Science.gov

Sample records for dependent hatching rates

  1. Metabolic rates are elevated and influenced by maternal identity during the early, yolk-dependent, post-hatching period in an estuarine turtle, the diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin).

    PubMed

    Rowe, Christopher L; Woodland, Ryan J; Funck, Sarah A

    2017-02-01

    Non-genetic maternal effects, operating through a female's physiology or behavior, can influence offspring traits and performance. Here we examined potential maternal influences on metabolic rates (MR) of offspring in an estuarine turtle, the diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin). Females and their eggs were collected from the field and the eggs incubated in the laboratory for subsequent measurement of MR of females, late-stage embryos, newly-hatched individuals that were nutritionally dependent on yolk, and older hatchlings that had depleted their yolk reserves and thus were independent of energetic contributions from the female. Female identity significantly affected MR of yolk-dependent hatchlings but, after yolk was depleted, MR of offspring converged and no longer reflected the maternal influence. Offspring from different females also differed in size, which influenced offspring MR and growth, but there was no correlation between female MR or size and offspring traits. MR of the older, yolk-independent hatchlings was lower overall than yolk-dependent hatchlings but correlated positively with growth rates and prior developmental rate (e.g. negatively correlated with time to hatching). Unlike another turtle species (snapping turtles), in which maternally-related differences in offspring MR were retained after yolk depletion, the maternal influence on offspring MR in diamondback terrapins is limited to early hatchling development and growth. The transient nature of the maternal effect, which was present only during the period that hatchlings were metabolizing yolk, suggests that variation among females in the composition of yolk deposited in eggs could be responsible for the differences observed in this study.

  2. The effects of laser assisted hatching on pregnancy rates

    PubMed Central

    Ghannadi, Alireza; Kazerooni, Marjaneh; Jamalzadeh, Fatemeh; Amiri, Sahar; Rostami, Parifar; Absalan, Forouzan

    2011-01-01

    Background: For infertile women aged over 35 years, failure of the ZP (zona pellucida) to rupture is believed to be associated with a decreased implantation rate in in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intra cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Objective: In this research, laser assisted hatching (LAH) was offered to patients with advanced maternal age to evaluate a possible benefit. Materials and Methods: Nine hundred thirty two cycles of IVF/ICSI in females were analyzed. Women included in this study were allocated in 4 groups. In group I and II, embryos were cultured and transferred with and without LAH in women aged ≤35, whereas embryos of group III and IV were examined with and without LAH in women aged ≥ 35. Laser manipulations were performed using a suturn-Tm3 system using 2-3 pulses of 0.8 millisecond with 400 voltage duration. The size of the hole made in the zona was measured to be 5-10 µm, depending on the zona thickness of each individual embryo. Results: The performance of LAH significantly increased clinical pregnancy rates in all patients. In group I and II, the chemical (50.99% and 31.61% respectively), clinical (50% and 30.69% respectively) and multiple pregnancies (22.27% and 5.94% respectively) significantly differ between these groups. In the patients with advanced female age ≥35 the performance of LAH significantly increased chemical (30.12%) and clinical pregnancy (27.71%) rates compared to whom without LAH (18.96% and 16.37% respectively). Conclusion: Our data demonstrate in the patients who were less than 35 years old, multiple pregnancy rates were significantly increased compared to other groups who aged over 35 years old. In addition benefit of LAH in improving pregnancy rates after IVF or ICSI in women of advanced age (≥35) was shown. PMID:25587254

  3. Hatching rates of resting eggs of 'Cladocera' (Crustacea; Branchiopoda) at a tropical bay, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mugrabe, G; Barros, S; Marazzo, A; Valentin, J L

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the development time of embryos and to estimate the hatching rates of resting eggs of cladocerans found in the sediment of Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, under experimental conditions. Eggs were sorted by species (Penilia avirostris--Sididae; Pleopis polyphemoides and Pseudevadne tergestina--Podonidae) and incubated at a temperature of 25 degrees C, salinity 35 and photoperiod 12 hours light/ 12 hours dark. Hatching rates were about 38% for Pseudevadne tergestina and 28% for Pleopis polyphemoides. Embryos of resting eggs of Penilia avirostris developed comparatively slowly (hatching after 86 days of incubation), with a hatching rate of only 5%. It was observed that development and hatching of resting eggs of marine cladocerans suggest that pulses of recruitment may exist, thus contributing to the rapid appearance and maintenance of planktonic populations of these crustaceans in Guanabara Bay.

  4. The relationship between hatching rate and number of embryos of the brood pouch in Littorina saxatilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde-Padín, P.; Carballo, M.; Caballero, A.; Rolán-Alvarez, E.

    2008-10-01

    Littorina saxatilis is an ovoviviparous organism in which shelled embryos can be directly observed in nearly all mature females captured in the wild. This characteristic has been used a number of times as an indirect estimate for fecundity of natural populations. However, there is no experimental corroboration that the number of embryos within a female brood pouch is actually related to the rate of hatching per unit of time, a more realistic estimate of female fecundity. In order to make this corroboration we estimated the correlation between the number of embryos in the brood pouch and the hatching rate of isolated females grown in the laboratory. We also compared the hatching rates of females from two sympatric ecotypes (RB and SU) of this species, which differ significantly in the number of embryos. We found a high agreement between hatching rate and number of embryos, concluding that the latter is a good proxy for fecundity.

  5. High hatching rates after cryopreservation of hydrated cysts of the brine shrimp A. franciscana.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toru; Arii, Yasuhiro; Hino, Katsuhiko; Sawatani, Ikuo; Tanaka, Midori; Takahashi, Rei; Bando, Toru; Mukai, Kazuhisa; Fukuo, Keisuke

    2011-01-01

    Cysts of Artemia franciscana are known to be extremely tolerant to UV and ionizing radiation, hypoxia, dryness, osmotic pressure, and temperatures. However, when cysts are hydrated, their resistance to extreme environmental conditions is markedly reduced, and they subsequently enter a developmental sequence. The hatching rate of hydrated cysts declined when they were rapidly frozen after a short period of hydration but slow freezing improved hatching rates after 6-h hydration (1.4 g H2O per g dry wt). We observed that trehalose content in hydrated cysts was greatly reduced up to 6-h time. DSC analysis showed different thermal profiles at two cooling rates, suggesting the formation of a minuscule ice crystal inside the cells. High hatching rates can be obtained from highly hydrated cysts at slow cooling rate.

  6. Heart rates increase after hatching in two species of Natricine snakes.

    PubMed

    Aubret, Fabien

    2013-11-29

    Experimental studies have shown heart rates to decrease from embryo to hatchling stage in turtles, remain steady in skinks, and increase in birds. However, no snake species has been studied in this regard. I recorded heart rate evolution trajectories from embryo to juvenile stage in 78 eggs from two species of European Natricine snakes. Unexpectedly, snakes behaved more like birds than turtles or lizards: heart rates increased after hatching in both N. maura and N. natrix, respectively by 43.92 ± 22.84% and 35.92 ± 24.52%. Heart rate shift was not related to an abrupt elevation of metabolism per se (snakes that increased their heart rates the most sharply grew the least after birth), but rather due to a number of smaller eggs that experienced lower than normal heart rates throughout the incubation and recovered a normal heart rate post-birth. This finding is discussed in the light of hatching synchrony benefits.

  7. Heart rates increase after hatching in two species of natricine snakes

    PubMed Central

    Aubret, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown heart rates to decrease from embryo to hatchling stage in turtles, remain steady in skinks, and increase in birds. However, no snake species has been studied in this regard. I recorded heart rate evolution trajectories from embryo to juvenile stage in 78 eggs from two species of European Natricine snakes. Unexpectedly, snakes behaved more like birds than turtles or lizards: heart rates increased after hatching in both N. maura and N. natrix, respectively by 43.92 ± 22.84% and 35.92 ± 24.52%. Heart rate shift was not related to an abrupt elevation of metabolism per se (snakes that increased their heart rates the most sharply grew the least after birth), but rather due to a number of smaller eggs that experienced lower than normal heart rates throughout the incubation and recovered a normal heart rate post-birth. This finding is discussed in the light of hatching synchrony benefits. PMID:24287712

  8. Egg Hatch Rate and Nymphal Survival of the Bed Bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) After Exposure to Insecticide Sprays.

    PubMed

    Hinson, K R; Benson, E P; Zungoli, P A; Bridges, W C; Ellis, B R

    2016-12-01

    Few studies have addressed the efficacy of insecticides used against eggs and first-instar nymphs of the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae). Insect eggs are often resistant to insecticides; therefore, information on which products are effective is important. We evaluated the efficacy of four commonly used insecticide sprays applied directly to bed bug eggs. We also evaluated the efficacy of these insecticides to first-instar nymphs exposed to residuals resulting from directly spraying eggs. Temprid SC (beta-cyfluthrin, imidacloprid) was the most effective insecticide at preventing egg hatch (13% hatch rate) for pyrethroid-resistant, field-strain (Jersey City) bed bugs compared with a control (water [99% hatch rate]), Bedlam (MGK-264, sumithrin [84% hatch rate]), Demand CS (lambda-cyhalothrin [91% hatch rate]), and Phantom SC (chlorfenapyr [95% hatch rate]). Demand CS and Temprid SC were most effective at preventing egg hatch (0%) for an insecticide-susceptible (Harold Harlan) strain, followed by Bedlam (28%). Phantom SC produced a hatch rate similar to the control (97% and 96%, respectively). Harold Harlan-strain nymphs showed 100% survival for the control but 0% survival for Bedlam and Phantom SC. Jersey City-strain nymphs showed 100% survival for the control, 99% survival for Bedlam, 0% survival for Demand CS, 4% survival for Phantom SC, and 38% survival for Temprid SC. Demand CS was less effective at preventing hatch (91% hatch rate) of Jersey City-strain nymphs but was the only product to kill all nymphs (0% survival). One of the least effective products for preventing Jersey City-strain egg hatch (Phantom SC, 95% hatch rate) was the second most effective at killing nymphs, leaving only six of 141 alive. These findings indicate that survival of directly sprayed eggs and residually exposed, first-instar nymphs varies by strain, life stage, and product used.

  9. Interactions between hatch dates, growth rates, and mortality of Age-0 native Rainbow Smelt and nonnative Alewife in Lake Champlain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrish, Donna; Simonin, Paul W.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Pientka, Bernard; Sullivan, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Timing of hatch in fish populations can be critical for first-year survival and, therefore, year-class strength and subsequent species interactions. We compared hatch timing, growth rates, and subsequent mortality of age-0 Rainbow Smelt Osmerus mordax and Alewife Alosa pseudoharengus, two common open-water fish species of northern North America. In our study site, Lake Champlain, Rainbow Smelt hatched (beginning May 26) almost a month earlier than Alewives (June 20). Abundance in the sampling area was highest in July for age-0 Rainbow Smelt and August for age-0 Alewives. Late-hatching individuals of both species grew faster than those hatching earlier (0.6 mm/d versus 0.4 for Rainbow Smelt; 0.7 mm/d versus 0.6 for Alewives). Mean mortality rate during the first 45 d of life was 3.4%/d for age-0 Rainbow Smelt and was 5.5%/d for age-0 Alewives. Alewife mortality rates did not differ with hatch timing but daily mortality rates of Rainbow Smelt were highest for early-hatching fish. Cannibalism is probably the primary mortality source for age-0 Rainbow Smelt in this lake. Therefore, hatching earlier may not be advantageous because the overlap of adult and age-0 Rainbow Smelt is highest earlier in the season. However, Alewives, first documented in Lake Champlain in 2003, may increase the mortality of age-0 Rainbow Smelt in the summer, which should favor selection for earlier hatching.

  10. Seasonal predator removal relative to hatch rate of duck nests in waterfowl production areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargeant, A.B.; Sovada, M.A.; Shaffer, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    These authors report that hatch rates of duck nests were related to removal of predators from waterfowl production areas. Cost effectiveness of such efforts is questioned. The prairie pothole region (PPR) is the primary breeding ground of several species of North American ducks (Bellrose 1980). Much habitat of breeding ducks in the PPR has been destroyed or degraded by intensive agriculture (e.g., Kiel et al. 1972, Bellrose 1980, Sugden and Beyersbergen 1984, Boyd 1985), resulting in high predation rates on duck nests (Sargeant and Raveling 1992). Because of predation, hatch rate (HR) of duck nests in Waterfowl Production Areas (WPA's) in the PPR is often less than the 15-20% suggested for stability of populations of the 5 most common species of dabbling ducks (e.g., Cowardin et al. 1985, Greenwood 1986, Klett et al. 1988, Greenwood et al. 1990). Managers seek ways to reduce depredations of duck clutches in WPA's, but little information is available concerning effects of predator removal. We evaluated seasonal (spring and early summer) removal of predators from WPA's in Minnesota and North Dakota. Our objectives were to compare HR in uplands of WPA's with and without predators removed and to determine functional aspects of conducting predator removal.

  11. Heart Rate Responses to Unaided Orion Side Hatch Egress in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, Kirk L.; Hwang Emma Y.; Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Kelly, Cody; Walker, Thomas; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is developing the Orion capsule as a vehicle for transporting crewmembers to and from the International Space Station (ISS) and for future human space exploration missions. Orion and other commercial vehicles are designed to splash down in the ocean where nominally support personnel will assist crewmembers in egressing the vehicle. However, off-nominal scenarios will require crewmembers to egress the vehicle unaided, deploy survival equipment, and ingress a life raft. PURPOSE: To determine the heart rate (HR) responses to unaided Orion side hatch egress and raft ingress as a part of the NASA Crew Survival Engineering Team's evaluation of the PORT Orion mockup in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL). METHODS: Nineteen test subjects, including four astronauts (N=19, 14 males/5 females, 38.6+/-8.4 y, 174.4+/-9.6 cm, 75.7+/-13.1 kg), completed a graded maximal test on a cycle ergometer to determine VO2peak and HRpeak and were divided into five crews of four members each; one subject served on two crews. Each crew was required to deploy a life raft, egress the Orion vehicle from the side hatch, and ingress the life raft with two 8 kg emergency packs per crew. Each crew performed this activity one to three times; a total of ten full egresses were completed. Subjects wore a suit that was similar in form, mass, and function to the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) including helmet, gloves, boots, supplemental O2 bottles, and a CO2-inflated life preserver (approx.18 kg); subjects began each trial seated supine in the PORT Orion mockup with seat belts and mockup O2 and communication connections and ended each trial with all four crewmembers inside the life raft. RESULTS: VO2peak was 40.8+/-6.8 mL/kg/min (3.1+/-0.7 L/min); HRpeak was 181+/-10 bpm. Total egress time across trials was 5.0+/-1.6 min (range: 2.8-8.0 min); all subjects were able to successfully complete all trials. Average maximum HR at activity start, at the hatch opening, in the water, and in the

  12. Effect of the presence of trophectoderm vesicles on blastocyst in relation to in vitro hatching, clinical pregnancy, and miscarriage rates.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yasuhisa; Matsui, Yuki; Iizumi, Ayaka; Tsuchiya, Syoutarou; Kaneko, Yumi; Sato, Kazufumi; Ozaki, Tomoya; Araki, Yasuyuki; Nishimura, Mitsuru

    2016-10-01

    Trophectoderm vesicles (TVs) are observed in some blastocysts that penetrate cells from the zona pellucida to the outer margin. Therefore, we compared this incidence in relation to hatching, pregnancy, and miscarriage rates between conventional in vitro fertilization (c-IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Vitrified/warmed blastocysts (n = 112) were derived from surplus embryos. The blastocysts were then observed using time-lapse cinematography to resolve the relationship between hatching and implantation. Another study was conducted that comprised 681 embryo transfer cycles in 533 patients who received a single vitrified/warmed blastocyst from our clinic. The incidence of TV was significantly higher in embryos inseminated by ICSI compared with c-IVF [ICSI: 51/56 (91 %); c-IVF: 25/56 (45 %); P < 0.01]. The successful hatching rate was significantly lower in ICSI than in c-IVF [ICSI: 11/56 (20 %); c-IVF: 29/56 (52 %); P < 0.01]. In addition, the hatching rate was significantly lower when TVs were present (14/76; 18 %) than in non-TV embryos (26/36; 72 %) (P < 0.01). In regard to the clinical study results, no significant differences were found between the groups in the pregnancy rate (TV present group: 107/183, 58.5 %; TV absent group: 273/498, 54.8 %) and miscarriage rate (TV present group: 21/107, 19.6 %; TV absent group: 53/273, 19.4 %). In vivo, we hypothesized that hatching and hatched would occur naturally by assisting protease action in the uterus; therefore, these results suggest that the presence of TV has no effect on pregnancy rates in the clinical setting.

  13. Hatching behavior in turtles.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Ricky-John; Janzen, Fredric J

    2011-07-01

    Incubation temperature plays a prominent role in shaping the phenotypes and fitness of embryos, including affecting developmental rates. In many taxa, including turtles, eggs are deposited in layers such that thermal gradients alter developmental rates within a nest. Despite this thermal effect, a nascent body of experimental work on environmentally cued hatching in turtles has revealed unexpected synchronicity in hatching behavior. This review discusses environmental cues for hatching, physiological mechanisms behind synchronous hatching, proximate and ultimate causes for this behavior, and future directions for research. Four freshwater turtle species have been investigated experimentally, with hatching in each species elicited by different environmental cues and responding via various physiological mechanisms. Hatching of groups of eggs in turtles apparently involves some level of embryo-embryo communication and thus is not a purely passive activity. Although turtles are not icons of complex social behavior, life-history theory predicts that the group environment of the nest can drive the evolution of environmentally cued hatching.

  14. Extended hatching periods in the subantarctic lithodid crabs Lithodes santolla and Paralomis granulosa (Crustacea: Decapoda: Lithodidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatje, S.; Calcagno, J. A.; Lovrich, G. A.; Sartoris, F. J.; Anger, K.

    2003-06-01

    Temporal pattern of hatching was studied in the subantarctic lithodid crabs Lithodes santolla (Molina) and Paralomis granulosa (Jaquinot) from the Argentine Beagle Channel. In both species, larval hatching occurred in low daily numbers over an extended period of up to several weeks, depending on hatch size. Low daily hatching activity and low oxygen-consumption rates in freshly hatched P. granulosa larvae are discussed as life history adaptations to, and/or physiological constraints by, the environmental conditions of high latitudes.

  15. Starting with a handicap: effects of asynchronous hatching on growth rate, oxidative stress and telomere dynamics in free-living great tits.

    PubMed

    Stier, Antoine; Massemin, Sylvie; Zahn, Sandrine; Tissier, Mathilde L; Criscuolo, François

    2015-12-01

    A trade-off between resource investment into growth rate and body self-maintenance is likely to occur, but the underlying molecular mediators of such a trade-off remain to be determined. In many altricial birds, hatching asynchrony creates a sibling competitive hierarchy within the brood, with first-hatched nestlings enjoying substantial advantages compared to last-hatched nestlings. We used this opportunity to test for a trade-off between growth and self-maintenance processes (oxidative stress, telomere erosion) in great tit nestlings, since resource availability and allocation are likely to differ between first-hatched and last-hatched nestlings. We found that despite their starting competitive handicap (i.e. being smaller/lighter before day 16), last-hatched nestlings exhibited growth rate and mass/size at fledging similar to first-hatched ones. However, last-hatched nestlings suffered more in terms of oxidative stress, and ended growth with shorter telomeres than first-hatched ones. Interestingly, growth rate was positively related to plasma antioxidant capacity and early life telomere length (i.e. at 7 days old), but among last-hatched nestlings, those exhibiting the faster body size growth were also those exhibiting the greatest telomere erosion. Last-hatched nestlings exhibited elevated levels of plasma testosterone (T), but only at day 7. T levels were positively associated with oxidative damage levels and plasma antioxidant capacity, the latter being only significant for first-hatched nestlings. Our results suggest that last-hatched nestlings present a specific trade-off between growth rate and self-maintenance processes, which is possibly driven by their need to compete with their older siblings and potentially mediated by elevated levels of T.

  16. Characterization of hatch-size and growth rates of captive and wild-reared brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli) chicks.

    PubMed

    Prier, Erica A; Gartrell, Brett D; Potter, Murray A; Lopez-Villalobos, Nicolas; McLennan, John

    2013-01-01

    Avian growth rate patterns represent a trade off between a tissue's functional maturity and its capacity for growth. At the time of hatch, the brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli) limb has a high level of maturity in order for the chick to be able to kick its way out of the shell and walk and forage independently from an early age. Growth curves of limb segments, bill length and bodyweight are presented for captive-reared, BNZ Operation Nest Egg™ chicks over a period of 3 months from the point of hatch. Some parameters were slightly larger in the females than in males at time of hatch, including the bill length. Growth in bodyweight began to slow earlier in males than in females. Regressions of limb and bill measurements over time showed linear patterns of growth instead of a sigmoidal curve as seen in other birds, probably due to the short period of observation. Bodyweight and bill length were then compared to these morphometrics in a wild population of kiwi. Captive-reared chicks were found to hatch with shorter bills and to increase in bodyweight at a faster rate than the wild birds. Rapid weight gain has been implicated in developmental limb deformities in other precocial and long-legged birds and should be avoided in captive kiwi.

  17. Cytokines and Blastocyst Hatching.

    PubMed

    Seshagiri, Polani B; Vani, Venkatappa; Madhulika, Pathak

    2016-03-01

    Blastocyst implantation into the uterine endometrium establishes early pregnancy. This event is regulated by blastocyst- and/or endometrium-derived molecular factors which include hormones, growth factors, cell adhesion molecules, cytokines and proteases. Their coordinated expression and function are critical for a viable pregnancy. A rate-limiting event that immediately precedes implantation is the hatching of blastocyst. Ironically, blastocyst hatching is tacitly linked to peri-implantation events, although it is a distinct developmental phenomenon. The exact molecular network regulating hatching is still unclear. A number of implantation-associated molecular factors are expressed in the pre-implanting blastocyst. Among others, cytokines, expressed by peri-implantation blastocysts, are thought to be important for hatching, making blastocysts implantation competent. Pro-inflammatory (IL-6, LIF, GM-CSF) and anti-inflammatory (IL-11, CSF-1) cytokines improve hatching rates; they modulate proteases (MMPs, tPAs, cathepsins and ISP1). However, functional involvement of cytokines and their specific mediation of hatching-associated proteases are unclear. There is a need to understand mechanistic roles of cytokines and proteases in blastocyst hatching. This review will assess the available knowledge on blastocyst-derived pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and their role in potentially regulating blastocyst hatching. They have implications in our understanding of early embryonic loss and infertility in mammals, including humans.

  18. From facultative to obligatory parental care: Interspecific variation in offspring dependency on post-hatching care in burying beetles

    PubMed Central

    Capodeanu-Nägler, Alexandra; Keppner, Eva M.; Vogel, Heiko; Ayasse, Manfred; Eggert, Anne-Katrin; Sakaluk, Scott K.; Steiger, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the evolution of parental care have focused primarily on the costs and benefits of parental care and the life-history attributes that favour it. However, once care evolves, offspring in some taxa appear to become increasingly dependent on their parents. Although offspring dependency is a central theme in family life, the evolutionary dynamics leading to it are not fully understood. Beetles of the genus Nicrophorus are well known for their elaborate biparental care, including provisioning of their young. By manipulating the occurrence of pre- or post-hatching care, we show that the offspring of three burying beetle species, N. orbicollis, N. pustulatus, and N. vespilloides, show striking variation in their reliance on parental care. Our results demonstrate that this variation within one genus arises through a differential dependency of larvae on parental feeding, but not on pre-hatching care. In N. pustulatus, larvae appear to be nutritionally independent of their parents, but in N. orbicollis, larvae do not survive in the absence of parental feeding. We consider evolutionary scenarios by which nutritional dependency may have evolved, highlighting the role of brood size regulation via infanticide in this genus. PMID:27378180

  19. Comparative analysis of hatching rates and clutch sizes of Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) eggs collected on- and off-farm in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Khosa, Patricia; Imbayarwo-Chikosi, Venancio Edward; Hamandishe, Vimbai

    2012-04-01

    The Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) is a large aquatic reptile predominant in the tropics in Africa and Zimbabwe in particular. Clutch sizes and hatching rates of Nile crocodile eggs collected from the wild and on-farm in Lowveld, Highveld and Kariba regions of Zimbabwe were evaluated. A total of 274 egg records for the period 2000 to 2008 from 39 farms were collected from the Crocodile Farmers Association of Zimbabwe. The effect of source of eggs was analysed using the non-parametric one way analysis of variance procedure of SAS Version 9.1.3. Wilcoxon signed rank test for independent samples was used to compare the mean hatching rates and clutch sizes for eggs collected from the different sources by region. The degree of association between clutch sizes and the hatching rates by source and region was determined using the Spearman's rank correlation test. Source of eggs had no effect (P > 0.05) on hatching rates in all the regions but significantly influenced (P < 0.05) clutch sizes in Lowveld and Kariba. In these regions, clutch sizes in the wild were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those on-farm. Correlation estimates between clutch size and hatching rates were weak and non-significant (P > 0.05) for the different sources of eggs in all regions. Full utilization of the wild resource would reduce challenges relating to shortage of captive breeders and high cost of rearing breeders and hence increase productivity.

  20. 76 FR 32188 - Hatch Solar Energy Center 1, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Hatch Solar Energy Center 1, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial... notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Hatch Solar Energy Center 1, LLC's application for...

  1. Hatching behavior of eastern long-necked turtles (Chelodina longicollis): The influence of asynchronous environments on embryonic heart rate and phenotype.

    PubMed

    McGlashan, Jessica K; Loudon, Fiona K; Thompson, Michael B; Spencer, Ricky-John

    2015-10-01

    Variable temperatures within a nest cause asynchronous development within clutches of freshwater turtle embryos, yet synchronous hatching occurs and is thought to be an important survival strategy for hatchlings. Metabolic compensation and circadian rhythms in heart rates of embryonic turtles indicate the potential of communication between embryos in a nest. Heart rates were used to identify metabolic circadian rhythms in clutches of an Australian freshwater turtle (Chelodina longicollis) and determine whether embryos metabolically compensate and hatch synchronously when incubated in asynchronous environments. The effects of a group environment during incubation on egg development and incubation period were also investigated during the final 3 weeks of development. Chelodina longicollis hatch synchronously and metabolically compensate so that less advanced embryos catch up to more advanced clutch-mates. Heart rates of embryos remained stable from week 4-7 in asynchronous (M=89 bpm) and synchronous (M=92 bpm) groups and declined in the final 2 weeks of incubation (M=72 and 77 bpm). Circadian rhythms were present throughout development and diel heart rates of embryos in asynchronous groups showed less deviation from the mean (M=-0.5 bpm) than synchronous groups (M=-4 bpm). Eggs incubated in groups had a significantly shorter incubation period than eggs incubated individually. Phenotypic traits including size, performance, and growth of all hatchlings were not affected. Egg position within a turtle nest is important for coordinating development throughout incubation and facilitating synchronous hatching.

  2. Vitamin C supplementation enhances compact morulae formation but reduces the hatching blastocyst rate of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Li-Jun; Zhang, Hui; Li, Rui-Zhe; Cui, Chen-Chen; Li, Wen-Zhe; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Ya-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Vitamin C, an antioxidant that reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells, is capable of significantly improving the developmental competence of porcine and mouse somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the effects of vitamin C on the developmental competence of bovine SCNT embryos were investigated. The results indicated that vitamin C (40 μg/mL) positively affected the scavenging of intracellular ROS, cleavage rate at 24 h (76.67 vs. 68.26%, p<0.05), compact morulae formation (60.83 vs. 51.30%, p<0.05), and the blastomere apoptosis index (3.70 ± 1.41 vs. 4.43% ± 1.65, p<0.05) of bovine SCNT embryos. However, vitamin C supplementation did not significantly affect the blastocyst formation rate and proportion of inner cell mass over total cells per blastocyst on day 7. Moreover, vitamin C supplementation obviously impaired the total cell numbers per blastocyst (97.20 ± 11.35 vs. 88.57 ± 10.43, p<0.05) on day 7 and the hatching blastocysts formation rate on day 9 (26.51 vs. 50.65%, p<0.05) compared with that of the untreated group. Vitamin C supplementation preferentially improved the viability of bovine SCNT embryos prior to the blastocyst stage, but did not enhance the formation and quality of blastocysts in vitro. In conclusion, the effect of vitamin C on the development of bovine SCNT embryos is complex, and vitamin C is not a suitable antioxidant chemical for the in vitro culture of bovine SCNT embryos.

  3. Comparison of three lines of broiler breeders differing in ascites susceptibility or growth rate. 1. Relationship between acoustic resonance data and embryonic or hatching parameters.

    PubMed

    Tona, K; Kemps, B; Bruggeman, V; Bamelis, F; De Smit, L; Onagbesan, O; De Baerdemaeker, J; Decuypere, E

    2005-09-01

    Ascites is a prevalent cardiovascular disease among modern broilers with negative impacts on production and animal welfare. The peak of mortality due to ascites occurs at the end of the growing period, but the etiology of this problem may start during embryonic development. A few recent reports have demonstrated that the signs of ascites susceptibility are manifested during the late stages of incubation. In the current study, we used a nondestructive method based on egg acoustic resonance parameters [resonant frequency (RF) and damping] to establish a relationship between embryo physiological events during early development in broiler eggs and susceptibility to ascites. The hatching eggs of 3 broiler lines differing in ascites susceptibility were used for this study: ascites-resistant dam line (DAR), ascites-sensitive dam line (DAS), and ascites-sensitive sire line (SASL). These lines were selected on the basis of fast growth, high breast meat yield, and ascites induction at low temperatures such that the order of ascites susceptibility in terms of mortality was SASL > DAS > DAR. Eggs were incubated under standard conditions in forced-draft incubators. We measured egg weights at setting, albumen pH, Haugh units (HU) at setting, and embryo weights at d 11 and 18, at internal pipping (IP), and at hatch. The durations of IP, external pipping (EP), and hatching were also determined. At 2 hourly periods during incubation, egg RF and damping were also measured. There were differences in egg weights between DAR and SASL vs. DAS, but albumen HU, albumen pH, and the ratio of yolk weight to egg weight were similar. There were differences in RF, damping, embryonic growth rates, and hatching events. Changes in resonant frequency and damping, which certainly suggest eggshell differences among lines, were not totally related to variations in physiological events during early and late embryonic development. A comparison between DAR and DAS, between DAS and SASL, or DAR and SASL

  4. Glassfrog embryos hatch early after parental desertion

    PubMed Central

    Delia, Jesse R. J.; Ramírez-Bautista, Aurelio; Summers, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Both parental care and hatching plasticity can improve embryo survival. Research has found that parents can alter hatching time owing to a direct effect of care on embryogenesis or via forms of care that cue the hatching process. Because parental care alters conditions critical for offspring development, hatching plasticity could allow embryos to exploit variation in parental behaviour. However, this interaction of parental care and hatching plasticity remains largely unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that embryos hatch early to cope with paternal abandonment in the glassfrog Hyalinobatrachium fleischmanni (Centrolenidae). We conducted male-removal experiments in a wild population, and examined embryos' response to conditions with and without fathers. Embryos hatched early when abandoned, but extended development in the egg stage when fathers continued care. Paternal care had no effect on developmental rate. Rather, hatching plasticity was due to embryos actively hatching at different developmental stages, probably in response to deteriorating conditions without fathers. Our experimental results are supported by a significant correlation between the natural timing of abandonment and hatching in an unmanipulated population. This study demonstrates that embryos can respond to conditions resulting from parental abandonment, and provides insights into how variation in care can affect selection on egg-stage adaptations. PMID:24789892

  5. Glassfrog embryos hatch early after parental desertion.

    PubMed

    Delia, Jesse R J; Ramírez-Bautista, Aurelio; Summers, Kyle

    2014-06-22

    Both parental care and hatching plasticity can improve embryo survival. Research has found that parents can alter hatching time owing to a direct effect of care on embryogenesis or via forms of care that cue the hatching process. Because parental care alters conditions critical for offspring development, hatching plasticity could allow embryos to exploit variation in parental behaviour. However, this interaction of parental care and hatching plasticity remains largely unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that embryos hatch early to cope with paternal abandonment in the glassfrog Hyalinobatrachium fleischmanni (Centrolenidae). We conducted male-removal experiments in a wild population, and examined embryos' response to conditions with and without fathers. Embryos hatched early when abandoned, but extended development in the egg stage when fathers continued care. Paternal care had no effect on developmental rate. Rather, hatching plasticity was due to embryos actively hatching at different developmental stages, probably in response to deteriorating conditions without fathers. Our experimental results are supported by a significant correlation between the natural timing of abandonment and hatching in an unmanipulated population. This study demonstrates that embryos can respond to conditions resulting from parental abandonment, and provides insights into how variation in care can affect selection on egg-stage adaptations.

  6. Post-hatching development of mitochondrial function, organ mass and metabolic rate in two ectotherms, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina)

    PubMed Central

    Sirsat, Sarah K. G.; Sirsat, Tushar S.; Price, Edwin R.; Dzialowski, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ontogeny of endothermy in birds is associated with disproportionate growth of thermogenic organs and increased mitochondrial oxidative capacity. However, no similar study has been made of the development of these traits in ectotherms. For comparison, we therefore investigated the metabolism, growth and muscle mitochondrial function in hatchlings of a turtle and a crocodilian, two ectotherms that never develop endothermy. Metabolic rate did not increase substantially in either species by 30 days post-hatching. Yolk-free body mass and heart mass did not change through 30 days in alligators and heart mass was a constant proportion of body mass, even after 1 year. Yolk-free body mass and liver mass grew 36% and 27%, respectively, in turtles during the first 30 days post-hatch. The mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity of mitochondria, assessed using permeabilized muscle fibers, increased by a non-significant 47% in alligator thigh and a non-significant 50% in turtle thigh over 30 days, but did not increase in the heart. This developmental trajectory of mitochondrial function is slower and shallower than that previously observed in ducks, which demonstrate a 90% increase in mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity in thigh muscles over just a few days, a 60% increase in mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the heart over a few days, and disproportionate growth of the heart and other organs. Our data thus support the hypothesis that these developmental changes in ducks represent mechanistic drivers for attaining endothermy. PMID:26962048

  7. In vitro embryo development and blastocyst hatching rates following vitrification of river buffalo embryos produced from oocytes recovered from slaughterhouse ovaries or live animals by ovum pick-up.

    PubMed

    Manjunatha, B M; Gupta, P S P; Ravindra, J P; Devaraj, M; Nandi, S

    2008-03-03

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether the source of oocytes (ovum pick up versus slaughterhouse ovaries) affected in vitro embryo production and embryo survival (as measured by blastocyst hatching rates) following vitrification in buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis). Oocytes recovered from live buffaloes (n=6) by ovum pick up (OPU) and by manual aspiration from slaughterhouse ovaries were in vitro matured, fertilized and cultured to blastocyst stage under same culture conditions. Vitrification of blastocysts was carried out in two steps at 24 degrees C. Embryos were equilibrated in 10% EG+10% DMSO+0.3 M sucrose in base medium for 4 min. Subsequently, the embryos were transferred into 25% EG+25% DMSO+0.3 M sucrose in base medium for 45 s and then the embryos were loaded into straws and immersed in liquid nitrogen. Following warming, blastocysts were cultured in vitro for 48 h to assess hatching. Oocytes derived from live animals by OPU resulted in a significantly higher blastocyst yield then those derived from slaughterhouse ovaries (30.6+/-4.3 versus 18.5+/-1.8). Blastocyst hatching rates following vitrification of buffalo embryos produced from the oocytes collected from live animals by OPU was significantly higher than the oocytes collected from slaughterhouse ovaries (52.8+/-4.2 versus 40.2+/-4.4). In conclusion, the present study showed that source of oocytes (OPU versus slaughterhouse ovaries) affects the in vitro embryo development and blastocyst hatching rates following vitrification of embryos in buffaloes.

  8. Effect of L-carnitine on in vitro developmental rate, the zona pellucida and hatching of blastocysts and their cell numbers in mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Khanmohammadi, Nasrin; Movahedin, Mansoureh; Safari, Manouchehr; Sameni, Hamid Reza; Yousefi, Behpour; Jafari, Behnaz; Zarbakhsh, Sam

    2016-01-01

    L-carnitine (LC) is an antioxidant with the ability to promote the growth in vitro embryo. Objective: The goal was to evaluate the effect of LC on some indicators of embryo development and blastocyst quality including zona pellucid (ZP) thickness, the hatching of blastocysts and their cell numbers. Materials and Methods: Mouse embryos were randomly divided into five groups and incubated with different concentrations of LC (I; 0, II; 0.5, III; 1, IV; 2 and V; 4 mg/ml) from 2-cell to hatched blastocyst. The percentage of blastocysts and hatched blastocysts was calculated. Blastocysts ZP thickness was measured and the number of blastocyst cells was counted using Hoechst and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Results: The results showed concentration of 0.5 mg/ml of LC had an antioxidant effect as in this group, the percentage of blastocysts and hatched blactocysts (p=0.01), the ZP thickness (p=0.00) and the number of blastocyst inner cell mass were significantly more favorable than the control group (p=0.03); and concentration of 4 mg/ml of LC had a toxic effect on embryo development and blastocyst quality (p=0.00). Conclusion: The results suggest that LC may increase the number of blastocyst cells, which probably helps to expand the blastocyst and thinning of the ZP thickness and, therefore, creating a successful hatching for implantation. PMID:27921089

  9. Effects of transgenic sterilization constructs and their repressor compounds on hatch, developmental rate and early survival of electroporated channel catfish embryos and fry.

    PubMed

    Su, Baofeng; Shang, Mei; Li, Chao; Perera, Dayan A; Pinkert, Carl A; Irwin, Michael H; Peatman, Eric; Grewe, Peter; Patil, Jawahar G; Dunham, Rex A

    2015-04-01

    Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) embryos were electroporated with sterilization constructs targeting primordial germ cell proteins or with buffer. Some embryos then were treated with repressor compounds, cadmium chloride, copper sulfate, sodium chloride or doxycycline, to prevent expression of the transgene constructs. Promoters included channel catfish nanos and vasa, salmon transferrin (TF), modified yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae copper transport protein (MCTR) and zebrafish racemase (RM). Knock-down systems were the Tet-off (nanos and vasa constructs), MCTR, RM and TF systems. Knock-down genes included shRNAi targeting 5' nanos (N1), 3' nanos (N2) or dead end (DND), or double-stranded nanos RNA (dsRNA) for overexpression of nanos mRNA. These constructs previously were demonstrated to knock down nanos, vasa and dead end, with the repressors having variable success. Exogenous DNA affected percentage hatch (% hatch), as all 14 constructs, except for the TF dsRNA, TF N1 (T), RM DND (C), vasa DND (C), vasa N1 (C) and vasa N2 (C), had lower % hatch than the control electroporated with buffer. The MCTR and RM DND (T) constructs resulted in delayed hatch, and the vasa and nanos constructs had minimal effects on time of hatch (P < 0.05). Cadmium chloride appeared to counteract the slow development caused by the TF constructs in two TF treatments (P < 0.05). The 4 ppt sodium chloride treatment for the RM system decreased % hatch (P < 0.05) and slowed development. In the case of nanos constructs, doxycycline greatly delayed hatch (P < 0.05). Adverse effects of the transgenes and repressors continued for several treatments for the first 6 days after hatch, but only in a few treatments during the next 10 days. Repressors and gene expression impacted the yield of putative transgenic channel catfish fry, and need to be considered and accounted for in the hatchery phase of producing transgenically sterilized catfish fry and their fertile counterparts. This fry output

  10. Convexity, gauge-dependence and tunneling rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia, Alexis D.; Tamarit, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    We clarify issues of convexity, gauge-dependence and radiative corrections in relation to tunneling rates. Despite the gauge dependence of the effective action at zero and finite temperature, it is shown that tunneling and nucleation rates remain independent of the choice of gauge-fixing. Taking as a starting point the functional that defines the transition amplitude from a false vacuum onto itself, it is shown that decay rates are exactly determined by a non-convex, false vacuum effective action evaluated at an extremum. The latter can be viewed as a generalized bounce configuration, and gauge-independence follows from the appropriate Nielsen identities. This holds for any election of gauge-fixing that leads to an invertible Faddeev-Popov matrix.

