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Sample records for deoxyribose

  1. Mangifera indica L. extract (Vimang) inhibits 2-deoxyribose damage induced by Fe (III) plus ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto Lázaro; Delgado, René; Núñez-Sellés, Alberto J; Vercesi, Anibal E

    2006-02-01

    Vimang is an aqueous extract of selected species of Mangifera indica L, used in Cuba as a nutritional antioxidant supplement. Many in vitro and in vivo models of oxidative stress have been used to elucidate the antioxidant mechanisms of this extract. To further characterize the mechanism of Vimang action, its effect on the degradation of 2-deoxyribose induced by Fe (III)-EDTA plus ascorbate or plus hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase was studied. Vimang was shown to be a potent inhibitor of 2-deoxyribose degradation mediated by Fe (III)-EDTA plus ascorbate or superoxide (O2-). The results revealed that Vimang, at concentrations higher than 50 microM mangiferin equivalent, was equally effective in preventing degradation of both 15 mM and 1.5 mM 2-deoxyribose. At a fixed Fe (III) concentration, increasing the concentration of ligands (either EDTA or citrate) caused a significant reduction in the protective effects of Vimang. When ascorbate was replaced by O2- (formed by hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase) the protective efficiency of Vimang was also inversely related to EDTA concentration. The results strongly indicate that Vimang does not block 2-deoxyribose degradation by simply trapping *OH radicals. Rather, Vimang seems to act as an antioxidant by complexing iron ions, rendering them inactive or poorly active in the Fenton reaction. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The Relative Reactivity of Deoxyribose and Ribose: Did DNA Come Before RNA?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, Jason P.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1995-01-01

    If it is assumed that there was a precursor to the ribose-phosphate backbone of RNA in the preRNA world (such as peptide nucleic acid), then the entry of various sugars into the genetic material may be related to the stability and non-enzymatic reactivity of the aldose. The rate of decomposition of 2-deoxyribose has been determined to be 1/3 that of ribose. In addition we have measured the amount of free aldehyde by H-1 and C-13 NMR and find that it has approximately 0.15% free aldehyde compared to 0.05% for ribose at 25 C. This suggests that deoxyribose would be significantly more reactive with early bases in the absence of enzymes. This is confirmed by urazole and deoxyribose reacting to form the deoxynucleoside 45 times faster as 25 C than urazole reacts with ribose to form the Ribonucleoside. Urazole is a potential precursor of uracil and is a plausible prebiotic compound which reacts with aldoses to form nucleosides. Thus the non-enzymatic reactivity of deoxyribose would favor its early use over ribose until enzymes could change the relative reactivities. Most of the reasons that RNA is presumed to have come before DNA are extrapolations back from contemporary metabolism (e.g. the abundance of ribose based coenzymes, the biosynthesis of histidine, deoxyribonucleotides are synthesized from ribonucleotides, etc.). It is very difficult to reconstruct biochemical pathways much before the last common ancestor, and it is even more difficult to do more than guess at the biochemistry of very early self-replicating systems. Thus we believe that these reasons are not compelling and that the non-enzymatic chemistry may be more important than enzymatic pathways for constructing the earliest of biochemical pathways. While the RNA world has been discussed at great length, there has not been an exploration of the transition out of the RNA world. We have constructed many possible schemes of genetic takeover events from preRNA to modern DNA, RNA, protein system which could

  3. Hydrogen abstraction from deoxyribose by a neighboring 3'-uracil peroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Schyman, Patric; Eriksson, Leif A; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2009-05-07

    Theoretical examination of the reactivity of the uracil-5-peroxyl radical when abstracting a hydrogen atom from a neighboring 5'-deoxyribose in 5'-ApU-5-peroxyl-3' has been performed using density functional theory with the MPWB1K functional. Halogenated uracils are often used as radiosensitizers in DNA since the reactive uracil-5-yl radical is formed upon radiation and is known to create strand break and alkali-labile sites. Under aerobic conditions, such as in the cell, it has been proposed that the uracil-5-peroxyl radical is formed and would be the damaging agent. Our results show low reactivity for the uracil-5-peroxyl radical, determined by calculating the activation and reaction energies for the plausible hydrogen abstraction sites C1', C2', and C3' of the neighboring 5'-deoxyribose. These findings support the hypothesis that hydrogen abstraction primarily occurs by the uracil-5-yl radical, also under aerobic conditions, prior to formation of the peroxyl radical.

  4. Production of 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate from fructose to demonstrate a potential of artificial bio-synthetic pathway using thermophilic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kohsuke; Maya, Shohei; Omasa, Takeshi; Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio; Ohtake, Hisao

    2010-08-02

    Six thermophilic enzymes from Thermus thermophilus were used to construct an 'artificial bio-synthetic pathway' for the production of 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate from fructose. By a simple operation using six recombinant Escherichia coli strains producing the thermophilic enzymes, respectively, fructose was converted to 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate with a molar yield of 55%. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Non-intercalative, deoxyribose binding of boric acid to calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Ayse; Gursaclı, Refiye Tekiner; Tekinay, Turgay

    2014-05-01

    The present study characterizes the effects of the boric acid binding on calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) by spectroscopic and calorimetric methods. UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were employed to characterize binding properties. Changes in the secondary structure of ct-DNA were determined by CD spectroscopy. Sizes and morphologies of boric acid-DNA complexes were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The kinetics of boric acid binding to calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). ITC results revealed that boric acid exhibits a moderate affinity to ct-DNA with a binding constant (K a) of 9.54 × 10(4) M(-1). FT-IR results revealed that boric acid binds to the deoxyribose sugar of DNA without disrupting the B-conformation at tested concentrations.

  6. Comparison of the acid-base properties of ribose and 2'-deoxyribose nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Mucha, Ariel; Knobloch, Bernd; Jezowska-Bojczuk, Małgorzata; Kozłowski, Henryk; Sigel, Roland K O

    2008-01-01

    The extent to which the replacement of a ribose unit by a 2'-deoxyribose unit influences the acid-base properties of nucleotides has not hitherto been determined in detail. In this study, by potentiometric pH titrations in aqueous solution, we have measured the acidity constants of the 5'-di- and 5'-triphosphates of 2'-deoxyguanosine [i.e., of H(2)(dGDP)(-) and H(2)(dGTP)(2-)] as well as of the 5'-mono-, 5'-di-, and 5'-triphosphates of 2'-deoxyadenosine [i.e., of H(2)(dAMP)(+/-), H(2)(dADP)(-), and H(2)(dATP)(2-)]. These 12 acidity constants (of the 56 that are listed) are compared with those of the corresponding ribose derivatives (published data) measured under the same experimental conditions. The results show that all protonation sites in the 2'-deoxynucleotides are more basic than those in their ribose counterparts. The influence of the 2'-OH group is dependent on the number of 5'-phosphate groups as well as on the nature of the purine nucleobase. The basicity of N7 in guanine nucleotides is most significantly enhanced (by about 0.2 pK units), while the effect on the phosphate groups and the N1H or N1H(+) sites is less pronounced but clearly present. In addition, (1)H NMR chemical shift change studies in dependence on pD in D(2)O have been carried out for the dAMP, dADP, and dATP systems, which confirmed the results from the potentiometric pH titrations and showed the nucleotides to be in their anti conformations. Overall, our results are not only of relevance for metal ion binding to nucleotides or nucleic acids, but also constitute an exact basis for the calculation, determination, and understanding of perturbed pK(a) values in DNAzymes and ribozymes, as needed for the delineation of acid-base mechanisms in catalysis.

  7. Early discrimination of nasopharyngeal carcinoma based on tissue deoxyribose nucleic acid surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Sufang; Li, Chao; Lin, Jinyong; Xu, Yuanji; Lu, Jun; Huang, Qingting; Zou, Changyan; Chen, Chao; Xiao, Nanyang; Lin, Duo; Chen, Rong; Pan, Jianji; Feng, Shangyuan

    2016-12-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was employed to detect deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) variations associated with the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Significant SERS spectral differences between the DNA extracted from early NPC, advanced NPC, and normal nasopharyngeal tissue specimens were observed at 678, 729, 788, 1337, 1421, 1506, and 1573 cm-1, which reflects the genetic variations in NPC. Principal component analysis combined with discriminant function analysis for early NPC discrimination yielded a diagnostic accuracy of 86.8%, 92.3%, and 87.9% for early NPC, advanced NPC, and normal nasopharyngeal tissue DNA, respectively. In this exploratory study, we demonstrated the potential of SERS for early detection of NPC based on the DNA molecular study of biopsy tissues.

  8. Excited state properties of naphtho-homologated xxDNA bases and effect of methanol solution, deoxyribose, and base pairing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Laibin; Ren, Tingqi; Tian, Jianxiang; Yang, Xiuqin; Zhou, Liuzhu; Li, Xiaoming

    2013-04-18

    Design and synthesis of fluorescent nucleobase analogues for studying structures and dynamics of nucleic acids have attracted much attention in recent years. In the present work, a comprehensive theoretical study of electronic transitions of naphtho-homologated base analogues, namely, xxC, xxT, xxA, and xxG, was performed. The nature of the low-lying excited states was discussed, and the results were compared with those of x-bases. Geometrical characteristics of the lowest excited singlet ππ* states were explored using the CIS method. The calculated excitation maxima are 423, 397, 383, and 357 nm for xxA, xxG, xxC, and xxT, respectively, and they are greatly red-shifted compared with x-bases and natural bases, allowing them to be selectively excited in the presence of the natural bases. In the gas phase, the fluorescence from them would be expected to occur around 497, 461, 457, and 417 nm, respectively. The effects of methanol solution, deoxyribose, and base paring with their complementary natural bases on the relevant absorption and emission spectra of these modified bases were also examined.

  9. Part I. Metabolites of Penicillium verrucosum var. cyclopium; Part II. Regioselective deuteriations of deoxyribose and incorporation into deoxynucleosides

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Penicillium verrucosum var. cyclopium is the fungus responsible for several outbreaks of neurotoxicoses among cattle in Tennessee beginning in 1979. Verrucosidin isolated from samples of P. verrucosum var. cyclopium was later shown to be a powerful neurotoxin capable of paralyzing its victims and was also said to cause tremoring in some cases. Part I of this dissertation describes the re-investigation of metabolites of P. verrucosum var. cyclopium and tremorgenicity of verrucosidin. Verrucosidin has been shown in this study to be non-tremorgenic. This research also describes development of efficient synthetic methods for incorporation of deuterium into the deoxyribose moiety of deoxyribonucleosides.more » Deuteriated deoxynucleosides are presently being considered for synthesis of deuteriated sequences of DNA to be utilized in {sup 1}H NMR studies of solution conformation and dynamics, as well as interactions with proteins, drugs, metals and carcinogens. A route for synthesizing 2-deoxy-D-ribose from D-ribonic-acid-{gamma}-lactone incorporating deuterium at the C-1, C-2 or C-5 positions is presented.« less

  10. DNA minor groove electrostatic potential: influence of sequence-specific transitions of the torsion angle gamma and deoxyribose conformations.

    PubMed

    Zhitnikova, M Y; Shestopalova, A V

    2017-11-01

    The structural adjustments of the sugar-phosphate DNA backbone (switching of the γ angle (O5'-C5'-C4'-C3') from canonical to alternative conformations and/or C2'-endo → C3'-endo transition of deoxyribose) lead to the sequence-specific changes in accessible surface area of both polar and non-polar atoms of the grooves and the polar/hydrophobic profile of the latter ones. The distribution of the minor groove electrostatic potential is likely to be changing as a result of such conformational rearrangements in sugar-phosphate DNA backbone. Our analysis of the crystal structures of the short free DNA fragments and calculation of their electrostatic potentials allowed us to determine: (1) the number of classical and alternative γ angle conformations in the free B-DNA; (2) changes in the minor groove electrostatic potential, depending on the conformation of the sugar-phosphate DNA backbone; (3) the effect of the DNA sequence on the minor groove electrostatic potential. We have demonstrated that the structural adjustments of the DNA double helix (the conformations of the sugar-phosphate backbone and the minor groove dimensions) induce changes in the distribution of the minor groove electrostatic potential and are sequence-specific. Therefore, these features of the minor groove sizes and distribution of minor groove electrostatic potential can be used as a signal for recognition of the target DNA sequence by protein in the implementation of the indirect readout mechanism.

  11. Direct Activation of NADPH Oxidase 2 by 2-Deoxyribose-1-Phosphate Triggers Nuclear Factor Kappa B-Dependent Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vara, Dina; Watt, Joanna M.; Fortunato, Tiago M.; Mellor, Harry; Burgess, Matthew; Wicks, Kate; Mace, Kimberly; Reeksting, Shaun; Lubben, Anneke; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P.D.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Deoxyribose-1-phosphate (dRP) is a proangiogenic paracrine stimulus released by cancer cells, platelets, and macrophages and acting on endothelial cells. The objective of this study was to clarify how dRP stimulates angiogenic responses in human endothelial cells. Results: Live cell imaging, electron paramagnetic resonance, pull-down of dRP-interacting proteins, followed by immunoblotting, gene silencing of different NADPH oxidases (NOXs), and their regulatory cosubunits by small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection, and experiments with inhibitors of the sugar transporter glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) were utilized to demonstrate that dRP acts intracellularly by directly activating the endothelial NOX2 complex, but not NOX4. Increased reactive oxygen species generation in response to NOX2 activity leads to redox-dependent activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), which, in turn, induces vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) upregulation. Using endothelial tube formation assays, gene silencing by siRNA, and antibody-based receptor inhibition, we demonstrate that the activation of NF-κB and VEGFR2 is necessary for the angiogenic responses elicited by dRP. The upregulation of VEGFR2 and NOX2-dependent stimulation of angiogenesis by dRP were confirmed in excisional wound and Matrigel plug vascularization assays in vivo using NOX2−/− mice. Innovation: For the first time, we demonstrate that dRP acts intracellularly and stimulates superoxide anion generation by direct binding and activation of the NOX2 enzymatic complex. Conclusions: This study describes a novel molecular mechanism underlying the proangiogenic activity of dRP, which involves the sequential activation of NOX2 and NF-κB and upregulation of VEGFR2. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 110–130. PMID:28793782

  12. Structural insights into the cTAR DNA recognition by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein: role of sugar deoxyriboses in the binding polarity of NC

    PubMed Central

    Bazzi, Ali; Zargarian, Loussiné; Chaminade, Françoise; Boudier, Christian; De Rocquigny, Hughes; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    An essential step of the reverse transcription of the HIV-1 genome is the first strand transfer that requires the annealing of the TAR RNA hairpin to the cTAR DNA hairpin. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a crucial role by facilitating annealing of the complementary hairpins. Using nuclear magnetic resonance and gel retardation assays, we investigated the interaction between NC and the top half of the cTAR DNA (mini-cTAR). We show that NC(11-55) binds the TGG sequence in the lower stem that is destabilized by the adjacent internal loop. The 5′ thymine interacts with residues of the N-terminal zinc knuckle and the 3′ guanine is inserted in the hydrophobic plateau of the C-terminal zinc knuckle. The TGG sequence is preferred relative to the apical and internal loops containing unpaired guanines. Investigation of the DNA–protein contacts shows the major role of hydrophobic interactions involving nucleobases and deoxyribose sugars. A similar network of hydrophobic contacts is observed in the published NC:DNA complexes, whereas NC contacts ribose differently in NC:RNA complexes. We propose that the binding polarity of NC is related to these contacts that could be responsible for the preferential binding to single-stranded nucleic acids. PMID:21227929

  13. DNA–protein π-interactions in nature: abundance, structure, composition and strength of contacts between aromatic amino acids and DNA nucleobases or deoxyribose sugar

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Katie A.; Kellie, Jennifer L.; Wetmore, Stacey D.

    2014-01-01

    Four hundred twenty-eight high-resolution DNA–protein complexes were chosen for a bioinformatics study. Although 164 crystal structures (38% of those searched) contained no interactions, 574 discrete π–contacts between the aromatic amino acids and the DNA nucleobases or deoxyribose were identified using strict criteria, including visual inspection. The abundance and structure of the interactions were determined by unequivocally classifying the contacts as either π–π stacking, π–π T-shaped or sugar–π contacts. Three hundred forty-four nucleobase–amino acid π–π contacts (60% of all interactions identified) were identified in 175 of the crystal structures searched. Unprecedented in the literature, 230 DNA–protein sugar–π contacts (40% of all interactions identified) were identified in 137 crystal structures, which involve C–H···π and/or lone–pair···π interactions, contain any amino acid and can be classified according to sugar atoms involved. Both π–π and sugar–π interactions display a range of relative monomer orientations and therefore interaction energies (up to –50 (–70) kJ mol−1 for neutral (charged) interactions as determined using quantum chemical calculations). In general, DNA–protein π-interactions are more prevalent than perhaps currently accepted and the role of such interactions in many biological processes may yet to be uncovered. PMID:24744240

  14. The replicative DNA polymerase of herpes simplex virus 1 exhibits apurinic/apyrimidinic and 5′-deoxyribose phosphate lyase activities

    PubMed Central

    Bogani, Federica; Boehmer, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is essential for maintaining genome stability both to counter the accumulation of unusual bases and to protect from base loss in the DNA. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a large dsDNA virus that encodes its own DNA replication machinery, including enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism. We report on a replicative family B and a herpesvirus-encoded DNA Pol that possesses DNA lyase activity. We have discovered that the catalytic subunit of the HSV-1 DNA polymerase (Pol) (UL30) exhibits apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) and 5′-deoxyribose phosphate (dRP) lyase activities. These activities are integral to BER and lead to DNA cleavage on the 3′ side of abasic sites and 5′-dRP residues that remain after cleavage by 5′-AP endonuclease. The UL30-catalyzed reaction occurs independently of divalent cation and proceeds via a Schiff base intermediate, indicating that it occurs via a lyase mechanism. Partial proteolysis of the Schiff base shows that the DNA lyase activity resides in the Pol domain of UL30. These observations together with the presence of a virus-encoded uracil DNA glycosylase indicates that HSV-1 has the capacity to perform critical steps in BER. These findings have implications on the role of BER in viral genome maintenance during lytic replication and reactivation from latency. PMID:18695225

  15. Quantification of the 2-deoxyribonolactone and nucleoside 5'-aldehyde products of 2-deoxyribose oxidation in DNA and cells by isotope-dilution gas chromatography mass spectrometry: differential effects of gamma-radiation and Fe2+-EDTA.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wan; Chen, Bingzi; Wang, Lianrong; Taghizadeh, Koli; Demott, Michael S; Dedon, Peter C

    2010-05-05

    The oxidation of 2-deoxyribose in DNA has emerged as a critical determinant of the cellular toxicity of oxidative damage to DNA, with oxidation of each carbon producing a unique spectrum of electrophilic products. We have developed and validated an isotope-dilution gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the rigorous quantification of two major 2-deoxyribose oxidation products: the 2-deoxyribonolactone abasic site of 1'-oxidation and the nucleoside 5'-aldehyde of 5'-oxidation chemistry. The method entails elimination of these products as 5-methylene-2(5H)-furanone (5MF) and furfural, respectively, followed by derivatization with pentafluorophenylhydrazine (PFPH), addition of isotopically labeled PFPH derivatives as internal standards, extraction of the derivatives, and quantification by GC-MS analysis. The precision and accuracy of the method were validated with oligodeoxynucleotides containing the 2-deoxyribonolactone and nucleoside 5'-aldehyde lesions. Further, the well-defined 2-deoxyribose oxidation chemistry of the enediyne antibiotics, neocarzinostatin and calicheamicin gamma(1)(I), was exploited in control studies, with neocarzinostatin producing 10 2-deoxyribonolactone and 300 nucleoside 5'-aldehyde per 10(6) nt per microM in accord with its established minor 1'- and major 5'-oxidation chemistry. Calicheamicin unexpectedly caused 1'-oxidation at a low level of 10 2-deoxyribonolactone per 10(6) nt per microM in addition to the expected predominance of 5'-oxidation at 560 nucleoside 5'-aldehyde per 10(6) nt per microM. The two hydroxyl radical-mediated DNA oxidants, gamma-radiation and Fe(2+)-EDTA, produced nucleoside 5'-aldehyde at a frequency of 57 per 10(6) nt per Gy (G-value 74 nmol/J) and 3.5 per 10(6) nt per microM, respectively, which amounted to 40% and 35%, respectively, of total 2-deoxyribose oxidation as measured by a plasmid nicking assay. However, gamma-radiation and Fe(2+)-EDTA produced different proportions of 2

  16. Yields of damage to C4' deoxyribose and to pyrimidines in pUC18 by the direct effect of ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Peoples, Anita R; Lee, Jane; Weinfeld, Michael; Milligan, Jamie R; Bernhard, William A

    2012-07-01

    Our mechanistic understanding of damage formation in DNA by the direct effect relies heavily on what is known of free radical intermediates studied by EPR spectroscopy. Bridging this information to stable product formation requires methods with comparable sensitivities, a criterion met by the (32)P-post-labeling assay developed by Weinfeld and Soderlind, [Weinfeld,M. and Soderlind,K.-J.M. (1991) (32)P-Postlabeling detection of radiation-induced DNA damage: identification and estimation of thymine glycols and phosphoglycolate termini. Biochemistry, 30, 1091-1097] which when applied to the indirect effect, detected phosphoglycolate (pg) and thymine glycol (Tg). Here we applied this assay to the direct effect, measuring product yields in pUC18 films with hydration levels (Γ) of 2.5, 16 or 23 waters per nucleotide and X-irradiated at either 4 K or room temperature (RT). The yields of pg [G(pg)] for Γ ≈ 2.5 were 2.8 ± 0.2 nmol/J (RT) and 0.2 ± 0.3 nmol/J (4 K), which is evidence that the C4' radical contributes little to the total deoxyribose damage via the direct effect. The yield of detectable base damage [G(B*)] at Γ ≈ 2.5 was found to be 30.2 ± 1.0 nmol/J (RT) and 12.9 ± 0.7 nmol/J (4 K). While the base damage called B*, could be due to either oxidation or reduction, we argue that two reduction products, 5,6-dihydrouracil and 5,6-dihydrothymine, are the most likely candidates.

  17. Allies and Competitors as Enscripted Audiences in Scientific Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Susan

    A set of much examined scientific papers which specifically portray a controversial topic and also manifest ally-peer and competitor-peer enscripted audiences are those written by James Watson and Francis Crick concerning their discovery of the structure of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA). The theoretical perspective of an ally-peer and…

  18. Piperazine-based nucleic acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Jurgen; Silks, Louis A.; Michalczyk, Ryszard

    2005-01-11

    A novel nucleoside analog is disclosed which comprises a piperazine ring in the place of the ring ribose or deoxyribose sugar. Monomers utilizing a broad variety of nucleobases are disclosed, as well as oligomers comprising the monomers disclosed herein linked by a variety of linkages, including amide, phosphonamide, and sulfonamide linkages. A method of synthesizing the nucleoside analogs is also disclosed.

  19. Cobalt(II) ion as a promoter of hydroxyl radical and possible 'crypto-hydroxyl' radical formation under physiological conditions. Differential effects of hydroxyl radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Moorhouse, C P; Halliwell, B; Grootveld, M; Gutteridge, J M

    1985-12-13

    Co(II) ions react with hydrogen peroxide under physiological conditions to form a 'reactive species' that can hydroxylate aromatic compounds (phenol and salicylate) and degrade deoxyribose to thiobarbituric-acid-reactive material. Catalase decreases the formation of this species but superoxide dismutase or low concentrations of ascorbic acid have little effect. EDTA, present in excess over the Co(II), can accelerate deoxyribose degradation and aromatic hydroxylation. In the presence of EDTA, deoxyribose degradation by the reactive species is inhibited competitively by scavengers of the hydroxyl radical (.OH), their effectiveness being related to their second-order rate constants for reaction with .OH. In the absence of EDTA the scavengers inhibit only at much higher concentrations and their order of effectiveness is changed. It is suggested that, in the presence of EDTA, hydroxyl radical is formed 'in free solution' and attacks deoxyribose or an aromatic molecule. In the absence of EDTA, .OH radical is formed in a 'site-specific' manner and is difficult to intercept by .OH scavengers. The relationship of these results to the proposed 'crypto .OH' radical is discussed.

  20. Reconstitution of infectious laryngotracheitis from a collection of overlapping cosmid clones

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have generated overlapping cosmids that span the complete genome of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) and have used these clones in transfection experiments to reconstitute the virus. This is the first example of the use of large deoxyribose nucleic acid fragment(s) (cosmid, fosmid, bact...

  1. Mechanisms of strand break formation in DNA due to the direct effect of ionizing radiation: the dependency of free base release on the length of alternating CG oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kiran K; Razskazovskiy, Yuriy; Purkayastha, Shubhadeep; Bernhard, William A

    2009-06-11

    The question of how NA base sequence influences the yield of DNA strand breaks produced by the direct effect of ionizing radiation was investigated in a series of oligodeoxynucleotides of the form (d(CG)(n))(2) and (d(GC)(n))(2). The yields of free base release from X-irradiated DNA films containing 2.5 waters/nucleotide were measured by HPLC as a function of oligomer length. For (d(CG)(n))(2), the ratio of the Gua yield to Cyt yield, R, was relatively constant at 2.4-2.5 for n = 2-4 and it decreased to 1.2 as n increased from 5 to 10. When Gua was moved to the 5' end, for example going from d(CG)(5) to d(GC)(5), R dropped from 1.9 +/- 0.1 to 1.1 +/- 0.1. These effects are poorly described if the chemistry at the oligomer ends is assumed to be independent of the remainder of the oligomer. A mathematical model incorporating charge transfer through the base stack was derived to explain these effects. In addition, EPR was used to measure the yield of trapped-deoxyribose radicals at 4 K following X-irradiation at 4 K. The yield of free base release was substantially greater, by 50-100 nmol/J, than the yield of trapped-deoxyribose radicals. Therefore, a large fraction of free base release stems from a nonradical intermediate. For this intermediate, a deoxyribose carbocation formed by two one-electron oxidations is proposed. This reaction pathway requires that the hole (electron loss site) transfers through the base stack and, upon encountering a deoxyribose hole, oxidizes that site to form a deoxyribose carbocation. This reaction mechanism provides a consistent way of explaining both the absence of trapped radical intermediates and the unusual dependence of free base release on oligomer length.

  2. Antioxidant Activity of the Essential Oils of Different Parts of Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb. subsp. excelsa and J. excelsa M. Bieb. subsp. polycarpos (K. Koch) Takhtajan (Cupressaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Sayyed Ahmad; Abedindo, Bibi Fatemeh; Hassanzadeh-Khayyat, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    The essential oils of branchlets and fruits of Juniperus excelsa subsp. excelsa and Juniperus excelsa subsp. polycarpos were examined for their antioxidant activity. The compositions of the essential oils were studied by GC and GC-MS. To evaluation the antioxidants activity of the volatile oils, pure components and positive controls at different concentrations, thin-layer chromatography (TLC) screening methods, diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, deoxyribose degradation test and modified deoxyribose degradation test were employed. The results of the present study demonstrate some antioxidant activity for the tested essential oils obtained from various parts of both plants. It indicates that the use of these essential oils, in very low concentrations, may be useful as a natural preservative. However before any final conclusion, it is suggested that the antioxidant activity of these oils should also be evaluated by using lipid solvent system methods. PMID:24250416

  3. Testing of WW-85

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-21

    secondary ROS, superoxide (O2 -) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the latter can react via Fenton chemistry with cellular metal ions to produce additional ·OH...nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and nitrosonium cation. Oxidations of thiols, sulfides, transition metal complexes, deoxyribose, phenols and other...respiratory chain and disruption of the zinc-thiolate center at the active site of enzymes. Peroxynitrite has been shown to inhibit a variety of ion

  4. Flexibility of the sugar moiety of nucleosides at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Scott

    2007-03-01

    In this poster we review our recent high pressure experiments on deoxyadenosine, adenosine, deoxycytidine and cytidine via mid-infrared absorption. These experiments reveal the presence of phase transitions near 2 GPa in these four different nucleosides. The spectroscopic evidence indicates that the sugar pucker changes at the phase transition in all four nucleosides. Differences between the deoxyribose nucleosides and the ribose nucleosides are compared to the known differences in the conformational flexibility of DNA and RNA.

  5. Reducing Electroosmotic Flow Enables DNA Separations in Ultrathin Channels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    Chemical structure of DNA bases 2 Figure 1-2: Schematic diagram of DNA base pairing 5 Figure 1-3: Schematic diagram of the capillary and the...hydrogen atoms near one of the Figure 1-1: A. Chemical structure of the DNA backbone. B. Chemical structure of DNA bases . The DNA backbone consists...of pentose sugar (deoxyribose) held together by phosphodiester bonds. The DNA bases that are derivatives of purine are adenine (A) and guanine (G

  6. Molecular Data for a Biochemical Model of DNA Radiation Damage: Electron Impact Ionization and Dissociative Ionization of DNA Bases and Sugar-Phosphate Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the database for building up a biochemical model of DNA radiation damage, electron impact ionization cross sections of sugar-phosphate backbone and DNA bases have been calculated using the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model. It is found that the total ionization cross sections of C3'- and C5'-deoxyribose-phospate, two conformers of the sugar-phosphate backbone, are close to each other. Furthermore, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3'- and C5'-deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 10%. Of the four DNA bases, the ionization cross section of guanine is the largest, then in decreasing order, adenine, thymine, and cytosine. The order is in accordance with the known propensity of oxidation of the bases by ionizing radiation. Dissociative ionization (DI), a process that both ionizes and dissociates a molecule, is investigated for cytosine. The DI cross section for the formation of H and (cytosine-Hl)(+), with the cytosine ion losing H at the 1 position, is also reported. The threshold of this process is calculated to be 17.1 eV. Detailed analysis of ionization products such as in DI is important to trace the sequential steps in the biochemical process of DNA damage.

  7. Electron-impact total ionization cross sections of DNA sugar-phosphate backbone and an additivity principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    The improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model [W.M. Huo, Phys. Rev. A64, 042719-1 (2001)l is used to study the total ionization cross sections of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone by electron impact. Calculations using neutral fragments found that the total ionization cross sections of C3' - and C5', -deoxyribose-phospate, two conformers of the sugar-phosphate backbone, are close to each other. Furthermore, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3' - and C5" -deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 10%. The result implies that certain properties of the-DNA, like the total singly ionization cross section, are localized properties and a building-up or additivity principle may apply. This allows us to obtain accurate properties of larger molecular systems built up from the results of smaller subsystem fragments. Calculations are underway using a negatively charged sugar-phosphate backbone with a metal counter-ion.

  8. SciTech Connect

    Winterbourn, C.C.; Sutton, H.C.

    O2- was produced by gamma irradiation of formate solutions, by the action of xanthine oxidase on hypoxanthine and O2, and by the action of ferredoxin reductase on NADPH and paraquat in the presence of O2. Its reaction with H2O2 and various iron chelates was studied. Oxidation of deoxyribose to thiobarbituric acid-reactive products that was appropriately inhibited by OH. scavengers, or formate oxidation to CO2, was used to detect OH(.). With each source of O2-, and by these criteria, Fe(EDTA) efficiently catalyzed this (Haber-Weiss) reaction, but little catalysis was detectable with iron bound to DTPA, citrate, ADP, ATP, or pyrophosphate, ormore » without chelator in phosphate buffer. O2- produced from xanthine oxidase, but not from the other sources, underwent another iron-dependent reaction with H2O2, to produce an oxidant that did not behave as free OH(.). It was formed in phosphate or bicarbonate buffer, and caused deoxyribose oxidation that was readily inhibited by mannitol or Tris, but not by benzoate, formate, or dimethyl sulfoxide. It did not oxidize formate to CO2. Addition of EDTA changed the pattern of inhibition to that expected for a reaction of OH(.). The other chelators all inhibited deoxyribose oxidation, provided their concentrations were high enough. The results are compatible with iron bound to xanthine oxidase catalyzing production of a strong oxidant (which is not free OH.) from H2O2 and O2- produced by the enzyme.« less

  9. Influence of nucleotide modifications at the C2’ position on the Hoogsteen base-paired parallel-stranded duplex of poly(A) RNA

    PubMed Central

    Copp, William; Denisov, Alexey Y.; Xie, Jingwei; Noronha, Anne M.; Liczner, Christopher; Safaee, Nozhat

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Polyadenylate (poly(A)) has the ability to form a parallel duplex with Hoogsteen adenine:adenine base pairs at low pH or in the presence of ammonium ions. In order to evaluate the potential of this structural motif for nucleic acid-based nanodevices, we characterized the effects on duplex stability of substitutions of the ribose sugar with 2′-deoxyribose, 2′-O-methyl-ribose, 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-ribose, arabinose and 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-arabinose. Deoxyribose substitutions destabilized the poly(A) duplex both at low pH and in the presence of ammonium ions: no duplex formation could be detected with poly(A) DNA oligomers. Other sugar C2’ modifications gave a variety of effects. Arabinose and 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-arabinose nucleotides strongly destabilized poly(A) duplex formation. In contrast, 2′-O-methyl and 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-ribo modifications were stabilizing either at pH 4 or in the presence of ammonium ions. The differential effect suggests they could be used to design molecules selectively responsive to pH or ammonium ions. To understand the destabilization by deoxyribose, we determined the structures of poly(A) duplexes with a single DNA residue by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The structures revealed minor structural perturbations suggesting that the combination of sugar pucker propensity, hydrogen bonding, pKa shifts and changes in hydration determine duplex stability. PMID:28973475

  10. Influence of nucleotide modifications at the C2' position on the Hoogsteen base-paired parallel-stranded duplex of poly(A) RNA.

    PubMed

    Copp, William; Denisov, Alexey Y; Xie, Jingwei; Noronha, Anne M; Liczner, Christopher; Safaee, Nozhat; Wilds, Christopher J; Gehring, Kalle

    2017-09-29

    Polyadenylate (poly(A)) has the ability to form a parallel duplex with Hoogsteen adenine:adenine base pairs at low pH or in the presence of ammonium ions. In order to evaluate the potential of this structural motif for nucleic acid-based nanodevices, we characterized the effects on duplex stability of substitutions of the ribose sugar with 2'-deoxyribose, 2'-O-methyl-ribose, 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-ribose, arabinose and 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-arabinose. Deoxyribose substitutions destabilized the poly(A) duplex both at low pH and in the presence of ammonium ions: no duplex formation could be detected with poly(A) DNA oligomers. Other sugar C2' modifications gave a variety of effects. Arabinose and 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-arabinose nucleotides strongly destabilized poly(A) duplex formation. In contrast, 2'-O-methyl and 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-ribo modifications were stabilizing either at pH 4 or in the presence of ammonium ions. The differential effect suggests they could be used to design molecules selectively responsive to pH or ammonium ions. To understand the destabilization by deoxyribose, we determined the structures of poly(A) duplexes with a single DNA residue by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The structures revealed minor structural perturbations suggesting that the combination of sugar pucker propensity, hydrogen bonding, pKa shifts and changes in hydration determine duplex stability. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. In vitro glutathione peroxidase mimicry of ebselen is linked to its oxidation of critical thiols on key cerebral suphydryl proteins - A novel component of its GPx-mimic antioxidant mechanism emerging from its thiol-modulated toxicology and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Kade, I J; Balogun, B D; Rocha, J B T

    2013-10-25

    The antioxidant mechanism of ebselen in rats brain is largely linked with its glutathione peroxidase (GPx) rather than its peroxiredoxin mimicry ability. However, the precise molecular dynamics between the GPx-mimicry of ebselen and thiol utilization is yet to be fully clarified and thus still open. Herein, we investigated the influence of dithiothreitol (DTT) on the antioxidant action of ebselen against oxidant-induced cerebral lipid peroxidation and deoxyribose degradation. Furthermore, the critical inhibitory concentrations of ebselen on the activities of sulphydryl enzymes such as cerebral sodium pump, δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALAD) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were also investigated. We observe that ebselen (at ≥42 μM) markedly inhibited lipid peroxidation in the presence and absence of DTT, whereas it inhibited deoxyribose degradation only in the presence of DTT. Furthermore, under in vitro conditions, ebselen inhibited the thiol containing enzymes; cerebral sodium pump (at ≥40 μM), δ-ALAD (≥10 μM) and LDH (≥1 μM) which were either prevented or reversed by DTT. However, the inhibition of the activities of these sulphydryl proteins in diabetic animals was prevented by ebselen. Summarily, it is apparent that the effective in vitro inhibitory doses of ebselen on the activity of the sulphydryl proteins are far less than its antioxidant doses. In addition, the presence of DTT is evidently a critical requirement for ebselen to effect its antioxidant action against deoxyribose degeradation and not lipid peroxidation. Consequently, we conclude that ebselen possibly utilizes available thiols on sulphydryl proteins to effect its GPx mimicry antioxidant action against lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Transition State Analysis of Thymidine Hydrolysis by Human Thymidine Phosphorylase*

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Phillip A.; Vetticatt, Mathew; Schramm, Vern L.

    2010-01-01

    Human thymidine phosphorylase (hTP) is responsible for thymidine (dT) homeostasis and its action promotes angiogenesis. In the absence of phosphate, hTP catalyzes a slow hydrolytic depyrimidination of dT yielding thymine and 2-deoxyribose (dRib). Its transition state was characterized using multiple kinetic isotope effect (KIE) measurements. Isotopically enriched thymidines were synthesized enzymatically from glucose or (deoxy)ribose and intrinsic KIEs were used to interpret the transition state structure. KIEs from [1′-14C]-, [1-15N]-, [1′-3H]-, [2′R-3H]-, [2′S-3H]-, [4′-3H]-, [5′-3H]dTs provided values of 1.033 ± 0.002, 1.004 ± 0.002, 1.325 ± 0.003, 1.101 ± 0.004, 1.087 ± 0.005, 1.040 ± 0.003, and 1.033 ± 0.003, respectively. Transition state analysis revealed a stepwise mechanism with a 2-deoxyribocation formed early and a higher energetic barrier for nucleophilic attack of a water molecule on the high energy intermediate. An equilibrium exists between the deoxyribocation and reactants prior to the irreversible nucleophilic attack by water. The results establish activation of the thymine leaving group without requirement for phosphate. A transition state constrained to match the intrinsic KIEs was found using density functional theory. An active site histidine (His116) is implicated as the catalytic base for activation of the water nucleophile at the rate-limiting transition state. The distance between the water nucleophile and the anomeric carbon (rC-O) is predicted to be 2.3 Å at the transition state. The transition state model predicts that deoxyribose adopts a mild 3′-endo confirmation during nucleophilic capture. These results differ from the concerted bimolecular mechanism reported for the arsenolytic reaction PMID:20804144

  13. Design and Demonstration of an Acousto-Optic Time-Integrating Correlator with a Large a Parallel Gain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Deoxyribose nucleicacid DPP: Digital Post-Processor DREO Detence Research Establishment Ottawa RF: Radio Frequency TeO2 : tellurium dioxide TIC: Time... TeO2 is 620 m/s, a device with a 100-As aperture device is 62-mm long. To take advantage of the full interaction time of these Bragg cells, the whole...INCLUDED IN THE DIGITAL POST-PROCESSOR HARDWARE Characteristics of Bandwidth Center Frequency Bragg Cell glass (bulk 100 MHz 150 MHz interaction) iNbO3

  14. Photochemical synthesis of biomolecules under anoxic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folsome, C.; Brittain, A.; Zelko, M.

