alexis; Nguyen, Thien-Huong; Pasquet, Gerard; Fron-Chabouis, Helene; Wulfman, Claudine

    2016-05-20

    Bone preservation is an essential issue in the context of last teeth extraction and complete edentulism. The intended treatment, whether a complete denture or an implant placement, is facilitated with a voluminous residual ridge. Bone resorption after multiple extractions has not been as well studied as the bone resorption that occurs after the extraction of a single tooth. Recent advances in bone substitute materials have revived this issue. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the interest in using bone substitute material to fill the socket after last teeth extraction in a maxillary immediate complete denture procedure compared with the conventional protocol without socket filling. A randomized, controlled, clinical trial was designed. The 34 participants eligible for maxillary immediate complete denture were divided into two groups. Complete dentures were prepared despite persistence of the last anterior teeth. The control group received a conventional treatment including denture placement immediately after extractions. In the experimental group, in addition to the immediate denture placement, a xenograft bone-substitute material (Bio-Oss Collagen®) was placed in the fresh sockets. The primary outcome of the study is to compare mean bone ridge height loss 1 year after maxillary immediate complete denture placement, with or without bone-substitute material, in incisor and canine sockets. The secondary outcomes are to compare the average bone ridge height and width loss for each extraction site. An original quantitative evaluation method using cone beam computed tomography was designed for reproducible measurements, with a radio-opaque denture duplicate. Two independent operators perform the radiologic measurements. The immediate complete denture technique limits bone resorption in multiple extraction situations and thus allows better denture retention and better options for implant placement. To compare the benefit of using any bone socket-filling material

  13. Surface roughness and Candida albicans biofilm formation on a reline resin after long-term chemical disinfection and toothbrushing.

    PubMed

    Izumida, Fernanda E; Jorge, Janaína H; Ribeiro, Roberta C; Pavarina, Ana C; Moffa, Eduardo B; Giampaolo, Eunice T

    2014-12-01

    Routine cleaning of a denture may increase the surface roughness of the material. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of denture cleansers and time on the roughness and Candida albicans biofilm formation on a reline resin. Specimens of Tokuyama Rebase Fast II (20 × 10 × 2 mm) were prepared and divided into 9 groups (n=15): Test groups were toothbrushed (30 cycles per day) in 1 of the following solutions: water, soap, or toothpaste. After toothbrushing, the specimens were immersed in solutions of water, sodium perborate, or chlorhexidine. These treatments were done once a day for 365 days. The surface roughness was evaluated at 0, 7, 15, 30, 90, 180, 270, and 365 days, and the C albicans biofilm formation was measured after 365 days. The roughness data were analyzed by 3-way repeated measures ANOVA and the Tukey test (α=.05), and the C albicans biofilm formation was analyzed by 2-way ANOVA. Significant differences were found in the toothbrush and time interaction and in the toothbrush, immersion, and time interaction (P<.001). No significant differences were found between the toothbrush agent and chemical disinfection (P=.085) or between chemical disinfection and time interaction (P=.604). Brushing with dentifrice (PPb and PCh) showed a gradual decrease in surface roughness. The comparison among groups showed that PCh produced the lowest values of roughness. For C albicans biofilm formation, no significant differences were found among the experimental groups. The roughness values ranged from 0.31 to 0.69 μm for all evaluated groups. For all groups, no significant differences were found in the quantification of C albicans. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Peel bond strength of resilient liner modified by the addition of antimicrobial agents to denture base acrylic resin

    PubMed Central

    ALCÂNTARA, Cristiane S.; de MACÊDO, Allana F.C.; GURGEL, Bruno C.V.; JORGE, Janaina H.; NEPPELENBROEK, Karin H.; URBAN, Vanessa M.

    2012-01-01

    In order to prolong the clinical longevity of resilient denture relining materials and reduce plaque accumulation, incorporation of antimicrobial agents into these materials has been proposed. However, this addition may affect their properties. Objective This study evaluated the effect of the addition of antimicrobial agents into one soft liner (Soft Confort, Dencril) on its peel bond strength to one denture base (QC 20, Dentsply). Material and Methods Acrylic specimens (n=9) were made (75x10x3 mm) and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 48 h. The drug powder concentrations (nystatin 500,000U - G2; nystatin 1,000,000U - G3; miconazole 125 mg - G4; miconazole 250 mg - G5; ketoconazole 100 mg - G6; ketoconazole 200 mg - G7; chlorhexidine diacetate 5% - G8; and 10% chlorhexidine diacetate - G9) were blended with the soft liner powder before the addition of the soft liner liquid. A group (G1) without any drug incorporation was used as control. Specimens (n=9) (75x10x6 mm) were plasticized according to the manufacturers' instructions and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 h. Relined specimens were then submitted to a 180-degree peel test at a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min. Data (MPa) were analyzed by analysis of variance (α=0.05) and the failure modes were visually classified. Results No significant difference was found among experimental groups (p=0.148). Cohesive failure located within the resilient material was predominantly observed in all tested groups. Conclusions Peel bond strength between the denture base and the modified soft liner was not affected by the addition of antimicrobial agents. PMID:23329241

  15. Effect of Aging on Bond Strength of Two Soft Lining Materials to a Denture Base Polymer.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Alaa'a M

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was evaluation the effect of immersion in distilled water and inorganic artificial saliva on the shear bond strength of a heat-polymerized and an auto-polymerized silicone-based denture lining materials. The denture liners investigated were Molloplast-B (heat-polymerized), and Mollosil plus (auto-polymerized). The soft liner specimens were 10 × 10 × 2.5 mm and were processed between two poly(methylmethacrylate) plates. Thirty shear specimens for each type of test lining material were prepared. Specimens were divided equally into three groups for each test lining material: first group, specimens were tested after 48 h of preparation without immersion; second group, specimens were tested following immersion in distilled water at 37 °C for 12 months; and third group, specimens were tested following immersion in inorganic artificial saliva at 37 °C for 12 months. Shear bond strength was measured using an universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 40 mm/min and failure mode (adhesive, cohesive and mixed) after debonding was assessed. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (α = 0.05). ANOVA was followed by Bonferroni post hoc tests for pairwise comparisons. A significant difference in shear bond strength was detected between Molloplast-B and Mollosil plus following immersion in distilled water and artificial saliva. Molloplast-B demonstrated considerably higher shear strength than Mollosil plus after immersion. Shear strengths of the lining materials investigated reduced significantly after immersion in both solutions. Visual examination after separation revealed that the soft materials tested exhibited mostly adhesive failure. The effect of immersion in distilled water and inorganic artificial saliva on bond strength of test lining materials was perceivable; however, both of them had acceptable bond strength and might be proper for long-term use.

  16. Blast furnace repairs, relines and modernizations

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.A.; Swanson, D.E; Chango, R.F. . Burns Harbor Div.)

    1994-09-01

    Bethlehem Steel's Burns Harbor Div. operates two 89,000-cu ft blast furnaces, D and C, built in 1969 and 1972. These furnaces have been in the forefront of blast furnace performance since they were blown-in. To maintain a credible operation throughout the past 25 years their performance has been improved continuously. Production was increased approximately 3%/year while fuel rate decreased 1%/year. This presentation summarizes the early repairs, relines and improvements that have sustained and enhanced the furnace's performance. The fourth reline of both furnaces will be discussed in detail. As part of the 1991 reline of D furnace its lines were improved and modern penstocks installed. The bosh, tuyere jacket, hearth jacket and both cast floors were replaced. The furnace now has a larger hearth making it easier to control and, liquid level is no longer a problem when pulling the wind to shut down. The new cast floor with its increased trough length has much improved separation of slag from iron and lowered refractory consumption. Since the cast floors on D furnace were changed, there has been a reduction in accidents and absenteeism. This may be related to the change in work practices on the new cast floors. The 1994 reline of C furnace incorporates those improvements made on D furnace in 1991. In addition, C furnace will have high-density cooling which is expected to double its campaign from 6 to 12 years, without interim repairs.

  17. Denture Care: How Do I Clean Dentures?

    MedlinePlus

    ... are a few things you typically should avoid: Abrasive cleaning materials. Avoid stiff-bristled brushes, strong cleansers and harsh toothpaste, as these are too abrasive and can damage your dentures. Whitening toothpastes. Toothpastes ...

  18. Hydrophilic surface modification of acrylic denture base material by silica coating and its influence on Candida albicans adherence.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Akinobu; Akiba, Norihisa; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2012-03-13

    Silica coating modifies hydrophobic denture base materials to have a hydrophilic surface. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of silica coating to a denture base material on resistance to Candida albicans (C. albicans) adherence. Specimens were prepared by polymerizing an acrylic denture lining material and polished using silicon carbide paper up an abrasive grade of 1000. The specimens of a coated group were treated three times by a silica coating agent using a nonwoven cloth. The surface properties were evaluated by contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). A C. albicans adherence assay was performed after 1.5, 6, and 24 h incubation. The mean contact angle of the coated group showed significantly lower than that of the non-coated group (p < 0.05). In the coated group, the surface roughness decreased in SEM images, and Si was continuously detected in EDS analysis. At 24 h incubation time, the colony forming unit of C. albicans on the coated group was significantly reduced compared to the non-coated group (p < 0.05). These results suggest that hydrophilic surface modification by the silica coating reduces C. albicans adherence and could contribute to daily denture care.

  19. Mechanical and thermal properties of polyamide versus reinforced PMMA denture base materials

    PubMed Central

    Bolayir, Giray; Boztug, Ali

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This in vitro study intended to investigate the mechanical and thermal characteristics of Valplast, and of polymethyl methacrylate denture base resin in which different esthetic fibers (E-glass, nylon 6 or nylon 6.6) were added. MATERIALS AND METHODS Five groups were formed: control (PMMA), PMMA-E glass, PMMA-nylon 6, PMMA-nylon 6.6 and Valplast resin. For the transverse strength test the specimens were prepared in accordance with ANSI/ADA specification No.12, and for the impact test ASTM D-256 standard were used. With the intent to evaluate the properties of transverse strength, the three-point bending (n=7) test instrument (Lloyd NK5, Lloyd Instruments Ltd, Fareham Hampshire, UK) was used at 5 mm/min. A Dynatup 9250 HV (Instron, UK) device was employed for the impact strength (n=7). All of the resin samples were tested by using thermo-mechanical analysis (Shimadzu TMA 50, Shimadzu, Japan). The data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Tukey tests for pairwise comparisons of the groups at the 0.05 level of significance. RESULTS In all mechanical tests, the highest values were observed in Valplast group (transverse strength: 117.22 ± 37.80 MPa, maximum deflection: 27.55 ± 1.48 mm, impact strength: 0.76 ± 0.03 kN). Upon examining the thermo-mechanical analysis data, it was seen that the E value of the control sample was 8.08 MPa, higher than that of the all other samples. CONCLUSION Although Valplast denture material has good mechanical strength, its elastic modulus is not high enough to meet the standard of PMMA materials. PMID:23755341

  20. High-impact strength acrylic denture base material processed by autoclave.

    PubMed

    Abdulwahhab, Salwan Sami

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the effect of two different cycles of autoclave processing on the transverse strength, impact strength, surface hardness and the porosity of high-impact strength acrylic denture base material. High Impact Acryl was the heat-cured acrylic denture base material included in the study. A total of 120 specimens were prepared, the specimens were grouped into: control groups in which high-impact strength acrylic resins processed by conventional water-bath processing technique (74°C for 1.5 h then boil for 30 min) and experimental groups in which high-impact strength acrylic resins processed by autoclave at 121°C, 210 kPa .The experimental groups were divided into (fast) groups for 15 min, and (slow) groups for 30 min. To study the effect of the autoclave processing (Tuttnauer 2540EA), four tests were conducted transverse strength (Instron universal testing machine), impact strength (Charpy tester), surface hardness (shore D), and porosity test. The results were analyzed to ANOVA and LSD test. In ANOVA test, there were highly significant differences between the results of the processing techniques in transverse, impact, hardness, and porosity test. The LSD test showed a significant difference between control and fast groups in transverse and hardness tests and a non-significant difference in impact test and a highly significant difference in porosity test; while, there were a highly significant differences between control and slow groups in all examined tests; finally, there were a non-significant difference between fast and slow groups in transverse and porosity tests and a highly significant difference in impact and hardness tests. In the autoclave processing technique, the slow (long) curing cycle improved the tested physical and mechanical properties as compared with the fast (short) curing cycle. The autoclave processing technique improved the tested physical and mechanical properties of High Impact Acryl. Copyright © 2013 Japan Prosthodontic Society

  1. An amine accelerator for colorfree curing of cold-curing methyl methacrylate denture systems.

    PubMed

    Argentar, H; Tesk, J A; Parry, E E

    1981-05-01

    These tests showed that DMBA, a recently commercialized amine accelerator, is more suitable from the standpoint of color for use in denture base, reline, and repair resins than is the commercially used amine, DMPT. As the curing times of all specimens were approximately the same, the mechanical properties are expected to be similar for the following reasons. Previous experiments have shown that in the same composite formulation, equimolar concentration of DMPT and DMBA produce identical hardening times. A more recent investigation with composite systems indicates that amines yielding comparable polymerization rates produce materials with approximately the same mechanical strength; the same is expected to prevail with unreinforced methacrylate polymers. All specimen disks provided similar resistance to bending by hand.

  2. Quality of materials supplied to dental laboratories for the fabrication of cobalt chromium removable partial dentures in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Christopher D; Allen, P Finbarr

    2003-12-01

    The adequacy of prescription for fabrication of cobalt chromium removable partial dentures is often regarded as being less than ideal. This study examines the nature and quality of written instructions and master impression sent to dental laboratories in Ireland for fabrication of cobalt chromium removable partial denture frameworks. Questionnaires were issued to dental laboratories seeking specific information relating to the materials (impression materials and trays) and written instructions supplied, as well as the technicians' opinion regarding the suitability of these materials. One hundred completed questionnaires were returned. One-third of master impressions were made using a plastic stock tray and alginate; technicians felt that one-fifth of master impressions were unsuitable; almost three-fifths of written instructions were inadequate. The quality of clinical information examined was found to be less than adequate.

  3. Esophageal impacted dentures.

    PubMed Central

    Nwaorgu, Onyekwere G.; Onakoya, Paul A.; Sogebi, Olusola A.; Kokong, Daniel D.; Dosumu, Oluwole O.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aims to highlight the problems associated with impacted acrylic dentures and proffers advice to check them. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective review of all cases of impacted acrylic dentures over a 16-year period. RESULTS: Twenty-two adults had impacted esophageal acrylic dentures of which 16 (72.7%) and six (27.3%) were males and females, respectively (M:F ratio = 2.7:1) with age range 23-77 years. Fourteen patients (63.6%) had worn their dentures for more than 10 years without check-up, and 54.5% presented within 48 hours of impaction. The common symptoms in all the patients were difficulty with swallowing, throat pain and discomfort, followed by tenderness in the neck in 15 (68.2%). Dentures were extracted through esophagoscopy (17 cases) and cervical (three cases) esophagotomy, respectively. Observed complications included pulmonary edema in one and esophageal perforation in five patients. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic extraction of dentures carries a high risk of perforation. Extraction of an impacted denture via esophagoscopy can be undertaken under direct vision and in an ideal situation with judicious use of the Shears forceps. In the absence of these, the safest option is an esophagotomy. Proper treatment planning in the fabrication of dentures with incorporation of radiopaque materials in the dental resins and adequate postdenture delivery instructions are necessary as preventive measures. PMID:15540888

  4. Peel bond strength of soft lining materials with antifungal to a denture base acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Aliaga, Adelaida; Pellissari, Cláudia Viviane Guimarães; Arrais, Cesar Augusto Galvão; Michél, Milton Domingos; Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Urban, Vanessa Migliorini

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the addition of nystatin, miconazole, ketoconazole, chlorhexidine, and itraconazole into the soft lining materials Softone and Trusoft on their peel bond strength to a denture base acrylic resin was evaluated. Specimens of soft lining materials (n=7) were made without (control) or with the incorporation of antifungals at their minimum inhibitory concentrations to the biofilm of C. albicans and bonded to the acrylic resin. Peel testing was performed after immersion in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 h, 7 and 14 days. Data (MPa) were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA/Tukey-Kramer test (α=0.05) and the failure modes were classified. The addition of nystatin and ketoconazole did not affect the peel bond strength for up to 14 days. Most failures were predominantly cohesive within soft lining materials. With the exception of itraconazole, incorporating the antifungals into the soft lining materials did not result in values below those recommended for peel bond strength after 7 and 14 days of analysis.

  5. Epidemiology and etiology of denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Gendreau, Linda; Loewy, Zvi G

    2011-06-01

    Denture stomatitis, a common disorder affecting denture wearers, is characterized as inflammation and erythema of the oral mucosal areas covered by the denture. Despite its commonality, the etiology of denture stomatitis is not completely understood. A search of the literature was conducted in the PubMed electronic database (through November 2009) to identify relevant articles for inclusion in a review updating information on the epidemiology and etiology of denture stomatitis and the potential role of denture materials in this disorder. Epidemiological studies report prevalence of denture stomatitis among denture wearers to range from 15% to over 70%. Studies have been conducted among various population samples, and this appears to influence prevalence rates. In general, where reported, incidence of denture stomatitis is higher among elderly denture users and among women. Etiological factors include poor denture hygiene, continual and nighttime wearing of removable dentures, accumulation of denture plaque, and bacterial and yeast contamination of denture surface. In addition, poor-fitting dentures can increase mucosal trauma. All of these factors appear to increase the ability of Candida albicans to colonize both the denture and oral mucosal surfaces, where it acts as an opportunistic pathogen. Antifungal treatment can eradicate C. albicans contamination and relieve stomatitis symptoms, but unless dentures are decontaminated and their cleanliness maintained, stomatitis will recur when antifungal therapy is discontinued. New developments related to denture materials are focusing on means to reduce development of adherent biofilms. These may have value in reducing bacterial and yeast colonization, and could lead to reductions in denture stomatitis with appropriate denture hygiene.

  6. Comparative evaluation of impact and flexural strength of four commercially available flexible denture base materials: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Abhay, Pande Neelam; Karishma, Shori

    2013-12-01

    Poly-methyl methacrylate is a rigid material. It is generally observed that the impact and flexural strength of this material is not satisfactory and that is reflected in the continuous efforts to improve these mechanical properties. Hence there was a serious need to make another material which could overcome the limitations of the existing materials and could have better properties, like thermoplastic materials. The study was aimed to evaluate and compare the impact strength and the flexural strength of four different flexible denture base materials (thermoplastic denture base resins) with the conventional denture base material (high impact polymethyl-methacrylate). Two, machine made master moulds of metal blocks according to the size of sample holder of the equipment were prepared to test the impact and flexural strength. Total 40 samples, 10 for each group of flexible denture base materials namely: De-flex (Deflex, United Kingdom), Lucitone FRS (Densply, Germany), Valplast (Novoblast, USA), and Bre-flex (Bredent, Germany) in specially designed flask by injection molded process. For different flexible materials, the time, temperature and pressure for injecting the materials were followed as per the manufacturer's instructions. Total 20 samples for control (Trevelon denture base materials) were prepared by compression moulded process, for each test. ANOVA test was applied to calculate p value. Unpaired t test was applied to calculate t-value. Tukey-Kramer multiple test was provided for comparison between the groups for flexural and impact strength. From the statistical analysis, it was found that, the impact strength of Group III (Valplast) was found to be the highest than all other groups and nearer to the control group. Whereas Group IV (Bre-flex) had the maximum flexural strength. The flexural strength of Group I (De-flex) was lowest than all other groups and nearer to control group. The values were found to be statistically significant but clinically non

  7. Interim dentures and treatment dentures.

    PubMed

    Smith, D E

    1984-04-01

    Improvement in the interim denture procedure in the past decade has been one of the significant advancements in prosthodontic practice. The interim denture approach is only slightly more time-consuming and expensive than the conventional immediate denture approach, yet it has many advantages. Among those advantages are the following: (1) allows rapid results; (2) results in a higher quality definitive denture; (3) allows the surgical treatment to be performed during one appointment; (4) permits duplication of the natural tooth position; and (5) provides the patient with a spare denture after the definitive denture is completed. An interim denture technique was described that utilized a flexible layered silicone mold to form the replaced teeth. The interim denture procedure is flexible and lends itself to many variations in technique to meet unusual clinical situations. An interim removable partial denture technique was described that involves block-out of undesirable undercuts and duplication of the master cast for fabrication of the partial denture. This technique results in an interim partial denture that can be placed with little or no adjustment and that will provide better service for those who require it. Three simple procedures for fabricating treatment dentures were described and the indications for each were discussed. Although treatment dentures are not often used, they are essential for the dentist who is treating difficult patients who require complete dentures.

  8. Effect of three investing materials on tooth movement during flasking procedure for complete denture construction.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Alaa'a M

    2016-01-01

    Tooth movement has been shown to occur during and after the processing of complete dentures. An understanding of this phenomenon may permit one to construct functional complete dentures that require less occlusal adjustment in the articulator and in the patient's mouth. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of three different investing methods on tooth movement occurring during the processing of simulated maxillary complete dentures. Forty-five similar maxillary dentures were made using heat-polymerized acrylic resin, and assigned randomly to three experimental groups (n = 15 each) according to investing method: plaster-plaster-plaster (P-P-P), plaster-stone-stone (P-S-S), and plaster-mix (P-M). Specimens in all experimental groups were compression molded with denture base resin. Transverse interincisor (I-I) and intermolar (M-M) distances, and anteroposterior incisor-molar (LI-LM and RI-RM) distances, were measured with digital calipers at the wax denture stage (pre-polymerization) and after denture decasting (post-polymerization). Analysis of variance and Tukey's test were used to compare the results. M-M, LI-LM, and RI-RM movement was significantly greater in the P-P-P group than in the P-S-S and P-M groups; no significant difference in I-I movement was observed among groups. Transverse movement along M-M and I-I was significantly greater than anteroposterior movement in the P-P-P group; no significant difference among measurements was observed in the other two groups. The study results indicate that the use of dental stone or a 50:50 mixture of plaster and stone for investing of dentures is an important factor in efforts to control the magnitude of tooth movement.

  9. Dentures as Learning Materials for Maxillomandibular Fixation by Erich Arch Bars.

    PubMed

    Aksam, Ersin; Aksam, Berrak

    2016-03-01

    Maxillomandibular fixation with Erich arch bars is an economic method for handling mandibular fractures. Unfortunately, this method has some disadvantages, such as long operating time, periodontal trauma, and risk of puncture injury to the operator. To overcome these disadvantages, we propose teaching the pits and pearls of maxillomandibular fixation with Erich arch bars to trainees using dentures of a patient. Experiencing the method on dentures will shorten the learning curve.

  10. Effect of Patient's Personality on Satisfaction with Their Present Complete Denture and after Increasing the Occlusal Vertical Dimension: A Study of Edentulous Egyptian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fouda, Shaimaa M.; Al-Attar, Mohamed S.; Virtanen, Jorma I.; Raustia, Aune

    2014-01-01

    Complete denture wearers often find it difficult to accept a new denture. Personality traits are among the factors that possibly affect patient satisfaction with a complete denture. Our aim was to investigate the influence of patients' personality on satisfaction with their present denture and after an increase in the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD). Sixty edentulous patients with complete dentures (22 men and 38 women, mean age 66 years, and range 50–75 years) participated in the study. The age of their complete dentures ranged from 5 to 16 years. Patients' personalities were evaluated using the Arabic version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Their satisfaction with their dentures before and after restoration of the OVD and relining of the mandibular denture was evaluated using two questionnaires (I and II), Patients with a high score of neuroticism were less satisfied with their original dentures and after relining and an increase of OVD compared with patients with an average score in that trait. The personality trait of psychoticism was significant to patients' acceptance of an increase in OVD; that is, patients with a high score were less satisfied with their dentures after increase of OVD than patients with an average score. It is concluded that personality traits affect patients' acceptance of their complete dentures. PMID:25110475

  11. Effect of polymerization cycles on flexural strengths and microhardness of different denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Hasan; Gundogdu, Mustafa; Alkurt, Murat; Yesil Duymus, Zeynep

    2017-01-13

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different polymerization cycles on the flexural strengths and microhardness of two denture base materials (Meliodent and Paladent). Heat-polymerized acrylic resin specimens (65.0 mm long×10.0 mm wide×2.5 mm in height) were prepared using different short and long polymerization cycles. After the specimens had been polymerized, they were stored in distilled water at 37±1°C for 24 h. Flexural strength test was performed at a cross-head speed of 5 mm/min and Vickers microhardness was measured. Data were analyzed with a 1-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey test, and Student t-test (α=0.05). The flexural strengths and microhardness were significantly different between Meliodent and Paladent (p<0.05). Significant differences were found among the polymerization cycles in terms of flexural strengths and microhardness (p<0.05). Polymerization with G cycle may be suggested for Meliodent and H cycle may be suggested for Paladent.

  12. Denture Care Practices and Perceived Denture Status among Complete Denture Wearers

    PubMed Central

    Kosuru, Krishnam Raju V.; Devi, Ganji; Grandhi, Vikram; Prasan, Kumar K.; Yasangi, Manoj K.; Dhanalakshmi, Mannem

    2017-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Considerable importance to oral health care was lacking in India, and oral health neglect continues to exist, which is evident in the low utilization rates and poor oral health status. Conventional dentures are the most common alternative in restoration of lost teeth. Without proper denture care practices, there is an increased risk of developing a multitude of problems. The aim of this study is to assess the denture care practices among complete denture wearers in East Godavari district, Andhra Pradesh. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of Prosthodontics at the Konaseema Institute of Dental Sciences, Amalapuram, Andhra Pradesh. Patients with self-care ability and adequate overall health who were using either single or full complete dentures for more than 6 months from the time of the study were requested to participate in the study. A total of 375 study participants were given a self-administered questionnaire on denture care practices followed by clinical examination of the denture status. Statistical analysis was done using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software for windows, version 20.0 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp). Results: The majority of participants reported cleansing their dentures once a day, with brush and water, and had the habit of removing the dentures at night. Almost 80% of the participants reported their denture status to be good/fair. Clinical examination revealed that slightly more than half of the participants had poor denture status. Conclusion: This study highlights the need for improvement in patient education and counseling with respect to the maintenance of dentures and upkeep of denture hygiene. It also emphasizes the need for educating patients on how to evaluate the status of their dentures. PMID:28316948

  13. An In-vitro Evaluation of Retention, Colonization and Penetration of Commonly Used Denture Lining Materials By Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hallikerimath, Rajendra B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Colonization of the surface by Candida albicans and related Candida species is one of the major concerns of denture lining materials. Aim We evaluated retention, colonization and penetration of the four denture lining materials namely Molloplast B, Permaflex, GC Soft Liner and Ufi Gel Hard C by Candida albicans. Material and Methods a) Evaluation of retention: Five test discs of each material with smooth surface on one side and rough on the other were prepared and surface roughness (Ra) was measured with profilometer. Retention of C. albicans to discs was monitored after one hour of incubation (37°C) with standardized (2.8 x 106 cfu/ml) washed cell suspension. Discs were stained with acridine orange and attached cells were counted using inverted microscope; b) Evaluation of colonization and penetration: Eight test discs of each material in sterile artificial saliva, were inoculated with C. albicans and incubated for six weeks. Two sections were cut across each test disc to provide three replicate samples. Candida cells on cut disc sections were fixed, dehydrated, air dried and viewed via fluorescence microscope; c) Evaluation of antifungal action: Two test discs of each material were placed onto diagnostic sensitivity testing the agar plate. After incubation at 37°C for 24 hours, the zone of inhibition formed around the samples were measured at four places, and the mean calculated. Results a) All rough surfaces showed higher retention of C. albicans than smooth surfaces. Among the smooth surfaces, Molloplast B and GC Soft Liner showed highest and lowest retention of C. albicans respectively (p=0.0090). Among the rough surfaces, the variation in the retention of C. albicans was not statistically significant; b) Penetration of C. albicans was observed through all three sections of the test discs of each material. There was no statistically significant difference among the test materials; c) Molloplast B and Permaflex produced a mean zone of inhibition

  14. Stress Distribution under Commercial Denture Liners- A Finite Element and Clinical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Saurabh; Verma, Ashok Kumar; Ali, Mariyum; Nagendra, Amrita; Chaturvedi, Mudita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have shown that 20-30% of denture users have been dissatisfied with their dentures. Aim To evaluate the stress pattern under elastic and viscoelastic denture liners using 3-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and its clinical correlation using a questionnaire. Materials and Methods The study had both in-vitro and in-vivo phases. In in-vitro phase fabrication of a virtual parametric model of edentulous maxilla and dentures with overlying mucosa was made. A virtual load of 166N was analyzed at three points (Point A=anterior ridge, Point B=right posterior ridge and Point C=left posterior ridge). For the in-vivo phase, 20 edentulous patients were provided conventional complete dentures (Group-I). The dentures were lined with silicone (elastic) liners (Group-II) and acrylic resins (viscoelastic) liners (Group-III) at regular (2 months) intervals. After each reline, the patients were evaluated using food eating ability and denture assessment questionnaires. The results were statistically analyzed. The statistical analysis was done using SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) version 15.0 statistical analysis software. Other than standard statistical test Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Post-Hoc tests (Tukey-HSD) were used. Results At loading, the in-vitro result for Groups–II and III revealed pressures of 0.074231N and 0.0678364N at Point A, 0.098764N and 0.093642N at Point B, and 0.099876N and 0.093746N at Point C respectively. The in-vivo study revealed that the mean quality of life score for different groups ranged from 23.65±4.00 (Group I) to 33.10±6.15 (Group III). The mean quality of life score for Group II was 29.50±5.08. Conclusion The viscoelastic liner provided the most uniform stress distribution and performed better than an elastic liner with hard, firm and soft foods. PMID:28208996

  15. Interkingdom cooperation between Candida albicans, Streptococcus oralis and Actinomyces oris modulates early biofilm development on denture material.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Indira M G; Nobbs, Angela H; Ricomini-Filho, Antônio Pedro; Jenkinson, Howard F; Del Bel Cury, Altair A

    2016-04-01

    Candida-associated stomatitis affects up to 60% of denture wearers, and Candida albicans remains the most commonly isolated fungal species. The oral bacteria Actinomyces oris and Streptococcus oralis are abundant in early dental plaque. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of S. oralis and A. oris on the development of C. albicans biofilms on denture material. Resin discs were coated with saliva and at early (1.5 h) or later (24 h) stages of biofilm development, cell numbers of each species were determined. Spatial distribution of microorganisms was visualized by confocal scanning laser microscopy of biofilms labelled by differential fluorescence or by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Interkingdom interactions underpinning biofilm development were also evaluated planktonically utilizing fluorescence microscopy. Synergistic interactions between all three species occurred within biofilms and planktonically. Bacterial cells coaggregated with each other and adhered singly or in coaggregates to C. albicans hyphal filaments. Streptococcus oralis appeared to enhance hyphal filament production and C. albicans biovolume was increased 2-fold. Concomitantly, cell numbers of S. oralis and A. oris were enhanced by C. albicans. Thus, cooperative physical and metabolic processes occurring between these three microbial species intensify pathogenic plaque communities on denture surfaces.

  16. An In-vitro Evaluation of Retention, Colonization and Penetration of Commonly Used Denture Lining Materials By Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Sushma; Hallikerimath, Rajendra B

    2016-10-01

    Colonization of the surface by Candida albicans and related Candida species is one of the major concerns of denture lining materials. We evaluated retention, colonization and penetration of the four denture lining materials namely Molloplast B, Permaflex, GC Soft Liner and Ufi Gel Hard C by Candida albicans. a) Evaluation of retention: Five test discs of each material with smooth surface on one side and rough on the other were prepared and surface roughness (Ra) was measured with profilometer. Retention of C. albicans to discs was monitored after one hour of incubation (37°C) with standardized (2.8 x 10(6) cfu/ml) washed cell suspension. Discs were stained with acridine orange and attached cells were counted using inverted microscope; b) Evaluation of colonization and penetration: Eight test discs of each material in sterile artificial saliva, were inoculated with C. albicans and incubated for six weeks. Two sections were cut across each test disc to provide three replicate samples. Candida cells on cut disc sections were fixed, dehydrated, air dried and viewed via fluorescence microscope; c) Evaluation of antifungal action: Two test discs of each material were placed onto diagnostic sensitivity testing the agar plate. After incubation at 37°C for 24 hours, the zone of inhibition formed around the samples were measured at four places, and the mean calculated. a) All rough surfaces showed higher retention of C. albicans than smooth surfaces. Among the smooth surfaces, Molloplast B and GC Soft Liner showed highest and lowest retention of C. albicans respectively (p=0.0090). Among the rough surfaces, the variation in the retention of C. albicans was not statistically significant; b) Penetration of C. albicans was observed through all three sections of the test discs of each material. There was no statistically significant difference among the test materials; c) Molloplast B and Permaflex produced a mean zone of inhibition of 16.9±4.8mm and 14.80±3.8mm respectively

  17. Temperature rise on dentin caused by temporary crown and fixed partial denture materials: influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Seelbach, Paul; Finger, Werner J; Ferger, Paul; Balkenhol, Markus

    2010-12-01

    Temporary crowns and fixed partial denture materials (t-c&b) generate exothermic heat during polymerization. The amount of temperature, reaching the pulp chamber, is dependent on the residual thickness of the prepared dentin as well as the volume of the t-c&b used. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of both factors on the temperature rise at the pulpal dentin surface as well as in the bulk of the t-c&b during polymerization. Four t-c&bs (Luxatemp AM Plus, Protemp 3 Garant, Structur Premium, Trim) were used to fabricate flat cylindrical specimens (∅ 15.5mm) of different thicknesses (1, 2 and 4mm) using an over-impression placed on top of dentin discs (thickness 0.5, 1 and 2mm). Temperature was recorded at the pulpal dentin surface as well as inside the t-c&b (n=6). Data was subjected to parametric statistics (α=0.05). Peak temperatures inside the t-c&b varied between 37.0°C and 51.9°C and at the pulpal dentin side between 37.0°C and 50.6°C. The maximum temperatures registered depended significantly on the thickness of the dentin disc and t-c&b, respectively (ANOVA p<0.05). Peak temperatures were reached 2-3 min after start of mixing (dimethacrylates) and 6 min (mono-methacrylate), respectively, whereas Trim exhibited significantly higher peak temperatures (p<0.05). At 4mm layer thickness of the t-c&b, temperature rise may become critical if the material is not cooled properly. Composite-based t-c&bs showed significant lower curing temperatures than Trim and should therefore be preferred in daily practice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Shear bond strength of a denture base acrylic resin and gingiva-colored indirect composite material to zirconia ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kubochi, Kei; Komine, Futoshi; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Yagawa, Shogo; Mori, Serina; Matsumura, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strengths of two gingiva-colored materials (an indirect composite material and a denture base acrylic resin) to zirconia ceramics and determine the effects of surface treatment with various priming agents. A gingiva-colored indirect composite material (CER) or denture base acrylic resin (PAL) was bonded to zirconia disks with unpriming (UP) or one of seven priming agents (n=11 each), namely, Alloy Primer (ALP), Clearfil Photo Bond (CPB), Clearfil Photo Bond with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator (CPB+Act), Metal Link (MEL), Meta Fast Bonding Liner (MFB), MR. bond (MRB), and V-Primer (VPR). Shear bond strength was determined before and after 5000 thermocycles. The data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test and Steel-Dwass test. The mean pre-/post-thermalcycling bond strengths were 1.0-14.1MPa/0.1-12.1MPa for the CER specimen and 0.9-30.2MPa/0.1-11.1MPa for the PAL specimen. For the CER specimen, the ALP, CPB, and CPB+Act groups had significantly higher bond strengths among the eight groups, at both 0 and 5000 thermocycles. For the PAL specimen, shear bond strength was significantly lower after thermalcycling in all groups tested. After 5000 thermocycles, bond strengths were significantly higher in the CPB and CPB+Act groups than in the other groups. For the PAL specimens, bond strengths were significantly lower after thermalcycling in all groups tested. The MDP functional monomer improved bonding of a gingiva-colored indirect composite material and denture base acrylic resin to zirconia ceramics. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Amy Yuntzu-Yen; Zirwas, Matthew J

    2007-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman presented for evaluation of an eruption localized to the area covered by her partial upper denture. Her medical history and physical examination were otherwise unremarkable. She originally had a metal upper partial denture, which she used for many years without difficulty. Four years before presentation, she developed a painful eruption affecting only the tissue covered by the upper partial denture. Contact dermatitis to metal was suspected, and a new upper partial denture constructed primarily of acrylates was fashioned. When she transitioned to the new denture, the inflammation in her oral mucosa persisted and perhaps worsened, despite an excellent fit. Examination revealed striking erythema and mild edema sharply localized to the areas where the partial upper denture contacted the gum ridge. Patch testing was performed and revealed allergies to multiple acrylates, including methyl methacrylate. A swab from the gums was sent for yeast culture. No Candida was detected. Based on suspected candidal overgrowth on the denture, the patient was advised to begin applying nystatin ointment between the gums and the denture, and to start soaking the dentures nightly in chlorhexidine 0.12% solution. In addition, because the relevance of the acrylate allergy was unclear, her dentist was contacted and it was recommended that the dentures be boiled to induce polymerization of any residual un-reacted methacrylate monomers. The patient had a 90% improvement in the clinical appearance and in symptoms at an 8-week follow-up appointment. Due to logistic issues, the dentures had not yet been boiled. The improvement, despite the dentures not having been boiled, was felt to demonstrate that the acrylate allergy was not relevant. The patient has continued to slowly show further improvement over 6 months of follow-up.

  20. Bond strength of poly(methyl methacrylate) denture base material to cast titanium and cobalt-chromium alloy.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Yanagida, Hiroaki; Ide, Takako; Matsumura, Hideo; Tanoue, Naomi

    2010-06-01

    The shear bond strength of an auto-polymerizing poly(methyl methacrylate) denture base resin material to cast titanium and cobalt-chromium alloy treated with six conditioning methods was investigated. Disk specimens (10 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm in thickness) were cast from pure titanium and cobalt-chromium alloy. The specimens were wet ground to a final surface finish of 600 grit, air dried, and treated with the following bonding systems: 1) air abraded with 50-70-microm-grain alumina (SAN); 2) air abraded with 50-70-microm-grain alumina + conditioned with Alloy Primer (ALP); 3) air abraded with 50-70-microm-grain alumina + conditioned with AZ Primer (AZP); 4) air abraded with 50-70-microm-grain alumina + conditioned with Estenia Opaque Primer (EOP); 5) air abraded with 50-70-microm-grain alumina + conditioned with Metal Link Primer (MLP), and 6) treated with ROCATEC system (ROC). A denture base material (Palapress Vario) was then applied to each metal specimen. Shear bond strengths were determined before and after 10,000 thermocycles. The strengths decreased after thermocycling in all combinations. Among the treatment methods assessed, groups 2 and 4 showed significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced shear bond strengths for both metals. In group 4, the strength in MPa (n = 7) after thermocycling for cobalt-chromium alloy was 38.3, which was statistically (p < 0.05) higher than that for cast titanium (34.7). Air abrasion followed by the application of two primers containing a hydrophobic phosphate monomer (MDP) effectively improved the strength of the bond of denture base material to cast titanium and cobalt-chromium alloy.

  1. Effect of relining on fiber post retention to root canal.

    PubMed

    Faria-e-Silva, André Luís; Pedrosa-Filho, Celso de Freitas; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Silveira, Daniele Machado da; Martins, Luís Roberto Marcondes

    2009-01-01

    One of the clinically relevant problems dentists face when restoring endodontically treated teeth is the mismatch between fiber post and post space diameters, which results in an excessively thick resin cement layer. Fiber post relining appears as a solution for this problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fiber post relining with composite resin on push-out bond strength. Twenty bovine incisors were selected to assess post retention. The crowns were removed below the cementoenamel junction and the root canals were treated endodontically and flared with diamond burs. The roots were allocated into two groups (n=10): G1: fiber posts without relining and G2: fiber posts relined with composite resin. The posts were cemented with a dual-cured resin cement and the specimens were sectioned transversally. Three 1.5-mm thick slabs were obtained per root and identified as cervical, medium and apical thirds. The push-out test was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement occurred. The failure mode of fractured specimens was analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed by split-plot ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. Relined fiber posts presented higher retention values than non-relined post in all thirds. No statistically significant differences (p>0.05) were found among thirds for relined posts. All failures occurred at the interface between resin cement and root dentin. Relining with composite resin seems to be an effective method to improve the retention of fiber posts to flared root canals.

  2. The effect of gypsum products and separating materials on the typography of denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Firtell, D N; Walsh, J F; Elahi, J M

    1980-09-01

    The typography of polymethyl methacrylate processed against various gypsum products coated with various separating materials was studied under an SEM. Tinfoil and two commercial tin foil substitutes were used as separating material during processing, and the surfaces of the resulting acrylic resin forms were studied for topographical differences. Tinfoil and alpha 2 hemihydrates produced the smoothest surfaces. As a practical solution, a good quality tinfoil substitute and alpha 1 hemihydrate could be used when processing polymethyl methacrylate resin.

  3. A modified treatment approach for fabricating a mandibular distal-extension partial denture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Soni; Monaco, Edward A

    2010-03-01

    An altered cast impression technique is routinely used for fabricating distal-extension partial dentures. The advantages of an altered cast impression technique are that it evenly distributes stresses between hard and soft tissues and reduces stresses to the abutment teeth. However, there is some controversy among clinicians as to the technique and requirements of both tooth and tissue management of the distal-extension partial denture. A modified approach of fabricating a distal-extension partial denture is presented using a laboratory-processed functional reline method. The functional reline is performed after the removable partial denture is processed to perfect the fit of the denture base to the residual ridge. This enables the partial denture to be constructed from a cast made from a single impression and results in a prosthesis that is stable and has well-extended borders. Not only is it easy and less technique-sensitive for the operator, but it also results in increased comfort and reduced need for multiple adjustment visits for the patient.

  4. Effect of oxygen plasma treatment on the bonding of a soft liner to an acrylic resin denture material.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaiqin; Fang, Jianglin; Hu, Zheng; Ma, Junchi; Han, Yi; Bian, Jie

    2010-08-01

    Mechanical roughening reportedly had a weakening effect on bond strength. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an alternative surface roughening method, namely oxygen plasma treatment, on the tensile bond strength between denture base resin and soft liner. The soft liner used in this study was Soft Reverse, whilst the denture base material was Zi Ran. Three groups of specimens were prepared, comprising untreated specimens and oxygen plasma-treated specimens with exposure to air for 1 day and 2 days. All specimens were subjected to surface composition analysis and tensile bond strength testing. All data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, and their mean values were compared using Tukey's HSD test (p<0.01). Highest tensile bond strength was observed in the 1-day exposure group (5.2 MPa), whilst the lowest in the control group of untreated specimens (2.8 MPa). Hence, results of this study clearly indicated that oxygen plasma treatment was effective in enhancing tensile bond strength.

