Science.gov

Sample records for dependent deuterium fractionation

  1. Deuterium fractionation in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punanova, A.; Caselli, P.; Pon, A.; Belloche, A.; André, Ph.

    2016-03-01

    Context. In cold (T< 25 K) and dense (nH> 104 cm-3) interstellar clouds, molecules such as CO are significantly frozen onto dust grain surfaces. Deuterium fractionation is known to be very efficient in these conditions as CO limits the abundance of H3+, which is the starting point of deuterium chemistry. In particular, N2D+ is an excellent tracer of dense and cold gas in star-forming regions. Aims: We measure the deuterium fraction, RD, and the CO depletion factor, fd, towards a number of starless and protostellar cores in the L1688 region of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud complex and search for variations based upon environmental differences across L1688. The kinematic properties of the dense gas traced by the N2H+ and N2D+ (1-0) lines are also discussed. Methods: Deuterium fraction has been measured via observations of the J = 1-0 transition of N2H+ and N2D+ towards 33 dense cores in different regions of L1688. We estimated the CO depletion factor using C17O(1-0) and 850 μm dust continuum emission from the SCUBA survey. We carried out all line observations with the IRAM 30 m antenna. Results: The dense cores show large (≃2-40%) deuterium fractions with significant variations between the sub-regions of L1688. The CO depletion factor also varies from one region to another (between ≃1 and 7). Two different correlations are found between deuterium fraction and CO depletion factor: cores in regions A, B2, and I show increasing RD with increasing fd, similar to previous studies of deuterium fraction in pre-stellar cores; cores in regions B1, B1B2, C, E, F, and H show a steeper RD - fd correlation with large deuterium fractions occurring in fairly quiescent gas with relatively low CO freeze-out factors. These are probably recently formed, centrally concentrated starless cores, which have not yet started the contraction phase towards protostellar formation. We also find that the deuterium fraction is affected by the amount of turbulence, dust temperature, and

  2. ISOTOPIC ANOMALIES IN PRIMITIVE SOLAR SYSTEM MATTER: SPIN-STATE-DEPENDENT FRACTIONATION OF NITROGEN AND DEUTERIUM IN INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Wirstroem, Eva S.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Milam, Stefanie N.

    2012-09-20

    Organic material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles is enriched in D and {sup 15}N. This is consistent with the idea that the functional groups carrying these isotopic anomalies, nitriles and amines, were formed by ion-molecule chemistry in the protosolar nebula. Theoretical models of interstellar fractionation at low temperatures predict large enrichments in both D and {sup 15}N and can account for the largest isotopic enrichments measured in carbonaceous meteorites. However, more recent measurements have shown that, in some primitive samples, a large {sup 15}N enrichment does not correlate with one in D, and that some D-enriched primitive material displays little, if any, {sup 15}N enrichment. By considering the spin-state dependence in ion-molecule reactions involving the ortho and para forms of H{sub 2}, we show that ammonia and related molecules can exhibit such a wide range of fractionation for both {sup 15}N and D in dense cloud cores. We also show that while the nitriles, HCN and HNC, contain the greatest {sup 15}N enrichment, this is not expected to correlate with extreme D enrichment. These calculations therefore support the view that solar system {sup 15}N and D isotopic anomalies have an interstellar heritage. We also compare our results to existing astronomical observations and briefly discuss future tests of this model.

  3. Isotopic Anomalies in Primitive Solar System Matter: Spin-State Dependent Fractionation of Nitrogen and Deuterium in Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milan, Stefanie N.

    2012-01-01

    Organic material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles is enriched in D and N-15, This is consistent with the idea that the functional groups carrying these isotopic anomalies, nitriles and amines, were formed by ion-molecule chemistry in the protosolar core. Theoretical models of interstellar fractionation at low temperatures predict large enrichments in both D and N-15 and can account for the largest isotop c enrichments measured in carbonaceous meteorites, However, more recent measurements have shown that, in some primitive samples, a large N-15 enrichment does not correlate with one in D, and that some D-enriched primitive material displays little, if any, N-15 enrichment. By considering the spin-state dependence in ion-molecule reactions involving the ortho and para forms of H2, we show that ammonia and related molecules can exhibit such a wide range of fractionation for both N-15 and D in dense cloud cores, We also show that while the nitriles, HCN and HNC, contain the greatest N-15 enrichment, this is not expected to correlate with extreme D emichment. These calculations therefore support the view that Solar System N-15 and D isotopic anomalies have an interstellar heritage, We also compare our results to existing astronomical observations and briefly discuss future tests of this model.

  4. Isotopic Anomalies in Primitive Solar System Matter: Spin-State-Dependent Fractionation of Nitrogen and Deuterium in Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.

    2012-01-01

    Organic material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles is enriched in D and N-15. This is consistent with the idea that the functional groups carrying these isotopic anomalies, nitriles and amines, were formed by ion-molecule chemistry in the protosolar nebula, Theoretical models of interstellar fractionation at low temperatures predict large enrichments in both D and N-15 and can account for the largest isotopic enrichments measured in carbonaceous meteorites. However, more recent measurements have shown that, in some primitive samples, a large N-15 enrichment does not correlate with one in D, and that some D-enriched primitive material displays little, if any, N-15 enrichment. By considering the spin-state dependence in ion-molecule reactions involving the ortho and para forms of H2, we show that ammonia and related molecules can exhibit such a wide range of fractionation for both N-15 and D in dense cloud cores. We also show that while the nitriles, HCN and HNC, contain the greatest N=15 enrichment, this is not expected to correlate with extreme D enrichment. These calculations therefore support the view that solar system N-15 and D isotopic anomalies have an interstellar heritage. We also compare our results to existing astronomical observations and briefly discuss future tests of this model.

  5. Calculations of ion-molecule deuterium fractionation reactions involving HD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluendes, Sergio A.; Mclean, A. D.; Herbst, Eric

    1992-01-01

    Gas-phase chemical models of deuterium fractionation in dense interstellar clouds utilize a small number of exothermic reactions to achieve fractionation. Although HD is a major repository of deuterium, it appears not to exchange deuterium with many molecular ions. Useful semiquantitative reasons have been given for the unusual lack of reactivity of exothermic ion-HD deuterium exchange systems, but quantum chemical studies are needed to understand these ideas in more detail and to determine if the lack of reactivity pertains at very low temperatures not studied in the laboratory, or whether tunneling can drive the reactions. Accordingly, the potential energy surfaces of three representative ion-molecule exchange reactions involving protonated ions and HD have been investigated with ab initio quantum chemical techniques. Our results generally confirm the semiquantitative picture as to which reactions are likely to occur and show that tunneling at low temperatures is unlikely to alter this picture.

  6. Calculations of ion-molecule deuterium fractionation reactions involving HD.

    PubMed

    Maluendes, S A; McLean, A D; Herbst, E

    1992-10-01

    Gas-phase chemical models of deuterium fractionation in dense interstellar clouds utilize a small number of exothermic reactions to achieve fractionation. Although HD is a major repository of deuterium, it appears not to exchange deuterium with many molecular ions. Useful semiquantitative reasons have been given for the unusual lack of reactivity of exothermic ion-HD deuterium exchange systems, but quantum chemical studies are needed to understand these ideas in more detail and to determine if the lack of reactivity pertains at very low temperatures not studied in the laboratory, or whether tunneling can drive the reactions. Accordingly, the potential energy surfaces of three representative ion-molecule exchange reactions involving protonated ions (H3+, CH3+, HCO+) and HD have been investigated with ab initio quantum chemical techniques. Our results generally confirm the semiquantitative picture as to which reactions are likely to occur and show that tunneling at low temperatures is unlikely to alter this picture.

  7. Fluence dependence of deuterium retention in oxidized SS-316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Suzuki, Sachiko; Matsuyama, Masao; Hayashi, Takumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Asakura, Yamato; Okuno, Kenji

    2011-10-01

    The ion fluence dependence of deuterium retention in SS-316 during oxidation at a temperature of 673 K was studied to evaluate the dynamics of deuterium retention in the oxide layer of SS-316. The correlation between the chemical state of stainless steel and deuterium retention was evaluated using XPS and TDS. It was found that the major deuterium desorption temperatures were located at around 660 K and 935 K, which correspond to the desorption of deuterium trapped as hydroxide. The deuterium retention increased with increasing deuterium ion fluence, since the deuterium retention as hydroxide increased significantly. However, retention saturated at an ion fluence of ˜2.5 × 10 21 D + m -2. The XPS result showed that FeOOD was formed on the surface, although pure Fe also remained in the oxide layer. These facts indicate the nature of the oxide layer have a key role in deuterium trapping behavior.

  8. Deuterium Fractionation and Ion-Molecule Reactions at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar; Hugo, Edouard; Gerlich, Dieter

    2005-08-01

    Understanding deuterium fractionation is currently one of the greatest challenges in astrochemistry. In this contribution deuteration experiments of the series CH_n^+, n=2-5, in a low temperature 22-pole ion trap are used to systematically test a simple chemical rule predicting which molecular ion undergoes deuterium exchange in collisions with HD. CH_4^+ turns out to be a problem case, where prediction fails. The method of laser induced reaction (LIR) is used to determine the population ratio of the lowest ortho-to-para states of H_2D^+ relaxed in collisions with H_2. Preliminary results indicate that the ortho-to-para ratio of H_2D^+ is substantially reduced in para-H_2. This points at the important role of nuclear spin in deuterium fractionation, in particular at the destruction of ortho-H_2D^+ in collisions with ortho-H_2. More systematic LIR experiments are needed for a chemical model of deuterium fractionation including state-to-state modifications of the species involved.

  9. The Deuterium Fraction in Massive Starless Cores and Dynamical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shuo; Tan, Jonathan C.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco; Pillai, Thushara; Butler, Michael J.; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Sakai, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    We study deuterium fractionation in two massive starless/early-stage cores, C1-N and C1-S, in Infrared Dark Cloud G028.37+00.07, which was first identified by Tan et al. with ALMA. Line emission from multiple transitions of N2H+ and N2D+ were observed with the ALMA, CARMA, SMA, JCMT, NRO 45 m, and IRAM 30 m telescopes. By simultaneously fitting the spectra, we estimate the excitation conditions and deuterium fraction, {D}{frac}{{{N}}2{{{H}}}+} \\equiv \\quad [{{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+]/[{{{N}}}2{{{H}}}+], with values of {D}{frac}{{{N}}2{{{H}}}+} ≃ 0.2-0.7, several orders of magnitude above the cosmic [D]/[H] ratio. Additional observations of o-H2D+ are also presented that help constrain the ortho-to-para ratio of H2, which is a key quantity affecting the degree of deuteration. We then present chemodynamical modeling of the two cores, especially exploring the implications for the collapse rate relative to free-fall, αff. In order to reach the high level of observed deuteration of {{{N}}}2{{{H}}}+, we find that the most likely evolutionary history of the cores involves collapse at a relatively slow rate, ≲ one-tenth of free-fall.

  10. The Deuterium Fractionation Timescale in Dense Cloud Cores: A Parameter Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shuo; Caselli, Paola; Tan, Jonathan C.; Wakelam, Valentine; Sipilä, Olli

    2015-05-01

    The deuterium fraction, [N2D+]/[N2H+], may provide information about the ages of dense, cold gas structures, which are important for comparing dynamical models of cloud core formation and evolution. Here we introduce a complete chemical network with species containing up to three atoms, with the exception of the oxygen chemistry, where reactions involving H3O+ and its deuterated forms have been added, significantly improving the consistency with comprehensive chemical networks. Deuterium chemistry and spin states of H2 and H3+ isotopologues are included in this primarily gas-phase chemical model. We investigate the dependence of deuterium chemistry on these model parameters: density ({{n}H}), temperature, cosmic ray ionization rate, and gas-phase depletion factor of heavy elements ({{f}D}). We also explore the effects of time-dependent freeze-out of gas-phase species and the dynamical evolution of density at various rates relative to free-fall collapse. For a broad range of model parameters, the timescales to reach large values of Dfrac{{N2}{{H}+}}≳ 0.1, observed in some low- and high-mass starless cores, are relatively long compared to the local free-fall timescale. These conclusions are unaffected by introducing time-dependent freeze-out and considering models with evolving density, unless the initial {{f}D} ≳ 10. For fiducial model parameters, achieving Dfrac{{N2}{{H}+}}≳ 0.1 requires collapse to be proceeding at rates at least several times slower than that of free-fall collapse, perhaps indicating a dynamically important role for magnetic fields in supporting starless cores and thus the regulation of star formation.

  11. An Analysis of the Deuterium Fractionation of Star-forming Cores in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, R. K.; Kirk, H. M.; Shirley, Y. L.

    2013-03-01

    We have performed a pointed survey of N2D+ 2-1 and N2D+ 3-2 emission toward 64 N2H+-bright starless and protostellar cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the Arizona Radio Observatory Submillimeter Telescope and Kitt Peak 12 m telescope. We find a mean deuterium fractionation in N2H+, RD = N(N2D+)/N(N2H+), of 0.08, with a maximum RD = 0.2. In detected sources, we find no significant difference in the deuterium fractionation between starless and protostellar cores, nor between cores in clustered or isolated environments. We compare the deuterium fraction in N2H+ with parameters linked to advanced core evolution. We only find significant correlations between the deuterium fraction and increased H2 column density, as well as with increased central core density, for all cores. Toward protostellar sources, we additionally find a significant anticorrelation between RD and bolometric temperature. We show that the Perseus cores are characterized by low CO depletion values relative to previous studies of star-forming cores, similar to recent results in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud. We suggest that the low average CO depletion is the dominant mechanism that constrains the average deuterium fractionation in the Perseus cores to small values. While current equilibrium and dynamic chemical models are able to reproduce the range of deuterium fractionation values we find in Perseus, reproducing the scatter across the cores requires variation in parameters such as the ionization fraction or the ortho-to-para-H2 ratio across the cloud, or a range in core evolution timescales.

  12. Deuterium Fractionation in Analogs of Interstellar Ices: Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A question of key interest in the field of Astrobiology is the extent to which organic compounds made in space may play a role in the origin of life in planetary systems. In general, the best proof that at least some interstellar materials survive incorporation into forming stellar/planetary systems is their identification in extraterrestrial samples through detection of the isotopic anomalies they may carry. In the case of organic compounds, the chief isotopic anomalies that might be expected are the enrichment of D and 15N. and such enrichments are seen in primitive extraterrestrial materials, for example, in the organics in carbonaceous chondrites and interplanetary dust particles. In my talk I will review the various astrochemical processes by which deuterium can become enriched in organic compounds and will discuss some recent laboratory experiments that examine one of these processes in particular. name]y the UV photolysis of interstellar ices. Finally, I will review the current state of our knowledge of D enrichments in primitive solar system materials and discuss the constraints these data place on the relative importance of the various possible interstellar D enrichment processes.

  13. Fractionation of hydrogen and deuterium on Venus due to collisional ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurwell, Mark A.; Yung, Yuk L.

    1993-01-01

    The collisional ejection process for hydrogen on Venus is reanalyzed. Improved values for the efficiency of H and D escape as a function of the ionospheric temperature are reported. It is proposed that the reduction of the hydrogen flux for collisional ejection be reduced from 8 to 3.5 x 10 exp 6/sq cm/s, and a revised D/H fractional factor of 0.47 due to collisional ejection is suggested. The resulting deuterium flux is 3.1 x 10 exp 4/sq cm/s, roughly six times the flux due to charge exchange, making collisional ejection the dominant escape mechanism for deuterium on Venus.

  14. Deuterium Fractionation and Ionization Degree in Massive Protostellar/cluster Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huei-Ru; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Su, Yu-Nung

    2013-03-01

    We have conducted a survey of deuterium fractionation of N2H+, RD (N2H+) ≡ N(N2D+)/N(N2H+), with the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) to assess the use of RD (N2H+) as an evolutionary tracer among massive protostellar/cluster cores in early stages. Our sample includes 32 dense cores in various evolutionary stages, from high-mass starless cores (HMSCs), high-mass protostellar objects (HMPOs), to ultra-compact (UC) HII regions, in infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) and high infrared extinction clouds. The results show a decreasing trend in deuterium fractionation with evolutionary stage traced by gas temperature and line width (Fig. 1). A moderate increasing trend of deuterium fractionation with the CO depletion factor is also found among cores in IRDCs and HMSCs. These suggest a general chemical behavior of deuterated species in low- and high-mass protostellar candidates. Upper limits to the ionization degree are also estimated to be in the range of 4 × 10-8 - 5 × 10-6.

  15. Effect of different tritium fractions on some plasma parameters in deuterium-tritium magnetic confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, S. M.; Mohsenpour, T.; Dashtban, N.

    2016-09-01

    Nearly all reactor projects have considered deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion. The cross section of D-T reaction is larger than those of other fusion reactions, thus it is considered to be a more favorable reaction. The mix of fuel can vary. In this work, a comparison between the effects of different mixture of D-T fuel on the plasma parameters is made. A time dependence calculation of the fusion process is performed using the zero-dimensional model based on a coupled set of particle and energy balance equations in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The time evolution of plasma parameters is also analyzed numerically.

  16. Deuterium Fractionation: The Ariadne's Thread from the Precollapse Phase to Meteorites and Comets Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccarelli, C.; Caselli, P.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Mousis, O.; Pizzarello, S.; Robert, F.; Semenov, D.

    The solar system formed about 4.6 billion years (b.y.) ago from condensation of matter inside a molecular cloud. Trying to reconstruct what happened is the goal of this chapter. For that, we combine our understanding of Galactic objects that will eventually form new suns and planetary systems with our knowledge on comets, meteorites, and small bodies of the solar system today. The specific tool we are using is molecular deuteration, namely the amount of deuterium with respect to hydrogen in molecules. This is the Ariadne’s thread that helps us to find the way out from a labyrinth of possible histories of our solar system. The chapter reviews the observations and theories of the deuterium fractionation in prestellar cores, protostars, protoplanetary disks (PPDs), comets, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), and meteorites and links them together to build up a coherent picture of the history of the solar system formation. We emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of this chapter, which gathers together researchers from different communities with the common goal of understanding solar system history.

  17. Origin of Terrestrial Water: Hydrogen/Deuterium Fractionation into Earth's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen isotopic compositions are among the most important constraints on the origin of Earth's water. Earth's bulk water content, which is small but not negligible, is significantly greater than what the thermal gradient of the solar nebula disk would suggest for planetesimal materials condensed at one astronomical unit. The proto-solar nebula is a likely source of early Earth's water, with probable contributions from one or more of the following: water-rich planetesimals, ordinary and carbonaceous meteorites, comets, asteroids, and interplanetary dust particles. However, all of these sources have been questioned, and the proposed proto-solar nebular origin has been disputed in light of the large difference in hydrogen isotopic composition between it and terrestrial water. Current opposition to the solar nebular hypothesis is based on the critical assumption that no processes in the interior of the early Earth changed the isotopic composition of hydrogen. Nevertheless, a hypothesized hydrogenation reaction of liquid iron (2Fe + xH2 ↔ 2FeHx) during core formation likely provided a fractionation mechanism between hydrogen and deuterium (D). We propose that modern D/H ratios at Earth's surface resulted from this isotopic fractionation and that terrestrial water originated from oxidation of proto-solar hydrogen dissolved in the magma ocean in the early Earth by coexisting oxides (such as FeO). Thus, the isotopic composition of water on Earth can be mainly explained by internal terrestrial processes.

  18. Deuterium Fractionation during Amino Acid Formation by Photolysis of Interstellar Ice Analogs Containing Deuterated Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Takano, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Deuterium (D) atoms in interstellar deuterated methanol might be distributed into complex organic molecules through molecular evolution by photochemical reactions in interstellar grains. In this study, we use a state-of-the-art high-resolution mass spectrometer coupled with a high-performance liquid chromatography system to quantitatively analyze amino acids and their deuterated isotopologues formed by the photolysis of interstellar ice analogs containing singly deuterated methanol CH2DOH at 10 K. Five amino acids (glycine, α-alanine, β-alanine, sarcosine, and serine) and their deuterated isotopologues whose D atoms are bound to carbon atoms are detected in organic residues formed by photolysis followed by warming up to room temperature. The abundances of singly deuterated amino acids are in the range of 0.3–1.1 relative to each nondeuterated counterpart, and the relative abundances of doubly and triply deuterated species decrease with an increasing number of D atoms in a molecule. The abundances of amino acids increase by a factor of more than five upon the hydrolysis of the organic residues, leading to decreases in the relative abundances of deuterated species for α-alanine and β-alanine. On the other hand, the relative abundances of the deuterated isotopologues of the other three amino acids did not decrease upon hydrolysis, indicating different formation mechanisms of these two groups upon hydrolysis. The present study facilitates both qualitative and quantitative evaluations of D fractionation during molecular evolution in the interstellar medium.

  19. Deuterium Fractionation during Amino Acid Formation by Photolysis of Interstellar Ice Analogs Containing Deuterated Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Takano, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Deuterium (D) atoms in interstellar deuterated methanol might be distributed into complex organic molecules through molecular evolution by photochemical reactions in interstellar grains. In this study, we use a state-of-the-art high-resolution mass spectrometer coupled with a high-performance liquid chromatography system to quantitatively analyze amino acids and their deuterated isotopologues formed by the photolysis of interstellar ice analogs containing singly deuterated methanol CH2DOH at 10 K. Five amino acids (glycine, α-alanine, β-alanine, sarcosine, and serine) and their deuterated isotopologues whose D atoms are bound to carbon atoms are detected in organic residues formed by photolysis followed by warming up to room temperature. The abundances of singly deuterated amino acids are in the range of 0.3-1.1 relative to each nondeuterated counterpart, and the relative abundances of doubly and triply deuterated species decrease with an increasing number of D atoms in a molecule. The abundances of amino acids increase by a factor of more than five upon the hydrolysis of the organic residues, leading to decreases in the relative abundances of deuterated species for α-alanine and β-alanine. On the other hand, the relative abundances of the deuterated isotopologues of the other three amino acids did not decrease upon hydrolysis, indicating different formation mechanisms of these two groups upon hydrolysis. The present study facilitates both qualitative and quantitative evaluations of D fractionation during molecular evolution in the interstellar medium.

  20. Water deuterium fractionation in the low-mass protostar NGC1333-IRAS2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.-C.; Parise, B.; Kristensen, L.; Visser, R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Güsten, R.

    2011-03-01

    Context. Although deuterium enrichment of water may provide an essential piece of information in the understanding of the formation of comets and protoplanetary systems, only a few studies up to now have aimed at deriving the HDO/H2O ratio in low-mass star forming regions. Previous studies of the molecular deuteration toward the solar-type class 0 protostar, IRAS 16293-2422, have shown that the D/H ratio of water is significantly lower than other grain-surface-formed molecules. It is not clear if this property is general or particular to this source. Aims: In order to see if the results toward IRAS 16293-2422 are particular, we aimed at studying water deuterium fractionation in a second low-mass solar-type protostar, NGC1333-IRAS2A. Methods: Using the 1-D radiative transfer code RATRAN, we analyzed five HDO transitions observed with the IRAM 30 m, JCMT, and APEX telescopes. We assumed that the abundance profile of HDO in the envelope is a step function, with two different values in the inner warm (T > 100 K) and outer cold (T < 100 K) regions of the protostellar envelope. Results: The inner and outer abundance of HDO is found to be well constrained at the 3σ level. The obtained HDO inner and outer fractional abundances are xHDO_in = 6.6 × 10-8-1.0 × 10-7(3σ) and x^{HDO}out=9×10-11= 9 × 10-11-1.0-1.8 × 10-9(3σ). These values are close to those in IRAS 16293-2422, which suggests that HDO may be formed by the same mechanisms in these two solar-type protostars. Taking into account the (rather poorly onstrained) H2O abundance profile deduced from Herschel observations, the derived HDO/H2O in the inner envelope is ≥1% and in the outer envelope it is 0.9%-18%. These values are more than one order of magnitude higher than what is measured in comets. If the same ratios apply to the protosolar nebula, this would imply that there is some efficient reprocessing of the material between the protostellar and cometary phases. Conclusions: The H2O inner fractional

  1. The Initial Conditions of Clustered Star Formation. III. The Deuterium Fractionation of the Ophiuchus B2 Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, R. K.; Di Francesco, J.; Myers, P. C.; Belloche, A.; Shirley, Y. L.; Bourke, T. L.; André, P.

    2010-08-01

    We present N2D+ 3-2 (IRAM), and H2D+ 111-110 and N2H+ 4-3 (JCMT) maps of the small cluster-forming Ophiuchus B2 core in the nearby Ophiuchus molecular cloud. In conjunction with previously published N2H+ 1-0 observations, the N2D+ data reveal the deuterium fractionation in the high-density gas across Oph B2. The average deuterium fractionation RD = N(N2D+)/N(N2H+) ~ 0.03 over Oph B2, with several small scale RD peaks and a maximum RD = 0.1. The mean RD is consistent with previous results in isolated starless and protostellar cores. The column density distributions of both H2D+ and N2D+ show no correlation with total H2 column density. We find, however, an anticorrelation in deuterium fractionation with proximity to the embedded protostars in Oph B2 to distances gsim0.04 pc. Destruction mechanisms for deuterated molecules require gas temperatures greater than those previously determined through NH3 observations of Oph B2 to proceed. We present temperatures calculated for the dense core gas through the equating of non-thermal line widths for molecules (i.e., N2D+ and H2D+) expected to trace the same core regions, but the observed complex line structures in B2 preclude finding a reasonable result in many locations. This method may, however, work well in isolated cores with less complicated velocity structures. Finally, we use RD and the H2D+ column density across Oph B2 to set a lower limit on the ionization fraction across the core, finding a mean x e,lim >~ few × 10-8. Our results show that care must be taken when using deuterated species as a probe of the physical conditions of dense gas in star-forming regions.

  2. Platform Dependencies in Bottom-up Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Kyle M.; Rey, Martial; Baker, Charles A. H.; Schriemer, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry is an important method for protein structure-function analysis. The bottom-up approach uses protein digestion to localize deuteration to higher resolution, and the essential measurement involves centroid mass determinations on a very large set of peptides. In the course of evaluating systems for various projects, we established two (HDX-MS) platforms that consisted of a FT-MS and a high-resolution QTOF mass spectrometer, each with matched front-end fluidic systems. Digests of proteins spanning a 20–110 kDa range were deuterated to equilibrium, and figures-of-merit for a typical bottom-up (HDX-MS) experiment were compared for each platform. The Orbitrap Velos identified 64% more peptides than the 5600 QTOF, with a 42% overlap between the two systems, independent of protein size. Precision in deuterium measurements using the Orbitrap marginally exceeded that of the QTOF, depending on the Orbitrap resolution setting. However, the unique nature of FT-MS data generates situations where deuteration measurements can be inaccurate, because of destructive interference arising from mismatches in elemental mass defects. This is shown through the analysis of the peptides common to both platforms, where deuteration values can be as low as 35% of the expected values, depending on FT-MS resolution, peptide length and charge state. These findings are supported by simulations of Orbitrap transients, and highlight that caution should be exercised in deriving centroid mass values from FT transients that do not support baseline separation of the full isotopic composition. PMID:23197788

  3. Warm water deuterium fractionation in IRAS 16293-2422. The high-resolution ALMA and SMA view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, M. V.; Jørgensen, J. K.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Measuring the water deuterium fractionation in the inner warm regions of low-mass protostars has so far been hampered by poor angular resolution obtainable with single-dish ground- and space-based telescopes. Observations of water isotopologues using (sub)millimeter wavelength interferometers have the potential to shed light on this matter. Aims: To measure the water deuterium fractionation in the warm gas of the deeply-embedded protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422. Methods: Observations toward IRAS 16293-2422 of the 53,2 - 44,1 transition of H218O at 692.07914 GHz from Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) as well as the 31,3 - 22,0 of H218O at 203.40752 GHz and the 31,2 - 22,1 transition of HDO at 225.89672 GHz from the Submillimeter Array (SMA) are presented. Results: The 692 GHz H218O line is seen toward both components of the binary protostar. Toward one of the components, "source B", the line is seen in absorption toward the continuum, slightly red-shifted from the systemic velocity, whereas emission is seen off-source at the systemic velocity. Toward the other component, "source A", the two HDO and H218O lines are detected as well with the SMA. From the H218O transitions the excitation temperature is estimated at 124 ± 12 K. The calculated HDO/H2O ratio is (9.2 ± 2.6) × 10-4 - significantly lower than previous estimates in the warm gas close to the source. It is also lower by a factor of ~5 than the ratio deduced in the outer envelope. Conclusions: Our observations reveal the physical and chemical structure of water vapor close to the protostars on solar-system scales. The red-shifted absorption detected toward source B is indicative of infall. The excitation temperature is consistent with the picture of water ice evaporation close to the protostar. The low HDO/H2O ratio deduced here suggests that the differences between the inner regions of the protostars and the Earth's oceans and comets are smaller than previously thought

  4. Deuterium excess in the Rayleigh model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dütsch, Marina; Pfahl, Stephan; Sodemann, Harald

    2016-04-01

    The deuterium excess is a useful quantity for measuring nonequilibrium effects of isotopic fractionation, and can therefore provide information about the meteorological conditions in evaporation regions (e.g., relative humidity over the ocean or the fraction of plant transpiration over land). In addition to nonequilibrium fractionation, there are two other effects that can change the deuterium excess during phase transitions. The first is the dependence of the equilibrium fractionation factors on temperature, the second is the nonlinearity of the delta scale, on which the deuterium excess is defined. We tested the impact of these three effects (nonequilibrium, temperature and delta scale) in a simple Rayleigh condensation model simulating the isotopic composition of an air parcel during a moist adiabatic ascent. The delta scale effect is important especially for depleted air parcels where it can change the sign of the deuterium excess in the remaining vapour from negative to positive. In this case the deuterium excess to a large extent reflects an artefact of its own definition, which overwrites both the nonequilibrium and the temperature effect. This problem can be solved by an alternative definition for the deuterium excess that is not based on the delta scale.

  5. First-principles study of temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients: Hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium in α-Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yong; Zhang, Ping

    2013-05-01

    We report the prediction of temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients of interstitial hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium atoms in α-Ti using transition state theory. The microscopic parameters in the pre-factor and activation energy of the impurity diffusion coefficients are obtained from first-principles total energy and phonon calculations including the full coupling between the vibrational modes of the diffusing atom with the host lattice. The dual occupancy case of impurity atom in the hcp matrix is considered, and four diffusion paths are combined to obtain the final diffusion coefficients. The calculated diffusion parameters show good agreement with experiments. Our numerical results indicate that the diffusions of deuterium and tritium atoms are slower than that of the hydrogen atom at temperatures above 425 K and 390 K, respectively.

  6. Cometary deuterium.

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Owen, T C

    1999-01-01

    Deuterium fractionations in cometary ices provide important clues to the origin and evolution of comets. Mass spectrometers aboard spaceprobe Giotto revealed the first accurate D/H ratios in the water of Comet 1P/Halley. Ground-based observations of HDO in Comets C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake) and C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), the detection of DCN in Comet Hale-Bopp, and upper limits for several other D-bearing molecules complement our limited sample of D/H measurements. On the basis of this data set all Oort cloud comets seem to exhibit a similar (D/H)H2O ratio in H2O, enriched by about a factor of two relative to terrestrial water and approximately one order of magnitude relative to the protosolar value. Oort cloud comets, and by inference also classical short-period comets derived from the Kuiper Belt cannot be the only source for the Earth's oceans. The cometary O/C ratio and dynamical reasons make it difficult to defend an early influx of icy planetesimals from the Jupiter zone to the early Earth. D/H measurements of OH groups in phyllosilicate rich meteorites suggest a mixture of cometary water and water adsorbed from the nebula by the rocky grains that formed the bulk of the Earth may be responsible for the terrestrial D/H. The D/H ratio in cometary HCN is 7 times higher than the value in cometary H2O. Species-dependent D-fractionations occur at low temperatures and low gas densities via ion-molecule or grain-surface reactions and cannot be explained by a pure solar nebula chemistry. It is plausible that cometary volatiles preserved the interstellar D fractionation. The observed D abundances set a lower limit to the formation temperature of (30 +/- 10) K. Similar numbers can he derived from the ortho-to-para ratio in cometary water, from the absence of neon in cometary ices and the presence of S2. Noble gases on Earth and Mars, and the relative abundance of cometary hydrocarbons place the comet formation temperature near 50 K. So far all cometary D/H measurements refer to

  7. Cometary deuterium.

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Owen, T C

    1999-01-01

    Deuterium fractionations in cometary ices provide important clues to the origin and evolution of comets. Mass spectrometers aboard spaceprobe Giotto revealed the first accurate D/H ratios in the water of Comet 1P/Halley. Ground-based observations of HDO in Comets C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake) and C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), the detection of DCN in Comet Hale-Bopp, and upper limits for several other D-bearing molecules complement our limited sample of D/H measurements. On the basis of this data set all Oort cloud comets seem to exhibit a similar (D/H)H2O ratio in H2O, enriched by about a factor of two relative to terrestrial water and approximately one order of magnitude relative to the protosolar value. Oort cloud comets, and by inference also classical short-period comets derived from the Kuiper Belt cannot be the only source for the Earth's oceans. The cometary O/C ratio and dynamical reasons make it difficult to defend an early influx of icy planetesimals from the Jupiter zone to the early Earth. D/H measurements of OH groups in phyllosilicate rich meteorites suggest a mixture of cometary water and water adsorbed from the nebula by the rocky grains that formed the bulk of the Earth may be responsible for the terrestrial D/H. The D/H ratio in cometary HCN is 7 times higher than the value in cometary H2O. Species-dependent D-fractionations occur at low temperatures and low gas densities via ion-molecule or grain-surface reactions and cannot be explained by a pure solar nebula chemistry. It is plausible that cometary volatiles preserved the interstellar D fractionation. The observed D abundances set a lower limit to the formation temperature of (30 +/- 10) K. Similar numbers can he derived from the ortho-to-para ratio in cometary water, from the absence of neon in cometary ices and the presence of S2. Noble gases on Earth and Mars, and the relative abundance of cometary hydrocarbons place the comet formation temperature near 50 K. So far all cometary D/H measurements refer to

  8. Dependence of stability of metastable superconductors on copper fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elrod, S. A.; Lue, J. W.; Miller, J. R.; Dresner, L.

    1980-12-01

    The stability of composite superconductors operating in the metastable regime depends upon such factors as matrix resistivity, cooled surface dimensions, fraction of critical current, and volume fraction of stabilizer. By assuming constant thermophysical properties, we developed analytic expressions for the energy and voltage of the minimum propagating zone (MPZ). With other factors held constant, these expressions have been used to predict composite superconductor stability as a function of copper fraction: lower copper fractions lead to higher MPZ energies. MPZ voltages have been measured for three NbTi/Cu composites having different copper fractions and different critical current densities for several magnetic fields and transport currents. Experimental MPZ voltages have been used to calculate an effective heat transfer coefficient, which is subsequently used to calculate the MPZ energy. The experimental MPZ energies support the theoretical expectation that lower copper fractions lead to higher stability in the metastable regime.

  9. FROM PRESTELLAR TO PROTOSTELLAR CORES. II. TIME DEPENDENCE AND DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION

    SciTech Connect

    Aikawa, Y.; Wakelam, V.; Hersant, F.; Garrod, R. T.; Herbst, E.

    2012-11-20

    We investigate the molecular evolution and D/H abundance ratios that develop as star formation proceeds from a dense molecular cloud core to a protostellar core, by solving a gas-grain reaction network applied to a one-dimensional radiative hydrodynamic model with infalling fluid parcels. Spatial distributions of gas and ice-mantle species are calculated at the first-core stage, and at times after the birth of a protostar. Gas-phase methanol and methane are more abundant than CO at radii r {approx}< 100 AU in the first-core stage, but gradually decrease with time, while abundances of larger organic species increase. The warm-up phase, when complex organic molecules are efficiently formed, is longer-lived for those fluid parcels infalling at later stages. The formation of unsaturated carbon chains (warm carbon-chain chemistry) is also more effective in later stages; C{sup +}, which reacts with CH{sub 4} to form carbon chains, increases in abundance as the envelope density decreases. The large organic molecules and carbon chains are strongly deuterated, mainly due to high D/H ratios in the parent molecules, determined in the cold phase. We also extend our model to simulate simply the chemistry in circumstellar disks, by suspending the one-dimensional infall of a fluid parcel at constant disk radii. The species CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} and HCOOCH{sub 3} increase in abundance in 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} yr at the fixed warm temperature; both also have high D/H ratios.

  10. The Dependence of Bar Fraction on Galaxy Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, Peter

    2009-05-01

    I present an analysis of how the fraction of galaxies with bars depends on galaxy properties, using the optical bar classifications of the RC3 catalog and data from the literature. The most striking result is a strong anti-correlation between bars and galaxy mass: the more massive a galaxy is, the less likely it is to host a bar. The trend is strongest when rotation velocity is used, which suggests that the halo mass might be the most important factor. For example, almost 90% of early-type spirals with Vrot < 150 km/s are barred; but the fraction drops to 40% by the time Vrot > 300 km/s. Bar fractions are systematically lower for S0 galaxies, even when the mass dependence is taken into account. I find no dependence of bar fraction on gas mass fraction, which may put constraints on models where high gas fractions are either necessary for bar persistence, or enhance bar weakening and destruction.

  11. Velocity-dependent isotope fractionation in secondary-ion emission

    SciTech Connect

    Gnaser, H.; Hutcheon, I.D.

    1987-01-15

    The formation of secondary ions is subject to isotopic fractionation (differing ionization probabilities for two isotopes) that depends linearly on the inverse velocity of the ejected ions. Theoretically, such a correlation follows directly from an exponential dependence of the ionization probability P on v/sup -1/, Pproportionalexp(-v/sub 0//v). The parameter v/sub 0/, derived from the experiment, amounts to --2 x 10/sup 6/ cm/sec for B, Si, and Ca ions.

  12. Alpha-tocopherol disappearance rates from plasma depend on lipid concentrations: Studies using deuterium labeled collard greens in younger and older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about alpha-tocopherol's bioavailability as a constituent of food or its dependence on a subject's age. To evaluate the alpha-tocopherol bioavailability from food, we used collard greens grown in deuterated water (2H collard greens) as a source of deuterium-labeled (2H) alpha-tocophe...

  13. Structure-dependent degradation of polar compounds in weathered oils observed by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Islam, Ananna; Kim, Donghwi; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-10-15

    The resin fractions of fresh mixtures of three oils spilled during the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill, as well as weathered oils collected at weathering stages II and IV from the oil spill site were analyzed and compared by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The significantly decreased abundance of N(+) and [N-H+D](+) ions suggested that secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds were preferentially degraded during the early stage of weathering. [N+H](+) and [N+D](+) ions previously attributed to pyridine-type compounds degraded more slowly than secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds. The preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed by photo-degradation experiments using 15 standard compounds. In addition, significant increases of [S1O1+H](+) and [S1O1+D](+) ions with higher DBE values were observed from fresh oil mixtures as compared to stages II and IV samples, and that could be linked with the decrease of higher DBE compounds of the S1 class. This study presented convincing arguments and evidence demonstrating that secondary and tertiary amines were more vulnerable to photo-degradation than compounds containing pyridine, and hence, preferential degradation depending on chemical structures must be considered in the production of hazardous or toxic components.

  14. Temperature Dependence of Carbon Isotope Fractionation in CAM Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Deleens, Eliane; Treichel, Isabel; O'Leary, Marion H.

    1985-01-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoë daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17°C nights, 23°C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is −4‰ (that is, malate is enriched in 13C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0‰ at 27°C/33°C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. PMID:16664371

  15. Does the obscured AGN fraction really depend on luminosity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, S.; Churazov, E.; Krivonos, R.

    2015-12-01

    We use a sample of 151 local non-blazar active galactic nuclei (AGN) selected from the INTEGRAL all-sky hard X-ray survey to investigate if the observed declining trend of the fraction of obscured (i.e. showing X-ray absorption) AGN with increasing luminosity is mostly an intrinsic or selection effect. Using a torus-obscuration model, we demonstrate that in addition to negative bias, due to absorption in the torus, in finding obscured AGN in hard X-ray flux-limited surveys, there is also positive bias in finding unobscured AGN, due to Compton reflection in the torus. These biases can be even stronger taking into account plausible intrinsic collimation of hard X-ray emission along the axis of the obscuring torus. Given the AGN luminosity function, which steepens at high luminosities, these observational biases lead to a decreasing observed fraction of obscured AGN with increasing luminosity even if this fraction has no intrinsic luminosity dependence. We find that if the central hard X-ray source in AGN is isotropic, the intrinsic (i.e. corrected for biases) obscured AGN fraction still shows a declining trend with luminosity, although the intrinsic obscured fraction is significantly larger than the observed one: the actual fraction is larger than ˜85 per cent at L ≲ 1042.5 erg s-1 (17-60 keV), and decreases to ≲60 per cent at L ≳ 1044 erg s-1. In terms of the half-opening angle θ of an obscuring torus, this implies that θ ≲ 30° in lower luminosity AGN, and θ ≳ 45° in higher luminosity ones. If, however, the emission from the central supermassive black hole is collimated as dL/dΩ ∝ cos α, the intrinsic dependence of the obscured AGN fraction is consistent with a luminosity-independent torus half-opening angle θ ˜ 30°.

  16. Microbial mass-dependent fractionation of chromium isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sikora, E.R.; Johnson, T.M.; Bullen, T.D.

    2008-01-01

    Mass-dependent fractionation of Cr isotopes occurs during dissimilatory Cr(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Cells suspended in a simple buffer solution, with various concentrations of lactate or formate added as electron donor, reduced 5 or 10 ??M Cr(VI) to Cr(III) over days to weeks. In all nine batch experiments, 53Cr/52Cr ratios of the unreacted Cr(VI) increased as reduction proceeded. In eight experiments covering a range of added donor concentrations up to 100 ??M, isotopic fractionation factors were nearly invariant, ranging from 1.0040 to 1.0045, with a mean value somewhat larger than that previously reported for abiotic Cr(VI) reduction (1.0034). One experiment containing much greater donor concentration (10 mM lactate) reduced Cr(VI) much faster and exhibited a lesser fractionation factor (1.0018). These results indicate that 53Cr/52Cr measurements should be effective as indicators of Cr(VI) reduction, either bacterial or abiotic. However, variability in the fractionation factor is poorly constrained and should be studied for a variety of microbial and abiotic reduction pathways. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Nuclear Volume-Dependent Fractionation of Uranium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyer, S.; Schauble, E. A.; Anbar, A. D.

    2007-12-01

    fractionation in these sediments is opposite in direction to what would be expected from mass-dependent equilibrium or kinetic/diffusive isotope fractionation. Instead, heavy U isotope compositions of reduced U species are expected from first-principles quantum chemical modeling of fractionation driven by nuclear volume. Our modeling results predict that equilibrium nuclear volume and mass-dependent isotope fractionation operate in opposite directions for U, and that the volume effect is of greater magnitude. Combining our observations on natural samples with the results of theoretical modeling strongly indicates that nuclear volume-, rather than mass-dependent isotope fractionation is the dominant process that fractionates the isotope composition of some very heavy elements, such as U, in nature.

  18. Deuterium isotope effect on femtosecond solvation dynamics in an ionic liquid microemulsion: an excitation wavelength dependence study.

    PubMed

    Sasmal, Dibyendu Kumar; Mojumdar, Supratik Sen; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2010-04-01

    The deuterium isotope effect on the solvation dynamics and the anisotropy decay of coumarin 480 (C480) in a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) microemulsion is studied by femtosecond up-conversion. The microemulsion consists of the RTIL 1-pentyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetra-fluoroborate ([pmim][BF(4)]) in triton X-100 (TX-100)/benzene. Replacement of H(2)O by D(2)O in the microemulsion causes retardation of solvation dynamics. The average solvation time of C480 (tau(s)) in RTIL microemulsion with 5 wt % D(2)O is approximately 1.5-1.7 times slower compared to that in the H(2)O containing RTIL microemulsion. This suggests that the main species in the microemulsion responsible for solvation is the water molecules. In both D(2)O and H(2)O containing RTIL microemulsion, the solvation dynamics exhibits marked dependence on the excitation wavelength (lambda(ex)) and becomes about 15 times faster as lambda(ex) increases from 375 to 435 nm. This is ascribed to the structural heterogeneity in the RTIL microemulsion. For lambda(ex) = 375 nm, the region near the TX-100 surfactant is probed where bound water molecules cause slow solvation dynamics. At 435 nm, the RTIL pool is selected where the water molecules are more mobile and hence gives rise to faster solvation. The average time constant of anisotropy decay shows opposite dependence on lambda(ex) and increases about 2.5-fold from 180 ps at lambda(ex) = 375 nm to 500 ps at lambda(ex) = 435 nm for D(2)O containing RTIL microemulsion. The slower anisotropy decay at lambda(ex) = 435 nm is ascribed to the higher viscosity of RTIL which causes greater friction at the core. PMID:20235504

  19. pH and urea dependence of amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates in the beta-trefoil protein hisactophilin.

    PubMed

    Houliston, R Scott; Liu, Chengsong; Singh, Laila M R; Meiering, Elizabeth M

    2002-01-29

    Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange rates were measured as a function of pH and urea for 37 slowly exchanging amides in the beta-trefoil protein hisactophilin. The rank order of exchange rates is generally maintained under different solution conditions, and trends in the pH and urea dependence of exchange rates are correlated with the rank order of exchange rates. The observed trends are consistent with the expected behavior for exchange of different amides via global and/or local unfolding. Analysis of the pH dependence of exchange in terms of rate constants for structural opening and closing reveals a wide range of rates in different parts of the hisactophilin structure. The slowest exchanging amides have the slowest opening and closing rates. Many of the slowest exchanging amides are located in trefoil 2, but there are also some slow exchanging amides in trefoils 1 and 3. Slow exchangers tend to be near the interface between the beta-barrel and the beta-hairpin triplet portions of this single-domain structure. The pattern of exchange behaviour in hisactophilin is similar to that observed previously in interleukin-1 beta, indicating that exchange properties may be conserved among beta-trefoil proteins. Comparisons of opening and closing rates in hisactophilin with rates obtained for other proteins reveal clear trends for opening rates; however, trends in closing rates are less apparent, perhaps due to inaccuracies in the values used for intrinsic exchange rates in the data fitting. On the basis of the pH and urea dependence of exchange rates and optical measurements of stability and folding, EX2 is the main exchange mechanism in hisactophilin, but there is also evidence for varying levels of EX1 exchange at low and high pH and high urea concentrations. Equilibrium intermediates in which subglobal portions of structure are cooperatively disrupted are not apparent from analysis of the urea dependence of exchange rates. There is, however, a strong correlation between

  20. α-Tocopherol disappearance rates from plasma depend on lipid concentrations: studies using deuterium-labeled collard greens in younger and older adults1234

    PubMed Central

    Traber, Maret G; Leonard, Scott W; Bobe, Gerd; Fu, Xueyan; Saltzman, Edward; Grusak, Michael A; Booth, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little is known about α-tocopherol’s bioavailability as a constituent of food or its dependence on a subject’s age. Objective: To evaluate the α-tocopherol bioavailability from food, we used collard greens grown in deuterated water (2H collard greens) as a source of deuterium-labeled (2H) α-tocopherol consumed by younger and older adults in a post hoc analysis of a vitamin K study. Design: Younger (mean ± SD age: 32 ± 7 y; n = 12 women and 9 men) and older (aged 67 ± 8 y; n = 8 women and 12 men) adults consumed a test breakfast that included 120 g 2H collard greens (1.2 ± 0.1 mg 2H-α-tocopherol). Plasma unlabeled α-tocopherol and 2H-α-tocopherol were measured by using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry from fasting (>12 h) blood samples drawn before breakfast (0 h) and at 24, 48, and 72 h and from postprandial samples collected at 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 12, and 16 h. Results: Times (12.6 ± 2.5 h) of maximum plasma 2H-α-tocopherol concentrations (0.82% ± 0.59% total α-tocopherol), fractional disappearance rates (0.63 ± 0.26 pools/d), half-lives (30 ± 11 h), and the minimum estimated 2H-α-tocopherol absorbed (24% ± 16%) did not vary between age groups or sexes (n = 41). Unlabeled α-tocopherol concentrations were higher in older adults (26.4 ± 8.6 μmol/L) than in younger adults (19.3 ± 4.2 μmol/L; P = 0.0019) and correlated with serum lipids (r = 0.4938, P = 0.0012). In addition, 2H-α-tocopherol half-lives were correlated with lipids (r = 0.4361, P = 0.0044). Conclusions: Paradoxically, α-tocopherol remained in circulation longer in participants with higher serum lipids, but the 2H-α-tocopherol absorbed was not dependent on the plasma lipid status. Neither variable was dependent on age. These data suggest that plasma α-tocopherol concentrations are more dependent on mechanisms that control circulating lipids rather than those related to its absorption and initial incorporation into plasma. This trial was registered at

  1. Chemodynamical deuterium fractionation in the early solar nebula: The origin of water on earth and in asteroids and comets

    SciTech Connect

    Albertsson, T.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th.

    2014-03-20

    Formation and evolution of water in the solar system and the origin of water on Earth constitute one of the most interesting questions in astronomy. The prevailing hypothesis for the origin of water on Earth is by delivery through water-rich small solar system bodies. In this paper, the isotopic and chemical evolution of water during the early history of the solar nebula, before the onset of planetesimal formation, is studied. A gas-grain chemical model that includes multiply deuterated species and nuclear spin-states is combined with a steady-state solar nebula model. To calculate initial abundances, we simulated 1 Myr of evolution of a cold and dark TMC-1-like prestellar core. Two time-dependent chemical models of the solar nebula are calculated over 1 Myr: (1) a laminar model and (2) a model with two-dimensional (2D) turbulent mixing. We find that the radial outward increase of the H{sub 2}O D/H ratio is shallower in the chemodynamical nebular model than in the laminar model. This is related to more efficient defractionation of HDO via rapid gas-phase processes because the 2D mixing model allows the water ice to be transported either inward and thermally evaporated or upward and photodesorbed. The laminar model shows the Earth water D/H ratio at r ≲ 2.5 AU, whereas for the 2D chemodynamical model this zone is larger, r ≲ 9 AU. Similarly, the water D/H ratios representative of the Oort-family comets, ∼2.5-10 × 10{sup –4}, are achieved within ∼2-6 AU and ∼2-20 AU in the laminar and the 2D model, respectively. We find that with regards to the water isotopic composition and the origin of the comets, the mixing model seems to be favored over the laminar model.

  2. Chemodynamical Deuterium Fractionation in the Early Solar Nebula: The Origin of Water on Earth and in Asteroids and Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertsson, T.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th.

    2014-03-01

    Formation and evolution of water in the solar system and the origin of water on Earth constitute one of the most interesting questions in astronomy. The prevailing hypothesis for the origin of water on Earth is by delivery through water-rich small solar system bodies. In this paper, the isotopic and chemical evolution of water during the early history of the solar nebula, before the onset of planetesimal formation, is studied. A gas-grain chemical model that includes multiply deuterated species and nuclear spin-states is combined with a steady-state solar nebula model. To calculate initial abundances, we simulated 1 Myr of evolution of a cold and dark TMC-1-like prestellar core. Two time-dependent chemical models of the solar nebula are calculated over 1 Myr: (1) a laminar model and (2) a model with two-dimensional (2D) turbulent mixing. We find that the radial outward increase of the H2O D/H ratio is shallower in the chemodynamical nebular model than in the laminar model. This is related to more efficient defractionation of HDO via rapid gas-phase processes because the 2D mixing model allows the water ice to be transported either inward and thermally evaporated or upward and photodesorbed. The laminar model shows the Earth water D/H ratio at r <~ 2.5 AU, whereas for the 2D chemodynamical model this zone is larger, r <~ 9 AU. Similarly, the water D/H ratios representative of the Oort-family comets, ~2.5-10 × 10-4, are achieved within ~2-6 AU and ~2-20 AU in the laminar and the 2D model, respectively. We find that with regards to the water isotopic composition and the origin of the comets, the mixing model seems to be favored over the laminar model.

  3. Temperature and site dependence of the rate of hydrogen and deuterium abstraction by methyl radicals in methanol glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Doba, T.; Ingold, K.U.; Siebrand, W.; Wildman, T.A.

    1984-07-19

    Rate constants are reported for hydrogen and deuterium abstraction by methyl radicals in CH/sub 3/OH and CD/sub 3/OD glasses in the ranges 5-89 and 77-97 K, respectively. At each temperature, they show a distribution due to a variation of radical trapping sites. The rate constants of this distribution are analyzed theoretically to yield a quantitative relation between tunneling rate and equilibrium tunneling distance. 20 references, 2 figures.

  4. Effect of deuterium on polystyrene degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Korshak, V.V.; Pavlova, S.S.A.; Gribkova, P.N.; Kozyreva, N.M.; Balykova, T.N.; Kirilin, A.I.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of replacing hydrogen by deuterium in polystyrene was studied on resistance to oxidative and thermal degradation. Polystyrene, polydeutero-styrene-D/sub 8/ containing 98-99 at.% deuterium, and a series of their statistical copolymers containing various proportions of deuterated and undeuterated monomer units were synthesized. The replacement of hydrogen by deuterium in polystyrene caused some increase in its resistance to thermal and oxidative destruction. A table shows that at all test temperatures, an increase in the fraction of deuterated monomer units in copolymer decreases the amounts of absorbed oxygen and evolved carbon oxides which is evidence for retadation of polystyrene oxidation when hydrogen is replaced by deuterium.

  5. Deuterium enrichment of interstellar dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Majumdar, Liton; Sahu, Dipen

    2016-07-01

    High abundance of some abundant and simple interstellar species could be explained by considering the chemistry that occurs on interstellar dusts. Because of its simplicity, the rate equation method is widely used to study the surface chemistry. However, because the recombination efficiency for the formation of any surface species is highly dependent on various physical and chemical parameters, the Monte Carlo method is best suited for addressing the randomness of the processes. We carry out Monte-Carlo simulation to study deuterium enrichment of interstellar grain mantle under various physical conditions. Based on the physical properties, various types of clouds are considered. We find that in diffuse cloud regions, very strong radiation fields persists and hardly a few layers of surface species are formed. In translucent cloud regions with a moderate radiation field, significant number of layers would be produced and surface coverage is mainly dominated by photo-dissociation products such as, C, CH_3, CH_2D, OH and OD. In the intermediate dense cloud regions (having number density of total hydrogen nuclei in all forms ˜2 × 10^4 cm^{-3}), water and methanol along with their deuterated derivatives are efficiently formed. For much higher density regions (˜10^6 cm^{-3}), water and methanol productions are suppressed but surface coverage of CO, CO_2, O_2, O_3 are dramatically increased. We find a very high degree of fractionation of water and methanol. Observational results support a high fractionation of methanol but surprisingly water fractionation is found to be low. This is in contradiction with our model results indicating alternative routes for de-fractionation of water.

  6. THE ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE EVOLVING S0 FRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Just, Dennis W.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Sand, David J.; Desai, Vandana; Rudnick, Gregory

    2010-03-01

    We re-investigate the dramatic rise in the S0 fraction, f{sub S0}, within clusters since z {approx} 0.5. In particular, we focus on the role of the global galaxy environment on f{sub S0} by compiling, either from our own observations or the literature, robust line-of-sight velocity dispersions, sigma's, for a sample of galaxy groups and clusters at 0.1 < z < 0.8 that have uniformly determined, published morphological fractions. We find that the trend of f{sub S0} with redshift is twice as strong for sigma < 750 km s{sup -1} groups/poor clusters than for higher-sigma, rich clusters. From this result, we infer that over this redshift range galaxy-galaxy interactions, which are more effective in lower-sigma environments, are more responsible for transforming spiral galaxies into S0's than galaxy-environment processes, which are more effective in higher-sigma environments. The rapid, recent growth of the S0 population in groups and poor clusters implies that large numbers of progenitors exist in low-sigma systems at modest redshifts ({approx}0.5), where morphologies and internal kinematics are within the measurement range of current technology.

  7. Stable strontium mass dependent isotopic fractionation in authigenic continental barite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, E. M.; Widanagamage, I. H.; Scher, H. D.; Senko, J.

    2013-12-01

    The use of stable Sr-isotopic measurements (δ88Sr) of barite precipitates from terrestrial environments will be evaluated as a new geochemical proxy to identify mode of barite mineralization for use in earth science applications including understanding similar ancient barite deposits. Stable Sr-isotope measurements of barite and waters from three warm artesian springs in the continental United States where barite precipitates under a variety of conditions (e.g., temperatures, saturation states, microbial communities) will be presented. Initial results show a large range of fractionation factors during barite precipitation from aqueous solution between and within some of the field sites of >0.6 permil. The waters range from δ88Sr = -0.04 to +0.50 permil. The solid barite precipitates that have been separated from the bulk sediment using a modified sequential leaching procedure range from δ88Sr = -0.43 to +0.16 permil. Average 2σ for the isotopic analyses is 0.05 permil, similar to previously published estimates for error on this measurement by MC-ICPMS. Barite is a highly stable and widely-distributed mineral found in magmatic, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks (of all ages), as well as in soils, aerosol dust, and extraterrestrial material. Establishing the controlling parameters of stable Sr-isotopic fractionation in barite is important as barite may be an ideal vehicle to address critical questions in the earth sciences, including early earth biogeochemistry.

  8. Exploring the Origins of Deuterium Enrichments in Solar Nebular Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Bergin, Edwin A.; O'D. Alexander, Conel M.; Du, Fujun; Graninger, Dawn; Öberg, Karin I.; Harries, Tim J.

    2016-03-01

    Deuterium-to-hydrogen (D/H) enrichments in molecular species provide clues about their original formation environment. The organic materials in primitive solar system bodies generally have higher D/H ratios and show greater D/H variation when compared to D/H in solar system water. We propose this difference arises at least in part due to (1) the availability of additional chemical fractionation pathways for organics beyond that for water, and (2) the higher volatility of key carbon reservoirs compared to oxygen. We test this hypothesis using detailed disk models, including a sophisticated, new disk ionization treatment with a low cosmic-ray ionization rate, and find that disk chemistry leads to higher deuterium enrichment in organics compared to water, helped especially by fractionation via the precursors CH2D+/CH3+. We also find that the D/H ratio in individual species varies significantly depending on their particular formation pathways. For example, from ˜20-40 au, CH4 can reach {{D}}/{{H}}˜ 2× {10}-3, while D/H in CH3OH remains locally unaltered. Finally, while the global organic D/H in our models can reproduce intermediately elevated D/H in the bulk hydrocarbon reservoir, our models are unable to reproduce the most deuterium-enriched organic materials in the solar system, and thus our model requires some inheritance from the cold interstellar medium from which the Sun formed.

  9. Temperature dependency of the triple isotope fractionation relationship for equilibrium processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayles, J. A.; Cao, X.; Bao, H.

    2015-12-01

    The use of an approximation to the Bigeleisen-Mayer-Urey model for isotope fractionation has led to the concept of a constant, and later constrained, mass fractionation law for multiple isotopes of the same element. This concept has brought new insights to investigation in photochemistry, radical chemistry, or the contribution of quantum tunneling to chemical and biological processes. Despite previous work indicating that these mass fractionation laws can be highly variable, the concept of a constant relationship remains common in these fields. Using the diatomic case as a first-order approximation, we demonstrate generically that the mass fractionation exponent, θ, can take any value for small fractionations but is less variable for large fractionations. The predicted variability is larger than both theoretical and analytical precision. These deviations from the traditional range of mass-dependence exponents are the largest under cross-over scenarios, but can occur for any scenario with small fractionations. We advocate the use of ∆∆‡M or "change in cap-delta", defined strictly with a slope of at the high-temperature limit, as a necessary, more reliable and more useful descriptor of mass-dependent fractionation. This work can bring new insights and a conventional explanation to low temperature experiments yielding traditionally unusual mass fractionation laws.

  10. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-13

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  11. State-dependent switching control of switched positive fractional-order systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xudong; Yin, Yunfei; Zheng, Xiaolong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the problem of switching stabilization for a class of continuous-time switched positive fractional-order systems is studied by using state-dependent switching. First, the asymptotic stability condition of switched positive fractional-order systems with state-dependent switching is given, which is based on the fractional co-positive Lyapunov method. Moreover, by the sliding sector method, the stability condition of switched positive fractional-order systems whose subsystems are possibly all unstable is obtained. A variable structure (VS) switching law with sliding sector is also proposed to guarantee the switched positive fractional-order system to be asymptotically stable. Finally, two numerical examples are given to demonstrate the advantages and effectiveness of our developed results.

  12. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Kinetics Demonstrate Long Range Allosteric Effects of Thumb Site 2 Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Viral RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Deredge, Daniel; Li, Jiawen; Johnson, Kenneth A; Wintrode, Patrick L

    2016-05-01

    New nonnucleoside analogs are being developed as part of a multi-drug regimen to treat hepatitis C viral infections. Particularly promising are inhibitors that bind to the surface of the thumb domain of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B). Numerous crystal structures have been solved showing small molecule non-nucleoside inhibitors bound to the hepatitis C viral polymerase, but these structures alone do not define the mechanism of inhibition. Our prior kinetic analysis showed that nonnucleoside inhibitors binding to thumb site-2 (NNI2) do not block initiation or elongation of RNA synthesis; rather, they block the transition from the initiation to elongation, which is thought to proceed with significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme-RNA complex. Here we have mapped the effect of three NNI2 inhibitors on the conformational dynamics of the enzyme using hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics. All three inhibitors rigidify an extensive allosteric network extending >40 Å from the binding site, thus providing a structural rationale for the observed disruption of the transition from distributive initiation to processive elongation. The two more potent inhibitors also suppress slow cooperative unfolding in the fingers extension-thumb interface and primer grip, which may contribute their stronger inhibition. These results establish that NNI2 inhibitors act through long range allosteric effects, reveal important conformational changes underlying normal polymerase function, and point the way to the design of more effective allosteric inhibitors that exploit this new information. PMID:27006396

  13. Molecular weight dependence of segmental alignment in a sheared polymer melt: A deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Ryan J.; Callaghan, Paul T.

    2002-06-01

    2H NMR quadrupole interaction spectroscopy has been used to measure the molecular weight dependence of poly(dimethylsiloxane) chain deformation under shear in a cylindrical Couette cell while NMR velocimetry has been used to directly measure shear rates. The signals were acquired from a perdeuterated benzene probe molecule, which provides a motionally averaged sampling of the entire segmental ensemble. We have measured the dependence on shear rate of the SXX (velocity), SYY (velocity gradient), and SZZ (vorticity) elements of the segmented alignment tensor, fitting the data using the standard Doi-Edwards theory and modified to allow for convected constraint release. Our results suggest that the tube disengagement times scale as molecular weight to the power 3.5±0.1, consistent with the usual 3.4 power law. Our velocimetry measurements indicate a reproducible and consistent slip occurring at high molecular weights (>1 M Dalton), a phenomenon which is independently observed in a lower than expected chain deformation.

  14. In vivo isotope-fractionation factors and the measurement of deuterium- and oxygen-18-dilution spaces from plasma, urine, saliva, respiratory water vapor, and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.W.; Cochran, W.J.; Klish, W.J.; Smith, E.O.; Lee, L.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    In vivo isotope-fractionation factors were determined for hydrogen and oxygen between plasma water samples and samples of urine, saliva, respiratory water vapor, and carbon dioxide in 20 normal adults. The isotope-fractionation factors ranged from 0.944 to 1.039 for /sup 2/H in breath water vapor and for /sup 18/O in breath CO/sub 2/, respectively. When corrected for isotope fractionation, the /sup 2/H- and /sup 18/O-dilution spaces determined from urine, saliva, respiratory water, and CO/sub 2/ were within -0.10 +/- 1.09 kg (mean +/- SD, n = 60) and 0.04 +/- 0.68 kg (n = 80), respectively, of the values determined from plasma. In the absence of these corrections, we observed a 6% overestimation of /sup 2/H-dilution space and a 1% overestimation of /sup 18/O-dilution space from the use of respiratory water values. A 4% underestimation of the /sup 18/O-dilution space was observed for breath CO/sub 2/ without correction for isotope fractionation.

  15. Temperature effect on leaf water deuterium enrichment and isotopic fractionation during leaf lipid biosynthesis: results from controlled growth of C3 and C4 land plants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Youping; Grice, Kliti; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Stuart-Williams, Hilary; Farquhar, Graham D; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2011-02-01

    The hydrogen isotopic ratios ((2)H/(1)H) of land plant leaf water and the carbon-bound hydrogen of leaf wax lipids are valuable indicators for climatic, physiological, metabolic and geochemical studies. Temperature will exert a profound effect on the stable isotopic composition of leaf water and leaf lipids as it directly influences the isotopic equilibrium (IE) during leaf water evaporation and cellular water dissociation. It is also expected to affect the kinetics of enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis, and therefore the balance of hydrogen inputs along different biochemical routes. We conducted a controlled growth experiment to examine the effect of temperature on the stable hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf water and the biological and biochemical isotopic fractionations during lipid biosynthesis. We find that leaf water (2)H enrichment at 20°C is lower than that at 30°C. This is contrary to the expectation that at lower temperatures leaf water should be more enriched in (2)H due to a larger equilibrium isotope effect associated with evapotranspiration from the leaf if all other variables are held constant. A hypothesis is presented to explain the apparent discrepancy whereby lower temperature-induced down-regulation of available aquaporin water channels and/or partial closure of transmembrane water channel forces water flow to "detour" to a more convoluted apoplastic pathway, effectively increasing the length over which diffusion acts against advection as described by the Péclet effect (Farquhar and Lloyd, 1993) and decreasing the average leaf water enrichment. The impact of temperature on leaf water enrichment is not reflected in the biological isotopic fractionation or the biochemical isotopic fractionation during lipid biosynthesis. Neither the biological nor biochemical fractionations at 20°C are significantly different from that at 30°C, implying that temperature has a negligible effect on the isotopic fractionation during lipid biosynthesis.

  16. Simulating transient dynamics of the time-dependent time fractional Fokker-Planck systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yan-Mei

    2016-09-01

    For a physically realistic type of time-dependent time fractional Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, derived as the continuous limit of the continuous time random walk with time-modulated Boltzmann jumping weight, a semi-analytic iteration scheme based on the truncated (generalized) Fourier series is presented to simulate the resultant transient dynamics when the external time modulation is a piece-wise constant signal. At first, the iteration scheme is demonstrated with a simple time-dependent time fractional FP equation on finite interval with two absorbing boundaries, and then it is generalized to the more general time-dependent Smoluchowski-type time fractional Fokker-Planck equation. The numerical examples verify the efficiency and accuracy of the iteration method, and some novel dynamical phenomena including polarized motion orientations and periodic response death are discussed.

  17. Volume fraction dependent magnetic behaviour of ferrofluids for rotating seal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinteie, G.; Palade, P.; Vekas, L.; Iacob, N.; Bartha, C.; Kuncser, V.

    2013-10-01

    Ferrofluid samples consisting of magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) coated with oleic acid and dispersed in a non-polar organic solvent have been synthesized by chemical routes. Different volume fractions, φ, of magnetic NPs were considered. The overall structural characterization of NPs has been performed by x-ray diffractometry, with lattice parameters and average coherence lengths evaluated via Rietveld refinements. The magnetic properties of different samples have been analysed by SQUID magnetometry and temperature-dependent Mössbauer spectroscopy and finally explained by adequate magnetic relaxation mechanisms. Zero field cooling-field cooling protocols provided useful information about specific volume fraction dependent magnetic relaxation and de-freezing processes, the lack of the Verwey transition and stronger dipolar interactions at higher volume fractions. Anisotropy energies as obtained by both temperature dependent Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetometry data are compared and a new procedure for a quantitative characterization of the dipolar interactions is proposed.

  18. Comment on 'A non-mass-dependent isotopic fractionation effect' by F. Robert, J. Halbout and J. Baudon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sund, Mark T.

    1990-01-01

    The fractionation model of Robert et al. (1988) treats the gas-phase isotopic exchange reaction between kinetically excited atoms aX and diatomic MbX yielding bX and MaX and finds an abundance-dependent fractionation superimposed on the usual mass dependent fractionation. This paper shows that the treatment of Robert et al. is in error and presents a more straightforward treatment of the same system. This model shows only mass-dependent fractionation.

  19. Correcting the initialization of models with fractional derivatives via history-dependent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Maolin; Wang, Zaihua

    2016-04-01

    Fractional differential equations are more and more used in modeling memory (history-dependent, non-local, or hereditary) phenomena. Conventional initial values of fractional differential equations are defined at a point, while recent works define initial conditions over histories. We prove that the conventional initialization of fractional differential equations with a Riemann-Liouville derivative is wrong with a simple counter-example. The initial values were assumed to be arbitrarily given for a typical fractional differential equation, but we find one of these values can only be zero. We show that fractional differential equations are of infinite dimensions, and the initial conditions, initial histories, are defined as functions over intervals. We obtain the equivalent integral equation for Caputo case. With a simple fractional model of materials, we illustrate that the recovery behavior is correct with the initial creep history, but is wrong with initial values at the starting point of the recovery. We demonstrate the application of initial history by solving a forced fractional Lorenz system numerically.

  20. Temperature-dependent isotopic fractionation of lithium between clinopyroxene and high-pressure hydrous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunder, Bernd; Meixner, Anette; Romer, Rolf L.; Heinrich, Wilhelm

    2006-01-01

    The fractionation of lithium isotopes between synthetic spodumene as representative of Li-bearing clinopyroxene and Cl- and OH-bearing aqueous fluids was experimentally determined between 500 and 900°C at 2.0 GPa. In all the experiments, 7Li was preferentially partitioned into the fluid. The fractionation is temperature dependent and approximated by the equation Δ7Li(clinopyroxene-fluid)=-4.61×(1,000/ T [K]) + 2.48; R 2=0.86. Significant Li isotopic fractionation of about 1.0‰ exists even at high temperatures of 900°C. Using neutral and weakly basic fluids revealed that the amount of fractionation is not different. The Li isotopic fractionation between altered basalt and hot spring water (350°C) in natural samples is in good agreement with our experimentally determined fractionation curve. The data confirm earlier speculations drawn from the Li isotopic record of dehydrated metamorphic rocks that fluids expelled from a dehydrating slab carry heavier Li into the mantle wedge, and that a light Li component is introduced into the deeper mantle. Li and Li isotopes are redistributed among wedge minerals as fluids travel across the wedge into hotter regions of arc magma production. This modifies the Li isotopic characteristics of slab-derived fluids erasing their source memory, and explains the absence of cross-arc variations of Li isotopes in arc basalts.