    1983-01-01

    The long-wavelength UV anoxic photosynthesis of uracil, various sugars (including deoxyribose and glycoaldehyde), amino acids, and other organic photoproducts is reported. The reactions were conducted in a mixture of water, calcium carbonate, hydrazine, and formaldehyde which were subjected to 24 hr or 72 hr radiation. Product yields were greatest when the hydrazine/formaldehyde ratio was one, and when the reactant concentrations were low. These data suggest that organic products can be formed in variety from those amounts of formaldehyde and hydazine precursors which are themselves formed under anoxic UV photochemical conditions.

  15. The structure of drug-deoxydinucleoside phosphate complex; generalized conformational behavior of intercalation complexes with RNA and DNA fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, H S; Berman, H M; Dabrow, M; Neidle, S

    1980-01-01

    A 2:2 complex of proflavine and deoxycytidylyl-3', 5'-guanosine has been crystallized and its structure determined by x-ray crystallography. The two dinucleoside phosphate strands form self complementary duplexes with Watson Crick hydrogen bonds. One proflavin is asymmetrically intercalated between the base pairs and the other is stacked above them. The conformations of the nucleotides are unusual in that one strand has C3',C2'endomixed sugar puckering and the other has C3',C3' endo deoxyribose sugars. These results show that the conformation of the 3'sugar is of secondary importance to the intercalated geometry. PMID:7355129

  16. Extreme ultraviolet photoionization of aldoses and ketoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Joong-Won; Dong, Feng; Grisham, Michael E.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2011-04-01

    Gas phase monosaccharides (2-deoxyribose, ribose, arabinose, xylose, lyxose, glucose galactose, fructose, and tagatose), generated by laser desorption of solid sample pellets, are ionized with extreme ultraviolet photons (EUV, 46.9 nm, 26.44 eV). The resulting fragment ions are analyzed using a time of flight mass spectrometer. All aldoses yield identical fragment ions regardless of size, and ketoses, while also generating same ions as aldoses, yields additional features. Extensive fragmentation of the monosaccharides is the result the EUV photons ionizing various inner valence orbitals. The observed fragmentation patterns are not dependent upon hydrogen bonding structure or OH group orientation.

  17. Multiscale QM/MM molecular dynamics study on the first steps of guanine damage by free hydroxyl radicals in solution.

    PubMed

    Abolfath, Ramin M; Biswas, P K; Rajnarayanam, R; Brabec, Thomas; Kodym, Reinhard; Papiez, Lech

    2012-04-19

    Understanding the damage of DNA bases from hydrogen abstraction by free OH radicals is of particular importance to understanding the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. Previous studies address the problem with truncated DNA bases as ab initio quantum simulations required to study such electronic-spin-dependent processes are computationally expensive. Here, for the first time, we employ a multiscale and hybrid quantum mechanical-molecular mechanical simulation to study the interaction of OH radicals with a guanine-deoxyribose-phosphate DNA molecular unit in the presence of water, where all of the water molecules and the deoxyribose-phosphate fragment are treated with the simplistic classical molecular mechanical scheme. Our result illustrates that the presence of water strongly alters the hydrogen-abstraction reaction as the hydrogen bonding of OH radicals with water restricts the relative orientation of the OH radicals with respect to the DNA base (here, guanine). This results in an angular anisotropy in the chemical pathway and a lower efficiency in the hydrogen-abstraction mechanisms than previously anticipated for identical systems in vacuum. The method can easily be extended to single- and double-stranded DNA without any appreciable computational cost as these molecular units can be treated in the classical subsystem, as has been demonstrated here. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  18. Structural and conformational analysis of pentostatin (2'-deoxycoformycin), a potent inhibitor of adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Cox, M B; Arjunan, P; Arora, S K

    1990-08-01

    X-ray, NMR and molecular mechanics studies on pentostatin (C11H16N4O4), a potent inhibitor of the enzyme adenosine deaminase, have been carried out to study the structure and conformation. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P21 with the cell dimensions of a = 4.960(1), b = 10.746(3), c = 11.279(4)A, beta = 101.18(2) degrees and Z = 2. The structure was solved by direct methods and difference Fourier methods and refined to an R value of 0.047 for 997 reflections. The trihydrodiazepine ring is nonplanar and adopts a distorted sofa conformation with C(7) deviated from the mean plane by 0.66A. The deoxyribose ring adopts a C3'-endo conformation, different from coformycin where the sugar has a C2'-endo conformation. The observed glycosidic torsion angle (chi = -119.5 degrees) is in the anti range. The conformation about the C(4')-C(5') bond is gauche+. The conformation of the molecule is compared with that of coformycin and 2-azacoformycin. 1 and 2D NMR studies have been carried out and the dihedral angles obtained from coupling constants have been compared with those obtained from the crystal structure. The conformation of deoxyribose in solution is approximately 70% S and 30% N. Molecular mechanics studies were performed to obtain the energy minimized conformation, which is compared with X-ray and NMR results.

  19. Molecular requirements for RNA-induced silencing complex assembly in the Drosophila RNA interference pathway.

    PubMed

    Pham, John W; Sontheimer, Erik J

    2005-11-25

    Complexes in the Drosophila RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) assembly pathway can be resolved using native gel electrophoresis, revealing an initiator called R1, an intermediate called R2, and an effector called R3 (now referred to as holo-RISC). Here we show that R1 forms when the Dicer-2/R2D2 heterodimer binds short interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes. The heterodimer alone can initiate RISC assembly, indicating that other factors are dispensable for initiation. During assembly, R2 requires Argonaute 2 to convert into holo-RISC. This requirement is reminiscent of the RISC-loading complex, which also requires Argonaute 2 for assembly into RISC. We have compared R2 to the RISC-loading complex and show that the two complexes are similar in their sensitivities to ATP and to chemical modifications on siRNA duplexes, indicating that they are likely to be identical. We have examined the requirements for RISC formation and show that the siRNA 5'-termini are repeatedly monitored during RISC assembly, first by the Dcr-2/R2D2 heterodimer and again after R2 formation, before siRNA unwinding. The 2'-position of the 5'-terminal nucleotide also affects RISC assembly, because an siRNA strand bearing a 2'-deoxyribose at this position can inhibit the cognate strand from entering holo-RISC; in contrast, the 2'-deoxyribose-modified strand has enhanced activity in the RNA interference pathway.

  20. Pedalium murex Linn (Pedaliaceae) fruits: a comparative antioxidant activity of its different fractions

    PubMed Central

    Patel, DK; Kumar, R; Prasad, SK; Hemalatha, S

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of different solvent fractions of Pedalium murex (P. murex) Linn fruits (Family: Pedaliaceae) as well as the correlation between the total antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content. Methods In the present study, the antioxidant activities of P. murex were evaluated using six in-vitro assays, namely total antioxidant assay, DPPH assay, reducing power, nitric oxide scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging and deoxyribose scavenging assays, and total phenol contents were also investigated. Results The ethyl acetate (EA) fraction was found to have high levels of phenolic content (298.72±2.09 mg GAE/g). The EA fraction exhibit higher total antioxidant capacity, higher percentage of DPPH radical scavenging activity (135.11±2.95µg/mL), nitric oxide (200.57±4.51µg/mL), hydrogen peroxide (217.91±6.12 µg/mL), deoxyribose (250.01±4.68µg/mL) and higher reducing power. Correlation coefficient (r2=0.914) was found to be significant between total phenolic content and total antioxidant activity. Conclusions In general, the results indicate that the EA fractions are rich in phenolic antioxidants with potent free radical scavenging activity implying their importance to human health. PMID:23569800

  1. Semiquinone formation and DNA base damage by toxic quinones and inhibition by N-acetylcysteine (NAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.C.; Shibamoto, T.

    1986-03-05

    Toxic, mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic effects have been reported for some quinones as well as compounds metabolized to quinones. Semiquinone radical formation, thymidine degradation, and protection by NAC were studied in a hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase (HX/XO) system. Quinone, benzo(a)pyrene-3,6-quinone, danthron, doxorubicin, emodin, juglone, menadione, and moniliformin were tested. Diethylstilbestrolquinone, N-acetylquinoneimine, and benzoquinonediimine, hypothesized toxic metabolites of diethylstilbestrol, acetaminophen and p-phenylenediamine, respectively, were synthesized and studied. Semiquinone radical formation was assessed in a HX/XO system monitoring cytochrome C reduction. Large differences in rates of semiquinone radical formation were noted for different quinones, with V/Vo values ranging from 1.2 to 10.6. DNA basemore » degradation, thymine or thymidine glycol formation, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) production were measured in a similar system containing thymine, thymidine, calf thymus DNA, or deoxyribose. TBARS formation was observed with deoxyribose, but thymidine degradation without TBARS formation was noted with thymidine. NAC (0.5 to 10 mM) caused dose-dependent inhibition of quinone-induced cytochrome C reduction.« less

  2. Ellagic acid inhibits iron-mediated free radical formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi, Luana T.; Moreira, Daniel C.; Andrade, Roberto; Ginani, Janini; Alonso, Antonio; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2017-02-01

    Polyphenols are reported to have some health benefits, which are link to their antioxidant properties. In the case of ellagic acid (EA), there is evidence that it has free radical scavenger properties and that it is able to form complexes with metal ions. However, information on a possible link between the formation of iron-EA complexes and their interference in Haber-Weiss/Fenton reactions was not yet determined. Thus, the present study investigated the in vitro antioxidant mechanism of EA in a system containing ascorbate, Fe(III) and different iron ligands (EDTA, citrate and NTA). Iron-mediated oxidative degradation of 2-deoxyribose was poorly inhibited (by 12%) in the presence of EA (50 μM) and EDTA. When citrate or NTA - which form weak iron complexes - were used, the 2-deoxyribose protection increased to 89-97% and 45%, respectively. EA also presented equivalent inhibitory effects on iron-mediated oxygen uptake and ascorbyl radical formation. Spectral analyses of iron-EA complexes show that EA removes Fe(III) from EDTA within hours, and from citrate within 1 min. This difference in the rate of iron-EA complex formation may explain the antioxidant effects of EA. Furthermore, the EA antioxidant effectiveness was inversely proportional to the Fe(III) concentration, suggesting a competition with EDTA. In conclusion, the results indicate that EA may prevent in vitro free radical formation when it forms a complex with iron ions.

  3. In vitro antioxidant activity of Valeriana officinalis against different neurotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Sudati, Jéssie Haigert; Fachinetto, Roselei; Pereira, Romaiana Picada; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Soares, Felix Antunes; de Vargas Barbosa, Nilda Berenice; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira

    2009-08-01

    Valeriana officinalis L. (Valerian) is widely used as a traditional medicine to improve the quality of sleep. Although V. officinalis have been well documented as promising pharmacological agent; the exact mechanisms by which this plant act is still unknown. Limited literature data have indicated that V. officinalis extracts can exhibit antioxidant properties against iron in hippocampal neurons in vitro. However, there is no data available about the possible antioxidant effect of V. officinalis against other pro-oxidants in brain. In the present study, the protective effect of V. officinalis on lipid peroxidation (LPO) induced by different pro-oxidant agents with neuropathological importance was examined. Ethanolic extract of valerian (0-60 microg/ml) was tested against quinolinic acid (QA); 3-nitropropionic acid; sodium nitroprusside; iron sulfate (FeSO4) and Fe2+/EDTA induced LPO in rat brain homogenates. The effect of V. officinalis in deoxyribose degradation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was also investigated. In brain homogenates, V. officinalis inhibited thiobarbituric acid reactive substances induced by all pro-oxidants tested in a concentration dependent manner. Similarly, V. officinalis caused a significant decrease on the LPO in cerebral cortex and in deoxyribose degradation. QA-induced ROS production in cortical slices was also significantly reduced by V. officinalis. Our results suggest that V. officinalis extract was effective in modulating LPO induced by different pro-oxidant agents. These data may imply that V. officinalis extract, functioning as antioxidant agent, can be beneficial for reducing insomnia complications linked to oxidative stress.

  4. Effect of air flow rate on the polyphenols content and antioxidant capacity of convective dried cactus pear cladodes (Opuntia ficus indica).

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Infante, José-Alberto; Rocha-Guzman, Nuria-Elizabeth; González-Laredo, Ruben-Francisco; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalia; Medina-Torres, Luis; Cervantes-Cardozo, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    The interest in nopal has encouraged the use of dehydration; there are few studies about the effect of process parameters on the nopal polyphenol content and antioxidant activity. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the effect of air-drying flow rates on the amount and antioxidant capacity of extracts of Opuntia ficus indica cladodes. Nopal was dried at 45 degrees C and air flow rates of 3 and 5 m/sec. Samples were analyzed for moisture, total polyphenol, flavonoid, and flavonol contents, chain-breaking activity, inhibition of low-density lipoprotein and deoxyribose oxidation. Nopal drying at an air flow rate of 3 m/sec showed higher values of phenols, flavonoids and flavonols. The best value of low-density lipoprotein inhibition and deoxyribose was found at 1,000 microg/ml. The air flow rate affected the amount of polyphenols and the OH( . ) radical scavenging, but did not modify the chain-breaking activity and the low-density lipoprotein inhibition activity.

  5. Quantification of hydroxyl radical produced during phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jonathan M; Aust, Steven D

    2009-12-01

    To quantitate hydroxyl radicals produced during phacoemulsification with various irrigating solutions and conditions used in cataract surgery. Chemistry and Biochemistry Department, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, USA. All experiments were performed using an Infiniti Vision System phacoemulsifier with irrigation and aspiration. Hydroxyl radicals were quantitated using electron spin resonance spectroscopy and a spectrophotometric assay for malondialdehyde, which is formed by the oxidation of deoxyribose by the hydroxyl radical. Hydroxyl radical production increased during longitudinal-stroking phacoemulsification as power levels were increased in a nonlinear, nonexponential fashion. The detection of hydroxyl radical was reduced in irrigating solutions containing organic molecules (eg, citrate, acetate, glutathione, dextrose) and further reduced in Navstel, an irrigating solution containing a viscosity-modifying agent, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose. Hydroxyl radicals produced in settings representative of those used in phacoemulsification cataract surgery were quantitated using the deoxyribose method. Hydroxyl radical production was dependent on the level of ultrasound power applied and the irrigating solution used. Oxidative stress on the eye during phacoemulsification may be minimized by using irrigating solutions that contain organic molecules, including the viscosity-modifying agent hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, that can compete for reaction with hydroxyl radicals.

  6. Antioxidant Activity of Pistacia vera Fruits, Leaves and Gum Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Sajadi Tabassi, Sayyed Abolghasem; Milani Moghadam, Negar; Rashedinia, Marzieh; Mehri, Soghra

    2012-01-01

    The side effects of synthetic antioxidants have been considered in different studies. Accordingly, there is an increasing interest toward the use of natural substances instead of the synthetic ones. In this study, the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Pistacia vera leaves and fruits as well as hydroalcoholic extract of gum were tested for a possible antioxidant activity using in vitro methods. Deoxyribose assay, erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation and liver misrosomal non- enzymatic lipid peroxidation tests were used as an in-vitro model for determination antioxidant activity. The extract were evaluated at different concentratios: 25,100, 250, 500 and 1000 μg/mL. In all procedures, all extracts showed free radical scavenging activity. The effect of ethanolic extract of P. vera fruit at 1000 μg/mL was quite similar to positive control (DMSO 20 mM) in deoxyribose method. In two other tests, the ethanolic extracts of fruits and leaves were more effective than the aqueous extracts to inhibit malondialdehyde generation. Phytochemical tests showed the presence of flavonoids and tannins in Pistocia vera extracts. The present study showed that extracts of different part of P. vera have antioxidant activity in different in vitro methods. The ethanolic extracts of leaves and fruits showed more roles for antioxidant properties and gum hydroalcoholic extract demonstrated less antioxidant effect. PMID:24250515

  7. Electron-Impact Ionization and Dissociative Ionization of Biomolecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2006-01-01

    It is well recognized that secondary electrons play an important role in radiation damage to humans. Particularly important is the damage of DNA by electrons, potentially leading to mutagenesis. Molecular-level study of electron interaction with DNA provides information on the damage pathways and dominant mechanisms. Our study of electron-impact ionization of DNA fragments uses the improved binary-encounter dipole model and covers DNA bases, sugar phosphate backbone, and nucleotides. An additivity principle is observed. For example, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3(sup prime)- and C5 (sup prime)-deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 5%. Investigation of tandem double lesion initiated by electron-impact dissociative ionization of guanine, followed by proton reaction with the cytosine in the Watson-Crick pair, is currently being studied to see if tandem double lesion can be initiated by electron impact. Up to now only OH-induced tandem double lesion has been studied.

  8. Hydroethanolic extracts from different genotypes of açaí (Euterpe oleracea) presented antioxidant potential and protected human neuron-like cells (SH-SY5Y).

    PubMed

    Torma, Priscila do Carmo Marchioro Raupp; Brasil, Allana Von Sulzback; Carvalho, Ana Vânia; Jablonski, André; Rabelo, Thallita Kelly; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Flôres, Simone Hickmann; Augusti, Paula Rossini; Rios, Alessandro de Oliveira

    2017-05-01

    Fruit breeding programs have resulted in bioactive compounds increase and health effects. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant activity and neuroprotective effects of the hydroethanolic extracts from six açaí (Euterpe oleracea) genotypes using ABTS, deoxyribose, and glutathione oxidation assays, as well as, SH-SY5Y cells insulted with H 2 O 2 . L22P13 genotype showed the highest total content of anthocyanins, while L06P13 showed a high content of total carotenoids. However, the genotypes showed no difference in the antioxidant activity by ABTS and deoxyribose assays. The hydroethanolic extracts from different genotypes of açaí showed a protective effect (13-62%) on SH-SY5Y cells insulted by H 2 O 2 at a concentration of 50μg/mL by DCFH-DA assay. Except L04P16, no genotypes showed cytotoxicity in the SRB assay. These results indicate that açaí genotypes have antioxidant effect against reactive species generated in SH-SY5Y cells, suggesting a neuroprotective effect of the hydroethanolic extracts from these fruits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Exploration of pro-oxidant and antioxidant activities of the flavonoid myricetin.

    PubMed

    Chobot, Vladimir; Hadacek, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Flavonoids are ubiquitous phenolic plant metabolites. Many of them are well known for their pro- and antioxidant properties. Myricetin has been reported to be either a potent antioxidant or a pro-oxidant depending on the conditions. The reaction conditions for the pro- and antioxidant activities were therefore investigated using variations of the deoxyribose degradation assay systems. The deoxyribose degradation assay systems were conducted as follows; H(2)O(2)/Fe(III)/ascorbic acid, H(2)O(2)/Fe(III), Fe(III)/ascorbic acid, and Fe(III). Each system was carried out in two variants, FeCl(3) (iron ions added as FeCl(3)) and FeEDTA (iron added in complex with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid). When ascorbic acid was present, myricetin showed antioxidant properties, especially when it occurred in complex with iron. In ascorbic acid-free systems, pro-oxidant activities prevailed, which where enhanced if iron was in complex with EDTA. Myricetin's antioxidant activity depends on both the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and iron ions chelation properties. The pro-oxidative properties are caused by reduction of molecular oxygen to ROS and iron(III) to iron(II). Myricetin is able to substitute for ascorbic acid albeit less efficiently.

  10. Accurate representation of B-DNA double helical structure with implicit solvent and counterions.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihua; Hingerty, Brian E; Srinivasan, A R; Olson, Wilma K; Broyde, Suse

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and crystallographic data have been taken to refine the force field used in the torsion angle space nucleic acids molecular mechanics program DUPLEX. The population balance deduced from NMR studies of two carcinogen-modified DNA conformers in equilibrium was used to fine tune a sigmoidal, distance-dependent dielectric function so that reasonable relative energies could be obtained. In addition, the base-pair and backbone geometry from high-resolution crystal structures of the Dickerson-Drew dodecamer was used to re-evaluate the deoxyribose pseudorotation profile and the Lennard-Jones nonbonded energy terms. With a modified dielectric function that assumes a very steep distance-dependent form, a deoxyribose pseudorotation profile with reduced energy barriers between C2'- and C3'-endo minima, and a shift of the Lennard-Jones potential energy minimum to a distance approximately 0.4 A greater than the sum of the van der Waals' radii, the sequence-dependent conformational features of the Dickerson-Drew dodecamer in both the solid state and the aqueous liquid crystalline phase are well reproduced. The robust performance of the revised force field, in conjunction with its efficiency through implicit treatment of solvent and counterions, provides a valuable tool for elucidating conformations and structure-function relationships of DNA, including those of molecules modified by carcinogens and other ligands. PMID:12080128

  11. Structural basis of the 3′-end recognition of a leading strand in stalled replication forks by PriA

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Kaori; Ose, Toyoyuki; Okamoto, Naoaki; Maenaka, Katsumi; Tanaka, Taku; Masai, Hisao; Saito, Mihoko; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Kohda, Daisuke

    2007-01-01

    In eubacteria, PriA helicase detects the stalled DNA replication forks. This critical role of PriA is ascribed to its ability to bind to the 3′ end of a nascent leading DNA strand in the stalled replication forks. The crystal structures in complexes with oligonucleotides and the combination of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and mutagenesis reveal that the N-terminal domain of PriA possesses a binding pocket for the 3′-terminal nucleotide residue of DNA. The interaction with the deoxyribose 3′-OH is essential for the 3′-terminal recognition. In contrast, the direct interaction with 3′-end nucleobase is unexpected, considering the same affinity for oligonucleotides carrying the four bases at the 3′ end. Thus, the N-terminal domain of PriA recognizes the 3′-end base in a base-non-selective manner, in addition to the deoxyribose and 5′-side phosphodiester group, of the 3′-terminal nucleotide to acquire both sufficient affinity and non-selectivity to find all of the stalled replication forks generated during DNA duplication. This unique feature is prerequisite for the proper positioning of the helicase domain of PriA on the unreplicated double-stranded DNA. PMID:17464287

  12. An unusual mode of DNA duplex association: Watson-Crick interaction of all-purine deoxyribonucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Battersby, Thomas R; Albalos, Maria; Friesenhahn, Michel J

    2007-05-01

    Nucleic acid duplexes associating through purine-purine base pairing have been constructed and characterized in a remarkable demonstration of nucleic acids with mixed sequence and a natural backbone in an alternative duplex structure. The antiparallel deoxyribose all-purine duplexes associate specifically through Watson-Crick pairing, violating the nucleobase size-complementarity pairing convention found in Nature. Sequence-specific recognition displayed by these structures makes the duplexes suitable, in principle, for information storage and replication fundamental to molecular evolution in all living organisms. All-purine duplexes can be formed through association of purines found in natural ribonucleosides. Key to the formation of these duplexes is the N(3)-H tautomer of isoguanine, preferred in the duplex, but not in aqueous solution. The duplexes have relevance to evolution of the modern genetic code and can be used for molecular recognition of natural nucleic acids.

  13. Selenium-Mediated Dehalogenation of Halogenated Nucleosides and its Relevance to the DNA Repair Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Santanu; Manna, Debasish; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2015-08-03

    Halogenated nucleosides can be incorporated into the newly synthesized DNA of replicating cells and therefore are commonly used in the detection of proliferating cells in living tissues. Dehalogenation of these modified nucleosides is one of the key pathways involved in DNA repair mediated by the uracil-DNA glycosylase. Herein, we report the first example of a selenium-mediated dehalogenation of halogenated nucleosides. We also show that the mechanism for the debromination is remarkably different from that of deiodination and that the presence of a ribose or deoxyribose moiety in the nucleosides facilitates the deiodination. The results described herein should help in understanding the metabolism of halogenated nucleosides in DNA and RNA. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Ribose in the heart.

    PubMed

    Herrick, James; St Cyr, John

    2008-01-01

    Every cell needs energy, i.e., adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to carry out its function. Decreased oxygen levels, decreased blood flow, and other stressful conditions can drastically effect the intracellular concentrations of these energy compounds. Skeletal muscle, unlike the heart, can address this drop in ATP by employing the myokinase reaction, ultimately producing ATP with a subsequent elevation in adenosine monophosphate (AMP). Ribose, a naturally occurring 5-carbon monosaccharide, is a key component of RNA, DNA (which has deoxyribose), acetyl coenzyme A, and ATP. Each cell produces its own ribose, involved in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), to aid in ATP production. States of ischemia and/or hypoxia can severely lower levels of cellular energy compounds in the heart, with an associated compromise in cellular processes, ultimately reflected in altered function. Ribose appears to provide a solution to the problem in replenishing the depressed ATP levels and improving functional status of patients afflicted with cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Hole Transport in A-form DNA/RNA Hybrid Duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jiun Ru; Shao, Fangwei

    2017-01-01

    DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes are prevalent in many cellular functions and are an attractive target form for electrochemical biosensing and electric nanodevice. However the electronic conductivities of DNA/RNA hybrid duplex remain relatively unexplored and limited further technological applications. Here cyclopropyl-modified deoxyribose- and ribose-adenosines were developed to explore hole transport (HT) in both DNA duplex and DNA/RNA hybrids by probing the transient hole occupancies on adenine tracts. HT yields through both B-form and A-form double helixes displayed similar shallow distance dependence, although the HT yields of DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes were lower than those of DNA duplexes. The lack of oscillatory periods and direction dependence in HT through both helixes implied efficient hole propagation can be achieved via the hole delocalization and coherent HT over adenine tracts, regardless of the structural variations. PMID:28084308

  16. The Roads to and from the RNA World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, Jason P.; Lazcano, Antonio; Miller, Stanley L.

    2003-01-01

    The historical existence of the RNA world, in which early life used RNA for both genetic information and catalytic ability, is widely accepted. However, there has been little discussion of whether protein synthesis arose before DNA or what preceded the RNA world (i.e. the pre-RNA world). We outline arguments of what route life may have taken out of the RNA world: whether DNA or protein followed. The metabolic arguments favor the possibility that RNA genomes preceded the use of DNA as the informational macromolecule. However, the opposite can also be argued based on the enhanced stability, reactivity, and solubility of 2-deoxyribose as compared to ribose. The possibility that DNA may have come before RNA is discussed, although it is a less parsimonious explanation than DNA following RNA.

  17. Hole Transport in A-form DNA/RNA Hybrid Duplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Jiun Ru; Shao, Fangwei

    2017-01-01

    DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes are prevalent in many cellular functions and are an attractive target form for electrochemical biosensing and electric nanodevice. However the electronic conductivities of DNA/RNA hybrid duplex remain relatively unexplored and limited further technological applications. Here cyclopropyl-modified deoxyribose- and ribose-adenosines were developed to explore hole transport (HT) in both DNA duplex and DNA/RNA hybrids by probing the transient hole occupancies on adenine tracts. HT yields through both B-form and A-form double helixes displayed similar shallow distance dependence, although the HT yields of DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes were lower than those of DNA duplexes. The lack of oscillatory periods and direction dependence in HT through both helixes implied efficient hole propagation can be achieved via the hole delocalization and coherent HT over adenine tracts, regardless of the structural variations.

  18. Molecular Structure of Humin and Melanoidin via Solid State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Herzfeld, Judith; Rand, Danielle; Matsuki, Yoh; Daviso, Eugenio; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody; Mamajanov, Irena

    2011-01-01

    Sugar-derived humins and melanoidins figure significantly in food chemistry, agricultural chemistry, biochemistry and prebiotic chemistry. Despite wide interest and significant experimental attention, the amorphous and insoluble nature of the polymers has made them resistant to conventional structural characterization. Here we make use of solid-state NMR methods, including selective 13C substitution, 1H-dephasing, and double quantum filtration. The spectra, and their interpretation, are simplified by relying exclusively on hydronium for catalysis. The results for polymers derived from ribose, deoxyribose and fructose indicate diverse pathways to furans, suggest a simple route to pyrroles in the presence of amines, and reveal a heterogenous network-type polymer in which sugar molecules cross-link the heterocycles. PMID:21456563

  19. Intercalation complex of proflavine with DNA: Structure and dynamics by solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Pei; Juang, Chilong; Harbison, G.S.

    1990-07-06

    The structure of the complex formed between the intercalating agent proflavine and fibrous native DNA was studied by one- and two-dimensional high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Carbon-13-labeled proflavine was used to show that the drug is stacked with the aromatic ring plane perpendicular to the fiber axis and that it is essentially immobile. Natural abundance carbon-13 NMR of the DNA itself shows that proflavine binding does not change the puckering of the deoxyribose ring. However, phosphorus-31 NMR spectra show profound changes in the orientation of the phosphodiester grouping on proflavine binding, with some of the phosphodiesters tilting almost parallelmore » to the helix axis, and a second set almost perpendicular. The first group to the phosphodiesters probably spans the intercalation sites, whereas the tilting of the second set likely compensates for the unwinding of the DNA by the intercalator.« less

  20. Antiparkinson drug--Mucuna pruriens shows antioxidant and metal chelating activity.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan; Tharakan, Binu; Manyam, Bala V

    2008-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder for which no neurorestorative therapeutic treatment is currently available. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. The ancient Indian medical system, Ayurveda, traditionally uses Mucuna pruriens to treat Parkinson's disease. In our earlier studies, Mucuna pruriens has been shown to possess antiparkinson and neuroprotective effects in animal models of Parkinson's disease. The antioxidant activity of Mucuna pruriens was demonstrated by its ability to scavenge DPPH radicals, ABTS radicals and reactive oxygen species. Mucuna pruriens significantly inhibited the oxidation of lipids and deoxyribose sugar. Mucuna pruriens exhibited divalent iron chelating activity and did not show any genotoxic/mutagenic effect on the plasmid DNA. These results suggest that the neuroprotective and neurorestorative effect of Mucuna pruriens may be related to its antioxidant activity independent of the symptomatic effect. In addition, the drug appears to be therapeutically safe in the treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Did the Pre-RNA World Rest Upon DNA Molecules?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazcano, Antonio; Dworkin, Jason P.; Miller, Stanley L.

    2004-01-01

    The isolation of a DNA sequence that catalyzes the ligation of oligodeoxynucleotides via the formation of 3' - 5' phosphodiester linkage significance in selection experiments has been reported. Ball recently used this to discuss the possibility that natural DNA molecules may have formed in the primitive Earth leading to the origin of life. As noted by Ferris and Usher, if metabolic pathways evolved backwards, it could be argued that the biosynthesis of 2-deoxyribose from ribose suggests that RNA came from DNA. As summarized elsewhere, there are several properties of deoxyribose which could be interpreted to support the possibility that DNA-like molecules arose prior to the RNA world. For example, 2-deoxyribose is slightly more soluble than ribose (which may have been an advantage in a drying pool scenario), may have been more reactive under possible prebiotic conditions (it forms a nucleoside approx. 150 times faster than ribose with the alternative base urazole at 25 C), while it decomposes in solution (approximately 2.6 times more slowly than ribose at 100 C). Other advantages of DNA over RNA are that it has one fewer chiral center, has a greater stability at the 8.2 pH value of the current oceans, and does not has the 2'5' and 3'5' ambiguity in polymerizations. Yet, there is strong molecular biological and biochemical evidence that RNA was featured in the biology well before the last common ancestor. The presence of sugar acids, including both ribo- and deoxysugar acids, in the 4.6 Ga old Murchison meteorite suggest that both may have been available in the primitive Earth, derived from the accretion of extraterrestrial sources and/or from endogenous processes involving formaldehyde and its derivatives. However, the abiotic synthesis of deoxyribose, ribose, and other sugars from glyceraldehyde and acetaldehyde under alkaline conditions is inefficient and unespecific. Although sugars are labile compounds, the role of cyanamide or borate minerals in the

  2. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of condensed tetrahydrofuran (THF) by 11-16 eV electrons.

    PubMed

    Lemelin, V; Bass, A D; Cloutier, P; Sanche, L

    2016-11-07

    Absolute cross section (CS) data on the interaction of low energy electrons with DNA and its molecular constituents are required as input parameters in Monte-Carlo type simulations, for several radiobiological applications. Previously [V. Lemelin et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 074701 (2016)], we measured absolute vibrational CSs for low-energy electron scattering from condensed tetrahydrofuran, a convenient surrogate for the deoxyribose. Here we report absolute electronic CSs for energy losses of between 6 and 11.5 eV, by electrons with energies between 11 and 16 eV. The variation of these CSs with incident electron energy shows no evidence of transient anion states, consistent with theoretical and other experimental results, indicating that initial electron capture leading to DNA strand breaks occurs primarily on DNA bases or the phosphate group.

  3. Phenazine virulence factor binding to extracellular DNA is important for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Das, Theerthankar; Kutty, Samuel K; Tavallaie, Roya; Ibugo, Amaye I; Panchompoo, Janjira; Sehar, Shama; Aldous, Leigh; Yeung, Amanda W S; Thomas, Shane R; Kumar, Naresh; Gooding, J Justin; Manefield, Mike

    2015-02-11

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics necessitates the identification of novel leads for infection control. Interference with extracellular phenomena, such as quorum sensing, extracellular DNA integrity and redox active metabolite release, represents a new frontier to control human pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and hence reduce mortality. Here we reveal that the extracellular redox active virulence factor pyocyanin produced by P. aeruginosa binds directly to the deoxyribose-phosphate backbone of DNA and intercalates with DNA nitrogenous base pair regions. Binding results in local perturbations of the DNA double helix structure and enhanced electron transfer along the nucleic acid polymer. Pyocyanin binding to DNA also increases DNA solution viscosity. In contrast, antioxidants interacting with DNA and pyocyanin decrease DNA solution viscosity. Biofilms deficient in pyocyanin production and biofilms lacking extracellular DNA show similar architecture indicating the interaction is important in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation.

  4. Phenazine virulence factor binding to extracellular DNA is important for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Theerthankar; Kutty, Samuel K.; Tavallaie, Roya; Ibugo, Amaye I.; Panchompoo, Janjira; Sehar, Shama; Aldous, Leigh; Yeung, Amanda W. S.; Thomas, Shane R.; Kumar, Naresh; Gooding, J. Justin; Manefield, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics necessitates the identification of novel leads for infection control. Interference with extracellular phenomena, such as quorum sensing, extracellular DNA integrity and redox active metabolite release, represents a new frontier to control human pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and hence reduce mortality. Here we reveal that the extracellular redox active virulence factor pyocyanin produced by P. aeruginosa binds directly to the deoxyribose-phosphate backbone of DNA and intercalates with DNA nitrogenous base pair regions. Binding results in local perturbations of the DNA double helix structure and enhanced electron transfer along the nucleic acid polymer. Pyocyanin binding to DNA also increases DNA solution viscosity. In contrast, antioxidants interacting with DNA and pyocyanin decrease DNA solution viscosity. Biofilms deficient in pyocyanin production and biofilms lacking extracellular DNA show similar architecture indicating the interaction is important in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. PMID:25669133

  5. A New Highly Reactive and Low Lipophilicity Fluorine-18 Labeled Tetrazine Derivative for Pretargeted PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A new 18F-labeled tetrazine derivative was developed aiming at optimal radiochemistry, fast reaction kinetics in inverse electron-demand Diels–Alder cycloaddition (IEDDA), and favorable pharmacokinetics for in vivo bioorthogonal chemistry. The radiolabeling of the tetrazine was achieved in high yield, purity, and specific activity under mild reaction conditions via conjugation with 5-[18F]fluoro-5-deoxyribose, providing a glycosylated tetrazine derivative with low lipophilicity. The 18F-tetrazine showed fast reaction kinetics toward the most commonly used dienophiles in IEDDA reactions. It exhibited excellent chemical and enzymatic stability in mouse plasma and in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.41). Biodistribution in mice revealed favorable pharmacokinetics with major elimination via urinary excretion. The results indicate that the glycosylated 18F-labeled tetrazine is an excellent candidate for in vivo bioorthogonal chemistry applications in pretargeted PET imaging approaches. PMID:26819667

  6. Raman spectroscopic study of plasma-treated salmon DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joon Lee, Geon; Kwon, Young-Wan; Hee Kim, Yong; Ha Choi, Eun

    2013-01-01

    In this research, we studied the effect of plasma treatment on the optical/structural properties of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from salmon sperm. DNA-cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) films were obtained by complexation of DNA with CTMA. Circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectra indicated that DNA retained its double helical structure in the solid film. The Raman spectra exhibited several vibration modes corresponding to the nuclear bases and the deoxyribose-phosphate backbones of the DNA, as well as the alkylchains of CTMA. Dielectric-barrier-discharge (DBD) plasma treatment induced structural modification and damage to the DNA, as observed by changes in the ultraviolet-visible absorption, CD, and Raman spectra. The optical emission spectra of the DBD plasma confirmed that DNA modification was induced by plasma ions such as reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species.