  5. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3600 Partially fabricated denture kit. (a... mold, by partially polymerizing the resin denture base materials while the materials are in contact...

  6. Denture plaque distribution and the effectiveness of a perborate-containing denture cleanser.

    PubMed

    Keng, S B; Lim, M

    1996-05-01

    Formation of plaque on the surfaces of dentures is a common problem among denture wearers. A study was conducted to determine the distribution of plaque on dentures. The plaque material was disclosed with a dye solution and measured with a modified Quigley-Hein scale. A photographic method was used to determine the distribution of plaque on the dentures of a group of complete-denture wearers. The effectiveness of a perborate soak-type cleanser was also measured by studying the precleaned and postcleaned states of the denture. Denture plaque was more evident on the fitting surfaces of the dentures than on areas of the flange, teeth, and palate. The use of the soak-type cleanser alone may not be completely effective for the control of heavy plaque.

  7. Denture Adhesives

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone and give temporary relief from loosening dentures. Zinc and Potential Risk Zinc is a mineral that is an essential ingredient ... in some dietary supplements. However, an excess of zinc in the body can lead to health problems ...

  8. Quality of Life with Removable Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Hadzipasic-Nazdrajic, Amra

    2011-01-01

    Goal: To measure change in a quality of life after treatment with removable dentures and to describe differences in quality of life in patients with new and worn out dentures. Materials and methods: Measuring instrument was OHIP-49, translated from English into one of the languages in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Sample consisted of patients who wanted to make/replace mobile dentures or came to repair a broken dentures. Comprehensibility of the OHIP-BH49 was tested on a sub-sample of patients. Three measurements were made: before and after the insertion of dentu res and when patients came to repair their mobile dentures. Results: Sample consisted of 67 patients: 32 patients who sought prosthetic treatment, and 35 who came to repair their broken dentures. We received 89.7% correctly filled questionnaires. Minor changes were made in four (4) questions. Statistical analysis performed with the T-test revealed the significant differences, before and after the treatment with mobile dentures (t=39.5, p<0.001). There was a significant difference in OHIP scores in patients with a new dentures, compared to the patients who had worn out dentures (t=44.30, p<0.001). Substantial differences, between OHIP scores, regarding the time of wearing dentures or patients’ age were not observed. Discussion: Patients who wore dentures longer than 5 years, showed better quality of life, because they became accustomed to the dentures. Conclusions: Self-reported life quality improved considerably after insertion of a new dentures. Patients with a new dentures showed significantly better quality of life than patients with worn out dentures. One part of OHIP validation in Bosnia-Herzegovina has been done. PMID:23678299

  9. The Effect of Cleaning Solutions on a Denture Base Material: Elimination of Candida albicans and Alteration of Physical Properties.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Aysegul; Erkose-Genc, Gonca; Uzun, Meltem; Sarı, Tuğrul; Isik-Ozkol, Gulbahar

    2016-09-06

    To evaluate the antimicrobial efficiency of three cleaning solutions and their effect on the physical properties of a denture base material. A heat-cured polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) denture base material (Meliodent) and three cleaning solutions (alkaline-peroxide, 30 minutes; 1% sodium-hypochlorite, 10 minutes; and 0.1% polymeric-guanidine solution, 5 minutes) were used. For antifungal activity test, 40 disc-shaped specimens were fabricated and allocated into a control group (distilled water) and 3 experimental groups (n = 10) according to the cleaning solutions. Antifungal activity against Candida albicans (ATCC 2091) was assessed with colony-forming units. An additional 40 rectangular plate specimens were fabricated for mechanical tests. Ten specimens were kept intact to be used as the control group for flexural strength test. The remaining 30 specimens were distributed into three groups according to the cleaning solutions. The surface roughness and Vickers hardness of the specimens were consecutively measured after 48 hours of water storage at 37 ± 2°C (t0), two disinfection cycles (t1), and 7 days of storage (t2) in one of the solutions. Finally, all 40 rectangular specimens were subjected to flexural strength test. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis test for antifungal activity, ANOVA for flexural strength test, and analysis of covariance for surface roughness and hardness tests. Significance was set at 0.05. The antifungal activities of polymeric guanidine and sodium hypochlorite were comparable to each other and significantly higher than alkaline peroxide (p < 0.05). The changes in the surface roughness of the specimens were statistically comparable among the cleaning solutions and time periods (p > 0.05); however, the decrease in the Vickers hardness of the specimens stored in sodium hypochlorite was significantly higher from t0 to t1 and t0 to t2 (p < 0.05) than other groups, resulting in comparable hardness changes. The flexural strengths of all

  10. Photoelastic analysis to compare implant-retained and conventional obturator dentures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Prado Ribeiro, Paula do; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; Haddad, Marcela Filiè; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Moreno, Amália

    2012-06-01

    The use of photoelastic analysis contributes to the rehabilitation of patients with oral-sinus-nasal sequelae, which in turn affect important functions such as chewing, swallowing, and speech. The prosthetic rehabilitation with implant-retained dentures is a suitable treatment option. The purpose of this study was to verify, by using a photoelastic analysis, the stress distribution in implant-retained palatal obturator dentures (relined or not) associated with different attachment systems (O-ring, bar-clip, and bar-clip associated with distally placed O-rings). Two photoelastic models were obtained from an experimental maxillary cast presenting an oral-nasal communication. One model had two 13-mm length implants placed on the left region. A total of eight colorless maxillary obturators were fabricated and subsequently four of them were relined with soft silicone soft, and three had attachment systems associated. The assembly (model/attachment system/prosthesis) was positioned in a circular polariscope and a 100-N load was applied at 10 mm/s. The results showed that the denture relining influenced the distribution and amount of stress on the models. The O-ring group displayed the lowest stress levels, followed by bar-clip system associated with distally placed O-rings and bar-clip groups.

  11. Fatigue resistance of acrylic resin denture base material reinforced with E-glass fibres.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, Ozlem; Dikbas, Idil; Unalan, Fatma

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of different forms and concentrations (2.5, 3, 4, 5% by volume) of glass fibres (chopped strand mat, continuous and woven) on fatigue resistance of acrylic denture base resin. The fatigue resistance was measured by applying repeated three-point bending deflection to the specimens, the cycle frequency of 1.05 g and magnitude of deflection of 2.0 mm. The number of loading cycles needed to cause a fracture in the test specimen was considered the fatigue resistance of the specimen. The results of this study revealed that the addition of three different glass fibre forms at all concentrations to acrylic resin did not produce a statistically significant increase in the fatigue resistance (p ≥ 0.05). This study also revealed that there were significant differences (p < 0.05) between glass fibres forms used concerning the effects on the fatigue resistance. This study showed that the woven glass fibres had a definite superiority over the chopped fibres and the continuous fibres in regard to the fatigue resistance of the acrylic denture base resin. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Hydrophilic nano-silica coating agents with platinum and diamond nanoparticles for denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Taro; Akiba, Norihisa; Inokoshi, Masanao; Shimada, Masayuki; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2017-05-31

    Preventing microorganisms from adhering to the denture surface is important for ensuring the systemic health of elderly denture wearers. Silica coating agents provide high hydrophilicity but lack durability. This study investigated solutions to improve the durability of the coating layer, determine an appropriate solid content concentration of SiO2 in the silica coating agent, and evaluate the effect of adding platinum (Pt) and diamond nanoparticles (ND) to the agent. Five coating agents were prepared with different SiO2 concentrations with/without Pt and ND additives. The contact angle was measured, and the brush-wear test was performed. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the silica coating layer. The appropriate concentration of SiO2 was found to be 0.5-0.75 wt%. The coating agents with additives showed significantly high hydrophilicity immediately after coating and after the brush-wear test. The coating agents with/without additives formed a durable coating layer even after the brush-wear test.

  13. The effect of the addition of different fibres on the transverse and impact strength of acrylic resin denture base material.

    PubMed

    Rahamneh, A; Jagger, D C; Harrison, A

    2003-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the addition of different types of fibres on the transverse and impact strength of acrylic resin denture base material. The addition of glass fibres (strand) and polyethylene fibres produced a non significant increase in the modulus of elasticity, compared with the control of conventional heat-cured acrylic resin. The addition of glass fibres (woven and strand), polyethylene and carbon fibres to acrylic resin produced a non significant increase in the modulus of rupture. The addition of carbon, glass (strand) and polyethylene fibres produced a significant increase in the impact strength. Within the limitations of this study the addition of silk fibres did not produce an improvement in the mechanical properties.

  14. Sac Hygroma After Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Successful Treatment with Endograft Relining

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Robert K. Palestrant, Sarah; Ryu, Jessica; Trachtenberg, Jeffrey

    2007-06-15

    Aneurysm sac expansion following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is typically associated with endoleaks that can be readily diagnosed on computed tomographic angiography (CTA), ultrasound, or catheter-directed arteriography. Sac hygromas are a cause of sac expansion without apparent endoleak and are presumed to be a result of ultrafiltration of serum manifested by accumulation of fibrinous, gelatinous material within the aneurysm sac following EVAR. Although there are no reported associated ruptures, sac expansion is nevertheless disconcerting and intervention is presumably indicated. We report a case of an expanding aneurysm after EVAR secondary to sac hygroma that was successfully treated with relining of the existing, original endograft.

  15. Health and safety precautions in the relining of aluminum electrolysis cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlek, Rudolf P.

    1994-05-01

    The risk of accidents when handling liquid metal and bath, the potential for explosions through reactions of gases, and electrical hazards all highlight the vital importance of safety in the cathode repair and cell restart processes. With respect to hygiene, refractory materials and reaction products must be handled carefully when repairing cathodes and when welding. Personnel therefore require appropriate clothing and protective equipment. This article reviews various procedures—short circuiting a cell, digging out the spent potlining, preparing the empty steel shell, fixing the steel bars to the cathode blocks, and general relining and start-up—in the context of both safety and health.

  16. Effect of different housing retaining materials on the flexural strength of an acrylic resin overdenture base.

    PubMed

    Ozkir, Serhat Emre; Yilmaz, Burak

    2017-04-03

    from the PMMA. The tested retaining materials significantly reduced the flexural strength of PMMA denture base. The flexural strength of the resin base with housing was significantly higher when PMMA-based retaining materials were used than when acrylic resin-based hard reline materials were used. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of denture cleansers on color stability, surface roughness, and hardness of different denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Porwal, Anand; Khandelwal, Meenakshi; Punia, Vikas; Sharma, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different denture cleansers on the color stability, surface hardness, and roughness of different denture base resins. Three denture base resin materials (conventional heat cure resin, high impact resin, and polyamide denture base resin) were immersed for 180 days in commercially available two denture cleansers (sodium perborate and sodium hypochlorite). Color, surface roughness, and hardness were measured for each sample before and after immersion procedure. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc honestly significant difference test were used to evaluate color, surface roughness, and hardness data before and after immersion in denture cleanser (α =0.05). All denture base resins tested exhibited a change in color, surface roughness, and hardness to some degree in both denture cleansers. Polyamides resin immersed in sodium perborate showed a maximum change in color after immersion for 180 days. Conventional heat cure resin immersed in sodium hypochlorite showed a maximum change in surface roughness and conventional heat cure immersed in sodium perborate showed a maximum change in hardness. Color changes of all denture base resins were within the clinically accepted range for color difference. Surface roughness change of conventional heat cure resin was not within the clinically accepted range of surface roughness. The choice of denture cleanser for different denture base resins should be based on the chemistry of resin and cleanser, denture cleanser concentration, and duration of immersion.

  18. Double-Layer Surface Modification of Polyamide Denture Base Material by Functionalized Sol-Gel Based Silica for Adhesion Improvement.

    PubMed

    Hafezeqoran, Ali; Koodaryan, Roodabeh

    2017-09-21

    Limited surface treatments have been proposed to improve the bond strength between autopolymerizing resin and polyamide denture base materials. Still, the bond strength of autopolymerizing resins to nylon polymer is not strong enough to repair the fractured denture effectively. This study aimed to introduce a novel method to improve the adhesion of autopolymerizing resin to polyamide polymer by a double layer deposition of sol-gel silica and N-2-(aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (AE-APTMS). The silica sol was synthesized by acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as silica precursors. Polyamide specimens were dipped in TEOS-derived sol (TS group, n = 28), and exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light under O2 flow for 30 minutes. UV-treated specimens were immersed in AE-APTMS solution and left for 24 hours at room temperature. The other specimens were either immersed in AE-APTMS solution (AP group, n = 28) or left untreated (NT group, n = 28). Surface characterization was investigated by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two autopolymerizing resins (subgroups G and T, n = 14) were bonded to the specimens, thermocycled, and then tested for shear bond strength with a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's HSD (α = 0.05). FTIR spectra of treated surfaces confirmed the chemical modification and appearance of functional groups on the polymer. One-way ANOVA revealed significant differences in shear bond strength among the study groups. Tukey's HSD showed that TST and TSG groups had significantly higher shear bond strength than control groups (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Moreover, bond strength values of APT were statistically significant compared to controls (p = 0.017). Amino functionalized TEOS-derived silica coating is a simple and cost-effective method for improving the bond strength between the autopolymerizing resin and polyamide denture

  19. 21 CFR 872.3590 - Preformed plastic denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3590 Preformed plastic denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed plastic denture tooth is a prefabricated device, composed of materials such as methyl...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3570 - OTC denture repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3570 OTC denture repair kit. (a) Identification. An OTC denture repair kit is a device consisting of a material, such as a resin monomer system of...

  1. No. 5 blast furnace 1995 reline and upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Kakascik, T.F. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    The 1995 reline of No. 5 Blast Furnace is an undertaking which has never been approached in previous relines of any blast furnace in the history of Wheeling Pittsburgh Steel Corporation. The scope of the project is such that it represents a radical departure from W.P.S.C.`s traditional methods of ironmaking. The reline of No. 5 Blast Furnace is one of the largest capital improvements performed at W.P.S.C. Blast Furnaces. The improvements made at one single time are taking a furnace from 1960`s technology into the 21st century. With this in mind, employee training was one of the largest parts of the project. Training for the automated stockhouse, castfloor, new skip drive, new instrumentation, new castfloor equipment, hydraulics and overall furnace operation were an absolute necessity. The reline has laid the ground work to give the Corporation an efficient, higher productive, modern Blast Furnace which will place W.P.S.C. in the world class category in ironmaking well into the 21st century.

  2. Comparative clinical evaluation of removable partial dentures made of two different materials in Kennedy Applegate class II partially edentulous situation

    PubMed Central

    Hundal, Maninder; Madan, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Cast Chromium Cobalt alloy has been the material of choice for fabricating Removable Partial Dentures (RPDs) but has certain drawbacks. Newer materials like the flexible Nylon based Super Polyamide have been introduced to overcome these drawbacks. The present study has compared the above two materials for nine clinical parameters. Method The study was carried out on 30 patients presenting with a Kennedy Applegate class II partially edentulous situation who were divided into two equal groups and clinically assessed. Result Statistically significant results were obtained in favor of flexible RPDs, in the parameters of ‘aesthetics’ and ‘overall patient satisfaction’. Both groups showed more or less similar values for ‘frequency of fracture of the prosthesis during usage’ with the incidence being slightly higher for patients wearing the cast RPDs. The clinical parameters of ‘oral soft tissue tolerance’, ‘gingival health’, ‘periodontal health’ and ‘adaptability in areas with undercut’ were statistically at par for all the 30 patients thus suggesting the comparable biocompatibility of the two materials. The highlight of this study was the relative ease in fabrication of the flexible RPDs as compared to the cast RPDs. Conclusion Based on the favorable clinical results of this study, it can be summarized that the flexible RPDs is a viable alternative to cast RPDs in Kennedy Applegate class II partially edentulous situation in the short term. PMID:26843744

  3. An effective technique for denture border evaluation.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, R D; DeFreest, C F

    1997-09-01

    Proper extension and adjustment of denture borders is a critical component in successful removable prosthodontic treatment. Unfortunately, commonly marketed disclosing media may not provide appropriate viscosities for the accurate assessment of denture border extensions. This article provides a technique for the mixing, unit-dose packaging, and utilization of a disclosing medium that is extremely well-suited for denture border applications. The technique employs commonly available materials and compiles with current "unit-dose" guidelines.

  4. Evaluation of the durability and antiadhesive action of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine grafting on an acrylic resin denture base material.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nana; Iwasa, Fuminori; Inoue, Yuuki; Morisaki, Hirobumi; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2014-08-01

    The polymer 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine is currently used on medical devices to prevent infection. Denture plaque-associated infection is regarded as a source of serious dental and medical complications in the elderly population, and denture hygiene, therefore, is an issue of considerable importance for denture wearers. Furthermore, because denture bases are exposed to mechanical stresses, for example, denture brushing, the durability of the coating is important for retaining the antiadhesive function of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine. The purpose of this study is to investigate the durability and antiadhesive activity of two 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer coating techniques: poly-2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine grafting and poly-2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-co-n-butyl methacrylate coating. It was revealed that 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer coating of the denture base resin polymethyl methacrylate decreases bacterial biofilm formation. Durability was examined by rhodamine staining and elemental surface analysis and by determining the wetting properties of the 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer-modified polymethyl methacrylate after a friction test that comprised 500 brushing cycles. Antiadhesive activity was examined by using a Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation assay. Poly-2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-grafted polymethyl methacrylate retained 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine units and antiadhesive activity even after repetitive mechanical stress, whereas co-n-butyl methacrylate-coated polymethyl methacrylate did not. These results demonstrated that graft polymerization of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine on denture surfaces may contribute to the durability of the coating and prevent microbial retention. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. EVALUATION OF DENTURE-RELATED FACTORS PREDISPOSING TO DENTURE STOMATITIS IN A LEBANESE POPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Georges; Cassia, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Denture stomatitis is a common fungal oral infection of multifactorial etiology. Denture-related factors such as denture’s age, hygiene, night wearing and colonization by Candida albicans are known to predispose to denture stomatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate these factors and their relationship with the occurrence of denture stomatitis in a Lebanese population. Material and methods: Sixty patients (40 women, 20 men; age range 40-80 years) showing clinical evidence of denture-related stomatitis were selected for this study. Swab samples from the palate and the palatal surfaces of the upper dentures of these patients were collected and examined mycologically. Denture’s age, hygiene, night wearing and colonization by Candida albicans were evaluated and analyzed statistically. Results: The statistical analysis showed a significant role for denture’s hygiene, night wearing, and colonization by Candida albicans in the installation of the denture stomatitis. Patient’s gender and age, as well as the denture’s age, were not significant predictors of the disease. Conclusion: In a sample of Lebanese population, poor denture hygiene, continuous denture use, and Candida denture colonization are important etiological factors that contribute to denture stomatitis. PMID:27999492

  6. The Anti-Adhesive Effect of Curcumin on Candida albicans Biofilms on Denture Materials

    PubMed Central

    Alalwan, Hasanain; Rajendran, Ranjith; Lappin, David F.; Combet, Emilie; Shahzad, Muhammad; Robertson, Douglas; Nile, Christopher J.; Williams, Craig; Ramage, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    The use of natural compounds as an alternative source of antimicrobials has become a necessity given the growing concern over global antimicrobial resistance. Polyphenols, found in various edible plants, offers one potential solution to this. We aimed to investigate the possibility of using curcumin within the context of oral health as a way of inhibiting and preventing the harmful development of Candida albicans biofilms. We undertook a series of adsorption experiments with varying concentrations of curcumin, showing that 50 μg/ml could prevent adhesion. This effect could be further synergized by the curcumin pre-treatment of yeast cells to obtain significantly greater inhibition (>90%, p < 0.001). Investigation of the biological impact of curcumin showed that it preferentially affected immature morphological forms (yeast and germlings), and actively promoted aggregation of the cells. Transcriptional analyses showed that key adhesins were down-regulated (ALS1 and ALS3), whereas aggregation related genes (ALS5 and AAF1) were up-regulated. Collectively, these data demonstrated that curcumin elicits anti-adhesive effects and that induces transcription of genes integrally involved in the processes related to biofilm formation. Curcumin and associated polyphenols therefore have the capacity to be developed for use in oral healthcare to augment existing preventative strategies for candidal biofilms on the denture surface. PMID:28473808

  7. A practical three visit complete denture system.

    PubMed

    Ling, B C

    2000-10-01

    Standard prosthodontic procedures require five visits to construct a set of complete maxillary and mandibular dentures. Various attempts have been made to reduce these procedures to four or three appointments. However, most of these techniques require the use of visible light polymerized resin as the final denture base materials. Visible light-cured resin materials have inferior physical properties and biocompatibility problems as compared with heat cured polymethylmethacrylate. This paper describes a system of complete denture construction which requires three clinical appointments instead of the usual five visits. This system is made possible by using the VLC base/tray material as the preliminary impression material as well as the application of a new biometric wax occlusion rim. It retains the use of polymethylmethacrylate as the denture base material. This system also utilizes all the procedures used in the conventional five appointment system of complete denture construction.

  8. Soft denture liners' effect on the masticatory function in patients wearing complete dentures: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Palla, Eleni Sotiria; Karaoglani, Eleni; Naka, Olga; Anastassiadou, Vassiliki

    2015-12-01

    To explore the effect of soft denture liners on the masticatory performance and muscle activity of edentulous patients wearing complete dentures, as determined by using objective measurement methods. Randomized controlled clinical trials and Cross-over studies that evaluated the masticatory capacity and muscle activity in denture wearers with and without soft denture liners were included in this systematic review. A comprehensive literature search was performed via electronic databases using the appropriate key words. The last search took place in September 2014. The potentially appropriate articles were identified and evaluated for eligibility through a predefined review process conducted by two examiners. Six out of the 176 identified records were included for quality and systematic assessment. The observed clinical and methodological diversity determined the narrative approach for the pooling of the findings. According to the studies brought together for the current systematic review, soft denture liners provided denture wearers with increased masticatory function compared to conventional denture base materials. Specifically, the use of long-term silicone liners significantly improved the mastication parameters. The observed intervention effects suggest further studies of higher quality to allow reliable conclusions to be drawn and to strengthen the clinical significance of these materials to patient's functionality. Soft denture lining materials have been suggested to address functional problems arising during complete denture function. This study was designed to systematically review the impact of soft liners' use on the masticatory efficiency in denture wearers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Denture adhesives: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Papadiochou, Sofia; Emmanouil, Ioannis; Papadiochos, Ioannis

    2015-05-01

    Denture adhesives have been the objective of scientific research for over half a century. Although they are used by denture wearers worldwide, investigations of their effectiveness and biocompatibility have led to controversial conclusions. The purpose of this study was to review the literature data with regard to the effectiveness and biocompatibility of denture adhesives as well as the attitudes of both patients and dental professionals toward these materials. An electronic search of English peer-reviewed dental literature in the Medline database was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and biocompatibility of denture adhesives. There was no limitation in publication year, so the search included all the available scientific evidence included in that particular database until March 2014. Specific inclusion criteria were used for the selection of the appropriate articles. A manual search of the citations of the obtained articles followed to extend the electronic search. A full text review was carried out for only 32 articles. Of the 32 articles, 21 examined the efficacy of denture adhesives in terms of retention and stability and masticatory performance, 6 evaluated the issue of the biocompatibility of denture adhesives, and 5 presented the attitudes of either professionals or patients toward these materials. The majority of clinical studies supported the fact that denture adhesives enhance the retention, stability, and masticatory performance of a removable prosthesis. In terms of biocompatibility, long-term in vivo studies to investigate potential harmful effects were lacking. Patients are satisfied with denture adhesives that meet their needs. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of experimental cleanser solution of Ricinus communis: effect on soft denture liner properties.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Marina Xavier; da Silva, Cláudia Helena Lovato; Paranhos, Helena Freitas Oliveira; Souza, Raphael Freitas; Macedo, Ana Paula

    2012-06-01

    This study evaluated colour stability, hardness and roughness of soft denture liners after immersion in various cleansers. Thirty specimens (14 mm × 4 mm) of Elite Soft Relining (ES) and Mucopren Soft (MS) were randomly immersed in distilled water at 37°C, sodium hypochlorite 1%, and an experimental Ricinus communis solution (RC) for 7, 15 and 183 continuous days. anova (p < 0.05) and Tukey's test indicated that after T7 (μ =8.79 ± 7.36); T15 (μ = 4.23 ± 2.62) and T183 (μ = 8.78 ± 3.16), MS presented a higher increase in hardness than ES. After T7, MS underwent an increase in roughness (μ = 0.09 ± 0.80); ES underwent a decrease (μ = -0.08 ± 0.16). RC caused the smallest variation in roughness. After T15, both materials presented an increase in roughness. After T183, ES (μ = -0.30 ± 0.48) presented a higher roughness variation than MS (μ = -0.07 ± 0.32). Hypochlorite caused an increase in roughness (μ = 0.02 ± 0.19). After all periods ES presented higher colour alteration than MS; highest colour alteration was caused by hypochlorite. Both materials were more stable after immersion in RC. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Patient-reported outcomes of maxillary implant-supported overdentures compared with conventional dentures.

    PubMed

    Zembic, Anja; Wismeijer, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present prospective clinical study was to compare patient-reported outcomes for maxillary conventional dentures and maxillary implant-supported dentures. Twenty-one patients (6 women and 15 men) being edentulous in the maxilla and encountering problems with their existing dentures were included. Twelve patients (4 women and 8 men) received a new set of conventional dentures, due to insufficient dentures. In nine patients (2 women and 7 men), the existing dentures were adjusted by means of relining or rebasing. All patients received implant-supported dentures on two retentive anchors. In total, 42 implants were inserted in the anterior maxilla. The participants rated their satisfaction on their existing conventional dentures, 2 months after insertion of new conventional dentures and 2 months after insertion of implant-supported dentures. Thereby, patients responded to questionnaires capturing the oral health impact profile (OHIP) using visual analog scales. Seven domains (functional limitation, physical pain, psychological discomfort, physical, psychological and social disability and handicap) were assessed. Higher scores implied poorer patient satisfaction. In addition, the questionnaire involved the evaluation of cleaning ability, general satisfaction, speech, comfort, esthetics, stability, and chewing ability. Higher scores implied higher patient satisfaction. Patient satisfaction significantly increased for implant-supported dentures compared with old dentures in all seven OHIP subgroups, as well as for cleaning ability, general satisfaction, ability to speak, comfort, esthetics, and stability (P < 0.05). The comparison of new conventional dentures and implant-supported dentures revealed a statistically significantly increased satisfaction for functional limitation (difference of 33.2 mm), psychological discomfort (difference of 36.7 mm), physical disability (difference of 36.3 mm), and social disability (difference of 23.5 mm), (P < 0

  12. Partial reline of Inland`s No. 7 blast furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrance, K.F. II; Johansson, J.; Carter, W.L.

    1995-10-01

    The background for the decision to partially reline No. 7 blast furnace that would achieve the same results as a complete reline is discussed. This approach was designed to reduce actual downtime on the furnace at a critical production period. Areas of work included the hearth, stack, stoves, gas cleaning and furnace top. Highlights of the project execution were: schedules; blowdown; salamander tap; quench; dig out/descale; scaffolding used; and brick installation. The furnace was blown-in 29 days after the blowdown and producing in excess of 9,000 tons/day after 12 days of operation. Inland has adopted a new definition for establishing campaign life based on refractory wear that includes a hearth monitoring system.

  13. Fracture toughness of cross-linked and non-cross-linked temporary crown and fixed partial denture materials.

    PubMed

    Balkenhol, Markus; Köhler, Heiko; Orbach, Katharina; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2009-07-01

    Temporary crowns and fixed partial dentures are exposed to considerable functional loading, which places severe demands on the biomaterials used for their fabrication (= temporary crown & bridge materials, t-c&b). As the longevity of biopolymers is influenced by the ability to withstand a crack propagation, the aim of this study was to investigate the fracture toughness of cross-linked and non-cross-linked t-c&bs. Four different t-c&bs (Luxatemp AM Plus, Protemp 3 Garant, Structur Premium, Trim) were used to fabricate bar shaped specimens (2mmx5mmx25mm, ISO 13586). A notch (depth 2.47mm) was placed in the center of the specimen using a diamond cutting disc and a sharp pre-crack was added using a razor blade. 60 specimens per material were subjected to different storage conditions (dry and water 37 degrees C: 30min, 60min, 4h, 24h, 168h; thermocycling 5-55 degrees C: 168h) prior to fracture (3-point bending setup). The fracture sites were inspected using SEM analysis. Data was subjected to parametric statistics (p=0.05). The K(IC) values varied between 0.4 and 1.3MPam(0.5) depending on the material and storage time. Highest K(IC) were observed for Protemp 3 Garant. Fracture toughness was significantly affected by thermocycling for all dimethacrylates (p<0.05) except for Structur Premium. All dimethacrylates showed a linear-elastic fracture mechanism, whereas the monomethacrylate showed an elasto-plastic fracture mechanism. Dimethacrylates exhibit a low resistance against crack propagation immediately after curing. In contrast, monomethacrylates may compensate for crack propagation due to plastic deformation. However, K(IC) is compromised with increasing storage time.

  14. Fracture Strength of Three-Unit Implant Supported Fixed Partial Dentures with Excessive Crown Height Fabricated from Different Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nazari, Vahideh; Ghodsi, Safoura; Alikhasi, Marzieh; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Fracture strength is an important factor influencing the clinical long-term success of implant-supported prostheses especially in high stress situations like excessive crown height space (CHS). The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture strength of implant-supported fixed partial dentures (FPDs) with excessive crown height, fabricated from three different materials. Materials and Methods: Two implants with corresponding abutments were mounted in a metal model that simulated mandibular second premolar and second molar. Thirty 3-unit frameworks with supportive anatomical design were fabricated using zirconia, nickel-chromium alloy (Ni-Cr), and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) (n=10). After veneering, the CHS was equal to 15mm. Then; samples were axially loaded on the center of pontics until fracture in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The failure load data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Games-Howell tests at significance level of 0.05. Results: The mean failure loads for zirconia, Ni-Cr and PEEK restorations were 2086±362N, 5591±1200N and 1430±262N, respectively. There were significant differences in the mean failure loads of the three groups (P<0.001). The fracture modes in zirconia, metal ceramic and PEEK restorations were cohesive, mixed and adhesive type, respectively. Conclusions: According to the findings of this study, all implant supported three-unit FPDs fabricated of zirconia, metal ceramic and PEEK materials are capable to withstand bite force (even para-functions) in the molar region with excessive CHS. PMID:28243301

  15. Reline-assisted green and facile synthesis of fluorapatite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mohammad; Ramsheh, Majid Rastegar; Ahmadi, Seyed Mohammad; Madani, Mohammad Reza; Shamsi, Mehdi; Reshadi, Reyhaneh; Lotfi, Farahnaz

    2017-08-01

    A fast, simple and sustainable method based on choline chloride-urea deep eutectic solvent (known as Reline) was employed to synthesize nanosized fluorapatite (FA) particles. Using XRD, FESEM, TEM, EDS, and FTIR, the formation of FA nanoparticles with average crystal size of ~34nm, percent crystallinity of 93%, particle size of ~45nm, and high crystal, elemental, and structural purity was confirmed. The MTT cytotoxicity assay endorsed the non-toxicity of as-synthesized FA nanoparticles. The good biocompatibility, osteogenity and mineralization ability of as-synthesized FA nanoparticles were confirmed by Alizarin red staining, Acridine orange staining and ALP activity tests. After synthesis of the nanoparticles, the Reline solvent was recovered successfully using freeze-drying method with 71% yield of recovery revealing the green, sustainable and economical nature of the developed synthesis method. According to the results, owing to its alkalinity, high ionic strength and 3D bulky configuration, the Reline solvent provides the optimum conditions required for formation of FA with maximum crystallinity and the particle size controlled in the nanometer range. Providing a simple, cost-effective, and green method for synthesis of FA nanoparticles with potential biological applications is the most innovative aspect of this study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. What Are Dentures?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Know About Puberty Train Your Temper What Are Dentures? KidsHealth > For Kids > What Are Dentures? Print A A A en español ¿Qué son ... to be pulled — an older person might need dentures (say: DEN-churs). Dentures are a set of ...

  17. Effect of powder to liquid ratio on tensile strength and glass transition temperature of alumina filled poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base material.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, S H; Arifin, A; Mohd Ishak, Z A; Nizam, A; Samsudin, A R

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties and glass transition temperature (Tg) of a denture base material prepared from high molecular weight poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) and alumina (Al2O3). The glass transition temperature was studied by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The effect of powder-to-liquid ratio was investigated. The result showed that the tensile properties and the Tg were slightly effected by the powder-to-liquid ratio. The ratio of 2.2:1 by weight of powder to liquid was found to be the best ratio for mixing the material to give the best result in this formulation.

  18. Effect of artificial saliva with different pH levels on the cytotoxicity of soft denture lining materials.

    PubMed

    Akay, Canan; Tanış, Merve Ç; Sevim, Handan

    2017-06-27

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effects of 9 different soft denture liners on the viability of L-929 mouse fibroblast cells at different incubation periods by storing them in artificial saliva (AS) with different pH levels. 96 disk samples from each lining material were prepared and divided into 4 groups: GI: No treatment; GII: Stored in artificial saliva with pH 3 for 21 days; Group III: Stored in artificial saliva with pH 7 for 21 days; and Group IV: Stored in artificial saliva with pH 14 for 21 days. The cytotoxicity of the extracts to cultured mouse fibroblasts (L-929) was measured by MTT (tetrazolium salt 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-dipHnyltetrazolium bromide) assay. Data were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variation (ANOVA). It was found that for the pH 3 values of New Truliner, Trusoft, Mollosil Plus, Dentusil, TDV, and HydroCast®; for the pH 7 values of Ufi Gel P and Elite plus; and for the pH 14 values of HydroCast®, there was a noncytotoxic effect during both the 24-hour and 48-hour incubation periods. In the control group 48-hour incubation period, HydroCast®, TDV, Mollosil, 24-hour incubation period Elite plus, for pH 3 values; Elite Plus 24-hour incubation period, for pH 7 values Trusoft 48-hour incubation period there was a moderately cytotoxic effect. This in vitro study revealed that storage in artificial saliva with different pH levels can affect the cytotoxicity of soft lining materials.

  19. A comparison of the cost effectiveness of pressure-indicating materials and their ability to detect pressure areas in complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Bookhan, V; Owen, C P

    2001-05-01

    Pressure areas on the fitting surfaces of dentures can cause great discomfort and pain to denture wearers if not detected and removed. Pressure-indicating materials are commonly used to detect these areas, and several commercial varieties are available, but these tend to be expensive. The cost effectiveness of these materials has not been investigated, nor has this been linked to their efficacy and ease of use. The aim of this study therefore, was to compare the different pressure-indicating materials available commercially with that of a home-made paste. An assumption of efficacy was made by the number and size of pressure areas revealed, by taking standardised photographs and analysing the images. User friendliness was determined by the time taken to mix, apply and remove the material. Cost was determined by a cost per unit calculation based on the average or minimum quantity required for each material. The results indicated that a home-made paste made of equal quantities of hand lanolin (BP) and zinc oxide powder was not only the most effective, but was also the cheapest, being only 3% of the cost of the most expensive of the materials.

  20. 16 CFR 20.2 - Deception as to identity of rebuilder, remanufacturer, reconditioner or reliner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., remanufacturer, reconditioner or reliner. 20.2 Section 20.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE REBUILT, RECONDITIONED AND OTHER USED AUTOMOBILE PARTS INDUSTRY § 20.2 Deception as to identity of rebuilder, remanufacturer, reconditioner or reliner. (a) It is...

  1. 16 CFR 20.2 - Deception as to identity of rebuilder, remanufacturer, reconditioner or reliner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., remanufacturer, reconditioner or reliner. 20.2 Section 20.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE REBUILT, RECONDITIONED AND OTHER USED AUTOMOBILE PARTS INDUSTRY § 20.2 Deception as to identity of rebuilder, remanufacturer, reconditioner or reliner. (a) It is...

  2. 16 CFR 20.2 - Deception as to identity of rebuilder, remanufacturer, reconditioner or reliner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., remanufacturer, reconditioner or reliner. 20.2 Section 20.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE REBUILT, RECONDITIONED AND OTHER USED AUTOMOBILE PARTS INDUSTRY § 20.2 Deception as to identity of rebuilder, remanufacturer, reconditioner or reliner. (a) It is...

  3. 16 CFR 20.2 - Deception as to identity of rebuilder, remanufacturer, reconditioner or reliner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., remanufacturer, reconditioner or reliner. 20.2 Section 20.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE REBUILT, RECONDITIONED AND OTHER USED AUTOMOBILE PARTS INDUSTRY § 20.2 Deception as to identity of rebuilder, remanufacturer, reconditioner or reliner. (a) It is...

  4. 16 CFR 20.2 - Deception as to identity of rebuilder, remanufacturer, reconditioner or reliner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., remanufacturer, reconditioner or reliner. 20.2 Section 20.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE REBUILT, RECONDITIONED AND OTHER USED AUTOMOBILE PARTS INDUSTRY § 20.2 Deception as to identity of rebuilder, remanufacturer, reconditioner or reliner. (a) It is...

  5. The cast aluminum denture base. Part I: Rationale.

    PubMed

    Halperin, A R

    1980-06-01

    Experiments with various casting techniques have been done, and aluminum base dentures have been made for many patients. The subjective clinical response from patients wearing aluminum dentures has not been different from patients wearing acrylic resin dentures. However, Brudvik and Holt have stated that they have had marked clinical success in using aluminum bases. A literature review on using aluminum as a denture base material has been presented, and the rationale for its use has been discussed. In part II, a technique will be described that can be used for casting aluminum denture bases.

  6. Effect of Storage in Distilled Water for Three Months on the Antimicrobial Properties of Poly(methyl methacrylate) Denture Base Material Doped with Inorganic Filler.

    PubMed

    Chladek, Grzegorz; Basa, Katarzyna; Mertas, Anna; Pakieła, Wojciech; Żmudzki, Jarosław; Bobela, Elżbieta; Król, Wojciech

    2016-04-29

    The colonization of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) denture base materials by pathogenic microorganisms is a major problem associated with the use of prostheses, and the incorporation of antimicrobial fillers is a method of improving the antimicrobial properties of these materials. Numerous studies have demonstrated the initial in vitro antimicrobial effectiveness of this type of material; however, reports demonstrating the stability of these fillers over longer periods are not available. In this study, silver sodium hydrogen zirconium phosphate was introduced into the powder component of a PMMA denture base material at concentrations of 0.25%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 4%, and 8% (w/w). The survival rates of the gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and yeast-type fungus Candida albicans were established after fungal or bacterial suspensions were incubated with samples that had been previously stored in distilled water. Storage over a three-month period led to the progressive reduction of the initial antimicrobial properties. The results of this study suggest that additional microbiological tests should be conducted for materials that are treated with antimicrobial fillers and intended for long-term use. Future long-term studies of the migration of silver ions from the polymer matrix and the influence of different media on this ion emission are required.

  7. Fatigue resistance of denture teeth.

    PubMed

    Heintze, Siegward D; Monreal, Dominik; Rousson, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    There is no standard test to determine the fatigue resistance of denture teeth. With the increasing number of patients with implant-retained dentures the mechanical strength of the denture teeth requires more attention and valid laboratory test set-ups. The purpose of the present study was to determine the fatigue resistance of various denture teeth using a dynamic load testing machine. Four denture teeth were used: Bonartic II (Candulor), Physiodens (Vita), SR Phonares II (Ivoclar Vivadent) and Trubyte (Dentsply). For dynamic load testing, first upper molars with a similar shape and cusp inclination were selected. The molar teeth were embedded in cylindrical steel molds with denture base material (ProBase, Ivoclar Vivadent). Dynamic fatigue loading was carried out on the mesio-buccal cusp at a 45° angle using dynamic testing machines and 2,000,000 cycles at 2Hz in water (37 °C). Three specimens per group and load were submitted to decreasing load levels (at least 4) until all the three specimens no longer showed any failures. All the specimens were evaluated under a stereo microscope (20× magnification). The number of cycles reached before observing a failure, and its dependence on the load and on the material, has been modeled using a parametric survival regression model with a lognormal distribution. This allowed to estimate the fatigue resistance for a given material as the maximal load for which one would observe less than 1% failure after 2,000,000 cycles. The failure pattern was similar for all denture teeth, showing a large chipping of the loaded mesio-buccal cusp. In our regression model, there were statistically significant differences among the different materials, with SR Phonares II and Bonartic II showing a higher resistance than Physiodens and Trubyte, the fatigue resistance being estimated at around 110 N for the former two, and at about 60 N for the latter two materials. The fatigue resistance may be a useful parameter to assess and to compare

  8. Effect of storage solution on surface roughness of provisional crown and fixed partial denture materials.

    PubMed

    Haselton, Debra R; Diaz-Arnold, Ana M; Dawson, Deborah V

    2004-12-01

    This study evaluated the surface roughness of polished provisional materials at baseline and after storage in artificial saliva and artificial saliva-coffee solutions. Ten specimens (25 mm x 25 mm x 2 mm) of 12 commercially available provisional crown materials (5 methacrylate and 7 bis-acryl resins) were fabricated and polished. Baseline surface roughness measurements (Ra) were made using a surface roughness tester. Specimens were divided into 2 groups and stored in artificial saliva or artificial saliva-coffee solution at 37 degrees C for 2 weeks. Baseline surface roughness data were analyzed using the analysis of variance; multiple comparisons adjustment was made using the Tukey method. Multiple linear regression methods were used to analyze change in roughness relative to baseline and to assess the impact of storage medium, material, and baseline roughness on this change, including potential interactions among these 3 factors; descriptors of poststorage surface roughness were obtained. Alike demonstrated the greatest surface roughness, both at baseline and after storage (p <0.05 after adjustment for all Pairwise comparison by Tukey method). Temphase, Temporary Bridge Resin, Instatemp, Unifast, Jet, and Zeta had the lowest baseline surface roughness measurements. The lowest poststorage roughness scores were associated with Protemp Garant, Jet, and Integrity. Five materials (Protemp Garant, Instatemp, Unifast, Jet, and Zeta), formed the group having the lowest rough poststorage outcomes. The data provided strong evidence of a material effect (p <0.0001) at baseline. Evaluation of change in Ra following storage indicated that surface roughness increased for the majority of materials after storage in a moist environment, and that provisional crown materials that exhibit less initial surface roughness tend to undergo greater surface roughness change in a moist environment. Strong indications were found that the effect of the type of storage solution used differed

  9. Impact of prosthetic material on mid- and long-term outcome of dental implants supporting single crowns and fixed partial dentures: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Abou-Ayash, Samir; Strasding, Malin; Rücker, Gerta; Att, Wael

    2017-01-01

    The impact of prosthetic material selection on implant survival is not clear. The current criteria for choosing a prosthetic material seem to be based on clinician preferences. This systematic review aims to evaluate the impact of restorative materials on the mid- and long-term survival of implants supporting single crowns and fixed partial dentures. Hand and MEDLINE searches were performed to identify relevant literature for single crowns (SC) and fixed partial dentures (FPD). Further inclusion criteria were a mean follow-up period of at least 3 years, the inclusion of at least 10 patients in a relevant study cohort, and a clear description of prosthesis type and prosthetic material. A total of 63 studies for the SC group and 11 studies for the FPD group were included. Full arch restorations were not included. The materials utilised in the SC group were metal-ceramic (precious and non-precious), lithium-disilicate, veneered zirconia, veneered alumina, and nanoceramics. The materials used in the FPD group were metal-ceramic (precious), veneered titanium, metal-resin (precious), and veneered zirconia. No significant impact on the prosthetic material relating to mid- or long-term implant survival was identified. Furthermore, there were no statistically significant differences between the survival rates of the dental prostheses made from different materials (SC and FPD group). Single crowns made of nanoceramics showed a higher risk for decementation relative to other materials (0.80, 95% CI [0.67; 0.89]; P < 0.0001), whereas metal-resin FPDs showed a higher risk for chipping (0.36, 95% CI [0.23; 0.52]; P = 0.0072). The current evidence suggests that prosthetic material selection has no influence on mid- and long-term survival of implants restored with single crowns and fixed partial dentures. Similarly, the prosthetic material seems to have no significant impact on prosthetic survival rates. Further research is required to provide more evidence regarding the impact of

  10. In vitro changes in hardness of sealed resilient lining materials on immersion in various fluids.

    PubMed

    Mante, Francis K; Mante, Mamle O; Petropolous, Vicki C

    2008-07-01

    During clinical use, resilient lining materials undergo changes in hardness that make them ineffective. The aims of this investigation were (1) to determine the effect of a resilient lining sealer on the hardness of four resilient denture liners; and (2) to determine the effect of the sealer on hardness after immersion in various solutions. Two sets of specimens of four resilient liners, Coe-comfort (CC), PermaSoft (PS), Tokuyama soft reline (TK), and Total-Soft (TS), 6-mm diameter by 4-mm thickness, were fabricated. Two coats of Permaseal, a soft reline sealant, were applied to one set of specimens of each material according to manufacturers' instructions. Sealed and unsealed samples were divided into four groups (n = 10). Each group was immersed in one of the following solutions: artificial saliva at 37 degrees C, Efferdent, Efferdent with once daily scrubbing with a soft toothbrush, and 50% ethanol. Shore A hardness numbers were obtained at 0, 1, 3, 7, 30, and 90 days. A two-way ANOVA test was performed using materials (treated and untreated) and immersion solution as independent variables. The percentage change in hardness after the 90-day immersion period was the dependent variable. The results show that the application of sealant significantly improved the durability of CC, PS, and TS in immersion solutions by maintaining hardness close to preimmersion values or delaying the softening effect of the solutions. The hardness of sealed and unsealed TK showed the significantly (p < 0.05) lowest change after immersion in the test solutions. Ethanol caused the most severe decrease in hardness of all solutions, followed by saliva. Immersion in Efferdent and daily brushing after immersion in Efferdent showed only a mild effect on the hardness of the soft reline agents. The use of a sealer can play an important role in the preservation of the hardness of some resilient lining materials.