  11. The load dependence of rate constants.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Sam

    2008-06-07

    As experimental techniques in biophysics have progressed at the single molecule level, there has been considerable interest in understanding how external mechanical influences (such as load) affect chemical reactions. The majority of biophysical studies investigating load-dependent kinetics use an equation where the rate constant exponentially depends on force, which is sometimes called Bell's equation. This equation requires the determination of two parameters that describe the potential energy-strain function: k(0), which is the reaction rate in the absence of load, and x(c), which is the difference in strain between the reactant and transition states. However, there have been theoretical studies based on Kramers' theory suggesting that the rate constant should have load-dependent pre-exponential terms and nonlinear load-dependent terms in the exponential. Kramers' theory requires an exact knowledge of the potential energy-strain function, which is in general not known for an experimental system. Here, we derive a general approximation of Kramers' theory where the potential energy-strain function is described by five parameters, which can, for small loads, be reduced to four-, three-, and finally to two parameters (Bell's equation). We then use an idealized physical system to validate our approximations to Kramers' theory and show how they can predict parameters of interest (such as k(0) and x(c)) better than Bell's equation. Finally, we show previously published experimental data that are not well fitted by Bell's equation but are adequately fitted by these more exact equations.

  12. Effect of short-term exposure to methyl-tert-butyl ether and tert-butyl alcohol on the hatch rate and development of the African catfish, Clarias gariepinus.

    PubMed

    Moreels, David; Lodewijks, Pieter; Zegers, Hans; Rurangwa, Eugène; Vromant, Nico; Bastiaens, Leen; Diels, Ludo; Springael, Dirk; Merckx, Roel; Ollevier, Frans

    2006-02-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a synthetic chemical used as a fuel additive, has been detected more frequently in the environment than previously. In this study, we examine the effects of MTBE (up to 100 mg/L) and its primary metabolite tertbutyl alcohol (TBA) (up to 1,400 mg/L) on the hatch rate and larval development of the African catfish Clarias gariepinus. Exposure to higher MTBE concentrations resulted in deformed eyes, mouthparts, and spinal cord and in increased larval mortality. Methyl tert-butyl ether exposure had no significant impact on egg viability, whereas TBA induced a decline of hatch rate. The MTBE can be regarded as a pollutant with toxicological effects on catfish larvae at concentrations above 50 mg/L. Although such concentrations greatly surpass present-day concentrations found in surface water (0.088 mg/L), concentrations up to 200 mg/L have been detected in groundwater.

  13. Hatching Behavior of Potato Cyst Nematodes from the Canary Islands

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Phillips, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    The present work investigated early hatching differences in naturally occuring field populations and newly reared populations of potato cyst nematodes from the Canary Islands. Hatching behavior of the two species appears to be distinct, with more juveniles hatched from G. pallida that hatch earlier and over a shorter time than G. rostochiensis. The hatching rate of 3-year-old PCN populations was more than double (mean 44.5% ñ 1) that shown by newly reared populations (mean 19.1% ñ 12.5), and those that could be classified as pathotype Pa 1 (Pa 1 and P 13) were found to hatch particularly poorly. Significant differences were also observed in the juveniles released in tap water between newly reared populations of both species, with mean hatch significantly higher for G. rostochiensis. The results are discussed in relation to the implication that these findings may have for competition between the two species of PCN in the field. PMID:19277163

  14. Time-Dependent Rate Phenomenon in Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Aiewsakun, Pakorn

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Among the most fundamental questions in viral evolutionary biology are how fast viruses evolve and how evolutionary rates differ among viruses and fluctuate through time. Traditionally, viruses are loosely classed into two groups: slow-evolving DNA viruses and fast-evolving RNA viruses. As viral evolutionary rate estimates become more available, it appears that the rates are negatively correlated with the measurement timescales and that the boundary between the rates of DNA and RNA viruses might not be as clear as previously thought. In this study, we collected 396 viral evolutionary rate estimates across almost all viral genome types and replication strategies, and we examined their rate dynamics. We showed that the time-dependent rate phenomenon exists across multiple levels of viral taxonomy, from the Baltimore classification viral groups to genera. We also showed that, by taking the rate decay dynamics into account, a clear division between the rates of DNA and RNA viruses as well as reverse-transcribing viruses could be recovered. Surprisingly, despite large differences in their biology, our analyses suggested that the rate decay speed is independent of viral types and thus might be useful for better estimation of the evolutionary time scale of any virus. To illustrate this, we used our model to reestimate the evolutionary timescales of extant lentiviruses, which were previously suggested to be very young by standard phylogenetic analyses. Our analyses suggested that these viruses are millions of years old, in agreement with paleovirological evidence, and therefore, for the first time, reconciled molecular analyses of ancient and extant viruses. IMPORTANCE This work provides direct evidence that viral evolutionary rate estimates decay with their measurement timescales and that the rate decay speeds do not differ significantly among viruses despite the vast differences in their molecular features. After adjustment for the rate decay dynamics, the

  15. Determination of Time Dependent Virus Inactivation Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, C. V.; Vogler, E. T.

    2003-12-01

    A methodology is developed for estimating temporally variable virus inactivation rate coefficients from experimental virus inactivation data. The methodology consists of a technique for slope estimation of normalized virus inactivation data in conjunction with a resampling parameter estimation procedure. The slope estimation technique is based on a relatively flexible geostatistical method known as universal kriging. Drift coefficients are obtained by nonlinear fitting of bootstrap samples and the corresponding confidence intervals are obtained by bootstrap percentiles. The proposed methodology yields more accurate time dependent virus inactivation rate coefficients than those estimated by fitting virus inactivation data to a first-order inactivation model. The methodology is successfully applied to a set of poliovirus batch inactivation data. Furthermore, the importance of accurate inactivation rate coefficient determination on virus transport in water saturated porous media is demonstrated with model simulations.

  16. Rates of oxygen uptake increase independently of changes in heart rate in late stages of development and at hatching in the green iguana, Iguana iguana.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Marina R; Abe, Augusto S; Crossley, Dane A; Taylor, Edwin W

    2017-03-01

    Oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate (fH), heart mass (Mh) and body mass (Mb) were measured during embryonic incubation and in hatchlings of green iguana (Iguana iguana). Mean fH and VO2 were unvarying in early stage embryos. VO2 increased exponentially during the later stages of embryonic development, doubling by the end of incubation, while fH was constant, resulting in a 2.7-fold increase in oxygen pulse. Compared to late stage embryos, the mean inactive level of VO2 in hatchlings was 1.7 fold higher, while fH was reduced by half resulting in a further 3.6 fold increase in oxygen pulse. There was an overall negative correlation between mean fH and VO2 when data from hatchlings was included. Thus, predicting metabolic rate as VO2 from measurements of fH is not possible in embryonic reptiles. Convective transport of oxygen to supply metabolism during embryonic incubation was more reliably indicated as an index of cardiac output (COi) derived from the product of fH and Mh. However, a thorough analysis of factors determining rates of oxygen supply during development and eclosion in reptiles will require cannulation of blood vessels that proved impossible in the present study, to determine oxygen carrying capacity by the blood and arteriovenous oxygen content difference (A-V diff), plus patterns of blood flow.

  17. Hatching Eggs in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert W.

    1984-01-01

    This article provides detailed instructions on how to hatch chicken eggs. Sections include: (1) making the incubator; (2) making the brooder; (3) guidelines for hatching eggs; (4) from incubator to brooder; and (5) recommended readings. (JMK)

  18. Time-dependent freezing rate parcel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, G.; Snider, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    The time-dependent freezing rate (TDFR) model here described represents the formation of ice particles by immersion freezing within an air parcel. The air parcel trajectory follows an adiabatic ascent and includes a period in time when the parcel remains stationary at the top of its ascent. The description of the ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the air parcel is taken from laboratory experiments with cloud and precipitation samples and is assumed to represent the INP content of the cloud droplets in the parcel. Time dependence is included to account for variations in updraft velocity and for the continued formation of ice particles under isothermal conditions. The magnitudes of these factors are assessed on the basis of laboratory measurements. Results show that both factors give rise to three-fold variations in ice concentration for a realistic range of the input parameters. Refinements of the parameters specifying time dependence and INP concentrations are needed to make the results more specific to different atmospheric aerosol types. The simple model framework described in this paper can be adapted to more elaborate cloud models. The results here presented can help guide decisions on whether to include a time-dependent ice nucleation scheme or a simpler singular description in models.

  19. Time-dependent freezing rate parcel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, G.; Snider, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    The Time-Dependent Freezing Rate (TDFR) model here described represents the formation of ice particles by immersion freezing within an air parcel. The air parcel trajectory follows an adiabatic ascent and includes a period at time with the parcel remaining stationary at the top of its ascent. The description of the ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the air parcel is taken from laboratory experiments with cloud and precipitation samples and is assumed to represent the INP content of the cloud droplets in the parcel. Time-dependence is included to account for variations in updraft velocity and for the continued formation of ice particles at isothermal conditions. The magnitudes of these factors are assessed on the basis of laboratory measurements. Results show that both factors give rise to factors of about 3 variations in ice concentration for a realistic range of the input parameters. Refinements of the parameters specifying time-dependence and INP concentrations are needed to make the results more specific to different atmospheric aerosol types. The simple model framework described in this paper can be adapted to more elaborate cloud models. The results here presented can help guide decisions on whether to include a time-dependent ice nucleation scheme or a simpler singular description in models.

  20. Mechanism Guides Hatch Through Hatchway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barron, Daniel R.; Kennedy, Steven E.

    1993-01-01

    Elliptical hatch designed to move through hatchway to make pressure-assisted seal with either side of bulkhead. Compact three-degree-of-freedom mechanism guides hatch through hatchway or holds hatch off to one side to facilitate passage of crew and/or equipment. Hatches and mechanisms used in submarines, pressure chambers (including hyperbaric treatment chambers), vacuum chambers, and vacuum-or-pressure test chambers.

  1. Spread of hatch and delayed feed access affect post hatch performance of female broiler chicks up to day 5.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Li, Y; Willems, E; Willemsen, H; Franssens, L; Koppenol, A; Guo, X; Tona, K; Decuypere, E; Buyse, J; Everaert, N

    2014-04-01

    It is not rare that newly hatched chicks remain without feed for about 24 to 48 h before they are placed on farms due to a series of logistic operations. Furthermore, the spread in hatching time can also mount up to 30 to 48 h for late v. early hatchers. In other words, the practice is a complex combination of spread of hatch and delayed feed access. The present study was aimed to investigate the combined effects of hatching time with a delay in feed access of 48 h, starting from their hatch-time (biological age). When chicks had access to feed immediately after hatch, late hatchers had a higher feed intake and relative growth rate up to day 5 compared with their early hatched counterparts. Feed deprivation during the first 48 h resulted in retarded early growth rate, which was further aggravated by an impaired feed intake after refeeding. In addition, the differential effects of hatching time on relative growth rate and feed intake observed in immediately fed chicks were eliminated by the 48 h feed delay. The yolk utilization after hatch was faster for the late hatchers up to biological day 2 regardless of the feeding treatments. Hatching muscle glycogen content was higher in the late hatchers compared with that of their early counterparts at hatch and at biological day 2 independent of feeding treatment. Moreover, the liver glycogen content of the late hatchers was also higher at hatch. For the immediately fed chicks, the proportional breast muscle weight of the late hatchers was higher at biological day 2 and 5. For the starved chicks, on the other hand, this effect was only observed after they had access to feed (biological day 5). The different plasma T3 levels at hatch may have contributed to the different post hatch performance. It is concluded that the spread of hatch influenced post hatch performance, especially appetite and growth at least until day 5. Moreover, the delay in feed access interacted with the hatching time and caused adverse effects on the

  2. Corticosterone stimulates hatching of late-term tree lizard embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Stacey L.; Johnston, Gwynne; Moore, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    The regulation of hatching in oviparous animals is important for successful reproduction and survival, but is poorly understood. We unexpectedly found that RU-486, a progesterone and glucocorticoid antagonist, interferes with hatching of viable tree lizard (Urosaurus ornatus) embryos in a dose-dependent manner and hypothesized that embryonic glucocorticoids regulate hatching. To test this hypothesis, we treated eggs with corticosterone (CORT) or vehicle on Day 30 (85%) of incubation, left other eggs untreated, and observed relative hatch order and hatch time. In one study, the CORT egg hatched first in 9 of 11 clutches. In a second study, the CORT egg hatched first in 9 of 12 clutches, before vehicle-treated eggs in 10 of 12 clutches, and before untreated eggs in 7 of 9 clutches. On average, CORT eggs hatched 18.2h before vehicle-treated eggs and 11.6h before untreated eggs. Thus, CORT accelerates hatching of near-term embryos and RU-486 appears to block this effect. CORT may mobilize energy substrates that fuel hatching and/or accelerate lung development, and may provide a mechanism by which stressed embryos escape environmental stressors. PMID:17208477

  3. Rate-dependent incompleteness of earthquake catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainzl, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Important information about the earthquake generation process can be gained from instrumental earthquake catalogs, but this requires complete recordings to avoid biased results. The local completeness magnitude Mc is known to depend on general conditions such as the seismographic network and the environmental noise, which generally limit the possibility to detect small events. The detectability can be additionally reduced by an earthquake-induced increase of the noise-level leading to short-term variations of Mc, which cannot be resolved by traditional methods relying on the analysis of the frequency-magnitude distribution. Based on simple assumptions, I propose a new method to estimate such temporal excursions of Mc solely based on the estimation of the earthquake rate resulting in a high temporal resolution of Mc. The approach is shown to be in agreement with the apparent decrease of the estimated Gutenberg-Richter b-value in high-activity phases of recorded data sets and the observed incompleteness periods after mainshocks. Furthermore, an algorithm to estimate temporal changes of Mc is introduced and applied to empirical aftershock and swarm sequences from California and central Europe, indicating that observed b-value fluctuations are often related to rate-dependent incompleteness of the earthquake catalogs.

  4. Ovulation Order Mediates a Trade-Off between Pre-Hatching and Post-Hatching Viability in an Altricial Bird

    PubMed Central

    Sockman, Keith W.

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneously dependent siblings often compete for parentally provided resources. This competition may lead to mortality, the probability of which may be a function, in part, of the individual offspring's production order. In birds, serial ovulation followed by hatching asynchrony of simultaneous dependents leads to differences in post-hatching survival that largely depend on ovulation (laying) order. This has led to the widespread assumption that early-laid eggs are of greater value and therefore should possess different maternally manipulated characteristics than later-laid eggs. However, this perspective ignores the potential effect of laying order on pre-hatching viability, an effect which some studies suggest should offset the effect of laying order on post-hatching viability. I examined the relationship between laying order and hatching and fledging probability in wild, free-living Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii). In broods with complete hatching success, first-laid and therefore first-hatched offspring had the highest probability of fledging, and fledging probability declined with increasing laying order. However, first-laid eggs were less likely than later-laid eggs to hatch. This effect of laying order on pre-hatching viability seemed to offset that on post-hatching viability, and, consistently, maternal investment in egg size varied little if at all with respect to laying order. These results suggest that ovulation order mediates a trade-off between pre-hatching and post-hatching viability and should encourage a re-evaluation of the solitary role post-embryonic survival often plays when researchers make assumptions about the value of propagules based on the order in which they are produced. PMID:18335056

  5. Heart Rate Dependency of Large Artery Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Tan, Isabella; Spronck, Bart; Kiat, Hosen; Barin, Edward; Reesink, Koen D; Delhaas, Tammo; Avolio, Alberto P; Butlin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) quantifies large artery stiffness, it is used in hemodynamic research and is considered a useful cardiovascular clinical marker. cfPWV is blood pressure (BP) dependent. Intrinsic heart rate (HR) dependency of cfPWV is unknown because increasing HR is commonly accompanied by increasing BP. This study aims to quantify cfPWV dependency on acute, sympathovagal-independent changes in HR, independent of BP. Individuals (n=52, age 40-93 years, 11 female) with in situ cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators were paced at 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 bpm. BP and cfPWV were measured at each HR. Both cfPWV (mean [95% CI], 0.31 [0.26-0.37] m/s per 10 bpm; P<0.001) and central aortic diastolic pressure (3.78 [3.40-4.17] mm Hg/10 bpm; P<0.001) increased with HR. The HR effect on cfPWV was isolated by correcting the BP effects by 3 different methods: (1) statistically, by a linear mixed model; (2) mathematically, using an exponential relationship between BP and cross-sectional lumen area; and (3) using measured BP dependency of cfPWV derived from changes in BP induced by orthostatic changes (seated and supine) in a subset of subjects (n=17). The BP-independent effects of HR on cfPWV were quantified as 0.20 [0.11-0.28] m/s per 10 bpm (P<0.001, method 1), 0.16 [0.11-0.22] m/s per 10 bpm (P<0.001, method 2), and 0.16 [0.11-0.21] m/s per 10 bpm (P<0.001, method 3). With a mean HR dependency in the range of 0.16 to 0.20 m/s per 10 bpm, cfPWV may be considered to have minimal physiologically relevant changes for small changes in HR, but larger differences in HR must be considered as contributing to significant differences in cfPWV.

  6. Aspects of hatching success and chick survival in Gull-billed Terns in coastal Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eyler, T.B.; Erwin, R.M.; Stotts, D.B.; Hatfield, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    Because of a long-term population decline in Gull-billed Terns (Sterna nilotica) nesting along the coast of Virginia, we began a three year study in 1994 to monitor hatching success and survival of Gull-billed Tern chicks at several Virginia colony sites. Colonies were located on either small, storm-deposited shellpiles along marsh fringes or large, sandshell overwash fans of barrier islands. Nests were monitored one to three times a week for hatching success, and enclosures were installed around selected nests to monitor chick survival from hatching to about two weeks of age. Hatching success was lower in marsh colonies than island colonies, and was lower in 1995 than in 1994 and 1996, primarily because of flooding. The average brood size of nests where at least one chick hatched was 1.99 chicks. Survival rates of chicks to 14 days depended on hatch order and year but not brood size (one vs. two or more) or time of season. A-chicks had higher survival rates than B-chicks and third-hatched C-chicks (0.661 compared to 0.442 and 0.357, respectively). The year effect was significant only for A-chicks, with lower survival in 1994 (0.50) than in 1995 (0.765) or 1996 (0.758). Overall, productivity was low (0.53 chick per nest) compared to estimates for colonies in Denmark, and was attributable to nest flooding by spring and storm-driven high tides and chick predation, presumably mostly by Great Horned Owls (Bubo virginianus).

  7. Environmentally cued hatching in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Doody, J S

    2011-07-01

    Evidence is accumulating for the widespread occurrence of environmentally cued hatching (ECH) in animals, but its diversity and distribution across taxa are unknown. Herein I review three types of ECH in reptiles: early hatching, delayed hatching, and synchronous hatching. ECH is currently known from 43 species, including turtles, crocodilians, lizards, snakes, tuatara, and possibly worm lizards. Early hatching caused by physical disturbance (e.g., vibrations) is the most commonly reported ECH across all groups; although it apparently serves an antipredator function in some species, its adaptive value is unknown in most. Delayed hatching, characterized by metabolic depression or embryonic aestivation, and sometimes followed by a hypoxic cue (flooding), occurs in some turtles and possibly in monitor lizards and crocodilians; in some of these species delayed hatching serves to defer hatching from the dry season until the more favorable conditions of the wet season. Synchronous hatching, whereby sibling eggs hatch synchronously despite vertical thermal gradients in the nest, occurs in some turtles and crocodilians. Although vibrations and vocalizations in hatching-competent embryos can stimulate synchronous hatching, cues promoting developmentally less advanced embryos to catch up with more advanced embryos have not been confirmed. Synchronous hatching may serve to dilute predation risk by promoting synchronous emergence or reduce the period in which smells associated with hatching can attract predators to unhatched eggs. Within species, advancing our understanding of ECH requires three types of studies: (1) experiments identifying hatching cues and the plastic hatching period, (2) experiments disentangling hypotheses about multiple hatching cues, and (3) investigations into the environmental context in which ECH might evolve in different species (major predators or abiotic influences on the egg, embryo, and hatchling). Among species and groups, surveys for ECH are

  8. Hatch securing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culling, Robert K.

    1992-09-01

    The invention is a hatch securing mechanism having a base attached to a hatchway and a hasp attached to a hatch lid. The base has an apertured retainer and a pinway element, the hasp being held between the retainer and pinway element during closure of the lid. A latch pin translatable in the pinway element has an angled tip which slides against a bevelled surface of the hasp to force the hasp into tighter, locked engagement with the base. The latch pin has a helical groove segment about the pin's axis, and a stud fixed to the pinway element engages the groove segment. The interaction of the stud and groove segment effects translation of the latch pin when the pin is manually rotated. The action of the latch pin also compresses an elastically deformable seal between the door and door frame so that the seal is increasingly effective against explosive blast pressures. The invention includes a lock mechanism for keeping the latch pin in a hasp retaining position unless the pin is manually moved.

  9. Forced collapse of the blastocoel enhances survival of cryotop vitrified bovine hatching/hatched blastocysts derived from in vitro fertilization and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Min, Sung-Hun; Lee, Enok; Son, Hyeong-Hoon; Yeon, Ji-Yeong; Koo, Deog-Bon

    2013-04-01

    Freezing of bovine blastocysts has been widely used to improve the feasibility of cattle production by the embryo transfer technique. However, the low survival of vitrified-warmed embryos and their further development are crucial problems. Particularly, the production of offspring in vitrified-warmed bovine hatching/hatched blastocysts derived from in vitro fertilization (IVF) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is very low. Thus, we examined the effects of forced blastocoel collapse (FBC) before vitrification of bovine IVF- and SCNT-derived hatching/hatched embryos on the survival rate and apoptosis index after warming. Under optimal conditions, the overall survival rates in vitrified-warmed bovine IVF- and SCNT-derived hatching/hatched blastocysts were higher in FBC groups than in non-FBC groups (p<0.05). The total cell numbers of vitrified-warmed hatching/hatched blastocysts were higher in FBC groups than in non-FBC groups (p<0.05). Otherwise, the number of apoptotic positive cells of vitrified-warmed hatching/hatched blastocysts was lower in FBC groups than in non-FBC groups (p<0.05). Taken together, these findings suggest that forced collapse of the blastocoel using a pulled Pasteur pipette is an effective pretreatment technique for vitrification of bovine IVF- and SCNT-derived hatching/hatched blastocysts.

  10. Localization in inelastic rate dependent shearing deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsaounis, Theodoros; Lee, Min-Gi; Tzavaras, Athanasios

    2017-01-01

    Metals deformed at high strain rates can exhibit failure through formation of shear bands, a phenomenon often attributed to Hadamard instability and localization of the strain into an emerging coherent structure. We verify formation of shear bands for a nonlinear model exhibiting strain softening and strain rate sensitivity. The effects of strain softening and strain rate sensitivity are first assessed by linearized analysis, indicating that the combined effect leads to Turing instability. For the nonlinear model a class of self-similar solutions is constructed, that depicts a coherent localizing structure and the formation of a shear band. This solution is associated to a heteroclinic orbit of a dynamical system. The orbit is constructed numerically and yields explicit shear localizing solutions.

  11. Station Crew Opens Dragon's Hatch

    NASA Video Gallery

    The hatch between the newly arrived SpaceX Dragon spacecraft and the Harmony module of the International Space Station was opened by NASA Astronaut Don Pettit at 5:53 am EDT as the station flew 253...

  12. Station Crew Opens Dragon Hatch

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams and Flight Engineer Aki Hoshide opened the hatch to the SpaceX Dragon cargo ship at 1:40 p.m. EDT Wednesday, Oct. 10, marking a milestone for the first commerc...

  13. NSA AERI Hatch Correction Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer

    Turner, David

    2012-03-23

    From 2000-2008, the NSA AERI hatch was determined to be indicated as open too frequently. Analysis suggests that the hatch was actually opening and closing properly but that its status was not being correctly reported by the hatch controller to the datastream. An algorithm was written to determine the hatch status from the observed

  14. Mechanism of reverse rate-dependent action of cardioactive agents.

    PubMed

    Bányász, T; Bárándi, L; Harmati, G; Virág, L; Szentandrássy, N; Márton, I; Zaza, A; Varró, A; Nánási, P P

    2011-01-01

    Class 3 antiarrhythmic agents exhibit reverse rate-dependent lengthening of the action potential duration (APD), i.e. changes in APD are greater at longer than at shorter cycle lengths. In spite of the several theories developed to explain this reverse rate-dependency, its mechanism has been clarified only recently. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for reverse rate-dependency in mammalian ventricular myocardium. Action potentials were recorded using conventional sharp microelectrodes from human, canine, rabbit, guinea pig, and rat ventricular myocardium in a rate-dependent manner. Rate-dependent drug-effects of various origin were studied using agents known to lengthen or shorten action potentials allowing thus to determine the drug-induced changes in APD as a function of the cycle length. Both drug-induced lengthening and shortening of action potentials displayed reverse rate-dependency in human, canine, and guinea pig preparations, but not in rabbit and rat myocardium. Similar results were obtained when repolarization was modified by injection of inward or outward current pulses in isolated canine cardiomyocytes. In contrast to reverse rate-dependence, drug-induced changes in APD well correlated with baseline APD values (i.e. that measured before the superfusion of drug or injection of current) in all of the preparations studied. Since the net membrane current (I(net)), determined from the action potential waveform at the middle of the plateau, was inversely proportional to APD, and consequently to cycle length, it is concluded that that reverse rate-dependency may simply reflect the inverse relationship linking I(net) to APD. In summary, reverse rate-dependency is an intrinsic property of drug action in the hearts of species showing positive APD - cycle length relationship, including humans. This implies that development of a pure K(+) channel blocking agent without reverse rate-dependent effects is not likely to be

  15. Spawning and hatching of endangered Gila Chub in captivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, Andrew A.; Bonar, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Information on reproductive characteristics of the endangered Gila Chub Gila intermedia is largely limited and qualitative, and culture techniques and requirements are virtually unknown. Here we provide the first published data on spawning and selected reproductive and developmental characteristics of Gila Chub. Fish were brought to the laboratory in March 2003 from Sabino Creek, Arizona (12.3°C). Fish were then warmed slowly and spawned at 14.9°C, 10 d after collection. Following this initial spawning, Gila Chub spawned consistently in the laboratory without hormonal, chemical, photoperiod, temperature, or substrate manipulation during all times of the year. Spawns were noted at temperatures ranging from about 15°C to 26°C; however, we noted that Gila Chub spawned less frequently at temperatures above 24°C. Multiple spawning attempts per year per individual are probable. There was a strong, inverse relationship between time to hatch and incubation temperature. The hatch rate of eggs was high (mean = 99.43%), and larval Gila Chub accepted a variety of natural and formulated diets at first feeding. The future of Gila Chub may someday depend in part on hatchery propagation to provide specimens for restocking formerly occupied habitats and establishing refuge populations. Information from our study can aid future efforts to successfully spawn and rear Gila Chub and related species.

  16. Item Response Models for Local Dependence among Multiple Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Su, Chi-Ming; Qiu, Xue-Lan

    2014-01-01

    Ratings given to the same item response may have a stronger correlation than those given to different item responses, especially when raters interact with one another before giving ratings. The rater bundle model was developed to account for such local dependence by forming multiple ratings given to an item response as a bundle and assigning…

  17. A cicada that ensures its fitness during climate warming by synchronizing its hatching time with the rainy season.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Minoru; Numata, Hideharu

    2011-12-01

    A shift in phenology due to climate change is associated with some recent changes in populations, as it can disrupt the synchrony between organisms' requirements and resource availability. This conceptual framework has been developed mostly in systems of trophic interactions. Many coincidental changes, however, are involved in trophic interactions, preventing us from describing the direct impact of phenological shifts on fitness consequences. Here we address the phenological relationship in a simple non-trophic interaction to document a causal process of a warming-driven fitness change in a cicada, Cryptotympana facialis, whose numbers increased dramatically in Osaka, Japan in the late 20th century. We show that synchrony of the rainy season and hatching time may have a substantial influence on hatching success, by 1) shifting the time of completion of embryonic development, and 2) supplying water at various intervals. We estimate the change in hatching time over the last eleven decades (1901-2009) based on meteorological records and the temperature-dependent rate of C. facialis embryogenesis. Our estimate shows that hatching had initially occurred after the rainy season, and that warming had advanced it into the rainy season in the late 20th century. The probability of hatching success was markedly variable, and often very low before this synchronization occurred, but became stably high thereafter. Our findings suggest that the stabilizing effect of this synchrony on fitness was indispensable to the recent population increase of C. facialis.

  18. Cross section dependence of event rates at neutrino telescopes.

    PubMed

    Hussain, S; Marfatia, D; McKay, D W; Seckel, D

    2006-10-20

    We examine the dependence of event rates at neutrino telescopes on the neutrino-nucleon cross section for neutrinos with energy above 1 PeV, and contrast the results with those for cosmic ray experiments. Scaling of the standard model cross sections leaves the rate of upward events essentially unchanged. Details, such as detector depth and cross section inelasticity, can influence rates. Numerical estimates of upward shower, muon, and tau event rates in the IceCube detector confirm these results.

  19. Hatching the Cleidoic Egg: The Role of Thyroid Hormones

    PubMed Central

    De Groef, Bert; Grommen, Sylvia V.H.; Darras, Veerle M.

    2013-01-01

    A major life stage transition in birds and other oviparous sauropsids is the hatching of the cleidoic egg. Not unlike amphibian metamorphosis, hatching in these species can be regarded as a transition from a relatively well-protected “aqueous” environment to a more hazardous and terrestrial life outside the egg, a transition in which thyroid hormones (THs) (often in concert with glucocorticoids) play an important role. In precocial birds such as the chicken, the perihatch period is characterized by peak values of THs. THs are implicated in the control of muscle development, lung maturation and the switch from chorioallantoic to pulmonary respiration, yolk sac retraction, gut development and induction of hepatic genes to accommodate the change in dietary energy source, initiation of thermoregulation, and the final stages of brain maturation as well as early post-hatch imprinting behavior. There is evidence that, at least for some of these processes, THs may have similar roles in non-avian sauropsids. In altricial birds such as passerines on the other hand, THs do not rise significantly until well after hatching and peak values coincide with the development of endothermy. It is not known how hatching-associated processes are regulated by hormones in these animals or how this developmental mode evolved from TH-dependent precocial hatching. PMID:23755041

  20. Rate dependent constitutive models for fiber reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    1990-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to assess the state-of-the-art in rate dependent constitutive models for continuous fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials. Several recent models which include formulations for describing plasticity, viscoelasticity, viscoplasticity, and rate-dependent phenomenon such as creep and stress relaxation are outlined and compared. When appropriate, these comparisons include brief descriptions of the mathematical formulations, the test procedures required for generating material constants, and details of available data comparing test results to analytical predictions.

  1. Strain rate dependence in plasticized and un-plasticized PVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, M. J.; Siviour, C. R.

    2012-08-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation has been made into the mechanical behaviour of two poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) polymers - an un-plasticized PVC and a diisononyl phthalate (DINP)-plasticized PVC. Measurements of the compressive stress-strain behaviour of the PVCs at strain rates ranging from 10-3 to 103s-1 and temperatures from - 60 to 100∘C are presented. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis was also performed in order to understand the material transitions observed in compression testing as the strain rate is increased. This investigation develops a better understanding of the interplay between the temperature dependence and rate dependence of polymers, with a focus on locating the temperature and rate-dependent material transitions that occur during high rate testing.

  2. 38 CFR 3.650 - Rate for additional dependent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....650 Rate for additional dependent. (a) Running awards. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this...: (1) Where benefits would be payable from a date prior to the date of filing claim, the reduction will be effective from the date of potential entitlement of the additional dependent. (2) Where...

  3. 38 CFR 3.650 - Rate for additional dependent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....650 Rate for additional dependent. (a) Running awards. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this...: (1) Where benefits would be payable from a date prior to the date of filing claim, the reduction will be effective from the date of potential entitlement of the additional dependent. (2) Where...

  4. Calculating Sputter Rate Angular Dependence Using Optical Profilometry (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-26

    This work attempts to determine angular dependence curves for sputter rates of a material based on a single experimental measurement. An aluminum...angular dependence curve to match the given erosion profile. The calculated profile matched well with the experimental profile; however, neither matched...the optimization routine, the angular dependence curve was input to the COLISEUM plasma modeling code, which generated the same erosion profile as the experimental data.

  5. Associations of resting heart rate with endothelium-dependent vasodilation and shear rate.

    PubMed

    Laosiripisan, Jitanan; Parkhurst, Kristin L; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2017-01-01

    Heart rate is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and a hemodynamic factor that can modulate blood flow as it affects the frequency of shear stimuli acting on the arterial wall. However, the association between heart rate and endothelium-dependent vasodilation remains highly controversial. We determined the association between heart rate at rest and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in 98 apparently healthy adults (18-63 years). The mild and positive association between heart rate and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was no longer significant when age and sex or baseline diameter were controlled for. The path analyses revealed that heart rate was not directly related to FMD but the association was indirectly mediated by shear rate, which was confirmed by a bias-corrected bootstrap 95% CIs (0.0157-0.1056). We concluded that even though heart rate and endothelium-dependent vasodilation were associated with shear rate, there was no independent relation between heart rate and FMD.

  6. Continuum modeling of rate-dependent granular flows in SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Ryan C.; Andrade, José E.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss a constitutive law for modeling rate-dependent granular flows that has been implemented in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We model granular materials using a viscoplastic constitutive law that produces a Drucker-Prager-like yield condition in the limit of vanishing flow. A friction law for non-steady flows, incorporating rate-dependence and dilation, is derived and implemented within the constitutive law. We compare our SPH simulations with experimental data, demonstrating that they can capture both steady and non-steady dynamic flow behavior, notably including transient column collapse profiles. This technique may therefore be attractive for modeling the time-dependent evolution of natural and industrial flows.

  7. Rate-dependent extensional "dynamic ligaments" using shear thickening fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenno, Paul T.; Wetzel, Eric D.

    2014-04-01

    A novel "dynamic ligament" smart material that exhibits a strongly rate-dependent response in extension is developed and characterized. The devices, based on elastomeric polymers and shear thickening fluids, exhibit low resistance to extension at rates below 10 mm/s, but when stretched at 100 mm/s or higher resist with up to 7 × higher force. A link between the shear thickening fluid's rheology and the dynamic ligament's tensile performance is presented to explain the rate-dependent response. Future recommendations for improving device performance are presented, along with a host of different potential application areas including safety equipment, adaptive braces, sporting goods, and military equipment.

  8. Hatching asynchrony in American Goldfinches: an experimental study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skagen, Susan Knight

    1987-01-01

    I examined Lack's (1954, 1968) hypothesis that asynchronous hatching is an adaptive response to food shortage during the breeding season by comparing growth and survival of nestlings in asynchronous and artificially created synchronous broods of American Goldfinches (Carduelis tristis). I also examined the effects of seasonal and environmental factors on nestling growth and survival and on hatching asynchrony. Nestlings in asynchronous broods were more likely to diverge in mass and did so at a faster rate than those in synchronous broods. The lightest nestlings of asynchronous broods grew more slowly than their heavier nestmates and than all nestlings in synchronous broods. Brood reduction occurred more frequently in asynchronous broods. Survival and growth rates decreased throughout the breeding season and during inclement weather. Hatching intervals increased during the season. When brood reduction or differential growth among nestmates occurred in asynchronous broods, suggesting that the energy available for growth was limiting, heavy nestlings in asynchronous broods grew nonsignificantly faster than heavy nestlings in concurrent synchronous broods. This trend implies that when insufficient food is delivered to nestlings, asynchronous hatching may provide a slight advantage for older nestlings. Growth rates of all nestlings, however, were greatest in highly synchronous broods. Explanations other than growth of young must be invoked to explain why extreme synchrony is not more common in goldfinches. I discuss constraints on the normal pattern of hatching asynchrony characteristic of this species. The proximate mechanism for differential feeding and brood reduction is discussed.

  9. Evolution of density- and patch-size-dependent dispersal rates.

    PubMed Central

    Poethke, Hans Joachim; Hovestadt, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Based on a marginal value approach, we derive a nonlinear expression for evolutionarily stable (ES) dispersal rates in a metapopulation with global dispersal. For the general case of density-dependent population growth, our analysis shows that individual dispersal rates should decrease with patch capacity and-beyond a certain threshold-increase with population density. We performed a number of spatially explicit, individual-based simulation experiments to test these predictions and to explore further the relevance of variation in the rate of population increase, density dependence, environmental fluctuations and dispersal mortality on the evolution of dispersal rates. They confirm the predictions of our analytical approach. In addition, they show that dispersal rates in metapopulations mostly depend on dispersal mortality and inter-patch variation in population density. The latter is dominantly driven by environmental fluctuations and the rate of population increase. These conclusions are not altered by the introduction of neighbourhood dispersal. With patch capacities in the order of 100 individuals, kin competition seems to be of negligible importance for ES dispersal rates except when overall dispersal rates are low. PMID:11916481

  10. Egg storage duration and hatch window affect gene expression of nutrient transporters and intestine morphological parameters of early hatched broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, S; Gursel, I; Bilgen, G; Izzetoglu, G T; Horuluoglu, B H; Gucluer, G

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, researchers have given emphasis on the differences in physiological parameters between early and late hatched chicks within a hatch window. Considering the importance of intestine development in newly hatched chicks, however, changes in gene expression of nutrient transporters in the jejunum of early hatched chicks within a hatch window have not been studied yet. This study was conducted to determine the effects of egg storage duration before incubation and hatch window on intestinal development and expression of PepT1 (H+-dependent peptide transporter) and SGLT1 (sodium-glucose co-transporter) genes in the jejunum of early hatched broiler chicks within a 30 h of hatch window. A total of 1218 eggs obtained from 38-week-old Ross 308 broiler breeder flocks were stored for 3 (ES3) or 14 days (ES14) and incubated at the same conditions. Eggs were checked between 475 and 480 h of incubation and 40 chicks from each egg storage duration were weighed; chick length and rectal temperature were measured. The chicks were sampled to evaluate morphological parameters and PepT1 and SGLT1 expression. The remaining chicks that hatched between 475 and 480 h were placed back in the incubator and the same measurements were conducted with those chicks at the end of hatch window at 510 h of incubation. Chick length, chick dry matter content, rectal temperature and weight of small intestine segments increased, whereas chick weight decreased during the hatch window. The increase in the jejunum length and villus width and area during the hatch window were higher for ES3 than ES14 chicks. PepT1 expression was higher for ES3 chicks compared with ES14. There was a 10.2 and 17.6-fold increase in PepT1 and SGLT1 expression of ES3 chicks at the end of hatch window, whereas it was only 2.3 and 3.3-fold, respectively, for ES14 chicks. These results suggested that egg storage duration affected development of early hatched chicks during 30 h of hatch window. It can be concluded that

  11. The effect of moisture stress upon the hatching of Nematodirus battus larvae.

    PubMed

    Parkin, J T

    1975-04-01

    An experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of soil moisture stress upon the hatching behaviour of Nematodirus battus. The method involved the use of polyethylene glycol solutions to maintain a steady osmotic pressure around a soil containing N. battus eggs, which were ready to hatch. Different concentrations of polyethylene glycol (creating different moisture stresses) were found to affect the numbers and the rate of egg hatching markedly.