  7. Catabolism of exogenous deoxyinosine in cultured epithelial amniotic cells.

    PubMed

    Carta, M C; Mattana, A; Camici, M; Allegrini, S; Tozzi, M G; Sgarrella, F

    2001-10-03

    Uptake and catabolism of purine nucleosides have been commonly considered as means to salvage the purine ring for nucleic acid synthesis, usually neglecting the destiny of the pentose moiety. With the aim to ascertain if deoxyribose derived from exogenous DNA can be utilised as a carbon and energy source, we studied the catabolism of exogenous deoxyinosine in a cell line derived from human amnion epithelium (WISH). Intact WISH cells catabolise deoxyinosine by conversion into hypoxanthine. The nucleoside enters the cell through a nitrobenzylthioinosine-insensitive equilibrative transport. Deoxyinosine undergoes a phosphorolytic cleavage inside the cell. The purine base diffuses back to the external medium, while the phosphorylated pentose moiety can be further catabolised to glycolysis and citric acid cycle intermediates. Our results indicate that the catabolism of the deoxynucleoside can be considered mainly as a means to meet the carbon and energy requirements of growing cells.

  8. Antioxidant and pro-oxidant activities of aqueous extracts and crude polyphenolic fractions of rooibos (Aspalathus linearis).

    PubMed

    Joubert, Elizabeth; Winterton, Paula; Britz, Trevor J; Gelderblom, Wentzel C A

    2005-12-28

    Unfermented rooibos tea is known to contain higher levels of total polyphenols and flavonoids than its fermented counterpart, making it the obvious choice for the preparation of flavonoid-enriched fractions. Evaluation of aqueous extracts and crude polyphenolic fractions of unfermented and fermented rooibos showed anti- and/or pro-oxidant activities, using a linoleic acid-Tween-buffer emulsion for lipid peroxidation and the deoxyribose degradation assay, based on a Fenton reaction model system containing FeCl3-EDTA and H2O2 for the generation of hydroxyl radicals. Except for the ethyl acetate fraction, with the highest total polyphenol (TP) content and offering the least protection presumably due to pro-oxidant activity, the inhibition of lipid peroxidation by the samples correlated moderately with their TP content in a linear relationship (r = 0.896, P < 0.01). Using the deoxyribose degradation assay, the pro-oxidant activity of the aqueous extracts and their crude polymeric fractions (0.1 mg/mL in the reaction mixture) was linear with respect to their dihydrochalcone (aspalathin and nothofagin) (r = 0.977, P = 0.023) and flavonoid (r = 0.971, P = 0.029) content. Pro-oxidant activity was demonstrated for pure aspalathin. Using the same assay, but with ascorbate added to regenerate Fe3+ to Fe2+, the aqueous extract and crude polymeric fraction of fermented rooibos displayed hydroxyl radical scavenging activity. Fermentation (i.e., oxidation) of rooibos decreased the pro-oxidant activity of aqueous extracts, which was contributed to a decrease in their dihydrochalcone content. The in vitro pro-oxidant activity displayed by flavonoid-enriched fractions of rooibos demonstrates that one must be aware of the potential adverse biological properties of potent antioxidant extracts utilized as dietary supplements.

  9. Vegetables’ juice influences polyol pathway by multiple mechanisms in favour of reducing development of oxidative stress and resultant diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Ashok K.; Kumar, D. Anand; Sweeya, Pisupati S.; Chauhan, H. Anusha; Lavanya, V.; Sireesha, K.; Pavithra, K.; Zehra, Amtul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hyperglycemia induced generation of free radicals and consequent development of oxidative stress by polyol pathway is one of the crucial mechanisms stirring up development of diabetic complications. We evaluated influence of ten vegetables’ juice on polyol pathway along with their antioxidant and antioxidative stress potentials. Materials and Methods: Aldose reductase activity was determined utilising goat lens and human erythrocytes. In goat lens, utilization of nicotinamine adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and aldose reductase inhibition was assayed. In human erythrocytes, sorbitol formation was measured as an index of aldose reductase activity under normoglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions. Ability of juices in inhibiting oxidative damage to deoxyribose sugar and calf thymus DNA and inhibitory activity against hydrogen peroxide induced hemolysis of erythrocytes was also analysed. Phytochemical contents like total polyphenol, total flavonoid and total protein were measured to find their influence on biological activities. Results: Vegetables’ juice displayed varying degrees of inhibitory potentials in mitigating NADPH dependent catalytic activity of aldose reductase in goat lens, accumulation of sorbitol in human erythrocytes under different glucose concentrations; Fenton-reaction induced oxidative damage to deoxyribose sugar, and calf thymus DNA. Substantial variations in vegetables phytochemicals content were also noticed in this study. Conclusions: Vegetables’ juice possesses potent activities in influencing polyol pathway by various mechanisms in favour of reducing development of oxidative stress independent of their inherent antioxidative properties. Juice of ivy gourd followed by green cucumber and ridge gourd were among the most potent for they displayed strong activities on various parameters analysed in this study. These vegetables’ juice may become part of mechanism-based complementary antioxidant therapy to prevent

  10. Variations of the chemical composition and bioactivity of essential oils from leaves and stems of Liquidambar styraciflua (Altingiaceae).

    PubMed

    El-Readi, Mahmoud Z; Eid, Hanaa H; Ashour, Mohamed L; Eid, Safaa Y; Labib, Rola M; Sporer, Frank; Wink, Michael

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the variations of the chemical composition and bioactivity of essential oils of Liquidambar styraciflua L. (Altingiaceae) collected in different seasons. The oils were analysed by GLC/FID and GLC/MS. The antioxidant activity was investigated by diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide anion radical scavenging assays and the deoxyribose degradation assay. Inhibition of both 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in hepatic cancer (HepG-2) cells were used to assess the anti-inflammatory activity. The cytotoxic activity was investigated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Altogether, 64 volatile secondary metabolites were identified. The major components of the leaf oil were d-limonene, α-pinene and β-pinene, and of the stem oil were germacrine D, α-cadinol, d-limonene, α-pinene, and β-pinene. Leaf and stem oils collected in spring could reduce DPPH● (IC50 = 3.17 and 2.19 mg/ml) and prevent the degradation of the deoxyribose sugar (IC50 = 17.55 and 14.29 μg/ml). The stem oil exhibited a higher inhibition of both 5-LOX and PGE2 than the leaf oil. The cytotoxic activity of leaf and stem oils was low in cancer cell lines (IC50 = 136.27 and 119.78 μg/ml in cervical cancer (HeLa) cells). Essential oils of L. styraciflua exhibited an interesting anti-inflammatory activity with low cytotoxicity, supporting its traditional use to treat inflammation. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  11. Chemical composition and inhibitory effects of water extract of Henna leaves on reactive oxygen species, DNA scission and proliferation of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Chandel, Madhu; Kaur, Paramjeet; Pandit, Kritika; Kaur, Varinder; Kaur, Sandeep; Kaur, Satwinderjeet

    2016-01-01

    From the centuries, Lawsonia inermis L. (Henna) is utilized in traditional health care system as a medicinal and cosmetic agent. The present study was intended to assess antiradical, DNA protective and antiproliferative activity of water extract of Lawsonia inermis L. leaves (W-LI). Antioxidant activity was estimated using various in vitro assays such as DPPH, ABTS, superoxide anion radical scavenging, FRAP, deoxyribose degradation and DNA protection assay. Growth inhibitory effects of W-LI were assessed using MTT assay against different cancer cell lines viz. HeLa, MCF-7, A549, C6 and COLO-205. From the results of antioxidant assays, it was found that W-LI quenched DPPH and ABTS cation radicals with IC50 value of 352.77 µg/ml and 380.87 µg/ml respectively. It demonstrated hydroxyl radical scavenging potential of 59.75 % at highest test dose of 1000 µg/ml in deoxyribose degradation assay. The results of FRAP assay showed that W-LI also possesses significant reducing activity. Extract inhibited hydroxyl radical induced pBR322 plasmid DNA strand scission, thus conferring DNA protection. Growth inhibition of various cancer cell lines was achieved to the varying extent on treatment with W-LI. Further, it was observed that activity was quite promising against colon cancer COLO-205 cells (GI50 121.03 µg/ml). HPLC profiling of W-LI revealed the presence of different polyphenolic compounds such as ellagic acid, catechin, quercetin, kaempferol etc. which might be contributing towards antioxidant and cytotoxic activity. The present study demonstrated that polyphenols rich W-LI extract from leaves of L. inermis possesses ability to inhibit oxidative radicals and cancer cells proliferation. PMID:28337113

  12. Decellularization of human donor aortic and pulmonary valved conduits using low concentration sodium dodecyl sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Vafaee, Tayyebeh; Thomas, Daniel; Desai, Amisha; Jennings, Louise M.; Berry, Helen; Rooney, Paul; Kearney, John; Fisher, John

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The clinical use of decellularized cardiac valve allografts is increasing. Long‐term data will be required to determine whether they outperform conventional cryopreserved allografts. Valves decellularized using different processes may show varied long‐term outcomes. It is therefore important to understand the effects of specific decellularization technologies on the characteristics of donor heart valves. Human cryopreserved aortic and pulmonary valved conduits were decellularized using hypotonic buffer, 0.1% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate and nuclease digestion. The decellularized tissues were compared to cellular cryopreserved valve tissues using histology, immunohistochemistry, quantitation of total deoxyribose nucleic acid, collagen and glycosaminoglycan content, in vitro cytotoxicity assays, uniaxial tensile testing and subcutaneous implantation in mice. The decellularized tissues showed no histological evidence of cells or cell remnants and >97% deoxyribose nucleic acid removal in all regions (arterial wall, muscle, leaflet and junction). The decellularized tissues retained collagen IV and von Willebrand factor staining with some loss of fibronectin, laminin and chondroitin sulfate staining. There was an absence of major histocompatibility complex Class I staining in decellularized pulmonary valve tissues, with only residual staining in isolated areas of decellularized aortic valve tissues. The collagen content of the tissues was not decreased following decellularization however the glycosaminoglycan content was reduced. Only moderate changes in the maximum load to failure of the tissues were recorded postdecellularization. The decellularized tissues were noncytotoxic in vitro, and were biocompatible in vivo in a mouse subcutaneous implant model. The decellularization process will now be translated into a good manufacturing practices‐compatible process for donor cryopreserved valves with a view to future clinical use. Copyright © 2016 The Authors

  13. Hydroxyl radical scavenging assay of phenolics and flavonoids with a modified cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) method using catalase for hydrogen peroxide degradation.

    PubMed

    Ozyürek, Mustafa; Bektaşoğlu, Burcu; Güçlü, Kubilay; Apak, Reşat

    2008-06-02

    Hydroxyl radicals (OH) generated in the human body may play an important role in tissue injury at sites of inflammation in oxidative stress-originated diseases. As a more convenient, efficient, and less costly alternative to HPLC/electrochemical detection techniques and to the nonspecific, low-yield deoxyribose (TBARS) test, we used a salicylate probe for detecting OH generated by the reaction of iron(II)-EDTA complex with H(2)O(2). The produced hydroxyl radicals attack both the salicylate probe and the hydroxyl radical scavengers that are incubated in solution for 10 min. Added radical scavengers compete with salicylate for the OH produced, and diminish chromophore formation from Cu(II)-neocuproine. At the end of the incubation period, the reaction was stopped by adding catalase. With the aid of this reaction, a kinetic approach was adopted to assess the hydroxyl radical scavenging properties of polyphenolics, flavonoids and other compounds (e.g., ascorbic acid, glucose, mannitol). A second-order rate constant for the reaction of the scavenger with OH could be deduced from the inhibition of colour formation due to the salicylate probe. In addition to phenolics and flavonoids, five kinds of herbs were evaluated for their OH scavenging activity using the developed method. The modified CUPRAC (cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity) assay proved to be efficient for ascorbic acid, gallic acid and chlorogenic acid, for which the deoxyribose assay test is basically nonresponsive. An important contribution of this developed assay is the inhibition of the Fenton reaction with catalase degradation of hydrogen peroxide so that the remaining H(2)O(2) would neither give a CUPRAC absorbance nor involve in redox cycling of phenolic antioxidants, enabling the rapid assay of polyphenolics.

  14. Purple Corn (Zea mays L.) Phenolic Compounds Profile and Its Assessment as an Agent Against Oxidative Stress in Isolated Mouse Organs

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Escudero, Fernando; Muñoz, Ana María; Alvarado-Ortíz, Carlos; Alvarado, Ángel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This study was designed to determine the contents of total polyphenols, flavonoids, flavonols, flavanols, and anthocyanins of purple corn (Zea mays L.) extracts obtained with different methanol:water concentrations, acidified with 1% HCl (1 N). Another objective was to determine the antioxidant activity by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and deoxyribose assay, individual phenolic compounds by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and endogenous antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase [SOD], catalase [CAT], and total peroxidase [TPX]) activity and lipid peroxidation activity (thiobarbituric acid–reactive substances [TBARS] assay) in isolated mouse organs. Overall, the highest total content of polyphenols, anthocyanins, flavonoids, flavonols, and flavanols was obtained with the 80:20 methanol:water extract, acidified with 1% HCl (1 N). The 50% inhibitory concentration values obtained by the DPPH and ABTS assays with this extract were 66.3 μg/mL and 250 μg/mL, respectively. The antioxidant activity by the FRAP assay was 26.1 μM Trolox equivalents/g, whereas the deoxyribose assay presented 93.6% inhibition. Because of these results, the 80:20 methanol:water extract, acidified with 1% HCl (1 N), was used for the remaining tests. Eight phenolic compounds were identified by HPLC: chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, rutin, ferulic acid, morin, quercetin, naringenin, and kaempferol. Furthermore, it was observed that the purple corn extract was capable of significantly reducing lipid peroxidation (lower malondialdehyde [MDA] concentrations by the TBARS assay) and at the same time increasing endogenous antioxidant enzyme (CAT, TPX, and SOD) activities in isolated mouse kidney, liver, and brain. On the basis of the results, it was concluded that the purple corn extract contained various bioactive phenolic compounds that exhibited

  15. Purple corn (Zea mays L.) phenolic compounds profile and its assessment as an agent against oxidative stress in isolated mouse organs.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Escudero, Fernando; Muñoz, Ana María; Alvarado-Ortíz, Carlos; Alvarado, Ángel; Yáñez, Jaime A

    2012-02-01

    This study was designed to determine the contents of total polyphenols, flavonoids, flavonols, flavanols, and anthocyanins of purple corn (Zea mays L.) extracts obtained with different methanol:water concentrations, acidified with 1% HCl (1 N). Another objective was to determine the antioxidant activity by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and deoxyribose assay, individual phenolic compounds by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and endogenous antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase [SOD], catalase [CAT], and total peroxidase [TPX]) activity and lipid peroxidation activity (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances [TBARS] assay) in isolated mouse organs. Overall, the highest total content of polyphenols, anthocyanins, flavonoids, flavonols, and flavanols was obtained with the 80:20 methanol:water extract, acidified with 1% HCl (1 N). The 50% inhibitory concentration values obtained by the DPPH and ABTS assays with this extract were 66.3 μg/mL and 250 μg/mL, respectively. The antioxidant activity by the FRAP assay was 26.1 μM Trolox equivalents/g, whereas the deoxyribose assay presented 93.6% inhibition. Because of these results, the 80:20 methanol:water extract, acidified with 1% HCl (1 N), was used for the remaining tests. Eight phenolic compounds were identified by HPLC: chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, rutin, ferulic acid, morin, quercetin, naringenin, and kaempferol. Furthermore, it was observed that the purple corn extract was capable of significantly reducing lipid peroxidation (lower malondialdehyde [MDA] concentrations by the TBARS assay) and at the same time increasing endogenous antioxidant enzyme (CAT, TPX, and SOD) activities in isolated mouse kidney, liver, and brain. On the basis of the results, it was concluded that the purple corn extract contained various bioactive phenolic compounds that exhibited considerable in vitro

  16. The association of DNA damage response and nucleotide level modulation with the antibacterial mechanism of the anti-folate drug trimethoprim.

    PubMed

    Sangurdekar, Dipen P; Zhang, Zhigang; Khodursky, Arkady B

    2011-11-28

    Trimethoprim is a widely prescribed antibiotic for a variety of bacterial infections. It belongs to a class of anti-metabolites - antifolates - which includes drugs used against malarial parasites and in cancer therapy. However, spread of bacterial resistance to the drug has severely hampered its clinical use and has necessitated further investigations into its mechanism of action and treatment regimen. Trimethoprim selectively starves bacterial cells for tetrahydrofolate, a vital cofactor necessary for the synthesis of several metabolites. The outcome (bacteriostatic or bactericidal) of such starvation, however, depends on the availability of folate-dependent metabolites in the growth medium. To characterize this dependency, we investigated in detail the regulatory and structural components of Escherichia coli cellular response to trimethoprim in controlled growth and supplementation conditions. We surveyed transcriptional responses to trimethoprim treatment during bacteriostatic and bactericidal conditions and analyzed associated gene sets/pathways. Concurrent starvation of all folate dependent metabolites caused growth arrest, and this was accompanied by induction of general stress and stringent responses. Three gene sets were significantly associated with the bactericidal effect of TMP in different media including LB: genes of the SOS regulon, genes of the pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway and members of the multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) regulon controlled by the MarR repressor. However, the SOS response was identified as the only universal transcriptional signature associated with the loss of viability by direct thymine starvation or by folate stress. We also used genome-wide gene knock-out screen to uncover means of sensitization of bacteria to the drug. We observed that among a number of candidate genes and pathways, the effect of knock-outs in the deoxyribose nucleotide salvage pathway, encoded by the deoCABD operon and under the control of

  17. Long-Range Vibrational Dynamics Are Directed by Watson-Crick Base Pairing in Duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Hithell, Gordon; Shaw, Daniel J; Donaldson, Paul M; Greetham, Gregory M; Towrie, Michael; Burley, Glenn A; Parker, Anthony W; Hunt, Neil T

    2016-05-05

    Ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy of a 15-mer A-T DNA duplex in solution has revealed structure-dependent vibrational coupling and energy transfer processes linking bases with the sugar-phosphate backbone. Duplex melting induces significant changes in the positions of off-diagonal peaks linking carbonyl and ring-stretching vibrational modes of the adenine and thymine bases with vibrations of the phosphate group and phosphodiester linkage. These indicate that Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding and helix formation lead to a unique vibrational coupling arrangement of base vibrational modes with those of the phosphate unit. On the basis of observations from time-resolved 2D-IR data, we conclude that rapid energy transfer processes occur between base and backbone, mediated by additional modes located on the deoxyribose moiety within the same nucleotide. These relaxation dynamics are insensitive to duplex melting, showing that efficient intramolecular energy relaxation to the solvent via the phosphate groups is the key to excess energy dissipation in both single- and double-stranded DNA.

  18. Comparative study of radical scavenger activities of crude extract and fractions from Cuphea carthagenensis leaves.

    PubMed

    Schuldt, E Z; Farias, M R; Ribeiro-do-Valle, R M; Ckless, K

    2004-09-01

    This study investigated the superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical scavenger properties, as well as the inhibition of lipid peroxidation by the crude hydroalcoholic extract (CE) and the butanolic (BF) and ethyl acetate (EAF) fractions of Cuphea carthagenensis leaves. In a enzymatic system of O2- production (xanthine/xanthine oxidase system) the CE, EAF and BF (0.1-100 microg ml(-1)) were effective at inhibiting both uric acid formation and NBT reduction by O2(-1). In the non-enzymatic system of O2- generation, the CE and fractions were effective only at the concentration of 100 microg ml(-1). The CE, EAF and BF were also evaluated for their ability to scavenge hydroxyl radicals and/or to chelate iron. The results showed that CE, BF and EAF from C. carthagenensis (0.1-100 microg ml(-1)) were able to inhibit deoxyribose degradation in a concentration-dependent manner. CE was more potent than the fractions. In a hydrophobic system, increasing concentrations of CE, EAF and BF (0.1-100 microg ml(-1)) caused graded inhibition of lipid peroxidation of rat liver homogenate. The EAF displayed the lowest median inhibitory concentration. The present study suggests that an extract (CE) and fractions (EAF and BF) from C. carthagenensis leaves are significant sources of phenolic compounds with antioxidant activity in vitro and may have important health effects, for example, in cardiovascular disease.

  19. Inhibitors of nuclease and redox activity of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox effector factor 1 (APE1/Ref-1).

    PubMed

    Laev, Sergey S; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F; Lavrik, Olga I

    2017-05-01

    Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox effector factor 1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein which is essential in the base excision repair (BER) pathway of DNA lesions caused by oxidation and alkylation. This protein hydrolyzes DNA adjacent to the 5'-end of an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site to produce a nick with a 3'-hydroxyl group and a 5'-deoxyribose phosphate moiety or activates the DNA-binding activity of certain transcription factors through its redox function. Studies have indicated a role for APE1/Ref-1 in the pathogenesis of cancer and in resistance to DNA-interactive drugs. Thus, this protein has potential as a target in cancer treatment. As a result, major efforts have been directed to identify small molecule inhibitors against APE1/Ref-1 activities. These agents have the potential to become anticancer drugs. The aim of this review is to present recent progress in studies of all published small molecule APE1/Ref-1 inhibitors. The structures and activities of APE1/Ref-1 inhibitors, that target both DNA repair and redox activities, are presented and discussed. To date, there is an urgent need for further development of the design and synthesis of APE1/Ref-1 inhibitors due to high importance of this protein target. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Radioprotective properties of apple polyphenols: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Kumar, I Prem; Namita, I; Afrin, Farhat; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2006-08-01

    Present study was undertaken to evaluate the radioprotective ability of total polyphenols extracted from edible portion (epicarp and mesocarp) of apple. Prior administration of apple polyphenols to murine thymocytes significantly countered radiation induced DNA damage (evaluated by alkaline halo assay) and cell death (trypan blue exclusion method) in a dose dependent manner maximally at a concentration of 2 and 0.2 mg/ml respectively. Apple polyphenols in a dose dependent fashion inhibited both radiation or Fenton reaction mediated 2-deoxyribose (2-DR) degradation indicating its ability to scavenge hydroxyl radicals and this activity was found to be unaltered in presence of simulated gastric juice. Similarly apple polyphenols in a dose dependent fashion scavenged DPPH radicals (maximum 69% at 1 mg/ml), superoxide anions (maximum 88% at 2 mg/ml), reduced Fe(3 +) to Fe(2 +) (maximum at 1 mg/ml) and inhibited Fenton reaction mediated lipid peroxidation (maximum 66% at 1.5 mg/ml) further establishing its antioxidative properties. Studies carried out with plasmid DNA revealed the ability of apple polyphenols to inhibit radiation induced single as well as double strand breaks. The results clearly indicate that apple polyphenols have significant potential to protect cellular system from radiation induced damage and ability to scavenge free radicals might be playing an important role in its radioprotective manifestation.

  1. Colorimetric Glucose Assay Based on Magnetic Particles Having Pseudo-peroxidase Activity and Immobilized Glucose Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Martinkova, Pavla; Opatrilova, Radka; Kruzliak, Peter; Styriak, Igor; Pohanka, Miroslav

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic particles (MPs) are currently used as a suitable alternative for peroxidase in the construction of novel biosensors, analytic and diagnostic methods. Their better chemical and thermal stabilities predestine them as appropriate pseudo-enzymatic catalysts. In this point of view, our research was focused on preparation of simply and fast method for immobilization of glucose oxidase onto surface of MPs with peroxidase-like activity. Spectrophotometric method (wavelength 450 nm) optimized for glucose determination using modified MPs has been successfully developed. Concentration curve for optimization of method was assayed, and Michaelis-Menten constant (K m) calculated, maximum reaction rate (V max), limit of detection, and correlation coefficient were determined to be 0.13 mmol/l (2.34 mg/dl), 1.79 pkat, 3.74 µmol/l (0.067 mg/dl), and 0.996, respectively. Interferences of other sugars such as sucrose, sorbitol, deoxyribose, maltose, and fructose were determined as well as effect of substances presenting in plasma (ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione, trolox, and urea). Results in comparison with positive and negative controls showed no interferences of the other sugars and no influence of plasma substances to measuring of glucose. The constructed method showed corresponding results with linear dependence and a correlation coefficient of 0.997. Possibility of repeated use of modified MPs was successfully proved.

  2. Induction of strand breaks by low-energy electrons (8-68 eV) in a self-assembled monolayer of oligonucleotides: Effective cross sections and attenuation lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhongli; Dextraze, Marie-Eve; Cloutier, Pierre; Hunting, Darel; Sanche, Léon

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers of 5'-P32-labeled 3'-thiolated oligonucleotides chemisorbed on gold were bombarded by low-energy electrons (LEE) of 8-68eV. Shorter 5'-P32-oligonucleotides produced by LEE-induced strand breaks were separated with denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and quantified by phosphor imaging. The yields of short oligonucleotides (y) decrease exponentially with their length (n), following the equation y =ae-bn, where a and b are constants, which are related to the average effective cross section per nucleotide for DNA strand break (σeff) and the attenuation length (AL=1/b) of LEE, respectively. The AL decreases with LEE energies from 2.5±0.6nm at 8eVto0.8±0.1nm at 68eV, whereas σeff increases from (3±1)×10-18to(5.1±1.6)×10-17cm2 within the same energy range. The energy dependence of σeff shows a resonance peak of (2.8±0.9)×10-17cm2 at 18eV superimposed on a monotonically rising curve. Transient electron attachment to a σ* anion state of the deoxyribose group, followed by dipolar dissociation into H- and the corresponding positive-ion radical, leading to C-O bond cleavage, is proposed to account for this maximum.

  3. Chemical composition and biological activity of the essential oil from Thymus lanceolatus.

    PubMed

    Khadir, Abdelmounaim; Sobeh, Mansour; Gad, Haidy A; Benbelaid, Fethi; Bendahou, Mourad; Peixoto, Herbenya; Sporer, Frank; Ashour, Mohamed L; Wink, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Thymus lanceolatus is a rare species, which grows wild in Algeria and Tunis. It is used traditionally as a drink and to flavor and preserve meat and poultry. The composition of the essential oil was determined by GLC/FID and GLC/MS. Forty-nine components were identified and quantified, accounting for 96.75% of the total detected components in the oil. The oxygenated monoterpenes (74.85%) constitute the major class of volatile secondary metabolites in the oil. Thymol was the most abundant constituent (69.61%) followed by γ-terpinene (8.38%). The antioxidant activity was evaluated using both diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH˙) reduction and 2-deoxyribose (2-DR) degradation prevention methods. The oil showed a very potent antioxidant activity with IC(50) values of 0.20 ± 0.07 and 4.96 ± 0.39 μg/mL for the DPPH˙ and 2-DR methods, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of the oil was assessed using the agar diffusion method, and the in vitro cytotoxicity on five different cancer cells was examined using the MTT assay. The oil revealed promising inhibitory activity against Gram positive bacteria, especially Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus pyogenes with an MIC value of 62.5 μg/mL. Additionally, the highest cytotoxic activity was observed against the HL-60 cells with an IC(50) of 113.5 μg/mL. These results validate some of their traditional uses in food preservation.

  4. Chemical Composition and Antioxidant/Antimicrobial Activities in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Fluid Extract of Gloiopeltis tenax

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiaojiao; Chen, Yicun; Yao, Fen; Chen, Weizhou; Shi, Ganggang

    2012-01-01

    Gloiopeltis tenax (G. tenax) is widely distributed along the Chinese coastal areas and is commonly used in the treatment of diarrhea and colitis. This study aimed at investigating the bioactivities of the volatile constituents in G. tenax. We extracted the essential constituents of G. tenax by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (CO2-SFE), then identified and analyzed the constituents by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In total, 30 components were identified in the G. tenax extract. The components showed remarkable antioxidant activity (radical scavenging activity of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)), lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity (in a β-carotene/linoleic acid-coupled oxidation reaction), and hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity (by deoxyribose degradation by iron-dependent hydroxyl radical), compared to butylated hydroxytoluene. In microdilution assays, G. tenax extracts showed a moderate inhibitory effects on Staphyloccocus aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 3.9 mg/mL), Enterococcus faecalis (7.8 mg/mL), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (15.6 mg/mL), and Escherichia coli (3.9 mg/mL). Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of G. tenax were related to the active chemical composition. These results suggest that the CO2-SFE extract from G. tenax has potential to be used as a natural antioxidant and antimicrobial agent in food processing. PMID:23342386

  5. Amelioration of oxidative stress in bio-membranes and macromolecules by non-toxic dye from Morinda tinctoria (Roxb.) roots.

    PubMed

    Bhakta, Dipita; Siva, Ramamoorthy

    2012-06-01

    Plant dyes have been in use for coloring and varied purposes since prehistoric times. A red dye found in the roots of plants belonging to genus Morinda is a well recognized coloring ingredient. The dye fraction obtained from the methanolic extract of the roots of Morinda tinctoria was explored for its role in attenuating damages caused by H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress. The antioxidant potential of the dye fraction was assessed through DPPH radical scavenging, deoxyribose degradation and inhibition of lipid peroxidation in mice liver. It was subsequently screened for its efficiency in extenuating damage incurred to biomembrane (using erythrocytes and their ghost membranes) and macromolecules (pBR322 DNA, lipids and proteins) from exposure to hydrogen peroxide. In addition, the non-toxic nature of the dye was supported by the histological evaluation conducted on the tissue sections from the major organs of Swiss Albino mice as well as effect on Hep3B cell line (human hepatic carcinoma). The LC-MS confirms the dye fraction to be morindone. Our study strongly suggests that morindone present in the root extracts of M. tinctoria, in addition to being a colorant, definitely holds promise in the pharmaceutical industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hybridization properties of long nucleic acid probes for detection of variable target sequences, and development of a hybridization prediction algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Öhrmalm, Christina; Jobs, Magnus; Eriksson, Ronnie; Golbob, Sultan; Elfaitouri, Amal; Benachenhou, Farid; Strømme, Maria; Blomberg, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems in nucleic acid-based techniques for detection of infectious agents, such as influenza viruses, is that of nucleic acid sequence variation. DNA probes, 70-nt long, some including the nucleotide analog deoxyribose-Inosine (dInosine), were analyzed for hybridization tolerance to different amounts and distributions of mismatching bases, e.g. synonymous mutations, in target DNA. Microsphere-linked 70-mer probes were hybridized in 3M TMAC buffer to biotinylated single-stranded (ss) DNA for subsequent analysis in a Luminex® system. When mismatches interrupted contiguous matching stretches of 6 nt or longer, it had a strong impact on hybridization. Contiguous matching stretches are more important than the same number of matching nucleotides separated by mismatches into several regions. dInosine, but not 5-nitroindole, substitutions at mismatching positions stabilized hybridization remarkably well, comparable to N (4-fold) wobbles in the same positions. In contrast to shorter probes, 70-nt probes with judiciously placed dInosine substitutions and/or wobble positions were remarkably mismatch tolerant, with preserved specificity. An algorithm, NucZip, was constructed to model the nucleation and zipping phases of hybridization, integrating both local and distant binding contributions. It predicted hybridization more exactly than previous algorithms, and has the potential to guide the design of variation-tolerant yet specific probes. PMID:20864443

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest changes in electrostatic interactions as a potential mechanism through which serine phosphorylation inhibits DNA Polymerase β's activity.

    PubMed

    Homouz, Dirar; Joyce-Tan, Kwee Hong; Shahir Shamsir, Mohd; Moustafa, Ibrahim M; Idriss, Haitham

    2018-01-01

    DNA polymerase β is a 39kDa enzyme that is a major component of Base Excision Repair in human cells. The enzyme comprises two major domains, a 31kDa domain responsible for the polymerase activity and an 8kDa domain, which bind ssDNA and has a deoxyribose phosphate (dRP) lyase activity. DNA polymerase β was shown to be phosphorylated in vitro with protein kinase C (PKC) at serines 44 and 55 (S44 and S55), resulting in loss of its polymerase enzymic activity, but not its ability to bind ssDNA. In this study, we investigate the potential phosphorylation-induced structural changes for DNA polymerase β using molecular dynamics. The simulations show drastic conformational changes of the polymerase structure as a result of S44 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation-induced conformational changes transform the closed (active) enzyme structure into an open one. Further analysis of the results points to a key hydrogen bond and newly formed salt bridges as potential drivers of these structural fluctuations. The changes observed with S44/55 and S55 phosphorylation were less dramatic than S44 and the integrity of the H-bond was not compromised. Thus the phosphorylation of S44 is likely the major contributor to structural fluctuations that lead to loss of enzymatic activity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Vertical detachment energies of anionic thymidine: Microhydration effects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunghwan; Schaefer, Henry F

    2010-10-14

    Density functional theory has been employed to investigate microhydration effects on the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of the thymidine anion by considering the various structures of its monohydrates. Structures were located using a random searching procedure. Among 14 distinct structures of the anionic thymidine monohydrate, the low-energy structures, in general, have the water molecule bound to the thymine base unit. The negative charge developed on the thymine moiety increases the strength of the intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the water and base units. The computed VDE values of the thymidine monohydrate anions are predicted to range from 0.67 to 1.60 eV and the lowest-energy structure has a VDE of 1.32 eV. The VDEs of the monohydrates of the thymidine anion, where the N(1)[Single Bond]H hydrogen of thymine has been replaced by a 2(')-deoxyribose ring, are greater by ∼0.30 eV, compared to those of the monohydrates of the thymine anion. The results of the present study are in excellent agreement with the accompanying experimental results of Bowen and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 133, 144304 (2010)].

  9. Azadinium Species Detection in Puget Sound, Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, K. J.; Trainer, V. L.; Adams, N. G.

    2017-12-01

    Species of the genus Azadinium, including A. spinosum, A. obesum, and A. poporum, were first detected in Puget Sound, Washington State, in 2014. Azadinium spinosum and A. poporum are known to produce azaspiracids (AZAs), toxins that can cause a syndrome in humans known as azaspiracid shellfish poisoning. Symptoms following the ingestion of shellfish contaminated with AZAs include chills, headaches, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and stomach cramps. In our study conducted in summer 2017, seawater samples collected weekly at <8 sites and monthly at <31 sites in Puget Sound, were used to determine the presence, abundance, and distribution of Azadinium. Deoxyribose nucleic acid was extracted from filtered seawater samples, quantified, analyzed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. Species-specific probes were used for the detection of A. poporum, A. obesum, and A. spinosum. If none of the three species were detected, the Amphidomataceae assay was used to determine whether other Azadinium species belonging to this family were present. Most samples were below the limit of detection for all three Azadinium species, however several samples had concentrations of cells that were detectable but below the limit of quantification. Concentrations of Azadinium poporum ranging from 5-76 cells/L were consistently detected at Quartermaster Harbor, Quilcene, and Sequim Bay, WA. Although Azadinium spp. were present only in low quantities during the period of our study, we demonstrated the effectiveness of routine analysis of seawater samples using specific qPCR assays to provide an early warning for potentially toxic Azadinium in Puget Sound.

  10. Pharmacological doses of dietary curcumin increase colon epithelial cell proliferation in vivo in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sylvia Jeewon; Hellerstein, Marc K

    2007-10-01

    Although curcumin has preventive actions in animal models of colon cancer, whether the mechanism of action is through anti-proliferation in normal environment is not clearly understood. Here, we studied the effects of chemopreventive doses of curcumin on the proliferation rate of colon epithelial cells (CEC), using a recently developed stable isotope-mass spectrometric method for measuring DNA synthesis rate. Adult male F344 rats were given diets containing 0, 2 and 4% curcumin for 5 weeks. 4% (2)H(2)O was given in drinking water to label DNA, after a priming bolus, for 4 days prior to sacrifice. The isotopic enrichment of the deoxyribose moiety of deoxyadenosine from DNA was measured by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. Cell cycle analysis was performed after propidium iodide staining of CECs. Curcumin administration did not reduce but instead resulted in dose-dependent increases in CEC proliferation rate (p < 0.05) for 2% and 4% curcumin vs 0%). The length of the colon crypts and the fraction of cells in S-phase were also increased in the 2% and 4% curcumin groups (p < 0.05). Thus, pharmacological doses of curcumin increase CEC proliferation rate and pool size in normal rats. Reduction of CEC proliferation therefore cannot explain the proposed chemopreventive actions of curcumin in colon cancer.

  11. Morphological spot counting from stacked images for automated analysis of gene copy numbers by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, Artyom M; Dougherty, Edward R; Kononen, Juha; Bubendorf, Lukas; Hostetter, Galen; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2002-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular diagnostic technique in which a fluorescent labeled probe hybridizes to a target nucleotide sequence of deoxyribose nucleic acid. Upon excitation, each chromosome containing the target sequence produces a fluorescent signal (spot). Because fluorescent spot counting is tedious and often subjective, automated digital algorithms to count spots are desirable. New technology provides a stack of images on multiple focal planes throughout a tissue sample. Multiple-focal-plane imaging helps overcome the biases and imprecision inherent in single-focal-plane methods. This paper proposes an algorithm for global spot counting in stacked three-dimensional slice FISH images without the necessity of nuclei segmentation. It is designed to work in complex backgrounds, when there are agglomerated nuclei, and in the presence of illumination gradients. It is based on the morphological top-hat transform, which locates intensity spikes on irregular backgrounds. After finding signals in the slice images, the algorithm groups these together to form three-dimensional spots. Filters are employed to separate legitimate spots from fluorescent noise. The algorithm is set in a comprehensive toolbox that provides visualization and analytic facilities. It includes simulation software that allows examination of algorithm performance for various image and algorithm parameter settings, including signal size, signal density, and the number of slices.

  12. Magic-angle spinning NMR of a class I filamentous bacteriophage virus.

    PubMed

    Abramov, Gili; Morag, Omry; Goldbourt, Amir

    2011-08-11

    The fd bacteriophage is a filamentous virus that is widely used for bio- and nanotechnology applications ranging from phage display to battery materials. The possibility of obtaining a detailed description of its structural properties regardless of its state is therefore essential not only for understanding its physical arrangement and its bacterial infection process but also for many other applications. Here we present a study of the fd phage by magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR. While current structures rely on a Y21M mutant, experiments performed on a strain bearing a wild-type capsid report on high symmetry of the phage and lack of explicit subunit polymorphism. Chemical shift analysis confirmed that the coat protein mostly consists of a rigid right-handed curved α-helix (residues 6-47 of 50), preceded by a flexible loop-structured N-terminus. We were able to qualitatively assign the resonances belonging to the DNA, including the deoxyribose sugars and the thymine bases. These chemical shifts are consistent with base stacking and a C2'-endo/C3'-exo sugar pucker. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. A one- and two-dimensional NMR study of the B to Z transition of (m5dC-dG)3 in methanolic solution.