  11. Further development and evaluation of high impact strength denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Rodford, R A

    1990-06-01

    The further development of poly(methylmethacrylate) reinforced with low molecular weight polybutadiene-based rubbers previously studied is described. The materials produced have been optimized with respect to impact strength and Young's modulus, giving results up to 0.13 J for the former whilst maintaining the latter at about 2.3 G.Pa. Additionally, the systems have been evaluated with respect to viscoelastic properties, water absorption and the effect of the latter on mechanical properties. Further work on the underlying mechanisms should lead to a greater understanding of these systems which could, in turn, produce more superior materials.

  12. 2-Methacryloyloxyethyl Phosphorylcholine Polymer Treatment of Complete Dentures to Inhibit Denture Plaque Deposition.

    PubMed

    Ikeya, Kenji; Fukunishi, Miya; Iwasa, Fuminori; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2016-12-26

    Removable dentures made of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) are prone to bacterial adherence and dental plaque formation, which is called denture plaque. Denture plaque-associated infection is a source of serious dental and medical complications in the elderly. 2-Methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) is a well-known biomedical material that exhibits marked antithrombogenicity and tissue compatibility because of its high resistance to protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Therefore, MPC polymer coatings are suggested to have the potential to inhibit plaque deposition on the surface of PMMA dentures. However, coating MPC polymer on the surface of a PMMA denture is a complex procedure that requires specialized equipment, which is regarded as a major barrier to its clinical application. Here, we introduce a new MPC polymer treatment procedure that uses poly (MPC-co-BMA-co-MPAz) (PMBPAz) to prevent denture plaque deposition on removable dentures. This procedure enables the MPC coating of PMMA denture surfaces in a simple and stable manner that is resistant to various chemical and mechanical stresses due to the MPC layer of PMBPAz that is covalently bound to the PMMA surface by ultraviolet light irradiation. In addition, the procedure does not require any specialized equipment and can be completed by clinicians within 2 min. We applied this procedure in a clinical setting and demonstrated its clinical utility and efficacy in inhibiting plaque deposition on removable dentures.

  13. A survey of U.S. prosthodontists and dental schools on the current materials and methods for final impressions for complete denture prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Cynthia S; Walker, Mary P; Williams, Karen

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey members of The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) to evaluate current materials and methods for final impressions for complete denture prosthodontics in the United States. In addition, those methods were compared with methods and materials taught in U.S. dental schools via a second survey sent to the chairpersons of prosthodontic/restorative departments. An anonymous questionnaire was mailed to all 1762 active ACP members in the United States in 2003. A slightly modified questionnaire was also distributed to chairpersons of prosthodontic/restorative departments in the 54 U.S. dental schools. Data analysis was performed via frequency distribution and chi-square statistics. Nine hundred and forty-five questionnaires were returned by members of the ACP (54% return rate) and 42 questionnaires were returned by the U.S. dental schools (78% return rate). The majority of the reporting prosthodontists (88%) and dental schools (98%) use a border-molded custom tray for final impressions for complete denture prosthodontics. The most popular material for border molding was plastic modeling compound (67% of reporting ACP members, and 95% of the responding dental schools). Variability of the materials used for final impressions was observed, with the most popular materials being polyvinylsiloxane for the ACP members (36%) and polysulfide for the dental schools (64%). Statistically significant differences were found in the materials used for border molding by prosthodontists based on the time elapsed since completion of prosthodontic training. No differences were found in the materials used for impression of edentulous arches based on years of experience. Geographic location did not influence the materials and methods used by prosthodontists for complete denture final impressions. There was variability of the materials and techniques used for final impressions by ACP members and dental schools; however, overall there was an agreement

  14. Provisional crown and fixed partial denture materials: mechanical properties and degree of conversion.

    PubMed

    Balkenhol, Markus; Ferger, Paul; Mautner, Meike Christina; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2007-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the flexural strength (FS) and flexural modulus (FM) of temporary crown and bridge materials (t-c&b) at different storage times and to identify possible correlations between the mechanical properties and the degree of conversion (DC). FS and FM of four proprietary di-methacrylate-based t-c&bs were tested in a 3-point bending test according to EN ISO 4049:2000 at various storage times after mixing (37 degrees C dry/water) including thermocycling (5000x, 5-55 degrees C). DC was determined by calculating the percentage of reacted CC double bonds using FTIR analysis (baseline method). Mean values of all measurements were calculated and subjected to the Games-Howell test for statistical analysis (p=0.05) as well as a logarithmic regression analysis. FS and FM were very low 10min after mixing for all materials tested (FS: 14.5-24.5MPa; FM: 96.1-211.2MPa). A very high correlation was observed between FS and FM on the one hand and storage time on the other. The DC was on a high level already 10min after mixing (57.7-69.8%) for all materials except for Structur Premium (42.2%). Structur Premium showed a significantly higher FS and FM (p<0.05) compared to all other materials tested though a significantly lower DC (p<0.05). FS and FM of t-c&bs significantly depend on the time after mixing. Dentists should be aware of the fact that the mechanical stability of temporary crowns is comparably low in the first hours after fabrication. The DC does not allow drawing conclusions about the mechanical stability of a t-c&b.

  15. Dentures - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Dentures URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/dentures.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  16. Blends of isoprene-styrene/methacrylate monomer systems as denture soft lining material.

    PubMed

    Nazhat, S N; Parker, S; Riggs, P D; Braden, M

    2001-08-01

    This work further develops the concept of using an elastomer gelled with methacrylate monomers to produce a methacrylate-based soft lining material without the use of a plasticizer. An isoprene-styrene (SIS) block copolymer was mixed with methyl methacrylate (MMA) and 1,6-hexandiol dimethacrylate (HDMA). The HDMA was used as a cross-linking agent. The elastomer/monomer ratios were maintained at 50/50 whereas the monomers ranged from 0 to 100%) HDMA. Mechanical properties and water absorption/desorption characteristics were used to assess the effect of varying the monomer compositions. The results indicated that phase separation took place, in particular at high HDMA content. This significantly increased the Young's modulus and decreased the elongation to break. Generally, the water uptake tended to decrease with increasing HDMA content, reflecting the effect of modulus. Second absorption cycles gave higher uptake values compared to the first. Formulations with a high amount of HDMA gave materials with modulus values too high for soft lining applications. This suggests that the optimum formulation requires a compromise between modulus and water uptake.

  17. Nanocryl Coating of PMMA Complete Denture Base Materials to Prevent Scratching.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Hawa M; Benonn, Hajer A; Johnson, Anthony

    2017-09-01

    The surface of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is vulnerable to indentation by hard objects that may contribute to abrade the material surface and subject it to wear. This phenomenon promotes an increase in the surface roughness leading to microbial colonisation which can endanger the general health of wearers and damage the intra-oral prosthesis. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of three different nanocryl coating agents (Easy Glaze, G-Coat Plus and Formulation XP) on surface roughness and thickness of PMMA material after a simulating cleaning process utilizing an electric toothbrush and three different dentifrices (pastes and immersion). Acrylic uncoated discs were used as a control group. The results showed that the G-Coat Plus coating agent had less changes in the surface roughness and thickness layer whereas the immersion cleaner revealed less abrasion effect compared with the paste cleaners which could be considered the most suitable cleaner to provide lower abrasivenes and good removal of organic debris. However, using nanofilled sealants did not demonstrate significant improvement in reducing surface roughness p ⟩ 0.05. Nevertheless, it could provide some protection against wearing to the acrylic resin surface during tooth brushing and may provide better resistance to microbial colonisation. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  18. Wear resistance of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Iwamoto, Misa; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2016-12-01

    Objective This study investigated the wear resistance of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins using nanoindentation instrument. Materials and methods Six injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins (two polyamides, two polyesters, one polycarbonate, one polymethylmethacrylate [PMMA]) and a PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer control were tested. Elastic modulus, hardness, wear depth, and roughness were calculated using a nanoindentation instrument. Results Elastic modulus and hardness of the injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins were significantly lower than those of the PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer. Wear depth of polycarbonate and PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer were significantly higher than that of other injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. The roughness of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins was significantly more than that of PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer after testing. Conclusions Wear resistance of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base was low compared to PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymers.

  19. Wear resistance of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Iwamoto, Misa; Lassila, Lippo V. J.; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study investigated the wear resistance of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins using nanoindentation instrument. Materials and methods Six injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins (two polyamides, two polyesters, one polycarbonate, one polymethylmethacrylate [PMMA]) and a PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer control were tested. Elastic modulus, hardness, wear depth, and roughness were calculated using a nanoindentation instrument. Results Elastic modulus and hardness of the injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins were significantly lower than those of the PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer. Wear depth of polycarbonate and PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer were significantly higher than that of other injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. The roughness of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins was significantly more than that of PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer after testing. Conclusions Wear resistance of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base was low compared to PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymers. PMID:28642909

  20. [Contemporary methods and mobile denture cleansers and theirs significance for older population].

    PubMed

    Strajnić, Ljiljana; Dokić, Miodrag; Vucinić, Predrag

    2011-01-01

    A dramatic increase in the number of people living in their seventies, eighties and nineties is associated with a loss of teeth and the use of mobile dentures. The aim of this paper was to highlight the consequences of poor denture hygiene on oral and general health in vulnerable elderly people, in long-term hospitalized elderly patients and in long-term institutionalized elderly in nursing homes. DENTURE DEPOSITS AND CONSEQUENCES OF POOR DENTURE HYGIENE: The number of bacteria living in the mouth is getting larger after putting denture on. Namely, a small "space" develops between jaw and denture, creating perfect conditions for bacterial growth. Denture becomes a "reservoir" of micro-organisms. Denture deposits such as bacterial plaque, fungi, tartar and remnants could be responsible for stomatitis prothetica, cheilitis angularis, inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia, halitosis (bad breath), dental caries in mobile denture carriers, mucositis and periimplantitis in mobile implant over-dentures carriers, accelerated destruction of denture materials for underlying, such as denture base soft liners, respiratory airways diseases, bacterial endocarditis and gastrointestinal infections. REMOVAL OF DENTURE DEPOSITS: It is recommendable to combine mechanical and chemical denture cleaning. Denture submersion into a commercial cleansing solution for less than one hour is an effective cleaning method. Commercial cleanser: specifically intended for dentures with metal parts should be used for those dentures. Commercial cleansers with a new component of silicon polymer, whose thin layer surrounds all denture surfaces and disables oral bacteria to agglomerate, are effective and useful. Preventive hygienic treatments are very important in hospitals and homes for the aged, bearing in mind that old and ill persons reside here. Those institutions are recommended to get equipped with ultrasound denture cleaners. IMPORTANCE OF WRITTEN BROCHURE ON PROPER DENTURE HYGIENE: Patients should

  1. Teaching complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Lechner, S K

    1993-01-01

    Success in wearing complete denture depends, in order of importance, on motivation, neuromuscular control and technical considerations. To address the two aspects of motivation and neuromuscular control, fourth year students at Sydney University are taught a protocol which encompasses duplication of the patient's existing denture and modification of this duplicate to satisfy the patient's needs and wants. This modified duplicate denture acts as a diagnostic prototype which is used as a guide during construction of the new denture.

  2. Does Hollowing of Complete Denture Enhance Retention? – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Ashish; Iyer, Satish R; Mittal, Manish; Kalra, Shilpa; Yadav, Shweta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prosthetic rehabilitation is an extremely challenging task in extreme resorption cases of the maxillary denture-bearing area. Reducing the weight of a maxillary obturator has been seen as beneficial. But whether reducing the weight of conventional complete denture also increases retention or not, is still very dubious. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of maxillary denture weight on denture retention and stability. Materials and Methods For this study, a total of 10 patients were considered for the pilot study (06 female and 04 male) with an average age of 70 y. Each patient was provided with two sets of maxillary complete dentures, one hollow labeled as A and one conventional maxillary denture labeled as B. Results It was shown that mean values for retention using MKIS for retention for hollow dentures (A) was 7.8 and for conventional dentures (B) it was 8.2 and the stability for maxillary dentures was more with conventional dentures (B) than hollow maxillary dentures (A) and it was significant as p-value was 0.015 (p<.1). Conclusion The denture retention and stability, chewing and comfort values of conventional dentures and hollow dentures were slightly better for conventional dentures. PMID:26155561

  3. Screening of fixed prosthodontic dentures after five years of use in relation to material and construction.

    PubMed

    Baucić, I; Baucić, M; Stipetić, J; Komar, D; Mehulić, K; Bozić, D; Klaić, B; Celebić, A

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to screen patients with fixed prosthodontic appliances that were in oral cavity for a period of 5 years or more and to assess clinically and radiologically root caries, gingival recession, pocket formation, alveolar ridge resorption, as well as gingival (GI) and plaque index (PI). The aim also was to find out the differences between materials and constructions, between abutment and non-abutment teeth, and to find out the need for replacement. A total of 260 patients and their orthopantomograms were examined, with a total of 2,265 teeth, 610 being bridge abutments and 246 being crowns. The most frequent were metal+ acrylic veneer crowns or bridges. Root caries was found under the abutments in 10-20%; however abutments with ceramic crowns had the lowest percentage of caries (p < 0.01). Alveolar ridge resorption, pocket formation deeper than 3 mm and gingival recession of various degree was found in 50% of the cases, again with the lowest percentage of ceramic-fused-to-metal appliances (p < 0.01). Pocket depth was registered in significantly higher percentage in metal-acrylic veneer appliances compared to natural teeth (p < 0.01), while there was no significant difference between metal-ceramic appliances and natural teeth (p > 0.05). Although the worst findings were recorded for metal- + acrylic veneer crowns for PI, no significant difference existed between crowns of different material or non-abutment teeth (p > 0.05). There was statistically significant difference between abutments with metal + acrylic veneer crowns, full metal crowns, metal ceramic crowns and non-abutments for GI scores. Higher percentage of scores 0 and 1 was recorded for metal ceramic crowns and non-abutments and significantly higher percentage of scores 2 and 3 was recorded for metal + acrylic veneer crowns and full metallic crowns. Almost 50% of metal-ceramic abutments had no pathologic findings. Almost 30% of the patients needed replacement, or even some abutments to

  4. Type IIIb Endoleak and Relining: A Mathematical Model of Distraction Forces.

    PubMed

    Swaelens, Charles; Poole, Robert J; Torella, Francesco; McWilliams, Richard G; England, Andrew; Fisher, Robert K

    2016-04-01

    To examine the changes in distraction force following relining of a conventional abdominal aortic stent-graft with a type IIIb endoleak using the Nellix endovascular sealing device compared to a unilateral stent-graft. Relining is often used to repair type IIIb endoleaks, but the consequences to graft stability are unknown. A mathematical model was constructed based on pressure and volume flow through the stent-grafts, incorporating recognized distraction force equations. Steady flow was presumed at peak systolic pressures to calculate the maximum distraction force, with gravity ignored. Distraction forces for 28- to 36-mm-diameter stent-graft bodies with 16-mm limbs were calculated and compared to forces following relining with single and double Nellix devices or the Renu unilateral device. Distraction forces for the 28-, 32-, and 36-mm stent-grafts prior to relining were 5.99, 10.21, and 14.99 N, respectively. Similar forces were reported after relining with bilateral Nellix devices (5.86, 10.08, and 14.86 N, respectively). However, use of a unilateral Nellix increased the distraction forces to 9.92, 14.14, and 18.92 N, respectively. These were comparable to the increase observed after relining with a Renu unilateral stent-graft (9.87, 14.09, and 18.86 N, respectively). The proportional increase in distraction force for a unilateral relining ranged from 26% to 66%, with the greatest increase noted in the smaller diameter main bodies. Relining a stent-graft with a type IIIb endoleak using bilateral Nellix devices does not increase the distraction force. However, a unilateral Nellix device or the Renu system could theoretically increase the distraction force by up to 66%, potentially risking migration and type Ia endoleak. In clinical practice, these results suggest that a relining with bilateral Nellix may have benefits over the Renu unilateral stent-graft. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. In vitro hardness, water sorption, and resin solubility of laboratory-processed and autopolymerized long-term resilient denture liners over one year of water storage.

    PubMed

    Parr, Gregory R; Rueggeberg, Frederick A

    2002-08-01

    The clinical properties of resilient denture liners may be influenced by the method by which they are polymerized. This in vitro study investigated material property changes of 2 new resilient denture lining materials that represent 2 different curing modes: autopolymerization and conventional laboratory processing. Two silicone-based liner products were tested; one was allowed to autopolymerize (Tokuyama Soft Relining Paste), and the other was laboratory processed (Luci-Sof). Ninety-six disk-shaped specimens (31 x 10 mm) were fabricated in aluminum ring molds for hardness testing. Sixty bar-shaped specimens (44 x 8.5 x 1.2 mm) were fabricated in aluminum molds for water sorption and resin solubility testing. Shore A hardness was determined directly after specimen fabrication and after 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year of water storage at 37 degrees C. Water sorption and resin solubility were determined at the same time intervals. Analysis of variance and appropriate t tests were used to determine the effect of immersion duration both within and between the products tested. All statistical testing was performed at alpha=.05. The hardness values of the laboratory-processed material were consistently greater than those of the autopolymerized material. After 1 week of water storage, the hardness of the autopolymerized specimens stabilized, whereas the hardness of the laboratory-processed specimens increased with immersion duration. Water sorption values for the 2 test products were similar after 6 months and after 1 year of water storage. At 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year, significantly lower resin solubility (P<.05) was recorded for the autopolymerized specimens compared with their laboratory-processed counterparts. Within the limitations of this study, the laboratory-processed material was harder than the autopolymerized product and demonstrated greater resin solubility over time. The latter result was not expected.

  6. Controlling fungal biofilms with functional drug delivery denture biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jianchuan; Jiang, Fuguang; Yeh, Chih-Ko; Sun, Yuyu

    2016-04-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis (CADS), caused by colonization and biofilm-formation of Candida species on denture surfaces, is a significant clinical concern. We show here that modification of conventional denture materials with functional groups can significantly increase drug binding capacity and control drug release rate of the resulting denture materials for potentially managing CADS. In our approach, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based denture resins were surface grafted with three kinds of polymers, poly(1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone) (PNVP), poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA), and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA), through plasma-initiated grafting polymerization. With a grafting yield as low as 2 wt%, the three classes of new functionalized denture materials showed significantly higher drug binding capacities toward miconazole, a widely used antifungal drug, than the original PMMA denture resin control, leading to sustained drug release and potent biofilm-controlling effects against Candida. Among the three classes of functionalized denture materials, PNVP-grafted resin provided the highest miconazole binding capability and the most powerful antifungal and biofilm-controlling activities. Drug binding mechanisms were studied. These results demonstrated the importance of specific interactions between drug molecules and functional groups on biomaterials, shedding lights on future design of CADS-managing denture materials and other related devices for controlled drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cu-sil dentures – a novel approach to conserve few remaining teeth: Case reports

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Jayesh Kumar; Prabhu, C R Allama; Zahrane, Mohammed Al; Esawy, Mohammed Sayed Al; Ajagannanavar, Sunil Lingaraj; Pal, Kapil Singh

    2015-01-01

    The present prime concern in dentistry is on preservation of remaining natural teeth. Presence of few teeth in oral cavity help in preserving alveolar ridge integrity, maintain the proprioception, and gives psychological benefit to the patient. Transitional denture provides us with alternative treatment plan for the patients willing to replace their missing teeth while retaining their very few remaining teeth. A relatively newer type of transitional denture is Cu-sil denture. A Cu-sil denture is a denture with holes, lined by a gasket of silicone rubber, the holes thus providing space for remaining natural teeth to emerge into the oral cavity through the denture. Cu-sil denture is the simplest removable partial denture, but its fabrication requires special armamentarium and material. This case report represents a simple chairside technique to fabricate Cu-sil dentures in usual dental set-up. PMID:26464557

  8. A survey of denture hygiene in patients attending Cardiff Dental Hospital.

    PubMed

    Collis, J J; Stafford, G D

    1994-12-01

    Patients attending the Cardiff Dental Hospital were interviewed by staff and students in the Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and a multidisciplinary teaching clinic. Information on denture hygiene was collected using a questionnaire. This questionnaire consisted of nineteen questions on the methods and materials used for denture hygiene, along with details pertinent to the patients and their dentures. One thousand patients were interviewed. The results showed that patients were less critical of standards of denture hygiene than clinicians. Only 46% of patients believed their dentures stained. This suggests high patient apathy regarding denture hygiene, that should be addressed in health education programs.

  9. Influence of water immersion on the transmitted load of home reliners.

    PubMed

    Kamochi, Gou; Akiba, Norihisa; Tanimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Toshinari; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2017-08-25

    This study aimed to clarify how composition and water immersion of home reliners affect the attenuation of the transmitted load. To conduct a transmitted load measurement, we used three different home reliners (Tafugurippu Pink A, Liodent Pink, and Cushion Correct), which were combined acrylic resin disks. They were immersed in distilled water and then placed on a silicone quasimucosa (φ20×1.5 mm), which was set on a pressure sensor (φ8×0.35 mm), followed by the application of static load. Subsequently, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and gas chromatography (GC) were used to clarify the composition of each home reliner. The attenuation of the transmitted load began 3 h after immersion. Moreover, both GPC and GC revealed a difference in composition among the three products. Further, the difference in the vinyl acetate molecular weight distribution and ethyl alcohol content affected the attenuation of the transmitted load of home reliners after water absorption.

  10. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Partially fabricated denture kit. 872.3600 Section 872.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... mold, by partially polymerizing the resin denture base materials while the materials are in...

  11. Inland Steel's No. 7 blast furnace third reline

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrance, K.F. II ); Johansson, J.; Carter, W.L. )

    1994-09-01

    The background information, investigation and benchmarking that led to a decision by Inland Steel to partially reline No. 7 blast furnace is covered. This approach reduced actual downtime on the furnace and extended the current campaign. This alternative allowed for the rebalancing of the physical plant of No. 7 blast furnace. Areas of scope covered are hearth, stack, stoves, gas cleaning and furnace top. Included are highlights of the execution of the project including schedules, blowdown, salamander tap, quench, dig out/descale, scaffolding used and brick installation. A summary of the actual results of the work is presented along with information on production planned, blow-in and the first 20 days of production.

  12. Photodynamic inactivation of microorganisms present on complete dentures. A clinical investigation. Photodynamic disinfection of complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniela Garcia; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Dovigo, Lívia Nordi; Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Machado, Ana Lucia; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the disinfection of complete dentures. Biofilm samples were collected from dentures of 60 denture users who were randomly divided into four experimental groups (n = 15 each): subjects whose maxillary dentures were sprayed with 50 and 100 mg/l of Photogem® suspension (groups P50S and P100S) and patients whose maxillary dentures were treated with 50 and 100 mg/l of Photogem® gel (groups P50G and P100G). Dentures with photosensitizers were left in the dark for 30 min (pre-irradiation time) and then irradiated with blue LED light at 37.5 J/cm(2) (26 min). Denture samples were taken with sterile cotton swab before (left side surfaces) and after (right side surfaces) PDT. All microbial material was diluted and plated on selective media for Candida spp., Staphylococcus mutans spp., streptococci and a non-selective media. After incubation (48 h/37°C), the number of colony-forming units (cfu/ml) was counted. Microorganisms grown on selective media were identified using biochemical methods before and after PDT. The data were submitted to McNemar and Kruskal-Wallis tests (α = 0.05). No growth after PDT was observed in 60, 53, 47, and 40% of dentures from P100G, P50G, P100S, and P50S groups, respectively. When evidence of microorganisms' growth was observed, PDT regimens eliminated over 90% of microorganisms on dentures. This clinical study showed that PDT was effective for disinfecting dentures.

  13. Allergic contact stomatitis caused by acrylic monomer in a denture.

    PubMed

    Koutis, D; Freeman, S

    2001-08-01

    A 71-year-old edentulous man developed a severely painful red mouth at sites of contact with a new denture. Patch testing showed allergy to samples of the denture material and to 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. Patch testing to methyl methacrylate was negative. Prolonged boiling of the denture resulted in reversal of his symptoms and samples of this fully cured denture material produced negative patch tests. While allergy to acrylates is a rare cause of stomatitis, this possibility must be considered in patients presenting with oral symptoms. Material safety data sheets are unreliable in providing information regarding the type of acrylate present in the material. Hence, patch testing should be performed with a battery of acrylate allergens as well as with small samples of the denture material.

  14. Photoelastic analysis of stresses transmitted by complete dentures lined with hard or soft liners.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Izabella P; Consani, Rafael L X; Mesquita, Marcelo F; Nóbilo, Mauro A A

    2015-10-01

    Stresses transmitted on the alveolar bone ridge by lined conventional complete mandibular dentures can decrease the bone absorption level. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the stresses induced on the alveolar bone ridge of lined conventional complete mandibular dentures by using photoelastic analysis. One maxillary and three mandibular conventional dentures were developed for the following treatments: 1 - Unlined denture (control), 2 - Denture lined with resin-based material, and 3 - Denture lined with silicone-based material. The photoelastic analysis took place with the dentures in the position of maximum intercuspation, and the mandibular photoelastic models were axially loaded with 10 kgf (98 N). Unlined denture (control) presented stresses along the model, especially on the anterior and left lateral sides with less stresses on the right side. On the left lateral side, the denture base lined with resin-based material demonstrated similar stresses to that of the control; however, lower stresses occurred in the premolar and retromolar regions. Denture bases lined with silicone-based material showed decreased fringe orders and homogeneous distribution of induced stresses. Both lined dentures exhibited lower stresses when compared to unlined dentures. Silicone-based material provided a more homogeneous distribution of stresses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. On denture marking.

    PubMed

    Borrman, H I; DiZinno, J A; Wasén, J; René, N

    1999-06-01

    During the last decades in Sweden dentures have been permanently marked with a stainless steel metal band incorporated into the acrylic and containing the patient's birth date, a special number, and "S" for Sweden. The last recommendation issued by the National Board of Health and Welfare states that "the patients shall always be offered denture marking and be informed about the benefit thereof. Denture marking is not permitted if the patient refuses it". Requirements for denture markers have been that they should be biologically inert (when incorporated into the denture), not be expensive, be easy to inscribe, be possible to retrieve after an accident, and survive elevated temperatures for a reasonable time under normal circumstances. Although the frequency of edentulousness has decreased in recent years due to the improvement in oral health there remains a need to address the issue of marking of complete dentures, because there is a large variation in the oral status of populations in different countries. Given that only one marked denture can reveal the identity of a deceased person when all other methods fail to do so, makes it worthwhile. Furthermore, denture marking is important in long-term care facilities. We have investigated the issue of denture marking in Europe and in the United States. The results from the European survey show that denture marking is, to our knowledge regulated by law only in Sweden and Iceland. In the US denture marking is so far mandatory in 21 states while New York State requires dentures to be marked if the patient requests it and several other states impose the obligation to mark dentures on long-term care facilities. Since there is no international consensus regarding the issue of denture marking it is important to address it. A survey from the Nordic countries has shown that if denture marking was in general use, the contribution to the establishment of identity by forensic odontology in cases of fire would increase by about 10

  16. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of two different chairside soft liners to heat processed acrylic denture base resin: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Rajaganesh, N.; Sabarinathan, S.; Azhagarasan, N. S.; Shankar, Chitra; Krishnakumar, Jaya; Swathi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chairside softliners are used more frequently than is reported and studies regarding the bond strength of chairside softliners to heat-polymerized denture base resin are few and limited. Hence, this study was conducted to comparatively evaluate the shear bond strength of two chairside soft relining materials viz., autopolymerizing plasticized acrylic resin liner and a silicone-based liner bonded to heat polymerized polymethyl methacrylate denture base resin and to analyze the mode of interfacial bond failure. Materials and Methods: Forty test specimens (n = 40) were prepared by bonding plasticized acrylic- and silicone-based soft liner to heat polymerized acrylic resin blocks. Twenty specimens, ten from each group, were subjected to thermal cycling and later to shear bond strength testing. The debonded specimens were then qualitatively analyzed for the mode of failure using scanning electron microscopy. The results obtained were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: The mean shear bond strength values obtained for acrylic-based soft liner before and after thermal cycling were 0.3365 ± 0.025 MPa and 0.3164 ± 0.04 MPa, respectively. The mean shear bond strength values obtained for silicone-based soft liner before and after thermal cycling were 0.4159 ± 0.025 MPa and 0.4335 ± 0.02 MPa, respectively. Silicone-based soft liner showed higher shear bond strength than the acrylic-based both before and after thermal cycling (P = 0.0001). Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed a predominantly mixed mode of failure with silicone-based liner and predominantly adhesive mode of failure with acrylic-based soft liner. Conclusion: The silicone-based soft liner showed higher shear bond strength to heat polymerized acrylic resin than acrylic-based soft liner both before and after thermal cycling. PMID:27829769

  17. Do flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges improve retention of mandibular complete dentures?

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed Elmorsy, Ayman Elmorsy; Ahmed Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa; Ela, Alaa Aboul; Fahmy, Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the retention of conventional mandibular complete dentures with that of mandibular complete dentures having lingual flanges constructed with flexible acrylic resin “Versacryl.” Materials and Methods: The study sample comprised 10 completely edentulous patients. Each patient received one maxillary complete denture and two mandibular complete dentures. One mandibular denture was made of conventional heat-cured acrylic resin and the other had its lingual flanges made of flexible acrylic resin Versacryl. Digital force-meter was used to measure retention of mandibular dentures at delivery and at 2 weeks and 45 days following denture insertion. Results: The statistical analysis showed that at baseline and follow-up appointments, retention of mandibular complete dentures with flexible lingual flanges was significantly greater than retention of conventional mandibular dentures (P < 0.05). In both types of mandibular dentures, retention of dentures increased significantly over the follow-up period (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The use of flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges in the construction of mandibular complete dentures improved denture retention. PMID:26539387

  18. Survival analysis of mandibular complete dentures with acrylic-based resilient liners.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Suguru; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Murakami, Hiroshi; Gunji, Atsuko; Ito, Nana; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this long-term randomised controlled trial was to compare the longevity of dentures constructed using a conventional acrylic resin (CAR) to that of dentures constructed using an acrylic-based resilient liner (ARL). The follow-up study was essentially carried out by annual telephone calls to each of the 67 participants. The Kaplan-Meier method and life-table analysis were used for univariate analyses. The Cox proportional-hazards test was used as a final model for statistically adjusting predictor variables such as sex, clinician type, mandibular denture type and age at denture delivery. The denture type was likely to affect the survival time of the dentures, while the sex and clinician type were not. The group using acrylic-based resilient denture liners had twice the risk of having shorter denture-survival times than those using conventional acrylic resin dentures. Younger participants were likely to have a reduced risk of having shorter denture-survival times than older participants. We conclude that mandibular complete dentures constructed using ARL are twice as likely as dentures constructed using CAR to have shorter denture survival times, mainly because of material deterioration. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. 21 CFR 872.3540 - OTC denture cushion or pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3540 OTC denture cushion or pad. (a...-counter. (b) Classification. (1) Class I if the device is made of wax-impregnated cotton cloth that the... denture cushion or pad is made of a material other than wax-impregnated cotton cloth or if the...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3520 - OTC denture cleanser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3520 OTC denture cleanser. (a) Identification. An OTC denture cleanser is a device that consists of material in the form of a powder, tablet, or paste that is intended to remove debris from removable prosthetic dental appliances, such as bridges or...

  1. Complication rates and patient satisfaction with removable dentures

    PubMed Central

    Bilhan, Hakan; Erdogan, Ozge; Ergin, Selen; Celik, Melahat; Ates, Gokcen

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the frequency and type of prosthetic complications in relation to type and properties of removable dentures and to investigate the influence of these complications and several data about the existing dentures on patient satisfaction. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ninety nine patients (44 males and 55 females) wearing removable dentures have been included in the study. The complications of the patients were recorded; patient satisfaction was determined with a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the relationship of complications and patient satisfaction with several data about the dentures such as denture age, type of denture, centric relation and vertical dimension was investigated. Kruskal Wallis, Mann Whitney U and Chi square tests were used for statistical analyses. The results were evaluated statistically at a significance level of P<.05. RESULTS Need for addition of artificial teeth for dentures with correct centric relations was found to be significantly lower than dentures with wrong centric relations (P<.01). Loss of retention, ulcerations and high vertical dimension affected the VAS chewing ability scores negatively and ulcerations affected the VAS phonation scores negatively (P<.05). CONCLUSION Considering the results of this study, it can be concluded that loss of retention, ulcerations and high vertical dimension caused patient dissatisfaction. Additionally, dentures with wrong centric relations caused need for addition of artificial teeth. PMID:22737317

  2. Prognoses of new complete dentures from the patient's denture assessment of existing dentures.

    PubMed

    Komagamine, Yuriko; Kanazawa, Manabu; Sasaki, Yoshiyuki; Sato, Yusuke; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2017-06-01

    The aim was to determine prognostic factors affecting frequent post-delivery adjustments of new complete dentures using patients' assessments of existing complete dentures. A total of 125 edentulous participants (56 men, 69 women; mean age, 76.4 years) who required new complete dentures evaluated existing dentures using the patient's denture assessment (PDA), a questionnaire regarding the self-assessment of dentures composed of 22 question items and containing six subscales: "function," "lower denture," "upper denture," "expectation," "esthetics and speech," and "importance." Moreover, the numbers of post-delivery adjustments of new dentures were recorded. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify significant factors for frequent adjustments of new dentures with five subscales of the PDA (excluding "importance"), level of mandibular ridge resorption, and age as independent variables. The analysis showed that "function," "esthetics and speech," and level of mandibular ridge resorption were significant variables for a frequent number of post-delivery adjustments of new complete dentures. The results suggested that patients' assessments of existing dentures using the PDA might allow a prediction of prognosis for complete denture treatments. Additionally, low "function" scores and high "esthetics and speech" scores for existing dentures and high levels of mandibular ridge resorption were significant prognostic factors affecting frequent post-delivery adjustments of new complete dentures. It may be difficult for edentulous persons to adapt to new complete dentures, especially those who have complaints about mastication and swallowing with existing dentures and poor mandibular ridges, but are satisfied with esthetics and speech.

  3. Swallowed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Syed; Walter, John; Smith, Wendy; Latis, Sergios

    2004-01-01

    Swallowed or inhaled partial dentures can present a diagnostic challenge. Three new cases are described, one of them near-fatal because of vascular erosion and haemorrhage. The published work points to the importance of good design and proper maintenance. The key to early recognition is awareness of the hazard by denture-wearers, carers and clinicians. PMID:14749401

  4. Denture adhesives improve mastication in denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Thais Marques Simek Vega; Viu, Flavia Carvalho; Gonçalves, Leticia Machado; Garcia, Renata Cunha Matheus Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    This clinical trial evaluated the influence of denture adhesive (DA) use on masticatory function in denture wearers according to their denture-bearing ridge status. Thirty edentulous subjects, wearing new well-fitting dentures, were classified as having either a normal or resorbed ridge. Mastication was evaluated in patients who completed chewing tests with and without two DA substances (cream or strips), which were randomly assigned. A chewing test with a sieve method analyzed masticatory performance. A kinesiographic device evaluated chewing cycle, and a visual analog scale measured masticatory ability. Data were submitted to Mauchly's sphericity test, and PROC MIXED procedures were conducted on repeated measures. Tukey-Kramer tests performed appropriate statistical comparisons (P ≤ .05). DA use increased masticatory performance and ability in patients with both ridge types (P < .05). Subjects with resorbed ridges showed the best masticatory performance (P < .001) and lowest chewing cycle time (P < .001) with DA cream, followed by DA strips and the nonadhesive trial. For normal ridge subjects, decreases in ×50 values were only significant with DA use (P < .05), regardless of DA type. The denture-bearing ridge status alone did not alter masticatory function in any of the parameters evaluated. DAs improve mastication by shortening the chewing cycle and by enhancing chewing ability and performance.

  5. Effect of biofilm formation, and biocorrosion on denture base fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ergin, Alper; Ayyildiz, Simel; Cosgun, Erdal; Uzun, Gulay

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to investigate the destructive effects of biofilm formation and/or biocorrosive activity of 6 different oral microorganisms. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three different heat polymerized acrylic resins (Ivocap Plus, Lucitone 550, QC 20) were used to prepare three different types of samples. Type "A" samples with "V" type notch was used to measure the fracture strength, "B" type to evaluate the surfaces with scanning electron microscopy and "C" type for quantitative biofilm assay. Development and calculation of biofilm covered surfaces on denture base materials were accomplished by SEM and quantitative biofilm assay. According to normality assumptions ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis was selected for statistical analysis (α=0.05). RESULTS Significant differences were obtained among the adhesion potential of 6 different microorganisms and there were significant differences among their adhesion onto 3 different denture base materials. Compared to the control groups after contamination with the microorganisms, the three point bending test values of denture base materials decreased significantly (P<.05); microorganisms diffused at least 52% of the denture base surface. The highest median quantitative biofilm value within all the denture base materials was obtained with P. aeruginosa on Lucitone 550. The type of denture base material did not alter the diffusion potential of the microorganisms significantly (P>.05). CONCLUSION All the tested microorganisms had destructive effect over the structure and composition of the denture base materials. PMID:23755339

  6. The effect of denture design and fixatives on the retention of mandibular complete dentures tested on a novel in-vitro edentulous model.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A; Al-Kaisy, N; Miller, C A; Martin, N

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the design (extension and adaptation) of a mandibular complete acrylic denture and the use of denture adhesives using a novel in-vitro edentulous model. The model is a highly anatomically accurate replica based on a moderately resorbed human mandibular edentulous arch. The model has been designed and fabricated by means of an elaborate clinical and technical process that employs synthetic elastomeric materials with properties that attempts to reproduce in-vitro characteristics of the soft tissues overlying the ridges and immediate reflected tissues. This model was used to measure and compare the retention of mandibular dentures ofvarying designs (well-fitting, over- and under-extended) with and without the aid of denture fixatives. Retention tests were conducted with different volumes of artificial saliva at a cross head speed of 50 mm/min with 4 equidistant holding points on the denture occlusal surface, using a universal tensile testing machine in an axial pull direction. The effect of three denture adhesives on denture retention was also tested on the same denture types at different times over a period of 5 hours and beyond. The in-vitro model presented can be effectively used to test the retention of mandibular complete dentures. The speed of dislodgement force and amount of saliva are important variables in mandibular denture retention. The retention of well-fitting dentures was statistically higher than that of ill-fitting dentures. A significantly higher retention force was needed to dislodge mandibular dentures (well and ill-fitting dentures) when using a denture adhesive.

  7. Influence of spark erosion on the fit of screw-retained Co-Cr fixed complete denture frameworks veneered with different materials.