  12. Rate Dependent Deformation and Strength Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    A research program is being undertaken to develop rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composite materials. In previous work in this program, strain-rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations used to analyze polymers have been implemented into a mechanics of materials based composite micromechanics method. In the current work, modifications to the micromechanics model have been implemented to improve the calculation of the effective inelastic strain. Additionally, modifications to the polymer constitutive model are discussed in which pressure dependence is incorporated into the equations in order to improve the calculation of constituent and composite shear stresses. The Hashin failure criterion is implemented into the analysis method to allow for the calculation of ply level failure stresses. The deformation response and failure stresses for two representative uniaxial polymer matrix composites, IM7/977-2 and AS4-PEEK, are predicted for varying strain rates and fiber orientations. The predicted results compare favorably to experimentally obtained values.

  13. Extreme-value dependence: An application to exchange rate markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Viviana

    2007-04-01

    Extreme value theory (EVT) focuses on modeling the tail behavior of a loss distribution using only extreme values rather than the whole data set. For a sample of 10 countries with dirty/free float regimes, we investigate whether paired currencies exhibit a pattern of asymptotic dependence. That is, whether an extremely large appreciation or depreciation in the nominal exchange rate of one country might transmit to another. In general, after controlling for volatility clustering and inertia in returns, we do not find evidence of extreme-value dependence between paired exchange rates. However, for asymptotic-independent paired returns, we find that tail dependency of exchange rates is stronger under large appreciations than under large depreciations.

  14. Differential effects of egg albumen content on barn swallow nestlings in relation to hatch order.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, R P; Martinelli, R; Saino, N

    2006-05-01

    In diverse animal taxa, egg mass variation mediates maternal effects with long-term consequences for offspring ontogeny and fitness. Patterns of egg mass variation with laying order differ considerably among birds, but no study has experimentally investigated the function of variation in albumen or yolk egg content in the wild. In barn swallows (Hirundo rustica), absolute and relative albumen mass increased with egg laying order. Experimental albumen removal delayed hatching, had larger negative effects on growth of late-hatched nestlings, and reduced nestling survival. Laying order positively predicted hatch order. Because nestling competitive ability depends on size, and albumen egg content influences hatchling size, present results suggest that by increasing albumen content of late eggs mothers reduce hatching asynchrony and enhance growth particularly of late-hatched nestlings. Thus, variation in albumen mass with laying order may function to mitigate the negative phenotypic consequences of hatching late in species that adopt a 'brood-survival' strategy.

  15. Growth-rate-dependent dynamics of a bacterial genetic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osella, Matteo; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2013-01-01

    Gene networks exhibiting oscillatory dynamics are widespread in biology. The minimal regulatory designs giving rise to oscillations have been implemented synthetically and studied by mathematical modeling. However, most of the available analyses generally neglect the coupling of regulatory circuits with the cellular “chassis” in which the circuits are embedded. For example, the intracellular macromolecular composition of fast-growing bacteria changes with growth rate. As a consequence, important parameters of gene expression, such as ribosome concentration or cell volume, are growth-rate dependent, ultimately coupling the dynamics of genetic circuits with cell physiology. This work addresses the effects of growth rate on the dynamics of a paradigmatic example of genetic oscillator, the repressilator. Making use of empirical growth-rate dependencies of parameters in bacteria, we show that the repressilator dynamics can switch between oscillations and convergence to a fixed point depending on the cellular state of growth, and thus on the nutrients it is fed. The physical support of the circuit (type of plasmid or gene positions on the chromosome) also plays an important role in determining the oscillation stability and the growth-rate dependence of period and amplitude. This analysis has potential application in the field of synthetic biology, and suggests that the coupling between endogenous genetic oscillators and cell physiology can have substantial consequences for their functionality.

  16. Strain rate dependency of laser sintered polyamide 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J. E. T.; Goodridge, R. D.; Siviour, C. R.

    2015-09-01

    Parts processed by Additive Manufacturing can now be found across a wide range of applications, such as those in the aerospace and automotive industry in which the mechanical response must be optimised. Many of these applications are subjected to high rate or impact loading, yet it is believed that there is no prior research on the strain rate dependence in these materials. This research investigates the effect of strain rate and laser energy density on laser sintered polyamide 12. In the study presented here, parts produced using four different laser sintered energy densities were exposed to uniaxial compression tests at strain rates ranging from 10-3 to 10+3 s-1 at room temperature, and the dependence on these parameters is presented.

  17. Strain Rate Dependent Modeling of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    A research program is in progress to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations have been developed to model the polymer matrix, and have been incorporated into a micromechanics approach to analyze polymer matrix composites. The Hashin failure criterion has been implemented within the micromechanics results to predict ply failure strengths. The deformation model has been implemented within LS-DYNA, a commercially available transient dynamic finite element code. The deformation response and ply failure stresses for the representative polymer matrix composite AS4/PEEK have been predicted for a variety of fiber orientations and strain rates. The predicted results compare favorably to experimentally obtained values.

  18. 78 FR 6173 - Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen... Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and Richard Kosiba...

  19. Rate-dependent deformation of rocks in the brittle regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baud, P.; Brantut, N.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.

    2013-12-01

    Rate-dependent brittle deformation of rocks, a phenomenon relevant for long-term interseismic phases of deformation, is poorly understood quantitatively. Rate-dependence can arise from chemically-activated, subcritical crack growth, which is known to occur in the presence of aqueous fluids. Here we attempt to establish quantitative links between this small scale process and its macroscopic manifestations. We performed a series of brittle deformation experiments in porous sandstones, in creep (constant stress) and constant strain rate conditions, in order to investigate the relationship between their short- and long-term mechanical behaviors. Elastic wave velocities measurements indicate that the amount of microcracking follows the amount of inelastic strain in a trend which does not depend upon the timescale involved. The comparison of stress-strain curves between constant strain rate and creep tests allows us to define a stress difference between the two, which can be viewed as a difference in energy release rate. We empirically show that the creep strain rates are proportional to an exponential function of this stress difference. We then establish a general method to estimate empirical micromechanical functions relating the applied stresses to mode I stress intensity factors at microcrack tips, and we determine the relationship between creep strain rates and stress intensity factors in our sandstone creep experiments. We finally provide an estimate of the sub-critical crack growth law parameters, and find that they match -within the experimental errors and approximations of the method- the typical values observed in independent single crack tests. Our approach provides a comprehensive and unifying explanation for the origin and the macroscopic manifestation of time-dependent brittle deformation in brittle rocks.

  20. Velocity of chloroplast avoidance movement is fluence rate dependent.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2004-06-01

    In Arabidopsis leaves, chloroplast movement is fluence rate dependent. At optimal, lower light fluences, chloroplasts accumulate at the cell surface to maximize photosynthetic potential. Under high fluence rates, chloroplasts avoid incident light to escape photodamage. In this paper, we examine the phenomenon of chloroplast avoidance movement in greater detail and demonstrate a proportional relationship between fluence rate and the velocity of chloroplast avoidance. In addition we show that the amount of light-activated phototropin2, the photoreceptor for the avoidance response, likely plays a role in this phenomenon, as heterozygous mutant plants show a reduced avoidance velocity compared to that of homozygous wild type plants.

  1. Temperature dependence of nucleation rate in a binary solid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Y.; Philippe, T.; Duguay, S.; Blavette, D.

    2012-12-01

    The influence of regression (partial dissolution) effects on the temperature dependence of nucleation rate in a binary solid solution has been studied theoretically. The results of the analysis are compared with the predictions of the simplest Volmer-Weber theory. Regression effects are shown to have a strong influence on the shape of the curve of nucleation rate versus temperature. The temperature TM at which the maximum rate of nucleation occurs is found to be lowered, particularly for low interfacial energy (coherent precipitation) and high-mobility species (e.g. interstitial atoms).

  2. Temperature-dependence of biomass accumulation rates during secondary succession.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kristina J; Allen, Andrew P; Gillooly, James F; Brown, James H

    2006-06-01

    Rates of ecosystem recovery following disturbance affect many ecological processes, including carbon cycling in the biosphere. Here, we present a model that predicts the temperature dependence of the biomass accumulation rate following disturbances in forests. Model predictions are derived based on allometric and biochemical principles that govern plant energetics and are tested using a global database of 91 studies of secondary succession compiled from the literature. The rate of biomass accumulation during secondary succession increases with average growing season temperature as predicted based on the biochemical kinetics of photosynthesis in chloroplasts. In addition, the rate of biomass accumulation is greater in angiosperm-dominated communities than in gymnosperm-dominated ones and greater in plantations than in naturally regenerating stands. By linking the temperature-dependence of photosynthesis to the rate of whole-ecosystem biomass accumulation during secondary succession, our model and results provide one example of how emergent, ecosystem-level rate processes can be predicted based on the kinetics of individual metabolic rate.

  3. The Accretion Rate Dependence of Burst Oscillation Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootes, Laura S.; Watts, Anna L.; Galloway, Duncan K.; Wijnands, Rudy

    2017-01-01

    Neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries exhibit oscillations during thermonuclear bursts, attributed to asymmetric brightness patterns on the burning surfaces. All models that have been proposed to explain the origin of these asymmetries (spreading hotspots, surface waves, and cooling wakes) depend on the accretion rate. By analysis of archival RXTE data of six oscillation sources, we investigate the accretion rate dependence of the amplitude of burst oscillations. This more than doubles the size of the sample analyzed previously by Muno et al., who found indications for a relationship between accretion rate and oscillation amplitudes. We find that burst oscillation signals can be detected at all observed accretion rates. Moreover, oscillations at low accretion rates are found to have relatively small amplitudes ({A}{{rms}}≤slant 0.10) while oscillations detected in bursts observed at high accretion rates cover a broad spread in amplitudes (0.05≤slant {A}{{rms}}≤slant 0.20). In this paper we present the results of our analysis and discuss these in the light of current burst oscillation models. Additionally, we investigate the bursts of two sources without previously detected oscillations. Despite the fact that these sources have been observed at accretion rates where burst oscillations might be expected, we find their behavior not to be anomalous compared to oscillation sources.

  4. Micromechanical modeling of rate-dependent behavior of Connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Fallah, A; Ahmadian, M T; Firozbakhsh, K; Aghdam, M M

    2017-03-07

    In this paper, a constitutive and micromechanical model for prediction of rate-dependent behavior of connective tissues (CTs) is presented. Connective tissues are considered as nonlinear viscoelastic material. The rate-dependent behavior of CTs is incorporated into model using the well-known quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) theory. A planar wavy representative volume element (RVE) is considered based on the tissue microstructure histological evidences. The presented model parameters are identified based on the available experiments in the literature. The presented constitutive model introduced to ABAQUS by means of UMAT subroutine. Results show that, monotonic uniaxial test predictions of the presented model at different strain rates for rat tail tendon (RTT) and human patellar tendon (HPT) are in good agreement with experimental data. Results of incremental stress-relaxation test are also presented to investigate both instantaneous and viscoelastic behavior of connective tissues.

  5. Heartbeat, embryo communication and hatching synchrony in snake eggs

    PubMed Central

    Aubret, Fabien; Blanvillain, Gaëlle; Bignon, Florent; Kok, Philippe J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Communication is central to life at all levels of complexity, from cells to organs, through to organisms and communities. Turtle eggs were recently shown to communicate with each other in order to synchronise their development and generate beneficial hatching synchrony. Yet the mechanism underlying embryo to embryo communication remains unknown. Here we show that within a clutch, developing snake embryos use heart beats emanating from neighbouring eggs as a clue for their metabolic level, in order to synchronise development and ultimately hatching. Eggs of the water snake Natrix maura increased heart rates and hatched earlier than control eggs in response to being incubated in physical contact with more advanced eggs. The former produced shorter and slower swimming young than their control siblings. Our results suggest potential fitness consequences of embryo to embryo communication and describe a novel driver for the evolution of egg-clustering behaviour in animals. PMID:26988725

  6. Scale dependence of immigration rates: models, metrics and data.

    PubMed

    Englund, Göran; Hambäck, Peter A

    2007-01-01

    1. We examine the relationship between immigration rate and patch area for different types of movement behaviours and detection modes. Theoretical models suggest that the scale dependence of the immigration rate per unit area (I/A) can be described by a power model I/A = i*Area(zeta), where zeta describes the strength of the scale dependence. 2. Three types of scaling were identified. Area scaling (zeta = 0) is expected for passively dispersed organisms that have the same probability of landing anywhere in the patch. Perimeter scaling (-0.30 > zeta > -0.45) is expected when patches are detected from a very short distance and immigrants arrive over the patch boundary, whereas diameter scaling (zeta = -0.5) is expected if patches are detected from a long distance or if search is approximately linear. 3. A meta-analysis of published empirical studies of the scale dependence of immigration rates in terrestrial insects suggests that butterflies show diameter scaling, aphids show area scaling, and the scaling of beetle immigration is highly variable. We conclude that the scaling of immigration rates in many cases can be predicted from search behaviour and the mode of patch detection.

  7. Immunological development in nestling American kestrels Falco sparverius: post-hatching ontogeny of the antibody response.

    PubMed

    Smits, Judit E G; Bortolotti, Gary R

    2008-12-01

    Avian research involving examination of immune function or testing of immunocompetence in wild birds has been based upon information on Galliforms, (chicken and quail) even though they are precocial, whereas most wild species with which ecologists, biologists and toxicologists work are altricial; blind, naked and completely dependent at hatching. Here we begin to address this gap in knowledge, offering insight into the early, post-hatching, humoral immune response in an altricial bird, the American kestrel (Falco sparverius). Over two breeding seasons, nestling kestrels were immunized with a non-pathogenic antigen, dinitrophenol keyhole limpet hemocyanin (DNP-KLH), between 3 and 9 days post-hatching and boostered 6 days later. Background levels, primary and secondary immune responses were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The specificity of our laboratory produced rabbit, anti-kestrel antibody was determined using a double immunodiffusion assay. Results showed the rabbit antiserum to have specific anti-kestrel IgG activity. Birds as young as three days old could successfully mount an antibody response, the magnitude of which increased with age at first vaccination. Early immunization did not compromise growth rate, nor did it affect the maximum secondary response. Comparatively, adult kestrels immunized during the same season and following the same protocol, had antibody levels four times higher than those of the nestlings.

  8. Worldwide Spacecraft Crew Hatch History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The JSC Flight Safety Office has developed this compilation of historical information on spacecraft crew hatches to assist the Safety Tech Authority in the evaluation and analysis of worldwide spacecraft crew hatch design and performance. The document is prepared by SAIC s Gary Johnson, former NASA JSC S&MA Associate Director for Technical. Mr. Johnson s previous experience brings expert knowledge to assess the relevancy of data presented. He has experience with six (6) of the NASA spacecraft programs that are covered in this document: Apollo; Skylab; Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP), Space Shuttle, ISS and the Shuttle/Mir Program. Mr. Johnson is also intimately familiar with the JSC Design and Procedures Standard, JPR 8080.5, having been one of its original developers. The observations and findings are presented first by country and organized within each country section by program in chronological order of emergence. A host of reference sources used to augment the personal observations and comments of the author are named within the text and/or listed in the reference section of this document. Careful attention to the selection and inclusion of photos, drawings and diagrams is used to give visual association and clarity to the topic areas examined.

  9. The role of landscape features and density dependence in growth andfledging rates of Piping Plovers in North Dakota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anteau, Michael J.; Wiltermuth, Mark T.; Sherfy, Mark H.; Shaffer, Terry L.; Pearse, Aaron T.

    2014-01-01

    For species with precocial young, survival from hatching to fledging is a key factor influencing recruitment. Furthermore, growth rates of precocial chicks are an indicator of forage quality and habitat suitability of brood-rearing areas. We examined how growth and fledging rates of Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus) chicks were influenced by landscape features, such as hatchling density (hatchlings per hectare of remotely sensed habitat [H ha-1]), island vs. mainland, and wind fetch (exposure to waves) at 2-km segments (n ¼ 15) of Lake Sakakawea, North Dakota, during 2007–2008. Hatchling growth was comparable with published estimates for other habitats. Models for fledging rate (fledged young per segment) assuming density dependence had more support (wi ¼ 96%) than those assuming density independence (wi ¼ 4%). Density-dependent processes appeared to influence fledging rate only at densities .5 H ha-1, which occurred in 19% of the segments we sampled. When areas with densities .5 H ha-1 were excluded, density-dependence and density-independence models were equally supported (wi ¼ 52% and 48%, respectively). Fledging rate declined as the wind fetch of a segment increased. Fledging rate on mainland shorelines was 4.3 times greater than that on islands. Previous work has indicated that plovers prefer islands for nesting, but our results suggest that this preference is not optimal and could lead to an ecological trap for chicks. While other researchers have found nesting-habitat requirements to be gravelly areas on exposed beaches without fine-grain substrates, our results suggest that chicks fledge at lower rates in these habitats. Thus, breeding plovers likely require complexes of these nesting habitats along with protected areas with fine, nutrient-rich substrate for foraging by hatchlings.

  10. Rate and state dependent seismicity during fluid injection in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Friedemann

    2014-05-01

    Dieterich (1994) developed a theoretical frame of seismicity evolution from a background seismicity due to stress changes in a medium. The theory assumes a volume density of seismic faults with a specific initial slip velocity distribution upon which the stress changes act. Each fault then follows the rate and state dependent frictional law where instabilities develop, but not as Coulomb failure. The evolution is expressed in the form of a differntial equation, which can be adapted for the case of fluid pressure changes resulting from injection and even linearized to allow for analytic insight into the properties of the solution. For a constant injection rate the seismic activity increases at a given distance from the injection point once the pressure exceeds a threshold value. If the presusure rate is high enough the seismic activity becomes proportional to the pressure rate in accordance with criticality theory of Shapiro (2002). Once the rate drops the seismicity reduced to lower levels. Shut off and variable injection rates must be evaluated numerically but lead to results comparable to the criticality theory. The presentation outlines the physical concept of the rate and state approach in comparison to the criticality approach and shows the main analytic and numerical results.

  11. Plasma corticosterone in American kestrel siblings: effects of age, hatching order, and hatching asynchrony.

    PubMed

    Love, Oliver P; Bird, David M; Shutt, Laird J

    2003-04-01

    Although it is well documented that hatching asynchrony in birds can lead to competitive and developmental hierarchies, potentially greatly affecting growth and survival of nestlings, hatching asynchrony may also precipitate modulations in neuroendocrine development or function. Here we examine sibling variation in adrenocortical function in postnatally developing, asynchronously hatching American kestrels (Falco sparverius) by measurements of baseline and stress-induced levels of corticosterone at ages 10, 16, 22, and 28 days posthatching. There was a significant effect of hatching order on both baseline and stress-induced corticosterone levels during development and these effects grew stronger through development. First-hatched chicks exhibited higher baseline levels than later-hatched chicks throughout development and higher stress-induced levels during the latter half of development. Furthermore, there was significant hatching span (difference in days between first- and last-hatched chicks) x hatching order interaction on both baseline and stress-induced corticosterone levels during development. Hatching span was also positively correlated with both measures of corticosterone and body mass in first-hatched chicks, but was negatively correlated with these factors through most of the development in last-hatched chicks. It is known that hatching asynchrony creates mass and size hierarchies within kestrel broods and we suggest that hierarchies in adrenocortical function among siblings may be one physiological mechanism by which these competitive hierarchies are maintained.

  12. Medium-dependent control of the bacterial growth rate.

    PubMed

    Ehrenberg, Måns; Bremer, Hans; Dennis, Patrick P

    2013-04-01

    By combining results from previous studies of nutritional up-shifts we here re-investigate how bacteria adapt to different nutritional environments by adjusting their macromolecular composition for optimal growth. We demonstrate that, in contrast to a commonly held view the macromolecular composition of bacteria does not depend on the growth rate as an independent variable, but on three factors: (i) the genetic background (i.e. the strain used), (ii) the physiological history of the bacteria used for inoculation of a given growth medium, and (iii) the kind of nutrients in the growth medium. These factors determine the ribosome concentration and the average rate of protein synthesis per ribosome, and thus the growth rate. Immediately after a nutritional up-shift, the average number of ribosomes in the bacterial population increases exponentially with time at a rate which eventually is attained as the final post-shift growth rate of all cell components. After a nutritional up-shift from one minimal medium to another minimal medium of higher nutritional quality, ribosome and RNA polymerase syntheses are co-regulated and immediately increase by the same factor equal to the increase in the final growth rate. However, after an up-shift from a minimal medium to a medium containing all 20 amino acids, RNA polymerase and ribosome syntheses are no longer coregulated; a smaller rate of synthesis of RNA polymerase is compensated by a gradual increase in the fraction of free RNA polymerase, possibly due to a gradual saturation of mRNA promoters. We have also analyzed data from a recent publication, in which it was concluded that the macromolecular composition in terms of RNA/protein and RNA/DNA ratios is solely determined by the effector molecule ppGpp. Our analysis indicates that this is true only in special cases and that, in general, medium adaptation also depends on factors other than ppGpp.

  13. Transcriptional dynamics with time-dependent reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Shubhendu; Ghosh, Anandamohan

    2015-02-01

    Transcription is the first step in the process of gene regulation that controls cell response to varying environmental conditions. Transcription is a stochastic process, involving synthesis and degradation of mRNAs, that can be modeled as a birth-death process. We consider a generic stochastic model, where the fluctuating environment is encoded in the time-dependent reaction rates. We obtain an exact analytical expression for the mRNA probability distribution and are able to analyze the response for arbitrary time-dependent protocols. Our analytical results and stochastic simulations confirm that the transcriptional machinery primarily act as a low-pass filter. We also show that depending on the system parameters, the mRNA levels in a cell population can show synchronous/asynchronous fluctuations and can deviate from Poisson statistics.

  14. The temperature-dependence of elementary reaction rates: beyond Arrhenius.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ian W M

    2008-04-01

    The rates of chemical reactions and the dependence of their rate constants on temperature are of central importance in chemistry. Advances in the temperature-range and accuracy of kinetic measurements, principally inspired by the need to provide data for models of combustion, atmospheric, and astrophysical chemistry, show up the inadequacy of the venerable Arrhenius equation--at least, over wide ranges of temperature. This critical review will address the question of how to reach an understanding of the factors that control the rates of 'non-Arrhenius' reactions. It makes use of a number of recent kinetic measurements and shows how developments in advanced forms of transition state theory provide satisfactory explanations of complex kinetic behaviour (72 references).

  15. Anesthetic diffusion through lipid membranes depends on the protonation rate.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Isidoro, Rosendo; Sierra-Valdez, F J; Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2014-12-18

    Hundreds of substances possess anesthetic action. However, despite decades of research and tests, a golden rule is required to reconcile the diverse hypothesis behind anesthesia. What makes an anesthetic to be local or general in the first place? The specific targets on proteins, the solubility in lipids, the diffusivity, potency, action time? Here we show that there could be a new player equally or even more important to disentangle the riddle: the protonation rate. Indeed, such rate modulates the diffusion speed of anesthetics into lipid membranes; low protonation rates enhance the diffusion for local anesthetics while high ones reduce it. We show also that there is a pH and membrane phase dependence on the local anesthetic diffusion across multiple lipid bilayers. Based on our findings we incorporate a new clue that may advance our understanding of the anesthetic phenomenon.

  16. On the Temperature Dependence of Enzyme-Catalyzed Rates.

    PubMed

    Arcus, Vickery L; Prentice, Erica J; Hobbs, Joanne K; Mulholland, Adrian J; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Pudney, Christopher R; Parker, Emily J; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-03-29

    One of the critical variables that determine the rate of any reaction is temperature. For biological systems, the effects of temperature are convoluted with myriad (and often opposing) contributions from enzyme catalysis, protein stability, and temperature-dependent regulation, for example. We have coined the phrase "macromolecular rate theory (MMRT)" to describe the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates independent of stability or regulatory processes. Central to MMRT is the observation that enzyme-catalyzed reactions occur with significant values of ΔCp(‡) that are in general negative. That is, the heat capacity (Cp) for the enzyme-substrate complex is generally larger than the Cp for the enzyme-transition state complex. Consistent with a classical description of enzyme catalysis, a negative value for ΔCp(‡) is the result of the enzyme binding relatively weakly to the substrate and very tightly to the transition state. This observation of negative ΔCp(‡) has important implications for the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates. Here, we lay out the fundamentals of MMRT. We present a number of hypotheses that arise directly from MMRT including a theoretical justification for the large size of enzymes and the basis for their optimum temperatures. We rationalize the behavior of psychrophilic enzymes and describe a "psychrophilic trap" which places limits on the evolution of enzymes in low temperature environments. One of the defining characteristics of biology is catalysis of chemical reactions by enzymes, and enzymes drive much of metabolism. Therefore, we also expect to see characteristics of MMRT at the level of cells, whole organisms, and even ecosystems.

  17. Strain rate dependency of oceanic intraplate earthquake b-values at extremely low strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasajima, Ryohei; Ito, Takeo

    2016-06-01

    We discovered a clear positive dependence of oceanic intraplate earthquake (OCEQ) b-values on the age of the oceanic lithosphere. OCEQ b-values in the youngest (<10 Ma) oceanic lithosphere are around 1.0, while those in middle to old (>20 Ma) oceanic lithosphere exceed 1.5, which is significantly higher than the average worldwide earthquake b-value (around 1.0). On the other hand, the b-value of intraplate earthquakes in the Ninety East-Sumatra orogen, where oceanic lithosphere has an anomalously higher strain rate compared with normal oceanic lithosphere, is 0.93, which is significantly lower than the OCEQ b-value (about 1.9) with the same age (50-110 Ma). Thus, the variation in b-values relates to the strain rate of the oceanic lithosphere and is not caused by a difference in thermal structure. We revealed a negative strain rate dependency of the b-value at extremely low strain rates (<2 × 10-10/year), which can clearly explain the above b-values. We propose that the OCEQ b-value depends strongly on strain rate (either directly or indirectly) at extremely low strain rates. The high OCEQ b-values (>1.5) in oceanic lithosphere >20 Ma old imply that future improvement in seismic observation will capture many smaller magnitude OCEQs, which will provide valuable information on the evolution of the oceanic lithosphere and the driving mechanism of plate tectonics.

  18. Temperature Dependent Rate Coefficients for the OH + Pinonaldehyde Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, M. E.; Talukdar, R.; Notte, G.; Ellison, G. B.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Burkholder, J. B.

    2005-12-01

    The biogenic emission of monoterpenes is an important source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere, approximately 10% of the biogenic hydrocarbons emitted yearly. The oxidation of alpha-pinene, the most abundant monoterpene in the atmosphere, by OH leads to the formation of pinonaldehyde (3-acetyl-2,2-dimethyl-cyclobutyl-ethanal) as a major oxidation product formed in yields > 50%. The atmospheric oxidation of pinonaldehyde will impact radical cycling, ozone formation and air quality on a regional scale. Previous laboratory studies of the OH + pinonaldehyde rate coefficient have used relative rate methods and were limited to room temperature. The reported rate coefficients are in poor agreement with values ranging from 4.0 to 9.1 × 10-11 cm#3 molecule-1 s-1. In this study we have measured absolute rate coefficients to resolve these discrepancies and have extended the measurements to include the temperature dependence. The rate coefficient for the gas phase reaction of OH with pinonaldehyde was measured over the temperature range 297 to 374 K and between 55 and 96 Torr under pseudo first order conditions in OH. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was used to monitor the OH radical which was produced by pulsed laser photolysis. The pinonaldehyde concentration was determined in situ using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV (185 nm) absorption spectroscopy. The rate coefficient for the OH + pinonaldehyde reaction will be presented. Our results will be compared with previous rate coefficient measurements and the discrepancies and the atmospheric implications of these measurements will be discussed.

  19. 46 CFR 174.220 - Hatches and coamings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Offshore Supply Vessels § 174.220 Hatches and coamings. (a) Each hatch exposed to the weather must be watertight, except that the following hatches may... inches) above the weather deck. (2) Each hatch in a cabin top. (b) Each hatch cover must— (1)...

  20. Can Artemia Hatching Assay Be a (Sensitive) Alternative Tool to Acute Toxicity Test?

    PubMed

    Rotini, A; Manfra, L; Canepa, S; Tornambè, A; Migliore, L

    2015-12-01

    Artemia sp. is extensively used in ecotoxicity testing, despite criticisms inherent to both acute and long-term tests. Alternative endpoints and procedures should be considered to support the use of this biological model. The hatching process comprises several developmental steps and the cyst hatchability seems acceptable as endpoint criterion. In this study, we assessed the reliability of the hatching assay on A. franciscana by comparing with acute and long-term mortality tests, using two chemicals: Diethylene Glycol (DEG), Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS). Both DEG and SDS tests demonstrated a dose dependent hatching inhibition. The hatching test resulted more sensitive than acute mortality test and less sensitive than the long-term one. Results demonstrate the reliability and high sensitivity of this hatching assay on a short time lag and support its useful application in first-tier risk assessment procedures.

  1. Scale dependence of rock friction at high work rate.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Mizoguchi, Kazuo; Takizawa, Shigeru; Xu, Shiqing; Kawakata, Hironori

    2015-12-10

    Determination of the frictional properties of rocks is crucial for an understanding of earthquake mechanics, because most earthquakes are caused by frictional sliding along faults. Prior studies using rotary shear apparatus revealed a marked decrease in frictional strength, which can cause a large stress drop and strong shaking, with increasing slip rate and increasing work rate. (The mechanical work rate per unit area equals the product of the shear stress and the slip rate.) However, those important findings were obtained in experiments using rock specimens with dimensions of only several centimetres, which are much smaller than the dimensions of a natural fault (of the order of 1,000 metres). Here we use a large-scale biaxial friction apparatus with metre-sized rock specimens to investigate scale-dependent rock friction. The experiments show that rock friction in metre-sized rock specimens starts to decrease at a work rate that is one order of magnitude smaller than that in centimetre-sized rock specimens. Mechanical, visual and material observations suggest that slip-evolved stress heterogeneity on the fault accounts for the difference. On the basis of these observations, we propose that stress-concentrated areas exist in which frictional slip produces more wear materials (gouge) than in areas outside, resulting in further stress concentrations at these areas. Shear stress on the fault is primarily sustained by stress-concentrated areas that undergo a high work rate, so those areas should weaken rapidly and cause the macroscopic frictional strength to decrease abruptly. To verify this idea, we conducted numerical simulations assuming that local friction follows the frictional properties observed on centimetre-sized rock specimens. The simulations reproduced the macroscopic frictional properties observed on the metre-sized rock specimens. Given that localized stress concentrations commonly occur naturally, our results suggest that a natural fault may lose its

  2. Temperature dependences of rate coefficients for electron catalyzed mutual neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    The flowing afterglow technique of variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry (VENDAMS) has recently yielded evidence for a novel plasma charge loss process, electron catalyzed mutual neutralization (ECMN), i.e., A+ + B- + e- → A + B + e-. Here, rate constants for ECMN of two polyatomic species (POCl3- and POCl2-) and one diatomic species (Br2-) each with two monatomic cations (Ar+and Kr+) are measured using VENDAMS over the temperature range 300 K-500 K. All rate constants show a steep negative temperature dependence, consistent with that expected for a three body process involving two ions and an electron. No variation in rate constants as a function of the cation type is observed outside of uncertainty; however, rate constants of the polyatomic anions (˜1 × 10-18 cm6 s-1 at 300 K) are measurably higher than that for Br2- [(5.5 ± 2) × 10-19 cm6 s-1 at 300 K].

  3. Temperature dependences of rate coefficients for electron catalyzed mutual neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-07-14

    The flowing afterglow technique of variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry (VENDAMS) has recently yielded evidence for a novel plasma charge loss process, electron catalyzed mutual neutralization (ECMN), i.e., A{sup +}+ B{sup -}+ e{sup -}{yields} A + B + e{sup -}. Here, rate constants for ECMN of two polyatomic species (POCl{sub 3}{sup -} and POCl{sub 2}{sup -}) and one diatomic species (Br{sub 2}{sup -}) each with two monatomic cations (Ar{sup +}and Kr{sup +}) are measured using VENDAMS over the temperature range 300 K-500 K. All rate constants show a steep negative temperature dependence, consistent with that expected for a three body process involving two ions and an electron. No variation in rate constants as a function of the cation type is observed outside of uncertainty; however, rate constants of the polyatomic anions ({approx}1 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} at 300 K) are measurably higher than that for Br{sub 2}{sup -}[(5.5 {+-} 2) x 10{sup -19} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} at 300 K].

  4. Interpretation of the temperature dependence of equilibrium and rate constants.

    PubMed

    Winzor, Donald J; Jackson, Craig M

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this review is to draw attention to potential pitfalls in attempts to glean mechanistic information from the magnitudes of standard enthalpies and entropies derived from the temperature dependence of equilibrium and rate constants for protein interactions. Problems arise because the minimalist model that suffices to describe the energy differences between initial and final states usually comprises a set of linked equilibria, each of which is characterized by its own energetics. For example, because the overall standard enthalpy is a composite of those individual values, a positive magnitude for DeltaH(o) can still arise despite all reactions within the subset being characterized by negative enthalpy changes: designation of the reaction as being entropy driven is thus equivocal. An experimenter must always bear in mind the fact that any mechanistic interpretation of the magnitudes of thermodynamic parameters refers to the reaction model rather than the experimental system. For the same reason there is little point in subjecting the temperature dependence of rate constants for protein interactions to transition-state analysis. If comparisons with reported values of standard enthalpy and entropy of activation are needed, they are readily calculated from the empirical Arrhenius parameters.

  5. Prey behavior, age-dependent vulnerability, and predation rates.

    PubMed

    Lingle, Susan; Feldman, Alex; Boyce, Mark S; Wilson, W Finbarr

    2008-11-01

    Variation in the temporal pattern of vulnerability can provide important insights into predator-prey relationships and the evolution of antipredator behavior. We illustrate these points with a system that has coyotes (Canis latrans) as a predator and two species of congeneric deer (Odocoileus spp.) as prey. The deer employ different antipredator tactics (aggressive defense vs. flight) that result in contrasting patterns of age-dependent vulnerability in their probability of being captured when encountered by coyotes. We use long-term survival data and a simple mathematical model to show that (1) species differences in age-dependent vulnerability are reflected in seasonal predation rates and (2) seasonal variation in prey vulnerability and predator hunt activity, which can be associated with the availability of alternative prey, interact to shape seasonal and annual predation rates for each prey species. Shifting hunt activity from summer to winter, or vice versa, alleviated annual mortality on one species and focused it on the other. Our results indicate that seasonal variation in prey vulnerability and hunt activity interact to influence the impact that a predator has on any particular type of prey. Furthermore, these results indicate that seasonal variation in predation pressure is an important selection pressure shaping prey defenses.

  6. Honeybee flight metabolic rate: does it depend upon air temperature?

    PubMed

    Woods, William A; Heinrich, Bernd; Stevenson, Robert D

    2005-03-01

    Differing conclusions have been reached as to how or whether varying heat production has a thermoregulatory function in flying honeybees Apis mellifera. We investigated the effects of air temperature on flight metabolic rate, water loss, wingbeat frequency, body segment temperatures and behavior of honeybees flying in transparent containment outdoors. For periods of voluntary, uninterrupted, self-sustaining flight, metabolic rate was independent of air temperature between 19 and 37 degrees C. Thorax temperatures (T(th)) were very stable, with a slope of thorax temperature on air temperature of 0.18. Evaporative heat loss increased from 51 mW g(-1) at 25 degrees C to 158 mW g(-1) at 37 degrees C and appeared to account for head and abdomen temperature excess falling sharply over the same air temperature range. As air temperature increased from 19 to 37 degrees C, wingbeat frequency showed a slight but significant increase, and metabolic expenditure per wingbeat showed a corresponding slight but significant decrease. Bees spent an average of 52% of the measurement period in flight, with 19 of 78 bees sustaining uninterrupted voluntary flight for periods of >1 min. The fraction of time spent flying declined as air temperature increased. As the fraction of time spent flying decreased, the slope of metabolic rate on air temperature became more steeply negative, and was significant for bees flying less than 80% of the time. In a separate experiment, there was a significant inverse relationship of metabolic rate and air temperature for bees requiring frequent or constant agitation to remain airborne, but no dependence for bees that flew with little or no agitation; bees were less likely to require agitation during outdoor than indoor measurements. A recent hypothesis explaining differences between studies in the slope of flight metabolic rate on air temperature in terms of differences in metabolic capacity and thorax temperature is supported for honeybees in voluntary

  7. Modified Sediment Rating Curve Approach for Supply-dependent Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. A.; Topping, D. J.; Rubin, D. M.; Melis, T. S.

    2007-12-01

    particularly suited to such an approach because it is substantially sediment supply-limited such that transport rates are dependent on both flow and sediment supply; also, there is a rich dataset available for constraining the empirical parameters and testing the hybrid model. Though more empirical in nature than the morphodynamic models, this modified sediment rating curve approach may have broad potential application because its simplicity allows for relatively rapid evaluation of long-term sediment budgets under a range of flow regimes and sediment supply conditions.

  8. Characterizing heart rate variability by scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jing; Gao, Jianbo; Tung, Wen-wen

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies on heart rate variability (HRV) using chaos theory, fractal scaling analysis, and many other methods, while fruitful in many aspects, have produced much confusion in the literature. Especially the issue of whether normal HRV is chaotic or stochastic remains highly controversial. Here, we employ a new multiscale complexity measure, the scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent (SDLE), to characterize HRV. SDLE has been shown to readily characterize major models of complex time series including deterministic chaos, noisy chaos, stochastic oscillations, random 1/f processes, random Levy processes, and complex time series with multiple scaling behaviors. Here we use SDLE to characterize the relative importance of nonlinear, chaotic, and stochastic dynamics in HRV of healthy, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation subjects. We show that while HRV data of all these three types are mostly stochastic, the stochasticity is different among the three groups.

  9. Acute and chronic eggshell temperature manipulations during hatching term influence hatchability, broiler performance, and ascites incidence.