    PubMed Central

    Feigon, J; Wang, A H; van der Marel, G A; Van Boom, J H; Rich, A

    1984-01-01

    The deoxyribose hexanucleoside pentaphosphate (m5dC-dG)3 has been studied by 500 MHz 1H NMR in D2O (0.1 M NaCl) and in D2O/deuterated methanol mixtures. Two conformations, in slow equilibrium on the NMR time scale, were detected in methanolic solution. Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) experiments were used to assign the base and many of the sugar resonances as well as to determine structural features for both conformations. The results were consistent with the an equilibrium in solution between B-DNA and Z-DNA. The majority of the molecules have a B-DNA structure in low-salt D2O and a Z-DNA structure at high methanol concentrations. A cross-strand NOE between methyl groups on adjacent cytosines is observed for Z-DNA but not B-DNA. The B-DNA conformation predominates at low methanol concentrations and is stabilized by increasing temperature, while the Z-DNA conformation predominates at high methanol concentrations and low temperatures. 31P NMR spectra gave results consistent with those obtained by 1H NMR. Comparison of the 31P spectra with those obtained on poly(dG-m5dC) allow assignment of the lower field resonances to GpC in the Z conformation. PMID:6694910

  14. beta-Citryl-L-glutamate is an endogenous iron chelator that occurs naturally in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Hamada-Kanazawa, Michiko; Kouda, Makiko; Odani, Akira; Matsuyama, Kaori; Kanazawa, Kiyoka; Hasegawa, Tatsuya; Narahara, Masanori; Miyake, Masaharu

    2010-01-01

    The compound beta-citryl-L-glutamate (beta-CG) was initially isolated from developing brains, while it has also been found in high concentrations in testes and eyes. However, its functional roles are unclear. To evaluate its coordination with metal ions, we performed pH titration experiments. The stability constant, logbeta(pqr) for M(p)(beta-CG)(q)H(r) was calculated from pH titration data, which showed that beta-CG forms relatively strong complexes with Fe(III), Cu(II), Fe(II) and Zn(II). beta-CG was also found able to solubilize Fe more effectively from Fe(OH)(2) than from Fe(OH)(3). Therefore, we examined the effects of beta-CG on Fe-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating systems, as well as the potential ROS-scavenging activities of beta-CG and metal ion-(beta-CG) complexes. beta-CG inhibited the Fe-dependent degradation of deoxyribose and Fe-dependent damage to DNA or plasmid DNA in a dose-dependent manner, whereas it had no effect on Cu-mediated DNA damage. In addition, thermodynamic data showed that beta-CG in a physiological pH solution is an Fe(II) chelator rather than an Fe(III) chelator. Taken together, these findings suggest that beta-CG is an endogenous low molecular weight Fe chelator.

  15. Active oligonucleotides incorporating alkylating an agent as potential sequence- and base selective modifier of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, S

    2001-04-01

    A number of cross-linking (alkylating) agents have been developed and incorporated into the oligonulceotides for sequence selective control of gene expression. Recently, potential application of such active oligonucleotides has been expanding from use for improvement of inhibition efficiency to new biotechnology that may enable chemical alteration of genetic information. These interests in active oligonucleotides have encouraged the generation of new cross-linking agents that exhibit high efficiency for application of either in vitro or in vivo. This mini review summarizes structures of alkylating agents, in particular, a new basic skeleton for cross-linking, a 2'-deoxyribose derivative of 2-amino-6-vinylpurine that has been recently developed by the author's group. The 2-amino-6-vinylpurine has been shown to form a complex with cytidine under acidic conditions, and brings the vinyl and the amino reactive groups into proximity to achieve efficient alkylation. A new strategy was designed so that the reactivity of 2-amino-6-vinylpurine can be induced from the corresponding phenylsulfoxide derivative within a duplex with the complementary strand. The validity of the new strategy has been proven by achievement of cytidine-selective cross-linking with remarkably efficiency.

  16. Transition state analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi uridine phosphorylase-catalyzed arsenolysis of uridine

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rafael G.; Vetticatt, Mathew J.; Merino, Emilio F.; Cassera, Maria B.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2011-01-01

    Uridine phosphorylase catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine and 2′-deoxyuridine to generate uracil and (2-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate, an important step in the pyrimidine salvage pathway. The coding sequence annotated as a putative nucleoside phosphorylase in the Trypanosoma cruzi genome was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and shown to be a homodimeric uridine phosphorylase, with similar specificity for uridine and 2′-deoxyuridine, and undetectable activity towards thymidine and purine nucleosides. Competitive kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) were measured and corrected for a forward commitment factor using arsenate as the nucleophile. The intrinsic KIEs are: 1′-14C = 1.103, 1,3-15N2 = 1.034, 3-15N = 1.004, 1-15N = 1.030, 1′-3H = 1.132, 2′-2H = 1.086 and 5′-3H2 = 1.041 for this reaction. Density functional theory was employed to quantitatively interpret the KIEs in terms of transition state structure and geometry. Matching of experimental KIEs to proposed transition state structures suggests an almost synchronous, SN2-like transition state model, in which the ribosyl moiety possesses significant bond order to both nucleophile and leaving group. Natural bond orbital analysis allowed a comparison of the charge distribution pattern between the ground state and the transition state model. PMID:21599004

  17. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5'-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C-C and C-O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  18. Glycal Formation in Crystals of Uridine Phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Debamita; O’Leary, Sen E.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta

    2010-06-22

    Uridine phosphorylase is a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway. This enzyme catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate (or 2{prime}-deoxyuridine to 2{prime}-deoxyribose 1-phosphate). Here we report the structure of hexameric Escherichia coli uridine phosphorylase treated with 5-fluorouridine and sulfate and dimeric bovine uridine phosphorylase treated with 5-fluoro-2{prime}-deoxyuridine or uridine, plus sulfate. In each case the electron density shows three separate species corresponding to the pyrimidine base, sulfate, and a ribosyl species, which can be modeled as a glycal. In the structures of the glycal complexes, the fluorouracil O2 atom is appropriately positioned to actmore » as the base required for glycal formation via deprotonation at C2{prime}. Crystals of bovine uridine phosphorylase treated with 2{prime}-deoxyuridine and sulfate show intact nucleoside. NMR time course studies demonstrate that uridine phosphorylase can catalyze the hydrolysis of the fluorinated nucleosides in the absence of phosphate or sulfate, without the release of intermediates or enzyme inactivation. These results add a previously unencountered mechanistic motif to the body of information on glycal formation by enzymes catalyzing the cleavage of glycosyl bonds.« less

  19. Redox and fungicidal properties of phthalocyanine metal complexes as related to active oxygen.

    PubMed

    Vol'pin, M E; Novodarova, G N; Krainova NYu; Lapikova, V P; Aver'yanov, A A

    2000-10-01

    Some chemical and fungicidal effects of 20 phthalocyanines of Co, Fe, Cu, and Al were studied. Under dark conditions, these complexes reduced nitroblue tetrazolium in the presence of KCN, accelerated the autoxidation of ascorbate or hydroquinone and decomposed hydrogen peroxide. In the later reaction, hydroxyl radical was generated as evidenced with the deoxyribose assay. The inhibition by superoxide dismutase and catalase of catalyzed autoxidation of ascorbate suggests the participation of superoxide anion-radical and hydrogen peroxide in the reaction. Most complexes were toxic to the fungus Magnaporthe grisea which causes blast disease of rice. The toxicity was enhanced by light being diminished by antioxidant reagents sequestering active oxygen species. Some complexes (including nontoxic ones), after 1-day contact with a leaf surface of the disease-susceptible rice cultivar, induced the fungitoxicity of leaf diffusate. This toxicity was also light-activated and sensitive to antioxidant reagents. Several complexes, when added to inocula, decreased 2-3 times the frequency of the compatible symptoms of the blast. It is suggested that in planta, the dark redox activity of phthalocyanines along with their photosensitization promote the generation of active oxygen, which damages the parasite and, therefore, favors disease resistance.

  20. Basic Proteins of Plant Nuclei during Normal and Pathological Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Rasch, Ellen; Woodard, John W.

    1959-01-01

    Histone proteins were studied by microphotometry of plant tissue sections stained with fast green at pH 8.1. For comparative purposes the Feulgen reaction was used for deoxyribose nuclei acid (DNA); the Sakaguchi reaction for arginine; and the Millon reaction for estimates of total protein. Analysis of Tradescantia tissues indicated that amounts of nuclear histone fell into approximate multiples of the gametic (egg or sperm) quantity except in dividing tissues, where amounts intermediate between multiples were found. In differentiated tissues of lily, corn, onion, and broad bean, histones occurred in constant amounts per nucleus, characteristic of the species, as was found also for DNA. Unlike the condition in several animal species, the basic proteins of sperm nuclei in these higher plants were of the histone type; no evidence of protamine was found. In a plant neoplasm, crown gall of broad bean, behavior of the basic nuclear proteins closely paralleled that of DNA. Thus, alterations of DNA levels in tumor tissues were accompanied by quantitatively similar changes in histone levels to maintain the same Feulgen/fast green ratios found in homologous normal tissues. PMID:14436319

  1. Targeting telomere-containing chromosome ends with a near-infrared femtosecond laser to study the activation of the DNA damage response and DNA damage repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bárbara Alcaraz; Stambaugh, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Telomeres are at the ends of chromosomes. Previous evidence suggests that laser-induced deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) breaks at chromosome ends during anaphase results in delayed cytokinesis. A possible explanation for this delay is that the DNA damage response (DDR) mechanism has been activated. We describe a live imaging method to study the effects of DDR activation following focal point near-infrared femtosecond laser microirradiation either at a single chromosome end or at a chromosome arm in mitotic anaphase cells. Laser microirradiation is used in combination with dual fluorescent labeling to monitor the co-localization of double-strand break marker γH2AX along with the DDR factors in PtK2 (Potorous tridactylus) cells. Laser-induced DNA breaks in chromosome ends as well as in chromosome arms results in recruitment of the following: poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1, checkpoint sensors (p-Chk1, p-Chk2), DNA repair protein Ku70/Ku80, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. However, phosphorylated p53 at serine 15 is detected only at chromosome ends and not at chromosome arms. Full activation of DDR on damaged chromosome ends may explain previously published results that showed the delay of cytokinesis. PMID:24064949

  2. Evaluation of in vitro antioxidant properties of methanol and aqueous extracts of Parkinsonia aculeata L. leaves.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sonia; Vig, Adarsh Pal

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, methanol and aqueous extracts of Parkinsonia aculeata L. leaves were prepared and analyzed for phytochemical analysis and antioxidant potential in different in vitro assays. Antioxidant activity was studied using DPPH, CUPRAC, reducing power assay, deoxyribose degradation (site and nonsite specific), ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP), ferric thiocyanate (FTC), thiobarbituric acid (TBA), and molybdate ion reduction, respectively. The total phenolic contents of the methanol and aqueous leaf extract were 39 mg GAE/g and 38 mg GAE/g, whereas flavonoid contents of these extracts were found to be 0.013 mg RE/g and 0.006 mg RE/g, respectively. From the two extracts, the methanol extract shows maximum inhibition (%) of 57.82%, 71.23%, 48.26%, 69.85%, and 52.78% in DPPH, nonsite- and site-specific, FTC, and TBA assays and absorbance of 0.669 and 0.241 in reducing power and CUPRAC assays at the highest concentration tested. UPLC analysis was done to determine the presence of various types of polyphenols present in plant extracts.

  3. Evaluation of In Vitro Antioxidant Properties of Methanol and Aqueous Extracts of Parkinsonia aculeata L. Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Vig, Adarsh Pal

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, methanol and aqueous extracts of Parkinsonia aculeata L. leaves were prepared and analyzed for phytochemical analysis and antioxidant potential in different in vitro assays. Antioxidant activity was studied using DPPH, CUPRAC, reducing power assay, deoxyribose degradation (site and nonsite specific), ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP), ferric thiocyanate (FTC), thiobarbituric acid (TBA), and molybdate ion reduction, respectively. The total phenolic contents of the methanol and aqueous leaf extract were 39 mg GAE/g and 38 mg GAE/g, whereas flavonoid contents of these extracts were found to be 0.013 mg RE/g and 0.006 mg RE/g, respectively. From the two extracts, the methanol extract shows maximum inhibition (%) of 57.82%, 71.23%, 48.26%, 69.85%, and 52.78% in DPPH, nonsite- and site-specific, FTC, and TBA assays and absorbance of 0.669 and 0.241 in reducing power and CUPRAC assays at the highest concentration tested. UPLC analysis was done to determine the presence of various types of polyphenols present in plant extracts. PMID:24348173

  4. Studies on interaction of norbixin with DNA: Multispectroscopic and in silico analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantharaman, Amrita; Priya, Rajendra Rao; Hemachandran, Hridya; Sivaramakrishna, Akella; Babu, Subramanian; Siva, Ramamoorthy

    2015-06-01

    The interaction of food colorant norbixin with calf thymus DNA (CTDNA) was investigated through UV-Visible spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Circular Dichroism (CD), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), DNA melting studies, electrophoretic analysis, histological staining technique and molecular docking studies. The results indicated that norbixin interacted with CTDNA by partial intercalation mode. The binding constant (K) of norbixin with CTDNA was calculated to be 5.08 × 105 Mol-1 L. FTIR and CD studies were coupled with 1H NMR spectra revealed that norbixin intercalates partially and binds to the groove's, phosphate group, deoxyribose sugar of DNA and also induces conformational transition of B-form to A-form DNA. Agarose gel electrophoretic and histological staining technique results further prove that, norbixin specifically binds to the DNA in the cell. Moreover, molecular docking studies on the specific binding of norbixin with CTDNA have exhibited lowest conformation energy score of -3.2. Therefore, this food colorant has the ability to interact with DNA and it could emerge as a promising class of natural DNA targeted therapeutic.

  5. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5(')-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C-C and C-O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  6. A Near-Atomic Structure of the Dark Apoptosome Provides Insight into Assembly and Activation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tat Cheung; Akey, Ildikó V; Yuan, Shujun; Yu, Zhiheng; Ludtke, Steven J; Akey, Christopher W

    2017-01-03

    In Drosophila, the Apaf-1-related killer (Dark) forms an apoptosome that activates procaspases. To investigate function, we have determined a near-atomic structure of Dark double rings using cryo-electron microscopy. We then built a nearly complete model of the apoptosome that includes 7- and 8-blade β-propellers. We find that the preference for dATP during Dark assembly may be governed by Ser325, which is in close proximity to the 2' carbon of the deoxyribose ring. Interestingly, β-propellers in V-shaped domains of the Dark apoptosome are more widely separated, relative to these features in the Apaf-1 apoptosome. This wider spacing may be responsible for the lack of cytochrome c binding to β-propellers in the Dark apoptosome. Our structure also highlights the roles of two loss-of-function mutations that may block Dark assembly. Finally, the improved model provides a framework to understand apical procaspase activation in the intrinsic cell death pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Methods for the determination of intracellular levels of ribose phosphates.

    PubMed

    Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Ipata, Piero Luigi

    2006-10-31

    Ribose phosphates are either synthesized through the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway or stem from the phosphorolytic cleavage of the N-glycosidic bond of ribonucleosides. The two major pentose phosphates, ribose-5-phosphate and ribose-1-phosphate, can be readily interconverted by phosphopentomutase. Ribose-5-phosphate is also the direct precursor of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate, which is used for both de novo and salvage synthesis of nucleotides. On the other hand, the phosphorolysis of deoxyribonucleosides is the major source of deoxyribose phosphates. While the destiny of the nucleobase stemming from nucleoside phosphorolysis has been extensively investigated, the fate of the sugar moiety has been somehow neglected. However, extensive advances have been made in elucidating the pathways by which the pentose phosphates, arising from nucleoside phosphorolysis, are either recycled, without opening of their furanosidic ring, or catabolized as a carbon and energy source. Nevertheless, many aspects of pentose phosphate metabolism, and the possible involvement of these compounds in a number of cellular processes still remain obscure. The comprehension of the role played by pentose phosphates may be greatly facilitated by the knowledge of their steady-state intracellular levels and of their changes in response to variations of intra- and extracellular signals.

  8. Chemical composition and antioxidant/antimicrobial activities in supercritical carbon dioxide fluid extract of Gloiopeltis tenax.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiaojiao; Chen, Yicun; Yao, Fen; Chen, Weizhou; Shi, Ganggang

    2012-12-01

    Gloiopeltis tenax (G. tenax) is widely distributed along the Chinese coastal areas and is commonly used in the treatment of diarrhea and colitis. This study aimed at investigating the bioactivities of the volatile constituents in G. tenax. We extracted the essential constituents of G. tenax by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (CO₂-SFE), then identified and analyzed the constituents by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In total, 30 components were identified in the G. tenax extract. The components showed remarkable antioxidant activity (radical scavenging activity of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)), lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity (in a β-carotene/linoleic acid-coupled oxidation reaction), and hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity (by deoxyribose degradation by iron-dependent hydroxyl radical), compared to butylated hydroxytoluene. In microdilution assays, G. tenax extracts showed a moderate inhibitory effects on Staphyloccocus aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 3.9 mg/mL), Enterococcus faecalis (7.8 mg/mL), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (15.6 mg/mL), and Escherichia coli (3.9 mg/mL). Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of G. tenax were related to the active chemical composition. These results suggest that the CO₂-SFE extract from G. tenax has potential to be used as a natural antioxidant and antimicrobial agent in food processing.

  9. In Silico Discovery of Novel Potent Antioxidants on the Basis of Pulvinic Acid and Coumarine Derivatives and Their Experimental Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Martinčič, Rok; Mravljak, Janez; Švajger, Urban; Perdih, Andrej; Anderluh, Marko; Novič, Marjana

    2015-01-01

    A pigment from the edible mushroom Xerocomus badius norbadione A, which is a natural derivative of pulvinic acid, was found to possess antioxidant properties. Since the pulvinic acid represents a novel antioxidant scaffold, several other derivatives were recently synthetized and evaluated experimentally, along with some structurally related coumarine derivatives. The obtained data formed the basis for the construction of several quantitative structure-activity and pharmacophore models, which were employed in the virtual screening experiments of compound libraries and for the prediction of their antioxidant activity, with the goal of discovering novel compounds possessing antioxidant properties. A final prioritization list of 21 novel compounds alongside 8 established antioxidant compounds was created for their experimental evaluation, consisting of the DPPH assay, 2-deoxyribose assay, β-carotene bleaching assay and the cellular antioxidant activity assay. Ten novel compounds from the tetronic acid and barbituric acid chemical classes displayed promising antioxidant activity in at least one of the used assays, that is comparable to or even better than some standard antioxidants. Compounds 5, 7 and 9 displayed good activity in all the assays, and were furthermore effective preventers of oxidative stress in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, which are promising features for the potential therapeutic use of such compounds. PMID:26474393

  10. A survey of the sequence-specific interaction of damaging agents with DNA: emphasis on antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Murray, V

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews the literature concerning the sequence specificity of DNA-damaging agents. DNA-damaging agents are widely used in cancer chemotherapy. It is important to understand fully the determinants of DNA sequence specificity so that more effective DNA-damaging agents can be developed as antitumor drugs. There are five main methods of DNA sequence specificity analysis: cleavage of end-labeled fragments, linear amplification with Taq DNA polymerase, ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR), single-strand ligation PCR, and footprinting. The DNA sequence specificity in purified DNA and in intact mammalian cells is reviewed for several classes of DNA-damaging agent. These include agents that form covalent adducts with DNA, free radical generators, topoisomerase inhibitors, intercalators and minor groove binders, enzymes, and electromagnetic radiation. The main sites of adduct formation are at the N-7 of guanine in the major groove of DNA and the N-3 of adenine in the minor groove, whereas free radical generators abstract hydrogen from the deoxyribose sugar and topoisomerase inhibitors cause enzyme-DNA cross-links to form. Several issues involved in the determination of the DNA sequence specificity are discussed. The future directions of the field, with respect to cancer chemotherapy, are also examined.

  11. The Human DNA glycosylases NEIL1 and NEIL3 Excise Psoralen-Induced DNA-DNA Cross-Links in a Four-Stranded DNA Structure.

    PubMed

    Martin, Peter R; Couvé, Sophie; Zutterling, Caroline; Albelazi, Mustafa S; Groisman, Regina; Matkarimov, Bakhyt T; Parsons, Jason L; Elder, Rhoderick H; Saparbaev, Murat K

    2017-12-12

    Interstrand cross-links (ICLs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions that block DNA replication and transcription by preventing strand separation. Previously, we demonstrated that the bacterial and human DNA glycosylases Nei and NEIL1 excise unhooked psoralen-derived ICLs in three-stranded DNA via hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond between the crosslinked base and deoxyribose sugar. Furthermore, NEIL3 from Xenopus laevis has been shown to cleave psoralen- and abasic site-induced ICLs in Xenopus egg extracts. Here we report that human NEIL3 cleaves psoralen-induced DNA-DNA cross-links in three-stranded and four-stranded DNA substrates to generate unhooked DNA fragments containing either an abasic site or a psoralen-thymine monoadduct. Furthermore, while Nei and NEIL1 also cleave a psoralen-induced four-stranded DNA substrate to generate two unhooked DNA duplexes with a nick, NEIL3 targets both DNA strands in the ICL without generating single-strand breaks. The DNA substrate specificities of these Nei-like enzymes imply the occurrence of long uninterrupted three- and four-stranded crosslinked DNA-DNA structures that may originate in vivo from DNA replication fork bypass of an ICL. In conclusion, the Nei-like DNA glycosylases unhook psoralen-derived ICLs in various DNA structures via a genuine repair mechanism in which complex DNA lesions can be removed without generation of highly toxic double-strand breaks.

  12. Computer Simulations Reveal Substrate Specificity of Glycosidic Bond Cleavage in Native and Mutant Human Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Hopmann, Kathrin Helen; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-04-12

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of purine ribonucleosides and 2'-deoxyribonucleosides, yielding the purine base and (2'-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate as products. While this enzyme has been extensively studied, several questions with respect to the catalytic mechanism have remained largely unanswered. The role of the phosphate and key amino acid residues in the catalytic reaction as well as the purine ring protonation state is elucidated using density functional theory calculations and extensive empirical valence bond (EVB) simulations. Free energy surfaces for adenosine, inosine, and guanosine are fitted to ab initio data and yield quantitative agreement with experimental data when the surfaces are used to model the corresponding enzymatic reactions. The cognate substrates 6-aminopurines (inosine and guanosine) interact with PNP through extensive hydrogen bonding, but the substrate specificity is found to be a direct result of the electrostatic preorganization energy along the reaction coordinate. Asn243 has previously been identified as a key residue providing substrate specificity. Mutation of Asn243 to Asp has dramatic effects on the substrate specificity, making 6-amino- and 6-oxopurines equally good as substrates. The principal effect of this particular mutation is the change in the electrostatic preorganization energy between the native enzyme and the Asn243Asp mutant, clearly favoring adenosine over inosine and guanosine. Thus, the EVB simulations show that this particular mutation affects the electrostatic preorganization of the active site, which in turn can explain the substrate specificity.

  13. Definition of the intermediates and mechanism of the anticancer drug bleomycin using nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy and related methods

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei V.; Bell, Caleb B.; Wong, Shaun D.; Wilson, Samuel A.; Kwak, Yeonju; Chow, Marina S.; Zhao, Jiyong; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.

    2010-01-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) is a glycopeptide anticancer drug capable of effecting single- and double-strand DNA cleavage. The last detectable intermediate prior to DNA cleavage is a low spin FeIII peroxy level species, termed activated bleomycin (ABLM). DNA strand scission is initiated through the abstraction of the C-4′ hydrogen atom of the deoxyribose sugar unit. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) aided by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are applied to define the natures of FeIIIBLM and ABLM as (BLM)FeIII─OH and (BLM)FeIII(η1─OOH) species, respectively. The NRVS spectra of FeIIIBLM and ABLM are strikingly different because in ABLM the δFe─O─O bending mode mixes with, and energetically splits, the doubly degenerate, intense O─Fe─Nax transaxial bends. DFT calculations of the reaction of ABLM with DNA, based on the species defined by the NRVS data, show that the direct H-atom abstraction by ABLM is thermodynamically favored over other proposed reaction pathways. PMID:21149675

  14. Bioconjugation of Oligodeoxynucleotides Carrying 1,4-Dicarbonyl Groups via Reductive Amination with Lysine Residues.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Jinnouchi, Akiko; Usui, Kazuteru; Katayama, Tsutomu; Fujii, Masayuki; Suemune, Hiroshi; Aso, Mariko

    2015-08-19

    We evaluated the efficacy of bioconjugation of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing 1,4-dicarbonyl groups, a C4'-oxidized abasic site (OAS), and a newly designed 2'-methoxy analogue, via reductive amination with lysine residues. Dicarbonyls, aldehyde and ketone at C1- and C4-positions of deoxyribose in the ring-opened form of OAS allowed efficient reaction with amines. Kinetic studies indicated that reductive amination of OAS-containing ODNs with a proximal amine on the complementary strand proceeded 10 times faster than the corresponding reaction of an ODN containing an abasic site with C1-aldehyde. Efficient reductive amination between the DNA-binding domain of Escherichia coli DnaA protein and ODNs carrying OAS in the DnaA-binding sequence proceeded at the lysine residue in proximity to the phosphate group at the 5'-position of the OAS, in contrast to unsuccessful conjugation with abasic site ODNs, even though they have similar aldehydes. Theoretical calculation indicated that the C1-aldehyde of OAS was more accessible to the target lysine than that of the abasic site. These results demonstrate the potential utility of cross-linking strategies that use dicarbonyl-containing ODNs for the study of protein-nucleic acid interactions. Conjugation with a lysine-containing peptide that lacked specific affinity for ODN was also successful, further highlighting the advantages of 1,4-dicarbonyls.

  15. [Quantitative analysis of nucleotide mixtures with terahertz time domain spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zeng-yan; Xiao, Ti-qiao; Zhao, Hong-wei; Yu, Xiao-han; Xi, Zai-jun; Xu, Hong-jie

    2008-09-01

    Adenosine, thymidine, guanosine, cytidine and uridine form the building blocks of ribose nucleic acid (RNA) and deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA). Nucleosides and their derivants are all have biological activities. Some of them can be used as medicine directly or as materials to synthesize other medicines. It is meaningful to detect the component and content in nucleosides mixtures. In the present paper, components and contents of the mixtures of adenosine, thymidine, guanosine, cytidine and uridine were analyzed. THz absorption spectra of pure nucleosides were set as standard spectra. The mixture's absorption spectra were analyzed by linear regression with non-negative constraint to identify the components and their relative content in the mixtures. The experimental and analyzing results show that it is simple and effective to get the components and their relative percentage in the mixtures by terahertz time domain spectroscopy with a relative error less than 10%. Component which is absent could be excluded exactly by this method, and the error sources were also analyzed. All the experiments and analysis confirms that this method is of no damage or contamination to the sample. This means that it will be a simple, effective and new method in biochemical materials analysis, which extends the application field of THz-TDS.

  16. Metallodrug induced apoptotic cell death and survival attempts are characterizable by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    le Roux, K.; Prinsloo, L. C.; Meyer, D.

    2014-09-01

    Chrysotherapeutics are under investigation as new or additional treatments for different types of cancers. In this study, gold complexes were investigated for their anticancer potential using Raman spectroscopy. The aim of the study was to determine whether Raman spectroscopy could be used for the characterization of metallodrug-induced cell death. Symptoms of cell death such as decreased peak intensities of proteins bonds and phosphodiester bonds found in deoxyribose nucleic acids were evident in the principal component analysis of the spectra. Vibrational bands around 761 cm-1 and 1300 cm-1 (tryptophan, ethanolamine group, and phosphatidylethanolamine) and 1720 cm-1 (ester bonds associated with phospholipids) appeared in the Raman spectra of cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells after metallodrug treatment. The significantly (p < 0.05, one way analysis of variance) increased intensity of phosphatidylethanolamine after metallodrug treatment could be a molecular signature of induced apoptosis since both the co-regulated phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine are externalized during cell death. Treated cells had significantly higher levels of glucose and glycogen vibrational peaks, indicative of a survival mechanism of cancer cells under chemical stress. Cancer cells excrete chemotherapeutics to improve their chances of survival and utilize glucose to achieve this. Raman spectroscopy was able to monitor a survival strategy of cancer cells in the form of glucose uptake to alleviate chemical stress. Raman spectroscopy was invaluable in obtaining molecular information generated by biomolecules affected by anticancer metallodrug treatments and presents an alternative to less reproducible, conventional biochemical assays for cytotoxicity analyses.

  17. Isolation and characterization of mammalian eumelanins from hair and irides.

    PubMed

    Novellino, L; Napolitano, A; Prota, G

    2000-07-26

    A new enzymatic procedure was developed for isolation of eumelanin from black human hair which might provide a substantially intact pigment for structural characterization. Sequential digestion with protease, proteinase K and papaine in the presence of dithiothreitol afforded a pigment with a 6% w/w protein content. HPLC analysis of pyrrole acids resulting from alkaline H(2)O(2) degradation, carboxyl content determination, and ferricyanide titration showed that the isolated pigment is made up of 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI)- and 5, 6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA)-derived units at a 6:1 ratio, exhibiting a significant degree of oxidative degradation. For comparison, a different eumelanin isolated from black bovine irides by a similar enzymatic procedure was analyzed. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry of the final pigment provided evidence for homologous series of DHICA oligomers, while chemical analysis allowed an estimate of 2:1 DHICA/DHI-derived units in the polymer, with a substantial proportion of intact o-diphenolic functions. Iris melanin proved able to promote the Fenton oxidation of deoxyribose while hair melanin was ineffective. Overall, these results provide, for the first time, unambiguous evidence for marked structural differences of mammalian eumelanins which may be directly related to the diversity of the sites of biosynthesis and storage, as well as to functional role of these pigments.

  18. Nucleoprotein Changes in Plant Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Rasch, Ellen; Swift, Hewson; Klein, Richard M.

    1959-01-01

    Tumor cell transformation and growth were studied in a plant neoplasm, crown gall of bean, induced by Agrobacterium rubi. Ribose nucleic acid (RNA), deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA), histone, and total protein were estimated by microphotometry of nuclei, nucleoli, and cytoplasm in stained tissue sections. Transformation of normal cells to tumor cells was accompanied by marked increases in ribonucleoprotein content of affected tissues, reaching a maximum 2 to 3 days after inoculation with virulent bacteria. Increased DNA levels were in part associated with increased mitotic frequency, but also with progressive accumulation of nuclei in the higher DNA classes, formed by repeated DNA doubling without intervening reduction by mitosis. Some normal nuclei of the higher DNA classes (with 2, 4, or 8 times the DNA content of diploid nuclei) were reduced to diploid levels by successive cell divisions without intervening DNA synthesis. The normal relation between DNA synthesis and mitosis was thus disrupted in tumor tissue. Nevertheless, clearly defined DNA classes, as found in homologous normal tissues, were maintained in the tumor at all times. PMID:13673042

  19. Structural insights into abasic site for Fpg specific binding and catalysis: comparative high-resolution crystallographic studies of Fpg bound to various models of abasic site analogues-containing DNA

    PubMed Central

    de Jésus, Karine Pereira; Serre, Laurence; Zelwer, Charles; Castaing, Bertrand

    2005-01-01

    Fpg is a DNA glycosylase that recognizes and excises the mutagenic 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) and the potentially lethal formamidopyrimidic residues (Fapy). Fpg is also associated with an AP lyase activity which successively cleaves the abasic (AP) site at the 3′ and 5′ sides by βδ-elimination. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structures of the wild-type and the P1G defective mutant of Fpg from Lactococcus lactis bound to 14mer DNA duplexes containing either a tetrahydrofuran (THF) or 1,3-propanediol (Pr) AP site analogues. Structures show that THF is less extrahelical than Pr and its backbone C5′–C4′–C3′ diverges significantly from those of Pr, rAP, 8-oxodG and FapydG. Clearly, the heterocyclic oxygen of THF is pushed back by the carboxylate of the strictly conserved E2 residue. We can propose that the ring-opened form of the damaged deoxyribose is the structure active form of the sugar for Fpg catalysis process. Both structural and functional data suggest that the first step of catalysis mediated by Fpg involves the expulsion of the O4′ leaving group facilitated by general acid catalysis (involving E2), rather than the immediate cleavage of the N-glycosic bond of the damaged nucleoside. PMID:16243784

  20. Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Grorge

    2001-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are relatively enriched in soluble organic compounds. To date, these compounds provide the only record available to study a range of organic chemical processes in the early Solar System chemistry. The Murchison meteorite is the best-characterized carbonaceous meteorite with respect to organic chemistry. The study of its organic compounds has related principally to aqueous meteorite parent body chemistry and compounds of potential importance for the origin of life. Among the classes of organic compounds found in Murchison are amino acids, amides, carboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, sulfonic acids, phosphonic acids, purines and pyrimidines (Table 1). Compounds such as these were quite likely delivered to the early Earth in asteroids and comets. Until now, polyhydroxylated compounds (polyols), including sugars (polyhydroxy aldehydes or ketones), sugar alcohols, sugar acids, etc., had not been identified in Murchison. Ribose and deoxyribose, five-carbon sugars, are central to the role of contemporary nucleic acids, DNA and RNA. Glycerol, a three-carbon sugar alcohol, is a constituent of all known biological membranes. Due to the relative lability of sugars, some researchers have questioned the lifetime of sugars under the presumed conditions on the early Earth and postulated other (more stable) compounds as constituents of the first replicating molecules. The identification of potential sources and/or formation mechanisms of pre-biotic polyols would add to the understanding of what organic compounds were available, and for what length of time, on the ancient Earth.

  1. Protective effects of Asian green vegetables against oxidant induced cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Peter; Ong, Choon Nam; Whiteman, Matt

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the antioxidant and phase II detoxification enzyme inducing ability of green leaf vegetables consumed in Asia. METHODS: The antioxidant properties of six commonly consumed Asian vegetables were determined using the ABTS, DPPH, deoxyribose, PR bleaching and iron- ascorbate induced lipid peroxidation assay. Induce of phase II detoxification enzymes was also determined for each respective vegetable extract. Protection against authentic ONOO- and HOCl mediated cytotoxicity in human colon HCT116 cells was determined using the MTT 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrasodium bromide) viability assay. RESULTS: All of the extracts derived from green leaf vegetables exhibited antioxidant properties, while also having cytoprotective effects against ONOO- and HOCl mediated cytotoxicity. In addition, evaluation of the phase II enzyme inducing ability of each extract, as assessed by quinone reductase and glutathione-S-transferase activities, showed significant variation between the vegetables analyzed. CONCLUSION: Green leaf vegetables are potential sources of antioxidants and phase II detoxification enzyme inducers in the Asian diet. It is likely that consumption of such vegetables is a major source of beneficial phytochemical constituents that may protect against colonic damage. PMID:16437686

  2. Purification of an Inducible DNase from a Thermophilic Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Kyle S.; Vu, Andrea; Levin, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to induce an extracellular DNase from a novel thermophilic fungus was studied and the DNAse purified using both traditional and innovative purification techniques. The isolate produced sterile hyphae under all attempted growing conditions, with an average diameter of 2 μm and was found to have an optimal temperature of 45 °C and a maximum of 65 °C. Sequencing of the internal transcribed region resulted in a 91% match with Chaetomium sp., suggesting a new species, but further clarification on this point is needed. The optimal temperature for DNase production was found to be 55 °C and was induced by the presence of DNA and/or deoxyribose. Static growth of the organism resulted in significantly higher DNase production than agitated growth. The DNase was purified 145-fold using a novel affinity membrane purification system with 25% of the initial enzyme activity remaining. Electrophoresis of the purified enzyme resulted in a single protein band, indicating DNase homogeneity. PMID:24447923

  3. Dynamics of keratinocytes in vivo using HO labeling: a sensitive marker of epidermal proliferation state.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Elaine A; Chai, Christine M; de Lumen, Benito O; Neese, Richard A; Hellerstein, Marc K

    2004-09-01

    A heavy water ((2)H(2)O) labeling method recently developed to measure cell proliferation in vivo is applied here to the measurement of murine epidermal cell turnover and to investigate conditions in which keratinocyte proliferation is either inhibited or stimulated. The technique is based on incorporation of (2)H(2)O into the deoxyribose moiety of deoxyribonucleotides in dividing cells. Label incorporation and die-away studies in cells isolated from C57BL/6J mouse epidermis revealed the replacement rate to be 34%-44% per wk (half-life of 1.6-2 wk). The kinetics provided evidence of a non-proliferative subpopulation of cells (10%-15% of the total) within the epidermis. Topical administration of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate for 3 wk increased epidermal cell proliferation by 55% in SENCAR mice. Topical addition of lunasin, an anti-mitotic agent from soy, decreased epidermal cell proliferation modestly though significantly (16% given alone, 9% given with carcinogens). Caloric restriction (by 33% of energy intake) for 4 wk decreased the epidermal cell proliferation rate by 45% in C57BL/6J mice. In summary, epidermal cell proliferation can be measured in vivo using (2)H(2)O labeling in normal, hyper- and hypo-proliferative conditions. Potential applications of this inherently safe method in humans might include studies of psoriasis, wound healing, chemopreventive agents, and caloric intake.

  4. Azobenzene as a photoregulator covalently attached to RNA: a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics-surface hopping dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Padmabati; Granucci, Giovanni; Rastädter, Dominique; Persico, Maurizio; Burghardt, Irene

    2018-05-28

    The photoregulation of nucleic acids by azobenzene photoswitches has recently attracted considerable interest in the context of emerging biotechnological applications. To understand the mechanism of photoinduced isomerisation and conformational control in these complex biological environments, we employ a Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) approach in conjunction with nonadiabatic Surface Hopping (SH) dynamics. Two representative RNA-azobenzene complexes are investigated, both of which contain the azobenzene chromophore covalently attached to an RNA double strand via a β-deoxyribose linker. Due to the pronounced constraints of the local RNA environment, it is found that trans -to- cis isomerization is slowed down to a time scale of ∼10-15 picoseconds, in contrast to 500 femtoseconds in vacuo , with a quantum yield reduced by a factor of two. By contrast, cis -to- trans isomerization remains in a sub-picosecond regime. A volume-conserving isomerization mechanism is found, similarly to the pedal-like mechanism previously identified for azobenzene in solution phase. Strikingly, the chiral RNA environment induces opposite right-handed and left-handed helicities of the ground-state cis -azobenzene chromophore in the two RNA-azobenzene complexes, along with an almost completely chirality conserving photochemical pathway for these helical enantiomers.