    PubMed

    Presotto, Anna Gabriella Camacho; Oliveira, Luciana Valadares; Pisani, Marina Xavier; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz

    2017-09-29

    Spark erosion is a fit corrective technology that can be used even after the veneering material has been applied. The framework does not require sectioning, thus preserving its mechanical resistance. However, the spark erosion effect on veneered Co-Cr fixed complete denture (FCD) frameworks has not been investigated. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate whether spark erosion is effective in improving marginal fit on screw-retained Co-Cr FCD frameworks veneered with different materials. A comparison between ceramic applications and simulated ceramic firing cycles was also investigated. Forty FCD frameworks were fabricated with a Co-Cr alloy. Four groups (n=10) were obtained according to the veneer material used on frameworks: HR (heat-polymerized resin); LR (light-polymerized resin); C (ceramic); and SC (simulated ceramic firing cycle). The spark erosion process was conducted for all groups. The marginal fit was analyzed according to the single-screw test protocol, and the measurements were performed at 3 evaluation times: initial, after veneer material application, and after spark erosion process. The results were submitted to a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA and the Tukey honest significant differences test (α=.05). Poorer marginal fit (in micrometers) was noted after veneer material application, where the HR and C groups presented the worst values (HR: 170; LR: 72; C: 165; SC: 86; P<.05). The spark erosion process was effective in improving the fit for all groups (HR: 109; LR: 52; C: 110; SC: 60; P<.05). Spark erosion improved the fit of Co-Cr FCD frameworks veneered with different materials. An actual ceramic application should be used to assess distortions generated by veneer material application instead of using only simulated ceramic firing cycles. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Candida albicans adherence to denture base material: chemical disinfection and the effect of acquired salivary pellicle formation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Acosta, Emilio José T; da Silva, Paulo Mauricio Batista; Jacobina, Matheus; Lara, Vanessa Soares; Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Porto, Vinicius Carvalho

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 1% sodium hypochlorite (H1%) and 4% chlorhexidine gluconate (CG4%) on the adhesion of Candida albicans to denture base acrylic resins, as well as to verify the effect of the acquired salivary pellicle (ASP) formation on this process. A total of 300 acrylic specimens were immersed in distilled water (control) (n = 100), H1% (n = 100), or CG4% (n = 100) for 30 days. Twenty specimens were used in each experimental period (0, 1, 7, 15, 30 days). At the end of disinfection testing periods, 10 specimens of each group were exposed to human whole saliva to simulate ASP formation, and then all specimens were incubated with C. albicans ATTC 90028. Microorganism adhesion was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy, after staining with Acridine orange. In the 30(th) disinfection cycle in relation to baseline, the H1% or CG4%, without ASP formation, reduced the C. albicans adhesion by approximately 80%; however, with ASP, this reduction after disinfection with H1% was higher (88%). The presence of ASP resulted in higher reduction of adhered fungal cells in comparison to resin without ASP, at the 1(st) H1% or CG4% disinfection cycle, as well as at 30(th) H1% disinfection cycles. Our results suggest that the presence of saliva might influence the adhesion of C. albicans and improve the effectiveness of methods to reduce fungal adhesion. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Effect of biofilm formation, and biocorrosion on denture base fractures.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Cem; Ergin, Alper; Ayyildiz, Simel; Cosgun, Erdal; Uzun, Gulay

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the destructive effects of biofilm formation and/or biocorrosive activity of 6 different oral microorganisms. Three different heat polymerized acrylic resins (Ivocap Plus, Lucitone 550, QC 20) were used to prepare three different types of samples. Type "A" samples with "V" type notch was used to measure the fracture strength, "B" type to evaluate the surfaces with scanning electron microscopy and "C" type for quantitative biofilm assay. Development and calculation of biofilm covered surfaces on denture base materials were accomplished by SEM and quantitative biofilm assay. According to normality assumptions ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis was selected for statistical analysis (α=0.05). Significant differences were obtained among the adhesion potential of 6 different microorganisms and there were significant differences among their adhesion onto 3 different denture base materials. Compared to the control groups after contamination with the microorganisms, the three point bending test values of denture base materials decreased significantly (P<.05); microorganisms diffused at least 52% of the denture base surface. The highest median quantitative biofilm value within all the denture base materials was obtained with P. aeruginosa on Lucitone 550. The type of denture base material did not alter the diffusion potential of the microorganisms significantly (P>.05). All the tested microorganisms had destructive effect over the structure and composition of the denture base materials.

  10. Denture care practice among patients attending the prosthetic clinic in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ogunrinde, Tunde Joshua; Opeodu, Olanrewaju Ige

    2015-01-01

    Background: Good denture care practice by individuals using Removable Partial Denture (RPD) is an important component of oral health measures. An assessment of denture care practice of such individuals by dental care practitioners is necessary. Objective: To evaluate the denture care practice among prosthetics patients attending a tertiary Hospital Dental Centre in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: An interviewer administered questionnaire was used to obtain information from RPD wearers that were willing to participate. The questionnaire assessed among other things, patients’ bio-data, frequency, techniques and device used for cleaning their dentures. Data was analyzed using Chi-square test (P < 0.05). Results: One hundred and ninety eight denture wearers consisting of 100 (50.5%) males and 98 (49.5%) females participated in the study. Majority 110 (55.6%) cleaned their dentures once daily and toothbrush and pastes were used by 105 (53%) of the participants. More than 70% of the respondents removed their dentures at night. One hundred and sixty-six (83.8%) visited the dentist only when they needed treatment. There was a statistical significant relationship between frequency and technique of cleaning denture, and denture cleanliness (P < 0.05). Conclusion: This study shows that once daily cleaning of dentures and cleaning the denture with rest of the teeth are ineffective in prevention of plaque accumulation. PMID:26229229

  11. Effect of repeated cycles of chemical disinfection on the roughness and hardness of hard reline acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Luciana de Rezende; Acosta, Emílio José T Rodríguez; Távora, Flora Freitas Fernandes; da Silva, Paulo Maurício Batista; Porto, Vinícius Carvalho

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of repeated cycles of five chemical disinfectant solutions on the roughness and hardness of three hard chairside reliners. A total of 180 circular specimens (30 mm x 6 mm) were fabricated using three hard chairside reliners (Jet; n = 60, Kooliner; n = 60, Tokuyama Rebase II Fast; n = 60), which were immersed in deionised water (control), and five disinfectant solutions (1%, 2%, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite; 2% glutaraldehyde; 4% chlorhexidine gluconate). They were tested for Knoop hardness (KHN) and surface roughness (microm), before and after 30 simulated disinfecting cycles. Data was analysed by the factorial scheme (6 x 2), two-way analysis of variance (anova), followed by Tukey's test. For Jet (from 18.74 to 13.86 KHN), Kooliner (from 14.09 to 8.72 KHN), Tokuyama (from 12.57 to 8.28 KHN) a significant decrease in hardness was observed irrespective of the solution used on all materials. For Jet (from 0.09 to 0.11 microm) there was a statistically significant increase in roughness. Kooliner (from 0.36 to 0.26 microm) presented a statistically significant decrease in roughness and Tokuyama (from 0.15 to 0.11 microm) presented no statistically significant difference after 30 days. This study showed that all disinfectant solutions promoted a statistically significant decrease in hardness, whereas with roughness, the materials tested showed a statistically significant increase, except for Tokuyama. Although statistically significant values were registered, these results could not be considered clinically significant.

  12. Is the bond between acrylic resin denture teeth and denture base resin stronger if they are both made by the same manufacturer?

    PubMed

    Patil, Reshma; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R; Clark, Robert K F

    2010-03-01

    A previous study suggested that a stronger bond may be achieved between acrylic resin denture base material and acrylic denture teeth when both are made by the same manufacturer. Three denture base acrylic resins from three different manufacturers were bonded to three different acrylic resin denture teeth, one of which was manufactured by each of the manufacturers of the base material. In each group there was a trend that the bond strength achieved between the teeth and base material from the same manufacturer was higher than the unmatched pairs but statistical significance was not achieved.

  13. Imaging findings of swallowed dentures: a case series.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Ashish; Bosco, Jerome; Subramanian, Manickam; Chokkapan, Kabilan; Shenoy, Jagadish; Lim, Tze Chwan

    2015-12-01

    Dental prosthesis is an uncommon ingested non-food foreign body in adults. Once swallowed, it can lead to serious complications and morbidity. Hence, early localization of the offending foreign body is crucial for timely management. As the dentures are usually made up of non-metallic material and often impacted at or below the level of C7 vertebra, conventional radiograph has limited role in their evaluation. We describe the clinical history and imaging findings of swallowed partial dentures in four patients who presented to the emergency department. The dentures were localized using unenhanced CT of the neck that showed the characteristic mildly hyperdense curvilinear or irregular appearance of the dentures within the upper esophagus. Multiplanar CT reconstructions provide an orientation of the ingested denture within the esophagus, thus guiding the endoscopist.

  14. [Oral mucosa reaction in patients adapting to removable dentures].

    PubMed

    Iordanishvili, A K; Soldatova, L N; Pikhur, O L; Mikhailova, E S; Peremyshlenko, A S; Soldatov, V S

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosa reaction of prosthetic bed to the removable acrylic dentures was evaluated in 43 patients (12 male and 31 female) aged 56-69 years with partial and full teeth loss in one or both jaws. Patients of the first (control) group (17 patients) were not using additional tools improving fixation of the removable dentures during adaptation period, while patients of the second (main) group (26 patients) used Corega cream for dentures fixation for 30 days follow-up. Oral mucosa assessment was carried out on 3-4 and 28-30 day of dentures use by 3 end points: pain syndrome, moisture level, inflammation of a prosthetic bed. The results proved Corega cream to improve prosthetic bed mucosa condition reducing inflammatory response to polymeric materials of removable dentures basis.

  15. The effectiveness of chemical denture cleansers and ultrasonic device in biofilm removal from complete dentures

    PubMed Central

    CRUZ, Patrícia Costa; de ANDRADE, Ingrid Machado; PERACINI, Amanda; de SOUZA-GUGELMIN, Maria Cristina Monteiro; SILVA-LOVATO, Cláudia Helena; de SOUZA, Raphael Freitas; PARANHOS, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Adequate denture hygiene can prevent and treat infection in edentulous patients. They are usually elderly and have difficulty for brushing their teeth. Objective This study evaluated the efficacy of complete denture biofilm removal using chemical (alkaline peroxide-effervescent tablets), mechanical (ultrasonic) and combined (association of the effervescent and ultrasonic) methods. Material and Methods Eighty complete denture wearers participated in the experiment for 21 days. They were distributed into 4 groups (n=20): (1) Brushing with water (Control); (2) Effervescent tablets (Corega Tabs); (3) Ultrasonic device (Ultrasonic Cleaner, model 2840 D); (4) Association of effervescent tablets and ultrasonic device. All groups brushed their dentures with a specific brush (Bitufo) and water, 3 times a day, before applying their treatments. Denture biofilm was collected at baseline and after 21 days. To quantify the biofilm, the internal surfaces of the maxillary complete dentures were stained and photographed at 45º. The photographs were processed and the areas (total internal surface stained with biofilm) quantified (Image Tool 2.02). The percentage of the biofilm was calculated by the ratio between the biofilm area multiplied by 100 and the total area of the internal surface of the maxillary complete denture. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison among groups followed by the Dunn multiple-comparison test. All tests were performed respecting a significance level of 0.05. Significant difference was found among the treatments (KW=21.18; P<0.001), the mean ranks for the treatments and results for Dunn multiple comparison test were: Control (60.9); Chemical (37.2); Mechanical (35.2) and Combined (29.1). Conclusion The experimental methods were equally effective regarding the ability to remove biofilm and were superior to the control method (brushing with water). Immersion in alkaline peroxide and ultrasonic vibration can be used as auxiliary agents for

  16. A Clinical Evaluation Denture Adhesives Used by Patients With Xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    Bogucki, Zdzislaw A.; Napadlek, Piotr; Dabrowa, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of study was to analyze the participants’ opinions concerning the effectiveness of 6 denture adhesives (DA). The study group included 60 participants. Criteria for selecting the patients were as follows: reduced retention and stabilization of maxillary complete dentures and xerostomia. These features were evaluated on basis of clinical examination and standard sialometry tests (u-SFR). Retention of maxillary dentures was scored by modified Kapur index before application of DA. All participants were divided randomly into 6 groups regarding the use of the 6 DA during a 6-month period. After this time, participants completed an HRQL questionnaire. DA noticeably improved retention and stabilization of maxillary complete dentures. DA in the glue form had the best retention effectiveness in participants with xerostomia. These materials are difficult to clean from the denture base. The data are presented in tables and figures. The results of the study collected positive influence of adhesives on retention of dentures in xerostomia patients. The cleaning dentures and denture bearing tissues was difficult. DA help in the use of prostheses, but it is also necessary for the treatment of the causes and symptoms of xerostomia. PMID:25700320

  17. A clinical evaluation denture adhesives used by patients with xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Bogucki, Zdzislaw A; Napadlek, Piotr; Dabrowa, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of study was to analyze the participants' opinions concerning the effectiveness of 6 denture adhesives (DA). The study group included 60 participants. Criteria for selecting the patients were as follows: reduced retention and stabilization of maxillary complete dentures and xerostomia. These features were evaluated on basis of clinical examination and standard sialometry tests (u-SFR). Retention of maxillary dentures was scored by modified Kapur index before application of DA. All participants were divided randomly into 6 groups regarding the use of the 6 DA during a 6-month period. After this time, participants completed an HRQL questionnaire. DA noticeably improved retention and stabilization of maxillary complete dentures. DA in the glue form had the best retention effectiveness in participants with xerostomia. These materials are difficult to clean from the denture base. The data are presented in tables and figures. The results of the study collected positive influence of adhesives on retention of dentures in xerostomia patients. The cleaning dentures and denture bearing tissues was difficult. DA help in the use of prostheses, but it is also necessary for the treatment of the causes and symptoms of xerostomia.

  18. Dentures for Randomised Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Sean; Hyde, T Paul

    2015-06-01

    Making complete dentures for dental research is difficult. The difficulty is not in the construction of dentures, but making sure the clinician is blind to the randomizations, and avoiding confounding variables. For research purposes it is essential that two sets of dentures are similar in every way, apart from the area to be investigated. A previous article showed how to duplicate a lower denture when it was articulated against a single upper denture. This paper describes the additional duplication of upper dentures. These additional problems presented the clinical and technical teams at the Leeds Dental Institute some challenges.

  19. Relined Fiberglass Post: Effect of Luting Length, Resin Cement, and Cyclic Loading on the Bond to Weakened Root Dentin.

    PubMed

    de Souza, N C; Marcondes, M L; da Silva, Dff; Borges, G A; Júnior, Lh Burnett; Spohr, A M

    This study evaluated the effects of luting length of the post, the resin cement, and cyclic loading on pull-out bond strength of fiberglass posts relined with composite resin in weakened roots. The canals of 80 bovine incisors were endodontically treated and weakened with diamond burs. The teeth were randomly divided into eight groups (n=10) according to the luting procedures of the relined fiberglass post (RFP): In groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, the RFPs were luted with RelyX ARC, and in groups 5, 6, 7, and 8 they were luted with RelyX U200. In groups 1, 3, 5, and 7, the RFPs were luted at a length of 5 mm, and in groups 2, 4, 6, and 8 they were luted at a length of 10 mm. Specimens from groups 3, 4, 7, and 8 were submitted to cyclic loading. Specimens were subjected to a pull-out bond strength test in a universal testing machine. The results (MPa) were analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and the Tukey post hoc test (α=0.05). Six human upper anterior teeth were used to analyze the bond interface by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The pull-out bond strength of RFPs luted with RelyX U200 was statistically higher than that of RelyX ARC. Cyclic loading influenced the bond strength only for the luting length of 5 mm. CLSM analysis revealed the formation of resin cement tags for both materials. Luting length is an important factor in retaining RFPs in weakened roots when they are subjected to cyclic loading, and RelyX U200 resulted in greater bond strengths to the root canal in comparison with RelyX ARC.

  20. Sectional dentures revisited.

    PubMed

    Karir, Naveen; Hindocha, Vishali; Walmsley, A Damien

    2012-04-01

    Sectional dentures are constructed in separate parts which join together intra-orally to create a single prosthesis. They are used to exploit undercuts around teeth, hard and soft tissues which require more than one path of insertion, and are usually of split pin or locking bolts design. By using two case studies, we aim to illustrate the provision of sectional dentures and to which situations their uses are best suited. A 30-year-old male was referred to the Department of Prosthetics at the Birmingham Dental Hospital for a replacement upper partial cobalt chrome denture of a Kennedy Class IV bounded saddle. The patient had a history of failed upper cobalt chrome removable partial dentures owing to loss of retention and poor stability over the previous 12 months. A 40-year-old female patient was referred by her GDP for restoration of a bounded saddle in the lower right quadrant with a history of intolerance to previous dentures. These two cases demonstrate the successful use of sectional dentures in the aesthetic zone. Although more technically demanding, they lie well within the scope of general practice and offer patients alternative solutions from dental implants and bridgework. These cases highlight the importance of the use of alternative prosthetic techniques which can be simple and achievable for all practitioners. Sectional dentures are a treatment modality for the edentulous space where the presence of one or more undercuts prevents restoration by more conventional techniques. This paper highlights some of the situations in which sectional dentures can be employed and emphasizes their use in general practice.

  1. A randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy of mandibular implant-supported overdentures and conventional dentures in diabetic patients. Part I: Methodology and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kapur, K K; Garrett, N R; Hamada, M O; Roumanas, E D; Freymiller, E; Han, T; Diener, R M; Levin, S; Ida, R

    1998-05-01

    Scientific evidence is lacking to support the general application of implant-supported mandibular overdentures. This randomized clinical trial was undertaken to compare the efficacy of conventional mandibular and implant-supported overdentures in diabetic edentulous patients with clinically acceptable metabolic control. A total of 102 diabetic patients, treated with or without insulin, were randomized to receive a new maxillary denture and either a conventional or an implant-supported removable mandibular overdenture. Treatment was completed for 89 patients, 37 with the conventional and 52 with implant-supported dentures. Detailed examinations, tests, and questionnaires were given before and at 6- and 24-months after treatment completion. Comparisons between the two treatment groups were made for treatment failures based on prespecifed criteria and the type and amount of maintenance care provided. The insulin and noninsulin treated groups were collapsed because of the lack of significant differences at entry. The conventional denture and implant-supported overdenture groups were similar in terms of general demographics, medical status, quality of their original dentures and denture support, several functional measures, and patient satisfaction. Treatment was judged to be successful in 56.9% of patients with conventional dentures and 72.1% with overdentures. This difference in success rate was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Patients with treatment failures in both groups required excessive maintenance care. Those with conventional dentures needed frequent denture base adjustments and relines, whereas those with overdentures required frequent clip replacements and repairs. Although significant improvements were seen with both treatment modalities, a higher percentage of patients with implant-supported overdentures than those with conventional dentures reported improvements in chewing comfort and moderate-to-complete overall satisfaction.

  2. The effect of different restorative and abutment materials on marginal and internal adaptation of three-unit cantilever implant-supported fixed partial dentures: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kahramanoğlu, Erkut; Kulak-Özkan, Yasemin

    2013-12-01

    Passive fit is generally assumed to be a significant prerequisite for long-term implant success. The aim of this study was to evaluate the precision fit of three-unit implant-supported fixed partial dentures with different restorative and abutment materials on two implant systems: the Straumann and Astra Tech. Two mandibular epoxy resin models (one for each implant system) were fabricated, and two implants were inserted at the first and second molar region. Poly(vinyl siloxane) impression material was used to make the dental impression. For each implant system, fifteen models were fabricated, and each group was divided into three subgroups (group 1: titanium abutment with metal framework, group 2: titanium abutment with zirconium framework, group 3: zirconium abutment with zirconium framework). The replica technique was used to examine the marginal and internal gap values. For each restoration, 20 measurements were performed, totaling 1200 measurements for all groups. Data were evaluated statistically using ANOVA and LSD post hoc test (p < 0.05). The highest values at internal adaptation measurements were found at the occlusal surface for all groups. When the mean values of the marginal measurements were assessed, the lowest measurements were found in group 3 (51.416 μm), and the highest values were found in group 1 (79.394 μm). There were statistically significant differences between subgroups for marginal measurements (p < 0.05). As included in our study, marginal measurement values were found to be 46 to 87 μm. The marginal discrepancy of the tested materials could be considered clinically acceptable. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. 21 CFR 872.3540 - OTC denture cushion or pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-counter. (b) Classification. (1) Class I if the device is made of wax-impregnated cotton cloth that the... denture cushion or pad is made of a material other than wax-impregnated cotton cloth or if the...

  4. Designing for Safety: Implications of a Fifteen Year Review of Swallowed and Aspirated Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, James; Macfarlane, Tatiana V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives Dentures are worn by around 20% of the population, yet if they become displaced they may enter the gastrointestinal or respiratory system, sometimes with grave consequences. The aim of this study was to review recent published literature in order to identify the epidemiology of patients and characteristics of swallowed and aspirated dental prostheses, and propose strategies to minimise these risks. Material and Methods A fifteen year retrospective of published case series and case reports was carried out. Photographs, radiographs and descriptions of the dental prostheses were gathered, as well as the patient’s presenting complaint, the anatomical site where the denture was caught and the procedure required to remove the denture. Results Ninety one separate events of swallowed or aspirated dentures were identified from 83 case reports and series from 28 countries. Average age was 55 years, and these were 74% male. Photographs were retrieved for 49 of these dentures. Clasps were present in 25 of the dentures. There was no significant difference between clasped and unclasped dentures for perforation rates, need for open surgery and spontaneously passed dentures. Conclusions We discuss the implications of this study regarding denture designs, specifically the importance of using a radiopaque acrylic, using clasps when required even if there is a risk of aspiration, advising patients to return if a denture is loose or damaged, and finally that all patients who wear a denture are at risk of aspiration and swallowing events, and associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:27489607

  5. Comparative Study of Acceptance and Adaptation to New Complete Dentures, Using Two Construction Protocols.

    PubMed

    Kamalakidis, Savvas N; Anastassiadou, Vassiliki; Sofou, Afrodite; Pissiotis, Argirios L

    2016-10-01

    To validate patients' acceptance and adaptation to new complete dentures, fabricated using two construction protocols. Evaluation was achieved by means of two psychometric questionnaires and registration of total number of sore spots. Twenty complete denture wearers, who sought replacement dentures because of complaints (material degradation or unsatisfactory repaired fracture) associated with them, were selected according to specific inclusion criteria. The denture construction protocols were randomly assigned to the study participants. Ten participants received complete dentures using a duplication construction protocol with a bilateral balanced occlusal (BBO) scheme (duplicate complete denture group); ten participants received complete dentures using a traditional construction protocol with BBO (traditional complete denture group). All study participants completed the Complete Denture Satisfaction and the Oral Health Impact Profile-20 (OHIP-20) questionnaires before they received the new complete dentures (pretreatment) and at 3 and 6 months post-treatment. At the initial adaptation/adjustment visits, the location and number of sore spots were identified. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate differences between groups and within each group pre- and post-treatment. Denture satisfaction and oral health related quality of life scores were independent of the complete denture construction protocol. Within the traditional complete denture group there was a statistically significant increase in denture satisfaction and equivalent decrease (improvement) in OHIP-20 scores between pre- and post-treatment (both at 3-month and 6-month visits). This finding was consistent for OHIP-20 scores within the duplicate complete denture group, but not for denture satisfaction, which was not statistically significant. The total number of recorded sore spots was approximately double for the traditional complete denture group compared to the duplicate complete denture group

  6. Unilateral removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Goodall, W A; Greer, A C; Martin, N

    2017-01-27

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) are widely used to replace missing teeth in order to restore both function and aesthetics for the partially dentate patient. Conventional RPD design is frequently bilateral and consists of a major connector that bridges both sides of the arch. Some patients cannot and will not tolerate such an extensive appliance. For these patients, bridgework may not be a predictable option and it is not always possible to provide implant-retained restorations. This article presents unilateral RPDs as a potential treatment modality for such patients and explores indications and contraindications for their use, including factors relating to patient history, clinical presentation and patient wishes. Through case examples, design, material and fabrication considerations will be discussed. While their use is not widespread, there are a number of patients who benefit from the provision of unilateral RPDs. They are a useful treatment to have in the clinician's armamentarium, but a highly-skilled dental team and a specific patient presentation is required in order for them to be a reasonable and predictable prosthetic option.

  7. Ultrasonic evaluation of influence of hard acrylic resin denture on blood flow of mandibular denture supporting mucosa utilizing duplex color Doppler studies: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Binsu, S; Nair, K Chandrasekharan; Jhon, Bijoy; Nayar, Sanjna; Julian, Jose; Shahid, Muhammed

    2017-01-01

    To determine the influence of hard acrylic denture base materials on the blood flow of mandibular denture supporting mucosa over a period of six months time. Select fifteen edentulous patients of age 55-75 years. The blood flow of the mandibular denture supporting mucosa was measured bilaterally in the molar region and in the incisor region utilizing Ultrasound colour Doppler (2D and Duplex Imaging). Measurements were performed prior to denture insertion and later after the dentures were worn for 1 month, 2 months, 3 months, 4 months, 5 months and 6 months. Mean blood flow as measured by Ultrasound colour Doppler were tabulated significant changes if any at various time interval in comparison to baseline was assessed by Kruskalwallis ANOVA test followed by Wilkoxan sign rank test for pairwise comparison. (In the present study, P < 0.05 was considered as the level of significance). The denture supporting mucosa exhibited a progressive reduction in the blood flow both with hard denture. The blood flow change with hard denture was a reversible condition as the blood flow improved at the end of six months. Kruskalwallis ANOVA test revealed no significant change in the blood flow at any interval of time in comparison to base value (P = 0.133). Within the limitations of the study denture supporting mucosa exhibited a progressive reduction in the blood flow with hard denture which was reversible.

  8. On the clinical deformation of maxillary complete dentures. Influence of the processing techniques of acrylate-based polymers.

    PubMed

    el Ghazali, S; Glantz, P O; Randow, K

    1988-10-01

    This paper aims to study the functional deformation patterns of complete maxillary dentures constructed in three different types of denture base materials and with two techniques of processing of dentures. The patients' evaluation of the fit of the dentures was also recorded. Thirty strain-gauged duplicate dentures were made for this study of five test subjects. The functional loading tests included maximum biting and the chewing of three food test samples. The results showed that there was no correlation between the patients' evaluation and acceptance of the fit of the dentures and the actual straining magnitudes and deformation of their dentures. The results also suggest that dentures manufactured from toughened or co-polymerized poly(methyl methacrylate) and processed by the injection molding technique deform to a lesser extent than when processed by by the compression molding technique. Standard poly(methyl methacrylate) seems to be less sensitive to the processing technique.

  9. Functional Impressions in Complete Denture and Overdenture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kršek, Hrvoje

    2015-01-01

    Tooth loss can cause loss of occlusal, masticatory, esthetic, physiognomic, phonetic and psychosocial function of patients. The most frequently used treatment method of completely edentulous patients and patients with a small number of remaining teeth are complete dentures or overdentures. One of the most important clinical and laboratory procedures in their fabrication is functional impression taking. The aim of this paper was to present procedures of taking functional impressions in fabrication of complete dentures and overdentures, using standardized techniques and materials. An accurate functional impression together with other correctly performed clinical and laboratory procedures ensure good retention and stability of dentures, which is a precondition for restoring patients’ lost functions. PMID:27688385

  10. Mandibular implant-supported removable partial denture with distal extension: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, R F C P; de Carvalho Dias, K; da Fonte Porto Carreiro, A; Barbosa, G A S; Ferreira, M A F

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate patient satisfaction, survival rate of implants, and prosthetic complications or maintenance for rehabilitation with removable partial dentures associated with implants in mandibular Kennedy class I and II cases. A systematic literature review was conducted by three independent reviewers including articles published from January 1981 through September 2011. Medline and Cochrane Library electronic databases were used in addition to hand searching to assess clinical outcomes for mandibular implant-supported removable partial denture with distal extension. This review yielded 1751 records that were narrowed down to 5. The studies revealed implant survival rates ranging from 95% to 100% with one failure reported of 98 implants. The removable partial dentures associated with implant in mandibular free-end arches showed some complications and need of repair for relining, pitting of the healing abutment, replacement of resilient component of the attachment, damage in framework, screw loosening and damage in acrylic denture base. Patient satisfaction was evaluated through a five-point questionnaire, and results ranged between 4.12 and 5.0, considering 1 as the least favourable situation. The literature review showed increase in patient satisfaction and high survival rates of implants associated with mandibular removable partial dentures with distal extensions. However, some complications and need of prosthetic repair were reported. Although this treatment approach could represent a low-cost and beneficial rehabilitation for free-end mandibular ridges, the lack of controlled and randomised well-designed clinical trials suggests further studies with more representative samples to validate the outcomes of this treatment modality. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Effect of different palatal vault shapes on the dimensional stability of glass fiber-reinforced heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture base material

    PubMed Central

    Dalkiz, Mehmet; Arslan, Demet; Tuncdemir, Ali Riza; Bilgin, M.Selim; Aykul, Halil

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different palatal vault shapes on the dimensional stability of a glass fiber reinforced heat polymerized acrylic resin denture base material. Methods: Three edentulous maxilla with shallow, deep and medium shaped palatal vaults were selected and elastomeric impressions were obtained. A maxillary cast with four reference points (A, B, C, and D) was prepared to serve as control. Point (A) was marked in the anterior midline of the edentulous ridge in the incisive papillary region, points (B) and (C) were marked in the right and left posterior midlines of the edentulous ridge in the second molar regions, and point (D) was marked in the posterior palatal midline near the fovea palatina media (Figure 2). To determine linear dimensional changes, distances between four reference points (A–B, A–C, A–D and B–C) were initially measured with a metal gauge accurate within 0.1 mm under a binocular stereo light microscope and data (mm) were recorded. Results: No significant difference of interfacial distance was found in sagittal and frontal sections measured 24 h after polymerization and after 30 days of water storage in any of experimental groups (P>.05). Significant difference of linear dimension were found in all experimental groups (P<.01) between measurements made 24 h after polymerization of specimens and 30 days after water storage. Conclusion: Palatal vault shape and fiber impregnation into the acrylic resin bases did not affect the magnitude of interfacial gaps between the bases and the stone cast surfaces. PMID:22229010

  12. Candida albicans biofilms and MMA surface treatment influence the adhesion of soft denture liners to PMMA resin.

    PubMed

    Mendonça e Bertolini, Martinna de; Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; Bordin, Dimorvan; Silva, Wander José da; Cury, Altair Antoninha Del Bel

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Candida albicans biofilms and methyl methacrylate (MMA) pretreatment on the bond strength between soft denture liners and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin was analyzed. Specimens were prepared and randomly divided with respect to PMMA pretreatment, soft liner type (silicone-based or PMMA-based), and presence or absence of a C. albicans biofilm. Samples were composed of a soft denture liner bonded between two PMMA bars. Specimens (n = 10) were incubated to produce a C. albicans biofilm or stored in sterile PBS for 12 days. The tensile bond strength test was performed and failure type was determined using a stereomicroscope. Surface roughness (SR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis were performed on denture liners (n = 8). Highest bond strength was observed in samples containing a silicone-based soft liner and stored in PBS, regardless of pretreatment (p < 0.01). Silicone-based specimens mostly underwent adhesive failures, while samples containing PMMA-based liners predominantly underwent cohesive failures. The silicone-based specimens SR decreased after 12 days of biofilm accumulation or PBS storage, while the SR of PMMA-based soft liners increased (p < 0.01). The PMMA-based soft liners surfaces presented sharp valleys and depressions, while silicone-based specimens surfaces exhibited more gentle features. In vitro exposure to C. albicans biofilms reduced the adhesion of denture liners to PMMA resin, and MMA pretreatment is recommended during relining procedures.

  13. The effect of two fibre impregnation methods on the cytotoxicity of a glass and carbon fibre-reinforced acrylic resin denture base material on oral epithelial cells and fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sipahi, Cumhur; Ozen, Julide; Ural, A Ugur; Dalkiz, Mehmet; Beydemir, Bedri

    2006-09-01

    Acrylic resin dentures may have cytotoxic effects on oral soft tissues. However, there is sparse data about the cytotoxic effect of fibre-reinforced acrylic resin denture base materials. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of two fibre impregnation methods on the cytotoxicity of a glass and carbon fibre-reinforced heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture base material on oral epithelial cells and fibroblasts. One hundred acrylic resin discs were assigned to five experimental groups (n = 20). One of the groups did not include any fibre. Two groups consisted of silane and monomer treated glass fibres (Vetrolex) impregnated into acrylic resin (QC-20) discs. The other two groups consisted of silane and monomer treated carbon fibres (Type Tenox J, HTA). Untreated cell culture was used as positive control. The human oral epithelial cell line and buccal fibroblast cultures were exposed to test specimens. The cytotoxicity of the test materials was determined by succinic dehydrogenase activity (MTT method) after 24 and 72 h exposures. Data were analysed with a statistical software program (SPSSFW, 9.0). A one-way analysis of variance (anova) test and Bonferroni test were used for the comparisons between the groups. All statistical tests were performed at the 0.95 confidence level (P < 0.05). After 24 and 72 h incubation, cell viability percentages of all experimental groups showed significant decrease according to the positive control cell culture. Fibroblastic cell viability percentages of silane and monomer treated fibre-reinforced groups were lower than the unreinforced group. Cell viability of monomer-treated groups displayed the lowest percentages. Elapsed incubation time decreased epithelial cell viability in silane-treated groups. Fibroblastic cell viability was not influenced by elapsed time except the unreinforced group.

  14. Effect of potentially chromogenic beverages on shear bond strength of acrylic denture teeth to heat-polymerized denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Urban, Vanessa Migliorini; de Oliveira, Denise Gusmão; Porto, Vinícius Carvalho; Almilhatti, Hercules Jorge; Campanha, Nara Hellen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Detachment of denture acrylic resin artificial teeth from denture base resin is one of the most common problems presented by denture wearers. Purpose: This study investigated the shear bond strength (SBS) and fracture type of bonding interface of two commercial acrylic teeth (Vipi Dent Plus e Biolux) to two denture base resins (Vipi Cril e Lucitone 550) after immersion in potentially chromogenic beverages (coffee, cola soft drink, and red wine) or control solution (distilled water). Materials and Methods: Maxillary central incisor acrylic teeth were placed at 45° to denture base resin and submitted to short polymerization cycle according to manufacturers. Specimens were divided according to the combination tooth/resin/solution (n = 8) and submitted to bond strength tests in a universal testing machine MTS-810 (0.5 mm/min). Subsequently, fracture area was analyzed by stereomicroscope at a magnification of ×10 and categorized into adhesive, cohesive, or mixed failure. Results: The bond strength of teeth/denture base resins interface was not significantly affected by tested solutions (P > 0.087), except for Biolux teeth immersed in coffee (P < 0.01). In all conditions, the Vipi Dent Plus teeth showed higher bond strength to Lucitone and Vipi Cril resins when compared to Biolux teeth (P < 0.003). All specimens’ failure modes were cohesive. Conclusions: The SBS of acrylic teeth to denture base resins was not generally influenced by immersion in the tested staining beverages. PMID:27621547

  15. Inelastic neutron scattering study of reline: shedding light on the hydrogen bonding network of deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Araujo, C F; Coutinho, J A P; Nolasco, M M; Parker, S F; Ribeiro-Claro, P J A; Rudić, S; Soares, B I G; Vaz, P D

    2017-07-21

    The solids choline chloride and urea, mixed in a 1 : 2 molar proportion, form the iconic deep eutectic solvent "Reline". A combination of computational and vibrational spectroscopy tools, including inelastic neutron scattering (INS), have been used to probe intermolecular interactions in the eutectic mixture. Reline's experimental spectra were estimated using discrete and periodic ab initio calculations of a molecular aggregate with two choline chloride and four urea units. This is the minimum size required to achieve satisfactory agreement with experiment, as smaller clusters cannot represent all of reline's significant intermolecular interactions. The INS spectrum of reline, compared with that of pure choline chloride, reveals a displacement of chloride anions away from their preferred positions on top of choline's methyl groups, whose torsional movement becomes less hindered in the mixture. Urea, which adopts a planar (sp(2)) shape in the crystal, becomes non-planar (sp(3)) in reline, a feature herein discussed for the first time. In reline, urea molecules form a wide range of hydrogen bonds, from soft contacts to stronger associations, the latter being responsible for the deviation from ideality. The chloride's interactions with choline are largely conserved at the hydroxyl end while becoming weaker at the cationic headgroup. The interplay of soft and strong interactions confers flexibility to the newly formed hydrogen-bond network and allows the ensemble to remain liquid at room temperature.

  16. The effects of silane-SiO2 nanocomposite films on Candida albicans adhesion and the surface and physical properties of acrylic resin denture base material.

    PubMed

    Yodmongkol, Sirasa; Chantarachindawong, Rojcharin; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Thaweboon, Boonyanit; Amornsakchai, Taweechai; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2014-12-01

    Polysiloxane has been used as a coupling material in restorative dental materials for several decades. However, few studies are available on the application of polysiloxane in other dental prosthesis functions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of silane-SiO2 nanocomposite films on Candida albicans adhesion and the surface and physical properties of acrylic resin denture base materials. Specimens were separated into 2 groups, uncoated and coated. They were coated with a film by using the dip-coating method. Specimens were incubated with Candida albicans 10(7) cells/mL for 1 hour, and the adherent cells were counted under an optical microscope. The following surface properties were measured: surface chemical composition with Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, surface roughness with a surface profiler, surface energy with the sessile drop method, and surface hardness with a microhardness tester. The physical properties, including water sorption, water solubility, ultimate flexural strength, and flexural modulus, were evaluated according to International Organization for Standardization 20795-1 requirements. The adhesion of Candida albicans and the surface properties of the specimens were investigated after cleaning with effervescent tablets and brushing. An MTT assay was used to evaluate the coated specimens. The results were statistically analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U test (α=.05). A significant reduction in Candida albicans adhesion (P=.002) was observed before cleaning. In addition, the surface energy was comparable (P=.100), the surface hardness increased significantly (P=.008), and the surface roughness remained unchanged (P=.310). After cleaning with effervescent tablets, a significant decrease in Candida albicans adhesion (P=.002) and in surface roughness (P=.008) was observed; however, similar surface energies were measured (P=.100). After cleaning with a toothbrush, the adhesion of Candida albicans was significantly higher on

  17. Denture hygiene habits among elderly patients wearing complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Apratim, Abhishek; Shah, Sanket S; Sinha, Manish; Agrawal, Manisha; Chhaparia, Nidhi; Abubakkar, Abu

    2013-11-01

    To determine the denture hygiene habits in complete denture patients according to their age and time of dentures. In this study a self administered structured was developed to know the attitude of the patients regarding denture hygiene in the department of Prosthodontics. The total study sample consisted of 230 subjects including 124 (53.9%) males and 106 (46.1%) females. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 15.0 with chi-square test at p-value <0.05. Nearly half of the subjects clean their dentures daily once. Participants from the younger age group and who had been wearing dentures since 2 years maintain better frequency of cleaning. The majority of these subjects used water and brush for denture cleansing. After seeing the condition, half of the dentures were rated as good 50.3%, followed by fair and poor as 29.5 and 20.2% respectively. Poor condition of complete dentures seen in the population is mainly due to irregularly cleansing habits and also less usage of cleansing solutions. Dentists should give proper instructions regarding maintenance of denture hygiene.

  18. Effect of location of glass fiber-reinforced composite reinforcement on the flexural properties of a maxillary complete denture in vitro.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yutaka; Yoshida, Kaneyoshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2011-07-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of the location of glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) reinforcement on the flexural load at the proportional limit (FL-PL) and the flexural deflection of a maxillary acrylic resin complete denture. Material and methods. Maxillary acrylic resin complete dentures strengthened with and without FRC reinforcement were tested. The polymerized FRC was embedded in the denture base resin in the doughy state and placed (1) under the ridge lap region, (2) in the anterior region, (3) in the middle region or (4) in the anterior and posterior regions. The FL-PL and flexural deflection value at the 100-N loading point of the reinforced maxillary denture specimens were tested. Results. All of the reinforced dentures had a higher FL-PL than the denture without reinforcement but the FL-PL values of all the dentures were not significantly different from each other. The efficiency of the FRC reinforcement compared to the unreinforced denture was 1.54-1.75 times greater. All of the reinforced dentures showed significantly lower deflection compared to the unreinforced denture, but the flexural deflections of all the dentures were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions. The location of the FRC reinforcement did not affect the fracture resistance of the maxillary acrylic resin complete denture. All of the reinforced dentures had higher FL-PL and lower flexural deflection than the denture without reinforcement.

  19. Wispy Prosthesis: A Novel Method in Denture Weight Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Anne, Gopinadh; Budeti, Sreedevi; Anche, Sampath Kumar; Zakkula, Srujana; Atla, Jyothi; Jyothula, Ravi Rakesh Dev; Peddinti, Vijaya Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stability and retention of the denture becomes at stake with the increase in weight of the denture prosthesis. As a consequence, different materials and methods have been introduced to overcome these issues but denture weight reduction still remains to be a cumbersome and strenuous procedure. Aim To introduce a novel technique for the fabrication of denture prosthesis where in the weight of the denture will not affect the retention and stability of the denture. Materials and Methods Four groups with a sample size of 10 each, were included where in one group was control and other three were study groups. The control group samples were made completely solid and the study group samples were packed with materials like bean balls, cellulose balls and polyacrylic fibers. The weight of all the samples of each study group was measured and compared with the control group. The observations were analyzed statistically by paired t-test. Results It was observed that the bean balls group produced a weight reduction of 31.3%, cellulose balls group 27.4% and polyacrylic fibers group 24.5% when compared to that of the control group. Conclusion This novel technique will eliminate the problems that were associated in creating hollowness and at the same time will reduce the weight of the prosthesis and among all the study groups, bean balls group were found to reduce maximum weight of the prosthesis. PMID:27190947

  20. Denture Care Practices and Perceived Denture Status among Complete Denture Wearers.

    PubMed

    Kosuru, Krishnam Raju V; Devi, Ganji; Grandhi, Vikram; Prasan, Kumar K; Yasangi, Manoj K; Dhanalakshmi, Mannem

    2017-01-01

    Considerable importance to oral health care was lacking in India, and oral health neglect continues to exist, which is evident in the low utilization rates and poor oral health status. Conventional dentures are the most common alternative in restoration of lost teeth. Without proper denture care practices, there is an increased risk of developing a multitude of problems. The aim of this study is to assess the denture care practices among complete denture wearers in East Godavari district, Andhra Pradesh. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of Prosthodontics at the Konaseema Institute of Dental Sciences, Amalapuram, Andhra Pradesh. Patients with self-care ability and adequate overall health who were using either single or full complete dentures for more than 6 months from the time of the study were requested to participate in the study. A total of 375 study participants were given a self-administered questionnaire on denture care practices followed by clinical examination of the denture status. Statistical analysis was done using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software for windows, version 20.0 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp). The majority of participants reported cleansing their dentures once a day, with brush and water, and had the habit of removing the dentures at night. Almost 80% of the participants reported their denture status to be good/fair. Clinical examination revealed that slightly more than half of the participants had poor denture status. This study highlights the need for improvement in patient education and counseling with respect to the maintenance of dentures and upkeep of denture hygiene. It also emphasizes the need for educating patients on how to evaluate the status of their dentures.

  1. Effect of surface condition and storage time on the repairability of temporary crown and fixed partial denture materials.