    PubMed

    Sozcu, A; Ipek, A

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine how a control temperature and acute and chronic high eggshell temperatures during the last three days of incubation, can affect hatchability, chick quality, and organ development on day of hatch as well as broiler performance and ascites incidence in later life. The eggshell temperature manipulations were applied during hatching term (days 19 to 21) as follows: control EST (37.3 to 38.0°C), acute high eggshell temperature manipulations (38.4- to 39.0°C for three hours daily) and chronic high eggshell temperature manipulations (38.4 to 39.0°C). The lowest hatchability and the highest cull chick rate were in the chronic high eggshell temperature manipulations group. Lower chick quality parameters correlated with lower chick weights and heavier residual yolk sac weights that were in the chronic high eggshell temperature manipulations group depending on hatch time. The live weights on the 1(st) day of the growing period were higher in the control and acute high eggshell temperature manipulations groups than the chronic high eggshell temperature manipulations group. At 6 wk of age, live weights of broilers were the highest in the control than in the acute and chronic high eggshell temperature manipulations groups. The total mortality was 2.5, 9.2, and 13.3%, the mortality due to ascites was 2.1, 8.3, and 12.9% in the control, acute ,and chronic high eggshell temperature manipulations groups, respectively. The right ventricular/total ventricular ratios for the control, acute and chronic high eggshell temperature manipulations groups were 0.22, 0.28, and 0.30%, respectively. In conclusion, short-term and long-term higher temperatures during the hatching term affect embryo development, incubation results, broiler performance, and ascites incidence. Although the acute high eggshell temperature manipulations did not affect the chick quality parameters at hatch, it negatively affected incubation results and broiler performance

  10. Objective and subjective memory ratings in cannabis-dependent adolescents

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Erin A.; Lydiard, Jessica B.; Goddard, Scott D.; Gray, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Cannabis is the most widely used illicit substance worldwide, with an estimated 160 million users. Among adolescents, rates of cannabis use are increasing, while the perception of detrimental effects of cannabis use is declining. Difficulty with memory is one of the most frequently noted cognitive deficits associated with cannabis use, but little data exists exploring how well users can identify their own memory deficits, if present. Methods The current secondary analysis sought to characterize objective verbal and visual memory performance via a neurocognitive battery in cannabis-dependent adolescents enrolled in a pharmacotherapeutic cannabis cessation clinical trial (N=112) and compare this to a single self-reported item assessing difficulties with memory loss. Exploratory analyses also assessed dose-dependent effects of cannabis on memory performance. Results A small portion of the study sample (10%) endorsed a “serious problem” with memory loss. Those participants reporting “no problem” or “serious problem” scored similarly on visual and verbal memory tasks on the neurocognitive battery. Exploratory analyses suggested a potential relationship between days of cannabis use, amount of cannabis used, and gender with memory performance. Conclusions and Scientific Significance This preliminary and exploratory analysis suggests that a sub-set of cannabis users may not accurately perceive difficulties with memory. Further work should test this hypothesis with the use of a control group, comprehensive self-reports of memory problems, and adult populations that may have more years of cannabis use and more severe cognitive deficits. PMID:25823635

  11. A STELLAR-MASS-DEPENDENT DROP IN PLANET OCCURRENCE RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Mulders, Gijs D.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Dániel

    2015-01-10

    The Kepler spacecraft has discovered a large number of planets with up to one-year periods and down to terrestrial sizes. While the majority of the target stars are main-sequence dwarfs of spectral type F, G, and K, Kepler covers stars with effective temperatures as low as 2500 K, which corresponds to M stars. These cooler stars allow characterization of small planets near the habitable zone, yet it is not clear if this population is representative of that around FGK stars. In this paper, we calculate the occurrence of planets around stars of different spectral types as a function of planet radius and distance from the star and show that they are significantly different from each other. We further identify two trends. First, the occurrence of Earth- to Neptune-sized planets (1-4 R {sub ⊕}) is successively higher toward later spectral types at all orbital periods probed by Kepler; planets around M stars occur twice as frequently as around G stars, and thrice as frequently as around F stars. Second, a drop in planet occurrence is evident at all spectral types inward of a ∼10 day orbital period, with a plateau further out. By assigning to each spectral type a median stellar mass, we show that the distance from the star where this drop occurs is stellar mass dependent, and scales with semi-major axis as the cube root of stellar mass. By comparing different mechanisms of planet formation, trapping, and destruction, we find that this scaling best matches the location of the pre-main-sequence co-rotation radius, indicating efficient trapping of migrating planets or planetary building blocks close to the star. These results demonstrate the stellar-mass dependence of the planet population, both in terms of occurrence rate and of orbital distribution. The prominent stellar-mass dependence of the inner boundary of the planet population shows that the formation or migration of planets is sensitive to the stellar parameters.

  12. Assessing Wind Farm Reliability Using Weather Dependent Failure Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G.; McMillan, D.

    2014-06-01

    Using reliability data comprising of two modern, large scale wind farm sites and wind data from two onsite met masts, a model is developed which calculates wind speed dependant failure rates which are used to populate a Markov Chain. Monte Carlo simulation is then exercised to simulate three wind farms which are subjected to controlled wind speed conditions from three separate potential UK sites. The model then calculates and compares wind farm reliability due to corrective maintenance and component failure rates influenced by the wind speed of each of the sites. Results show that the components affected most by changes in average daily wind speed are the control system and the yaw system. A comparison between this model and a more simple estimation of site yield is undertaken. The model takes into account the effects of the wind speed on the cost of operation and maintenance and also includes the impact of longer periods of downtime in the winter months and shorter periods in the summer. By taking these factors into account a more detailed site assessment can be undertaken. There is significant value to this model for operators and manufacturers.

  13. DnaK-Dependent Accelerated Evolutionary Rate in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Kadibalban, A. Samer; Bogumil, David; Landan, Giddy; Dagan, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins depend on an interaction with molecular chaperones in order to fold into a functional tertiary structure. Previous studies showed that protein interaction with the GroEL/GroES chaperonine and Hsp90 chaperone can buffer the impact of slightly deleterious mutations in the protein sequence. This capacity of GroEL/GroES to prevent protein misfolding has been shown to accelerate the evolution of its client proteins. Whether other bacterial chaperones have a similar effect on their client proteins is currently unknown. Here, we study the impact of DnaK (Hsp70) chaperone on the evolution of its client proteins. Evolutionary parameters were derived from comparison of the Escherichia coli proteome to 1,808,565 orthologous proteins in 1,149 proteobacterial genomes. Our analysis reveals a significant positive correlation between protein binding frequency with DnaK and evolutionary rate. Proteins with high binding affinity to DnaK evolve on average 4.3-fold faster than proteins in the lowest binding affinity class at the genus resolution. Differences in evolutionary rates of DnaK interactor classes are still significant after adjusting for possible effects caused by protein expression level. Furthermore, we observe an additive effect of DnaK and GroEL chaperones on the evolutionary rates of their common interactors. Finally, we found pronounced similarities in the physicochemical profiles that characterize proteins belonging to DnaK and GroEL interactomes. Our results thus implicate DnaK-mediated folding as a major component in shaping protein evolutionary dynamics in bacteria and supply further evidence for the long-term manifestation of chaperone-mediated folding on genome evolution. PMID:27189986

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STAR FORMATION RATE AND THE SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE AT FIXED MORPHOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa

    2010-09-20

    From the Main galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, I construct two volume-limited samples with luminosities -20.5 {<=} M{sub r} {<=} -18.5 and -22.5{<=}M{sub r} {<=}-20.5, respectively, to explore the environmental dependence of the star formation rate (SFR) and the specific star formation rate (SSFR) at fixed morphology. It is found that in these two volume-limited samples, galaxies in the lowest density regime preferentially have higher SFR and SSFR than galaxies in the densest regime. I divide each volume-limited Main galaxy sample into two distinct populations, the early type and the late type, and observe that the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR of galaxies remains true at fixed morphology: the SFR and SSFR of galaxies in the densest regime is still preferentially lower than that of the ones in the lowest density regime with the same morphological type. I also note that the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR of late-type galaxies is stronger than that of early-type galaxies.

  15. 9 CFR 91.29 - Hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....25 (e) and (f) are met and sufficient space shall be left clear on such hatches for passageway across... stowed, sufficient space shall be left clear for the proper removal and handling of such hay and feed...

  16. Hatches Open, Expedition 32 Expands to Six

    NASA Video Gallery

    The hatches between the Soyuz and the Rassvet module opened Tuesday at 3:23 a.m. when Flight Engineers Suni Williams, Yuri Malenchenko and Aki Hoshide entered the International Space Station. Exped...

  17. Spreading rate dependence of gravity anomalies along oceanic transform faults.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Patricia M; Lin, Jian; Behn, Mark D; Montési, Laurent G J

    2007-07-12

    Mid-ocean ridge morphology and crustal accretion are known to depend on the spreading rate of the ridge. Slow-spreading mid-ocean-ridge segments exhibit significant crustal thinning towards transform and non-transform offsets, which is thought to arise from a three-dimensional process of buoyant mantle upwelling and melt migration focused beneath the centres of ridge segments. In contrast, fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are characterized by smaller, segment-scale variations in crustal thickness, which reflect more uniform mantle upwelling beneath the ridge axis. Here we present a systematic study of the residual mantle Bouguer gravity anomaly of 19 oceanic transform faults that reveals a strong correlation between gravity signature and spreading rate. Previous studies have shown that slow-slipping transform faults are marked by more positive gravity anomalies than their adjacent ridge segments, but our analysis reveals that intermediate and fast-slipping transform faults exhibit more negative gravity anomalies than their adjacent ridge segments. This finding indicates that there is a mass deficit at intermediate- and fast-slipping transform faults, which could reflect increased rock porosity, serpentinization of mantle peridotite, and/or crustal thickening. The most negative anomalies correspond to topographic highs flanking the transform faults, rather than to transform troughs (where deformation is probably focused and porosity and alteration are expected to be greatest), indicating that crustal thickening could be an important contributor to the negative gravity anomalies observed. This finding in turn suggests that three-dimensional magma accretion may occur near intermediate- and fast-slipping transform faults.

  18. Temperature Dependence of the O + HO2 Rate Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed laser photolysis technique has been employed to investigate the kinetics of the radical-radical reaction O((sup 3)P) + HO2 OH + O2 over the temperature range 266-391 K in 80 Torr of N2 diluent gas. O((sup 3)P) was produced by 248.5-nm KrF laser photolysis of O3 followed by rapid quenching of O(1D) to O((sup 3)P) while HO2 was produced by simultaneous photolysis of H2O2 to create OH radicals which, in turn, reacted with H2O2 to yield HO2. The O((sup 3)P) temporal profile was monitored by using time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy. The HO2 concentration was calculated based on experimentally measured parameters. The following Arrhenius expression describes our experimental results: k(sub 1)(T) equals (2.91 +/- 0.70) x 10(exp -11) exp[(228 +/- 75)/T] where the errors are 2 sigma and represent precision only. The absolute uncertainty in k, at any temperature within the range 266-391 K is estimated to be +/- 22 percent. Our results are in excellent agreement with a discharge flow study of the temperature dependence of k(sub 1) in 1 Torr of He diluent reported by Keyser, and significantly reduce the uncertainty in the rate of this important stratospheric reaction at subambient temperatures.

  19. Activation of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) promotes blastocyst hatching in mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hee Jung; Hwang, Soo Jin; Yoon, Jung Ah; Jun, Jin Hyun; Lim, Hyunjung Jade; Yoon, Tae Ki; Song, Haengseok

    2011-10-01

    Prostaglandins participate in a variety of female reproductive processes, including ovulation, fertilization, embryo implantation and parturition. In particular, maternal prostacyclin (PGI(2)) is critical for embryo implantation and the action of PGI(2) is not mediated via its G-protein-coupled membrane receptor, IP, but its nuclear receptor, peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ). Recently, several studies have shown that PGI(2) enhances blastocyst development and/or hatching rate in vitro, and subsequently implantation and live birth rates in mice. However, the mechanism by which PGI(2) improves preimplantation embryo development in vitro remains unclear. Using molecular, pharmacologic and genetic approaches, we show that PGI(2)-induced PPARδ activation accelerates blastocyst hatching in mice. mRNAs for PPARδ, retinoid X receptor (heterodimeric partners of PPARδ) and PGI(2) synthase (PGIS) are temporally induced after zygotic gene activation, and their expression reaches maximum levels at the blastocyst stage, suggesting that functional complex of PPARδ can be formed in the blastocyst. Carbaprostacyclin (a stable analogue of PGI(2)) and GW501516 (a PPARδ selective agonist) significantly accelerated blastocyst hatching but did not increase total cell number of cultured blastocysts. Whereas U51605 (a PGIS inhibitor) interfered with blastocyst hatching, GW501516 restored U51605-induced retarded hatching. In contrast to the improvement of blastocyst hatching by PPARδ agonists, PPAR antagonists significantly inhibited blastocyst hatching. Furthermore, deletion of PPARδ at early stages of preimplantation mouse embryos caused delay of blastocyst hatching, but did not impair blastocyst development. Taken together, PGI(2)-induced PPARδ activation accelerates blastocyst hatching in mice.

  20. Hatching asynchrony aggravates inbreeding depression in a songbird (Serinus canaria): an inbreeding-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Raïssa A; Eens, Marcel; Fransen, Erik; Müller, Wendt

    2015-04-01

    Understanding how the intensity of inbreeding depression is influenced by stressful environmental conditions is an important area of enquiry in various fields of biology. In birds, environmental stress during early development is often related to hatching asynchrony; differences in age, and thus size, impose a gradient in conditions ranging from benign (first hatched chick) to harsh (last hatched chick). Here, we compared the effect of hatching order on growth rate in inbred (parents are full siblings) and outbred (parents are unrelated) canary chicks (Serinus canaria). We found that inbreeding depression was more severe under more stressful conditions, being most evident in later hatched chicks. Thus, consideration of inbreeding-environment interactions is of vital importance for our understanding of the biological significance of inbreeding depression and hatching asynchrony. The latter is particularly relevant given that hatching asynchrony is a widespread phenomenon, occurring in many bird species. The exact causes of the observed inbreeding-environment interaction are as yet unknown, but may be related to a decrease in maternal investment in egg contents with laying position (i.e. prehatching environment), or to performance of the chicks during sibling competition and/or their resilience to food shortage (i.e. posthatching environment).

  1. Base metal thermocouples drift rate dependence from thermoelement diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlasek, P.; Duris, S.; Palencar, R.

    2015-02-01

    testing was used to establish the relation between the level of EMF drift and the lead diameter of the thermocouple thermoelements. Furthermore this data was also used to create a drift function which mathematically expresses the dependency between the drift rate and the diameter of the thermocouple leads.

  2. Thermal effects in laser-assisted embryo hatching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas-Hamilton, Diarmaid H.; Conia, Jerome D.

    2000-08-01

    Diode lasers [(lambda) equals 1480 nm] are used with in-vitro fertilization [IVF] as a promoter of embryo hatching. A focused laser beam is applied in vitro to form a channel in the zona pellucida (shell) of the pre-embryo. After transfer into the uterus, the embryo hatches: it extrudes itself through the channel and implants into the uterine wall. Laser-assisted hatching can result in improving implantation and pregnancy success rates. We present examples of zone pellucida ablation using animal models. In using the laser it is vital not to damage pre-embryo cells, e.g. by overheating. In order to define safe regimes we have derived some thermal side-effects of zona pellucida removal. The temperature profile in the beam and vicinity is predicted as function of laser pulse duration and power. In a crossed-beam experiment a HeNe laser probe detects the temperature-induced change in refractive index. We find that the diode laser beam produces superheated water approaching 200 C on the beam axis. Thermal histories during and following the laser pulse are given for regions in the neighborhood of the beam. We conclude that an optimum regime exists with pulse duration

  3. Hatching and fledging times from grassland passerine nests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pietz, P.J.; Granfors, D.A.; Grant, T.A.; Ribic, C.A.; Thompson, F. R.; Pietz, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate estimates of fledging age are needed in field studies to avoid inducing premature fledging or missing the fledging event. Both may lead to misinterpretation of nest fate. Correctly assessing nest fate and length of the nestling period can be critical for accurate calculation of nest survival rates. For researchers who mark nestlings, knowing the age at which their activities may cause young to leave nests prematurely could prevent introducing bias to their studies. We obtained estimates of fledging age using data from grassland bird nests monitored from hatching through fledging with video-surveillance systems in North Dakota and Minnesota during 1996–2001. We compared these values to those obtained from traditional nest visits and from available literature. Mean and modal fledging ages for video-monitored nests were generally similar to those for visited nests, although Clay-colored Sparrows (Spizella pallida) typically fledged 1 day earlier from visited nests. Average fledging ages from both video and nest visits occurred within ranges reported in the literature, but expanded by 1–2 days the upper age limit for Clay-colored Sparrows and the lower age limit for Bobolinks (Dolichonyx oryzivorus). Video showed that eggs hatched throughout the day whereas most young fledged in the morning (06:30–12:30 CDT). Length of the hatching period for a clutch was usually >1 day and was positively correlated with clutch size. Length of the fledging period for a brood was usually <1 day, and in nearly half the nests, fledging was completed within <2 hr. Video surveillance has proven to be a useful tool for providing new information and for corroborating published statements related to hatching and fledging chronology. Comparison of data collected from video and nest visits showed that carefully conducted nest visits generally can provide reliable data for deriving estimates of survival.

  4. Environmentally cued hatching across taxa: embryos respond to risk and opportunity.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Karen M

    2011-07-01

    Most animals begin life in eggs, protected and constrained by a capsule, shell, or other barrier. As embryos develop, their needs and abilities change, altering the costs and benefits of encapsulation, and the risks and opportunities of the outside world. When the cost/benefit ratio is better outside the egg, animals should hatch. Adaptive timing of hatching evolves in this context. However, many environmental variables affect the optimal timing of hatching so there is often no consistent best time. Across a broad range of animals, from flatworms and snails to frogs and birds, embryos hatch at different times or at different developmental stages in response to changing risks or opportunities. Embryos respond to many types of cues, assessed via different sensory modalities. Some responses appear simple. Others are surprisingly complex and sophisticated. Parents also manipulate the timing of hatching. The number and breadth of examples of cued hatching suggest that, in the absence of specific information, we should not assume that hatching timing is fixed. Our challenge now is to integrate information on the timing of hatching across taxa to better understand the diversity of patterns and how they are structured in relation to different types of environmental and developmental variation. As starting points for comparative studies, I: (1) suggest a framework based on heterokairy-individual, plastic variation in the rate, timing, or sequence of developmental events and processes-to describe patterns and mechanisms of variation in the timing of hatching; (2) briefly review the distribution of environmentally cued hatching across the three major clades of Bilateria, highlighting the diverse environmental factors and mechanisms involved; and (3) discuss factors that shape the diversity of plastic and fixed timing of hatching, drawing on evolutionary theory on phenotypic plasticity which directs our attention to fitness trade-offs, environmental heterogeneity, and

  5. Killifish Hatching and Orientation experiment MA-161

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheld, H. W.; Boyd, J. F.; Bozarth, G. A.; Conner, J. A.; Eichler, V. B.; Fuller, P. M.; Hoffman, R. B.; Keefe, J. R.; Kuchnow, K. P.; Oppenheimer, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The killifish Fundulus heteroclitus was used as a model system for study of embryonic development and vestibular adaptation in orbital flight. Juvenile fish in a zero gravity environment exhibited looping swimming activity similar to that observed during the Skylab 3 mission. Hatchings from a 336 hour egg stage were also observed to loop. At splashdown, both juveniles and hatchings exhibited a typical diving response suggesting relatively normal vestibular function. Juveniles exhibited swimming patterns suggestive of abnormal swim bladders. The embryos exhibited no abnormalities resulting from development in a zero gravity environment.

  6. Dependence of the Brittle Ductile Transition on Strain-Rate-Dependent Critical Homologous Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Paul M.

    2017-02-01

    Earthquakes mainly occur in crust or mantle that is below a critical temperature for the tectonic strain-rate, \\dot{e}_t, such that stress builds up to the breaking point before it can relax due to creep. Then long-range stress correlation gives rise to power law seismicity including large events. The limiting temperature depends on pressure, which is taken into account by finding a critical homologous temperature THc = T/TM above which earthquakes are rarely observed (where T, TM are temperature and average melting temperature of constituent minerals). We find that THc for ocean plates is ∼0.55. For California earthquakes, it is also close to 0.55. The uppermost mantle layer of oceanic plates of thickness ∼50 km is composed of harzburgite and depleted peridotite from which basalt has been removed to form ocean crust. Thus it has a higher melting temperature than the peridotite of the surrounding mantle, or the lower halves of plates. Thicknesses of seismicity in deep subduction zones, determined from 2D polynomial fits to a relocated catalog, are ∼50 km, which suggests that the earthquake channel is confined to this layer. We construct models to find homologous temperatures in slabs, and find that seismicity thicknesses are also, on average, confined to TH ≤ 0.55 ± 0.05. The associated rheology is compared with that obtained from flexure models of ocean lithosphere. The brittle-ductile transition occurs where viscosity drops from high values in the cold cores of slabs to values of 1022 to 1023 Pa s, i.e., where creep strain-rates become comparable to tectonic rates. The cutoff for deep earthquakes is not sharp. However they appear unlikely to occur if homologous temperature is high TH > 0.55. Exceptions to the rule are anomalously deep earthquakes such as those beneath the Iceland and the Hawaiian hotspots, and the Newport Inglewood Fault. These are smaller events with short-range stress correlation, and can be explained if strain-rates are 2 to 3 orders

  7. Rate dependence of swelling in lithium-ion cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, KY; Siegel, JB; Secondo, L; Kim, SU; Samad, NA; Qin, JW; Anderson, D; Garikipati, K; Knobloch, A; Epureanu, BI; Monroe, CW; Stefanopoulou, A

    2014-12-01

    Swelling of a commercial 5 Ah lithium-ion cell with a nickel/manganese/cobalt-oxide cathode is investigated as a function of the charge state and the charge/discharge rate. In combination with sensitive displacement measurements, knowledge of the electrode configuration within this prismatic cell's interior allows macroscopic deformations of the casing to be correlated to electrochemical and mechanical transformations in individual anode/separator/cathode layers. Thermal expansion and interior charge state are both found to cause significant swelling. At low rates, where thermal expansion is negligible, the electrode sandwich dilates by as much as 1.5% as the charge state swings from 0% to 100% because of lithium-ion intercalation. At high rates a comparably large residual swelling was observed at the end of discharge. Thermal expansion caused by joule heating at high discharge rate results in battery swelling. The changes in displacement with respect to capacity at low rate correlate well with the potential changes known to accompany phase transitions in the electrode materials. Although the potential response changes minimally with the C-rate, the extent of swelling varies significantly, suggesting that measurements of swelling may provide a sensitive gauge for characterizing dynamic operating states. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Rate-dependent fracture characteristics of lumbar vertebral bodies.

    PubMed

    Stemper, Brian D; Yoganandan, Narayan; Baisden, Jamie L; Umale, Sagar; Shah, Alok S; Shender, Barry S; Paskoff, Glenn R

    2015-01-01

    Experimental testing incorporating lumbar columns and isolated components is essential to advance the understanding of injury tolerance and for the development of safety enhancements. This study incorporated a whole column axial acceleration model and an isolated vertebral body model to quantify compression rates during realistic loading and compressive tolerance of vertebrae. Eight lumbar columns and 53 vertebral bodies from 23 PMHS were used. Three-factor ANOVA was used to determine significant differences (p<0.05) in physiologic and failure biomechanics based on compression rate, spinal level, and gender. Results demonstrated a significant increase in ultimate force (i.e., fracture) from lower to higher compression rates. Ultimate stress also increased with compression rate. Displacement and strain to failure were consistent at both compression rates. Differences in ultimate mechanics between vertebral bodies obtained from males and females demonstrated non-significant trends, with female vertebral bodies having lower ultimate force that would be associated with decreased injury tolerance. This was likely a result of smaller vertebrae in that population. Combined with existing literature, results presented in this manuscript contribute to the understanding of lumbar spine tolerance during axial loading events that occur in both military and civilian environments with regard to effects of compression rate and gender.

  9. Variation in incubation periods and egg metabolism in mallards: Intrinsic mechanisms to promote hatch synchrony

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCluskie, Margaret C.; Flint, Paul L.; Sedinger, James S.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting incubation time and metabolic rates of Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) eggs incubated under constant environmental conditions. Time required to reach the star-pipped stage of hatch varied significantly among females, but not with laying sequence or egg size. Metabolic rate of eggs varied positively with position in the laying sequence and tended to vary among females. Metabolic rate did not vary with egg volume or incubation length. Our results indicate metabolic rate may act as one synchronization mechanism for hatch. The role of maternal effects in development time should be considered in subsequent studies of incubation time in ducks.

  10. Rate dependent of strength in metallic glasses at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y. W.; Bian, X. L.; Wu, S. W.; Hussain, I.; Jia, Y. D.; Yi, J.; Wang, G.

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between the strength at the macroscale and the elastic deformation as well as shear cracking behavior at the microscale of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is investigated. The temperatures of 298 K and 77 K as well as the strain rate ranging from 10−6 s−1 to 10−2 s−1 are applied to the BMGs, in which the mechanical responses of the BMGs are profiled through the compression tests. The yield strength is associated with the activation of the elementary deformation unit, which is insensitive to the strain rate. The maximum compressive strength is linked to the crack propagation during shear fracture process, which is influenced by the strain rate. The cryogenic temperature of 77 K significantly improves the yield strength and the maximum compressive strength of the BMGs. PMID:27270688

  11. Dependence of rate constants on vibrational temperatures - An Arrhenius description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, D. I.; Johnson, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    An interpretation of the variation of rate constants with vibrational temperature is proposed which introduces parameters analogous to those of the classical Arrhenius expression. The constancy of vibrational activation energy is studied for the dissociaton of NO, the ion-molecular reaction of O(+) with N2, and the atom exchange reaction of I with H2. It is found that when a Boltzmann distribution for vibrational states is applicable, the variation of the rate constant with the vibrational temperature can be used to define a vibrational activation energy. The method has application to exchange reactions where a vibrational energy threshold exists.

  12. Effects of Selected Nematicides on Hatching of Heterodera schachtii.

    PubMed

    Steele, A E

    1983-07-01

    Aldicarb, carbofuran, fensulfothion, and phenamiphos were tested in concentrations of 1-100 mug/ml for their effects on hatching of Heterodera schachtii. Exposure of cysts to 1 mug aldicarb or carbofuran/ml stimulated hatch whereas phenamiphos and, to a lesser degree, fensulfothion inhibited hatch. Addition of aldicarb to sugarbeet root diffusate or 4 mM zinc chloride suppressed activities of these hatching agents. Transfer of cysts previously treated with aldicarb or carbofuran to zinc chloride or water rapidly initiated hatch which finally exceeded the hatch from cysts not treated with the nematicides.

  13. Mechanical Hatching Egg Sanitization: A Fresh Look

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three to four decades ago, hatching egg sanitization was done by immersion of eggs in an egg-gathering basket (plastic-coated metal wire) into a small vat with a heating element and disinfectant solution. This procedure failed miserably for several reasons. First, the eggs were not subjected to the...

  14. DEPENDENCE OF INTERSTELLAR TURBULENT PRESSURE ON SUPERNOVA RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, M. Ryan; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Bryan, Greg L. E-mail: mordecai@amnh.or

    2009-10-10

    Feedback from massive stars is one of the least understood aspects of galaxy formation. We perform a suite of vertically stratified local interstellar medium (ISM) models in which supernova (SN) rates and vertical gas column densities are systematically varied based on the Schmidt-Kennicutt law. Our simulations have a sufficiently high spatial resolution (1.95 pc) to follow the hydrodynamic interactions among multiple SNe that structure the interstellar medium. At a given SN rate, we find that the mean mass-weighted sound speed and velocity dispersion decrease as the inverse square root of gas density. The sum of thermal and turbulent pressures is nearly constant in the midplane, so the effective equation of state is isobaric. In contrast, across our four models having SN rates that range from 1 to 512 times the Galactic SN rate, the mass-weighted velocity dispersion remains in the range 4-6 km s{sup -1}. Hence, gas averaged over approx100 pc regions follows P propor to rho{sup a}lpha with alpha approx 1, indicating that the effective equation of state on this scale is close to isothermal. Simulated H I emission lines have widths of 10-18 km s{sup -1}, comparable to observed values. In our highest SN rate model, superbubble blow-outs occur, and the turbulent pressure on large scales is approx>4 times higher than the thermal pressure. We find a tight correlation between the thermal and turbulent pressures averaged over approx100 pc regions in the midplane of each model, as well as across the four ISM models. We construct a subgrid model for turbulent pressure based on analytic arguments and explicitly calibrate it against our stratified ISM simulations. The subgrid model provides a simple yet physically motivated way to include SN feedback in cosmological simulations.

  15. Temperature and strain-rate dependent fracture strength of graphynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying-Yan; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Mai, Yiu-Wing; Gu, Yuan-Tong

    2014-10-01

    Graphyne is an allotrope of graphene. The mechanical properties of graphynes (α-, β-, γ- and 6,6,12-graphynes) under uniaxial tension deformation at different temperatures and strain rates are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that graphynes are more sensitive to temperature changes than graphene in terms of fracture strength and Young's modulus. The temperature sensitivity of the different graphynes is proportionally related to the percentage of acetylenic linkages in their structures, with the α-graphyne (having 100% of acetylenic linkages) being most sensitive to temperature. For the same graphyne, temperature exerts a more pronounced effect on the Young's modulus than fracture strength, which is different from that of graphene. The mechanical properties of graphynes are also sensitive to strain rate, in particular at higher temperatures.

  16. Long-range dependencies in heart rate signals—revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowiec, Danuta; Gałaşka, Rafał; Dudkowska, Aleksandra; Rynkiewicz, Andrzej; Zwierz, Marcin

    2006-09-01

    The arguments are given that local exponents obtained in multifractal analysis by two methods: wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) and multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) allow to separate statistically hearts of healthy people and subjects suffering from reduced left ventricle systolic function (NYHA I-III class). Proposed indices of fractality suggest that a signal of human heart rate is a mixture of two processes: monofractal and multifractal ones.

  17. Egg hatching of two locusts, Schistocerca gregaria and Locusta migratoria, in response to light and temperature cycles.

    PubMed

    Nishide, Yudai; Tanaka, Seiji; Saeki, Shinjiro

    2015-05-01

    The present study showed that the eggs of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria, and the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, responded to photoperiod by hatching when placed on sand in the laboratory. S. gregaria mainly hatched during the dark phase and L. migratoria during the light phase. The importance of light as a hatching cue depended on the magnitude of the temperature change during the thermoperiod; photoperiod played a more important role in the control of hatching time in both species when the magnitude of the temperature change was small. In addition, the eggs of the two species that were covered with sand did not respond to photoperiod and hatched during both the light and dark phases, indicating that light did not penetrate through the sand. Because locust eggs are normally laid as egg pods and a foam plug is deposited between the egg mass and the ground surface, we tested a possibility that naturally deposited eggs perceived light through the foam plug. The eggs that were deposited and left undisturbed in the sand hatched during the light and dark phases at similar frequencies. These results suggest that the eggs of both locust species responded to light and controlled their hatching timing accordingly but would not use light as a hatching cue in the field. The evolutionary significance of the ability of eggs to respond to light in these locusts was discussed.

  18. Density dependence, whitebark pine, and vital rates of grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Manen, Frank T.; Haroldson, Mark A.; Bjornlie, Daniel D; Ebinger, Michael R.; Thompson, Daniel J.; Costello, Cecily M; White, Gary C.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding factors influencing changes in population trajectory is important for effective wildlife management, particularly for populations of conservation concern. Annual population growth of the grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) population in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, USA has slowed from 4.2–7.6% during 1983–2001 to 0.3–2.2% during 2002–2011. Substantial changes in availability of a key food source and bear population density have occurred. Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), the seeds of which are a valuable but variable fall food for grizzly bears, has experienced substantial mortality primarily due to a mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreak that started in the early 2000s. Positive growth rates of grizzly bears have resulted in populations reaching high densities in some areas and have contributed to continued range expansion. We tested research hypotheses to examine if changes in vital rates detected during the past decade were more associated with whitebark pine decline or, alternatively, increasing grizzly bear density. We focused our assessment on known-fate data to estimate survival of cubs-of-the-year (cubs), yearlings, and independent bears (≥2 yrs), and reproductive transition of females from having no offspring to having cubs. We used spatially and temporally explicit indices for grizzly bear density and whitebark pine mortality as individual covariates. Models indicated moderate support for an increase in survival of independent male bears over 1983–2012, whereas independent female survival did not change. Cub survival, yearling survival, and reproductive transition from no offspring to cubs all changed during the 30-year study period, with lower rates evident during the last 10–15 years. Cub survival and reproductive transition were negatively associated with an index of grizzly bear density, indicating greater declines where bear densities were higher. Our analyses did not support a similar relationship for the

  19. Binary accretion rates: dependence on temperature and mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. D.; Clarke, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    We perform a series of 2D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of gas accretion on to binaries via a circumbinary disc, for a range of gas temperatures and binary mass ratios (q). We show that increasing the gas temperature increases the accretion rate on to the primary for all values of the binary mass ratio: for example, for q = 0.1 and a fixed binary separation, an increase of normalized sound speed by a factor of 5 (from our `cold' to `hot' simulations) changes the fraction of the accreted gas that flows on to the primary from 10 to ˜40 per cent. We present a simple parametrization for the average accretion rate of each binary component accurate to within a few per cent and argue that this parametrization (rather than those in the literature based on warmer simulations) is relevant to supermassive black hole accretion and all but the widest stellar binaries. We present trajectories for the growth of q during circumbinary disc accretion and argue that the period distribution of stellar `twin' binaries is strong evidence for the importance of circumbinary accretion. We also show that our parametrization of binary accretion increases the minimum mass ratio needed for spin alignment of supermassive black holes to q ˜ 0.4, with potentially important implications for the magnitude of velocity kicks acquired during black hole mergers.

  20. Enzyme surface rigidity tunes the temperature dependence of catalytic rates.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-07-12

    The structural origin of enzyme adaptation to low temperature, allowing efficient catalysis of chemical reactions even near the freezing point of water, remains a fundamental puzzle in biocatalysis. A remarkable universal fingerprint shared by all cold-active enzymes is a reduction of the activation enthalpy accompanied by a more negative entropy, which alleviates the exponential decrease in chemical reaction rates caused by lowering of the temperature. Herein, we explore the role of protein surface mobility in determining this enthalpy-entropy balance. The effects of modifying surface rigidity in cold- and warm-active trypsins are demonstrated here by calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots and thermodynamic activation parameters for the peptide hydrolysis reaction, using extensive computer simulations. The protein surface flexibility is systematically varied by applying positional restraints, causing the remarkable effect of turning the cold-active trypsin into a variant with mesophilic characteristics without changing the amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we show that just restraining a key surface loop causes the same effect as a point mutation in that loop between the cold- and warm-active trypsin. Importantly, changes in the activation enthalpy-entropy balance of up to 10 kcal/mol are almost perfectly balanced at room temperature, whereas they yield significantly higher rates at low temperatures for the cold-adapted enzyme.

  1. Texture-dependent anaerobic microsites constrain soil carbon oxidation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiluweit, Marco; Fendorf, Scott

    2016-04-01

    Soil texture, which is a product of parent material, climate and other soil forming factors, is a predictor for long-term storage of soil organic carbon (SOC) storage in many soil ecosystems. Positive correlation between texture (particularly clay content) and SOC storage have long been attributed to protective associations between clay minerals and organic compounds that prevent microbial and enzymatic access - a mechanism commonly referred to as 'mineral protection'. Texture therefore acts as the primary proxy for mineral protection in terrestrial ecosystem models used to assess SOC storage and its sensitivity to global change impacts. Here we show that this protective effect of texture is not only due to mineral protection, but also to the formation of anaerobic microsites. Combining micro-scale laboratory experiments with field-scale observations, we find that oxygen diffusion limitations within clay-rich domains create anaerobic microsites within seemingly well-aerated soils, shifting microbial metabolism to less efficient anaerobic SOC oxidation pathways. Kinetic and thermodynamic constraints reduce SOC oxidation rates within these anaerobic microsites by an order of magnitude relative to aerobic rates, and caused the preservation of bioavailable, polymeric and reduced organic compounds. Lifting these metabolic constraints through increased soil aeration (e.g., through changes in precipitation patterns or land use) may stimulate microbial oxidation of this inherently bioavailable SOC pool. Models that attribute the effects of texture merely to 'mineral protection' may therefore underestimate the vulnerability of soil C to global change impacts.

  2. Enzyme surface rigidity tunes the temperature dependence of catalytic rates

    PubMed Central

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-01-01

    The structural origin of enzyme adaptation to low temperature, allowing efficient catalysis of chemical reactions even near the freezing point of water, remains a fundamental puzzle in biocatalysis. A remarkable universal fingerprint shared by all cold-active enzymes is a reduction of the activation enthalpy accompanied by a more negative entropy, which alleviates the exponential decrease in chemical reaction rates caused by lowering of the temperature. Herein, we explore the role of protein surface mobility in determining this enthalpy–entropy balance. The effects of modifying surface rigidity in cold- and warm-active trypsins are demonstrated here by calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots and thermodynamic activation parameters for the peptide hydrolysis reaction, using extensive computer simulations. The protein surface flexibility is systematically varied by applying positional restraints, causing the remarkable effect of turning the cold-active trypsin into a variant with mesophilic characteristics without changing the amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we show that just restraining a key surface loop causes the same effect as a point mutation in that loop between the cold- and warm-active trypsin. Importantly, changes in the activation enthalpy–entropy balance of up to 10 kcal/mol are almost perfectly balanced at room temperature, whereas they yield significantly higher rates at low temperatures for the cold-adapted enzyme. PMID:27354533

  3. Prebreeding survival of Roseate Terns Sterna dougallii varies with sex, hatching order and hatching date

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nisbet, Ian C.T.; Monticelli, David; Spendelow, Jeffrey A.; Szczys, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Unequal sex ratios can reduce the productivity of animal populations and are especially prevalent among endangered species. A cohort of 333 Roseate Tern Sterna dougallii chicks at a site where the adult sex ratio was skewed towards females was sexed at hatching and followed through fledging and return to the breeding area, and subsequently during adulthood. The entire regional metapopulation was sampled for returning birds. Prebreeding survival (from fledging to age 3 years) was lower in males than in females, but only among B-chicks (second in hatching order). Prebreeding survival also declined with hatching date. The proportion of females in this cohort increased from 54.6% at hatching to 56.2% at fledging and to an estimated 58.0% among survivors at age 3 years. This was more than sufficient to explain the degree of skew in the sex ratio of the adult population, but changes in this degree of skew during the study period make it difficult to identify the influence of a single cohort of recruits. Many studies of prebreeding survival in other bird species have identified effects of sex, hatching order or hatching date, but no previous study has tested for effects of all three factors simultaneously.

  4. 1. VIEW OF THE ENTRANCE TO THE HATCH ADIT (FEATURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF THE ENTRANCE TO THE HATCH ADIT (FEATURE B-28), FACING WEST. (OCTOBER, 1995) - Nevada Lucky Tiger Mill & Mine, Hatch Adit, East slope of Buckskin Mountain, Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, NV

  5. Strain Rate Dependant Material Model for Orthotropic Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignjevic, Rade

    2016-08-01

    In manufacturing processes anisotropic metals are often exposed to the loading with high strain rates in the range from 102 s-1 to 106 s-1 (e.g. stamping, cold spraying and explosive forming). These types of loading often involve generation and propagation of shock waves within the material. The material behaviour under such a complex loading needs to be accurately modelled, in order to optimise the manufacturing process and achieve appropriate properties of the manufactured component. The presented research is related to development and validation of a thermodynamically consistent physically based constitutive model for metals under high rate loading. The model is capable of modelling damage, failure and formation and propagation of shock waves in anisotropic metals. The model has two main parts: the strength part which defines the material response to shear deformation and an equation of state (EOS) which defines the material response to isotropic volumetric deformation [1]. The constitutive model was implemented into the transient nonlinear finite element code DYNA3D [2] and our in house SPH code. Limited model validation was performed by simulating a number of high velocity material characterisation and validation impact tests. The new damage model was developed in the framework of configurational continuum mechanics and irreversible thermodynamics with internal state variables. The use of the multiplicative decomposition of deformation gradient makes the model applicable to arbitrary plastic and damage deformations. To account for the physical mechanisms of failure, the concept of thermally activated damage initially proposed by Tuller and Bucher [3], Klepaczko [4] was adopted as the basis for the new damage evolution model. This makes the proposed damage/failure model compatible with the Mechanical Threshold Strength (MTS) model Follansbee and Kocks [5], 1988; Chen and Gray [6] which was used to control evolution of flow stress during plastic deformation. In

  6. The Luminosity Dependence of the Galaxy Merger Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, D. R.; Atfield, J. E.