  1. Bulk retention of deuterium in graphites exposed to deuterium plasma at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, I. I.; Gorodetsky, A. E.; Zakharov, A. P.; Khripunov, B. I.; Shapkin, V. V.; Petrov, V. B.; Pistunovich, V. I.; Negodaev, M. A.; Bagulya, A. V.

    1996-10-01

    A highly ionized deuterium plasma with a low residual gas pressure and a high intensity D 2+-ion beam were used for the study of deuterium retention in RG-Ti-91 and POCO AXF-5Q graphites. Deuterium retention in the samples was estimated by TDS during heating to 2000 K. Mechanical removal of a surface layer 100 μm thick was used to distinguish bulk and surface fractions of retained deuterium. The samples of RG-Ti and POCO graphites were exposed to a plasma with an ion flux of 3 × 10 17 D/cm 2 · s in the 'Lenta' plasma device for 10 to 10 4 s at residual deuterium pressure of 0.04 Pa at 1400 K. Under plasma exposure deuterium capture in RG-Ti graphite reached the saturation level at a fluence of 4 × 10 20 D/cm 2 while the bulk inventory was negligible. As for POCO graphite, deuterium retention increased with fluence and was equal to 18 appm in the bulk for a fluence of 7 × 10 21 D/cm 2. The same amount of deuterium in the bulk was obtained after gas exposure of POCO at an effective pressure of 0.8 Pa (1400 K, 6 h). With this result, the tritium concentration in the plasma-facing graphite materials can reach 1500 appm or 380 grams of tritium per ton of graphite. To understand the role of ion flux in generation of effective pressure, POCO was irradiated with 16 keV D 2+-ions at 1400 K for 4 h to 8 × 10 20 D/cm 2 (ion flux was 6 × 10 16 D/cm 2 · s, residual deuterium pressure was 0.004 Pa). The results are discussed on the basis of structural differences for POCO and RG-Ti graphites.

  2. Use and Abuse of a Fractional Fokker-Planck Dynamics for Time-Dependent Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinsalu, E.; Patriarca, M.; Goychuk, I.; Hänggi, P.

    2007-09-01

    We investigate a subdiffusive, fractional Fokker-Planck dynamics occurring in time-varying potential landscapes and thereby disclose the failure of the fractional Fokker-Planck equation (FFPE) in its commonly used form when generalized in an ad hoc manner to time-dependent forces. A modified FFPE (MFFPE) is rigorously derived, being valid for a family of dichotomously alternating force fields. This MFFPE is numerically validated for a rectangular time-dependent force with zero average bias. For this case, subdiffusion is shown to become enhanced as compared to the force free case. We question, however, the existence of any physically valid FFPE for arbitrary varying time-dependent fields that differ from this dichotomous varying family.

  3. Approximating a Giving Up Smoking Dynamic on Adolescent Nicotine Dependence in Fractional Order

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider giving up smoking dynamic on adolescent nicotine dependence. First, we use the Caputo derivative to develop the model in fractional order. Then we apply two different numerical methods to compute accurate approximate solutions of this new model in fractional order and compare their results. In order to do this, we consider the generalized Euler method (GEM) and multi-step generalized differential transform method (MSGDTM). We also show the unique positive solution for this model and present numerical results graphically. PMID:27105426

  4. Approximating a Giving Up Smoking Dynamic on Adolescent Nicotine Dependence in Fractional Order.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Anwar; Zaman, Gul; Erturk, Vedat Suat; Alzalg, Baha; Yousafzai, Faisal; Khan, Madad

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider giving up smoking dynamic on adolescent nicotine dependence. First, we use the Caputo derivative to develop the model in fractional order. Then we apply two different numerical methods to compute accurate approximate solutions of this new model in fractional order and compare their results. In order to do this, we consider the generalized Euler method (GEM) and multi-step generalized differential transform method (MSGDTM). We also show the unique positive solution for this model and present numerical results graphically. PMID:27105426

  5. Thermal conductivity of simple liquids: temperature and packing-fraction dependence.

    PubMed

    Ohtori, Norikazu; Ishii, Yoshiki; Togawa, Yoshinori; Oono, Takuya; Takase, Keiichi

    2014-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of rare gases in liquid and dense fluid states has been evaluated using molecular dynamics simulation with the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials and the Green-Kubo (GK) formula. All the calculated thermal conductivities are in very good agreement with experimental results for a wide range of temperature and density. Special attention was paid to temperature and packing-fraction dependence which is nontrivial from dimensional analysis on the LJ potentials and the GK formula. First, the temperature dependence of T(1/4) was determined from the calculations at constant densities. Secondly, in order to obtain the dependence on packing fraction from that on number density separately, a scaling method of particle and/or cell size was introduced. The number density dependence of (N/V)(2/3) which is expected from the dimensional analysis of the GK formulas was confirmed and the packing-fraction dependence of η(3/2) was determined by using the scaling method. It turned out that the summarized functional form of m(-1/2)(N/V)(2/3)η(3/2)T(1/4) can well express both the calculated and experimental thermal conductivities for Ar, Kr, and Xe, where m is the atomic mass. The scaling method has also been applied to molten NaCl and KCl so that it has been found that the thermal conductivity has the packing-fraction dependence of η(2/3) which is much weaker than that of the simple LJ liquids.

  6. Energy-Gap Dependence on the Mn Mole Fraction and Temperature in Cdmnte Crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Bolotnikov, A; Camarda, G; Yang, G; Hossain, A; Cui, Y; James, r; Hong, J; Kim, S

    2009-01-01

    We measured the dependence of the energy gap in Bridgman-grown Cd1-xMnxTe crystals, 0 {le} x {le} 0.25, on the Mn mole fraction and temperatures from 40 to 300 K. We determined the Mn mole fraction and energy gap, respectively, from electron probe microanalysis and near-infrared Fourier-transform infrared transmission spectra. The energy gap increased linearly with an increase in the Mn content in the crystal and with a decrease in temperature. We formulated new equations from these experimental results, wherein we expressed the energy gap as a function of Mn mole fraction and temperature. Also, we compare our findings with published results.

  7. Oxygen isotope fractionation in the vacuum ultraviolet photodissociation of carbon monoxide: Wavelength, pressure and temperature dependency.

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Subrata; Davis, Ryan; Ahmed, Musahid; Jackson, Teresa L.; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2012-01-03

    Several absorption bands exist in the VUV region of Carbon monoxide (CO). Emission spectra indicate that these bands are all predissociative. An experimental investigation of CO photodissociation by vacuum ultraviolet photons (90 to 108 nm; ~13 to 11 eV) from the Advanced Light Source Synchrotron and direct measurement of the associated oxygen isotopic composition of the products are presented here. A wavelength dependency of the oxygen isotopic composition in the photodissociation product was observed. Slope values (δ'{sup 18}O/ δ'{sup 17}O) ranging from 0.76 to 1.32 were observed in oxygen three-isotope space (δ'{sup 18}O vs. δ'{sup 17}O) which correlated with increasing synchrotron photon energy, and indicate a dependency of the upper electronic state specific dissociation dynamics (e.g., perturbation and coupling associated with a particular state). An unprecedented magnitude in isotope separation was observed for photodissociation at the 105 and 107 nm synchrotron bands and are found to be associated with accidental predissociation of the vibrational states ({nu} = 0 and 1) of the upper electronic state E{sup 1}Π. For each synchrotron band, a large (few hundred per mil) extent of isotopic fractionation was observed and the range of fractionation is a combination of column density and exposure time. A significant temperature dependency in oxygen isotopic fractionation was observed, indicating a rotational level dependency in the predissociation process.

  8. Image encryption combining multiple generating sequences controlled fractional DCT with dependent scrambling and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yaru; Liu, Guoping; Zhou, Nanrun; Wu, Jianhua

    2015-02-01

    Based on the fractional discrete cosine transform with multiple generating sequences (MGSFrDCT) and the dependent scrambling and diffusion (DSD), an image encryption algorithm is proposed, in which the multiple-generating sequences greatly enlarge the key space of the encryption system. The real-valued output of MGSFrDCT is beneficial to storage, display and transmission of the cipher-text. During the stage of confusion and diffusion, the locations and values of all MGSFrDCT transformed coefficients change due to DSD, and the initial values and fractional orders of encryption system depend not only on the cipher keys but also on the plain-image due to introduction of a disturbance factor, which allows the encryption system to resist the known-plaintext and chosen-plaintext attacks. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed encryption algorithm is feasible, effective and secure and able to resist common classical attacks.

  9. EVIDENCE FOR MULTIPLE PATHWAYS TO DEUTERIUM ENHANCEMENTS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua; Wilner, David J.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.

    2012-04-20

    The distributions of deuterated molecules in protoplanetary disks are expected to depend on the molecular formation pathways. We use observations of spatially resolved DCN emission from the disk around TW Hya, acquired during ALMA science verification with a {approx}3'' synthesized beam, together with comparable DCO{sup +} observations from the Submillimeter Array, to investigate differences in the radial distributions of these species and hence differences in their formation chemistry. In contrast to DCO{sup +}, which shows an increasing column density with radius, DCN is better fit by a model that is centrally peaked. We infer that DCN forms at a smaller radii and thus at higher temperatures than DCO{sup +}. This is consistent with chemical network model predictions of DCO{sup +} formation from H{sub 2}D{sup +} at T < 30 K and DCN formation from additional pathways involving CH{sub 2}D{sup +} at higher temperatures. We estimate a DCN/HCN abundance ratio of {approx}0.017, similar to the DCO{sup +}/HCO{sup +} abundance ratio. Deuterium fractionation appears to be efficient at a range of temperatures in this protoplanetary disk. These results suggest caution in interpreting the range of deuterium fractions observed in solar system bodies, as multiple formation pathways should be taken into account.

  10. Mass dependent stable isotope fractionation of mercury during mer mediated microbial degradation of monomethylmercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritee, K.; Barkay, Tamar; Blum, Joel D.

    2009-03-01

    Controlling bioaccumulation of toxic monomethylmercury (MMHg) in aquatic food chains requires differentiation between biotic and abiotic pathways that lead to its production and degradation. Recent mercury (Hg) stable isotope measurements of natural samples suggest that Hg isotope ratios can be a powerful proxy for tracing dominant Hg transforming pathways in aquatic ecosystems. Specifically, it has been shown that photo-degradation of MMHg causes both mass dependent (MDF) and mass independent fractionation (MIF) of Hg isotopes. Because the extent of MDF and MIF observed in natural samples (e.g., fish, soil and sediments) can potentially be used to determine the relative importance of pathways leading to MMHg accumulation, it is important to determine the potential role of microbial pathways in contributing to the fractionation, especially MIF, observed in these samples. This study reports the extent of fractionation of Hg stable isotopes during degradation of MMHg to volatile elemental Hg and methane via the microbial Hg resistance ( mer) pathway in Escherichia coli carrying a mercury resistance ( mer) genetic system on a multi-copy plasmid. During experimental microbial degradation of MMHg, MMHg remaining in reactors became progressively heavier (increasing δ202Hg) with time and underwent mass dependent Rayleigh fractionation with a fractionation factor α202/198 = 1.0004 ± 0.0002 (2SD). However, MIF was not observed in any of the microbial MMHg degradation experiments indicating that the isotopic signature left by mer mediated MMHg degradation is significantly different from fractionation observed during DOC mediated photo-degradation of MMHg. Additionally, a clear suppression of Hg isotope fractionation, both during reduction of Hg(II) and degradation of MMHg, was observed when the cell densities increased, possibly due to a reduction in substrate bioavailability. We propose a multi-step framework for understanding the extent of fractionation seen in our MMHg

  11. Size-dependent geometrically nonlinear free vibration analysis of fractional viscoelastic nanobeams based on the nonlocal elasticity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Faraji Oskouie, M.; Gholami, R.

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, mathematical modeling and engineering applications of fractional-order calculus have been extensively utilized to provide efficient simulation tools in the field of solid mechanics. In this paper, a nonlinear fractional nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model is established using the concept of fractional derivative and nonlocal elasticity theory to investigate the size-dependent geometrically nonlinear free vibration of fractional viscoelastic nanobeams. The non-classical fractional integro-differential Euler-Bernoulli beam model contains the nonlocal parameter, viscoelasticity coefficient and order of the fractional derivative to interpret the size effect, viscoelastic material and fractional behavior in the nanoscale fractional viscoelastic structures, respectively. In the solution procedure, the Galerkin method is employed to reduce the fractional integro-partial differential governing equation to a fractional ordinary differential equation in the time domain. Afterwards, the predictor-corrector method is used to solve the nonlinear fractional time-dependent equation. Finally, the influences of nonlocal parameter, order of fractional derivative and viscoelasticity coefficient on the nonlinear time response of fractional viscoelastic nanobeams are discussed in detail. Moreover, comparisons are made between the time responses of linear and nonlinear models.

  12. Oxygen and sulfur isotope fractionation during methane dependent sulfate reduction in high pressure continuous incubation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deusner, C.; Brunner, B.; Holler, T.; Widdel, F.; Ferdelman, T. G.

    2009-12-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction in marine sediments is an important sink in the global methane budget. However, many aspects of methane dependent sulfate reduction are not fully understood. We developed a novel high pressure biotechnical system to simulate marine conditions with high concentrations of dissolved gases, e.g. at gas seeps and gas hydrate systems. The system allows for batch, fed-batch and continuous gas-phase free incubation. We employ this system to study the kinetics and isotope fractionation during AOM at varying methane partial pressures up to 10 MPa. We present the results of long-term continuous and fed-batch incubations with highly active naturally enriched biomass from microbial mats from the Black Sea. During these experiments the methane partial pressure was increased stepwise from 0.1 to 10 MPa. The methane dependent sulfate reduction rate increased from 0.1 mmol/l/d to 3.5 mmol/l/d resulting from the increase in methane concentration and microbial growth. Sulfate reduction was negligible in the absence of methane. The sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction was strongly influenced by the concentration of dissolved methane. Sulfur isotope fractionation was highest at low methane concentrations, and lowest at high methane concentrations. Relative to sulfate reduction rates, oxygen isotope exchange between sulfate and water was highest at low methane concentrations, and lowest at high methane concentrations.

  13. THE ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE FRACTION OF 'UNCONVENTIONAL' GALAXIES: RED LATE TYPES AND BLUE EARLY TYPES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; He Jizhou; Wu Ping; Ding Yingping

    2009-07-10

    From the Main galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6, we construct two volume-limited samples with the luminosity -20.0 {<=} M{sub r} {<=} -18.5 and -22.40 {<=} M{sub r} {<=} -20.16, respectively, to explore the environmental dependence of the fraction of 'unconventional' galaxies: red late types and blue early types. We use the density estimator within the distance to the fifth nearest neighbor, and construct two samples at both extremes of density and perform comparative studies between them for each volume-limited sample. Results of two volume-limited samples show the same conclusions: the fraction of red late-type galaxies rises considerably with increasing local density, and that one of the blue early-type galaxies declines substantially with increasing local density. In addition, we note that bluer galaxies preferentially are late types, but the red galaxies are not dominated by early types.

  14. Tritium catalyzed deuterium tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.; Jung, J.; Gilligan, J.

    1984-04-01

    A preliminary assessment of the promise of the Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium (TCD) tokamak power reactors relative to that of deuterium-tritium (D-T) and catalyzed deuterium (Cat-D) tokamaks is undertaken. The TCD mode of operation is arrived at by converting the /sup 3/He from the D(D,n)/sup 3/He reaction into tritium, by neutron capture in the blanket; the tritium thus produced is fed into the plasma. There are three main parts to the assessment: blanket study, reactor design and economic analysis and an assessment of the prospects for improvements in the performance of TCD reactors (and in the promise of the TCD mode of operation, in general).

  15. (Un)true deuterium abundance in the Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prodanović, Tijana; Steigman, Gary; Fields, Brian D.

    2010-04-01

    Deuterium has a special place in cosmology, nuclear astrophysics, and galactic chemical evolution, because of its unique property that it is only created in the big bang nucleosynthesis while all other processes result in its net destruction. For this reason, among other things, deuterium abundance measurements in the interstellar medium (ISM) allow us to determine the fraction of interstellar gas that has been cycled through stars, and set constraints and learn about different Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) models. However, recent indications that deuterium might be preferentially depleted onto dust grains complicate our understanding about the meaning of measured ISM deuterium abundances. For this reason, recent estimates by Linsky et al. (2006) have yielded a lower bound to the “true”, undepleted, ISM deuterium abundance that is very close to the primordial abundance, indicating a small deuterium astration factor contrary to the demands of many GCE models. To avoid any prejudice about deuterium dust depletion along different lines of sight that are used to determine the “true” D abundance, we propose a model-independent, statistical Bayesian method to address this issue and determine in a model-independent manner the undepleted ISM D abundance. We find the best estimate for the gas-phase ISM deuterium abundance to be (D/H)ISM ≥ (2.0 ± 0.1) × 10-5. Presented are the results of Prodanović et al. (2009).

  16. Reporting and measurement of mass-dependent and mass-independent fractionation of mercury isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergquist, B. A.; Blum, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Hg isotope analysis by MC-ICP-MS is an important new approach for fingerprinting Hg sources and monitoring Hg redox reactions and bioaccumulation, especially with the recent discovery of mass independent Hg isotope fractionation. Unfortunately research groups have adopted different standards, definitions of delta values, and methods of isotopic measurement. We suggest that a single standard, NIST SRM 3133, be adopted for reporting the isotopic variability of Hg isotopes. Isotope ratios should be determined by sample-standard bracketing (SSB) during analysis and reported as permil (‰) deviation from SRM 3133. For the highest precision and accuracy, a Tl internal standard along with SSB should be used to correct instrumental mass bias. Measurement routines should also include on-peak zero corrections and matching of concentration and matrix between the samples and bracketing standard. For samples that display mass-dependent fractionation (MDF), only one delta value needs to be reported (δ202/198Hg). Mass-independent fractionation (MIF) (Jackson et al., 2006; Bergquist et al., 2006; Bergquist and Blum, submitted) requires additional nomenclature, and we suggest reporting MIF as the deviation in isotope ratios from the theoretical mass dependent kinetic isotope fractionation (Δxxx/198Hg)¬. External reproducibility should be monitored by analysis of secondary standards. For studies of MDF, we use an in-house secondary standard solution made from metallic Hg mined from Almaden Spain and obtain a δ202Hg of -0.55 ±0.06‰ (2SD). For studies of MIF, we use NRCC CRM DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) and obtain a mean value of δ202Hg of +0.19 ±0.13‰ (2SD), Δ201Hg of +0.89 ±0.07‰ (2SD) , and Δ199Hg of +1.07 ±0.08‰ (2SD).

  17. ORIGINS OF NON-MASS-DEPENDENT FRACTIONATION OF EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL OXYGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Barcena, Homar; Connolly, Harold C.

    2012-08-01

    The distribution of oxygen isotopes in meteorites and within the earliest solids that formed in the solar system hints that the precursors of these materials must have undergone a mass-independent process. The mass-independent process is specifically one that fractionates {sup 16}O from {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O. This chemical signature is indicative of non-equilibrium processing, which bear resemblance to some unusual terrestrial phenomenon such as fractionation of ozone in the upper Earth atmosphere. That the mass-independent fractionation of oxygen isotopes is preserved within petrological records presents planetary scientists interesting clues to the events that may have occurred during the formation of the solar system. Currently, there are several hypotheses on the origins of the oxygen isotope distribution within primitive planetary materials, which include both thermal and photochemical models. We present a new model based on a physico-chemical hypothesis for the origin of non-mass-dependent O-isotope distribution in oxygen-bearing extra-terrestrial materials, which originated from the disproportionation of CO in dark molecular clouds to create CO{sub 2} reservoirs. The disproportionation created a reservoir of heavy oxygen isotopes and could have occurred throughout the evolution of the disk. The CO{sub 2} was a carrier of the isotope anomaly in the solar nebula and we propose that non-steady-state mixing of these reservoirs with the early rock-forming materials during their formation corresponds with the birth and evolution of the solar system.

  18. Inelastic dark matter with spin-dependent couplings to protons and large modulation fractions in DAMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopel, Stefano; Yoon, Kook-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    We discuss a scenario where the DAMA modulation effect is explained by a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) which upscatters inelastically to a heavier state and predominantly couples to the spin of protons. In this scenario constraints from xenon and germanium targets are evaded dynamically, due to the suppression of the WIMP coupling to neutrons, while those from fluorine targets are evaded kinematically, because the minimal WIMP incoming speed required to trigger upscatters off fluorine exceeds the maximal WIMP velocity in the Galaxy, or is very close to it. In this scenario WIMP scatterings off sodium are usually sensitive to the large-speed tail of the WIMP velocity distribution and modulated fractions of the signal close to unity arise in a natural way. On the other hand, a halo-independent analysis with more conservative assumptions about the WIMP velocity distribution allows to extend the viable parameter space to configurations where large modulated fractions are not strictly necessary. We discuss large modulated fractions in the Maxwellian case showing that they imply a departure from the usual cosine time dependence of the expected signal in DAMA. However we explicitly show that the DAMA data is not sensitive to this distortion, both in time and frequency space, even in the extreme case of a 100 % modulated fraction. Moreover the same scenario provides an explanation of the maximum in the energy spectrum of the modulation amplitude detected by DAMA in terms of WIMPs whose minimal incoming speed matches the kinematic threshold for inelastic upscatters. For the elastic case the detection of such maximum suggests an inversion of the modulation phase below the present DAMA energy threshold, while this is not expected for inelastic scattering. This may allow to discriminate between the two scenarios in a future low-threshold analysis of the DAMA data.

  19. Low energy cosmic ray positron fraction explained by charge-sign dependent solar modulation.

    PubMed

    Maccione, Luca

    2013-02-22

    We compute cosmic ray (CR) nuclei, proton, antiproton, electron, and positron spectra below 1 TeV at Earth by means of a detailed transport description in the galaxy and in the solar system. CR spectra below 10 GeV are strongly modified by charge-sign dependent propagation effects. These depend on the polarity of the solar magnetic field and therefore vary with the solar cycle. The puzzling discrepancy between the low-energy positron fraction measured by PAMELA and AMS-01 is then easily explained by their different data-taking epochs. We reproduce the observed spectra of CR light nuclei within the same galactic and solar-system propagation model.

  20. An inverse time-dependent source problem for a time-fractional diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, T.; Li, X. L.; Li, Y. S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper is devoted to identifying a time-dependent source term in a multi-dimensional time-fractional diffusion equation from boundary Cauchy data. The existence and uniqueness of a strong solution for the corresponding direct problem with homogeneous Neumann boundary condition are firstly proved. We provide the uniqueness and a stability estimate for the inverse time-dependent source problem. Then we use the Tikhonov regularization method to solve the inverse source problem and propose a conjugate gradient algorithm to find a good approximation to the minimizer of the Tikhonov regularization functional. Numerical examples in one-dimensional and two-dimensional cases are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. This paper was supported by the NSF of China (11371181) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (lzujbky-2013-k02).

  1. Retention and release mechanisms of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberkofler, M.; Reinelt, M.; Linsmeier, Ch.

    2011-06-01

    The fraction of deuterium (D) that is retained upon irradiation of beryllium (Be) as well as the temperatures at which implanted D is released are of importance for the international fusion experiment ITER, where Be will be used as an armor material. The influence of single parameters on retention and release is investigated in laboratory experiments performed under well defined conditions with the aim to identify dominant underlying mechanisms and thus be able to predict the behavior of the Be wall in ITER. Recent progress in the quantification of retained fractions and release temperatures as well as in the understanding of the governing mechanisms is presented. The retained fraction upon implantation of D at 1 keV into Be(1 1 2¯ 0) to fluences far below the saturation threshold of 10 21 m -2 is almost 95%, the remaining 5% being attributed to reflection at the surface. At these low fluences, no dependence of the retained fractions on implantation energy is observed. At fluences of the order of 10 21 m -2 and higher, saturation of the irradiated material affects the retention, leading to lower retained fractions. Furthermore, at these fluences the retained fractions decrease with decreasing implantation energies. Differences in the retained fractions from implanted Be(1 1 2¯ 0) and polycrystalline Be are explained by anisotropic diffusion of interstitials during implantation, leading to an amount of surviving D-trap complexes that depends on surface-orientation. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) spectra are recorded after implantation of fluences of the order of 10 19 m -2 at various energies and simulated by means of a newly developed code based on coupled reaction-diffusion systems (CRDS). The asymmetric shape of the TPD peaks is reproduced by introducing a local D accumulation process into the model.

  2. Dialysis experiments for assessing the pH-dependent sorption of sulfonamides to soil clay fractions.

    PubMed

    Anskjær, G G; Krogh, K A; Halling-Sørensen, B

    2014-01-01

    Equilibrium dialysis experiments, a novel approach for conducting soil/water distribution experiments in environmental samples, were found to be applicable for assessing pH-dependent partitioning and to quantify the sorption of three sulfonamides, sulfadiazine, sulfadoxine, and sulfacetamide. Clay fractions from two agricultural soils including both particulate and dissolved soil matter were used in the experiments to achieve a high sorption capacity when varying pH in a relevant environmental range. Stabilizing and controlling pH was done by using organic buffers. In two clay fractions, Kd for sulfadiazine was determined to be 43 and 129 L kg(-1), and 1.3 and 4.6 L kg(-1) at pH 4.0 and pH 9.0, respectively. This corresponded to Kd for the neutral and ionized form of sulfadiazine, respectively. The difference in sulfadiazine sorption between the two clay fractions could to some extent be related to the difference in the amount of organic carbon. Sorption experiments with sulfacetamide and sulfadoxine also exhibited decreasing sorption when increasing pH. At low pH, maximum Kd for sulfacetamide and sulfadoxine was determined to be 83 and 211 L kg(-1), respectively, while at high pH minimum Kd was 4.8 and 1.2 L kg(-1), respectively. Hence, compound speciation was important for the quantity of sorbed sulfonamide, which was confirmed by a correlation (R(2)) close to unity, when using the experimentally obtained Kd values with a simple model weighing the contribution from the neutral and the ionized compound, respectively.

  3. Fractional photo-current dependence of graphene quantum dots prepared from carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sumana; Ghosh, Sujoy; Fralaide, Michael; Narayanan, T N; Pillai, Vijayamohanan K; Talapatra, Saikat

    2015-10-14

    We report on the photo-conductivity studies of chemically synthesized graphene quantum dots (GQDs) of average size 12 nm obtained by the oxidative acid treatment of MWCNTs. The dependence of photocurrent Iph (Iph = Iill - Idark) on the laser intensity P under a wide range of laser intensities (5 mW ≤ P ≤ 60 mW) shows a fractional power dependence of Iph on light intensity. The temperature dependence (300 K < T < 50 K) of Iph observed in thin films of these GQDs indicates that in the higher temperature region (T > ∼100 K), as the temperature increases, the number of thermally generated carriers increase resulting in increased Iph. At sufficiently low temperatures (T ≤ 100 K), a constant Iph is observed, indicating a constant photo-carrier density. Such a behavior is typically observed in many photoactive disordered semiconductors, which are often used in a variety of applications. We believe that the investigations presented here will enhance our understanding of the photocurrent generation phenomenon in chemically obtained GQDs. PMID:26351706

  4. Novel type of phorbol ester-dependent protein phosphorylation in the particulate fraction of mouse epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwendt, M.; Kittstein, W.; Marks, F.

    1986-06-13

    In a Triton X100-extract from the particulate fraction of mouse epidermis but also of other murine tissues, the phosphorylation of a protein with the relative molecular mass of 82,000 (p82) is found to be dependent on phosphatidyl serine and the tumor promoting phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Unlike protein kinase C-catalyzed phosphorylation, p82 phosphorylation is neither observed in the presence of high concentrations of Ca/sup 2 +/ and phosphatidyl serine alone nor after addition of exogenous protein kinase C. Dioctanoylglycerol and the incomplete promoter 12-O-retinoylphorbol-13-acetate are also capable of stimulating p82 phosphorylation, whereas the non-promoting phorbol ester 4-O-methyl-TPA is at least 100-fold less active in this respect.

  5. Deuterium accumulation in beryllium oxide layer exposed to deuterium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, V. M.; Alimov, V. Kh.; Gavrilov, L. E.

    1998-10-01

    The interaction of deuterium atoms with beryllium TIP-30 was studied at temperatures of 340, 500 and 740 K. After D atom exposure, the depth distributions of deuterium atoms and molecules in Be were measured using combined Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Residual Gas Analysis (RGA) methods. It was shown that deuterium is mainly accumulated in the oxide layer although long tails are also observed. Deuterium is retained in two states - atomic and molecular forms. The amount of trapped deuterium in samples decreases during the sample storage in vacuum or air at room temperature. The results were explained by the chemical bonding of D atoms in BeO oxide with beryllium hydroxide formation and the trapping of deuterium molecules in bubbles which are formed at growth defects in the oxide layer.

  6. Load-dependent destabilization of the γ-rotor shaft in FOF1 ATP synthase revealed by hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Vahidi, Siavash; Bi, Yumin; Dunn, Stanley D.; Konermann, Lars

    2016-01-01

    FoF1 is a membrane-bound molecular motor that uses proton-motive force (PMF) to drive the synthesis of ATP from ADP and Pi. Reverse operation generates PMF via ATP hydrolysis. Catalysis in either direction involves rotation of the γε shaft that connects the α3β3 head and the membrane-anchored cn ring. X-ray crystallography and other techniques have provided insights into the structure and function of FoF1 subcomplexes. However, interrogating the conformational dynamics of intact membrane-bound FoF1 during rotational catalysis has proven to be difficult. Here, we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to probe the inner workings of FoF1 in its natural membrane-bound state. A pronounced destabilization of the γ C-terminal helix during hydrolysis-driven rotation was observed. This behavior is attributed to torsional stress in γ, arising from γ⋅⋅⋅α3β3 interactions that cause resistance during γ rotation within the apical bearing. Intriguingly, we find that destabilization of γ occurs only when FoF1 operates against a PMF-induced torque; the effect disappears when PMF is eliminated by an uncoupler. This behavior resembles the properties of automotive engines, where bearings inflict greater forces on the crankshaft when operated under load than during idling. PMID:26884184

  7. Load-dependent destabilization of the γ-rotor shaft in FOF1 ATP synthase revealed by hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vahidi, Siavash; Bi, Yumin; Dunn, Stanley D; Konermann, Lars

    2016-03-01

    FoF1 is a membrane-bound molecular motor that uses proton-motive force (PMF) to drive the synthesis of ATP from ADP and Pi. Reverse operation generates PMF via ATP hydrolysis. Catalysis in either direction involves rotation of the γε shaft that connects the α3β3 head and the membrane-anchored cn ring. X-ray crystallography and other techniques have provided insights into the structure and function of FoF1 subcomplexes. However, interrogating the conformational dynamics of intact membrane-bound FoF1 during rotational catalysis has proven to be difficult. Here, we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to probe the inner workings of FoF1 in its natural membrane-bound state. A pronounced destabilization of the γ C-terminal helix during hydrolysis-driven rotation was observed. This behavior is attributed to torsional stress in γ, arising from γ⋅⋅⋅α3β3 interactions that cause resistance during γ rotation within the apical bearing. Intriguingly, we find that destabilization of γ occurs only when FoF1 operates against a PMF-induced torque; the effect disappears when PMF is eliminated by an uncoupler. This behavior resembles the properties of automotive engines, where bearings inflict greater forces on the crankshaft when operated under load than during idling. PMID:26884184

  8. Diffusion in heterogeneous media: An iterative scheme for finding approximate solutions to fractional differential equations with time-dependent coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bologna, Mauro; Svenkeson, Adam; West, Bruce J.; Grigolini, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    Diffusion processes in heterogeneous media, and biological systems in particular, are riddled with the difficult theoretical issue of whether the true origin of anomalous behavior is renewal or memory, or a special combination of the two. Accounting for the possible mixture of renewal and memory sources of subdiffusion is challenging from a computational point of view as well. This problem is exacerbated by the limited number of techniques available for solving fractional diffusion equations with time-dependent coefficients. We propose an iterative scheme for solving fractional differential equations with time-dependent coefficients that is based on a parametric expansion in the fractional index. We demonstrate how this method can be used to predict the long-time behavior of nonautonomous fractional differential equations by studying the anomalous diffusion process arising from a mixture of renewal and memory sources.

  9. Analytical solutions to the fractional advection-diffusion equation with time-dependent pulses on the boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubbab, Qammar; Mirza, Itrat Abbas; Qureshi, M. Zubair Akbar

    2016-07-01

    The time-fractional advection-diffusion equation with Caputo-Fabrizio fractional derivatives (fractional derivatives without singular kernel) is considered under the time-dependent emissions on the boundary and the first order chemical reaction. The non-dimensional problem is formulated by using suitable dimensionless variables and the fundamental solutions to the Dirichlet problem for the fractional advection-diffusion equation are determined using the integral transforms technique. The fundamental solutions for the ordinary advection-diffusion equation, fractional and ordinary diffusion equation are obtained as limiting cases of the previous model. Using Duhamel's principle, the analytical solutions to the Dirichlet problem with time-dependent boundary pulses have been obtained. The influence of the fractional parameter and of the drift parameter on the solute concentration in various spatial positions was analyzed by numerical calculations. It is found that the variation of the fractional parameter has a significant effect on the solute concentration, namely, the memory effects lead to the retardation of the mass transport.

  10. Variations in the magnitude of non mass dependent sulfur fractionation in the Archean atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claire, M.; Kasting, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Recent experimental data have enabled quantitatively meaningful computations of the non-mass dependent fractionation of sulfur’s isotopes (Δ33S) that exemplify the Archean rock record. The Δ33S signal originates as a result of fine structure in the absorption cross-section of SO2 isotopologues [1], which only undergo significant photolysis in reducing atmospheres [2]. The Δ33S signal produced by SO2 photolysis varies significantly between 190 and 220 nm, and thus is strongly dependent on any other atmospheric gases which absorb photons in this range [3], as well as the height at which photolysis occurs. A model that is capable of resolving the altitude-dependent radiative transfer through a realistic self-consistent reducing atmosphere is therefore essential when making direct comparisons between atmospheric Δ33S production and the rock record. In this work, we investigate how the magnitude of Δ33S might vary as function of atmospheric composition, which in turn allows the rock record to constrain the Archean atmosphere. Other recent work on this topic using simplied atmospheric models has implicated large concentrations of SO2 [5], OCS [3], and CO2 [6] as being responsible for the variations in Archean Δ33S. We present results from an altitude-dependent photochemical model of Archean photochemistry [4] of necessary complexity to resolve the complicated redox structure of the Archean atmosphere. We show that while increased concentrations of these gases all affect Δ33S in an unconstrained model, the atmospheric conditions required for OCS or SO2 shielding are unlikely to occur in an Archean atmosphere constrained by reasonable expectations of volcanic and biogenic fluxes. Within the context of plausible Archean atmospheres, we investigate how shielding due to changing amounts of CO2, biogenic sulfur gases, and fractal organic haze [7] affect the magnitude of Δ33S produced by the Archean atmosphere, and show why simplified atmospheric modeling may lead to

  11. An update on the Thermal Gradient Induced Non -Mass-Dependent Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T.; Niles, P. B.; Bao, H.; Socki, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mass flow and compositional gradient (elemental and isotope separation) occur when fluid(s) or gas(es) in an enclosure is subjected to a thermal gradient, and the phenomenon is named thermal diffusion. Gas phase thermal diffusion has been experimentally and theoretically investigated for more than a century, although there has not been a satisfactory theory to date. Nevertheless, theories predict that when dealing with a multi-isotope system, such as O16-O17-O18, S32-S33-S34-S36, or Ne20-Ne21-Ne22, the mass difference is the only term in the thermal diffusion separation factors that distinguish one isotope pair from another. Thus a mass dependent relationship is expected. For O-bearing molecules the α17O/ α 18O is expected to be at 0.5 to 0.515, and for S-bearing molecules the α33S/ α 34S at 0.5 to 0.508, where α is isotope fractionation factor between cold and warm reservoirs. We recently reported that thermal diffusion generates non-mass dependent (NMD) isotope fractionation for low-pressure O2 and SF6 gases. The observed NMD phenomenon in the simple thermal-diffusion experiments demands quantitative validation and theoretical explanation. It was suggested that additional (not mass related) terms need to be theoretically considered in the order to account for the observations. In addition to the pressure and temperature dependency illustrated in our earlier report, the role of turbulence, batch gas effects, and whether it is only a transient, non-equilibrium effect have been examined in this study. We report here new results on low-pressure O2 gas thermal diffusion. (1) In a purely diffusive vertical two-bulb setting with colder reservoir at lower position, time course experiments showed that the NMD effect persists after the system reaches isotopic steady state between warmer and colder compartments, suggesting that the effect is not a transient one. (2) When the average temperature approaching condensation point for O2, the 17O switches to migrating

  12. Nucleation and growth of micellar polycrystals under time-dependent volume fraction conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louhichi, Ameur; Tamborini, Elisa; Ghofraniha, Neda; Caton, François; Roux, Denis; Oberdisse, Julian; Cipelletti, Luca; Ramos, Laurence

    2013-03-01

    We study the freezing kinetics of colloidal polycrystals made of micelles of Pluronic F108, a thermosensitive copolymer, to which a small amount of silica nanoparticles of a size comparable to that of the micelles are added. We use rheology and calorimetry to measure Tc, the crystallization temperature, and find that Tc increases with the heating rate Ṫ used to crystallize the sample. To rationalize our results, we first use viscosity measurements to establish a linear mapping between temperature T and the effective volume fraction, φ, of the micelles, treated as hard spheres. Next, we reproduce the experimental Ṫ dependence of the crystallization temperature with numerical calculations based on standard models for the nucleation and growth of hard-sphere crystals, classical nucleation theory and the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov theory. The models have been adapted to account for the peculiarities of our experiments: the presence of nanoparticles that are expelled in the grain boundaries and the steady increase of T and, hence, φ during the experiment. We moreover show that the polycrystal grain size obtained from the calculations is in good agreement with light microscopy data. Finally, we find that the φ dependence of the nucleation rate for the micellar polycrystal is in remarkable quantitative agreement with that found in previous experiments on colloidal hard spheres. These results suggests that deep analogies exist between hard-sphere colloidal crystals and Pluronics micellar crystals, in spite of the difference in particle softness. More generally, our results demonstrate that crystallization processes can be quantitatively probed using standard rheometry.

  13. Integration by parts and Pohozaev identities for space-dependent fractional-order operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubb, Gerd

    2016-08-01

    Consider a classical elliptic pseudodifferential operator P on Rn of order 2a (0 < a < 1) with even symbol. For example, P = A(x , D)a where A (x , D) is a second-order strongly elliptic differential operator; the fractional Laplacian (- Δ)a is a particular case. For solutions u of the Dirichlet problem on a bounded smooth subset Ω ⊂Rn, we show an integration-by-parts formula with a boundary integral involving (d-a u)|∂Ω, where d (x) = dist (x , ∂ Ω). This extends recent results of Ros-Oton, Serra and Valdinoci, to operators that are x-dependent, nonsymmetric, and have lower-order parts. We also generalize their formula of Pohozaev-type, that can be used to prove unique continuation properties, and nonexistence of nontrivial solutions of semilinear problems. An illustration is given with P =(- Δ +m2)a. The basic step in our analysis is a factorization of P, P ∼P-P+, where we set up a calculus for the generalized pseudodifferential operators P± that come out of the construction.

  14. Time-dependence of sea-ice concentration and multiyear ice fraction in the Arctic Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gloersen, P.; Zwally, H.J.; Chang, A.T.C.; Hall, D.K.; Campbell, W.J.; Ramseier, R.O.

    1978-01-01

    The time variation of the sea-ice concentration and multiyear ice fraction within the pack ice in the Arctic Basin is examined, using microwave images of sea ice recently acquired by the Nimbus-5 spacecraft and the NASA CV-990 airborne laboratory. The images used for these studies were constructed from data acquired from the Electrically Scanned Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) which records radiation from earth and its atmosphere at a wavelength of 1.55 cm. Data are analyzed for four seasons during 1973-1975 to illustrate some basic differences in the properties of the sea ice during those times. Spacecraft data are compared with corresponding NASA CV-990 airborne laboratory data obtained over wide areas in the Arctic Basin during the Main Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment (1975) to illustrate the applicability of passive-microwave remote sensing for monitoring the time dependence of sea-ice concentration (divergence). These observations indicate significant variations in the sea-ice concentration in the spring, late fall and early winter. In addition, deep in the interior of the Arctic polar sea-ice pack, heretofore unobserved large areas, several hundred kilometers in extent, of sea-ice concentrations as low as 50% are indicated. ?? 1978 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  15. Human Milk MicroRNA and Total RNA Differ Depending on Milk Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Alsaweed, Mohammed; Hepworth, Anna R; Lefèvre, Christophe; Hartmann, Peter E; Geddes, Donna T; Hassiotou, Foteini

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNA have been recently discovered in human milk signifying potentially important functions for both the lactating breast and the infant. Whilst human milk microRNA have started to be explored, little data exist on the evaluation of sample processing, and analysis to ensure that a full spectrum of microRNA can be obtained. Human milk comprises three main fractions: cells, skim milk, and lipids. Typically, the skim milk fraction has been measured in isolation despite evidence that the lipid fraction may contain more microRNA. This study aimed to standardize isolation of microRNA and total RNA from all three fractions of human milk to determine the most appropriate sampling and analysis procedure for future studies. Three different methods from eight commercially available kits were tested for their efficacy in extracting total RNA and microRNA from the lipid, skim, and cell fractions of human milk. Each fraction yielded different concentrations of RNA and microRNA, with the highest quantities found in the cell and lipid fractions, and the lowest in skim milk. The column-based phenol-free method was the most efficient extraction method for all three milk fractions. Two microRNAs were expressed and validated in the three milk fractions by qPCR using the three recommended extraction kits for each fraction. High expression levels were identified in the skim and lipid milk factions for these microRNAs. These results suggest that careful consideration of both the human milk sample preparation and extraction protocols should be made prior to embarking upon research in this area.

  16. Human Milk MicroRNA and Total RNA Differ Depending on Milk Fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Alsaweed, Mohammed; Hepworth, Anna R.; Lefèvre, Christophe; Hartmann, Peter E.; Geddes, Donna T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT MicroRNA have been recently discovered in human milk signifying potentially important functions for both the lactating breast and the infant. Whilst human milk microRNA have started to be explored, little data exist on the evaluation of sample processing, and analysis to ensure that a full spectrum of microRNA can be obtained. Human milk comprises three main fractions: cells, skim milk, and lipids. Typically, the skim milk fraction has been measured in isolation despite evidence that the lipid fraction may contain more microRNA. This study aimed to standardize isolation of microRNA and total RNA from all three fractions of human milk to determine the most appropriate sampling and analysis procedure for future studies. Three different methods from eight commercially available kits were tested for their efficacy in extracting total RNA and microRNA from the lipid, skim, and cell fractions of human milk. Each fraction yielded different concentrations of RNA and microRNA, with the highest quantities found in the cell and lipid fractions, and the lowest in skim milk. The column‐based phenol‐free method was the most efficient extraction method for all three milk fractions. Two microRNAs were expressed and validated in the three milk fractions by qPCR using the three recommended extraction kits for each fraction. High expression levels were identified in the skim and lipid milk factions for these microRNAs. These results suggest that careful consideration of both the human milk sample preparation and extraction protocols should be made prior to embarking upon research in this area. J. Cell. Biochem. 116: 2397–2407, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25925799

  17. Trichomonas vaginalis: identification of a phospholipase A-dependent hemolytic activity in a vesicular subcellular fraction.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito D; González-Salazar, Francisco; Lozano-Garza, Hector G; Cortes-Gutierrez, Elva I; Palaclos-Corona, Rebeca; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia G; Ramírez-Bon, Enrique; Said-Fernández, Salvador

    2003-02-01

    Trichomonad total extracts (TTE), or vesicular (P30) and soluble (530) subcellular fractions from 3 pathogenic Trichomonas vaginalis strains (GT-3. GT-13. and GT-15), lysed both human and Sprague-Dawley rat erythrocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The entire hemolytic activity of TTE was located in P30, showing 2 peaks of maximum activity, one at pH 6.0 and another at pH 8.0. in the presence of 1 mM Ca2+. Hemolytic activity on rat erythrocytes was greater at pH 6.0 16.71 +/- 0.33 hemolytic units IHU]/mg/hr to 11.60 +/- 0.24 HU/mg/hr) than at pH 8.0 (3.81 +/- 0.30 HU/mg/hr to 5.75 +/- 0.65 HU/mg/hr). and it was greater than that on human red blood cells at pH 6.0 (2.67 +/- 0.19 HU/mg/hr to 4.08 +/- 0.15 HU/mg/hr) or pH 8.0 (2.24 +/- 0.0 9 HU/mg/hr to 2.81 +/- 0.06 HU/mg/hr). The alkaline and acidic hemolytic activity diminished (60-93% at pH 6.0 and 78-93% at pH 8.0) by the effect of 80 microM Rosenthal's inhibitor, which also inhibited 27-45% and 29-54% trichomonad alkaline and acidic phospholipase A activities, respectively. Vesicles, vacuoles, and hydrogenosomes were rich in P30. Trichomonas vaginalis has a hemolytic PLA, which could be involved in its cytopathogenic mechanism. PMID:12659311

  18. Coil fraction-dependent phase behaviour of a model globular protein–polymer diblock copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Carla S.; Olsen, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    The self-assembly of the model globular protein–polymer block copolymer mCherry-b-poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) is explored across a range of polymer coil fractions from 0.21 to 0.82 to produce a phase diagram for these materials as a function of molecular composition. Overall, four types of morphologies were observed: hexagonally packed cylinders, perforated lamellae, lamellae, and disordered nanostructures. Across all coil fractions and morphologies, a lyotropic re-entrant order–disorder transition in water was observed, with disordered structures below 30 wt% and above 70 wt% and well-ordered morphologies at intermediate concentrations. Solid state samples prepared by solvent evaporation show moderately ordered structures similar to those observed in 60 wt% solutions, suggesting that bulk structures result from kinetic trapping of morphologies which appear at lower concentrations. While highly ordered cylindrical nanostructures are observed around a bioconjugate polymer volume fraction of 0.3 and well-ordered lamellae are seen near a volume fraction of 0.6, materials at lower or higher coil fractions become increasingly disordered. Notable differences between the phase behaviour of globular protein–polymer block copolymers and coil–coil diblock copolymers include the lack of spherical nanostructures at either high or low polymer coil fractions as well as shifted phase boundaries between morphologies which result in an asymmetric phase diagram.

  19. Coil fraction-dependent phase behaviour of a model globular protein-polymer diblock copolymer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Carla S; Olsen, Bradley D

    2014-05-01

    The self-assembly of the model globular protein-polymer block copolymer mCherry-b-poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) is explored across a range of polymer coil fractions from 0.21 to 0.82 to produce a phase diagram for these materials as a function of molecular composition. Overall, four types of morphologies were observed: hexagonally packed cylinders, perforated lamellae, lamellae, and disordered nanostructures. Across all coil fractions and morphologies, a lyotropic re-entrant order-disorder transition in water was observed, with disordered structures below 30 wt% and above 70 wt% and well-ordered morphologies at intermediate concentrations. Solid state samples prepared by solvent evaporation show moderately ordered structures similar to those observed in 60 wt% solutions, suggesting that bulk structures result from kinetic trapping of morphologies which appear at lower concentrations. While highly ordered cylindrical nanostructures are observed around a bioconjugate polymer volume fraction of 0.3 and well-ordered lamellae are seen near a volume fraction of 0.6, materials at lower or higher coil fractions become increasingly disordered. Notable differences between the phase behaviour of globular protein-polymer block copolymers and coil-coil diblock copolymers include the lack of spherical nanostructures at either high or low polymer coil fractions as well as shifted phase boundaries between morphologies which result in an asymmetric phase diagram. PMID:24695642

  20. A molecular dynamic model for analyzing concentrations of electrolytes: Fractional molar dependences of microstructure properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalansky, D.; Popova, E.; Gladyshev, P.; Dushanov, E.; Kholmurodov, Kh.

    2014-12-01

    Aqueous electrolyte solutions play an important role in many electrophysical and chemical processes in aerospace technology and industrial applications. As noncovalent interactions, the interactions between ions are crucially important for biomolecular structures as well (protein structure folding, molecular level processes followed by ionic pair correlations, the formation of flexible hydrate shells, and so on). Specifically, ions (cations and anions with the same valence charges) can form stable pairs if their sizes match. The formation of ionic pairs can substantially affect the thermodynamic stabilities of proteins in the alkali salts physiologically present in the human body. Research aims and problems impose severe demands on readjustments of the ionic force fields and potential parameters developed to describe aqueous solutions and electrolytic systems. Ionic solutions and their interaction with biomolecules have been observed for over 100 years [1], but the behavior of such solutions remains poorly studied today. New data obtained in this work deals with parameterization strategies and adjustments for the ionic force fields of the alkali cations and halide anions that should be helpful in biomolecular research. Using molecular dynamics (MD) models, four electrolytic systems (HCl-H2O, LiCl-H2O, NaCl-H2O, and KCl-H2O) are investigated as binary mixtures of water and cations and anions, respectively. The intermolecular interaction parameters are varied for two of the four model electrolytes (HCl-H2O and NaCl-H2O) to simulate the possibility of different ionic shells forming during interaction with water. It is found that varying the potential parameters strongly affects the dynamic and structural characteristics of electrolyte systems. MD simulations are performed in the temperature range of 300 to 600 K with a step of 50 K. MD simulations for all electrolyte models (HCl-H2O, LiCl-H2O, NaCl-H2O, KCl-H2O) are also conducted for different molar fractions of

  1. Species-dependent silicon isotope fractionation in unialgal cultures of marine diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, J. N.; Varela, D. E.; Brzezinski, M. A.; Beucher, C.

    2011-12-01

    Variations in the natural abundance of stable isotopes of silicon (expressed as δ30Si in %) are a key tool for studying the marine silicon (Si) cycle in modern and ancient oceans. In particular, this tool can be used to track relative differences in silicic acid drawdown in surface waters by siliceous microplankton. Diatoms are siliceous phytoplankton that dominate the cycling of Si in the oceans. They represent a major source of primary production and are important in the transfer of Si, nitrogen, phosphorus, and atmospheric carbon to the deep sea. Previous investigations of Si isotope fractionation in diatom cultures have ruled out the influence of temperature (12-22°C) and shown that Si fractionation was invariant in different species of temperate diatoms (De La Rocha et al. 1997). However, the application of this proxy for marine paleo-silicon reconstructions has typically only been used in polar regions, such as the Southern Ocean, where high primary production rates give rise to diatom-rich sediments. Here, we present results on the fractionation of Si isotopes by four species of polar diatoms grown in semi-continuous cultures (Chaetoceros brevis, Fragilariopsis kerguelensis, Porosira glacialis, and Thalassiosira antarctica). To compare with previous studies (De La Rocha et al, 1997), we also tested Si isotope fractionation by two species of temperate diatoms (Thalassiosira pseudonana and Thalassiosira weissflogii). The temperate species yielded Si isotope fractionation (Δ30Si) values of -0.81 % (±0.12, SD, n=11) for T. pseudonana and -1.03% (±0.09, SD, n=3) for T. weissflogii, that are identical to the previously reported fractionation of -1.1 % (±0.4, SD, n=6) (De La Rocha et al. 1997). Similarly, our data for polar species F. kerguelensis, P. glacialis and T. antarctica suggest a fractionation of -0.7 to -1.1 %. Interestingly, our preliminary results from Chaetoceros brevis cultures show a Si isotope fractionation value of about -2.61 % (±0.05, SD

  2. Salinity dependent hydrogen isotope fractionation in alkenones produced by coastal and open ocean haptophyte algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M'boule, Daniela; Chivall, David; Sinke-Schoen, Danielle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2014-04-01

    The hydrogen isotope fractionation in alkenones produced by haptophyte algae is a promising new proxy for paleosalinity reconstructions. To constrain and further develop this proxy the coastal haptophyte Isochrysis galbana and the open ocean haptophyte alga Emiliania huxleyi were cultured at different salinities. The fractionation factor, αalkenones-water, ranged between 0.853 and 0.902 for I. galbana and 0.789 and 0.822 for E. huxleyi. The results show a strong linear correlation between the fractionation factor α and salinity for E. huxleyi, in agreement with earlier studies, but also for I. galbana. Both haptophytes show the same response to changes in salinity, represented by the slopes of the α-salinity relationship (˜0.002 per salinity unit). This suggests that the same process, in both coastal as well as open ocean haptophytes, is responsible for reducing fractionation with increasing salinity. However, there is a significant difference in absolute isotope fractionation between E. huxleyi and I. galbana, i.e. E. huxleyi produces alkenones which are 90‰ more depleted in D under the same culturing conditions than I. galbana. Our data suggest that the δD of alkenones can be used to reconstruct relative shifts in paleosalinity in coastal as well as open ocean environments with careful consideration of species composition and other complicating factors especially in coastal regions.

  3. Deuterium-tritium experiments on TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, N. L.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J. W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Barnes, C. W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bateman, G.; Beer, M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Bush, C. E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Dorland, W.; Dudek, L.; Duong, H.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Evensen, H.; Fisch, N.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, R.; Fu, G.; Fujita, T.; Furth, H. P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gilbert, J.; Giola, J.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G. R.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hill, K. W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Hughes, M.; Hulse, R.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D. L.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Labik, G.; Lam, N. T.; LaMarche, P. H.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F. M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Loughlin, M. J.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Marmar, E.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mauel, M.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M. P.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D. C.; McGuire, K. M.; McKee, G.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mirnov, S. V.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G. A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Norris, M.; O'Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Parks, P.; Paul, S. F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Phillips, M.; Pitcher, S.; Pysher, R.; Qualls, A. L.; Raftapoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmunsen, D. A.; Redi, M. H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbaugh, S. A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scillia, R.; Scott, S. D.; Semenov, I.; Senko, T.; Sesnic, S.; Sissingh, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Snipes, J.; Stencel, J.; Stevens, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stodiek, W.; Strachan, J. D.; Stratton, B. C.; Swanson, J.; Synakowski, E.; Takahashi, H.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Terry, J.; Thompson, M. E.; Tighe, W.; Timberlake, J. R.; Tobita, K.; Towner, H. H.; Tuszewski, M.; Von Halle, A.; Vannoy, C.; Viola, M.; Goeler, S. von; Voorhees, D.; Walters, R. T.; Wester, R.; White, R.; Wieland, R.; Wilgen, J. B.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Winston, J.; Wright, K.; Wong, K.-L.; Woskov, P.; Wurden, G. A.; Yamada, M.; Yoshikawa, S.; Young, K. M.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zavereev, V.; Zweben, S. J.

    1995-09-01

    A peak fusion power production of 9.3±0.7 MW has been achieved on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in deuterium plasmas heated by co and counter injected deuterium and tritium neutral beams with a total power of 33.7 MW. The ratio of fusion power output to heating power input is 0.27. At the time of the highest neutron flux the plasma conditions are: Te(0)=11.5 keV, Ti(0)=44 keV, ne(0)=8.5×1019 m-3, and =2.2 giving τE=0.24 s. These conditions are similar to those found in the highest confinement deuterium plasmas. The measured D-T neutron yield is within 7% of computer code estimates based on profile measurements and within experimental uncertainties. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha fraction of 0.2% and central fusion power density of 2 MW/m3 similar to that expected in a fusion reactor. Even though the alpha velocity exceeds the Alfven velocity throughout the time of high neutron output in most high power plasmas, MHD activity is not substantially different from that in comparable deuterium plasmas and Alfven wave activity is low. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles is about 3% of the total as expected from alphas which are born on unconfined orbits. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas with similar externally applied conditions, the stored energy in electrons and ions is about 25% higher indicating improvements in confinement associated with D-T plasmas and consistent with modest electron heating expected from alpha particles. ICRF heating of D-T plasmas using up to 5.5 MW has resulted in 10 keV increases in central ion and 2.5 keV increases in central electron temperatures in relatively good agreement with code predictions. In these cases heating on the magnetic axis at 2ΩT gave up to 80% of the ICRF energy to ions.

  4. Deuterium-tritium experiments on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Bretz, N.L.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bateman, G.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Dorland, W.; Dudek, L.; Duong, H.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Evensen, H.; Fisch, N.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, R.; Fu, G.; Fujita, T.; Furth, H.P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gilbert, J.; Giola, J.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Hughes, M.; Hulse, R.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Labik, G.; Lam, N.T.; LaMarche, P.H.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F.M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Loughlin, M.J.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.K.; Marmar, E.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mauel, M.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.P.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D.C.; McGuire, K.M.; McKee, G.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Mirnov, S.V.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J.A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G.A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Norris, M.; OConnor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Parks, P.; Paul, S.F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Phillips, M.; Pitcher, S.; Pysher, R.; Qualls, A.L.; Raftapoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmunsen, D.A.; Redi, M.H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A.L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbaugh, S.A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G.L.; Scillia, R.; Scott, S.D.; Semenov, I.; Senko, T.

    1995-09-01

    A peak fusion power production of 9.3{plus_minus}0.7 MW has been achieved on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in deuterium plasmas heated by co and counter injected deuterium and tritium neutral beams with a total power of 33.7 MW. The ratio of fusion power output to heating power input is 0.27. At the time of the highest neutron flux the plasma conditions are: {ital T}{sub {ital e}}(0)=11.5 keV, {ital T}{sub {ital i}}(0)=44 keV, {ital n}{sub {ital e}}(0)=8.5{times}10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}, and {l_angle}{ital Z}{sub eff}{r_angle}=2.2 giving {tau}{sub {ital E}}=0.24 s. These conditions are similar to those found in the highest confinement deuterium plasmas. The measured D-T neutron yield is within 7% of computer code estimates based on profile measurements and within experimental uncertainties. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha fraction of 0.2% and central fusion power density of 2 MW/m{sup 3} similar to that expected in a fusion reactor. Even though the alpha velocity exceeds the Alfven velocity throughout the time of high neutron output in most high power plasmas, MHD activity is similar to that in comparable deuterium plasmas and Alfven wave activity is low. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles is about 3% of the total as expected from alphas which are born on unconfined orbits. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas with similar externally applied conditions, the stored energy in electrons and ions is about 25% higher indicating improvements in confinement associated with D-T plasmas and consistent with modest electron heating expected from alpha particles. ICRF heating of D-T plasmas using up to 5.5 MW has resulted in 10 keV increases in central ion and 2.5 keV increases in central electron temperatures in relatively good agreement with code predictions. In these cases heating on the magnetic axis at 2{Omega}{sub {ital T}} gave up to 80% of the ICRF energy to ions. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Characterizing time dependent anomalous diffusion process: A survey on fractional derivative and nonlinear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Song; Chen, Wen; Hon, Y. C.

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the temporal effects in the modeling of flows through porous media and particles transport. Studies will be made among the time fractional diffusion model and two classical nonlinear diffusion models. The effects of the parameters upon the mentioned models have been studied. By simulating the sub-diffusion processes and comparing the numerical results of these models under different boundary conditions, we can conclude that the time fractional diffusion model is more suitable for simulating the sub-diffusion with steady diffusion rate; whereas the nonlinear models are more appropriate for depicting the sub-diffusion under changing diffusion rate.

  6. Shock compression of precompressed deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M R; Crowhurst, J C; Zaug, J M; Bastea, S; Goncharov, A F; Militzer, B

    2011-07-31

    Here we report quasi-isentropic dynamic compression and thermodynamic characterization of solid, precompressed deuterium over an ultrafast time scale (< 100 ps) and a microscopic length scale (< 1 {micro}m). We further report a fast transition in shock wave compressed solid deuterium that is consistent with the ramp to shock transition, with a time scale of less than 10 ps. These results suggest that high-density dynamic compression of hydrogen may be possible on microscopic length scales.

  7. Laser-driven polarized hydrogen and deuterium internal targets

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.E.; Fedchak, J.A.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1995-08-01

    After completing comprehensive tests of the performance of the source with both hydrogen and deuterium gas, we began tests of a realistic polarized deuterium internal target. These tests involve characterizing the atomic polarization and dissociation fraction of atoms in a storage cell as a function of flow and magnetic field, and making direct measurements of the average nuclear tensor polarization of deuterium atoms in the storage cell. Transfer of polarization from the atomic electron to the nucleus as a result of D-D spin-exchange collisions was observed in deuterium, verifying calculations suggesting that high vector polarization in both hydrogen and deuterium can be obtained in a gas in spin temperature equilibrium without inducing RF transitions between the magnetic substates. In order to improve the durability of the system, the source glassware was redesigned to simplify construction and installation and eliminate stress points that led to frequent breakage. Improvements made to the nuclear polarimeter, which used the low energy {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He reaction to analyze the tensor polarization of the deuterium, included installing acceleration lenses constructed of wire mesh to improve pumping conductance, construction of a new holding field coil, and elimination of the Wien filter from the setup. These changes substantially simplified operation of the polarimeter and should have reduced depolarization in collisions with the wall. However, when a number of tests failed to show an improvement of the nuclear polarization, it was discovered that extended operation of the system with a section of teflon as a getter for potassium caused the dissociation fraction to decline with time under realistic operating conditions, suggesting that teflon may not be a suitable material to eliminate potassium from the target. We are replacing the teflon surfaces with drifilm-coated ones and plan to continue tests of the polarized internal target in this configuration.

  8. More than just halo mass: modelling how the red galaxy fraction depends on multiscale density in an HOD framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phleps, S.; Wilman, D. J.; Zibetti, S.; Budavári, T.

    2014-03-01

    The fraction of galaxies with red colours depends sensitively on environment, and on the way in which environment is measured. To distinguish competing theories for the quenching of star formation, a robust and complete description of environment is required, to be applied to a large sample of galaxies. The environment of galaxies can be described using the density field of neighbours on multiple scales - the multiscale density field. We are using the Millennium simulation and a simple halo occupation distribution (HOD) prescription which describes the multiscale density field of Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 galaxies to investigate the dependence of the fraction of red galaxies on the environment. Using a volume-limited sample, where we have sufficient galaxies in narrow density bins, we have more dynamic range in halo mass and density for satellite galaxies than for central galaxies. Therefore, we model the red fraction of central galaxies as a constant while we use a functional form to describe the red fraction of satellites as a function of halo mass which allows us to distinguish a sharp from a gradual transition. While it is clear that the data can only be explained by a gradual transition, an analysis of the multiscale density field on different scales suggests that colour segregation within the haloes is needed to explain the results. We also rule out a sharp transition for central galaxies, within the halo mass range sampled.

  9. Deuterium retention and surface modifications of nanocrystalline tungsten films exposed to high-flux plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    `t Hoen, M. H. J.; Dellasega, D.; Pezzoli, A.; Passoni, M.; Kleyn, A. W.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P. A.

    2015-08-01

    Deuterium retention studies are presented for nanostructured tungsten films exposed to high-flux deuterium plasmas. Thin tungsten films of ∼1 μm thickness were deposited with pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on bulk tungsten. Surface modifications were studied with scanning electron microscopy and deuterium retention with thermal desorption spectroscopy. Three types of PLD films with different densities and crystallinity were studied after exposure to deuterium plasmas. The surface temperature ranged from about 460 K at the periphery to about 520 K in the centre of the targets. The films withstand the intense plasma exposure well and maintain their overall integrity. An increase of deuterium retention is observed with decreasing tungsten density and crystallite size. We found that the filling of these thin films with deuterium is significantly faster than for pre-damaged polycrystalline tungsten. We observed formation of micrometer-sized blisters as well as structures on the nanometer scale, both depending on the layer type.

  10. The extent, time course, and fraction size dependence of mouse spinal cord recovery from radiation injury

    SciTech Connect

    Lavey, R.S.; Taylor, M.G.; Tward, J.D.

    1994-10-15

    This experiment was designed to assess: (a) the influence of fraction size and time interval between fractions on the tolerance of the spinal cord to high cumulative doses of radiation; and (b) the influence of the long-term recovery process on the tolerance of the spinal cord to reirradiation. The T10-L2 level of the spinal cord of C3Hf mice was irradiated using a conventionally fractionated regimen of 2.0 Gy once daily, a prolonged fractionated regimen of 1.2 Gy once daily, a hyperfractionated regimen of 1.2 Gy twice daily, or a single dose of 12 Gy followed 0-190 days later by a second dose of 5-20 Gy. Mice in the multifractionated regimen groups were given a single 15 Gy top-up- dose 24 h after reaching a cumulative fractionated dose of 24-70 Gy. Hind limb strength was measured weekly for 2 years after the completion of irradiation. Paralysis occurred in a bimodal time distribution, with peaks at 5-10 months and 15-23 months after the completion of irradiation. The cumulative radiation dose was directly associated with the incidence of paralysis in each radiation schedule (p<0.0001) and inversely associated with the time to onset of paralysis in the 1.2 Gy b.i.d. (p = 0.0001) and 2.0 Gy q.d. schedules (p = 0.03). The median latency of paralysis in each group was inversely associated with the incidence of paralysis in that group (p =<0.001). Decreasing the fraction size from 2.0 to 1.2 Gy once daily markedly increased the radiation tolerance of the spinal cord (p <0.0001), consistent with a very small alpha-beta value of -0.30 Gy ({approximately}95% confidence interval -0.72, +0.18) in the linear-quadratic model. Decreasing the time interval from 24 h to alternating 8 and 16 h periods produced an offsetting diminuation in cord tolerance (p <0.0001). 36 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Dependence of the Broad Absorption Line Quasar Fraction on Radio Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Francesco; Dai, Xinyu; Sivakoff, Gregory R.

    2008-11-01

    We find that the fraction of classical broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) among the FIRST radio sources in the Sloan Data Release 3, is 20.5+ 7.3-5.9% at the faintest radio powers detected (L1.4 GHz ~ 1032 erg s-1), and rapidly drops to lesssim8% at L1.4 GHz ~ 3 × 1033 erg s-1. Similarly, adopting the broader absorption index (AI) definition of Trump et al., we find the fraction of radio BALQSOs to be 44+ 8.1-7.8%, reducing to 23.1+ 7.3-6.1% at high luminosities. While the high fraction at low radio power is consistent with the recent near-IR estimates by Dai et al., the lower fraction at high radio powers is intriguing and confirms previous claims based on smaller samples. The trend is independent of the redshift range, the optical and radio flux selection limits, or the exact definition of a radio match. We also find that at fixed optical magnitude, the highest bins of radio luminosity are preferentially populated by non-BALQSOs, consistent with the overall trend. We do find, however, that those quasars identified as AI-BALQSOs but not under the classical definition do not show a significant drop in their fraction as a function of radio power, further supporting independent claims that these sources, characterized by lower equivalent width, may represent an independent class from the classical BALQSOs. We find the balnicity index, a measure of the absorption trough in BALQSOs, and the mean maximum wind velocity to be roughly constant at all radio powers. We discuss several plausible physical models which may explain the observed fast drop in the fraction of the classical BALQSOs with increasing radio power, although none is entirely satisfactory. A strictly evolutionary model for the BALQSO and radio emission phases requires a strong fine-tuning to work, while a simple geometric model, although still not capable of explaining polar BALQSOs and the paucity of FRII BALQSOs, is statistically successful in matching the data if part of the apparent radio

  12. Temperature Dependence and Recoil-free Fraction Effects in Olivines Across the Mg-Fe Solid Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sklute, E. C.; Rothstein, Y.; Dyar, M. D.; Schaefer, M. W.; Menzies, O. N.; Bland, P. A.; Berry, F. J.

    2005-01-01

    Olivine and pyroxene are the major ferromagnesian minerals in most meteorite types and in mafic igneous rocks that are dominant at the surface of the Earth. It is probable that they are the major mineralogical components at the surface of any planetary body that has undergone differentiation processes. In situ mineralogical studies of the rocks and soils on Mars suggest that olivine is a widespread mineral on that planet s surface (particularly at the Gusev site) and that it has been relatively unaffected by alteration. Thus an understanding of the characteristics of Mossbauer spectra of olivine is of great importance in interpreting MER results. However, variable temperature Mossbauer spectra of olivine, which are needed to quantify recoil-free fraction effects and to understand the temperature dependence of olivine spectra, are lacking in the literature. Thus, we present here a study of the temperature dependence and recoil-free fraction of a series of synthetic olivines.

  13. Influence of Deuterium Treatments on the Polysilicon-Based Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Photodetector.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Sung

    2016-06-01

    The electrical behavior of metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) Schottky barrier photodetector structure, depending on deuterium treatment, is analyzed by means of the dark current and the photocurrent measurements. Al/Ti bilayer was used as Schottky metal. The deuterium incorporation into the absorption layer, undoped polysilicon, was achieved with annealing process and with ion implantation process, respectively. In the photocurrent-to-dark current ratio measurement, deuterium-ion-implanted photodetector shows over hundred higher than the control device. It means that the heightening of the Schottky barrier and the passivation of grain boundary trap were achieved effectively through the deuterium ion implantation process. PMID:27427689

  14. Influence of Deuterium Treatments on the Polysilicon-Based Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Photodetector.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Sung

    2016-06-01

    The electrical behavior of metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) Schottky barrier photodetector structure, depending on deuterium treatment, is analyzed by means of the dark current and the photocurrent measurements. Al/Ti bilayer was used as Schottky metal. The deuterium incorporation into the absorption layer, undoped polysilicon, was achieved with annealing process and with ion implantation process, respectively. In the photocurrent-to-dark current ratio measurement, deuterium-ion-implanted photodetector shows over hundred higher than the control device. It means that the heightening of the Schottky barrier and the passivation of grain boundary trap were achieved effectively through the deuterium ion implantation process.