    PubMed

    Balkenhol, Markus; Meyer, Manuela; Michel, Karin; Ferger, Paul; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate which parameters (chemical nature, time after mixing, surface characteristics) might affect the repair strength of temporary crown and bridge materials (t-c&b). Four different t-c&bs (Cool Temp Natural, Protemp 3 Garant, Structur Premium, Trim) were investigated using a shear-bond strength (SBS) setup. A cylinder (2 mm x 2.37 mm) of identical t-c&b (n=10) was bonded onto a specimen surface of either freshly set t-c&b (10 min after mixing) or onto specimens that were stored for 24h (37 degrees C, distilled water) and 7 days (thermocycling x 5,000, 5-55 degrees C=TC), respectively. The specimen surface was roughened with SiC paper (grit size 320) or left as it was (specimens stored for 10 min) prior to repair to retain the oxygen-inhibition layer. In addition, mono-block specimens were fabricated as control. The thickness of the oxygen-inhibition layer and the surface morphology was determined. Statistical analysis was carried out with an ANOVA followed by parametric tests (p=0.05). SBS values ranged from 10 to 40 MPa. Trim showed lowest SBS values for most storage conditions. Material, surface characteristics and time after mixing significantly affected the SBS (ANOVA p<0.001). TC significantly reduced the SBS (p<0.05) for all t-c&bs except for Trim (p>0.05). In case of monomethacrylates, storage and surface condition do not affect the repair strength. In contrast, the repair quality of dimethacrylates greatly depends on the material. In any case, roughening the surface is recommended, even if an oxygen-inhibition layer is present.

  2. Effect of water on the thermo-physical properties of Reline: An experimental and molecular simulation based approach.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dhawal; Mjalli, Farouq S

    2014-11-21

    Increasing applications of ionic liquids and their analogues, namely Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs), requires further investigation into the effect of moisture content on the physico-chemical characteristics of these fluids. Although it is common practice to synthesize these fluids in a moisture-controlled environment, as moisture is generally considered to have an impact on their properties, there are no systematic studies on this. We herein examine the effects of water on Reline, a Type-III DES composed of urea and choline chloride. Experiments were performed to obtain the physical properties of aqueous Reline solution. We observed moderate changes in density, speed of sound, refractive index, and pH with increasing water fraction; however, the change in viscosity and conductivity was strong and exponential. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to analyze the intermolecular interactions of Reline and aqueous Reline solutions. The simulations primarily present the significance of urea-anion interaction to explain the low melting point of the DES. In the presence of water, the anion is preferentially hydrated as compared to urea or the cation. More interestingly, simulations help to classify the effects of water into different regimes. At low water fractions (<5%) the urea-urea interactions are enhanced, as is revealed through the hydrogen bond analysis. Beyond 25% water fractions, the components of Reline are individually hydrated and have high diffusivity, which is further reflected in the change in transport properties. The results presented herein provide valuable information on aqueous Reline solutions both in terms of experimental data and molecular insights, which in turn, we believe, might assist in developing further applications of Reline and other related DESs.

  3. Comparison of the Effect of two Denture Cleansers on Tensile bond Strength of a Denture Liner

    PubMed Central

    Farzin, M; Bahrani, F; Adelpour, E

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: One of the most clinical challenging issues in prosthodontics is debonding of soft liners from the denture base. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare tensile bond strength between soft liner and heat-cured acrylic resin when immersed in two different types of denture cleanser and distilled water, at different period of times. Materials and Method: In this experimental in vivo study, 238 heat-cured acrylic blocks were made. A soft liner was embedded between the acrylic blocks. Samples were divided into four groups: 17 samples were in the control group and were not soaked in any solution .The remaining samples were divided into 3 groups (Distilled water, Calgon and Fittydent). Each group was then subdivided into two subcategories, regarding the immersion time variable; 15 and 45 minutes. All samples were placed in tension force and tensile bond strength was recorded with the testing machine. One- way ANOVA and Tucky HSD post-hoc test were adopted to analyze the yielded data (α> 0.05). Results: Specimens which were immersed in two denture cleansers (Fittydent and Calgon) and in distilled water showed significant difference (p= 0.001) in bonding strength when compared to the control group. The subjects immersed in denture cleanser solutions and distilled water did not reveal any significant difference (p= 0.90). For all groups; most of the bonding failures (72%) were cohesive type. Conclusion: The effect of the denture cleansers and distilled water on the bond strength was not statistically different; however, the difference was significant between the immersed groups with the non-immersed group. Moreover, type of the denture cleanser did not show any effect on the tensile strength. The tensile strength increases with time of immersion. PMID:24724134

  4. Removable partial dentures without rests.

    PubMed

    Meinig, D A

    1994-04-01

    Ever since Bonwill recommended the use of rests on removable partial dentures in 1899, rests have been universally considered inviolate and have gone unchallenged and untested. The author claims that removable partial dentures without rests may not cause the adverse conditions usually predicted, such as gingival stripping, gingival inflammation, mutilated residual ridges, or extensive and rapid resorption of the alveolar ridges. In removable partial dentures made by the author for several patients, the residual ridge remained stable and in physiologic equilibrium when rests were not used. A history of the long-term effect on patients wearing partial dentures with and without rests is presented.

  5. Immediate dentures: 1.Treatment planning.

    PubMed

    St George, Geoffrey; Hussain, Sela; Welfare, Richard

    2010-03-01

    The treatment planning, clinical stages and construction of immediate dentures pose challenges to both dentist, dental technician and patient. In this two-part series, the various principles for successfully providing patients with immediate dentures will be discussed. This first paper examines the advantages and disadvantages, as well as the treatment planning involved in providing immediate dentures. Although the provision of immediate dentures is common in dental practice, it is a treatment option which is not without problems. This article will show how careful planning, prior to treatment starting, can prevent unforeseen complications occurring.

  6. Masticatory performance of complete denture wearers after using two adhesives: a crossover randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Junior, Norberto Martins; Rodriguez, Larissa Santana; Mendoza Marin, Danny Omar; Paleari, André Gustavo; Pero, Ana Carolina; Compagnoni, Marco Antonio

    2014-11-01

    Masticatory performance analysis of conventional complete denture wearers who use denture adhesives is scarce in the dental literature. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of the use of 2 denture adhesives on the masticatory performance of conventional complete denture wearers by means of a crossover study. Forty individuals who were edentulous received new maxillary and mandibular complete dentures, and, after an adaptation period, were submitted to masticatory performance analysis without denture adhesive (control). The participants were randomly divided and assigned to 2 protocols: protocol 1, denture adhesive 1 (Ultra Corega cream tasteless) use during the first 15 days, followed by no use of denture adhesive over the next 15 days (washout), and then use of denture adhesive 2 (Ultra Corega powder tasteless) for 15 days; protocol 2, denture adhesive 2 (Ultra Corega powder tasteless) use during the first 15 days, followed by no use of denture adhesive during the next 15 days (washout), and then use of denture adhesive 1 (Ultra Corega cream tasteless) for 15 days. The masticatory performance was assessed immediately after the use of denture adhesive by means of the sieve method, in which participants were instructed to deliberately chew 5 almonds for 20 chewing strokes. Masticatory performance was calculated by the weight of comminuted material that passed through the sieves. Data were analyzed by a 1-way ANOVA for paired samples and the multiple comparison of means by using the Bonferroni test (α=.05). A significant increase in masticatory performance was noted after using the Ultra Corega cream (mean, 32.6%) and Ultra Corega powder (mean, 31.2%) when compared with the control group (mean, 19.8%) (P<.001). No significant difference was found between the 2 denture adhesives evaluated. The use of denture adhesive improved the masticatory performance of conventional complete denture wearers. No difference was found in masticatory performance with

  7. Scratch test of thermoplastic denture base resins for non-metal clasp dentures.

    PubMed

    Kawara, Misao; Iwata, Yoshihiro; Iwasaki, Masatoshi; Komoda, Yoshihiro; Iida, Takashi; Asano, Takashi; Komiyama, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Several thermoplastic denture base resins have been introduced for the fabrication of non-metal clasp dentures. Although the surface of these materials is easily damaged, the surface roughness and characteristics of scratches created have not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness of thermoplastic resins using a scratch test for the development of future materials. Four thermoplastic (polyamide: Valplast(®); VLP and Lucitone FRS(®); FRS, polyethylene terephthalate: EstheShot(®); ES, and polyester: EstheShot Bright(®); ESB) and two conventional acrylic (Heat-polymerizing: Urban(®); HC, and Pour type auto-polymerizing: Pro-Cast DSP(®); PR) denture base resins were examined. Eight specimens, approximately 10mm×10mm×30mm in size, of each material were fabricated. Scratch test was performed by a scratch tester with a diamond indenter of 10-μm radius and cone angle 90°, applying a constant load of 500mN, and 2-mm-long scratches were made. The scratch marks were studied under 3D laser measuring microscope and cross-section profiles at approximately 0.5mm, 1.0mm, and 1.5mm from the starting point were extracted and measured with analysis software. Data from 24 cross-section profiles in each denture base material were analyzed. The maximum depths of ES, ESB and FRS were greater than VLP, PR and HC, and the scratch widths of ES, ESB, FRS and VPL were greater than PR and HC. The results showed that the surface of thermoplastic denture base resins was easily damaged compared to polymethyl methacrylate. Copyright © 2013 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Complete denture impression techniques practiced by private dental practitioners: a survey.

    PubMed

    Kakatkar, Vinay R

    2013-09-01

    Impression making is an important step in fabricating complete dentures. A survey to know the materials used and techniques practiced while recording complete denture impressions was conducted. It is disheartening to know that 33 % practitioners still use base plate custom trays to record final impressions. 8 % still use alginate for making final impressions. An acceptable technique for recording CD impressions is suggested.

  9. A survey assessing modes of maintaining denture hygiene among elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Ashishtaru; Dutta, Sudipto; Varghese, Rana K.; Kharsan, Vinay; Agrawal, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the denture hygiene habits in complete denture wearers. Materials and Methods: In this study, a self-administered structured questionnaire was developed to know the attitude of the patients from the Department of Prosthodontics regarding denture hygiene. The study sample consisted of totally 500 subjects, which included 284 (56.8%) males and 216 (43.2%) females. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 15.0 with Chi-square (χ2) test at P < 0.05. Results: Nearly half of the subjects cleaned their dentures daily once. Participants from the younger age group and who had been wearing dentures since 2 years maintained better frequency of cleaning. The majority of these subjects used water and brush for denture cleansing. After seeing the condition, more than half of the dentures were rated as poor (60%). There was significant difference between all the groups on comparison (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Poor condition of complete dentures seen in the population is mainly due to irregular cleansing habits and also less usage of cleansing solutions. Dentists should give proper instructions regarding maintenance of denture hygiene. PMID:25374830

  10. Reinforcement of poly(methyl methacrylate) denture base with glass flake.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Paul; Wood, David J; Bubb, Nigel L

    2005-04-01

    Since the introduction of poly(methyl methacrylate) as a denture base material, it has suffered from having relatively poor mechanical properties. Many methods of improving its strength and toughness have been investigated. Most of these have not been adopted due to: increased cost, the need for specialist processing equipment or increased laboratory time due to more complicated procedures. Glass flake has been used as a reinforcing agent in many industrial polymers, but is as yet untested with denture base acrylic materials. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of adding glass flake to denture base acrylic powder on the fracture toughness of the set material. Glass flake was added in 5, 10 or 20% w/w to Trevalon denture base powder. The material was mixed, flasked, packed and processed in a manner typical for a denture base material. Fracture toughness was determined using a double torsion test technique. The addition of glass flake gave up to a 69% increase in fracture toughness compared to plain Trevalon material. The addition of 5% glass flake lead to an improvement in fracture toughness that was statistically significant compared to both plain Trevalon and the 10 and 20% groups. The significant improvement in fracture toughness of a denture base acrylic material using glass flake is an extremely promising result. Other mechanical properties will require testing before glass flake can be recommended as a reinforcing agent for denture base acrylic materials.

  11. A follow-up study on removable partial dentures in undergraduate program: part I. participants and denture use by telephone survey.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Eiko; Fueki, Kenji; Igarashi, Yoshimasa

    2011-07-04

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical outcome of removable partial dentures (RPDs) designed to minimize denture mobility during function. Using archived files of the undergraduate program between 2003 and 2005 at Tokyo Medical and Dental University, a list of 169 patients treated with 184 RPDs was created. The RPDs had either an acrylic resin-base or a cobalt-chrome framework-base. Two examiners telephoned all the listed patients and interviewed 118 patients (70%) regarding the use of their RPDs. Of 118 patients, 42 (36%) had stopped using, mainly due to problems with abutment teeth in resin-based dentures, and replacement in cobalt-chrome-based dentures. There was no significant difference in mean age, gender distribution, mean number of remaining/abutment teeth, distribution of denture arch, and Kennedy classification between denture use and nonuse groups (p>0.05). The nonuse group showed a significantly higher percentage of resin-base compared to the use group (p = 0.006). Logistic regression analysis indicated that resin-base was a significant risk factor for nonuse (p = 0.008). The present findings suggest that abutment teeth should be selected carefully, especially in this type of resin-based RPDs, and that the denture base material may be a critical factor which determines denture use.

  12. Impacted dentures in the oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, S N; Das, S; Das, S K; Mandal, A

    2014-05-01

    This study presents the incidence of denture impaction in the oesophagus, and discusses the difficulties of managing such cases. A total of 262 patients with a history of foreign body ingestion (between 1999 and 2010) were reviewed; 46 of these patients had dentures impacted in the oesophagus. The cervical section of the oesophagus was the commonest site of impaction. Dysphagia and tracheal tenderness were the most consistent features when dentures became impacted in the upper oesophagus. In most cases, rigid oesophagoscopy enabled successful removal of the impacted denture. Locating an impacted denture hidden within the oesophageal mucosal folds sometimes proved difficult. In cases of impacted dentures in the oesophagus, a positive history helps in the diagnosis, but a high degree of clinical suspicion aids early detection. Conventional radiographs are important but may not always be of assistance. Early intervention reduces complications. Dentures that are poorly maintained and old are more likely to be swallowed accidentally. The inclusion of radiopaque filler within dentures would assist localisation following accidental swallowing.

  13. Clinical and antimicrobial efficacy of NitrAdineTM-based disinfecting cleaning tablets in complete denture wearers

    PubMed Central

    SILVA-LOVATO, Cláudia Helena; DE WEVER, Bart; ADRIAENS, Els; PARANHOS, Helena de Freitas Oliveira; WATANABE, Evandro; PISANI, Maria Xavier; de SOUZA, Rafael Freitas; ITO, Isabel Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the efficacy of NitrAdineTM-based disinfecting cleaning tablets for complete denture, in terms of denture biofilm removal and antimicrobial action. Material and methods Forty complete denture wearers (14 men and 26 women) with a mean age of 62.3±9.0 years were randomly assigned to two groups and were instructed to clean their dentures according to two methods: brushing (control) - 3 times a day with denture brush and tap water following meals; brushing and immersion (experimental) - brushing the denture 3 times a day with denture brush and tap water following meals and immersion of the denture in NitrAdineTM-based denture tablets (Medical InterporousTM). Each method was used for 21 days. Denture biofilm was disclosed by a 1% neutral red solution and quantified by means of digital photos taken from the internal surface before and after the use of the product. Microbiological assessment was conducted to quantify Candida sp. Results An independent t-test revealed a significant lower biofilm percentage for the experimental group (4.7, 95% CI 2.4 to 7.9) in comparison with the control group (mean 37.5, 95% CI 28.2 to 48.1) (t38=7.996, p<0.001). A significant reduction of yeast colony forming units could be found after treatment with Medical InterporousTM denture tablets as compared to the control group (Mann-Whitney test, Z=1.90; p<0.05). Conclusion The present findings suggest that NitrAdineTM-based disinfecting cleaning tablets are efficient in removal of denture biofilm. In addition, a clear antimicrobial action was demonstrated. Therefore, they should be recommended as a routine denture maintenance method for the prevention of the development of microbial biofilm-induced denture stomatitis. PMID:21308285

  14. Evaluation of the effect of denture adhesives on surface roughness of two chemically different denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Mahmoud; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of four commercially available denture adhesives (DAs) on surface roughness of two chemically different denture base materials. Materials and Methods: Fifty specimens of heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate, and another fifty specimens of light-cured urethane dimethacrylate were divided into five groups (n = 10), each was immersed in four prepared DAs (Corega Super Cream, Corega Ultra Powder, Olivafix Cream, Protefix Cream) as well as distilled water (control group). The mean surface roughness (Ra) of the polished and unpolished surfaces of the specimens was recorded using profilometer device. T-test for paired observation was used to indicate any changes in surface roughness between the baseline and after 30 days of immersion in the DA. Results: Almost all the tested DAs had no significant effect on the roughness of polished and unpolished surfaces of both denture base materials. The Corega super cream DA produced significant increase in the roughness of the polished surfaces of both types of acrylic specimens (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The majority of the investigated DAs appears not to affect the surface roughness of denture base materials. Only Corega super cream DA produced detectable increase in the roughness of polished surfaces of denture base specimens. PMID:27403047

  15. Denture hygiene knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward patient education in denture care among dental practitioners of Jabalpur city, Madhya Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    Suresan, Vinay; Mantri, Sneha; Deogade, Suryakant; Sumathi, K.; Panday, Pragya; Galav, Ankit; Mishra, Kanika

    2016-01-01

    Context: Researchers have concentrated their focus on denture wearer's attitude and practice toward denture cleansing despite the fact that they should be more focused on the attitudes of the dentists’ themselves towards patient education at the time of denture delivery. It is an obligation of every dentist to motivate, instruct and provide the means and methods of plaque control for their patients. Aims: The aim was to assess the denture hygiene knowledge, attitudes and practice towards patient education in denture care among dental practitioners (DPs) of Jabalpur city, Madhya Pradesh, India. Material and Methods: A total of 168 dental practitioners completed a comprehensive questionnaire. All participants signed an informed consent before answering the questionnaire. The institutional review committee approved the study. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test for non-parametric study was employed to determine the statistical difference between the two groups. A P-value of 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Most of the subjects were qualified with a bachelor degree 142 (85%). 25 (18%) subjects did not associate oral biofilms on complete denture with conditions like denture stomatitis and other serious systemic diseases. Approximately half of the DPs 69 (48%) and specialists 8 (31%) agreed that explaining denture hygiene instructions to old patients can be very time consuming. A recall program for their patients is of importance according to 39 (27%) of DPs and 3 (12%) specialists. Conclusions: It may be concluded that the study subjects had limited knowledge of denture cleansing materials and denture hygiene importance. Attitudes varied among the subjects when it came to sharing information with their patients. PMID:27134425

  16. Reline 33 year old kettle for more corrosive process at about 1/3 cost of new unit: lightweight foamed glass block protects corroded cast iron cover

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    This article presents a solution to a chemical plant's need for a lining material to reline a 33 year old kettle that would be resistant to attack by aqueous bromine and hydrochloric, nitrous, and bromic acid. The solution was to use an elastomeric polyisobutylene sheeting as a primary lining for the kettle. The problem was also solved by using a light weight foamed glass block which protected the corroded cast iron dome cover for the kettle. Installation of the two-step lining for the kettle and cover by Chemsteel Construction Company of New Kensington, PA was completed in 5 weeks. The cost was about 1/3 as much as fabricating, installing, and lining a new steel 5000 gal vessel. The kettle has been in service about 12 months and the acid brick/polyisobutylene membrance liner shows no signs of damage from the highly corrosive chemicals and elevated temperatures required for the process change.

  17. An alternative impression technique for complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Burak; Özçelik, Tuncer Burak

    2014-02-01

    This article describes a technique for creating adequate space for an even thickness of polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression material at the periphery during complete denture impression making. A PVS border molding material is injected around the borders of a custom tray, a 17-μm-thick stretch wrap film is folded into 4 layers, and a tray-shaped piece slightly larger than the size of the custom tray is placed on the tray covering the borders. After the border molding procedure is completed, the film is removed and the definitive impression completed with a medium-viscosity PVS impression material.

  18. Influence of water sorption on mechanical properties of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Iwamoto, Misa; Lassila, Lippo; Vallittu, Pekka; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the influence of water sorption on certain mechanical properties of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Six thermoplastic resins (two polyamides, two polyesters, one polycarbonate, one polymethylmethacrylate) and a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer, selected as a control, were tested. Specimens of each denture base material were fabricated according to ISO 1567 specifications and were either dry or water-immersed for 30 days (n = 10). The ultimate flexural strength, the flexural strength at the proportional limit and the elastic modulus of the denture base materials were calculated. Water sorption significantly decreased the ultimate flexural strength, the flexural strength at the proportional limit and the elastic modulus of one of the polyamides and the PMMAs. It also significantly increased the ultimate flexural strength of the polycarbonate. The mechanical properties of some injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins changed after water sorption.

  19. THE COMPATIBILITY OF DENTURE CLEANSERS AND RESILIENT LINERS

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Luciana Valadares; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Henriques, Guilherme Elias Pessanha; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Fragoso, Wagner Sotero

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Difficulty in cleaning resilient denture liners remains a material disadvantage. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of denture cleansers on hardness of resilient liner materials. Materials and Methods: Three resilient liners, Luci Sof® (Dentsply), Molloplast-B® (Dentax), and Sofreliner® (Tokuyama), and two denture cleansers, Efferdent® (Warner-Lamber), and 0.5% alkaline hypochlorite preparation were used. Twenty specimens of each material were prepared, measuring 25X15X3mm. Two denture cleansing approaches were used: 1) alkaline hypochlorite, for 20 minutes; 2) alkaline peroxide, for 30 minutes. This procedure was repeated 8 times a day, during 90 days. The specimens were evaluated before and after 360 and 720 cycles, to simulate 1 and 2 years of clinical cleaning procedures, respectively. The Shore A hardness was evaluated in a durometer (Teclock GS-709A), with a penetrating load of 10N for 1 second. Any macroscopic changes, such as loss of color or alteration in surface texture were recorded by one observer. All numeric data were subject to ANOVA with repeated measures followed by Tukey's test (α= 0.05). Results: All materials were significantly different, independently to time and treatment. Initially, Luci Sof® and Sofreliner® immersed in either hypochlorite or peroxide increased the hardness mean values significantly. These hardness mean values decreased significantly after 720 cycles. Molloplast-B® showed no significant difference after the treatments, in any time. Conclusions: Denture cleansers had no effect on hardness of the resilient denture liners evaluated after 2 years of in vivo simulated conditions of hygiene. Sofreliner® was the smoothest material before and after all treatments. PMID:19089278

  20. Evaluation of the effect of denture adhesives on surface roughness of two chemically different denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Mahmoud; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of four commercially available denture adhesives (DAs) on surface roughness of two chemically different denture base materials. Fifty specimens of heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate, and another fifty specimens of light-cured urethane dimethacrylate were divided into five groups (n = 10), each was immersed in four prepared DAs (Corega Super Cream, Corega Ultra Powder, Olivafix Cream, Protefix Cream) as well as distilled water (control group). The mean surface roughness (R a) of the polished and unpolished surfaces of the specimens was recorded using profilometer device. T-test for paired observation was used to indicate any changes in surface roughness between the baseline and after 30 days of immersion in the DA. Almost all the tested DAs had no significant effect on the roughness of polished and unpolished surfaces of both denture base materials. The Corega super cream DA produced significant increase in the roughness of the polished surfaces of both types of acrylic specimens (P < 0.05). The majority of the investigated DAs appears not to affect the surface roughness of denture base materials. Only Corega super cream DA produced detectable increase in the roughness of polished surfaces of denture base specimens.

  1. In vitro comparison of the tensile bond strength of denture adhesives on denture bases.

    PubMed

    Kore, Doris R; Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Hall, Dan B; Bahjri, Khaled

    2013-12-01

    With several denture adhesives available, it is important for dentists to make appropriate patient recommendations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength of denture adhesives on denture base materials at time intervals of up to 24 hours. Fixodent, Super Poligrip, Effergrip, and SeaBond denture adhesives were tested with 3 denture base materials: 2 heat-polymerized (Lucitone 199 and SR Ivocap) and 1 visible-light-polymerized (shade-stable Eclipse). Artificial saliva with mucin was used as a control. Tensile bond strength was tested in accordance with American Dental Association specifications at 5 minutes, 3 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after applying the adhesive. Maximum forces before failure were recorded in megapascals (MPa), and the data were subjected to a 2-way analysis of variance (α=.05). All 4 adhesives had greater tensile bond strength than the control. Fixodent, Super Poligrip, and SeaBond had higher tensile bond strength values than Effergrip. All adhesives had the greatest tensile bond strength at 5 minutes and the least at 24 hours. The 3 denture bases produced significantly different results with each adhesive (P<.001). Lucitone 199 with the adhesives had the greatest tensile bond strength, followed by Ivocap and Eclipse. All 4 adhesives had greater tensile bond strength than the control, and all 4 adhesives were strongest at the 5-minute interval. On all 3 types of denture bases, Effergrip produced significantly lower tensile bond strength, and Fixodent, Super Poligrip, and SeaBond produced significantly higher tensile bond strength. At 24 hours, the adhesive-base combinations with the highest tensile bond strength were Fixodent on Lucitone 199, Fixodent on Eclipse, Fixodent on Ivocap, and Super Poligrip on Ivocap. Copyright © 2013 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Relining of iron heat treating furnace with ceramic fiber conserves process gas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    Relining of a primary heat treating furnace with ceramic fiber blanket at Georgia Iron Works at Groveton, Ga., not only saved /10,800 a year in gas consumption at full furnace capacity, but also cut maintenance expenditures, reduced downtime and slashed cycle time. The first phase was installing a wallpaper veneer of two-ft-wide ceramic fiber blankets on the sidewalls and door. The other was erecting a roof of edge-stacked blanket for increased resistance to high temperature and gas velocities.

  3. Influence of adhesive cementation systems on the bond strength of relined fiber posts to root dentin.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Raquel Viana; Sampaio, Camila Sobral; Pacheco, Rafael Rocha; Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria; Giannini, Marcelo

    2017-10-01

    Glass fiber post cementation procedures have undergone significant development. Relining the post with composite resin is a technique that aims to reduce resin cement thickness and consequently problems inherent to polymerization. Evidence is sparse regarding the efficacy of bonding procedures at increasing depths (from cervical to apical) using different adhesive cementation techniques. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength (PBS) of composite resin relined glass fiber posts cemented to bovine root dentin using different adhesive cementation protocols. Eighteen bovine teeth (n=6) were embedded in polystyrene resin blocks, and the crowns were sectioned leaving a root portion of 20 mm in length. Root canals were prepared using rotary instruments provided by the post manufacturer (Whitepost DC #1), resulting in a uniform root canal preparation. The root canals were lubricated with a water-soluble glycerin gel. Silane (Prosil) was applied and the posts relined with a microhybrid composite resin (Filtek Z100) to conform to the root canal anatomy. Three adhesive cementation protocols were evaluated: a 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi Purpose) in combination with a dual polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC); a universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal) associated with a dual polymerizing resin cement (RelyX Ultimate); and a self-adhesive dual polymerizing resin cement (RelyX Unicem 2). The roots were sectioned, resulting in four 2-mm segments at 4 different depths (cervical to apical) and evaluated by the PBS test, using a universal testing machine (Instron 4411) at 0.5 mm/min, until failure. Interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, and failures were classified as cohesive failure in composite resin, cohesive failure in cement, cohesive failure in root dentin, adhesive failure, or mixed. Data were analyzed by 2-way split-plot ANOVA and the Tukey post hoc test (α=.05). No

  4. Retention of complete maxillary dentures measured as resistance against unilateral occlusal loading.

    PubMed

    Fløystrand, F; Orstavik, J S

    1984-02-01

    Complete maxillary dentures were tested for their ability to remain in place when subjected to unilateral occlusal loads. The test material comprised five persons, each supplied with three identical dentures. The denture design was based on the principles of 1) functionally determined filling-in of the vestibular sulcus, 2) palatal coverage to the vibration line without post dam, 3) aesthetically governed positioning of the front teeth, and 4) positioning of the lateral teeth in the plane connecting the top of the residual ridge with the central part of the occlusal surface of the antagonizing natural teeth. Resistance to unilateral occlusal loads was measured by means of a miniature bite force sensor. In the pooled material, an average load of 70 N was tolerated before the dentures were dislodged. For a given participant/denture combination, the resistance against dislodgment varied considerably when tested on different days. Marked differences were also found among three identical dentures in one person. The tolerance against unilateral occlusal loads could feasibly be quantified. However, the influence of specific clinical and/or technological factors on denture retention during function should be studied only if strict definitions as to the test conditions are given. These conditions must include the time, person, and denture tested.

  5. Removable partial denture education in Portugal following the Bologna Process.

    PubMed

    Figueiral, M H; Fonseca, P; Campos, J C R; Correia, A R; Fernandes, M S; Branco, F J M

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the current guidelines used for the undergraduate course subject Removable Partial Denture in Portuguese Dental Schools following the Bologna Process. All Dental Schools were sent a questionnaire, divided into the following areas: (I) organization and syllabus; (II) teaching methods; (III) materials and techniques; Answers about organization and syllabus of course subjects showed the most variability; teaching methods were identical regarding principal textbook and live demonstrations of laboratory/clinical procedures; the same techniques and materials are used in all the schools' dental clinics. The majority of Dental Schools present similar guidelines for removable partial dentures.

  6. Effect of different denture cleansers on surface roughness and microhardness of artificial denture teeth

    PubMed Central

    Yuzugullu, Bulem; Cetinsahin, Cem; Celik, Cigdem

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different denture cleansers on the surface roughness and microhardness of various types of posterior denture teeth. MATERIALS AND METHODS 168 artificial tooth specimens were divided into the following four subgroups (n=42): SR Orthotyp PE (polymethylmethacrylate); SR Orthosit PE (Isosit); SR Postaris DCL (double cross-linked); and SR Phonares II (nanohybrid composite). The specimens were further divided according to the type of the denture cleanser (Corega Tabs (sodium perborate), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and distilled water (control) (n=14)) and immersed in the cleanser to simulate a 180-day immersion period, after which the surface roughness and microhardness were tested. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal–Wallis test, Conover's nonparametric multiple comparison test, and Spearman's rank correlation analysis (P<.05). RESULTS A comparison among the denture cleanser groups showed that NaOCl caused significantly higher roughness values on SR Orthotyp PE specimens when compared with the other artificial teeth (P<.001). Furthermore, Corega Tabs resulted in higher microhardness values in SR Orthotyp PE specimens than distilled water and NaOCl (P<.005). The microhardness values decreased significantly from distilled water, NaOCl, to Corega Tabs for SR Orthosit PE specimens (P<.001). SR Postaris DLC specimens showed increased microhardness when immersed in distilled water or NaOCl when compared with immersion in Corega Tabs (P<.003). No correlation was found between surface roughness and microhardness (r=0.104, P=.178). CONCLUSION NaOCl and Corega Tabs affected the surface roughness and microhardness of all artificial denture teeth except for the new generation nanohybrid composite teeth. PMID:27826382

  7. Comparative evaluation of effect of complete denture wears on the flow rate of saliva in both medicated and apparently healthy patients

    PubMed Central

    Sonthalia, Abhay; Chandrasekaran, Arun P.; Mhaske, Sheetal P.; Lau, Mayank; Joshy, V. R.; Attokaran, George

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: In the denture wearing people, saliva is necessary to create adhesion, cohesion, and surface tension that ultimately leads to the increased retention of the denture. Medications have some influence on the flow rate of saliva and denture retention. The present study evaluates the effect of complete denture wear on the flow rate of saliva in both medicated and apparently healthy patients. Materials and Methods: The participants were 42 edentulous individuals aged 35–70 years requiring complete denture prostheses. The participants were divided into two groups of medicated and unmedicated. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected at 24 h and 3 months after the insertion of new complete dentures in both the groups. The data obtained were analyzed using Student's paired t-test and unpaired t-test. Intergroup changes were compared with unpaired t-test. Intragroup changes were compared with paired t-test using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences, version 22.0. Results: In the unmedicated group, the mean salivary flow rate was high at 24 h after denture insertion when compared to before denture insertion (P = 0.001 VHS). In the medicated group, the observation was highly significant (P = 0.007 HS) 24 h after denture insertion and after 3 months (P = 0.02 S) when compared to before denture insertion. Conclusion: No significant difference in the salivary flow rate was found 3 months after denture insertion when compared to before denture insertion for both the medicated and unmedicated groups. PMID:27382537

  8. Denture hygiene knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward patient education in denture care among dental practitioners of Jabalpur city, Madhya Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Suresan, Vinay; Mantri, Sneha; Deogade, Suryakant; Sumathi, K; Panday, Pragya; Galav, Ankit; Mishra, Kanika

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have concentrated their focus on denture wearer's attitude and practice toward denture cleansing despite the fact that they should be more focused on the attitudes of the dentists' themselves towards patient education at the time of denture delivery. It is an obligation of every dentist to motivate, instruct and provide the means and methods of plaque control for their patients. The aim was to assess the denture hygiene knowledge, attitudes and practice towards patient education in denture care among dental practitioners (DPs) of Jabalpur city, Madhya Pradesh, India. A total of 168 dental practitioners completed a comprehensive questionnaire. All participants signed an informed consent before answering the questionnaire. The institutional review committee approved the study. Chi-square test for non-parametric study was employed to determine the statistical difference between the two groups. A P-value of 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Most of the subjects were qualified with a bachelor degree 142 (85%). 25 (18%) subjects did not associate oral biofilms on complete denture with conditions like denture stomatitis and other serious systemic diseases. Approximately half of the DPs 69 (48%) and specialists 8 (31%) agreed that explaining denture hygiene instructions to old patients can be very time consuming. A recall program for their patients is of importance according to 39 (27%) of DPs and 3 (12%) specialists. It may be concluded that the study subjects had limited knowledge of denture cleansing materials and denture hygiene importance. Attitudes varied among the subjects when it came to sharing information with their patients.

  9. Denture Stomatitis and Candida Albicans in Iranian Population: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Akbari, Maryam; Tabrizi, Reza; Ghorbani, Anahita; Golkari, Ali; Banakar, Morteza; Sekhavati, Eghbal; Kavari, Seyed Habibollah; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Denture stomatitis is the common form of oral candidiasis, which is seen in the form of diffused inflammation in the areas covered by dentures. Many primary studies report the prevalence of denture stomatitis and candida albicans among patients in the Iranian population; therefore, using meta-analysis is valuable for health policy makers. Purpose: The purpose of the present study is to determine the prevalence of denture stomatitis and candida albicans in Iran. Materials and Method: Using relevant keywords, national and international databases were searched. After limiting the search strategy and deleting the duplicates, the remaining papers were screened by examining the title and abstract. In order to increase the sensitivity of search reference lists of papers were examined. Finally the index of heterogeneity between studies was defined using Cochran test (Q) and I-squared (I2). According to heterogeneity, the random effects model was used to estimate the prevalence of denture stomatitis and candida albicans in Iran. Result: The prevalence of denture stomatitis in 12 studies, and the prevalence of candida albicans in patients with denture stomatitis have been reported in 6 studies. The number of sample under investigated and its age range among primary studies included meta- analysis was 2271 individuals and 32.7 till 87.5 years respectively. The prevalence of denture stomatitis in preliminary studies imported to a meta-analysis varied from 1.9% to 54.6%, and its rate in Iran using the meta-analysis was estimated 28.9 % (CI 95%: 18.2-39.6). Also the overall prevalence of candida albicans in patients with denture stomatitis in Iran was estimated 60.6% (CI 95%:50.1-71.2). Conclusion: This study showed that the prevalence of denture stomatitis and candida albicans among patient infected denture stomatitis is relatively significant in Iran. PMID:27840842

  10. A comparison of the efficacy of mechanical, chemical, and microwave radiation methods in disinfecting complete dentures

    PubMed Central

    Mojarad, Niloofar; Khalili, Zahra; Aalaei, Shima

    2017-01-01

    Background: Poor denture hygiene can be a potential source of pathogens. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of microwave radiation with that of chemical and mechanical techniques in disinfecting complete dentures contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two sterilized mandibular dentures were separately contaminated with S. aureus (n = 32) and P. aeruginosa (n = 32) and then incubated at 37°C for 48 h. The contaminated dentures were disinfected as follows: chemical disinfection with Corega tablets; chemical disinfection with 2% glutaraldehyde; mechanical disinfection by brushing the denture; and physical disinfection by 650-W microwaves irradiation for 3 min with six samples in each subgroup. Six dentures served as negative control group, and six contaminated dentures with no disinfection served as the positive control group. 10-3–10-6 dilutions were cultured in the nutrient agar, and the colonies were counted after incubation at 37°C for 48 h. To evaluate the lasting time of disinfection, the containers with nutrient agar and dentures were stored for 7 days at 37°C to evaluate turbidity. Data were analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-test (α = 0.05). Results: There was no evidence of bacterial growth in 48 h and turbidity after 7 days of incubation of dentures disinfected by microwaves, glutaraldehyde, and Corega tablets, which was statistically significant compared to the positive controls (P < 0.001). In mechanically disinfected dentures (brushing), bacterial growth was detected after 48 h which was statistically significant compared to the positive controls (P < 0.001) and turbidity was seen in all the nutrient agar plates. Conclusion: Microwave iradiation, 2% glutaraldehyde, and Corega tablets disinfected complete dentures contaminated with S. aureus and P. aeruginosa which lasted for a long and a short terms. PMID:28584537

  11. [Transient removable dentures].

    PubMed

    Kouadio, A A; Jordana, F; N'Goran, J K; Le Bars, P

    2015-09-01

    Removable dentures are always transient current. The epidemiology and causes of tooth gaps demonstrate the need to master the different prosthetic treatment. This made whether to propose treatment plans that take into account psychological, physiological and technical support for this patient. Different situations may arise. A gradual transition may be considered or immediate passage to the total edentulous according to general criteria, local and desiderata of patients. After tooth extraction, the transitional prosthesis can control bone lysis thereby it is part of a complete treatment before prosthesis. It also facilitates a good psychological and physiological integration before the prosthesis use.

  12. A Comparison of Masticatory Performance and Efficiency of Complete Dentures Made with High Impact and Flexible Resins: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhoyar, Anjali; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Yadav, Naveen S.; Mahajan, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with extensive tooth loss, restoration of masticatory function and aesthetics is main concern for a prosthodontist. Aim of Study This study aimed to evaluate and compare differences in masticatory efficiency of patients treated with complete dentures made with either high impact or flexible resins. Setting and Design The sample size consisted of 10 study subjects. Two sets of dentures first conventional followed by flexible dentures were fabricated for each subject and both the sets of dentures were accessed for masticatory performance and efficiency. Materials and Methods This study compared the masticatory performance and efficiency of dentures by means of standardized mesh sieves. Masticatory efficiency was calculated by recording the total number of chewing cycles and time required to completely swallow a standardized food item. A patient satisfaction questionnaire was given and evaluated. Statistical Analysis Used The statistical analyses were performed using Z-test of Proportion and Paired t-test. Results The masticatory performance ratio was found to be more for hard food in conventional dentures. The values of masticatory performance ratios for soft food, time and number of masticatory strokes were indicating better masticatory efficiency of conventional dentures. Conclusion Though masticatory efficiency and performance were found to be better for patient’s dentures made with Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), a statistically significant number of patients reported that the flexible dentures were more satisfying than the conventional dentures. PMID:26266213

  13. Assessment of states of dentures and interest in implant-retained prosthetic treatment in 55-year-old edentulous Finns.

    PubMed

    Salonen, M A

    1994-04-01

    One hundred and fifty 55-year-old edentulous subjects (104 women and 46 men) were interviewed. Materials, conditions, functional stabilities, and occlusions of complete dentures, and resorption of alveolar crests were recorded and assessed. The dentures were in good condition in 52% of subjects. Occlusion was correct in 45% of cases. Every fifth mandibular denture exhibited good functional stability. The mean age of dentures in good condition and functionally stable was statistically significantly lower than the mean age of dentures poor in these respects. Severe alveolar resorption contributed to poor functional stability of dentures (P = 0.0068 (maxilla), P = 0.0023 (mandible)) and to incorrect occlusion (P = 0.0177). Good agreement was noted between objective and subjective opinions of denture function (P = 0.01 (maxillary denture), P = 0.01 (mandibular denture)). Although oral rehabilitation with endosseous implants is common and, objectively, needs for such treatment existed, only 22 subjects (15%) who had recently had their dentures renewed and were experiencing problems with functional stability were interested in implant-retained overdentures.

  14. Biological properties of denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Eick, J D

    1977-04-01

    The biocompatibility and clinical efficacy of dental materials have been and continue to be a major concern of the dental profession. There are some cases of dental materials that have demonstrated problems with biocompatibility, for example, silicone soft liners. Although rare, allergic stomatitis caused by denture base resin is another example. High purity, very large polymer size, and nonoccurrence in nature significantly contribute to the acceptance of polymers used as biomaterials. New Federal Food and Drug Administration law and requirements of the specification and testing program of the American Dental Association will control the biocompatibility and clinical efficacy of dental biomaterials presently available to the dental profession.

  15. Retention of denture bases fabricated by three different processing techniques – An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Chalapathi Kumar, V. H.; Surapaneni, Hemchand; Ravikiran, V.; Chandra, B. Sarat; Balusu, Srilatha; Reddy, V. Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Distortion due to Polymerization shrinkage compromises the retention. To evaluate the amount of retention of denture bases fabricated by conventional, anchorized, and injection molding polymerization techniques. Materials and Methods: Ten completely edentulous patients were selected, impressions were made, and master cast obtained was duplicated to fabricate denture bases by three polymerization techniques. Loop was attached to the finished denture bases to estimate the force required to dislodge them by retention apparatus. Readings were subjected to nonparametric Friedman two-way analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni correction methods and Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test. Results: Denture bases fabricated by injection molding (3740 g), anchorized techniques (2913 g) recorded greater retention values than conventional technique (2468 g). Significant difference was seen between these techniques. Conclusions: Denture bases obtained by injection molding polymerization technique exhibited maximum retention, followed by anchorized technique, and least retention was seen in conventional molding technique. PMID:27382542

  16. Modified functionally generated path technique for single complete denture against non-modified natural dentition

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Snehal Rashmikant; Singh, Saumyendra V; Bhalla, Gaurav; Kumar, Lakshya; Singh, Balendra P

    2012-01-01

    Background A clinical report of a patient complaining of frequent fractures of her maxillary complete denture opposing dentulous mandibular arch is presented. Materials and Methods The patient was rehabilitated with a maxillary complete denture using modified functionally generated path technique to achieve harmonious occlusion between the complete denture and the natural dentition. Discussion Using the patient's own denture to record the functionally generated path made the technique much easier and also saved valuable chair-side time. Occlusal balancing in the trial denture bases gave us the flexibility to move the teeth slightly, or grind them in order to balance the occlusion. Summary and Conclusion Our modification of the functionally generated path technique resulted in successful rehabilitation of the patient without any fracture of the prosthesis in the 2-year follow-up, and has saved valuable chair-side time and laboratory effort. PMID:25756037

  17. Influence of palatal morphology on strain in maxillary complete dentures: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshihito; Gonda, Tomoya; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary investigation was to assess the influence of palatal morphology on deformation of maxillary complete dentures in vivo. The palatal morphology of the maxillae of eight edentulous subjects was measured. Experimental dentures were fabricated, and a strain gauge was attached at the first molar position at the midline of the polished surface of each denture. Subjects were instructed to bite a metal bar placed bilaterally at the denture's first molar region with a force of 49 N. The resultant strains were recorded, and the correlation between strain and palatal morphology was evaluated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. A strong correlation between strain and both palatal depth and radius of curvature was noted, suggesting that edentulous patients with wide, shallow palates have a higher risk of denture deformation, which may lead to material fracture.