  5. Probing the DNA kink structure induced by the hyperthermophilic chromosomal protein Sac7d

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Yu; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Lin, Ting-Wan; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2005-01-01

    Sac7d, a small, abundant, sequence-general DNA-binding protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, causes a single-step sharp kink in DNA (∼60°) via the intercalation of both Val26 and Met29. These two amino acids were systematically changed in size to probe their effects on DNA kinking. Eight crystal structures of five Sac7d mutant–DNA complexes have been analyzed. The DNA-binding pattern of the V26A and M29A single mutants is similar to that of the wild-type, whereas the V26A/M29A protein binds DNA without side chain intercalation, resulting in a smaller overall bending (∼50°). The M29F mutant inserts the Phe29 side chain orthogonally to the C2pG3 step without stacking with base pairs, inducing a sharp kink (∼80°). In the V26F/M29F-GCGATCGC complex, Phe26 intercalates deeply into DNA bases by stacking with the G3 base, whereas Phe29 is stacked on the G15 deoxyribose, in a way similar to those used by the TATA box-binding proteins. All mutants have reduced DNA-stabilizing ability, as indicated by their lower Tm values. The DNA kink patterns caused by different combinations of hydrophobic side chains may be relevant in understanding the manner by which other minor groove-binding proteins interact with DNA. PMID:15653643

  6. Versatile Redox Chemistry Complicates Antioxidant Capacity Assessment: Flavonoids as Milieu-Dependent Antiand Pro-Oxidants

    PubMed Central

    Chobot, Vladimir; Kubicova, Lenka; Bachmann, Gert; Hadacek, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Some antioxidants have been shown to possess additional pro-oxidant effects. Diverse methodologies exist for studying redox properties of synthetic and natural chemicals. The latter are substantial components of our diet. Exploration of their contribution to life-extending or -compromising effects is mandatory. Among reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydroxyl radical (•OH) is the most damaging species. Due to its short half-life, the assay has to contain a specific generation system. Plants synthesize flavonoids, phenolic compounds recognized as counter-agents to coronary heart disease. Their antioxidant activities are affected by their hydroxylation patterns. Moreover, in the plant, they mainly occur as glycosides. We chose three derivatives, quercetin, luteolin, and rutin, in attempts to explore their redox chemistry in contrasting hydrogen peroxide environments. Initial addition of hydrogen peroxide in high concentration or gradual development constituted a main factor affecting their redox chemical properties, especially in case of quercetin. Our study exemplifies that a combination of a chemical assay (deoxyribose degradation) with an electrochemical method (square-wave voltammetry) provides insightful data. The ambiguity of the tested flavonoids to act either as anti- or pro-oxidant may complicate categorization, but probably contributed to their evolution as components of a successful metabolic system that benefits both producer and consumer. PMID:23736691

  7. Computational and experimental analysis identified 6-diazo-5-oxonorleucine as a potential agent for treating infection by Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Plaimas, Kitiporn; Wang, Yulin; Rotimi, Solomon O; Olasehinde, Grace; Fatumo, Segun; Lanzer, Michael; Adebiyi, Ezekiel; König, Rainer

    2013-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum (PF) is the most severe malaria parasite. It is developing resistance quickly to existing drugs making it indispensable to discover new drugs. Effective drugs have been discovered targeting metabolic enzymes of the parasite. In order to predict new drug targets, computational methods can be used employing database information of metabolism. Using this data, we performed recently a computational network analysis of metabolism of PF. We analyzed the topology of the network to find reactions which are sensitive against perturbations, i.e., when a single enzyme is blocked by drugs. We now used a refined network comprising also the host enzymes which led to a refined set of the five targets glutamyl-tRNA (gln) amidotransferase, hydroxyethylthiazole kinase, deoxyribose-phophate aldolase, pseudouridylate synthase, and deoxyhypusine synthase. It was shown elsewhere that glutamyl-tRNA (gln) amidotransferase of other microorganisms can be inhibited by 6-diazo-5-oxonorleucine. Performing a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) assay, we showed, that 6-diazo-5-oxonorleucine is also severely affecting viability of PF in blood plasma of the human host. We confirmed this by an in vivo study observing Plasmodium berghei infected mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Joong-Won, E-mail: jshin@govst.edu; Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1872; Bernstein, Elliot R., E-mail: erb@lamar.colostate.edu

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5{sup ′}-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate,more » rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C–C and C–O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.« less

  9. DNA@Mn3(PO4)2 Nanoparticles Supported with Graphene Oxide as Photoelectrodes for Photoeletrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lixia; Xie, Jiale; Ma, Xiaoqing; Li, Man; Yu, Ling

    2017-01-01

    A novel deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA)-based photoelectrode consisting of DNA@Mn3(PO4)2 nanoparticles on graphene oxide (GO) sheets was successfully fabricated for photoelectrocatalysis. DNA served as a soft template to guide the nucleation and growth of Mn3(PO4)2 nanoparticles in the synthesis of Mn3(PO4)2 nanoparticles. More importantly, the DNA also serves as semiconductor materials to adjust charge transport. Under UV light irradiation (180-420 nm, 15 mW/cm2), the photocurrent density of DNA@ Mn3(PO4)2/GO electrodes reached 9 μA/cm2 at 0.7 V bias (vs. SCE). An applied bias photon-to-current efficiency (ABPE) of 0.18% can be achieved, which was much higher than that of other control electrodes (<0.04%). In this DNA-based photoelectrode, well-matched energy levels can efficiently improve charge transfer and reduce the recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs.

  10. Repair Activity of trans-Resveratrol toward 2'-Deoxyguanosine Radicals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xing; An, Ping; Li, Shujin; Zhou, Liping

    2018-04-26

    In the present study, the repair activity of trans-resveratrol toward 2'-deoxyguanosine (dGuo) radicals in polar and nonpolar solvents was studied using density functional theory. The hydrogen transfer/proton coupled electron transfer and single electron transfer (SET) mechanisms between trans-resveratrol and dGuo-radicals were considered. Taking into consideration the molar fraction of neutral trans-resveratrol (ROH) and anionic trans-resveratrol (RO - ), the overall rate constants for repairing dGuo-radicals by trans-resveratrol are 9.94 × 10 8 and 2.01 × 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 in polar and nonpolar solvents, respectively, and the overall rate constant of repairing cation radical (dGuo •+ ) by trans-resveratrol via an SET mechanism is 7.17 × 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . The repair activity of RO - toward dGuo-radicals is better than that of ROH, but the repair activity of ROH toward dGuo •+ is better than that of RO - . Unfortunately, neither ROH nor RO - can repair the 2'-deoxyribose radicals of dGuo. It can therefore be concluded that trans-resveratrol is an effective antioxidant for repairing base radicals of dGuo and dGuo •+ . The study can help us understand the repair activity of trans-resveratrol toward dGuo radicals.

  11. Variation of antioxidant activity and the levels of bioactive compounds in lipophilic and hydrophilic extracts from hot pepper (Capsicum spp.) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Bae, Haejin; Jayaprakasha, G K; Jifon, John; Patil, Bhimanagouda S

    2012-10-15

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) are a rich source of diverse bioactive compounds with potential health-promoting properties. This study investigated the extraction efficiency of five solvents on antioxidant activities from cayenne (CA408 and Mesilla), jalapeño (Ixtapa) and serrano (Tuxtlas) pepper cultivars. Freeze-dried peppers were extracted using a Soxhlet extractor with five solvents: hexane, ethyl acetate, acetone, methanol, and methanol:water (80:20). The levels of specific bioactive compounds (phenolics, capsaicinoids, carotenoids and flavonoids) were determined by HPLC and antioxidant activities were assayed by three methods. For all pepper cultivars tested, hexane extracts had the highest levels of capsaicinoids and carotenoids, but methanol extracts had the maximum levels of flavonoids. Hexane extracts showed higher 2,2-diphenyl-1-pricrylhydrozyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity and higher reducing power, and acetone extracts (from Mesilla pepper) had a high reducing power. All pepper extracts, except hexane, were effective in preventing deoxyribose degradation, and the inhibition was increased by high concentrations of extracts. The results of the present study indicated that, among the different measures of antioxidant activity, DPPH radical-scavenging activity was strongly correlated with total bioactive compounds (capsaicinoids, carotenoids, flavonoids and total phenolics) in pepper cultivars. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Isoguanine and 5-Methyl-Isocytosine Bases, In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bande, Omprakash; Abu El Asrar, Rania; Braddick, Darren; Dumbre, Shrinivas; Pezo, Valérie; Schepers, Guy; Pinheiro, Vitor B; Lescrinier, Eveline; Holliger, Philipp; Marlière, Philippe; Herdewijn, Piet

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis, base-pairing properties and in vitro and in vivo characteristics of 5-methyl-isocytosine (isoCMe) and isoguanine (isoG) nucleosides, incorporated in an HNA(h) (hexitol nucleic acid)–DNA(d) mosaic backbone, are described. The required h-isoG phosphoramidite was prepared by a selective deamination as a key step. As demonstrated by Tm measurements the hexitol sugar showed slightly better mismatch discrimination against dT. The d-isoG base mispairing follows the order T>G>C while the h-isoG base mispairing follows the order G>C>T. The h- and d-isoCMe bases mainly mispair with G. Enzymatic incorporation experiments show that the hexitol backbone has a variable effect on selectivity. In the enzymatic assays, isoG misincorporates mainly with T, and isoCMe misincorporates mainly with A. Further analysis in vivo confirmed the patterns of base-pair interpretation for the deoxyribose and hexitol isoCMe/isoG bases in a cellular context, through incorporation of the bases into plasmidic DNA. Results in vivo demonstrated that mispairing and misincorporation was dependent on the backbone scaffold of the base, which indicates rational advances towards orthogonality. PMID:25684598

  13. Inclusion of methoxy groups inverts the thermodynamic stabilities of DNA-RNA hybrid duplexes: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Gorle; Priyakumar, U Deva

    2015-09-01

    Modified nucleic acids have found profound applications in nucleic acid based technologies such as antisense and antiviral therapies. Previous studies on chemically modified nucleic acids have suggested that modifications incorporated in furanose sugar especially at 2'-position attribute special properties to nucleic acids when compared to other modifications. 2'-O-methyl modification to deoxyribose sugars of DNA-RNA hybrids is one such modification that increases nucleic acid stability and has become an attractive class of compounds for potential antisense applications. It has been reported that modification of DNA strands with 2'-O-methyl group reverses the thermodynamic stability of DNA-RNA hybrid duplexes. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on two hybrid duplexes (DR and RD) which differ from each other and 2'-O-methyl modified counterparts to investigate the effect of 2'-O-methyl modification on their duplex stability. The results obtained suggest that the modification drives the conformations of both the hybrid duplexes towards A-RNA like conformation. The modified hybrid duplexes exhibit significantly contrasting dynamics and hydration patterns compared to respective parent duplexes. In line with the experimental results, the relative binding free energies suggest that the introduced modifications stabilize the less stable DR hybrid, but destabilize the more stable RD duplex. Binding free energy calculations suggest that the increased hydrophobicity is primarily responsible for the reversal of thermodynamic stability of hybrid duplexes. Free energy component analysis further provides insights into the stability of modified duplexes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. In situ generation of a hydroxyl radical by nanoporous activated carbon derived from rice husk for environmental applications: kinetic and thermodynamic constants.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, S; Sekaran, G

    2014-03-07

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate the hydroxyl radical (˙OH) generation using nanoporous activated carbon (NPAC), derived from rice husk, and dissolved oxygen in water. The in situ production of the ˙OH radical was confirmed through the DMPO spin trapping method in EPR spectroscopy and quantitative determination by a deoxyribose assay procedure. NPAC served as a heterogeneous catalyst to degrade 2-deoxy-d-ribose (a reference compound) using hydroxyl radical generated from dissolved oxygen in water at temperatures in the range 313-373 K and pH 6, with first order rate constants (k = 9.2 × 10(-2) min(-1), k = 1.2 × 10(-1) min(-1), k = 1.3 × 10(-1) min(-1) and k = 1.68 × 10(-1) min(-1)). The thermodynamic constants for the generation of hydroxyl radicals by NPAC and dissolved oxygen in water were ΔG -1.36 kJ mol(-1) at 313 K, ΔH 17.73 kJ mol(-1) and ΔS 61.01 J mol(-1) K(-1).

  15. Investigation of biochemical property changes in activation-induced CD 8 + T cell apoptosis using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Ju; Ahn, Hyung Joon; Lee, Gi-Ja; Jung, Gyeong Bok; Lee, Gihyun; Kim, Dohyun; Shin, Jae-Ho; Jin, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2015-07-01

    The study was to investigate the changes in biochemical properties of activated mature CD8+ T cells related to apoptosis at a molecular level. We confirmed the activation and apoptosis of CD8+ T cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and atomic force microscopy and then performed Raman spectral measurements on activated mature CD8+ T cells and cellular deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA). In the activated mature CD8+ T cells, there were increases in protein spectra at 1002 and 1234 cm-1. In particular, to assess the apoptosis-related DNA spectral signatures, we investigated the spectra of the cellular DNA isolated from resting and activated mature CD8+ T cells. Raman spectra at 765 to 786 cm-1 and 1053 to 1087 cm-1 were decreased in activated mature DNA. In addition, we analyzed Raman spectrum using the multivariate statistical method including principal component analysis. Raman spectra of activated mature DNA are especially well-discriminated from those of resting DNA. Our findings regarding the biochemical and structural changes associated with apoptosis in activated mature T cells and cellular DNA according to Raman spectroscopy provide important insights into allospecific immune responses generated after organ transplantation, and may be useful for therapeutic manipulation of the immune response.

  16. Designing easy DNA extraction: Teaching creativity through laboratory practice.

    PubMed

    Susantini, Endang; Lisdiana, Lisa; Isnawati; Tanzih Al Haq, Aushia; Trimulyono, Guntur

    2017-05-01

    Subject material concerning Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid (DNA) structure in the format of creativity-driven laboratory practice offers meaningful learning experience to the students. Therefore, a laboratory practice in which utilizes simple procedures and easy-safe-affordable household materials should be promoted to students to develop their creativity. This study aimed to examine whether designing and conducting DNA extraction with household materials could foster students' creative thinking. We also described how this laboratory practice affected students' knowledge and views. A total of 47 students participated in this study. These students were grouped and asked to utilize available household materials and modify procedures using hands-on worksheet. Result showed that this approach encouraged creative thinking as well as improved subject-related knowledge. Students also demonstrated positive views about content knowledge, social skills, and creative thinking skills. This study implies that extracting DNA with household materials is able to develop content knowledge, social skills, and creative thinking of the students. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(3):216-225, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Model of biological quantum logic in DNA.

    PubMed

    Mihelic, F Matthew

    2013-08-02

    The DNA molecule has properties that allow it to act as a quantum logic processor. It has been demonstrated that there is coherent conduction of electrons longitudinally along the DNA molecule through pi stacking interactions of the aromatic nucleotide bases, and it has also been demonstrated that electrons moving longitudinally along the DNA molecule are subject to a very efficient electron spin filtering effect as the helicity of the DNA molecule interacts with the spin of the electron. This means that, in DNA, electrons are coherently conducted along a very efficient spin filter. Coherent electron spin is held in a logically and thermodynamically reversible chiral symmetry between the C2-endo and C3-endo enantiomers of the deoxyribose moiety in each nucleotide, which enables each nucleotide to function as a quantum gate. The symmetry break that provides for quantum decision in the system is determined by the spin direction of an electron that has an orbital angular momentum that is sufficient to overcome the energy barrier of the double well potential separating the C2-endo and C3-endo enantiomers, and that enantiomeric energy barrier is appropriate to the Landauer limit of the energy necessary to randomize one bit of information.

  18. Shape-selective recognition of DNA abasic sites by metallohelices: inhibition of human AP endonuclease 1.

    PubMed

    Malina, Jaroslav; Scott, Peter; Brabec, Viktor

    2015-06-23

    Loss of a base in DNA leading to creation of an abasic (AP) site leaving a deoxyribose residue in the strand, is a frequent lesion that may occur spontaneously or under the action of various physical and chemical agents. Progress in the understanding of the chemistry and enzymology of abasic DNA largely relies upon the study of AP sites in synthetic duplexes. We report here on interactions of diastereomerically pure metallo-helical 'flexicate' complexes, bimetallic triple-stranded ferro-helicates [Fe2(NN-NN)3](4+) incorporating the common NN-NN bis(bidentate) helicand, with short DNA duplexes containing AP sites in different sequence contexts. The results show that the flexicates bind to AP sites in DNA duplexes in a shape-selective manner. They preferentially bind to AP sites flanked by purines on both sides and their binding is enhanced when a pyrimidine is placed in opposite orientation to the lesion. Notably, the Λ-enantiomer binds to all tested AP sites with higher affinity than the Δ-enantiomer. In addition, the binding of the flexicates to AP sites inhibits the activity of human AP endonuclease 1, which is as a valid anticancer drug target. Hence, this finding indicates the potential of utilizing well-defined metallo-helical complexes for cancer chemotherapy. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Shape-selective recognition of DNA abasic sites by metallohelices: inhibition of human AP endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Malina, Jaroslav; Scott, Peter; Brabec, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Loss of a base in DNA leading to creation of an abasic (AP) site leaving a deoxyribose residue in the strand, is a frequent lesion that may occur spontaneously or under the action of various physical and chemical agents. Progress in the understanding of the chemistry and enzymology of abasic DNA largely relies upon the study of AP sites in synthetic duplexes. We report here on interactions of diastereomerically pure metallo–helical ‘flexicate’ complexes, bimetallic triple-stranded ferro-helicates [Fe2(NN-NN)3]4+ incorporating the common NN–NN bis(bidentate) helicand, with short DNA duplexes containing AP sites in different sequence contexts. The results show that the flexicates bind to AP sites in DNA duplexes in a shape-selective manner. They preferentially bind to AP sites flanked by purines on both sides and their binding is enhanced when a pyrimidine is placed in opposite orientation to the lesion. Notably, the Λ-enantiomer binds to all tested AP sites with higher affinity than the Δ-enantiomer. In addition, the binding of the flexicates to AP sites inhibits the activity of human AP endonuclease 1, which is as a valid anticancer drug target. Hence, this finding indicates the potential of utilizing well-defined metallo–helical complexes for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25940617

  20. Rates of Decomposition of Ribose and other Sugars: Implications for Chemical Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larralde, Rosa; Robertson, Michael P.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1995-01-01

    The existence of the RNA world, in which RNA acted as a catalyst as well as an informational macromolecule, assumes a large prebiotic source of ribose or the existence of pre-RNA molecules with backbones different from ribose-phosphate. The generally accepted prebiotic synthesis of ribose, the formose reaction, yields numerous sugars without any selectivity. Even if there were a selective synthesis of ribose, there is still the problem of stability. Sugars are known to be unstable in strong acid or base, but there are few data for neutral solutions. Therefore, we have measured the rate of decomposition of ribose between pH 4 and pH 8 from 40 C to 120 C. The ribose half-lives are very short (73 min at pH 7.0 and 100 C and 44 years at pH 7.0 and 0 C). The other aldopentoses and aldohexoses have half-lives within an order of magnitude of these values, as do 2-deoxyribose, ribose 5-phosphate, and ribose 2,4bisphosphate. These results suggest that the backbone of the first genetic material could not have contained ribose or other sugars because of their instability.

  1. Unraveling the complexity of the interactions of DNA nucleotides with gold by single molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bano, Fouzia; Sluysmans, Damien; Wislez, Arnaud; Duwez, Anne-Sophie

    2015-11-01

    Addressing the effect of different environmental factors on the adsorption of DNA to solid supports is critical for the development of robust miniaturized devices for applications ranging from biosensors to next generation molecular technology. Most of the time, thiol-based chemistry is used to anchor DNA on gold - a substrate commonly used in nanotechnology - and little is known about the direct interaction between DNA and gold. So far there have been no systematic studies on the direct adsorption behavior of the deoxyribonucleotides (i.e., a nitrogenous base, a deoxyribose sugar, and a phosphate group) and on the factors that govern the DNA-gold bond strength. Here, using single molecule force spectroscopy, we investigated the interaction of the four individual nucleotides, adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine, with gold. Experiments were performed in three salinity conditions and two surface dwell times to reveal the factors that influence nucleotide-Au bond strength. Force data show that, at physiological ionic strength, adenine-Au interactions are stronger, asymmetrical and independent of surface dwell time as compared to cytosine-Au and guanine-Au interactions. We suggest that in these conditions only adenine is able to chemisorb on gold. A decrease of the ionic strength significantly increases the bond strength for all nucleotides. We show that moderate ionic strength along with longer surface dwell period suggest weak chemisorption also for cytosine and guanine.Addressing the effect of different environmental factors on the adsorption of DNA to solid supports is critical for the development of robust miniaturized devices for applications ranging from biosensors to next generation molecular technology. Most of the time, thiol-based chemistry is used to anchor DNA on gold - a substrate commonly used in nanotechnology - and little is known about the direct interaction between DNA and gold. So far there have been no systematic studies on the direct

  2. Conformation-dependent DNA attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weifeng; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Zhou, Ruhong; Mu, Yuguang

    2014-05-01

    Understanding how DNA molecules interact with other biomolecules is related to how they utilize their functions and is therefore critical for understanding their structure-function relationships. For a long time, the existence of Z-form DNA (a left-handed double helical version of DNA, instead of the common right-handed B-form) has puzzled the scientists, and the definitive biological significance of Z-DNA has not yet been clarified. In this study, the effects of DNA conformation in DNA-DNA interactions are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Using umbrella sampling, we find that for both B- and Z-form DNA, surrounding Mg2+ ions always exert themselves to screen the Coulomb repulsion between DNA phosphates, resulting in very weak attractive force. On the contrary, a tight and stable bound state is discovered for Z-DNA in the presence of Mg2+ or Na+, benefiting from their hydrophobic nature. Based on the contact surface and a dewetting process analysis, a two-stage binding process of Z-DNA is outlined: two Z-DNA first attract each other through charge screening and Mg2+ bridges to phosphate groups in the same way as that of B-DNA, after which hydrophobic contacts of the deoxyribose groups are formed via a dewetting effect, resulting in stable attraction between two Z-DNA molecules. The highlighted hydrophobic nature of Z-DNA interaction from the current study may help to understand the biological functions of Z-DNA in gene transcription.Understanding how DNA molecules interact with other biomolecules is related to how they utilize their functions and is therefore critical for understanding their structure-function relationships. For a long time, the existence of Z-form DNA (a left-handed double helical version of DNA, instead of the common right-handed B-form) has puzzled the scientists, and the definitive biological significance of Z-DNA has not yet been clarified. In this study, the effects of DNA conformation in DNA-DNA interactions are explored by

  3. Mass spectrometry of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) adducts with the dinucleosidemonophosphates d(ApG), d(GpG) and d(TpC) in an ion trap.

    PubMed

    Hagemeister, Timo; Linscheid, Michael

    2002-07-01

    The detection and fragmentation behaviour of adducts of the chemotherapeutic cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cisplatin) with the dinucleosidemonophosphates d(ApG), d(GpG) and d(TpC) as model compounds for DNA adducts in an ion trap with electrospray ionization were studied. Mainly the monofunctional adduct, the bifunctional adduct and the bifunctional adduct with platinum bridging two dinucleosidemonophosphates were detected. In addition, several more complex adducts were seen resulting from reactions among these species. Adduct formation was low in the case of d(TpC). Fragmentation could be controlled strongly by varying the temperature of the transfer capillary; furthermore, tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) experiments on both the monofunctional and the bifunctional adducts were performed. For the adducts of d(ApG) and d(GpG) losses of NH(3) and HCl were the most dominant reactions, followed by the losses of one, then another two units of 98 amu from the sugar-phosphate backbone, whereas d(TpC)-Pt predominantly forms the dinucleosidemonophosphate. In the gas phase, the conversion of the monofunctional into the bifunctional adducts through binding to another site in the dinucleotide accompanied by loss of NH(3) or HCl could also be observed. The removal of a ligand from the coordination sphere of the square-planar platinum complexes appeared to be the crucial step for the induction of further fragmentation of the dinucleotide ligand. MS(n) experiments of the bifunctional adducts of d(ApG) and d(GpG) revealed different fragmentation pathways involving the loss of phosphoric acid, metaphosphoric acid, deoxyribose units (intact or dehydrated) and the nucleobases in different orders, leaving characteristic binding site-determining fragments. Fragmentation of these ions was also performed, mainly resulting in fragmentation of the bases. The study confirmed the remarkable stability of the platinum-guanine bond compared with other nucleobases. Copyright 2002 John

  4. Chemical properties which control selectivity and efficacy of aromatic N-oxide bioreductive drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Wardman, P.; Priyadarsini, K. I.; Dennis, M. F.; Everett, S. A.; Naylor, M. A.; Patel, K. B.; Stratford, I. J.; Stratford, M. R.; Tracy, M.

    1996-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis was used to generate radicals from one electron reduction of 1,2,4-benzotriazine-1,4-dioxides (derivatives of tirapazamine), and of imidazo [1,2-a]quinoxaline-4-oxides (analogues of RB90740), which have selective toxicity towards hypoxic cells. Radicals from the mono N-oxides (from the latter compounds) react with oxygen approximately 10-40 times faster than does the tirapazamine radical. Radicals from the tirapazamine analogues studied react with oxygen up to approximately 10 times slower than tirapazamine radicals. The quinoxaline N-oxide radicals are involved in prototropic equilibria with pK(a) values (5.5 to 7.4) spanning that reported for tirapazamine (6.0). Generation of radicals radiolytically in the presence of H donors (formate, 2-propanol, deoxyribose) indicate a chain reaction ascribed to H abstraction by the drug radical. The protonated drug radical is much more reactive than the radical anion (H abstraction rate constant approximately equal to 10(2) - 10(3) dm3 mol-1 s-1). Chain termination is ascribed to drug radical-radical reactions, i.e. radical stability in anoxia, with rate constants 2k approximately equal to 1 x 10(7) to 2 x 10(8) dm3 mol-1 s-1 at pH approximately 7.4. Estimates of the reduction potentials of the drug-radical couples in water at pH 7 for two of the mono-N-oxides were in the range-0.7 to 0.8 V vs NHE at pH 7. PMID:8763850

  5. Phytochemical Constituents, ChEs and Urease Inhibitions, Antiproliferative and Antioxidant Properties of Elaeagnus umbellata Thunb.

    PubMed

    Ozen, Tevfik; Yenigun, Semiha; Altun, Muhammed; Demirtas, Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Due to the common ethnopharmacological used or scientifically examined biochemical properties, Elaeagnaceae family, Elaeagnus umbellate (Thunb.) (EU, Guz yemisi) was worth investigating. In this investigation, we revealed antioxidant, antiproliferative and enzyme inhibition activities of the water, methanol, ethanol, acetone, ethyl acetate and hexane extracts of EU as well as the contents of their phenolic, flavonoid, anthocyanin, ascorbic acid, lycopene and β- carotene. The antioxidant activity was screened by total antioxidant (phosphomolybdenum), inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation, reducing power, 2-deoxyribose degradation assay, H2O2 scavenging and metal chelating activities of the samples were tested in vitro. Additionally, the scavenging activities of the extracts were determined against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH˙), 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazloine-6-sulfonicacid (ABTS˙+), superoxide anion and peroxide radicals. The samples were determined for their inhibitory activities against urease, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE). In vitro, antiproliferative activities of six different extracts were tested using the xCELLigence system against HeLa and HT29 cell lines. The antioxidant activities of the extracts were found higher than standard antioxidants. The water extracts of fruit and leaf showed the best antioxidant activity. In inhibition assays of urease, AChE and BuChE, all extracts exhibited remarkable inhibition potential. Ethyl acetate extracts, especially, showed better inhibition capacity. It was found that the antioxidant activities of the extracts presented consistently with their chemical contents. The antiproliferative activities of leaf extracts were more effective than the fruit extracts. The chromatographic methods were applied to the different solvents to analyses phenolic secondery metabolites. It was found that fumaric acid, 4- hydroxybenzoic acid, rutin and quercetin-3-

  6. Probing the mechanistic consequences of 5-fluorine substitution on cytidine nucleotide analogue incorporation by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Ray, Adrian S; Schinazi, Raymond F; Murakami, Eisuke; Basavapathruni, Aravind; Shi, Junxing; Zorca, Suzana M; Chu, Chung K; Anderson, Karen S

    2003-05-01

    Beta-D and beta-L-enantiomers of 2',3'-dideoxycytidine analogues are potent chain-terminators and antimetabolites for viral and cellular replication. Seemingly small modifications markedly alter their antiviral and toxicity patterns. This review discusses previously published and recently obtained data on the effects of 5- and 2'-fluorine substitution on the pre-steady state incorporation of 2'-deoxycytidine-5'-monophosphate analogues by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in light of their biological activity. The addition of fluorine at the 5-position of the pyrimidine ring altered the kinetic parameters for all nucleotides tested. Only the 5-fluorine substitution of the clinically relevant nucleosides (-)-beta-L-2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thia-5-fluorocytidine (L-FTC, Emtriva), and (+)-beta-D-2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxy-5-fluorocytidine (D-D4FC, Reverset), caused a higher overall efficiency of nucleotide incorporation during both DNA- and RNA-directed synthesis. Enhanced incorporation by RT may in part explain the potency of these nucleosides against HIV-1. In other cases, a lack of correlation between RT incorporation in enzymatic assays and antiviral activity in cell culture illustrates the importance of other cellular factors in defining antiviral potency. The substitution of fluorine at the 2' position of the deoxyribose ring negatively affects incorporation by RT indicating the steric gate of RT can detect electrostatic perturbations. Intriguing results pertaining to drug resistance have led to a better understanding of HIV-1 RT resistance mechanisms. These insights serve as a basis for understanding the mechanism of action for nucleoside analogues and, coupled with studies on other key enzymes, may lead to the more effective use of fluorine to enhance the potency and selectivity of antiviral agents.

  7. Protocol for assessing maternal, environmental and epigenetic risk factors for dental caries in children.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Surani; Speicher, David J; Bakr, Mahmoud M; Benton, Miles C; Lea, Rodney A; Scuffham, Paul A; Mihala, Gabor; Johnson, Newell W

    2015-12-29

    Expenditure on dental and oral health services in Australia is $3.4 billion AUD annually. This is the sixth highest health cost and accounts for 7 % of total national health expenditure. Approximately 49 % of Australian children aged 6 years have caries experience in their deciduous teeth and this is rising. The aetiology of dental caries involves a complex interplay of individual, behavioural, social, economic, political and environmental conditions, and there is increasing interest in genetic predisposition and epigenetic modification. The Oral Health Sub-study; a cross sectional study of a birth cohort began in November 2012 by examining mothers and their children who were six years old by the time of initiation of the study, which is ongoing. Data from detailed questionnaires of families from birth onwards and data on mothers' knowledge, attitudes and practices towards oral health collected at the time of clinical examination are used. Subjects' height, weight and mid-waist circumference are taken and Body Mass Index (BMI) computed, using an electronic Bio-Impedance balance. Dental caries experience is scored using the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS). Saliva is collected for physiological measures. Salivary Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid (DNA) is extracted for genetic studies including epigenetics using the SeqCap Epi Enrichment Kit. Targets of interest are being confirmed by pyrosequencing to identify potential epigenetic markers of caries risk. This study will examine a wide range of potential determinants for childhood dental caries and evaluate inter-relationships amongst them. The findings will provide an evidence base to plan and implement improved preventive strategies.

  8. Antioxidant properties of sour cherries (Prunus cerasus L.): role of colorless phytochemicals from the methanolic extract of ripe fruits.

    PubMed

    Piccolella, Simona; Fiorentino, Antonio; Pacifico, Severina; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Uzzo, Piera; Monaco, Pietro

    2008-03-26

    Many edible plant metabolites are known to be useful as cellular antioxidants. In the search for antioxidative chemicals from native fruits of the Campania region of Italy, Prunus cerasus L., an acidic cherry widely used for culinary purposes, has been studied. Fruit crude extracts (MeOH, EtOAc, and hexane) were submitted to an antioxidative screening using specific assay media characterized from the presence of highly reactive radical species (DPPH*, ABTS*+, O2*-, NO) or lipoperoxidation markers. The reducing power of the samples was also determined. It was observed that the most polar extracts in MeOH and EtOAc were able to exercise a massive and dose-increasing antioxidative capacity. The peculiar efficacy of the same extracts was revealed by investigating their protein and deoxyribose oxidation capacity. A preliminary analysis of total phenol, flavonoid, and anthocyanin contents together with biological screening data put the basis on P. cerasus fruit phytochemical investigation of methanolic extract. Twenty secondary metabolites were isolated and characterized by spectroscopic (especially 1D and 2D NMR) and spectrometric techniques. 1-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)-1,2-ethanediol-1,2-bis-1-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), (4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)methanol-1-O-beta-D-gentiobioside (4), epicatechin-3-malate (14), and epicatechin-3-(1''-methyl)malate (15) were isolated for the first time. All of the compounds were evaluated for their radical scavenging activity on DPPH*, O2*-, and NO. Flavonoids and quinic acid derivatives were found to be the more antioxidative substances.

  9. Kinetic and Binding Analysis of the Catalytic Involvement of Ribose Moieties of a trans-Acting δ Ribozyme*

    PubMed Central

    Fiola, Karine; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    We have identified ribose 2′-hydroxyl groups (2′-OHs) that are critical for the activity of a trans-cleaving δ ribozyme derived from the antigenomic strand of the hepatitis δ virus. Initially, an RNA-DNA mixed ribozyme composed of 26 deoxyribo- (specifically the nucleotides forming the P2 stem and the P4 stem-loop) and 31 ribonucleotides (those forming the catalytic center) was engineered. This mixed ribozyme catalyzed the cleavage of a small substrate with kinetic parameters virtually identical to those of the all-RNA ribozyme. The further substitution of deoxyribose for ribose residues permitted us to investigate the contribution of all 2′-OHs to catalysis. Determination of the kinetic parameters for the cleavage reaction of the resulting ribozymes revealed (i) 10 2′-OH groups appear to be important in supporting the formation of several hydrogen bonds within the catalytic core, (ii) none of the important 2′-OHs seem to coordinate a magnesium cation, and (iii) 1 of the tested RNA-DNA mixed polymers appeared to stabilize the ribozyme-substrate transition-state complex, resulting in an improvement over the all-RNA counterpart. The contribution of the 2′-OHs to the catalytic mechanism is discussed, and differences with the crystal structure of a genomic δ self-cleaved product are explained. Clearly, the 2′-OHs are essential components of the network of interactions involved in the formation of the catalytic center of the δ ribozyme. PMID:12015324

  10. Glucose-nucleobase pairs within DNA: impact of hydrophobicity, alternative linking unit and DNA polymerase nucleotide insertion studies† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc04850e

    PubMed Central

    Vengut-Climent, Empar; Peñalver, Pablo; Lucas, Ricardo; Gómez-Pinto, Irene; Aviñó, Anna; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M.; Galbis, Elsa; de Paz, M. Violante; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias; Eritja, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Recently, we studied glucose-nucleobase pairs, a binding motif found in aminoglycoside–RNA recognition. DNA duplexes with glucose as a nucleobase were able to hybridize and were selective for purines. They were less stable than natural DNA but still fit well on regular B-DNA. These results opened up the possible use of glucose as a non-aromatic DNA base mimic. Here, we have studied the incorporation and thermal stability of glucose with different types of anchoring units and alternative apolar sugar-nucleobase pairs. When we explored butanetriol instead of glycerol as a wider anchoring unit, we did not gain duplex thermal stability. This result confirmed the necessity of a more conformationally restricted linker to increase the overall duplex stability. Permethylated glucose-nucleobase pairs showed similar stability to glucoside-nucleobase pairs but no selectivity for a specific nucleobase, possibly due to the absence of hydrogen bonds between them. The three-dimensional structure of the duplex solved by NMR located both, the hydrophobic permethylated glucose and the nucleobase, inside the DNA helix as in the case of glucose-nucleobase pairs. Quantum chemical calculations on glucose-nucleobase pairs indicate that the attachment of the sugar to the DNA skeleton through the OH1 or OH4 positions yields the highest binding energies. Moreover, glucose was very selective for guanine when attached through OH1 or OH4 to the DNA. Finally, we examined DNA polymerase insertion of nucleotides in front of the saccharide unit. KF– polymerase from E. coli inserted A and G opposite glc and 6dglc with low efficiency but notable selectivity. It is even capable of extending the new pair although its efficiency depended on the DNA sequence. In contrast, Bst 2.0, SIII and BIOTAQ™ DNA polymerases seem to display a loop-out mechanism possibly due to the flexible glycerol linker used instead of deoxyribose. PMID:29780486

  11. Structures of (5′S)-8,5′-Cyclo-2′-deoxyguanosine Mismatched with dA or dT

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Diastereomeric 8,5′-cyclopurine 2′-deoxynucleosides, containing a covalent bond between the deoxyribose and the purine base, are induced in DNA by ionizing radiation. They are suspected to play a role in the etiology of neurodegeneration in xeroderma pigmentosum patients. If not repaired, the S-8,5′-cyclo-2′-deoxyguanosine lesion (S-cdG) induces Pol V-dependent mutations at a frequency of 34% in Escherichia coli. Most are S-cdG → A transitions, suggesting mis-incorporation of dTTP opposite the lesion during replication bypass, although low levels of S-cdG → T transversions, arising from mis-incorporation of dATP, are also observed. We report the structures of 5′-d(GTGCXTGTTTGT)-3′·5′-d(ACAAACAYGCAC)-3′, where X denotes S-cdG and Y denotes either dA or dT, corresponding to the situation following mis-insertion of either dTTP or dATP opposite the S-cdG lesion. The S-cdG·dT mismatch pair adopts a wobble base pairing. This provides a plausible rationale for the S-cdG → A transitions. The S-cdG·dA mismatch pair differs in conformation from the dG·dA mismatch pair. For the S-cdG·dA mismatch pair, both S-cdG and dA intercalate, but no hydrogen bonding is observed between S-cdG and dA. This is consistent with the lower levels of S-cdG → T transitions in E. coli. PMID:22309170

  12. Low energy electron induced fragmentation and reactions of DNA and its molecular components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Andrew

    2005-05-01

    Much research has been stimulated by the recognition that ionizing radiation can, in condensed matter, generate large numbers of secondary electrons with energies less than 20 eV [1] and by the experimental demonstration that such electrons may induce both single and double strand breaks in plasmid DNA [2]. Identifying the underlying mechanisms involves several research methodologies, from further experiments with DNA to studies of the electron interaction with the component `sub-units' of DNA in both the gas and condensed phases [3]. In particular, understanding electron-induced strand break damage, the type of damage most difficult for organisms to repair, necessitates study of the sub-units of DNA back-bone, and here Tetrahyrofuran (THF) and its derivatives, provide a useful model for the furyl ring at the centre of the deoxyribose sugar. In this contribution, we review with particular reference to DNA and related molecules, the use of electron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to study electron-induced fragmentation and reactions in thin molecular solids. We describe a newly completed instrument that combines laser post-ionization with a time-of-flight mass analyzer for highly sensitive ion and neutral detection. Use of the instrument is illustrated with results for THF and derivatives. Anion desorption measurements reveal the role of transient negative ions (TNI) and Dissociative Electron Attachment in significant molecular fragmentation and permit effective cross sections for this electron-induced damage to be obtained. The neutral yield functions also illustrate the importance of TNI, mirroring features seen in recently measured cross sections for electron induced aldehyde production in THF [4]. 1. J. A. Laverne and S. M. Pimblott, Radiat. Res. 141, 208 (1995) 2. B. Boudaiffa, et al, Science 287, 1658 (2000) 3. L. Sanche. Physica Scripta. 68, C108, (2003) 4. S.-P. Breton, et al.,J. Chem. Phys. 121, 11240 (2004)

  13. Cytotoxic and radioprotective effects of Podophyllum hexandrum.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Prem Kumar, Indracanti; Afrin, Farhat; Puri, Satish Chandra; Qazi, Ghulam Nabi; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2006-07-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum, a herb thriving in Himalayas has already been reported to exhibit antitumor and radioprotective properties. Present study was undertaken to unravel the possible mechanism responsible for the cytotoxic and radioprotective properties of REC-2001, a fraction isolated from the rhizome of P. hexandrum using murine peritoneal macrophages and plasmid DNA as model systems. Cell death, levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis were studied employing trypan blue exclusion assay, dichlorofluorescein diacetate and DNA fragmentation assay, respectively. Superoxide anions, hydroxyl radicals and DNA damage were estimated following nitroblue tetrazolium, 2-deoxyribose degradation and plasmid DNA relaxation assays, respectively. Pre-irradiation administration of REC-2001 to peritoneal macrophages in the concentration range of 25-200μg/ml significantly reduced radiation induced ROS generation, DNA damage, apoptosis and cell killing in comparison to radiation control group indicating radioprotective potential. Studies with plasmid DNA indicated the ability of REC-2001 to inhibit 20Gy induced single and double strand breaks further supporting the antioxidative potential. However, REC-2001 in a dose-dependent fashion induced cell death, ROS and DNA fragmentation indicating the cytotoxic nature. REC-2001, in presence of 100μM copper sulfate, generated significant amount of hydroxyl radicals and superoxide anions indicating ability to act as a pro-oxidant in presence of metal ions. The superoxide anion generation was found to be sensitive to metal chelators like EDTA and deferoxamine mesylate (DFR). These results suggest that the ability of REC-2001 to act as a pro-oxidant in presence of metal ions and antioxidant in presence of free radicals might be responsible for cytotoxic and radioprotective properties.