  15. Strain-dependent fractional molecular diffusion in humid spider silk fibres.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Igor; Seydel, Tilo; Greving, Imke; Blankenburg, Malte; Vollrath, Fritz; Müller, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Spider silk is a material well known for its outstanding mechanical properties, combining elasticity and tensile strength. The molecular mobility within the silk's polymer structure on the nanometre length scale importantly contributes to these macroscopic properties. We have therefore investigated the ensemble-averaged single-particle self-dynamics of the prevailing hydrogen atoms in humid spider dragline silk fibres on picosecond time scales in situ as a function of an externally applied tensile strain. We find that the molecular diffusion in the amorphous fraction of the oriented fibres can be described by a generalized fractional diffusion coefficient Kα that is independent of the observation length scale in the probed range from approximately 0.3-3.5 nm. Kα increases towards a diffusion coefficient of the classical Fickian type with increasing tensile strain consistent with an increasing loss of memory or entropy in the polymer matrix. PMID:27628174

  16. The dependence of optimal fractionation schemes on the spatial dose distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Craft, David; Salari, Ehsan; Ramakrishnan, Jagdish; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We consider the fractionation problem in radiation therapy. Tumor sites in which the dose-limiting organ at risk (OAR) receives a substantially lower dose than the tumor, bear potential for hypofractionation even if the α/β-ratio of the tumor is larger than the α/β-ratio of the OAR. In this work, we analyze the interdependence of the optimal fractionation scheme and the spatial dose distribution in the OAR. In particular, we derive a criterion under which a hypofractionation regimen is indicated for both a parallel and a serial OAR. The approach is based on the concept of the biologically effective dose (BED). For a hypothetical homogeneously irradiated OAR, it has been shown that hypofractionation is suggested by the BED model if the α/β-ratio of the OAR is larger than α/β-ratio of the tumor times the sparing factor, i.e. the ratio of the dose received by the tumor and the OAR. In this work, we generalize this result to inhomogeneous dose distributions in the OAR. For a parallel OAR, we determine the optimal fractionation scheme by minimizing the integral BED in the OAR for a fixed BED in the tumor. For a serial structure, we minimize the maximum BED in the OAR. This leads to analytical expressions for an effective sparing factor for the OAR, which provides a criterion for hypofractionation. The implications of the model are discussed for lung tumor treatments. It is shown that the model supports hypofractionation for small tumors treated with rotation therapy, i.e. highly conformal techniques where a large volume of lung tissue is exposed to low but nonzero dose. For larger tumors, the model suggests hyperfractionation. We further discuss several non-intuitive interdependencies between optimal fractionation and the spatial dose distribution. For instance, lowering the dose in the lung via proton therapy does not necessarily provide a biological rationale for hypofractionation.

  17. Deuterium flux measurements in the edge plasmas of PLT and PDX during auxiliary heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, W.R.; Cohen, S.A.; Dylla, H.F.; Manos, D.M.; Magee, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    The flux of deuterium in the plasma edge several centimeters outside the limiter has been measured using collector probes during neutral beam heating experiments on the PDX tokamak and RF heating experiments on the PLT tokamak. The dependence of the flux on the distance from the plasma was determined, and the time dependence of the flux was measured with a time resolution of 90 ms. In PDX the deuterium flux decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the plasma. The deuterium flux increased strongly when the beams came on and decreased when they turned off. The depth distribution of the deuterium in the samples, measured using SIMS, shows that when the beams are on about 30% of the deuterium incident on the probe is superthermal deuterium from the beams. In PLT the deuterium flux decreased only slightly with increasing distance from the plasma. The ICRH heating in PLT caused an increase of about 30% in the flux of deuterium to the samples and in the plasma density. In both machines the deuterium fluxes were fairly low (less than or equal to 10/sup 16/D/cm/sup 2/s) at the positions sampled.

  18. Deuterium flux measurements in the edge plasmas of PLT and PDX during auxiliary heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, W.R.; Cohen, S.A.; Dylla, H.F.; Manos, D.M.; Magee, C.W.

    1982-04-01

    The flux of deuterium in the plasma edge several centimeters outside the limiter has been measured using collector probes during neutral beam heating experiments on the PDX tokamak and rf heating experiments on the PLT tokamak. The dependence of the flux on the distance from the plasma was determined, and the time dependence of the flux was measured with a time resolution of 90 ms. In PDX the deuterium flux decreases rapidly with increasing distance from the plasma. The deuterium flux increased strongly when the beams came on and decreased when they turned off. The depth distribution of the deuterium in the samples, measured using SIMS, shows that when the beams are on, about 30% of the deuterium incident on the probe is superthermal deuterium from the beams. In PLT the deuterium flux decreased only slightly with increasing distance from the plasma. The ICRH heating in PLT caused an increase of about 30% in the flux of deuterium to the samples and in the plasma density. In both machines the deuterium fluxes were fairly low (< or approx. =10/sup 16/ D/cm/sup 2/s) at the positions sampled.

  19. Isotope fractionation of water during evaporation without condensation.

    PubMed

    Cappa, Christopher D; Drisdell, Walter S; Smith, Jared D; Saykally, Richard J; Cohen, Ronald C

    2005-12-29

    The microscopic events engendering liquid water evaporation have received much attention over the last century, but remain incompletely understood. We present measurements of isotope fractionation occurring during free molecular evaporation from liquid microjets and show that the isotope ratios of evaporating molecules exhibit dramatic differences from equilibrium vapor values, strong variations with the solution deuterium mole fraction, and a clear temperature dependence. These results indicate the existence of an energetic barrier to evaporation and that the evaporation coefficient of water is less than unity. These new insights into water evaporation promise to advance our understanding of the processes that control the formation and lifetime of clouds in the atmosphere. PMID:16375440

  20. Isotope fractionation of water during evaporation without condensation.

    PubMed

    Cappa, Christopher D; Drisdell, Walter S; Smith, Jared D; Saykally, Richard J; Cohen, Ronald C

    2005-12-29

    The microscopic events engendering liquid water evaporation have received much attention over the last century, but remain incompletely understood. We present measurements of isotope fractionation occurring during free molecular evaporation from liquid microjets and show that the isotope ratios of evaporating molecules exhibit dramatic differences from equilibrium vapor values, strong variations with the solution deuterium mole fraction, and a clear temperature dependence. These results indicate the existence of an energetic barrier to evaporation and that the evaporation coefficient of water is less than unity. These new insights into water evaporation promise to advance our understanding of the processes that control the formation and lifetime of clouds in the atmosphere.

  1. Effect of nitrogen fraction on the temperature dependence of GaNAs/GaAs quantum-well emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, R. J.; Balkan, N.; Carrère, H.; Arnoult, A.; Bedel, E.; Marie, X.

    2003-05-01

    The effects of nitrogen fraction on the temperature dependence of GaNxAs1-x/GaAs (x<2.8%) quantum-well emission was investigated using steady-state photoluminescence between 2 and 300 K. At low temperatures, a characteristic S-shape behavior indicative of carrier localization was observed for each of the samples. This is believed to result from the large miscibility gap induced by the nitrogen, which results in structural/compositional fluctuations in the well. In the high temperature regime (T>150 K) where the emission has a linear dependence, a strong reduction in emission temperature dependence was observed with increasing nitrogen. The temperature dependence was modeled using the band anticrossing approach, with the interaction matrix element parameter CNM (VMN=-CMN√x ) and the nitrogen level parameter γ (EN=EN0-γx) used as fitting parameters.

  2. Metabolite identification of artemether by data-dependent accurate mass spectrometric analysis using an LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in combination with the online hydrogen/deuterium exchange technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Du, Fuying; Zhu, Fanping; Xing, Jie

    2011-11-15

    Artemether (ARM), the O-methyl ether prodrug of dihydroartemisinin (DHA), is a first-line antimalarial drug used in areas of multi-drug resistance. Artemisinin drugs can be metabolized extensively in vivo and this seems related to their autoinduction pharmacokinetics. In the present study, the metabolite identification of ARM was performed by the generic data-dependent accurate mass spectrometric analysis, using high-resolution (HR) liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in conjunction with online hydrogen (H)/deuterium (D) exchange for rapid structural characterization. The LC separation was improved allowing the separation of ARM parent drugs and their metabolites from their diastereomers. A total of 77 phase I metabolites of ARM were identified in rat liver microsomal incubates and rat urine, including dihydroartemisinin and artemisinin. In rat bile, 12 phase II metabolites were found. Accurate mass data were obtained in both full scan and HR-MS/MS mode to support assignments of metabolite structures. Online H/D exchange LC/HR-ESI-MS experiments provided additional evidence in differentiating dihydroxylated deoxy-ARM from mono-hydroxylated ARM. The results showed the main phase I metabolites of artemether are hydroxylated, dehydro, demethylated and deoxy products, and they will undergo subsequent phase II glucuronidation processes. Most metabolites were reported for the first time. This study also demonstrated the effectiveness of high-resolution mass spectrometry in combination with an online H/D exchange LC/HR-MS(n) technique in rapid identification of drug metabolites. PMID:22006394

  3. Reading skill-fractional anisotropy relationships in visuospatial tracts diverge depending on socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Margaret M; Demir-Lira, Özlem Ece; Booth, James R

    2016-07-01

    Low socioeconomic status (SES) has been repeatedly linked with decreased academic achievement, including lower reading outcomes. Some lower SES children do show skills and scores commensurate with those of their higher SES peers, but whether their abilities stem from the same systems as high SES children or are based on divergent strategies is unknown. We here investigated a potential interactive relationship between SES and real-word reading skill in the white matter in 42 typically developing children. SES was determined based on parental education; reading skill and age were not significantly related to SES. There was a significant neural interaction: Clusters in the bilateral inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), left superior longitudinal fasciculus, and left corticospinal tract demonstrated interactive skill-SES relationships in fractional anisotropy. Follow-up analyses demonstrated that higher SES children showed a positive relationship between fractional anisotropy, reflecting tract coherence, and reading skill in left hemisphere tract clusters, whereas lower SES children showed a positive relationship in the right hemisphere homologues. Broadly, the ILF has been demonstrated to support orthographic skill on the left and more general visuospatial processing on the right, so high reading achievement in lower SES children may rely on supplementary visuospatial processing more than for higher SES readers. This pattern is consistent with previous work reporting low SES children's environments to include less rich verbal experience, which may lead them to disproportionately draw on visuospatial skills for success. Further, these results indicate that group SES differences may be best described by an adaptive, not a deficit, model.

  4. Deuterium enrichment of the interstellar grain mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ankan; Sahu, Dipen; Majumdar, Liton; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-01-01

    We carry out Monte Carlo simulation to study deuterium enrichments of interstellar grain mantles under various physical conditions. Based on the physical properties, various types of clouds are considered. We find that in diffuse cloud regions, very strong radiation fields persists and hardly a few layers of surface species are formed. In translucent cloud regions with a moderate radiation field, significant number of layers would be produced and surface coverage is mainly dominated by photo-dissociation products such as, C, CH3, CH2D, OH and OD. In the intermediate dense cloud regions (having number density of total hydrogen nuclei in all forms ˜2 × 104 cm-3), water and methanol along with their deuterated derivatives are efficiently formed. For much higher density regions (˜106 cm-3), water and methanol productions are suppressed but surface coverages of CO, CO2, O2 and O3 are dramatically increased. We find a very high degree of fractionation of water and methanol. Observational results support a high fractionation of methanol but surprisingly water fractionation is found to be low. This is in contradiction with our model results indicating alternative routes for de-fractionation of water. Effects of various types of energy barriers are also studied. Moreover, we allow grain mantles to interact with various charged particles (such as H+, Fe+, S+ and C+) to study the stopping power and projected range of these charged particles on various target ices.

  5. Reading skill-fractional anisotropy relationships in visuospatial tracts diverge depending on socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Margaret M; Demir-Lira, Özlem Ece; Booth, James R

    2016-07-01

    Low socioeconomic status (SES) has been repeatedly linked with decreased academic achievement, including lower reading outcomes. Some lower SES children do show skills and scores commensurate with those of their higher SES peers, but whether their abilities stem from the same systems as high SES children or are based on divergent strategies is unknown. We here investigated a potential interactive relationship between SES and real-word reading skill in the white matter in 42 typically developing children. SES was determined based on parental education; reading skill and age were not significantly related to SES. There was a significant neural interaction: Clusters in the bilateral inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), left superior longitudinal fasciculus, and left corticospinal tract demonstrated interactive skill-SES relationships in fractional anisotropy. Follow-up analyses demonstrated that higher SES children showed a positive relationship between fractional anisotropy, reflecting tract coherence, and reading skill in left hemisphere tract clusters, whereas lower SES children showed a positive relationship in the right hemisphere homologues. Broadly, the ILF has been demonstrated to support orthographic skill on the left and more general visuospatial processing on the right, so high reading achievement in lower SES children may rely on supplementary visuospatial processing more than for higher SES readers. This pattern is consistent with previous work reporting low SES children's environments to include less rich verbal experience, which may lead them to disproportionately draw on visuospatial skills for success. Further, these results indicate that group SES differences may be best described by an adaptive, not a deficit, model. PMID:27412229

  6. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation during nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation by Methylomirabilis oxyfera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasigraf, Olivia; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Ettwig, Katharina F.

    2012-07-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to nitrite reduction is a recently discovered methane sink of as yet unknown global significance. The bacteria that have been identified to carry out this process, Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera, oxidize methane via the known aerobic pathway involving the monooxygenase reaction. In contrast to aerobic methanotrophs, oxygen is produced intracellularly and used for the activation of methane by a phylogenetically distinct particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Here we report the fractionation factors for carbon and hydrogen during methane oxidation by an enrichment culture of M. oxyfera bacteria. In two separate batch incubation experiments with different absolute biomass and methane contents, the specific methanotrophic activity was similar and the progressive isotope enrichment identical. Headspace methane was consumed up to 98% with rates showing typical first order reaction kinetics. The enrichment factors determined by Rayleigh equations were -29.2 ± 2.6‰ for δ13C (εC) and -227.6 ± 13.5‰ for δ2H (εH), respectively. These enrichment factors were in the upper range of values reported so far for aerobic methanotrophs. In addition, two-dimensional specific isotope analysis (Λ = ( α H - 1 - 1)/( α C - 1 - 1)) was performed and also the determined Λ value of 9.8 was within the range determined for other aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs. The results showed that in contrast to abiotic processes biological methane oxidation exhibits a narrow range of fractionation factors for carbon and hydrogen irrespective of the underlying biochemical mechanisms. This work will therefore facilitate the correct interpretation of isotopic composition of atmospheric methane with implications for modeling of global carbon fluxes.

  7. Studies of quaternary saline lakes-I. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in saline minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matsuo, S.; Friedman, I.; Smith, G.I.

    1972-01-01

    Borax, gaylussite, nahcolite and trona were synthesized in aqueous solution at temperatures ranging from 8?? to 35??C. Except for borax, deuterium was always depleted in these hydrated minerals relative to the solutions from which they were crystallized. In borax, no significant fractionation was found. The fractionation factor of D H for the trona-water system exhibited a marked temperature dependence. By combining the deuterium contents of trona and the solution from which trona was crystallized, the following thermometer scale was obtained: In ( D H) trona ( D H)water = 1.420 ?? 104 T2 + 23.56 T (1). An attempt to establish a geothermometer based on C13 C12 fractionation between carbonate minerals and carbonate ions in aqueous solution was not successful. ?? 1972.

  8. Empirical equations for the temperature dependence of calcite-water oxygen isotope fractionation from 10 to 70°C.

    PubMed

    Demény, Attila; Kele, Sándor; Siklósy, Zoltán

    2010-12-30

    Although the temperature dependence of calcite-water oxygen isotope fractionation seems to have been well established by numerous empirical, experimental and theoretical studies, it is still being discussed, especially due to the demand for increased accuracy of paleotemperature calculations. Experimentally determined equations are available and have been verified by theoretical calculations (considered as representative of isotopic equilibrium); however, many natural formations do not seem to follow these relationships implying either that existing fractionation equations should be revised, or that carbonate deposits are seriously affected by kinetic and solution chemistry effects, or late-stage alterations. In order to test if existing fractionation-temperature relationships can be used for natural deposits, we have studied calcite formations precipitated in various environments by means of stable isotope mass spectrometry: travertines (freshwater limestones) precipitating from hot and warm waters in open-air or quasi-closed environments, as well as cave deposits formed in closed systems. Physical and chemical parameters as well as oxygen isotope composition of water were monitored for all the investigated sites. Measuring precipitation temperatures along with oxygen isotope compositions of waters and calcites yielded empirical environment-specific fractionation-temperature equations: [1] 1000 · lnα = 17599/T - 29.64 [for travertines with a temperature range of 30 to 70°C] and [2] 1000 · lnα = 17500/T - 29.89 [for cave deposits for the range 10 to 25°C]. Finally, based on the comparison of literature data and our results, the use of distinct calcite-water oxygen isotopic fractionation relationships and application strategies to obtain the most reliable paleoclimate information are evaluated. PMID:21080503

  9. Diffusion, trapping, and isotope exchange of plasma implanted deuterium in ion beam damaged tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Joseph Lincoln

    Tritium accumulation in nuclear fusion reactor materials is a major concern for practical and safe fusion energy. This work examines hydrogen isotope exchange as a tritium removal technique, analyzes the effects of neutron damage using high energy copper ion beams, and introduces a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the concentration of trapped atoms. Tungsten samples were irradiated with high energy (0.5 - 5 MeV) copper ions for controlled levels of damage - 10-3 to 10-1 displacements per atom (dpa) - at room temperature. Samples were then exposed to deuterium plasma at constant temperature (˜ 380 K) to a high fluence of 1024 ions/m2, where retention is at is maximized (i.e. saturated). By then subsequently exposing these samples to fractions of this fluence with hydrogen plasma, isotope exchange rates were observed. The resulting deuterium still trapped in the tungsten is then measured post mortem. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) gives the depth resolved deuterium retention profile with the 3He(D,p) 4He reaction, and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) gives the total amount of deuterium trapped in the tungsten by heating a sample in vacuum up to 1200 K and measuring the evaporated gas molecules with a residual gas analyzer. Isotope exchange data show that hydrogen atoms can displace trapped deuterium atoms efficiently only up to the first few microns, but does not affect the atoms trapped at greater depths. In ion damaged tungsten, measurements showed a significant increase in retention in the damage region proportional to dpa 0.66, which results in a significant spike in total retention, and isotope exchange in damaged samples is still ineffective at depths greater than a few microns. Thus, isotope exchange is not an affective tritium removal technique; however, these experiments have shown that trapping in material defects greatly affects diffusion. These experiments lead to a simplified diffusion model with defect densities as the only free

  10. NOTE: On the Deuterium Abundance on Mars and Some Related Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir

    2000-12-01

    Strong fractionation of deuterium in photolysis of H 2O and above the hygropause reduces the production of HD relative to H 2 on Mars by a factor of 3.7 total. The model by Y. L. Yung et al. (1988, Icarus76, 146-159) for deuterium fractionation in chemical reactions on Mars corrected for this factor results in (HD/H 2)/(HDO/H 2O)=0.43. This value may fit the deuterium abundance observed by V. A. Krasnopolsky et al. (1998, Science 280, 1576-1580) if the eddy diffusion coefficient does not depend on solar activity: K=1.4×10 13n-1/2 cm 2 s -1 (model 2). The Mariner 9 observations show very low variability of atomic oxygen at the 1.2 n bar pressure level (h˜125 km) with solar activity. This requires eddy diffusion to be proportional to the solar activity index F10.7: K=( F10.7 cm/30)×10 13n-1/2 cm 2 s -1 (model 1). The fractionation factor for escape of hydrogen isotopes is equal to 0.016 and 0.135 for models 1 and 2. These values have been averaged over the solar cycle. The three-reservoir model for hydrogen isotope fractionation suggested by Krasnopolsky et al. (1998) involves a reservoir composed primarily of water ice in the polar caps that isotopically interacts with the atmosphere. Assuming that water ice is half of the total volume of the polar caps and the polar-layered deposits, the total loss of water from Mars is equal to 65 and 120 m for models 1 and 2, respectively. Along with thermal and nonthermal escape, these values may include the loss of water by oxidation of regolith, if the released hydrogen escaped with isotopic fractionation. Although the solar-wind α particles are the main source of He on Mars, capture of the solar-wind H + and D + ions by Mars has a negligible effect on the thermospheric abundances of H and D. Improved observations of minor components in Mars' thermosphere may resolve the problem of eddy diffusion at various solar activity and choosing between the models.

  11. Non-Mass Dependent Isotope Fractionations of Rarefied Gases (O2, SF6) Under a Thermal Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T.; Bao, H.; Oxy-Anion Stable Isotope Consortium

    2010-12-01

    Thermal diffusion induced isotope fractionation has long been intensely studied both experimentally and theoretically. It was usually used for small scale isotope separations in nuclear industry, both in gas and liquid phase. Previous research focus has mainly been on convective, high pressure and binary mixture systems, serving the purpose of efficient isotope separations. However, multiple-isotope behavior of rarefied gases under a thermal gradient has not been carefully examined, especially for a non-convective system. In addition to the limited practical applications of such a system, the lack of interest is largely due to the fact that thermal diffusion has never been considered outside the classical thermodynamic and kinetic realm and that the associated multiple isotope fractionation has to be mass dependent. When an otherwise homogeneous gas is superimposed by a thermal gradient, the coupled thermal and chemical diffusions occur. The multiple isotope (16O, 17O, 18O, or 32S, 33S, 34S, and 36S) fractionations associated with the dynamic process are indeed predicted to be entirely mass dependent as we calculate from Jones and Furry (1946) and Huang et al (2010). However, our thermal-gradient experiments on O2 and SF6 have proven otherwise. We found that a simple superimposed external thermal gradient on low pressure O2 or SF6 gas in a closed (but not isolated) system can produce measurable non-mass-dependent 17O or 33S anomalies. A series tests were conducted using two sets of apparatus to constrain the controlling factors. We obtained up to -0.51 or +0.82‰ (s. d., 1σ = 0.03) for the Δ17O and -0.111‰ (1σ = 0.018) for the Δ33S from different ends of our thermal gradients. We found that the magnitude of the 17O or 33S anomaly is a function of the initial gas pressure, temperature gradient, experimental duration, average temperature of the whole apparatus, and the geometry of the apparatus. The λ value (lnα17/lnα18 or lnα33/lnα34) ranges from ~ -0

  12. Detection of atomic deuterium in the upper atmosphere of Mars.

    PubMed

    Krasnopolsky, V A; Mumma, M J; Gladstone, G R

    1998-06-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of Mars' atmosphere with the Hubble Space Telescope revealed the deuterium Lyman alpha line at an intensity of 23 +/- 6 rayleighs. This measured intensity corresponds to HD/H2 = 1.5 +/- 0.6 x 10(-4), which is smaller by a factor of 11 than HDO/H2O. This indicates that fractionation of HD/H2 relative to that of HDO/H2O is not kinetically controlled by the rates of formation and destruction of H2 and HD but is thermodynamically controlled by the isotope exchange HD + H2O left and right arrow HDO + H2. Molecular hydrogen is strongly depleted in deuterium relative to water on Mars because of the very long lifetime of H2 (1200 years). The derived isotope fractionation corresponds to an estimate of a planetwide reservoir of water ice about 5 meters thick that is exchangeable with the atmosphere.

  13. Detection of atomic deuterium in the upper atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Mumma, M. J.; Gladstone, G. R.

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of Mars' atmosphere with the Hubble Space Telescope revealed the deuterium Lyman alpha line at an intensity of 23 +/- 6 rayleighs. This measured intensity corresponds to HD/H2 = 1.5 +/- 0.6 x 10(-4), which is smaller by a factor of 11 than HDO/H2O. This indicates that fractionation of HD/H2 relative to that of HDO/H2O is not kinetically controlled by the rates of formation and destruction of H2 and HD but is thermodynamically controlled by the isotope exchange HD + H2O left and right arrow HDO + H2. Molecular hydrogen is strongly depleted in deuterium relative to water on Mars because of the very long lifetime of H2 (1200 years). The derived isotope fractionation corresponds to an estimate of a planetwide reservoir of water ice about 5 meters thick that is exchangeable with the atmosphere.

  14. Detection of atomic deuterium in the upper atmosphere of Mars.

    PubMed

    Krasnopolsky, V A; Mumma, M J; Gladstone, G R

    1998-06-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of Mars' atmosphere with the Hubble Space Telescope revealed the deuterium Lyman alpha line at an intensity of 23 +/- 6 rayleighs. This measured intensity corresponds to HD/H2 = 1.5 +/- 0.6 x 10(-4), which is smaller by a factor of 11 than HDO/H2O. This indicates that fractionation of HD/H2 relative to that of HDO/H2O is not kinetically controlled by the rates of formation and destruction of H2 and HD but is thermodynamically controlled by the isotope exchange HD + H2O left and right arrow HDO + H2. Molecular hydrogen is strongly depleted in deuterium relative to water on Mars because of the very long lifetime of H2 (1200 years). The derived isotope fractionation corresponds to an estimate of a planetwide reservoir of water ice about 5 meters thick that is exchangeable with the atmosphere. PMID:9616115

  15. Nucleon structure at large x: nuclear effects in deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Wally Melnitchouk

    2010-07-01

    I review quark momentum distributions in the nucleon at large momentum fractions x. Particular attention is paid to the impact of nuclear effects in deuterium on the d/u quark distribution ratio as x -> 1. A new global study of parton distributions, using less restrictive kinematic cuts in Q^2 and W^2, finds strong suppression of the d quark distribution once nuclear corrections are accounted for.

  16. Study of ion-irradiated tungsten in deuterium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khripunov, B. I.; Gureev, V. M.; Koidan, V. S.; Kornienko, S. N.; Latushkin, S. T.; Petrov, V. B.; Ryazanov, A. I.; Semenov, E. V.; Stolyarova, V. G.; Danelyan, L. S.; Kulikauskas, V. S.; Zatekin, V. V.; Unezhev, V. N.

    2013-07-01

    Experimental study aimed at investigation of neutron induced damage influence on fusion reactor plasma facing materials is reported. Displacement damage was produced in tungsten by high-energy helium and carbon ions at 3-10 MeV. The reached level of displacement damage ranged from several dpa to 600 dpa. The properties of the irradiated tungsten were studied in steady-state deuterium plasma on the LENTA linear divertor simulator. Plasma exposures were made at 250 eV of ion energy to fluence 1021-1022 ion/сm2. Erosion dynamics of the damaged layer and deuterium retention were observed. Surface microstructure modifications and important damage of the 5 μm layer shown. Deuterium retention in helium-damaged tungsten (ERD) showed its complex behavior (increase or decrease) depending on implanted helium quantity and the structure of the surface layer.

  17. Deuterium pellet injector gun design

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, R.V.; Wysor, R.B.; Bryan, W.E.; Shipley, W.D.; Combs, S.K.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.; Fisher, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Deuterium Pellet Injector (DPI), an eight-pellet pneumatic injector, is being designed and fabricated for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). It will accelerate eight pellets, 4 by 4 mm maximum, to greater than 1500 m/s. It utilizes a unique pellet-forming mechanism, a cooled pellet storage wheel, and improved propellant gas scavenging.

  18. Growth phase dependent hydrogen isotopic fractionation in alkenone-producing haptophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolhowe, M. D.; Prahl, F. G.; Probert, I.; Maldonado, M.

    2009-08-01

    Recent works have investigated use of the hydrogen isotopic composition of C37 alkenones (δDK37s, lipid biomarkers of certain haptophyte microalgae, as an independent paleosalinity proxy. We discuss herein the factors impeding the success of such an application and identify the potential alternative use of δDK37s measurements as a proxy for non-thermal, physiological stress impacts on the U37K' paleotemperature index. Batch-culture experiments with the haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi (CCMP 1742) were conducted to determine the magnitude and variability of the isotopic contrasts between individual C37 alkenones. Further experiments were conducted with Emiliania huxleyi (CCMP 1742) andGephyrocapsa oceanica (PZ3-1) to determine whether, and to what extent, δDK37s varies between the physiological extremes of nutrient-replete exponential growth and nutrient-depleted senescence. Emiliania huxleyi was observed to exhibit an isotopic contrast between di- and tri-unsaturated C37 alkenones (αK37:3-K37:2≈0.97) that is nearly identical to that reported recently by others for environmental samples. Furthermore, this contrast appears to be constant with growth stage. The consistency of the offset across different growth stages suggests that a single, well-defined value for αK37:3-K37:2 may exist and that its use in an isotope mass-balance will allow accurate determination of δD values for individual alkenones without having to rely on time- and labor-intensive chemical separations. The isotopic fractionation between growth medium and C37 alkenones was observed to increase dramatically upon the onset of nutrient-depletion-induced senescence, suggesting that δDK37s may serve as an objective tool for recognizing and potentially correcting, at least semi-quantitatively, for the effects of nutrient stress on U37K' temperature records.

  19. Determination of mass-dependent isotopic fractionation of cerium and neodymium in geochemical samples by MC-ICPMS.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Takeshi; Hirata, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a new analytical method to determine the mass-dependent isotopic fractionations on Ce and Nd in geochemical samples. Mass discrimination effects on Ce and Nd were externally corrected by normalizing (149)Sm/(147)Sm and (153)Eu/(151)Eu, being 0.92124 and 1.0916, respectively based on an exponential law. The reproducibility of the isotopic ratio measurements on (142)Ce/(140)Ce, (146)Nd/(144)Nd and (148)Nd/(144)Nd were 0.08‰ (2SD, n = 25), 0.06‰ (2SD, n = 39) and 0.12‰ (2SD, n = 39), respectively. The present technique was applied to determine the variations of the Ce and Nd isotopic ratios for five geochemical reference materials (igneous rocks, JB-1a and JA-2; sedimentary rocks, JMn-1, JCh-1 and JDo-1). The resulting ratios for two igneous rocks (JB-1a and JA-2) and two sedimentary rocks (JMn-1 and JCh-1) did not vary significantly among the samples, whereas the Ce and Nd isotope ratios for the carbonate samples (JDo-1) were significantly higher than those for igneous and sedimentary rock samples. The 1:1 simple correlation between δ(142)Ce and δ(146)Nd indicates that there were no significant difference in the degree of isotopic fractionation between the Ce and Nd. This suggests that the isotopic fractionation for Ce found in the JDo-1 could be induced by geochemical or physicochemical processes without changing the oxidation status of Ce, since the redox-reaction can produce larger isotopic fractionation than the reactions without changing the oxidation state. The variations in the Ce and Nd isotope ratios for geochemical samples could provide new information concerning the physico-chemical processes of the sample formation.

  20. Determination of mass-dependent isotopic fractionation of cerium and neodymium in geochemical samples by MC-ICPMS.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Takeshi; Hirata, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a new analytical method to determine the mass-dependent isotopic fractionations on Ce and Nd in geochemical samples. Mass discrimination effects on Ce and Nd were externally corrected by normalizing (149)Sm/(147)Sm and (153)Eu/(151)Eu, being 0.92124 and 1.0916, respectively based on an exponential law. The reproducibility of the isotopic ratio measurements on (142)Ce/(140)Ce, (146)Nd/(144)Nd and (148)Nd/(144)Nd were 0.08‰ (2SD, n = 25), 0.06‰ (2SD, n = 39) and 0.12‰ (2SD, n = 39), respectively. The present technique was applied to determine the variations of the Ce and Nd isotopic ratios for five geochemical reference materials (igneous rocks, JB-1a and JA-2; sedimentary rocks, JMn-1, JCh-1 and JDo-1). The resulting ratios for two igneous rocks (JB-1a and JA-2) and two sedimentary rocks (JMn-1 and JCh-1) did not vary significantly among the samples, whereas the Ce and Nd isotope ratios for the carbonate samples (JDo-1) were significantly higher than those for igneous and sedimentary rock samples. The 1:1 simple correlation between δ(142)Ce and δ(146)Nd indicates that there were no significant difference in the degree of isotopic fractionation between the Ce and Nd. This suggests that the isotopic fractionation for Ce found in the JDo-1 could be induced by geochemical or physicochemical processes without changing the oxidation status of Ce, since the redox-reaction can produce larger isotopic fractionation than the reactions without changing the oxidation state. The variations in the Ce and Nd isotope ratios for geochemical samples could provide new information concerning the physico-chemical processes of the sample formation. PMID:23303084

  1. An Update on the Non-Mass-Dependent Isotope Fractionation under Thermal Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Tao; Niles, Paul; Bao, Huiming; Socki, Richard; Liu, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Mass flow and compositional gradient (elemental and isotope separation) occurs when flu-id(s) or gas(es) in an enclosure is subjected to a thermal gradient, and the phenomenon is named thermal diffusion. Gas phase thermal diffusion has been theoretically and experimentally studied for more than a century, although there has not been a satisfactory theory to date. Nevertheless, for isotopic system, the Chapman-Enskog theory predicts that the mass difference is the only term in the thermal diffusion separation factors that differs one isotope pair to another,with the assumptions that the molecules are spherical and systematic (monoatomic-like structure) and the particle collision is elastic. Our previous report indicates factors may be playing a role because the Non-Mass Dependent (NMD) effect is found for both symmetric and asymmetric, linear and spherical polyatomic molecules over a wide range of temperature (-196C to +237C). The observed NMD phenomenon in the simple thermal-diffusion experiments demands quantitative validation and theoretical explanation. Besides the pressure and temperature dependency illustrated in our previous reports, efforts are made in this study to address issues such as the role of convection or molecular structure and whether it is a transient, non-equilibrium effect only.

  2. Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods Capture Different Microbial Community Fractions in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Franck O. P.; Bell, Terrence H.; Marchand, Charlotte; de la Providencia, Ivan E.; El Yassimi, Abdel; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Bioremediation is a cost-effective and sustainable approach for treating polluted soils, but our ability to improve on current bioremediation strategies depends on our ability to isolate microorganisms from these soils. Although culturing is widely used in bioremediation research and applications, it is unknown whether the composition of cultured isolates closely mirrors the indigenous microbial community from contaminated soils. To assess this, we paired culture-independent (454-pyrosequencing of total soil DNA) with culture-dependent (isolation using seven different growth media) techniques to analyse the bacterial and fungal communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. Although bacterial and fungal rarefaction curves were saturated for both methods, only 2.4% and 8.2% of the bacterial and fungal OTUs, respectively, were shared between datasets. Isolated taxa increased the total recovered species richness by only 2% for bacteria and 5% for fungi. Interestingly, none of the bacteria that we isolated were representative of the major bacterial OTUs recovered by 454-pyrosequencing. Isolation of fungi was moderately more effective at capturing the dominant OTUs observed by culture-independent analysis, as 3 of 31 cultured fungal strains ranked among the 20 most abundant fungal OTUs in the 454-pyrosequencing dataset. This study is one of the most comprehensive comparisons of microbial communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils using both isolation and high-throughput sequencing methods. PMID:26053848

  3. Ozonolysis of beta-pinene: temperature dependence of secondary organic aerosol mass fraction.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ravikant; Donahue, Neil M; Pandis, Spyros N

    2008-07-15

    The SOA formation from beta-pinene ozonolysis at modest precursor concentrations (2-40 ppb) was investigated in the temperature range of 0-40 degrees C. The presence of inert seeds and high ozone concentrations is necessary to minimize losses of semivolatile vapors to the walls of the smog chamber. beta-pinene secondary organic aerosol production increases significantly with decreasing temperature. An increase by a factor of 2-3, depending on the reacted beta-pinene concentration, was observed as the temperature decreased from 40 to 0 degrees C. This increase appearsto be due mainly to the shifting of partitioning of the semivolatile SOA componentstoward the particulate phase and not to a change of the beta-pinene product distribution with temperature. The measurements are used to develop a new temperature-dependent parametrization for the four-component basis-set. The parametrization predicts much higher SOA production for beta-pinene ozonolysis for typical atmospheric conditions than the values that have been suggested by previous studies.

  4. Growth phase dependent hydrogen isotopic fractionation in alkenone-producing haptophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolhowe, M. D.; Prahl, F. G.; Probert, I.; Maldonado, M.

    2009-04-01

    Several recent works have investigated use of the hydrogen isotopic composition of C37 alkenones (δDK37s), lipid biomarkers of certain haptophyte microalgae, as an independent paleosalinity proxy. We discuss herein the factors impeding the success of such an application and identify the potential alternative use of δDK37s measurements as a proxy for non-thermal, physiological stress impacts on the U37K' paleotemperature index. Batch-culture experiments with the haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi (CCMP 1742) were conducted to determine the magnitude and variability of the isotopic contrasts between individual C37 alkenones, an analytical impediment to the use of δDK37s in any paleoceanographic context. Further experiments were conducted with Emiliania huxleyi (CCMP 1742) and Gephyrocapsa oceanica (PZ3-1) to determine whether, and to what extent, δDK37s varies between the physiological extremes of nutrient-replete exponential growth and nutrient-depleted senescence, the basis for our proposed use of the measurement as an indicator of stress. Emiliania huxleyi exhibited an isotopic contrast between di- and tri-unsaturated C37 alkenones (αK37:3-K37:2≈0.97) that is nearly identical to that reported recently by others for environmental samples. Furthermore, this contrast appears to be constant with growth stage. The consistency of the offset across different growth stages suggests that a single, well-defined value for αK37:3-K37:2 exists and that its use in an isotope mass-balance will allow accurate determination of δD values for individual alkenones without having to rely on time- and labor-intensive chemical separations. The isotopic fractionation between growth medium and C37 alkenones was observed to increase dramatically upon the onset of nutrient-depletion-induced senescence, suggesting that δDK37s may serve as an objective tool for recognizing and potentially correcting, at least semi-quantitatively, for the effects of nutrient stress on U37K' temperature

  5. A study of SS size distribution during runoff and fractionation of phosphates depending on soil size in agricultural watershed.

    PubMed

    Sa, S H; Masuda, T; Hosoi, Y

    2005-01-01

    Characterization of the differences and algal-available fractions of P in soils, suspended solids, and bottom sediments have been the main topics of research during the past decade. However, the size distribution and properties of particulate matter in runoff have not been much studied in Japan. Here we study particle size distribution during runoff and the chemical characteristics of P in each soil size fraction and relate them to land use. The temporal variation of particulate sizes during rain events is different in each watershed. Most particles have the size in the range of 10-100 microm. Also, the percentage of BAP in TP as well as percentage of PCOD in SS also varies temporally and spatially during runoff. To investigate how soil particles characteristics depend on land use, soil samples from two watersheds are examined. For particle size distribution and specific gravity, no significant difference among watersheds is found. However, C, N, and P content are indirectly proportional to the particle size, which means smaller particle size results in larger. H2O-extracted P, NH4Cl-extracted P, NAI-P, Apatite-P, Organic-P, and TP contents in each soil particle sample vary depending on particle size, land use, and watershed.

  6. Temperature dependence of oxygen isotope fractionation in coccolith calcite: A culture and core top calibration of the genus Calcidiscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelier, Yaël; Minoletti, Fabrice; Probert, Ian; Hermoso, Michaël

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructions of seawater temperature based on measurement of oxygen isotopes in carbonates mostly derive from analyses of bulk sediment samples or manually picked foraminifera. The temperature dependence of 18O fractionation in biogenic calcite was first established in the 1950s and the objective of the present study is to re-evaluate this temperature dependence in coccolith calcite with a view to developing a robust proxy for reconstructing "vital effect"-free δ18O values. Coccoliths, the micron-sized calcite scales produced by haptophyte algae that inhabit surface mixed-layer waters, are a dominant component of pelagic sediments. Despite their small size, recent methodological developments allow species-specific separation (and thus isotopic analysis) of coccoliths from bulk sediments. This is especially the case for Calcidiscus spp. coccoliths that are relatively easy to separate out from other sedimentary carbonate grains including other coccolith taxa. Three strains of coccolithophores belonging to the genus Calcidiscus and characterised by distinct cell and coccolith diameters were grown in the laboratory under controlled temperature conditions over a range from 15 to 26 °C. The linear relationship that relates 18O fractionation to the temperature of calcification is here calibrated by the equation: T [°C] = -5.83 × (δ18OCalcidiscus - δ18Omedium) + 4.83 (r = 0.98). The slope of the regression is offset of ˜-1.1‰ from that of equilibrium calcite. This offset corresponds to the physiologically induced isotopic effect or "vital effect". The direction of fractionation towards light isotopic values is coherent with previous reports, but the intensity of fractionation in our dilute batch cultures was significantly closer to equilibrium compared to previously reported offset values. No significant isotopic difference was found between the three Calcidiscus coccolithophores, ruling out a control of the cell geometry on oxygen isotope fractionation within

  7. Thermal desorption of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Markin, A.V.; Chernikov, V.N.; Zakharov, A.P.

    1995-09-01

    By means of TDS measurements it is shown that the desorption of deuterium from Be implanted with 5 keV D ions to fluences, {Phi}, from 1x10{sup 20} D/m{sup 2} to 1x10{sup 21} D/m{sup 2} proceeds in one high temperature stage B, while at {Phi} {ge} 1.2x10{sup 21}D/m{sup 2} one more stage A is added. The desorption maximum A is narrow and consists of two peaks A{sub 1} and A{sub 2} at about 460 K and 490 K, respectively. Peak A{sub 1} is attributed to the desorption of deuterium from the walls of opened channels formed under D ion implantation. Peak {sub A}2 is a consequence of the opening of a part of closed bubbles/channels to the outer surface. The position of maximum B shifts noticeably and nonsteadily on the fluence in a range from 850 to 1050 K. The origin of this maximum is the liberation of D atoms bound at vacancy complexes discussed previously by Wampler. The dependence of Tm(B) on the fluence is governed by the interaction of freely migrating D atoms with partly opened or fully closed gas cavity arrangements which are created under temperature ramping, but differently in specimens implanted with D ions to different fluences.

  8. Influence of traps on the deuterium behaviour in the low activation martensitic steels F82H and Batman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, E.; Perujo, A.; Benamati, G.

    1997-06-01

    A time dependent permeation method is used to measure the permeability, diffusivity and solubility of deuterium in the low activation martensitic steels F82H and Batman. The measurements cover the temperature range from 373 to 743 K which includes the onset of deuterium trapping effects on diffusivity and solubility. The results are interpreted using a trapping model. The number of trap sites and their average energies for deuterium in F82H and Batman steels are determined.

  9. Mass-dependent and mass-independent fractionation of mercury isotopes in precipitation from Guiyang, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuhong; Chen, Jiubin; Feng, Xinbin; Hintelmann, Holger; Yuan, Shengliu; Cai, Hongming; Huang, Qiang; Wang, Shuxiao; Wang, Fengyang

    2015-11-01

    The isotopic composition of mercury (Hg) is increasingly used to constrain the sources and pathways of this metal in the atmosphere. Though China has the highest Hg production, consumption and emission in the world, Hg isotope ratios are rarely reported for Chinese wet deposition. In this study, we examined, for the first time outside North America, both mass-dependent fractionation (MDF, expressed as δ202Hg) and mass-independent fractionation of odd (odd-MIF, Δ199Hg) and even (even-MIF, Δ200Hg) Hg isotopes in 15 precipitation samples collected from September 2012 to August 2013 in Guiyang (SW China). All samples displayed significant negative δ202Hg (-0.44 ∼ -4.27‰), positive Δ199Hg (+0.19 to +1.16‰) and slightly positive Δ200Hg (-0.01‰ to +0.20‰). Potential sources of Hg in precipitation were identified by coupling both MDF and MIF of Hg isotopes with a back-trajectory model. The results showed that local emission from coal-fired power plants and cement plants and western long-range transportation are two main contributing sources, while the contribution of Hg from south wind events would be very limited on an annual basis. The relatively lower Δ200Hg values in Guiyang precipitation may indicate a dilution effect by local sources and/or insignificant even-MIF in the tropopause contribution of this subtropical region. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of isotope fractionation, especially MIF for tracing sources and pathways of Hg in the atmosphere.

  10. Mercury (Hg) in meteorites: Variations in abundance, thermal release profile, mass-dependent and mass-independent isotopic fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Matthias M. M.; Cloquet, Christophe; Marty, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the concentration, isotopic composition and thermal release profiles of Mercury (Hg) in a suite of meteorites, including both chondrites and achondrites. We find large variations in Hg concentration between different meteorites (ca. 10 ppb to 14,000 ppb), with the highest concentration orders of magnitude above the expected bulk solar system silicates value. From the presence of several different Hg carrier phases in thermal release profiles (150-650 °C), we argue that these variations are unlikely to be mainly due to terrestrial contamination. The Hg abundance of meteorites shows no correlation with petrographic type, or mass-dependent fractionation of Hg isotopes. Most carbonaceous chondrites show mass-independent enrichments in the odd-numbered isotopes 199Hg and 201Hg. We show that the enrichments are not nucleosynthetic, as we do not find corresponding nucleosynthetic deficits of 196Hg. Instead, they can partially be explained by Hg evaporation and redeposition during heating of asteroids from primordial radionuclides and late-stage impact heating. Non-carbonaceous chondrites, most achondrites and the Earth do not show these enrichments in vapor-phase Hg. All meteorites studied here have however isotopically light Hg (δ202Hg = ∼-7 to -1) relative to the Earth's average crustal values, which could suggest that the Earth has lost a significant fraction of its primordial Hg. However, the late accretion of carbonaceous chondritic material on the order of ∼2%, which has been suggested to account for the water, carbon, nitrogen and noble gas inventories of the Earth, can also contribute most or all of the Earth's current Hg budget. In this case, the isotopically heavy Hg of the Earth's crust would have to be the result of isotopic fractionation between surface and deep-Earth reservoirs.

  11. Influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium-tritium plasma containing inactive impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Sherman, V. E.

    2016-08-01

    The degree of influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma has been theoretically studied as dependent on the content of inactive impurities in plasma. The analytic criterion of plasma ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets is modified taking into account the absorption of intrinsic radiation from plasma in the ignition region. The influence of radiative processes on the DT plasma ignition has been analytically and numerically studied for plasma that contains a significant fraction of inactive impurities either as a result of DT fuel mixing with ICF target ablator material or as a result of using light metal DT-hydrides as solid noncryogenic fuel. It has been shown that the effect of the absorption of intrinsic radiation leads to lower impurity-induced increase in the ignition energy as compared to that calculated in the approximation of optically transparent ignition region.

  12. Laser spectroscopy of muonic deuterium.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Randolf; Nez, François; Fernandes, Luis M P; Amaro, Fernando D; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M R; Covita, Daniel S; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Le Bigot, Eric-Olivier; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A M; Ludhova, Livia; Monteiro, Cristina M B; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; dos Santos, Joaquim M F; Schaller, Lukas A; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F C A; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-08-12

    The deuteron is the simplest compound nucleus, composed of one proton and one neutron. Deuteron properties such as the root-mean-square charge radius rd and the polarizability serve as important benchmarks for understanding the nuclear forces and structure. Muonic deuterium μd is the exotic atom formed by a deuteron and a negative muon μ(-). We measured three 2S-2P transitions in μd and obtain r(d) = 2.12562(78) fm, which is 2.7 times more accurate but 7.5σ smaller than the CODATA-2010 value r(d) = 2.1424(21) fm. The μd value is also 3.5σ smaller than the r(d) value from electronic deuterium spectroscopy. The smaller r(d), when combined with the electronic isotope shift, yields a "small" proton radius r(p), similar to the one from muonic hydrogen, amplifying the proton radius puzzle. PMID:27516595

  13. Laser spectroscopy of muonic deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Randolf; Nez, François; Fernandes, Luis M. P.; Amaro, Fernando D.; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M. R.; Covita, Daniel S.; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L.; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Le Bigot, Eric-Olivier; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A. M.; Ludhova, Livia; Monteiro, Cristina M. B.; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; dos Santos, Joaquim M. F.; Schaller, Lukas A.; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F. C. A.; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    The deuteron is the simplest compound nucleus, composed of one proton and one neutron. Deuteron properties such as the root-mean-square charge radius rd and the polarizability serve as important benchmarks for understanding the nuclear forces and structure. Muonic deuterium μd is the exotic atom formed by a deuteron and a negative muon μ-. We measured three 2S-2P transitions in μd and obtain rd = 2.12562(78) fm, which is 2.7 times more accurate but 7.5σ smaller than the CODATA-2010 value rd = 2.1424(21) fm. The μd value is also 3.5σ smaller than the rd value from electronic deuterium spectroscopy. The smaller rd, when combined with the electronic isotope shift, yields a “small” proton radius rp, similar to the one from muonic hydrogen, amplifying the proton radius puzzle.

  14. Laser spectroscopy of muonic deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Randolf; Nez, François; Fernandes, Luis M. P.; Amaro, Fernando D.; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M. R.; Covita, Daniel S.; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L.; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Le Bigot, Eric-Olivier; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A. M.; Ludhova, Livia; Monteiro, Cristina M. B.; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; dos Santos, Joaquim M. F.; Schaller, Lukas A.; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F. C. A.; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    The deuteron is the simplest compound nucleus, composed of one proton and one neutron. Deuteron properties such as the root-mean-square charge radius rd and the polarizability serve as important benchmarks for understanding the nuclear forces and structure. Muonic deuterium μd is the exotic atom formed by a deuteron and a negative muon μ–. We measured three 2S-2P transitions in μd and obtain rd = 2.12562(78) fm, which is 2.7 times more accurate but 7.5σ smaller than the CODATA-2010 value rd = 2.1424(21) fm. The μd value is also 3.5σ smaller than the rd value from electronic deuterium spectroscopy. The smaller rd, when combined with the electronic isotope shift, yields a “small” proton radius rp, similar to the one from muonic hydrogen, amplifying the proton radius puzzle.

  15. Presence of Not5 and ubiquitinated Rps7A in polysome fractions depends upon the Not4 E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Panasenko, Olesya O; Collart, Martine A

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we determine that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Not4 E3 ligase ubiquitinates Rps7A in vivo and in vitro, but not its paralogue, Rps7B. Ubiquitinated Rps7A is detectable only in 80S and polysomes, but not in free 40S fractions. A different role of the Rps7 paralogues in vivo is supported by the observation that the deletion of Rps7A but not Rps7B is sensitive to translational inhibitors and leads to an accumulation of aggregated proteins. An important accumulation of aggregated proteins that include ribosomal proteins and ribosome-associated chaperones is also observed in cells lacking Not4. A contribution of Not4 to ribosomal function extending beyond Rps7A ubiquitination is supported by the observation that the deletion of Not4 displays a synthetic slow growth phenotype when combined with the deletion of either one of the two Rps7 paralogues. Not4 is detectable in polysome fractions, as are other subunits of the Ccr4-Not complex such as Not5. The optimal presence of Not5 in polysomes is dependent upon Not4 and the deletion of Not5 leads to a dramatic reduction of polysomes. These results lead us to suggest that Not4 contributes to normal polysome levels and is important for cellular protein solubility maybe in part by ubiquitination of Rps7A.

  16. Geographic origin determination of heroin and cocaine using site-specific isotopic ratio deuterium NMR

    PubMed

    Hays; Remaud; Jamin; Martin

    2000-05-01

    SNIF-NMR (Site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by deuterium NMR) was employed on 36 heroin samples from seven different known origins, and two cocaine samples from two different known origins. Heroin has two "synthetic" deuterium labeled sites (the two acetyls from acetic anhydride, each representing three equivalent nuclei) and 15 "natural" deuterium labeled sites (originating from the morphine produced in the opium plant). The "natural" sites have the potential for determining geographic location of the original opium plant, while the "synthetic" sites could assist in giving information about the commercial source of acetic anhydride used to convert morphine to heroin. Cocaine has 15 "natural" deuterium labeled sites. This study shows that SNIF-NMR has some use in determining the geographic origin of heroin and also has good potential for determining the geographical origin of cocaine.

  17. Mass Dependency of Isotope Fractionation of Gases Under Thermal Gradient and Its Possible Implications for Planetary Atmosphere Escaping Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Tao; Niles, Paul; Bao, Huiming; Socki, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Physical processes that unmix elements/isotopes of gas molecules involve phase changes, diffusion (chemical or thermal), effusion and gravitational settling. Some of those play significant roles for the evolution of chemical and isotopic compositions of gases in planetary bodies which lead to better understanding of surface paleoclimatic conditions, e.g. gas bubbles in Antarctic ice, and planetary evolution, e.g. the solar-wind erosion induced gas escaping from exosphere on terrestrial planets.. A mass dependent relationship is always expected for the kinetic isotope fractionations during these simple physical processes, according to the kinetic theory of gases by Chapman, Enskog and others [3-5]. For O-bearing (O16, -O17, -O18) molecules the alpha O-17/ alpha O-18 is expected at 0.5 to 0.515, and for S-bearing (S32,-S33. -S34, -S36) molecules, the alpha S-33/ alpha S-34 is expected at 0.5 to 0.508, where alpha is the isotope fractionation factor associated with unmixing processes. Thus, one isotope pair is generally proxied to yield all the information for the physical history of the gases. However, we recently] reported the violation of mass law for isotope fractionation among isotope pairs of multiple isotope system during gas diffusion or convection under thermal gradient (Thermal Gradient Induced Non-Mass Dependent effect, TGI-NMD). The mechanism(s) that is responsible to such striking observation remains unanswered. In our past studies, we investigated polyatomic molecules, O2 and SF6, and we suggested that nuclear spin effect could be responsible to the observed NMD effect in a way of changing diffusion coefficients of certain molecules, owing to the fact of negligible delta S-36 anomaly for SF6.. On the other hand, our results also showed that for both diffusion and convection under thermal gradient, this NMD effect is increased by lower gas pressure, bigger temperature gradient and lower average temperature, which indicate that the nuclear spin effect may

  18. The non-mass-dependent oxygen isotope effect in the electrodissociation of carbon dioxide - A step toward understanding NoMaD chemistry. [fractionations in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidenreich, J. E., III; Thiemens, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    A non-mass dependent (NoMaD) oxygen isotope effect is demonstrated in the dissociation of CO2 similar to that observed in the electrosynthesis of ozone. The molecular oxygen produced carries the signature of two separate isotopic fractionation processes; a mass-dependent fractionation probably due to CO2 + O isotopic exchange, and a secondary NoMaD fractionation (delta O-17 = 0.97 + or - 0.09 delta O-18, with the O2 depleted in O-17 and O-18). It is suggested that the effect is due to either the formation or relaxation of ozone in an excited electronic state. This represents the latest advance in the understanding of chemical NoMaD effects which may be essential to the explanation of non-mass-dependent fractionations observed in meteorites.

  19. Deuterium Abundance in Consciousness and Current Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Elizabeth A.

    We utilize the deuterium-hydrogen abundances and their role in setting limits on the mass and other conditions of cosmogenesis and cosmological evolution. We calculate the dependence of a set of physical variables such as density, temperature, energy mass, entropy and other physical variable parameters through the evolution of the universe under the Schwarzschild conditions as a function from early to present time. Reconciliation with the 3°K and missing mass is made. We first examine the Schwarzschild condition; second, the geometrical constraints of a multidimensional Cartesian space on closed cosmologies, and third we will consider the cosmogenesis and evolution of the universe in a multidimensional Cartesian space, obeying the Schwarzschild condition. Implications of this model for matter creation are made. We also examine experimental evidence for closed versus open cosmologies; x-ray detection of the "missing mass" density. Also the interstellar deuterium abundance, along with the value of the Hubble constant set a general criterion on the value of the curvature constant, k. Once the value of the Hubble constant, H is determined, the deuterium abundance sets stringent restrictions on the value of the curvature constant k by an detailed discussion is presented. The experimental evidences for the determination of H and the primary set of coupled equations to determine D abundance is given. 'The value of k for an open, closed, or flat universe will be discussed in terms of the D abundance which will affect the interpretation of the Schwarzschild, black hole universe. We determine cosmology solutions to Einstein's field obeying the Schwarzschild solutions condition. With this model, we can form a reconciliation of the black hole, from galactic to cosmological scale. Continuous creation occurs at the dynamic blackhole plasma field. We term this new model the multiple big bang or "little whimper model". We utilize the deuteriumhydrogen abundances and their role in

  20. Deuterium Gas Analysis by Residual Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, B. K.; Shukla, R.; Das, R.; Shyam, A.; Rao, A. D. P.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen gas is generated by electrolysis method in a compact hydrogen generator. A simple procedure reduces handling and storage of hydrogen cylinders for laboratory applications. In such a system, we are producing deuterium gas from heavy water by electrolysis method. After production of the deuterium gas, we have checked the purity level of the outgoing deuterium from the electrolyser. The test was carried out in a high vacuum system in which one residual gas analyser (RGA) was mounted. The deuterium gas was inserted by one manual gas leak valve in to the vacuum system. In this study, the effect of the emission current of the RGA on the detection of the deuterium was performed. In this paper, we will discuss the detail analysis of the deuterium gas and the effect of the emission current on the partial pressure measurement.

  1. Impact-induced devolatilization and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of serpentine: implications for planetary accretion.

    PubMed

    Tyburczy, J A; Krishnamurthy, R V; Epstein, S; Ahrens, T J

    1990-05-01

    The degree of impact-induced devolatilization of nonporous serpentine, porous serpentine, and deuterium-enriched serpentine was investigated using two independent experimental methods, the gas recovery method and the solid recovery method, yielding consistent results. The gas recovery method enables determination of the chemical and hydrogen isotopic composition of the recovered gases. Experiments on deuterium-enriched serpentine unambiguously identify the samples as the source of the recovered gases, as opposed to other possible contaminants. For shock pressures near incipient devolatilization (Pinitial = 5.0 GPa), the hydrogen isotopic composition of the evolved gas is similar to that of the starting material. For higher shock pressures the bulk evolved gas is significantly lower in deuterium than the starting material. There is also significant reduction of H2O to H2 in gases recovered at higher shock pressures, probably caused by reaction of evolved H2O with the metal gas recovery fixture. The hydrogen isotopic fractionation between the evolved gas and the residual solid indicates nonequilibrium, kinetic control of gas-solid isotopic ratios. In contrast, gaseous H2O-H2 isotopic fractionation suggests high temperature (800-1300 K) isotopic equilibrium between the gaseous species, indicating initiation of devolatilization at sites of greater than average energy deposition (i.e., shear bands). Impact-induced hydrogen isotopic fractionation of hydrous silicates during accretion can affect the distribution of hydrogen isotopes of planetary bodies during accretion, leaving the interiors enriched in deuterium. The significance of this process for planetary development depends on the models used for extrapolation of the observed isotopic fractionation to devolatilizations greater than those investigated experimentally and assumptions about timing and rates of protoatmosphere loss, frequency of multiple impacts, and rates of gas-solid or gas-melt isotopic re

  2. Preparation and characterization of planar deuterium cryotargets.

    PubMed

    Lei, Haile; Li, Jun; Tang, Yongjian; Liu, Yuanqiong

    2009-03-01

    Using a planar-cryotarget system with the cooling power provided by a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler, the deuterium vapor is condensed to form liquid in a cylinder target cell. The liquefaction processes of deuterium are examined by the Mach-Zehnder interference and infrared spectra. The infrared-absorption spectra of deuterium show a strong absorption peak around 3040 nm at 19 K. The thickness distribution of the condensed deuterium in the target cell is determined from Mach-Zehnder interference images by developing a new mathematical treatment method in combination with the digital-image processing technique.

  3. The CALYMHA survey: Lyα escape fraction and its dependence on galaxy properties at z = 2.23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthee, Jorryt; Sobral, David; Oteo, Iván; Best, Philip; Smail, Ian; Röttgering, Huub; Paulino-Afonso, Ana

    2016-05-01

    We present the first results from our CAlibrating LYMan α with Hα (CALYMHA) pilot survey at the Isaac Newton Telescope. We measure Lyα emission for 488 Hα selected galaxies at z = 2.23 from High-z Emission Line Survey in the COSMOS and UDS fields with a specially designed narrow-band filter (λc = 3918 Å, Δλ = 52 Å). We find 17 dual Hα-Lyα emitters [fLyα > 5 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2, of which five are X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGN)]. For star-forming galaxies, we find a range of Lyα escape fractions (fesc, measured with 3 arcsec apertures) from 2 to 30 per cent. These galaxies have masses from 3 × 108 M⊙ to 1011 M⊙ and dust attenuations E(B - V) = 0-0.5. Using stacking, we measure a median escape fraction of 1.6 ± 0.5 per cent (4.0 ± 1.0 per cent without correcting Hα for dust), but show that this depends on galaxy properties. The stacked fesc tends to decrease with increasing star formation rate and dust attenuation. However, at the highest masses and dust attenuations, we detect individual galaxies with fesc much higher than the typical values from stacking, indicating significant scatter in the values of fesc. Relations between fesc and UV slope are bimodal, with high fesc for either the bluest or reddest galaxies. We speculate that this bimodality and large scatter in the values of fesc is due to additional physical mechanisms such as outflows facilitating fesc for dusty/massive systems. Lyα is significantly more extended than Hα and the UV. fesc continues to increase up to at least 20 kpc (3σ, 40 kpc [2σ]) for typical star-forming galaxies and thus the aperture is the most important predictor of fesc.

  4. Deuterium accelerator experiments for APT.

    SciTech Connect

    Causey, Rion A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hertz, Kristin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Cowgill, Donald F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories in California initiated an experimental program to determine whether tritium retention in the tube walls and permeation through the tubes into the surrounding coolant water would be a problem for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT), and to find ways to mitigate the problem, if it existed. Significant holdup in the tube walls would limit the ability of APT to meet its production goals, and high levels of permeation would require a costly cleanup system for the cooling water. To simulate tritium implantation, a 200 keV accelerator was used to implant deuterium into Al 6061-T and SS3 16L samples at temperatures and particle fluxes appropriate for APT, for times varying between one week and five months. The implanted samples were characterized to determine the deuterium retention and Permeation. During the implantation, the D(d,p)T nuclear reaction was used to monitor the build-up of deuterium in the implant region of the samples. These experiments increased in sophistication, from mono-energetic deuteron implants to multi-energetic deuteron and proton implants, to more accurately reproduce the conditions expected in APT. Micron-thick copper, nickel, and anodized aluminum coatings were applied to the front surface of the samples (inside of the APT walls) in an attempt to lower retention and permeation. The reduction in both retention and permeation produced by the nickel coatings, and the ability to apply them to the inside of the APT tubes, indicate that both nickel-coated Al 6061-T6 and nickel-coated SS3 16L tubes would be effective for use in APT. The results of this work were submitted to the Accelerator Production of Tritium project in document number TPO-E29-Z-TNS-X-00050, APT-MP-01-17.

  5. Fundamental aspects of deuterium retention in tungsten at high flux plasma exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.

    2015-08-21

    An effect of enhanced trapping of deuterium in tungsten at high flux was discovered. It was shown analytically and confirmed experimentally that the deuterium trapping in a presence of high density of defects in tungsten (W) depends on the ion energy and ion flux. Newly developed analytical model explains experimentally observed discrepancy of deuterium trapping at radiation-induced defects in tungsten at different ion fluxes that significantly improves a prediction of hydrogen isotope accumulation in different plasma devices, including ITER and DEMO. The developed model can be used for many system of hydrogen in a metal in both normal and extreme environments (high fluxes, elevated temperatures, neutron irradiation, etc.). This new model allows, for the first time, to validate density function theory (DFT) predictions of multiple occupation of a defect with deuterium against experimental data that bridge the gap in length and time scale between DFT calculations and experiments. By comparing first-principle calculations based on DFT and semi-empirical “adsorption model,” it was proved that the mechanism of hydrogen isotope trapping in a vacancy cluster is similar to a chemisorption on a surface. Binding energies of deuterium with different types of defects in W were defined. Moreover, the surface barrier of deuterium to be chemisorbed on a clean W surface was found to be less than 1 eV and kinetics of deuterium release is limited by de-trapping from defects rather than to be limited by surface effects.

  6. Deuterium retention after deuterium plasma implantation in tungsten pre-damaged by fast C+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, V. S.; Gasparyan, Yu M.; Pisarev, A. A.; Khripunov, B. I.; Koidan, V. S.; Ryazanov, A. I.; Semenov, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    Thermal desorption of deuterium from W was investigated. Virgin samples and samples damaged by 10 MeV C 3+ ions were implanted from plasma in the LENTA facility at 370 K and 773 K. In comparison with the undamaged sample, deuterium retention in the damaged sample slightly increased in the case of deuterium implantation at RT, but decreased in the case of deuterium implantation at 773 K. At 773 K, deuterium was concluded to diffuse far behind the D ion range in the virgin sample, while C implantation region was concluded to be a barrier for D diffusion in the damaged sample.

  7. LETTER: H-mode threshold and confinement in helium and deuterium in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryter, F.; Pütterich, T.; Reich, M.; Scarabosio, A.; Wolfrum, E.; Fischer, R.; Gemisic Adamov, M.; Hicks, N.; Kurzan, B.; Maggi, C.; Neu, R.; Rohde, V.; Tardini, G.; ASDEX Upgrade TEAM

    2009-06-01

    In 2008, experiments have been carried out in ASDEX Upgrade to compare H-mode power threshold and confinement time in helium and deuterium. A scan in magnetic field and a wide density variation indicate that the threshold power in the two gases is very similar. The density dependence of the threshold exhibits a clear minimum. Confinement in helium is about 30% lower than in deuterium, mainly due to the reduction in the ion density caused by Z = 2 in helium.

  8. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Leslie D.

    1982-01-01

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  9. Dynamic deuterium recycling on tungsten under carbon-deuterium implantation circumstance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Tomohisa; Kobayashi, Makoto; Kawasaki, Kiyotaka; Miyahara, Yuto; Ashikawa, Naoko; Sagara, Akio; Yoshida, Naoaki; Miyamoto, Mitsutaka; Ono, Kotaro; Hatano, Yuji; Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji

    2013-07-01

    Dynamics of deuterium recycling, including retention and sputtering behaviors was studied for C+ implanted tungsten. The amount of deuterium trapped by irradiation damages was clearly increased in the C+ implantation sample because the irradiation damages in the C+ implanted sample were formed more than those in the only D2+ implanted one. In addition, the deuterium diffusion toward the bulk would be refrained by the formation of W-C mixed layer, which would work as the deuterium diffusion barrier. The in situ sputtered particle measurement system has been established and revealed that the formation of hydrocarbons such as CD4 was directly observed during D2+ implantation into the C+ implanted tungsten. In the lower deuterium fluence, the CD4 sputtering rate was enhanced with increasing the deuterium fluence. It was considered that the sputtering rate of CD4 would be controlled by the concentration of deuterium on the top surface of the W-C mixed layer.

  10. Deuterium enhancement in H3+ in pre-stellar cores.

    PubMed

    Vastel, Charlotte; Phillips, T G; Caselli, P; Ceccarelli, C; Pagani, L

    2006-11-15

    Deuterium enhancement of monodeuterated species has been recognized for more than 30 years as a result of chemical fractionation that results from the difference in zero-point energies of deuterated and hydrogenated molecules. The key reaction is the deuteron exchange in the reaction between HD, the reservoir of deuterium in dark interstellar clouds, and the H3+ molecular ion, leading to the production of H2D+ molecule, and the low temperature in dark interstellar clouds favours this production. Furthermore, the presence of multiply deuterated species have incited our group to proceed further and consider the subsequent reaction of H2D+ with HD, leading to D2H+, which can further react with HD to produce D3+. In pre-stellar cores, where CO was found to be depleted, this production should be increased as CO would normally destroy H3+. The first model including D2H+ and D3+ predicted that these molecules should be as abundant as H2D+. The first detection of the D2H+ was made possible by the recent laboratory measurement for the frequency of the fundamental line of para-D2H+. Here, we present observations of H2D+ and D2H+ towards a sample of dark clouds and pre-stellar cores and show how the distribution of ortho-H2D+ (1(1,0)-1(1,1)) can trace the deuterium factory in pre-stellar cores. We also present how future instrumentation will improve our knowledge concerning the deuterium enhancement of H3+.

  11. Community N and O isotope fractionation by sulfide-dependent denitrification and anammox in a stratified lacustrine water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenk, Christine B.; Zopfi, Jakob; Blees, Jan; Veronesi, Mauro; Niemann, Helge; Lehmann, Moritz F.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the community nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotope effects of fixed N loss in the northern basin of Lake Lugano, where sulfide-dependent denitrification and anammox are the main drivers of suboxic N2 production. A decrease in nitrate (NO3-) concentration toward the redox transition zone (RTZ) at mid-water depth was paralleled by an increase in δ15N and δ18O from approximately 5‰ to >20‰ and from 0‰ to >10‰, respectively. Ammonium (NH4+) concentrations were highest in the near-bottom water and decreased toward the RTZ concomitant with an increase in δ15N-NH4+ from ∼7‰ to >15‰. A diffusion-reaction model yielded N and O isotope enrichment factors that are significantly smaller than isotope effects reported previously for microbial NO3- reduction and NH4+ oxidation (15εNO3 ≈ 10‰, 18εNO3 ≈ 7‰, and 15εNH4 ≈ 10-12‰). For the Lake Lugano north basin, we constrain the apparent under-expression of the N isotope effects to: (1) environmental conditions (e.g., substrate limitation, low cell specific N transformation rates), or (2) low process-specific (chemolithotrophic denitrification and anammox) isotope fractionation. Our results have confirmed the robust nature of the co-linearity between N and O isotope enrichment during microbial denitrification beyond its organotrophic mode. However, the ratio of 18O to 15N enrichment (18εNO3:15εNO3) associated with NO3- reduction in the RTZ was ∼0.89, which is lower than observed in marine environments and in most culture experiments. We propose that chemolithotrophic NO3- reduction in the Lake Lugano north basin was partly catalyzed by the periplasmic dissimilatory nitrate reductase (Nap) (rather than the membrane-bound dissimilatory Nar), which is known to express comparably low 18εNO3:15εNO3 ratios in the ambient NO3- pool. However, NO2- re-oxidation, e.g., during anammox or microaerobic nitrification, could have contributed to the lowered 18O to 15N enrichment ratios. Although

  12. Depletion of GSH in human blood plasma and cytosolic fraction during cadmium toxicity is temperature and pH dependent.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Hashmat; Khan, Muhammad Farid; Jan, Syed Umer; Hashmat, Farwa

    2016-01-01

    Toxicities of heavy metals is a burning issue and a topic of interest among the toxicologists throughout the world. Metals are always in use of man since long but in recent years the use of cadmium has increased in the form of various cadmium compounds such as cadmium compounds as stabilizers in plastic pipe industries and in the preparations of different alloys etc. Cadmium is even used in phosphate fertilizers and thus comes directly or indirectly in contact with human eatables like crops, vegetables and fruits. Once it is absorbed it affects almost all the organs and systems of human body especially blood components and kidneys. Always the chemical reactions of different chemicals are dependent on some influential factors, among these factors the effect of pH and temperature of the media in which these chemicals interact with each other are very much important. Keeping in view this fact we have evaluated the effect of cadmium nitrate tetra hydrate on GSH of human plasma and cytosolic fraction. Estimation of thiol was done by Ellman's modified method and was found that the interaction of cadmium nitrate tetra hydrate and GSH of these blood components was more at a pH and temperature, which were near to physiological pH and temperature of human body. This fact was proved as the estimated thiol concentration left after the interaction of cadmium nitrate tetra hydrate and thiol of these blood components was minimum at pH and temperature near to human blood pH and temperature. We concluded that the possible reason for depletion of GSH of these blood components was conversion of GSH into Cd(SG) (2) and/or GSSG formation.