  18. Three dimensional deformation of dry-stored complete denture base at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate whether there is any typical deformation pattern existing in complete denture when it was dried by using the 3D scanner and surface matching program. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 28 denture bases were fabricated with heat curing acrylic resin (each 14 upper and lower denture bases), and 14 denture bases (each 7 upper and lower denture bases) were stored in the water bottle (water stored), and another 14 denture bases were stored in the air (dry stored). Each specimen was scanned at 1st day after deflasking, 14th day after deflasking, and 28th day after deflasking, and digitalized. Three dimensional deformation patterns were acquired by comparison of the data within storage group using surface matching program. For evaluating differences between groups, these data were compared statisticallyusing Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney-U test (α=.05). RESULTS When evaluating 3D deformation of denture base, obvious deformations were not found in maxillary and mandibular water storage group. However, in dry stored group, typical deformation pattern was detected as storage time passes. It occurred mostly in first two weeks. Major deformations were found in the bilateral posterior area in both maxillary and mandibular group. In maxillary dry stored group, a statistical significance was found. CONCLUSION It was proved that in both upper and lower denture bases, dry storage caused more dimensional deformation than water storage with typical pattern. PMID:27555899

  19. Fibres reinforced dentures investigated with en-face optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Goguta, Luciana; Rominu, Mihai; Negru, Radu; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2008-04-01

    The complete dentures are currently made using different technologies. In order to avoid deficiencies of the prostheses made using the classical technique, several alternative procedures have been devised. In order to enhance the mechanical strength, complete denture bases are reinforced with fibres. Their material and structure vary wildly, which makes the investigation difficult. In this study, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is evaluated as a possible non-invasive technique to assess the biomechanical behaviour of the reinforcing fibres. OCT images demonstrate structural defects between fibres and the acrylic material in all dentures bases investigated. We conclude that OCT can successfully be used as a noninvasive analysis method.

  20. TRENDS IN COMPLETE DENTURE IMPRESSIONS IN PAKISTAN.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Fahim; Rashid, Haroon; Hanif, Ayesha; Ghani, Siti Mariam Ab; Najeeb, Shariq

    2015-01-01

    Multiple materials and techniques have been reported for complete denture impressions in literature. The aim of the study was to assess the trends in complete denture impression materials and techniques among general dental practitioners (GDP) and specialists (SP) in Pakistan. In this cross-sectional study, self-designed-structured questionnaires were distributed among 500 dentists in Pakistan. The three-part questionnaire enquired about the demographic features, preferred impression materials, impression techniques and related procedures commonly used in their clinical practice. A comparison between the responses of SP and GDP was also drawn. Frequency distribution and Chi-square test were performed to compare the responses. A total of 294 questionnaires were completed at a response rate of 58.8%. 75% of GDP used alginate for primary impressions and 66% of SP preferred impression compound for the same. A majority of both SP and GDP favoured the used of custom trays (SP 81%, GDP 85%) and selective pressure technique (SP 84%, GDP 53%) for final impression. However, 85% of GDP used zinc-oxide eugenol and 62% of SP favoured elastomeric materials for the same. Most of the SP and GDP used chemical cured resin custom trays (SP 54%, GDP 75%), however, 86% of SP used spaced trays and almost 60% of GDP preferred close-fitting trays. The practice of GDP and SP with regards to CD impression materials and techniques differed significantly. Continued education and training for GDP and SP with respect to procedures and techniques related to CD is recommended.

  1. Effect of various chemicals on the bond strength of acrylic tooth and denture base -An Invitro comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, V Pridhvi; Premalatha, Averneni; Babu, P Jithendra; Raju, D Srinivasa; Kumar, M Praveen; Rao, D Bheemalingeswara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Debonding of acrylic teeth from the denture base is a common problem. Certain clinical conditions like ridge prominence leads to excess trimming of acrylic teeth and base, resulting in a weak interface. The denture base polymer debonds adhesively in the region of the highly cross –linked matrix of the teeth. To compare the effect of different chemical surface treatments on the bond between cross-linked acrylic teeth and different types of denture base material. Materials & Methods: A total of 180 wax specimens were fabricated and divided into 3 groups: Heat-cure, high impact heat-cure, flexible denture base material bonded to acrylic teeth. Each group was further subdivided into 6 subgroups with 10 specimens each according to the surface treatment ofthe ridge lap area: control, monomer, acetone 99%, chloroform 99%, acrylic adhesive cyanoacrylate, ethyl acetate 99%. After processing, specimens were tested for bond strength using a universal testing machine. The resulting bond strengths were recorded, statistically analyzed and compared. Results: Among all the 3types of denture base resins, highimpact heat-cure denture base resin gave highest bond strength. There was no bonding of teeth with flexible denture base material. Chemical surface treatment of acrylic teeth with ethyl acetate gave highest bond strength followed by control, chloroform, acetone and cyanoacrylate groups. Conclusion: Among all the 3types of denture base materials, high-impact heat-cure denture base resin gave highest bond strength with ethyl acetate surface treatment. Simple and quick tooth chemical surface treatment with ethylacetate could be an effective option in decreasing bonding failures and also avoid repeated denture repairs improving patient satisfaction. How to cite the article: Krishna VP, Premalatha A, Babu PJ, Raju DS, Kumar MP, Rao DB. Effect of various chemicals on the bond strength of acrylic tooth and denture base -An In-vitro comparative study. J Int Oral Health

  2. Evaluation of complete denture quality and masticatory efficiency in denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jaiane Augusta Medeiros; de Resende, Camila Maria Bastos Machado; Lopes, Ana Lilian Correia; Mestriner, Wilson; Roncalli, Angelo Giuseppe; Farias-Neto, Arcelino; Carreiro, Adriana da Fonte Porto

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate (1) the influence of complete denture quality and years of denture use on masticatory efficiency and (2) the relationship between complete denture quality and years of use. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 93 edentulous patients (mean age: 65.6 years) wearing both mandibular and maxillary dentures. Patients were classified into two categories according to years of denture use: ≤ 2 years and ≥ 5 years. Masticatory efficiency was evaluated via the colorimetric method with beads as the artificial test food. A reproducible method for objective evaluation of the technical quality of complete dentures was employed. The association between denture quality and years of denture use was analyzed using chi-square and Fisher exact tests. The results of masticatory efficiency testing were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (with the Tukey post hoc test) in terms of years of denture use (≤ 2 years, ≥ 5 years) and denture quality (poor, average, good). A significant relationship was found between denture quality and years of denture use (P < .05). Masticatory efficiency differed significantly (P < .05) between patients with ≤ 2 years of denture use (0.101 ± 0.076 absorbance) and ≥ 5 years of use (0.068 ± 0.076 absorbance). Masticatory efficiency was not influenced by denture quality. Complete denture quality and masticatory efficiency significantly decreased over time. However, complete denture quality did not influence masticatory efficiency.

  3. Characteristics of denture thermoplastic resins for non-metal clasp dentures.

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Yota

    2010-08-01

    Six thermoplastic resins and conventional acrylic resin were examined to characterize their mechanical and physical properties, water sorption, solubility, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, tensile strength and color stability. Thermoplastic resins for non-metal clasp dentures exhibiting low water sorption and solubility offer hygienic advantages. Since they have a low modulus of elasticity and are easily manipulated, these materials make it possible for larger undercuts to be used for retention compared to acrylic resin. Not all of the thermoplastic resins tested fractured after the bending test in contrast to the conventional denture base resin, which fractured when tested beyond its proportional limit. It was also found that clinically noticeable staining may occur on the polyamide resins and polyethylene terephtalate resins.

  4. A Clinical Study to Examine the Effect of Complete Denture on Head Posture/Craniovertical Angle

    PubMed Central

    Nandeeshwar, D.B.; Sangur, Rajashekar; Makkar, Sumit; Khare, Pooja; Chitumalla, Rajkiran; Prasad, Renuka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Edentulous patients show some significant changes in ridge relationship caused by resorption of alveolar ridge. The changes are characterized by an upward rotation of mandible, increase in mandibular prognathism that ultimately results in change of natural head posture. Aim This clinical study was planned to know the effect of complete denture on head posture in different age groups of Indian completely edentulous population, after placement of complete denture at various time intervals. Materials and Methods The sample consisted of completely edentulous patients without previous experience of the dentures. They were divided into 2 age groups: Group A (45-60) and Group B (61-75). During placement of complete denture craniovertical angle was measured with the help of custom made ruler protector device. Readings were taken before denture placement, immediately after denture placement, 30 minutes, 24 hours and 30 days after dentures placement. Results The results of this study indicated that in most of the patients (90%) despite their age, change in head posture (extension) occurred immediately after the denture placement. Thereafter reading remains same for measurement at 30 minutes and 24 hours of denture placement. However after 30 days, observation revealed that all the patients showed reduced craniovertical angle (flexion). Even though the values of craniovertical angle remain higher than its baseline in both groups, significant changes were noticed only in Group A. Conclusion Findings revealed that head posture was significantly altered by the placement of dentures in completely edentulous patients. Within the time interval of 30 minutes and 24 hours extension of head posture remained constant with slight variation. Although after 30 days, changes remained significant for group ‘A’, but no significant changes were observed in the subjects of group ‘B’. PMID:27190938

  5. Reinforcing effect of glass fiber-reinforced composite reinforcement on flexural strength at proportional limit of a repaired denture base resin

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kaneyoshi; Takahashi, Yutaka; Hamanaka, Ippei; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Hirono; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study evaluated the reinforcing effect of glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) reinforcement on flexural strength at the proportional limit (FS-PL) of a repaired denture base resin. Materials and methods: Repaired denture base resins reinforced with metal and with FRC reinforcement, and that without reinforcement were tested. The ultimate flexural strength, the FS-PL and the elastic modulus of repaired denture base resins were tested. The joint efficiency (times) of the repaired denture base resins on the intact denture base resin was evaluated. Results: The repaired denture base resins reinforced with metal reinforcement and with FRC reinforcement had significantly higher ultimate flexural strength than the repaired denture base resin without reinforcement (p < 0.05) and were not significantly different from each other (p > 0.05). The FS-PL of a repaired denture base resin reinforced with the FRC reinforcement was similar to that with the metal reinforcement (p > 0.05), and these were significantly higher than the FS-PL of a repaired denture base resin without reinforcement (p < 0.05). The elastic modulus of the repaired denture base resin reinforced with the FRC reinforcement was significantly lower than that with metal reinforcement (p < 0.05) and was significantly higher than that without reinforcement (p < 0.05). The joint efficiency of the FRC reinforced specimen was 0.98. Conclusion: The FRC reinforcement had a reinforcing effect on the FS-PL of a repaired denture base resin. PMID:28642906

  6. Swallowed dentures: Two cases and a review

    PubMed Central

    Gachabayov, Mahir; Isaev, Mubariz; Orujova, Lala; Isaev, Emin; Yaskin, Evgeniy; Neronov, Dmitriy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Denture ingestion or aspiration is a problem requiring awareness of different specialists including dentists, surgeons, otolaryngologists, anesthesiologists etc. in terms of prevention, early diagnosis and adequate treatment. Complications of swallowed dentures include hollow viscus necrosis, perforation, penetration to neighbor organs leading to fistulae, bleeding and obstruction. Presentation of cases First case is a 54-year-old female who accidentally swallowed retractable one-tooth denture during fall about 22 h before admission and clinical manifestation of acute small bowel obstruction developed. The patient underwent laparotomy, enterotomy with retrieval of the foreign body. The second case is a 31-year-old male who accidentally ingested fixed one-tooth prosthesis while eating which impacted in the ileocaecal valve. During the preparation to colonoscopy the denture spontaneously passed out with stools. Discussion Denture ingestion is more common among patients with psychoneurologic deficit, alcohol and drug abusers. Among healthy and younger population denture ingestion is rare. Both reported patients are not elder. Thus dislodgement of removable or fixed dentures is another risk factor of denture ingestion. Most common site of denture impaction is esophagus; small bowel impaction is rare. Moreover, in most reported cases, small bowel impaction of ingested dentures leads to small bowel perforation. In our first case the complication of denture ingestion appeared to be bowel obstruction what is even rarer. Conclusion Fixed dentures can be accidentally ingested as well as removable dentures. Denture loosening leads to accidental denture ingestion. Patients with denture loosening should be recommended to visit dentist as soon as possible. PMID:26635957

  7. Case report: a tale of two dentures.

    PubMed

    Beckett, H; Sequeira, P

    1998-12-01

    A case is presented where loss of an incisor tooth in a partial denture wearer created an aesthetic emergency. It was not possible to solve this simply by addition of a tooth to the existing denture. Reference to the previous dental history suggested that a further immediate solution might be unwise. The design of the existing denture lent itself to the novel solution of a second denture, retained by elements of the first.

  8. [Denture stomatitis - definition, etiology, classification and treatment].

    PubMed

    Cubera, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Denture stomatitis pertains to a number of pathological symptoms in the oral cavity caused by wearing acrylic dentures. Etiological factors include: mucosal trauma, fungal infection and accumulation of denture plaque. All of these factors appear to increase the ability of Candida albicans to colonize both the denture and oral mucosal surfaces. Antifungal treatment can eradicate C. albicans contamination and relieve stomatitis symptoms. Early diagnosis of the lesion is essential to assure rational therapy.

  9. The attitude of complete denture wearers towards denture adhesives in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, M; Kulak, Y; Arikan, A; Silahtar, E

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of using denture adhesives is to subjectively benefit denture-wearers with improved fit and comfort of their dentures and to improve their chewing ability and confidence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the approach and thought of complete denture wearers to denture adhesives and to see why they had tried denture adhesive, and their reasons for its current use or non-use through a questionnaire. One hundred and fifteen patients attending the Marmara University, Dental School for new denture treatment were surveyed. In the survey, there were 62 females (54%) and 53 males (46%). Nearly half of these patients (53%) were in the 61-70-year age group with a mean age of 64 years. One hundred and six (92%) patients had never tried denture adhesive. Most patients (73%) who did not use denture adhesives managed their dentures well, but a significant number 101 (87%) did not know that denture adhesives existed. Nine (8%) had tried denture adhesives, and none of the patients were currently using them. Those who ceased using denture adhesive complained mainly that it did not improve the fit and chewing ability significantly. The outcome of this survey demonstrated that the knowledge of the patients is not enough on denture adhesives in Istanbul as it is still generally believed by the practitioners that the prescription of a denture adhesive is a sign of failure of the dentist.

  10. Denture disinfection by microwave irradiation: a randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniela Garcia; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Dovigo, Lívia Nordi; Palomari Spolidorio, Denise Madalena; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo

    2009-09-01

    This study evaluated the clinical effectiveness of two exposure times of microwave irradiation on the disinfection of complete dentures. Biofilm samples were collected from dentures of 30 patients, who were randomly divided into two experimental groups of 15 subjects each: Group 1-patients had their maxillary denture microwaved for 3 min (650W); Group 2-patients had their maxillary denture microwaved for 2 min (650W). Denture biofilm samples were taken with swabs, before (left side surfaces) and after (right side surfaces) microwave irradiation. All microbial material was plated on selective media for Candida spp., Staphylococcus spp., mutans streptococci and a non-selective media. After incubation (48 h/37 degrees C), the number of colony-forming units (cfu/mL) was counted. Microorganisms which grew on selective media were identified using biochemical methods. The data were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by Dunn's post-test (alpha=0.05). Microwave irradiation for 3 min (Group 1) resulted in sterilization of all dentures evaluated. After microwave irradiation for 2 min (Group 2), a significant decrease in Candida spp. (P=0.0062), Staphylococcus spp. (P=0.0178), mutans streptococci (P=0.0047) and non-identified species (P<0.0001) was achieved in comparison with the cfu/mL obtained before irradiation. The colonies grown after 2 min of microwave irradiation were identified as Candida albicans, non-aureus Staphylococci and Streptococcus mutans. Microwave irradiation for 3 min may be a potential treatment to prevent cross-contamination.

  11. Deproteinization technique stabilizes the adhesion of the fiberglass post relined with resin composite to root canal.

    PubMed

    Cecchin, Doglas; Almeida, José F A; Gomes, Brenda P F A; Zaia, Alexandre A; Ferraz, Caio C R

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of pretreatment of root dentin by 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) alone, associated with 2% chlorhexidine in gel base (CHX) and/or ethanol (EtOH), and the air-drying technique (Air) on the bond strength and adhesive durability of fiberglass post relined with resin composite to root dentin. A total of 100 bovine incisor roots were divided into 10 groups: G1 (control), irrigation with physiologic solution; G2, Air; G3, NaOCl; G4, NaOCl + Air; G5, NaOCl + EtOH; G6, NaOCl + EtOH + Air; G7, NaOCl + CHX; G8, NaOCl + CHX + Air; G9, NaOCl + CHX + EtOH; G10, NaOCl + CHX + EtOH + Air. Fiberglass post relined with resin composite was cemented and each group was randomly divided into two subgroups: 24 h of water storage and 12 months of water storage. The push-out test was performed and bond strength values were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test. The use of NaOCl alone or associated with CHX had the highest values of bond strength with or without Air in the immediate and stored groups, being statistically similar to the immediate control group (p > 0.05). The groups using EtOH or Air alone had lower bond strength in the immediate and stored groups (p < 0.05). A significant decrease with the time of the bond strength in the control group was observed after 12 months of storage (p > 0.05). The use of NaOCl or NaOCl associated with CHX preserved the bond strength immediate and for 12 months. The air-drying technique and the other associations decreased the immediate bond strength values. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Computer-aided technology for fabricating complete dentures: systematic review of historical background, current status, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bidra, Avinash S; Taylor, Thomas D; Agar, John R

    2013-06-01

    Computer-aided technology is an emerging method for fabricating complete dentures. Consolidated information about historical background, current status, and scope for the future is lacking. The purpose of this systematic review was to analyze the existing literature on computer-aided technology for fabricating complete dentures and provide the reader with a historical background, current status, and future perspectives on this emerging technology. An electronic search of the English language literature between the periods of January 1957 and June 2012 was performed by using PubMed/MEDLINE with the following specific search terms: CAD-CAM complete dentures, digital complete dentures, computer dentures, designed dentures, machined dentures, manufactured dentures, milled dentures, and rapid prototyping dentures. Additionally, the search terms were used on the Google search engine to identify current commercial manufacturers and their protocols. A total of 1584 English language titles were obtained from the electronic database, and the systematic application of exclusion criteria resulted in the identification of 8 articles pertaining to computer-aided technology for complete dentures. Since the first published report in 1994, multiple authors have described different theoretical models and protocols for fabricating complete dentures with computer-aided technology. Although no clinical trials or clinical reports were identified in the scientific literature, the Google search engine identified 2 commercial manufacturers in the United States currently fabricating complete dentures with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology for clinicians world-wide. These manufacturers have definitive protocols in place and offer exclusive dental materials, techniques, and laboratory support. Their protocols contrast with conventional paradigms for fabricating complete dentures and allow the fabrication of complete dentures in 2 clinical appointments

  13. [Mechanical analysis of the denture bases using the photoelastic-coating method. 2. Upper complete denture bases under uniform bending moment load].

    PubMed

    Takayama, Y; Takakuda, K; Miyairi, H

    1989-11-01

    Deformation of the anterior teeth and palatal regions on upper complete dentures was investigated using the photoelastic coating method and strain gages. In this experiment, an uniform-moment bending load method was employed to simulate the occlusal situation, and the distribution of strain in epoxy resin, stainless swaged and Co-Cr alloy cast dentures were measured and analyzed. The 030-series reflection polariscope is compact and lightweight with its main components consisting of two polarizer/quarter-wave-plate assemblies attached to a common frame. The highest level of strain was seen in the anterior region of the palate and the low strain was observed in other regions. Differences in strain magnitude of the three dentures were not observed with test at the same point. But, when denture base materials with high flexural rigidity and bending strength were used on the palatal region of the denture base, strain was decreased in the anterior and other regions of the palate. Therefore, dentures using those materials could be effectively reinforced.

  14. Effectiveness of denture cleanser associated with microwave disinfection and brushing of complete dentures: in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Sesma, Newton; Rocha, Alessandra Lima; Laganá, Dalva Cruz; Costa, Bruno; Morimoto, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Complete dentures acts as a reservoir for microbial colonization, which may lead to systemic infections. Microwave irradiation has been used as an efficient method of denture disinfection. Even though current methods eliminate denture-base microorganisms, a recurrence rate of denture stomatitis (DS) is still observed among denture-wearing patients. It was hypothesized that microwave disinfection kills microorganisms but do not remove dead bacteria from the denture surface. To test this hypothesis, the biofilm found in the dentures of 10 patients with DS was evaluated. In addition, the effects of microwave irradiation plus brushing (MW+B) on the denture biofilm and the combination of denture cleanser with microwave irradiation and brushing (MW+DC+B) for the removal of denture-accumulating microorganisms were investigated. Microbiological data were analyzed statistically by nonparametric analysis (Friedman/Wilcoxon, α=0.05). MW+B and MW+DC+B were effective in reducing the rate of microorganisms (99.2% and 99.5% respectively), but without significant difference between them (p=0.553). However, it was observed that the complete removal of microorganisms from denture surface was only possible when all regimens were combined (MW+DC+B). Microwave irradiation in combination with soaking in denture cleanser and brushing effectively disinfected the dentures and removed denture biofilm.

  15. Color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasp denture.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dae-Eun; Lee, Ji-Young; Jang, Hyun-Seon; Lee, Jang-Jae; Son, Mee-Kyoung

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp dentures to those of thermoplastic polyamide and conventional heat-polymerized denture base resins. Three types of denture base resin, which are conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20), thermoplastic polyamide resin (Bio Tone), thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) were used as materials for this study. One hundred five specimens were fabricated. For the color stability test, specimens were immersed in the coffee and green tee for 1 and 8 weeks. Color change was measured by spectrometer. Water sorption was tested after 1 and 8 weeks immersion in the water. For the test of cytotoxicity, cell viability assay was measured and cell attachment was analyzed by FE-SEM. All types of denture base resin showed color changes after 1 and 8 weeks immersion. However, there was no significant difference between denture base resins. All specimens showed significant color changes in the coffee than green tee. In water sorption test, thermoplastic acrylic resin showed lower values than conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin and thermoplastic polyamide resin. Three types of denture base showed low cytotoxicity in cell viability assay. Thermoplastic acrylic resin showed the similar cell attachment but more stable attachment than conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin. Thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp denture showed acceptable color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity. To verify the long stability in the mouth, additional in vitro studies are needed.

  16. Designing successful removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Daher, Tony; Hall, Dan; Goodacre, Charles J

    2006-03-01

    In today's busy dental offices, removable partial denture design is often abdicated by dentists, both as a result of a lack of experience and consensus of design and because of educational failure on the part of dental schools. The result is delegation of the clinical design process to the lab technician. The lack of clinical data provided to the dental technician jeopardizes the quality of care. This article will focus on a logical and simple approach to this problem, making removable partial denture design simple and predictably achievable. The clinical evidence related to removable partial denture design will be described, along with a checklist to simplify the process and make it practical and applicable to everyday clinical practice.

  17. [Indications for removable partial dentures].

    PubMed

    van Waas, M A J

    2009-11-01

    Since there are many ways of preserving a natural dentition, if necessary with support of solitary crowns and fixed partial dentures, sometimes on dental implants, removable partial dentures are nowadays primarily indicated in patients with complaints about missing teeth in the aesthetic zone, which cannot be solved in another way. In addition to this, a removable partial denture is indicated in patients with extremely reduced dentitions or large or multiple edentulous areas, in patients with severe periodontitis or excessive loss of alveolar bone, in patients who are physically or emotionally vulnerable, as an interim solution on the way to edentulousness, as a temporary solution waiting for more extensive treatment and for patients who cannot afford an alternative.

  18. Cytotoxicity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    de Gomes, Pedro Sousa; Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fernandes, Maria Helena R; Scully, Crispian

    2011-12-01

    Ten commercially available denture adhesives, nine soluble formulations (six creams, three powders) and one insoluble product (pad), were analyzed regarding the cytotoxicity profile in direct and indirect assays using L929 fibroblast cells. In the direct assay, fibroblasts were seeded over the surface of a thick adhesive gel (5%, creams; 2.5%, powders and pad). In the indirect assay, cells were cultured in the presence of adhesive extracts prepared in static and dynamic conditions (0.5-2%, creams; 0.25-1%, powders and pad). Cell toxicity was assessed for cell viability/proliferation (MTT assay) and cell morphology (observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization by confocal laser scanning microscopy). Direct contact of the L929 fibroblasts with the thick adhesive gels caused no, or only a slight, decrease in cell viability/proliferation. The adhesive extracts (especially those prepared in dynamic conditions) caused significantly higher growth inhibition of fibroblasts and, in addition, caused dose- and time-dependent effects, throughout the 6-72 h exposure time. Also, dose-dependent effects on cell morphology, with evident disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization, were seen in the presence of most adhesives. In conclusion, the adhesives possessed different degrees of cytotoxicity, but similar dose- and time-dependent biological profiles.

  19. “Nature Cures:” An Alternative Herbal Formulation as a Denture Cleanser

    PubMed Central

    Sushma, R.; Sathe, Tanuja Tanaji; Farias, Anand; Sanyal, Pronob Kumar; Kiran, Shashi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Candida albicans is one of the microorganisms which harbor the oral cavity, especially in elderly. However, the incidence of existence of this increases in patients using removable dental prosthesis. There is therefore a need to test the anticandidal efficacy of these cost-effective, easily available products to be used as routine denture cleansers. Aim and Objectives: (1) To evaluate antifungal properties of triphala churna on the heat cure denture base material. (2) To evaluate the antifungal effect of chlorhexidine gluconate on the heat cure denture base material. (3) To compare the antifungal effect of triphala churna and chlorhexidine gluconate with a control. (4) To evaluate which among triphala churna and chlorhexidine gluconate has a better antifungal property on the heat cure denture base material. Materials and Methods: Study population consisted of sixty dentures wearers from those attending the Outpatient Department of Prosthodontics of the School of Dentistry, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences Deemed University, Karad. Swabs were collected from the dentures before and after the use of triphala and chlorhexidine. The swabs were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar and the total Candida counts were determined. Conclusion: Triphala as an antifungal is shown to have more efficacy than the conventional chlorhexidine mouthwash. PMID:28300045

  20. Location of the allergenic monomer in warm-polymerized acrylic dentures. Part II: Experiments aimed at establishing guidelines for production of acrylic dentures suited for patients allergic to acrylic monomer and complementary investigations.

    PubMed

    Fernström, A I; Oquist, G

    1980-01-01

    An account has been given of a patient with denture sore mouth caused by allergy to the denture material (Part I). In the continued investigation the residual monomer or part thereof was found to be the allergen. Patch testing of the skin with drillings from the upper and lower dentures made of a "warm-polymerized" methyl methacrylate resin was carried out with special reference to the topography of the distribution of the allergenic factor within the dentures. Only that surface of the upper denture that is in contact with the hard palate and the maxillary crista were allergenic. All other surfaces of the upper denture as well as the complete lower denture were non-allergenic. The resin was, in other words, inhomogeneous as regards the allergenic factor. An analysis of the test castings showed that the allergenic properties in the resin are located in the surface and that the resin was free from allergens below the "allergenic film" (Parts I and II). A non-allergenic, extraordinarily well-fitting denture was produced from the same make of acrylic as that used for the non-tolerated denture. It was made by a new technique, "directed polymerization," comprising initial application of heat centrally in the cuvette (a metal cup surrounding the gypsum), including tin-foiling of the palatal half of the mould. The production of the denture was based on experience from tests with test castings. A check-up 18 months later showed no stomatitis and the retention and stability of the denture were very satisfactory, and tests with the original model of the upper gum showed that it had an excellent fit.

  1. Morphology of root canal surface: A reflection on the process of cementation of the composite relined glass fiber post.

    PubMed

    Pupo, Yasmine Mendes; Casacqui, Elaine; de Lima, Paola Andressa Barbosa; Michél, Milton Domingos; Bueno, Albano Luis Novaes; Michelotto, André Luiz da Costa

    2017-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the bond strength in the different root thirds (premolars and maxillary central incisors) of composite relined glass fiber posts compared to untreated glass fiber posts cemented with dual- or chemical-cure cements. Sixty human single-rooted premolars (flat canal) (n = 15) and 12 maxillary central incisors were used (round canal) (n = 3). The teeth were sectioned, and the roots received endodontic treatment. The standardized preparation of the canals was carried out, and the roots were randomly divided into four groups according to the cementation systems: G1: cemented posts (dual: Ambar/Allcem); G2: relined posts (dual: Ambar/Allcem); G3: cemented posts (chemical: Fusion Duralink/Cement Post); and G4: relined posts (chemical: Fusion Duralink/Cement Post). The roots were cut to give two slices of each third of the root canal per specimen. Push-out test was conducted at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between groups for the premolars (flat canal) (P = 0.959). There was a significant difference in the central incisors between the middle and apical thirds in the cemented group when using the dual system (P = 0.04) and between the middle and apical thirds (P = 0.003) and cervical and apical thirds (P = 0.033) when using the chemical system. Due to the anatomy of the root canal, flat canal of the premolars does not require relining, but round canal of the maxillary central incisors demands it for more secure in the bond strength.

  2. The Evaluation of 3 Dimensional Polymerization Changes of a Denture Resin Utilizing Injection Molding with Water Bath Polymerization and Microwave Polymerization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    The Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Polymerization Changes of a Denture Resin Utilizing Injection Molding with Water Bath Polymerization and Microwave...methacrylate denture resin . Materials and Methods: The study used a randomized observational design. Thirty SLA master dies, in the form of a...groups and sequencing numbers for each group were recorded in a log (see 6.3.4). From the SLA master dies, 30 acrylic resin denture bases were

  3. Dentist-Patient Communication and Denture Quality Associated with Complete Denture Satisfaction Among Taiwanese Elderly Wearers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Hao; Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Lin, Ying-Chun; Chou, Tsau-Mau; Ebinger, John; Lee, Huey-Er

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore individual (ie, sociodemographic characteristics, patient personality) and clinical factors (ie, dentist-patient communication, denture quality) associated with complete denture satisfaction among the Taiwanese elderly population. A multistage sampling and cross-sectional design was used to collect data. A total of 387 fully edentulous citizens, aged 65 years and older and who had received new sets of complete dentures, were selected. The participants completed clinical dental examinations and questionnaires by personal interview to collect information on denture satisfaction and associated variables. The relationship among three groups of these participants (satisfied, neutral, and dissatisfied) and potential factors were simultaneously examined using polytomous logistic regression analysis. Overall, 36.7% of the participants were dissatisfied with their dentures. Living status (crude odds ratio [COR] = 2.04), personality (COR = 4.86), dentist-patient communication (COR = 7.46), and denture quality (COR = 5.02) were associated with complete denture satisfaction. The multivariate regression model showed that dentist-patient communication (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 6.41) and denture quality (AOR = 4.40) were significant complete denture satisfaction factors that diluted the effect of living status and personality. Inadequate dentistpatient communication and low denture quality were associated with the dissatisfaction of patients with dentures. To increase complete denture satisfaction, the importance of training programs aimed at enhancing dentist-patient communication and denture quality cannot be overemphasized.

  4. Effect of some curing methods on acrylic maxillary denture base fit.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Fazal; Kikuchi, Masahiko; Lynch, Christopher D; Watanabe, Makoto

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fit of acrylic maxillary denture bases processed by the methods of microwave, quick-wet-heat, slow-wet-heat, and self curing. Forty stone-casts were obtained using a mould of an undercut-free acrylic resin master cast of an edentulous maxilla. Standard acrylic replicas patterns sealed on casts and randomized to four groups (10 in each) were used to make denture bases using different processing methods for each of the four groups. The resultant discrepancy of fit between the denture base and the casts were measured using a silicone wafer. Varying fit discrepancies both within and between denture base groups was observed. The proportional fit-loss in the palatal region was significantly greater than the sulcular areas for all materials tested (p < 0.05). The fit-loss observed was greater in microwave-cured bases than for other materials examined. Careful selection of appropriate denture base materials and processing technique is important when providing complete dentures for edentulous patients.

  5. Addressing problems in complete dentures.

    PubMed

    LaBarre, Eugene; Giusti, Lola; Pitigoi-Aron, Gabriela

    2007-10-01

    The authors have compiled a set of solutions to the most common issues influencing the success of complete denture cases. A brief review and discussion of occlusal vertical dimension is presented, followed by a troubleshooting guide to problems such as inadequate retention and stability, discomfort, and other problems affecting treatment outcome.

  6. Effect of denture cleansers on surface hardness of resilient denture liners at various time intervals- an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pahuja, Rasleen Kaur; Bansal, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was aimed to determine the effect of two chemically distinct denture cleansers and water on the surface hardness of acrylic and silicone based soft denture liners at various time intervals. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two commonly used commercial resilient liner material were selected based on their chemical composition (silicone- and acrylic-based soft liners) for this investigation. 120 cylindrical specimens were made of 15 mm × 10 mm dimensions (according to ASTM: D-2240-64T) in a custom made metal mold. All specimens were stored in artificial saliva throughout the study. Forty specimens were cleansed daily in 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution; forty were cleansed in sodium perborate and remaining forty specimens were daily rinsed in water. Testing was done at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months for surface hardness using a Shore A Durometer. A mean of 3 reading for each sample was subjected to one-way ANOVA, Post Hoc test and pair-t test for statistical analysis. P values of less than 0.05 were taken as statistically significant. RESULTS Surface hardness of all the samples was significantly higher after a period of 6 months irrespective of the cleansing treatment. Minor changes were observed between control, sodium hypochlorite and sodium perborate groups with time. Greater change was observed in surface hardness of acrylic-based soft denture liners as compared to silicone-based soft liners for all groups, as time progressed. CONCLUSION Silicone-based soft denture liners performed significantly better in all cleansing treatments than acrylic-based soft denture liners. PMID:24049568

  7. Development of a device to study fatigue life of fixed partial dentures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, S. C.; Meseguer, M. D.; Estal, R.; Folguera, F.; Vidal, V.

    2012-04-01

    Fixed partial dentures can be fabricated by means of different materials and with different manufacturing processes. In order to establish possible differences among them, their behaviour, as fatigue life or cement shear bond strength, have to be evaluated. This article presents a modular, economic and robust device to evaluate fixed partial dentures and dental crowns. A base to support the fixed partial dentures and a device to simulate masticatory loads have been developed. The device has got a simple design. It is based on a pneumatic piston, with a pressure regulator to control masticatory loads. On a first stage, only vertical forces have been taking into account. However, the device will allow simulating tangential masticatory loads on the other axis, studying the behaviour of the fixed partial dentures submerged in a solution similar to saliva, changing masticatory load application, etc. with little modifications.

  8. Effectiveness of Hexetidine 0.1% in Eliminating Candida albicans Colonizing Dentures: A Randomized Clinical In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Georges; Nasseh, Ibrahim; Saadeh, Maria; Cassia, Antoine; Berberi, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Effective cleaning of dentures is important to maintain a good oral hygiene for patients suffering from denture stomatitis (DS). This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of hexetidine 0.1% in eliminating C. albicans colonizing dentures. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 denture wearers (18 men, 22 women; age range 40-80 years) with clinical evidence of DS were randomly divided into 2 groups, 1 test, and 1 control. The dentures of the test group were treated by immersion in hexetidine 0.1% while those of the control group were immersed in distilled water. Swab samples from the palatal surfaces of the upper dentures were collected before and after of cleaner use and examined mycologically. Results: Reduction in the number of colony-forming units (CFU) of C. albicans after immersion of the dentures with hexetidine 0.1% was evaluated compared to those of the control group. Conclusion: Hexetidine 0.1% solution tested for the first time as a product of disinfection of the acrylic dentures showed average results after immersion of 8 night hours for 4 days. PMID:26225095

  9. A clinical study to evaluate denture adhesive use in well-fitting dentures.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Carlos A; Gendreau, Linda; Shanga, Gilbert; Magnuszewski, Tabetha; Fernandez, Patricia; Durocher, John

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was the assessment of retention and stability and functional benefits of denture adhesive applied to well-fitting and well-made dentures. This was a randomized, crossover study to compare two marketed denture adhesives (test cream, Super Poligrip® Free, and test strip, Super Poligrip® Comfort Seal Strips) and an unmarketed cream adhesive (GlaxoSmith Kline Consumer Healthcare) with no adhesive as the negative control. Thirty-six subjects completed the study. One hour after the application of denture adhesive, retention and stability were measured using the Kapur Index and maxillary incisal bite force. Two hours after application, functional tests were used to assess denture movement and peanut particle migration under the denture. Subjects also rated confidence, comfort, satisfaction with dentures, and denture wobble in conjunction with the functional tests. Denture adhesives significantly (p < 0.05) improved retention and stability of well-fitting dentures. Subjects experienced significantly (p < 0.05) fewer dislodgements while eating an apple after adhesive was applied to dentures. Significant (p < 0.05) increases in subjective ratings of confidence and comfort as well as decreases in denture wobble were associated with the use of adhesive. There was significant (p < 0.05) improvement in satisfaction ratings for cream adhesives. A single application of each denture adhesive was well tolerated. The results of this study provide evidence that use of Super Poligrip® denture adhesives can enhance aspects of performance of complete well-fitting dentures as well as provide increased comfort, confidence, and satisfaction with dentures. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  10. The Effect of Microwave Disinfection on Denture Base Polymers, Liners and Teeth: A Basic Overview

    PubMed Central

    Katsimpali, Aspasia; Polyzois, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to overview the current scientific knowledge concerning the effect of microwave disinfection on denture related material properties. Cross-infection control in dentistry is a significant issue in everyday clinical practice due to the recent increase in some infectious diseases such as hepatitis B, C and AIDS and therefore numerous methods of disinfection have been used. The most widespread method of disinfection used in everyday practice is chemical, however, studies have suggested that chemical disinfectants alter the physical and mechanical properties of the acrylic resins and enable the growth and proliferation of certain bacteria. Therefore, microwaves were introduced as an easy to use-and-access, low cost, chemical free alternative. The question that arose was if and in what way the microwave irradiation affected the denture related material properties. Microwaving affects the denture resin bases, liners and teeth in different ways. The results showed that microwave disinfection could be a safe alternative for the disinfection of denture bases and liners compared to the chemical one, when the procedure is carried out in dry conditions, but could possibly cause dimensional changes of clinical significance on them when the irradiation takes place in wet environment. It also seems to have no detrimental effects of clinical importance on the flexural properties, impact strength and hardness of denture resins and the bond, flexural strength, porosity and hardness of denture liners. The effects of microwave disinfection on the hardness of denture teeth and teeth/denture bond strength are still controversial and no safe conclusions can be drawn. PMID:27688409

  11. The spectral analysis of syllables in patients using dentures.

    PubMed

    Jindra, Petr; Eber, Miroslav; Pesák, Josef

    2002-12-01

    Changes in the oral cavity resulting from the loss of teeth and the ensuing reconstruction of a set of teeth by dentures (partial or complete) may cause changes in the speech and voice of the patient. The aim of the present investigation was to study the changes in speech and voice in patients suffering from teeth loss and the degree of speech improvement using dentures. Voice and speech parameters of a set of tested syllables were analysed in 10 patients at the 2nd Clinic of Stomatology. The analysis was carried out by means of an FFT, SoundForge 5.0 programme. Differently expressed acoustic changes in both consonants and vowels were ascertained in a percentage of the patients under examination. These concerned especially the sibilant ("s", "(see text)"), labiodental ("f", "v") and vibrating ("r", "(see text)") consonants. Changes in the FFT spectrum and air leakage in constrictive consonants were also found. In some patients the vowels, especially the closed ones ("i", "u"), may change their fundamental frequency and show noise admixture manifested as a blurred delimitation of the formants. A denture should, inter alia, render it possible for the patient to produce the same articulation to which he/she had been accustomed before the loss of teeth. For the construction of dentures the most important factors from a phonetic point of view appear to be the following: overbite, overjet, the height of the plate, the thickness of the palatal material, the incisor position, and the modelling of the ruga palatina on the hard palate. In case of wrong denture construction the acoustic changes may continue, resulting in the patient's stress load dependent upon sex, age, psychic condition and seriousness of the problem.

  12. Clinical evaluation of three denture cushion adhesives by complete denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Koronis, Spyros; Pizatos, Evangelos; Polyzois, Gregory; Lagouvardos, Panagiotis

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was the clinical evaluation of three denture cushion adhesives and whether the results were correlated to Kapur Index for denture-supporting tissues. Various types of denture adhesives are used among denture patients. However, information on the clinical behaviour of denture cushions is limited. Thirty edentulous patients had their denture-supporting tissues scored by Kapur Index and their old dentures replaced. They received three brands of denture cushion adhesives (Fittydent(®) , Protefix(®) and Seabond(®)) and were instructed to use them in a sequence according to the group they were randomly assigned to. Each brand of adhesive was used for 48 h on the lower denture according to the manufacturer's suggestions. After each brand was used, participants spent 24 h without applying any sort of adhesive. Finally, a questionnaire evaluating and comparing the performance of each brand was filled out. Denture adhesives generally improved patient satisfaction and masticatory ability, especially in participants with poor Kapur Index and those who reported a poor retention of their old dentures. Fittydent(®) was the most preferred adhesive, showing the best retention and the longest duration of its effect, but also reported as difficult to remove from the denture-bearing area. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Partial denture-- an ENT surgeon's nightmare.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, M; Sagesh, M

    2012-11-01

    Foreign body oesophagus is one among the common otorhinolaryngology emergencies that we come across. Artificial partial denture impaction in the oesophagus is often an ENT surgeon's nightmare. This study was done in the department of otorhinolaryngology, Government Medical College Kozhikode for a period of 2 years. All patients presented with history of accidental swallowing of partial denture followed by dysphagia. Radiological evaluation was done and subsequently oesophagoscopy and removal of the denture was done. In failed cases exploration and removal of foreign body was required. Complications were found in partial denture with metal wire clasps. It is better to avoid using malfitting dentures with small base, those with metal wire clasps and be cautious of using dentures in alcoholics and unconscious patients.