    2008-09-01

    We measure the number of companions per galaxy (Nc) as a function of r-band absolute magnitude for both the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Croton and coworkers semianalytic catalog applied to the Millennium Run simulation. For close pairs with projected separations of 5-20 h-1 kpc, velocity differences less than 500 km s-1, and luminosity ratios between 1:2 and 2:1, we find good agreement between the observations and simulations, with Nc consistently close to 0.02 over the range -22 < Mr < - 18. For larger pair separations, Nc(Mr) instead becomes increasingly steep toward the faint end, implying that luminosity-dependent clustering plays an important role on small scales. Using the simulations to assess and correct for projection effects, we infer that the real-space Nc(Mr) for close pairs peaks at about M* and declines by at least a factor of 2 as Mr becomes fainter. Conversely, by measuring the number density of close companions, we estimate that at least 90% of all major mergers occur between galaxies which are fainter than L*. Finally, measurements of the luminosity density of close companions indicate that L* galaxies likely dominate in terms of the overall importance of major mergers in the evolution of galaxy populations at low redshift.

  7. Strain-rate dependence for Ni/Al hybrid foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Anne; Larcher, Martin; Jirousek, Ondrej; Koudelka, Petr; Solomos, George

    2015-09-01

    Shock absorption often needs stiff but lightweight materials that exhibit a large kinetic energy absorption capability. Open-cell metal foams are artificial structures, which due to their plateau stress, including a strong hysteresis, can in principle absorb large amounts of energy. However, their plateau stress is too low for many applications. In this study, we use highly novel and promising Ni/Al hybrid foams which consist of standard, open-cell aluminium foams, where nanocrystalline nickel is deposited by electrodeposition as coating on the strut surface. The mechanical behaviour of cellular materials, including their behaviour under higher strain-rates, is governed by their microstructure due to the properties of the strut material, pore/strut geometry and mass distribution over the struts. Micro-inertia effects are strongly related to the microstructure. For a conclusive model, the exact real microstructure is needed. In this study a micro-focus computer tomography (μCT) system has been used for the analysis of the microstructure of the foam samples and for the development of a microstructural Finite Element (micro-FE) mesh. The microstructural FE models have been used to model the mechanical behaviour of the Ni/Al hybrid foams under dynamic loading conditions. The simulations are validated by quasi-static compression tests and dynamic split Hopkinson pressure bar tests.

  8. Female promiscuity and maternally dependent offspring growth rates in mammals.

    PubMed

    Garratt, Michael; Brooks, Robert C; Lemaître, Jean-François; Gaillard, Jean-Michel

    2014-04-01

    Conflicts between family members are expected to influence the duration and intensity of parental care. In mammals, the majority of this care occurs as resource transfer from mothers to offspring during gestation and lactation. Mating systems can have a strong influence on the severity of familial conflict--where female promiscuity is prevalent, conflict is expected to be higher between family members, causing offspring to demand more resources. If offspring are capable of manipulating their mothers and receive resources in proportion to their demands, resource transfer should increase with elevated promiscuity. We tested this prediction, unexplored across mammals, using a comparative approach. The total durations of gestation and lactation were not related to testes mass, a reliable proxy of female promiscuity across taxa. Offspring growth during gestation, however, and weaning mass, were positively correlated with testes mass, suggesting that offspring gain resources from their mothers at faster rates when familial conflict is greater. During gestation, the relationship between offspring growth and testes mass was also related to placenta morphology, with a stronger relationship between testes mass and growth observed in species with a less invasive placenta. Familial conflict could have a pervasive influence on patterns of parental care in mammals.

  9. Discovery of Spin-Rate-Dependent Asteroid Thermal Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Alan; Drube, Line

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of the surface thermal inertia of an asteroid can provide insight into surface structure: porous material has a lower thermal inertia than rock. Using WISE/NEOWISE data and our new asteroid thermal-inertia estimator we show that the thermal inertia of main-belt asteroids (MBAs) appears to increase with spin period. Similar behavior is found in the case of thermophysically-modeled thermal inertia values of near-Earth objects (NEOs). We interpret our results in terms of rapidly increasing material density and thermal conductivity with depth, and provide evidence that thermal inertia increases by factors of 10 (MBAs) to 20 (NEOs) within a depth of just 10 cm. On the basis of a picture of depth-dependent thermal inertia our results suggest that, in general, thermal inertia values representative of solid rock are reached some tens of centimeters to meters below the surface in the case of MBAs (the median diameter in our dataset = 24 km). In the case of the much smaller (km-sized) NEOs a thinner porous surface layer is indicated, with large pieces of solid rock possibly existing just a meter or less below the surface. These conclusions are consistent with our understanding from in-situ measurements of the surfaces of the Moon, and a few asteroids, and suggest a very general picture of rapidly changing material properties in the topmost regolith layers of asteroids. Our results have important implications for calculations of the Yarkovsky effect, including its perturbation of the orbits of potentially hazardous objects and those of asteroid family members after the break-up event. Evidence of a rapid increase of thermal inertia with depth is also an important result for studies of the ejecta-enhanced momentum transfer of impacting vehicles ("kinetic impactors") in planetary defense.

  10. Section BB Hatch Coating; Framing Plan on Line C Lodging ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section B-B Hatch Coating; Framing Plan on Line C Lodging Knees at Hatch; Elevation A-A Hull Framing; Section at Hatch Frame 36, Starboard Looking Aft; Midship Section Frame 37, Port Looking Aft - Steam Schooner WAPAMA, Kaiser Shipyard No. 3 (Shoal Point), Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  11. 9 CFR 147.22 - Hatching egg sanitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hatching egg sanitation. 147.22... Procedures § 147.22 Hatching egg sanitation. Hatching eggs should be collected from the nests at frequent... practices should be observed: (a) Cleaned and disinfected containers, such as egg flats, should be used...

  12. 9 CFR 147.22 - Hatching egg sanitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hatching egg sanitation. 147.22... Procedures § 147.22 Hatching egg sanitation. Hatching eggs should be collected from the nests at frequent... practices should be observed: (a) Cleaned and disinfected containers, such as egg flats, should be used...

  13. 9 CFR 147.22 - Hatching egg sanitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hatching egg sanitation. 147.22... Procedures § 147.22 Hatching egg sanitation. Hatching eggs should be collected from the nests at frequent... practices should be observed: (a) Cleaned and disinfected containers, such as egg flats, should be used...

  14. 9 CFR 147.22 - Hatching egg sanitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hatching egg sanitation. 147.22... Procedures § 147.22 Hatching egg sanitation. Hatching eggs should be collected from the nests at frequent... practices should be observed: (a) Cleaned and disinfected containers, such as egg flats, should be used...

  15. 9 CFR 147.22 - Hatching egg sanitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hatching egg sanitation. 147.22... Procedures § 147.22 Hatching egg sanitation. Hatching eggs should be collected from the nests at frequent... practices should be observed: (a) Cleaned and disinfected containers, such as egg flats, should be used...

  16. 46 CFR 185.610 - Watertight doors and watertight hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Watertight doors and watertight hatches. 185.610 Section... (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Markings Required § 185.610 Watertight doors and watertight hatches. Watertight doors and watertight hatches must be marked on both sides in clearly legible letters at least...

  17. 46 CFR 169.747 - Watertight doors and hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Watertight doors and hatches. 169.747 Section 169.747... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.747 Watertight doors and hatches. Each watertight door and watertight hatch must be marked on both sides in at least 1-inch...

  18. 46 CFR 169.747 - Watertight doors and hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Watertight doors and hatches. 169.747 Section 169.747... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.747 Watertight doors and hatches. Each watertight door and watertight hatch must be marked on both sides in at least 1-inch...

  19. 46 CFR 185.610 - Watertight doors and watertight hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Watertight doors and watertight hatches. 185.610 Section... (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Markings Required § 185.610 Watertight doors and watertight hatches. Watertight doors and watertight hatches must be marked on both sides in clearly legible letters at least...

  20. 29 CFR 1918.43 - Handling hatch beams and covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... apply in cases where hatch beams are of such design that: (1) The width of the flange is 50 percent or more of the height of the web; and (2) The flange rests flat on the deck when the hatch beam is stood... position, unless the design of the system otherwise prevents unintentional movement. (h) Hatches shall...

  1. Consequences of Hatch Phenology on Stages of Fish Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Bogner, David M.; Wuellner, Melissa R.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how hatch phenology (e.g., the start, peak, and duration of hatching) could influence subsequent recruitment of freshwater fishes into a population. We used two commonly sympatric fish species that exhibit different hatching phenologies to examine recruitment across multiple life stages. Nine yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) annual cohorts were sampled from 2004 through 2013 across larval, age-0, age-1, and age-2 life stages in a Nebraska (U.S.A.) Sandhill lake. Yellow perch hatched earlier in the season and displayed a more truncated hatch duration compared to bluegill. The timing of hatch influenced recruitment dynamics for both species but important hatching metrics were not similar between species across life stages. A longer hatch duration resulted in greater larval yellow perch abundance but greater age-1 bluegill abundance. In contrast, bluegill larval and age-0 abundances were greater during years when hatching duration was shorter and commenced earlier, whereas age-0 yellow perch abundance was greater when hatching occurred earlier. As a result of hatch phenology, yellow perch recruitment variability was minimized sooner (age-0 life stage) than bluegill (age-1 life stage). Collectively, hatch phenology influenced recruitment dynamics across multiple life stages but was unique for each species. Understanding the complexities of when progeny enter an environment and how this influences eventual recruitment into a population will be critical in the face of ongoing climate change. PMID:27764216

  2. Characterization of Nonlinear Rate Dependent Response of Shape Memory Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Brent; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Chen, Yi-Chao; Whitley, Karen S.

    2007-01-01

    the material while it was above its glass transition temperature. After deforming the material to a specified applied strain, the material was then cooled to below the glass transition temperature (Tg) while retaining the deformed shape. Finally, the specimen was heated again to above the transition temperature, and the resulting shape recovery profile was measured. Results show that strain recovery occurs at a nonlinear rate with respect to time. Results also indicate that the ratio of recoverable strain/applied strain increases as the applied strain increases.

  3. Causes of hatching failure in endangered birds

    PubMed Central

    Hemmings, N.; West, M.; Birkhead, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    About 10 per cent of birds' eggs fail to hatch, but the incidence of failure can be much higher in endangered species. Most studies fail to distinguish between infertility (due to a lack of sperm) and embryo mortality as the cause of hatching failure, yet doing so is crucial in order to understand the underlying problem. Using newly validated techniques to visualize sperm and embryonic tissue, we assessed the fertility status of unhatched eggs of five endangered species, including both wild and captive birds. All eggs were classified as ‘infertile’ when collected, but most were actually fertile with numerous sperm on the ovum. Eggs of captive birds had fewer sperm and were more likely to be infertile than those of wild birds. Our findings raise important questions regarding the management of captive breeding programmes. PMID:22977070

  4. Hatching asynchrony in Burrowing Owls is influenced by clutch size and hatching success but not by food.

    PubMed

    Wellicome, Troy I

    2005-01-01

    In most animals, siblings from a given reproductive event emerge over a very short period of time. In contrast, many species of birds hatch their young asynchronously over a period of days or weeks, handicapping last-hatched chicks with an age and size disadvantage. Numerous studies have examined the adaptive significance of this atypical hatching pattern, but few have attempted to explain the considerable intrapopulation variation that exists in hatching asynchrony. I explored proximate determinants of hatching asynchrony by monitoring 112 Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) nests in the grasslands of southern Saskatchewan, Canada, over 4 years. Age disparities between first- and last-hatched siblings (i.e., hatching spans) varied considerably, ranging between 1 and 7 days (mode = 4 days). These hatching spans increased with increased hatching success. Hatching spans also increased with larger clutches, but the increase was less than predicted given the increased time required to lay more eggs. Hatching span was unrelated to number of prey cached in the nest during egg laying (an index of food availability), and was unaltered by a year of super-abundant prey. Furthermore, pairs given extra food during laying had hatching spans equal to those of unsupplemented control pairs. These results were inconsistent with both the energy constraint and facultative manipulation hypotheses, which predict that hatching asynchrony should vary with the level of food during laying, when incubation onset is determined. Burrowing Owls were apparently free of food limitation early in breeding, yet may not have been able to optimize hatching spans because food conditions during laying were largely unrelated to food conditions during brooding. Thus, one of the premises for facultative manipulation of hatching asynchrony-that laying females are able to forecast post-hatch food conditions-may not have been met for this population of Burrowing Owls.

  5. Asynchronous hatching provides females with a means for increasing male care but incurs a cost by reducing offspring fitness.

    PubMed

    Ford, L E; Smiseth, P T

    2016-02-01

    In species with biparental care, sexual conflict occurs because the benefit of care depends on the total amount of care provided by the two parents while the cost of care depends on each parent's own contribution. Asynchronous hatching may play a role in mediating the resolution of this conflict over parental care. The sexual conflict hypothesis for the evolution of asynchronous hatching suggests that females adjust hatching patterns in order to increase male parental effort relative to female effort. We tested this hypothesis in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides by setting up experimental broods with three different hatching patterns: synchronous, asynchronous and highly asynchronous broods. As predicted, we found that males provided care for longer in asynchronous broods whereas the opposite was true of females. However, we did not find any benefit to females of reducing their duration of care in terms of increased lifespan or reduced mass loss during breeding. We found substantial negative effects of hatching asynchrony on offspring fitness as larval mass was lower and fewer larvae survived to dispersal in highly asynchronous broods compared to synchronous or asynchronous broods. Our results suggest that, even though females can increase male parental effort by hatching their broods more asynchronously, females pay a substantial cost from doing so in terms of reducing offspring growth and survival. Thus, females should be under selection to produce a hatching pattern that provides the best possible trade-off between the benefits of increased male parental effort and the costs due to reduced offspring fitness.

  6. The instantaneous rate dependence in low temperature laboratory rock friction and rock deformation experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.; Kronenberg, A.K.; Reinen, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Earthquake occurrence probabilities that account for stress transfer and time-dependent failure depend on the product of the effective normal stress and a lab-derived dimensionless coefficient a. This coefficient describes the instantaneous dependence of fault strength on deformation rate, and determines the duration of precursory slip. Although an instantaneous rate dependence is observed for fracture, friction, crack growth, and low temperature plasticity in laboratory experiments, the physical origin of this effect during earthquake faulting is obscure. We examine this rate dependence in laboratory experiments on different rock types using a normalization scheme modified from one proposed by Tullis and Weeks [1987]. We compare the instantaneous rate dependence in rock friction with rate dependence measurements from higher temperature dislocation glide experiments. The same normalization scheme is used to compare rate dependence in friction to rock fracture and to low-temperature crack growth tests. For particular weak phyllosilicate minerals, the instantaneous friction rate dependence is consistent with dislocation glide. In intact rock failure tests, for each rock type considered, the instantaneous rate dependence is the same size as for friction, suggesting a common physical origin. During subcritical crack growth in strong quartzofeldspathic and carbonate rock where glide is not possible, the instantaneous rate dependence measured during failure or creep tests at high stress has long been thought to be due to crack growth; however, direct comparison between crack growth and friction tests shows poor agreement. The crack growth rate dependence appears to be higher than the rate dependence of friction and fracture by a factor of two to three for all rock types considered. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. STS-96 Astronauts Adjust Unity Hatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), astronauts Rick D. Husband and Tamara E. Jernigan adjust the hatch for the U.S. built Unity node. The task was part of an overall effort of seven crew members to prepare the existing portion of the International Space Station (ISS). Launched on May 27, 1999, aboard the Orbiter Discovery, the STS-96 mission was the second ISS assembly flight and the first shuttle mission to dock with the station.

  8. Reinforcer magnitude and rate dependency: evaluation of resistance-to-change mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pinkston, Jonathan W; Ginsburg, Brett C; Lamb, Richard J

    2014-10-01

    Under many circumstances, reinforcer magnitude appears to modulate the rate-dependent effects of drugs such that when schedules arrange for relatively larger reinforcer magnitudes rate dependency is attenuated compared with behavior maintained by smaller magnitudes. The current literature on resistance to change suggests that increased reinforcer density strengthens operant behavior, and such strengthening effects appear to extend to the temporal control of behavior. As rate dependency may be understood as a loss of temporal control, the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency may be due to increased resistance to disruption of temporally controlled behavior. In the present experiments, pigeons earned different magnitudes of grain during signaled components of a multiple FI schedule. Three drugs, clonidine, haloperidol, and morphine, were examined. All three decreased overall rates of key pecking; however, only the effects of clonidine were attenuated as reinforcer magnitude increased. An analysis of within-interval performance found rate-dependent effects for clonidine and morphine; however, these effects were not modulated by reinforcer magnitude. In addition, we included prefeeding and extinction conditions, standard tests used to measure resistance to change. In general, rate-decreasing effects of prefeeding and extinction were attenuated by increasing reinforcer magnitudes. Rate-dependent analyses of prefeeding showed rate-dependency following those tests, but in no case were these effects modulated by reinforcer magnitude. The results suggest that a resistance-to-change interpretation of the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency is not viable.

  9. Hatching asynchrony vs. foraging efficiency: the response to food availability in specialist vs. generalist tit species.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, R; Bueno-Enciso, J; Sanz, J J

    2016-11-28

    Breeding mistiming is increasingly frequent in several ecosystems in the face of current climate change. Species belonging to higher trophic levels must employ mechanisms to reduce it. One of these mechanisms is hatching asynchrony, with the eggs in a clutch hatching over a period of several days. Some authors have suggested it to be adaptive when food is unpredictable. However, these birds can also suffer associated costs. We tested whether a species with higher foraging efficiency avoid hatching asynchrony compared to its sister species. We studied hatching asynchrony and nestling provisioning in relation to food availability in sympatric populations of blue and great tits. For the first time, we show that sister species respond to food availability with different strategies. Blue tit feeding rates readily responded to the abundance of their main prey, and also reduced the impact of nestling size hierarchy on mean nestling weight, consequently increasing fledging rate. Our results suggest that levels of hatching asynchrony seem to be influenced by species-specific life history traits, as generalist foragers rely less on it. They also highlight the importance of multi-species approaches when studying the response of organisms to environmental unpredictability.

  10. Hatching asynchrony vs. foraging efficiency: the response to food availability in specialist vs. generalist tit species

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, R.; Bueno-Enciso, J.; Sanz, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Breeding mistiming is increasingly frequent in several ecosystems in the face of current climate change. Species belonging to higher trophic levels must employ mechanisms to reduce it. One of these mechanisms is hatching asynchrony, with the eggs in a clutch hatching over a period of several days. Some authors have suggested it to be adaptive when food is unpredictable. However, these birds can also suffer associated costs. We tested whether a species with higher foraging efficiency avoid hatching asynchrony compared to its sister species. We studied hatching asynchrony and nestling provisioning in relation to food availability in sympatric populations of blue and great tits. For the first time, we show that sister species respond to food availability with different strategies. Blue tit feeding rates readily responded to the abundance of their main prey, and also reduced the impact of nestling size hierarchy on mean nestling weight, consequently increasing fledging rate. Our results suggest that levels of hatching asynchrony seem to be influenced by species-specific life history traits, as generalist foragers rely less on it. They also highlight the importance of multi-species approaches when studying the response of organisms to environmental unpredictability. PMID:27892941

  11. Measurement of generation-dependent proliferation rates and death rates during mouse erythroid progenitor cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Akbarian, Vahe; Wang, Weijia; Audet, Julie

    2012-05-01

    Herein, we describe an experimental and computational approach to perform quantitative carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) cell-division tracking in cultures of primary colony-forming unit-erythroid (CFU-E) cells, a hematopoietic progenitor cell type, which is an important target for the treatment of blood disorders and for the manufacture of red blood cells. CFSE labeling of CFU-Es isolated from mouse fetal livers was performed to examine the effects of stem cell factor (SCF) and erythropoietin (EPO) in culture. We used a dynamic model of proliferation based on the Smith-Martin representation of the cell cycle to extract proliferation rates and death rates from CFSE time-series. However, we found that to accurately represent the cell population dynamics in differentiation cultures of CFU-Es, it was necessary to develop a model with generation-specific rate parameters. The generation-specific rates of proliferation and death were extracted for six generations (G(0) -G(5) ) and they revealed that, although SCF alone or EPO alone supported similar total cell outputs in culture, stimulation with EPO resulted in significantly higher proliferation rates from G(2) to G(5) and higher death rates in G(2) , G(3) , and G(5) compared with SCF. In addition, proliferation rates tended to increase from G(1) to G(5) in cultures supplemented with EPO and EPO + SCF, while they remained lower and more constant across generations with SCF. The results are consistent with the notion that SCF promotes CFU-E self-renewal while EPO promotes CFU-E differentiation in culture.

  12. Induced hatching to avoid infectious egg disease in whitefish.

    PubMed

    Wedekind, Claus

    2002-01-08

    Reacting to a threat before physical contact, e.g., induced by air- or water-borne substances, appears to be an elegant way of defense. The reaction may be behavioral, developmental, morphological, or physiological, and it can involve a shift in niche or life history. Hatching from eggs is a shift in niche and in life history. From niche shift and life history models, one would predict that the timing of hatching is, to some degree, phenotypically plastic, i.e., early or delayed hatching is likely to be inducible. Temporary increased larval mortality (e.g., increased predation on larvae) would favor delayed hatching, while relatively high egg mortality would favor early hatching. Here, I show experimentally that eggs of the whitefish (Coregonus sp.) hatch earlier in the presence of a virulent egg parasite and that this early hatching is induced by water-borne cues emitted from infected eggs.

  13. Flight Test Techniques for Quantifying Pitch Rate and Angle of Attack Rate Dependencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.; Murri, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    Three different types of maneuvers were designed to separately quantify pitch rate and angle of attack rate contributions to the nondimensional aerodynamic pitching moment coefficient. These maneuvers combined pilot inputs and automatic multisine excitations, and were own with the subscale T-2 and Bat-4 airplanes using the NASA AirSTAR flight test facility. Stability and control derivatives, in particular C(sub mq) and C(sub m alpha(.)) were accurately estimated from the flight test data. These maneuvers can be performed with many types of aircraft, and the results can be used to increase simulation prediction fidelity and facilitate more accurate comparisons with wind tunnel experiments or numerical investigations.

  14. Early transition of the digestive system to exogenous nutrition in domestic post-hatch birds.

    PubMed

    Pinchasov, Y

    1995-03-01

    The effect of early transition of the digestive system to exogenous nutrition was examined in three experiments with growing birds. A nutrient mixture (0.5 ml) of glucose, starch and oil (1:1:0.5, by vol) was orally administered immediately after hatch to turkey poults (Meleagris gallopavo) having immediate or delayed access to feed (Expt 1). Increasing amounts (0, 0.25 and 0.5 ml) of this mixture were administered immediately after hatch to turkey poults (Expt 2), or to broiler chicks (Gallus domesticus; Expt 3). The relative weights of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and its ingesta content, and the amylolytic capability of the pancreas were examined during the immediate post-hatch period (to 30 h). Oral administration of nutrients immediately after hatching only slightly influenced the growth of the pancreas and its amylolytic activity, but significantly increased GIT weight in both species, in a dose-dependent manner. It is suggested that early post-hatching exposure of the digestive system by the forced administration of nutrient mixture induces anatomical and metabolic changes in the digestive system slightly earlier than in birds with late access to feed. This increases GIT content and plasma glucose levels, resulting in enhanced feed consumption and growth promotion.

  15. Laboratory oviposition, fecundity and egg hatching ability of colonized Anopheles albimanus from southwestern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, J M; Salinas, E; Lopez, J R; del Angel-Cabañas, G; Martinez, L; Bown, D N

    1988-12-01

    Fecundity, oviposition patterns and egg hatching characteristics were studied in two colonies of Anopheles albimanus isolated from the Pacific coast of southern Mexico. Fecundity was inversely proportional to the cage space available to the female and was influenced by the bloodmeal source, feeding method and previous feeding history. The length of the gonotrophic cycle decreased with succeeding experience from a mean 6.6 in the first to 2.6 days for the fifth cycle. Oviposition timing was also dependent on availability of oviposition substrate. Hatching success of eggs increased significantly when the oviposition site was witheld until 48 hr post-bloodmeal.

  16. A generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model for characterizing the rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis of piezoelectric actuators.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jinqiang; Zhang, Xianmin; Wu, Heng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a generalized hysteresis model is developed to describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators. Based on the classical Prandtl-Ishlinskii (P-I) model, the developed model adds a quadratic polynomial and makes other small changes. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, the parameters of the model are constants, which can be identified by self-adaptive particle swarm optimization. The effectiveness of this rate-independent modified P-I model is demonstrated by comparing simulation results of the developed model and the classic Prandtl-Ishlinskii model. Simulation results suggest that the rate-independent modified P-I model can describe hysteresis more precisely. Compared with the classical P-I model, the rate-independent modified P-I model reduces modeling error by more than 50%. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, a one-side operator is adopted and the parameters are functions with input frequency. The results of the experiments and simulations have shown that the proposed models can accurately describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators.

  17. Dynamics of a Hogg-Huberman Model with Time Dependent Reevaluation Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toshijiro; Kurihara, Tetsuya; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2006-05-01

    The dynamical behavior of the Hogg-Huberman model with time-dependent reevaluation rates is studied. The time dependence of the reevaluation rate that agents using one of resources decide to consider their resource choice is obtained in terms of states of the system. It is seen that the change of fraction of agents using one resource is suppressed to be smaller than that in the case of a fixed reevaluation rate and the chaos control in the system associated with time-dependent reevaluation rates can be performed by the system itself.

  18. Effects of hatching time for larval ambystomatid salamanders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, M.D.; Scott, D.E.; Niewiarowski, P.H.

    2002-01-01

    In aquatic communities, the phenology of breeding may influence species interactions. In the early-breeding marbled salamander, Ambystoma opacum, timing of pond filling may determine whether interactions among larvae are competitive or predatory. The objectives of our studies were to determine how time of egg hatching affected size, larval period, and survival to metamorphosis in A. opacum, and if early-hatching in A. opacum influenced the competitive and predator-prey relationships with smaller larvae of the mole salamander, Ambystoma talpoideum. Salamander larvae were reared from hatching through metamorphosis in large, outdoor enclosures located in a natural temporary pond in Aiken County, South Carolina, in two experiments. In study 1, we reared early- and late-hatching A. opacum larvae separately from hatching through metamorphosis. In study 2, we examined how early- versus late-hatching A. opacum affected a syntopic species, A. talpoideum. In general, early-hatching A. opacum were larger and older at metamorphosis, had greater survival, and left the pond earlier than late-hatching larvae. Ambystoma talpoideum reared in the presence of early-hatching A. opacum had lower survival than in controls, suggesting that A. opacum may predate upon A. talpoideum when they gain a growth advantage over later-hatching larvae. Our studies demonstrate that time of pond filling and phenology of breeding may influence population dynamics and alter the nature of relationships that develop among species.

  19. Alcohol-Dependent Individuals Discount Sex at Higher Rates than Controls

    PubMed Central

    Jarmolowicz, David P.; Bickel, Warren K.; Gatchalian, Kirstin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Research on delay discounting has expanded our understanding of substance dependence in many ways. Recently, orderly discounting of sexual rewards has been demonstrated in both substance-dependent individuals, and healthy controls. Less clear, however, is if rates of sexual discounting are higher than controls in alcohol-dependent-individuals. Methods 20 Alcohol-dependent individuals and 21 healthy control participants completed two delay-discounting tasks. One task involved monetary rewards, whereas the other involved the discounting of sexual rewards (i.e., number of sex acts). Results Alcohol dependent individuals discounted sexual rewards at significantly higher rates than did controls. There was a trend towards, but not a similarly significant relation for the discounting of monetary rewards. Conclusions Rates of sexual discounting are elevated in alcohol dependent individuals. If this relation is replicated in other at risk populations, the rapid devaluation of sexual rewards may be a behavioral marker of impulsive sexual choices. PMID:23312341

  20. Reinforcement magnitude modulation of rate dependent effects in pigeons and rats.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Brett C; Pinkston, Jonathan W; Lamb, R J

    2011-08-01

    Response rate can influence the behavioral effects of many drugs. Reinforcement magnitude may also influence drug effects. Further, reinforcement magnitude can influence rate-dependent effects. For example, in an earlier report, we showed that rate-dependent effects of two antidepressants depended on reinforcement magnitude. The ability of reinforcement magnitude to interact with rate-dependency has not been well characterized. It is not known whether our previous results are specific to antidepressants or generalize to other drug classes. Here, we further examine rate-magnitude interactions by studying effects of two stimulants (d-amphetamine [0.32-5.6 mg/kg] and cocaine [0.32-10 mg/kg]) and two sedatives (chlordiazepoxide [1.78-32 mg/kg] and pentobarbital [1.0-17.8 mg/kg]) in pigeons responding under a 3-component multiple fixed-interval (FI) 300-s schedule maintained by 2-, 4-, or 8-s of food access. We also examine the effects of d-amphetamine [0.32-3.2 mg/kg] and pentobarbital [1.8-10 mg/kg] in rats responding under a similar multiple FI300-s schedule maintained by 2- or 10- food pellet (45 mg) delivery. In pigeons, cocaine and, to a lesser extent, chlordiazepoxide exerted rate-dependent effects that were diminished by increasing durations of food access. The relationship was less apparent for pentobarbital, and not present for d-amphetamine. In rats, rate-dependent effects of pentobarbital and d-amphetamine were not modulated by reinforcement magnitude. In conclusion, some drugs appear to exert rate-dependent effect which are diminished when reinforcement magnitude is relatively high. Subsequent analysis of the rate-dependency data suggest the effects of reinforcement magnitude may be due to a diminution of drug-induced increases in low-rate behavior that occurs early in the fixed-interval.

  1. Does Impulsivity Change Rate Dependently Following Stimulant Administration? A Translational Selective Review and Reanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Bickel, W. K.; Quisenberry, A. J.; Snider, S. E.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Rate dependence refers to an orderly relationship between a baseline measure of behavior and the change in that behavior following an intervention. The most frequently observed rate-dependent effect is an inverse relationship between the baseline rate of behavior and response rates following an intervention. A previous report of rate dependence in delay discounting suggests that the discounting of delayed reinforcers, and perhaps, other impulsivity measures, may change rate dependently following acute and chronic administration of potentially therapeutic medications in both preclinical and clinical studies. Objective The aim of the current paper was to review the effects of stimulants on delay discounting and other impulsivity tasks. Methods All studies identified from the literature were required to include: 1) an objective measure of impulsivity, 2) administration of amphetamine, methylphenidate, or modafinil, 3) presentation of a pre- and post- drug administration impulsivity measure, and 4) the report of individual drug effects or results in groups split by baseline or vehicle impulsivity. Twenty-five research reports were then re-analyzed for evidence consistent with rate dependence. Results Of the total possible instances, 67% produced results consistent with rate dependence. Specifically, 72%, 45%, and 80% of the data sets were consistent with rate dependence following amphetamine, methylphenidate, and modafinil administration, respectively. Conclusions These results suggest rate dependence is a more robust phenomenon than reported in the literature. Impulsivity studies should consider this quantitative signature as a process to determine the effects of variables and as a potential prognostic tool to evaluate the effectiveness future interventions. PMID:26581504

  2. Time-dependent Kramers escape rate in overdamped system with power-law distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanjun; Yin, Cangtao

    2016-05-01

    The probability distribution of Brownian particles moving in an overdamped complex system follows the generalized Smoluchowski equation, which can be rigorously proven that the exact time-dependent solution for this equation follows Tsallis form. Time-dependent escape rate in overdamped system with power-law distributions is then established based on the flux over population theory. The stationary state escape rate in overdamped system with power-law distribution which has been obtained before based on mean first passage time theory is recovered from time-dependent escape rate as time toward infinity.

  3. Rate dependence of grain boundary sliding via time-scaling atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, Farah; Kulkarni, Yashashree

    2017-02-01

    Approaching experimentally relevant strain rates has been a long-standing challenge for molecular dynamics method which captures phenomena typically on the scale of nanoseconds or at strain rates of 107 s-1 and higher. Here, we use grain boundary sliding in nanostructures as a paradigmatic problem to investigate rate dependence using atomistic simulations. We employ a combination of time-scaling computational approaches, including the autonomous basin climbing method, the nudged elastic band method, and kinetic Monte Carlo, to access strain rates ranging from 0.5 s-1 to 107 s-1. Combined with a standard linear solid model for viscoelastic behavior, our simulations reveal that grain boundary sliding exhibits noticeable rate dependence only below strain rates on the order of 10 s-1 but is rate independent and consistent with molecular dynamics at higher strain rates.

  4. Biomolecular origin of the rate-dependent deformation of prismatic enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jikou; Hsiung, Luke L.

    2006-07-01

    Penetration deformation of columnar prismatic enamel was investigated using instrumented nanoindentation testing that was carried out at three constant strain rates (0.05, 0.005, and 0.0005s-1). Enamel demonstrated better resistance to penetration deformation and greater elastic modulus values were measured at higher strain rates. The origin of rate-dependent deformation was rationalized to be the shear deformation of nanoscale protein matrix surrounding each hydroxyapatite crystal rod. The shear modulus of protein matrix was determined. It depends on strain rate in a format Gp=0.213+0.021lnɛ˙.

  5. Design and properties of a rate-dependent ‘dynamic ligament’ containing shear thickening fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenno, Paul T.; Wetzel, Eric D.

    2014-12-01

    A ‘dynamic ligament’ device that exhibits a discontinuous, rate-dependent tensile response is developed and characterized. The device, based on a shear thickening fluid (STF) and flexible ribbons enclosed in elastomeric tubing, exhibits low resistance to extension at rates below 10 mm s-1, but when stretched at 100 mm s-1 or higher resists with more than tenfold higher force. A link between the rheology of the STF and the tensile performance of the dynamic ligament is presented to explain the rate-dependent response. Visualization experiments show evidence of void formation and dilation in the STF during high rate extension.

  6. Yield strength dependence on strain rate of molybdenum-alloy nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Loya, P. E.; Peng, C.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, J.; Lou, J.; Xia, Y. Z.; Bei, H.; George, E. P.; Gao, Y. F.

    2014-06-23

    The yield strength dependence on strain rate was studied for molybdenum-alloy nanofibers with varying initial dislocation density at three different pre-strain levels. In-situ tensile experiments at three displacement rates were carried out in a scanning electron microscope. Yield strength and its scatter decreased as a function of the pre-strain level for different displacement rates. A statistical model was used to analyze the results, and a negative strain rate dependence was inferred from the yield experiments. This finding suggests the need for theoretical investigations since classical models such as dynamic strain aging may have limitations at such nanoscales.

  7. Rate dependent inelastic behavior of polycrystalline solids using a dislocation model

    SciTech Connect

    Werne, R.W.; Kelly, J.M.

    1980-02-26

    A rate dependent theory of polycrystalline plasticity is presented in which the solid is modeled as an isotropic continuum with internal variables. The rate of plastic deformation is shown to be a function of the deviatoric portion of the Cauchy stress tensor as well as two scalar internal variables. The scalar internal variables, which are the dislocation density and mobile fraction, are governed by rate equations which reflect the evolution of microstructural processes. The model has been incorporated into a two dimensional finite element code and several example multidimensional problems are presented which exhibit the rate dependence of the material model.

  8. Displacement rate dependence of irradiation creep as predicted by the production bias model

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, C.H.

    1996-04-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the non-swelling component of irradiation creep of austenitic stainless steels is relatively independent of temperature but is sensitive to the displacement rate. An earlier model of Lewthwaite and Mosedale anticipated the sensitivity of displacement rate and attributed it to the flux sensitivity of point defect recombination. The point-defect recombination process does not yield the observed temperature dependence, however, although it does predict an inverse dependence of the creep rate on the square root of the displacement rate that was experimentally observed at relatively low temperatures.

  9. Coordinate-dependent diffusion coefficients: Decay rate in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Palchikov, Yu. V.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.

    2007-06-15

    Based on a master equation for the reduced density matrix of an open quantum collective system, the influence of coordinate-dependent microscopical diffusion coefficients on the decay rate from a metastable state is treated. For various frictions and temperatures larger than a crossover temperature, the quasistationary decay rates obtained with the coordinate-dependent microscopical set of diffusion coefficients are compared with those obtained with the coordinate-independent microscopical set of diffusion coefficients and coordinate-independent and -dependent phenomenological sets of diffusion coefficients. Neglecting the coordinate dependence of diffusion coefficients, one can strongly overestimate or underestimate the decay rate at low temperature. The coordinate-dependent phenomenological diffusion coefficient in momentum are shown to be suitable for applications.

  10. Solvent viscosity dependence of the folding rate of a small protein: distributed computing study.

    PubMed

    Zagrovic, Bojan; Pande, Vijay

    2003-09-01

    By using distributed computing techniques and a supercluster of more than 20,000 processors we simulated folding of a 20-residue Trp Cage miniprotein in atomistic detail with implicit GB/SA solvent at a variety of solvent viscosities (gamma). This allowed us to analyze the dependence of folding rates on viscosity. In particular, we focused on the low-viscosity regime (values below the viscosity of water). In accordance with Kramers' theory, we observe approximately linear dependence of the folding rate on 1/gamma for values from 1-10(-1)x that of water viscosity. However, for the regime between 10(-4)-10(-1)x that of water viscosity we observe power-law dependence of the form k approximately gamma(-1/5). These results suggest that estimating folding rates from molecular simulations run at low viscosity under the assumption of linear dependence of rate on inverse viscosity may lead to erroneous results.

  11. Efficient rate-distortion optimized media streaming for tree-reducible packet dependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röder, Martin; Cardinal, Jean; Hamzaoui, Raouf

    2006-01-01

    In packetized media streaming systems, packet dependencies are often modeled as a directed acyclic graph called the dependency graph. We consider the situation where the dependency graph is reducible to a tree. This occurs, for instance, in MPEG1 video streams that are packetized at the frame level. Other video coding standards such as H.264 also allow tree-reducible dependencies. We propose in this context efficient dynamic programming algorithms for finding rate-distortion optimal transmission policies. The proposed algorithms are much faster than previous exact algorithms developed for arbitrary dependency graphs.

  12. Rate-Dependent Homogenization Based Continuum Plasticity Damage Model for Dendritic Cast Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    The overall framework of this rate-dependent HCPD model follows the structure of the anisotropic Gursen- Tvergaard-Needleman( GTN ) type elasto...with evolving porosity. The HCPD model follows the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman or GTN models framework established in [14, 15, 16, 17] that account for...this method. In [32, 33] the VCFEM model has been extended for rate-dependent elastic- viscoplastic porous ductile material. Micromechanical analysis

  13. Current dependence of spin torque switching rate based on Fokker-Planck approach

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro Imamura, Hiroshi

    2014-05-07

    The spin torque switching rate of an in-plane magnetized system in the presence of an applied field is derived by solving the Fokker-Planck equation. It is found that three scaling currents are necessary to describe the current dependence of the switching rate in the low-current limit. The dependences of these scaling currents on the applied field strength are also studied.

  14. Drugs and punished responding I: rate-dependent effects under multiple schedules1

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of drugs were studied in pigeons whose responses were punished with electric shock during one component of a multiple fixed-interval 5-min fixed-interval 5-min schedule of food presentation. Most of the drugs analyzed for rate-dependent effects increased low rates of both punished and unpunished responding, while increasing higher rates less, or decreasing them; however, low rates of punished responding sometimes were increased more by pentobarbital, diazepam, and chlordiazepoxide than were matched rates of unpunished responding. In contrast, d-amphetamine and chlorpromazine usually increased low rates of unpunished responding more than matched rates of punished responding. These two drugs also decreased high rates of unpunished responding less than they decreased high rates of punished responding. Thus, the effects of drugs on punished responding depend on the control rate of punished responding; however, the rate-dependent effects of drugs on punished responding are not always the same as they are for unpunished responding. PMID:4706233

  15. Tainted resurrection: metal pollution is linked with reduced hatching and high juvenile mortality in Daphnia egg banks.