  13. Investigations of chemical erosion of carbon materials in hydrogen and deuterium low pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, P.; Fantz, U.; Balden, M.

    2005-03-01

    Investigations on chemical erosion of pure and carbide-doped graphite materials were carried out in inductively coupled RF plasmas containing hydrogen, deuterium or a mixture of both in helium. For extrapolations of erosion yields to future fusion devices the relevant particle fluxes have to be known precisely. This was done by several diagnostic techniques. In particular the ion fluxes are determined by an energy mass analyzer. An isotope effect of the ion composition is measured resulting in an enhanced erosion of graphite in deuterium plasmas. Since in fusion plasmas a mixture of deuterium and tritium will interact with the surface, a mixture of hydrogen and deuterium on graphite was investigated as well. In order to reduce erosion yields doping of carbon is under discussion. Therefore, fluence dependent erosion yields of several W-, Ti-, V- and Zr-doped graphite materials are measured and compared with pure graphite.

  14. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange on aromatic rings during atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Davies, Noel W; Smith, Jason A; Molesworth, Peter P; Ross, John J

    2010-04-15

    It has been demonstrated that substituted indoles fully labelled with deuterium on the aromatic ring can undergo substantial exchange back to partial and even fully protonated forms during atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). The degree of this exchange was strongly dependent on the absolute quantity of analyte, the APCI desolvation temperature, the nature of the mobile phase, the mobile phase flow rate and the instrument used. Hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange on several other aromatic ring systems during APCI LC/MS was either undetectable (nitrobenzene, aniline) or extremely small (acetanilide) compared to the effect observed for substituted indoles. This observation has major implications for quantitative assays using deuterium-labelled internal standards and for the detection of deuterium-labelled products from isotopically labelled feeding experiments where there is a risk of back exchange to the protonated form during the analysis. PMID:20213724

  15. First observation of muonic hyperfine effects in pure deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kammel, P.; Breunlich, W.H.; Cargnelli, M.; Mahler, H.G.; Zmeskal, J.; Bertl, W.H.; Petitjean, C.

    1983-11-01

    We discovered a strong hyperfine dependence of the resonant formation process of d..mu..d mesomolecules, while detecting neutrons from muon-catalyzed fusion in pure deuterium gas at 34 K. This new effect enabled us to observe directly transitions between hyperfine states of the ..mu..d atom for the first time and to determine an accurate experimental value for this transition rate. Our analysis demonstrates the importance of hyperfine effects for the quantitative understanding of the mechanism of resonant d..mu..d formation. Moreover, this experiment indicates that the resonant formation process is a powerful tool for a refined spectroscopy of d..mu..d bound states. Finally, the detailed knowledge about mesoatomic and mesomolecular processes obtained in this work provides valuable information for the analysis of experiments on the elementary muon-capture process in deuterium.

  16. Characterization of deuterium clusters mixed with helium gas for an application in beam-target-fusion experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Dyer, G.; Ihn, Y. S.; Cortez, J.; Aymond, F.; Gaul, E.; Donovan, M. E.; Barbui, M.; et al

    2014-12-10

    We measured the average deuterium cluster size within a mixture of deuterium clusters and helium gas by detecting Rayleigh scattering signals. The average cluster size from the gas mixture was comparable to that from a pure deuterium gas when the total backing pressure and temperature of the gas mixture were the same as those of the pure deuterium gas. According to these measurements, the average size of deuterium clusters depends on the total pressure and not the partial pressure of deuterium in the gas mixture. To characterize the cluster source size further, a Faraday cup was used to measure themore » average kinetic energy of the ions resulting from Coulomb explosion of deuterium clusters upon irradiation by an intense ultrashort pulse. The deuterium ions indeed acquired a similar amount of energy from the mixture target, corroborating our measurements of the average cluster size. As the addition of helium atoms did not reduce the resulting ion kinetic energies, the reported results confirm the utility of using a known cluster source for beam-target-fusion experiments by introducing a secondary target gas.« less

  17. Characterization of deuterium clusters mixed with helium gas for an application in beam-target-fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Dyer, G.; Ihn, Y. S.; Cortez, J.; Aymond, F.; Gaul, E.; Donovan, M. E.; Barbui, M.; Bonasera, A.; Natowitz, J. B.; Albright, B. J.; Fernández, J. C.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-12-10

    We measured the average deuterium cluster size within a mixture of deuterium clusters and helium gas by detecting Rayleigh scattering signals. The average cluster size from the gas mixture was comparable to that from a pure deuterium gas when the total backing pressure and temperature of the gas mixture were the same as those of the pure deuterium gas. According to these measurements, the average size of deuterium clusters depends on the total pressure and not the partial pressure of deuterium in the gas mixture. To characterize the cluster source size further, a Faraday cup was used to measure the average kinetic energy of the ions resulting from Coulomb explosion of deuterium clusters upon irradiation by an intense ultrashort pulse. The deuterium ions indeed acquired a similar amount of energy from the mixture target, corroborating our measurements of the average cluster size. As the addition of helium atoms did not reduce the resulting ion kinetic energies, the reported results confirm the utility of using a known cluster source for beam-target-fusion experiments by introducing a secondary target gas.

  18. The fractional acoustoelectric current plateau induced by the energy-dependent tunnelling from dynamic quantum dots into an impurity dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. W.; Song, L.

    2016-08-01

    The fractional acoustoelectric (AE) current plateau in surface-acoustic-waves (SAW) single-electron transport devices is studied by measuring the current plateau as a function of the SAW power and gate bias as well as a function of perpendicular magnetic filed. Our investigation indicates that the fractional plateau is induced by the tunnelling effect from the dynamic quantum dots (QDs) into a static impurity dot. Rate equations are used to extract the tunnelling rates, which change a lot with the number of electrons in the dynamic QDs, the SAW power and gate bias. In addition, the current plateau evolves into a fractional structure, when a strong perpendicular magnetic field is applied to the system.

  19. In-ESI source hydrogen/deuterium exchange of carbohydrate ions.

    PubMed

    Kostyukevich, Yury; Kononikhin, Alexey; Popov, Igor; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2014-03-01

    We present the investigation of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of carbohydrates ions occurring in the electrospray ion source. The shape of the deuterium distribution was observed to be considerably dependent on the temperature of the ion transfer tube and the solvent used. If deuterated alcohol (EtOD or MeOD) or D2O/deuterated alcohol is used as an electrospray solvent, then for high temperatures (>350 °C), intensive back exchange is observed, resulting in ∼30% depth of the deuterium exchange. At low temperatures (<150 °C), the back exchange is weaker and the depth of the deuterium exchange is ∼70%. In the intermediate temperature region (∼250 °C), the deuterium distribution is unusually wide for methanol and bimodal for ethanol. The addition of 1% formic acid results in low (∼30%) depth of the deuterium exchange for any temperature in the operating region. The bimodal distribution for the ethanol can be possibly explained by the presence of differently folded gas-phase ions of carbohydrates.

  20. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, L.D.

    1980-03-13

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator was designed to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  1. Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 142 Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium (Web, free access)   This database provides theoretical values of energy levels of hydrogen and deuterium for principle quantum numbers n = 1 to 200 and all allowed orbital angular momenta l and total angular momenta j. The values are based on current knowledge of the revelant theoretical contributions including relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, recoil, and nuclear size effects.

  2. Mass dependent fractionation of stable chromium isotopes in mare basalts: Implications for the formation and the differentiation of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnand, Pierre; Parkinson, Ian J.; Anand, Mahesh

    2016-02-01

    We present the first stable chromium isotopic data from mare basalts in order to investigate the similarity between the Moon and the Earth's mantle. A double spike technique coupled with MC-ICP-MS measurements was used to analyse 19 mare basalts, comprising high-Ti, low-Ti and KREEP-rich varieties. Chromium isotope ratios (δ53Cr) for mare basalts are positively correlated with indices of magmatic differentiation such as Mg# and Cr concentration which suggests that Cr isotopes were fractionated during magmatic differentiation. Modelling of the results provides evidence that spinel and pyroxene are the main phases controlling the Cr isotopic composition during fractional crystallisation. The most evolved samples have the lightest isotopic compositions, complemented by cumulates that are isotopically heavy. Two hypotheses are proposed to explain this fractionation: (i) equilibrium fractionation where heavy isotopes are preferentially incorporated into the spinel lattice and (ii) a difference in isotopic composition between Cr2+ and Cr3+ in the melt. However, both processes require magmatic temperatures below 1200 °C for appreciable Cr3+ to be present at the low oxygen fugacities found in the Moon (IW -1 to -2 log units). There is no isotopic difference between the most primitive high-Ti, low-Ti and KREEP basalts, which suggest that the sources of these basalts were homogeneous in terms of stable Cr isotopes. The least differentiated sample in our sample set is the low-Ti basalt 12016, characterised by a Cr isotopic composition of -0.222 ± 0.025‰, which is within error of the current BSE value (-0.124 ± 0.101‰). The similarity between the mantles of the Moon and Earth is consistent with a terrestrial origin for a major fraction of the lunar Cr. This similarity also suggests that Cr isotopes were not fractionated by core formation on the Moon.

  3. Vicinal deuterium perturbations on hydrogen NMR chemical shifts in cyclohexanes.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Daniel J; Allis, Damian G; Hudson, Bruce S; James, Shelly; Morgera, Katherine B; Baldwin, John E

    2008-10-15

    The substitution of a deuterium for a hydrogen is known to perturb the NMR chemical shift of a neighboring hydrogen atom. The magnitude of such a perturbation may depend on the specifics of bonding and stereochemical relationships within a molecule. For deuterium-labeled cyclohexanes held in a chair conformation at -80 degrees C or lower, all four possible perturbations of H by D as H-C-C-H is changed to D-C-C-H have been determined experimentally, and the variations seen, ranging from 6.9 to 10.4 ppb, have been calculated from theory and computational methods. The predominant physical origins of the NMR chemical shift perturbations in deuterium-labeled cyclohexanes have been identified and quantified. The trends defined by the Delta delta perturbation values obtained through spectroscopic experiments and by theory agree satisfactorily. They do not match the variations typically observed in vicinal J(H-H) coupling constants as a function of dihedral angles.

  4. Pion Induced Pion Production on Deuterium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossi, Vesna

    V. We also added the Fermi motion of the nucleon to the model to account for the deuterium environment. The 'free' parameters of the model are the largely unknown coupling constants listed above. We fixed C to be -2.08 by requiring the energy dependence of the model to be that of the measurement of (22) and compared the energy and angular distributions of the model to our data for several values of the f_Delta and g_{N^*Delta_tau } coupling constants ranging between 0 and 2 (where the units are 4/5 f_{NNpi }) and between 1.08 and 1.53 respectively. We found reasonable sensitivity of the model to the f _Delta variation, but only limited sensitivity to the value of the g_{N ^*Delta_tau} coupling constant. Overall we achieved a very good agreement between data and the theoretical predictions for f_ Delta values smaller than 0.5 and g _{N^*Delta_tau} values closer to its lower limit. Improved statistical accuracy of the data would however be needed to better constrain the values of the coupling constants. On the basis of our results we feel that this model is a useful tool for planning future experiments and that a more extensive (pi,2pi) experimental program, where differential cross sections are measured for differing isospin channels, would provide a further, more stringent test on the model allowing for a more precise determination of the coupling constants.

  5. Neutron Emission in Deuterium Dense Plasma Foci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of a computational study of the deuterium dense plasma focus (DPF) carried out to improve understanding of the neutron production mechanism in the DPF. The device currents studied range from 70 kA to several MA. The complete evolution of the DPF is simulated in 3D from rundown through to neutron emission using a hybrid computational method. The rundown, pinching, stagnation and post-stagnation (pinch break-up) phases are simulated using the 3D MHD code Gorgon. Kinetic computational tools are used to model the formation and transport of non-thermal ion populations and neutron production during the stagnation and post-stagnation phases, resulting in the production of synthetic neutron spectra. It is observed that the break-up phase plays an important role in the formation of non-thermal ions. Large electric fields generated during pinch break-up cause ions to be accelerated from the edges of dense plasma regions. The dependence on current of the neutron yield, neutron spectra shape and isotropy is studied. The effect of magnetization of the non-thermal ions is evident as the anisotropy of the neutron spectra decreases at higher current.

  6. Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance unambiguously quantifies pore and collagen-bound water in cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Henry H.; Wright, Alexander C.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2012-01-01

    Bone water (BW) plays a pivotal role in nutrient transport and conferring bone with its viscoelastic mechanical properties. BW is partitioned between the pore spaces of the Haversian and lacuno-canalicular system, and water predominantly bound to the matrix proteins (essentially collagen). The general model of BW is that the former predominantly experiences fast isotropic molecular reorientation, whereas water in the bone matrix undergoes slower anisotropic rotational diffusion. Here, we provide direct evidence for the correctness of this model and show that unambiguous quantification in situ of these two functionally and dynamically different BW fractions is possible. The approach chosen relies on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of deuterium (2H) that unambiguously separates and quantifies the two fractions on the basis of their distinguishing microdynamic properties. Twenty-four specimens of the human tibial cortex from six donors (3 male, 3 female, ages 27-83 years) were cored and 2H spectra recorded at 62 MHz (9.4 Tesla) on a Bruker Instruments DMX 400 spectrometer after exchange of native BW with 2H2O. Spectra consisted of a doublet signal resulting from quadrupole interaction of water bound to collagen. Doublet splittings were found to depend on the orientation of the osteonal axis with respect to the magnetic field direction (8.2 and 4.3 kHz for parallel and perpendicular orientation, respectively). In contrast, the isotropically reorienting pore-resident water yielded a single resonance line superimposed on the doublet. Nulling of the singlet resonance allowed separation of the two fractions. The results indicate that in human cortical bone 60-80% of detectable BW is collagen-bound. Porosity determined as the difference between total BW and collagen bound water fraction was found to strongly parallel μCT based measurements (R2 = 0.91). Our method provides means for direct validation of emerging relaxation-based measurements of cortical bone porosity by

  7. Impact-induced devolatilization and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of serpentine: Implications for planetary accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyburczy, James A.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Epstein, Samuel; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Impact-induced devolatilization of porous serpentine was investigated using two independent experimental methods, the gas recovery and the solid recovery method, each yielding nearly identical results. For shock pressures near incipient devolatilization, the hydrogen isotopic composition of the evolved H2O is very close to that of the starting material. For shock pressures at which up to 12 percent impact-induced devolatilization occurs, the bulk evolved gas is significantly lower in deuterium than the starting material. There is also significant reduction of H2O to H2 in gases recovered at these higher shock pressures, probably caused by reaction of evolved H2O with the metal gas recovery fixture. Gaseous H2O-H2 isotopic fractionation suggests high temperature isotopic equilibrium between the gaseous species, indicating initiation of devolatilization at sites of greater than average energy deposition. Bulk gas-residual solid isotopic fractionations indicate nonequilibrium, kinetic control of gas-solid isotopic ratios. Impact-induced hydrogen isotopic fractionation of hydrous silicates during accretion can strongly affect the long-term planetary isotopic ratios of planetary bodies, leaving the interiors enriched in deuterium. Depending on the model used for extrapolation of the isotopic fractionation to devolatilization fractions greater than those investigated experimentally can result from this process.

  8. Gas swelling and deuterium distribution in beryllium implanted with deuterium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chernikov, V.N.; Alimov, V.Kh.; Zakharov, A.P.

    1995-09-01

    An extensive TEM study of the microstructure of Be TIP-30 irradiated with 3 and 10 keV D ions up to fluences, {Phi}, in the range from 3 x 10{sup 20} to 8 x 10{sup 21} D/m{sup 2} at temperatures T{sub irr} = 300 K, 500 K and 700 K has been carried out. Depth distributions of deuterium in the form of separate D atoms and D{sub 2} molecules have been investigated by means of SIMS and RGA methods, correspondingly. D ion irradiation is accompanied by blistering and gives rise to different kind of destructions depending mainly on the irradiation temperature. Irradiation with D ions at 300 K leads to the formation of tiny highly pressurized D{sub 2} bubbles reminiscent of He bubbles in Be. Under 3 keV D ion irradiation D{sub 2} bubbles ({bar r}{sub b} {approx} 0.7 nm) appear at a fluence as low as 3x10{sup 20} D/m{sup 2}. Irradiation at 500 K results in the development, along with relatively small facetted bubbles, of larger oblate gas-filled cavities accumulating most of injected D atoms and providing for much higher gas swelling values as compared to irradiation at 300 K. The increase of D and/or T{sub irr}, to 700 K causes the further coarsening of large cavities which are transformed into sub-surface labyrinth structures. D and He ion implantation leads to the enhanced growth of porous microcrystalline layers of c.p.h.-BeO oxide with a microstructure which differs considerably from that of oxide layers on electropolished surfaces of Be. Based on the analysis of experimental data questions of deuterium reemission, thermal desorption and trapping in Be have been discussed in detail.

  9. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and the CP-odd fraction in the decay B0-->D(*+)D(*-).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Barillari, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Forti, A C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-09-26

    We present a measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and an updated determination of the CP-odd fraction in the decay B0-->D(*+)D(*-) using a data sample of 88x10(6)BB pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC. We determine the CP-odd fraction to be 0.063+/-0.055(stat)+/-0.009(syst). The time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters Im(lambda(+)) and /lambda(+)/ are determined to be 0.05+/-0.29(stat)+/-0.10(syst) and 0.75+/-0.19(stat)+/-0.02(syst), respectively. The standard model predicts these parameters to be -sin(2beta and 1, respectively, in the absence of penguin diagram contributions.

  10. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and the CP-odd fraction in the decay B0-->D*+D*-.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2005-10-01

    We present an updated measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and the CP-odd fraction in the decay B0-->D*+D*- using 232x10(6)BB pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B factory. We determine the CP-odd fraction to be 0.125+/-0.044(stat)+/-0.007(syst). The time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters C+ and S+ are determined to be 0.06+/-0.17(stat)+/-0.03(syst) and -0.75+/-0.25(stat)+/-0.03(syst), respectively. The standard model predicts these parameters to be 0 and -sin2beta, respectively, in the absence of penguin amplitude contributions.

  11. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries and the CP-Odd Fraction in the Decay B0->D*+D*-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-06

    We present an updated measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and the CP-odd fraction in the decay B{sup 0} D*{sup +}D*{sup -} using 232 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. We determine the CP-odd fraction to be 0.125 {+-} 0.044(stat) {+-} 0.007(syst). The time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters C{sub +} and S{sub +} are determined to be 0.06 {+-} 0.17(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst) and -0.75 {+-} 0.25(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst), respectively. The Standard Model predicts these parameters to be 0 and -sin2{beta}, respectively, in the absence of penguin amplitude contributions.

  12. Scaling and long-range dependence in option pricing III: A fractional version of the Merton model with transaction costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Tian; Yan, Hai-Gang; Tang, Ming-Ming; Zhu, En-Hui

    2010-02-01

    A model for option pricing of fractional version of the Merton model with ‘Hurst exponent’ H being in [1/2,1) is established with transaction costs. In particular, for H∈(1/2,1) the minimal price Cmin(t,St) of an option under transaction costs is obtained, which displays that the timestep δt and the ‘Hurst exponent’ H play an important role in option pricing with transaction costs.

  13. High-dose total-body irradiation and autologous marrow reconstitution in dogs: dose-rate-related acute toxicity and fractionation-dependent long-term survival

    SciTech Connect

    Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.; Schumacher, D.; Shulman, H.; Graham, T.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-11-01

    Beagle dogs treated by total-body irradiation (TBI) were given autologous marrow grafts in order to avoid death from marrow toxicity. Acute and delayed non-marrow toxicities of high single-dose (27 dogs) and fractionated TBI (20 dogs) delivered at 0.05 or 0.1 Gy/min were compared. Fractionated TBI was given in increments of 2 Gy every 6 hr for three increments per day. Acute toxicity and early mortality (<1 month) at identical total irradiation doses were comparable for dogs given fractionated or single-dose TBI. With single-dose TBI, 14, 16, and 18 Gy, respectively, given at 0.05 Gy/min, 0/5, 5/5, and 2/2 dogs died from acute toxicity; with 10, 12, and 14 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 5/5 dogs died acutely. With fractionated TBI, 14 and 16 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 2/2 dogs died auctely. Early deaths were due to radiation enteritis with or without associated septicemia (29 dogs; less than or equal to Day 10). Three dogs given 10 Gy of TBI at 0.1 Gy/min died from bacterial pneumonia; one (Day 18) had been given fractionated and two (Days 14, 22) single-dose TBI. Fifteen dogs survived beyond 1 month; eight of these had single-dose TBI (10-14 Gy) and all died within 7 months of irradiation from a syndrome consisting of hepatic damage, pancreatic fibrosis, malnutrition, wasting, and anemia. Seven of the 15 had fractionated TBI, and only one (14 Gy) died on Day 33 from hepatic failure, whereas 6 (10-14 Gy) are alive and well 250 to 500 days after irradiation. In conclusion, fractionated TBI did not offer advantages over single-dose TBI with regard to acute toxicity and early mortality; rather, these were dependent upon the total dose of TBI. The total acutely tolerated dose was dependent upon the exposure rate; however, only dogs given fractionated TBI became healthy long-term survivors.

  14. A study of the substance dependence effect of the ethanolic extract and iridoid-rich fraction from Valeriana jatamansi Jones in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin; Ke-ke, Xu; Chao-yong, Chen; Rui-tong, Zhang; Ming, Lan; Shao-hua, Li; Ling-zhen, Pan; Tian-e, Zhang; Zhi-yong, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently we found the ethanolic extract and iridoid-rich fraction from Valeriana jatamansi Jones, which is a traditional Chinese medicine exhibited anxiolytic properties. Objective: This study aims to the substance dependence effect of the ethanolic extract and iridoid-rich fraction. Materials and Methods: The study included two experiments: Mice were given orally with ethanolic extract for 12 weeks or iridoid-rich fraction for 16 weeks in experiment I and experiment II, respectively. Diazepam was used as a control drug and the normal mice groups were administered with 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose Na in both experiments. All groups were administered twice daily. Natural withdrawal symptoms, withdrawal-induced body weight change, audiogenic tail-erection test (in experiment I), and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced convulsion test (in experiment II) were measured. Results: (1) Compared to normal group in both experiments, the diazepam-treated group exhibited obvious withdrawal symptoms of tail-erection, irritability, teeth chattering, etc; the body weight of them after withdrawal had a period of significant loss (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01); and the ratios of tail-erection and seizure in two experiments were improved significantly when mice were induced by mixer noise ringtone (experiment I) or PTZ (experiment II) (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01).(2) In experiment I and II, there were no significant differences between mice that received ethanolic extract or iridoid-rich fraction and normal group in terms of natural withdrawal symptoms and withdrawal-induced body weight change (P > 0.05); in audiogenic tail-erection test, it found that the significant difference compared with normal group was just in ethanolic extract 900 mg/kg dose group on week 8 (P < 0.05); in PTZ-induced convulsion test, mice in iridoid-rich fraction groups had a slightly tail-erection and seizure, all results of them were with no significant difference compare to normal mice (P > 0.05), while

  15. Controlling the Neutron Yield from a Small Dense Plasma Focus using Deuterium-Inert Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bures, B. L.; Krishnan, M.; Eshaq, Y.

    2009-01-21

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) is a well known source of neutrons when operating with deuterium. The DPF is demonstrated to scale from 10{sup 4} n/pulse at 40 kA to >10{sup 12} n/pulse at 2 MA by non-linear current scaling as described in [1], which is itself based on the simple yet elegant model developed by Lee [2]. In addition to the peak current, the gas pressure controls the neutron yield. Recent published results suggest that mixing 1-5% mass fractions of Krypton increase the neutron yield per pulse by more than 10x. In this paper we present results obtained by mixing deuterium with Helium, Neon and Argon in a 500 J dense plasma focus operating at 140 kA with a 600 ns rise time. The mass density was held constant in these experiments at the optimum (pure) deuterium mass density for producing neutrons. A typical neutron yield for a pure deuterium gas charge is 2x10{sup 6}{+-}15% n/pulse. Neutron yields in excess of 10{sup 7}{+-}10% n/pulse were observed with low mass fractions of inert gas. Time integrated optical images of the pinch, soft x-ray measurements and optical emission spectroscopy where used to examine the pinch in addition to the neutron yield monitor and the fast scintillation detector. Work supported by Domestic Nuclear Detection Office under contract HSHQDC-08-C-00020.

  16. A novel technique to remove deuterium from CANDU pressure tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Z.; Zhang, C.-S.; Griffiths, K.; Norton, P. R.

    2001-10-01

    Deuterium ingress into the pressure tubes of a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) nuclear reactor can cause the pressure tubes to crack prematurely. A novel technique, based on the rapid diffusion of deuterium in zirconium alloys, and subsequent preferential segregation of deuterium at the surface, has been developed to remove dissolved deuterium. This technique involves a simple continuous plasma treatment of the surface of a pressure tube, and can remove as much as 70% of the dissolved deuterium from the entire wall thickness of a pressure tube in realistic time scales. The proposed technique has considerable economic incentive: it may extend the life of pressure tubes without channel replacement.

  17. Hydrogen--deuterium exchange in KD2PO4

    SciTech Connect

    Kucheyev, S O; Felter, T E; Siekhaus, W J; Nelson, A J; Hamza, A V

    2003-11-04

    Depth profiles of {sup 1}H and {sup 2}D in rapidly-grown KD{sub 2x}H{sub 2(1-x)}PO{sub 4} (DKDP) single crystals are studied by elastic recoil detection analysis. Results show that, at ambient conditions, deuteration in the first {approx} 500 nm from the sample surface significantly decreases within the first several days after D{sub 2}O surface polishing. This effect is attributed to the deuterium-hydrogen exchange. The effective diffusion coefficient of this process is strongly dependent on both the degree of deuteration and sample growth conditions. Physical mechanisms of the D/H exchange are discussed.

  18. Hot muonic deuterium and tritium from cold targets

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, G.M.; Beveridge, J.L. ); Bailey, J.M. ); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. ); Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. ); Huber, T.M.; Pippitt, B. ); Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Schellenberg, L. (Fribourg U

    1992-01-01

    Experiments are described which use a solid hydrogen layer to form muonic hydrogen isotopes in vacuum. The method relies on transfer of the muon from protium to either a deuteron or a triton. The resulting muonic deuterium or muonic tritium will not immediately thermalize because of the very low elastic cross sections, and may be emitted from the surface of the layer. Measurements which detect decay electrons, muonic x-rays, and fusion products have been used to study the processes. A target has been constructed which exploits muonic atom emission in order to study the energy dependence of transfer and muon molecular formation.

  19. Hot muonic deuterium and tritium from cold targets

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, G.M.; Beveridge, J.L.; Bailey, J.M.; Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M.; Huber, T.M.; Pippitt, B.; Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Schellenberg, L.; Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.; Kunselman, A.R.; Martoff, C.J.; Petitjean, C.

    1992-12-31

    Experiments are described which use a solid hydrogen layer to form muonic hydrogen isotopes in vacuum. The method relies on transfer of the muon from protium to either a deuteron or a triton. The resulting muonic deuterium or muonic tritium will not immediately thermalize because of the very low elastic cross sections, and may be emitted from the surface of the layer. Measurements which detect decay electrons, muonic x-rays, and fusion products have been used to study the processes. A target has been constructed which exploits muonic atom emission in order to study the energy dependence of transfer and muon molecular formation.

  20. Deuterium isotope effect on the oxidation of monophenols and o-diphenols by tyrosinase.

    PubMed Central

    Fenoll, Lorena G; Peñalver, María José; Rodríguez-López, José N; García-Ruiz, P A; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Tudela, José

    2004-01-01

    A solvent deuterium isotope effect on the catalytic affinity (km) and catalytic constant (kcat) of tyrosinase in its action on different monophenols and o-diphenols was observed. The catalytic constant decreased in all substrates as the molar fraction of deuterated water in the medium increased, while the catalytic affinity only decreased for the o-diphenols with an R group in C-1 [-H, -CH3 and -CH(CH3)2]. In a proton inventory study of the oxidation of o-diphenols, the representation of kcat fn/kcat f0 against n (atom fractions of deuterium), where kcat fn is the catalytic constant for a molar fraction of deuterium (n) and kcat f0 is the corresponding kinetic parameter in a water solution, was linear for all substrates, indicating that only one of the four protons transferred from the hydroxy groups of the two molecules of substrate, which are oxidized in one turnover, is responsible for the isotope effects, the proton transferred from the hydroxy group of C-4 to the peroxide of the oxytyrosinase form (Eox). However, in the representation of Km fn/Km f0 against n, where Km fn represents the catalytic affinity for a molar fraction of deuterium (n) and Km f0 is the corresponding kinetic parameter in a water solution, a linear decrease was observed as n increased in the case of o-diphenols with the R group [-H, -CH3 and -CH(CH3)2], and a parabolic increase with other R groups, indicating that more than one proton is responsible for the isotope effects on substrate binding. In the case of monophenols with six protons transferred in the catalytic cycle, the isotope effect occurs in the same way as for o-diphenols. In the present paper, the fractionation factors of different monophenols and o-diphenols are described and possible mechanistic implications are discussed. PMID:15025557

  1. CO2-dependent fractional crystallization of alkaline silicate magmas and unmixing of carbonatites within the intrusive complexes of Brava Island (Cape Verde)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidendorfer, D.; Schmidt, M. W.; Mattsson, H. B.

    2014-12-01

    Intrusive carbonatites often occur in intimate association with SiO2-undersaturated rocks such as melilitites, nephelinites, syenites and phonolites. The occurrence of carbonatites on five of the 10 main islands of the Cape Verde hotspot argues for a CO2-enriched mantle source. Whether alkali-poor carbonatites on the Cape Verdes directly represent small mantle melt fractions or form by extreme fractionation and/or liquid immiscibility from a CO2-rich silicate magma remains a matter of debate. This study focuses on the pyroxenites, nephelinites, ijolites, syenites, phonolites and carbonatites of the intrusive unit of Brava Island. This relative complete series allows for the deduction of a CO2-dependent fractionation pathway from the most primitive basanitic dikes towards phonolitic compositions through an ijolitic series. Major and trace element whole rock and mineral composition trends can be reproduced by fractionating a sequence of olivine, augite, perovskite, biotite, apatite, sodalite and FeTi-oxides, present as phenocrysts in the rocks corresponding to their fractionation interval. To reproduce the observed chemistry of the alkaline silicate rocks a total fractionation of ~87% is required. The melts evolve towards the carbonatite-silicate miscibility gap, an initial CO2 of 0.5 wt% would be sufficient to maintain CO2-saturation in the more evolved compositions. The modelled carbonatite compositions, conjugate to nepheline-syenites to phonolites, correspond well to the observed ones except for an alkali-enrichment with respect to the natural samples. The alkali-depleted nature of the small carbonatite intrusions and dikes on Brava is likely a consequence of fluid-release to the surrounding wall-rocks during crystallization, where fenitization can be observed. The trace element chemistry of primary carbonates and also cpx within both, the carbonatites and the associated silicate rocks, substantiates our fractionation model. Furthermore, carbonatite and silicate

  2. Radio observations of D I and fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiles, Carl; Mccullough, Peter R.; Glassgold, Alfred E.

    1993-01-01

    We report observations to detect the 327 MHz line of atomic deuterium in the primarily molecular clouds towards Cas A and Sgr A, making appropriate choices of spectral and spatial resolution. Our best results for Cas A, based on 1253 hr of observing with the 85 foot (26 m) Hat Creek telescope and 45 hr with the very large array (VLA), yield an upper limit for the fraction of deuterium in atomic form, D I, of 0.14. We present an approximate analytical analysis of deuterium fractionation in translucent clouds, which shows that gas-phase ion-molecule reactions, assisted by dust and HD line self-shielding, are efficient in converting deuterium to HD. We conclude that little atomic deuterium is present in the molecular clumps in the Cas A clouds and that much higher sensitivity observations would be required to detect 327 MHz line in molecular clouds. We have also attempted to detect the 72 GHz line of DCO(+) toward Cas A. The observed upper limit to the DCO(+)/HCO(+) ratio of approximately 0.03 is not much larger than our theoretical estimate, and the DCO(+) line should be detectable with existing instrumentation, unless the temperature of these clouds is much larger than usually assumed.

  3. Wafer Mapping Using Deuterium Enhanced Defect Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, K.; Holland, O. W.; Hellmer, R.; Vanmil, B.; Bubulac, L. O.; Golding, T. D.

    2010-07-01

    Deuterium (as well as other hydrogen isotopes) binds with a wide range of morphological defects in semiconductors and, as such, becomes distributed similarly to those defects. Thus, the deuterium profile within the sample serves as the basis of a technique for defect mapping known as amethyst wafer mapping (AWM). The efficiency of this technique has been demonstrated by evaluation of ion-induced damage in implanted Si, as well as as-grown defects in HgCdTe (MCT) epilayers. The defect tagging or decoration capability of deuterium is largely material independent and applicable to a wide range of defect morphologies. A number of analytical techniques including ion channeling and etch pit density measurements were used to evaluate the AWM results.

  4. The effect of propylene glycol on the P450-dependent metabolism of acetaminophen and other chemicals in subcellular fractions of mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Snawder, J.E.; Benson, R.W.; Leakey, J.E.A.; Roberts, D.W. )

    1993-01-01

    Propylene glycol (PG) decreases the hepatotoxicity of acetominophen (APAP). To elucidate the mechanism for this response, the authors measured the effect of PG on the in vitro metabolism of APAP by subcellular liver fractions from 6-10 week-old male B6C3F1 mice. The fractions were assayed for their ability to bioactivate APAP to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, which was trapped as APAP-glutathione conjugates or APAP-protein adducts, and for dimethyl-nitrosamine-N-demethylase (DMN), 4-nitrophenol hydroxylase (4-NPOH), and phenacetin-O-deethylase (PAD) activities. Activity in the crude mitochondrial-rich (10,000 [times] g pellet) fraction was low and PG had no effect. PG inhibited DMN and 4-NPOH, indicators of IIE1-dependent activity, and the formation of APAP-glutathione conjugates and APAP-protein adducts in both heavy (15,000 [times] g pellet) and light (100,000 [times] g pellet) microsomes. PAD, a measure of IA2-dependent activity, was not inhibited. These data demonstrate that PG selectively inhibits IIE1 activity, including the bioactivation of APAP, and implicates this as the mechanism for PG-mediated protection of APAP hepatotoxicity in mice. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Simultaneous experimental determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate with irradiation radio frequency power-dependent quantitative CEST MRI analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2013-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is sensitive to dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, and has been increasingly evaluated for molecular imaging and in vivo applications. However, the experimentally measured CEST effect depends on the CEST agent concentration, exchange rate and relaxation time. In addition, there may be non-negligible direct radio-frequency (RF) saturation effects, particularly severe for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) agents owing to their relatively small chemical shift difference from that of the bulk water resonance. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis only provides CEST-weighted information. Recently, it has been shown with numerical simulation that both labile proton concentration and exchange rate can be determined by evaluating the RF power dependence of DIACEST effect. To validate the simulation results, we prepared and imaged two CEST phantoms: a pH phantom of serially titrated pH at a fixed creatine concentration and a concentration phantom of serially varied creatine concentration titrated to the same pH, and solved the labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate per-pixel. For the concentration phantom, we showed that the labile proton fraction ratio is proportional to the CEST agent concentration with negligible change in the exchange rate. Additionally, we found the exchange rate of the pH phantom is dominantly base-catalyzed with little difference in the labile proton fraction ratio. In summary, our study demonstrated quantitative DIACEST MRI, which remains promising to augment the conventional CEST-weighted MRI analysis.

  6. Study of the kinematic dependences of Λ {/b 0} production in pp collisions and a measurement of the Λ {/b 0} → Λ {/c +} π - branching fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Gomez, M. Calvo; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suárez, A. Dosil; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Albor, V. Fernandez; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Torreira, A. Gallas; Galli, D.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Gándara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Morata, J. A. Hernando; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jezabek, M.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manzali, M.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C. Marin; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Sánchez, A. Martín; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Tostes, D. Martins; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Alvarez, A. Pazos; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Trigo, E. Perez; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Romero, D. A. Roa; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Vidal, A. Romero; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Valls, P. Ruiz; Sabatino, G.; Silva, J. J. Saborido; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Mayordomo, C. Sanchez; Sedes, B. Sanmartin; Santacesaria, R.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spinella, F.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Regueiro, P. Vazquez; Sierra, C. Vázquez; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Diaz, M. Vieites; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-08-01

    The kinematic dependences of the relative production rates, , of Λ {/b 0} baryons and B 0 mesons are measured using Λ {/b 0} → Λ {/c +} π - and decays. The measurements use proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 fb-1 at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, recorded in the forward region with the LHCb experiment. The relative production rates are observed to depend on the transverse momentum, p T, and pseudorapidity, η, of the beauty hadron, in the studied kinematic region 1 .5 < p T < 40 GeV /c and 2 < η < 5. Using a previous LHCb measurement of in semileptonic decays, the branching fraction ℬ( Λ {/b 0} → Λ {/c +} π -) = (4.30 ± 0.03{-/0.11 + 0.12} ± 0.26 ± 0.21) × 10- 3 is obtained, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, the third is from the previous LHCb measurement of and the fourth is due to the b branching fraction. This is the most precise measurement of a Λ {/b 0} branching fraction to date. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate with irradiation radio frequency (RF) power dependent quantitative CEST MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is sensitive to dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, and has been increasingly evaluated for molecular imaging and in vivo applications. However, the experimentally measured CEST effect depends on the CEST agent concentration, exchange rate and relaxation time. In addition, there may be non-negligible direct radio-frequency (RF) saturation effects, particularly severe for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) agents due to their relatively small chemical shift difference from that of the bulk water resonance. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis only provides CEST-weighted information. Recently, it has been shown with numerical simulation that both labile proton concentration and exchange rate can be determined by evaluating the RF power dependence of DIACEST effect. To validate the simulation results, we prepared and imaged two CEST phantoms: a pH phantom of serially titrated pH at a fixed creatine concentration and a concentration phantom of serially varied creatine concentration titrated to the same pH, and solved the labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate per-pixel. For the concentration phantom, we showed that the labile proton fraction ratio is proportional to the CEST agent concentration with negligible change in the exchange rate. Additionally, we found the exchange rate of the pH phantom is dominantly base-catalyzed with little difference in the labile proton fraction ratio. In summary, our study demonstrated quantitative DIACEST MRI, which remains promising to augment the conventional CEST-weighted MRI analysis. PMID:23606428

  8. Deuterium-incorporated gate oxide of MOS devices fabricated by using deuterium ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Sung; Lear, Kevin L.

    2012-04-01

    In the aspect of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) device reliability, deuterium-incorporated gate oxide could be utilized to suppress the wear-out that is combined with oxide trap generation. An alternative deuterium process for the passivation of oxide traps or defects in the gate oxide of MOS devices has been suggested in this study. The deuterium ion is delivered to the location where the gate oxide resides by using an implantation process and subsequent N2 annealing process at the back-end of metallization process. A conventional MOS field-effect transistor (MOSFET) with a 3-nm-thick gate oxide and poly-to-ploy capacitor sandwiched with 20-nm-thick SiO2 were fabricated in order to demonstrate the deuterium effect in our process. An optimum condition of ion implantation was necessary to account for the topography of the overlaying layers in the device structure and to minimize the physical damage due to the energy of the implanted ion. Device parameter variations, the gate leakage current, and the dielectric breakdown phenomenon were investigated in the deuterium-ion-implanted devices. We found the isotope effect between hydrogen- and deuterium-implanted devices and an improved electrical reliability in the deuterated gate oxide. This implies that deuterium bonds are generated effectively at the Si/SiO2 interface and in the SiO2 bulk.

  9. Deuterium in crystalline and amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Borzi, R.; Ma, H.; Fedders, P.A.; Leopold, D.J.; Norberg, R.E.; Boyce, J.B.; Johnson, N.M.; Ready, S.E.; Walker, J.

    1997-07-01

    The authors report deuteron magnetic resonance (DMR) measurements on aged deuterium-implanted single crystal n-type silicon and comparisons with amorphous silicon spectra. The sample film was prepared six years ago by deuteration from a-D{sub 2} plasma and evaluated by a variety of experimental methods. Deuterium has been evolving with time and the present DMR signal shows a smaller deuteron population. A doublet from Si-D configurations along (111) has decreased more than have central molecular DMR components, which include 47 and 12 kHz FWHM gaussians. Transient DMR magnetization recoveries indicate spin lattice relaxation to para-D{sub 2} relaxation centers.

  10. Measurements of the Branching Fraction and Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries of B0 to J/Psi pi0 Decays

    SciTech Connect

    George, K

    2006-03-10

    We present measurements of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0} decays based on (231.8 {+-} 2.6) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. We obtain a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.94 {+-} 0.22 (stat) {+-} 0.17 (syst)) x 10{sup -5}. We also measure the CP asymmetry parameters C = -0.21 {+-} 0.26 (stat) {+-} 0.06 (syst) and S = -0.68 {+-} 0.30 (stat) {+-} 0.04 (syst).

  11. Measurements of the Branching Fraction and Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries of B0 to J/Psi pi0 Decays.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2005-08-04

    The authors present measurements of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} {pi}{sup 0} decays based on (231.8 {+-} 2.6) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC during the years 1999-2004. We obtain a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.94 {+-} 0.22 (stat) {+-} 0.17 (syst)) x 10{sup -5}. They also measure the CP asymmetry parameters C = -0.21 {+-} 0.26 (stat) {+-} 0.09 (syst) and S = -0.68 {+-} 0.30 (stat) {+-} 0.04 (syst). All results presented in this paper are preliminary.

  12. Modulation of Intestinal Inflammation by Yeasts and Cell Wall Extracts: Strain Dependence and Unexpected Anti-Inflammatory Role of Glucan Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Jawhara, Samir; Habib, Khalid; Maggiotto, François; Pignede, Georges; Vandekerckove, Pascal; Maes, Emmanuel; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Fontaine, Thierry; Guerardel, Yann; Poulain, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts and their glycan components can have a beneficial or adverse effect on intestinal inflammation. Previous research has shown that the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii (Sb) reduces intestinal inflammation and colonization by Candida albicans. The aim of this study was to identify dietary yeasts, which have comparable effects to the anti-C. albicans and anti-inflammatory properties of Sb and to assess the capabilities of yeast cell wall components to modulate intestinal inflammation. Mice received a single oral challenge of C. albicans and were then given 1.5% dextran-sulphate-sodium (DSS) for 2 weeks followed by a 3-day restitution period. S. cerevisiae strains (Sb, Sc1 to Sc4), as well as mannoprotein (MP) and β-glucan crude fractions prepared from Sc2 and highly purified β-glucans prepared from C. albicans were used in this curative model, starting 3 days after C. albicans challenge. Mice were assessed for the clinical, histological and inflammatory responses related to DSS administration. Strain Sc1-1 gave the same level of protection against C. albicans as Sb when assessed by mortality, clinical scores, colonization levels, reduction of TNFα and increase in IL-10 transcription. When Sc1-1 was compared with the other S. cerevisiae strains, the preparation process had a strong influence on biological activity. Interestingly, some S. cerevisiae strains dramatically increased mortality and clinical scores. Strain Sc4 and MP fraction favoured C. albicans colonization and inflammation, whereas β-glucan fraction was protective against both. Surprisingly, purified β-glucans from C. albicans had the same protective effect. Thus, some yeasts appear to be strong modulators of intestinal inflammation. These effects are dependent on the strain, species, preparation process and cell wall fraction. It was striking that β-glucan fractions or pure β-glucans from C. albicans displayed the most potent anti-inflammatory effect in the DSS model. PMID

  13. Deuterium separation by infrared-induced addition reaction

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1977-01-01

    A method for deuterium enrichment by the infrared-induced addition reaction of a deuterium halide with an unsaturated aliphatic compound. A gaseous mixture of a hydrogen halide feedstock and an unsaturated aliphatic compound, particularly an olefin, is irradiated to selectively vibrationally excite the deuterium halide contained therein. The excited deuterium halide preferentially reacts with the unsaturated aliphatic compound to produce a deuterated addition product which is removed from the reaction mixture.

  14. Theoretical predictions of deuterium abundances in the Jovian planets

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W.B.; MacFarlane, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    Current concepts for the origin of the Jovian planets and current constraints on their interior structure are used to support the argument that the presence of large amounts of 'ice' (H2O, CH4, and NH3) in Uranus and Neptune indicates temperature low enough to condense these species at the time Uranus and Neptune formed. Such low temperatures, however, imply orders-of-magnitude fractionation effects for deuterium into the 'ice' component if isotopic equilibration can occur. The present models thus imply that Uranus and Neptune should have D/H ratio at least four times primordial, contrary to observation for Uranus. It is found that the Jovian and Saturnian D/H should be close to primordial regardless of formation scenario.

  15. Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-2 is a distinct protein kinase enriched in a novel cytoskeletal fraction associated with adipocyte plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Hresko, Richard C; Murata, Haruhiko; Mueckler, Mike

    2003-06-13

    By recombining subcellular components of 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a test tube, early insulin signaling events dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) were successfully reconstituted, up to and including the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 by the serine/threonine kinase, Akt (Murata, H., Hresko, R.C., and Mueckler, M. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 21607-21614). Utilizing the advantages provided by a cell-free methodology, we characterized phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 2 (PDK2), the putative kinase responsible for phosphorylating Akt on Ser-473. Immunodepleting cytosolic PDK1 from an in vitro reaction containing plasma membrane and cytosol markedly inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt at the PDK1 site (Thr-308) but had no effect on phosphorylation at the PDK2 site (Ser-473). In contrast, PDK2 activity was found to be highly enriched in a novel cytoskeletal subcellular fraction associated with plasma membranes. Akt isoforms 1-3 and a kinase-dead Akt1 (K179A) mutant were phosphorylated in a phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent manner at Ser-473 in an in vitro reaction containing this novel adipocyte subcellular fraction. Our data indicate that this PDK2 activity is the result of a kinase distinct from PDK1 and is not due to autophosphorylation or transphosphorylation of Akt. PMID:12682057

  16. Sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane is dependent on methane concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deusner, Christian; Holler, Thomas; Arnold, Gail L.; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Formolo, Michael J.; Brunner, Benjamin

    2014-08-01

    to induce very large sulfur isotope fractionation between sulfate and sulfide (i.e. >60‰) and will drive the oxygen isotope composition of sulfate towards the sulfate-water oxygen isotope equilibrium value. Sulfur isotope fractionation by AOM-SR at gas seeps, where methane fluxes are high, will be much smaller (i.e. 20 to 40‰).

  17. Coulomb explosions of deuterium clusters studied by compact design of Nomarski interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinkova, Michaela; Kalal, Milan; Rhee, Yong Joo

    2010-08-01

    Interactions of high-intensity femtosecond lasers with deuterium clusters leading to Coulombic explosions and subsequent production of fusion neutrons attracted in recent years considerable attention. In order to maximize the neutron yield finding a dependence of clusters size and their spatial distribution on experimental conditions became very important. In this paper a possibility to measure the deuterium clusters spatial distributions experimentally was analyzed. In combination with experiments recently performed in the Laboratory of Quantum Optics at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) interferometry was identified as the diagnostics suitable for such measurements.

  18. Does Deuterium Enable the Formation of Primordial Brown Dwarfs?

    PubMed

    Uehara; Inutsuka

    2000-03-10

    We investigate thermal and dynamical evolution of a primordial gas cloud with an updated deuterium chemistry. We consider a fragment of a postshock-cooled sheet that is expected to form by collapse of a massive cloud ( greater, similar108 M middle dot in circle) and by blast waves due to supernova explosions. At first we investigate molecule formation in a primordial shock. We show that almost all deuterium can be converted to HD within the age of the universe at the collapsed redshift in the case of a cloud that has a virial temperature of approximately 106 K and collapses at z>1. When the postshock sheet fragments owing to gravitational instability, the fractional H2 and HD abundances become approximately 10-2 and approximately 10-5, respectively, which are 103-104 times higher than the result of molecule formation in the expanding universe after recombination. To study the subsequent evolution of a fragment, we performed one-dimensional simulations of a spherical/cylindrical cloud, of which initial conditions (e.g., fractional abundances of chemical composition, temperature) are derived from the result of the shock. It is found that, in case of a cylindrical collapse, the cooling by HD molecules keeps the temperature of the cloud less than 100 K and the cloud evolves almost isothermally. When the cloud becomes optically thick to the HD line emission ( approximately 1010 cm-3) and the gravitational fragmentation of the cylindrical cloud becomes effective, the Jeans mass becomes comparable to 0.1 M middle dot in circle. This series of processes enables the formation of primordial low-mass stars, and possibly brown dwarfs, in primordial gas clouds.

  19. Does Deuterium Enable the Formation of Primordial Brown Dwarfs?

    PubMed

    Uehara; Inutsuka

    2000-03-10

    We investigate thermal and dynamical evolution of a primordial gas cloud with an updated deuterium chemistry. We consider a fragment of a postshock-cooled sheet that is expected to form by collapse of a massive cloud ( greater, similar108 M middle dot in circle) and by blast waves due to supernova explosions. At first we investigate molecule formation in a primordial shock. We show that almost all deuterium can be converted to HD within the age of the universe at the collapsed redshift in the case of a cloud that has a virial temperature of approximately 106 K and collapses at z>1. When the postshock sheet fragments owing to gravitational instability, the fractional H2 and HD abundances become approximately 10-2 and approximately 10-5, respectively, which are 103-104 times higher than the result of molecule formation in the expanding universe after recombination. To study the subsequent evolution of a fragment, we performed one-dimensional simulations of a spherical/cylindrical cloud, of which initial conditions (e.g., fractional abundances of chemical composition, temperature) are derived from the result of the shock. It is found that, in case of a cylindrical collapse, the cooling by HD molecules keeps the temperature of the cloud less than 100 K and the cloud evolves almost isothermally. When the cloud becomes optically thick to the HD line emission ( approximately 1010 cm-3) and the gravitational fragmentation of the cylindrical cloud becomes effective, the Jeans mass becomes comparable to 0.1 M middle dot in circle. This series of processes enables the formation of primordial low-mass stars, and possibly brown dwarfs, in primordial gas clouds. PMID:10688760

  20. Comparison between the radial density buildup in the TARA plugs using hydrogen versus deuterium neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Blackfield, D.T.

    1983-11-01

    The WOLF code is used to compare the beam divergences from a TARA source using hydrogen and deuterium. Factors which influence the divergence which are investigated are the electron temperature, initial ion energy, electrode positions and ion beam current density. The beam divergence for 20 keV hydrogen is found to be only 20% smaller than for 25 keV deuterium for the same electrode positions. Since the optimal positioning of the electrodes is found to be independent of mesh spacing, a large parameter study is undertaken using little computer time. A time-dependent radial Fokker-Planck code is next used to examine the radial density buildup in a plug of the TARA tandem mirror. For both hydrogen and deuterium neutral beams, the influences of beam positioning, current and energy, edge neutral pressure and assumed electron temperature are studied.

  1. The primordial abundance of deuterium: ionization correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Ryan; Pettini, Max

    2016-01-01

    We determine the relative ionization of deuterium and hydrogen in low metallicity damped Lyman α (DLA) and sub-DLA systems using a detailed suite of photoionization simulations. We model metal-poor DLAs as clouds of gas in pressure equilibrium with a host dark matter halo, exposed to the Haardt & Madau background radiation of galaxies and quasars at redshift z ≃ 3. Our results indicate that the deuterium ionization correction correlates with the H I column density and the ratio of successive ion stages of the most commonly observed metals. The N(N II)/N(N I) column density ratio provides the most reliable correction factor, being essentially independent of the gas geometry, H I column density, and the radiation field. We provide a series of convenient fitting formulae to calculate the deuterium ionization correction based on observable quantities. The ionization correction typically does not exceed 0.1 per cent for metal-poor DLAs, which is comfortably below the current measurement precision (2 per cent). However, the deuterium ionization correction may need to be applied when a larger sample of D/H measurements becomes available.

  2. Synthesis of deuterium-labeled prochlorperazine

    SciTech Connect

    Hawes, E.M.; Gurnsey, T.S.; Shetty, H.U.; Midha, K.K.

    1983-06-01

    The propylpiperazine side chain of prochlorperazine was labeled with two, four, or six deuterium atoms by lithium aluminum deuteride reduction of the appropriate amide. The isotopic purity of the products after correcting for chlorine isotopes was greater than 95.7%.

  3. The deuterium puzzle in the symmetric universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leroy, B.; Nicolle, J. P.; Schatzman, E.

    1973-01-01

    An attempt was made to use deuterium abundance in the symmetric universe to prove that no nucleosynthesis takes place during annihilation and therefore neutrons were loss before nucleosynthesis. Data cover nucleosynthesis during the radiative era, cross section estimates, maximum abundance of He-4 at the end of nucleosynthesis area, and loss rate.

  4. Tempered fractional calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  5. Tempered fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  6. Electron-transport pathway of the NADH-dependent haem oxygenase system of rat liver microsomal fraction induced by cobalt chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Hino, Y; Minakami, S

    1979-01-01

    The hepatic microsomal haem oxygenase activity of rats treated with CoCl2 was studied kinetically by measuring biliverdin, the immediate product of the reaction. Biliverdin was extracted with diethyl ether/ethanol mixture, and was determined by the difference between A690 and A800. The apparent Km value for NADPH (at 50 microM-haematin) was about 0.2 microM when an NADPH-generating system was used, whereas that for NADH was about 630 microM. Essentially the same Vmax. values were obtained for both the NADH- and NADPH-dependent haem oxygenase reactions. No synergism was observed with NADH and NADPH. The NADH-dependent reaction was competitively inhibited by NADP+, with a Ki of about 10 microM. The inhibitoin of the NADH-dependent reaction by the antibody against rat liver microsomal NADPH-cytochrome c reductase was essentially complete, with a pattern similar to that of the NADPH-dependent reaction. The immunochemical experiment and the comparison of the kinetic values with the reported data on isolated NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase and NADPH--cytochrome c reductase indicated the involvement of the latter enzyme in NADH-dependent haem oxygenation by microsomal fraction in situ. PMID:36076

  7. Transcription of fractionated mammalian chromatin by mammalian ribonucleic acid polymerase. Demonstration of temperature-dependent rifampicin-resistant initiation sites in euchromatin deoxyribonucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Chesterton, C. James; Coupar, Barbara E. H.; Butterworth, Peter H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The chromatin fractionation method of Frenster et al. (1963) as modified by Leake et al. (1972) was used to prepare fragments of euchromatin from rat liver nuclei. These remain soluble in 5mm-MgCl2, and contain DNA of maximum mol.wt. 1×106–2×106. The fragments were separated from condensable chromatin on a sucrose gradient. Euchromatin contains endogenous DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and most of the nascent RNA labelled in vivo or in vitro. Euchromatin fragments allow initiation of transcription by added purified rat liver form-B RNA polymerase and contain temperature-dependent rifampicin-resistant initiation sites for the form-B enzyme. These findings indicate that transcription of the euchromatin regions of interphase chromosomes is not initiated in condensed chromatin, but is initiated within the euchromatin stretches. Condensable chromatin also contains most of these activities, but is not associated with nascent RNA. PMID:4464858

  8. Hydrogen-deuterium substitution in solid ethanol by surface reactions at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Osaka, Kazuya; Chigai, Takeshi; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Ethanol (CH3CH2OH) is one of the most abundant complex organic molecules in star-forming regions. Despite its detection in the gas phase only, ethanol is believed to be formed by low-temperature grain-surface reactions. Methanol, the simplest alcohol, has been a target for observational, experimental, and theoretical studies in view of its deuterium enrichment in the interstellar medium; however, the deuterium chemistry of ethanol has not yet been an area of focus. Recently, deuterated dimethyl ether, a structural isomer of ethanol, was found in star-forming regions, indicating that deuterated ethanol can also be present in those environments. In this study, we performed laboratory experiments on the deuterium fractionation of solid ethanol at low temperatures through a reaction with deuterium (D) atoms at 10 K. Hydrogen (H)-D substitution, which increases the deuteration level, was found to occur on the ethyl group but not on the hydroxyl group. In addition, when deuterated ethanol (e.g. CD3CD2OD) solid was exposed to H atoms at 10 K, D-H substitution that reduced the deuteration level occurred on the ethyl group. Based on the results, it is likely that deuterated ethanol is present even under H-atom-dominant conditions in the interstellar medium.

  9. Cosmic Deuterium and Social Networking Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Suer, T.-A.; Lubowich, D. A.; Glaisyer, T.

    2006-08-01

    For the education of newcomers to a scientific field and for the convenience of students and workers in the field, it is helpful to have all the basic scientific papers gathered. For the study of deuterium in the Universe, in 2004-5 we set up http://www.cosmicdeuterium.info with clickable links to all the historic and basic papers in the field and to many of the current papers. Cosmic deuterium is especially important because all deuterium in the Universe was formed in the epoch of nucleosynthesis in the first 1000 seconds after the Big Bang, so study of its relative abundance (D:H~1:100,000) gives us information about those first minutes of the Universe's life. Thus the understanding of cosmic deuterium is one of the pillars of modern cosmology, joining the cosmic expansion, the 3 degree cosmic background radiation, and the ripples in that background radiation. Studies of deuterium are also important for understanding Galactic chemical evolution, astrochemistry, interstellar processes, and planetary formation. Some papers had to be scanned while others are available at the Astrophysical Data System, adswww.harvard.edu, or to publishers' Websites. By 2006, social networking software (http:tinyurl.com/ zx5hk) had advanced with popular sites like facebook.com and MySpace.com; the Astrophysical Data System had even set up MyADS. Social tagging software sites like http://del.icio.us have made it easy to share sets of links to papers already available online. We have set up http://del.icio.us/deuterium to provide links to many of the papers on cosmicdeuterium.info, furthering previous del.icio.us work on /eclipses and /plutocharon. It is easy for the site owner to add links to a del.icio.us site; it takes merely clicking on a button on the browser screen once the site is opened and the desired link is viewed in a browser. Categorizing different topics by keywords allows subsets to be easily displayed. The opportunity to expose knowledge and build an ecosystem of web

  10. TEMPERED FRACTIONAL CALCULUS

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, MARK M.; SABZIKAR, FARZAD; CHEN, JINGHUA

    2014-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series. PMID:26085690

  11. Determination of degradation rates of organic substances in the unsaturated soil zone depending on the grain size fractions of various soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Thomas; Stefan, Catalin; Goersmeyer, Nora

    2015-04-01

    Rate and extent of the biological degradation of organic substances during transport through the unsaturated soil zone is decisively influenced by the chemical and physical properties of the pollutants such as water solubility, toxicity and molecular structure. Furthermore microbial degradation processes are also influenced by soil-specific properties. An important parameter is the soil grain size distribution on which the pore volume and the pore size depends. Changes lead to changes in air and water circulation as well as preferred flow paths. Transport capacity of water inclusive nutrients is lower in existing bad-drainable fine pores in soils with small grain size fractions than in well-drainable coarse pores in a soil with bigger grain size fractions. Because fine pores are saturated with water for a longer time than the coarse pores and oxygen diffusion in water is ten thousand times slower than in air, oxygen is replenished much slower in soils with small grain size fractions. As a result life and growth conditions of the microorganisms are negatively affected. This leads to less biological activity, restricted degradation/mineralization of pollutants or altered microbial processes. The aim of conducted laboratory column experiments was to study the correlation between the grain size fractions respectively pore sizes, the oxygen content and the biodegradation rate of infiltrated organic substances. Therefore two columns (active + sterile control) were filled with different grain size fractions (0,063-0,125 mm, 0,2-0,63 mm and 1-2 mm) of soils. The sterile soil was inoculated with a defined amount of a special bacteria culture (sphingobium yanoikuae). A solution with organic substances glucose, oxalic acid, sinaphylic alcohol and nutrients was infiltrated from the top in intervals. The degradation of organic substances was controlled by the measurement of dissolved organic carbon in the in- and outflow of the column. The control of different pore volumes

  12. Real-time prostate motion assessment: image-guidance and the temporal dependence of intra-fraction motion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The rapid adoption of image-guidance in prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) results in longer treatment times, which may result in larger intrafraction motion, thereby negating the advantage of image-guidance. This study aims to qualify and quantify the contribution of image-guidance to the temporal dependence of intrafraction motion during prostate IMRT. Methods One-hundred and forty-three patients who underwent conventional IMRT (n=67) or intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT/RapidArc, n=76) for localized prostate cancer were evaluated. Intrafraction motion assessment was based on continuous RL (lateral), SI (longitudinal), and AP (vertical) positional detection of electromagnetic transponders at 10 Hz. Daily motion amplitudes were reported as session mean, median, and root-mean-square (RMS) displacements. Temporal effect was evaluated by categorizing treatment sessions into 4 different classes: IMRTc (transponder only localization), IMRTcc (transponder + CBCT localization), IMATc (transponder only localization), or IMATcc (transponder + CBCT localization). Results Mean/median session times were 4.15/3.99 min (IMATc), 12.74/12.19 min (IMATcc), 5.99/5.77 min (IMRTc), and 12.98/12.39 min (IMRTcc), with significant pair-wise difference (p<0.0001) between all category combinations except for IMRTcc vs. IMATcc (p>0.05). Median intrafraction motion difference between CBCT and non-CBCT categories strongly correlated with time for RMS (t-value=17.29; p<0.0001), SI (t-value=−4.25; p<0.0001), and AP (t-value=2.76; p<0.0066), with a weak correlation for RL (t-value=1.67; p=0.0971). Treatment time reduction with non-CBCT treatment categories showed reductions in the observed intrafraction motion: systematic error (Σ)<0.6 mm and random error (σ)<1.2 mm compared with ≤0.8 mm and <1.6 mm, respectively, for CBCT-involved treatment categories. Conclusions For treatment durations >4-6 minutes, and without any intrafraction motion mitigation protocol

  13. Deuterium content of the Venus atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Clarke, John T.

    1989-01-01

    The abundance of deuterium in the atmosphere of Venus is an important clue to the role of water in the planet's history, because ordinary and deuterated water escape the atmosphere at different rates. The high-resolution mode of the IUE was used to measure hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission from Venus, but only an upper limit on deuterium Lyman-alpha emission was found, from which was inferred a D/H ratio of less than 0.002-0.005. This is smaller by a factor of 3-8 than the D/H ratio derived from measurements by the Pioneer Venus Large Probe, and may indicate either a stratification of D/H ratio with altitude or a smaller overall ratio than previously thought.

  14. Deuterium Retention in NSTX with Lithium Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner, J.P. Allain, W. Blanchard, H.W. Kugel, R. Maingi, L. Roquemore, V. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor

    2010-06-02

    High (≈ 90%) deuterium retention was observed in NSTX gas balance measurements both withand without lithiumization of the carbon plasma facing components. The gas retained in ohmic discharges was measured by comparing the vessel pressure rise after a discharge to that of a gasonly pulse with the pumping valves closed. For neutral beam heated discharges the gas input and gas pumped by the NB cryopanels were tracked. The discharges were followed by outgassing of deuterium that reduced the retention. The relationship between retention and surface chemistry was explored with a new plasma-material interface probe connected to an in-vacuo surface science station that exposed four material samples to the plasma. XPS and TDS analysis showed that the binding of D atoms is fundamentally changed by lithium - in particular atoms are weakly bonded in regions near lithium atoms bound to either oxygen or the carbon matrix.

  15. Deuterium Abundance in the Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferlet, R.; Gry, C.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    1984-01-01

    The present situation of deuterium abundance evaluation in interstellar space is discussed, and it is shown that it should be or = .00001 by studying in more detail lambda the Sco line of sight and by observing two NaI interstellar components toward that star, it can be shown that the D/H evaluation made toward lambda Sco is in fact related to the local interstellar medium (less than 10 pc from the Sun). Because this evaluation is also or = .00001 it is in striking contrast with the one made toward alpha Aur (D/H or = .000018 confirming the fact that the deuterium abundance in the local interstellar medium varies by at least a factor of two over few parsecs.

  16. Precision measures of the primordial abundance of deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Ryan J.; Jorgenson, Regina A.; Murphy, Michael T.; Steidel, Charles C.

    2014-01-20

    We report the discovery of deuterium absorption in the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] = –2.88) damped Lyα system at z {sub abs} = 3.06726 toward the QSO SDSS J1358+6522. On the basis of 13 resolved D I absorption lines and the damping wings of the H I Lyα transition, we have obtained a new, precise measure of the primordial abundance of deuterium. Furthermore, to bolster the present statistics of precision D/H measures, we have reanalyzed all of the known deuterium absorption-line systems that satisfy a set of strict criteria. We have adopted a blind analysis strategy (to remove human bias) and developed a software package that is specifically designed for precision D/H abundance measurements. For this reanalyzed sample of systems, we obtain a weighted mean of (D/H){sub p} = (2.53 ± 0.04) × 10{sup –5}, corresponding to a universal baryon density 100 Ω{sub b,} {sub 0} h {sup 2} = 2.202 ± 0.046 for the standard model of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). By combining our measure of (D/H){sub p} with observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), we derive the effective number of light fermion species, N {sub eff} = 3.28 ± 0.28. We therefore rule out the existence of an additional (sterile) neutrino (i.e., N {sub eff} = 4.046) at 99.3% confidence (2.7σ), provided that the values of N {sub eff} and of the baryon-to-photon ratio (η{sub 10}) did not change between BBN and recombination. We also place a strong bound on the neutrino degeneracy parameter, independent of the {sup 4}He primordial mass fraction, Y {sub P}: ξ{sub D} = +0.05 ± 0.13 based only on the CMB+(D/H){sub p} observations. Combining this value of ξ{sub D} with the current best literature measure of Y {sub P}, we find a 2σ upper bound on the neutrino degeneracy parameter, |ξ| ≤ +0.062.

  17. Is Deuterium Nuclear Fusion Catalyzed by Antineutrinos?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shomer, Isaac

    2010-02-01

    The hypothesis of Fischbach and Jenkins that neutrinos emitted from the sun accelerate radioactive decay is noted. It is thought that neutrinos accelerate beta decay by reacting with neutron-rich nuclides to form a beta particle and a daughter product, with no antineutrino emitted. Conversely, it is proposed that antineutrinos can react with proton-rich nuclides to cause positron decay, with no neutrino emitted. It is also proposed that the nuclear fusion of the hydrogen bomb is triggered not only by the energy of the igniting fission bomb, but by the antineutrinos created by the rapid beta decay of the daughter products in the fission process. The contemplated mechanism for antineutrino initiated fusion is the following: 1. The antineutrinos from the fission daughter products cause positron decay of deuterium by the process outlined above. 2. In a later fusion step, these positrons subsequently react with neutrons in deuterium to create antineutrinos. Electrons are unavailable to annihilate positrons in the plasma of the hydrogen bomb. 3. These antineutrinos thereafter react with more deuterium to form positrons, thereby propagating a chain reaction. )

  18. In vivo measurement of plasma cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis with deuterated water: determination of the average number of deuterium atoms incorporated.

    PubMed

    Diraison, F; Pachiaudi, C; Beylot, M

    1996-07-01

    Fractional lipid synthesis can be measured using the incorporation of deuterium from deuterated water. The calculations require knowledge of the maximum incorporation number (N) of deuterium atoms in the molecules synthesized. For both tissue palmitate and cholesterol, N values have been found to be higher during in vivo versus in vitro experiments. We determined the N values to be used for measuring the fractional synthesis of plasma cholesterol and of palmitate triglycerides (TG). Rats were given drinking water enriched (7% to 10%) with deuterated water, and N was determined from the mass isotopomer distributions of plasma cholesterol and plasma TG palmitate and the deuterium enrichment of plasma water. We found N to be 21 for palmitate and 27 for cholesterol. These values agree with those reported for tissue palmitate and cholesterol in vivo, and are higher than values found in vitro. We also found large deuterium enrichments in plasma glucose and in liver lactate and pyruvate. We suggest that, compared with in vitro studies, in vivo metabolism of these compounds leads to an additional pathway of incorporation of deuterium into lipids through deuterium-labeled acetyl coenzyme A (CoA). This could explain why N values are higher in vivo than in vitro. PMID:8692014

  19. Immune-system-dependent anti-tumor activity of a plant-derived polyphenol rich fraction in a melanoma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Cadena, A; Urueña, C; Prieto, K; Martinez-Usatorre, A; Donda, A; Barreto, A; Romero, P; Fiorentino, S

    2016-06-02

    Recent findings suggest that part of the anti-tumor effects of several chemotherapeutic agents require an intact immune system. This is in part due to the induction of immunogenic cell death. We have identified a gallotannin-rich fraction, obtained from Caesalpinia spinosa (P2Et) as an anti-tumor agent in both breast carcinoma and melanoma. Here, we report that P2Et treatment results in activation of caspase 3 and 9, mobilization of cytochrome c and externalization of annexin V in tumor cells, thus suggesting the induction of apoptosis. This was preceded by the onset of autophagy and the expression of immunogenic cell death markers. We further demonstrate that P2Et-treated tumor cells are highly immunogenic in vaccinated mice and induce immune system activation, clearly shown by the generation of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) producing tyrosine-related protein 2 antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Moreover, the tumor protective effects of P2Et treatment were abolished in immunodeficient mice, and partially lost after CD4 and CD8 depletion, indicating that P2Et's anti-tumor activity is highly dependent on immune system and at least in part of T cells. Altogether, these results support the hypothesis that the gallotannin-rich fraction P2Et's anti-tumor effects are mediated to a great extent by the endogenous immune response following to the exposure to immunogenic dying tumor cells.