  14. Prevalence of denture-related oral lesions among patients attending College of Dentistry, University of Dammam: A clinico-pathological study

    PubMed Central

    Mubarak, Suhayla; Hmud, Ali; Chandrasekharan, Suresh; Ali, Aiman A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heterogeneous groups of oral lesions are likely to develop among denture wearers. The objectives of this study were to determine the exact prevalence of oral lesions among denture wearers attending the clinics of the College of Dentistry, University of Dammam. Materials and Methods: All denture wearers attending the dental clinics in the period between January 2012 and April 2013 were included in this study. Of the total 210 patients, 166 (79%) were males and 44 (21%) were females. Comprehensive oral examination was performed for all patients. Any denture-induced lesion was biopsied. Data collected were analyzed using SPSS program. Results: Oral lesions were found in 20.5% of the cases under study (43 out of the total 210 denture wearers). Denture-induced fibrous hyperplasia was the most common type of lesion detected (41.9%). A significant correlation (P = 0.004) was found between the type of denture and oral lesions in this study. Conclusion: The prevalence of denture-induced oral lesions was found to differ significantly from that reported in other studies. The diversity of these lesions among different studies depends on the quality and materials of dentures delivered, the techniques used, and the methods of patients’ instructions adopted. PMID:26759806

  15. Comparison of the fracture resistances of glass fiber mesh- and metal mesh-reinforced maxillary complete denture under dynamic fatigue loading

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of reinforcing materials on the fracture resistances of glass fiber mesh- and Cr–Co metal mesh-reinforced maxillary complete dentures under fatigue loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Glass fiber mesh- and Cr–Co mesh-reinforced maxillary complete dentures were fabricated using silicone molds and acrylic resin. A control group was prepared with no reinforcement (n = 15 per group). After fatigue loading was applied using a chewing simulator, fracture resistance was measured by a universal testing machine. The fracture patterns were analyzed and the fractured surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS After cyclic loading, none of the dentures showed cracks or fractures. During fracture resistance testing, all unreinforced dentures experienced complete fracture. The mesh-reinforced dentures primarily showed posterior framework fracture. Deformation of the all-metal framework caused the metal mesh-reinforced denture to exhibit the highest fracture resistance, followed by the glass fiber mesh-reinforced denture (P<.05) and the control group (P<.05). The glass fiber mesh-reinforced denture primarily maintained its original shape with unbroken fibers. River line pattern of the control group, dimples and interdendritic fractures of the metal mesh group, and radial fracture lines of the glass fiber group were observed on the fractured surfaces. CONCLUSION The glass fiber mesh-reinforced denture exhibits a fracture resistance higher than that of the unreinforced denture, but lower than that of the metal mesh-reinforced denture because of the deformation of the metal mesh. The glass fiber mesh-reinforced denture maintains its shape even after fracture, indicating the possibility of easier repair. PMID:28243388

  16. Effect of denture cleansers on surface hardness of resilient denture liners at various time intervals- an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pahuja, Rasleen Kaur; Garg, Sandeep; Bansal, Sanjay; Dang, Rajat Harvinder

    2013-08-01

    This study was aimed to determine the effect of two chemically distinct denture cleansers and water on the surface hardness of acrylic and silicone based soft denture liners at various time intervals. Two commonly used commercial resilient liner material were selected based on their chemical composition (silicone- and acrylic-based soft liners) for this investigation. 120 cylindrical specimens were made of 15 mm × 10 mm dimensions (according to ASTM: D-2240-64T) in a custom made metal mold. All specimens were stored in artificial saliva throughout the study. Forty specimens were cleansed daily in 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution; forty were cleansed in sodium perborate and remaining forty specimens were daily rinsed in water. Testing was done at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months for surface hardness using a Shore A Durometer. A mean of 3 reading for each sample was subjected to one-way ANOVA, Post Hoc test and pair-t test for statistical analysis. P values of less than 0.05 were taken as statistically significant. Surface hardness of all the samples was significantly higher after a period of 6 months irrespective of the cleansing treatment. Minor changes were observed between control, sodium hypochlorite and sodium perborate groups with time. Greater change was observed in surface hardness of acrylic-based soft denture liners as compared to silicone-based soft liners for all groups, as time progressed. Silicone-based soft denture liners performed significantly better in all cleansing treatments than acrylic-based soft denture liners.

  17. Acrylic strengthened casts for removable partial denture for occlusion equilibration.

    PubMed

    Oh, Won-Suk; Saglik, Berna

    2011-09-01

    A removable partial denture (RPD) remount cast must resist wear or breakage, present a rigid surface, and ensure a solid support for an accurate equilibration of the occlusion for a RPD. This article describes a procedure of processing a thin layer of tooth colored acrylic resin over the dental plaster to present wear- and fracture-resistant incisal/occlusal surfaces without involving a third material.

  18. In vivo efficacy of alkaline peroxide tablets and mouthwashes on Candida albicans in patients with denture stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    ULUDAMAR, Altay; ÖZKAN, Yasemin Kulak; KADIR, Tanju; CEYHAN, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Objective Effective cleaning of dentures is important for the maintenance of good oral hygiene for denture stomatitis patients. The in vivo efficacy of three different brands of alkaline peroxide tablets (Polident, Efferdent, and Fittydent) and two mouthwashes (CloSYS II and Corsodyl) to eliminate Candida albicans on dentures was evaluated in this in vivo study. Material and methods Ninety denture wearers with clinical evidence of denture stomatitis were randomly divided into 5 test groups and 1 control group. Each group was further divided into three subgroups in which the dentures were subjected to 15-, 30-, and 60-min disinfection procedures. The dentures of each test group were treated with one of the cleaners, while those of the control group were treated with distilled water. Swab samples from the palatal surfaces (2 cm x 2 cm template delimited area) of the upper dentures were obtained before and after 15, 30, and 60 min periods of cleaner use and examined mycologically. Results The reduction in the number of colony-forming units (CFU) of C. albicans before, and after 15, 30, and 60 min of use of CloSYS II and Corsodyl was significantly greater than that of the control group (p<0.05). Moreover, there was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) among Polident, Efferdent and the control group in any of the treatment periods. Dentures treated with Fittydent appeared to have a significantly greater reduction in the number of Candida spp. only after 60 min of treatment. Conclusions The results of this study showed that the use of mouthwashes significantly reduced the number of microorganisms on dentures. PMID:20857010

  19. Curricula for the teaching of complete dentures in Spanish and Portuguese dental schools

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-de Oyagüe, Raquel; Albaladejo, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Given the need to ensure that dentists are sufficiently skilled to offer the best possible care to their patients, this study aims to evaluate the teaching methods and clinical experience achieved by undergraduate dental students in Spain and Portugal as regards complete dentures. Study design: In February 2011, a questionnaire seeking information about the preclinical and clinical teaching of complete dentures was e-mailed to all Spanish and Portuguese dental schools with fully developed undergraduate degree dental programs. Results: A response rate of 82.6% was obtained. The distribution of lectures and hours spent at the laboratory and in clinical activities revealed that teaching complete dentures is eminently a practical issue, this being mostly performed by full-time prosthodontists. All surveyed schools teach the design of the record base, and most of them instruct students in the mounting of teeth in wax. Most schools (94.7%) used a semiadjustable articulator, alginate for primary impressions (73.7%) and elastomeric materials in border-molded custom trays for final impressions (68.4%). In most schools, within the clinical setting students work in pairs, the mean student/ professional staff member ratio being 2.3 ± 0.7. Most schools perform a competence-based assessment (83.3%), although innovative techniques such as problem-based learning are still rarely applied. On average, the students emplaced 1.8 ± 1.2 complete dentures during their clinical training, ranging from 0 to 4, although no clear trend was seen as regards the minimum number of dentures to be made for graduating. Conclusions: Variations in teaching programs and clinical experience concerning complete denture curricula among Spanish and Portuguese dental schools are evident, but all the schools base their teaching mainly on preclinical and clinical practice. However, the low number of dentures made by student per year seems insufficient to ensure clinical skills and cope with

  20. Effect of the processing cycle on dimensional changes of heat-polymerized denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Savabi, Ghazal; Savabi, Omid; Dastgheib, Badrosadat; Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: The second processing cycle for adding the artificial teeth to heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture bases may result in dimensional changes of the denture bases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dimensional changes of the heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture bases with one and two-cycle processing methods. Materials and Methods: A metal edentulous maxillary arch was used for making 40 stone casts. Maxillary complete dentures were made with heat-polymerized acrylic resins (Meliodent and Acropars) with one and two stage processing methods (n = 10 for each group). Linear dimensional changes in anteroposterior and mediolateral distances and vertical changes in the first molar region were measured following each processing cycle, using a digital caliper. Mean percentage of the dimensional changes were subjected to two-way analysis of variance and Tukey honest significant difference tests (α = 0.05). Results: Postpolymerization contraction occurred in both anteroposterior and mediolateral directions in all studied groups; however, the vertical dimension was increased. Acropars acrylic resin showed the highest dimensional changes and the second processing cycle significantly affected the measured distances (P < 0.05). Meliodent acrylic resin was not significantly influenced by the processing method. Conclusion: Reheating of the acrylic resin denture bases for the addition of denture teeth result in linear dimensional changes, which can be clinically significant based on the acrylic resin used. PMID:26288618

  1. Correlation between age and gender in Candida species infections of complete denture wearers: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Loster, Jolanta E; Wieczorek, Aneta; Loster, Bartłomiej W

    2016-01-01

    Aim Denture-related stomatitis is a disorder that often affects denture wearers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intensity, genera, and frequency of yeasts in the oral cavity of complete denture wearers in terms of subject gender and age. Materials and methods Nine hundred twenty patients (307 males and 613 females) with complete upper dentures were selected for the study and divided into four age groups: ≤50 years, 51–60, 61–70, and >70 years. Yeast samples were taken as a smear from the palate. The data were collected from January 15, 2007 to January 15, 2012. Results The distribution of the number of yeast colonies by gender was statistically significant (P=0.02). Across all subjects, there was a statistically significant relationship between the intensity of yeast growth and the gender (P=0.01). In every age group, the number of infection-free individuals was greater among males than females. Intermediate, intense, and abundant growth of yeast occurred most frequently in the youngest group of females. Conclusion The genera of Candida species and the frequency of yeast infection in denture wearers appear to be influenced by both age and gender. The complete denture wearers ≤50 years of age appeared to have the greatest proclivity to oral Candida infections. PMID:27920509

  2. The impact of frenulum height on strains in maxillary denture bases

    PubMed Central

    Bilhan, Hakan; Baysal, Gokhan; Sunbuloglu, Emin; Bozdag, Ergun

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The midline fracture of maxillary complete dentures is a frequently encountered complication. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of frenulum height on midline strains of maxillary complete dentures. MATERIALS AND METHODS A removable maxillary complete denture was fabricated and duplicated seven times. Four different labial frenulum heights were tested for stresses occurring on the palatal cameo surface. The strains were measured with strain gauges placed on 5 different locations and the stresses were calculated. To mimic occlusal forces bilaterally 100 N of load was applied from the premolar and molar region. RESULTS A statistically significant association between the height of the labial frenulum and the calculated stresses and strains was shown (P<.05) predominantly on the midline and especially on the incisive papilla. The results showed that stress on the anterior midline of the maxillary complete denture increases with a higher labial frenulum. CONCLUSION Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it can be concluded that the stress on the anterior midline of the maxillary complete denture increases with a higher labial frenulum. Surgical or mechanical precautions should be taken to prevent short-term failure of maxillary complete dentures due to stress concentration and low cycle fatigue tendency at the labial frenulum region. PMID:24353878

  3. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 45. Competency Curricula for Dental Prosthetic Assistant and Dental Prosthetic Technician.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-31

    17 a -h ------------ 4’ _ _ Units/Modiu -s Page V1I. Repair, Rebac; and Reline Complete Denture . . 18 1. Rebase/ Reline Complete Denture ...Removable Partial Denture Bases . . . . . . 32 6. Processing and Finishing Removable Partial Denture Bases............. . . . 33 7. Reline , Rebase or Repair...ASSISTANT (DPA) COMPETENCY UNIT VII: REPAIR, REBASE AND RELINE COMPLETE DENTURE This unit includes the following Modules: Number Title Page 1 Rebase

  4. Comparison of the fracture resistances of glass fiber mesh- and metal mesh-reinforced maxillary complete denture under dynamic fatigue loading.

    PubMed

    Im, So-Min; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Cho, Lee-Ra; Park, Chan-Jin

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of reinforcing materials on the fracture resistances of glass fiber mesh- and Cr-Co metal mesh-reinforced maxillary complete dentures under fatigue loading. Glass fiber mesh- and Cr-Co mesh-reinforced maxillary complete dentures were fabricated using silicone molds and acrylic resin. A control group was prepared with no reinforcement (n = 15 per group). After fatigue loading was applied using a chewing simulator, fracture resistance was measured by a universal testing machine. The fracture patterns were analyzed and the fractured surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. After cyclic loading, none of the dentures showed cracks or fractures. During fracture resistance testing, all unreinforced dentures experienced complete fracture. The mesh-reinforced dentures primarily showed posterior framework fracture. Deformation of the all-metal framework caused the metal mesh-reinforced denture to exhibit the highest fracture resistance, followed by the glass fiber mesh-reinforced denture (P<.05) and the control group (P<.05). The glass fiber mesh-reinforced denture primarily maintained its original shape with unbroken fibers. River line pattern of the control group, dimples and interdendritic fractures of the metal mesh group, and radial fracture lines of the glass fiber group were observed on the fractured surfaces. The glass fiber mesh-reinforced denture exhibits a fracture resistance higher than that of the unreinforced denture, but lower than that of the metal mesh-reinforced denture because of the deformation of the metal mesh. The glass fiber mesh-reinforced denture maintains its shape even after fracture, indicating the possibility of easier repair.

  5. Denture adhesive use in complete dentures: clinical recommendations and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Duqum, Ibrahim; Powers, Kendall Ann; Cooper, Lyndon; Felton, David

    2012-01-01

    This literature review sought to determine the advantages and disadvantages of denture adhesive use among complete denture patients. Manuscripts were obtained by searching the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database, Cochrane Collaboration Library, ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry website, and EMBASE database. A total of 85 abstracts were reviewed, and 38 articles that met the inclusion criteria for this review were selected. The inclusion criteria included clinical trials and case series in which 10 or more patients were treated, as well as Cochrane collaboration reviews and in vitro studies where clinical relevance could be determined. The selected manuscripts were reviewed using a standardized manuscript review matrix. Although denture adhesives improve the retention and function of complete dentures, standardized guidelines are needed for the proper use, application, and removal of denture adhesives. Additionally, long-term studies are warranted on the biologic effects of denture adhesives. There is a need to establish a regular recall program for complete denture patients.

  6. Dentures are a Reservoir for Respiratory Pathogens.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Lindsay E; Smith, Karen; Williams, Craig; Nile, Chris J; Lappin, David F; Bradshaw, David; Lambert, Margaret; Robertson, Douglas P; Bagg, Jeremy; Hannah, Victoria; Ramage, Gordon

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have established a relationship between dental plaque and pulmonary infection, particularly in elderly individuals. Given that approximately one in five adults in the UK currently wears a denture, there remains a gap in our understanding of the direct implications of denture plaque on systemic health. The aim of this study was to undertake a comprehensive evaluation of putative respiratory pathogens residing upon dentures using a targeted quantitative molecular approach. One hundred and thirty patients' dentures were sonicated to remove denture plaque biofilm from the surface. DNA was extracted from the samples and was assessed for the presence of respiratory pathogens by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Ct values were then used to approximate the number of corresponding colony forming equivalents (CFEs) based on standard curves. Of the dentures, 64.6% were colonized by known respiratory pathogens. Six species were identified: Streptococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus influenzae B, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Moraxella catarrhalis. P. aeruginosa was the most abundant species followed by S. pneumoniae and S. aureus in terms of average CFE and overall proportion of denture plaque. Of the participants, 37% suffered from denture stomatitis; however, there were no significant differences in the prevalence of respiratory pathogens on dentures between healthy and inflamed mouths. Our findings indicate that dentures can act as a reservoir for potential respiratory pathogens in the oral cavity, thus increasing the theoretical risk of developing aspiration pneumonia. Implementation of routine denture hygiene practices could help to reduce the risk of respiratory infection among the elderly population. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  7. Flexural strength,water sorption and solubility of a methylmethacrylate-free denture base polymer reinforced with glass fibre reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Mutluay, M M; Tezvergil-Mutluay, A; Vallittu, P; Lassila, L

    2013-12-01

    A methylmethacrylate-free denture base polymer (Eclipse) in comparison to a conventional denture base polymer (Palapress vario) was evaluated after water saturation and Stick glass fibre reinforcement. The data were analysed with ANOVA at a = 0.05. Water-storage caused a decrease in the flexural strength and stiffness of the materials (p > 0.05). Conventional denture base material with fibre reinforcement gave highest flexural strength (201.1 MPa) compared to fibre reinforced Eclipse (79.1 MPa) (p < 0.05). Water sorption after 76 days was 2.08% (Palapress vario) and 1.55% (Eclipse). Fibre-reinforcement of methylmethacrylate-free material was not as successful as conventional denture base and needs to be further optimized.

  8. Characterization and bacterial anti-adherent effect on modified PMMA denture acrylic resin containing platinum nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study characterized the synthesis of a modified PMMA (Polymethyl methacrylate) denture acrylic loading platinum nanoparticles (PtN) and assessed its bacterial inhibitory efficacy to produce novel antimicrobial denture base material. MATERIALS AND METHODS Polymerized PMMA denture acrylic disc (20 mm × 2 mm) specimens containing 0 (control), 10, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of PtN were fabricated respectively. The obtained platinum-PMMA nanocomposite (PtNC) was characterized by TEM (transmission electron microscopy), SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), thermogravimetric and atomic absorption spectrophotometer analysis. In antimicrobial assay, specimens were placed on the cell culture plate, and 100 µL of microbial suspensions of S. mutans (Streptococcus mutans) and S. sobrinus (Streptococcus sobrinus) were inoculated then incubated at 37℃ for 24 hours. The bacterial attachment was tested by FACS (fluorescence-activated cell sorting) analysis after staining with fluorescent probe. RESULTS PtN were successfully loaded and uniformly immobilized into PMMA denture acrylic with a proper thermal stability and similar surface morphology as compared to control. PtNC expressed significant bacterial anti-adherent effect rather than bactericidal effect above 50 mg/L PtN loaded when compared to pristine PMMA (P=.01) with no or extremely small amounts of Pt ion eluted. CONCLUSION This is the first report on the synthesis and its antibacterial activity of Pt-PMMA nanocomposite. PMMA denture acrylic loading PtN could be a possible intrinsic antimicrobial denture material with proper mechanical characteristics, meeting those specified for denture bases. For clinical application, future studies including biocompatibility, color stability and warranting the long-term effect were still required. PMID:25006385

  9. Effect of length post and remaining root tissue on fracture resistance of fibre posts relined with resin composite.

    PubMed

    Farina, A P; Weber, A L; Severo, B de P; Souza, M A; Cecchin, D

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the influence of post length and amount of remaining root tissue on the fracture resistance of roots restored with fibre posts relined with resin composite. Ninety upper canine teeth were divided into nine groups (n = 10). The post spaces were prepared resulting in different lengths, as follows: group 2/3, preparations with lengths of 10 mm; group 1/2, preparations with lengths of 7·5 mm; and group 1/3, preparations with lengths of 5 mm. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups according to amount of remaining root tooth tissue (2, 1 mm or 0·5 mm of thick root). Fibre posts relined with resin composite were cemented, and all teeth were restored with metal crowns. The samples were submitted to the fracture resistance test in a universal testing machine, at an angle of 135° and speed of 0·5 mm min(-1) . Failure modes were observed and the data of fracture resistance were submitted to the anova and Tukey's (α = 0·05). No statistically significant difference in fracture resistance was found among different post lengths (P > 0·05). Remaining dentin thickness of 2 and 1 mm did not differ statistically in fracture resistance (P > 0·05), which was higher than of 0·5 mm dentin thickness (P < 0·05). A prevalence of repairable failure was observed in all groups. It can be concluded that the length of fibre post relined with resin composite did not influence fracture resistance, but thickness was an important factor for the restoration of endodontically treated teeth. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. An Investigation into the Accuracy of Two Currently Available Dental Impression Materials in the Construction of Cobalt-Chromium Frameworks for Removable Partial Dentures.

    PubMed

    Dubal, Rajesh Kumar; Friel, Tim; Taylor, Philip D

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the suitability of irreversible hydrocolloid as an impression material for cobalt-chromium framework construction. Scans of casts derived from (1) alginate and (2) addition-cured polyvinylsiloxane impressions were superposed on to a control. The differences within and between groups were compared at fixed landmarks. The investigation revealed a high degree of scan coincidence within and between groups. However, certain features, such as undercuts, resulted in a lower degree of scan coincidence. Irreversible hydrocolloid appears to be a viable alternative to addition-cured polyvinyl-siloxane as an impression material for cobalt-chromium framework construction.

  11. Evolution of removable partial denture design.

    PubMed

    Becker, C M; Kaiser, D A; Goldfogel, M H

    1994-09-01

    This is a brief overview of the progress of design philosophies of removable partial dentures. It begins in 1711 with the first published description of a removable partial denture prosthesis and continues, with discussion of the most significant discoveries, through 1990.

  12. Acrylic Resin Cytotoxicity for Denture Base--Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo C; Freitas, Emily; dos Santos, Daniela; de Medeiros, Rodrigo; Sonego, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    Acrylic resin is a widely used material in clinical practice, and a satisfactory biocompatibility is essential. When the resin polymerization reaction is incomplete, residual monomers are released into the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate, through a literature review, the cytotoxicity caused by the denture base acrylic resin used, and its components. The selection of published studies was performed on the Pubmed database from January 2008 to July 2013. The keywords used were: "cytotoxicity and acrylic resins", "cytotoxicity and denture base resins" and "cytotoxicity and oral prosthesis". Inclusion criteria were: in vitro studies and literature reviews published in English that evaluated the acrylic resin cytotoxicity for denture base and its components. Studies with no reference to the search strategy were excluded. A total of 182 articles were found. Among these, only 13 were included for writing this review. The MTT test is the most common test used to evaluate acrylic resin cytotoxicity. Auto-polymerized resin is more cytotoxic than heat-polymerized resin because of its higher quantity of residual monomers which cause cell and tissue changes in the oral mucosa. However, more studies are necessary for the development of biocompatible materials.

  13. Cytocompatible antifungal acrylic resin containing silver nanoparticles for dentures

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Torres, Laura Susana; Mendieta, Irasema; Nuñez-Anita, Rosa Elvira; Cajero-Juárez, Marcos; Castaño, Víctor M

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibition of Candida albicans on denture resins could play a significant role in preventing the development of denture stomatitis. The safety of a new dental material with antifungal properties was analyzed in this work. Methods Poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] discs and PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs were formulated, with the commercial acrylic resin, Nature-CrylTM, used as a control. Silver nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, dispersive Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The antifungal effect was assessed using a luminescent microbial cell viability assay. Biocompatibility tests were carried out using NIH-3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts and a Jurkat human lymphocyte cell line. Cells were cultured for 24 or 72 hours in the presence or absence of the polymer formulations and analyzed using three different tests, ie, cellular viability by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and cell proliferation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay BrdU, and genomic DNA damage (Comet assay). Finally, the samples were evaluated mechanically, and the polymer-bearing silver nanoparticles were analyzed microscopically to evaluate dispersion of the nanoparticles. Results The results show that PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs significantly reduce adherence of C. albicans and do not affect metabolism or proliferation. They also appear not to cause genotoxic damage to cells. Conclusion The present work has developed a new biocompatible antifungal PMMA denture base material. PMID:22969297

  14. Developments in denture teeth to prevent softening by food solvents.

    PubMed

    Shahdad, Shakeel A; McCabe, John F; Wassell, Robert W

    2007-08-01

    The effect of various food-simulating solvents on the hardness of denture teeth after varying storage times, using a Martens hardness test was determined. Martens hardness (HM) was assessed at baseline and during storage up to 1 month in distilled water (DW), peppermint oil (PO), heptane (HT) and 75% ethanol (ET) for four commercially-available denture teeth; Vivodent (VIV), Double-cross-linked Postaris (DCL), Orthosit (ORT), Candulor porcelain (POR) and two polymer based experimental denture teeth: Experimental 1 (EXP1); a hybrid nanocomposite with two different sized silanated filler particles and Experimental 2 (EXP2); containing an organic copolymer based upon urethanedimethacrylate and polymethyl methacrylate. Hardness [mean (sd)] at baseline was: VIV 142 (1), DCL 142 (1), ORT 209 (9), POR 2926 (101), EXP1 285 (11), and EXP2 146 (12). One-way ANOVA using Tukey's test on polymer-based materials showed that the hardness values of ORT and EXP1 were significantly higher than those of VIV, DCL and EXP2 (P < 0.05). Moreover, EXP1 had a significantly higher hardness value than ORT (P < 0.05). Except for EXP1, all polymer based materials showed a significant drop in hardness after storage in ET (P < 0.05). Specimens stored in water, heptane and peppermint oil showed minor fluctuations in hardness, which were not statistically significant.

  15. Complete denture analyzed by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Todea, Carmen; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2008-02-01

    The complete dentures are currently made using different technologies. In order to avoid deficiencies of the prostheses made using the classical technique, several alternative systems and procedures were imagined, directly related to the material used and also to the manufacturing technology. Thus, at the present time, there are several injecting systems and technologies on the market, that use chemoplastic materials, which are heat cured (90-100°C), in dry or wet environment, or cold cured (below 60°C). There are also technologies that plasticize a hard cured material by thermoplastic processing (without any chemical changes) and then inject it into a mold. The purpose of this study was to analyze the existence of possible defects in several dental prostheses using a non invasive method, before their insertion in the mouth. Different dental prostheses, fabricated from various materials were investigated using en-face optical coherence tomography. In order to discover the defects, the scanning was made in three planes, obtaining images at different depths, from 0,01 μm to 2 mm. In several of the investigated prostheses we found defects which may cause their fracture. These defects are totally included in the prostheses material and can not be vizualised with other imagistic methods. In conclusion, en-face OCT is an important investigative tool for the dental practice.

  16. Interventions for cleaning dentures in adults.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Raphael Freitas; de Freitas Oliveira Paranhos, Helena; Lovato da Silva, Claudia H; Abu-Naba'a, Layla; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Gurgan, Cem A

    2009-10-07

    Removing denture plaque may be essential for maintaining the oral health of edentulous people. Brushing and soaking in chemical products are two of the most commonly used methods of cleaning dentures. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of different methods for cleansing removable dentures. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to May 2009); CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 2); MEDLINE (1965 to May 2009); EMBASE (1980 to May 2009); LILACS (1980 to May 2009); and CINAHL (1997 to May 2009). There were no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing any mechanical method (e.g. brushing or ultrasound) or chemical (e.g. enzymes, sodium hypochlorite, oral rinses or peroxide solutions) in adults over the age of 18 wearing removable partial dentures or complete dentures.The primary outcomes considered were the health of denture bearing areas (soft tissues, periodontal tissues and teeth) and participants' satisfaction and preference. Secondary outcomes included denture plaque coverage area, indicators of halitosis and microbial counts on abutment teeth, soft tissues or denture base or saliva. Two independent review authors screened and extracted information from, and independently assessed the risk of bias in the included trials. Although six RCTs were included in this review, the wide range of different interventions and outcome variables did not permit pooling of data in a meta-analysis. Isolated reports indicated that chemicals and brushing appear to be more effective than placebo in the reduction of plaque coverage and microbial counts of anaerobes and aerobes on complete denture bases. There is a lack of evidence about the comparative effectiveness of the different denture cleaning methods considered in this review. Few well designed RCTs were found. Future research should focus on comparisons between mechanical and chemical methods; the assessment of the association of methods

  17. Stress analysis of a complete maxillary denture under various drop impact conditions: a 3D finite element study.

    PubMed

    Sunbuloglu, Emin

    2015-01-01

    Complete maxillary dentures are one of the most economic and easy ways of treatment for edentulous patients and are still widely used. However, their survival rate is slightly above three years. It is presumed that the failure reasons are not only due to normal fatigue but also emerge from damage based on unavoidable improper usage. Failure types other than long-term fatigue, such as over-deforming, also influence the effective life span of dentures. A hypothesis is presumed, stating that the premature/unexpected failures may be initiated by impact on dentures, which can be related to dropping them on the ground or other effects such as biting crispy food. Thus, the behavior of a complete maxillary denture under impact loading due to drop on a rigid surface was investigated using the finite element method utilizing explicit time integration and a rate-sensitive elastoplastic material model of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Local permanent deformations have been observed along with an emphasis on frenulum region of the denture, regardless of the point of impact. Contact stresses at the tooth-denture base were also investigated. The spread of energy within the structure via wave propagation is seen to play a critical role in this fact. Stress-wave propagation is also seen to be an important factor that decreases the denture's fatigue life.

  18. Power spectrum density analysis for the influence of complete denture on the brain function of edentulous patients - pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Praveen; Anitha, Kuttae Viswanathan; Reddy, Jetti Ramesh; Muthukumar, Balasubramanium

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This pilot study was to find the influence of complete denture on the brain activity and cognitive function of edentulous patients measured through Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study recruited 20 patients aged from 50 to 60 years requiring complete dentures with inclusion and exclusion criteria. The brain function and cognitive function were analyzed with a mental state questionnaire and a 15-minute analysis of power spectral density of EEG alpha waves. The analysis included edentulous phase and post denture insertion adaptive phase, each done before and after chewing. The results obtained were statistically evaluated. RESULTS Power Spectral Density (PSD) values increased from edentulous phase to post denture insertion adaption phase. The data were grouped as edentulous phase before chewing (EEG p1-0.0064), edentulous phase after chewing (EEG p2-0.0073), post denture insertion adaptive phase before chewing (EEG p3-0.0077), and post denture insertion adaptive phase after chewing (EEG p4-0.0096). The acquired values were statistically analyzed using paired t-test, which showed statistically significant results (P<.05). CONCLUSION This pilot study showed functional improvement in brain function of edentulous patients with complete dentures rehabilitation. PMID:27350852

  19. Color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasp denture

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dae-Eun; Lee, Ji-Young; Jang, Hyun-Seon; Lee, Jang-Jae

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp dentures to those of thermoplastic polyamide and conventional heat-polymerized denture base resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three types of denture base resin, which are conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20), thermoplastic polyamide resin (Bio Tone), thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) were used as materials for this study. One hundred five specimens were fabricated. For the color stability test, specimens were immersed in the coffee and green tee for 1 and 8 weeks. Color change was measured by spectrometer. Water sorption was tested after 1 and 8 weeks immersion in the water. For the test of cytotoxicity, cell viability assay was measured and cell attachment was analyzed by FE-SEM. RESULTS All types of denture base resin showed color changes after 1 and 8 weeks immersion. However, there was no significant difference between denture base resins. All specimens showed significant color changes in the coffee than green tee. In water sorption test, thermoplastic acrylic resin showed lower values than conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin and thermoplastic polyamide resin. Three types of denture base showed low cytotoxicity in cell viability assay. Thermoplastic acrylic resin showed the similar cell attachment but more stable attachment than conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin. CONCLUSION Thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp denture showed acceptable color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity. To verify the long stability in the mouth, additional in vitro studies are needed. PMID:26330974

  20. Characterization and bacterial anti-adherent effect on modified PMMA denture acrylic resin containing platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki-Young

    2014-06-01

    This study characterized the synthesis of a modified PMMA (Polymethyl methacrylate) denture acrylic loading platinum nanoparticles (PtN) and assessed its bacterial inhibitory efficacy to produce novel antimicrobial denture base material. Polymerized PMMA denture acrylic disc (20 mm × 2 mm) specimens containing 0 (control), 10, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of PtN were fabricated respectively. The obtained platinum-PMMA nanocomposite (PtNC) was characterized by TEM (transmission electron microscopy), SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), thermogravimetric and atomic absorption spectrophotometer analysis. In antimicrobial assay, specimens were placed on the cell culture plate, and 100 µL of microbial suspensions of S. mutans (Streptococcus mutans) and S. sobrinus (Streptococcus sobrinus) were inoculated then incubated at 37℃ for 24 hours. The bacterial attachment was tested by FACS (fluorescence-activated cell sorting) analysis after staining with fluorescent probe. PtN were successfully loaded and uniformly immobilized into PMMA denture acrylic with a proper thermal stability and similar surface morphology as compared to control. PtNC expressed significant bacterial anti-adherent effect rather than bactericidal effect above 50 mg/L PtN loaded when compared to pristine PMMA (P=.01) with no or extremely small amounts of Pt ion eluted. This is the first report on the synthesis and its antibacterial activity of Pt-PMMA nanocomposite. PMMA denture acrylic loading PtN could be a possible intrinsic antimicrobial denture material with proper mechanical characteristics, meeting those specified for denture bases. For clinical application, future studies including biocompatibility, color stability and warranting the long-term effect were still required.

  1. Clinical effects of acrylic resilient denture liners applied to mandibular complete dentures on the alveolar ridge.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, S; Kimoto, K; Gunji, A; Kawai, Y; Murakami, H; Tanaka, K; Syu, K; Aoki, H; Toyoda, M; Kobayashi, K

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether resilient denture liners has the potential to decrease problems affecting the alveolar ridge mucosa during the first adjustment session following the initial fitting of the denture. Interventions were complete denture treatment with permanent acrylic resilient denture liner dentures (RLD) in mandibles and conventional heat-activated acrylic resin dentures (ARD) in mandibles. Maxillary dentures were fabricated with conventional heat-activated ARD. Seventy-four subjects were randomly allocated to the RLD and ARD groups by random permuted blocks within the strata method after obtaining written informed consent. A randomized controlled parallel clinical trial with two hospital centres was conducted from April 2004 to July 2006. The problems were comprehensively evaluated by three outcomes with subjective and objective factors as follows: (i) numbers of sore spots, (ii) duration of wearing dentures and (iii) pain perception with 100 mm Visual Analog Scale. The numbers of sore spots in the mandibular support and border areas for the RLD group were significantly less than those for the ARD groups (P < 0.05). The RLD wearers were able to wear their dentures an additional day longer than the ARD wearers (P < 0.05). The maxillary and mandibular pain ratings for the RLD group were significantly lower than those for the ARD group (P < 0.05). Application of resilient denture liners to mandibular complete dentures provided edentulous patients with fewer problems affecting the alveolar during the first adjustment session following the initial fitting of the denture when compared with conventional denture treatments.

  2. Creep and stress relaxation behavior of two soft denture liners.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Alaa'a M

    2014-03-01

    Numerous investigators stated the indications of soft denture lining materials; but no one determined the indications of these materials according to their chemical structure. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the viscoelastic properties of acrylic and silicon lining materials. This study investigated and compared viscoelastic properties of two resilient denture lining materials. Tested materials were laboratory processed; one of them was silicone-based liner product (Molloplast-B), and the other was plasticized acrylic resin (Vertex™ Soft). Twenty cylindrical specimens (10-20 mm in length, 11.55 mm in diameter) were fabricated in an aluminum mold from each material for creep and stress relaxation testing (the study of viscoelastic properties). Tests were performed by using the universal testing machine DY-34. Collected data were analyzed with t test statistics for statistically significant differences at the 95 % confidence level. There was a clear difference in creep and stress relaxation behavior between acrylic and silicone liners. Statistical study of Young's moduli illustrated that Vertex™ Soft was softer than Molloplast-B. On the other hand, the results explained that the recovery of silicone material was better than of acrylic one. The creep test revealed that the plasticized acrylic resin lining material exhibited considerable creep, whereas silicone-based liner exhibited elastic behavior. Besides, the stress relaxation test showed that relaxation of the plasticized acrylic resin material was bigger than of the silicone-based liner.

  3. Influence of high expansion dental stone used as investing medium on the changes in occlusal vertical dimension of complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Alaa'a M

    2013-10-01

    Despite advances in materials and techniques, complete dentures made of acrylic resin experience an increase in the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) during processing. Many factors that affect the OVD of complete dentures are known. However, no study has examined the effect of using high-expansion dental stone (type V) as an investing material on the OVD. This study investigated the effects of using a high-expansion dental stone as an investing material on changes in the OVD of complete dentures. Twenty sets of simulated upper and lower dentures were processed by the compression molding technique. Specimens were equally divided into 2 groups. In the dental stone type III (DST III) group, the lower, middle, and upper parts of a flask were filled with DST III. In the dental stone type V (DST V) group, the procedure was the same as in the DST III group, except that the middle layer was made of high-expansion DST V. Changes in the OVD were measured before and after denture processing. Collected data were analyzed with t-test statistics. Differences were considered statistically significant at the 95% confidence level. Both groups showed a small increase in the OVD as a result of processing, but the OVD increase was significantly less in the DST V group compared to the DST III group. High-expansion DST V can be recommended as an investing material to reduce the increase in the OVD that may occur while processing complete dentures.

  4. Does Hollowing of Complete Denture Enhance Retention? - A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Ashish; Dhull, Kanika Singh; Iyer, Satish R; Mittal, Manish; Kalra, Shilpa; Yadav, Shweta

    2015-05-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation is an extremely challenging task in extreme resorption cases of the maxillary denture-bearing area. Reducing the weight of a maxillary obturator has been seen as beneficial. But whether reducing the weight of conventional complete denture also increases retention or not, is still very dubious. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of maxillary denture weight on denture retention and stability. For this study, a total of 10 patients were considered for the pilot study (06 female and 04 male) with an average age of 70 y. Each patient was provided with two sets of maxillary complete dentures, one hollow labeled as A and one conventional maxillary denture labeled as B. It was shown that mean values for retention using MKIS for retention for hollow dentures (A) was 7.8 and for conventional dentures (B) it was 8.2 and the stability for maxillary dentures was more with conventional dentures (B) than hollow maxillary dentures (A) and it was significant as p-value was 0.015 (p<.1). The denture retention and stability, chewing and comfort values of conventional dentures and hollow dentures were slightly better for conventional dentures.

  5. Dimensional accuracy of two rubber base impression materials as a function of spacer design and techniques in custom trays for fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Pankaj; Dhiman, R K; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-12-01

    A prostheses can't be better than the cast over which it has been fabricated. To make accurate casts, accurate impressions are mandatory. To get an accurate and dimensionally stable impression, various techniques and materials have been advocated. This study compares the most commonly used techniques and materials for dimensional accuracy. Two types of spacers were designed to compare the addition silicon and polyether and their techniques. A metal die was used to make the impressions. A total of 60 impressions were made using multiple mix and monophasic techniques for addition silicon and polyether in custom trays. A travelling microscope was used to measure the dimensional accuracy of die stone casts retrieved from impressions. The results were compared using paired t test and SPSS software. The study was highly significant (p < 0.001). The polyether was more accurate than the addition silicon and spacer design I (adapted to the edentulous area) was more accurate than the design II (spacer over the abutments, not adapted to edentulous area). The multiple mix technique was more accurate than the monophasic for addition silicon. The combination of multiple mix technique with spacer design I for addition silicon gave the best accurate results.

  6. Comparison of flexural strength in three types of denture base resins: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Jaikumar, R. Arun; Karthigeyan, Suma; Ali, Syed Asharf; Naidu, N. Madhulika; Kumar, R. Pradeep; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the flexural strength of a commercially available, heat polymerized acrylic denture base material could be improved using reinforcements. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 specimens (65 mm × 10 mm × 3 mm) were fabricated; the specimens were divided into three groups with 10 specimens each. They were Group 1 - conventional denture base resins, Group 2 - high impact denture base resins, and Group 3 - glass reinforced denture base resins. The specimens were loaded until failure on a three-point bending test machine. An one-way analysis of variance was used to determine statistical differences among the flexural strength of three groups. Data were analyzed by SPSS software version 21.0© (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA) and the results were obtained. Results: The flexural strength values showed statistically significant differences among experimental groups (P < 0.005). Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) reinforced with glass fibers showed the highest flexural strength values this was followed by PMMA reinforced with butadiene styrene, and the least strength was observed in the conventional denture base resins. PMID:26538898

  7. Impact of removable partial denture prosthesis on chewing efficiency

    PubMed Central

    BESSADET, Marion; NICOLAS, Emmanuel; SOCHAT, Marine; HENNEQUIN, Martine; VEYRUNE, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Removable partial denture prostheses are still being used for anatomic, medical and economic reasons. However, the impact on chewing parameters is poorly described. Objectives The objective of this study was to estimate the impact of removable partial denture prosthesis on masticatory parameters. Material and Methods Nineteen removable partial denture prosthesis (RPDP) wearers participated in the study. Among them, 10 subjects were Kennedy Class III partially edentulous and 9 with posterior edentulism (Class I). All presented a complete and full dentate opposing arch. The subjects chewed samples of carrots and peanuts with and without their prosthesis. The granulometry of the expectorated boluses from carrot and peanuts was characterized by median particle size (D50), determined at the natural point of swallowing. Number of chewing cycles (CC), chewing time (CT) and chewing frequency (CF=CC/CT) were video recorded. Results With RPDP, the mean D50 values for carrot and peanuts were lower [Repeated Model Procedures (RMP), F=15, p<0.001] regardless of the type of Kennedy Class. For each food, mean CC, CT and CF values recorded decreased (RMP, F=18, F=9, and F=20 respectively, p<0.01). With or without RPD, the boluses' granulometry values were above the masticatory normative index (MNI) determined as 4,000 µm. Conclusion RPDP rehabilitation improves the ability to reduce the bolus particle size, but does not reestablish fully the masticatory function. Clinical relevance This study encourages the clinical improvement of oral rehabilitation procedure. PMID:24212983

  8. Capacity of denture plaque/biofilm removal and antimicrobial action of a new denture paste.

    PubMed

    Paranhos, H de F; Panzeri, H; Lara, E H; Candido, R C; Ito, I Y

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of a paste for complete dentures was analyzed in terms of denture plaque/biofilm removal and antimicrobial action against specific microorganisms by determination of colony forming units of mutans group streptococci and yeast from 120 full denture wearers with a healthy palatine mucosa. The patients were given a questionnaire to evaluate the experimental product in terms of important characteristics. The paste was widely accepted by the patients, and effective in denture plaque removal and antimicrobial action. The species of yeasts most frequently isolated were C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. We conclude that it is possible for complete denture wearers to keep their dentures clean with the regular use of a paste-like hygienic product.