  14. Structural and functional divergence of the aldolase fold in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Tonkin, Michelle L; Halavaty, Andrei S; Ramaswamy, Raghavendran; Ruan, Jiapeng; Igarashi, Makoto; Ngô, Huân M; Boulanger, Martin J

    2015-02-27

    Parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa are highly successful pathogens of humans and animals worldwide. As obligate intracellular parasites, they have significant energy requirements for invasion and gliding motility that are supplied by various metabolic pathways. Aldolases have emerged as key enzymes involved in these pathways, and all apicomplexans express one or both of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (F16BP) aldolase and 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate (dR5P) aldolase (DERA). Intriguingly, Toxoplasma gondii, a highly successful apicomplexan parasite, expresses F16BP aldolase (TgALD1), d5RP aldolase (TgDERA), and a divergent dR5P aldolase-like protein (TgDPA) exclusively in the latent bradyzoite stage. While the importance of TgALD1 in glycolysis is well established and TgDERA is also likely to be involved in parasite metabolism, the detailed function of TgDPA remains elusive. To gain mechanistic insight into the function of different T. gondii aldolases, we first determined the crystal structures of TgALD1 and TgDPA. Structural analysis revealed that both aldolases adopt a TIM barrel fold accessorized with divergent secondary structure elements. Structural comparison of TgALD1 and TgDPA with members of their respective enzyme families revealed that, while the active-site residues are conserved in TgALD1, key catalytic residues are absent in TgDPA. Consistent with this observation, biochemical assays showed that, while TgALD1 was active on F16BP, TgDPA was inactive on dR5P. Intriguingly, both aldolases are competent to bind polymerized actin in vitro. Altogether, structural and biochemical analyses of T. gondii aldolase and aldolase-like proteins reveal diverse functionalization of the classic TIM barrel aldolase fold. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Multidimensional B-Spline Correction for Accurate Modeling Sugar Puckering in QM/MM Simulations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming; Dissanayake, Thakshila; Kuechler, Erich; Radak, Brian K; Lee, Tai-Sung; Giese, Timothy J; York, Darrin M

    2017-09-12

    The computational efficiency of approximate quantum mechanical methods allows their use for the construction of multidimensional reaction free energy profiles. It has recently been demonstrated that quantum models based on the neglect of diatomic differential overlap (NNDO) approximation have difficulty modeling deoxyribose and ribose sugar ring puckers and thus limit their predictive value in the study of RNA and DNA systems. A method has been introduced in our previous work to improve the description of the sugar puckering conformational landscape that uses a multidimensional B-spline correction map (BMAP correction) for systems involving intrinsically coupled torsion angles. This method greatly improved the adiabatic potential energy surface profiles of DNA and RNA sugar rings relative to high-level ab initio methods even for highly problematic NDDO-based models. In the present work, a BMAP correction is developed, implemented, and tested in molecular dynamics simulations using the AM1/d-PhoT semiempirical Hamiltonian for biological phosphoryl transfer reactions. Results are presented for gas-phase adiabatic potential energy surfaces of RNA transesterification model reactions and condensed-phase QM/MM free energy surfaces for nonenzymatic and RNase A-catalyzed transesterification reactions. The results show that the BMAP correction is stable, efficient, and leads to improvement in both the potential energy and free energy profiles for the reactions studied, as compared with ab initio and experimental reference data. Exploration of the effect of the size of the quantum mechanical region indicates the best agreement with experimental reaction barriers occurs when the full CpA dinucleotide substrate is treated quantum mechanically with the sugar pucker correction.

  16. B-ring-aryl substituted luotonin A analogues with a new binding mode to the topoisomerase 1-DNA complex show enhanced cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    González-Ruiz, Víctor; Pascua, Irene; Fernández-Marcelo, Tamara; Ribelles, Pascual; Bianchini, Giulia; Sridharan, Vellaisamy; Iniesta, Pilar; Ramos, M Teresa; Olives, Ana I; Martín, M Antonia; Menéndez, J Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Topoisomerase 1 inhibition is an important strategy in targeted cancer chemotherapy. The drugs currently in use acting on this enzyme belong to the family of the camptothecins, and suffer severe limitations because of their low stability, which is associated with the hydrolysis of the δ-lactone moiety in their E ring. Luotonin A is a natural camptothecin analogue that lacks this functional group and therefore shows a much-improved stability, but at the cost of a lower activity. Therefore, the development of luotonin A analogues with an increased potency is important for progress in this area. In the present paper, a small library of luotonin A analogues modified at their A and B rings was generated by cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate-catalyzed Friedländer reactions. All analogues showed an activity similar or higher than the natural luotonin A in terms of topoisomerase 1 inhibition and some compounds had an activity comparable to that of camptothecin. Furthermore, most compounds showed a better activity than luotonin A in cell cytotoxicity assays. In order to rationalize these results, the first docking studies of luotonin-topoisomerase 1-DNA ternary complexes were undertaken. Most compounds bound in a manner similar to luotonin A and to standard topoisomerase poisons such as topotecan but, interestingly, the two most promising analogues, bearing a 3,5-dimethylphenyl substituent at ring B, docked in a different orientation. This binding mode allows the hydrophobic moiety to be shielded from the aqueous environment by being buried between the deoxyribose belonging to the G(+1) guanine and Arg364 in the scissile strand and the surface of the protein and a hydrogen bond between the D-ring carbonyl and the basic amino acid. The discovery of this new binding mode and its associated higher inhibitory potency is a significant advance in the design of new topoisomerase 1 inhibitors.

  17. Gene essentiality, conservation index and co-evolution of genes in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Tiruveedula, Gopi Siva Sai; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2017-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, a group of photosynthetic prokaryotes, dominate the earth with ~ 1015 g wet biomass. Despite diversity in habitats and an ancient origin, cyanobacterial phylum has retained a significant core genome. Cyanobacteria are being explored for direct conversion of solar energy and carbon dioxide into biofuels. For this, efficient cyanobacterial strains will need to be designed via metabolic engineering. This will require identification of target knockouts to channelize the flow of carbon toward the product of interest while minimizing deletions of essential genes. We propose "Gene Conservation Index" (GCI) as a quick measure to predict gene essentiality in cyanobacteria. GCI is based on phylogenetic profile of a gene constructed with a reduced dataset of cyanobacterial genomes. GCI is the percentage of organism clusters in which the query gene is present in the reduced dataset. Of the 750 genes deemed to be essential in the experimental study on S. elongatus PCC 7942, we found 494 to be conserved across the phylum which largely comprise of the essential metabolic pathways. On the contrary, the conserved but non-essential genes broadly comprise of genes required under stress conditions. Exceptions to this rule include genes such as the glycogen synthesis and degradation enzymes, deoxyribose-phosphate aldolase (DERA), glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase (zwf) and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase class1, which are conserved but non-essential. While the essential genes are to be avoided during gene knockout studies as potentially lethal deletions, the non-essential but conserved set of genes could be interesting targets for metabolic engineering. Further, we identify clusters of co-evolving genes (CCG), which provide insights that may be useful in annotation. Principal component analysis (PCA) plots of the CCGs are demonstrated as data visualization tools that are complementary to the conventional heatmaps. Our dataset consists of phylogenetic profiles for 23

  18. In vitro and in silico antioxidant and toxicological activities of Achyrocline satureioides.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro, Andréia C F; Folmer, Vanderlei; da Rosa, Hemerson S; Costa, Márcio T; Boligon, Aline A; Paula, Fávero R; Roos, Daniel H; Puntel, Gustavo O

    2016-12-24

    Achyrocline satureioides ("macela or marcela") is a medicinal plant, traditionally collected in "Good Friday" before sunrise. In traditional medicine, dried flowers of A. satureioides are used as anti-dyspeptic, antispasmodic and anti-inflammatory. To evaluate the phytochemical profile and to present an in vitro and in silico approach about toxicity and antioxidant potential of A. satureioides flowers extract and its major phytoconstituents. Plant were collected according to the popular tradition. Extract were obtained by infusion and analyzed from high-performance liquid chromatography. Toxicity was evaluated in Artemia salina and human lymphocytes. Extract antioxidant activity was determined with total antioxidant capacity, DPPH • and ABTS +• scavenging, ferric reducing antioxidant power, deoxyribose degradation assay, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBA-RS) assay. TBA-RS inhibitions were evaluated in brain of rats for A. satureioides extract and its major phytoconstituents. Predictions of activity spectra for substances and in silico toxicity evaluation from major phytoconstituents were performed via computer simulation. Chromatographic data indicated isoquercitrin, quercetin and caffeic acid as main compounds in flowers extract. Toxicity tests demonstrated a very low toxic potential of A. satureioides. Extract exhibited antioxidant activities in low concentrations. Both extract and major phytochemicals standards showed protection against lipid peroxidation in brain of rats. Computer simulations pointed some biological activities in agreement with traditional use, as well as some experimental results found in this work. Moreover, in silico toxic predictions showed that the A. satureioides major compounds had low probability for toxic risk. Our results indicate that A. satureioides infusion possesses low toxicological potential and an effective antioxidant activity. These findings confirm the traditional use of this plant in the folk medicine

  19. Fisetin Protects DNA Against Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Lin, Huajuan; Tu, Qian; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xican

    2016-06-01

    The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNA damage, then to investigate the possible mechanism. The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro, including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation), •O2 (-) scavenging (pyrogallol autoxidation), DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•(+) scavenging, and Cu(2+)-reducing power assays. Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-induced DNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 µM). It also increased its radical-scavenging percentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in •OH scavenging, •O2(-) scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•(+) scavenging, and Cu(2+)-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 µM, 34.05±0.87 µM, 9.69±0.53 µM, 2.43±0.14 µM, and 1.49±0.16 µM, respectively. Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damage possibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging approach, which is assumed to be hydrogen atom (H•) and/or single electron (e) donation (HAT/SET) pathways. In the HAT pathway, the 3',4'-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an important role, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form.

  20. Fisetin Protects DNA Against Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Lin, Huajuan; Tu, Qian; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xican

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNA damage, then to investigate the possible mechanism. Methods: The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro, including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation), •O2- scavenging (pyrogallol autoxidation), DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays. Results: Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-induced DNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 µM). It also increased its radical-scavenging percentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in •OH scavenging, •O2- scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 µM, 34.05±0.87 µM, 9.69±0.53 µM, 2.43±0.14 µM, and 1.49±0.16 µM, respectively. Conclusion: Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damage possibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging approach, which is assumed to be hydrogen atom (H•) and/or single electron (e) donation (HAT/SET) pathways. In the HAT pathway, the 3’,4’-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an important role, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form. PMID:27478791

  1. Pentose phosphates in nucleoside interconversion and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Maria G; Camici, Marcella; Mascia, Laura; Sgarrella, Francesco; Ipata, Piero L

    2006-03-01

    Ribose phosphates are either synthesized through the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway, or are supplied by nucleoside phosphorylases. The two main pentose phosphates, ribose-5-phosphate and ribose-1-phosphate, are readily interconverted by the action of phosphopentomutase. Ribose-5-phosphate is the direct precursor of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate, for both de novo and 'salvage' synthesis of nucleotides. Phosphorolysis of deoxyribonucleosides is the main source of deoxyribose phosphates, which are interconvertible, through the action of phosphopentomutase. The pentose moiety of all nucleosides can serve as a carbon and energy source. During the past decade, extensive advances have been made in elucidating the pathways by which the pentose phosphates, arising from nucleoside phosphorolysis, are either recycled, without opening of their furanosidic ring, or catabolized as a carbon and energy source. We review herein the experimental knowledge on the molecular mechanisms by which (a) ribose-1-phosphate, produced by purine nucleoside phosphorylase acting catabolically, is either anabolized for pyrimidine salvage and 5-fluorouracil activation, with uridine phosphorylase acting anabolically, or recycled for nucleoside and base interconversion; (b) the nucleosides can be regarded, both in bacteria and in eukaryotic cells, as carriers of sugars, that are made available though the action of nucleoside phosphorylases. In bacteria, catabolism of nucleosides, when suitable carbon and energy sources are not available, is accomplished by a battery of nucleoside transporters and of inducible catabolic enzymes for purine and pyrimidine nucleosides and for pentose phosphates. In eukaryotic cells, the modulation of pentose phosphate production by nucleoside catabolism seems to be affected by developmental and physiological factors on enzyme levels.

  2. Methodological considerations for characterizing potential antioxidant actions of bioactive components in plant foods.

    PubMed

    Aruoma, Okezie I

    2003-01-01

    The study of free radicals and antioxidants in biology is producing medical revolution that promises a new age of health and disease management. From prevention of the oxidative reactions in foods, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics to the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in chronic degenerative diseases including cancer, autoimmune, inflammatory, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, Downs syndrome) and aging challenges continue to emerge from difficulties associated with methods used in evaluating antioxidant actions in vivo. Our interest presently is focused on development of neurodegeneration models based on the integrity of neuronal cells in the central nervous system and how they are protected by antioxidants when challenged by neurotoxins as well as Fenton chemistry models based on the profile of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) for the assessment of antioxidant actions in vivo. Use continues to be made of several in vitro analytical tools to characterise the antioxidant propensity of bioactive compounds in plant foods and supplements. For example, the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), total oxidant scavenging capacity (TOSC), the deoxyribose assay, assays involving oxidative DNA damage, assays involving reactive nitrogen intermediates (e.g. ONOO(-)), Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. There is need to agree governance on in vitro antioxidant methods based on an understanding of the mechanisms involved. Because some of the assays are done in non-physiological pH values, it is impossible to extrapolate the results to physiological environment. The consensus of opinion is that a mix of these tools should be used in assessing the antioxidant activities in vitro. The proof of bio-efficacy must emanate from application of reliable in vivo models where markers of baseline oxidative

  3. Conformation-dependent DNA attraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Weifeng; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Zhou, Ruhong; Mu, Yuguang

    2014-06-21

    Understanding how DNA molecules interact with other biomolecules is related to how they utilize their functions and is therefore critical for understanding their structure-function relationships. For a long time, the existence of Z-form DNA (a left-handed double helical version of DNA, instead of the common right-handed B-form) has puzzled the scientists, and the definitive biological significance of Z-DNA has not yet been clarified. In this study, the effects of DNA conformation in DNA-DNA interactions are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Using umbrella sampling, we find that for both B- and Z-form DNA, surrounding Mg(2+) ions always exert themselves to screen the Coulomb repulsion between DNA phosphates, resulting in very weak attractive force. On the contrary, a tight and stable bound state is discovered for Z-DNA in the presence of Mg(2+) or Na(+), benefiting from their hydrophobic nature. Based on the contact surface and a dewetting process analysis, a two-stage binding process of Z-DNA is outlined: two Z-DNA first attract each other through charge screening and Mg(2+) bridges to phosphate groups in the same way as that of B-DNA, after which hydrophobic contacts of the deoxyribose groups are formed via a dewetting effect, resulting in stable attraction between two Z-DNA molecules. The highlighted hydrophobic nature of Z-DNA interaction from the current study may help to understand the biological functions of Z-DNA in gene transcription.

  4. Molecular architecture of protein-RNA recognition sites.

    PubMed

    Barik, Amita; C, Nithin; Pilla, Smita P; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2015-01-01

    The molecular architecture of protein-RNA interfaces are analyzed using a non-redundant dataset of 152 protein-RNA complexes. We find that an average protein-RNA interface is smaller than an average protein-DNA interface but larger than an average protein-protein interface. Among the different classes of protein-RNA complexes, interfaces with tRNA are the largest, while the interfaces with the single-stranded RNA are the smallest. Significantly, RNA contributes more to the interface area than its partner protein. Moreover, unlike protein-protein interfaces where the side chain contributes less to the interface area compared to the main chain, the main chain and side chain contributions flipped in protein-RNA interfaces. We find that the protein surface in contact with the RNA in protein-RNA complexes is better packed than that in contact with the DNA in protein-DNA complexes, but loosely packed than that in contact with the protein in protein-protein complexes. Shape complementarity and electrostatic potential are the two major factors that determine the specificity of the protein-RNA interaction. We find that the H-bond density at the protein-RNA interfaces is similar with that of protein-DNA interfaces but higher than the protein-protein interfaces. Unlike protein-DNA interfaces where the deoxyribose has little role in intermolecular H-bonds, due to the presence of an oxygen atom at the 2' position, the ribose in RNA plays significant role in protein-RNA H-bonds. We find that besides H-bonds, salt bridges and stacking interactions also play significant role in stabilizing protein-nucleic acids interfaces; however, their contribution at the protein-protein interfaces is insignificant.

  5. Structural and Functional Divergence of the Aldolase Fold in Toxoplasma gondii

    DOE PAGES

    Tonkin, Michelle L.; Halavaty, Andrei S.; Ramaswamy, Raghavendran; ...

    2014-10-02

    Parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa are highly successful pathogens of humans and animals worldwide. As obligate intracellular parasites, they have significant energy requirements for invasion and gliding motility that are supplied by various metabolic pathways. Aldolases have emerged as key enzymes involved in these pathways, and all apicomplexans express one or both of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (F16BP) aldolase and 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate (dR5P) aldolase (DERA). Intriguingly, Toxoplasma gondii, a highly successful apicomplexan parasite, expresses F16BP aldolase (TgALD1), d5RP aldolase (TgDERA), and a divergent dR5P aldolase-like protein (TgDPA) exclusively in the latent bradyzoite stage. While the importance of TgALD1 in glycolysis is wellmore » established and TgDERA is also likely to be involved in parasite metabolism, the detailed function of TgDPA remains elusive. Here, to gain mechanistic insight into the function of different T. gondii aldolases, we first determined the crystal structures of TgALD1 and TgDPA. Structural analysis revealed that both aldolases adopt a TIM barrel fold accessorized with divergent secondary structure elements. Structural comparison of TgALD1 and TgDPA with members of their respective enzyme families revealed that, while the active-site residues are conserved in TgALD1, key catalytic residues are absent in TgDPA. Consistent with this observation, biochemical assays showed that, while TgALD1 was active on F16BP, TgDPA was inactive on dR5P. In conclusion, intriguingly, both aldolases are competent to bind polymerized actin in vitro. Altogether, structural and biochemical analyses of T. gondii aldolase and aldolase-like proteins reveal diverse functionalization of the classic TIM barrel aldolase fold.« less

  6. Increase in Furfural Tolerance in Ethanologenic Escherichia coli LY180 by Plasmid-Based Expression of thyA

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huabao; Wang, Xuan; Yomano, Lorraine P.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.

    2012-01-01

    Furfural is an inhibitory side product formed during the depolymerization of hemicellulose by mineral acids. Genomic libraries from three different bacteria (Bacillus subtilis YB886, Escherichia coli NC3, and Zymomonas mobilis CP4) were screened for genes that conferred furfural resistance on plates. Beneficial plasmids containing the thyA gene (coding for thymidylate synthase) were recovered from all three organisms. Expression of this key gene in the de novo pathway for dTMP biosynthesis improved furfural resistance on plates and during fermentation. A similar benefit was observed by supplementation with thymine, thymidine, or the combination of tetrahydrofolate and serine (precursors for 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate, the methyl donor for ThyA). Supplementation with deoxyuridine provided a small benefit, and deoxyribose was of no benefit for furfural tolerance. A combination of thymidine and plasmid expression of thyA was no more effective than either alone. Together, these results demonstrate that furfural tolerance is increased by approaches that increase the supply of pyrimidine deoxyribonucleotides. However, ThyA activity was not directly affected by the addition of furfural. Furfural has been previously shown to damage DNA in E. coli and to activate a cellular response to oxidative damage in yeast. The added burden of repairing furfural-damaged DNA in E. coli would be expected to increase the cellular requirement for dTMP. Increased expression of thyA (E. coli, B. subtilis, or Z. mobilis), supplementation of cultures with thymidine, and supplementation with precursors for 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate (methyl donor) are each proposed to increase furfural tolerance by increasing the availability of dTMP for DNA repair. PMID:22504824

  7. Increase in furfural tolerance in ethanologenic Escherichia coli LY180 by plasmid-based expression of thyA.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huabao; Wang, Xuan; Yomano, Lorraine P; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2012-06-01

    Furfural is an inhibitory side product formed during the depolymerization of hemicellulose by mineral acids. Genomic libraries from three different bacteria (Bacillus subtilis YB886, Escherichia coli NC3, and Zymomonas mobilis CP4) were screened for genes that conferred furfural resistance on plates. Beneficial plasmids containing the thyA gene (coding for thymidylate synthase) were recovered from all three organisms. Expression of this key gene in the de novo pathway for dTMP biosynthesis improved furfural resistance on plates and during fermentation. A similar benefit was observed by supplementation with thymine, thymidine, or the combination of tetrahydrofolate and serine (precursors for 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate, the methyl donor for ThyA). Supplementation with deoxyuridine provided a small benefit, and deoxyribose was of no benefit for furfural tolerance. A combination of thymidine and plasmid expression of thyA was no more effective than either alone. Together, these results demonstrate that furfural tolerance is increased by approaches that increase the supply of pyrimidine deoxyribonucleotides. However, ThyA activity was not directly affected by the addition of furfural. Furfural has been previously shown to damage DNA in E. coli and to activate a cellular response to oxidative damage in yeast. The added burden of repairing furfural-damaged DNA in E. coli would be expected to increase the cellular requirement for dTMP. Increased expression of thyA (E. coli, B. subtilis, or Z. mobilis), supplementation of cultures with thymidine, and supplementation with precursors for 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate (methyl donor) are each proposed to increase furfural tolerance by increasing the availability of dTMP for DNA repair.

  8. Sida tuberculata (Malvaceae): a study based on development of extractive system and in silico and in vitro properties

    PubMed Central

    da Rosa, H.S.; Salgueiro, A.C.F.; Colpo, A.Z.C.; Paula, F.R.; Mendez, A.S.L.; Folmer, V.

    2016-01-01

    Sida tuberculata (Malvaceae) is a medicinal plant traditionally used in Brazil as an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory agent. Here, we aimed to investigate the different extractive techniques on phytochemical parameters, as well as to evaluate the toxicity and antioxidant capacity of S. tuberculata extracts using in silico and in vitro models. Therefore, in order to determine the dry residue content and the main compound 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) concentration, extracts from leaves and roots were prepared testing ethanol and water in different proportions. Extracts were then assessed by Artemia salina lethality test, and toxicity prediction of 20E was estimated. Antioxidant activity was performed by DPPH and ABTS radical scavenger assays, ferric reducing power assay, nitrogen derivative scavenger, deoxyribose degradation, and TBARS assays. HPLC evaluation detected 20E as main compound in leaves and roots. Percolation method showed the highest concentrations of 20E (0.134 and 0.096 mg/mL of extract for leaves and roots, respectively). All crude extracts presented low toxic potential on A. salina (LD50 >1000 µg/mL). The computational evaluation of 20E showed a low toxicity prediction. For in vitro antioxidant tests, hydroethanolic extracts of leaves were most effective compared to roots. In addition, hydroethanolic extracts presented a higher IC50 antioxidant than aqueous extracts. TBARS formation was prevented by leaves hydroethanolic extract from 0.015 and 0.03 mg/mL and for roots from 0.03 and 0.3 mg/mL on egg yolk and rat tissue, respectively (P<0.05). These findings suggest that S. tuberculata extracts are a considerable source of ecdysteroids and possesses a significant antioxidant property with low toxic potential. PMID:27409335

  9. Sida tuberculata (Malvaceae): a study based on development of extractive system and in silico and in vitro properties.

    PubMed

    da Rosa, H S; Salgueiro, A C F; Colpo, A Z C; Paula, F R; Mendez, A S L; Folmer, V

    2016-07-11

    Sida tuberculata (Malvaceae) is a medicinal plant traditionally used in Brazil as an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory agent. Here, we aimed to investigate the different extractive techniques on phytochemical parameters, as well as to evaluate the toxicity and antioxidant capacity of S. tuberculata extracts using in silico and in vitro models. Therefore, in order to determine the dry residue content and the main compound 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) concentration, extracts from leaves and roots were prepared testing ethanol and water in different proportions. Extracts were then assessed by Artemia salina lethality test, and toxicity prediction of 20E was estimated. Antioxidant activity was performed by DPPH and ABTS radical scavenger assays, ferric reducing power assay, nitrogen derivative scavenger, deoxyribose degradation, and TBARS assays. HPLC evaluation detected 20E as main compound in leaves and roots. Percolation method showed the highest concentrations of 20E (0.134 and 0.096 mg/mL of extract for leaves and roots, respectively). All crude extracts presented low toxic potential on A. salina (LD50 >1000 µg/mL). The computational evaluation of 20E showed a low toxicity prediction. For in vitro antioxidant tests, hydroethanolic extracts of leaves were most effective compared to roots. In addition, hydroethanolic extracts presented a higher IC50 antioxidant than aqueous extracts. TBARS formation was prevented by leaves hydroethanolic extract from 0.015 and 0.03 mg/mL and for roots from 0.03 and 0.3 mg/mL on egg yolk and rat tissue, respectively (P<0.05). These findings suggest that S. tuberculata extracts are a considerable source of ecdysteroids and possesses a significant antioxidant property with low toxic potential.

  10. Pf1 bacteriophage hydration by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeyev, Ivan V.; Bahri, Salima; McDermott, Ann E., E-mail: aem5@columbia.edu

    2014-12-14

    High resolution two- and three-dimensional heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy ({sup 1}H–{sup 13}C, {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N, and {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C–{sup 13}C HETCOR) has provided a detailed characterization of the internal and external hydration water of the Pf1 virion. This long and slender virion (2000 nm × 7 nm) contains highly stretched DNA within a capsid of small protein subunits, each only 46 amino acid residues. HETCOR cross-peaks have been unambiguously assigned to 25 amino acids, including most external residues 1–21 as well as residues 39–40 and 43–46 deep inside the virion. In addition, the deoxyribose rings of the DNA near the virionmore » axis are in contact with water. The sets of cross-peaks to the DNA and to all 25 amino acid residues were from the same hydration water {sup 1}H resonance; some of the assigned residues do not have exchangeable side-chain protons. A mapping of the contacts onto structural models indicates the presence of water “tunnels” through a highly hydrophobic region of the capsid. The present results significantly extend and modify results from a lower resolution study, and yield a comprehensive hydration surface map of Pf1. In addition, the internal water could be distinguished from external hydration water by means of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. The internal water population may serve as a conveniently localized magnetization reservoir for structural studies.« less

  11. Ultrashort fluorescence lifetimes of hydrogen-bonded base pairs of guanosine and cytidine in solution.

    PubMed

    Schwalb, Nina K; Michalak, Thomas; Temps, Friedrich

    2009-12-24

    The optically excited electronic states of hydrogen-bonded homo- and heterodimers of guanosine (G) and deoxycytidine (C) were investigated by femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion spectroscopy. The base pairs were prepared in CHCl(3) solution by employing tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) groups at the OH positions of the ribose (G) or deoxyribose (C) moieties to enhance the solubilities of the nucleosides in organic solvents. The H-bonded complexes that were obtained were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. Fluorescence lifetime measurements were performed following electronic excitation at a series of UV wavelengths from lambda(pump) = 294 nm, close to the electronic origins of the bases, to lambda(pump) = 262 nm, where significant excess vibronic energy is deposited in the molecules, at nucleoside concentrations of c(0) = 0.1 and 1.0 mM. The experimental results revealed the existence of an ultrafast deactivation pathway for the optically prepared electronically excited state(s) of the G.C Watson-Crick base pair, which was found to have a lifetime of tau(GC) = 0.30(3) ps (with 2sigma error limits) irrespective of the pump wavelength. A similar short decay time, tau(GG) = 0.32(2) ps, was observed for the respective excited G.G homodimer. In contrast, the excited G monomer displayed a significantly longer-lived and wavelength-dependent deactivation, requiring three time constants, between 0.43(6) ps < or = tau(G,1) < or = 1.2(1) ps, 4.2(8) ps < or = tau(G,2) < or = 8(1) ps, and tau(G,3) = 195(32) ps. Self-complexation of C, on the other hand, led to a longer-lived excited state with a lifetime estimated between 1 ps < or = tau(CC) < or = 10 ps, compared to the dominant initial subpicosecond decay time of the C monomer of tau(C,1) = 0.80(4) ps.

  12. Conformational Study of DNA Sugars: from the Gas Phase to Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uriarte, Iciar; Vallejo-López, Montserrat; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Corzana, Francisco; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2017-06-01

    Sugars are versatile molecules that play a variety of roles in the organism. For example, they are important in energy storage processes or as structural scaffolds. Here, we focus on the monosaccharide present in DNA by addressing the conformational and puckering properties in the gas phase of α- and β-methyl-2-deoxy-ribofuranoside and α- and β-methyl-2-deoxy-ribopiranoside. Other sugars have been previously studied in the gas phase The work presented here stems from a combination of chemical synthesis, ultrafast vaporization methods, supersonic expansions, microwave spectroscopy (both chirped-pulsed and Balle-Flygare cavity-based spectrometers) and NMR spectroscopy. Previous studies in the gas phase had been performed on 2-deoxyribose, but only piranose forms were detected. However, thanks to the combination of these techniques, we have isolated and characterized for the first time the conformational landscape of the sugar present in DNA in its biologically relevant furanose form. Our gas phase study serves as a probe of the conformational preferences of these biomolecules under isolation conditions. Thanks to the NMR experiments, we can characterize the favored conformations in solution and extract the role of the solvent in the structure and puckering of the monosaccharides. E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. Écija, F. J. Basterretxea, J.-U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández, F. Castaño, Angew. Chem. Int. Edit. 2012, 51, 3119. P. Écija, I. Uriarte, L. Spada, B. G. Davis, W. Caminati, F. J. Basterretxea, A. Lesarri, E. J. Cocinero, Chem. Commun. 2016, 52, 6241. I. Peña, E. J. Cocinero, C. Cabezas, A. Lesarri, S. Mata, P. Écija, A. M. Daly, Á. Cimas, C. Bermúdez, F. J. Basterretxea, S. Blanco, J. A. Fernández, J. C. López, F. Castaño, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Edit. 2013, 52, 11840.

  13. Genetic requirements for sensitivity of bacteriophage t7 to dideoxythymidine.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Q; Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C

    2014-08-01

    We previously reported that the presence of dideoxythymidine (ddT) in the growth medium selectively inhibits the ability of bacteriophage T7 to infect Escherichia coli by inhibiting phage DNA synthese (N. Q. Tran, L. F. Rezende, U. Qimron, C. C. Richardson, and S. Tabor, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105:9373-9378, 2008, doi:10.1073/pnas.0804164105). In the presence of T7 gene 1.7 protein, ddT is taken up into the E. coli cell and converted to ddTTP. ddTTP is incorporated into DNA as ddTMP by the T7 DNA polymerase, resulting in chain termination. We have identified the pathway by which exogenous ddT is converted to ddTTP. The pathway consists of ddT transport by host nucleoside permeases and phosphorylation to ddTMP by the host thymidine kinase. T7 gene 1.7 protein phosphorylates ddTMP and ddTDP, resulting in ddTTP. A 74-residue peptide of the gene 1.7 protein confers ddT sensitivity to the same extent as the 196-residue wild-type gene 1.7 protein. We also show that cleavage of thymidine to thymine and deoxyribose-1-phosphate by the host thymidine phosphorylase greatly increases the sensitivity of phage T7 to ddT. Finally, a mutation in T7 DNA polymerase that leads to discrimination against the incorporation of ddTMP eliminates ddT sensitivity. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Kinetics of photoinduced electron transfer between DNA bases and triplet 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid in aqueous solution of different pH's: proton-coupled electron transfer?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Truong X; Kattnig, Daniel; Mansha, Asim; Grampp, Günter; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Lukzen, Nikita

    2012-11-08

    The kinetics of triplet state quenching of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid (BPTC) by DNA bases adenine, adenosine, thymine, and thymidine has been investigated in aqueous solution using time-resolved laser flash photolysis. The observation of the BPTC ketyl radical anion at λ(max) = 630 nm indicates that one electron transfer is involved in the quenching reactions. The pH-dependence of the quenching rate constants is measured in detail. As a result, the chemical reactivity of the reactants is assigned. The bimolecular rate constants of the quenching reactions between triplet BPTC and adenine, adenosine, thymine, and thymidine are k(q) = 2.3 × 10(9) (4.7 < pH < 9.9), k(q) = 4.0 × 10(9) (3.5 < pH < 4.7), k(q) = 1.0 × 10(9) (4.7 < pH < 9.9), and k(q) = 4.0 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) (4.7 < pH < 9.8), respectively. Moreover, it reveals that in strong basic medium (pH = 12.0) a keto-enol tautomerism of thymine inhibits its reaction with triplet BPTC. Such a behavior is not possible for thymidine because of its deoxyribose group. In addition, the pH-dependence of the apparent electrochemical standard potential of thymine in aqueous solution was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The ΔE/ΔpH ≈ -59 mV/pH result is characteristic of proton-coupled electron transfer. This behavior, together with the kinetic analysis, leads to the conclusion that the quenching reactions between triplet BPTC and thymine involve one proton-coupled electron transfer.