  20. Dependence on solar elevation and the daily sunshine fraction of the correlation between monthly-average-hourly diffuse and global radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, A. )

    1992-01-01

    In the present work the authors study for Uccle, Belgium data (50{degree}48 minutes N, 4{degree}21 minutes E), the dependence on {anti {gamma}} and {sigma} of the correlations between {anti K}{sub d} = {anti I}{sub d}/{anti I}{sub o} and {anti I}{sub t} = {anti I}/{anti I}{sub o}, where {anti I}, {anti I}{sub d}, and {anti I}{sub o} are respectively, the monthly-average-hourly value of global, diffuse, and extraterrestrial radiation (all of them on a horizontal surface), {anti {gamma}} is the solar elevation at midhour and {sigma} the daily sunshine fraction. The dependence on {sigma} is studied for different ranges of values, from {sigma} = 0 to {sigma} > 0.9. The dependence on {anti {gamma}} is studied for {anti {gamma}} = 5{degree}, 10{degree}, 15{degree}, 25{degree}-30{degree}; 35{degree}-40{degree}; 45{degree}-60{degree} ({delta}{anti {gamma}} = 5{degree}). Relating the dependence on {sigma}, for increasing values of {sigma}({sigma} {>=} 0), there is an increase in {anti K}{sub d} with the increase in {anti K}{sub t}. For 0.42 < {anti K}{sub t} < 0.52 a maximum is obtained for {anti K}{sub d}. After the maximum, as the skies become clearer, {anti K}{sub d} decreases as {anti K}{sub t} increases. Relating the dependence on {anti {gamma}}, for each range of values of {sigma} ({sigma} > 0.2), values of the slope for linear {anti K}{sub d} = f({anti K}{sub t}) correlations show a tendency to decrease as {anti {gamma}} increases. For each value of {anti {gamma}} the slopes of the linear {anti K}{sub d} = f({anti K}{sub t}) correlations tend to decrease when {sigma} increases.

  1. Measurement of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP asymmetry in the decay B0→D*+D*-Ks0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Ronan, M. T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Barrett, M.; Ford, K. E.; Harrison, T. J.; Hart, A. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Watson, A. T.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Burke, J. P.; Cottingham, W. N.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Saleem, M.; Sherwood, D. J.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dvoretskii, A.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Brandt, T.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bard, D. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Ziegler, V.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Oyanguren, A.; Pruvot, S.; Rodier, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, K. A.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Menges, W.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; Naisbit, M. T.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Chen, C.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lae, C. K.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Kim, H.; McLachlin, S. E.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Pompili, A.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Hamon, O.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Therin, G.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Mazur, M. A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Wagoner, D. E.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Legendre, M.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Berger, N.; Claus, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Halyo, V.; Hast, C.; Hryn'Ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; van Bakel, N.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Pappagallo, M.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Kutter, P. E.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2006-11-01

    We study the decay B0→D*+D*-KS0 using (230±2)×106BB¯ pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. We measure a branching fraction B(B0→D*+D*-KS0)=(4.4±0.4±0.7)×10-3 and find evidence for the decay B0→D*-Ds1+(2536) with a significance of 4.6σ. A time-dependent CP asymmetry analysis is also performed to study the possible resonant contributions to B0→D*+D*-KS0 and the sign of cos⁡2β. Our measurement indicates that there is a sizable resonant contribution to the decay B0→D*+D*-KS0 from an unknown Ds1+ state with large width, and that cos⁡2β is positive at the 94% confidence level under certain theoretical assumptions.

  2. Identical Hg isotope mass dependent fractionation signature during methylation by sulfate-reducing bacteria in sulfate and sulfate-free environment.

    PubMed

    Perrot, Vincent; Bridou, Romain; Pedrero, Zoyne; Guyoneaud, Remy; Monperrus, Mathilde; Amouroux, David

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic mercury (iHg) methylation in aquatic environments is the first step leading to monomethylmercury (MMHg) bioaccumulation in food webs and might play a role in the Hg isotopic composition measured in sediments and organisms. Methylation by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) under sulfate-reducing conditions is probably one of the most important sources of MMHg in natural aquatic environments, but its influence on natural Hg isotopic composition remains to be ascertained. In this context, the methylating SRB Desulfovibrio dechloracetivorans (strain BerOc1) was incubated under sulfate reducing and fumarate respiration conditions (SR and FR, respectively) to determine Hg species specific (MMHg and IHg) isotopic composition associated with methylation and demethylation kinetics. Our results clearly establish Hg isotope mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) during biotic methylation (-1.20 to +0.58‰ for δ(202)Hg), but insignificant mass-independent fractionation (MIF) (-0.12 to +0.15‰ for Δ(201)Hg). During the 24h of the time-course experiments Hg isotopic composition in the produced MMHg becomes significantly lighter than the residual IHg after 1.5h and shows similar δ(202)Hg values under both FR and SR conditions at the end of the experiments. This suggests a unique pathway responsible for the MDF of Hg isotopes during methylation by this strain regardless the metabolism of the cells. After 9 h of experiment, significant simultaneous demethylation is occurring in the culture and demethylates preferentially the lighter Hg isotopes of MMHg. Therefore, depending on their methylation/demethylation capacities, SRB communities in natural sulfate reducing conditions likely have a significant and specific influence on the Hg isotope composition of MMHg (MDF) in sediments and aquatic organisms.

  3. Deuterium excess as a proxy for continental moisture recycling and plant transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aemisegger, F.; Pfahl, S.; Sodemann, H.; Lehner, I.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Wernli, H.

    2014-04-01

    Studying the evaporation process and its link to the atmospheric circulation is central for a better understanding of the feedbacks between the surface water components and the atmosphere. In this study, we use 5 months of deuterium excess (d) measurements at the hourly to daily timescale from a cavity ring-down laser spectrometer to characterise the evaporation source of low-level continental water vapour at the long-term hydrometeorological monitoring site Rietholzbach in northeastern Switzerland. To reconstruct the phase change history of the air masses in which we measure the d signature and to diagnose its area of surface evaporation we apply a Lagrangian moisture source diagnostic. With the help of a correlation analysis we investigate the strength of the relation between d measurements and the moisture source conditions. Temporal episodes with a duration of a few days of strong anticorrelation between d and relative humidity as well as temperature are identified. The role of plant transpiration, the large-scale advection of remotely evaporated moisture, the local boundary layer dynamics at the measurement site and recent precipitation at the site of evaporation are discussed as reasons for the existence of these modes of strong anticorrelation between d and moisture source conditions. We show that the importance of continental moisture recycling and the contribution of plant transpiration to the continental evaporation flux may be deduced from the d-relative humidity relation at the seasonal timescale as well as for individual events. The methodology and uncertainties associated with these estimates of the transpiration fraction of evapotranspiration are presented and the proposed novel framework is applied to individual events from our data set. Over the whole analysis period (August to December 2011) a transpiration fraction of the evapotranspiration flux over the continental part of the moisture source region of 62% is found albeit with a large event

  4. Oxygen isotopes in synthetic goethite and a model for the apparent pH dependence of goethite-water 18O/ 16O fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapp, Crayton J.

    2007-03-01

    Goethite synthesis experiments indicate that, in addition to temperature, pH can affect the measured value of the 18O/ 16O fractionation factor between goethite and water ( αG-W). A simple model was developed which expresses αG-W in terms of kinetic parameters associated with the growth of goethite from aqueous solution. The model predicts that, at a particular temperature, the range of pH over which αG-W changes as pH changes is expected to be comparatively small (˜3 pH "units") relative to the range of pH values over which goethite can crystallize (pH from ˜1 to 14). Outside the range of sensitivity to pH, αG-W is predicted to be effectively constant (for constant temperature) at either a low-pH αG-W value or a high-pH αG-W value. It also indicates that the values of αG-W at high pH will be disequilibrium values. Values of αG-W for goethite crystallized at low pH may approach, but probably do not attain, equilibrium values. For goethite synthesized at values of pH from ˜1 to 2, data from two different laboratories define the following equation for the temperature dependence of 1000 ln αG-W ( T in degrees Kelvin) 1000lnα={1.66×106}/{T2}-12.6 Over the range of temperatures from 0 to 120°C, values of 1000 ln αG-W from Eq. (IV) differ by ⩽0.1‰from those of a published equation [Yapp C.J., 1990. Oxygen isotopes in iron (III) oxides. 1. Mineral-water fractionation factors. Chem. Geol.85, 329-335]. Therefore, interpretations of data from natural goethites using the older equation are not changed by use of Eq. (IV). Data from a synthetic goethite suggest that the temperature dependence of 1000 ln αG-W at low pH as expressed in Eq. (IV) may be valid for values of pH up to at least 6. This result and the model prediction of an insensitivity of αG-W to pH over a larger range of pH values could explain the observation that Eq. (IV) yields values of αG-W which mimic most 18O/ 16O fractionations measured to date in natural goethites.

  5. Evolution of dispersion in the cosmic deuterium abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorkin, Irina; Vangioni, Elisabeth; Silk, Joseph; Petitjean, Patrick; Olive, Keith A.

    2016-05-01

    Deuterium is created during big bang nucleosynthesis, and, in contrast to the other light stable nuclei, can only be destroyed thereafter by fusion in stellar interiors. In this Letter, we study the cosmic evolution of the deuterium abundance in the interstellar medium (ISM) and its dispersion using realistic galaxy evolution models. We find that models that reproduce the observed metal abundance are compatible with observations of the deuterium abundance in the local ISM and z ˜ 3 absorption line systems. In particular, we reproduce the low astration factor which we attribute to a low global star formation efficiency. We calculate the dispersion in deuterium abundance arising from different structure formation histories in different parts of the Universe. Our model also predicts a tight correlation between deuterium and metal abundances which could be used to measure the primordial deuterium abundance.

  6. Chemical erosion of atomically dispersed doped hydrocarbon layers by deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balden, M.; Roth, J.; Pardo, E. de Juan; Wiltner, A.

    2003-03-01

    The chemical erosion of atomically dispersed Ti-doped (˜10 at.%) amorphous hydrocarbon layers (a-C:H:Ti) was investigated in the temperature range of 300-800 K for 30 eV deuterium impact. Compared to pyrolytic graphite, the methane production yield is strongly reduced at elevated temperatures. This reduction starts from temperatures just above room temperature and is even larger than for B-doped graphite. The reduction of the activation energy for hydrogen release may be the dominant interpretation for the decreased hydrocarbon formation. The ratio of emitted CD 3 to CD 4 increases with temperature for pyrolytic graphite and even stronger for the doped layers. The fluence dependence of the chemical erosion yield was determined, which is explained by enrichment of the dopant due to the preferential erosion of C.

  7. Diffusion of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium in niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Matusiewicz, Gerald Robert

    1981-01-01

    The diffusion of hydrogen in niobium was investigated over the temperature range 148 to 500 degrees Kelvin, using measurements of the elastic after effect caused by long range diffusion (the Gorsky Effect). Relaxation curves for pure annealed niobium were generally not of the single exponential form expected from the Gorsky Effect theory, but were described well by a sum of two exponential curves with different amplitudes and relaxation times. The effects of oxygen and nitrogen interstitials on the diffusion were studied and were not in agreement with conventional trapping models. Deuterium and tritium diffusion in niobium were also studied, and a non-classical isotope effect was observed. Hydrogen diffusion coefficients in several Nb-Ta alloys were measured, and the diffusivity in all these alloys exhibited a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence. Experimental results were compared to several models for diffusion and trapping. A model is presented which can account for the form of the relaxation curves observed in pure, annealed niobium.

  8. Pion Electroproduction form Helium 3, Deuterium, and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    S. Avery

    2002-05-01

    A series of measurements for pion electroproduction from helium-3, deuterium, and hydrogen were completed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility by the NucPi Collaboration. E91003 began taking data in February 1998 and was completed in April 1998. The longitudinal and transverse parts of the differential cross section were extracted, by means of a Rosenbluth type separation, in the direction parallel to the virtual photon, at Q 2 = 0.4 GeV 2 , for W = 1.15 and W = 1.6 GeV. The mass dependence of the longitudinal cross section should provide insight into the surprising apparent absence of any significant cross section enhancement due to excess pions in the nuclear medium.

  9. Kinetic studies of reactions of cobalt clusters with deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, J.; Zhu, L.; Parks, E.K.; Riley, S.J.

    1992-10-01

    The kinetics of chemical reactions of cobalt clusters Co{sub n} with deuterium are described. Absolute rate constants have been measured in the cluster range n = 7--68 at 293 K. The rate constants are found to be a strong function of cluster size, varying by up to three orders of magnitude. This size , dependence is most prominent in the n = 7--25 size range: CO{sub 15} is the most reactive cluster, and CO{sub 7-9} and CO{sub 19--20} are particularly unreactive. Abrupt changes in the rate constants from one cluster size to the next are observed. For the clusters above n = 25, the rate constants show several less prominent maxima and minima superimposed on a slow, nearly monotonic increase with cluster size.

  10. Deuterium incorporation in biomass cell wall components by NMR analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Foston, Marcus B; McGaughey, Joseph; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Evans, Barbara R; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2012-01-01

    A commercially available deuterated kale sample was analyzed for deuterium incorporation by ionic liquid solution 2H and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This protocol was found to effectively measure the percent deuterium incorporation at 33%, comparable to the 31% value determined by combustion. The solution NMR technique also suggested by a qualitative analysis that deuterium is preferentially incorporated into the carbohydrate components of the kale sample.

  11. Fractionally charged Wilson loops as a probe of {theta} dependence in CP{sup N-1} sigma models: Instantons versus large N

    SciTech Connect

    Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Thacker, H. B.

    2008-07-15

    The behavior of Wilson loops with fractional charge is used to study the {theta} dependence of the free energy density {epsilon}({theta}) for the CP{sup 1}, CP{sup 5}, and CP{sup 9} sigma models in two space-time dimensions. The function {epsilon}({theta}) is extracted from the area law for a Wilson loop of charge q={theta}/2{pi}. For CP{sup 1}, {epsilon}({theta}) is smooth in the region {theta}{approx_equal}{pi} and well described by a dilute instanton gas throughout the range 0<{theta}<2{pi}. For CP{sup 5} and CP{sup 9} the energy exhibits a clear cusp and evidence for discrete, degenerate vacua at {theta}={pi}, as expected from large N arguments. For CP{sup 9} the {theta} dependence is in good quantitative agreement with the leading-order large N prediction {epsilon}({theta})=(1/2){chi}{sub t}{theta}{sup 2} throughout the range 0<{theta}<{pi}.

  12. A field evaporation deuterium ion source for neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, Birk; Solano, I.; Schwoebel, P. R.

    2008-05-01

    Proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated an electrostatic field evaporation based deuterium ion source for use in compact, high-output deuterium-tritium neutron generators. The ion source produces principally atomic deuterium and titanium ions. More than 100 ML of deuterated titanium thin film can be removed and ionized from a single tip in less than 20 ns. The measurements indicate that with the use of microfabricated tip arrays the deuterium ion source could provide sufficient ion current to produce 10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2} of tip array area.

  13. A field evaporation deuterium ion source for neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Birk; Solano, I.; Schwoebel, P. R.

    2008-05-01

    Proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated an electrostatic field evaporation based deuterium ion source for use in compact, high-output deuterium-tritium neutron generators. The ion source produces principally atomic deuterium and titanium ions. More than 100 ML of deuterated titanium thin film can be removed and ionized from a single tip in less than 20 ns. The measurements indicate that with the use of microfabricated tip arrays the deuterium ion source could provide sufficient ion current to produce 109-1010 n/cm2 of tip array area.

  14. Neutron production from puffing deuterium in plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect

    Kubes, P.; Cikhardt, J.; Kortanek, J.; Batobolotova, B.; Rezac, K.; Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.; Surala, W.; Sadowski, M. J.; Scholz, M.; Karpinski, L.

    2014-08-15

    The current research has continued on the PF-1000 plasma focus device at the current of 2 MA by comparison of the shots with and without injected deuterium. The increase of the total neutron yield at the level of 10{sup 10}–10{sup 11} per shot was achieved after the compression of about 10 μg/cm of the deuterium from the gas-valve by about 46 μg/cm of the neon or deuterium plasma sheath. It increases five times at the decrease of the puffing deuterium mass to one-half. In shots with neon in the chamber and with puffing deuterium, a considerable decrease was confirmed of the soft X-ray emission in comparison with shots without deuterium injection. This decrease can be explained by the absence of the neon in the region of the compressed and hot plasma. The deuterium plasma from the gas-puff should then be confined in the internal structures both in the phase of implosion as well as during their formation and transformation. In shots with puffing deuterium, the evolution of instabilities in the plasma column was suppressed. The deuterium plasma has a higher conductance and better ability to form expressive and dense plasmoids and to transport the internal current in comparison with neon plasma. Neutrons were produced both at the initial phase of stagnation, as well as at a later time at the evolution of the constrictions and dense plasmoids.

  15. Fractionation of oil sands-process affected water using pH-dependent extractions: a study of dissociation constants for naphthenic acids species.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rongfu; Sun, Nian; Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; McPhedran, Kerry N; Changalov, Mohamed; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2015-05-01

    The fractionation of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) via pH-dependent extractions was performed to quantitatively investigate naphthenic acids (NAs, CnH2n+ZO2) and oxidized NAs (Ox-NAs) species (CnH2n+ZO3 and CnH2n+ZO4) using ultra-performance liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-TOFMS). A mathematical model was also developed to estimate the dissociation constant pKa for NAs species, considering the liquid-liquid extraction process and the aqueous layer acid-base equilibrium. This model provides estimated dissociation constants for compounds in water samples based on fractionation extraction and relative quantification. Overall, the sum of O2-, O3-, and O4-NAs species accounted for 33.6% of total extracted organic matter. Accumulative extracted masses at different pHs revealed that every oxygen atom added to NAs increases the pKa (i.e., O2-NAs

  16. Nuclear Structure Corrections in Muonic Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    2011-05-13

    The muonic hydrogen experiment measuring the 2P-2S transition energy [R. Pohl et al., Nature (London) 466, 213 (2010)] is significantly discrepant with theoretical predictions based on quantum electrodynamics. A possible approach to resolve this conundrum is to compare experimental values with theoretical predictions in another system, muonic deuterium {mu}D. The only correction which might be questioned in {mu}D is that due to the deuteron polarizability. We investigate this effect in detail and observe cancellation with the elastic contribution. The total value obtained for the deuteron structure correction in the 2P-2S transition is 1.680(16) meV.

  17. Pressure Dependent Mass Fraction in Noble Gas Mass Spectrometers: A Possible Explanation for the Excessive Dispersion in the EARTHTIME Fish Canyon/Alder Creek Inter-Calibration Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, B. D.; Swisher, C. C.; Mana, S.

    2011-12-01

    Mass spectrometer fractionation bias (mass discrimination) is a ubiquitous phenomenon in noble gas mass spectroscopy and must be corrected for in order to obtain accurate-high precision isotopic ratios that are used in isotopic age calculations. Temporal variations in mass fractionation are well known phenomena and have been reported in several studies (eg. Turrin et al., 2010 and references therein). Here we report on the pressure dependency on mass spectrometer fractionation bias. In our experiment, we varied by a factor of five the signal size of aliquots of atmospheric argon delivered from an automated air pipette system. The measured mass discrimination difference (MD) as determined by the 40Ar/36Ar ratio between the 1-fold and 5-fold air pipette shots is ~5%. The air 40Ar/36Ar aliquots were measured using a MAP 215-50 operating in pulse counting mode. The air measurements were interspersed with measurements of Alder Creek (AC) sanidine and Fish Canyon (FC) sanidine that were co-irradiated for 0.75 hours. The grain sizes for the two mineral standards were chosen such that the AC sample yielded 40Ar signals of about 50 kcps, similar to that delivered by a single aliquot delivered by the air pipette. The FC grains were about 5-10 times greater (150-600 kcps) than the single air aliquot. Following the analyses, we applied the MD correction to both the FC and AC analyses. When the MD as determined from the single pipette data (which matches 40Ar beam intensity of the AC sample) is applied to both the AC and FC data a "J" of 1.579±0.001x10-4 is obtained from the FC data and an age of 1183 ±4 ka for AC. However, when the MD as determined from the multiple aliquot pipette data (with an 40Ar beam similar to that of the FC analyses) is applied to the FC data a "J" of 1.588±0.001x10-4 is obtained and an AC age of 1189 ±4 ka the same age at the 95% confidence level, the reported age for AC. We conclude that variation in MD over signal sizes typically analyzed in 40Ar

  18. Deuterium-depleted water has stimulating effects on long-term memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Mladin, Cristian; Ciobica, Alin; Lefter, Radu; Popescu, Alexandru; Bild, Walther

    2014-11-01

    Deuterium-depleted water (DDW) is a water which has a 6-7-fold less concentration of the naturally occurring deuterium (20-25ppm vs. 150ppm). While administrated for a longer period, it may reduce the concentration of deuterium throughout the body, thus activating cellular mechanisms which are depending on protons (channels, pumps, enzyme proteins). The aim of the present work was to study, for the first time in our knowledge, the possible influence of deuterium-depleted water (DDW) chronic administration in normal Wistar rats, as compared to a control group which received distilled water, on spatial working memory and the locomotor activity (as studied through Y-maze) or both short-term and long-term spatial memory (assed in radial 8 arms-maze task). Our results presented here showed no significant modifications in terms of spatial working memory (assessed through spontaneous alternation percentage) and locomotor activity (expressed through the number of arm entries) in Y-maze, as a result of DDW ingestion. Also, no significant differences between the DDW and control group were found in terms of the number of working memory errors in the eight-arm radial maze, as a parameter of short-term memory. Still, we observed a significant decrease for the number of reference memory errors in the DDW rats. In this way, we could speculate that the administration of DDW may generate an improvement of the reference memory, as an index of long-term memory. Thus, we can reach the conclusion that the change between the deuterium/hydrogen balance may have important consequences for the mechanisms that govern long-term memory, as showed here especially in the behavioral parameters from the eight-arm radial maze task.

  19. Fundamental limits to the accuracy of deuterium isotopes for identifying the spatial origin of migratory animals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farmer, A.; Cade, B.S.; Torres-Dowdall, J.

    2008-01-01

    Deuterium isotope analyses have revolutionized the study of migratory connectivity because global gradients of deuterium in precipitation (??DP) are expressed on a continental scale. Several authors have constructed continental scale base maps of ??DP to provide a spatial reference for studying the movement patterns of migratory species and, although they are very useful, these maps present a static, 40-year average view of the landscape that ignores much underlying inter-annual variation. To more fully understand the consequences of this underlying variation, we analyzed the GNIP deuterium data, the source for all current ??DP maps, to estimate the minimum separation in ??DP (and latitude) necessary to conclude with a given level of confidence that distinct ??DP values represent different geographic sites. Extending analyses of ??DP successfully to deuterium in tissues of living organisms, e.g., feathers in migratory birds (??DF), is dependent on the existence of geographic separation of ??DP, where every geographic location has a distribution of values associated with temporal variability in ??DP. Analyses were conducted for three distinct geographic regions: North America, eastern North America (east of longitude 100??W), and Argentina. At the 80% confidence level, the minimum separation values were 12, 7, and 14?? of latitude (equivalent to 53, 31, and 32???) for North America, eastern North America, and Argentina, respectively. Hence, in eastern North America, for example, one may not be able to accurately assign individual samples to sites separated by less than about 7?? of latitude as the distributions of ??DP were not distinct at latitudes <7?? apart. Moreover, two samples that differ by less than 31??? cannot be confidently said to originate from different latitudes. These estimates of minimum separation for ??DP do not include other known sources of variation in feather deuterium (??D F) and hence are a first order approximation that may be useful, in

  20. Cryotarget Control Software for Liquid Deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakman, David; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Cuevas, Chris; Christo, Steve; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    One of the experiments in Hall B at Jefferson Lab will measure the neutron elastic magnetic form factor with a 12 GeV electron beam striking a liquid deuterium target (LD2) and measuring the resulting debris in the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12). A program was created that acts as a control system for the LD2 target. It will monitor the deuterium target and send data to the main control system and the shift workers monitoring the experiment in real time. The data include measurements of pressure, temperature, and liquid level. The system will also control setpoints for temperature, heater power, and other parameters as well as download calibration curves. The program was written in LabVIEW, a graphical programming language noted for readily interfacing with lab equipment. This project has completed two stages so far. Simulated data were generated within LabVIEW and passed to subroutines that send, log, and display data on a PC. In the second stage, the PC was connected to a data acquisition board, and test signals were read and analyzed to simulate the target sensors. Work supported by the University of Richmond and the US Department of Energy.

  1. Deuterium storage in nanocrystalline magnesium thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checchetto, R.; Bazzanella, N.; Miotello, A.; Brusa, R. S.; Zecca, A.; Mengucci, A.

    2004-02-01

    Nanocrystalline magnesium deuteride thin films with the β-MgD2 structure were prepared by vacuum evaporation of hexagonal magnesium (h-Mg) samples and thermal annealing in 0.15 MPa D2 atmosphere at 373 K. Thermal desorption spectroscopy analysis indicated that the rate-limiting step in the deuterium desorption was given by the thermal decomposition of the deuteride phase. The activation energy Δg of the β-MgD2→h-Mg+D2 reaction scaled from 1.13±0.03 eV in 650-nm-thick films to 1.01±0.02 eV in 75-nm-thick films most likely as consequence of different stress and defect level. Positron annihilation spectroscopy analysis of the thin-film samples submitted to deuterium absorption and desorption cycles reveal the presence of a high concentration of void-like defects in the h-Mg layers after the very first decomposition of the β-MgD2 phase, the presence of these open volume defects reduces the D2 absorption capacity of the h-Mg thin film.

  2. Deuterium Retention in NSTX with Lithium Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C. H.; Allain, J. P.; Blanchard, W.; Kugel, H. W.; Maingi, Rajesh; Roquemore, L.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Taylor, C. N.

    2011-01-01

    High (approximate to 90%) deuterium retention was observed in NSTX gas balance measurements both with- and without lithiumization of the carbon plasma-facing components. The gas retained in ohmic discharges was measured by comparing the vessel pressure rise after a discharge to that of a gas-only pulse with the pumping valves closed. For neutral beam heated discharges the gas input and gas pumped by the NB cryopanels were tracked. The discharges were followed by outgassing of deuterium that reduced the retention. The relationship between retention and surface chemistry was explored with a new plasma-material interface probe connected to an in vacuo surface science station that exposed four material samples to the plasma. XPS and TDS analysis demonstrated that binding of D atoms in graphite is fundamentally changed by lithium - in particular atoms are weakly bonded in regions near lithium atoms bound to either oxygen or the carbon matrix. This is in contrast to the strong ionic bonding that occurs between D and pure Li. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  4. N2 Mole Fraction Dependence of Plasma Bullet Propagation in Premixed He/N2 Plasma Needle Discharge at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Gengsong; Qian, Muyang; Yang, Congying; Liu, Sanqiu; Wang, Dezhen

    2016-07-01

    In this work, a computational modeling study on the mechanism of the acceleration behavior of a plasma bullet in needle-plane configuration is presented. Above all, in our model, two sub-models of time-dependent plasma dynamics and laminar flow are connected using a oneway coupled method, and both the working gas and the surrounding gas around the plasma jet are assumed to be the same, which are premixed He/N2 gas. The mole fractions of the N2 (NMF) ingredient are set to be 0.01%, 0.1% and 1% in three cases, respectively. It is found that in each case, the plasma bullet accelerates with time to a peak velocity after it exits the nozzle and then decreases until getting to the treated surface, and that the velocity of the plasma bullet increases at each time moment with the peak value changing from 0.72×106 m/s to 0.80×106 m/s but then drops more sharply when the NMF varies from 0.01% to 1%. Besides, the electron impact ionizations of helium neutrals and nitrogen molecules are found to have key influences on the propagation of a plasma bullet instead of the penning ionization. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11465013), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (No. 20151BAB212012), and in part by the International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China (No. 2015DFA61800)

  5. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Time-Dependent CP Asymmetry in the Decay B0 to D*+D*-Ks

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-26

    The authors study the decay B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}D*{sup -} K{sub S}{sup 0} using (230 {+-} 2) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. They measure a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}D*{sup -} K{sub S}{sup 0}) = (4.4 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.7) x 10{sup -3} and find evidence for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup -} D{sub s1}{sup +}(2536) with a statistical significance of 4.6 {sigma}. A time-dependent CP asymmetry analysis is also performed to study the possible resonant contributions to B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}D*{sup -} K{sub S}{sup 0} and the sign of cos2{beta}. Their measurement indicates that there is a sizable resonant contribution to the decay B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +} D*{sup -} K{sub S}{sup 0} from a unknown D{sub s1}{sup +} state with large width, and that cos2{beta} is positive at the 94% confidence level under certain theoretical assumptions.

  6. High concentration of deuterium in palladium from plasma ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, H.S.; Lee, W.M. )

    1991-11-01

    Based on a theoretical calculation, a new scheme to increase deuterium density in palladium over its initial value is presented. This deuterium enrichment scheme makes use of plasma ion implantation. A cylindrical palladium rod (target) preloaded with deuterium atoms, coated with a diffusion-barrier material, is immersed in a deuterium plasma. The palladium rod is connected to a high-power modulator which provides a series of negative-voltage pulses. During these negative pulses, deuterium ions fall into the target, penetrate the diffusion barrier, and are implanted inside the palladium. For reasonable system parameters allowed by present technology, it is found from theoretical calculations that the saturation deuterium density after prolonged ion implantation can be several times the palladium atomic number density. Assuming an initial deuterium density, {ital n}{sub 0}=4{times}10{sup 22} cm{sup {minus}3}, it is also found that the deuterium density in palladium can triple its original value within a few days of the ion implantation for a reasonable target size. Because of the small diffusion coefficient in palladium, the incoming ions do not diffuse quickly inward, thereby accumulating near the target surface at the beginning of the implantation.

  7. Tables of equation-of-state, thermodynamic properties, and shock Hugoniot for hot dense fluid deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R.

    2015-11-15

    We present computational results and tables of the equation-of-state, thermodynamic properties, and shock Hugoniot for hot dense fluid deuterium. The present results are generated using a recently developed chemical model that takes into account different high density effects such as Coulomb interactions among charged particles, partial degeneracy, and intensive short range hard core repulsion. Internal partition functions are evaluated in a statistical-mechanically consistent way implementing recent developments in the literature. The shock Hugoniot curve derived from the present tables is overall in reasonable agreement with the Hugoniot derived from the Nova-laser shock wave experiments on liquid deuterium, showing that deuterium has a significantly higher compressibility than predicted by the SESAME tables or by Path Integral Monte Carlo calculations. Computational results are presented as surface plots for the dissociated fraction, degree of ionization, pressure, and specific internal energy for densities ranging from 0.0001 to 40 g/cm{sup 3} and temperatures from 2000 to ∼10{sup 6 }K. Tables for values of the above mentioned quantities in addition to the specific heat at constant pressure, c{sub p}, ratio of specific heats, c{sub p}/c{sub v}, sound speed and Hugoniot curve (for a specific initial state) are presented for practical use.

  8. Deuterium enrichment by selective photoinduced dissociation of a multihalogenated organic compound

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.; Herman, Irving P.

    1981-01-01

    A method for deuterium enrichment by photoinduced dissociation which uses as the deuterium source a multihalogenated organic compound selected from the group consisting of a dihalomethane, a trihalomethane, a 1,2-dihaloethene, a trihaloethene, a tetrahaloethane and a pentahaloethane. The multihalogenated organic compound is subjected to intense infrared radiation at a preselected wavelength to selectively excite and thereby induce dissociation of substantially only those molecules containing deuterium to provide a deuterium enriched dissociation product. The deuterium enriched product may be combusted with oxygen to provide deuterium enriched water. The deuterium depleted undissociated molecules may be redeuterated by treatment with a deuterium source such as water.

  9. Deuterium Enrichment of Amino and Hydroxy Acids Found in the Murchison Meteorite: Constraints on Parent Body Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, Narcinda R.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The alpha-amino and alpha-hydroxy acids found in the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite are deuterium enriched. These compounds are thought to have originated from common deuterium enriched carbonyl precursors, by way of a Strecker synthesis which took place in a solution of HCN, NH3, and carbonyl compounds during the period of aqueous alteration of the meteorite parent body. However, the hydroxy acids found on Murchison are less deuterium enriched than the amino acids. With the objective of determining if the discrepancy in deuterium enrichment between the amino acids and the hydroxy acids found on Murchison is consistent with their formation in a Strecker synthesis, we have measured the deuterium content of alpha-amino and alpha-hydroxy acids produced in solutions of deuterated carbonyl compounds, KCN and NH4Cl, and also in mixtures of such solutions and Allende dust at 263 K and 295 K. Retention of the isotopic signature of the starting carbonyl by both alpha amino acids and alpha hydroxy acids is more dependent upon temperature, concentration and pH than upon the presence of meteorite dust in the solution. The constraints these observations place on Murchison parent body conditions will be discussed.

  10. Scaled energy (z) distributions of charged hadrons observed in deep-inelastic muon scattering at 490 GeV from xenon and deuterium targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Carroll, T.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H. J.; Venkataramania, H.; Vidal, M.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1994-08-01

    Fermilab Experiment-665 measured deep-inelastic scattering of 490 GeV muons off deuterium and xenon targets. Events were selected with a range of energy exchange ν from 100 GeV to 500 GeV and with large ranges of Q2 and xBj: 0.1 GeV2/c2fractional energy (z) distributions of forward-produced hadrons from the two targets have been compared as a function of the kinematics of the scattering; specifically, the kinematic region of ``shadowing'' has been compared to that of nonshadowing. The dependence of the distributions upon the order of the hadrons, determined by the fractional energies, has been examined as well; a strong degree of similarity has been observed in the shapes of the distributions of the different order hadrons. These z distributions, however, show no nuclear dependence, even in the kinematic region of shadowing.

  11. Scaled energy ([ital z]) distributions of charged hadrons observed in deep-inelastic muon scattering at 490 GeV from xenon and deuterium targets

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.R.; Aied, S.; Anthony, P.L.; Baker, M.D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A.A.; Braun, H.M.; Busza, W.; Carroll, T.; Conrad, J.M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S.K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H.J.; Geesaman, D.F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M.C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V.W.; Jackson, H.E.; Jaffe, D.E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D.M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R.D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H.G.E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J.J.; Lubatti, H.J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D.G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H.E.; Morfin, J.G.; Nickerson, R.B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F.M.; Ramberg, E.J.; Roeser, A.; Ryan, J.J.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schueler, K.P.; Seyerlein, H.J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G.A.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P.H.; Stier, H.E.; St

    1994-08-01

    Fermilab Experiment-665 measured deep-inelastic scattering of 490 GeV muons off deuterium and xenon targets. Events were selected with a range of energy exchange [nu] from 100 GeV to 500 GeV and with large ranges of [ital Q][sup 2] and [ital x][sub Bj]: 0.1 GeV[sup 2]/[ital c][sup 2][lt][ital Q][sup 2][lt]150 GeV[sup 2]/[ital c][sup 2] and 0.001[lt][ital x][sub Bj][lt]0.5. The fractional energy ([ital z]) distributions of forward-produced hadrons from the two targets have been compared as a function of the kinematics of the scattering; specifically, the kinematic region of shadowing'' has been compared to that of nonshadowing. The dependence of the distributions upon the [ital order] of the hadrons, determined by the fractional energies, has been examined as well; a strong degree of similarity has been observed in the shapes of the distributions of the different order hadrons. These [ital z] distributions, however, show no nuclear dependence, even in the kinematic region of shadowing.

  12. Influence of the tritium beta(-) decay on low-temperature thermonuclear burn-up in deuterium-tritium mixtures

    PubMed

    Frolov

    2000-09-01

    Low-temperature (Tdeuterium-tritium mixtures with various deuterium-tritium-helium-3 ratios is considered. The general dependence is studied for the critical burn-up parameter x(c)=rhor(c) upon the initial temperature T, density rho(0), and tritium molar concentration y for the [D]:y[T]:(1-y)[3He] mixture. In particular, it is shown that, if the tritium concentration y decreases, then the critical burn-up parameter x(c)(T,rho(0),y) grows very quickly (at fixed T and rho(0)). This means that tritium beta(-) decay significantly complicates thermonuclear burn-up in deuterium-tritium mixtures.

  13. The mass dependent and independent equilibrium fractionation of stable mercury isotopes during laboratory synthesis of metacinnabar and other mercury-bearing phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. S.; Wiederhold, J. G.; Bourdon, B.; Kretzschmar, R.

    2010-12-01

    Mercury has long been recognized as a contaminant of global concern for its toxicity and bioaccumulation ability. Soils are a primary reservoir for Hg where various processes can transform it into more toxic and mobile forms. Highly contaminated Hg sites, i.e. former mines, generally contain a well-defined geochemical gradient, where typically ore, waste rock, and roasted ore are present. Advancements in MC-ICPMS and the ability to precisely measure mass dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass independent fractionation (MIF) have allowed for the potential use of Hg isotopes as a pollution source tracer and to elucidate Hg cycling mechanisms in soil environments. The objective of this work was to determine if precipitation of Hg-bearing minerals can yield distinct isotopic signatures that can be identified in natural samples. Laboratory synthesis of metacinnabar (β-HgS), an ore mineral, was performed to examine if precipitation could induce MDF and MIF of Hg isotopes. Experiments were conducted using solutions of either Hg(II)-acetate or Hg(II)-nitrate at different pH values. The addition of varying amounts of Na-sulfide solutions to parallel batches was designed to precipitate between 30 and 90% of the initial Hg in solution. Two sets of experiments were run to vary the aging time (hours to days) between precipitation and separation of the supernatant. Additional experiments using an excess of sulfur were also conducted for precipitate characterization. Concentration analyses were conducted using CV-AFS while isotopic analyses were performed using the Nu Instruments MC-ICPMS with cold vapor introduction. Experiments in both systems demonstrated that when sulfur was in excess, precipitates were black and appeared more crystalline. In the Hg-acetate system, precipitates formed during Hg-excess experiments, appeared black and poorly-crystalline, while precipitates of the Hg-nitrate system appeared white to gray and poorly-crystalline. Concentration analyses determined

  14. Deuterium excess in precipitation of Alpine regions - moisture recycling.

    PubMed

    Froehlich, Klaus; Kralik, Martin; Papesch, Wolfgang; Rank, Dieter; Scheifinger, Helfried; Stichler, Willibald

    2008-03-01

    The paper evaluates long-term seasonal variations of the deuterium excess (d-excess = delta(2)H - 8. delta(18)O) in precipitation of stations located north and south of the main ridge of the Austrian Alps. It demonstrates that sub-cloud evaporation during precipitation and continental moisture recycling are local, respectively, regional processes controlling these variations. In general, sub-cloud evaporation decreases and moisture recycling increases the d-excess. Therefore, evaluation of d-excess variations in terms of moisture recycling, the main aim of this paper, includes determination of the effect of sub-cloud evaporation. Since sub-cloud evaporation is governed by saturation deficit and distance between cloud base and the ground, its effect on the d-excess is expected to be lower at mountain than at lowland/valley stations. To determine quantitatively this difference, we examined long-term seasonal d-excess variations measured at three selected mountain and adjoining valley stations. The altitude differences between mountain and valley stations ranged from 470 to 1665 m. Adapting the 'falling water drop' model by Stewart [J. Geophys. Res., 80(9), 1133-1146 (1975).], we estimated that the long-term average of sub-cloud evaporation at the selected mountain stations (altitudes between about 1600 and 2250 m.a.s.l.) is less than 1 % of the precipitation and causes a decrease of the d-excess of less than 2 per thousand. For the selected valley stations, the corresponding evaporated fraction is at maximum 7 % and the difference in d-excess ranges up to 8 per thousand. The estimated d-excess differences have been used to correct the measured long-term d-excess values at the selected stations. Finally, the corresponding fraction of water vapour has been estimated that recycled by evaporation of surface water including soil water from the ground. For the two mountain stations Patscherkofel and Feuerkogel, which are located north of the main ridge of the Alps, the

  15. Mass-dependent and Mass-independent Sulphur Isotope Fractionation Accompanying Thermal- and Photo-chemical Decomposition of Sulphur Bearing Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oduro, Harry; Izon, Gareth; Ono, Shuhei

    2014-05-01

    The bimodal S-isotope record, specifically the transition from mass independent (MIF) to mass dependent fractionation (MDF), is perhaps the most widely cited line of evidence for an irreversible rise in atmospheric oxygen at ca. 2.4Ga. The production and preservation of S-MIF, manifested in both Δ33S and Δ36S, within the geological record are linked to atmospheric O2 via a number of arguments. However, to date, the only mechanism capable of generating S-MIF consistent with the Archaean sedimentary records involves gas-phase ultraviolet irradiation of SO21 photolysis. More recently, Δ33S S-MIF trends have been reported from en vitro thermochemical sulphate reduction (TSR) experiments, prompting authors to question the importance of S-MIF as a proxy for Earth oxidation2. Importantly, whilst emerging TSR experiments3,4 affirm the reported Δ33S trends2, these experiments fail to identify correlated S-MIF between Δ33S and Δ36S values3,4. Realization that S-MIF is confined to Δ33S during TSR, precludes TSR as a mechanism responsible for the origin of the Archaean S-MIF record but strongly suggests the effect originating from a magnetic isotope effect (MIE) associated with 33S nucleus3,4. Clearly, photochemical and thermochemical processes impart different Δ36S/Δ33S trends with significant variation in δ34S; however, a complete experimental elucidation of mechanisms responsible for the S-MIF and S-MIE signatures is lacking. Interestingly, a complete understanding of the S-isotope chemistry during thermal- and photo-chemical decomposition may reveal wavelength and thermal dependence archived in the sedimentary record. Here we extend the experimental database to explore the magnitude and sign of Δ36S/Δ33S and δ34S produced during both photo- and thermochemical processes. Here the organic sulphur compounds (OSC) utilized in these experiments carries diagnostic Δ36S/Δ33S patterns that differ from those reported from photolysis experiment SO2 and from the

  16. Ignition of deuterium-tritium fuel targets

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.

    1991-08-27

    Disclosed is a method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom. 5 figures.

  17. Ignition of deuterium-trtium fuel targets

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, Donald L.; Mruzek, Michael T.

    1991-01-01

    A method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom.

  18. The discovery and modeling of energy dependent time-lags and fractional RMS of heartbeat state in GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, Mubashir; Iqbal, Naseer; Pahari, Mayukh; Misra, Ranjeev

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery and modeling of enigmatic Energy dependent time-lags and fractional RMS of the heartbeat state in GRS 1915+105. The time-lags reveal the crucial information related to geometry of accretion flow, the emission regions and the relation between various spectral parameters. The lag and frms at the fundamental frequency show non-monotonic behavior with energy. The lag increases up to typically ˜10 keV and later shows a reversal and in some observations becomes hard(negative). However, the lags at the harmonic increase with energy and don't show any turn around at least till ˜20 keV. The frms at harmonic has similar non-monotonic behavior as at fundamental, however the variability amplitude is lesser as expected. The lag seen here can have magnitude of the order of seconds, and thus can't be accounted by light travel time effects or comptonization delays. The continuum X-ray spectra can roughly be described by a disk blackbody and a hard X-ray power-law component and from phase resolved spectroscopy it has been shown that the inner disk radius varies during the oscillation We propose the model based on the delayed response of inner disc (DRIOD) radius to the outer accretion rate i;e r_{in}(t)∝ dot{m}^β (t-τ_d). The fluctuating accretion rate varies the inner disk after a certain time delay t_d which could be of the order of the viscous propagation delays. The model very well explains the observed shape and nature of lags and frms at fundamental and harmonic frequencies. We present here the series of observations that constrain the four free parameters of our model. These parameters contain the vital information related to the nature of accretion flow in a highly periodic state like a heartbeat state.

  19. Depth distribution of deuterium atoms and molecules in beryllium oxide implanted with deuterium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimov, V. Kh; Chernikov, V. N.

    1999-08-01

    In-depth concentration profiles of deuterium (D) in beryllium oxide (BeO) films implanted with 3 keV D ions at 300 and 700 K have been determined using SIMS and RGA (residual gas analysis) measurements in the course of surface sputtering. The microstructure of implanted specimens was studied by TEM. Implanted D is found to be retained in the BeO matrix in the form of D atoms and D 2 molecules. At 300 and 700 K, the maximum concentration of deuterium in both states reaches values of 0.2 and 0.07 D/BeO, respectively. Irradiation with D ions at 300 and 700 K leads to the formation of tiny D 2 bubbles of 0.6-0.7 nm radius and of high volume density ≈(4-5) × 10 24 m -3. These bubbles together with the intercrystalline gaps are responsible for the accumulation of D 2 molecules. At both irradiation temperatures, D 2 concentration reaches in the ion stopping zone its maximum of 0.01 molecules/BeO. At 300 and 700 K, the major part of deuterium implanted in BeO films is present in the form of D atoms, probably chemically bound to O atoms. Maximum D atom concentration is 0.18 D atoms/BeO for 300 K and 0.05 D atoms/BeO for 700 K.

  20. The deuterium content of water in some volcanic glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Smith, R.L.

    1958-01-01

    The deuterium-hydrogen composition (relative to Lake Michigan water = 0.0) of water extractsd from coexisting perlite and obsidian from eleven different localities was determined. The water content of the obsidians is generally from 0.09 to 0.29 per cent by weight, though two samples from near Olancha, California, contain about 0.92 per cent. The relative deuterium concentration is from -4.6 to -12.3 per cent. The coexisting perlite contains from 2.0 to 3.8 per cent of water with a relative deuterium concentration of -3.1 to -16.6 per cent. The deuterium concentration in the perlites is not related to that in the enclosed obsidian. The deuterium concentration in the perlite water is related to the deuterium concentration of the modern meteoric water and the perlite water contains approximately 4 per cent less deuterium than does the groundwater of the area in which the perlites occur. The above relations hold true for perlites from northern New Mexico, east slope of the Sierra Nevada. California Coast Range, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and New Zealand. As the water in the obsidian is unrelated to meteoric water, but the enclosing perlite water is related, we believe that this is evidence for the secondary hydration of obsidian to form high water content perlitic glass. ?? 1958.

  1. Method for measuring deuterium in erbium deuteride films

    SciTech Connect

    Brangan, J.R.; Thornberg, S.M.; Keenan, M.R.

    1997-09-01

    Determining the quantity of deuterium in an erbium deuteride (ErD{sub 2}) film is essential for assessing the quality of the hydriding process but is a challenging measurement to make. First, the ideal gas law cannot be applied directly due to high temperature (950{degrees}C) and low temperature (25{degrees}C) regions in the same manifold. Additionally, the metal hydride does not release all of the deuterium rapidly upon heating and metal evaporation occurs during extended heating periods. Therefore, the method developed must provide a means to compensate for temperature inhomogeneities and the amount of deuterium retained in the metal film while heating for a minimal duration. This paper presents two thermal desorption methods used to evaluate the kinetics and equilibria of the deuterium desorption process at high temperatures (950{degrees}C). Of primary concern is the evaluation of the quantity of deuterium remaining in these films at the high temperature. A multiple volume expansion technique provided insight into the kinetics of the deuterium evolution and metal evaporation from the film. Finally a repeated pump-down approach yielded data that indicated approximately 10% of the deuterium is retained in the metal film at 950{degrees}C and approximately 1 Torr pressure. When the total moles of deuterium determined by this method were divided by the moles of erbium determined by ICP/AES, nearly stochiometric values of 2:1 were obtained for several erbium dideuteride films. Although this work presents data for erbium and deuterium, these methods are applicable to other metal hydrides as well.

  2. Method for measuring deuterium in erbium deuteride films

    SciTech Connect

    Brangan, J.R.; Thornberg, S.M.; Keenan, M.R.

    1999-07-01

    Determining the quantity of deuterium in an erbium deuteride film is essential for assessing the quality of the hydriding process but is a challenging measurement to make. First, the ideal gas law cannot be applied directly due to high temperature (950&hthinsp;{degree}C) and low temperature (25&hthinsp;{degree}C) regions in the same manifold. Additionally, the metal hydride does not release all of the deuterium rapidly upon heating and metal evaporation occurs during extended heating periods. Therefore, the method developed must provide a means to compensate for temperature inhomogeneities and the amount of deuterium retained in the metal film while heating for a minimal duration. This article presents two thermal desorption methods used to evaluate the kinetics and equilibria of the deuterium desorption process at high temperatures (950&hthinsp;{degree}C). Of primary concern is the evaluation of the quantity of deuterium remaining in these films at the high temperature. A multiple volume expansion technique provided insight into the kinetics of the deuterium evolution and metal evaporation from the film. Finally, a repeated pump-down approach yielded data that indicated approximately 10{percent} of the deuterium is retained in the metal film at 950&hthinsp;{degree}C and approximately 1 Torr pressure. When the total moles of deuterium determined by this method were divided by the moles of erbium determined by inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, nearly stochiometric values of 2:1 were obtained for several erbium dideuteride films. Although this work presents data for erbium and deuterium, these methods are applicable to other metal hydrides as well. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.}

  3. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  4. Deuterium in astrophysical ice analogues: Isotope exchange and IR detection sensitivity for HDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escribano, R. M.; Galvez, O.; Mate, B.; Herrero, V. J.

    2011-12-01

    Among D-bearing molecules, water is especially interesting from an astrophysical point of view. Although the deuterium content of water in astronomical environments is relatively small as compared with other molecules, it holds most valuable information, still largely undeciphered, on the dynamics of formation and evaporation of ice grain mantels in protostellar regions [1], and is crucial for the understanding of the formation of the Solar System and the Earth [2]. In this work, we have used the OD stretching bands of HDO and D2O molecules in various ice mixtures formed by vapor deposition on a cold substrate (see ref [3] for a description of the experimental set-up) to study the sensitivity of the IR technique for the detection of HDO in ice samples, and to monitor processes of H/D isotope exchange in these solids. It is found that the detection sensitivity is strongly dependent on the ice structure. The OD band is extremely broad and tends to disappear into the absorption continuum of H2O for low temperature amorphous samples. Detectable HDO/H2O ratios with this technique may range from a few per cent for amorphous samples to a few per thousand in crystalline ice. These relatively high upper limits and the appreciable dependence of the band shape on temperature, complicating the interpretation of data from many lines of sight, may question the usefulness of this technique. Isotopic H/D exchange in mixed ices of H2O/D2O is found to start at ~ 120 K and is greatly accelerated at 150 K, as crystallization proceeds in the ice. The process is mainly driven by proton transfer assisted by orientational defect mobility. Annealed amorphous samples are more favourable for isotope exchange than samples directly formed in the crystalline phase. The annealing process seems to lead to polycrystalline ice morphology with a higher defect activity. The present data emphasize the relevance of a depletion mechanism for D atoms in hydroxylic bonds in the solid state, recently

  5. Computer experiments concerning palladium-deuterium and titanium-deuterium lattices - implications to phenomenon of low-energy nuclear reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.R.; Chaplot, S.L.

    1996-12-01

    Short-lived large energy fluctuations (SLEFs) in solids, proposed by Khait, are known to be responsible for several anomalous properties in a variety of materials. The study of SLEFs in palladium-deuterium and titanium-deuterium lattices via computer experiments is reported. The relevance of these large energy fluctuations in penetrating coulombic barriers in these systems is discussed. Such dynamical effects arising from the phonon bath in solids may enhance nuclear reaction probabilities leading to cold fusion. Expected cold fusion reaction rates are reported taking into account the effective charges of the deuterium atoms in the solid and SLEF frequencies. 25 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Spatial reproducibility of complex fractionated atrial electrogram depending on the direction and configuration of bipolar electrodes: an in-silico modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun-Seop; Lee, Young-Seon; Hwang, Minki; Lee, Jung-Kee; Li, Changyong; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Although 3D-complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) mapping is useful in radiofrequency catheter ablation for persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), the directions and configuration of the bipolar electrodes may affect the electrogram. This study aimed to compare the spatial reproducibility of CFAE by changing the catheter orientations and electrode distance in an in-silico left atrium (LA). We conducted this study by importing the heart CT image of a patient with AF into a 3D-homogeneous human LA model. Electrogram morphology, CFAE-cycle lengths (CLs) were compared for 16 different orientations of a virtual bipolar conventional catheter (conv-cath: size 3.5 mm, inter-electrode distance 4.75 mm). Additionally, the spatial correlations of CFAE-CLs and the percentage of consistent sites with CFAE-CL<120 ms were analyzed. The results from the conv-cath were compared with that obtained using a mini catheter (mini-cath: size 1 mm, inter-electrode distance 2.5 mm). Depending on the catheter orientation, the electrogram morphology and CFAE-CLs varied (conv-cath: 11.5±0.7% variation, mini-cath: 7.1±1.2% variation), however the mini-cath produced less variation of CFAE-CL than conv-cath (p<0.001). There were moderate spatial correlations among CFAE-CL measured at 16 orientations (conv-cath: r=0.3055±0.2194 vs. mini-cath: 0.6074±0.0733, p<0.001). Additionally, the ratio of consistent CFAE sites was higher for mini catheter than conventional one (38.3±4.6% vs. 22.3±1.4%, p<0.05). Electrograms and CFAE distribution are affected by catheter orientation and electrode configuration in the in-silico LA model. However, there was moderate spatial consistency of CFAE areas, and narrowly spaced bipolar catheters were less influenced by catheter direction than conventional catheters. PMID:27610037

  7. Spatial reproducibility of complex fractionated atrial electrogram depending on the direction and configuration of bipolar electrodes: an in-silico modeling study.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun-Seop; Lee, Young-Seon; Hwang, Minki; Lee, Jung-Kee; Li, Changyong; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Shim, Eun Bo; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2016-09-01

    Although 3D-complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) mapping is useful in radiofrequency catheter ablation for persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), the directions and configuration of the bipolar electrodes may affect the electrogram. This study aimed to compare the spatial reproducibility of CFAE by changing the catheter orientations and electrode distance in an in-silico left atrium (LA). We conducted this study by importing the heart CT image of a patient with AF into a 3D-homogeneous human LA model. Electrogram morphology, CFAE-cycle lengths (CLs) were compared for 16 different orientations of a virtual bipolar conventional catheter (conv-cath: size 3.5 mm, inter-electrode distance 4.75 mm). Additionally, the spatial correlations of CFAE-CLs and the percentage of consistent sites with CFAE-CL<120 ms were analyzed. The results from the conv-cath were compared with that obtained using a mini catheter (mini-cath: size 1 mm, inter-electrode distance 2.5 mm). Depending on the catheter orientation, the electrogram morphology and CFAE-CLs varied (conv-cath: 11.5±0.7% variation, mini-cath: 7.1±1.2% variation), however the mini-cath produced less variation of CFAE-CL than conv-cath (p<0.001). There were moderate spatial correlations among CFAE-CL measured at 16 orientations (conv-cath: r=0.3055±0.2194 vs. mini-cath: 0.6074±0.0733, p<0.001). Additionally, the ratio of consistent CFAE sites was higher for mini catheter than conventional one (38.3±4.6% vs. 22.3±1.4%, p<0.05). Electrograms and CFAE distribution are affected by catheter orientation and electrode configuration in the in-silico LA model. However, there was moderate spatial consistency of CFAE areas, and narrowly spaced bipolar catheters were less influenced by catheter direction than conventional catheters. PMID:27610037

  8. Spatial reproducibility of complex fractionated atrial electrogram depending on the direction and configuration of bipolar electrodes: an in-silico modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun-Seop; Lee, Young-Seon; Hwang, Minki; Lee, Jung-Kee; Li, Changyong; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Although 3D-complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) mapping is useful in radiofrequency catheter ablation for persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), the directions and configuration of the bipolar electrodes may affect the electrogram. This study aimed to compare the spatial reproducibility of CFAE by changing the catheter orientations and electrode distance in an in-silico left atrium (LA). We conducted this study by importing the heart CT image of a patient with AF into a 3D-homogeneous human LA model. Electrogram morphology, CFAE-cycle lengths (CLs) were compared for 16 different orientations of a virtual bipolar conventional catheter (conv-cath: size 3.5 mm, inter-electrode distance 4.75 mm). Additionally, the spatial correlations of CFAE-CLs and the percentage of consistent sites with CFAE-CL<120 ms were analyzed. The results from the conv-cath were compared with that obtained using a mini catheter (mini-cath: size 1 mm, inter-electrode distance 2.5 mm). Depending on the catheter orientation, the electrogram morphology and CFAE-CLs varied (conv-cath: 11.5±0.7% variation, mini-cath: 7.1±1.2% variation), however the mini-cath produced less variation of CFAE-CL than conv-cath (p<0.001). There were moderate spatial correlations among CFAE-CL measured at 16 orientations (conv-cath: r=0.3055±0.2194 vs. mini-cath: 0.6074±0.0733, p<0.001). Additionally, the ratio of consistent CFAE sites was higher for mini catheter than conventional one (38.3±4.6% vs. 22.3±1.4%, p<0.05). Electrograms and CFAE distribution are affected by catheter orientation and electrode configuration in the in-silico LA model. However, there was moderate spatial consistency of CFAE areas, and narrowly spaced bipolar catheters were less influenced by catheter direction than conventional catheters.

  9. Cytology is advanced by studying effects of deuterium environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, S.; Crespi, H. L.; Flaumenhaft, E.; Katz, J. J.

    1967-01-01

    Research of deuterium effects on biological systems shows deuteriation is not incompatible with life. With the successful cultivation of deuteriated bacteria, work is now being done on extraction of deuterio-compounds from bacteria.

  10. The Primordial Deuterium Abundance: Current Status and Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Meara, John

    2007-04-01

    Measurements of the abundances of the light nuclei (H, D, ^3He, ^4He, and ^7 Li) offer precise constraints on the cosmological parameters relevant to big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Deuterium is of particular interest, since, at the level of cosmological relevance, it is produced only during BBN. The advent of high resolution spectrographs on telescopes both on the ground and in space has enabled the measurement of the abundance of deuterium in a number of astrophysical environments, including those which give the primordial abundance, namely the absorption line systems seen toward distant quasars. In this talk, I will discuss the current state of the deuterium abundance, with a focus given to the primordial abundance, and will discuss the future roles deuterium can play in futher constraining physics during the epoch of BBN.

  11. Confinement and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C.Z.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Darrow, D.S.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G.Y.; Furth, H.P.; Gentile, C.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kugel, H.; Lam, N.T.; LaMarche, P.H.; Loughlin, M.J.; LeBlanc, B.; Leonard, M.; Levinton, F.M.; Machuzak, J.; Mansfield, D.K.; Martin, A.; Mazzucato, E.; Majeski, R.; Marmar, E.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D.C.; McGuire, K.M.; McKee, G.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Muelle

    1994-05-30

    The Tomamak Fusion Test reactor has performed initial high-power experiments with the plasma fueled with nominally equal densities of deuterium and tritium. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas, the energy stored in the electron and ions increased by [similar to]20%. These increases indicate improvements in confinement associated with the use of tritium and possibly heating of electrons by [alpha] particles created by the D-T fusion reactions.

  12. Calibration of a direct nuclear activation diagnostic which uses boron nitride to measure energetic deuterium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, G.W.; Chambers, G.D.; Savage, M.E.; Ruiz, C.L.; Schmidlapp, F.A.

    1998-07-01

    A direct nuclear activation diagnostic for the measurement of the kinetic energy of deuterium ions in the energy range of 1 to 3 MeV has been successfully developed. This diagnostic is based on the fact that the ratio of two different thick target yields which are generated by the same incident ion species can be a sensitive function of incident ion energy. Targets for this diagnostic are made of {alpha}-boron nitride (BN) and use the two reactions: {sup 10}B(d,n){sup 11}C({beta}+) and {sup 14}N(d,n){sup 15}O({beta}+). As long as the BN material matrix remains constant, the ratio of thick target yields depends only on the deuterium ion energy and is independent of ion fluence and detector efficiency. Calibration of the diagnostic was accomplished by irradiating BN targets with deuterium beams of known ion kinetic energy and fluence. The calibrated diagnostic was then fielded to measure the voltage in a Plasma Opening Switch (POS). Electrical measurements of the POS voltage and the voltage inferred from the BN nuclear activation diagnostic were in good agreement.

  13. Neutral beam stopping and emission in fusion plasmas I: deuterium beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, H.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Hoekstra, R.; Horton, L. D.; Howman, A. C.; Konig, R. W. T.; Martin, R.; Olson, R. E.; Summers, H. P.

    2000-07-01

    The charge transfer reaction of neutral deuterium beams with impurities enables one of the principle quantitative diagnostic measurements of the hot core fusion plasma; that is, charge exchange spectroscopy. The complementary measurement of beam emission spectroscopy has been fruitful in motional Stark wavelength shift and fluctuation studies, but less so in using absolute measured intensities. In the last two years we have achieved substantial improvement in the quantitative analysis and agreement between the observed and modelled beam emission at the JET Joint Undertaking. This has depended on improved spectral fitting of the overlayed Dα motional Stark multiplet, self-consistent beam emission and impurity charge exchange modelling and analysis, and revision of the data entering the modelling of the beam emission process. The paper outlines the present JET beam emission diagnostic system and the collisional radiative modelling of deuterium beam stopping and emission. The nature and organization of the effective derived data directly used in experimental interpretation at JET are described and some results of spectral analysis of deuterium beam emission given. The practical implementation of the methods described here is part of the ADAS Project.

  14. Initial deuterium confinement studies in DIII-D tokamak: DIII-D milestone report number 58

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deboo, J. C.; Schissel, D. P.; Burrell, K.; Stjohn, H.

    1989-08-01

    The operational space of DIII-D was extended to include high current, high power deuterium neutral beam heating of deuterium discharges in both the single null and double null configurations. Recent completion of the neutron shielding of the DIII-D facility has allowed operation in these new parameter regimes while maintaining a low neutron dose at the site boundary. The plasma current and neutral beam power ranges with D(0) yields D(+) operation were extended to P(sub T) is less than or equal to 12 MW and I(sub p) is less than or equal to 2.5 MA. Comparison of H-mode discharges in pure H with those in pure D indicates a continuing superior confinement in deuterium for values of q is greater than or equal to 3; however at lower values of q the confinement becomes similar. Analysis of the energy confinement in this regime has shown no major differences in current or power scaling compared to H(0) yields D(+) operation. Energy confinement during the ELMing phase of D(0) yields D(+) H-mode discharges scales linearly with the plasma current and deteriorates with neutral beam power. Recent, ongoing time dependent analysis of discharges with long ELM-free periods following the L to H transition indicate that the energy confinement time may be independent of power so that power degradation may be a manifestation of ELMs.

  15. Transient effects during erosion of WN by deuterium ions studied with the quartz crystal microbalance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Bernhard M.; Stadlmayr, Reinhard; Meisl, Gerd; Čekada, Miha; Eisenmenger-Sittner, Christoph; Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2016-09-01

    Transient effects during erosion of polycrystalline tungsten-nitride (WN) films by mono-energetic deuterium projectiles are studied using a quartz crystal microbalance technique. The evolution of the mass removal rate of a 360 nm thin WN film under 500 eV/D and 1000 eV/D bombardment is investigated at a temperature of 465 K in situ and in real-time as a function of the deuterium fluence. The measurements are performed at a typical flux of 1018 m-2 s-1. A strong dependency of the observed mass change rate on the deuterium fluence is found. The mass loss is initially higher than for pure tungsten (W) and drops with fluence, finally reaching the same steady state value as for pure W sputtering. Steady state surface conditions are obtained at a fluence of about 0.2 × 1023 D/m2 for 500 eV/D and 0.6 × 1023 D/m2 for 1000 eV/D. SDTrimSP simulations indicate a preferential removal of N and a corresponding W enrichment of the surface.

  16. Thermal annealing and exposure to divertor-like deuterium plasma of tailored tungsten oxide coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzoli, A.; Dellasega, D.; Russo, V.; Gallo, A.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P. A.; Passoni, M.

    2015-08-01

    In this work we produced tungsten (W) and W oxide (WOx) films by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with the aim of the addressing modifications of structure and morphology that occur after annealing treatments and high-flux deuterium plasma. Thanks to the high flexibility of PLD we produced nanostructured W containing non-bounded oxygen, different types of WOx and multilayered films. W coatings are dense, non-porous and exhibit a nanocrystalline structure, resembling the coatings used as first wall in tokamaks. The oxide films are nearly stoichiometric amorphous WOx (x = 3) with different morphology from compact to porous. Depending on annealing temperature, nucleation of different crystalline phases (e.g. WO3, W18O49) occurs. Exposure of films to high-flux (∼1024 m-2 s-1) deuterium plasmas in Magnum-PSI at different surface temperatures (Tmax = 580 K) determines material modifications at the nanoscale (e.g. nanometric defects) but no delamination. In addition preliminary deuterium retention results are reported.

  17. First-principles opacity table of warm dense deuterium for inertial-confinement-fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; Epstein, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.

    2014-09-01

    Accurate knowledge of the optical properties of a warm dense deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture is important for reliable design of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions using radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. The opacity of a warm dense DT shell essentially determines how much radiation from hot coronal plasmas can be deposited in the DT fuel of an imploding capsule. Even for the simplest species of hydrogen, the accurate calculation of their opacities remains a challenge in the warm-dense matter regime because strong-coupling and quantum effects play an important role in such plasmas. With quantum-molecular-dynamics (QMD) simulations, we have derived a first-principles opacity table (FPOT) of deuterium (and the DT mixture by mass scaling) for a wide range of densities from ρD=0.5 to 673.518g/cm3 and temperatures from T=5000K up to the Fermi temperature TF for each density. Compared with results from the astrophysics opacity table (AOT) currently used in our hydrocodes, the FPOT of deuterium from our QMD calculations has shown a significant increase in opacity for strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions by a factor of 3-100 in the ICF-relevant photon-energy range. As conditions approach those of classical plasma, the opacity from the FPOT converges to the corresponding values of the AOT. By implementing the FPOT of deuterium and the DT mixture into our hydrocodes, we have performed radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for low-adiabat cryogenic DT implosions on the OMEGA laser and for direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility. The simulation results using the FPOT show that the target performance (in terms of neutron yield and energy gain) could vary from ˜10% up to a factor of ˜2 depending on the adiabat of the imploding DT capsule; the lower the adiabat, the more variation is seen in the prediction of target performance when compared to the AOT modeling.

  18. Nuclear Quadrupole Double Resonance Investigation of the Anomalous Temperature Coefficients of the Strong Hydrogen Bonds in Sodium and Potassium Deuterium Diacetate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Eric Max

    This thesis was directed at learning more about the unusual electronic environment near hydrogen within strong hydrogen bonds. "Strong" hydrogen bonds are unique in that the hydrogen atom is symmetrically located, or nearly so, between two electronegative atoms; the bond energies are relatively large. In a "normal" hydrogen bond the hydrogen atom is bonded to, and thus physically closer to, a parent atom, and only weakly attracted to another electronegative atom; bond energies are typically small. To examine these bonds, deuterium was substituted for hydrogen and the electric quadrupole coupling constant (QCC) of deuterium was measured using field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance. The electric quadrupole moment of deuterium is sensitive to changes in the surrounding electric field gradient, and is thus a good probe of the immediate electronic structure. The results show that the temperature dependence of the QCC is opposite to, and much larger than, what one would normally expect to observe for deuterium. The QCC is found to decrease strongly with decreasing temperature. This project was the first to study in detail the temperature dependence of deuterium QCCs in strong hydrogen bonds. The magnitude of the deuterium QCCs for the diacetates was found to be strongly depressed relative to typical values for deuterium. These results parallel large shifts in the infrared vibrational frequencies observed in many molecules which contain strong hydrogen bonds. The asymmetry parameter, which is a measure of the departure from axial symmetry of the electric field gradient (EFG) at deuterium, was found to be unusually large for what are known to be linear, or nearly linear, three-center bonds. Based on ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations aimed at determining the EFG at H in the archetypal bifluoride ion, F-H-F^-, the electronic charge density is drastically depleted at H. It is believed that the large reduction in the charge density allows the deuterium EFG to be highly

  19. Is deuterium in high-redshift Lyman limit systems primordial?

    SciTech Connect

    Jedamzik, K.; Fuller, G.M.

    1997-07-01

    Detections of deuterium in high-redshift Lyman limit absorption systems along the line of sight to QSOs promise to reveal the primordial deuterium abundance. At present, the deuterium abundances (D/H) derived from the very few systems observed are significantly discordant. Assuming the validity of all the data, if this discordance does not reflect intrinsic primordial inhomogeneity, then it must arise from processes operating after the primordial nucleosynthesis epoch. We consider processes that might lead to significant deuterium production or destruction and yet allow the cloud to mimic a chemically unevolved system. These processes include, for example, anomalous/stochastic chemical evolution and D/{sup 4}He photodestruction. In general, we find it unlikely that these processes could have significantly altered D/H in Lyman limit clouds. We argue that chemical evolution scenarios, unless very finely tuned, cannot account for significant local deuterium depletion since they tend to overproduce {sup 12}C, even when allowance is made for possible outflow. Similarly, D/{sup 4}He photodestruction schemes engineered to locally produce or destroy deuterium founder on the necessity of requiring an improbably large {gamma}-ray source density. Future observations of D/H in Lyman limit systems may provide important insight into the initial conditions for the primordial nucleosynthesis process, early chemical evolution, and the galaxy formation process. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  20. Advanced Deuterium Fusion Rocket Propulsion for Manned Deep Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    Excluding speculations about future breakthrough discoveries in physics, it is shown that with what is at present known, and also what is technically feasible, manned space flight to the limits of the solar system and beyond deep into the Oort cloud is quite possible. Using deuterium as the rocket fuel of choice, abundantly available on the comets of the Oort cloud, rockets driven by deuterium fusion can there be refuelled. To obtain a high thrust with high specific impulse favours the propulsion by deuterium micro-bombs, and it is shown that the ignition of deuterium micro-bombs is possible by intense GeV proton beams, generated in space by using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated billion volt capacitor. The cost to develop this kind of a propulsion system in space would be very high, but it can also be developed on Earth by a magnetically insulated Super Marx Generator. Since the ignition of deuterium is theoretically possible with the Super Marx Generator, making obsolete the ignition of deuterium-tritium with a laser, where 80% of the energy goes into neutrons, this would also mean a breakthrough in fusion research, and therefore would justify the large development costs.