  9. In Vivo Comparison of the Masticatory Efficiency of Artificial Teeth with Two Different Cusp Heights in Complete Dentures: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Wallace Ferreira; Iegami, Carolina Mayumi; Uehara, Priscila Nakasone; Furuyama, Ricardo Jun; Tamaki, Regina

    2017-04-01

    The goal of complete denture rehabilitation is to restore facial esthetics and masticatory function to edentulous patients. Several types of artificial teeth with different occlusal anatomy are available. Theoretically, teeth with a higher cusp height provide improved masticatory efficiency. The aim of this study was to compare the masticatory efficiency of complete denture wearers using artificial teeth with two cusp heights. Sixteen complete denture wearers were given complete dentures with Heraeus Premium teeth. Fifteen days after denture installation, a first masticatory efficiency test was performed with Optocal. A new pair of complete dentures with Dentsply Biotone teeth was then given to each participant to replace the first set. This second set was fabricated by duplicating the same models used to fabricate the first set of dentures. Fifteen days after installation of the dentures with Biotone teeth, a second masticatory efficiency test was performed with Optocal. On both tests, the comminuted material was treated and sieved through a stack of sieves under vibration. The content of each sieve was weighed, and the obtained data were tabulated. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Wilcoxon tests. Mean and standard deviation of participants' masticatory efficiency, as measured by X50 particle size (mm), were 8.39 and 5.59 for dentures with Premium teeth, and 8.56 and 5.84 for dentures with Biotone teeth. According to the results, there were no differences (p < 0.05) in the masticatory efficiency of the complete denture sets using teeth with the two cusp heights. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  10. Candida albicans biofilm heterogeneity does not influence denture stomatitis but strongly influences denture cleansing capacity.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Lindsay E; Alalwan, Hasanain K A; Kean, Ryan; Calvert, Gareth; Nile, Christopher J; Lappin, David F; Robertson, Douglas; Williams, Craig; Ramage, Gordon; Sherry, Leighann

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 20  % of the UK population wear some form of denture prosthesis, resulting in denture stomatitis in half of these individuals. Candida albicans is primarily attributed as the causative agent, due to its biofilm -forming ability. Recently, there has been increasing evidence of C. albicans biofilm heterogeneity and the negative impact it can have clinically; however, this phenomenon has yet to be studied in relation to denture isolates. The aims of this study were to evaluate C. albicans biofilm formation of clinical denture isolates in a denture environment and to assess antimicrobial activity of common denture cleansers against these tenacious communities. C. albicans isolated from dentures of healthy and diseased individuals was quantified using real-time PCR and biofilm biomass assessed using crystal violet. Biofilm development on the denture substratum poly(methyl methacrylate), Molloplast B and Ufi-gel was determined. Biofilm formation was assessed using metabolic and biomass stains, following treatment with denture hygiene products. Although C. albicans was detected in greater quantities in diseased individuals, it was not associated with increased biofilm biomass. Denture substrata were shown to influence biofilm biomass, with poly(methyl methacrylate) providing the most suitable environment for C. albicans to reside. Of all denture hygiene products tested, Milton had the most effective antimicrobial activity, reducing biofilm biomass and viability the greatest. Overall, our results highlight the complex nature of denture- related disease, and disease development cannot always be attributed to a sole cause. It is the distinct combination of various factors that ultimately determines the pathogenic outcome.

  11. Measurement of interfacial porosity at the acrylic resin/denture tooth interface.

    PubMed

    Pero, Ana Carolina; Marra, Juliê; Paleari, André Gustavo; Pereira, Wellington Roberto Fagundes; Barbosa, Débora Barros; Compagnoni, Marco Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Small pores of almost uniform shape and size are common in polymeric materials; however, significant porosity can weaken a denture base resin and promote staining, harboring of organisms such as Candida albicans, and bond failures between the artificial tooth and denture base resin. The aim of this study was to investigate the porosity at the interface of one artificial tooth acrylic resin (Trilux, copolymer of polymethyl methacrylate, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, and color pigments) and three denture base resins: Acron MC (microwave-polymerized), Lucitone 550 (heat-polymerized), and QC-20 (heat-polymerized). Ten specimens of each denture base resin with artificial tooth were processed. After polymerization, specimens were polished and observed under a microscope at 80x magnification. The area of each pore present between artificial tooth and denture base resin was measured using computer software, and the total area of pores per surface was calculated in millimeter square. The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to compare porosity data (alpha= 0.05). Porosity analysis revealed the average number of pores (n), area range (S, mm(2)), and diameter range (d, mum) for Acron MC (n = 23, S = 0.001 to 0.0056, d = 35 to 267), Lucitone 550 (n = 13, S = 0.001 to 0.005, d = 35 to 79), and QC-20 (n = 19, S = 0.001 to 0.014, d = 35 to 133). The analyses showed that there were no statistically significant differences among the groups (p= 0.7904). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it was concluded that the denture base resins evaluated did not affect porosity formation at the artificial tooth/denture base resin interface.

  12. The Effects of Removable Denture on Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Son, Dae-Sik; Seong, Jin Wan; Kim, Younghoon; Chee, Youngjoon

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between removable dentures and swallowing and describe risks. Methods Twenty-four patients with removable dentures who were referred for videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) were enrolled. We evaluated the change of swallowing function using VFSS before and after the removal of the removable denture. The masticatory performance by Kazunori's method, sensation of oral cavity by Christian's method, underlying disease, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale for level of consciousness were collected. Functional dysphagia scales, including the oral transit time (OTT), pharyngeal transit time (PTT), percentage of oral residue, percentage of pharyngeal residue, oropharyngeal swallow efficiency (OPSE), and presence of aspiration were measured. Results Four patients dropped out and 20 patients were analyzed (stroke, 13 patients; pneumonia, 3 patients; and others, 4 patients). The mean age was 73.3±11.4 years. There were significant differences before and after the removal of the denture for the OTT. OTT was significantly less after the removal of the denture (8.87 vs. 4.38 seconds, p=0.01). OPSE increased remarkably after the removal of the denture, but without significance (18.24%/sec vs. 25.26%/sec, p=0.05). The OTT and OPSE, while donning a removable denture, were correlated with the masticatory performance (OTT, p=0.04; OPSE, p=0.003) and sensation of oral cavity (OTT, p=0.006; OPSE, p=0.007). Conclusion A removable denture may have negative effects on swallowing, especially OTT and OPSE. These affects may be caused by impaired sensation of the oral cavity or masticatory performance induced by the removable denture. PMID:23705121

  13. Removable partial denture occlusion.

    PubMed

    Ivanhoe, John R; Plummer, Kevin D

    2004-07-01

    No single occlusal morphology, scheme, or material will successfully treat all patients. Many patients have been treated, both successfully and unsuccessfully, using widely varying theories of occlusion, choices of posterior tooth form, and restorative materials. Therefore, experience has demonstrated that there is no one righ r way to restore the occlusion of all patients. Partially edentulous patients have many and varied needs. Clinicians must understand the healthy physiologic gnathostomatic system and properly diagnose what is or may become pathologic. Henderson [3] stated that the occlusion of the successfully treated patient allows the masticating mechanism to carry out its physiologic functions while the temporomandibular joints, the neuromuscular mechanism, the teeth and their supporting structures remain in a good state of health. Skills in diagnosis and treatment planning are of utmost importance in treating these patients, for whom the clinician's goals are not only an esthetic and functional restoration but also a lasting harmonious state. Perhaps this was best state by DeVan [55] more than 60 years ago in his often-quoted objective. "The patient's fundamental need is the continued meticulous restoration of what is missing, since what is lost is in a sense irretrievably lost." Because it is clear that there is no one method, no one occlusal scheme, or one material that guarantees success for all patients, recommendations for consideration when establishing or reestablishing occlusal schemes have been presented. These recommendations must be used in conjunction with other diagnostic and technical skills.

  14. Duplication of complete dentures using general-purpose handheld optical scanner and 3-dimensional printer: Introduction and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Kosuke; Matsuda, Takashi; Goto, Takaharu; Ishida, Yuichi; Ito, Teruaki; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    To introduce a new clinical procedure for fabricating duplicates of complete dentures by bite pressure impression using digital technology, and to discuss its clinical significance. The denture is placed on a rotary table and the 3-dimensional form of the denture is digitized using a general-purpose handheld optical scanner. The duplicate denture is made of polylactic acid by a 3-dimensional printer using the 3-dimensional data. This procedure has the advantages of wasting less material, employing less human power, decreasing treatment time at the chair side, lowering the rates of contamination, and being readily fabricated at the time of the treatment visit. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effectiveness of Hexetidine 0.1% Compared to Chlorhexidine Digluconate 0.12% in Eliminating Candida Albicans Colonizing Dentures: A Randomized Clinical In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Georges; Saadeh, Maria; Berberi, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Denture hygiene is an important factor in the prevention and treatment of denture stomatitis (DS). This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of two different mouthwashes (chlorhexidine digluconate 0.12% and hexetidine 0.1%) in eliminating Candida albicans on dentures. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 denture wearers (20 men, 40 women; age range 40-80 years) with clinical evidence of DS were randomly divided into 2 test groups and 1 control group. The dentures of each test group were treated by immersion in one of the two mouthwashes while those of the control group were immersed in distilled water. Swab samples from the palatal surfaces of the upper dentures were collected before and after of cleaner use and examined mycologically. Results: Reduction in the number of colony-forming units of Candida albicans after immersion of the dentures with chlorhexidine digluconate 0.12% was significantly greater than that of the group using hexetidine 0.1% and those of the control group. Conclusion: Hexetidine 0.1% solution tested for the first time as a product of disinfection of the acrylic dentures showed average results after immersion of 8 night hours for 4 days and was less effective than chlorhexidine digluconate 0.12%. PMID:26464531

  16. Denture-handling ability of elderly persons with dementia: examination of time spent inserting and removing dentures.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Kin-ya; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Shibutani, Toshiaki; Ito, Masaki; Iwaku, Fumihiko

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of dementia on denture-handling ability, we measured the amount of time that elderly subjects spent inserting and removing dentures. Elderly subjects with dementia tended to take more time inserting and removing dentures than those who were not demented. Only elderly patients who were severely demented needed significantly more time removing partial dentures than they did removing complete dentures. There was no significant difference between the time spent inserting dentures and removing dentures. The greater amount of time required to insert or remove dentures for subjects with dementia was due to disorientation. The results indicate that elderly people with mild to moderate dementia are able to insert and remove their dentures without help.

  17. Isolation and Identification of Nonoral Pathogenic Bacteria in the Oral Cavity of Patients with Removable Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Derafshi, Reza; Bazargani, Abdollah; Ghapanchi, Jannan; Izadi, Yazdan; Khorshidi, Hooman

    2017-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Dentures in the oral cavity may act as a reservoir of microorganisms, which may be related to systemic infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the nonoral pathogenic bacteria in the oral cavity of patients with removable dentures in Shiraz, Southern Iran. Materials and Methods: The bacterial flora of saliva samples from 50 men and 50 women with removable dentures and 100 age- and sex-matched controls with normal dentate were compared using culture, Gram staining, and API20E Kit methods. All data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: Except for Enterobacter cloacae isolate (P = 0.03), there was no significant difference between both groups for the presence of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli, Raoultella ornithinolytica, Raoultella planticola, Kluyvera spp., and Enterobacter aerogenes. No significant correlation was noticed between age and presence of bacteria in the oral cavity. The Gram-negative rod bacteria were more in males, but the difference was not significant. When a total of Gram-negative rods were considered, there was a significant difference between case and control groups (P = 0.004). Conclusions: Based on our findings that nonoral pathogenic bacteria are detected from the saliva of the denture wearers, general and oral health measures in patients with removable dentures should be adopted to decrease the risk of cross infection. PMID:28852636

  18. Bond Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Teeth Using Visible Light Cure Composite Resin

    PubMed Central

    Muhsin, Saja Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although bonding to denture teeth after surface treatment with chemical agents is desirable, there is little information on the use of Visible Light Cure composite resin (VLC) as bonding denture materials. Objectives: To determine the effect of various surface treatments on shear bond strength between Visible Light Cure composite resin and the acrylic denture teeth interface. Methods: Forty cylindrical sticks of acrylic resin with denture teeth mounted atop were prepared. Various treatments were implemented upon the acrylic resin teeth surfaces. The samples were divided into four groups (n = 10). Light-cured composite resin (LC) was applied over all treated and untreated surfaces of tested groups. The shear bond was tested using a universal tensile testing apparatus with the knife-edge of a 0.8mm shear tester. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA performed at a confidence level of 95% and significant P-value of (P ≤ 0.05). Results: Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between treated and untreated teeth surfaces. The treated surfaces exhibited various levels of bond strength depending on the type of treatment. Conclusion: Application of VLC bonding agent with prior treatment of methylmethacrylate (MMA) on the acrylic resin denture teeth resulted in maximum bond strength with composite resin. PMID:28400865

  19. Contour of lingual surface in lower complete denture formed by polished surface impression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to analyze the shapes of lingual polished surfaces in lower complete dentures formed by polished surface impressions and to provide reference data for use when manufacturing edentulous trays and lower complete dentures. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-six patients with mandibular edentulism were studied. After lower wax dentures were fabricated, wax was removed from the lingual side of the wax denture and a lingual polished surface impression was obtained with tissue conditioner. The definitive denture was scanned with a three-dimensional scanner, and scanned images were obtained. At the cross-sections of the lingual frenum, lateral incisors, first premolars, first molars, and anterior border of the retromolar pads, three points were marked and eight measurements were taken. The Kruskal-Wallis test and a post hoc analysis with the Mann-Whitney test were performed. RESULTS Each patient showed similar values for the same areas on the left and right sides without a statistically significant difference. The height of the contour of the lingual polished surface at the lingual frenum was halfway between the occlusal plane and lingual border, it moved gradually in a downward direction. The angle from the occlusal plane to the height of the contour of the lingual polished surface was increased as it progressed from the lingual frenum towards the retromolar pads. CONCLUSION The shape of the mandibular lingual polished surface was convex at the lingual frenum, lateral incisors and gradually flattened towards the first molars and retromolar pads. PMID:28018565

  20. Rehabilitation of oral function with removable dentures--still an option?

    PubMed

    Xie, Q; Ding, T; Yang, G

    2015-03-01

    Tooth loss is a chronic disability, which makes it difficult for patients to perform essential tasks such as eating, communicating with others and socialising. Numerous studies have revealed and addressed the recent rapid development of various prosthodontic materials and treatment patterns. Oral rehabilitation with dentures exerts a great influence on people's daily life and has tremendous social implications. Dentures help to restore an individual's sense of normality and ability to interact normally. With the introduction and progression of implant technology, many troublesome issues can now be solved simply. Nowadays, more and more attention has been paid to new trends (implant-assisted restoration and fixed prostheses). However, removable dentures may be a more appropriate solution under some circumstances, such as if they are a patient's preferred option, if remaining oral tissues are in poor condition, or if they provide the most cost-effective form of treatment. Thus, removable dentures are still an option for the rehabilitation of oral function. The purpose of this article was to retrospectively review the applications of removable dentures and to emphasise their indispensable status. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Evaluation of Sensibility Threshold for Interocclusal Thickness of Patients Wearing Complete Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Shala, Kujtim Sh.; Ahmedi, Enis F.; Tmava-Dragusha, Arlinda

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate sensibility threshold for interocclusal thickness in experienced and nonexperienced denture wearers after the insertion of new complete dentures. Materials and Methods A total of 88 patients with complete dentures have participated in this study. The research was divided into two experimental groups, compared with the previous experience prosthetic dental treatment. The sensibility threshold for interocclusal thickness was measured with metal foil with 8 μm thickness and width of 8 mm, placed between the upper and lower incisor region. Statistical analysis was performed using standard software package BMDP (biomedical statistical package). Results Results suggest that time of measurement affects the average values of the sensibility threshold for interocclusal thickness (F = 242.68, p = 0.0000). Gender appeared to be a significant factor when it interacted with time measurement resulting in differences in sensibility threshold for interocclusal thickness (gender: F = 9.84, p = 0.018; F = 4.83, p = 0.0003). Conclusion The sensibility threshold for interocclusal thickness was the most important functional adaptation in patient with complete dentures. A unique trait of this indicator is the progressive reduction of initial values and a tendency to reestablish the stationary state in the fifteenth week after dentures is taken off. PMID:28702055

  2. Comparative review of gnathometric characteristics in total dentures and eugnathic subjects.

    PubMed

    Carek, V; Jerolimov, V; Catović, A; Buković, D

    1997-06-01

    The problem of determining the position and lining of the teeth in total dentures is presented by a comparative examination of gnathometric variables in eugnathic subjects and in those wearing total dentures. The material consisted of 51 plaster casts of eugnathic subjects and 49 subjects wearing total dentures. The following were examined: upper total number of incisors (T1), anterior width (AW), posterior width (PW), anterior length (AL) and posterior length (PL) of models. Analysis of the investigated variables was carried out by means of sliding calipers MECANIC Type 6901 (IVOCLAR, Lichtenstein) with a scale of 0-130 mm, and reading accuracy 97.5%. A three-dimensional pair of compasses according to Korhaus (Dentaurum, Germany) was used to measure the anterior and posterior lengths of models, with a scale 10-60 mm and reading accuracy 95%. No significant difference was observed between the eugnathic subjects and subjects wearing total dentures (p > 0.05). The results of this comparative gnathometric analysis of examined variables (Tl, AW, PW, AL and PL) are a contribution to the rules when lining anterior and posterior teeth in total dentures.

  3. In vivo biofilm formation on a soft denture liner in elderly patients with controlled diabetes.

    PubMed

    Faccio, Daniela R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Cenci, Maximiliano S; Demarco, Flávio F; Moraes, Rafael R; Boscato, Noéli

    2012-06-01

    This in vivo study evaluated the influence of controlled diabetes on biofilm formation on a soft denture liner in elderly patients. Soft denture lining materials are more susceptible to microbial colonisation than denture base acrylic resins. Especially in the elderly, several predisposing factors may accumulate leading to an increased probability of biofilm development that may result in candidiasis, a significant clinical oral disease. Volunteers wearing complete dentures were divided into two groups (n = 20): diabetic patients with controlled glycaemia, and healthy patients. In both groups, a silicone-based soft liner was placed in a recess created at the base of the maxillary dentures. Subjects cleaned the prosthesis three times a day. Biofilm formed on the liner was quantified at various time points (baseline, two, four and six weeks). Data were analysed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). There was no statistical difference in biofilm formation for any of the time points between controlled diabetes patients and healthy patients. The results suggest that the control of diabetes in elderly patients provides the same levels of biofilm formation when compared to healthy individuals. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Bond Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Teeth Using Visible Light Cure Composite Resin.

    PubMed

    Muhsin, Saja Ali

    2017-01-01

    Although bonding to denture teeth after surface treatment with chemical agents is desirable, there is little information on the use of Visible Light Cure composite resin (VLC) as bonding denture materials. To determine the effect of various surface treatments on shear bond strength between Visible Light Cure composite resin and the acrylic denture teeth interface. Forty cylindrical sticks of acrylic resin with denture teeth mounted atop were prepared. Various treatments were implemented upon the acrylic resin teeth surfaces. The samples were divided into four groups (n = 10). Light-cured composite resin (LC) was applied over all treated and untreated surfaces of tested groups. The shear bond was tested using a universal tensile testing apparatus with the knife-edge of a 0.8mm shear tester. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA performed at a confidence level of 95% and significant P-value of (P ≤ 0.05). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between treated and untreated teeth surfaces. The treated surfaces exhibited various levels of bond strength depending on the type of treatment. Application of VLC bonding agent with prior treatment of methylmethacrylate (MMA) on the acrylic resin denture teeth resulted in maximum bond strength with composite resin.

  5. Silver nanoparticle incorporation effect on mechanical and thermal properties of denture base acrylic resins

    PubMed Central

    KÖROĞLU, Ayşegül; ŞAHİN, Onur; KÜRKÇÜOĞLU, Işın; DEDE, Doğu Ömür; ÖZDEMİR, Tonguç; HAZER, Baki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the mechanical and thermal characteristics of two denture base acrylic resins containing silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Material and Methods Two different acrylic denture base resins (heat-polymerized and microwave polymerized) containing 0.3, 0.8 and 1.6 wt% AgNPs were evaluated for flexural strength, elastic modulus and impact strength. The glass transition temperature (Tg) and relative heat capacity (Cp) of the samples were determined from the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) results. For statistical analysis, two-way ANOVA and Tukey-HSD tests were performed. Results Addition of 0.8% and 1.6% AgNPs in microwave-polymerized resin significantly decreased the transverse strength and elastic modulus. In terms of impact strength, the addition of AgNPs has no effect on both resin groups. Glass transition temperature (Tg) was decreased with the addition of AgNPs for both denture base resins. Conclusions The incorporation of AgNPs, generally used for antimicrobial efficiency, affected the transverse strength of the denture base acrylic resins depending on the concentration of nanoparticles. Tg was decreased with the addition of AgNPs for both denture base resins. PMID:28076464

  6. Effect of Antimicrobial Denture Base Resin on Multi-Species Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keke; Ren, Biao; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H K; Chen, Yu; Han, Qi; Li, Bolei; Weir, Michael D; Li, Mingyun; Feng, Mingye; Cheng, Lei

    2016-06-29

    Our aims of the research were to study the antimicrobial effect of dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) modified denture base resin on multi-species biofilms and the biocompatibility of this modified dental material. Candida albicans (C. albicans), Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis), as well as Actinomyces naeslundii (A. naeslundii) were used for biofilm formation on denture base resin. Colony forming unit (CFU) counts, microbial viability staining, and 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) array were used to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of DMADDM. C. albicans staining and Real-time PCR were used to analyze the morphology and expression of virulence genes of C. albicans in biofilm. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) array and Real-time PCR were conducted to examine the results after biofilm co-cultured with epithelial cell. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining followed by histological evaluation were used to study the biocompatibility of this modified material. We found that DMADDM containing groups reduced both biomass and metabolic activity of the biofilm significantly. DMADDM can also inhibit the virulence of C. albicans by means of inhibiting the hyphal development and downregulation of two virulence related genes. DMADDM significantly reduced the cell damage caused by multi-species biofilm according to the LDH activity and reduced the expression of IL-18 gene of the cells simultaneously. The in vivo histological evaluation proved that the addition of DMADDM less than 6.6% in denture material did not increase the inflammatory response (p > 0.05). Therefore, we proposed that the novel denture base resin containing DMADDM may be considered as a new promising therapeutic system against problems caused by microbes on denture base such as denture stomatitis.

  7. Effect of Antimicrobial Denture Base Resin on Multi-Species Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keke; Ren, Biao; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H. K.; Chen, Yu; Han, Qi; Li, Bolei; Weir, Michael D.; Li, Mingyun; Feng, Mingye; Cheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Our aims of the research were to study the antimicrobial effect of dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) modified denture base resin on multi-species biofilms and the biocompatibility of this modified dental material. Candida albicans (C. albicans), Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis), as well as Actinomyces naeslundii (A. naeslundii) were used for biofilm formation on denture base resin. Colony forming unit (CFU) counts, microbial viability staining, and 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) array were used to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of DMADDM. C. albicans staining and Real-time PCR were used to analyze the morphology and expression of virulence genes of C. albicans in biofilm. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) array and Real-time PCR were conducted to examine the results after biofilm co-cultured with epithelial cell. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining followed by histological evaluation were used to study the biocompatibility of this modified material. We found that DMADDM containing groups reduced both biomass and metabolic activity of the biofilm significantly. DMADDM can also inhibit the virulence of C. albicans by means of inhibiting the hyphal development and downregulation of two virulence related genes. DMADDM significantly reduced the cell damage caused by multi-species biofilm according to the LDH activity and reduced the expression of IL-18 gene of the cells simultaneously. The in vivo histological evaluation proved that the addition of DMADDM less than 6.6% in denture material did not increase the inflammatory response (p > 0.05). Therefore, we proposed that the novel denture base resin containing DMADDM may be considered as a new promising therapeutic system against problems caused by microbes on denture base such as denture stomatitis. PMID:27367683

  8. [The use of Dental D (polyacetal resin) as an alternative for chrome-cobalt removable partial denture: a case report].

    PubMed

    Savion, Y; Sharon-Buller, A; Kalisker, Y; Kalisker, N; Sela, M

    2001-10-01

    Polyacetal resin (Delrin) is well known material in many medical fields as for artificial heart valves and artificial hip joints. In dentistry the material is known as Dental D, and among its other applications, is used for removable partial dentures. The article presents a cleft lip and palate patient with missing teeth (12 and 22). The patient underwent on operations for closure of the cleft, but even so some sinus tracts from the nasal cavity to the soft and hard palate exist. The patient was rehabilitated 10 years ago with chrome-cobalt removable partial denture, but lately, episodes of swelling and burning sensation were reported. The patient was diagnosed (by the allergy clinic in Hadassah hospital) as allergic to chrome-cobalt. Some optional treatment plans were offered to the patient (fixed, which involved an operation of closing the fistulas, and then a fixed restoration, another option was removable denture with Dental D). The patient chose to be rehabilitated with Dental D removable partial denture, which closes the fistulas and reconstructs the missing teeth. Due to the physical properties of the Dental D, its biocompatibility and the improved esthetics results, the Dental D can be a good alternative for the chrome-cobalt removable partial denture. The esthetic results with the Dental D, as far better than the conventional partial denture.

  9. Effectiveness of microwave disinfection of complete dentures on the treatment of Candida-related denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Neppelenbroek, K H; Pavarina, A C; Palomari Spolidorio, D M; Sgavioli Massucato, E M; Spolidorio, L C; Vergani, C E

    2008-11-01

    The effectiveness of microwave disinfection of maxillary complete dentures on the treatment of Candida-related denture stomatitis was evaluated. Patients (n = 60) were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups of 15 subjects each; patients performed the routine denture care; Mw group: patients had their upper denture microwaved (650 W per 6 min) three times per week for 30 days; group MwMz: patients received the treatment of Mw group in conjunction with topical application of miconazole three times per day for 30 days; group Mz: patients received the antifungal therapy of group MwMz. Cytological smears and mycological cultures were taken from the dentures and the palates of all patients before treatment at day 15 and 30 of treatment and at follow-up (days 60 and 90). The effectiveness of the treatments was evaluated by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Microbial and clinical analysis of the control group demonstrated no significant decrease in the candidal infection over the clinical trial. Smears and cultures of palates and dentures of the groups Mw and MwMz exhibited absence of Candida at day 15 and 30 of treatment. On day 60 and 90, few mycelial forms were observed on 11 denture smears (36.6%) from groups Mw and MwMz, but not on the palatal smears. Miconazole (group Mz) neither caused significant reduction of palatal inflammation nor eradicated Candida from the dentures and palates. Microwaving dentures was effective for the treatment of denture stomatitis. The recurrence of Candida on microwaved dentures at follow-up was dramatically reduced.

  10. Investigation of bonding properties of denture bases to silicone-based soft denture liner immersed in isobutyl methacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Tugut, Faik; Mutaf, Burcu; Guney, Umit

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the bonding properties of denture bases to silicone-based soft denture liners immersed in isobutyl methacrylate (iBMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) for various lengths of time. MATERIALS AND METHODS Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) test specimens were fabricated (75 mm in length, 12 mm in diameter at the thickest section, and 7 mm at the thinnest section) and then randomly assigned to five groups (n=15); untreated (Group 1), resilient liner immersed in iBMA for 1 minute (Group 2), resilient liner immersed in iBMA for 3 minutes (Group 3), resilient liner immersed in HEMA for 1 minute (Group 4), and resilient liner immersed in HEMA for 3 minutes (Group 5). The resilient liner specimens were processed between 2 PMMA blocks. Bonding strength of the liners to PMMA was compared by tensile test with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were evaluated by 1-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons tests (α=0.05). RESULTS The highest mean value of force was observed in Group 3 specimens. The differences between groups were statistically significant (P<.05), except between Group 1 and Group 4 (P=.063). CONCLUSION Immersion of silicone-based soft denture liners in iBMA for 3 minutes doubled the tensile bond strength between the silicone soft liner and PMMA denture base materials compared to the control group. PMID:24843397

  11. Removable partial dentures: use of rapid prototyping.

    PubMed

    Lima, Julia Magalhaes Costa; Anami, Lilian Costa; Araujo, Rodrigo Maximo; Pavanelli, Carlos A

    2014-10-01

    The CAD/CAM technology associated with rapid prototyping (RP) is already widely used in the fabrication of all-ceramic fixed prostheses and in the biomedical area; however, the use of this technology for the manufacture of metal frames for removable dentures is new. This work reports the results of a literature review conducted on the use of CAD/CAM and RP in the manufacture of removable partial dentures. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Magnetic denture retention systems: inexpensive and efficient.

    PubMed

    Gillings, B R

    1984-09-01

    A magnetic retention system has been used in more than 6000 complete and partial overdentures, sectional dentures and implant overdentures, with excellent clinical results and patient acceptability. For the overdenture application, decoronated, root-treated teeth are fitted with preformed or cast magnetisable alloy root elements, or 'keepers'. Following conventional denture construction, paired cobalt/samarium magnets in a special configuration are cured into the denture base so that with the denture inserted, the magnets grip the root elements with a retentive force of approximately 300 g per root. The paired magnet arrangement eliminates any external magnetic field and doubles the available retention. Magnetic retention has few of the problems encountered with other retention devices. It offers simplicity, low cost, self-adjustment, inherent stress-breaking, automatic repositioning after denture displacement, comparative freedom of lateral denture movement, reduces trauma to retained roots and eliminates the need for adjustment in service. For the sectional denture application, undesirable undercuts on the abutment teeth are used to provide passive, positive retention. The separate buccal and lingual sections are joined together by parallel pins fitting into matching tubes, assembly being maintained by magnetic attraction between a retention element in one section and a keeper in the other. Insertion and removal are more difficult than with a conventional denture but soft tissue coverage is minimal. There are no visible retainer arms and food traps are eliminated. Abutment tooth preparation is negligible, the laboratory procedures simple, and the treatment inexpensive and reversible. A clinical trial of magnetic overdenture retention in conjunction with osseointegrated titanium implants is now in progress. After 21 months acceptable clinical results have been obtained. An improved implant with an alumina core and a sintered hydroxyapatite coating is at present

  13. The conversion partial denture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Waliszewski, Michael P; Brudvik, James S

    2004-04-01

    The treatment alternative described maximizes the benefit of remaining teeth while allowing simplified alteration of the prosthesis if abutments are lost during the life span of the removable partial denture (RPD). A conversion partial is an RPD whose tooth-frame assembly components are individually fabricated and then joined with an acrylic resin major connector. The conversion RPD optimizes retention and stabilization of a terminal dentition and can be easily converted to an immediate complete denture.

  14. A modified indirect method for fabricating silicone soft-lined complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Oki, Meiko; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Hidekazu

    2016-12-01

    A method is described of polymerizing silicone soft lining materials with a hard acrylic resin base by using a photoactivated spacer. The use of a photoactivated spacer is convenient because of the ease in determining the correct location covering the attached mucosa but not extending to the border margins. By using this method, the optimum shape and thickness of the spacer can also be ensured. Thus, the long-term durability of soft lining dentures is achieved without invasion by microorganisms or peeling away from the denture margin.

  15. Knowledge and attitudes of dental interns toward denture adhesives in King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al Taweel, Sara Mohammad; Al Shehri, Huda Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes of dental interns at King Saud University College of Dentistry (KSUCD) regarding denture adhesives (DAs). Materials and Methods: Surveys were distributed to dental interns at KSUCD (n = 100). Cross-tabulations with the Pearson-™s Chi-square test were used to compare variables using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (P ≤ 0.05). Results: Approximately, 85.5% of the respondents had learned about DAs as part of their undergraduate curriculum, 71% agree that DAs can be a beneficial adjunct in the fabrication of dentures, and 87% agree that dentists should routinely inform all denture patients of the proper use and misuse of DAs. Conclusion: Most of the participants have adequate knowledge and attitude toward DAs. PMID:28042271

  16. Age, gender, dentures and oral mucosal disorders.

    PubMed

    MacEntee, M I; Glick, N; Stolar, E

    1998-03-01

    The numbers of participants over 75 years of age in previous studies of oral health have not been sufficient to permit a full investigation of the influence of age on the mouth. In this study a disproportionate stratified random sample of 255 independent elders was selected from a list of urban voters to provide similar numbers of men and women in three age groups. The subjects were interviewed and examined, and nearly half of them had mucosal disorders. There was a significant (P < 0.05) association between mucosal lesions and the use of dentures and tobacco, whereas stomatitis, denture-related hyperplasia and angular cheilitis in particular were associated significantly with men and with the use of defective dentures. Logistic regression revealed that neither age alone nor the quality of dentures predispose to mucosal lesions, but that the odds of finding stomatitis, denture-related hyperplasia and angular cheilitis in particular increased about three-fold in denture-users, and almost doubled in men.

  17. The effects of denture status on nutrition.

    PubMed

    Papas, A S; Palmer, C A; Rounds, M C; Russell, R M

    1998-01-01

    In Part I of this study, the Human Nutrition Research Center of the United States Department of Agriculture's Nutritional Status Study (NSS) of 691 independently living elderly people aged 60-98 found that poor dietary quality was associated with low educational attainment, low median family income, and self-report of partial or full dentures. In Part II, further analysis was conducted on a random subsample of 181 subjects who were examined and divided into four groups according to dentate status: two dentures, one denture, partial dentures, and teeth. In this subgroup, significant correlations were found between the quality of nutrient intake and the degree of edentulousness. Analysis of 53 nutrients plus calories from three-day food records showed a significantly higher nutritional quality of the diet in dentate volunteers than in the other groups. This difference was approximately 20% for 19 nutrients, bringing some nutrients (such as calcium) below the RDA for this age group. Although direct correlations cannot be made with actual nutritional status, the introduction of dentures could further compromise the precarious nutritional intake of the elderly population. With this in mind, dentists need to consider carefully the importance of their elderly patients maintaining at least some natural dentition and should provide adequate information on nutritional adaptations to dentures.

  18. Efficacy of denture adhesives in maxillary dentures using gnathodynamometry: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Polyzois, Gregory; Lagouvardos, Panagiotis; Frangou, Maria; Stefaniotis, Theodoros

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of four commercially available denture adhesives on the incisal and premolar dislodgement forces of maxillary complete dentures by using an electronic and disposable gnathodynamometer and compare the measured incisal forces for differences. This study was conducted with 12 complete maxillary denture wearers. Four commercially available denture adhesives Super Corega(®), Corega Ultra(®), Super Corega Powder(®) and Fittydent Cationic(®) were investigated. Testing protocol and sequence included baseline measurements without adhesives (control) for previous and new dentures and then replications of measurements with the four adhesives. Maximum dislodgement forces were recorded in two sites between central incisors and the left 2nd premolars by using an electronic and disposable gnathodynamometer. To estimate the effect of the different adhesives on the dislodgement forces, data were analyzed by a 2- and 3-way ANOVA, while for estimating the agreement of the two devices a Bland-Altman and Mountain plots were used. ANOVAs indicated significant differences between adhesives (p < 0.05), denture types (p < 0.05) and biting sites (p < 0.05) with both devices. Bland-Altman plot and Mountain plots indicated a poor agreement of the two devices. It was concluded that denture adhesives increase the denture dislodgement forces, but with differences among them. The two devices do not highly agree with each other, but each one alone is useful in estimating dislodgement forces in clinical practice and research.

  19. Effects of antibacterial coating on monomer exudation and the mechanical properties of denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dan; Gong, Haihuan; Zhang, Jiahui; Guo, Xiaowei; Yan, Min; Zhu, Song

    2017-01-01

    Denture base resin may be exposed to different conditions for long periods, resulting in the loss of monomer by exudation and a decrease in mechanical properties. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate monomer loss by exudation from denture base resins doped with antibacterial coatings and their mechanical properties after long-term water immersion. Four kinds of dental base resin materials were used as experimental materials. The specimens of each resin were divided into an experimental group (coated) and a control group (uncoated). Monomer exudation was tested at 7 and 28 days by gas chromatography after materials were immersed in distilled water or a solution of 75% alcohol/distilled water. Flexural strength and elastic modulus were tested with a universal testing machine after immersion for 2 and 180 days. The surface morphology was characterized with atomic force microscopy. The data were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey-Kramer honest significant difference test (α=.05). In both of the immersion media, each of the 3 factors (materials, coating, and immersion time) significantly affected the monomer exudation (P<.05). In addition, the interaction between any 2 of those factors or among the 3 factors had a significant interaction effect on the monomer exudation of the denture base (P<.05). The mechanical properties of the tested materials were different, and the immersion time had a significant effect on the flexural properties (P<.05). For flexural strength, a significant interaction effect occurred among the 3 factors (material, coating, and immersion time) (P<.05). The coating has a significant effect on the elastic modulus of denture base resin (P<.05) and on the interaction between the material and immersion time (P<.05). The silver-loaded mesoporous silica antibacterial coating can effectively reduce monomer exudation and enhance the flexural properties of denture base resin after immersion. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council

  20. Effect of Reinforcement on the Flexural Properties of Injection-Molded Thermoplastic Denture Base Resins.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hirono; Hamanaka, Ippei; Takahashi, Yutaka; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of reinforcement on the flexural properties of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Three injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins (polyamide, polyester, polycarbonate) were selected for this study, and a conventional heat-polymerized denture base resin (PMMA) was used as a control. Continuous unidirectional glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) and metal wire were used for reinforcement. Reinforced bar-shaped specimens (65 mm long, 10 mm wide, 3.3 mm high) were fabricated (n = 10). The flexural strength at the proportional limit (FS-PL) and the elastic modulus were measured using a three-point bending test. All the denture base material specimens reinforced with FRC possessed a significantly higher FS-PL compared to those without reinforcement. The FS-PL of the polycarbonate specimens reinforced with metal wire was significantly higher than that without reinforcement, and there was no significant difference in the FS-PL between the polycarbonate specimens reinforced with FRC and those with metal wire. The order of the elastic modulus according to the denture base material, arranged in terms of statistical significance, was as follows: PMMA (3.46 ± 0.53 GPa) > polycarbonate (2.69 ± 0.48 GPa) > polyester (2.00 ± 0.39 GPa) > polyamide (1.14 ± 0.35 GPa). The order of the elastic modulus according to the reinforcement, arranged in terms of statistical significance, was as follows: metal wire (2.74 ± 0.96 GPa) > FRC (2.40 ± 0.89 GPa) > no reinforcement (1.82 ± 0.83 GPa). Continuous unidirectional glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) reinforcement had a satisfactory reinforcing effect for the injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. Denture Hygiene Knowledge and Practices among Complete Denture Wearers attending a Postgraduate Dental Institute.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Thatapudi; Gowd, Snigdha; Suresan, Vinay; Mantri, Sneha; Saxena, Sudhanshu; Mishra, Prateek; Panday, Pragya

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the denture hygiene knowledge and practices among patients using complete dentures attending a postgraduate dental hospital in Jabalpur city. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between hygiene knowledge and practices to the denture wearer's gender, education, and income. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire involving the complete denture patients attending the Department of Prosthodontics. The study subjects were randomly selected by recruiting old dentures wearers visiting the Department of Prosthodontics for a recall visit or for new dentures on the odd dates of the month. All subjects signed an informed consent before filling the questionnaire. The institutional review committee approved the study. Descriptive statistics included computation of frequencies and percentages. Nonparametric test, namely, chi-square test, was used for further data analysis; p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 530 individuals were approached for participation in our survey, 30 (5.66%) subjects declined to participate. The results showed that 195 (39%) subjects were wearing the same dentures for more than 5 years. In this study, 51 (10.2%) subjects reported never having been advised by their dentists as to how to clean their dentures. Among all the subjects interviewed, 264 (52.8%) reported to clean the oral tissues daily. This study disclosed that 66 (13.2%) of the subjects usually slept with their dentures. Maximum subjects in illiterate group had experienced bad breath sometimes when compared with subjects in postgraduate group (χ(2) = 47.452, p < 0.001). There was a significant difference for method of denture cleaning according to gender (χ(2) = 101.076, p < 0.001). The majority of the denture wearers have limited knowledge of denture cleansing and oral hygiene practices. Hygiene habits and practices may not always present a positive

  2. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A partially fabricated denture kit is a device composed of connected preformed teeth that is... with the oral tissues. After the denture base is constructed, the connected preformed teeth...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A partially fabricated denture kit is a device composed of connected preformed teeth that is... with the oral tissues. After the denture base is constructed, the connected preformed teeth...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A partially fabricated denture kit is a device composed of connected preformed teeth that is... with the oral tissues. After the denture base is constructed, the connected preformed teeth...

  5. The oral status of elderly removable partial denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Drake, C W; Beck, J D

    1993-01-01

    A random sample of 1019 elderly home dwelling persons participated in this study. There were 809 dentate respondents, 28.6% of whom wore removable partial dentures. They were examined for coronal and root caries, gingival recession, pocket depth and loss of gingival attachment. The removable partial dentures were also evaluated. Abutment teeth were found to be more likely to have caries and periodontal disease than all other teeth. Using a MANOVA statistical procedure, the analysis indicated that the partial denture itself, irrespective of any professionally determined problems with the denture, appears to affect coronal and root caries on the teeth of partial denture wearers. Partial dentures judged to need repair or adjustment were related to periodontal status. The data on adverse effects of partial dentures suggest a need for patient education by the dentist and through public health measures, and good oral self care and regular professional recall for people who wear removable partial dentures.

  6. Denture-induced fibrous inflammatory hyperplasia (epulis fissuratum): research aspects.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G A

    1993-01-01

    Denture-induced fibrous inflammatory hyperplasia (FIH) is a common lesion of the oral mucosa which can be treated by either surgical excision, conservative methods or both combined. Clinical aspects are briefly reviewed and a newer conservative approach to treatment is suggested. This is based on the observation that light pressure using soft lining materials may facilitate shrinkage of the fibrous mass. The histopathogenesis is discussed from the view point of the modern technologies of immunocytochemistry, and digital image analysis. The recent development of a microwave instrument with sophisticated control of power and temperature is discussed and its use in the field of histotechnology outlined.

  7. Effect of palatal form on movement of teeth during processing of complete denture prosthesis: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Sumanth; Manjunath, Shaurya; Vajawat, Mayuri

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this in-vitro study was to assess the influence of shallow and deep palatal forms on the movement of teeth during the processing of complete denture prosthesis. Materials and Methods: Maxillary casts with shallow and deep palatal forms were selected and duplicated to make 10 casts of each palatal form. Base plates were constructed and teeth were arranged in their anatomic positions. Metal pins with true apex were placed on the central groove of the right and left first molars and one on the incisive papilla area as a reference point. Casts were scanned using i-CAT Vision Q 1.9 (i-CAT cone beam 3D dental imaging system by Imaging Sciences International, PA, USA), which has 360° rotational tomography. The distances between the apices of metallic pin inserts on the teeth and fitted point of reference were recorded in buccopalatal axes at waxed up stage, after deflasking, and after finishing and polishing. Results: Results showed a statistically significant movement of teeth in shallow and deep palatal forms during all stages of complete denture processing. In shallow palatal form dentures, there was a significant tooth movement in palatal direction between Stages 1 and 2 (P ≤ 0.05) and buccal movement between Stages 2 and 3. In deep palatal form dentures, teeth showed a statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05) movement in buccal direction during all stages of denture processing. Conclusion: Teeth showed significant movement during processing of acrylic resin dentures. Overall, the movement of teeth in shallow palatal form dentures was in palatal direction, whereas in deep palatal form dentures, the movement of teeth was in buccal direction. PMID:27041898

  8. Transcription Factors Efg1 and Bcr1 Regulate Biofilm Formation and Virulence during Candida albicans-Associated Denture Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Junko; Yu, Alika; Fidel, Paul L.; Noverr, Mairi C.

    2016-01-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS) is characterized by inflammation of the oral mucosa in direct contact with dentures and affects a significant number of otherwise healthy denture wearers. The disease is