  15. Kinetics of Photoinduced Electron Transfer between DNA Bases and Triplet 3,3′,4,4′-Benzophenone Tetracarboxylic Acid in Aqueous Solution of Different pH's: Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of triplet state quenching of 3,3′,4,4′-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid (BPTC) by DNA bases adenine, adenosine, thymine, and thymidine has been investigated in aqueous solution using time-resolved laser flash photolysis. The observation of the BPTC ketyl radical anion at λmax = 630 nm indicates that one electron transfer is involved in the quenching reactions. The pH-dependence of the quenching rate constants is measured in detail. As a result, the chemical reactivity of the reactants is assigned. The bimolecular rate constants of the quenching reactions between triplet BPTC and adenine, adenosine, thymine, and thymidine are kq = 2.3 × 109 (4.7 < pH < 9.9), kq = 4.0 × 109 (3.5 < pH < 4.7), kq = 1.0 × 109 (4.7 < pH < 9.9), and kq = 4.0 × 108 M–1 s–1 (4.7 < pH < 9.8), respectively. Moreover, it reveals that in strong basic medium (pH = 12.0) a keto–enol tautomerism of thymine inhibits its reaction with triplet BPTC. Such a behavior is not possible for thymidine because of its deoxyribose group. In addition, the pH-dependence of the apparent electrochemical standard potential of thymine in aqueous solution was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The ΔE/ΔpH ≈ −59 mV/pH result is characteristic of proton-coupled electron transfer. This behavior, together with the kinetic analysis, leads to the conclusion that the quenching reactions between triplet BPTC and thymine involve one proton-coupled electron transfer. PMID:23038981

  16. Determining the local origin of hydroxyl radical generation during phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Aust, Steven D; Terry, Scott; Hebdon, Thomas; Gunderson, Broc; Terry, Michael; Dimalanta, Ramon

    2011-06-01

    To determine the local origin of hydroxyl radicals during phacoemulsification using an ultrasonic phacoemulsification device that includes longitudinal and torsional modalities. Chemistry and Biochemistry Department, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, USA. Experimental study. Experiments were conducted using the Infiniti Vision System and Ozil handpiece. Hydroxyl radical concentrations during longitudinal and torsional phacoemulsification were quantitated as malondialdehyde (MDA) determined spectrophotometrically using the deoxyribose assay. The difference between the total concentration found in the aspirated solution at steady-state concentrations and the pre-aspirate levels deductively determined the concentration of MDA formed along the interior of the sonicating tip. The time to reach 50% of steady state as a function of reaction vessel volume was determined. The mean maximum for torsional ultrasound at 100% amplitude was 7.70 nM ± 0.38 (SD), 91.1% of which was generated outside the tip. During longitudinal ultrasound at 100% power, MDA concentration in the aspirated solution was 29.5 ± 0.3 nM, 71.6% of which was generated outside the tip. The time (seconds) to reach 50% of maximum for longitudinal ultrasound using 5 mL, 10 mL, and 20 mL reaction vessels was 12.6 ± 1.5, 21.0 ± 1.5, and 25.3 ± 3.4, respectively. Although a significantly greater proportion of the hydroxyl radicals generated during ultrasound modality were formed outside the phaco tip (91.1% torsional; 71.6% longitudinal), torsional ultrasound generated only about one-fourth the amount of MDA as longitudinal ultrasound in total and about one-third that generated outside the tip (7.02 nM versus 21.1 nM). No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Additional disclosures are found in the footnotes. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydroxyl free radical production during torsional phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Aust, Steven D; Hebdon, Thomas; Humbert, Jordan; Dimalanta, Ramon

    2010-12-01

    To quantitate free radical generation during phacoemulsification using an ultrasonic phacoemulsification device that includes a torsional mode and evaluate tip designs specific to the torsional mode. Chemistry and Biochemistry Department, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, USA. Experimental study. Experiments were performed using the Infiniti Vision System and OZil handpiece. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the aspirated irrigation solution during torsional phacoemulsification were quantitated as nanomolar malondialdehyde (nM MDA) and determined spectrophotometrically using the deoxyribose assay. The mean free radical production during phacoemulsification with torsional modality at 100% amplitude was 30.1 nM MDA ± 5.1 (SD) using a 0.9 mm 45-degree Kelman tapered ABS tip. With other tip designs intended for use with the torsional modality, free radical production was further reduced when fitted with the 0.9 mm 45-degree Kelman mini-flared ABS tip (13.2 ± 5.6 nM MDA) or the 0.9 mm 45-degree OZil-12 mini-flared ABS tip (14.3 ± 6.7 nM MDA). Although the measurements resulting from the use of the latter 2 tips were not statistically significantly different (P ≈ .25), they were different from those of the tapered tip (P<.0001). The MDA concentration in the aspirated irrigation solution using the torsional modality was approximately one half that reported for the handpiece's longitudinal modality in a previous study using the same bent-tip design (Kelman tapered, P<.0001). The level of MDA was further reduced approximately one half with torsional-specific tips. Copyright © 2010 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Structural insight into the mechanism of substrate specificity and catalytic activity of an HD domain phosphohydrolase: the 5′-deoxyribonucleotidase YfbR from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Proudfoot, Michael; Yakunin, Alexander; Minor, Wladek

    2008-01-01

    Summary HD-domain phosphohydrolases have nucleotidase and phosphodiesterase activities and play important roles in the metabolism of nucleotides and in signaling. We present three 2.1 Å resolution crystal structures (one in the free state and two complexed with natural substrates) of a HD-domain phosphohydrolase, the E. coli 5′-nucleotidase YfbR. The free-state structure of YfbR contains a large cavity accommodating the metal-coordinating HD motif (H33, H68, D69, and D137) and other conserved residues (R18, E72, and D77). Alanine scanning mutagenesis confirms that these residues are important for activity. Two structures of the catalytically inactive mutant E72A complexed with Co2+ and either TMP or dAMP disclose the novel binding mode of deoxyribonucleotides in the active site. Residue R18 stabilizes the phosphate on the Co2+, and residue D77 forms a strong hydrogen bond critical for binding the ribose. The indole side chain of W19 is located close to the 2′-carbon atom of the deoxyribose moiety and is proposed to act as the selectivity switch for deoxyribonucleotide, which is supported by comparison to YfdR, another 5′-nucleotidase in E. coli. The nucleotide bases of both dAMP and TMP make no specific hydrogen bonds with the protein, explaining the lack of nucleotide base selectivity. The YfbR E72A substrate complex structures also suggest a plausible single-step nucleophilic substitution mechanism. This is the first proposed molecular mechanism for a HD-domain phosphohydrolase based directly on substrate-bound crystal structures. PMID:18353368

  19. Genetic Requirements for Sensitivity of Bacteriophage T7 to Dideoxythymidine

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Ngoc Q.; Tabor, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that the presence of dideoxythymidine (ddT) in the growth medium selectively inhibits the ability of bacteriophage T7 to infect Escherichia coli by inhibiting phage DNA synthese (N. Q. Tran, L. F. Rezende, U. Qimron, C. C. Richardson, and S. Tabor, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105:9373–9378, 2008, doi:10.1073/pnas.0804164105). In the presence of T7 gene 1.7 protein, ddT is taken up into the E. coli cell and converted to ddTTP. ddTTP is incorporated into DNA as ddTMP by the T7 DNA polymerase, resulting in chain termination. We have identified the pathway by which exogenous ddT is converted to ddTTP. The pathway consists of ddT transport by host nucleoside permeases and phosphorylation to ddTMP by the host thymidine kinase. T7 gene 1.7 protein phosphorylates ddTMP and ddTDP, resulting in ddTTP. A 74-residue peptide of the gene 1.7 protein confers ddT sensitivity to the same extent as the 196-residue wild-type gene 1.7 protein. We also show that cleavage of thymidine to thymine and deoxyribose-1-phosphate by the host thymidine phosphorylase greatly increases the sensitivity of phage T7 to ddT. Finally, a mutation in T7 DNA polymerase that leads to discrimination against the incorporation of ddTMP eliminates ddT sensitivity. PMID:24858186

  20. Sugar Radical Formation by a Proton Coupled Hole Transfer in 2′-Deoxyguanosine Radical Cation (2′-dG•+): A Theoretical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Previous experimental and theoretical work has established that electronic excitation of a guanine cation radical in nucleosides or in DNA itself leads to sugar radical formation by deprotonation from the dexoxyribose sugar. In this work we investigate a ground electronic state pathway for such sugar radical formation in a hydrated one electron oxidized 2′-deoxyguanosine (dG•+ + 7H2O), using density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP functional and the 6-31G* basis set. We follow the stretching of the C5′-H bond in dG•+ to gain an understanding of the energy requirements to transfer the hole from the base to sugar ring and then to deprotonate to proton acceptor sites in solution and on the guanine ring. The geometries of reactant (dG•+ + 7H2O), transition state (TS) for deprotonation of C5′ site and product (dG(•C5′, N7-H+) + 7 H2O) were fully optimized. The zero point energy (ZPE) corrected activation energy (TS) for the proton transfer (PT) from C5′ is calculated to be 9.0 kcal/mol and is achieved by stretching the C5′-H bond by 0.13 Å from its equilibrium bond distance (1.099 Å). Remarkably, this small bond stretch is sufficient to transfer the “hole” (positive charge and spin) from guanine to the C5′ site on the deoxyribose group. Beyond the TS, the proton (H+) spontaneously adds to water to form a hydronium ion (H3O+) as an intermediate. The proton subsequently transfers to the N7 site of the guanine (product). The 9 kcal/mol barrier suggests slow thermal conversion of the cation radical to the sugar radical but also suggests that localized vibrational excitations would be sufficient to induce rapid sugar radical formation in DNA base cation radicals. PMID:19754084

  1. Data-Independent Mass Spectrometry Approach for Screening and Identification of DNA Adducts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingshu; Villalta, Peter W; Turesky, Robert J

    2017-11-07

    Long-term exposures to environmental toxicants and endogenous electrophiles are causative factors for human diseases including cancer. DNA adducts reflect the internal exposure to genotoxicants and can serve as biomarkers for risk assessment. Liquid chromatography-multistage mass spectrometry (LC-MS n ) is the most common method for biomonitoring DNA adducts, generally targeting single exposures and measuring up to several adducts. However, the data often provide limited evidence for a role of a chemical in the etiology of cancer. An "untargeted" method is required that captures global exposures to chemicals, by simultaneously detecting their DNA adducts in the genome; some of which may induce cancer-causing mutations. We established a wide selected ion monitoring tandem mass spectrometry (wide-SIM/MS 2 ) screening method utilizing ultraperformance-LC nanoelectrospray ionization Orbitrap MS n with online trapping to enrich bulky, nonpolar adducts. Wide-SIM scan events are followed by MS 2 scans to screen for modified nucleosides by coeluting peaks containing precursor and fragment ions differing by -116.0473 Da, attributed to the neutral loss of deoxyribose. Wide-SIM/MS 2 was shown to be superior in sensitivity, specificity, and breadth of adduct coverage to other tested adductomic methods with detection possible at adduct levels as low as 4 per 10 9 nucleotides. Wide-SIM/MS 2 data can be analyzed in a "targeted" fashion by generation of extracted ion chromatograms or in an "untargeted" fashion where a chromatographic peak-picking algorithm can be used to detect putative DNA adducts. Wide-SIM/MS 2 successfully detected DNA adducts, derived from chemicals in the diet and traditional medicines and from lipid peroxidation products, in human prostate and renal specimens.

  2. The Crystal Structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Uridine Phosphorylase Reveals a Distinct Subfamily of Nucleoside Phosphorylases

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Timothy H.; Christoffersen, S.; Allan, Paula W.

    2011-09-20

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine or 2'-deoxyuridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate or 2'-deoxyribose 1-phosphate. This enzyme belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase I superfamily whose members show diverse specificity for nucleoside substrates. Phylogenetic analysis shows Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase (SpUP) is found in a distinct branch of the pyrimidine subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases. To further characterize SpUP, we determined the crystal structure in complex with the products, ribose 1-phosphate and uracil, at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. Like Escherichia coli UP (EcUP), the biological unit of SpUP is a hexamermore » with an ?/? monomeric fold. A novel feature of the active site is the presence of His169, which structurally aligns with Arg168 of the EcUP structure. A second active site residue, Lys162, is not present in previously determined UP structures and interacts with O2 of uracil. Biochemical studies of wild-type SpUP showed that its substrate specificity is similar to that of EcUP, while EcUP is {approx}7-fold more efficient than SpUP. Biochemical studies of SpUP mutants showed that mutations of His169 reduced activity, while mutation of Lys162 abolished all activity, suggesting that the negative charge in the transition state resides mostly on uracil O2. This is in contrast to EcUP for which transition state stabilization occurs mostly at O4.« less

  3. Application of multiplex nested methylated specific PCR in early diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bi; Yu, Lei; Yang, Guo-Zhen; Luo, Xin; Huang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    To explore the application of multiplex nested methylated specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the early diagnosis of epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). Serum and fresh tissue samples were collected from 114 EOC patients. RUNX3, TFPI2 and OPCML served as target genes. Methylation levels of tissues were assessed by multiplex nested methylated specific PCR, the results being compared with those for carcinoma antigen 125 (CA125). The serum free deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) methylation spectrum of EOC patients was completely contained in the DNA spectrum of cancer tissues, providing an accurate reflection of tumor DNA methylation conditions. Serum levels of CA125 and free DNA methylation in the EOC group were evidently higher than those in benign lesion and control groups (p<0.05). Patients with early EOC had markedly lower serum CA125 than those with advanced EOC (p<0.05), but there was no significant difference in free DNA methylation (p>0.05). The sensitivity, specificity and positive predicative value (PPV) of multiplex nested methylated specific PCR were significantly higher for detection of all patients and those with early EOC than those for CA125 (p<0.05). In the detection of patients with advanced EOC, the PPV of CA125 detection was obviously lower than that of multiplex nested methylated specific PCR (p>0.05), but there was no significant difference in sensitivity (p>0.05). Serum free DNA methylation can be used as a biological marker for EOC and multiplex nested methylated specific PCR should be considered for early diagnosis since it can accurately determine tumor methylation conditions.

  4. Identification of Determinants Required for Agonistic and Inverse Agonistic Ligand Properties at the ADP Receptor P2Y12

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Philipp; Ritscher, Lars; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Hermsdorf, Thomas; Cöster, Maxi; Wittkopf, Doreen; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The ADP receptor P2Y12 belongs to the superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its activation triggers platelet aggregation. Therefore, potent antagonists, such as clopidogrel, are of high clinical relevance in prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic events. P2Y12 displays an elevated basal activity in vitro, and as such, inverse agonists may be therapeutically beneficial compared with antagonists. Only a few inverse agonists of P2Y12 have been described. To expand this limited chemical space and improve understanding of structural determinants of inverse agonist-receptor interaction, this study screened a purine compound library for lead structures using wild-type (WT) human P2Y12 and 28 constitutively active mutants. Results showed that ATP and ATP derivatives are agonists at P2Y12. The potency at P2Y12 was 2-(methylthio)-ADP > 2-(methylthio)-ATP > ADP > ATP. Determinants required for agonistic ligand activity were identified. Molecular docking studies revealed a binding pocket for the ATP derivatives that is bordered by transmembrane helices 3, 5, 6, and 7 in human P2Y12, with Y105, E188, R256, Y259, and K280 playing a particularly important role in ligand interaction. N-Methyl-anthraniloyl modification at the 3′-OH of the 2′-deoxyribose leads to ligands (mant-deoxy-ATP [dATP], mant-deoxy-ADP) with inverse agonist activity. Inverse agonist activity of mant-dATP was found at the WT human P2Y12 and half of the constitutive active P2Y12 mutants. This study showed that, in addition to ADP and ATP, other ATP derivatives are not only ligands of P2Y12 but also agonists. Modification of the ribose within ATP can result in inverse activity of ATP-derived ligands. PMID:23093496

  5. Abasic Phosphorothioate Oligomers Inhibit HIV-1 Reverse Transcription and Block Virus Transmission across Polarized Ectocervical Organ Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Fraietta, Joseph A.; Mueller, Yvonne M.; Lozenski, Karissa L.; Ratner, Deena; Boesteanu, Alina C.; Hancock, Aidan S.; Lackman-Smith, Carol; Zentner, Isaac J.; Chaiken, Irwin M.; Chung, Suhman; LeGrice, Stuart F. J.; Snyder, Beth A.; Mankowski, Marie K.; Jones, Natalie M.; Hope, Jennifer L.; Gupta, Phalguni; Anderson, Sharon H.; Wigdahl, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of universally available antiretroviral (ARV) drugs or a vaccine against HIV-1, microbicides may offer the most immediate hope for controlling the AIDS pandemic. The most advanced and clinically effective microbicides are based on ARV agents that interfere with the earliest stages of HIV-1 replication. Our objective was to identify and characterize novel ARV-like inhibitors, as well as demonstrate their efficacy at blocking HIV-1 transmission. Abasic phosphorothioate 2′ deoxyribose backbone (PDB) oligomers were evaluated in a variety of mechanistic assays and for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection and virus transmission through primary human cervical mucosa. Cellular and biochemical assays were used to elucidate the antiviral mechanisms of action of PDB oligomers against both lab-adapted and primary CCR5- and CXCR4-utilizing HIV-1 strains, including a multidrug-resistant isolate. A polarized cervical organ culture was used to test the ability of PDB compounds to block HIV-1 transmission to primary immune cell populations across ectocervical tissue. The antiviral activity and mechanisms of action of PDB-based compounds were dependent on oligomer size, with smaller molecules preventing reverse transcription and larger oligomers blocking viral entry. Importantly, irrespective of molecular size, PDBs potently inhibited virus infection and transmission within genital tissue samples. Furthermore, the PDB inhibitors exhibited excellent toxicity and stability profiles and were found to be safe for vaginal application in vivo. These results, coupled with the previously reported intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties of PDBs, support further investigations in the development of PDB-based topical microbicides for preventing the global spread of HIV-1. PMID:25224013

  6. Base-Pairing Energies of Protonated Nucleoside Base Pairs of dCyd and m5dCyd: Implications for the Stability of DNA i-Motif Conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M. T.

    2015-08-01

    Hypermethylation of cytosine in expanded (CCG)n•(CGG)n trinucleotide repeats results in Fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited mental retardation. The (CCG)n•(CGG)n repeats adopt i-motif conformations that are preferentially stabilized by base-pairing interactions of protonated base pairs of cytosine. Here we investigate the effects of 5-methylation and the sugar moiety on the base-pairing energies (BPEs) of protonated cytosine base pairs by examining protonated nucleoside base pairs of 2'-deoxycytidine (dCyd) and 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine (m5dCyd) using threshold collision-induced dissociation techniques. 5-Methylation of a single or both cytosine residues leads to very small change in the BPE. However, the accumulated effect may be dramatic in diseased state trinucleotide repeats where many methylated base pairs may be present. The BPEs of the protonated nucleoside base pairs examined here significantly exceed those of Watson-Crick dGuo•dCyd and neutral dCyd•dCyd base pairs, such that these base-pairing interactions provide the major forces responsible for stabilization of DNA i-motif conformations. Compared with isolated protonated nucleobase pairs of cytosine and 1-methylcytosine, the 2'-deoxyribose sugar produces an effect similar to the 1-methyl substituent, and leads to a slight decrease in the BPE. These results suggest that the base-pairing interactions may be slightly weaker in nucleic acids, but that the extended backbone is likely to exert a relatively small effect on the total BPE. The proton affinity (PA) of m5dCyd is also determined by competitive analysis of the primary dissociation pathways that occur in parallel for the protonated (m5dCyd)H+(dCyd) nucleoside base pair and the absolute PA of dCyd previously reported.

  7. Hydrophilic and Cell-Penetrable Pyrrolidinyl Peptide Nucleic Acid via Post-synthetic Modification with Hydrophilic Side Chains.

    PubMed

    Pansuwan, Haruthai; Ditmangklo, Boonsong; Vilaivan, Chotima; Jiangchareon, Banphot; Pan-In, Porntip; Wanichwecharungruang, Supason; Palaga, Tanapat; Nuanyai, Thanesuan; Suparpprom, Chaturong; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2017-09-20

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a nucleic acid mimic in which the deoxyribose-phosphate was replaced by a peptide-like backbone. The absence of negative charge in the PNA backbone leads to several unique behaviors including a stronger binding and salt independency of the PNA-DNA duplex stability. However, PNA possesses poor aqueous solubility and cannot directly penetrate cell membranes. These are major obstacles that limit in vivo applications of PNA. In previous strategies, the PNA can be conjugated to macromolecular carriers or modified with positively charged side chains such as guanidinium groups to improve the aqueous solubility and cell permeability. In general, a preformed modified PNA monomer was required. In this study, a new approach for post-synthetic modification of PNA backbone with one or more hydrophilic groups was proposed. The PNA used in this study was the conformationally constrained pyrrolidinyl PNA with prolyl-2-aminocyclopentanecarboxylic acid dipeptide backbone (acpcPNA) that shows several advantages over the conventional PNA. The aldehyde modifiers carrying different linkers (alkylene and oligo(ethylene glycol)) and end groups (-OH, -NH 2 , and guanidinium) were synthesized and attached to the backbone of modified acpcPNA by reductive alkylation. The hybrids between the modified acpcPNAs and DNA exhibited comparable or superior thermal stability with base-pairing specificity similar to those of unmodified acpcPNA. Moreover, the modified apcPNAs also showed the improvement of aqueous solubility (10-20 folds compared to unmodified PNA) and readily penetrate cell membranes without requiring any special delivery agents. This study not only demonstrates the practicality of the proposed post-synthetic modification approach for PNA modification, which could be readily applied to other systems, but also opens up opportunities for using pyrrolidinyl PNA in various applications such as intracellular RNA sensing, specific gene detection, and antisense

  8. Antioxidant properties of Taraxacum officinale fruit extract are involved in the protective effect against cellular death induced by sodium nitroprusside in brain of rats.

    PubMed

    Colle, Dirleise; Arantes, Letícia Priscilla; Rauber, Ricardo; de Mattos, Sérgio Edgar Campos; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira da; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes

    2012-07-01

    Taraxacum officinale Weber (Asteraceae), known as dandelion, is used for medicinal purposes due to its choleretic, diuretic, antitumor, antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and hepatoprotective properties. We sought to investigate the protective activity of T. officinale fruit extract against sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced decreased cellular viability and increased lipid peroxidation in the cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of rats in vitro. To explain the mechanism of the extract's antioxidant activity, its putative scavenger activities against NO, DPPH·, OH·, and H(2)O(2) were determined. Slices of cortex, hippocampus, and striatum were treated with 50 μM SNP and T. officinale fruit ethanolic extract (1-20 µg/mL) to determine cellular viability by MTT reduction assay. Lipid peroxidation was measure in cortical, hippocampal and striatal slices incubates with SNP (5 µM) and T. officinale fruit extract (1-20 µg/mL). We also determined the scavenger activities of T. officinale fruit extract against NO·, DPPH·, OH·, and H(2)O(2), as well as its iron chelating capacity. The extract (1, 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL) protected against SNP-induced decreases in cellular viability and increases in lipid peroxidation in the cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of rats. The extract had scavenger activity against DPPH· and NO· at low concentrations and was able to protect against H(2)O(2) and Fe(2+)-induced deoxyribose oxidation. T. officinale fruit extract has antioxidant activity and protects brain slices against SNP-induced cellular death. Possible mechanisms of action include its scavenger activities against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), which are attributed to the presence of phenolic compounds in the extract.

  9. Conformational influence of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl group: crystal structures of DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egli, M.; Usman, N.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    We have crystallized three double-helical DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes and determined their structures by X-ray crystallography at resolutions between 2 and 2.25 A. The two self-complementary duplexes [r(G)d(CGTATACGC)]2 and [d(GCGT)r(A)d(TACGC)]2, as well as the Okazaki fragment d(GGGTATACGC).r(GCG)d(TATACCC), were found to adopt A-type conformations. The crystal structures are non-isomorphous, and the crystallographic environments for the three chimeras are different. A number of intramolecular interactions of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl groups contribute to the stabilization of the A-conformation. Hydrogen bonds between 2'-hydroxyls and 5'-oxygens or phosphate oxygens, in addition to the previously observed hydrogen bonds to 1'-oxygens of adjacent riboses and deoxyriboses, are observed in the DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes. The crystalline chimeric duplexes do not show a transition between the DNA A- and B-conformations. CD spectra suggest that the Okazaki fragment assumes an A-conformation in solution as well. In this molecule the three RNA residues may therefore lock the complete decamer in the A-conformation. Crystals of an all-DNA strand with the same sequence as the self-complementary chimeras show a morphology which is different from those of the chimera crystals. Moreover, the oligonucleotide does not match any of the sequence characteristics of DNAs usually adopting the A-conformation in the crystalline state (e.g., octamers with short alternating stretches of purines and pyrimidines). In DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes, it is therefore possible that a single RNA residue can drive the conformational equilibrium toward the A-conformation.

  10. Structural, conformational and thermodynamic aspects of groove-directed-intercalation of flavopiridol into DNA.

    PubMed

    Ray, Bhumika; Agarwal, Shweta; Lohani, Neelam; Rajeswari, Moganty R; Mehrotra, Ranjana

    2016-11-01

    Certain plant-derived alkaloids and flavonoids have shown propitious cytotoxic acitvity against different types of cancer, having deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) as their main cellular target. Flavopiridol, a semi-synthetic derivative of rohitukine (a natural compound isolated from Dysoxylum binectariferum plant), has attained much attention owing to its anticancer potential against various haematological malignancies and solid tumours. This work focuses on investigating interaction between flavopiridol and DNA at molecular level in order to decipher its underlying mechanism of action, which is not well understood. To define direct influence of flavopiridol on the structural, conformational and thermodynamic aspects of DNA, various spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques have been used. ATR-FTIR and SERS spectral outcomes indicate a novel insight into groove-directed-intercalation of flavopiridol into DNA via direct binding with nitrogenous bases guanine (C6=O6) and thymine (C2=O2) in DNA groove together with slight external binding to its sugar-phosphate backbone. Circular dichroism spectral analysis of flavopiridol-DNA complexes suggests perturbation in native B-conformation of DNA and its transition into C-form, which may be localized up to a few base pairs of DNA. UV-visible spectroscopic results illustrate dual binding mode of flavopiridol when interacts with DNA having association constant, Ka = 1.18 × 10(4) M(-1). This suggests moderate type of interaction between flavopiridol and DNA. Further, UV melting analysis also supports spectroscopic outcomes. Thermodynamically, flavopiridol-DNA complexation is an enthalpy-driven exothermic process. These conclusions drawn from this study could be helpful in unveiling mechanism of cytoxicity induced by flavopiridol that can be further applied in the development of flavonoid-based new chemotherapeutics with more specificity and better efficacy.

  11. Oxalate modulates thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) production in supernatants of homogenates from rat brain, liver and kidney: effect of diphenyl diselenide and diphenyl ditelluride.

    PubMed

    Puntel, Robson Luiz; Roos, Daniel Henrique; Paixão, Márcio Weber; Braga, Antônio Luiz; Zeni, Gilson; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Rocha, Joao Batista Teixeira

    2007-01-30

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the mechanism(s) involved in the sodium oxalate pro-oxidative activity in vitro and the potential protection by diphenyl diselenide ((PhSe)(2)) and diphenyl ditelluride ((PhTe)(2)) using supernatants of homogenates from brain, liver and kidney. Oxalate causes a significant increase in the TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive species) production up to 4mmol/l and it had antioxidant activity from 8 to 16mmol/l in the brain and liver. Oxalate had no effect in kidney homogenates. The difference among tissues may be related to the formation of insoluble crystal of oxalate in kidney, but not in liver and brain homogenates. (PhSe)(2) and (PhTe)(2) reduced both basal and oxalate-induced TBARS in rat brain homogenates, whereas in liver homogenates they were antioxidant only on oxalate-induced TBARS production. (PhSe)(2) showed a modest effect on renal TBARS production, whereas (PhTe)(2) did not modulate TBARS in kidney preparations. Oxalate at 2mmol/l did not change deoxyribose degradation induced by Fe(2+) plus H(2)O(2), whereas at 20mmol/l it significantly prevents its degradation. Oxalate (up to 4mmol/l) did not alter iron (10micromol/l)-induced TBARS production in the brain preparations, whereas at 8mmol/l onwards it prevents iron effect. In liver preparations, oxalate amplifies iron pro-oxidant activity up to 4mmol/l, preventing iron-induced TBARS production at 16mmol/l onwards. These results support the antioxidant effect of organochalcogens against oxalate-induced TBARS production. In addition, our results suggest that oxalate pro- and antioxidant activity in vitro could be related to its interactions with iron ions.

  12. Genome analysis of Mycoplasma synoviae strain MS-H, the most common M. synoviae strain with a worldwide distribution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling; Shahid, Muhammad A; Markham, John; Browning, Glenn F; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Marenda, Marc S

    2018-02-02

    The bacterial pathogen Mycoplasma synoviae can cause subclinical respiratory disease, synovitis, airsacculitis and reproductive tract disease in poultry and is a major cause of economic loss worldwide. The M. synoviae strain MS-H was developed by chemical mutagenesis of an Australian isolate and has been used as a live attenuated vaccine in many countries over the past two decades. As a result it may now be the most prevalent strain of M. synoviae globally. Differentiation of the MS-H vaccine from local field strains is important for epidemiological investigations and is often required for registration of the vaccine. The complete genomic sequence of the MS-H strain was determined using a combination of Illumina and Nanopore methods and compared to WVU-1853, the M. synoviae type strain isolated in the USA 30 years before the parent strain of MS-H, and MS53, a more recent isolate from Brazil. The vaccine strain genome had a slightly larger number of pseudogenes than the two other strains and contained a unique 55 kb chromosomal inversion partially affecting a putative genomic island. Variations in gene content were also noted, including a deoxyribose-phosphate aldolase (deoC) fragment and an ATP-dependent DNA helicase gene found only in MS-H. Some of these sequences may have been acquired horizontally from other avian mycoplasma species. MS-H was somewhat more similar to WVU-1853 than to MS53. The genome sequence of MS-H will enable identification of vaccine-specific genetic markers for use as diagnostic and epidemiological tools to better control M. synoviae.

  13. The photochemistry of pyrimidine in realistic astrophysical ices and the production of nucleobases

    SciTech Connect

    Nuevo, Michel; Materese, Christopher K.; Sandford, Scott A., E-mail: michel.nuevo-1@nasa.gov

    2014-10-01

    Nucleobases, together with deoxyribose/ribose and phosphoric acid, are the building blocks of DNA and RNA for all known life. The presence of nucleobase-like compounds in carbonaceous chondrites delivered to the Earth raises the question of an extraterrestrial origin for the molecules that triggered life on our planet. Whether these molecules are formed in interstellar/protostellar environments, in small parent bodies in the solar system, or both, is currently unclear. Recent experiments show that the UV irradiation of pyrimidine (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}) in H{sub 2}O-rich ice mixtures that contain NH{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}OH, or CH{sub 4} leads to the formation ofmore » the pyrimidine-based nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine. In this work, we discuss the low-temperature UV irradiation of pyrimidine in realistic astrophysical ice mixtures containing H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}OH, and NH{sub 3}, with or without CH{sub 4}, to search for the production of nucleobases and other prebiotic compounds. These experiments show the presence of uracil, urea, glycerol, hexamethylenetetramine, small amino acids, and small carboxylic acids in all samples. Cytosine was only found in one sample produced from ices irradiated with a higher UV dose, while thymine was not found in any sample, even after irradiation with a higher UV dose. Results are discussed to evaluate the role of the photochemistry of pyrimidine in the inventory of organic molecules detected in meteorites and their astrophysical/astrobiological implications.« less

  14. Attenuation of Oxidative Damage by Boerhaavia diffusa L. Against Different Neurotoxic Agents in Rat Brain Homogenate.

    PubMed

    Ayyappan, Prathapan; Palayyan, Salin Raj; Kozhiparambil Gopalan, Raghu

    2016-01-01

    Due to a high rate of oxidative metabolic activity in the brain, intense production of reactive oxygen metabolite occurs, and the subsequent generation of free radicals is implicated in the pathogenesis of traumatic brain injury, epilepsy, and ischemia as well as chronic neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, protective effects of polyphenol rich ethanolic extract of Boerhaavia diffusa (BDE), a neuroprotective edible medicinal plant against oxidative stress induced by different neurotoxic agents, were evaluated. BDE was tested against quinolinic acid (QA), 3-nitropropionic acid (NPA), sodium nitroprusside (SNP), and Fe (II)/EDTA complex induced oxidative stress in rat brain homogenates. QA, NPA, SNP, and Fe (II)/EDTA treatment caused an increased level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in brain homogenates along with a decline in the activities of antioxidant enzymes. BDE treatment significantly decreased the production of TBARS (p < .05) and increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes like catalase and superoxide dismutase along with increased concentration of non-enzymatic antioxidant, reduced glutathione (GSH). Similarly, BDE caused a significant decrease in the lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the cerebral cortex. Inhibitory potential of BDE against deoxyribose degradation (IC50 value 38.91 ± 0.12 μg/ml) shows that BDE can protect hydroxyl radical induced DNA damage in the tissues. Therefore, B. diffusa had high antioxidant potential that could inhibit the oxidative stress induced by different neurotoxic agents in brain. Since many of the neurological disorders are associated with free radical injury, these data may imply that B. diffusa, functioning as an antioxidant agent, may be beneficial for reducing various neurodegenerative complications.

  15. Head-to-head right-handed cross-links of the antitumor-active bis(mu-N,N'-di-p-tolylformamidinato)dirhodium(II,II) unit with the dinucleotides d(GpA) and d(ApG).

    PubMed

    Chifotides, Helen T; Dunbar, Kim R

    2008-01-01

    Reactions of cis-[Rh(2)(DTolF)(2)(NCCH(3))(6)](BF(4))(2) with the dinucleotides d(GpA) and d(ApG) proceed to form [Rh(2)(DTolF)(2){d(GpA)}] and [Rh(2)(DTolF)(2){d(ApG)}], respectively, with bridging purine bases spanning the Rh-Rh unit in the equatorial positions. Both dirhodium adducts exhibit head-to-head (HH) arrangement of the bases, as indicated by the presence of H8/H8 NOE cross-peaks in the 2D ROESY NMR spectra. The guanine bases bind to the dirhodium core at positions N7 and O6, a conclusion that is supported by the absence of N7 protonation at low pH values and the notable increase in the acidity of the guanine N1H sites (pK(a) approximately 7.4 in 4:1 CD(3)CN/D(2)O), inferred from the pH-dependence titrations of the guanine H8 proton resonances. In both dirhodium adducts, the adenine bases coordinate to the metal atoms through N6 and N7, which induces stabilization of the rare imino tautomer of the bases with a concomitant substantial decrease in the basicity of the N1H adenine sites (pK(a) approximately 7.0-7.1 in 4:1 CD(3)CN/D(2)O), as compared to the imino form of free adenosine. The presence of the adenine bases in the rare imino form is further corroborated by the observation of DQF-COSY H2/N1H and ROE N1H/N6H cross-peaks in the 2D NMR spectra of [Rh(2)(DTolF)(2){d(GpA)}] and [Rh(2)(DTolF)(2){d(ApG)}] in CD(3)CN at -38 degrees C. The 2D NMR spectroscopic data and the molecular modeling results suggest the presence of right-handed variants, HH1R, in solution for both adducts (HH1R refers to the relative base canting and the direction of propagation of the phosphodiester backbone with respect to the 5' base). Complete characterization of [Rh(2)(DTolF)(2){d(GpA)}] and [Rh(2)(DTolF)(2){d(ApG)}] by 2D NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling supports anti-orientation of the sugar residues for both adducts about the glycosyl bonds as well as N- and S-type conformations for the 5'- and 3'-deoxyribose residues, respectively.

  16. The Prebiotic Synthesis of Ethylenediamine Monoacetic Acid, The Repeating Unit of Peptide Nucleic Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Kevin E.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1992-01-01

    The polymerization of ribonucleic acids or their precursors constitutes an important event in prebiotic chemistry. The various problems using ribonucleotides to make RNA suggest that there may have been a precursor. An attractive possibility are the peptide nucleic acids (PNA). PNAs are nucleotide analogs that make use of a polymer of ethylenediamine monoacetic acid (EDMA or 2-amninoethyl glycine) with the bases attached by an acetic acid. EDMA is an especially attractive alternative to the ribose phosphate or deoxyribose phosphate backbone because it contains no chiral centers and is potentially prebiotic, but there is no reported prebiotic synthesis. We have synthesized both EDMA and ethylenediamine diacetic acid (EDDA) from the prebiotic compounds ethylenediamine, formaldehyde, and hydrogen cyanide. The yields of EDMA range from 11 to 79% along with some sEDDA and uEDDA. These reactions work with concentrations of 10(exp -1)M and as low as 10(exp -4)M, and the reaction is likely to be effective at even lower concentrations. Ethylenediamine is a likely prebiotic compound, but it has not yet been demonstrated, although compounds such as ethanolamine and cysteamine have been proven to be prebiotic. Under neutral pH and heating at l00 C, EDMA is converted to the lactam, monoketopiperazine (MKP). The cyclization occurs and has an approximate ratio of MKP/EDMA = 3 at equilibrium. We have measured the solubilities of EDMA center dot H20 as 6.4 m, EDMA center dot HCl center dot H20 as 13.7 m, and EDMA center dot 2HCl center dot H20 as 3.4 m. These syntheses together with the high solubility of EDMA suggest that EDMA would concentrate in drying lagoons and might efficiently form polymers. Given the instability of ribose and the poor polymerizability of nucleotides, the prebiotic presence of EDMA and the possibility of its polymerization raises the possibility that PNAs are the progenitors of present day nucleic acids. A pre-RNA world may have existed in which PNAs or

  17. Interpreting sperm DNA damage in a diverse range of mammalian sperm by means of the two-tailed comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; López-Fernández, Carmen; Fernández, José Luis; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I.; Johnston, Stephen D.; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Key Concepts The two-dimensional Two-Tailed Comet assay (TT-comet) protocol is a valuable technique to differentiate between single-stranded (SSBs) and double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) on the same sperm cell.Protein lysis inherent with the TT-comet protocol accounts for differences in sperm protamine composition at a species-specific level to produce reliable visualization of sperm DNA damage.Alkaline treatment may break the sugar–phosphate backbone in abasic sites or at sites with deoxyribose damage, transforming these lesions into DNA breaks that are also converted into ssDNA. These lesions are known as Alkali Labile Sites “ALSs.”DBD–FISH permits the in situ visualization of DNA breaks, abasic sites or alkaline-sensitive DNA regions.The alkaline comet single assay reveals that all mammalian species display constitutive ALS related with the requirement of the sperm to undergo transient changes in DNA structure linked with chromatin packing.Sperm DNA damage is associated with fertilization failure, impaired pre-and post- embryo implantation and poor pregnancy outcome.The TT is a valuable tool for identifying SSBs or DSBs in sperm cells with DNA fragmentation and can be therefore used for the purposes of fertility assessment. Sperm DNA damage is associated with fertilization failure, impaired pre-and post- embryo implantation and poor pregnancy outcome. A series of methodologies to assess DNA damage in spermatozoa have been developed but most are unable to differentiate between single-stranded DNA breaks (SSBs) and double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) on the same sperm cell. The two-dimensional Two-Tailed Comet assay (TT-comet) protocol highlighted in this review overcomes this limitation and emphasizes the importance in accounting for the difference in sperm protamine composition at a species-specific level for the appropriate preparation of the assay. The TT-comet is a modification of the original comet assay that uses a two dimensional electrophoresis to

  18. SciTech Connect

    Chenna, A.; Singer, B.