  1. A high deuterium abundance in the early Universe.

    PubMed

    Songaila, A; Wampler, E J; Cowie, L L

    1997-01-01

    Intergalactic gas clouds at high redshifts have element abundances that are close to primordial. The ratio of deuterium to hydrogen (D/H) within such clouds-which is determined from absorption lines in the spectra of more distant quasars that lie along the same line of sight-provides the best estimate of the density of baryons (omegaB) in the Universe. Previous estimates of D/H in the early Universe have yielded values that differ by about an order of magnitude, with the lower values implying a high density of baryons that may be difficult to reconcile with both estimates of the primordial abundances of other light elements (especially 4He) and the known number of light neutrinos. The accuracy of such D/H determinations is heavily dependent on the inferred column density of neutral hydrogen in the absorbing clouds. Here we report an independent measurement of the neutral hydrogen column density in the cloud towards the quasar Q1937 - 1009, for which one of the low D/H values was derived. Our measurement requires a substantial revision to the D/H value reported previously; we obtain a lower limit of D/H > 4 x 10(-5) for this cloud, which implies omegaB < 0.016 for a Hubble constant of 100 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). This reduced upper limit for the baryon density relieves any conflict with standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis.

  2. Deuterium on Venus: Observations from Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, Barry L.; Debergh, C.; Bezard, B.; Owen, T.; Crisp, D.; Maillard, J.-P.

    1991-01-01

    In view of the importance of the deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio in understanding the evolutionary scenario of planetary atmospheres and its relationship to understanding the evolution of our own Earth, we undertook a series of observations designed to resolve previous observational conflicts. We observed the dark side of Venus in the 2.3 micron spectral region in search of both H2O and HDO, which would provide us with the D/H ratio in Venus' atmosphere. We identified a large number of molecular lines in the region, belonging to both molecules, and, using synthetic spectral techniques, obtained mixing ratios of 34 plus or minus 10 ppm and 1.3 plus or minus 0.2 ppm for H2O and HDO, respectively. These mixing ratios yield a D/H ratio for Venus of D/H equals 1.9 plus or minus 0.6 times 10 (exp 12) and 120 plus or minus 40 times the telluric ratio. Although the detailed interpretation is difficult, our observations confirm that the Pioneer Venus Orbiter results and establish that indeed Venus had a period in its early history in which it was very wet, perhaps not unlike the early wet period that seems to have been present on Mars, and that, in contrast to Earth, lost much of its water over geologic time.

  3. Equations of state for hydrogen and deuterium.

    SciTech Connect

    Kerley, Gerald Irwin (Kerley Technical Services, Appomattox, VA)

    2003-12-01

    This report describes the complete revision of a deuterium equation of state (EOS) model published in 1972. It uses the same general approach as the 1972 EOS, i.e., the so-called 'chemical model,' but incorporates a number of theoretical advances that have taken place during the past thirty years. Three phases are included: a molecular solid, an atomic solid, and a fluid phase consisting of both molecular and atomic species. Ionization and the insulator-metal transition are also included. The most important improvements are in the liquid perturbation theory, the treatment of molecular vibrations and rotations, and the ionization equilibrium and mixture models. In addition, new experimental data and theoretical calculations are used to calibrate certain model parameters, notably the zero-Kelvin isotherms for the molecular and atomic solids, and the quantum corrections to the liquid phase. The report gives a general overview of the model, followed by detailed discussions of the most important theoretical issues and extensive comparisons with the many experimental data that have been obtained during the last thirty years. Questions about the validity of the chemical model are also considered. Implications for modeling the 'giant planets' are also discussed.

  4. The fraction of cells that resume growth after acetic acid addition is a strain-dependent parameter of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Steve; Fernández-Niño, Miguel; González-Ramos, Daniel; van Maris, Antonius J A; Nevoigt, Elke

    2014-06-01

    High acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a relevant phenotype in industrial biotechnology when using lignocellulosic hydrolysates as feedstock. A screening of 38 S. cerevisiae strains for tolerance to acetic acid revealed considerable differences, particularly with regard to the duration of the latency phase. To understand how this phenotype is quantitatively manifested, four strains exhibiting significant differences were studied in more detail. Our data show that the duration of the latency phase is primarily determined by the fraction of cells within the population that resume growth. Only this fraction contributed to the exponential growth observed after the latency phase, while all other cells persisted in a viable but non-proliferating state. A remarkable variation in the size of the fraction was observed among the tested strains differing by several orders of magnitude. In fact, only 11 out of 10(7)  cells of the industrial bioethanol production strain Ethanol Red resumed growth after exposure to 157 mM acetic acid at pH 4.5, while this fraction was 3.6 × 10(6) (out of 10(7)  cells) in the highly acetic acid tolerant isolate ATCC 96581. These strain-specific differences are genetically determined and represent a valuable starting point to identify genetic targets for future strain improvement.

  5. Toxicity of scorpion venom in chick embryo and mealworm assay depending on the use of the soluble fraction versus the whole venom.

    PubMed

    van der Valk, Tom; van der Meijden, Arie

    2014-09-01

    The LD50 is an important metric for venom studies and antivenom development. It has been shown that several variables in the protocol influence the LD50 value obtained, such as venom source, extraction and treatment and administration route. These inconsistencies reduce the utility of the results of these test for comparative studies. In scorpion venom LD50 assays, often only the soluble fraction of the venom is used, whereas other studies use the whole venom. We here tested the toxicity of the soluble fraction in isolation, and of the whole venom in two different systems: chick embryos and mealworms Tenebrio molitor. Ten microliters of venom solutions from Hadrurus arizonensis, Leiurus quinquestriatus, Androctonus australis, Grosphus grandidieri and Heterometrus laoticus were applied to five day old chicken embryos at stage 25-27. Our results showed no significant differences between the LD50 based on the whole venom versus that of only the soluble fraction and in the chicken embryo assay in four of the five scorpion species tested. H. laoticus however, showed a significantly lower LD50 value for the whole venom than the soluble fraction. In assays on mealworms however, this pattern was not seen. Nonetheless, caution may be warranted when using LD50 values obtained from only the soluble fraction. The LD50 values of the five species in this study, based on the chicken embryo assay, showed good correlation with values from the literature based on mouse studies. This suggests that the chick embryo assay may be an economic alternative to rodent assays for scorpion LD50 studies. PMID:24951875

  6. Recovery capacity of glial progenitors after in vivo fission-neutron or X irradiation: age dependence, fractionation and low-dose-rate irradiations.

    PubMed

    Philippo, H; Winter, E A M; van der Kogel, A J; Huiskamp, R

    2005-06-01

    Previous experiments on the radiosensitivity of O-2A glial progenitors determined for single-dose fission-neutron and X irradiation showed log-linear survival curves, suggesting a lack of accumulation of recovery of sublethal damage. In the present study, we addressed this question and further characterized the radiobiological properties of these glial stem cells by investigating the recovery capacity of glial stem cells using either fractionated or protracted whole-body irradiation. Irradiations were performed on newborn, 2-week-old or 12-week-old rats. Fractionated irradiations (four fractions) were performed with 24-h intervals, followed by cell isolations 16- 24 h after the last irradiation. Single-dose irradiations were followed by cell isolation 16-24 h after irradiation or delayed cell isolation (4 days after irradiation) of the O-2A progenitor cells from either spinal cord (newborns) or optic nerve (2- and 12-week-old rats). Results for neonatal progenitor cell survival show effect ratios for both fractionated fission-neutron and X irradiation of the order of 1.8 when compared with single-dose irradiation. A similar ratio was found after single-dose irradiation combined with delayed plating. Comparable results were observed for juvenile and adult optic nerve progenitors, with effect ratios of the order of 1.2. The present investigation clearly shows that fractionated irradiation regimens using X rays or fission neutrons and CNS tissue from rats of various ages results in an increase in O-2A progenitor cell survival while repair is virtually absent. This recovery of the progenitor pool after irradiation can be observed at all ages but is greatest in the neonatal spinal cord and can probably be attributed to repopulation. PMID:15913395

  7. Measurements of beam current density and proton fraction of a permanent-magnet microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard

    2011-11-15

    A permanent-magnet microwave ion source has been built for use in a high-yield, compact neutron generator. The source has been designed to produce up to 100 mA of deuterium and tritium ions. The electron-cyclotron resonance condition is met at a microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz and a magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT. The source operates at a low hydrogen gas pressure of about 0.15 Pa. Hydrogen beams with a current density of 40 mA/cm{sup 2} have been extracted at a microwave power of 450 W. The dependence of the extracted proton beam fraction on wall materials and operating parameters was measured and found to vary from 45% for steel to 95% for boron nitride as a wall liner material.

  8. Temperature dependence of oxygen- and clumped isotope fractionation in carbonates: A study of travertines and tufas in the 6-95 °C temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kele, Sándor; Breitenbach, Sebastian F. M.; Capezzuoli, Enrico; Meckler, A. Nele; Ziegler, Martin; Millan, Isabel M.; Kluge, Tobias; Deák, József; Hanselmann, Kurt; John, Cédric M.; Yan, Hao; Liu, Zaihua; Bernasconi, Stefano M.

    2015-11-01

    Conventional carbonate-water oxygen isotope thermometry and the more recently developed clumped isotope thermometer have been widely used for the reconstruction of paleotemperatures from a variety of carbonate materials. In spite of a large number of studies, however, there are still large uncertainties in both δ18O- and Δ47-based temperature calibrations. For this reason there is a need to better understand the controls on isotope fractionation especially on natural carbonates. In this study we analyzed oxygen, carbon and clumped isotopes of a unique set of modern calcitic and aragonitic travertines, tufa and cave deposits from natural springs and wells. Together these samples cover a temperature range from 6 to 95 °C. Travertine samples were collected close to the vents of the springs and from pools, and tufa samples were collected from karstic creeks and a cave. The majority of our vent and pool travertines and tufa samples show a carbonate-water oxygen isotope fractionation comparable to the one of Tremaine et al. (2011) with some samples showing higher fractionations. No significant difference between the calcite-water and aragonite-water oxygen isotope fractionation could be observed. The Δ47 data from the travertines show a strong relationship with temperature and define the regression Δ47 = (0.044 ± 0.005 × 106)/T2 + (0.205 ± 0.047). The pH of the parent solution, mineralogy and precipitation rate do not appear to significantly affect the Δ47-signature of carbonates, compared to the temperature effect and the analytical error. The tufa samples and three biogenic calcites show an excellent fit with the travertine calibration, indicating that this regression can be used for other carbonates as well. This work extends the calibration range of the clumped isotope thermometer to travertine and tufa deposits in the temperature range from 6 °C to 95 °C.

  9. Radioprotective efficacy of dipyridamole and AMP combination in fractionated radiation regimen, and its dependence on the time of administration of the drugs prior to irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Pospísil, M; Netíková, J; Znojil, V; Vácha, J; Holá, J

    1995-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the combined administration of dipyridamole and adenosine monophospate to mice induces radioprotective effects in terms of postirradiation haemopoietic recovery in animals irradiated with a single dose. The aim of the present experiments was to investigate the radioprotective ability of the drug combination under conditions of fractionated radiation treatment. It has been shown that administration of drugs either 15 or 60 min before each of the five daily 3-Gy doses of gamma-radiation enhances haemopoietic recovery and survival of mice exposed to an additional "top-up" dose of 3.5 Gy. Furthermore, it has been ascertained that the regimen using administration of the drugs 60 min prior to irradiation is more effective than administration of the drugs 15 min prior to irradiation. Due to the evidence that administration of the drugs 15 min prior to irradiation protects the organism mainly via mechanisms of systemic hypoxia while the pretreatment 60 min before irradiation avoids the role of hypoxia and mainly induces cell proliferation effects, our results suggest a more effective protective role of mechanisms stimulating haemopoiesis under conditions of fractionated radiation. The data may provide a basis for more rational use of radioprotection in fractionated radiation regimens.

  10. Deuterium absorption from the D{sub 2}O exposure of oxidized 4H-SiC (0001), (0001{sup ¯}), and (112{sup ¯}0) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gang; Xu, Can; Feldman, Leonard C.; Yakshinskiy, Boris; Wielunski, Leszek; Gustafsson, Torgny; Bloch, Joseph; Dhar, Sarit

    2015-03-23

    We report results on deuterium absorption on several oxidized 4H-SiC surfaces following D{sub 2}O vapor absorption. Absorption at the oxide/semiconductor interface is strongly face dependent with an order of magnitude more deuterium on the C-face and a-face than on the Si-face, in contrast to the bulk of the oxides which show essentially no face dependence. Annealing in NO gas produces a large reduction in interfacial deuterium absorption in all cases. The reduction of the positive charge at the interface scales linearly with the interface D content. These results also scale with the variation in interface trap density (D{sub it}) and mobility on the three faces after wet oxidation annealing.

  11. Chemical response of lithiated graphite with deuterium irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C. N.; Heim, B.; Allain, J. P.

    2011-03-01

    Lithium wall conditioning has been found to enhance plasma performance for graphite walled fusion devices such as TFTR, CDX-U, T-11M, TJ-II and NSTX. Among observed plasma enhancements is a reduction in edge density and reduced deuterium recycling. The mechanism by which lithiated graphite retains deuterium is largely unknown. Under controlled laboratory conditions, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to observe the chemical changes that occur on ATJ graphite after lithium deposition. The chemical state of lithiated graphite is found to change upon deuterium irradiation indicating the formation Li-O-D, manifest at 532.9 {+-} 0.6 eV. Lithium-deuterium interactions are also manifest in the C 1s photoelectron energy range and show Li-C-D interactions at 291.2 {+-} 0.6 eV. Post-mortem NSTX tiles that have been exposed to air upon extraction are cleaned and examined, revealing the chemical archaeology that formed during NSTX operations. XPS spectra show strong correlation ({+-} 0.3 eV) in Li-O-D and Li-O peaks from post-mortem and control experiments, thus validating offline experiments. We report findings that show that deuterium is found to interact with lithium after lithium has already reacted with carbon and oxygen.

  12. Revealing water’s secrets: deuterium depleted water

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The anomalous properties of water have been of great interest for generations of scientists. However the impact of small amount of deuterium content which is always present in water has never been explored before. For the first time the fundamental properties of deuterium depleted (light) water at 4°C and 20°C are here presented. Results The obtained results show the important role of the deuterium in the properties of bulk water. At 4°C the lowest value of the kinematic viscosity (1.46 mm2/s) has been found for 96.5 ppm D/H ratio. The significant deviation in surface tension values has been observed in deuterium depleted water samples at the both temperature regimes. The experimental data provides direct evidence that density, surface tension and viscosity anomalies of water are caused by the presence of variable concentration of deuterium which leads to the formation of water clusters of different size and quantity. Conclusions The investigated properties of light water reveal the origin of the water anomalies. The new theoretical model of cluster formation with account of isotope effect is proposed. PMID:23773696

  13. Impacts of ENSO events on cloud radiative effects in preindustrial conditions: Changes in cloud fraction and their dependence on interactive aerosol emissions and concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Russell, Lynn M.; Xu, Li; Lou, Sijia; Lamjiri, Maryam A.; Somerville, Richard C. J.; Miller, Arthur J.; Cayan, Daniel R.; DeFlorio, Michael J.; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Ying; Singh, Balwinder; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Rasch, Philip J.

    2016-06-01

    We use three 150 year preindustrial simulations of the Community Earth System Model to quantify the impacts of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events on shortwave and longwave cloud radiative effects (CRESW and CRELW). Compared to recent observations from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System data set, the model simulation successfully reproduces larger variations of CRESW and CRELW over the tropics. The ENSO cycle is found to dominate interannual variations of cloud radiative effects. Simulated cooling (warming) effects from CRESW (CRELW) are strongest over the tropical western and central Pacific Ocean during warm ENSO events, with the largest difference between 20 and 60 W m-2, with weaker effects of 10-40 W m-2 over Indonesian regions and the subtropical Pacific Ocean. Sensitivity tests show that variations of cloud radiative effects are mainly driven by ENSO-related changes in cloud fraction. The variations in midlevel and high cloud fractions each account for approximately 20-50% of the interannual variations of CRESW over the tropics and almost all of the variations of CRELW between 60°S and 60°N. The variation of low cloud fraction contributes to most of the variations of CRESW over the midlatitude oceans. Variations in natural aerosol concentrations explained 10-30% of the variations of both CRESW and CRELW over the tropical Pacific, Indonesian regions, and the tropical Indian Ocean. Changes in natural aerosol emissions and concentrations enhance 3-5% and 1-3% of the variations of cloud radiative effects averaged over the tropics.

  14. Hydroxy-Terminated Conjugated Polymer Nanoparticles Have Near-Unity Bright Fraction and Reveal Cholesterol-Dependence of IGF1R Nanodomains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles have enabled many discoveries regarding how molecular machines function. Quantum dots have been the dominant class of fluorescent nanoparticles but suffer from blinking and from a substantial dark fraction—particles where the fluorescence is never seen—complicating any analysis of biological function. Nanoparticles composed of conjugated fluorescent polymers (Pdots) have recently been shown to have high brightness and no blinking. Here we develop a robust and efficient means to measure the dark fraction of Pdots, conjugating Atto dyes to the nanoparticles and testing fluorescence colocalization of dye and Pdot puncta. This established that the Pdots we generated had minimal dark fraction: ∼3%. The application of nanoparticles in biological environments is highly sensitive to surface functionalization. For Pdots we found that passivation with uncharged hydroxy-terminated polyethylene glycol caused a dramatic reduction in nonspecific cell binding and aggregation compared to a charged coating. Using carbonyl di-imidazole the hydroxy-Pdots were functionalized efficiently with streptavidin for high stability targeting, allowing specific labeling of mammalian cells. Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) regulates cell survival and development, with roles in aging, heart disease, and cancer. We used hydroxy-Pdots to track the dynamics of IGF1R on a breast cancer cell-line, determining the diffusion characteristics and showing cholesterol-containing membrane nanodomains were important for receptor mobility at the plasma membrane. The near-unity bright fraction and low nonspecific binding of hydroxy-Pdots, combined with Pdot photostability and lack of blinking, provides many advantages for investigations at the single molecule level. PMID:23330847

  15. Spatial variation of deuterium enrichment in bulk water of snowgum leaves.

    PubMed

    Santrucek, Jirí; Kveton, Jirí; Setlík, Jirí; Bulícková, Lenka

    2007-01-01

    Deuterium enrichment of bulk water was measured and modeled in snowgum (Eucalyptus pauciflora Sieber ex Sprengel) leaves grown under contrasting air and soil humidity in arid and wet conditions in a glasshouse. A map of the enrichment was constructed with a resolution of 4 mm by using a newly designed cryodistillation method. There was progressively increasing enrichment in both longitudinal (along the leaf midrib) and transversal (perpendicular to the midrib) directions, most pronounced in the arid-grown leaf. The whole-leaf average of the enrichment was well below the value estimated by the Craig-Gordon model. The discrepancy between model and measurements persisted when the estimates were carried out separately for the leaf base and tip, which differed in temperature and stomatal conductance. The discrepancy was proportional to the transpiration rate, indicating the significance of diffusion-advection interplay (Péclet effect) of deuterium-containing water molecules in small veins close to the evaporating sites in the leaf. Combined Craig-Gordon and desert-river models, with or without the Péclet number, P, were used for predicting the leaf longitudinal enrichment. The predictions without P overestimated the measured values of deltadeuterium. Fixed P value partially improved the coincidence. We suggest that P should vary along the leaf length l to reconcile the modeled data with observations of longitudinal enrichment. Local values of P, P(l), integrating the upstream fraction of water used or the leaf area, substantially improved the model predictions. PMID:17158587

  16. Deuterium trapping and release in JET ITER-like wall divertor tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likonen, J.; Heinola, K.; De Backer, A.; Koivuranta, S.; Hakola, A.; Ayres, C. F.; Baron-Wiechec, A.; Coad, P.; Matthews, G. F.; Mayer, M.; Widdowson, A.; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    A selected set of samples from JET-ILW divertor tiles exposed in 2011-2012 has been analysed using thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). The highest amount of deuterium was found on the regions with the thickest deposited layers, i.e. on the horizontal (apron) part and on the top part of Tile 1, which resides deep in the scrape-off layer. Outer divertor Tiles 6, 7 and 8 had nearly an order of magnitude less deuterium. The co-deposited layers on the JET tiles and the W coatings contain C, O and Ni impurities which may change the desorption properties. The D2 signals in the TDS spectra were convoluted and the positions of the peaks were compared with the Be and C amounts but no correlations between them were found. The remaining fractions of D in the analysed samples at ITER baking temperature 350 °C are rather high implying that co-deposited films may be difficult to be de-tritiated.

  17. Modification of alpha-particle emission spectrum in beam-injected deuterium-tritium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, H.; Nakao, Y.

    2009-04-01

    The alpha (α)-particle and neutron emission spectra in a deuterium-tritium plasma accompanied with neutral-beam-injection (NBI) heating are evaluated in a consistent way by solving the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equations for deuteron, triton, and α-particle simultaneously. It is shown that owing to the existence of non-Maxwellian tail component in fuel-ion distribution function due to NBI and/or nuclear elastic scattering, the generation rate of the energetic (≥4 MeV) α-particle increases significantly. When 20 MW intense deuterium beam with 1 MeV beam-injection energy is injected into an 800 m3 plasma (Te=10 keV, ne=6.2×1019 m-3), the enhancement of the fraction of the power carried by α-particles with energy above 4 (3.9) MeV to total α-particle power is almost twice (1.5 times) as much from the value for Gaussian distribution. A verification scenario for the modification of the emission spectrum by using the gamma (γ)-ray-generating B9e(α ,nγ)C12 reaction is also presented.

  18. A Dosimetry Study of Deuterium-Deuterium Neutron Generator-based In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Daniel; Liu, Yingzi; Mostafaei, Farshad; Blake, Scott; Nie, Linda H

    2015-12-01

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator that produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 × 10(8) ± 30% s(-1). A moderator/reflector/shielding [5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite and 5.7 cm borated (HDPE)] assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeters (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and the photon dose was measured by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10-min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 ± 0.8 mSv for neutrons and 4.2 ± 0.2 mSv for photons for 10 min; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population. PMID:26509624

  19. A dosimetry study of deuterium-deuterium neutron generator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowers, Daniel A.

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo Neutron Activation Analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator which produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 x 108 +/-30% s-1. A moderator/reflector/shielding (5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite & 5.7 cm borated HDPE) assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeter (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and photon dose by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10 min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 +/- 0.8 mSv for neutron and 4.2 +/- 0.2 mSv for photon for 10 mins; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  20. A Dosimetry Study of Deuterium-Deuterium Neutron Generator-based In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Daniel; Liu, Yingzi; Mostafaei, Farshad; Blake, Scott; Nie, Linda H

    2015-12-01

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator that produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 × 10(8) ± 30% s(-1). A moderator/reflector/shielding [5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite and 5.7 cm borated (HDPE)] assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeters (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and the photon dose was measured by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10-min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 ± 0.8 mSv for neutrons and 4.2 ± 0.2 mSv for photons for 10 min; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  1. Development of neutron spectrometer toward deuterium plasma diagnostics in LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, H.; Iwai, H.; Iguchi, T.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Isobe, M.; Konno, C.

    2010-10-15

    Neutron spectrometer based on coincident counting of associated particles has been developed for deuterium plasma diagnostics on Large Helical Device (LHD) at the National Institute for Fusion Science. Efficient detection of 2.5 MeV neutron with high energy resolution would be achievable by coincident detection of a scattered neutron and a recoiled proton associated with an elastic scattering of incident neutron in a plastic scintillator as a radiator. The calculated neutron spectra from deuterium plasma heated by neutral beam injection indicate that the energy resolution of better than 7% is required for the spectrometer to evaluate energetic deuterium confinement. By using a prototype of the proposed spectrometer, the energy resolution of 6.3% and the detection efficiency of 3.3x10{sup -7} count/neutron were experimentally demonstrated for 2.5 MeV monoenergetic neutron, respectively.

  2. Large deuterium isotope effects and their use: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Krumbiegel, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Isotope effects are differences in the properties of the isotopes of an element resulting in different reaction rates of a corresponding compound, in equilibrium constants and in the spectra. Shortly after the discovery of stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon, Jacob Bigeleisen formulated a theory of isotope effects and calculated possible maximum values. Large isotope effects of (2)H (deuterium) against (1)H (protium) were seen to possibly influence interpretations of reaction mechanisms if corresponding labelling is used. Much work was invested to ensure the safety of deuterium use in men in spite of the large isotope effect. On the other hand, large deuterium isotope effects gave rise to several practical applications. Examples are the enhancement of the stability of some technical products against oxidative and against hydrolytic degradation (oils, pharmaceuticals) as well as alterations of the detoxification metabolism of pharmaceuticals in vivo. PMID:21390986

  3. Ion beam technique for the measurement of deuterium diffusion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.B.; Farrell, K.

    1980-05-15

    This letter describes how a combination of the techniques of nuclear microanalysis and cathodic hydrogenation has been used to determine the diffusion coefficient of dueterium in austenitic stainless steel at room temperature. Samples charged in deuterated acid solutions to levels of about 20 at. % deuterium were quickly transferred to a scattering chamber where a depth profile of the near-surface deuterium was measured. For charging times much longer than the transfer plus anlyzing time, the deuterium profile could be described by an error function at the specimen surface. A diffusion coefficient was determined by a chi-squared test fitting procedure and shown to be consistent with values reported for other methods measured at higher temperatures.

  4. Core Deuterium Fusion and Radius Inflation in Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaikumar, Prashanth; Rachid Ouyed

    2016-06-01

    Several laboratory-based studies have shown that the Deuterium fusion cross-section is enhanced in a solid deuterated target as compared to a gas target, attributable to enhanced mobility of deuterons in a metal lattice. As an application, we propose that, for core temperatures and compositions characterizing hot Jupiters, screened Deuterium fusion can occur deep in the interior, and show that the amount of radius inflation from this effect can be important if there is sufficient rock-ice in the core. The mechanism of screened Deuterium fusion, operating in the above temperature range, is generally consistent with the trend in radius anomaly with planetary equilibrium temperature. We also explore the trend with planetary mass using a simple analytic model.

  5. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  6. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 3. Estimating Surface Area Exposure by Deuterium Uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX), collision cross section (CCS) measurement, and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) techniques were utilized to develop and compare three methods for estimating the relative surface area exposure of separate peptide chains within bovine insulin ions. Electrosprayed [M - 3H]3- and [M - 5H]5- insulin ions produced a single conformer type with respective collision cross sections of 528 ± 5 Å2 and 808 ± 2 Å2. [M - 4H]4- ions were comprised of more compact (Ω = 676 ± 3 Å2) and diffuse (i.e., more elongated, Ω = 779 ± 3 Å2) ion conformer types. Ions were subjected to HDX in the drift tube using D2O as the reagent gas. Collision-induced dissociation was used to fragment mobility-selected, isotopically labeled [M - 4H]4- and [M - 5H]5- ions into the protein subchains. Deuterium uptake levels of each chain can be explained by limited inter-chain isotopic scrambling upon collisional activation. Using nominal ion structures from MDS and a hydrogen accessibility model, the deuterium uptake for each chain was correlated to its exposed surface area. In separate experiments, the per-residue deuterium content for the protonated and deprotonated ions of the synthetic peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK were compared. The differences in deuterium content indicated the regional HDX accessibility for cations versus anions. Using ions of similar conformational type, this comparison highlights the complementary nature of HDX data obtained from positive- and negative-ion analysis.

  7. Evidence of the Timing and Rate of Uplift of Central Peruvian Andes from Deuterium Isotopes in Volcanic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winton, R.; Saylor, J. E.; Horton, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    The uplift history of the Central Andean Plateau (CAP) presents challenges to paleoelevation research with both the rate and timing of uplift debated. Two end-member models have been proposed: 1) gradual surface uplift driven primarily by tectonic shortening (e.g., Barnes and Ehlers, 2009); and 2) rapid uplift in the late Miocene driven primarily by convective removal of dense lower lithosphere (e.g., Garzione et al., 2008). Recently acquired stable isotope and paleotemperature data present a more complex picture of CAP uplift, with multiple spatially and temporally separate uplift pulses (e.g., Quade et al., 2011; Saylor et al., 2012; Leier et al., 2013). In particular, Quade et al. (2011) and Saylor et al. (2012) suggest that the southern and northern CAP may have been uplifted in the early Oligocene and early Miocene, respectively; earlier than the central Altiplano implying an 'edge-to-center' progression of uplift. Determining the rates, timing, and spatial patterns of uplift is hindered by the complex array of factors that influence paleoelevation proxies. While the isotopic composition in rising air masses, precipitation and surface water shows a systematic depletion of 18O and D at higher elevations, this lapse rate may have varied through time due to changes in topography or climate (e.g., Insel et al., 2012). Further complications arise when using carbonates as a proxy record because the fractionation factor between surface water and carbonate depends on the temperature of crystallization which is, in turn, also dependent primarily on elevation. Here we present new deuterium isotopic analyses of volcanic glass in the Ayacucho Basin (13.15° S, 74.2° W), central Peru. The Ayacucho Basin is located north of the Altiplano at 2.7-3.7 km elevation, north of the Abancay Deflection. Volcanic glass is well suited for this study because once hydrated, the isotopic composition of the waters of hydration remains distinct from the isotopic composition of modern

  8. COMPARISON OF AIR AND DEUTERIUM ON PINCH WELD BOND APPEARANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P

    2005-10-11

    The effect that air and deuterium internal atmospheres have on the pinch weld bond quality was evaluated by conducting a scoping study using type 304L stainless steel LF-7 test stems that were fabricated for an associated study. Welds were made under cool, yet nominal conditions to exacerbate the influence of the atmosphere. The bond quality of the welds was directly related to the internal atmosphere with the air atmosphere welds being of lower quality than the deuterium atmosphere welds for nominally identical welding conditions.

  9. Synthesis of deuterium labeled 17-methyl-testosterone

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Y.; Baba, S.; Kasuya, Y.

    1984-09-01

    The synthesis of two forms of selectively deuterated 17-methyl-testosterone is described. 17-Methyl-d3-testosterone was prepared by the Grignard reaction of dehydroepiandrosterone with deuterium labeled methyl magnesium iodide followed by an Oppenauer oxidation. 17-Methyl-d3-testosterone-19,19,19-d3 was prepared by treating 3,3-ethylenedioxy-5,10-epoxy-5 alpha, 10 alpha-estran-17-one with deuterium labeled methyl magnesium bromide followed by hydrolysis and dehydration of the 5 alpha-hydroxyandrostane derivative.

  10. Deuterium: Natural variations used as a biological tracer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleason, J.D.; Friedman, I.

    1970-01-01

    The suggestion is made that isotope tracing be carried out by monitoring the natural variations in deuterium concentrations. As an example, the natural variations in deuterium concentrations between food and water collected in Illinois and food and water collected in Colorado were used to determine the residence time of water in the blood and urine of rats. We observed not only a 51/2-day turnover time of water in the blood and urine, but also evidence for the influx of water vapor from the atmosphere through the lungs into the blood.

  11. Liquid deuterium cold source in graphite thermal column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsuro, M.; Kawai, T.; Maeda, Y.; Yamaoka, H.; Akiyoshi, T.; Okamoto, S.

    1989-01-01

    A liquid deuterium cold source with a non-spherical moderator chamber of about 4 litres was installed into the graphite thermal column of 5 MW Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). Three cold neutron holes and one very cold neutron hole are provided in the graphite for beam extractions. The operation tests with hydrogen liquefied in the condenser showed satisfactory performances and high gain factors of cold and very cold neutrons of more than 20 and 10, respectively. Neutron measurements with the deuterium moderator are now in progress.

  12. Calculation of Shock Hugoniot Curves of Precompressed Liquid Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Militzer, B

    2002-11-18

    Path integral Monte Carlo simulations have been used to study deuterium at high pressure and temperature. The equation of state has been derived in the temperature and density region of 10,000 {le} T {le} 1,000,000 and 0.6 {le} {rho} {le} 2.5 g cm{sup -3}. A series of shock Hugoniot curves is computed for different initial compressions in order to compare with current and future shock wave experiments using liquid deuterium samples precompressed in diamond anvil cells.

  13. Commissioning status of the Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Hartog, P.D.; Dooling, J.; Lorello, M.; Rathke, J. ); Carwardine, J.; Godden, D.; Pile, G. ); Yule, T.; Zinneman, T. )

    1993-01-01

    Grumman Aerospace Corporation, Argonne National Laboratory, and Culham Laboratory are commissioning the Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator (CWDD) in a facility at Argonne National Laboratory. CWDD is a high-brightness, high-current, 7.5-MeV negative deuterium accelerator. The 352-MHz rf accelerating cavities are cryogenically cooled with supercritical neon to reduce the rf power requirements. Installation of the accelerator into the Argonne facility began in May 1991, and first beam from the injector was extracted in February 1992. The accelerator and facility are described, and current status and future plans are discussed.

  14. Commissioning status of the Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Hartog, P.D.; Dooling, J.; Lorello, M.; Rathke, J.; Carwardine, J.; Godden, D.; Pile, G.; Yule, T.; Zinneman, T.

    1993-06-01

    Grumman Aerospace Corporation, Argonne National Laboratory, and Culham Laboratory are commissioning the Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator (CWDD) in a facility at Argonne National Laboratory. CWDD is a high-brightness, high-current, 7.5-MeV negative deuterium accelerator. The 352-MHz rf accelerating cavities are cryogenically cooled with supercritical neon to reduce the rf power requirements. Installation of the accelerator into the Argonne facility began in May 1991, and first beam from the injector was extracted in February 1992. The accelerator and facility are described, and current status and future plans are discussed.

  15. Scaling and long-range dependence in option pricing II: Pricing European option with transaction costs under the mixed Brownian-fractional Brownian model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Tian; Zhu, En-Hui; Tang, Ming-Ming; Yan, Hai-Gang

    2010-02-01

    This paper deals with the problem of discrete-time option pricing by the mixed Brownian-fractional Brownian model with transaction costs. By a mean-self-financing delta hedging argument in a discrete-time setting, a European call option pricing formula is obtained. In particular, the minimal pricing cmin(t,st) of an option under transaction costs is obtained, which shows that timestep δt and Hurst exponent H play an important role in option pricing with transaction costs. In addition, we also show that there exists fundamental difference between the continuous-time trade and discrete-time trade and that continuous-time trade assumption will result in underestimating the value of a European call option.

  16. The Prognostic Value of the Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction Is Dependent upon the Severity of Mitral Regurgitation in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Sun; Youn, Ho-Joong; Her, Sung-Ho; Park, Maen Won; Kim, Chan Joon; Park, Gyung-Min; Jeong, Myung Ho; Cho, Jae Yeong; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Kye Hun; Park, Jong Chun; Seung, Ki Bae; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Kim, Young Jo; Han, Kyoo Rok; Kim, Hyo Soo

    2015-07-01

    The prognostic value of the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been questioned even though it is an accurate marker of left ventricle (LV) systolic dysfunction. This study aimed to examine the prognostic impact of LVEF in patients with AMI with or without high-grade mitral regurgitation (MR). A total of 15,097 patients with AMI who received echocardiography were registered in the Korean Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) between January 2005 and July 2011. Patients with low-grade MR (grades 0-2) and high-grade MR (grades 3-4) were divided into the following two sub-groups according to LVEF: LVEF ≤ 40% (n = 2,422 and 197, respectively) and LVEF > 40% (n = 12,252 and 226, respectively). The primary endpoints were major adverse cardiac events (MACE), cardiac death, and all-cause death during the first year after registration. Independent predictors of mortality in the multivariate analysis in AMI patients with low-grade MR were age ≥ 75 yr, Killip class ≥ III, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide > 4,000 pg/mL, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ≥ 2.59 mg/L, LVEF ≤ 40%, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, PCI was an independent predictor in AMI patients with high-grade MR. No differences in primary endpoints between AMI patients with high-grade MR (grades 3-4) and EF ≤ 40% or EF > 40% were noted. MR is a predictor of a poor outcome regardless of ejection fraction. LVEF is an inadequate method to evaluate contractile function of the ischemic heart in the face of significant MR.

  17. pH-dependent equilibrium isotope fractionation associated with the compound specific nitrogen and carbon isotope analysis of substituted anilines by SPME-GC/IRMS.

    PubMed

    Skarpeli-Liati, Marita; Turgeon, Aurora; Garr, Ashley N; Arnold, William A; Cramer, Christopher J; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2011-03-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) was used to elucidate the effects of N-atom protonation on the analysis of N and C isotope signatures of selected aromatic amines. Precise and accurate isotope ratios were measured using polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) as the SPME fiber material at solution pH-values that exceeded the pK(a) of the substituted aniline's conjugate acid by two pH-units. Deviations of δ(15)N and δ(13)C-values from reference measurements by elemental analyzer IRMS were small (<0.9‰) and within the typical uncertainties of isotope ratio measurements by SPME-GC/IRMS. Under these conditions, the detection limits for accurate isotope ratio measurements were between 0.64 and 2.1 mg L(-1) for δ(15)N and between 0.13 and 0.54 mg L(-1) for δ(13)C, respectively. Substantial inverse N isotope fractionation was observed by SPME-GC/IRMS as the fraction of protonated species increased with decreasing pH leading to deviations of -20‰ while the corresponding δ(13)C-values were largely invariant. From isotope ratio analysis at different solution pHs and theoretical calculations by density functional theory, we derived equilibrium isotope effects, EIEs, pertinent to aromatic amine protonation of 0.980 and 1.001 for N and C, respectively, which were very similar for all compounds investigated. Our work shows that N-atom protonation can compromise accurate compound-specific N isotope analysis of aromatic amines.

  18. Mass-Dependent and -Independent Fractionation of Mercury Isotope during Gas-Phase Oxidation of Elemental Mercury Vapor by Atomic Cl and Br.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guangyi; Sommar, Jonas; Feng, Xinbin; Lin, Che-Jen; Ge, Maofa; Wang, Weigang; Yin, Runsheng; Fu, Xuewu; Shang, Lihai

    2016-09-01

    This study presents the first measurement of Hg stable isotope fractionation during gas-phase oxidation of Hg(0) vapor by halogen atoms (Cl(•), Br(•)) in the laboratory at 750 ± 1 Torr and 298 ± 3 K. Using a relative rate technique, the rate coefficients for Hg(0)+Cl(•) and Hg(0)+Br(•) reactions are determined to be (1.8 ± 0.5) × 10(-11) and (1.6 ± 0.8) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively. Results show that heavier isotopes are preferentially enriched in the remaining Hg(0) during Cl(•) initiated oxidation, whereas being enriched in the product during oxidation by Br(•). The fractionation factors for (202)Hg/(198)Hg during the Cl(•) and Br(•) initiated oxidations are α(202/198) = 0.99941 ± 0.00006 (2σ) and 1.00074 ± 0.00014 (2σ), respectively. A Δ(199)Hg/Δ(201)Hg ratio of 1.64 ± 0.30 (2σ) during oxidation of Hg(0) by Br atoms suggests that Hg-MIF is introduced by the nuclear volume effect (NVE). In contrast, the Hg(0) + Cl(•) reaction produces a Δ(199)Hg/Δ(201)Hg-slope of 1.89 ± 0.18 (2σ), which in addition to a high degree of odd-mass-number isotope MIF suggests impacts from MIF effects other than NVE. This reaction also exhibits significant MIF of (200)Hg (Δ(200)Hg, up to -0.17‰ in the reactant) and is the first physicochemical process identified to trigger (200)Hg anomalies that are frequently detected in atmospheric samples. PMID:27501307

  19. Dissociation and ionization equilibria of deuterium fluid over a wide range of temperatures and densities

    SciTech Connect

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R.

    2015-06-15

    We investigate the dissociation and ionization equilibria of deuterium fluid over a wide range of temperatures and densities. The partition functions for molecular and atomic species are evaluated, in a statistical-mechanically consistent way, implementing recent developments in the literature and taking high-density effects into account. A new chemical model (free energy function) is introduced in which the fluid is considered as a mixture of diatomic molecules, atoms, ions, and free electrons. Intensive short range hard core repulsion is taken into account together with partial degeneracy of free electrons and Coulomb interactions among charged particles. Samples of computational results are presented as a set of isotherms for the degree of ionization, dissociated fraction of molecules, pressure, and specific internal energy for a wide range of densities and temperatures. Predictions from the present model calculations show an improved and sensible physical behavior compared to other results in the literature.

  20. The deuterium/hydrogen distribution in chondritic organic matter attests to early ionizing irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Boris; Roskosz, Mathieu; Remusat, Laurent; Robert, François; Leroux, Hugues; Vezin, Hervé; Depecker, Christophe; Nuns, Nicolas; Lefebvre, Jean-Marc

    2015-10-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a large array of organic compounds dominated by insoluble organic matter (IOM). A striking feature of this IOM is the systematic enrichment in deuterium compared with the solar hydrogen reservoir. This enrichment has been taken as a sign of low-temperature ion-molecule or gas-grain reactions. However, the extent to which Solar System processes, especially ionizing radiation, can affect D/H ratios is largely unknown. Here, we report the effects of electron irradiation on the hydrogen isotopic composition of organic precursors containing different functional groups. From an initial terrestrial composition, overall D-enrichments and differential intramolecular fractionations comparable with those measured in the Orgueil meteorite were induced. Therefore, ionizing radiation can quantitatively explain the deuteration of organics in some carbonaceous chondrites. For these meteorites, the precursors of the IOM may have had the same isotopic composition as the main water reservoirs of the inner Solar System.

  1. The deuterium/hydrogen distribution in chondritic organic matter attests to early ionizing irradiation.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Boris; Roskosz, Mathieu; Remusat, Laurent; Robert, François; Leroux, Hugues; Vezin, Hervé; Depecker, Christophe; Nuns, Nicolas; Lefebvre, Jean-Marc

    2015-10-13

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a large array of organic compounds dominated by insoluble organic matter (IOM). A striking feature of this IOM is the systematic enrichment in deuterium compared with the solar hydrogen reservoir. This enrichment has been taken as a sign of low-temperature ion-molecule or gas-grain reactions. However, the extent to which Solar System processes, especially ionizing radiation, can affect D/H ratios is largely unknown. Here, we report the effects of electron irradiation on the hydrogen isotopic composition of organic precursors containing different functional groups. From an initial terrestrial composition, overall D-enrichments and differential intramolecular fractionations comparable with those measured in the Orgueil meteorite were induced. Therefore, ionizing radiation can quantitatively explain the deuteration of organics in some carbonaceous chondrites. For these meteorites, the precursors of the IOM may have had the same isotopic composition as the main water reservoirs of the inner Solar System.

  2. The deuterium/hydrogen distribution in chondritic organic matter attests to early ionizing irradiation.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Boris; Roskosz, Mathieu; Remusat, Laurent; Robert, François; Leroux, Hugues; Vezin, Hervé; Depecker, Christophe; Nuns, Nicolas; Lefebvre, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a large array of organic compounds dominated by insoluble organic matter (IOM). A striking feature of this IOM is the systematic enrichment in deuterium compared with the solar hydrogen reservoir. This enrichment has been taken as a sign of low-temperature ion-molecule or gas-grain reactions. However, the extent to which Solar System processes, especially ionizing radiation, can affect D/H ratios is largely unknown. Here, we report the effects of electron irradiation on the hydrogen isotopic composition of organic precursors containing different functional groups. From an initial terrestrial composition, overall D-enrichments and differential intramolecular fractionations comparable with those measured in the Orgueil meteorite were induced. Therefore, ionizing radiation can quantitatively explain the deuteration of organics in some carbonaceous chondrites. For these meteorites, the precursors of the IOM may have had the same isotopic composition as the main water reservoirs of the inner Solar System. PMID:26461170

  3. The deuterium/hydrogen distribution in chondritic organic matter attests to early ionizing irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Boris; Roskosz, Mathieu; Remusat, Laurent; Robert, François; Leroux, Hugues; Vezin, Hervé; Depecker, Christophe; Nuns, Nicolas; Lefebvre, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a large array of organic compounds dominated by insoluble organic matter (IOM). A striking feature of this IOM is the systematic enrichment in deuterium compared with the solar hydrogen reservoir. This enrichment has been taken as a sign of low-temperature ion-molecule or gas-grain reactions. However, the extent to which Solar System processes, especially ionizing radiation, can affect D/H ratios is largely unknown. Here, we report the effects of electron irradiation on the hydrogen isotopic composition of organic precursors containing different functional groups. From an initial terrestrial composition, overall D-enrichments and differential intramolecular fractionations comparable with those measured in the Orgueil meteorite were induced. Therefore, ionizing radiation can quantitatively explain the deuteration of organics in some carbonaceous chondrites. For these meteorites, the precursors of the IOM may have had the same isotopic composition as the main water reservoirs of the inner Solar System. PMID:26461170

  4. Roughening and reflection performance of molybdenum coatings exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eren, B.; Marot, L.; Ryzhkov, I. V.; Lindig, S.; Houben, A.; Wisse, M.; Skoryk, O. O.; Oberkofler, M.; Voitsenya, V. S.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Meyer, E.

    2013-11-01

    Optical diagnostic systems of ITER are foreseen to include metallic, plasma-facing, electromagnetic radiation reflecting components called first mirrors (FMs). Molybdenum coatings are important candidates for these components. Depending on the local plasma parameters of the reactor, the mirrors may be under net erosion or deposition conditions. In this work, we exposed molybdenum coatings to a high-flux deuterium plasma in order to test their roughening limits under erosion conditions. The high energy of deuterium ions (500 eV on average) results in more vigorous roughening of the surface compared with lower energy ions (200 eV). Longer exposure (3 × 1020 ions cm-2) of the 200 eV ions results in only a slightly increased roughness compared with shorter exposure (6.8 × 1019 ions cm-2). Both phenomena match to the theory regarding roughening dynamics of physical sputtering. A comparison of results in this work with previous studies gives support to the hypothesis that roughening is flux and temperature dependent. Partial delamination of the coatings is observed upon exposure at room temperature, but not at an elevated temperature (200 °C). In summary, Mo coatings will remain functional in the ITER environment under the expected conditions. However, changes in the expected conditions such as 500 eV mean energy of impinging charge exchange neutrals or <100 °C surface temperature of the mirrors can lead to gradual or sudden failure of the coatings.

  5. 78 FR 79021 - Request for a License To Export; Deuterium

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... COMMISSION Request for a License To Export; Deuterium Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70 (b) ``Public Notice of....gov/reading-rm.html at the NRC Homepage. A request for a hearing or petition for leave to intervene... Secretary, U.S. Department of State, Washington, DC 20520. A request for a hearing or petition for leave...

  6. Heterogeneous Catalysis: Deuterium Exchange Reactions of Hydrogen and Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirich, Anne; Miller, Trisha Hoette; Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Two gas phase deuterium/hydrogen exchange reactions are described utilizing a simple inexpensive glass catalyst tube containing 0.5% Pd on alumina through which gas mixtures can be passed and products collected for analysis. The first of these exchange reactions involves H[subscript 2] + D[subscript 2], which proceeds at temperatures as low as 77…

  7. URBAN STORMWATER TRACING WITH THE NATURALLY OCCURRING DEUTERIUM ISOTOPE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of the naturally-occurring deuterium isotope assist the tracing of water components during wet-weather flows in an urban watershed. A transect of installations in the vadose and saturated zones was completed in the vicinity of a small stream and storm sewer. High-r...

  8. Defect trapping of ion-implanted deuterium in nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Besenbacher, F.; Bottiger, J.; Myers, S.M.

    1982-05-01

    Trapping of ion-implanted deuterium by lattice defects in nickel has been studied by ion-beam-analysis techniques in the temperature range between 30 and 380 K. The deuterium-depth profiles were determined by measuring either the ..cap alpha.. particles or the protons from the /sup 3/He-excited nuclear reaction D(/sup 3/He,..cap alpha..)p, and the deuterium lattice location was obtained by means of ion channeling. Linear-ramp annealing (1 K/min) following a 10-keV D/sup +/ implantation in nickel produced two annealing stages at 275 and 320 K, respectively. The release-vs-temperature data were analyzed by solving the diffusion equation with appropriate trapping terms, yielding 0.24 and 0.43 eV for the trap-binding enthalpies associated with the two stages, referred to as an untrapped solution site. The 0.24-eV trap corresponds to deuterium close to the octahedral interstitial site where it is believed to be trapped at a vacancy, whereas it is suggested that the defect correlated with the 0.43-eV trap is a multiple-vacancy defect. The previously air-exposed and electropolished nickel surface was essentially permeable; the surface-recombination coefficient was determined to be K> or approx. =10/sup -19/ cm/sup 4//s at 350 K.

  9. Gas-induced swelling of beryllium implanted with deuterium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernikov, V. N.; Alimov, V. Kh.; Markin, A. V.; Gorodetsky, A. E.; Kanashenko, S. L.; Zakharov, A. P.; Kupriyanov, I. B.

    1996-10-01

    An extensive TEM study of the microstructure of Be TIP-30 irradiated with 3 and 10 keV D ions up to fluences, Φ, in the range from 3 × 10 20 to 8 × 10 21 D/m 2 at temperatures, Tirr = 300, 500 and 700 K has been carried out. Depth distributions of deuterium in a form of separate D atoms and D 2 molecules have been investigated by means of SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry) and RGA (residual gas analysis) methods, correspondingly. D ion implantation is accompanied by blistering and gives rise to processes of gas-induced cavitation which are very sensitive to the irradiation temperature. At Tirr = 300 K tiny gas bubbles (about 1 nm in size) pressurized with molecular deuterium are developed with parameters resembling those of helium bubbles in Be. Irradiation at Tirr ≥ 500 K leads to the appearance of coarse deuterium-filled cavities which can form in sub-surface layers different kinds of oblate labyrinth structures. Questions of reemission, thermal desorption and trapping of deuterium in Be have been discussed.

  10. Gas-pressure dependence of charge-state fractions and mean charges of 1.4 MeV/u-uranium ions stripped in molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevelko, V. P.; Winckler, N.; Tolstikhina, I. Yu.

    2016-06-01

    Using a recently created BREIT computer code (Balance Rate Equations for Ion Transportation), evolutions of the charge-state fractions Fq (x) and equilibrium mean charge states q bar are calculated for stripping of 1.4 MeV/u-U4+ ions in H2 gas for target thicknesses x ⩽ 100 μg /cm2 (⩽ 3 ·1019molecule /cm2) and gas pressures 10-4 ⩽ P ⩽ 500 mbar. Calculations of the non-equilibrium Fq (x) and equilibrium Fq0 distributions for ion charges 4 ⩽ q ⩽ 40 are performed by solving the balance (rate) equations with account for the multi-electron processes and the target-density effect. Calculated equilibrium mean charge state increases from q bar ≈ 27.6 at P =10-4 mbar to its saturated (maximum) value of q bar ≈ 32.7 at pressures P≳ 250 mbar while the equilibrium target thickness xeq increases from 20 to 50 μg /cm2 (from 0.6 to 1.5 in units of 1019molecule /cm2) in the H2-pressure range considered. From the present calculations it is concluded that the maximum mean charge state q bar which can be achieved in stripping of 1.4 MeV/u-U4+ ions in H2 gas is about q bar ≈ 33 at a gas pressure P≳ 250 mbar.

  11. Dependence of intake fraction on release location in a multi-media framework: A case study of four contaminants in North America

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, Matthew; Bennett, Deborah H.; Perem, Merike; Maddalena, Randy L.; M cKone, Thomas E.; Mackay, Don

    2003-03-01

    The extent of human exposure to persistent anthropogenic environmental contaminants is a complex function of the amount of chemical emitted, its physico-chemical properties and reactivity, the nature of the environment, and the characteristics of the pathways for human exposure, such as inhalation, intake of food and water and dermal contact. For some chemicals, the location of emissions relative to areas of high population density or intense food production may also be an important factor. The relative importance of these variables is explored using the regionally segmented BETR North America contaminant fate model and data for food production patterns and population density for North America. The model is applied to four contaminants emitted to air: benzene, carbon tetrachloride, benzo[a]pyrene and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo dioxin. The total continental intake fraction (iF), relating exposure quantity to emission quantity, is employed as a metric for assessing population exposure to environmental contaminants. The results show that the use of continentally averaged parameters for population density and food production provides an accurate estimate of the median of iF calculated for emissions in individual regions, however iF can range from this median by up to 3 orders of magnitude, especially for chemicals transferred to humans through the food pathway. The location of population relative to food production and emissions of chemicals are important variables that should be considered in assessing the public health implications of chemical emissions.

  12. Fast deuterium access to the buried magnesium/manganese site in cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Florens, L; Schmidt, B; McCracken, J; Ferguson-Miller, S

    2001-06-26

    The recently determined crystal structures of bacterial and bovine cytochrome c oxidases show an area of organized water within the protein immediately above the active site where oxygen chemistry occurs. A pathway for exit of protons or water produced during turnover is suggested by possible connections of this aqueous region to the exterior surface. A non-redox-active Mg(2+) site is located in the interior of this region, and our previous studies [Florens, L., Hoganson, C., McCracken, J., Fetter, J., Mills, D., Babcock, G. T., and Ferguson-Miller, S. (1998) in Phototropic Prokaryotes (Peschek, G. A., Loeffelhard, W., and Schmetterer, G., Eds.) Kluwer Academic/Plenum, New York] have shown that the protons of water molecules that coordinate the metal can be exchanged within minutes of mixing with (2)H(2)O. Here we examine the extent and rate of deuterium exchange, using a combination of rapid freeze-quench and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) analysis of Mn(2+)-substituted cytochrome c oxidase, which retains full activity. In the oxidized enzyme at room temperature, deuterium exchange at the Mn(2+) site occurs in less than 11 ms, which corresponds to an apparent rate constant higher than 3000 s(-1). The extent of deuterium substitution is dependent on the concentration of (2)H(2)O in the sample, indicative of rapid equilibrium, with three inner sphere (2)H(2)O exchanged per Mn(2+). This indicates that the water ligands of the Mn(2+)/Mg(2+) site, or the protons of these waters, can exchange with bulk solvent at a rate consistent with a role for this region in product release during turnover.

  13. High electric field deuterium ion sources for neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Birk

    Active interrogation systems for highly enriched uranium require improved fieldable neutron sources. The target technology for deuterium-tritium neutron generators is well understood and the most significant improvement can be achieved by improving the deuterium ion source through increased output and, in some cases, lifetime of the ion source. We are developing a new approach to a deuterium ion sources based upon the field desorption/evaporation of deuterium from the surfaces of metal tips. Electrostatic field desorption (EFD) desorbs previously adsorbed deuterium as ions under the influence of high electric fields (several V/A), without removing tip material. Single etched wire tip experiments have been performed and have shown that this is difficult but can be achieved with molybdenum and tungsten tips. Electrostatic field evaporation (EFE) evaporates ultra thin deuterated titanium films as ions. It has been shown that several 10s of atomic layers can be removed within a few nanoseconds from etched tungsten tips. In the course of these studies titanium deposition and deuteration methods were studied and new detection methods developed. Space charge effects resulting from the large ion currents were identified to be the most likely cause of some unusual ion emission characteristics. In addition, on W < 110 > oriented substrates a surprising body-centered cubic crystal structure of the titanium film was found and studied. The ion currents required for neutron generator applications can be achieved by microfabrication of metal tip arrays. Field desorption studies of microfabricated field emitter tip arrays have been conducted for the first time. Maximum fields of 3 V/A have been applied to the array tip surfaces to date, although fields of ˜ 2 V/A to ˜ 2.5 V/A are more typical. Desorption of atomic deuterium ions has been observed at fields of roughly 2 V/A at room temperature. The desorption of common surface adsorbates, such as hydrogen, carbon, water, and

  14. A Microfabricated Deuterium Ion Source for Compact Neutron Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Benjamin Bargsten

    Active neutron interrogation is generally accepted as a reliable means of detecting the illicit transportation of special nuclear materials, in particular highly enriched uranium. The development of portable active neutron interrogation systems for field detection applications could be facilitated by the use of a new deuterium ion source which has the potential to advance many of the performance limiting aspects of exiting compact, accelerator-driven neutron generators. The ion source being investigated is a gated array of sharp metal tips that uses high electric fields to generate deuterium ion currents through the physical processes of field ionization and field desorption. The deuterium ions produced by the source are extracted and used to drive a D-D (or D-T) fusion reaction to create neutrons. The basic microstructure for the ion source array is derived from modern semiconductor microfabrication technology for field emitter arrays, though many structural modifications have been made in an attempt to reach the required operating fields of the ion generation processes. Pulsed (field desorption) and d.c. (field ionization) tests conducted with each array design type developed thus far indicate a steady improvement in array tip operating fields. Field ionization studies were conducted with arrays at source temperatures of 77 K and 293 K. Newly developed arrays have demonstrated field ionization currents upwards of ˜50 nA, which is roughly 50% of the maximum ion production possible, as presently fabricated. Neutron production by field ionization was demonstrated for the first time from the microfabricated arrays. A maximum neutron yield of 95 n/s (6300 n/s/cm2 of array active area) was observed from a 1.5 mm2 array using a D-D fusion reaction at -90 kV. Field desorption studies at 77 K and 293 K were conducted in parallel with field ionization testing. To date, the arrays have consistently demonstrated the field desorption of deuterium ions from array tip surfaces

  15. Development of Approaches for Deuterium Incorporation in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Barbara R

    2015-01-01

    Soon after the discovery of deuterium, efforts to utilize this stable isotope of hydrogen for labeling of plants began and have proven successful for natural abundance to 20% enrichment. However, isotopic labeling with deuterium (2H) in higher plants at the level of 40% and higher is complicated by both physiological responses, particularly water exchange through transpiration, and inhibitory effects of D2O on germination, rooting, and growth. The highest incorporation of 40 50% had been reported for photoheterotrophic cultivation of the duckweed Lemna. Higher substitution is desirable for certain applications using neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. 1H2H-NMR and mass spectroscopy are standard methods frequently used for determination of location and amount of deuterium substitution. The changes in infrared (IR) absorption observed for H to D substitution in hydroxyl and alkyl groups provide rapid initial evaluation of incorporation. Short-term experiments with cold-tolerant annual grasses can be carried out in enclosed growth containers to evaluate incorporation. Growth in individual chambers under continuous air perfusion with dried sterile-filtered air enables long-term cultivation of multiple plants at different D2O concentrations. Vegetative propagation from cuttings extends capabilities to species with low germination rates. Cultivation in 50% D2O of annual ryegrass and switchgrass following establishment of roots by growth in H2O produces samples with normal morphology and 30 40 % deuterium incorporation in the biomass. Winter grain rye (Secale cereale) was found to efficiently incorporate deuterium by photosynthetic fixation from 50% D2O but did not incorporate deuterated phenylalanine-d8 from the growth medium.

  16. Balloon-Borne Submillimeter Polarimetry of the Vela C Molecular Cloud: Systematic Dependence of Polarization Fraction on Column Density and Local Polarization-Angle Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fissel, Laura M.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angilè, Francesco E.; Ashton, Peter; Benton, Steven J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dober, Bradley; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Martin, Peter G.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Novak, Giles; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Santos, Fabio P.; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A.; Diego Soler, Juan; Thomas, Nicholas E.; Tucker, Carole E.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2016-06-01

    We present results for Vela C obtained during the 2012 flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry. We mapped polarized intensity across almost the entire extent of this giant molecular cloud, in bands centered at 250, 350, and 500 μm. In this initial paper, we show our 500 μm data smoothed to a resolution of 2.‧5 (approximately 0.5 pc). We show that the mean level of the fractional polarization p and most of its spatial variations can be accounted for using an empirical three-parameter power-law fit, p \\propto {{\\boldsymbol{N}}}-0.45 {{\\boldsymbol{S}}}-0.60, where N is the hydrogen column density and S is the polarization-angle dispersion on 0.5 pc scales. The decrease of p with increasing S is expected because changes in the magnetic field direction within the cloud volume sampled by each measurement will lead to cancellation of polarization signals. The decrease of p with increasing N might be caused by the same effect, if magnetic field disorder increases for high column density sightlines. Alternatively, the intrinsic polarization efficiency of the dust grain population might be lower for material along higher density sightlines. We find no significant correlation between N and S. Comparison of observed submillimeter polarization maps with synthetic polarization maps derived from numerical simulations provides a promising method for testing star formation theories. Realistic simulations should allow for the possibility of variable intrinsic polarization efficiency. The measured levels of correlation among p, N, and S provide points of comparison between observations and simulations.

  17. Deuterium enrichment by selective photo-induced dissociation of an organic carbonyl compound

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1981-01-01

    A method for producing a deuterium enriched material by photoinduced dissociation which uses as the working material a gas phase photolytically dissociable organic carbonyl compound containing at least one hydrogen atom bonded to an atom which is adjacent to a carbonyl group and consisting of molecules wherein said hydrogen atom is present as deuterium and molecules wherein said hydrogen atom is present as another isotope of hydrogen. The organic carbonyl compound is subjected to intense infrared radiation at a preselected wavelength to selectively excite and thereby induce dissociation of the deuterium containing species to yield a deuterium enriched stable molecular product. Undissociated carbonyl compound, depleted in deuterium, is preferably redeuterated for reuse.

  18. [Isotopic effects of low concentration of deuterium in water on biological systems].

    PubMed

    Kirkina, A A; Lobyshev, V I; Lopina, O D; Doronin, Yu K; Burdeinaya, T N; Chernopyatko, A S

    2014-01-01

    Isotopic effects of deuterium in water are studied in a broad range of concentrations on a number of biological objects of different organization levels. The results obtained show that biological objects are sensitive to variations of isotope composition in water. A decrease or increase in deuterium concentrations in water may cause activation or inhibition of biological functions. The values of biological isotopic effects of low deuterium concentration may even be higher than those of high deuterium concentration. No regularity in response for all the objects studied failed to find out in a range of deuterium concentration in water from 4 ppm to 1%. PMID:25702494

  19. Deuterium removal from radiation damage in tungsten by isotopic exchange with hydrogen atomic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Markelj, S.; Efimov, V. S.; Gasparyan, Yu M.

    2016-09-01

    The tungsten samples were pre-irradiated with self-ions to create radiation-induced defects and then exposed to the deuterium atomic beam. The deuterium removal was studied by isotopic exchange with atomic hydrogen beam. Modification of the deuterium depth profile in self-ion irradiated tungsten under isotopic exchange up to a depth of 6 μm was measured in- situ by nuclear reaction analysis. The total deuterium retention after isotopic exchange was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy. It is shown that the efficiency of the deuterium removal increases with increasing of the hydrogen incident flux, incident energy and temperature of the tungsten sample.

  20. A dose-dependent decrease in the fraction of cases harboring M6P/IGF2R mutations in hepatocellular carcinomas from the atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Yano, Shiho; Barber, Chad L; MacPhee, Donald G; Tokuoka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    The risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development is significantly heightened in the atomic bomb survivors, but the mechanism is unclear. We have previously reported finding a radiation dose-dependent increase in HCCs with TP53 mutations from the survivors. We now show that, in the same HCC samples, the frequency of 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) mutations in M6P/IGF2R, a candidate HCC tumor suppressor gene, decreases with dose (P = 0.0091), implying a radiation dose-dependent negative selection of cells harboring such mutations. The fact that they were in the 3'UTR implicates changes in transcript stability rather than in protein function as the mechanism. Moreover, these M6P/IGF2R 3'UTR mutations and the TP53 mutations detected previously were mutually exclusive in most of the tumors, suggesting two independent pathways to HCC development, with the TP53 pathway being more favored with increasing radiation dose than the M6P/IGF2R pathway. These results suggest that tumors attributable to radiation may be genotypically different from tumors of other etiologies and hence may provide a way of distinguishing radiation-induced cancers from "background" cancers--a shift from the current paradigm.

  1. First-principles opacity table of warm dense deuterium for inertial-confinement-fusion applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, S X; Collins, L A; Goncharov, V N; Boehly, T R; Epstein, R; McCrory, R L; Skupsky, S

    2014-09-01

    Accurate knowledge of the optical properties of a warm dense deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture is important for reliable design of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions using radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. The opacity of a warm dense DT shell essentially determines how much radiation from hot coronal plasmas can be deposited in the DT fuel of an imploding capsule. Even for the simplest species of hydrogen, the accurate calculation of their opacities remains a challenge in the warm-dense matter regime because strong-coupling and quantum effects play an important role in such plasmas. With quantum-molecular-dynamics (QMD) simulations, we have derived a first-principles opacity table (FPOT) of deuterium (and the DT mixture by mass scaling) for a wide range of densities from ρ(D)=0.5 to 673.518g/cm(3) and temperatures from T=5000K up to the Fermi temperature T(F) for each density. Compared with results from the astrophysics opacity table (AOT) currently used in our hydrocodes, the FPOT of deuterium from our QMD calculations has shown a significant increase in opacity for strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions by a factor of 3-100 in the ICF-relevant photon-energy range. As conditions approach those of classical plasma, the opacity from the FPOT converges to the corresponding values of the AOT. By implementing the FPOT of deuterium and the DT mixture into our hydrocodes, we have performed radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for low-adiabat cryogenic DT implosions on the OMEGA laser and for direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility. The simulation results using the FPOT show that the target performance (in terms of neutron yield and energy gain) could vary from ∼10% up to a factor of ∼2 depending on the adiabat of the imploding DT capsule; the lower the adiabat, the more variation is seen in the prediction of target performance when compared to the AOT modeling. PMID:25314551

  2. HYDROGEN AND DEUTERIUM NMR OF SOLIDS BY MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING

    SciTech Connect

    Eckman, R.R.

    1982-10-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance of solids has long been characterized by very large spectral broadening which arises from internuclear dipole-dipole coupling or the nuclear electric quadrupole interaction. These couplings can obscure the smaller chemical shift interaction and make that information unavailable. Two important and difficult cases are that of hydrogen and deuterium. For example, the homonuclear dipolar broadening, HD, for hydrogen is usually several tens of kilohertz. For deuterium, HD is relatively small; however, the quadrupole interaction causes a broadening which can be hundreds of kilohertz in polycrystalline or amorphous solids. The development of cross polarization, heteronuclear radiofrequency decoupling, and coherent averaging of nuclear spin interactions has provided measurement of chemical shift tensors in solids. Recently, double quantum NMR and double quantum decoupling have led to measurement of deuterium and proton chemical shift tensors, respectively. A general problem of these experiments is the overlapping of the tensor powder pattern spectra of magnetically distinct sites which cannot be resolved. In this work, high resolution NMR of hydrogen and deuterium in solids is demonstrated. For both nuclei, the resonances are narrowed to obtain liquid-like isotropic spectra by high frequency rotation of the sample about an axis inclined at the magic angle, {beta}{sub m} = Arccos(3{sup -1/2}), with respect to the direction of the external magnetic field. Two approaches have been developed for each nucleus. For deuterium, the powder spectra were narrowed by over three orders of magnitude by magic angle rotation with precise control of {beta}. A second approach was the observation of deuterium double quantum transitions under magic angle rotation. For hydrogen, magic angle rotation alone could be applied to obtain the isotropic spectrum when H{sub D} was small. This often occurs naturally when the nuclei are semi-dilute or involved in internal

  3. On the variation of the structure of liquid deuterium fluoride with temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLain, S. E.; Benmore, C. J.; Siewenie, J. E.; Molaison, J. J.; Turner, J. F. C.

    2004-10-01

    The structure of liquid deuterium fluoride has been measured using pulsed neutron diffraction and high energy x-ray diffraction techniques as a function of temperature. The neutron experiments were performed at T=296±2 K, 246±2 K, and 193±2 K and the x-ray measurements carried out at 296±2 K and 195±2 K. The x-ray pair correlation functions, which are dominated by fluorine-fluorine interactions, show the first peak at ˜2.53±0.05 Å remains very nearly invariant with decreasing temperature. Peaks around 4.5 and 5.0 Å also appear at both temperatures in the x-ray data. In contrast, the intermolecular peaks in the total neutron pair correlation function show that significant systematic local structural changes occur as the temperature is lowered. The first intermolecular peak position shortens from 1.64±0.05 Å at 296 K to 1.56±0.05 Å at 195 K. Although there are overlapping contributions from the intermolecular hydrogen-fluorine and hydrogen-hydrogen correlations, it is clear that the temperature dependent structural changes are largely due to a rearrangement of the deuterium atom positions in the fluid. By comparison with partial structure factor data the hydrogen bonds appear to become more linear at lower temperatures.

  4. New reaction rates for improved primordial D /H calculation and the cosmic evolution of deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coc, Alain; Petitjean, Patrick; Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Vangioni, Elisabeth; Descouvemont, Pierre; Iliadis, Christian; Longland, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Primordial or big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is one of the three historically strong evidences for the big bang model. Standard BBN is now a parameter-free theory, since the baryonic density of the Universe has been deduced with an unprecedented precision from observations of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation. There is a good agreement between the primordial abundances of 4He, D, 3He, and 7Li deduced from observations and from primordial nucleosynthesis calculations. However, the 7Li calculated abundance is significantly higher than the one deduced from spectroscopic observations and remains an open problem. In addition, recent deuterium observations have drastically reduced the uncertainty on D /H , to reach a value of 1.6%. It needs to be matched by BBN predictions whose precision is now limited by thermonuclear reaction rate uncertainties. This is especially important as many attempts to reconcile Li observations with models lead to an increased D prediction. Here, we reevaluate the d (p ,γ )3He, d (d ,n ) 3H3, and d (d ,p ) 3H reaction rates that govern deuterium destruction, incorporating new experimental data and carefully accounting for systematic uncertainties. Contrary to previous evaluations, we use theoretical ab initio models for the energy dependence of the S factors. As a result, these rates increase at BBN temperatures, leading to a reduced value of D /H =(2.45 ±0.10 )×10-5 (2 σ ), in agreement with observations.