    PubMed

    Rogalski, Mary A

    2015-05-01

    Many taxa, from plants to zooplankton, produce long-lasting dormant propagules capable of temporal dispersal. In some cases, propagules can persist for decades or even centuries before emerging from seed and egg banks. Despite impressive longevity, relatively little is known about how the chemical environment experienced before or during dormancy affects the fate and performance of individuals. This study examines the hatching rate and developmental success of Daphnia hatched from diapausing eggs isolated from sediments from four lakes that experienced varying levels of metal contamination. Two hundred seventy-three animals were hatched from lake sediments deposited over the past century. Hatching rate was negatively influenced by metal contamination and sediment age. There was a robust positive relationship between sediment metal concentrations and juvenile mortality in Daphnia hatching from those sediments. The negative effect of metals on Daphnia hatching and juvenile survival may stem from metal bioaccumulation, genetic effects, or reduced maternal investment in diapausing embryos. Regardless of the specific mechanism driving this trend, exposure to metals may impose strong selection on Daphnia diapausing egg banks.

  16. Participation Rates in the Aid to Families with Dependent Children Program: Trends for 1967 through 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruggles, Patricia; Michel, Richard C.

    This report examines participation rates in the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program. TRIM2, a microsimulation model that simulated the eligibility and benefit rules of the AFDC program on a state-by-state basis, showed that there had been a dramatic decline after 1981 in the rate at which AFDC families were applying for and…

  17. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  18. Reaction rate and composition dependence of the stability of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Keek, L.; Cyburt, R. H.; Heger, A.

    2014-06-01

    The stability of thermonuclear burning of hydrogen and helium accreted onto neutron stars is strongly dependent on the mass accretion rate. The burning behavior is observed to change from Type I X-ray bursts to stable burning, with oscillatory burning occurring at the transition. Simulations predict the transition at a 10 times higher mass accretion rate than observed. Using numerical models we investigate how the transition depends on the hydrogen, helium, and CNO mass fractions of the accreted material, as well as on the nuclear reaction rates of 3α and the hot-CNO breakout reactions {sup 15}O(α, γ){sup 19}Ne and {sup 18}Ne(α, p){sup 21}Na. For a lower hydrogen content the transition is at higher accretion rates. Furthermore, most experimentally allowed reaction rate variations change the transition accretion rate by at most 10%. A factor 10 decrease of the {sup 15}O(α, γ){sup 19}Ne rate, however, produces an increase of the transition accretion rate of 35%. None of our models reproduce the transition at the observed rate, and depending on the true {sup 15}O(α, γ){sup 19}Ne reaction rate, the actual discrepancy may be substantially larger. We find that the width of the interval of accretion rates with marginally stable burning depends strongly on both composition and reaction rates. Furthermore, close to the stability transition, our models predict that X-ray bursts have extended tails where freshly accreted fuel prolongs nuclear burning.

  19. On the Firing Rate Dependency of the Phase Response Curve of Rat Purkinje Neurons In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Couto, João; Linaro, Daniele; De Schutter, E; Giugliano, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous spiking during cerebellar tasks has been observed across Purkinje cells: however, little is known about the intrinsic cellular mechanisms responsible for its initiation, cessation and stability. The Phase Response Curve (PRC), a simple input-output characterization of single cells, can provide insights into individual and collective properties of neurons and networks, by quantifying the impact of an infinitesimal depolarizing current pulse on the time of occurrence of subsequent action potentials, while a neuron is firing tonically. Recently, the PRC theory applied to cerebellar Purkinje cells revealed that these behave as phase-independent integrators at low firing rates, and switch to a phase-dependent mode at high rates. Given the implications for computation and information processing in the cerebellum and the possible role of synchrony in the communication with its post-synaptic targets, we further explored the firing rate dependency of the PRC in Purkinje cells. We isolated key factors for the experimental estimation of the PRC and developed a closed-loop approach to reliably compute the PRC across diverse firing rates in the same cell. Our results show unambiguously that the PRC of individual Purkinje cells is firing rate dependent and that it smoothly transitions from phase independent integrator to a phase dependent mode. Using computational models we show that neither channel noise nor a realistic cell morphology are responsible for the rate dependent shift in the phase response curve. PMID:25775448

  20. Physical mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of kangaroo shoulder cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibbotuwawa, Namal; Oloyede, Adekunle; Li, Tong; Singh, Sanjleena; Senadeera, Wijitha; Gu, YuanTong

    2015-09-01

    Due to anatomical and biomechanical similarities to human shoulder, kangaroo was chosen as a model to study shoulder cartilage. Comprehensive enzymatic degradation and indentation tests were applied on kangaroo shoulder cartilage to study mechanisms underlying its strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior. We report that superficial collagen plays a more significant role than proteoglycans in facilitating strain-rate-dependent behavior of the kangaroo shoulder cartilage. By comparing the mechanical properties of degraded and normal cartilages, it was noted that proteoglycan and collagen degradation significantly compromised strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of the cartilage. Superficial collagen contributed equally to the tissue behavior at all strain-rates. This is different to the studies reported on knee cartilage and confirms the importance of superficial collagen on shoulder cartilage mechanical behavior. A porohyperelastic numerical model also indicated that collagen disruption would lead to faster damage of the shoulder cartilage than when proteoglycans are depleted.

  1. Oxygen consumption in the foraging honeybee depends on the reward rate at the food source.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, L; Núñez, J A

    1997-01-01

    Oxygen consumption of the honeybee Apis mellifera ligustica was measured as a function of the flow rate supply of sucrose solution at an automatic feeder located inside a respirometric chamber. Trained bees freely entered the respirometric chamber and collected the sucrose solution supplied. The mean value of the O2 consumption rate per visit increased with the sucrose flow rate, and for a given flow rate, with increasing locomotor activity. However, when no locomotor activity was displayed, O2 consumption also increased with increasing nectar flow rate. Crop load attained at the end of the visit showed a positive relationship with the nectar flow rate; however, for a given flow rate, O2 consumption showed either no correlation or a negative one with the final crop load attained. It is concluded that the energy expenditure of the foraging bee is controlled by a motivational drive whose intensity depends on the reward rate at the food source.

  2. 45 CFR 1226.10 - Hatch Act restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hatch Act restrictions. 1226.10 Section 1226.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PROHIBITIONS ON ELECTORAL AND LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Volunteer Activities § 1226.10 Hatch...

  3. 29 CFR 1918.43 - Handling hatch beams and covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... stable piles not closer to the hatch coaming than three feet (.91 m). Exception: On the working side of... their sides, or stood on an edge close together and lashed. Exception: This paragraph (b) shall not apply in cases where hatch beams are of such design that: (1) The width of the flange is 50 percent...

  4. Effect of storage environment on hatching of Globodera ellingtonae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Globodera spp. eggs go through a diapause stage in which development remains dormant until favorable hatching conditions are reached. Because of the regulatory concerns with Globodera spp., it is often only possible to rear eggs for research in the greenhouse. However, hatch is often lower for green...

  5. 29 CFR 780.211 - Contract production of hatching eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Contract production of hatching eggs. 780.211 Section 780... eggs. It is common practice for hatcherymen to enter into arrangements with farmer poultry raisers for the production of hatching eggs which the hatchery agrees to buy. Ordinarily, the farmer furnishes...

  6. 29 CFR 780.211 - Contract production of hatching eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Contract production of hatching eggs. 780.211 Section 780... eggs. It is common practice for hatcherymen to enter into arrangements with farmer poultry raisers for the production of hatching eggs which the hatchery agrees to buy. Ordinarily, the farmer furnishes...

  7. 29 CFR 780.211 - Contract production of hatching eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Contract production of hatching eggs. 780.211 Section 780... eggs. It is common practice for hatcherymen to enter into arrangements with farmer poultry raisers for the production of hatching eggs which the hatchery agrees to buy. Ordinarily, the farmer furnishes...

  8. 29 CFR 780.211 - Contract production of hatching eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Contract production of hatching eggs. 780.211 Section 780... eggs. It is common practice for hatcherymen to enter into arrangements with farmer poultry raisers for the production of hatching eggs which the hatchery agrees to buy. Ordinarily, the farmer furnishes...

  9. 29 CFR 780.211 - Contract production of hatching eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Contract production of hatching eggs. 780.211 Section 780... eggs. It is common practice for hatcherymen to enter into arrangements with farmer poultry raisers for the production of hatching eggs which the hatchery agrees to buy. Ordinarily, the farmer furnishes...

  10. 46 CFR 122.610 - Watertight doors and watertight hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Watertight doors and watertight hatches. 122.610 Section... Markings Required § 122.610 Watertight doors and watertight hatches. Watertight doors and watertight...: “WATERTIGHT DOOR—KEEP CLOSED” or “WATERTIGHT HATCH—KEEP CLOSED”, unless such markings are deemed...

  11. 46 CFR 131.893 - Watertight doors and watertight hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Watertight doors and watertight hatches. 131.893 Section... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.893 Watertight doors and watertight hatches. Each watertight door in a bulkhead that must be watertight in compliance with the requirements...

  12. 46 CFR 131.893 - Watertight doors and watertight hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Watertight doors and watertight hatches. 131.893 Section... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.893 Watertight doors and watertight hatches. Each watertight door in a bulkhead that must be watertight in compliance with the requirements...

  13. 46 CFR 122.610 - Watertight doors and watertight hatches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Watertight doors and watertight hatches. 122.610 Section... Markings Required § 122.610 Watertight doors and watertight hatches. Watertight doors and watertight...: “WATERTIGHT DOOR—KEEP CLOSED” or “WATERTIGHT HATCH—KEEP CLOSED”, unless such markings are deemed...

  14. 14. VIEW OF NORTHSOUTH ROAD WHICH PARALLELS ROAD TO HATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW OF NORTH-SOUTH ROAD WHICH PARALLELS ROAD TO HATCH ADIT (FEATURE B-28). NOTE MODERN 'LAY DOWN' FENCE ON ROAD. ROAD LIES TO THE WEST OF THE HATCH ADIT AND PHOTOGRAPH IS VIEW TO THE SOUTH. (OCTOBER, 1995) - Nevada Lucky Tiger Mill & Mine, East slope of Buckskin Mountain, Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, NV

  15. 46 CFR 108.145 - Hatches and tonnage openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hatches and tonnage openings. 108.145 Section 108.145 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Structural Fire Protection § 108.145 Hatches and...

  16. 46 CFR 108.145 - Hatches and tonnage openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hatches and tonnage openings. 108.145 Section 108.145 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Structural Fire Protection § 108.145 Hatches and...

  17. Pairing context determines condition-dependence of song rate in a monogamous passerine bird

    PubMed Central

    David, Morgan; Auclair, Yannick; Dall, Sasha R. X.; Cézilly, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Condition-dependence of male ornaments is thought to provide honest signals on which females can base their sexual choice for genetic quality. Recent studies show that condition-dependence patterns can vary within populations. Although long-term association is thought to promote honest signalling, no study has explored the influence of pairing context on the condition-dependence of male ornaments. In this study, we assessed the influence of natural variation in body condition on song rate in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) in three different situations: during short and long encounters with an unfamiliar female, and within heterosexual mated pairs. We found consistent individual differences in male directed and undirected song rate. Moreover, body condition had a positive effect on song rate in paired males. However, male song rate was not influenced by body condition during short or long encounters with unfamiliar females. Song rate appears to be an unreliable signal of condition to prospective females as even poor-condition birds can cheat and sing at a high rate. By contrast, paired females can reliably use song rate to assess their mate's body condition, and possibly the genetic quality. We propose that species' characteristics, such as mating system, should be systematically taken into account to generate relevant hypotheses about the evolution of condition-dependent male ornaments. PMID:23256191

  18. Place dependent stimulation rates improve pitch perception in cochlear implantees with single-sided deafness.

    PubMed

    Rader, Tobias; Döge, Julia; Adel, Youssef; Weissgerber, Tobias; Baumann, Uwe

    2016-09-01

    In normal hearing, the pitch of an acoustic tone can theoretically be encoded by either the place of stimulation in the cochlea or the corresponding rate of vibration. Thus spectral attributes and temporal fine structure of an acoustic signal are naturally correlated. Cochlear implants (CIs), neural prosthetic devices that restore hearing in the profoundly hearing impaired, currently disregard this mechanism; electrical stimulation is provided at fixed electrode positions with default place independent stimulation rate assignments. This does not account for individual cochlear encoding depending on electrode array placement, variations in insertion depth, and the proximity to nerve fibers. Encoding pitch in such manner delivers limited tonal information. Consequently, music appraisal in CI users is often rated cacophonic while speech perception in quiet is close to normal in top performers. We hypothesize that this limitation in electric stimulation is at least partially due to the mismatch between frequency and place encoding in CIs. In the present study, we determined individual electrode locations by analysis of cochlear radiographic images obtained after surgery and calculated place dependent stimulation rates according to models of the normal tonotopic function. Pitch matching in CI users with single-sided deafness shows that place dependent stimulation rates allow thus far unparalleled restoration of tonotopic pitch perception. Collapsed data of matched pitch frequencies as a function of calculated electrical stimulation rate were well fitted by linear regression (R(2) = 0.878). Sound processing strategies incorporating place dependent stimulation rates are expected to improve pitch perception in CI users.

  19. Scale-Dependent Rates of Uranyl Surface Complexation Reaction in Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Zachara, John M.; Zhu, Weihuang

    2013-03-15

    Scale-dependency of uranyl[U(VI)] surface complexation rates was investigated in stirred flow-cell and column systems using a U(VI)-contaminated sediment from the US Department of Energy, Hanford site, WA. The experimental results were used to estimate the apparent rate of U(VI) surface complexation at the grain-scale and in porous media. Numerical simulations using molecular, pore-scale, and continuum models were performed to provide insights into and to estimate the rate constants of U(VI) surface complexation at the different scales. The results showed that the grain-scale rate constant of U(VI) surface complexation was over 3 to 10 orders of magnitude smaller, dependent on the temporal scale, than the rate constant calculated using the molecular simulations. The grain-scale rate was faster initially and slower with time, showing the temporal scale-dependency. The largest rate constant at the grain-scale decreased additional 2 orders of magnitude when the rate was scaled to the porous media in the column. The scaling effect from the grain-scale to the porous media became less important for the slower sorption sites. Pore-scale simulations revealed the importance of coupled mass transport and reactions in both intragranular and inter-granular domains, which caused both spatial and temporal dependence of U(VI) surface complexation rates in the sediment. Pore-scale simulations also revealed a new rate-limiting mechanism in the intragranular porous domains that the rate of coupled diffusion and surface complexation reaction was slower than either process alone. The results provided important implications for developing models to scale geochemical/biogeochemical reactions.

  20. Characterization of shock-dependent reaction rates in an aluminum/perfluoropolyether pyrolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dennis; Granier, John; Johnson, Richard; Littrell, Donald

    2017-01-01

    Energetic formulations of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and aluminum are highly non-ideal. They release energy via a fast self-oxidized combustion wave rather than a true self-sustaining detonation. Unlike high explosives, the reactions are shock dependent and can be overdriven to control energy release rate. Reaction rate experiments show that the velocity can vary from 1.25 to 3 km/s. This paper examines the effect of the initial shock conditions upon the reaction rate of the explosive. The following conditions were varied in a series of reaction rate experiments: the high explosive booster mass and geometry; shock attenuation; confinement; and rate stick diameter and length. Several experiments designed to isolate and quantify these dependencies are described and summarized.

  1. Inbreeding coefficient and heterozygosity-fitness correlations in unhatched and hatched song sparrow nestmates.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sabrina S; Sardell, Rebecca J; Reid, Jane M; Bucher, Thomas; Taylor, Nathan G; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F

    2010-10-01

    Heterozygosity-fitness correlations use molecular measures of heterozygosity as proxy estimates of individual inbreeding coefficients (f) to examine relationships between inbreeding and fitness traits. Heterozygosity-fitness correlations partly depend on the assumption that individual heterozygosity and f are strongly and negatively correlated. Although theory predicts that this relationship will be strongest when mean f and variance in f are high, few studies of heterozygosity-fitness correlations include estimates of f based on pedigrees, which allow for more thorough examinations of the relationship between f, heterozygosity and fitness in nature. We examined relationships between pedigree-based estimates of f, multilocus heterozygosity (MLH) and the probability of survival to hatch in song sparrow nestmates. f and MLH were weakly, but significantly negatively correlated. Inbreeding coefficient predicted the probability of survival to hatch. In contrast, MLH did not predict the probability of survival to hatch nor did it account for residual variation in survival to hatch after statistically controlling for the effects of f. These results are consistent with the expectation that heterozygosity-f correlations will be weak when mean and variance in f are low. Our results also provide empirical support for recent simulation studies, which show that variation in MLH among siblings with equal f can be large and may obscure MLH-fitness relationships.

  2. MicroRNA-276 promotes egg-hatching synchrony by up-regulating brm in locusts

    PubMed Central

    He, Jing; Chen, Qianquan; Wei, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Feng; Yang, Meiling; Hao, Shuguang; Guo, Xiaojiao; Chen, Dahua; Kang, Le

    2016-01-01

    Developmental synchrony, the basis of uniform swarming, migration, and sexual maturation, is an important strategy for social animals to adapt to variable environments. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying developmental synchrony are largely unexplored. The migratory locust exhibits polyphenism between gregarious and solitarious individuals, with the former displaying more synchronous sexual maturation and migration than the latter. Here, we found that the egg-hatching time of gregarious locusts was more uniform compared with solitarious locusts and that microRNA-276 (miR-276) was expressed significantly higher in both ovaries and eggs of gregarious locusts than in solitarious locusts. Interestingly, inhibiting miR-276 in gregarious females and overexpressing it in solitarious females, respectively, caused more heterochronic and synchronous hatching of progeny eggs. Moreover, miR-276 directly targeted a transcription coactivator gene, brahma (brm), resulting in its up-regulation. Knockdown of brm not only resulted in asynchronous egg hatching in gregarious locusts but also impaired the miR-276–induced synchronous egg hatching in solitarious locusts. Mechanistically, miR-276 mediated brm activation in a manner that depended on the secondary structure of brm, namely, a stem-loop around the binding site of miR-276. Collectively, our results unravel a mechanism by which miR-276 enhances brm expression to promote developmental synchrony and provide insight into regulation of developmental homeostasis and population sustaining that are closely related to biological synchrony. PMID:26729868

  3. Multi-item direct behavior ratings: Dependability of two levels of assessment specificity.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Robert J; Briesch, Amy M

    2015-09-01

    Direct Behavior Rating-Multi-Item Scales (DBR-MIS) have been developed as formative measures of behavioral assessment for use in school-based problem-solving models. Initial research has examined the dependability of composite scores generated by summing all items comprising the scales. However, it has been argued that DBR-MIS may offer assessment of 2 levels of behavioral specificity (i.e., item-level, global composite-level). Further, it has been argued that scales can be individualized for each student to improve efficiency without sacrificing technical characteristics. The current study examines the dependability of 5 items comprising a DBR-MIS designed to measure classroom disruptive behavior. A series of generalizability theory and decision studies were conducted to examine the dependability of each item (calls out, noisy, clowns around, talks to classmates and out of seat), as well as a 3-item composite that was individualized for each student. Seven graduate students rated the behavior of 9 middle-school students on each item over 3 occasions. Ratings were based on 10-min video clips of students during mathematics instruction. Separate generalizability and decision studies were conducted for each item and for a 3-item composite that was individualized for each student based on the highest rated items on the first rating occasion. Findings indicate favorable dependability estimates for 3 of the 5 items and exceptional dependability estimates for the individualized composite.

  4. Modeling of Rate-Dependent Hysteresis Using a GPO-Based Adaptive Filter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Ma, Yaopeng

    2016-02-06

    A novel generalized play operator-based (GPO-based) nonlinear adaptive filter is proposed to model rate-dependent hysteresis nonlinearity for smart actuators. In the proposed filter, the input signal vector consists of the output of a tapped delay line. GPOs with various thresholds are used to construct a nonlinear network and connected with the input signals. The output signal of the filter is composed of a linear combination of signals from the output of GPOs. The least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm is used to adjust the weights of the nonlinear filter. The modeling results of four adaptive filter methods are compared: GPO-based adaptive filter, Volterra filter, backlash filter and linear adaptive filter. Moreover, a phenomenological operator-based model, the rate-dependent generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii (RDGPI) model, is compared to the proposed adaptive filter. The various rate-dependent modeling methods are applied to model the rate-dependent hysteresis of a giant magnetostrictive actuator (GMA). It is shown from the modeling results that the GPO-based adaptive filter can describe the rate-dependent hysteresis nonlinear of the GMA more accurately and effectively.

  5. Comparison of radiative-convective models with constant and pressure-dependent lapse rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummel, J. R.; Kuhn, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    One of the most commonly used models for studying climatic processes is the convective adjustment radiation model. In current radiation models, stable temperature profiles are maintained with a convective adjustment in which the temperature lapse rate is set equal to a critical lapse rate whenever the computed lapse rates exceed the critical value. First introduced by Manabe and Strickler (1964), a variety of convective adjustment models are now in use. It is pointed out that on a global scale, moist adiabatic processes, and thus moist adiabatic lapse rates, approximate the atmospheric temperature profile. Comparisons of profiles from a one-dimensional-radiative-convective model have been made using the conventional 6.5 K/km as the critical lapse rate and the pressure-dependent moist adiabatic lapse rates. For a clear sky and a single effective cloud the surface temperatures are 1 to 3 K higher with the constant 6.5 K/km critical lapse rate.

  6. Growth rate regulation of lac operon expression in Escherichia coli is cyclic AMP dependent.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jong-Tar; Chang, Yu-Jen; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2003-10-23

    In contrast to the ribosomal RNA gene expression increasing with growth rate, transcription of the lac operon is downregulated by cell growth rate. In continuous culture, growth rate regulation of lac promoter was independent of carbon substrate used and its location on the chromosome. Since the lac operon is activated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which decreases with increasing cell growth rate, expression of plac-lacZ reporter fusion was analyzed in cya mutant under various growth conditions. The results demonstrated that expression of plac-lacZ in cya mutant was both lower and growth rate independent. In addition, ppGpp (guanosine tetraphosphate) was not involved in the mechanism of growth rate regulation of the lac promoter. Thus, the results of this study indicate that cAMP mediates the growth rate-dependent regulation of lac operon expression in Escherichia coli.

  7. Thermal and maternal environments shape the value of early hatching in a natural population of a strongly cannibalistic freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    Pagel, Thilo; Bekkevold, Dorte; Pohlmeier, Stefan; Wolter, Christian; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Hatching early in the season is often assumed to elevate fitness, particularly in cannibalistic fish in which size-dependent predation mortality is a major selective force. While the importance of the thermal environment for the growth of fish is undisputed, the relevance of maternal effects for offspring growth in the wild is largely unknown. Otoliths of 366 age-0 pike (Esox lucius L.) were sampled in a natural lake over three seasons. All offspring were assigned to more than 330 potential mothers using 16 informative microsatellites. We found temperature and past maternal environment (as represented by juvenile growth rate), but not female total length, to jointly contribute to explain within- and among-season size variation in juvenile pike. While there was no statistical evidence for maternal effects on offspring growth rate, fast female juvenile growth positively correlated with the offspring length in early summer. One mechanism could be related to fast-growing females spawning somewhat earlier in the season. However, the more likely mechanism emerging in our study was that fast-growing females could have been in better condition prior to spawning, in turn possibly producing higher numbers of high-quality eggs. Our study is among the few to reveal carry-over effects related to past maternal environments on offspring performance in a naturally reproducing fish stock. At the same time, our study underscores recent arguments that size-dependent maternal effects may not be expressed in the wild and that early hatching does not generally produce size advantages in light of stochastically varying temperature conditions.

  8. Factors Affecting Growth of Tengmalm's Owl (Aegolius funereus) Nestlings: Prey Abundance, Sex and Hatching Order.

    PubMed

    Zárybnická, Markéta; Riegert, Jan; Brejšková, Lucie; Šindelář, Jiří; Kouba, Marek; Hanel, Jan; Popelková, Alena; Menclová, Petra; Tomášek, Václav; Šťastný, Karel

    2015-01-01

    In altricial birds, energy supply during growth is a major predictor of the physical condition and survival prospects of fledglings. A number of experimental studies have shown that nestling body mass and wing length can vary with particular extrinsic factors, but between-year observational data on this topic are scarce. Based on a seven-year observational study in a central European Tengmalm's owl population we examine the effect of year, brood size, hatching order, and sex on nestling body mass and wing length, as well as the effect of prey abundance on parameters of growth curve. We found that nestling body mass varied among years, and parameters of growth curve, i.e. growth rate and inflection point in particular, increased with increasing abundance of the owl's main prey (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles), and pooled prey abundance (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles, and Sorex shrews). Furthermore, nestling body mass varied with hatching order and between sexes being larger for females and for the first-hatched brood mates. Brood size had no effect on nestling body mass. Simultaneously, we found no effect of year, brood size, hatching order, or sex on the wing length of nestlings. Our findings suggest that in this temperate owl population, nestling body mass is more sensitive to prey abundance than is wing length. The latter is probably more limited by the physiology of the species.

  9. Cryopreservation of sperm in common carp Cyprinus carpio: sperm motility and hatching success of embryos.

    PubMed

    Linhart, O; Rodina, M; Cosson, J

    2000-11-01

    In this study, fish sperm cryopreservation methods were elaborated upon for ex situ conservation of nine strains of Bohemian common carp. Common carp sperm were diluted in Kurokura medium and chilled to 4 degrees C and dimethyl sulfoxide was added. Cryotubes of sperm with media were then cooled from +4 to -9 degrees C at a rate of 4 degrees C min(-1) and then from -9 to -80 degrees C at a rate of 11 degrees C min(-1), held for 6 min at -80 degrees C, and finally transferred into liquid N(2). The spermatozoa were thawed in a water bath at 35 degrees C for 110 s and checked for fertilization yield, hatching yield of embryos, and larval malformations. Fresh and frozen/thawed sperm were evaluated for the percentage and for the velocity of motile sperm from video frames using image analysis. The percentage and velocity of sperm motility at 15 s after activation of frozen/thawed sperm was significantly lower than that of fresh sperm (nine males). ANOVA showed a significant influence of fresh vs frozen/thawed sperm on fertilization rate (P < 0.0001), but differences in hatching rate and in larval malformation (0-6.8%) were not significant, and different males had a significant influence on fertilization and hatching rate (P < 0.003 and P < 0.007, respectively). Multiple range analysis (LSD) showed significant differences between fresh and frozen/thawed sperm regarding fertilization rate (68 +/- 11 and 56 +/- 10%, respectively) and insignificant differences between fresh and frozen/thawed sperm on the hatching rate (50 +/- 18 and 52 +/- 9%, respectively). The percentage and velocity of fresh sperm motility were correlated, respectively, with the fertilization yield of frozen/thawed sperm at the levels r = 0.51 and r = 0.54.

  10. Implementation of Fiber Substructuring Into Strain Rate Dependent Micromechanics Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2001-01-01

    A research program is in progress to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to impact loads. Previously, strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations developed to model the polymer matrix were incorporated into a mechanics of materials based micromechanics method. In the current work, the micromechanics method is revised such that the composite unit cell is divided into a number of slices. Micromechanics equations are then developed for each slice, with laminate theory applied to determine the elastic properties, effective stresses and effective inelastic strains for the unit cell. Verification studies are conducted using two representative polymer matrix composites with a nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation response. The computed results compare well to experimentally obtained values.

  11. CHARADE: A characteristic code for calculating rate-dependent shock-wave response

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.N.; Tonks, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this report we apply spatially one-dimensional methods and simple shock-tracking techniques to the solution of rate-dependent material response under flat-plate-impact conditions. This method of solution eliminates potential confusion of material dissipation with artificial dissipative effects inherent in finite-difference codes, and thus lends itself to accurate calculation of elastic-plastic deformation, shock-to-detonation transition in solid explosives, and shock-induced structural phase transformation. Equations are presented for rate-dependent thermoelastic-plastic deformation for (100) planar shock-wave propagation in materials of cubic symmetry (or higher). Specific numerical calculations are presented for polycrystalline copper using the mechanical threshold stress model of Follansbee and Kocks with transition to dislocation drag. A listing of the CHARADE (for characteristic rate dependence) code and sample input deck are given. 26 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Strain-rate-dependent model for the dynamic compression of elastoplastic spheres.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Hayden A; Daraio, Chiara

    2014-03-01

    We present a force-displacement contact model for the compressive loading of elastoplastic spheres. This model builds from the well known Hertz contact law for elastic, quasistatic compression to incorporate a material's strain-rate-dependent plasticity in order to describe collisions between particles. In the quasistatic regime, finite-element analysis is used to derive an empirical function of the material properties. A Johnson-Cook strain rate dependence is then included into the model to study dynamic effects. We validate the model using split Hopkinson bar experiments and show that the model can accurately simulate the force-displacement response of strain-rate-dependent elastoplastic spheres during dynamic compression and unloading.

  13. Strain-rate-dependent model for the dynamic compression of elastoplastic spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgoyne, Hayden A.; Daraio, Chiara

    2014-03-01

    We present a force-displacement contact model for the compressive loading of elastoplastic spheres. This model builds from the well known Hertz contact law for elastic, quasistatic compression to incorporate a material's strain-rate-dependent plasticity in order to describe collisions between particles. In the quasistatic regime, finite-element analysis is used to derive an empirical function of the material properties. A Johnson-Cook strain rate dependence is then included into the model to study dynamic effects. We validate the model using split Hopkinson bar experiments and show that the model can accurately simulate the force-displacement response of strain-rate-dependent elastoplastic spheres during dynamic compression and unloading.

  14. Rate-dependent Mechanical Deformation Behavior of POSS-filled and Plasticized Poly(vinyl chloride).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soong, Sharon; Cohen, Robert; Boyce, Mary

    2006-03-01

    In different temperatures or strain-rate regimes, the rate sensitivities of polymers change as various primary and secondary molecular mobility mechanisms are accessed. Incorporating nanoparticles into the polymer matrix can potentially alter the molecular level structure and offers an opportunity to tailor the rate-dependent mechanical deformation behavior of the polymer. In this study, methacryl-POSS (C56H88O28Si8) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) were incorporated into poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) through melt blending. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis revealed that the incorporation of POSS in PVC plasticizes PVC and reduces both the alpha and beta transition temperatures. As for the PVC/DOP blends, while the alpha-transition temperatures were reduced, beta-motions vanishes with high DOP contents. The rate dependent yield behavior is characterized in compression testing. Zwick Mechine is used for low to moderate strain rate (0.0001 to 0.1/s) and Split Hopkinson Bar is used for high strain rate (500 to 2000/s). It was found that PVC with POSS shows a delay in yield strength rate-sensitivity transition. For PVC with higher DOP contents which show restricted beta-motions, the rate-sensitivity transition in yield stress faded away. Constitutive model used was able to predict the rate-sensitivity transitions in the compression yield behavior of PVC compounds.

  15. Effects of Mycoplasma anatis and cold stress on hatching success and growth of mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Goldberg, D.R.; Thomas, C.B.; Sharp, P.

    1995-01-01

    We inoculated game-farm mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) eggs and 1-day-old birds with Mycoplasma anatis to determine its effect on hatching success and growth rates of ducklings. Inoculations of eggs reduced hatching success, hatchling size, and duckling growth rates, compared to controls. Intratracheal inoculations of 1-day-old birds did not affect growth rates. Hatchlings and 1-day-old ducklings grew much slower for the first 7 to 10 days when raised at 17 to 19 C, compared to controls raised at 30 to 35 C. The effect of cold stress on growth was greater than the effect of M. anatis infection; we found no synergistic effects between cold stress and M. anatis infection.

  16. The Mitral Valve Prolapsus : Quantification of the Regurgitation Flow Rate by Experimental Time-Dependant PIV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The Mitral Valve Prolapsus : Quantification of the Regurgitation Flow Rate by Experimental Time-Dependant PIV. F. Billy1, D. Coisne1,2, L. Sanchez1... mitral valve insufficiency), assumes that the velocity field in the convergent region have hemispheric shapes and introduce miscalculation specially...upstream a prolaps model of regurgitant orifice based on 2D time dependent PIV reconstruction. Keywords- Mitral Valve , Prolapsus, Regurgitation Flow

  17. Discrete dislocation plasticity analysis of loading rate-dependent static friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H.; Deshpande, V. S.; Van der Giessen, E.

    2016-08-01

    From a microscopic point of view, the frictional force associated with the relative sliding of rough surfaces originates from deformation of the material in contact, by adhesion in the contact interface or both. We know that plastic deformation at the size scale of micrometres is not only dependent on the size of the contact, but also on the rate of deformation. Moreover, depending on its physical origin, adhesion can also be size and rate dependent, albeit different from plasticity. We present a two-dimensional model that incorporates both discrete dislocation plasticity inside a face-centred cubic crystal and adhesion in the interface to understand the rate dependence of friction caused by micrometre-size asperities. The friction strength is the outcome of the competition between adhesion and discrete dislocation plasticity. As a function of contact size, the friction strength contains two plateaus: at small contact length (≲0.6 μ m), the onset of sliding is fully controlled by adhesion while for large contact length (≳10 μ m), the friction strength approaches the size-independent plastic shear yield strength. The transition regime at intermediate contact size is a result of partial de-cohesion and size-dependent dislocation plasticity, and is determined by dislocation properties, interfacial properties as well as by the loading rate.

  18. Implementation of Higher Order Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Micromechanics Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Heung Soo; Zhu, Linfa; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2004-01-01

    A procedure has been developed to investigate the nonlinear response of composite plates under large strain and high strain rate loading. A recently developed strain dependent micromechanics model is extended to account for the shear effects during impact. Four different assumptions of shear deformation effects are investigated to improve the development strain rate dependent micromechanics model. A method to determine through the thickness strain and transverse Poisson's ratio is developed. The revised micromechanics model is implemented into higher order laminate theory. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate transverse shear effects during impact.

  19. Rate dependence, polarization, and light sensitivity of neutron-irradiated scCVD diamond sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentele, B.; Cumalat, J. P.; Schaeffer, D.; Wagner, S. R.; Riley, G.; Spanier, S.

    2016-12-01

    We study the dependence of the charge-collection-efficiency, or CCE, on the rate of charged particles impinging on neutron-irradiated single-crystal Chemical-Vapor-Deposition (scCVD) diamond sensors. These effects are not observed in un-irradiated high quality scCVD sensors. The rate dependence appears to be associated with the build-up of an electric field opposing the applied charge-collection field in the sensor. We find that exposure of the detector to red or near-IR light reverses this effect on the CCE during operation.

  20. A numerical basis for strain-gradient plasticity theory: Rate-independent and rate-dependent formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, K. L.; Niordson, C. F.

    2014-02-01

    A numerical model formulation of the higher order flow theory (rate-independent) by Fleck and Willis [2009. A mathematical basis for strain-gradient plasticity theory - part II: tensorial plastic multiplier. Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 57, 1045-1057.], that allows for elastic-plastic loading/unloading and the interaction of multiple plastic zones, is proposed. The predicted model response is compared to the corresponding rate-dependent version of visco-plastic origin, and coinciding results are obtained in the limit of small strain-rate sensitivity. First, (i) the evolution of a single plastic zone is analyzed to illustrate the agreement with earlier published results, whereafter examples of (ii) multiple plastic zone interaction, and (iii) elastic-plastic loading/unloading are presented. Here, the simple shear problem of an infinite slab constrained between rigid plates is considered, and the effect of strain gradients, strain hardening and rate sensitivity is brought out. For clarity of results, a 1D model is constructed following a procedure suitable for generalization to 2D and 3D.

  1. Rate of egg maturation in marine turtles exhibits 'universal temperature dependence'.

    PubMed

    Weber, Sam B; Blount, Jonathan D; Godley, Brendan J; Witt, Matthew J; Broderick, Annette C

    2011-09-01

    1. The metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) predicts that, after correcting for body mass variation among organisms, the rates of most biological processes will vary as a universal function of temperature. However, empirical support for 'universal temperature dependence' (UTD) is currently equivocal and based on studies of a limited number of traits. 2. In many ectothermic animals, the rate at which females produce mature eggs is temperature dependent and may be an important factor in determining the costs of reproduction. 3. We tested whether the rate of egg maturation in marine turtles varies with environmental temperature as predicted by MTE, using the time separating successive clutches of individual females to estimate the rate at which eggs are formed. We also assessed the phenotypic contribution to this rate, by using radio telemetry to make repeated measurements of interclutch intervals for individual green turtles (Chelonia mydas). 4. Rates of egg maturation increased with seasonally increasing water temperatures in radio-tracked green turtles, but were not repeatable for individual females, and did not vary according to maternal body size or reproductive investment (number and size of eggs produced). 5. Using a collated data set from several different populations and species of marine turtles, we then show that a single relationship with water temperature explains most of the variation in egg maturation rates, with a slope that is statistically indistinguishable from the UTD predicted by MTE. However, several alternative statistical models also described the relationship between temperature and egg maturation rates equally parsimoniously. 6. Our results offer novel support for the MTE's predicted UTD of biological rates, although the underlying mechanisms require further study. The strong temperature dependence of egg maturation combined with the apparently weak phenotypic contribution to this rate has interesting behavioural implications in ectothermic

  2. Estimation of DNA sequence context-dependent mutation rates using primate genomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Bouffard, Gerard G; Wallace, Susan S; Bond, Jeffrey P

    2007-09-01

    It is understood that DNA and amino acid substitution rates are highly sequence context-dependent, e.g., C --> T substitutions in vertebrates may occur much more frequently at CpG sites and that cysteine substitution rates may depend on support of the context for participation in a disulfide bond. Furthermore, many applications rely on quantitative models of nucleotide or amino acid substitution, including phylogenetic inference and identification of amino acid sequence positions involved in functional specificity. We describe quantification of the context dependence of nucleotide substitution rates using baboon, chimpanzee, and human genomic sequence data generated by the NISC Comparative Sequencing Program. Relative mutation rates are reported for the 96 classes of mutations of the form 5' alphabetagamma 3' --> 5' alphadeltagamma 3', where alpha, beta, gamma, and delta are nucleotides and beta not equal delta, based on maximum likelihood calculations. Our results confirm that C --> T substitutions are enhanced at CpG sites compared with other transitions, relatively independent of the identity of the preceding nucleotide. While, as expected, transitions generally occur more frequently than transversions, we find that the most frequent transversions involve the C at CpG sites (CpG transversions) and that their rate is comparable to the rate of transitions at non-CpG sites. A four-class model of the rates of context-dependent evolution of primate DNA sequences, CpG transitions > non-CpG transitions approximately CpG transversions > non-CpG transversions, captures qualitative features of the mutation spectrum. We find that despite qualitative similarity of mutation rates among different genomic regions, there are statistically significant differences.

  3. Does the Rate of Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection Depend on the Dissipation Mechanism?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aunai, Nicolas; Hesse, Michael; Black, Carrie; Evans, Rebekah; Kuznetsova, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The importance of the electron dissipation effect on the reconnection rate is investigated in the general case of asymmetric collisionless magnetic reconnection. Contrary to the standard collisionless reconnection model, it is found that the reconnection rate, and the macroscopic evolution of the reconnecting system, crucially depend on the nature of the dissipation mechanism and that the Hall effect alone is not able to sustain fast reconnection.

  4. Does the Rate of Collisionless Reconnection Depend on the Dissipation Mechanism?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aunai, Nicolas; Hesse, Michael; Black, Carrie; Evans, Rebekah; Kuznetsova, maria

    2012-01-01

    The importance of the electron dissipation effect on the reconnection rate is investigated in the general case of asymmetric collisionless magnetic reconnection. Contrary to the standard collisionless reconnection model, it is found that the reconnection rate, and them acroscopic evolution of the reconnecting system, crucially depend on the nature of the dissipation mechanism and that the Hall effect alone is not able to sustain fast reconnection.