    Benzene is a carcinogen in rodents and a cause of bone marrow toxicity and leukemia in humans. p-Benzoquinone (p-BQ) is one of the stable metabolites of benzene, as well as of a number of drugs and other chemicals. 2{prime}-Deoxycytidine (dC) and 2{prime}-deoxyadenosine (dA) were allowed to react with p-BQ in aqueous solution at pH 7.4 and 4.5. The yields were considerably higher at pH 4.5 than at pH 7.4 and 4.5. The yields were considerably higher at pH 4.5 than at pH 7.4, as indicated by HPLC analysis. The desired products were isolated by column chromatography on silica gel ormore » cellulose. Identification was done by FAB-MS, {sup 1}H NMR, and UV spectroscopy. The reaction of p-BQ with dC and dA at pH 4.5 produced the exocyclic compounds 3-hydroxy-1,N{sup 4}-benzetheno-2{prime}-deoxycytidine (p-BA-dC), and 9-hydroxy-1,N{sup 6}-benzetheno-2{prime}-deoxyadenosine (p-BQ-dA), respectively, in a large scale and high yield. These adducts have been previously made in a microgram scale as the 3{prime}-phosphate for {sup 32}P-postlabeling studies of their incidence in DNA. The p-BQ-dC and p-BQ-dA adducts have, in addition to the two hydroxyl groups of deoxyribose, one newly formed hydroxyl group a the C-3 or C-9 of the exocyclic base of each product respectively. Incorporation of these adducts into oligonucleotides as the phosphoramidite requires the protection of ll three hydroxyl groups in these compounds. The mass spectroscopic analysis of the DNA oligomers was confirmed by electrospray MS. These oligomers are now under investigation for their biochemical properties. 41 refs., 4 figs.« less

  19. Increasing the applications of Crocus sativus flowers as natural antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Díaz, Jéssica; Sánchez, Ana M; Maggi, Luana; Martínez-Tomé, Magdalena; García-Diz, Luis; Murcia, M Antonia; Alonso, Gonzalo L

    2012-11-01

    Large amounts of floral bio-residues (92.6 g per 100 g of flowers) are generated and wasted in the production of saffron (Crocus sativus) spice. Progress in mechanization of saffron crop offer the opportunity to expand the uses of C. sativus flowers, beyond the spice (dried stigmas). The antioxidant potential of flowers of saffron, their separate parts (tepals, stamens, styles, and stigmas) and floral bio-residues were evaluated by 4 in vitro assays: lipid peroxidation, deoxyribose assay, Rancimat test, and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity. Phenolic content and crocetin ester composition were also determined. All the samples studied showed to be potential antioxidants. The highest phenolic, flavonoid, and anthocyanin contents were observed in tepals. Stamens showed lower phenolic, flavonoid, and anthocyanin contents than those of whole flowers, tepals, and floral bio-residues. Crocetin esters were not found in tepals or stamens. Stamens exhibited the most potent LOO(•) and OH(•) radicals scavenging activity, being higher than those of food antioxidant propyl gallate. Flowers of saffron, tepals, stamens, styles, and floral bio-residues showed LOO(•), OH(•), and ABTS(•-) radicals scavenging activity, while stigmas showed LOO(•) and ABTS(•-) radicals scavenging activity. All samples studied improved the oxidative stability of sunflower oil in Rancimat test. These antioxidant properties could suggest the application of this floral material as functional ingredients with the subsequent added value. Saffron spice, the most valuable spice worldwide, is the dried stigma that only represents 7.4% of Crocus sativus flowers. Other parts of the flowers different to stigmas are discarded. Flower harvest and all the postharvest steps to produce saffron spice are performed manually. Mechanization of flower collection, stigma separation, and dehydration process is a revolution in saffron spice production, which increases the productive capacity making it

  20. DNA Sequence Modulates Geometrical Isomerism of the trans-8,9-Dihydro-8-(2,6-diamino-4-oxo-3,4-dihydropyrimid-5-yl-formamido)-9-hydroxy Aflatoxin B1 Adduct

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus, is oxidized by cytochrome P450 enzymes to aflatoxin B1-8,9-epoxide, which alkylates DNA at N7-dG. Under basic conditions, this N7-dG adduct rearranges to yield the trans-8,9-dihydro-8-(2,6-diamino-4-oxo-3,4-dihydropyrimid-5-yl-formamido)-9-hydroxy aflatoxin B1 (AFB1–FAPY) adduct. The AFB1–FAPY adduct exhibits geometrical isomerism involving the formamide moiety. NMR analyses of duplex oligodeoxynucleotides containing the 5′-XA-3′, 5′-XC-3′, 5′-XT-3′, and 5′-XY-3′ sequences (X = AFB1–FAPY; Y = 7-deaza-dG) demonstrate that the equilibrium between E and Z isomers is controlled by major groove hydrogen bonding interactions. Structural analysis of the adduct in the 5′-XA-3′ sequence indicates the preference of the E isomer of the formamide group, attributed to formation of a hydrogen bond between the formyl oxygen and the N6 exocyclic amino group of the 3′-neighbor adenine. While the 5′-XA-3′ sequence exhibits the E isomer, the 5′-XC-3′ sequence exhibits a 7:3 E:Z ratio at equilibrium at 283 K. The E isomer is favored by a hydrogen bond between the formyl oxygen and the N4-dC exocyclic amino group of the 3′-neighbor cytosine. The 5′-XT-3′ and 5′-XY-3′ sequences cannot form such a hydrogen bond between the formyl oxygen and the 3′-neighbor T or Y, respectively, and in these sequence contexts the Z isomer is favored. Additional equilibria between α and β anomers and the potential to exhibit atropisomers about the C5–N5 bond do not depend upon sequence. In each of the four DNA sequences, the AFB1–FAPY adduct maintains the β deoxyribose configuration. Each of these four sequences feature the atropisomer of the AFB1 moiety that is intercalated above the 5′-face of the damaged guanine. This enforces the Ra axial conformation for the C5–N5 bond. PMID:25587868

  1. UVA-potentiated damage to calf thymus DNA by Fenton reaction system and protection by para-aminobenzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Shih, M K; Hu, M L

    1996-03-01

    Calf thymus DNA was irradiated with low-intensity UVA (main output at 365 nm, 2 mW cm-2 or 36 kJ m-2 for 30 min), and the role of metal ions, hydrogen peroxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) was examined. DNA damage was measured as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (possibly from degradation of deoxyribose) and as changes in ethidium bromide-DNA fluorescence due to unwinding from strand breaks. Under the present experimental conditions, UVA alone or in the presence of H2O2 had no effect on DNA but slightly enhanced the damage by iron/EDTA. Ultraviolet A strongly enhanced DNA damage (ca four- to five-fold) by the Fenton reaction system (50 microM Fe2+/100 microM EDTA + 0.5 mM H2O2). The results suggest that the Fenton reaction system was "photosensitized" to damage DNA by low-intensity UVA radiation. The enhanced damage by UVA was attributed in part to the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+. Ultraviolet A had no effect when iron (ferric or ferrous) ions were replaced by Cu2+, Zn2+, Mn2+ or Cd2+. The ROS involved in the UVA-enhanced damage to DNA by the Fenton reagents were OH and, to a lesser extent, superoxide anions. The UVA-potentiated DNA damage by the Fenton reaction system was then used to examine the protective effect of para-aminobenzoate (PABA), a UVB-absorbing sunscreen that protects against photocarcinogenesis in hairless mice. The results show that PABA and mannitol dose-dependently inhibited the damage with concentrations required for 50% inhibition at 0.1 mM and 3 mM, respectively. The protection by PABA was attributed to its radical-scavenging ability because PABA does not absorb light in the UVA region. These findings may be relevant to the biological damage by UVA and suggest that PABA is useful in protection against photocarcinogenesis by wide-range UV radiation.

  2. DNA Polymerase λ Inactivation by Oxidized Abasic Sites&

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Adam J.; Guan, Lirui; Bebenek, Katarzyna; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Greenberg, Marc M.

    2013-01-01

    Base excision repair plays a vital role in maintaining genomic integrity in mammalian cells. DNA polymerase λ is believed to play a backup role to DNA polymerase β in base excision repair. Two oxidized abasic lesions that are produced by a variety of DNA damaging agents, including several antitumor antibiotics, the C4′-oxidized abasic site following Ape1 incision (pC4-AP) and 5′-(2-phosphoryl-1,4-dioxobutane) (DOB), irreversibly inactivate Pol β and Pol λ. The interactions of DOB and pC4-AP with Pol λ are examined in detail using DNA substrates containing these lesions at defined sites. Single turnover kinetic experiments show that Pol λ excises DOB almost 13-times more slowly than a 5′-phosphorylated 2-deoxyribose (dRP). pC4-AP is excised approximately twice as fast as DOB. The absolute rate constants are considerably slower than those reported for Pol β at the respective reactions, suggesting that Pol λ may be an inefficient backup in BER. DOB inactivates Pol λ approximately 3-fold less efficiently than it does Pol β and the difference is attributable to a higher KI (33 ± 7 nM). Inactivation of Pol λ’s lyase activity by DOB also prevents the enzyme from carrying out polymerization following preincubation of the protein and DNA. Mass spectral analysis of GluC digested Pol λ inactivated by DOB shows that Lys324 is modified. There is inferential support that Lys312 may also be modified. Both residues are within the Pol λ lyase active site. Protein modification involves reaction with released but-2-ene-1,4-dial. When acting on pC4-AP, Pol λ achieves approximately 4 turnovers on average before being inactivated. Lyase inactivation by pC4-AP is also accompanied by loss of polymerase activity and mass spectrometry indicates that Lys312 and Lys324 are modified by the lesion. The ability of DOB and pC4-AP to inactivate Pol λ provides additional evidence that these lesions are significant sources of the cytotoxicity of DNA damaging agents that

  3. N-terminal domains of human DNA polymerase lambda promote primer realignment during translesion DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, David J.; Dayeh, Daniel M.; Fredrickson, Saul W.; Suo, Zucai

    2014-01-01

    The X-family DNA polymerases λ (Polλ) and β (Polβ) possess similar 5′-2-deoxyribose-5-phosphatelyase (dRPase) and polymerase domains. Besides these domains, Polλ also possesses a BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domain and a proline-rich domain at its N terminus. However, it is unclear how these non-enzymatic domains contribute to the unique biological functions of Polλ. Here, we used primer extension assays and a newly developed high-throughput short oligonucleotide sequencing assay (HT-SOSA) to compare the efficiency of lesion bypass and fidelity of human Polβ, Polλ and two N-terminal deletion constructs of Polλ during the bypass of either an abasic site or a 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) lesion. We demonstrate that the BRCT domain of Polλ enhances the efficiency of abasic site bypass by approximately 1.6-fold. In contrast, deletion of the N-terminal domains of Polλ did not affect the efficiency of 8-oxodG bypass relative to nucleotide incorporations opposite undamaged dG. HT-SOSA analysis demonstrated that Polλ and Polβ preferentially generated −1 or −2 frameshift mutations when bypassing an abasic site and the single or double base deletion frequency was highly sequence dependent. Interestingly, the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ cooperatively promoted the generation of −2 frameshift mutations when the abasic site was situated within a sequence context that was susceptible to homology-driven primer realignment. Furthermore, both N-terminal domains of Polλ increased the generation of −1 frameshift mutations during 8-oxodG bypass and influenced the frequency of substitution mutations produced by Polλ opposite the 8-oxodG lesion. Overall, our data support a model wherein the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ act cooperatively to promote primer/template realignment between DNA strands of limited sequence homology. This function of the N-terminal domains may facilitate the role of Polλ as a gap-filling polymerase

  4. Nucleic acid is a novel ligand for innate, immune pattern recognition collectins surfactant proteins A and D and mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Palaniyar, Nades; Nadesalingam, Jeya; Clark, Howard; Shih, Michael J; Dodds, Alister W; Reid, Kenneth B M

    2004-07-30

    Collectins are a family of innate immune proteins that contain fibrillar collagen-like regions and globular carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs). The CRDs of these proteins recognize various microbial surface-specific carbohydrate patterns, particularly hexoses. We hypothesized that collectins, such as pulmonary surfactant proteins (SPs) SP-A and SP-D and serum protein mannose-binding lectin, could recognize nucleic acids, pentose-based anionic phosphate polymers. Here we show that collectins bind DNA from a variety of origins, including bacteria, mice, and synthetic oligonucleotides. Pentoses, such as arabinose, ribose, and deoxyribose, inhibit the interaction between SP-D and mannan, one of the well-studied hexose ligands for SP-D, and biologically relevant d-forms of the pentoses are better competitors than the l-forms. In addition, DNA and RNA polymer-related compounds, such as nucleotide diphosphates and triphosphates, also inhibit the carbohydrate binding ability of SP-D, or approximately 60 kDa trimeric recombinant fragments of SP-D that are composed of the alpha-helical coiled-coil neck region and three CRDs (SP-D(n/CRD)) or SP-D(n/CRD) with eight GXY repeats (SPD(GXY)(8)(n/CRD)). Direct binding and competition studies suggest that collectins bind nucleic acid via their CRDs as well as by their collagen-like regions, and that SP-D binds DNA more effectively than do SP-A and mannose-binding lectin at physiological salt conditions. Furthermore, the SP-D(GXY)(8)(n/CRD) fragments co-localize with DNA, and the protein competes the interaction between propidium iodide, a DNA-binding dye, and apoptotic cells. In conclusion, we show that collectins are a new class of proteins that bind free DNA and the DNA present on apoptotic cells by both their globular CRDs and collagen-like regions. Collectins may therefore play an important role in decreasing the inflammation caused by DNA in lungs and other tissues.

  5. DNA Sequence Modulates Geometrical Isomerism of the trans-8,9- Dihydro-8-(2,6-diamino-4-oxo-3,4-dihydropyrimid-5-yl-formamido)- 9-hydroxy Aflatoxin B1 Adduct.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Brown, Kyle L; Ma, Ruidan; Stone, Michael P

    2015-02-16

    Aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)), a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus, is oxidized by cytochrome P450 enzymes to aflatoxin B(1)-8,9-epoxide, which alkylates DNA at N7-dG. Under basic conditions, this N7-dG adduct rearranges to yield the trans-8,9-dihydro-8-(2,6-diamino-4-oxo-3,4-dihydropyrimid-5-yl-formamido)-9-hydroxy aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)−FAPY) adduct. The AFB(1)−FAPY adduct exhibits geometrical isomerism involving the formamide moiety. NMR analyses of duplex oligodeoxynucleotides containing the 5′-XA-3′, 5′-XC-3′, 5′-XT-3′, and 5′-XY-3′ sequences (X = AFB(1)−FAPY; Y = 7-deaza-dG)demonstrate that the equilibrium between E and Z isomers is controlled by major groove hydrogen bonding interactions.Structural analysis of the adduct in the 5′-XA-3′ sequence indicates the preference of the E isomer of the formamide group,attributed to formation of a hydrogen bond between the formyl oxygen and the N(6) exocyclic amino group of the 3′-neighboradenine. While the 5′-XA-3′ sequence exhibits the E isomer, the 5′-XC-3′ sequence exhibits a 7:3 E:Z ratio at equilibrium at 283K. The E isomer is favored by a hydrogen bond between the formyl oxygen and the N(4)-dC exocyclic amino group of the 3′-neighbor cytosine. The 5′-XT-3′ and 5′-XY-3′ sequences cannot form such a hydrogen bond between the formyl oxygen and the 3′-neighbor T or Y, respectively, and in these sequence contexts the Z isomer is favored. Additional equilibria between α and β anomers and the potential to exhibit atropisomers about the C5−N(5) bond do not depend upon sequence. In each of the four DNA sequences, the AFB(1)−FAPY adduct maintains the β deoxyribose configuration. Each of these four sequences feature the atropisomer of the AFB(1) moiety that is intercalated above the 5′-face of the damaged guanine. This enforces the Ra axialc onformation for the C5−N(5) bond.

  6. (+/-)-catechin: chemical weapon, antioxidant, or stress regulator?

    PubMed

    Chobot, Vladimir; Huber, Christoph; Trettenhahn, Guenter; Hadacek, Franz

    2009-08-01

    (+/-)-Catechin is a flavan-3-ol that occurs in the organs of many plant species, especially fruits. Health-beneficial effects have been studied extensively, and notable toxic effects have not been found. In contrast, (+/-)-catechin has been implicated as a 'chemical weapon' that is exuded by the roots of Centaurea stoebe, an invasive knapweed of northern America. Recently, this hypothesis has been rejected based on (+/-)-catechin's low phytotoxicity, instability at pH levels higher than 5, and poor recovery from soil. In the current study, (+/-)-catechin did not inhibit the development of white and black mustard to an extent that was comparable to the highly phytotoxic juglone, a naphthoquinone that is allegedly responsible for the allelopathy of the walnut tree. At high stress levels, caused by sub-lethal methanol concentrations in the medium, and a 12 h photoperiod, (+/-)-catechin even attenuated growth retardation. A similar effect was observed when (+/-)-catechin was assayed for brine shrimp mortality. Higher concentrations reduced the mortality caused by toxic concentrations of methanol. Further, when (+/-)-catechin was tested in variants of the deoxyribose degradation assay, it was an efficient scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) when they were present in higher concentrations. This antioxidant effect was enhanced when iron was chelated directly by (+/-)-catechin. Conversely, if iron was chelated to EDTA, pro-oxidative effects were demonstrated at higher concentrations; in this case (+/-)-catechin reduced molecular oxygen and iron to reagents required by the Fenton reaction to produce hydroxyl radicals. A comparison of cyclic voltammograms of (+/-)-catechin with the phytotoxic naphthoquinone juglone indicated similar redox-cycling properties for both compounds although juglone required lower electrochemical potentials to enter redox reactions. In buffer solutions, (+/-)-catechin remained stable at pH 3.6 (vacuole) and decomposed at pH 7.4 (cytoplasm

  7. Novel LC-ESI/MS/MSn Method for the Characterization and Quantification of 2′-Deoxyguanosine Adducts of the Dietary Carcinogen 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine by 2-D Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Angela K.; Schut, Herman A. J.; Turesky, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    An accurate and sensitive liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/multi-stage mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS/MSn) technique has been developed for the characterization and quantification of 2′-deoxyguanosine (dG) adducts of the dietary mutagen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). PhIP is an animal and potential human carcinogen that occurs in grilled meats. Following enzymatic digestion and adduct enrichment by solid-phase extraction (SPE), PhIP—DNA adducts were analyzed by MS/MS and MSn scan modes on a 2-D linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (QIT/MS). The major DNA adduct, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP), was detected in calf thymus (CT) DNA modified in vitro with a bioactivated form of PhIP and in the colon and liver of rats given PhIP as part of the diet. The lower limit of detection (LOD) was 1 adduct per 108 DNA bases, and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 3 adducts per 108 DNA bases in both MS/MS and MS3 scan modes, using 27 μg of DNA for analysis. Measurements were based on isotope dilution with the internal standard, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-amino-1-(trideutero)methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (dG-C8-[2H3C]-PhIP). The selected reaction monitoring (SRM) scan mode in MS/MS was employed to monitor the loss of deoxyribose (dR) from the protonated molecules of the adducts ([M + H - 116]+). The consecutive reaction monitoring (CRM) scan modes in MS3 and MS4 were used to measure and further characterize product ions of the aglycone ion (BH2+) (Guanyl-PhIP). The MS3 scan mode was effective in eliminating isobaric interferences observed in the MS/MS scan mode and resulted in an improved signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Moreover, the product ion spectra obtained by the MSn scan modes provided rich structural information about the adduct and were used to corroborate the identity of dG-C8-PhIP. In addition, an isomeric dG-PhIP adduct was detected in vivo. This LCESI

  8. Expression of the p12 subunit of human DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ), CDK inhibitor p21(WAF1), Cdt1, cyclin A, PCNA and Ki-67 in relation to DNA replication in individual cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Sufang; Xu, Dazhong; Lee, Marietta Ywt; Zhang, Zhongtao; Lee, Ernest Yc; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that the p12 subunit of human DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ4) is degraded by CRL4(Cdt2) which regulates the licensing factor Cdt1 and p21(WAF1) during the G1 to S transition. Presently, we performed multiparameter laser scanning cytometric analyses of changes in levels of p12, Cdt1 and p21(WAF1), detected immunocytochemically in individual cells, vis-à-vis the initiation and completion of DNA replication. The latter was assessed by pulse-labeling A549 cells with the DNA precursor ethynyl-2'-deoxyribose (EdU). The loss of p12 preceded the initiation of DNA replication and essentially all cells incorporating EdU were p12 negative. Completion of DNA replication and transition to G2 phase coincided with the re-appearance and rapid rise of p12 levels. Similar to p12 a decline of p21(WAF1) and Cdt1 was seen at the end of G1 phase and all DNA replicating cells were p21(WAF1) and Cdt1 negative. The loss of p21(WAF1) preceded that of Cdt1 and p12 and the disappearance of the latter coincided with the onset of DNA replication. Loss of p12 leads to conversion of Pol δ4 to its trimeric form, Pol δ3, so that the results provide strong support to the notion that Pol δ3 is engaged in DNA replication during unperturbed progression through the S phase of cell cycle. Also assessed was a correlation between EdU incorporation, likely reflecting the rate of DNA replication in individual cells, and the level of expression of positive biomarkers of replication cyclin A, PCNA and Ki-67 in these cells. Of interest was the observation of stronger correlation between EdU incorporation and expression of PCNA (r = 0.73) than expression of cyclin A (r = 0.47) or Ki-67 (r = 0.47).

  9. Development of a targeted adductomic method for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon DNA adducts using online column-switching liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajinder; Teichert, Friederike; Seidel, Albrecht; Roach, Jonathan; Cordell, Rebecca; Cheng, Mai-Kim; Frank, Heinrich; Steward, William P; Manson, Margaret M; Farmer, Peter B

    2010-08-30

    Human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sources such as industrial or urban air pollution, tobacco smoke and cooked food is not confined to a single compound, but instead to mixtures of different PAHs. The interaction of different PAHs may lead to additive, synergistic or antagonistic effects in terms of DNA adduct formation and carcinogenic activity resulting from changes in metabolic activation to reactive intermediates and DNA repair. The development of a targeted DNA adductomic approach using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) incorporating software-based peak picking and integration for the assessment of exposure to mixtures of PAHs is described. For method development PAH-modified DNA samples were obtained by reaction of the anti-dihydrodiol epoxide metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P) and dibenz[a,h]anthracene with calf thymus DNA in vitro and enzymatically hydrolysed to 2'-deoxynucleosides. Positive LC/electrospray ionisation (ESI)-MS/MS collision-induced dissociation product ion spectra data showed that the majority of adducts displayed a common fragmentation for the neutral loss of 116 u (2'-deoxyribose) resulting in a major product ion derived from the adducted base. The exception was the DB[a,l]P dihydrodiol epoxide adduct of 2'-deoxyadenosine which resulted in major product ions derived from the PAH moiety being detected. Specific detection of mixtures of PAH-adducted 2'-deoxynucleosides was achieved using online column-switching LC/MS/MS in conjunction with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) of the [M+H](+) to [M+H-116](+) transition plus product ions derived from the PAH moiety for improved sensitivity of detection and a comparison was made to detection by constant neutral loss scanning. In conclusion, different PAH DNA adducts were detected by employing SRM [M+H-116](+) transitions or constant neutral loss scanning. However, for improved sensitivity of

  10. Chemistry and Biology of Aflatoxin-DNA Adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Michael P.; Banerjee, Surajit; Brown, Kyle L.

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal contaminant of stored rice, wheat, corn, and other grainstuffs, and peanuts. This is of concern to human health because it produces the mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}), which is genotoxic and is implicated in the etiology of liver cancer. AFB{sub 1} is oxidized in vivo by cytochrome P450 to form aflatoxin B{sub 1} epoxide, which forms an N7-dG adduct (AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG) in DNA. The latter rearranges to a formamidopyrimidine (AFB{sub 1}-FAPY) derivative that equilibrates between {alpha} and {beta} anomers of the deoxyribose. In DNA, both the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG and AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adducts intercalate abovemore » the 5'-face of the damaged guanine. Each produces G {yields} T transversions in Escherichia coli, but the AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adduct is more mutagenic. The Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA polymerase IV (Dpo4) provides a model for understanding error-prone bypass of the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG and AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adducts. It bypasses the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG adduct, but it conducts error-prone replication past the AFB{sub 1}-FAPY adduct, including mis-insertion of dATP, consistent with the G {yields} T mutations characteristic of AFB{sub 1} mutagenesis in E. coli. Crystallographic analyses of a series of binary and ternary complexes with the Dpo4 polymerase revealed differing orientations of the N7-C8 bond of the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG adduct as compared to the N{sup 5}-C8 bond in the AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adduct, and differential accommodation of the intercalated AFB{sub 1} moieties within the active site. These may modulate AFB{sub 1} lesion bypass by this polymerase.« less

  11. Structural Insights into HIV Reverse Transcriptase Mutations Q151M and Q151M Complex That Confer Multinucleoside Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Kalyan; Martinez, Sergio E.; Arnold, Eddy

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is targeted by multiple drugs. RT mutations that confer resistance to nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) emerge during clinical use. Q151M and four associated mutations, A62V, V75I, F77L, and F116Y, were detected in patients failing therapies with dideoxynucleosides (didanosine [ddI], zalcitabine [ddC]) and/or zidovudine (AZT). The cluster of the five mutations is referred to as the Q151M complex (Q151Mc), and an RT or virus containing Q151Mc exhibits resistance to multiple NRTIs. To understand the structural basis for Q151M and Q151Mc resistance, we systematically determined the crystal structures of the wild-type RT/double-stranded DNA (dsDNA)/dATP (complex I), wild-type RT/dsDNA/ddATPmore » (complex II), Q151M RT/dsDNA/dATP (complex III), Q151Mc RT/dsDNA/dATP (complex IV), and Q151Mc RT/dsDNA/ddATP (complex V) ternary complexes. The structures revealed that the deoxyribose rings of dATP and ddATP have 3'-endo and 3'-exo conformations, respectively. The single mutation Q151M introduces conformational perturbation at the deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP)-binding pocket, and the mutated pocket may exist in multiple conformations. The compensatory set of mutations in Q151Mc, particularly F116Y, restricts the side chain flexibility of M151 and helps restore the DNA polymerization efficiency of the enzyme. The altered dNTP-binding pocket in Q151Mc RT has the Q151-R72 hydrogen bond removed and has a switched conformation for the key conserved residue R72 compared to that in wild-type RT. On the basis of a modeled structure of hepatitis B virus (HBV) polymerase, the residues R72, Y116, M151, and M184 in Q151Mc HIV-1 RT are conserved in wild-type HBV polymerase as residues R41, Y89, M171, and M204, respectively; functionally, both Q151Mc HIV-1 and wild-type HBV are resistant to dideoxynucleoside analogs.« less

  12. Role of DNA repair enzymes in the cellular resistance to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Laval, J

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative stress occurs in cells when the equilibrium between prooxidant and antioxidant species is broken in favor of the prooxidant state. It is due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated either by the cellular metabolism such as phagocytosis, mitochondrial respiration, xenobiotic detoxification, or by exogenous factors such as ionizing radiation or chemical compounds performing red-ox reactions. Some ROS are extremely reactive and interact with all the macromolecules including lipids, nucleic acids and proteins. Cells have numerous defence systems to counteract the deleterious effects of ROS. Proteins and small molecules specifically eliminate ROS when they are formed. There are three species of superoxyde dismutases which transform the superoxyde anion O2- in hydrogen peroxyde H2O2 which in turn will be destroyed by peroxysomal catalase or by various peroxydases. There are numerous small molecules in the cell such as glutathion, alpha-tocopherol, vitamines A and C, melanine, etc. which are antioxydant molecules. ROS escaping destruction generate various lesions in DNA such as base modifications, degradation products of deoxyribose, chain breaks. These various lesions have been characterized and it is possible to quantitate them in the DNA of cells which have been irradiated or treated by free radical generating systems. The biological properties of the bases modified by ROS have been established. For example C8-hydroxyguanine (8-oxoG) is promutagenic since, if present in DNA during replication, it leads to incorporation of dAMP residues, leading to transversion mutation (GC-->TA). Purines whose imidazole ring is opened (Fapy residues) are stops for the DNA polymerase during DNA replication and are therefore potentially lethal lesions for the cell. Oxidized pyrimidines have comparable coding properties. Efficient DNA repair mechanisms remove these oxidized bases. In Escherichia coli cells, endonuclease III (NTH protein) and endonuclease VIII (NEI protein

  13. An improved liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in DNA samples using immunoaffinity column purification.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajinder; McEwan, Michael; Lamb, John H; Santella, Regina M; Farmer, Peter B

    2003-01-01

    The analysis of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) represents an important biomarker of oxidative stress. A sensitive method for the detection of 8-oxodG in DNA samples has been developed that utilizes immunoaffinity column purification of 8-oxodG followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode analysis. An internal standard of stable-isotopically labelled 8-oxodG containing [(15)N(5)] was added prior to the enzymatic digestion of DNA to deoxynucleosides, which was then subjected to immunoaffinity column purification followed by microbore positive ion LC/MS/MS MRM. The 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) base product ion at m/z 168 was monitored following cleavage of the glycosidic bond of the 8-oxodG [M+H](+) ion at m/z 284. Similar determinations were made for [(15)N(5)]8-oxodG by monitoring the [(15)N(5)]8-oxoG base product ion at m/z 173 formed from the [M+H](+) ion at m/z 289. The introduction of the immunoaffinity column purification step into the method represents a significant improvement for the accurate determination of 8-oxodG since all artefactual peaks that are observed following the direct injection of digested DNA onto the LC/MS/MS system are removed. The identity of these artefactual peaks has been confirmed to be 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG), thymidine (dT) and 2'-deoxyadenosine (dA). The presence of these artefactual peaks in MRM mode analysis can be explained as a consequence of a concentration effect due to their considerably higher relative abundance in DNA compared to 8-oxodG. The highest signal intensity was observed for the artefactual peak for dA due to the fact that the adenine base formed an adduct with methanol, which is a constituent of the mobile phase. The resulting [M+H](+) ion at m/z 284 (dA m/z 252 + CH(3)OH m/z 32) gave rise to a product ion at m/z 168 following the loss of deoxyribose in MRM mode analysis. Control calf thymus DNA was digested to

  14. Bypass of Aflatoxin B[subscript 1] Adducts by the Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA Polymerase IV

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Surajit; Brown, Kyle L.; Egli, Martin

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) is oxidized to an epoxide in vivo, which forms an N7-dG DNA adduct (AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG). The AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG can rearrange to a formamidopyrimidine (AFB{sub 1}-FAPY) derivative. Both AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG and the {beta}-anomer of the AFB{sub 1}-FAPY adduct yield G {yields} T transversions in Escherichia coli, but the latter is more mutagenic. We show that the Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA polymerase IV (Dpo4) bypasses AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG in an error-free manner but conducts error-prone replication past the AFB{sub 1}-FAPY adduct, including misinsertion of dATP, consistent with the G {yields} T mutations observed in E. coli. Three ternarymore » (Dpo4-DNA-dNTP) structures with AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG adducted template:primers have been solved. These demonstrate insertion of dCTP opposite the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG adduct, and correct vs incorrect insertion of dATP vs dTTP opposite the 5'-template neighbor dT from a primed AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG:dC pair. The insertion of dTTP reveals hydrogen bonding between the template N3 imino proton and the O{sup 2} oxygen of dTTP, and between the template T O{sup 4} oxygen and the N3 imino proton of dTTP, perhaps explaining why this polymerase does not efficiently catalyze phosphodiester bond formation from this mispair. The AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG maintains the 5'-intercalation of the AFB{sub 1} moiety observed in DNA. The bond between N7-dG and C8 of the AFB{sub 1} moiety remains in plane with the alkylated guanine, creating a 16{sup o} inclination of the AFB{sub 1} moiety with respect to the guanine. A binary (Dpo4-DNA) structure with an AFB{sub 1}-FAPY adducted template:primer also maintains 5'-intercalation of the AFB{sub 1} moiety. The {beta}-deoxyribose anomer is observed. Rotation about the FAPY C5-N{sup 5} bond orients the bond between N{sup 5} and C8 of the AFB{sub 1} moiety out of plane in the 5'-direction, with respect to the FAPY base. The formamide group extends in the 3'-direction. This improves stacking of the AFB

  15. Preferential uptake of ribose by primitive cells might explain why RNA was favored over its analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wei, Chenyu

    Permeation of molecules through membranes is a fundamental process in biological systems, which not only involves mass and signal transfers between the interior of a contemporary cell and its environment, but was also of crucial importance in the origin of life. In the absence of complex protein transporters, nutrients and building blocks of biopolymers must have been able to permeate membranes at sufficient rates to support primordial metabolism and cel-lular reproduction. From this perspective one class of solutes that is of special interest are monosaccharides, which serve not only as nutritional molecules but also as building blocks for information molecules. In particular, ribose is a part of the RNA backbone, but RNA analogs containing a number of other sugars have also been shown to form stable duplexes. Why, among these possibilities, ribose (and, subsequently, deoxyribose) was selected for the backbone of information polymers is still poorly understood. It was recently found that ribose permeates membranes an order of magnitude faster than its diastereomers, arabinose and xylose [1]. On this basis it was hypothesized that differences in membrane permeability to aldopentoses provide a mechanism for preferential delivery of ribose to primitive cells for subsequent, selective incorporation into nucleotides and their polymers. However, the origins of these unusually large differences had not been well understood. We addressed this issue in molecular dynamics simulations combined with free energy calculations. It was found that the free energy barrier for transferring ribose from water to the bilayer is lower by 1.5-2 kcal/mol than the barrier for transferring the other two aldopentoses. The calculated [2] and measured [1] permeability coefficients are in an excellent agreement. The sugar structures that permeate the membrane are -pyranoses, with a possible contribution of the -anomer for arabinose. The furanoid form of ribose is not substantially involved in

  16. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition as a potent diagnostic tool for gene function in plant biology

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Christer; Sun, Chuanxin; Ghebramedhin, Haile

    portion of the gel as well as the lowest band were absent. Based on these data we provide a tentative annotation for the various SBE activity bands. In animal experiments, naked ODNs are usually not taken up by the cells since both the ODNs and the outside of the plasma membrane carry a net negative charge. Thus the uptake of naked ODNs into barley leaf cells was surprising and called for an explanation. As demonstrated in our subsequent paper, the answer seems to be that the ODNs slip into the cells through sugar translocators as they are activated in the presence of the appropriate sugar (Fig. 2). Whether it is the structural resemblance between the sugar (deoxyribose) backbone of the ODNs and the transported sugars that allows for the ODNs to be transferred, or if other mechanisms are involved, remains to be elucidated.« less

  17. Considerations on the mechanism of action of artemisinin antimalarials: part 1--the 'carbon radical' and 'heme' hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Richard K; Cheu, Kwan-Wing; N'Da, David; Coghi, Paolo; Monti, Diego

    2013-08-01

    +) complements the action of artemisinins, to be discussed in Part 2; there is no need to posit a reaction of Fe(2+) with the artemisinins to account for their antimalarial activity. The ability of artemisinins and synthetic peroxides to elicit membrane damage is examined in the light of established processes of autoxidation. The oxidant character of the intraparasitic environment is incompatible with the reducing conditions required for generation of C-radicals, and in contrast to the expectation raised by the C-radical hypothesis, and indeed by the heme hypothesis outlined below, antimalarial activities of artemisinins are enhanced under higher partial pressures of dioxygen. Structure-activity data from a wide variety of artemisinins and synthetic peroxides cannot be accommodated within the bounds of the C-radical hypothesis. Finally, the antimalarial Cradical construct sharply contrasts with that of the potently antitumour-active ene-diyne antibiotics such as neocarzinostatin. In an iron-free process, these compounds generate highly reactive aryl C-radicals that abstract H atoms from deoxyribose units in DNA to generate alkyl C-radicals. The last do react with dioxygen in a normal intracellular environment to initiate DNA strand cleavage. Overall, it must be concluded that the C-radical hypothesis as the basis for antimalarial activities of artemisinins and synthetic peroxides is untenable. Heme has been intensively studied as an 'activator' of artemisinins and other antimalarial peroxides, and indeed the hypothesis seemingly has become firmly embedded in the underlying brickwork of the scientific edifice. The locus of activity of the peroxides interacting with the heme is considered to be the parasite digestive vacuole. The basis for the nanomolar activities of artemisinins and synthetic peroxides is variously ascribed to heme-Fe(2+)-mediated generation of C-radicals from the peroxides, formation of heme-artemisinin adducts that are held either to engage in redox cycling

  18. HWHAP_Ep27_ The Search for Life

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-01-12

    the question right. [00:30:10] >> No, it's -- [00:30:11] >> It would still be DNA, RNA? [00:30:14] >> Yeah. So they're -- you know, so DNA is deoxyribose nucleic acid and RNA is ribonucleic acid. [00:30:20] >> Right, right. [00:30:21] >> And what we leave out of there is a little prefix at the front that has a D. And in the case of amino acids and proteins, we leave out a little symbol in front that's an L. And so it's believed that one of those came first and was fixed. So you either had left-handed proteins or right-handed sugars that came about. And then proteins or -- the other one evolved around it. So you started with a system that had left-handed proteins and that fit really well with right-handed sugars. And that was where evolution took off and that was how you got, you know, sort of left-handed life and right-hand sugars. [00:31:00] >> I see. Okay. [00:31:01] >> But we were talking about synthetic biology and origins of life experiments. So I have left-handed proteins and right-handed sugars in me. And if you give me a drug that's made out of left-handed sugars, my left-handed proteins don't recognize those sugars anymore. And so those molecules can stick around a lot of longer in my body because my natural mechanisms for processing, you know, DNA from food I eat or, you know, bacteria that are floating around everywhere, they don't work on those molecules. [00:31:31] >> Hmm. So what's an example of a left-handed sugar that would just sort of stick around? [00:31:38] >> So you could actually make just left-handed DNA. [00:31:41] >> Oh. [00:31:41] >> And left-handed RNA. [00:31:43] >> How do you make it [Laughs]? [00:31:45] >> So that's a synthetic organic chemistry that ends up being fairly difficult. But what's interesting about this is so people have gone in the lab and taken a naturally-occurring left-handed protein and they've synthesized a right-handed version of it. [00:32:01] >> Yeah. [00:32:02] >> And they've found that it works just fine. You know