  5. Gas swelling and related phenomena in beryllium implanted with deuterium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernikov, V. N.; Alimov, V. Kh.; Markin, A. N.; Zakharov, A. P.

    1996-02-01

    An extensive TEM study of the microstructure of TIP-30 Be implanted with 3 and 10 keV D ions to fluences, Φ in the range from 3 × 1020 to 8 × 10 21D/m 2 at temperatures, Tirr = 300, 500 and 700 K has been carried out. Depth distributions of separate D atoms and D 2 molecules have been investigated by means of SIMS and RGA methods, correspondingly. D ion irradiation, accompanied by blistering, gives rise to destructions dependent mainly on Tirr. Irradiation at 300 K leads to the formation of tiny D 2 bubbles of 1 run in size (reminiscent of He bubbles in Be). At Tirr ≥ 500 K, along with small facetted bubbles, the development of larger oblate cavities occurs accumulating most of injected deuterium and providing for a much higher gas swelling compared to that at 300 K. D (He) ion implantation leads to the enhanced growth of microcrystalline layers of cph-BeO oxide with a microstructure differing from that on the electropolished Be surface. Based on the analysis of experimental data deuterium reemission, thermal desorption and trapping in defects are discussed.

  6. a Study of Orientational Ordering in Solid Deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Myron Eugene, Jr.

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies were performed on samples of solid Deuterium with para concentrations X in the range 0.05 < X < 0.07 at temperatures between 0.032K and 3.0K and at a Larmor frequency of 5.88 MHz. This range of temperatures and concentrations includes the first order transition to the long range orientational ordered state. The spin-lattice relaxation times for both ortho (I = 2) and para (I = 1) D(,2) species were measured by the intensity of solid echos generated by the pulse sequence 90(,0)-t-90(,0)-150(mu)s-90(,90). In addition, the solid echoes themselves were digitized which, through the use of the fast Fourier transform, provided both the lineshapes of the two species, and the secondmoments M(,2) of their absorption lines. The secondmoments and relaxation times for both species are reported as functions of temperature at concentrations X = 0.05, 0.33, 0.46, 0.56 in the disordered phase, and for concentrations X = 0.65 and 0.70 which are above the concentration at which the long range order transition is observed. The results are discussed in terms of existing models (Washburn, 1983b) of spin-lattice relaxation in solid H(,2). At all concentrations below which the transition to a long range ordered phase does not occur (X < 0.58), the temperature dependence of the lineshape, secondmoment, and spin-lattice relaxation times is quite smooth. This finding is in agreement with the results of Candela (1983) and does not support the contention of some investigators (Sullivan, 1978, 1979) (Cochran, 1980) that at low temperatures in this concentration range D(,2) undergoes a phase transition to a "quadrupolar glass" phase. The relaxation times for T < 0.5K in the long range ordered phase (X > 0.59) seem to suggest the emergence of a mechanism providing intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation for the ortho molecules. Previous measurements in the cubic phase have been confined to higher temperatures, and measurements at comparable temperatures have

  7. Seeking the Limits of Low-Temperature Nuclear Fusion: Sticking in Muon-Catalyzed Fusion, and Piezonuclear Fusion in Deuterium/condensed Matter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart F.

    Studies seeking an upper limit of two types of low temperature nuclear fusion is presented. The upper limit for muon catalyzed fusion is generally considered to be the number of fusions per muon obtainable. The limiting factor has been found to be how often the muon remains bound to the alpha produced by the fusion, known as the "sticking fraction." Experiments directly measuring the sticking and determining the sticking using high tritium fractions are presented. In deuterium/condensed matter systems the question is nearly whether nuclear fusion proceeds at all. Experiments where neutrons around deuterided titanium and palladium are measured are presented.

  8. Results from deuterium-tritium tokamak confinement experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    Recent scientific and technical progress in magnetic fusion experiments has resulted in the achievement of plasma parameters (density and temperature) which enabled the production of significant bursts of fusion power from deuterium-tritium fuels and the first studies of the physics of burning plasmas. The key scientific issues in the reacting plasma core are plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability, and the confinement and loss of energetic fusion products from the reacting fuel ions. Progress in the development of regimes of operation which have both good confinement and are MHD stable have enabled a broad study of burning plasma physics issues. A review of the technical and scientific results from the deuterium-tritium experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is given with particular emphasis on alpha-particle physics issues.

  9. Inelastic X-ray Scattering from Shocked Liquid Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, S. P.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Boehly, T. R.; Crowley, B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O.; Gericke, D. O.; Doeppner, T.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Murphy, C. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Vorberger, J.

    2012-12-28

    The Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions created in liquid deuterium by a laser-ablation—driven shock wave were probed with noncollective, spectrally resolved, inelastic x-ray Thomson scattering employing Cl Lyα line emission at 2.96 keV. Thus, these first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of the microscopic properties of shocked deuterium show an inferred spatially averaged electron temperature of 8±5 eV, an electron density of 2.2(±0.5)×1023 cm-3, and an ionization of 0.8 (-0.25, +0.15). Our two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using equation-of-state models suited for the extreme parameters occurring in inertial confinement fusion research and planetary interiors are consistent with the experimental results.

  10. Multiple spherically converging shock waves in liquid deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Boehly, T. R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Seka, W.; Hu, S. X.; Marozas, J. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Celliers, P. M.; Hicks, D. G.; Barrios, M. A.; Fratanduono, D.; Collins, G. W.

    2011-09-15

    To achieve ignition, inertial confinement fusion target designs use a sequence of shocks to compress the target before it implodes. To minimize the entropy acquired by the fuel, the strength and timing of these shocks will be precisely set during a series of tuning experiments that adjust the laser pulse to achieve optimal conditions. We report measurements of the velocity and timing of multiple, converging shock waves inside spherical targets filled with liquid (cryogenic) deuterium. These experiments produced the highest reported shock velocity observed in liquid deuterium (U{sub s} = 135 km/s at {approx}25 Mb) and observed an increase in shock velocity due to spherical convergence. These direct-drive experiments are best simulated when hydrodynamic codes use a nonlocal model for the transport of absorbed laser energy from the coronal plasma to the ablation surface.

  11. Effects of Low-Level Deuterium Enrichment on Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xueshu; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    Using very precise (±0.05%) measurements of the growth parameters for bacteria E. coli grown on minimal media, we aimed to determine the lowest deuterium concentration at which the adverse effects that are prominent at higher enrichments start to become noticeable. Such a threshold was found at 0.5% D, a surprisingly high value, while the ultralow deuterium concentrations (≤0.25% D) showed signs of the opposite trend. Bacterial adaptation for 400 generations in isotopically different environment confirmed preference for ultralow (≤0.25% D) enrichment. This effect appears to be similar to those described in sporadic but multiple earlier reports. Possible explanations include hormesis and isotopic resonance phenomena, with the latter explanation being favored. PMID:25033078

  12. Techniques for determining total body water using deuterium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Phillip A.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of total body water (TBW) is fundamental to the study of body fluid changes consequent to microgravity exposure or treatment with microgravity countermeasures. Often, the use of radioactive isotopes is prohibited for safety or other reasons. It was selected and implemented for use by some Johnson Space Center (JCS) laboratories, which permitted serial measurements over a 14 day period which was accurate enough to serve as a criterion method for validating new techniques. These requirements resulted in the selection of deuterium oxide dilution as the method of choice for TBW measurement. The development of this technique at JSC is reviewed. The recommended dosage, body fluid sampling techniques, and deuterium assay options are described.

  13. Inelastic X-ray Scattering from Shocked Liquid Deuterium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Regan, S. P.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Boehly, T. R.; Crowley, B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O.; Gericke, D. O.; et al

    2012-12-28

    The Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions created in liquid deuterium by a laser-ablation—driven shock wave were probed with noncollective, spectrally resolved, inelastic x-ray Thomson scattering employing Cl Lyα line emission at 2.96 keV. Thus, these first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of the microscopic properties of shocked deuterium show an inferred spatially averaged electron temperature of 8±5 eV, an electron density of 2.2(±0.5)×1023 cm-3, and an ionization of 0.8 (-0.25, +0.15). Our two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using equation-of-state models suited for the extreme parameters occurring in inertial confinement fusion research and planetary interiors are consistent with the experimental results.

  14. Three-dimensional microscopy of deuterium in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeper, K.; Moser, M.; Reichart, P.; Markina, E.; Elgeti (Lindig, S.; Balden, M.; Schwarz-Selinger, Th; Mayer, M.; Dollinger, G.

    2014-04-01

    The hydrogen isotope retention in tungsten is an important issue for fusion devices. In this paper we study the possibility of using a μm-focused deuterium beam in order to quantify deuterium distributions in microscopic dimensions. Due to the lack of cross-section data for deuteron-deuteron-scattering (dd-scattering) a validated reference sample is needed. For this purpose we used a 15 μm thick aluminum foil covered by a-C:D-layers that have been deposited in a CD4 plasma discharge from both sides. At the SNAKE facility of the Munich tandem accelerator we already established a three-dimensional microscopy of hydrogen using protons within an energy range between 17 and 25 MeV. Now, we have tested the possibility for deuteron microscopy. As a first application we analyzed a 25 μm foil implanted with 2.0 × 1020 atom cm-2 deuterons.

  15. Deuterium Retention in Pure and Mixed Plasma Facing Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimov, V. Kh.

    Depth profiles of D atoms and D2 molecules in beryllium (Be), beryllium oxide (BeO), tungsten (W), chemically vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten carbide WC, and tungsten trioxide (WO3) both implanted with D ions at energies in the range of several keV and exposed to a low energy (30–200 eV) D plasma have been determined using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and residual gas analysis (RGA) measurements in the course of surface sputtering. Additionally, the deuterium retention in carbon (C) and tungsten-carbon (W-C) mixed films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering in D2 atmosphere has been investigated. Mechanisms of the deuterium trapping in these materials are discussed.

  16. Deuterium hyperfine structure in interstellar C3HD.

    PubMed

    Bell, M B; Watson, J K; Feldman, P A; Matthews, H E; Madden, S C; Irvine, W M

    1987-05-22

    The deuterium nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure of the transition 1(10)-1(01) of the ring molecule cyclopropenylidene-d1 (C3HD) has been observed in emission from interstellar molecular clouds. The narrowest linewidths (approximately 7 kHz) so far observed are in the cloud L1498. The derived D coupling constants Xzz = 186.9(1.4) kHz, eta=0.063(18) agree well with correlations based on other molecules.

  17. Kinetic isotope effects for fast deuterium and proton exchange rates

    PubMed Central

    Mammoli, Daniele; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Pelupessy, Philippe; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    By monitoring the effect of deuterium decoupling on the decay of transverse 15N magnetization in D–15N spin pairs during multiple-refocusing echo sequences, we have determined fast D–D exchange rates k D and compared them with fast H–H exchange rates k H in tryptophan to determine the kinetic isotope effect as a function of pH and temperature. PMID:27009684

  18. Release Fraction Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2004-01-01

    liquid phase. Release fractions are commonly used to make conservative estimates of emissions from processes. Usually, rather gross assumptions are made in such estimates, such as the total failure of abatement equipment and the use of maximum inventory values. Consequently, it is common practice to report bounding release fraction values with single digit accuracy. The release fractions for the top of the unventilated tank ranged from 9 x 10{sup -7} to 8 x 10{sup -5} depending on the process simulated.

  19. The Influence of Salinity, Growth Rate and Temperature on D/H Fractionation in Algal Lipids from Culture and Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, J. P.; Schwab, V.; Sachse, D.; Cash, A.; Nelson, D.; Zhang, Z.; Kawka, O.

    2007-12-01

    The use of compound-specific D/H ratios to decipher biochemical, geochemical, oceanographic, and climatic processes is expanding rapidly. The relative success of these efforts depends on an understanding of the environmental conditions that influence the deuterium depletion relative to environmental water observed in all plant, algal and bacterial lipids, and the sensitivity of D/H fractionation responses to changes in those environmental conditions. Presently very little is known about this interplay between the environment and D/H fraction in algal lipids. Here we present results from field studies (in the Chesapeake Bay, Christmas Island, the Great Salt Lake, and saline basins in Alberta and Saskatchewan) and culture studies (both continuous and batch) that indicate that salinity, growth rate and temperature each influence D/H fractionation in algal lipids to varying degrees, depending on the algae and the lipid. Our initial results indicate that D/H fractionation (1) decreases with increasing salinity, (2) increases with increasing growth rate in isoprenoid lipids, (3) is insensitive to growth rate in acetogenic lipids, and (4) increases with increasing temperature.

  20. Heat generation above break-even from laser-induced fusion in ultra-dense deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Holmlid, Leif

    2015-08-15

    Previous results from laser-induced processes in ultra-dense deuterium D(0) give conclusive evidence for ejection of neutral massive particles with energy >10 MeV u{sup −1}. Such particles can only be formed from nuclear processes like nuclear fusion at the low laser intensity used. Heat generation is of interest for future fusion energy applications and has now been measured by a small copper (Cu) cylinder surrounding the laser target. The temperature rise of the Cu cylinder is measured with an NTC resistor during around 5000 laser shots per measured point. No heating in the apparatus or the gas feed is normally used. The fusion process is suboptimal relative to previously published studies by a factor of around 10. The small neutral particles H{sub N}(0) of ultra-dense hydrogen (size of a few pm) escape with a substantial fraction of the energy. Heat loss to the D{sub 2} gas (at <1 mbar pressure) is measured and compensated for under various conditions. Heat release of a few W is observed, at up to 50% higher energy than the total laser input thus a gain of 1.5. This is uniquely high for the use of deuterium as fusion fuel. With a slightly different setup, a thermal gain of 2 is reached, thus clearly above break-even for all neutronicity values possible. Also including the large kinetic energy which is directly measured for MeV particles leaving through a small opening gives a gain of 2.3. Taking into account the lower efficiency now due to the suboptimal fusion process, previous studies indicate a gain of at least 20 during long periods.

  1. DEUTERIUM BURNING IN MASSIVE GIANT PLANETS AND LOW-MASS BROWN DWARFS FORMED BY CORE-NUCLEATED ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Bodenheimer, Peter; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Saumon, Didier E-mail: gennaro.dangelo@nasa.gov E-mail: jfortney@ucolick.org

    2013-06-20

    Using detailed numerical simulations, we study the formation of bodies near the deuterium-burning limit according to the core-nucleated giant planet accretion scenario. The objects, with heavy-element cores in the range 5-30 M{sub Circled-Plus }, are assumed to accrete gas up to final masses of 10-15 Jupiter masses (M{sub Jup}). After the formation process, which lasts 1-5 Myr and which ends with a ''cold-start'', low-entropy configuration, the bodies evolve at constant mass up to an age of several Gyr. Deuterium burning via proton capture is included in the calculation, and we determined the mass, M{sub 50}, above which more than 50% of the initial deuterium is burned. This often-quoted borderline between giant planets and brown dwarfs is found to depend only slightly on parameters, such as core mass, stellar mass, formation location, solid surface density in the protoplanetary disk, disk viscosity, and dust opacity. The values for M{sub 50} fall in the range 11.6-13.6 M{sub Jup}, in agreement with previous determinations that do not take the formation process into account. For a given opacity law during the formation process, objects with higher core masses form more quickly. The result is higher entropy in the envelope at the completion of accretion, yielding lower values of M{sub 50}. For masses above M{sub 50}, during the deuterium-burning phase, objects expand and increase in luminosity by one to three orders of magnitude. Evolutionary tracks in the luminosity versus time diagram are compared with the observed position of the companion to Beta Pictoris.

  2. Cryogenic distillation facility for isotopic purification of protium and deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, I.; Arkhipov, Ev.; Bondarenko, S.; Fedorchenko, O.; Ganzha, V.; Ivshin, K.; Kravtsov, P. Trofimov, V.; Vasilyev, A.; Vasyanina, T.; Vorobyov, A.; Vznuzdaev, M.; Kammel, P.; Petitjean, C.

    2015-12-15

    Isotopic purification of the protium and deuterium is an important requirement of many physics experiments. A cryogenic facility for high-efficiency separation of hydrogen isotopes with a cryogenic distillation column as the main element is described. The instrument is portable, so that it can be used at the experimental site. It was designed and built at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Russia. Fundamental operating parameters have been measured including a liquid holdup in the column packing, the pressure drops across the column and the purity of the product at different operating modes. A mathematical model describes expected profiles of hydrogen isotope concentration along the distillation column. An analysis of ortho-parahydrogen isomeric composition by gas chromatography was used for evaluation of the column performance during the tuning operations. The protium content during deuterium purification (≤100 ppb) was measured using gas chromatography with accumulation of the protium in the distillation column. A high precision isotopic measurement at the Institute of Particle Physics, ETH-Zurich, Switzerland, provided an upper bound of the deuterium content in protium (≤6 ppb), which exceeds all commercially available products.

  3. Measurement of the deuterium Balmer series line emission on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. R.; Huang, J.; Gao, W.; Gao, W.; Xu, Z.; Chang, J. F.; Hou, Y. M.; Jin, Z.; Xu, J. C.; Duan, Y. M.; Zhang, P. F.; Chen, Y. J.; Zhang, L.; Wu, Z. W.; Li, J. G.

    2016-11-01

    Volume recombination plays an important role towards plasma detachment for magnetically confined fusion devices. High quantum number states of the Balmer series of deuterium are used to study recombination. On EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak), two visible spectroscopic measurements are applied for the upper/lower divertor with 13 channels, respectively. Both systems are coupled with Princeton Instruments ProEM EMCCD 1024B camera: one is equipped on an Acton SP2750 spectrometer, which has a high spectral resolution ˜0.0049 nm with 2400 gr/mm grating to measure the Dα(Hα) spectral line and with 1200 gr/mm grating to measure deuterium molecular Fulcher band emissions and another is equipped on IsoPlane SCT320 using 600 gr/mm to measure high-n Balmer series emission lines, allowing us to study volume recombination on EAST and to obtain the related line averaged plasma parameters (Te, ne) during EAST detached phases. This paper will present the details of the measurements and the characteristics of deuterium Balmer series line emissions during density ramp-up L-mode USN plasma on EAST.

  4. Selective deuterium ion acceleration using the Vulcan petawatt laser

    SciTech Connect

    Krygier, A. G.; Morrison, J. T.; Kar, S. Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Jung, D.; Clarke, R.; Notley, M.; Fuchs, J.; Vassura, L.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Roth, M.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P.; Oliver, M.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Freeman, R. R.

    2015-05-15

    We report on the successful demonstration of selective acceleration of deuterium ions by target-normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) with a high-energy petawatt laser. TNSA typically produces a multi-species ion beam that originates from the intrinsic hydrocarbon and water vapor contaminants on the target surface. Using the method first developed by Morrison et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 030707 (2012)], an ion beam with >99% deuterium ions and peak energy 14 MeV/nucleon is produced with a 200 J, 700 fs, >10{sup 20}W/cm{sup 2} laser pulse by cryogenically freezing heavy water (D{sub 2}O) vapor onto the rear surface of the target prior to the shot. Within the range of our detectors (0°–8.5°), we find laser-to-deuterium-ion energy conversion efficiency of 4.3% above 0.7 MeV/nucleon while a conservative estimate of the total beam gives a conversion efficiency of 9.4%.

  5. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  6. Deuterium REDOR: Principles and Applications for Distance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, I.; Goldbourt, A.; Vega, S.; Buntkowsky, G.

    1999-05-01

    The application of short composite pulse schemes ([figure] and [figure]) to the rotational echo double-resonance (REDOR) spectroscopy ofX-2H (X: spin{1}/{2}, observed) systems with large deuterium quadrupolar interactions has been studied experimentally and theoretically and compared with simple 180° pulse schemes. The basic properties of the composite pulses on the deuterium nuclei have been elucidated, using average Hamiltonian theory, and exact simulations of the experiments have been achieved by stepwise integration of the equation of motion of the density matrix. REDOR experiments were performed on15N-2H in doubly labeled acetanilide and on13C-2H in singly2H-labeled acetanilide. The most efficient REDOR dephasing was observed when [figure] composite pulses were used. It is found that the dephasing due to simple 180° deuterium pulses is about a factor of 2 less efficient than the dephasing due to the composite pulse sequences and thus the range of couplings observable byX-2H REDOR is enlarged toward weaker couplings, i.e., larger distances. From these experiments the2H-15N dipolar coupling between the amino deuteron and the amino nitrogen and the2H-13C dipolar couplings between the amino deuteron and the α and β carbons have been elucidated and the corresponding distances have been determined. The distance data from REDOR are in good agreement with data from X-ray and neutron diffraction, showing the power of the method.

  7. Cryogenic distillation facility for isotopic purification of protium and deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, I.; Arkhipov, Ev.; Bondarenko, S.; Fedorchenko, O.; Ganzha, V.; Ivshin, K.; Kammel, P.; Kravtsov, P.; Petitjean, C.; Trofimov, V.; Vasilyev, A.; Vasyanina, T.; Vorobyov, A.; Vznuzdaev, M.

    2015-12-01

    Isotopic purification of the protium and deuterium is an important requirement of many physics experiments. A cryogenic facility for high-efficiency separation of hydrogen isotopes with a cryogenic distillation column as the main element is described. The instrument is portable, so that it can be used at the experimental site. It was designed and built at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Russia. Fundamental operating parameters have been measured including a liquid holdup in the column packing, the pressure drops across the column and the purity of the product at different operating modes. A mathematical model describes expected profiles of hydrogen isotope concentration along the distillation column. An analysis of ortho-parahydrogen isomeric composition by gas chromatography was used for evaluation of the column performance during the tuning operations. The protium content during deuterium purification (≤100 ppb) was measured using gas chromatography with accumulation of the protium in the distillation column. A high precision isotopic measurement at the Institute of Particle Physics, ETH-Zurich, Switzerland, provided an upper bound of the deuterium content in protium (≤6 ppb), which exceeds all commercially available products.

  8. Cryogenic distillation facility for isotopic purification of protium and deuterium.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, I; Arkhipov, Ev; Bondarenko, S; Fedorchenko, O; Ganzha, V; Ivshin, K; Kammel, P; Kravtsov, P; Petitjean, C; Trofimov, V; Vasilyev, A; Vasyanina, T; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, M

    2015-12-01

    Isotopic purification of the protium and deuterium is an important requirement of many physics experiments. A cryogenic facility for high-efficiency separation of hydrogen isotopes with a cryogenic distillation column as the main element is described. The instrument is portable, so that it can be used at the experimental site. It was designed and built at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Russia. Fundamental operating parameters have been measured including a liquid holdup in the column packing, the pressure drops across the column and the purity of the product at different operating modes. A mathematical model describes expected profiles of hydrogen isotope concentration along the distillation column. An analysis of ortho-parahydrogen isomeric composition by gas chromatography was used for evaluation of the column performance during the tuning operations. The protium content during deuterium purification (≤100 ppb) was measured using gas chromatography with accumulation of the protium in the distillation column. A high precision isotopic measurement at the Institute of Particle Physics, ETH-Zurich, Switzerland, provided an upper bound of the deuterium content in protium (≤6 ppb), which exceeds all commercially available products.

  9. The water, deuterium, gas and uranium content of tektites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.

    1958-01-01

    The water content, deuterium concentration of the water, total gas and uranium contents were determined on tektite samples and other glass samples from Texas, Australia, Philippine Islands, Java, French Indo-China, Czechoslovakia, Libyan Desert, Billiton Island, Thailand, French West Africa, Peru, and New Mexico. The water content ranges from 0.24 per cent for the Peru tektite, to 0.0002 per cent for a moldavite. The majority of the tektites have less than 0.05 per cent water, and average 0.005 per cent H2O by weight. No other gases were detected, the lower detection limit being about 1 p.p.m. by weight. The deuterium content of the water in tektites is in the same range as that in terrestrial waters, and varies from 0.010 mole per cent to 0.0166 mole per cent deuterium. The uranium content is about from 1 to 3 p.p.m. The possible origin of tektites is discussed. The experimental data presented favour their being originally terrestrial, but produced by some catastrophic event. An extra-terrestrial source is not ruled out. ?? 1958.

  10. Deuterium thermal desorption from vacancy clusters in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabtsev, S.; Gasparyan, Yu.; Zibrov, M.; Shubina, A.; Pisarev, A.

    2016-09-01

    Deuterium interaction with vacancy clusters in tungsten was studied by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). A recrystallized W foil was used as a sample, and the vacancy clusters were formed in the bulk by irradiation with 10 keV/D ions to the fluence of 3 × 1019 D/m2 and subsequent annealing at the temperature of 800 K. Then the sample was loaded with deuterium (0.67 keV/D ions with a fluence of 1 × 1019 D/m2), and TDS measurements with varying heating rates β in the range of 0.25-4 K/s were performed. The high temperature peak with the maximum at around 700 K was attributed to deuterium desorption from vacancy clusters and the detrapping energy for this type of defects was determined from the slope of the Arrhenius-like plot ln (β / Tm2) versus 1 /Tm , where Tm is the peak position. The detrapping energy calculated this way is 2.10 ± 0.02 eV.

  11. Deuterium NMR of Raft Model Membranes Reveals Domain-Specific Order Profiles and Compositional Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Tomokazu; Tsuchikawa, Hiroshi; Murata, Michio; Matsumori, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we applied site-specifically deuterated N-stearoylsphingomyelins (SSMs) to raft-exhibiting ternary mixtures containing SSM, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), and cholesterol (Chol) and successfully acquired deuterium quadrupole coupling profiles of SSM from liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) domains. To our knowledge, this is the first report that shows detailed lipid chain dynamics separately and simultaneously obtained from coexisting Lo and Ld domains. We also found that the quadrupole profile of the Lo phase in the ternary system was almost identical to that in the SSM-Chol binary mixture, suggesting that the order profile of the binary system is essentially applicable to more complicated membrane systems in terms of the acyl chain order. We also demonstrated that 2H NMR spectroscopy, in combination with organic synthesis of deuterated components, could be used to reveal the accurate mole fractions of each component distributed in the Lo and Ld domains. As compared with the reported tie-line analysis of phase diagrams, the merit of our 2H NMR analysis is that the domain-specific compositional fractions are directly attainable without experimental complexity and ambiguity. The accurate compositional distributions as well as lipid order profiles in ternary mixtures are relevant to understanding the molecular mechanism of lipid raft formation. PMID:25992728

  12. Deuterium off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation of macromolecular bound ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Rydzewski, J M; Schleich, T

    1996-01-01

    Deuterated 3-trimethylsilylpropionic acid binding to bovine serum albumin was used as a model system to examine the feasibility and limitations of using the deuterium off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation experiment for the study of equilibrium ligand-binding behavior to proteins. The results of this study demonstrate that the rotational-diffusion behavior of the bound species can be monitored directly, i.e., the observed correlation time of the ligand in the presence of a protein is approximately equal to the correlation time of the ligand in the bound state, provided that the fraction of bound ligand is at least 0.20. The presence of local ligand motion and/or chemical exchange contributions to relaxation in the bound state was inferred from the observation that the correlation time of the bound ligand was somewhat smaller than the correlation time characterizing the overall tumbling of the protein. An approximate value for the fraction of bound ligand was obtained from off-resonance relaxation experiments when supplemental spin-lattice or transverse relaxation times were employed in the analysis. Incorporation of local motion effects for the bound species into the theoretical relaxation formalism enabled the evaluation of an order parameter and an effective correlation time, which in conjunction with a wobbling in a cone model, provided additional information about ligand motion in the bound state. PMID:8785304

  13. Cryogenic Implosion Performance Using High-Purity Deuterium-Tritium Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, T. C.; Goncharov, V. N.; Radha, P. B.; Earley, R.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Shoup, M. J., III; Michel, D. T.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2014-10-01

    Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence between symmetric implosions on OMEGA and National Ignition Facility ignition designs will require a number of facility enhancements that include dynamic bandwidth reduction, a set of higher-order super-Gaussian phase plates, high-spatial-resolution gated-core imaging, high-bandwidth neutron burnwidth measurements, improved power balance, and contaminant-free deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. The historic DT fuel supply was contaminated with ~6 atm% of 1H, leading to significant fractionation of the fuel during the layering process (the triple points of H:D and H:T are significantly colder than DD, DT, and TT). The fractionation leads to a drop in the potential yield because the D and T number densities are lower in the void than they would be with a pure-DT mixture). An isotope separation system has been developed to remove the 1H from the DT fuel supply. This talk will discuss the first results with the purified fuel, conclusions from recent implosions to test cross-beam energy transfer mitigation, and the status of the remaining facility enhancements. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  14. Concentration and removal of tritium and/or deuterium from water contaminated with tritium and/or deuterium

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas J.; Narula, Poonam M.

    2001-01-01

    Concentration of tritium and/or deuterium that is a contaminant in H.sub.2 O, followed by separation of the concentrate from the H.sub.2 O. Employed are certain metal oxo complexes, preferably with a metal from Group VIII. For instance, [Ru.sup.IV (2,2',6',2"-terpyridine)(2,2'-bipyridine)(O)](ClO.sub.4).sub.2 is very suitable.

  15. On the abundance of deuterium in celestial objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, Rickard; Kero, Johan; Liszka, Ludwik

    2016-04-01

    The deuterium hydrogen ratio (D/H) is the subject of conflicting ideas about the origin of water on the Earth. The present D/H ratio in the Earth oceans (≈1.5x10-4) is substantially lower than most, if not all potential cosmic sources. Furthermore, other celestial bodies, including interstellar space, display a fairly wide range of D/H ratios superseding the terrestrial one. Escape processes may in part explain higher D/H ratios on Mars and Venus, but cannot explain the Earth's low ratio compared to that of the potential sources (e.g. comets and meteors), unless a deuterium "removal" process can be inferred that reduces the D/H ratio. Alternatively, the D/H ratio in the Earth's ocean represents a time capsule of a yet to be identified cosmic source. It is here hypothesized that the former is the cause, a "removal" of deuterium in matter (carbohydrates, water etc.) having high (pristine) D/H ratios. By "removal" is here meant an isotope transmutation, i.e. deuterium is transmuted to hydrogen plus a thermal neutron, a process requiring >2.25 MeV (≈3.6·10-13 J). However, once released a thermal neutron will eventually fuse with another heavier element by thermal neutron capture, a process that may lead to energy in excess of the spallation energy. The energy gain differs for different isotopes, but if exceeding unity it will induce more heat/power than the input power, maintaining power production over time. A gain less than unity will still result in deuterium removal, but also isotope transmutation, and/or element transmutation via β± decay. This report gives a theoretical background for the plasma forcing that can lead to thermal neutron spallation, a process that changes/decrease the D/H ratio in celestial objects. The applicability of the theory will be tested on celestial objects subjected to strong dynamic, and electromagnetic forcing, by the Sun or during the entry of high-speed objects into the Earth's atmosphere.

  16. Structural Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Induced by Deuterium Implantation: Irradiation at 295 K.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Oleksandr; Zhurba, Volodymir; Neklyudov, Ivan; Mats, Oleksandr; Progolaieva, Viktoria; Boshko, Valerian

    2016-12-01

    Deuterium thermal desorption spectra were investigated on the samples of austenitic steel 18Cr10NiTi pre-implanted at 295 K with deuterium ions in the dose range from 8 × 10(14) to 2.7 × 10(18) D/cm(2). The kinetics of structural transformation development in the steel layer was traced from deuterium thermodesorption spectra as a function of deuterium concentration. Three characteristic regions with different low rates of deuterium amount desorption as the implantation dose increases were revealed: I-the linear region of low implantation doses (up to 1 × 10(17) D/cm(2)); II-the nonlinear region of medium implantation doses (1 × 10(17) to 8 × 10(17) D/cm(2)); III-the linear region of high implantation doses (8 × 10(17) to 2.7 × 10(18) D/cm(2)). During the process of deuterium ion irradiation, the coefficient of deuterium retention in steel varies in discrete steps. Each of the discrete regions of deuterium retention coefficient variation corresponds to different implanted-matter states formed during deuterium ion implantation. The low-dose region is characterized by formation of deuterium-vacancy complexes and solid-solution phase state of deuterium in the steel. The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in this region varies between 2.5 and 3 at.%. The medium-dose region is characterized by the radiation-induced action on the steel in the presence of deuterium with the resulting formation of the energy-stable nanosized crystalline structure of steel, having a developed network of intercrystalline boundaries. The basis for this developed network of intercrystalline boundaries is provided by the amorphous state, which manifests itself in the thermodesorption spectra as a widely temperature-scale extended region of deuterium desorption (structure formation with a varying activation energy). The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in the region of medium implantation doses makes 7 to 8 at.%. The

  17. Structural Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Induced by Deuterium Implantation: Irradiation at 295 K.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Oleksandr; Zhurba, Volodymir; Neklyudov, Ivan; Mats, Oleksandr; Progolaieva, Viktoria; Boshko, Valerian

    2016-12-01

    Deuterium thermal desorption spectra were investigated on the samples of austenitic steel 18Cr10NiTi pre-implanted at 295 K with deuterium ions in the dose range from 8 × 10(14) to 2.7 × 10(18) D/cm(2). The kinetics of structural transformation development in the steel layer was traced from deuterium thermodesorption spectra as a function of deuterium concentration. Three characteristic regions with different low rates of deuterium amount desorption as the implantation dose increases were revealed: I-the linear region of low implantation doses (up to 1 × 10(17) D/cm(2)); II-the nonlinear region of medium implantation doses (1 × 10(17) to 8 × 10(17) D/cm(2)); III-the linear region of high implantation doses (8 × 10(17) to 2.7 × 10(18) D/cm(2)). During the process of deuterium ion irradiation, the coefficient of deuterium retention in steel varies in discrete steps. Each of the discrete regions of deuterium retention coefficient variation corresponds to different implanted-matter states formed during deuterium ion implantation. The low-dose region is characterized by formation of deuterium-vacancy complexes and solid-solution phase state of deuterium in the steel. The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in this region varies between 2.5 and 3 at.%. The medium-dose region is characterized by the radiation-induced action on the steel in the presence of deuterium with the resulting formation of the energy-stable nanosized crystalline structure of steel, having a developed network of intercrystalline boundaries. The basis for this developed network of intercrystalline boundaries is provided by the amorphous state, which manifests itself in the thermodesorption spectra as a widely temperature-scale extended region of deuterium desorption (structure formation with a varying activation energy). The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in the region of medium implantation doses makes 7 to 8 at.%. The

  18. Structural Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Induced by Deuterium Implantation: Irradiation at 295 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleksandr; Zhurba, Volodymir; Neklyudov, Ivan; Mats, Oleksandr; Progolaieva, Viktoria; Boshko, Valerian

    2016-02-01

    Deuterium thermal desorption spectra were investigated on the samples of austenitic steel 18Cr10NiTi pre-implanted at 295 K with deuterium ions in the dose range from 8 × 1014 to 2.7 × 1018 D/cm2. The kinetics of structural transformation development in the steel layer was traced from deuterium thermodesorption spectra as a function of deuterium concentration. Three characteristic regions with different low rates of deuterium amount desorption as the implantation dose increases were revealed: I—the linear region of low implantation doses (up to 1 × 1017 D/cm2); II—the nonlinear region of medium implantation doses (1 × 1017 to 8 × 1017 D/cm2); III—the linear region of high implantation doses (8 × 1017 to 2.7 × 1018 D/cm2). During the process of deuterium ion irradiation, the coefficient of deuterium retention in steel varies in discrete steps. Each of the discrete regions of deuterium retention coefficient variation corresponds to different implanted-matter states formed during deuterium ion implantation. The low-dose region is characterized by formation of deuterium-vacancy complexes and solid-solution phase state of deuterium in the steel. The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in this region varies between 2.5 and 3 at.%. The medium-dose region is characterized by the radiation-induced action on the steel in the presence of deuterium with the resulting formation of the energy-stable nanosized crystalline structure of steel, having a developed network of intercrystalline boundaries. The basis for this developed network of intercrystalline boundaries is provided by the amorphous state, which manifests itself in the thermodesorption spectra as a widely temperature-scale extended region of deuterium desorption (structure formation with a varying activation energy). The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in the region of medium implantation doses makes 7 to 8 at.%. The resulting structure shows stability against the action of

  19. Development of a new deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron generator for prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergaoui, K; Reguigui, N; Gary, C K; Brown, C; Cremer, J T; Vainionpaa, J H; Piestrup, M A

    2014-12-01

    A new deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron generator has been developed by Adelphi Technology for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), neutron activation analysis (NAA), and fast neutron radiography. The generator makes an excellent fast, intermediate, and thermal neutron source for laboratories and industrial applications that require the safe production of neutrons, a small footprint, low cost, and small regulatory burden. The generator has three major components: a Radio Frequency Induction Ion Source, a Secondary Electron Shroud, and a Diode Accelerator Structure and Target. Monoenergetic neutrons (2.5MeV) are produced with a yield of 10(10)n/s using 25-50mA of deuterium ion beam current and 125kV of acceleration voltage. The present study characterizes the performance of the neutron generator with respect to neutron yield, neutron production efficiency, and the ionic current as a function of the acceleration voltage at various RF powers. In addition the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) simulation code was used to optimize the setup with respect to thermal flux and radiation protection.

  20. Recent Trends Of The Tropospheric Vapor Deuterium To Hydrogen Ratio And Their Climatological Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, N.; Posmentier, E. S.; Worden, J. R.; Samuels-Crow, K. E.; Feng, X.

    2015-12-01

    Preliminary analysis of satellite-borne Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) data reveals recent trends in both the 900 hPa deuterium to hydrogen (D/H) ratio of water vapor, and the 500-800 hPa water vapor mixing ratio, rE. In the Arctic, vapor dD decreased at 1.9‰/yr (p=0.041) from 2004 to at least 2009, and rE increased at 0.041 g kg-1/yr (p=0.065). The ratio of the two trends is -46‰/ g kg-1, comparable with the dD vs. rE regression slope of -29‰/ g kg-1 (p<0.0001). In low latitudes (15-40ºN) the dD trend is much smaller and opposite in sign, but statistically insignificant (+0.42‰/yr, p=0.64), while rE also has a positive but statistically insignificant trend of +0.037 g kg-1/yr (p=0.58). During this period, Arctic sea surface temperature (SST) increased slightly, so its positive effect on equilibrium fractionation is the wrong sign to explain the observed decrease of Arctic dD. Making the preliminary assumption that these temporal variations in vapor are robust relative to TES data calibration, we investigate them using a marine boundary layer (MBL) model with isotopes. The model includes meteorological processes such as subsidence and convergence of air from the mid and upper troposphere, and height-dependent turbulent mixing in the MBL. The convergence component allows us to investigate the effect of the mixing ratio of air aloft (rE) on the isotopic composition of the MBL. Model results show that vapor δD in the MBL decreases as rE increases. This is because the admixture of isotopically depleted vapor from the upper atmosphere, which increases with rE, results in isotopic depletion near the surface. However, the sensitivity of dD to rE is strongly nonlinear; it is -30.33 ‰/g kg-1 in the Arctic, but only -5.25 ‰/g kg-1 in the subtropics. This explains both the negative trend of dD in the Arctic and lack of trend in the subtropics. In addition, the simulated Arctic sensitivity compares well with the observed values of -46 and -29‰/ g kg-1

  1. Lattice location of deuterium in plasma and gas charged Mg doped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, W.R.; Barbour, J.C.; Seager, C.H.; Myers, S.M. Jr.; Wright, A.F.; Han, J.

    1999-12-02

    The authors have used ion channeling to examine the lattice configuration of deuterium in Mg doped GaN grown by MOCVD. The deuterium is introduced both by exposure to deuterium gas and to ECR plasmas. A density functional approach including lattice relaxation, was used to calculate total energies for various locations and charge states of hydrogen in the wurtzite Mg doped GaN lattice. Computer simulations of channeling yields were used to compare results of channeling measurements with calculated yields for various predicted deuterium lattice configurations.

  2. Design of a tensor polarized deuterium target polarized by spin-exchange with optically pumped NA

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.C.

    1984-05-01

    A proposed design for a tensor polarized deuterium target (approx. 10/sup 15/ atoms/cm/sup 2/) for nuclear physics studies in an electron storage ring accelerator is presented. The deuterium atoms undergo electron spin exchange with a highly polarized sodium vapor; this polarization is transferred to the deuterium nuclei via the hyperfine interaction. The deuterium nuclei obtain their tensor polarization through repeated electron spin exchange/hyperfine interactions. The sodium vapor polarization is maintained by standard optical pumping techniques. Model calculations are presented in detail leading to a discussion of the expected performance and the technical obstacles to be surmounted in the development of such a target. 15 references, 10 figures.

  3. Long Term Retention of Deuterium and Tritium in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    FIORE,C.; LABOMBARD,B.; LIPSCHULTZ,B.; PITCHER,C.S.; SKINNER,C.H.; WAMPLER,WILLIAM R.

    1999-11-03

    We estimate the total in-vessel deuterium retention in Alcator C-Mod from a run campaign of about 1090 plasmas. The estimate is based on measurements of deuterium retained on 22 molybdenum tiles from the inner wall and divertor. The areal density of deuterium on the tiles was measured by nuclear reaction analysis. From these data, the in-vessel deuterium inventory is estimated to be about 0.1 gram, assuming the deuterium coverage is toroidally symmetric. Most of the retained deuterium is on the walls of the main plasma chamber, only about 2.5% of the deuterium is in the divertor. The D coverage is consistent with a layer saturated by implantation with ions and charge-exchange neutrals from the plasma. This contrasts with tokamaks with carbon plasma-facing components (PFC's) where long-term retention of tritium and deuterium is large and mainly in the divertor due to codeposition with carbon eroded by the plasma. The low deuterium retention in the C-Mod divertor is mainly due to the absence of carbon PFC's in C-Mod and the low erosion rate of Mo.

  4. Electron Scattering From High-Momentum Neutrons in Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    A.V. Klimenko; S.E. Kuhn

    2005-10-12

    We report results from an experiment measuring the semi-inclusive reaction D(e,e'p{sub s}) where the proton p{sub s} is moving at a large angle relative to the momentum transfer. If we assume that the proton was a spectator to the reaction taking place on the neutron in deuterium, the initial state of that neutron can be inferred. This method, known as spectator tagging, can be used to study electron scattering from high-momentum (off-shell) neutrons in deuterium. The data were taken with a 5.765 GeV electron beam on a deuterium target in Jefferson Laboratory's Hall B, using the CLAS detector. A reduced cross section was extracted for different values of final-state missing mass W*, backward proton momentum {rvec p}{sub s} and momentum transfer Q{sup 2}. The data are compared to a simple PWIA spectator model. A strong enhancement in the data observed at transverse kinematics is not reproduced by the PWIA model. This enhancement can likely be associated with the contribution of final state interactions (FSI) that were not incorporated into the model. A ''bound neutron structure function'' F{sub 2n}{sup eff} was extracted as a function of W* and the scaling variable x* at extreme backward kinematics, where effects of FSI appear to be smaller. For p{sub s} > 400 MeV/c, where the neutron is far off-shell, the model overestimates the value of F{sub 2n}{sup eff} in the region of x* between 0.25 and 0.6. A modification of the bound neutron structure function is one of possible effects that can cause the observed deviation.

  5. Dietary peptides from the non-digestible fraction of Phaseolus vulgaris L. decrease angiotensin II-dependent proliferation in HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells through the blockade of the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vital, Diego A; Liang, Katie; González de Mejía, Elvira; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2016-05-18

    This study aimed to determine the ability of peptides present in the non-digestible fraction (NDF) of common beans to decrease angiotensin II (AngII) through the blockade of RAS and its effect on the proliferation of HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells. Pure synthesized peptides GLTSK and GEGSGA and the peptide fractions (PF) of cultivars Azufrado Higuera and Bayo Madero were used. The cells were pretreated with pure peptides, PF or AGT at their IC50 or IC25 values, in comparison with the simultaneous treatment of peptides and AGT. For western blot and microscopy analysis, 100 μM and 0.5 mg mL(-1) were used for pure peptides and PF treatments, respectively. According to the ELISA tests, GLTSK and GEGSGA decreased (p < 0.05) the conversion rate of AGT to angiotensin I (AngI) by 38 and 28%, respectively. All the peptides tested reduced (p < 0.05) the conversion rate of AngI to AngII from 38 to 50%. When the cells were pretreated with both pure peptides and PF before exposure to AGT, the effectiveness inhibiting cell proliferation was higher than the simultaneous treatment suggesting their preventive effects. GLTSK and GEGSGA interacted with the catalytic site of renin, the angiotensin-I converting enzyme, and the AngII receptor, mainly through hydrogen bonds, polar, hydrophobic and cation-π interactions according to molecular docking. Through confocal microscopy, it was determined that GLTSK and GEGSGA caused the decrease (p < 0.05) of AngII-dependent STAT3 nuclear activation in HCT116 cells by 66 and 23%, respectively. The results suggest that peptides present in the common bean NDF could potentially ameliorate the effects of RAS overexpression in colorectal cancer. PMID:27156533

  6. Precision measurement of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitlinger, K.; Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Blüm, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.; Elsener, K.; Gotta, D.; Morenzoni, E.; Simons, L. M.

    1992-09-01

    X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressures. Using the cyclotron trap, a 105 MeV/c antiproton beam from LEAR was stopped with an efficiency of 86% in 30 mbar hydrogen gas in a volume of only 100 cm3. The X-rays were measured with Si(Li) detectors and a Xe-CH4 drift chamber. The strong interaction shift and broadening of the Lyman α transition and the spin-averaged 2p width in antiprotonic hydrogen was measured with unprecedented accuracy. The triplet component of the ground state in antiprotonic hydrogen was determined for the first time.

  7. Diagnosing radiative shocks from deuterium and tritium implosions on NIF.

    PubMed

    Pak, A; Divol, L; Weber, S; Döppner, T; Kyrala, G A; Kilne, J; Izumi, N; Glenn, S; Ma, T; Town, R P; Bradley, D K; Glenzer, S H

    2012-10-01

    During the recent ignition tuning campaign at the National Ignition Facility, layered cryogenic deuterium and tritium capsules were imploded via x-ray driven ablation. The hardened gated x-ray imager diagnostic temporally and spatially resolves the x-ray emission from the core of the capsule implosion at energies above ~8 keV. On multiple implosions, ~200-400 ps after peak compression a spherically expanding radiative shock has been observed. This paper describes the methods used to characterize the radial profile and rate of expansion of the shock induced x-ray emission.

  8. The effects of deuterium on static posture control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layne, Charles S.

    1990-01-01

    A significant operational problem impacting upon the Space Shuttle program involves the astronaut's ability to safely egress from the Orbiter during an emergency situation. Following space flight, astronauts display significant movement problems. One variable which may contribute to increased movement ataxia is deuterium (D2O). Deuterium is present in low levels within the Orbiter's water supply but may accumulate to significant physiological levels during lengthy missions. Deuterium was linked to a number of negative physiological responses, including motion sickness, decreased metabolism, and slowing of neural conduction velocity. The effects of D2O on static postural control in response to a range of dosage levels were investigated. Nine sugjects were divided into three groups of three subjects each. The groups were divided into a low, medium, and a high D2O dosage group. The subjects static posture was assessed with the use of the EquiTest systems, a commercially available postural control evaluation system featuring movable force plates and a visual surround that can be servoed to the subject's sway. In addition to the force plate information, data about the degree of subject sway about the hips and shoulders was obtained. Additionally, surface electromyographic (EMG) data from the selected lower limb muscles were collected along with saliva samples used to determine the amount of deuterium enrichment following D2O ingestion. Two baseline testing sessions were performed using the EquiTest testing protocol prior to ingestion of the D2O. Thirty minutes after dosing, subjects again performed the tests. Two more post-dosing tests were run with an interest interval of one hour. Preliminary data anlaysis indicates that only subjects in the igh dose group displayed any significant static postural problems. Future analyses of the sway and EMG is expected to reveal significant variations in the subject's postural control strategy following D2O dosing. While

  9. The pion nucleon scattering lengths from pionic hydrogen and deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, H.-Ch.; Badertscher, A.; Goudsmit, P. F. A.; Janousch, M.; Leisi, H. J.; Matsinos, E.; Sigg, D.; Zhao, Z. G.; Chatellard, D.; Egger, J.-P.; Gabathuler, K.; Hauser, P.; Simons, L. M.; Rusi El Hassani, A. J.

    2001-07-01

    This is the final publication of the ETH Zurich Neuchâtel PSI collaboration on the pionic hydrogen and deuterium precision X-ray experiments. We describe the recent hydrogen 3 p 1 s measurement, report on the determination of the Doppler effect correction to the transition line width, analyze the deuterium shift measurement and discuss implications of the combined hydrogen and deuterium results. From the pionic hydrogen 3 p 1 s transition experiments we obtain the strong-interaction energy level shift \\varepsilon_{1s} = -7.108±0.013 (stat.)±0.034 (syst.) eV and the total decay width Γ_{1s} = 0.868±0.040 (stat.)±0.038 (syst.) eV of the 1s state. Taking into account the electromagnetic corrections we find the hadronic π N s-wave scattering amplitude a_{π-prightarrowπ-p} = 0.0883±0.0008 m_{π}^{-1} for elastic scattering and a_{π-prightarrowπ0n} = -0.128±0.006 m_{π} ^{-1} for single charge exchange, respectively. We then combine the pionic hydrogen results with the 1 s level shift measurement on pionic deuterium and test isospin symmetry of the strong interaction: our data are still compatible with isospin symmetry. The isoscalar and isovector π N scattering lengths (within the framework of isospin symmetry) are found to be b_0 = -0.0001^{+0.0009}_{-0.0021} m_{π}^{-1} and b1 = -0.0885^{+0.0010}_{-0.0021} m_{π} ^{-1}, respectively. Using the GMO sum rule, we obtain from b_1 a new value of the π N coupling constant (g_{π N} = 13.21_{-0.05}^{+0.11}) from which follows the Goldberger Treiman discrepancy Δ_{{GT}} =0.027_{-0.008}^{+0.012}. The new values of b_0 and g_{π N} imply an increase of the nucleon sigma term by at least 9 MeV.

  10. UCN Production With a Single Crystal of Ortho-Deuterium.

    PubMed

    Utsuro, M; Tanaka, M; Mishima, K; Nagai, Y; Shima, T; Fukuda, Y; Kohmoto, T; Momose, T; Moriai, A; Okumura, K; Yoshino, H

    2005-01-01

    The present paper reports on the preliminary experimental results concerning a new concept of ultracold neutron production with a single crystal converter of ortho-deuterium lying in the ground rotational state at the low temperature of about 10 K, which should make it possible to utilize a guided cold neutron beam instead of irradiating the converter material in the inside of high radiation fields. The successful observation of the clear Bragg scattering pattern from the single crystal converter and the reasonable results from the first experimental trial of the ultracold neutron production with the single crystal are shown.

  11. Diagnosing radiative shocks from deuterium and tritium implosions on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, A.; Divol, L.; Weber, S.; Doeppner, T.; Izumi, N.; Glenn, S.; Ma, T.; Town, R. P.; Bradley, D. K.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kyrala, G. A.; Kilne, J.

    2012-10-15

    During the recent ignition tuning campaign at the National Ignition Facility, layered cryogenic deuterium and tritium capsules were imploded via x-ray driven ablation. The hardened gated x-ray imager diagnostic temporally and spatially resolves the x-ray emission from the core of the capsule implosion at energies above {approx}8 keV. On multiple implosions, {approx}200-400 ps after peak compression a spherically expanding radiative shock has been observed. This paper describes the methods used to characterize the radial profile and rate of expansion of the shock induced x-ray emission.

  12. Dislocation mechanism of deuterium retention in tungsten under plasma implantation.

    PubMed

    Dubinko, V I; Grigorev, P; Bakaev, A; Terentyev, D; van Oost, G; Gao, F; Van Neck, D; Zhurkin, E E

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a new theoretical model for deuterium (D) retention in tungsten-based alloys on the basis of its being trapped at dislocations and transported to the surface via the dislocation network with parameters determined by ab initio calculations. The model is used to explain experimentally observed trends of D retention under sub-threshold implantation, which does not produce stable lattice defects to act as traps for D in conventional models. Saturation of D retention with implantation dose and effects due to alloying of tungsten with, e.g. tantalum, are evaluated, and comparison of the model predictions with experimental observations under high-flux plasma implantation conditions is presented.

  13. Matrix fractional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the matrix representation of dynamical systems in the perspective of fractional calculus. Fractional elements and fractional systems are interpreted under the light of the classical Cole-Cole, Davidson-Cole, and Havriliak-Negami heuristic models. Numerical simulations for an electrical circuit enlighten the results for matrix based models and high fractional orders. The conclusions clarify the distinction between fractional elements and fractional systems.

  14. [Microbial synthesis of deuterium labelled L-phenylalanine with different levels of isotopic enrichment by facultative methylotrophic bacterium Brevibacterium methylicum with RMP assimilation of carbon].

    PubMed

    Mosin, O V; Shvets, V I; Skladnev, D A; Ignatov, I

    2014-01-01

    The preparative microbial synthesis of amino acids labelled with stable isotopes, including deuterium ( 2 H), suitable for biomedical applications by methylotrophic bacteria was studied using L-phenylalanine as example. This amino acid is secreted by Gram-negative aerobic facultative methylotrophic bacteria Brevibacterium methylicum, assimilating methanol via ribulose-5-monophosphate (RMP) cycle of assimilation of carbon, The data on adaptation of L-phenylalanine secreted by methylotrophic bacterium В. methylicum to the maximal concentration of deuterium in the growth medium with 98% 2 Н 2 O and 2% [ 2 Н]methanol, and biosynthesis of deuterium labelled L-phenylalanine With different levels of enrichment are presented. The strain was adapted by means of plating initial cells on firm (2% agarose) minimal growth media with an increasing gradient of 2 Н 2 O concentration from 0; 24.5; 49.0; 73.5 up to 98% 2 Н 2 O followed by subsequent selection of separate colonies stable to the action of 2 Н 2 O. These colonies were capable to produce L-phenylalanine. L-phenylalanine was extracted from growth medium by extraction with isopropanol with the subsequent crystallization in ethanol (output 0.65 g/l). The developed method of microbial synthesis allows to obtain deuterium labelled L-phenylalanine with different levels of isotopic enrichment, depending on concentration of 2 Н 2 O in growth media, from 17% (on growth medium with 24,5% 2 Н 2 O) up to 75% (on growth medium with 98% 2 Н 2 O) of deuterium in the molecule that is confirmed with the data of the electron impact (EI) mass- spectrometry analysis of methyl ethers of N-dimethylamino(naphthalene)-5-sulfochloride (dansyl) phenylalanine in these experimental conditions.

  15. Peptide-Column Interactions and Their Influence on Back Exchange Rates in Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheff, Joey G.; Rey, Martial; Schriemer, David C.

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) methods generate useful information on protein structure and dynamics, ideally at the individual residue level. Most MS-based HDX methods involve a rapid proteolytic digestion followed by LC/MS analysis, with exchange kinetics monitored at the peptide level. Localizing specific sites of HDX is usually restricted to a resolution the size of the host peptide because gas-phase processes can scramble deuterium throughout the peptide. Subtractive methods may improve resolution, where deuterium levels of overlapping and nested peptides are used in a subtractive manner to localize exchange to smaller segments. In this study, we explore the underlying assumption of the subtractive method, namely, that the measured back exchange kinetics of a given residue is independent of its host peptide. Using a series of deuterated peptides, we show that secondary structure can be partially retained under quenched conditions, and that interactions between peptides and reversed-phase LC columns may both accelerate and decelerate residue HDX, depending upon peptide sequence and length. Secondary structure is induced through column interactions in peptides with a solution-phase propensity for structure, which has the effect of slowing HDX rates relative to predicted random coil values. Conversely, column interactions can orient random-coil peptide conformers to accelerate HDX, the degree to which correlates with peptide charge in solution, and which can be reversed by using stronger ion pairing reagents. The dependency of these effects on sequence and length suggest that subtractive methods for improving structural resolution in HDX-MS will not offer a straightforward solution for increasing exchange site resolution.

  16. Internal dynamics of DNA - a solid state deuterium NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wen-Chang.

    1989-01-01

    In this dissertation, solid state {sup 2}H NMR spectroscopy has been used to investigate the dynamics of the sodium salt oligonucleotide, (d(CGCGAATTCGCG)){sub 2}, which contains the Eco R1 binding site. Deuterium quadrupole echo line shape and spin-lattice relaxation times were obtained as a function of hydration on three different deuterated samples. In the first sample, (d{sub 12}-(d(CG*CG*A*A*TTCG*CG*)){sub 2}), the C8 proton of all purine in the self-complementary dodecamer were exchanged for deuterons. Specifically labeled thymidine (C6 deuterated) was also synthetically incorporated at the seventh position (counting 5{prime} to 3{prime}) in the sequence (d{sub 2}-(d(CGCGAAT*TCGCG)){sub 2}). In the third sample the C2{double prime} position of the furanose ring of adenosine at the fifth and sixth positions in the same sequence (d{sub 4}-(d(CGCGA*A*TTCGCG)){sub 2}) was deuterium labeled. The static quadrupole coupling constant (e{sup 2}qQ/h) and asymmetry parameter ({eta}) were obtained through the analysis of appropriative motional models from the corresponding monomers studies.

  17. Understanding neutron production in the deuterium dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbe, Brian E-mail: j.chittenden@imperial.ac.uk; Chittenden, Jeremy E-mail: j.chittenden@imperial.ac.uk

    2014-12-15

    The deuterium Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) can produce copious amounts of MeV neutrons and can be used as an efficient neutron source. However, the mechanism by which neutrons are produced within the DPF is poorly understood and this limits our ability to optimize the device. In this paper we present results from a computational study aimed at understanding how neutron production occurs in DPFs with a current between 70 kA and 500 kA and which parameters can affect it. A combination of MHD and kinetic tools are used to model the different stages of the DPF implosion. It is shown that the anode shape can significantly affect the structure of the imploding plasma and that instabilities in the implosion lead to the generation of large electric fields at stagnation. These electric fields can accelerate deuterium ions within the stagnating plasma to large (>100 keV) energies leading to reactions with ions in the cold dense plasma. It is shown that the electromagnetic fields present can significantly affect the trajectories of the accelerated ions and the resulting neutron production.

  18. Understanding neutron production in the deuterium dense plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2014-12-01

    The deuterium Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) can produce copious amounts of MeV neutrons and can be used as an efficient neutron source. However, the mechanism by which neutrons are produced within the DPF is poorly understood and this limits our ability to optimize the device. In this paper we present results from a computational study aimed at understanding how neutron production occurs in DPFs with a current between 70 kA and 500 kA and which parameters can affect it. A combination of MHD and kinetic tools are used to model the different stages of the DPF implosion. It is shown that the anode shape can significantly affect the structure of the imploding plasma and that instabilities in the implosion lead to the generation of large electric fields at stagnation. These electric fields can accelerate deuterium ions within the stagnating plasma to large (>100 keV) energies leading to reactions with ions in the cold dense plasma. It is shown that the electromagnetic fields present can significantly affect the trajectories of the accelerated ions and the resulting neutron production.

  19. Effect of deuterium oxide on junctional membrane channel permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of deuterium oxide on junctional membrane permeability to dichlorofluorescein was examined to determine the mode of transfer of the dye from one cell interior to another in the septate giant axon of earthworm. Dichlorofluorescein was shown to diffuse through the nexus passively and in a hydrated form. Additionally, evidence suggested an alteration of the cell-to-cell channel structure by deuterium/hydrogen exchange. Dichlorofluorescein was rendered impermeant at 6 degrees C in D/sub 2/O and 4 degrees C in H/sub 2/O. Action potentials, however, were capable of propagation from cell to cell at 4 degrees C in D/sub 2/O and H/sub 2/O. The results are consistent with a hydrophilic channel where solute molecules diffuse through the junction (nexus) in a hydrated form. The temperature blocks are presumably brought about by increasing hydration shells around solute and channel proteins with cooling until the solute is rendered too large to diffuse.

  20. Electron Scattering Experiments with Polarized Hydrogen/Deuterium Internal Targets

    SciTech Connect

    van Buuren, L.D.; 97-01 Collaboration

    2000-12-31

    A high-density polarized hydrogen/deuterium internal gas target is presented. The target is based on a setup previously used in electron scattering experiments with tensor-polarized deuterium. To increase the target thickness, new state-of-the-art permanent sextupole magnets and a more powerful pumping system were installed together with a longer (60 cm) and colder ({approximately}70 K) cylindrical storage cell. Electro-nuclear spin observables were measured by scattering longitudinally polarized electrons stored in the AmPS ring (NIFHEF) from the target gas. The product of electron beam and target polarization was determined from the known e{prime}p (quasi) elastic asymmetries. A target thickness of 1.1 {times} 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2} was achieved which with typical beam currents of 110 mA corresponds to a luminosity of about 7.5 {times} 10{sup 31} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. Target and beam polarizations up to 0.7 and 0.65, respectively, were obtained.

  1. A neutron diagnostic for high current deuterium beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rebai, M.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Cavenago, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Tollin, M.; Croci, G.; Gervasini, G.; Ghezzi, F.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Murtas, F.; Gorini, G.

    2012-02-15

    A neutron diagnostic for high current deuterium beams is proposed for installation on the spectral shear interferometry for direct electric field reconstruction (SPIDER, Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) test beam facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission on the beam dump surface by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses gas electron multiplier detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. The cathode is made of a thin polythene film and an aluminium film; it is designed for detection of neutrons of energy >2.2 MeV with an incidence angle < 45 deg. CNESM was designed on the basis of simulations of the different steps from the deuteron beam interaction with the beam dump to the neutron detection in the nGEM. Neutron scattering was simulated with the MCNPX code. CNESM on SPIDER is a first step towards the application of this diagnostic technique to the MITICA beam test facility, where it will be used to resolve the horizontal profile of the beam intensity.

  2. Characterization of human plasma proteome dynamics using deuterium oxide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ding; Liem, David A; Lau, Edward; Ng, Dominic CM; Bleakley, Brian J; Cadeiras, Martin; Deng, Mario C; Lam, Maggie PY; Ping, Peipei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High-throughput quantification of human protein turnover via in vivo administration of deuterium oxide (2H2O) is a powerful new approach to examine potential disease mechanisms. Its immediate clinical translation is contingent upon characterizations of the safety and hemodynamic effects of in vivo administration of 2H2O to human subjects. Experimental design We recruited 10 healthy human subjects with a broad demographic variety to evaluate the safety, feasibility, efficacy, and reproducibility of 2H2O intake for studying protein dynamics. We designed a protocol where each subject orally consumed weight-adjusted doses of 70% 2H2O daily for 14 days to enrich body water and proteins with deuterium. Plasma proteome dynamics was measured using a high-resolution MS method we recently developed. Results This protocol was successfully applied in 10 human subjects to characterize the endogenous turnover rates of 542 human plasma proteins, the largest such human dataset to-date. Throughout the study, we did not detect physiological effects or signs of discomfort from 2H2O consumption. Conclusions and clinical relevance Our investigation supports the utility of a 2H2O intake protocol that is safe, accessible, and effective for clinical investigations of large-scale human protein turnover dynamics. This workflow shows promising clinical translational value for examining plasma protein dynamics in human diseases. PMID:24946186

  3. Preparation and characterization of deuterium-labeled glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Naggi, A; Casu, B; Crippa, B; Magnaghi, S; Silvestro, L; Torri, G

    1994-01-01

    Heparin, NAcHep, DS, and CS were labeled with deuterium by N-reacetylating, with the deuterated acetic anhydride (CD3CO)2O, GAGs previously N-deacetylated (by hydrazinolysis) to the desired extent. Degrees of deuteration of the present preparations, as determined by 2H- and 1H-NMR were 15%, 51%, 49%, and 79% for heparin, NAcHep, DS, and CS, respectively. The NMR analysis (including the 13C spectra) of the labeled products indicated that deuterium labeling did not involve any substantial modification of the GAG structures. Also NMR signals associated with specific sequences of heparin for antithrombin and of DS for heparin cofactor II were essentially the same in the unlabeled and in the deuterated GAGs. The substantial retention of the original structure was confirmed by data on the degree of sulfation (by conductimetry) and on the electrophoretic mobility in acid buffer. On the other hand, HPLC/SEC data indicated some depolymerization of heparin and DS in the N-deacetylation step of the labeling reactions. HPLC/MS spectrometry permitted a clear identification of disaccharide and tetrasaccharide fragments obtained from deuterated GAGs by enzymic (heparinase, chondroitinase ABC) or chemical depolymerization (deaminative cleavage, Smith degradation), opening new prospects for studies of human pharmacokinetics, with differentiation of exogenous from endogenous GAGs.

  4. Phototransformation and dark reversion of phytochrome in deuterium oxide.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, H K; Song, P S

    1981-07-21

    The photostationary equilibrium between the Pr and Pfr forms of phytochrome shows a strong solvent deuterium isotope effect. Phytochrome transformation from the Pr to the Pfr form exhibits a small deuterium isotope effect, in Tris-D2O upon irradiation with red light, only after a photocycling of the phytochrome. In contrast, both the photoreversion and dark reversion of Pfr show an enhanced rate in D2O. In addition to the shift in the photostationary equilibrium in D2O, another pronounced effect of D2O on phytochrome is reflected in a significant enhancement of the fluorescence quantum yield of phytochrome (Pr). This result is interpreted in terms of the primary reaction involving an intramolecular proton transfer and its consequence in the phototransformation of phytochrome. It is further proposed that a tyrosyl residue acts as a general acid catalyst in the Pr to Pfr phototransformation, which is slower in D2O than in H2O. The D2O solvent isotope effect on the photoreversion and dark reversion of Pfr is explained on the basis of acid catalysis, probably a specific acid catalysis by deuteronium ion.

  5. A high deuterium abundance at redshift z = 0.7.

    PubMed

    Webb, J K; Carswell, R F; Lanzetta, K M; Ferlet, R; Lemoine, M; Vidal-Madjar, A; Bowen, D V

    1997-07-17

    Of the light elements, the primordial abundance of deuterium relative to hydrogen, (D/H)p, provides the most sensitive diagnostic for the cosmological mass density parameter, omegaB. Recent high-redshift D/H measurements are highly discrepant, although this may reflect observational uncertainties. The larger primordial D/H values imply a low omegaB (requiring the Universe to be dominated by non-baryonic matter), and cause problems for galactic chemical evolution models, which have difficulty in reproducing the steep decline in D/H to the present-day values. Conversely, the lower D/H values measured at high redshift imply an omegaB greater than that derived from 7Li and 4He abundance measurements, and may require a deuterium-abundance evolution that is too low to easily explain. Here we report the first measurement of D/H at intermediate redshift (z = 0.7010), in a gas cloud selected to minimize observational uncertainties. Our analysis yields a value of D/H ((2.0 +/- 0.5) x 10[-4]) which is at the upper end of the range of values measured at high redshifts. This finding, together with other independent observations, suggests that there may be inhomogeneity in (D/H)p of at least a factor of ten.

  6. A high deuterium abundance at redshift z = 0.7.

    PubMed

    Webb, J K; Carswell, R F; Lanzetta, K M; Ferlet, R; Lemoine, M; Vidal-Madjar, A; Bowen, D V

    1997-07-17

    Of the light elements, the primordial abundance of deuterium relative to hydrogen, (D/H)p, provides the most sensitive diagnostic for the cosmological mass density parameter, omegaB. Recent high-redshift D/H measurements are highly discrepant, although this may reflect observational uncertainties. The larger primordial D/H values imply a low omegaB (requiring the Universe to be dominated by non-baryonic matter), and cause problems for galactic chemical evolution models, which have difficulty in reproducing the steep decline in D/H to the present-day values. Conversely, the lower D/H values measured at high redshift imply an omegaB greater than that derived from 7Li and 4He abundance measurements, and may require a deuterium-abundance evolution that is too low to easily explain. Here we report the first measurement of D/H at intermediate redshift (z = 0.7010), in a gas cloud selected to minimize observational uncertainties. Our analysis yields a value of D/H ((2.0 +/- 0.5) x 10[-4]) which is at the upper end of the range of values measured at high redshifts. This finding, together with other independent observations, suggests that there may be inhomogeneity in (D/H)p of at least a factor of ten. PMID:9230433

  7. The Abundance and Distribution of Deuterium on Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Jaffel, Lotfi

    1996-07-01

    We propose to obtain high resolution profiles of the D Lymanalpha line emitted by the limb of the upper atmosphere Saturn,using the GHRS Echelle A and the LSA. Ourtechnique consists in a radial drift of the LSA slit acrossthe limb of the planet. This is much like the very efficientoccultation technique although we record reflected instead oftransmitted light. As the deuterium emission is opticallythin, the analysis of the resulting profiles will provide,through our photochemistry models and radiative transfercalculations, the possibility for the first time to retrievethe deuterium scale height and abundance at least in four locationsof the upper atmosphere of Saturn. Scale heights at differentlocations derived from the D Ly-alpha emission, and the analysis of theH Ly-alpha profile, obtained with each limb observation, will accuratelyprovide the H total column density. A precise estimate of theD/H ratio will therefore be inferred. Recently, wesuccessfully applied the technique to observe the limb ofJupiter with the medium resolution grating G160M. The inferredD/H ratio ~ 6+/- 1 * 10^-5 seems to support the measurementsmade through HD/H2 rather than CH3D/CH4. The uncertainty onthis value could be reduced if high resolution observationswith Echelle A are conducted. This should confirm the newlyderived ratio and check the D/H ratio for Saturn.Ultimately, this will help to refine the scenario on theformation and the evolution our Solar System 4.5 billionsyears ago.