  5. Can-out hatch assembly with magnetic retention means

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Robert C.; Hoh, Joseph C.

    1986-01-01

    A can-out hatch assembly may be positioned in sealed engagement about an aperture within a chamber and is adapted to engage a cover on a container positioned over the aperture to allow the transfer of a contaminant from the chamber to the container while maintaining the contaminant as well as internal portions of the chamber and container isolated from the surrounding environment. With the container's cover engaged by the can-out hatch assembly, the hatch assembly as well as the cover may be pivotally displaced from the aperture with the cover maintaining the exterior portion of the hatch assembly isolated from the contaminant. After the contaminant is transferred from the chamber to the container, the hatch assembly and cover are again positioned in sealed engagement about the aperture. The hatch assembly then positions the cover upon the open end of the container in a sealed manner allowing the container to be removed while maintaining the chamber sealed relative to the surrounding environment. The can-out hatch assembly is particularly adapted for operation by remote control means within the sealed chamber.

  6. Can-out hatch assembly and positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Basnar, Paul J.; Frank, Robert C.; Hoh, Joseph C.

    1986-01-01

    A can-out hatch assembly is adapted to engage in a sealed manner the upper end of a covered sealed container around an aperture in a sealed chamber and to remove the cover from the container permitting a contaminant to be transferred between the container and the chamber while isolating internal portions of the container and chamber from the surrounding environment. A swing bracket is coupled at a first end thereof to the inner, lower wall of the sealed container adjacent to the aperture therein. To a second end of the swing bracket is mounted a hatch cover which may be positioned in sealed engagement about the chamber's aperture by rotating the hatch cover in a first direction when the swing bracket is in the full down position. Rotation of the hatch cover in a second direction releases it from sealed engagement with the chamber's aperture. A lid support rod also coupled to the second end of the swing bracket and inserted through an aperture in the center of the hatch cover may be rotated for threadably engaging the container's cover whereupon the cover may be removed from the container and the hatch cover displaced from the aperture by pivoting displacement of the swing bracket. The contaminant may then be either removed from the container and placed within the sealed chamber, or vice versa, followed by positioning of the cover upon the container and the hatch cover over the aperture in a sealed manner.

  7. Can-out hatch assembly and positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Basnar, Paul J.; Frank, Robert C.; Hoh, Joseph C.

    1986-01-07

    A can-out hatch assembly is adapted to engage in a sealed manner the upper end of a covered sealed container around an aperture in a sealed chamber and to remove the cover from the container permitting a contaminant to be transferred between the container and the chamber while isolating internal portions of the container and chamber from the surrounding environment. A swing bracket is coupled at a first end thereof to the inner, lower wall of the sealed container adjacent to the aperture therein. To a second end of the swing bracket is mounted a hatch cover which may be positioned in sealed engagement about the chamber's aperture by rotating the hatch cover in a first direction when the swing bracket is in the full down position. Rotation of the hatch cover in a second direction releases it from sealed engagement with the chamber's aperture. A lid support rod also coupled to the second end of the swing bracket and inserted through an aperture in the center of the hatch cover may be rotated for threadably engaging the container's cover whereupon the cover may be removed from the container and the hatch cover displaced from the aperture by pivoting displacement of the swing bracket. The contaminant may then be either removed from the container and placed within the sealed chamber, or vice versa, followed by positioning of the cover upon the container and the hatch cover over the aperture in a sealed manner.

  8. Can-out hatch assembly with magnetic retention means

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Robert C.; Hoh, Joseph C.

    1986-01-07

    A can-out hatch assembly may be positioned in sealed engagement about an aperture within a chamber and is adapted to engage a cover on a container positioned over the aperture to allow the transfer of a contaminant from the chamber to the container while maintaining the contaminant as well as internal portions of the chamber and container isolated from the surrounding environment. With the container's cover engaged by the can-out hatch assembly, the hatch assembly as well as the cover may be pivotally displaced from the aperture with the cover maintaining the exterior portion of the hatch assembly isolated from the contaminant. After the contaminant is transferred from the chamber to the container, the hatch assembly and cover are again positioned in sealed engagement about the aperture. The hatch assembly then positions the cover upon the open end of the container in a sealed manner allowing the container to be removed while maintaining the chamber sealed relative to the surrounding environment. The can-out hatch assembly is particularly adapted for operation by remote control means within the sealed chamber.

  9. Can-out hatch assembly and positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Basnar, P.J.; Frank, R.C.; Hoh, J.C.

    1985-07-03

    A can-out hatch assembly is adapted to engage in a sealed manner the upper end of a covered sealed container around an aperture in a sealed chamber and to remove the cover from the container permitting a contaminant to be transferred between the container and the chamber while isolating internal portions of the container and chamber from the surrounding environment. A swing bracket is coupled at a first end thereof to the inner, lower wall of the sealed container adjacent to the aperture therein. To a second end of the swing bracket is mounted a hatch cover which may be positioned in sealed engagement about the chamber's aperture by rotating the hatch cover in a first direction when the swing bracket is in the full down position. Rotation of the hatch cover in a second direction release it from sealed engagement with the chamber's aperture. A lid support rod also coupled to the second end of the swing bracket and inserted through an aperture in the center of the hatch cover may be rotated for theadably engaging the container's cover whereupon the cover may be removed from the container and the hatch cover displaced from the aperture by pivoting displacement of the swing bracket. The contaminant may then be either removed from the container and placed within the sealed chamber, or vice versa, followed by positioning of the cover upon the container and the hatch cover over the aperture in a sealed manner.

  10. Can-out hatch assembly with magnetic retention means

    DOEpatents

    Frank, R.C.; Hoh, J.C.

    1985-07-03

    A can-out hatch assembly may be positioned in sealed engagement about aperture within a chamber and is adapted to engage a cover on a container positioned over the aperture to allow the transfer of a contaminant from the chamber to the container while maintaining the contaminant as well as internal portions of the chamber and container isolated from the surrounding environment. With the container's cover engaged by the can-out hatch assembly, the hatch assembly as well as the cover may be pivotally displaced from the aperture with the cover maintaining the exterior portion of the hatch assembly isolated from the contaminant. After the contaminant is transferred from the chamber to the container, the hatch assembly and cover are again positioned in sealed engagement about the aperture. The hatch assembly then positions the cover upon the open end of the container in a sealed manner allowing the container to be removed while maintaining the chamber sealed relative to the surrounding environment. The can-out hatch assembly is particularly adapted for operation by remote control means within the sealed chamber.

  11. A novel report of hatching plasticity in the phylum Echinodermata.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, A Frances; Blackburn, Holly N; Allen, Jonathan D

    2013-02-01

    Hatching plasticity occurs in response to a wide range of stimuli across many animal taxa, including annelids, arthropods, mollusks, and chordates. Despite the prominence of echinoderms in developmental biology and more than 100 years of detailed examination of their development under a variety of conditions, environmentally cued hatching plasticity has never been reported in the phylum Echinodermata. Here we report plasticity in the timing and stage of hatching of embryos of the sand dollar Echinarachnius parma in response to reductions in salinity. Embryos of E. parma increased their time to hatching more than twofold in response to ecologically relevant salinity reductions, while maintaining an otherwise normal developmental schedule. Embryos that experienced the greatest delay in hatching time emerged from the fertilization envelope as four-arm pluteus larvae rather than hatching as blastulae or early gastrulae. Salinity manipulations across multiple male-female pairs indicated high variability in hatching time both within and among clutches, suggesting significant intraspecific variation in developmental responses to salinity.

  12. Mapping Strain-rate Dependent Dislocation-Defect Interactions by Atomistic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yue; Osetskiy, Yury N; Yip, Sidney; Yildiz-Botterud, Bilge

    2013-01-01

    Probing the mechanisms of defect-defect interactions at strain rates lower than 106 s-1 is an unresolved challenge to date to molecular dynamics (MD) techniques. Here we propose a novel atomistic approach based on transition state theory and the concept of a strain-dependent effective activation barrier that is capable of simulating the kinetics of dislocation-defect interactions at virtually any strain rate, exemplified within 10-7 to 107 s-1. We apply this approach to the problem of an edge dislocation colliding with a cluster of self-interstitial atoms (SIA) under shear deformation. Using an activation-relaxation algorithm (1), we uncover a unique strain-rate dependent trigger mechanism that allows the SIA cluster to be absorbed during the process leading to dislocation climb. Guided by this finding, we determine the activation barrier of the trigger mechanism as a function of shear strain, and use that in a coarse-graining rate equation formulation for constructing a mechanism map in the phase space of strain-rate and temperature. Our predictions of a crossover from a defect recovery at the low strain rate regime to defect absorption behavior in the high strain-rate regime are validated against our own independent, direct MD simulations at 105 to 107 s-1. Implications of the present approach for probing molecular-level mechanisms in strain-rate regimes previously considered inaccessible to atomistic simulations are discussed.

  13. Change in heat capacity for enzyme catalysis determines temperature dependence of enzyme catalyzed rates.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Joanne K; Jiao, Wanting; Easter, Ashley D; Parker, Emily J; Schipper, Louis A; Arcus, Vickery L

    2013-11-15

    The increase in enzymatic rates with temperature up to an optimum temperature (Topt) is widely attributed to classical Arrhenius behavior, with the decrease in enzymatic rates above Topt ascribed to protein denaturation and/or aggregation. This account persists despite many investigators noting that denaturation is insufficient to explain the decline in enzymatic rates above Topt. Here we show that it is the change in heat capacity associated with enzyme catalysis (ΔC(‡)p) and its effect on the temperature dependence of ΔG(‡) that determines the temperature dependence of enzyme activity. Through mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the Topt of an enzyme is correlated with ΔC(‡)p and that changes to ΔC(‡)p are sufficient to change Topt without affecting the catalytic rate. Furthermore, using X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulations we reveal the molecular details underpinning these changes in ΔC(‡)p. The influence of ΔC(‡)p on enzymatic rates has implications for the temperature dependence of biological rates from enzymes to ecosystems.

  14. Age-related degeneration of the egg-laying system promotes matricidal hatching in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Pickett, Christopher L; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2013-08-01

    The identification and characterization of age-related degenerative changes is a critical goal because it can elucidate mechanisms of aging biology and contribute to understanding interventions that promote longevity. Here, we document a novel, age-related degenerative change in C. elegans hermaphrodites, an important model system for the genetic analysis of longevity. Matricidal hatching--intra-uterine hatching of progeny that causes maternal death--displayed an age-related increase in frequency and affected ~70% of mated, wild-type hermaphrodites. The timing and incidence of matricidal hatching were largely independent of the levels of early and total progeny production and the duration of male exposure. Thus, matricidal hatching appears to reflect intrinsic age-related degeneration of the egg-laying system rather than use-dependent damage accumulation. Consistent with this model, mutations that extend longevity by causing dietary restriction significantly delayed matricidal hatching, indicating age-related degeneration of the egg-laying system is controlled by nutrient availability. To identify the underlying tissue defect, we analyzed serotonin signaling that triggers vulval muscle contractions. Mated hermaphrodites displayed an age-related decline in the ability to lay eggs in response to exogenous serotonin, indicating that vulval muscles and/or a further downstream function that is necessary for egg laying degenerate in an age-related manner. By characterizing a new, age-related degenerative event displayed by C. elegans hermaphrodites, these studies contribute to understanding a frequent cause of death in mated hermaphrodites and establish a model of age-related reproductive complications that may be relevant to the birthing process in other animals such as humans.

  15. Circadian clock controlling egg hatching in the cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus).

    PubMed

    Itoh, M T; Sumi, Y

    2000-06-01

    Adult crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus) were maintained under a 12-h light:12-h dark cycle (LD 12:12). After oviposition, their eggs were incubated under different lighting regimens at 23 degrees C, and temporal profiles of egg hatching were examined. When the eggs were incubated in LD 12:12 or in DL 12:12 with a phase difference of 12h from LD 12:12, throughout embryogenesis, 88% to 97% of hatching occurred within 3 h of the dark-light transition on days 17 and 18 of embryogenesis; the phases of the egg-hatching rhythms in the LD 12:12 and DL 12:12 groups differed by about 12 h. In eggs incubated in constant darkness (DD) throughout embryogenesis, a circadian (about 24 h) rhythm of hatching was found, and the phase of the rhythm was similar to that seen in eggs incubated in LD 12:12, but not DL 12:12, throughout embryogenesis. When eggs that had been incubated in DD after oviposition were transferred to DL 12:12 in the middle or later stages of embryogenesis and were returned to DD after three cycles of DL 12:12, the rhythm of hatching synchronized (entrained) to DL 12:12. However, when eggs in the earlier stages of embryogenesis were transferred from DD to DL 12:12 and returned to DD after three cycles, 52% to 94% of hatching did not entrain to DL 12:12. To determine whether photoperiodic conditions to which the parents had been exposed influenced the timing of egg hatching, adult crickets were maintained in DL 12:12, and their eggs were incubated in LD 12:12, DL 12:12, or DD throughout embryogenesis. The egg-hatching rhythm was also found in the eggs incubated under these three lighting regimens. In DD, the phase of the rhythm was similar to that seen in eggs incubated in DL 12:12, not LD 12:12, throughout embryogenesis. The results indicate that in the cricket, the timing of egg hatching is under circadian control and that the circadian rhythm of hatching entrains to 24-h light:dark cycles, but only if the light:dark cycles are imposed midway through embryogenesis

  16. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: ELDRS and dose-rate dependence of vertical NPN transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yu-Zhan; Lu, Wu; Ren, Di-Yuan; Wang, Gai-Li; Yu, Xue-Feng; Guo, Qi

    2009-01-01

    The enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity (ELDRS) and dose-rate dependence of vertical NPN transistors are investigated in this article. The results show that the vertical NPN transistors exhibit more degradation at low dose rate, and that this degradation is attributed to the increase on base current. The oxide trapped positive charge near the SiO2-Si interface and interface traps at the interface can contribute to the increase on base current and the two-stage hydrogen mechanism associated with space charge effect can well explain the experimental results.

  17. The vibrational dependence of dissociative recombination: Rate constants for N{sub 2}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Guberman, Steven L.

    2014-11-28

    Dissociative recombination rate constants are reported with electron temperature dependent uncertainties for the lowest 5 vibrational levels of the N{sub 2}{sup +} ground state. The rate constants are determined from ab initio calculations of potential curves, electronic widths, quantum defects, and cross sections. At 100 K electron temperature, the rate constants overlap with the exception of the third vibrational level. At and above 300 K, the rate constants for excited vibrational levels are significantly smaller than that for the ground level. It is shown that any experimentally determined total rate constant at 300 K electron temperature that is smaller than 2.0 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup 3}/s is likely to be for ions that have a substantially excited vibrational population. Using the vibrational level specific rate constants, the total rate constant is in very good agreement with that for an excited vibrational distribution found in a storage ring experiment. It is also shown that a prior analysis of a laser induced fluorescence experiment is quantitatively flawed due to the need to account for reactions with unknown rate constants. Two prior calculations of the dissociative recombination rate constant are shown to be inconsistent with the cross sections upon which they are based. The rate constants calculated here contribute to the resolution of a 30 year old disagreement between modeled and observed N{sub 2}{sup +} ionospheric densities.

  18. Age-Of Dependent Mutation Rate and Weak Children in the Penna Model in Biological Ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berntsen, K. Nikolaj

    We investigate the effect of an age-dependent mutation rate in the Penna model of ageing and then we observe that the high mortality for human babies can be reproduced by the model if one assumes babies to be weaker than adults.

  19. Translation elicits a growth rate-dependent, genome-wide, differential protein production in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Olivier; Goelzer, Anne; Schaffer, Marc; Calabre, Magali; Mäder, Ulrike; Aymerich, Stéphane; Jules, Matthieu; Fromion, Vincent

    2016-05-17

    Complex regulatory programs control cell adaptation to environmental changes by setting condition-specific proteomes. In balanced growth, bacterial protein abundances depend on the dilution rate, transcript abundances and transcript-specific translation efficiencies. We revisited the current theory claiming the invariance of bacterial translation efficiency. By integrating genome-wide transcriptome datasets and datasets from a library of synthetic gfp-reporter fusions, we demonstrated that translation efficiencies in Bacillus subtilis decreased up to fourfold from slow to fast growth. The translation initiation regions elicited a growth rate-dependent, differential production of proteins without regulators, hence revealing a unique, hard-coded, growth rate-dependent mode of regulation. We combined model-based data analyses of transcript and protein abundances genome-wide and revealed that this global regulation is extensively used in B. subtilis We eventually developed a knowledge-based, three-step translation initiation model, experimentally challenged the model predictions and proposed that a growth rate-dependent drop in free ribosome abundance accounted for the differential protein production.

  20. Category Rating Is Based on Prototypes and Not Instances: Evidence from Feedback-Dependent Context Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrov, Alexander A.

    2011-01-01

    Context effects in category rating on a 7-point scale are shown to reverse direction depending on feedback. Context (skewed stimulus frequencies) was manipulated between and feedback within subjects in two experiments. The diverging predictions of prototype- and exemplar-based scaling theories were tested using two representative models: ANCHOR…

  1. Cryopreservation of European catfish Silurus glanis sperm: sperm motility, viability, and hatching success of embryos.

    PubMed

    Linhart, Otomar; Rodina, Marek; Flajshans, Martin; Gela, David; Kocour, Martin

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to elaborate cryopreservation methods for ex situ conservation of European catfish. The success of sperm cryopreservation was evaluated by post-thaw sperm motility and velocity, percentage of live spermatozoa and fertility (hatching rates) using frozen/thawed sperm. The best hatching rates of 82-86% were obtained with sperm stored for 5 h before freezing in immobilizing solution and frozen with Me2SO in concentrations of 8, 10, and 12%, or with a mixture of 5% Me2SO and 5% propandiole. These results did not significantly differ from the fresh sperm control sample. The percentage of live spermatozoa in frozen/thawed sperm did not correlate with hatching rate or motility of spermatozoa, but was negatively correlated with velocity of spermatozoa (r=-0.47, P=0.05). The percentage motility in frozen/thawed sperm ranged from 8 to 62%, when sperm was stored in immobilizing solution 5h before freezing. The average value in the fresh sperm (control) was 96%. The frozen/thawed sperm motility rate significantly correlated with the hatching rate (r=0.76, P=0.0002), but not with the percentage of live spermatozoa (r=0.16, P=0.52) or the sperm velocity (r=0.07, P=0.79). The velocity of frozen/thawed spermatozoa ranged from 37 to 85 microm/s, whereby methanol concentrations of 7.5 and 10% resulted in highest velocities. Freezing sperm volumes of 1-4 ml did not affect the quality of frozen/thawed sperm.

  2. Dose- and Rate-Dependent Effects of Cocaine on Striatal Firing Related to Licking

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chengke; Mittler, Taliah; Duke, Dawn C.; Zhu, Yun; Pawlak, Anthony P.; West, Mark O.

    2011-01-01

    To examine the role of striatal mechanisms in cocaine-induced stereotyped licking, we investigated the acute effects of cocaine on striatal neurons in awake, freely moving rats before and after cocaine administration (0, 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg). Stereotyped licking was induced only by the high dose. Relative to control (saline), cocaine reduced lick duration and concurrently increased interlick interval, particularly at the high dose, but it did not affect licking rhythm. Firing rates of striatal neurons phasically related to licking movements were compared between matched licks before and after injection, minimizing any influence of sensorimotor variables on changes in firing. Both increases and decreases in average firing rate of striatal neurons were observed after cocaine injection, and these changes exhibited a dose-dependent pattern that strongly depended on predrug firing rate. At the middle and high doses relative to the saline group, the average firing rates of slow firing neurons were increased by cocaine, resulting from a general elevation of movement-related firing rates. In contrast, fast firing neurons showed decreased average firing rates only in the high-dose group, with reduced firing rates across the entire range for these neurons. Our findings suggest that at the high dose, increased phasic activity of slow firing striatal neurons and simultaneously reduced phasic activity of fast firing striatal neurons may contribute, respectively, to the continual initiation of stereotypic movements and the absence of longer movements. PMID:17991811

  3. Mapping strain rate dependence of dislocation-defect interactions by atomistic simulations

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yue; Osetskiy, Yuri N.; Yip, Sidney; Yildiz, Bilge

    2013-01-01

    Probing the mechanisms of defect–defect interactions at strain rates lower than 106 s−1 is an unresolved challenge to date to molecular dynamics (MD) techniques. Here we propose an original atomistic approach based on transition state theory and the concept of a strain-dependent effective activation barrier that is capable of simulating the kinetics of dislocation–defect interactions at virtually any strain rate, exemplified within 10−7 to 107 s−1. We apply this approach to the problem of an edge dislocation colliding with a cluster of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) under shear deformation. Using an activation–relaxation algorithm [Kushima A, et al. (2009) J Chem Phys 130:224504], we uncover a unique strain-rate–dependent trigger mechanism that allows the SIA cluster to be absorbed during the process, leading to dislocation climb. Guided by this finding, we determine the activation barrier of the trigger mechanism as a function of shear strain, and use that in a coarse-graining rate equation formulation for constructing a mechanism map in the phase space of strain rate and temperature. Our predictions of a crossover from a defect recovery at the low strain-rate regime to defect absorption behavior in the high strain-rate regime are validated against our own independent, direct MD simulations at 105 to 107 s−1. Implications of the present approach for probing molecular-level mechanisms in strain-rate regimes previously considered inaccessible to atomistic simulations are discussed. PMID:24114271

  4. Dose rate dependence for different dosimeters and detectors: TLD, OSL, EBT films, and diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Karsch, L.; Beyreuther, E.; Burris-Mog, T.; Kraft, S.; Richter, C.; Zeil, K.; Pawelke, J.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The use of laser accelerators in radiation therapy can perhaps increase the low number of proton and ion therapy facilities in some years due to the low investment costs and small size. The laser-based acceleration technology leads to a very high peak dose rate of about 10{sup 11} Gy/s. A first dosimetric task is the evaluation of dose rate dependence of clinical dosimeters and other detectors. Methods: The measurements were done at ELBE, a superconductive linear electron accelerator which generates electron pulses with 5 ps length at 20 MeV. The different dose rates are reached by adjusting the number of electrons in one beam pulse. Three clinical dosimeters (TLD, OSL, and EBT radiochromic films) were irradiated with four different dose rates and nearly the same dose. A faraday cup, an integrating current transformer, and an ionization chamber were used to control the particle flux on the dosimeters. Furthermore two diamond detectors were tested. Results: The dosimeters are dose rate independent up to 410{sup 9} Gy/s within 2% (OSL and TLD) and up to 1510{sup 9} Gy/s within 5% (EBT films). The diamond detectors show strong dose rate dependence. Conclusions: TLD, OSL dosimeters, and EBT films are suitable for pulsed beams with a very high pulse dose rate like laser accelerated particle beams.

  5. The systematic study of the stability of forecasts in the rate- and state-dependent model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gaetano, D.; McCloskey, J.; Nalbant, S.

    2012-04-01

    Numerous observations have shown a general spatial correlation between positive Coulomb failure stress changes due to an earthquake and the locations of aftershocks. However this correlation does not give any indication of the rate from which we can infer the magnitude using the Gutenberg-Richter law. Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model can be used to obtain a forecast of the observed aftershock rate for the space and time evolution of seismicity caused by stress changes applied to an infinite population of nucleating patches. The seismicity rate changes on this model depend on eight parameters: the stressing rate, the amplitude of the stress perturbation, the physical constitutive properties of faults, the spatial parameters (location and radii of the cells), the start and duration of each of the temporal windows as well as the background seismicity rate. The background seismicity is obtained from the epidemic type aftershock sequence model. We use the 1992 Landers earthquake as a case study, using the Southern California Earthquake Data Centre (SCEDC) catalogue, to examine if Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model can forecast the aftershock seismicity rate. A systematic study is performed on a range of values on all the parameters to test the forecasting ability of this model. The results obtained suggest variable success in forecasting, when varying the values for the parameters, with the spatial and temporal parameters being the most sensitive. Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model is compared with a well studied null hypothesis, the Omori-Utsu law. This law describes the aftershock rate as a power law in time following the main shock and depends on only three parameters: the aftershock productivity, the elapsed time since the main shock and the constant time shift, all of which can be estimated in the early part of the aftershock sequence and then extrapolated to give a long term rate forecast. All parameters are estimated using maximum

  6. Nonlinear modeling on rate dependent ferroelectric and ferroelastic response of 1-3 piezocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayendiran, R.; Arockiarajan, A.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of loading rate on ferroelectric and ferroelastic behavior of 1-3 piezocomposites is presented in this work. Experiments are conducted for various loading rates under different loading conditions such as electrical and electromechanical to measure the rate dependent response of 1-3 piezocomposite compared with bulk piezoceramics. A thermodynamic based rate dependent domain switching criteria has been proposed to predict the ferroelectric and ferroelastic behavior of homogenized 1-3 piezocomposites. In this model, volume fraction of six distinct uni-axial variants are used as internal variables to describe the microscopic state of the material. Plasticity based kinematic hardening parameter is introduced as a function of internal variables to describe the grain boundary effects. Homogenization of 1-3 piezocomposite material properties are obtained by finite element (FE) resonator models using commercially available FE tool Abaqus. To evaluate the possible modes of vibration of 1-3 piezocomposite four different configuration of FE resonators are modeled. The FE resonator model is validated with the impedance spectra obtained experimentally for length extensional and thickness extensional resonator models. The predicted effective properties using the resonance based technique are incorporated in the proposed rate dependent macromechanical model to study the behavior of 1-3 piezocomposites. The simulated results are compared with the experimental observations.

  7. Unwinding and rewinding the nucleosome inner turn: force dependence of the kinetic rate constants.

    PubMed

    Mochrie, S G J; Mack, A H; Schlingman, D J; Collins, R; Kamenetska, M; Regan, L

    2013-01-01

    A simple model for the force-dependent unwinding and rewinding rates of the nucleosome inner turn is constructed and quantitatively compared to the results of recent measurements [A. H. Mack et al., J. Mol. Biol. 423, 687 (2012)]. First, a coarse-grained model for the histone-DNA free-energy landscape that incorporates both an elastic free-energy barrier and specific histone-DNA bonds is developed. Next, a theoretical expression for the rate of transitions across a piecewise linear free-energy landscape with multiple minima and maxima is presented. Then, the model free-energy landscape, approximated as a piecewise linear function, and the theoretical expression for the transition rates are combined to construct a model for the force-dependent unwinding and rewinding rates of the nucleosome inner turn. Least-mean-squares fitting of the model rates to the rates observed in recent experiments rates demonstrates that this model is able to well describe the force-dependent unwinding and rewinding rates of the nucleosome inner turn, observed in the recent experiments, except at the highest forces studied, where an additional ad hoc term is required to describe the data, which may be interpreted as an indication of an alternate high-force nucleosome disassembly pathway, that bypasses simple unwinding. The good agreement between the measurements and the model at lower forces demonstrates that both specific histone-DNA contacts and an elastic free-energy barrier play essential roles for nucleosome winding and unwinding, and quantifies their relative contributions.

  8. Unwinding and rewinding the nucleosome inner turn: Force dependence of the kinetic rate constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochrie, S. G. J.; Mack, A. H.; Schlingman, D. J.; Collins, R.; Kamenetska, M.; Regan, L.

    2013-01-01

    A simple model for the force-dependent unwinding and rewinding rates of the nucleosome inner turn is constructed and quantitatively compared to the results of recent measurements [A. H. Mack , J. Mol. Biol.JMOBAK0022-283610.1016/j.jmb.2012.08.021 423, 687 (2012)]. First, a coarse-grained model for the histone-DNA free-energy landscape that incorporates both an elastic free-energy barrier and specific histone-DNA bonds is developed. Next, a theoretical expression for the rate of transitions across a piecewise linear free-energy landscape with multiple minima and maxima is presented. Then, the model free-energy landscape, approximated as a piecewise linear function, and the theoretical expression for the transition rates are combined to construct a model for the force-dependent unwinding and rewinding rates of the nucleosome inner turn. Least-mean-squares fitting of the model rates to the rates observed in recent experiments rates demonstrates that this model is able to well describe the force-dependent unwinding and rewinding rates of the nucleosome inner turn, observed in the recent experiments, except at the highest forces studied, where an additional ad hoc term is required to describe the data, which may be interpreted as an indication of an alternate high-force nucleosome disassembly pathway, that bypasses simple unwinding. The good agreement between the measurements and the model at lower forces demonstrates that both specific histone-DNA contacts and an elastic free-energy barrier play essential roles for nucleosome winding and unwinding, and quantifies their relative contributions.

  9. Simulation of biochemical reactions with time-dependent rates by the rejection-based algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Thanh, Vo Hong; Priami, Corrado

    2015-08-07

    We address the problem of simulating biochemical reaction networks with time-dependent rates and propose a new algorithm based on our rejection-based stochastic simulation algorithm (RSSA) [Thanh et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141(13), 134116 (2014)]. The computation for selecting next reaction firings by our time-dependent RSSA (tRSSA) is computationally efficient. Furthermore, the generated trajectory is exact by exploiting the rejection-based mechanism. We benchmark tRSSA on different biological systems with varying forms of reaction rates to demonstrate its applicability and efficiency. We reveal that for nontrivial cases, the selection of reaction firings in existing algorithms introduces approximations because the integration of reaction rates is very computationally demanding and simplifying assumptions are introduced. The selection of the next reaction firing by our approach is easier while preserving the exactness.

  10. Implementation of Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Micromechanics Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2000-01-01

    A research program is in progress to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to impact loads. Previously, strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations developed to model the polymer matrix were implemented into a mechanics of materials based micromechanics method. In the current work, the computation of the effective inelastic strain in the micromechanics model was modified to fully incorporate the Poisson effect. The micromechanics equations were also combined with classical laminate theory to enable the analysis of symmetric multilayered laminates subject to in-plane loading. A quasi-incremental trapezoidal integration method was implemented to integrate the constitutive equations within the laminate theory. Verification studies were conducted using an AS4/PEEK composite using a variety of laminate configurations and strain rates. The predicted results compared well with experimentally obtained values.

  11. The effect of the site of laser zona opening on the complete hatching of mouse blastocysts and their cell numbers

    PubMed Central

    Sanmee, Usanee; Piromlertamorn, Waraporn

    2016-01-01

    Objective We studied the effect of the site of laser zona opening on the complete hatching of mouse blastocysts and the cell numbers of the completely hatched blastocysts. Methods Mouse blastocysts were randomly allocated to the inner cell mass (ICM) group (zona opening performed at the site of the ICM, n=125), the trophectoderm (TE) group (zona opening performed opposite to the ICM, n=125) and the control group (no zona opening, n=125). Results The rate of complete hatching of the blastocysts was not significantly different in the ICM and the TE group (84.8% vs 80.8%, respectively; p=0.402), but was significantly lower in the control group (51.2%, p<0.001). The cell numbers in the completely hatched blastocysts were comparable in the control group, the ICM group, and the TE group (69±19.3, 74±15.7, and 71±16.8, respectively; p=0.680). Conclusion These findings indicate that the site of laser zona opening did not influence the rate of complete hatching of mouse blastocysts or their cell numbers. PMID:27689037

  12. The systematic study of the stability of forecasts in the rate- and state-dependent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gaetano, D.; McCloskey, J.; Nalbant, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    Numerous observations have shown a general spatial correlation between positive Coulomb failure stress changes due to an earthquake and the locations of aftershocks. However this correlation does not give any indication of the rate from which we can infer the magnitude using the Gutenberg-Richter law. Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model can be used to obtain a forecast of the observed aftershock rate for the space and time evolution of seismicity caused by stress changes applied to an infinite population of nucleating patches. The seismicity rate changes on this model depend on eight parameters: the stressing rate, the amplitude of the stress perturbation, the physical constitutive properties of faults, the spatial parameters (location and radii of the cells), the start and duration of each of the temporal windows as well as the background seismicity rate. The background seismicity is declustered using the epidemic type aftershock sequence model. We use the 1992 Landers earthquake as a case study, using the Southern California Earthquake Data Centre (SCEDC) catalogue, to examine if Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model can forecast the aftershock seismicity rate. We perform a systematic study on a range of values on all the parameters to test the forecasting ability of this model. The results obtained suggest variable success in forecasting, when varying the values for the parameters, with the spatial and temporal parameters being the most sensitive. The Omori-Utsu law describes the aftershock rate as a power law in time following the main shock and depends on only three parameters: the aftershock productivity, the elapsed time since the main shock and the constant time shift, all of which can be estimated in the early part of the aftershock sequence and then extrapolated to give a long term rate forecast. All parameters are estimated using maximum likelihood methods. We compare the Dieterich and the Omori-Utsu forecasts using the Akaike information

  13. Astronaut Richard Gordon returns to hatch of spacecraft following EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., pilot for the Gemini 11 space flight, returns to the hatch of the spacecraft following extravehicular activity (EVA). This picture was taken over the Atlantic Ocean at approximately 160 nautical miles above the earth's surface.

  14. Interior below decks in fish hold looking forward. Fish hatch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior below decks in fish hold looking forward. Fish hatch opening is at upper left, ceiling planks and knees at center and right. - Purse Seiner SHENANDOAH, Gig Harbor Peninsula Historical Society and Museum, Gig Harbor, Pierce County, WA

  15. 52. Patent steering gear, hatch and steering compass binnacle, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Patent steering gear, hatch and steering compass binnacle, view from starboard looking aft. Photograph by Jet Lowe, April 1988. - Ship BALCLUTHA, 2905 Hyde Street Pier, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. 9. Mispillion Lighthouse, Tower Lantern Floor Hatch Mispillion Lighthouse, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Mispillion Lighthouse, Tower Lantern Floor Hatch - Mispillion Lighthouse, South bank of Mispillion River at its confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  17. 14. View inside Building 802, the "Escape Hatch" at the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View inside Building 802, the "Escape Hatch" at the rear of the "Sleeping Quarters", facing south. - Naval Air Station Fallon, 100-man Fallout Shelter, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  18. SOUTHWEST REAR, SHOWING CLOSED ENTRY HATCH, BUILDING 1934. Looking north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHWEST REAR, SHOWING CLOSED ENTRY HATCH, BUILDING 1934. Looking north - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Observation Bunker Types, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. BLDG 10, INTERIOR DETAIL OF WINDOW AND CEILING FEED HATCHES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG 10, INTERIOR DETAIL OF WINDOW AND CEILING FEED HATCHES - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Storage Building, Kolekole Road near Sixty-first Street intersection, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. Depth and rate dependent mechanical behaviors for articular cartilage: experiments and theoretical predictions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li-Lan; Zhang, Chun-Qiu; Gao, Hong; Liu, Zhi-Dong; Xiao, Peng-Peng

    2014-05-01

    An optimized digital image correlation (DIC) technique was applied to investigate the depth-dependent mechanical properties of articular cartilage and simultaneously the depth-dependent nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model of cartilage was proposed and validated. The creep tests were performed with different stress levels and it is found that the initial strain and instantaneous strain increase; however the creep compliance decreases with the increase of compressive stress. The depth-dependent creep strain of cartilage was obtained by analyzing the images acquired using the optimized DIC technique. Moreover the inhomogeneous creep compliance distributions within the tissues were determined at different creep time points. It is noted that both creep strain and creep compliance with different creep times decrease from cartilage surface to deep. The depth-dependent creep compliance increases with creep time and the increasing amplitude of creep compliance decreases along cartilage depth. The depth-dependent and stress rate dependent nonlinear stress and strain curves were obtained for articular cartilage through uniaxial compression tests. It is found that the Young's modulus of cartilage increases obviously along cartilage depth from superficial layer to deep layer and the Young's modulus of different layers for cartilage increases with the increase of stress rate. The Poisson's ratio of cartilage increases along cartilage depth with given compressive strain and the Poisson's ratio of different layers decreases with the increase of compressive strain. The depth-dependent nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model was proposed and some creep data were applied to determine the parameters of the model. The depth-dependent compressive behaviors of cartilage were predicted by the model and the results show that there are good agreements between the experimental data and predictions.

  1. Viscosity Dependence of Some Protein and Enzyme Reaction Rates: Seventy-Five Years after Kramers.

    PubMed

    Sashi, Pulikallu; Bhuyan, Abani K

    2015-07-28

    Kramers rate theory is a milestone in chemical reaction research, but concerns regarding the basic understanding of condensed phase reaction rates of large molecules in viscous milieu persist. Experimental studies of Kramers theory rely on scaling reaction rates with inverse solvent viscosity, which is often equated with the bulk friction coefficient based on simple hydrodynamic relations. Apart from the difficulty of abstraction of the prefactor details from experimental data, it is not clear why the linearity of rate versus inverse viscosity, k ∝ η(-1), deviates widely for many reactions studied. In most cases, the deviation simulates a power law k ∝ η(-n), where the exponent n assumes fractional values. In rate-viscosity studies presented here, results for two reactions, unfolding of cytochrome c and cysteine protease activity of human ribosomal protein S4, show an exceedingly overdamped rate over a wide viscosity range, registering n values up to 2.4. Although the origin of this extraordinary reaction friction is not known at present, the results indicate that the viscosity exponent need not be bound by the 0-1 limit as generally suggested. For the third reaction studied here, thermal dissociation of CO from nativelike cytochrome c, the rate-viscosity behavior can be explained using Grote-Hynes theory of time-dependent friction in conjunction with correlated motions intrinsic to the protein. Analysis of the glycerol viscosity-dependent rate for the CO dissociation reaction in the presence of urea as the second variable shows that the protein stabilizing effect of subdenaturing amounts of urea is not affected by the bulk viscosity. It appears that a myriad of factors as diverse as parameter uncertainty due to the difficulty of knowing the exact reaction friction and both mode and consequences of protein-solvent interaction work in a complex manner to convey as though Kramers rate equation is not absolute.

  2. On rate-dependent mechanical model for adaptive magnetorheological elastomer base isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yancheng; Li, Jianchun

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents research on the phenomenological model of an adaptive base isolator. The adaptive base isolator is made of field-dependent magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) which can alter its physical property under application of magnetic field. Experimental testing demonstrated that the developed MRE base isolator possesses an amazing ability to vary its stiffness under applied magnetic field. However, several challenges have been encountered when it comes modeling such novel device. For example, under a large deformation, the MRE base isolator exhibits a clear strain stiffening effect and this behavior escalates with the increasing of applied current. In addition, the MRE base isolator has also shown typical rate-dependent behavior. Following a review on mechanical models for viscos-elastic rubber devices, a novel rate-dependent model is proposed in this paper to capture the behavior of the new MRE base isolator. To develop a generalized model, the proposed model was evaluated using its performance under random displacement input and a seismic input. It shows that the proposed rate-dependent model can successfully describe the complex behavior of the device.

  3. DETAIL OF OPEN HATCH SHOWING INTERIOR OF MISSILE TUBE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF OPEN HATCH SHOWING INTERIOR OF MISSILE TUBE AND OPEN HATCH AND DOOR ON OPPOSITE SIDE OF TUBE (AT THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB). VIEW FACING WEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Production traits of artificially and naturally hatched geese in intensive and free-range systems: I. Growth traits.