  8. Water behavior in bacterial spores by deuterium NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Friedline, Anthony W; Zachariah, Malcolm M; Johnson, Karen; Thomas, Kieth J; Middaugh, Amy N; Garimella, Ravindranath; Powell, Douglas R; Vaishampayan, Parag A; Rice, Charles V

    2014-07-31

    Dormant bacterial spores are able to survive long periods of time without nutrients, withstand harsh environmental conditions, and germinate into metabolically active bacteria when conditions are favorable. Numerous factors influence this hardiness, including the spore structure and the presence of compounds to protect DNA from damage. It is known that the water content of the spore core plays a role in resistance to degradation, but the exact state of water inside the core is a subject of discussion. Two main theories present themselves: either the water in the spore core is mostly immobile and the core and its components are in a glassy state, or the core is a gel with mobile water around components which themselves have limited mobility. Using deuterium solid-state NMR experiments, we examine the nature of the water in the spore core. Our data show the presence of unbound water, bound water, and deuterated biomolecules that also contain labile deuterons. Deuterium-hydrogen exchange experiments show that most of these deuterons are inaccessible by external water. We believe that these unreachable deuterons are in a chemical bonding state that prevents exchange. Variable-temperature NMR results suggest that the spore core is more rigid than would be expected for a gel-like state. However, our rigid core interpretation may only apply to dried spores whereas a gel core may exist in aqueous suspension. Nonetheless, the gel core, if present, is inaccessible to external water.

  9. Mass separation of deuterium and helium with conventional quadrupole mass spectrometer by using varied ionization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yaowei; Hu, Jiansheng; Wan, Zhao; Wu, Jinhua; Wang, Houyin; Cao, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Deuterium pressure in deuterium-helium mixture gas is successfully measured by a common quadrupole mass spectrometer (model: RGA200) with a resolution of ˜0.5 atomic mass unit (AMU), by using varied ionization energy together with new developed software and dedicated calibration for RGA200. The new software is developed by using MATLAB with the new functions: electron energy (EE) scanning, deuterium partial pressure measurement, and automatic data saving. RGA200 with new software is calibrated in pure deuterium and pure helium 1.0 × 10-6-5.0 × 10-2 Pa, and the relation between pressure and ion current of AMU4 under EE = 25 eV and EE = 70 eV is obtained. From the calibration result and RGA200 scanning with varied ionization energy in deuterium and helium mixture gas, both deuterium partial pressures (PD2) and helium partial pressure (PHe) could be obtained. The result shows that deuterium partial pressure could be measured if PD2 > 10-6 Pa (limited by ultimate pressure of calibration vessel), and helium pressure could be measured only if PHe/PD2 > 0.45, and the measurement error is evaluated as 15%. This method is successfully employed in EAST 2015 summer campaign to monitor deuterium outgassing/desorption during helium discharge cleaning.

  10. Development of positron annihilation spectroscopy for investigating deuterium decorated voids in neutron-irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, C. N.; Shimada, M.; Merrill, B. J.; Akers, D. W.; Hatano, Y.

    2015-08-01

    The present work is a continuation of a recent research to develop and optimize positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) for characterizing neutron-irradiated tungsten. Tungsten samples were exposed to neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and damaged to 0.025 and 0.3 dpa. Subsequently, they were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory. The implanted deuterium was desorbed through sample heating to 900 °C, and Doppler broadening (DB)-PAS was performed both before and after heating. Results show that deuterium impregnated tungsten is identified as having a smaller S-parameter. The S-parameter increases after deuterium desorption. Microstructural changes also occur during sample heating. These effects can be isolated from deuterium desorption by comparing the S-parameters from the deuterium-free back face with the deuterium-implanted front face. The application of using DB-PAS to examine deuterium retention in tungsten is examined.

  11. Mass separation of deuterium and helium with conventional quadrupole mass spectrometer by using varied ionization energy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yaowei; Hu, Jiansheng; Wan, Zhao; Wu, Jinhua; Wang, Houyin; Cao, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Deuterium pressure in deuterium-helium mixture gas is successfully measured by a common quadrupole mass spectrometer (model: RGA200) with a resolution of ∼0.5 atomic mass unit (AMU), by using varied ionization energy together with new developed software and dedicated calibration for RGA200. The new software is developed by using MATLAB with the new functions: electron energy (EE) scanning, deuterium partial pressure measurement, and automatic data saving. RGA200 with new software is calibrated in pure deuterium and pure helium 1.0 × 10(-6)-5.0 × 10(-2) Pa, and the relation between pressure and ion current of AMU4 under EE = 25 eV and EE = 70 eV is obtained. From the calibration result and RGA200 scanning with varied ionization energy in deuterium and helium mixture gas, both deuterium partial pressures (P(D2)) and helium partial pressure (P(He)) could be obtained. The result shows that deuterium partial pressure could be measured if P(D2) > 10(-6) Pa (limited by ultimate pressure of calibration vessel), and helium pressure could be measured only if P(He)/P(D2) > 0.45, and the measurement error is evaluated as 15%. This method is successfully employed in EAST 2015 summer campaign to monitor deuterium outgassing/desorption during helium discharge cleaning.

  12. Measurement of deuterium-labeled phylloquinone in plasma by LC-APCI-MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deuterium-labeled vegetables were fed to humans for the measurement of both unlabeled and deuterium-labeled phylloquinone in plasma. We developed a technique to determine the quantities of these compounds using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LC...

  13. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of the Deuterium Exchange in Classical Keto-Enol Tautomeric Equilibrium Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Michael A.; Waner, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    An extension of the classic keto-enol tautomerization of beta-dicarbonyl compounds into a kinetic analysis of deuterium exchange is presented. It is shown that acetylacetone and ethyl acetoacetate undergo nearly complete deuterium exchange of the alpha-methylene carbon when dissolved in methanol-d[subscript 4]. The extent of deuteration may be…

  14. Differentiating the role of lithium and oxygen in retaining deuterium on lithiated graphite plasma-facing components

    SciTech Connect

    C.N. Taylor; J. P. Allain; P. S. Krstic; J. Dadras; C. H. Skinner; K. E. Luitjohan

    2013-11-01

    Laboratory experiments have been used to investigate the fundamental interactions responsible for deuterium retention in lithiated graphite. Oxygen was found to be present and play a key role in experiments that simulated NSTX lithium conditioning, where the atomic surface concentration can increase to >40% when deuterium retention chemistry is observed. Quantum-classical molecular dynamic simulations elucidated this oxygen-deuterium effect and showed that oxygen retains significantly more deuterium than lithium in a simulated matrix with 20% lithium, 20% oxygen, and 60% carbon. Simulations further show that deuterium retention is even higher when lithium is removed from the matrix. Experiments artificially increased the oxygen content in graphite to approximately 16% and then bombarded with deuterium. XPS showed depletion of the oxygen and no enhanced deuterium retention, thus demonstrating that lithium is essential in retaining the oxygen that thereby retains deuterium.

  15. Differentiating the role of lithium and oxygen in retaining deuterium on lithiated graphite plasma-facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C. N.; Allain, J. P.; Luitjohan, K. E.; Krstic, P. S.; Dadras, J.; Skinner, C. H.

    2014-05-15

    Laboratory experiments have been used to investigate the fundamental interactions responsible for deuterium retention in lithiated graphite. Oxygen was found to be present and play a key role in experiments that simulated NSTX lithium conditioning, where the atomic surface concentration can increase to >40% when deuterium retention chemistry is observed. Quantum-classical molecular dynamic simulations elucidated this oxygen-deuterium effect and showed that oxygen retains significantly more deuterium than lithium in a simulated matrix with 20% lithium, 20% oxygen, and 60% carbon. Simulations further show that deuterium retention is even higher when lithium is removed from the matrix. Experiments artificially increased the oxygen content in graphite to ∼16% and then bombarded with deuterium. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed depletion of the oxygen and no enhanced deuterium retention, thus demonstrating that lithium is essential in retaining the oxygen that thereby retains deuterium.

  16. Disassembly time of deuterium-cluster-fusion plasma irradiated by an intense laser pulse

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bang, W.

    2015-07-02

    Energetic deuterium ions from large deuterium clusters (>10 nm diameter) irradiated by an intense laser pulse (>10¹⁶ W/cm²) produce DD fusion neutrons for a time interval determined by the geometry of the resulting fusion plasma. We show an analytical solution of this time interval, the plasma disassembly time, for deuterium plasmas that are cylindrical in shape. Assuming a symmetrically expanding deuterium plasma, we calculate the expected fusion neutron yield and compare with an independent calculation of the yield using the concept of a finite confinement time at a fixed plasma density. The calculated neutron yields agree quantitatively with the availablemore » experimental data. Our one-dimensional simulations indicate that one could expect a tenfold increase in total neutron yield by magnetically confining a 10 - keV deuterium fusion plasma for 10 ns.« less

  17. Disassembly time of deuterium-cluster-fusion plasma irradiated by an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.

    2015-07-02

    Energetic deuterium ions from large deuterium clusters (>10 nm diameter) irradiated by an intense laser pulse (>10¹⁶ W/cm²) produce DD fusion neutrons for a time interval determined by the geometry of the resulting fusion plasma. We show an analytical solution of this time interval, the plasma disassembly time, for deuterium plasmas that are cylindrical in shape. Assuming a symmetrically expanding deuterium plasma, we calculate the expected fusion neutron yield and compare with an independent calculation of the yield using the concept of a finite confinement time at a fixed plasma density. The calculated neutron yields agree quantitatively with the available experimental data. Our one-dimensional simulations indicate that one could expect a tenfold increase in total neutron yield by magnetically confining a 10 - keV deuterium fusion plasma for 10 ns.

  18. Use of deuterium labelled glucose in evaluating the pathway of hepatic glycogen synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M.N.; Masuoka, L.K.; deRopp, J.S.; Jones, A.D.

    1989-03-15

    Deuterium labelled glucose has been used to study the pathway of hepatic glycogen synthesis during the fasted-refed transition in rats. Deuterium enrichment of liver glycogen was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance as well as mass spectroscopy. Sixty minutes after oral administration of deuterated glucose to fasted rats, the portal vein blood was fully enriched with deuterated glucose. Despite this, less than half of the glucose molecules incorporated into liver glycogen contained deuterium. The loss of deuterium label from glucose is consistent with hepatic glycogen synthesis by an indirect pathway requiring prior metabolism of glucose. The use of deuterium labelled glucose may prove to be a useful probe to study hepatic glycogen metabolism. Its use may also find application in the study of liver glycogen metabolism in humans by a noninvasive means.

  19. Deuterium isotopic exchangeability of resin and amber at low thermal stress under hydrous conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, G.; Tappert, R.; Wolfe, A. P.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrous deuterium-exchange experiments have shown that a significant fraction of the original D/H composition of bulk kerogens, bitumens and expelled oils may participate in isotopic exchange reactions during burial diagenesis. However, it is unknown to what extent plant-derived secondary metabolites, namely resins and their fossil counterpart amber, exchange hydrogen isotopes following their biosynthesis. This situation hinders the application of resin D/H measurements in paleoenvironmental reconstruction. Here, we assess explicitly hydrogen exchange in resins and ambers using a series of immersion experiments in deuterated (D-enriched) waters over a period of several months at several temperatures. We are especially interested in assessing whether significant H-isotopic exchange occurs between resins and meteoric waters during early thermal maturation and polymerization. At 90°C, equivalent to ~3km of burial in most diagenetic regimes, modern conifer and angiosperm resins have an average post-metabolic H exchange of 4.6%, compared to only 1.1% for mature, polymerized ambers. At 55°C the degree of exchange is considerably lower: 1.9% for resins and 0.6% for ambers. These results indicate that most D/H isotopic exchange occurs prior to polymerization reactions, thereby confirming that D/H measurements from amber constitute a potentially sensitive proxy for environmental change.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of explosive detection system based on a Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Bergaoui, K; Reguigui, N; Gary, C K; Brown, C; Cremer, J T; Vainionpaa, J H; Piestrup, M A

    2014-12-01

    An explosive detection system based on a Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) neutron generator has been simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP5). Nuclear-based explosive detection methods can detect explosives by identifying their elemental components, especially nitrogen. Thermal neutron capture reactions have been used for detecting prompt gamma emission (10.82MeV) following radiative neutron capture by (14)N nuclei. The explosive detection system was built based on a fully high-voltage-shielded, axial D-D neutron generator with a radio frequency (RF) driven ion source and nominal yield of about 10(10) fast neutrons per second (E=2.5MeV). Polyethylene and paraffin were used as moderators with borated polyethylene and lead as neutron and gamma ray shielding, respectively. The shape and the thickness of the moderators and shields are optimized to produce the highest thermal neutron flux at the position of the explosive and the minimum total dose at the outer surfaces of the explosive detection system walls. In addition, simulation of the response functions of NaI, BGO, and LaBr3-based γ-ray detectors to different explosives is described.

  1. Deuterium Retention and Release from Highly Irradiated Annealed Tungsten After Exposure to a Deuterium DC Glow Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, Brian M.; Causey, Rion; Maloy, S A.

    2004-08-01

    Samples taken from tungsten rods irradiated by 800 MeV protons in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center beam line have been used in experiments to study the effects of radiation damage and subsequent annealing on the retention of hydrogen isotopes. The tungsten samples had been originally irradiated to proton doses of approximately 0.3 and 8 dpa. These samples were first annealed and then exposed to energetic deuterium ions using a DC glow discharge. Following exposure, the samples were subjected to a linear temperature ramp from {approx}300 K to {approx}1500 K, and the offgas analyzed by mass spectrometry. The results indicate that annealing to a temperature of only 1273 K for 6 hours effectively removed all irradiation-produced traps, and also indicated that hydrogen trapping at voids is not as prevalent as had been assumed. Modeling the deuterium release suggests that most of the trapping occurred in a combination of near-surface 1.4 eV traps, a low concentration of uniform 1.4 eV traps, and 0.95 eV traps likely resulting from oxygen diffusion from the original water-cooled irradiation environment.

  2. Application of a pyroprobe–deuterium NMR system: Deuterium tracing and mechanistic study of upgrading process for lignin model compounds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ben, Haoxi; Jarvis, Mark W.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Gjersing, Erica L.; Sturgeon, Matthew R.; Foust, Thomas D.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Biddy, Mary J.

    2016-03-03

    In this study, a pyroprobe–deuterium (2H) NMR system has been used to identify isotopomer products formed during the deuteration and ring opening of lignin model compounds. Several common model compounds for lignin and its upgraded products, including guaiacol, syringol, toluene, p-xylene, phenol, catechol, cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, and methylcyclopentane, have been examined for selective ring opening. Similar pathways for upgrading of toluene and p-xylene has been found, which will undergo hydrogenation, methyl group elimination, and ring opening process, and benzene, cyclohexane, and methylcyclohexane have been found as major intermediates before ring opening. Very interestingly, the 2H NMR analysis for the deuterium-traced ringmore » opening of catechol on Ir/γ-Al2O3 is almost identical to the ring opening process for phenol. The ring opening processes for guaiacol and syringol appeared to be very complicated, as expected. As a result, benzene, phenol, toluene, cyclohexane, and methylcyclohexane have been determined to be the major products.« less

  3. Pyrolysis compound specific isotopic analysis (δ13C and δD Py-CSIA) of soil organic matter size fractions under four vegetation covers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; González-Vila, Francisco J.; Almendros, Gonzalo; De la Rosa, José M.; González-Pérez, José A.

    2015-04-01

    specific SOM compounds released directly from pyrolysis (Py-CSIA); lipids (Alkenes), aromatic unspecific (alkylphenols), lignin (methoxyphenols) and polysaccharides (anhydrosugars) derived molecules. For all coarse fractions the δ13C and δD values had the same general behavior with sugar derived molecules being enriched in the heavy isotope. Regarding alkenes δ13C isotopic signature, this was variable and dependent upon the main cover vegetation that may reflect different fractionations at different synthesis stages (Chikaraishi & Naraoka, 2001), The δD values for specific compounds had a similar behavior to that for δ13C, being the sugar derived compounds the most deuterium enriched in comparison with lipid and lignin derived pyrolysis products. A conspicuous δD fractionation was observed for the sugar derived compounds in the fine fractions as compared with the coarse ones, with a depletion in deuterium, mainly for the PA sample where the depletion was the highest (c. -140 ‰). This may points to the occurrence of biological reworking with a higher microbiological activity fixing the lighter isotope in the soil fine organic fractions. It is known that lipid hydrogen is deuterium depleted relative to bulk organic hydrogen (Smith and Epstein, 1970). In line with this, in our study the lipid derived compounds had the largest deuterium depleted signature with a difference between bulk and lipid δD values was c. -35‰. This fractionation was highest in Pine (PP) and Rockrose (HH). The combination of traditional techniques for the study of SOM i.e. Py-GC/MS and IRMS, with new hyphenated analytical pyrolysis techniques i.e. Py-CSIA opens new possibilities and windows of information in SOM research. Our findings points to the occurrence of more or less complex processes that affects SOM chemical characteristics; whereas the coarse fraction resembles the chemical structure of the above vegetation, this SOM "memory" is less defined in the fine fractions, probably due to

  4. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  5. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  6. Increased Deuterium Discrimination in Micronesian Mangroves Growing at High Salinity: Insights from Leaf and Xylem Water Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, N.; Sachs, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios of plant leaf waxes are increasingly used as a proxy for past hydrologic variability. However, a number of environmental variables influence the net fractionation between leaf waxes and the environmental water from which their hydrogen is ultimately derived. Salinity effects are of particular importance in coastal tropical and subtropical settings, where deuterium discrimination increases by 1.5‰ per salinity unit in the leaf wax n-alkanes of the grey mangrove, Avicennia marina. It is not possible to tell whether sedimentary n-alkanes are from mangrove plants, or from terrestrial plants that are not exposed to salt water. The salinity component of hydrogen isotope fractionation therefore complicates leaf wax hydrogen isotopes in most tropical coastal marine and lacustrine settings. However, a strong relationship between salinity and a more specific mangrove lipid biomarker could provide the basis for a paleosalinity and water isotope proxy in low-latitude coastal environments. Here we present results from a calibration study of Rhizophora spp. (red mangroves) growing on the Micronesian islands of Pohnpei and Palau, using taraxerol, a biomarker that is largely specific to this genus in these settings. We observed an increase in net deuterium discrimination between surface water and taraxerol of 1.2‰ per salinity unit. We investigated potential mechanisms for this increase at high salinity by measuring the hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf and xylem water from Rhizophora spp. Contrary to most terrestrial plants, xylem water in these trees is depleted relative to surface water, with greater relative depletion at higher salinities. This could be the result of increased deuterium discrimination during water uptake, as a greater percentage of salt is excluded by roots at higher salinity. Alternatively, it could indicate that some of the water in the xylem is from relatively depleted freshwater (rain and or dew) that enters the plant

  7. Soot Volume Fraction Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique is described for the full-field determination of soot volume fractions via laser extinction measurements. This technique differs from previously reported point-wise methods in that a two-dimensional array (i.e., image) of data is acquired simultaneously. In this fashion, the net data rate is increased, allowing the study of time-dependent phenomena and the investigation of spatial and temporal correlations. A telecentric imaging configuration is employed to provide depth-invariant magnification and to permit the specification of the collection angle for scattered light. To improve the threshold measurement sensitivity, a method is employed to suppress undesirable coherent imaging effects. A discussion of the tomographic inversion process is provided, including the results obtained from numerical simulation. Results obtained with this method from an ethylene diffusion flame are shown to be in close agreement with those previously obtained by sequential point-wise interrogation.

  8. Measurements of the deuterium ion toroidal rotation in the DIII-D tokamak and comparison to neoclassical theory

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, B. A.; Pablant, N. A.; Solomon, W. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Lanctot, M. J.

    2012-05-15

    Bulk ion toroidal rotation plays a critical role in controlling microturbulence and MHD stability as well as yielding important insight into angular momentum transport and the investigation of intrinsic rotation. So far, our understanding of bulk plasma flow in hydrogenic plasmas has been inferred from impurity ion velocity measurements and neoclassical theoretical calculations. However, the validity of these inferences has not been tested rigorously through direct measurement of the main-ion rotation in deuterium plasmas, particularly in regions of the plasma with steep pressure gradients where very large differences can be expected between bulk ion and impurity rotation. New advances in the analysis of wavelength-resolved D{sub {alpha}} emission on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 807 (2002)] have enabled accurate measurements of the main-ion (deuteron) temperature and toroidal rotation. The D{sub {alpha}} emission spectrum is accurately fit using a model that incorporates thermal deuterium charge exchange, beam emission, and fast ion D{sub {alpha}} (FIDA) emission spectra. Simultaneous spectral measurements of counter current injected and co current injected neutral beams permit a direct determination of the deuterium toroidal velocity. Time-dependent collisional radiative modeling of the photoemission process is in quantitative agreement with measured spectral characteristics. L-mode discharges with low beam ion densities and broad thermal pressure profiles exhibit deuteron temperature and toroidal rotation velocities similar to carbon. However, intrinsic rotation H-mode conditions and plasmas with internal transport barriers exhibit differences between core deuteron and carbon rotation which are inconsistent with the sign and magnitude of the neoclassical predictions.

  9. Pyrolysis compound specific isotopic analysis (δ13C and δD Py-CSIA) of soil organic matter size fractions under four vegetation covers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; González-Vila, Francisco J.; Almendros, Gonzalo; De la Rosa, José M.; González-Pérez, José A.

    2015-04-01

    specific SOM compounds released directly from pyrolysis (Py-CSIA); lipids (Alkenes), aromatic unspecific (alkylphenols), lignin (methoxyphenols) and polysaccharides (anhydrosugars) derived molecules. For all coarse fractions the δ13C and δD values had the same general behavior with sugar derived molecules being enriched in the heavy isotope. Regarding alkenes δ13C isotopic signature, this was variable and dependent upon the main cover vegetation that may reflect different fractionations at different synthesis stages (Chikaraishi & Naraoka, 2001), The δD values for specific compounds had a similar behavior to that for δ13C, being the sugar derived compounds the most deuterium enriched in comparison with lipid and lignin derived pyrolysis products. A conspicuous δD fractionation was observed for the sugar derived compounds in the fine fractions as compared with the coarse ones, with a depletion in deuterium, mainly for the PA sample where the depletion was the highest (c. -140 ‰). This may points to the occurrence of biological reworking with a higher microbiological activity fixing the lighter isotope in the soil fine organic fractions. It is known that lipid hydrogen is deuterium depleted relative to bulk organic hydrogen (Smith and Epstein, 1970). In line with this, in our study the lipid derived compounds had the largest deuterium depleted signature with a difference between bulk and lipid δD values was c. -35‰. This fractionation was highest in Pine (PP) and Rockrose (HH). The combination of traditional techniques for the study of SOM i.e. Py-GC/MS and IRMS, with new hyphenated analytical pyrolysis techniques i.e. Py-CSIA opens new possibilities and windows of information in SOM research. Our findings points to the occurrence of more or less complex processes that affects SOM chemical characteristics; whereas the coarse fraction resembles the chemical structure of the above vegetation, this SOM "memory" is less defined in the fine fractions, probably due to

  10. Efficient synthesis of deuterium labeled hydroxyzine and aripiprazole.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Mohit; Sandbhor, Mahendra; Wozniak, Andrew

    2015-06-15

    Hydroxyzine and aripiprazole are active pharmaceutical ingredients that have been largely acknowledged for their antipsychotic properties. Deuterium labeled isotopes of hydroxyzine and aripiprazole are internal standards that can aid in the further research of non-isotopic forms via quantification analysis using HPLC-MS/MS. The synthesis of hydroxyzine-d8 was accomplished by coupling piperazine-d8 with 4-chlorobenzhydryl chloride followed by the reaction of the first intermediate with 2-(2-chloroethoxy) ethanol to afford 11.7% of hydroxyzine-d8 with 99.5% purity. The synthesis of aripiprazole-d8 was also achieved in two steps. 1,4-Dibromobutane-d8 reacted with 7-hydroxy-3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone. The first intermediate was then coupled with 1-(2, 3-dichlorophenyl)piperazine hydrochloride to produce 33.4% of aripiprazole-d8 with 99.93% purity.

  11. DEUTERIUM CHEMISTRY IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. THE INNER 30 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Willacy, K.; Woods, P. M. E-mail: Paul.Woods@manchester.ac.u

    2009-09-20

    We present the results of models of the chemistry, including deuterium, in the inner regions of protostellar disks. We find good agreement with recent gas-phase observations of several (non-deuterated) species. We also compare our results with observations of comets and find that in the absence of other processing, e.g., in the accretion shock at the surface of the disk, or by mixing in the disk, the calculated D/H ratios in ices are higher than measured and reflect the D/H ratio set in the molecular cloud phase. Our models give quite different abundances and molecular distributions to other inner disk models because of the differences in physical conditions in the model disk. This emphasizes how changes in the assumptions about the density and temperature distribution can radically affect the results of chemical models.

  12. Near-threshold photoproduction of Φ mesons from deuterium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qian, X.; Chen, W.; Gao, H.; Hicks, K.; Kramer, K.; Laget, J. M.; Mibe, T.; Qiang, Y.; Stepanyan, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; et al

    2011-01-05

    In this report, we measure the differential cross section onmore » $$\\phi$$-meson photoproduction from deuterium near the production threshold for a proton using the CLAS detector and a tagged-photon beam in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The measurement was carried out by a triple coincidence detection of a proton, $K^+$ and $K^-$ near the theoretical production threshold of 1.57 GeV. Moreover, the extracted differential cross sections $$\\frac{d\\sigma}{dt}$$ for the initial photon energy from 1.65-1.75 GeV are consistent with predictions based on a quasifree mechanism. Ultimately, this experiment establishes a baseline for a future experimental search for an exotic $$\\phi$$-N bound state from heavier nuclear targets utilizing subthreshold/near-threshold production of $$\\phi$$ mesons.« less

  13. Interstellar Processes Leading to Molecular Deuterium Enrichment and Their Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Large deuterium (D) enrichments in meteoritic materials indicate that interstellar organic materials survived incorporation into parent bodies within the forming Solar System. These enrichments are likelier due to one or more of four distinct astrochemical processes. These are (1) low temperature gas phase ion-molecule reactions; (2) low temperature gas-grain reactions; (3) gas phase unimolecular photodissociation, and (4) ultraviolet photolysis in D-enriched ice mantles. Each of these processes should be associated with molecular carriers having, distinct regiochemical signatures (D placement on the product molecules, correlation with specific chemical functionalities, etc.). These processes are reviewed and specific spectroscopic signatures for the detection of these processes in space are identified and described.

  14. Near-threshold photoproduction of Φ mesons from deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, X.; Chen, W.; Gao, H.; Hicks, K.; Kramer, K.; Laget, J. M.; Mibe, T.; Qiang, Y.; Stepanyan, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Xu, W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Amaryan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bellis, M.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Careccia, S. L.; Carman, D. S.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dhamija, S.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; Eugenio, P.; Fegan, S.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hassall, N.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Konczykowski, P.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Livingston, K.; Martinez, D.; Mayer, M.; McAndrew, J.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mikhailov, K.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moreno, B.; Moriya, K.; Morrison, B.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, I.; Niroula, M. R.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, C. E.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voutier, E.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2011-01-05

    In this report, we measure the differential cross section on $\\phi$-meson photoproduction from deuterium near the production threshold for a proton using the CLAS detector and a tagged-photon beam in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The measurement was carried out by a triple coincidence detection of a proton, $K^+$ and $K^-$ near the theoretical production threshold of 1.57 GeV. Moreover, the extracted differential cross sections $\\frac{d\\sigma}{dt}$ for the initial photon energy from 1.65-1.75 GeV are consistent with predictions based on a quasifree mechanism. Ultimately, this experiment establishes a baseline for a future experimental search for an exotic $\\phi$-N bound state from heavier nuclear targets utilizing subthreshold/near-threshold production of $\\phi$ mesons.

  15. Fuel provision for nonbreeding deuterium-tritium fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Katsurai, M.

    1980-01-01

    Nonbreeding D-T reactors have decisive advantages in minimum size, unit cost, variety of applications, and ease of heat removal over reactors using any other fusion cycle, and significant advantages in environmental and safety characteristics over breeding D-T reactors. Considerations of relative energy production demonstrate that the most favorable source of tritium for a widely deployed system of nonbreeding D-T reactors is the very large (approx. 10 GW thermal) semi-catalyzed-deuterium (SCD), or sub-SCD reactor, where none of the escaping /sup 3/He (> 95%) or tritium (< 25%) is reinjected for burn-up. Feasibility of the ignited SCD tokamak reactor requires spatially averaged betas of 15 to 20% with a magnetic field at the TF coils of 12 to 13 Tesla.

  16. Calculation of deuterium isotope effects in proton transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiner, Steve

    1994-05-01

    Various levels of theory are tested for the purpose of computing the rate constant for proton transfer reactions. Standard transition state theory is applied to a series of molecules with a progressively more bent intramolecular hydrogen bond. The systems all display similar deuterium isotope effects (DIEs); the larger DIE at low temperature is attributed to zero-point vibrational effects. However, when tunneling is incorporated via a microcanonical approach, a dramatically enhanced effect is observed for the most distorted H-bond. The energy barrier for proton transfer between carbon atoms involved in triple bonds is smaller than for carbons with lesser multiplicity. The DIE displays a sensitivity to temperature that is least for the carbon atoms with the greatest multiplicity of bonding. The tunneling obtained by following the minimum energy reaction path along the potential energy surface is similar to that when the potential is approximated by an Eckart barrier. However, significant discrepancies are observed at temperatures below about 250 K.

  17. Deuterium Abundance in the Local ISM and Possible Spatial Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1998-01-01

    Excellent HST/GHRS spectra of interstellar hydrogen and deuterium Lyman-(alpha) absorption toward nearby stars allow us to identify systematic errors that have plagued earlier work and to measure accurate values of the D/H ratio in local interstellar gas. Analysis of 12 sightlines through the Local Interstellar Cloud leads to a mean value of D/H = (1.50 +/- 0.10) x 10(exp -5) with all data points lying within +/- l(delta) of the mean. Whether or not the D/H ratio has different values elsewhere in the Galaxy and beyond is a very important open question that will be one of the major objectives of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) mission.

  18. Extreme deuterium excesses in ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites from central Antarctic snow.

    PubMed

    Duprat, J; Dobrică, E; Engrand, C; Aléon, J; Marrocchi, Y; Mostefaoui, S; Meibom, A; Leroux, H; Rouzaud, J-N; Gounelle, M; Robert, F

    2010-05-01

    Primitive interplanetary dust is expected to contain the earliest solar system components, including minerals and organic matter. We have recovered, from central Antarctic snow, ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites whose organic matter contains extreme deuterium (D) excesses (10 to 30 times terrestrial values), extending over hundreds of square micrometers. We identified crystalline minerals embedded in the micrometeorite organic matter, which suggests that this organic matter reservoir could have formed within the solar system itself rather than having direct interstellar heritage. The high D/H ratios, the high organic matter content, and the associated minerals favor an origin from the cold regions of the protoplanetary disk. The masses of the particles range from a few tenths of a microgram to a few micrograms, exceeding by more than an order of magnitude those of the dust fragments from comet 81P/Wild 2 returned by the Stardust mission. PMID:20448182

  19. Plasma deuterium oxide accumulation following ingestion of different carbohydrate beverages.

    PubMed

    Currell, Kevin; Urch, Joanna; Cerri, Erika; Jentjens, Roy L P; Blannin, Andy K; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2008-12-01

    Optimal fluid delivery from carbohydrate solutions such as oral rehydration solutions or sports drinks is essential. The aim of the study was to investigate whether a beverage containing glucose and fructose would result in greater fluid delivery than a beverage containing glucose alone. Six male subjects were recruited (average age (+/-SD): 22 +/- 2 y). Subjects entered the laboratory between 0700 h and 0900 h after an overnight fast. A 600 mL bolus of 1 of the 3 experimental beverages was then given. The experimental beverages were water (W), 75 g glucose (G), or 50 g glucose and 25 g fructose (GF); each beverage also contained 3.00 g of D2O. Following administration of the experimental beverage subjects remained in a seated position for 180 min. Blood and saliva samples were then taken every 5 min in the first hour and every 15 min thereafter. Plasma and saliva samples were analyzed for deuterium enrichment by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Deuterium oxide enrichments were compared using a 2-way repeated measures analysis of variance. The water trial (33 +/- 3 min) showed a significantly shorter time to peak than either G (82 +/- 40 min) or GF (59 +/- 25 min), but the difference between G and GF did not reach statistical significance. There was a significantly greater AUC for GF (55 673 +/- 10 020 delta per thousand vs. Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW).180 min) and W (60 497 +/- 9864 delta per thousand vs. VSMOW.180 min) compared with G (46 290 +/- 9622 delta per thousand vs. VSMOW.180 min); W and GF were not significantly different from each other. These data suggest that a 12.5% carbohydrate beverage containing glucose and fructose results in more rapid fluid delivery in the first 75 min than a beverage containing glucose alone.

  20. Retention mechanisms and binding states of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinelt, M.; Allouche, A.; Oberkofler, M.; Linsmeier, Ch

    2009-04-01

    The retention of 1 keV D+ ions implanted into clean and oxidized single crystalline Be at room and elevated temperatures is investigated by a combination of in situ analytical techniques including temperature programmed desorption (TPD), nuclear reaction analysis, low-energy ion spectroscopy (LEIS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. For the first time, the whole temperature regime for deuterium release and the influence of thin oxide films on the release processes are clarified. The cleaned and annealed Be sample has residual oxygen concentration equivalent to 0.2 monolayer (ML) BeO in the near-surface region as the only contamination. LEIS shows that Be from the volume covers thin BeO surface layers above an annealing temperature of 1000 K by segregation, forming a pure Be-terminated surface, which is stable at lower temperatures until again oxidized by residual gas. No deuterium is retained in the sample above 950 K. By analyzing TPD spectra, active retention mechanisms and six energetically different binding states are identified. Activation energies (EA) for the release of D from binding states in Be are obtained by modelling the experimental data. Two ion-induced trap sites with release temperatures between 770 and 840 K (EA= 1.88 and 2.05 eV, respectively) and two trap sites (release between 440 and 470 K) due to supersaturation of the bulk above the steady state fluence of 2×1017 cm-2 are identified. None of the release steps shows a surface recombination limit. A thin BeO surface layer introduces an additional binding state with a release temperature of 680 K. Implantation at elevated temperatures (up to 530 K) changes the retention mechanism above the saturation limit and populates a binding state with a release temperature of 570 K.

  1. Cosmological and astrophysical consequences of a high primordial deuterium abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vangioni-Flam, Elisabeth; Casse, Michel

    1995-03-01

    We explore the consequences of the first detection of deuterium in a high-redshift, very metal-poor absorbing cloud complex, D/H = (1.9-2.5) x 10-4, by Songaila et al. and Carswell et al., obtained with the Keck telescope. This value reflects closely the primordial abundance ratio provided that the observed spectral features are not due to the corruption of the signal by an errant hydrogen cloud of misfortunate velocity. Assuming that the measured D abundance is free from contamination, the baryon/photon ratio is now confined to the range 1.3-2 (instead of 3-4 and more), in both the classical and inhomogeneous big bangs. Other light elements (He-3, He-4 and Li-7) are consistent with these figures. The low baryonic density of the universe that ensues leaves no room for baryonic matter in the extended halos of elliptical galaxies, especially if the Hubble parameter is close to 100 km/s/Mpc. Nonbaryonic matter clearly dominates the gravitating mass of clusters of galaxies. The upper limit of the gas density at high redshift (before bulk galaxy formation) is now consistent with the baryonic one. A massive destruction of deuterium, in the course of the evolution of the galaxy (say, by a factor of 10-25) is required to match the D/H ratio observed in the local interstellar medium. The higher D destruction proposed up to now corresponds to galactic evolutionary models devised by Vangioni-Flam & Audouze (1988) and Vangioni-Flam, Olive, & Prantzos (1994). We discuss the virtues and the limits of this class of models and propose an alternative based on mass related to a galactic wind.

  2. Suppressed gross erosion of high-temperature lithium films under high-flux deuterium bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Tyler; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Capece, A. M.; Nichols, J. H.; Stotler, D. P.; Roszell, J. P.; de Temmerman, G.; van den Berg, M. A.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Morgan, T. W.

    2014-10-01

    Liquid lithium is an attractive plasma facing component (PFC) for a fusion reactor because it improves confinement and protects the underlying substrate from high heat fluxes. However some previous studies have implied the maximum Li temperature permitted on such devices may be unacceptably low. Recently thin (<1 μm) and thick (~500 μm) Li films on TZM molybdenum substrates were studied in the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device with ion fluxes >1024 m-2 s1 and Li surface temperatures <= 800 °C. Measured Li erosion yields under neon plasma bombardment were similar to previous studies on low-flux devices, but erosion under deuterium bombardment was significantly suppressed. This motivated development of a mixed-material Li-D surface model incorporating D diffusion in Li, preferential sputtering, and LiD chemistry. This model is coupled to the adatom-evaporation equation for thermally-enhanced sputtering and the Langmuir law evaporation equation to obtain realistic predictions of temperature-dependent erosion rates. This model is found to predict the correct functional dependence of the mixed-material Li-D erosion rate vs. temperature in these discharges. Further investigations via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and surface science experiments will also be presented. This work supported by US DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  3. Viscosity and mutual diffusion of deuterium-tritium mixtures in the warm-dense-matter regime

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, J. D.; Cohen, James S.; Horner, D. A.; Collins, L. A.; Lambert, F.

    2010-09-15

    We have calculated viscosity and mutual diffusion of deuterium-tritium (DT) in the warm, dense matter regime for densities from 5 to 20 g/cm{sup 3} and temperatures from 2 to 10 eV, using both finite-temperature Kohn-Sham density-functional theory molecular dynamics (QMD) and orbital-free molecular dynamics (OFMD). The OFMD simulations are in generally good agreement with the benchmark QMD results, and we conclude that the simpler OFMD method can be used with confidence in this regime. For low temperatures (3 eV and below), one-component plasma (OCP) model simulations for diffusion agree with the QMD and OFMD calculations, but deviate by 30% at 10 eV. In comparison with the QMD and OFMD results, the OCP viscosities are not as good as for diffusion, especially for 5 g/cm{sup 3} where the temperature dependence is significantly different. The QMD and OFMD reduced diffusion and viscosity coefficients are found to depend largely, though not completely, only on the Coulomb coupling parameter {Gamma}, with a minimum in the reduced viscosity at {Gamma}{approx_equal}25, approximately the same position found in the OCP simulations. The QMD and OFMD equations of state (pressure) are also compared with the hydrogen two-component plasma model.

  4. Deuterium-Tritium Fuel Layer Formation for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B. J.; Mapoles, E. R.; Sater, J. D.; Chernov, A. A.; Moody, J. D.; Lugten, J. B.; Johnson, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion requires very smooth and uniform solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) point design calls for a 65- to 75-m-thick D-T fuel layer inside of a 2-mm-diam spherical ablator shell to be 1.5 K below the D-T melting temperature (Tm) of 19.79 K. We also find that the layer quality depends on the initial crystal seeding, with the best layers grown from a single seed. The low modes of the layer are controlled by thermal shimming of the hohlraum and meet the NIF requirement with beryllium shells and nearly meet the requirement with plastic shells. The remaining roughness is localized in grain-boundary grooves and is minimal for a single crystal layer. Once formed, the layers need to be cooled to Tm - 1.5 K. Here, we studied dependence of the roughness on the cooling rate and found that cooling at rates of 0.03 to 0.5 K/s is able to preserve the layer structure for a few seconds after reaching the desired temperature. The entire fuel layer remains in contact with the shell during this rapid cooling. Therefore, rapid cooling of the layers is able to satisfy the NIF ignition requirements.

  5. A multi-technique analysis of deuterium trapping and near-surface precipitate growth in plasma-exposed tungsten

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kolasinski, Robert; Shimada, Masashi; Oya, Yasuhisa; Buchenauer, Dean A.; Chikada, Takumi; Cowgill, Donald F.; Donovan, David; Friddle, Raymond William; Michibayashi, Katsu; Sato, Misaki

    2015-08-17

    We examine how deuterium becomes trapped in plasma-exposed tungsten and forms near-surface platelet-shaped precipitates. How these bubbles nucleate and grow, as well as the amount of deuterium trapped within, is crucial for interpreting the experimental database. Here, we use a combined experimental/theoretical approach to provide further insight into the underlying physics. With the Tritium Plasma Experiment, we exposed a series of ITER-gradetungsten samples to high flux D plasmas (up to 1.5 × 1022 m-2 s-1) at temperatures ranging between 103 and 554 °C. Retention of deuterium trapped in the bulk, assessed through thermal desorption spectrometry, reached a maximum at 230more » °C and diminished rapidly thereafter for T > 300 °C. Post-mortem examination of the surfaces revealed non-uniform growth of bubbles ranging in diameter between 1 and 10 μm over the surface with a clear correlation with grain boundaries. Electron back-scattering diffraction maps over a large area of the surface confirmed this dependence; grains containing bubbles were aligned with a preferred slip vector along the <111> directions. Focused ion beam profiles suggest that these bubbles nucleated as platelets at depths of 200 nm–1 μm beneath the surface and grew as a result of expansion of sub-surface cracks. Furthermore, to estimate the amount of deuterium trapped in these defects relative to other sites within the material, we applied a continuum-scale treatment of hydrogen isotope precipitation. Additionally, we propose a straightforward model of near-surface platelet expansion that reproduces bubble sizes consistent with our measurements. For the tungsten microstructure considered here, we find that bubbles would only weakly affect migration of D into the material, perhaps explaining why deep trapping was observed in prior studies with plasma-exposed neutron-irradiated specimens. We foresee no insurmountable issues that would prevent the theoretical framework developed here from

  6. A multi-technique analysis of deuterium trapping and near-surface precipitate growth in plasma-exposed tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Kolasinski, R. D. Buchenauer, D. A.; Cowgill, D. F.; Donovan, D. C.; Shimada, M.; Oya, Y.; Chikada, T.; Sato, M.; Friddle, R. W.; Michibayashi, K.

    2015-08-21

    In this work, we examine how deuterium becomes trapped in plasma-exposed tungsten and forms near-surface platelet-shaped precipitates. How these bubbles nucleate and grow, as well as the amount of deuterium trapped within, is crucial for interpreting the experimental database. Here, we use a combined experimental/theoretical approach to provide further insight into the underlying physics. With the Tritium Plasma Experiment, we exposed a series of ITER-grade tungsten samples to high flux D plasmas (up to 1.5 × 10{sup 22 }m{sup −2} s{sup −1}) at temperatures ranging between 103 and 554 °C. Retention of deuterium trapped in the bulk, assessed through thermal desorption spectrometry, reached a maximum at 230 °C and diminished rapidly thereafter for T > 300 °C. Post-mortem examination of the surfaces revealed non-uniform growth of bubbles ranging in diameter between 1 and 10 μm over the surface with a clear correlation with grain boundaries. Electron back-scattering diffraction maps over a large area of the surface confirmed this dependence; grains containing bubbles were aligned with a preferred slip vector along the <111> directions. Focused ion beam profiles suggest that these bubbles nucleated as platelets at depths of 200 nm–1 μm beneath the surface and grew as a result of expansion of sub-surface cracks. To estimate the amount of deuterium trapped in these defects relative to other sites within the material, we applied a continuum-scale treatment of hydrogen isotope precipitation. In addition, we propose a straightforward model of near-surface platelet expansion that reproduces bubble sizes consistent with our measurements. For the tungsten microstructure considered here, we find that bubbles would only weakly affect migration of D into the material, perhaps explaining why deep trapping was observed in prior studies with plasma-exposed neutron-irradiated specimens. We foresee no insurmountable issues that would prevent the

  7. A multi-technique analysis of deuterium trapping and near-surface precipitate growth in plasma-exposed tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Kolasinski, Robert; Shimada, Masashi; Oya, Yasuhisa; Buchenauer, Dean A.; Chikada, Takumi; Cowgill, Donald F.; Donovan, David; Friddle, Raymond William; Michibayashi, Katsu; Sato, Misaki

    2015-08-17

    We examine how deuterium becomes trapped in plasma-exposed tungsten and forms near-surface platelet-shaped precipitates. How these bubbles nucleate and grow, as well as the amount of deuterium trapped within, is crucial for interpreting the experimental database. Here, we use a combined experimental/theoretical approach to provide further insight into the underlying physics. With the Tritium Plasma Experiment, we exposed a series of ITER-gradetungsten samples to high flux D plasmas (up to 1.5 × 1022 m-2 s-1) at temperatures ranging between 103 and 554 °C. Retention of deuterium trapped in the bulk, assessed through thermal desorption spectrometry, reached a maximum at 230 °C and diminished rapidly thereafter for T > 300 °C. Post-mortem examination of the surfaces revealed non-uniform growth of bubbles ranging in diameter between 1 and 10 μm over the surface with a clear correlation with grain boundaries. Electron back-scattering diffraction maps over a large area of the surface confirmed this dependence; grains containing bubbles were aligned with a preferred slip vector along the <111> directions. Focused ion beam profiles suggest that these bubbles nucleated as platelets at depths of 200 nm–1 μm beneath the surface and grew as a result of expansion of sub-surface cracks. Furthermore, to estimate the amount of deuterium trapped in these defects relative to other sites within the material, we applied a continuum-scale treatment of hydrogen isotope precipitation. Additionally, we propose a straightforward model of near-surface platelet expansion that reproduces bubble sizes consistent with our measurements. For the tungsten microstructure considered here, we find that bubbles would only weakly affect migration of D into the material, perhaps explaining why deep trapping was observed in prior studies with plasma-exposed neutron-irradiated specimens. We foresee no insurmountable issues that would prevent the theoretical

  8. Biochemical Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation during Lipid Biosynthesis in Higher Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahmen, A.; Gamarra, B.; Cormier, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Although hydrogen isotopes (δ2H) of leaf wax lipids are increasingly being applied as (paleo-) hydrological proxies, we still do not understand some of the basic processes that shape the δ2H values of these compounds. In general, it is believed that three variables shape the δ2H values of leaf wax lipids: source water δ2H values, evaporative deuterium (2H) enrichment of leaf water and the biosynthetic fractionation (ɛbio) during the synthesis of organic compounds. While the influences of source water δ2H values and leaf water evaporative 2H enrichment have been well documented, very little is known how ɛbio shapes the δ2H values of plant-derived lipids. I will present the results from recent experiments, where we show that the magnitude of ɛbio, and thus the δ2H value of plant-derived lipids, strongly depends on the carbon (C) metabolism of a plant. Specifically, I will show that plants that rely for their tissue formation on recently assimilated C have δ2H values in their n-alkanes that are up to 60‰ more negative than plants that depend for their tissue formation on stored carbohydrates. Our findings can be explained by the fact that NADPH is the primary source of hydrogen in plant lipids and that the δ2H value of NADPH differs whether NADPH was generated directly in the light reaction of photosynthesis or whether it was generated by processing stored carbohydrates. As such, the δ2H values of plant-derived lipids will directly depend on whether the tissue containing these lipids was synthesized using recent assimilates, e.g. in a C autonomous state or, if it was synthesized from stored or otherwise aquired C sources, e.g. in a not C autonomous state. Given the magnidude of this effect, our results have important implications for interpretation of plant-derived lipid δ2H values when used as (paleo-) hydrological proxies. In addition, our results suggest, that δ2H values of plant-derived lipids could be employed as a new tools to assess the C

  9. Measurements of Time-Dependent CP-Asymmetry Parameters in B Meson Decays to η' K0 and of Branching Fractions of SU(3) Related Modes with BaBar Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Biassoni, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis work we have measured the following upper limits at 90% of confidence level, for B meson decays (in units of 10-6), using a statistics of 465.0 x 106 B$\\bar{B}$ pairs: β(B0 → ηK0) < 1.6 β(B0 → ηη) < 1.4 β(B0 → η'η') < 2.1 β(B0 → ηΦ) < 0.52 β(B0 → ηω) < 1.6 β(B0 → η'Φ) < 1.2 β(B0 → η'ω) < 1.7 We have no observation of any decay mode, statistical significance for our measurements is in the range 1.3-3.5 standard deviation. We have a 3.5σ evidence for B → ηω and a 3.1 σ evidence for B → η'ω. The absence of observation of the B0 → ηK0 open an issue related to the large difference compared to the charged mode B+ → ηK+ branching fraction, which is measured to be 3.7 ± 0.4 ± 0.1 [118]. Our results represent substantial improvements of the previous ones [109, 110, 111] and are consistent with theoretical predictions. All these results were presented at Flavor Physics and CP Violation (FPCP) 2008 Conference, that took place in Taipei, Taiwan. They will be soon included into a paper to be submitted to Physical Review D. For time-dependent analysis, we have reconstructed 1820 ± 48 flavor-tagged B0 → η'K0 events, using the final BABAR statistic of 467.4 x 106 B$\\bar{B}$ pairs. We use these events to measure the time-dependent asymmetry parameters S and C. We find S = 0.59 ± 0.08 ± 0.02, and C = -0.06 ± 0.06 ± 0.02. A non-zero value of C would represent a directly CP non-conserving component in B0 → η'K0, while S would be equal to sin2β measured in B0 → J/ΨKs0 [108], a mixing-decay interference effect, provided the decay is dominated by amplitudes of a single weak phase. The new measured value of S can be considered in agreement with the expectations of the

  10. Ethanol diversely alters palmitate, stearate and oleate metabolism in the liver and pancreas of rats using the deuterium oxide single tracer

    PubMed Central

    Boros, Laszlo G.; Deng, Qinggao; Pandol, Stephen J.; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Go, Vay Liang W.; Lee, Wai-Nang Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine tissue specific effects of alcohol on fatty acid synthesis and distribution as related to functional changes in triglyceride transport and membrane formation. Methods Tissue fatty acid profile, and de novo lipogenesis were determined in adult male Wistar rats after 5 weeks of ethanol feeding using deuterated water and GC/MS. Liver and pancreas fatty acid profiles and new synthesis fractions were compared with those from control rats on an isocaloric diet. Results Fatty acid ratios in the liver indicated that there was an over two-fold accumulation of stearate to that of palmitate, with an apparent decrease in oleate content. On the other hand, in the pancreas there was a 17% decrease in the stearate to palmitate ratio, while oleate to palmitate ratio was increased by 30%. The fractions of deuterium labeled palmitate and stearate were substantially reduced in the liver and pancreas of the alcohol treated animals. Deuterium labeling of oleate was reduced in the liver but not in the pancreas consistent with the oleate/stearate ratios in these tissues. Conclusions Long-term alcohol exposure results in opposite effects on the desaturase activity in the liver and pancreas limiting fatty acid transport in the liver but promoting the exocrine function of the pancreas. PMID:19248221

  11. Retention property of deuterium for fuel recovery in divertor by using hydrogen storage material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mera, Saori; Tonegawa, Akira; Matsumura, Yoshihito; Sato, Kohnosuke; Kawamura, Kazutaka

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic confinement fusion reactor by using Deuterium and Tritium of hydrogen isotope as fuels is suggested as one of the future energy source. Most fuels don't react and are exhausted out of fusion reactor. Especially, Tritium is radioisotope and rarely exists in nature, so fuels recovery is necessary. This poster presentation will explain about research new fuel recovery method by using hydrogen storage materials in divertor simulator TPD-Sheet IV. Samples are tungsten coated with titanium; tungsten of various thickness, and titanium films deposited by ion plating on tungsten substrates. The sample surface temperature is measured by radiation thermometer. Retention property of deuterium after deuterium plasma irradiation was examined with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). As a result, the TDS measurement shows that deuterium is retained in titanium. Therefore, Titanium as a hydrogen storage material expects to be possible to use separating and recovering fuel particles in divertor.

  12. Reactor prospects of muon-catalyzed fusion of deuterium and tritium concentrated in transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W.M. Jr. . Fusion Research Center )

    1989-09-01

    It is conjectured that the number of fusion events catalyzed by a single muon is orders of magnitude greater for deuterium and tritium concentrated in a transition metal than in gaseous form and that the recent observation of 2.5-MeV neutrons from a D/sub 2/O electrolytic cell with palladium and titanium cathodes can thereby be interpreted in terms of cosmic muon-catalyzed deuterium-deuterium fusion. This suggests a new fusion reactor reactor consisting of deuterium and tritium concentrated in transition metal fuel elements in a fusion core that surrounds an accelerator-produced muon source. The feasibility of net energy production in such a reactor is established in terms of requirements on the number of fusion events catalyzed per muon. The technological implications for a power reactor based on this concept are examined. The potential of such a concept as a neutron source for materials testing and tritium and plutonium production is briefly discussed.

  13. Fundamental mechanisms of deuterium retention in lithiated graphite plasma facing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Chase N.

    Plasma impurities and undesirable deuterium recycling degrade plasma confinement and impede a sustainable fusion reaction. This occurs by inducing plasma instabilities and reducing plasma temperature. Lithium wall conditioning has been used in fusion devices including TFTR, CDX-U, FTU, TJ-II, MAST and NSTX as a means to reduce plasma impurities and improve deuterium retention, resulting in significant enhancements in plasma performance. These improvements have come via a reduction in deuterium recycling in addition to a reduction in oxygen and carbon impurities. NSTX, with ATJ graphite walls, is the leading fusion device in lithium research. Many previous studies have investigated deuterated lithium, deuterated graphite, and lithiated graphite in order to understand fundamental properties and particular applications. Deuterium irradiation of lithiated graphite studies are few in number and no systematic research has been conducted to determine the fundamental mechanisms by which deuterium is retained in lithiated graphite. This work presents controlled laboratory studies that use X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to identify the fundamental chemical interactions in lithiated graphite. Li-O chemical interactions are observed in the photoelectron energy spectrum at 529.5 eV after thermally depositing lithium onto ATJ graphite. Deuterium retention induces Li-O-D and Li-C-D interactions which are observed at 529.9 eV and 291.2 eV, respectively. Examination of NSTX post-mortem tiles confirms the formation of Li-O-D and Li-C-D chemical interactions and validates the procedures in these experiments. Prior to these findings, deuterium was assumed to bind exclusively with lithium to form stoichiometric LiD. Instead, we find that in a graphite matrix, lithium will always bind with oxygen and carbon (when present) prior to the introduction of deuterium. The deuterium saturation of lithiated graphite is also assessed using XPS and results indicate that saturation occurs

  14. An Effective Deuterium Exchange Method for Neutron Crystal Structure Analysis with Unfolding-Refolding Processes.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akiko; Morimoto, Yukio

    2016-02-01

    A method of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange with an unfolding-refolding process has been applied to hen egg-white lysozyme (HWL), and accurate evaluation of its deuteration was carried out by time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. Neutron crystallography requires a suitable crystal with enough deuterium exchanged in the protein to decrease incoherent scattering from hydrogens. It is very expensive to prepare a fully deuterated protein, and therefore a simple H/D exchange technique is desirable for this purpose. Acid or base addition to protein solutions with heating effectively increased the number of deuterium up to more than 20 % of that of all hydrogen atoms, and refolded structures were determined by X-ray structure analysis at 1.8 Å resolution. Refolded HWL had increased deuterium content in its protein core and its native structure, determined at atomic resolution, was fully preserved. PMID:26718545

  15. Deuterium retention and lattice damage in tungsten irradiated with D ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimov, V. Kh.; Ertl, K.; Roth, J.

    2001-03-01

    Depth profiles of D atoms and D 2 molecules in a W single crystal implanted with 6 keV D ions at 300 K have been determined using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and residual gas analysis (RGA) measurements in the course of surface sputtering. Profiles of deuterium and lattice damage in a W single crystal irradiated with 10 keV D ions at 300 K have been investigated by means of nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry combined with ion channelling techniques (RBS/C). There are at least two types of ion-induced defects which are responsible for trapping of deuterium: (i) D 2-filled microvoids (deuterium bubbles) localised in the implantation zone; and (ii) dislocations which are distributed from the surface to depths far beyond 1 μm and which capture deuterium in the form of D atoms.

  16. Deuterium and helium release and microstructure of tungsten deposition layers formed by RF plasma sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, K.; Imaoka, K.; Tokitani, M.; Miyamoto, M.; Nishikawa, M.; Fukada, S.; Yoshida, N.

    2008-07-15

    It is important to evaluate tritium behavior in tungsten deposition layers considering a long-term plasma operation. In this study, tungsten deposition layers were formed by deuterium or helium RF plasma sputtering. The release behavior of deuterium or helium from the layers were observed by a thermal desorption method. When a tungsten deposition layer does not contain oxygen, the retained deuterium is mainly released as D{sub 2}. When oxygen exists in the layer, the majority of deuterium is released as water vapor. Tungsten deposition layers have an amorphous structure and consist offline grain with size of 2-3 nm. Numerous bubbles are observed in the layers. A formation of tungsten deposition layer in a fusion reactor may make tritium control more difficult. (authors)

  17. Parity-violating neutron spin rotation in hydrogen and deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießhammer, H. W.; Schindler, M. R.; Springer, R. P.

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the (parity-violating) spin-rotation angle of a polarized neutron beam through hydrogen and deuterium targets, using pionless effective field theory up to next-to-leading order. Our result is part of a program to obtain the five leading independent low-energy parameters that characterize hadronic parity violation from few-body observables in one systematic and consistent framework. The two spin-rotation angles provide independent constraints on these parameters. Our result for np spin rotation is frac{1} {ρ }frac{{d\\varphi _{PV}^{np} }} {{dl}} = left[ {4.5 ± 0.5} right] rad MeV^{ - frac{1} {2}} left( {2g^{left( {^3 S_1 - ^3 P_1 } right)} + g^{left( {^3 S_1 - ^3 P_1 } right)} } right) - left[ {18.5 ± 1.9} right] rad MeV^{ - frac{1} {2}} left( {g_{left( {Δ I = 0} right)}^{left( {^1 S_0 - ^3 P_0 } right)} - 2g_{left( {Δ I = 2} right)}^{left( {^1 S_0 - ^3 P_0 } right)} } right), while for nd spin rotation we obtain frac{1} {ρ }frac{{d\\varphi _{PV}^{nd} }} {{dl}} = left[ {8.0 ± 0.8} right] rad MeV^{ - frac{1} {2}} g^{left( {^3 S_1 - ^1 P_1 } right)} + left[ {17.0 ± 1.7} right] rad MeV^{ - frac{1} {2}} g^{left( {^3 S_1 - ^3 P_1 } right)} + left[ {2.3 ± 0.5} right] rad MeV^{ - frac{1} {2}} left( {3g_{left( {Δ I = 0} right)}^{left( {^1 S_0 - ^3 P_0 } right)} - 2g_{left( {Δ I = 1} right)}^{left( {^1 S_0 - ^3 P_0 } right)} } right), where the g (X-Y), in units of MeV^{ - frac{3} {2}}, are the presently unknown parameters in the leading-order parity-violating Lagrangian. Using naıve dimensional analysis to estimate the typical size of the couplings, we expect the signal for standard target densities to be left| {frac{{d\\varphi _{PV} }} {{dl}}} right| ≈ left[ {10^{ - 7} ldots 10^{ - 6} } right]frac{{rad}} {m} for both hydrogen and deuterium targets. We find no indication that the nd observable is enhanced compared to the np one. All results are properly renormalized. An estimate of the numerical and systematic uncertainties of our calculations

  18. THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ASPECTS OF ISOTOPIC FRACTIONATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, James R.

    1986-01-01

    Essential to the interpretation of natural variations of light stable isotope ratios is knowledge of the magnitude and temperature dependence of isotopic fractionation factors between the common minerals and fluids. These fractionation factors are obtained in three ways: (1) Semi-empirical calculations using spectroscopic data and the methods of statistical mechanics. (2) Laboratory calibration studies. (3) Measurements of natural samples whose formation conditions are well-known or highly constrained. In this chapter methods (1) and (2) are evaluated and a review is given of the present state of knowledge of the theory of isotopic fractionation and the fraction that influence the isotopic properties of minerals.

  19. Venus was wet: a measurement of the ratio of deuterium to hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, T.M.; Hoffman, J.H.; Hodges, R.R. Jr.; Watson, A.J.

    1982-05-07

    The deuterium-hydrogen abundance ratio in the Venus atmosphere was measured while the inlets to the Pioneer Venus large probe mass spectrometer were coated with sulfuric acid from Venus' clouds. The ratio is (1.6 +- 0.2) x 10/sup -2/. The hundredfold enrichment of deuterium means that at least 0.3% of a terrestrial ocean was outgassed on Venus, but is consistent with a much greater production. 2 figures.

  20. Venus was wet: a measurement of the ratio of deuterium to hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Donahue, T M; Hoffman, J H; Hodges, R R; Watson, A J

    1982-05-01

    The deuterium-hydrogen abundance ratio in the Venus atmosphere was measured while the inlets to the Pioneer Venus large probe mass spectrometer were coated with sulfuric acid from Venus' clouds. The ratio is (1.6 +/- 0.2) x 10(-2). The hundredfold enrichment of deuterium means that at least 0.3 percent of a terrestrial ocean was outgassed on Venus, but is consistent with a much greater production.

  1. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange of aromatic amines and amides using deuterated trifluoroacetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Richard; Lee, Amy; Jung, Erica; Kang, Aaron; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-01-01

    The H-D exchange of aromatic amines and amides, including pharmaceutically relevant compounds such as acetaminophen and diclofenac, was investigated using CF3COOD as both the sole reaction solvent and source of deuterium label. The described method is amenable to efficient deuterium incorporation for a wide variety of substrates possessing both electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents. Best results were seen with less basic anilines and highly activated acetanilides, reflecting the likelihood of different mechanistic pathways. PMID:25641994

  2. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C and 15N chemical shifts of intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded enaminocarbonyl derivatives of Meldrum’s and Tetronic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Saif; Zhang, Wei; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2010-07-01

    Secondary deuterium isotope effects on 13C and 15N nuclear shieldings in a series of cyclic enamino-diesters and enamino-esters and acyclic enaminones and enamino-esters have been examined and analysed using NMR and DFT (B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)) methods. One-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra of enaminocarbonyl and their deuterated analogues were recorded in CDCl 3 and CD 2Cl 2 at variable temperatures and assigned. 1JNH coupling constants for the derivatives of Meldrum's and tetronic acids reveal that they exist at the NH-form. It was demonstrated that deuterium isotope effects, for the hydrogen bonded compounds, due to the deuterium substitution at the nitrogen nucleus lead to large one-bond isotope effects at nitrogen, 1Δ 15N(D), and two-bond isotope effects on carbon nuclei, 2ΔC(ND), respectively. A linear correlations exist between 2ΔC(ND) and 1Δ 15N(D) whereas the correlation with δNH is divided into two. A good agreement between the experimentally observed 2ΔC(ND) and calculated dσ 13C/dR NH was obtained. A very good correlation between calculated NH bond lengths and observed NH chemical shifts is found. The observed isotope effects are shown to depend strongly on Resonance Assisted Hydrogen bonding.

  3. Impurity reduction in a plasma by using the deuterium and helium glow discharge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangyong; Kim, Jaeyong

    2015-02-01

    To reduce the levels of impurities such as water, oxygen and nitrogen in a plasma chamber, we evaporated and deposited carborane (C2B10H12) powders on a silicon substrate by using a glow discharge method, and investigated the effects of boronization as functions of the carborane temperature and the rates of the flowing gases between deuterium and helium. The reduced amount of impurities after boronization was estimated by measuring the partial pressures of the corresponding gases in the chamber and the concentrations of nitrogen and oxygen in a deposited carborane film. The ratio of deuterium to hydrogen in the deposited film was analyzed by using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). When carborane powders were evaporated under a deuterium atmosphere, the residual gas analyzer showed a significant decrease in the partial pressure of water while less change was noted from the partial pressures of nitrogen and oxygen. The most efficient removal rate for water was obtained when carborane powder was flown under deuterium atmosphere at 150 °C. The SIMS data showed higher concentrations of nitrogen and oxygen in the carborane films deposited on Si substrates under a deuterium atmosphere, demonstrating that boronization under a deuterium atmosphere is an effective method to remove impurities.

  4. Effect of plastic deformation on deuterium retention and release in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Terentyev, D. Lambrinou, K.; Minov, B.; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, T. W.; Zayachuk, Y.; Bystrov, K.; Dubinko, A.; Van Oost, G.

    2015-02-28

    The effect of severe plastic deformation on the deuterium retention in tungsten exposed to high-flux low-energy plasma (flux ∼ 10{sup 24 }D/m{sup 2}/s, energy ∼ 50 eV, and fluence up to 3 × 10{sup 26 }D/m{sup 2}) at the plasma generator Pilot-PSI was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The desorption spectra in both reference and plastically deformed samples were deconvolved into three contributions attributed to the detrapping from dislocations, deuterium-vacancy clusters, and pores, respectively. The plastically induced deformation, resulting in high dislocation density, does not change the positions of the three peaks, but alters their amplitudes as compared to the reference material. The appearance of blisters detected by scanning electron microscopy and the desorption peak attributed to the release from pores (i.e., deuterium bubbles) were suppressed in the plastically deformed samples but only up to a certain fluence. Beyond 5 × 10{sup 25 }D/m{sup 2}, the release from the bubbles in the deformed material is essentially higher than in the reference material. Based on the presented results, we suggest that a dense dislocation network increases the incubation dose needed for the appearance of blisters, associated with deuterium bubbles, by offering numerous nucleation sites for deuterium clusters eventually transforming into deuterium-vacancy clusters by punching out jogs on dislocation lines.

  5. Body composition of lactating and dry Holstein cows estimated by deuterium dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.A.; Ehle, F.R.

    1986-01-01

    In three experiments patterns of water turnover and body composition estimated by deuterium oxide were studied in Holstein cows. In the first experiment, four lactating cows were infused with deuterium oxide, and blood samples were taken during 4-d collection. Milking was stopped; cows were reinfused with deuterium oxide and resampled. Slopes of deuterium oxide dilution curves indicated lactating cows turned water over more rapidly than nonlactating cows. In the second experiment with the same four cows, during 4-d collection, deuterium oxide concentrations in milk, urine, and feces showed dilution patterns similar to deuterium oxide in blood. Sampling milk may be an alternative to sampling blood. In the third experiment, 36 Holstein cows were fed 55, 65, or 75% alfalfa, smooth bromegrass, or equal parts of each forage as total mixed rations; remaining portions of rations were a grain mixture. Body composition was estimated at -1, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mo postpartum. Empty body water, protein, mineral, fat, and fat percentage decreased from prepartum to postpartum. First calf heifers contained less empty body water, protein, and mineral than older cows. Cows fed diets with 55% forage had more body fat than those fed diets with 75% forage. Cows fed alfalfa-based diets had more gastrointestinal fill regardless of grain than cows fed diets that contained alfalfa and smooth bromegrass. Gastrointestinal fill of cows increased from prepartum to 5 mo postpartum.

  6. Detailed implosion modeling of deuterium-tritium layered experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Eder, D. C.; Jones, O. S.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Suter, L. J.; Town, R. P. J.

    2013-05-15

    More than two dozen inertial confinement fusion ignition experiments with cryogenic deuterium-tritium layers have now been performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller et al., Opt. Eng. 443, 2841 (2004)]. Each of these yields a wealth of data including neutron yield, neutron down-scatter fraction, burn-averaged ion temperature, x-ray image shape and size, primary and down-scattered neutron image shape and size, etc. Compared to 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations modeling both the hohlraum and the capsule implosion, however, the measured capsule yield is usually lower by a factor of 5 to 10, and the ion temperature varies from simulations, while most other observables are well matched between experiment and simulation. In an effort to understand this discrepancy, we perform detailed post-shot simulations of a subset of NIF implosion experiments. Using two-dimensional HYDRA simulations [M. M. Marinak, et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001).] of the capsule only, these simulations represent as accurately as possible the conditions of a given experiment, including the as-shot capsule metrology, capsule surface roughness, and ice layer defects as seeds for the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities. The radiation drive used in these capsule-only simulations can be tuned to reproduce quite well the measured implosion timing, kinematics, and low-mode asymmetry. In order to simulate the experiments as accurately as possible, a limited number of fully three-dimensional implosion simulations are also being performed. Despite detailed efforts to incorporate all of the effects known and believed to be important in determining implosion performance, substantial yield discrepancies remain between experiment and simulation. Some possible alternate scenarios and effects that could resolve this discrepancy are discussed.

  7. Volume Fraction Effects in Electroacoustic Measurements.

    PubMed

    Rasmusson, Mikael

    2001-08-15

    We measured the dynamic mobility of a polystyrene latex at 1 MHz as a function of volume fraction using the ESA-8000. The volume fraction dependence is compared with a semiempirical equation as well as with some theoretical predictions. It turns out that our polystyrene latex exhibits a volume fraction dependence much weaker than that predicted by any of the theories. This suggests that (polystyrene) latices may not be the ideal model system and that the centrifugation process may influence the surface structure of the particles. We also measured the dynamic mobility spectrum of a silica sol as a function of volume fraction using the Acoustosizer. The experimental spectrum of the silica sol was found to agree reasonably well with the semiempirical and theoretical spectra, especially below φ=0.144. At higher volume fractions we observed positive phase angles that were not predicted by the semiempirical method nor the cell model. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11482951

  8. The effect of deuterium oxide (D sub 2 O) on in vitro vascular smooth muscle contraction

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliam, T.M.; Liepins, A.; Rankin, A.J. )

    1990-02-26

    Deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O), a stable nonradioactive isotope of water, has been demonstrated to reduce L-type calcium channel conductance in isolated myocytes. Since the concentration of intracellular free calcium has been implicated in the mechanism of vascular smooth muscle contraction, the authors investigated whether it inhibits contraction of vascular smooth muscle. Phenylephrine concentration-contraction curves were carried out in the rat aortic ring preparation to determine whether D{sub 2}O inhibits contraction of rat aorta induced through activation of receptor-operated calcium channels. D{sub 2}O depressed these response curves in a concentration dependent manner with 50% inhibition of maximum contraction observed with 60% D{sub 2}O; this effect proved to be reversible and non-toxic. D{sub 2}O also depressed potassium chloride curves, demonstrating an effect on voltage-operated calcium channels. Since vascular endothelium releases endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) when stimulated by a range of pharmacological agents, it was examined whether the endothelium has a role in these actions of D{sub 2}O on vascular contraction. Mechanical disruption of the endothelium had no effect.

  9. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Cheng, B.; Glimm, J.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-02-01

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  10. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    SciTech Connect

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Glimm, J.; Cheng, B.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D.