    PubMed

    Boz, M A; Sarica, M; Yamak, U S

    2017-04-01

    1. This study investigated the effect of incubation type and production system on geese growth traits. 2. A total of 216 geese were either naturally (114) or artificially (102) hatched and reared in intensive or free-range production systems (4 replicates each) until 18 weeks of age. 3. Weights of naturally hatched goslings (NHG) were significantly higher than artificially hatched goslings (AHG) at 2 weeks (644 vs. 536 g); however, weights of AHG were significantly higher than NHG at both 6 weeks (3245 vs. 3010 g) and 18 weeks (5212 vs. 4353 g). 4. AHG had better feed conversion ratios (FCRs) than NHG (6.21 vs. 6.46 at 18 weeks). Feed consumption of naturally hatched geese was found higher in first 4 weeks when compared to artificially hatched geese and artificially hatched geese consumed more feed than naturally hatched geese after 8 weeks. 5. Production system had insignificant effects on feed consumption, FCRs, viability and mutilation rates. 6. Slipped wings were more frequent in NHG than AHG (8.32% vs. 1.68% at 6 weeks; 23.84% vs. 5.12% between 7 and 18 weeks) and in free-range production when compared to intensive production (17.88% vs. 11.08% over the course of the production period). 7. The study results indicate that both artificially and NHG can be reared in free-range production systems without any loss in performance and in deference to animal welfare.

  5. Rate- and state-dependent seismicity during fluid injection in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Friedemann

    2015-04-01

    Dieterich (1994) developed a theoretical frame of seismicity evolution due to stress changes in a medium based on rate- and state-theory of frictional fault motion. The theory assumes a volume density of seismic faults with a specific initial slip velocity distribution upon which the stress changes act. Each fault then follows the rate- and state-dependent frictional law where instabilities develop not as Coulomb failure. The evolution is expressed in the form of a differential equation, which can be used for aftershock generation after a shear stress change caused by a main shock but equally well for normal stress changes on faults caused by fluid pressure changes resulting from injection. For a constant injection rate the seismic activity increases at a given distance from the injection point once the pressure exceeds a threshold value. If the pressure rate is high enough the seismic activity becomes proportional to the local pressure rate in accordance with criticality theory of Shapiro (2002). Once the rate drops the seismicity reduced to lower levels. Shut off and variable injection rates must be evaluated numerically but lead to results comparable to the criticality theory. The presentation outlines the physical concept of the rate- and state-approach in comparison to the criticality approach and shows the main analytic and numerical results.

  6. Spreading rate dependence of three-dimensional structure in oceanic spreading centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, E. M.; Morgant, Jason Phipps

    1990-11-01

    SEGMENTATION by transform faults and other types of along-axis discontinuity1 is a well described but poorly explained characteristic of oceanic spreading centres. Here we use numerical experiments to explore the dynamics of mantle flow and melting beneath a mid-ocean ridge. Buoyant upwelling, driven by compositional density variations resulting from the extraction of the melt that forms the ocean crust, exhibits a spreading-rate-dependent transition between two-dimensional and three-dimensional upwelling structures. For low spreading rates and mantle viscosities an initial two-dimensional structure transforms into a three-dimensional one; at high spreading rates, an initially two-dimensional structure remains two-dimensional. These results suggest that the origin of spreading-centre segmentation may be different at fast and slow spreading rates.

  7. A numerical investigation of oxygen concentration dependence on biodegradation rate laws in vapor intrusion.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Shen, Rui; Pennel, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric M

    2013-12-01

    In subsurface vapor intrusion, aerobic biodegradation has been considered as a major environmental factor that determines the soil gas concentration attenuation factors for contaminants such as petroleum hydrocarbons. The site investigation has shown that oxygen can play an important role in this biodegradation rate, and this paper explores the influence of oxygen concentration on biodegradation reactions included in vapor intrusion (VI) models. Two different three dimensional (3-D) numerical models of vapor intrusion were explored for their sensitivity to the form of the biodegradation rate law. A second order biodegradation rate law, explicitly including oxygen concentration dependence, was introduced into one model. The results indicate that the aerobic/anoxic interface depth is determined by the ratio of contaminant source vapor to atmospheric oxygen concentration, and that the contaminant concentration profile in the aerobic zone was significantly influenced by the choice of rate law.

  8. Sleep Stage Dependence of Invariance Characteristics in Fluctuations of Healthy Human Heart Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togo, Fumiharu; Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2005-08-01

    The outstanding feature of healthy human heart rate is the robust scale invariance in the non-Gaussian probability density function (PDF), which is preserved not only in a quiescent condition, but also in a dynamic state during waking hours [K. Kiyono et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004)]. Together with 1/f like scaling, this characteristic is a strong indication of far-from-equilibrium, critical-like dynamics of heart rate regulation. Our results suggest that healthy human heart rate departs from a critical state-like operation during sleeping hours, at a rate which is heterogeneous with respect to sleep stages annotated according to traditional techniques. We study specific contributions of sleep stages to the relative departure from criticality through the analysis of sleep stage dependence of the root mean square of multiscale local energy and the multiscale PDF. There is a possibility that the involvement of cortical activity may be important for a critical state-like operation.

  9. A numerical investigation of oxygen concentration dependence on biodegradation rate laws in vapor intrusion

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yijun; Shen, Rui; Pennel, Kelly G.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    In subsurface vapor intrusion, aerobic biodegradation has been considered as a major environmental factor that determines the soil gas concentration attenuation factors for contaminants such as petroleum hydrocarbons. The site investigation showed that oxygen could play an important role in this biodegradation rate, and this paper explores the influence of oxygen concentration in biodegradation reactions included in vapor intrusion (VI) models. Two different three dimensional (3-D) numerical models of vapor intrusion were explored for their sensitivity to the form of the biodegradation rate law. A second order biodegradation rate law, explicitly including oxygen concentration dependence, was introduced into one model. The results indicate that the aerobic/anoxic interface depth is determined by the ratio of contaminant source vapor to atmospheric oxygen concentration, and that the contaminant concentration profile in the aerobic zone was significantly influenced by the choice of rate law. PMID:24197079

  10. Integrated rate-dependent and dual pathway AV nodal functions: principles and assessment framework.

    PubMed

    Billette, Jacques; Tadros, Rafik

    2014-01-15

    The atrioventricular (AV) node conducts slowly and has a long refractory period. These features sustain the filtering of atrial impulses and hence are often modulated to optimize ventricular rate during supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. The AV node is also the site of a clinically common reentrant arrhythmia. Its function is assessed for a variety of purposes from its responses to a premature protocol (S1S2, test beats introduced at different cycle lengths) repeatedly performed at different basic rates and/or to an incremental pacing protocol (increasingly faster rates). Puzzlingly, resulting data and interpretation differ with protocols as well as with chosen recovery and refractory indexes, and are further complicated by the presence of built-in fast and slow pathways. This problem applies to endocavitary investigations of arrhythmias as well as to many experimental functional studies. This review supports an integrated framework of rate-dependent and dual pathway AV nodal function that can account for these puzzling characteristics. The framework was established from AV nodal responses to S1S2S3 protocols that, compared with standard S1S2 protocols, allow for an orderly quantitative dissociation of the different factors involved in changes in AV nodal conduction and refractory indexes under rate-dependent and dual pathway function. Although largely based on data from experimental studies, the proposed framework may well apply to the human AV node. In conclusion, the rate-dependent and dual pathway properties of the AV node can be integrated within a common functional framework the contribution of which to individual responses can be quantitatively determined with properly designed protocols and analytic tools.

  11. An accurate analytic representation of the temperature dependence of nonresonant nuclear reaction rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2016-12-01

    There has been intense interest for several decades by different research groups to accurately model the temperature dependence of a large number of nuclear reaction rate coefficients for both light and heavy nuclides. The rate coefficient, k(T) , is given by the Maxwellian average of the reactive cross section expressed in terms of the astrophysical factor, S(E) , which for nonresonant reactions is generally written as a power series in the relative energy E. A computationally efficient algorithm for the temperature dependence of nuclear reaction rate coefficients is required for fusion reactor research and for models of nucleosynthesis and stellar evolution. In this paper, an accurate analytical expression for the temperature dependence of nuclear reaction rate coefficients is provided in terms of τ = 3(b / 2) 2/3 or equivalently, T - 1/3 , where b = B /√{kB T }, B is the Gamow factor and kB is the Boltzmann constant. The methodology is appropriate for all nonresonant nuclear reactions for which S(E) can be represented as a power series in E. The explicit expression for the rate coefficient versus temperature is derived with the asymptotic expansions of the moments of w(E) = exp(- E /kB T - B /√{ E }) in terms of τ. The zeroth order moment is the familiar Gaussian approximation to the rate coefficient. Results are reported for the representative reactions D(d, p)T, D(d, n)3He and 7Li(p, α) α and compared with several different fitting procedures reported in the literature.

  12. Early post-hatching starvation delays p70 S6 kinase activation in the muscle of neonatal chicks.

    PubMed

    Bigot, Karine; Taouis, Mohammed; Picard, Michel; Tesseraud, Sophie

    2003-12-01

    Chicken muscle ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1) has been recently characterised and its enzymic activity is regulated by the nutritional and hormonal (insulin) status in vivo. The regulation of S6K1 is still unknown in neonatal chicks. The present study aimed to compare the activation of S6K1 in early-feeding (EF) and 48 h-delayed-feeding (DF) chicks from hatching to 4 d of age. During post-hatching starvation, S6K1 activity remained at the basal level measured in the control-hatched chicks. The maximum S6K1 activity was recorded on the first day of feeding with an increase of about 2.5-fold in the EF and DF chicks (P<0.01). S6K1 activity was correlated with plasma insulin level, suggesting a probable insulin-dependent S6K1 activation. The feeding-induced increase in S6K1 activity was related to its Thr389 residue phosphorylation. A similar pattern for protein kinase B phosphorylation was observed, upstream from S6K1. The S6K1 pathway was stimulated to the same extent in the EF and DF chicks, which indicates that post-hatching starvation did not increase S6K1 activation. It is concluded that muscle S6K1 is activated as soon as food is available without improvement in the response of the S6K1 pathway after post-hatching starvation.

  13. Does lighting manipulation during incubation affect hatching rhythms and early development of sole?

    PubMed

    Blanco-Vives, B; Aliaga-Guerrero, M; Cañavate, J P; Muñoz-Cueto, J A; Sánchez-Vázquez, F J

    2011-05-01

    Light plays a key role in the development of biological rhythms in fish. Previous research on Senegal sole has revealed that both spawning rhythms and larval development are strongly influenced by lighting conditions. However, hatching rhythms and the effect of light during incubation are as yet unexplored. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the light spectrum and photoperiod on Solea senegalensis eggs and larvae until day 7 post hatching (dph). To this end, eggs were collected immediately after spawning during the night and exposed to continuous light (LL), continuous darkness (DD), or light-dark (LD) 12L:12D cycles of white light (LD(W)), blue light (LD(B); λ(peak) = 463 nm), or red light (LD(R); λ(peak) = 685 nm). Eggs exposed to LD(B) had the highest hatching rate (94.5% ± 1.9%), whereas LD(R) and DD showed the lowest hatching rate (54.4% ± 3.9% and 48.4% ± 4.2%, respectively). Under LD conditions, the hatching rhythm peaked by the end of the dark phase, but was advanced in LD(B) (zeitgeber time 8 [ZT8]; ZT0 representing the onset of darkness) in relation to LD(W) and LD(R) (ZT11). Under DD conditions, the same rhythm persisted, although with lower amplitude, whereas under LL the hatching rhythm split into two peaks (ZT8 and ZT13). From dph 4 onwards, larvae under LD(B) showed the best growth and quickest development (advanced eye pigmentation, mouth opening, and pectoral fins), whereas larvae under LD(R) and DD had the poorest performance. These results reveal that developmental rhythms at the egg stage are tightly controlled by light characteristics, underlining the importance of reproducing their natural underwater photoenvironment (LD cycles of blue wavelengths) during incubation and early larvae development of fish.

  14. The rate dependence of the saturation flow stress of Cu and 1100 Al

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, D.L.; Tonks, D.L.; Wallace, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The strain-rate dependence of the saturation flow stress of OFHC Cu and 1100 Al from 10{sup {minus}3}s{sup {minus}1} to nearly to 10{sup 12}s{sup {minus}1} is examined. The flow stress above 10{sup 9}s{sup {minus}1} is estimated using Wallace's theory of overdriven shocks in metals. A transition to the power-law behavior {Psi} {approximately} {tau}{sub s}{sup 5} occurs at a strain rate of order 10{sup 5}s{sup {minus}1}. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Monitoring of ultraviolet pulse rate dependent photomechanical actuation in carbon nanotubes using fiber Bragg gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Shivananju, B. N.; Suri, Ashish; Asokan, S.; Misra, Abha

    2014-01-06

    In this Letter, we present a non-contact method of controlling and monitoring photomechanical actuation in carbon nanotubes (CNT) by exposing it to ultra-violet radiation at different pulse rates (10 to 200 Hz). This is accomplished by imparting a reversible photo induced strain (5–330 με) on CNT coated fibre Bragg gratings; CNT undergoes an internal reversible structural change due to cyclic photon absorption that leads to the development of mechanical strain, which in turn allows reversible switching of the Bragg wavelength. The results also reveal an interesting pulse rate dependent rise and fall times of photomechanical actuation in CNT.

  16. Invasion rate of deer ked depends on spatiotemporal variation in host density.

    PubMed

    Meier, C M; Bonte, D; Kaitala, A; Ovaskainen, O

    2014-06-01

    Invasive parasites are of great global concern. Understanding the factors influencing the spread of invading pest species is a first step in developing effective countermeasures. Growing empirical evidence suggests that spread rates are essentially influenced by spatiotemporal dynamics of host-parasite interactions, yet approaches modelling spread rate have typically assumed static environmental conditions. We analysed invasion history of the deer ked (Lipoptena cervi) in Finland with a diffusion-reaction model, which assumed either the movement rate, the population growth rate, or both rates may depend on spatial and temporal distribution of moose (Alces alces), the main host of deer ked. We fitted the model to the data in a Bayesian framework, and used the Bayesian information criterion to show that accounting for the variation in local moose density improved the model's ability to describe the pattern of the invasion. The highest ranked model predicted higher movement rate and growth rate of deer ked with increasing moose density. Our results suggest that the historic increase in host density has facilitated the spread of the deer ked. Our approach illustrates how information about the ecology of an invasive species can be extracted from the spatial pattern of spread even with rather limited data.

  17. Striatal Input- and Rate-Dependent Effects of Muscarinic Receptors on Pallidal Firing

    PubMed Central

    Querejeta, Enrique; Alatorre, Alberto; Ríos, Alain; Barrientos, Rafael; Oviedo-Chávez, Aldo; Bobadilla-Lugo, Rosa Amalia; Delgado, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    The globus pallidus (GP) plays a key role in the overall basal ganglia (BG) activity. Despite evidence of cholinergic inputs to GP, their role in the spiking activity of GP neurons has not received attention. We examine the effect of local activation and blockade of muscarinic receptors (MRs) in the spontaneous firing of GP neurons both in normal and ipsilateral striatum-lesioned rats. We found that activation of MRs produces heterogeneous responses in both normal and ipsilateral striatum-lesioned rats: in normal rats the response evoked by MRs depends on the predrug basal firing rate; the inhibition evoked by MRs is higher in normal rats than in striatum-lesioned rats; the number of neurons that undergo inhibition is lower in striatum-lesioned rats than in normal rats. Our data suggest that modulation of MRs in the GP depends on the firing rate before their activation and on the integrity of the striato-pallidal pathway. PMID:22654627

  18. Temperature dependence of metabolic rates for microbial growth, maintenance, and survival

    PubMed Central

    Price, P. Buford; Sowers, Todd

    2004-01-01

    Our work was motivated by discoveries of prokaryotic communities that survive with little nutrient in ice and permafrost, with implications for past or present microbial life in Martian permafrost and Europan ice. We compared the temperature dependence of metabolic rates of microbial communities in permafrost, ice, snow, clouds, oceans, lakes, marine and freshwater sediments, and subsurface aquifer sediments. Metabolic rates per cell fall into three groupings: (i) a rate, μg(T), for growth, measured in the laboratory at in situ temperatures with minimal disturbance of the medium; (ii) a rate, μm(T), sufficient for maintenance of functions but for a nutrient level too low for growth; and (iii) a rate, μs(T), for survival of communities imprisoned in deep glacial ice, subsurface sediment, or ocean sediment, in which they can repair macromolecular damage but are probably largely dormant. The three groups have metabolic rates consistent with a single activation energy of ≈110 kJ and that scale as μg(T):μm(T):μs(T) ≈ 106:103:1. There is no evidence of a minimum temperature for metabolism. The rate at -40°C in ice corresponds to ≈10 turnovers of cellular carbon per billion years. Microbes in ice and permafrost have metabolic rates similar to those in water, soil, and sediment at the same temperature. This finding supports the view that, far below the freezing point, liquid water inside ice and permafrost is available for metabolism. The rate μs(T) for repairing molecular damage by means of DNA-repair enzymes and protein-repair enzymes such as methyltransferase is found to be comparable to the rate of spontaneous molecular damage. PMID:15070769

  19. Optimal Control of Markov Processes with Age-Dependent Transition Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Mrinal K. Saha, Subhamay

    2012-10-15

    We study optimal control of Markov processes with age-dependent transition rates. The control policy is chosen continuously over time based on the state of the process and its age. We study infinite horizon discounted cost and infinite horizon average cost problems. Our approach is via the construction of an equivalent semi-Markov decision process. We characterise the value function and optimal controls for both discounted and average cost cases.

  20. Strain-Rate Dependency of Strength of Soft Marine Deposits of the Gulf of Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    abstract number: 090612-057 Strain-rate dependency of strength of soft marine deposits of the Gulf of Mexico Andrei Abelev and Philip Valent...from the Gulf of Mexico . The vane test may not always be the most accurate method of describing the undrained shear strength, mainly because it...deposits of the Gulf of Mexico 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  1. Energetic Effects of Pre-hatch Albumen Removal on Embryonic Development and Early Ontogeny in Gallus gallus.

    PubMed

    Peña-Villalobos, Isaac; Piriz, Gabriela; Palma, Verónica; Sabat, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the yolk and albumen content in bird eggs, and the effects of variations in their relative loads in the phenotype of the birds, have revealed multiple consequences at different levels of biological organization, from biochemical traits to behavior. However, little is known about the effect of albumen variation on energetics performance during development and early ontogeny, despite the fact that variation in energy expenditure may have consequences in terms of fitness for both feral and domestic species. In this work, we evaluated experimentally whether variations in the content of albumen of Gallus gallus eggs could generate differences in metabolic rates during embryonic development. Additionally, we assessed changes in the activity of mitochondrial enzymes (cytochrome c oxidase and citrate synthase) in skeletal muscles and liver. Finally, we evaluated the success of hatching of these embryos and their metabolic rates (MR) post-hatching. The results revealed a significant reduction in MR in the last fifth of embryonic life, and reduced catabolic activities in the skeletal muscle of chicks hatched from albumen-removed eggs. However, the same group demonstrated an increase in catabolic activity in the liver, suggesting the existence of changes in energy allocation between tissues. Besides, we found a decrease in hatching success in the albumen-removed group, suggesting a negative effect of the lower albumen content on eggs, possibly due to lower catabolic activities in skeletal muscle. We also found a compensatory phenomenon in the first week after hatching, i.e., birds from albumen-removed eggs did not show a decrease in MR either at thermoneutral temperatures or at 10°C, compared to the control group. Collectively, our data suggest that a reduction in albumen may generate a trade-off between tissue metabolic activities, and may explain the differences in metabolic rates and hatching success, supporting the immediate adaptive response (IAR) hypothesis.

  2. Energetic Effects of Pre-hatch Albumen Removal on Embryonic Development and Early Ontogeny in Gallus gallus

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Villalobos, Isaac; Piriz, Gabriela; Palma, Verónica; Sabat, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the yolk and albumen content in bird eggs, and the effects of variations in their relative loads in the phenotype of the birds, have revealed multiple consequences at different levels of biological organization, from biochemical traits to behavior. However, little is known about the effect of albumen variation on energetics performance during development and early ontogeny, despite the fact that variation in energy expenditure may have consequences in terms of fitness for both feral and domestic species. In this work, we evaluated experimentally whether variations in the content of albumen of Gallus gallus eggs could generate differences in metabolic rates during embryonic development. Additionally, we assessed changes in the activity of mitochondrial enzymes (cytochrome c oxidase and citrate synthase) in skeletal muscles and liver. Finally, we evaluated the success of hatching of these embryos and their metabolic rates (MR) post-hatching. The results revealed a significant reduction in MR in the last fifth of embryonic life, and reduced catabolic activities in the skeletal muscle of chicks hatched from albumen-removed eggs. However, the same group demonstrated an increase in catabolic activity in the liver, suggesting the existence of changes in energy allocation between tissues. Besides, we found a decrease in hatching success in the albumen-removed group, suggesting a negative effect of the lower albumen content on eggs, possibly due to lower catabolic activities in skeletal muscle. We also found a compensatory phenomenon in the first week after hatching, i.e., birds from albumen-removed eggs did not show a decrease in MR either at thermoneutral temperatures or at 10°C, compared to the control group. Collectively, our data suggest that a reduction in albumen may generate a trade-off between tissue metabolic activities, and may explain the differences in metabolic rates and hatching success, supporting the immediate adaptive response (IAR) hypothesis

  3. Valuation of stochastic interest rate securities with time-dependent variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarroel, Javier

    2006-11-01

    We consider the problem of how to prize general securities whose payoff at maturity only depends on the interest rate rT at the time of exercise, where rt is supposed to be a stochastic Feller process. We show how to generalize the results of Cox et al. [Econometrica 53 (2) (1985) 385] regarding bond valuation to a situation where the stochastic evolution of rt under the martingale probability involves time-dependent coefficients and the payoff is arbitrary. The solution to this problem is given in terms of the propagator for the heat operator with a potential. This propagator is constructed in terms of a classical harmonic oscillator with time-dependent frequency.

  4. On rate-dependent polycrystal deformation: the temperature sensitivity of cold dwell fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Cuddihy, M. A.; Dunne, F. P. E.

    2015-01-01

    A temperature and rate-dependent crystal plasticity framework has been used to examine the temperature sensitivity of stress relaxation, creep and load shedding in model Ti-6Al polycrystal behaviour under dwell fatigue conditions. A temperature close to 120°C is found to lead to the strongest stress redistribution and load shedding, resulting from the coupling between crystallographic slip rate and slip system dislocation hardening. For temperatures in excess of about 230°C, grain-level load shedding from soft to hard grains diminishes because of the more rapid stress relaxation, leading ultimately to the diminution of the load shedding and hence, it is argued, the elimination of the dwell debit. Under conditions of cyclic stress dwell, at temperatures between 20°C and 230°C for which load shedding occurs, the rate-dependent accumulation of local slip by ratcheting is shown to lead to the progressive cycle-by-cycle redistribution of stress from soft to hard grains. This phenomenon is termed cyclic load shedding since it also depends on the material's creep response, but develops over and above the well-known dwell load shedding, thus providing an additional rationale for the incubation of facet nucleation. PMID:26528078

  5. Spawning Characteristics and Artificial Hatching of Female Mottled Skate, Beringraja pulchra in the West Coast of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee-Woong; Jo, Yeong-Rok; Kang, Duk-Yong; Jeong, Gyeong-Suk; Jo, Hyun-Su

    2013-01-01

    The gonadsomatic index (GSI) of mottled skate was the highest in April, GSI and HSI showed a reverse phase for its reproductive cycle. The fish had one pair of egg capsules, having 1 to 7 fertilized eggs, and spawned all the year round. When surveying the reproductive characteristics of females over 63 ㎝ in disc width, we found the spawning peak was between April to June, and the appearance ratio of egg capsules was the highest in May (32.1%). The eggs were hatched at 8°C, 13°C, 18°C, water temperature (12.8 to 24.2°C), and the best hatching temperature was 18°C. The number of fish hatched was 4 to 5 fish/egg capsules, and the hatching rate was 100%. The sex ratios of hatching larvae were 45.5% female and 54.5% male. Therefore this study will provide fundamental data and information for artificial reproduction of the mottled skate. PMID:25949140

  6. Dose-rate dependent effects of ionizing radiation on vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Suvorava, T; Luksha, L; Bulanova, K Ya; Lobanok, L M

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the dose-rate dependent effects of ionising radiation on endothelium- and NO-mediated reactivity of aorta and coronary vessels. Rats were exposed to acute ((137)Cs, 9 x 10(-4) Gy s(-1), 18 min) and chronic ((137)Cs, 2.8 x 10(-7) Gy s(-1), 41 days) radiation in 1 Gy dose. Acute irradiation transiently increased coronary flow in eNOS-activity-dependent manner on day 3 after exposure. In striking contrast, chronic irradiation caused a significant depression of coronary flow even on day 90 after irradiation and abolished the effects of NO-synthase inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10 micromol l(-1)). Furthermore, low intensity radiation strongly diminished the vasodilator properties of NO-donor sodium nitroprusside (5 micromol l(-1)). A similar pattern was observed in aortic rings. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was increased on days 3 and 10 after acute irradiation, but strongly inhibited following chronic exposure for the entire post-radiation period. This was accompanied by a diminished vasodilator response to NO-donor on days 3, 10 and 30 of post-radiation but not on day 90. The data suggest that ionising radiation in 1 Gy induces changes of aortic and coronary vessels reactivity depending on the dose-rate and the interval after exposure.

  7. ANALYTICAL THEORY FOR THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION. III. TIME DEPENDENCE AND STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Hennebelle, Patrick

    2013-06-20

    The present paper extends our previous theory of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) by including time dependence and by including the impact of the magnetic field. The predicted mass spectra are similar to the time-independent ones with slightly shallower slopes at large masses and peak locations shifted toward smaller masses by a factor of a few. Assuming that star-forming clumps follow Larson-type relations, we obtain core mass functions in good agreement with the observationally derived IMF, in particular, when taking into account the thermodynamics of the gas. The time-dependent theory directly yields an analytical expression for the star formation rate (SFR) at cloud scales. The SFR values agree well with the observational determinations of various Galactic molecular clouds. Furthermore, we show that the SFR does not simply depend linearly on density, as is sometimes claimed in the literature, but also depends strongly on the clump mass/size, which yields the observed scatter. We stress, however, that any SFR theory depends, explicitly or implicitly, on very uncertain assumptions like clump boundaries or the mass of the most massive stars that can form in a given clump, making the final determinations uncertain by a factor of a few. Finally, we derive a fully time dependent model for the IMF by considering a clump, or a distribution of clumps accreting at a constant rate and thus whose physical properties evolve with time. In spite of its simplicity, this model reproduces reasonably well various features observed in numerical simulations of converging flows. Based on this general theory, we present a paradigm for star formation and the IMF.

  8. The effects of temperature change on the hatching success and larval survival of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu.

    PubMed

    Landsman, S J; Gingerich, A J; Philipp, D P; Suski, C D

    2011-04-01

    In this study, the effects of abrupt temperature change on the hatching success and larval survival of eggs, yolk-sac larvae (YSL) and larvae above nest (LAN), for both largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu were quantified. Temperature had a significant effect on hatching success and time to 50% mortality, with large heat shocks causing accelerated mortality. The temperature changes shown to influence survival of all life stages, however, were beyond what is typically experienced in the wild. Micropterus salmoides had greater egg hatching success rates and increased survival rates at YSL and LAN stages, relative to M. dolomieu. Additionally, egg hatching success and survival of LAN varied across nests within the study. These findings suggest that temperature alone may not account for variations in year-class strength and may emphasize the need for protection of the nest-guarding male Micropterus spp. to ensure recruitment.

  9. Influence of Temperature on Multiplication and Egg Hatching of Longidorus africanus

    PubMed Central

    Ploeg, Antoon T.

    1999-01-01

    Longidorus africanus multiplication on tomato was highest at 29 °C. Few nematodes were recovered after 6 weeks at soil temperatures of 35 °C or below 23 °C. The time to egg hatching was shortest and the percentage of eggs hatching was highest at 29 °C. The minimum temperature and the heat sum above this temperature required for egg development were calculated to be 14.3 °C and 94.08 degree-days, respectively. The thermal times required for egg development by L. africanus and L. elongatus were nearly identical. For both species the product of the base temperature and the heat sum was near constant, and at a temperature of 22.3 °C the rates of egg development were equal. PMID:19270878

  10. 9 CFR 82.9 - Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interstate movement of hatching eggs... Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area. Hatching eggs from birds or poultry not known...) The hatching eggs are accompanied by a permit obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (b) Copies of...

  11. 9 CFR 82.9 - Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interstate movement of hatching eggs... Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area. Hatching eggs from birds or poultry not known...) The hatching eggs are accompanied by a permit obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (b) Copies of...

  12. 9 CFR 82.9 - Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interstate movement of hatching eggs... Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area. Hatching eggs from birds or poultry not known...) The hatching eggs are accompanied by a permit obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (b) Copies of...

  13. 9 CFR 82.9 - Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interstate movement of hatching eggs... Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area. Hatching eggs from birds or poultry not known...) The hatching eggs are accompanied by a permit obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (b) Copies of...

  14. Nonlinearity and Strain-Rate Dependence in the Deformation Response of Polymer Matrix Composites Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2000-01-01

    There has been no accurate procedure for modeling the high-speed impact of composite materials, but such an analytical capability will be required in designing reliable lightweight engine-containment systems. The majority of the models in use assume a linear elastic material response that does not vary with strain rate. However, for containment systems, polymer matrix composites incorporating ductile polymers are likely to be used. For such a material, the deformation response is likely to be nonlinear and to vary with strain rate. An analytical model has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field that incorporates both of these features. A set of constitutive equations that was originally developed to analyze the viscoplastic deformation of metals (Ramaswamy-Stouffer equations) was modified to simulate the nonlinear, rate-dependent deformation of polymers. Specifically, the effects of hydrostatic stresses on the inelastic response, which can be significant in polymers, were accounted for by a modification of the definition of the effective stress. The constitutive equations were then incorporated into a composite micromechanics model based on the mechanics of materials theory. This theory predicts the deformation response of a composite material from the properties and behavior of the individual constituents. In this manner, the nonlinear, rate-dependent deformation response of a polymer matrix composite can be predicted.

  15. Temperature-Dependent Rate Coefficients for the Reaction of CH2OO with Hydrogen Sulfide.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mica C; Chao, Wen; Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S; Takahashi, Kaito; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2017-02-09

    The reaction of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO with hydrogen sulfide was measured with transient UV absorption spectroscopy in a temperature-controlled flow reactor, and bimolecular rate coefficients were obtained from 278 to 318 K and from 100 to 500 Torr. The average rate coefficient at 298 K and 100 Torr was (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10(-13) cm(3) s(-1). The reaction was found to be independent of pressure and exhibited a weak negative temperature dependence. Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations of the temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficient at the QCISD(T)/CBS level are in reasonable agreement with the experiment. The reaction of CH2OO with H2S is 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than the reaction with H2O monomer. Though rates of CH2OO scavenging by water vapor under atmospheric conditions are primarily controlled by the reaction with water dimer, the H2S loss pathway will be dominated by the reaction with monomer. The agreement between experiment and theory for the CH2OO + H2S reaction lends credence to theoretical descriptions of other Criegee intermediate reactions that cannot easily be probed experimentally.

  16. The Effects of High-Amplitude Impulsive Noise on Hatching Success: A reanalysis of the Sooty Tern Incident

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    test whether impulsive noise could cause mass hatching failures. We exposed 20 chicken (GaR!uM gaNlu.)O And 20 A(OR cSmix) eggs to explosions of four...longitudinal cracks that had been reported on Dry Tortugas. We also exposed fertile chicken (13) and quail (8) eggs to five similar impulses and...compared hatch rates with those of matched controls. The chicken eggs were exposed on Day 2 of incubation, the most sensitive phase of development; the

  17. MAGNETIC BRAKING FORMULATION FOR SUN-LIKE STARS: DEPENDENCE ON DIPOLE FIELD STRENGTH AND ROTATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Matt, Sean P.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Greene, Thomas P. E-mail: kmac@ucar.edu E-mail: thomas.p.greene@nasa.gov

    2012-08-01

    We use two-dimensional axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations to compute steady-state solutions for solar-like stellar winds from rotating stars with dipolar magnetic fields. Our parameter study includes 50 simulations covering a wide range of relative magnetic field strengths and rotation rates, extending from the slow- and approaching the fast-magnetic-rotator regimes. Using the simulations to compute the angular momentum loss, we derive a semi-analytic formulation for the external torque on the star that fits all of the simulations to a precision of a few percent. This formula provides a simple method for computing the magnetic braking of Sun-like stars due to magnetized stellar winds, which properly includes the dependence on the strength of the magnetic field, mass loss rate, stellar radius, surface gravity, and spin rate, and which is valid for both slow and fast rotators.

  18. Rate dependency of beta-adrenergic modulation of repolarizing currents in the guinea-pig ventricle.

    PubMed

    Rocchetti, M; Freli, V; Perego, V; Altomare, C; Mostacciuolo, G; Zaza, A

    2006-07-01

    Beta-adrenergic stimulation modulates ventricular currents and sinus cycle length (CL). We investigated how changes in CL affect the current induced by isoprenaline (Iso) during the action potential (AP) of guinea-pig ventricular myocytes. Action-potential clamp was applied at CLs of 250 and 1000 ms to measure: (1) the net current induced by 0.1 microm Iso (I(Iso)); (2) the L-type Ca2+ current I(CaL) and slow delayed rectifier current I(Ks) components of I(Iso) (I(IsoCa) and I(IsoK)), identified as the Iso-induced current sensitive to nifedipine and HMR1556, respectively; and (3) I(Iso) persisting after inhibition of both I(Ca) and I(Ks) (I(isoR)). The pause dependency of I(Ks) and its modulation were evaluated in voltage-clamp experiments. The rate dependency of the duration of the action potential at 90% repolarization (APD90) and its modulation by isoprenaline were tested in current-clamp experiments. At a CL of 250 ms I(Iso) was inward during initial repolarization and reversed at 59% of APD90. At a CL of 1000 ms I(Iso) became mostly inward in all cells. Switching to shorter CL did not change I(IsoCa) and I(IsoK) amplitudes, but moved their peak amplitudes to earlier repolarization; I(IsoR) was independent of CL. Acceleration of I(IsoK) at shorter CL was based on faster pause dependency of I(Ks) activation rate. The 'restitution' of activation rates was modulated by isoprenaline. The APD90-CL relation was rotated anticlockwise by isoprenaline and crossed the control curve at a CL of 150 ms (400 beats min(-1)). We conclude that: (1) isoprenaline induced markedly different current profiles according to pacing rate, involving CL-dependent I(Ca) and I(Ks) modulation; (2) the effect of isoprenaline on APD90 was CL dependent, and negligible during tachycardia; and (3) during sympathetic activation, repolarization stability may involve matched modulation of sinus rate and repolarizing currents.

  19. STRONG DEPENDENCE OF THE INNER EDGE OF THE HABITABLE ZONE ON PLANETARY ROTATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jun; Abbot, Dorian S.; Boué, Gwenaël; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-05-20

    Planetary rotation rate is a key parameter in determining atmospheric circulation and hence the spatial pattern of clouds. Since clouds can exert a dominant control on planetary radiation balance, rotation rate could be critical for determining the mean planetary climate. Here we investigate this idea using a three-dimensional general circulation model with a sophisticated cloud scheme. We find that slowly rotating planets (like Venus) can maintain an Earth-like climate at nearly twice the stellar flux as rapidly rotating planets (like Earth). This suggests that many exoplanets previously believed to be too hot may actually be habitable, depending on their rotation rate. The explanation for this behavior is that slowly rotating planets have a weak Coriolis force and long daytime illumination, which promotes strong convergence and convection in the substellar region. This produces a large area of optically thick clouds, which greatly increases the planetary albedo. In contrast, on rapidly rotating planets a much narrower belt of clouds form in the deep tropics, leading to a relatively low albedo. A particularly striking example of the importance of rotation rate suggested by our simulations is that a planet with modern Earth's atmosphere, in Venus' orbit, and with modern Venus' (slow) rotation rate would be habitable. This would imply that if Venus went through a runaway greenhouse, it had a higher rotation rate at that time.

  20. The influence of strain rate dependency on the structure-property relations of porcine brain.

    PubMed

    Begonia, Mark T; Prabhu, Raj; Liao, Jun; Horstemeyer, Mark F; Williams, Lakiesha N

    2010-10-01

    This study examines the internal microstructure evolution of porcine brain during mechanical deformation. Strain rate dependency of porcine brain was investigated under quasi-static compression for strain rates of 0.00625, 0.025, and 0.10 s(-1). Confocal microscopy was employed at 15, 30, and 40% strain to quantify microstructural changes, and image analysis was implemented to calculate the area fraction of neurons and glial cells. The nonlinear stress-strain behavior exhibited a viscoelastic response from the strain rate sensitivity observed, and image analysis revealed that the mean area fraction of neurons and glial cells increased according to the applied strain level and strain rate. The area fraction for the undamaged state was 7.85 ± 0.07%, but at 40% strain the values were 11.55 ± 0.35%, 13.30 ± 0.28%, and 19.50 ± 0.14% for respective strain rates of 0.00625, 0.025, and 0.10 s(-1). The increased area fractions were a function of the applied strain rate and were attributed to the compaction of neural constituents and the stiffening tissue response. The microstructural variations in the tissue were linked to mechanical properties at progressive levels of compression in order to generate structure-property relationships useful for refining current FE material models.

  1. Effect of nesting environment on incubation temperature and hatching success of Morelet's crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii) in an urban lake of Southeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    López-Luna, Marco A; Hidalgo-Mihart, Mircea G; Aguirre-León, Gustavo; González-Ramón, Mariana Del C; Rangel-Mendoza, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    Incubation temperature is an important aspect in terms of biological performance among crocodiles, and several controlled experiments have demonstrated a significant relationship between incubation temperature, success in hatching and survival of hatchlings. However, a few studies have tested these relationships in the wild. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship of nest characteristics and environment (hatch year, nest basal area and height, clutch size, distance to shore line, and vegetation cover), to incubation temperature and hatching success among Morelet's crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii). The study was carried out during the nesting seasons of Morelet's crocodile, from 2007 to 2009 in the Laguna de Las Ilusiones, an urban lake located in Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico. We physically characterized 18 nests and inserted a temperature data logger in each nest chamber. At the end of the nesting season and prior to hatching, we recovered the crocodile eggs and data loggers and calculated hatching success, under laboratory conditions. We related the environmental variables of the nest with the mean and fluctuation (standard deviation) of nest temperature, using linear models. We also related the environmental variables affecting the nest, to mean nest temperature and fluctuation in incubation temperature and to hatching success, using linear models. Although we found differences in incubation temperature between nests, mean incubation temperature did not differ between years, but there were differences in nest thermal fluctuation between years. The mean incubation temperature for 11 nests (61.1%) was lower than the suggested Female-Male pivotal temperature (producing 50% of each sex) for this species, and all hatchlings obtained were males. There were no differences in clutch size between years, but hatching success varied. Our study indicates that hatching success depends on certain environmental variables and nest conditions to which the

  2. Rate sensitive continuum damage models and mesh dependence in finite element analyses.

    PubMed

    Ljustina, Goran; Fagerström, Martin; Larsson, Ragnar

    2014-01-01

    The experiences from orthogonal machining simulations show that the Johnson-Cook (JC) dynamic failure model exhibits significant element size dependence. Such mesh dependence is a direct consequence of the utilization of local damage models. The current contribution is an investigation of the extent of the possible pathological mesh dependence. A comparison of the resulting JC model behavior combined with two types of damage evolution is considered. The first damage model is the JC dynamic failure model, where the development of the "damage" does not affect the response until the critical state is reached. The second one is a continuum damage model, where the damage variable is affecting the material response continuously during the deformation. Both the plasticity and the damage models are rate dependent, and the damage evolutions for both models are defined as a postprocessing of the effective stress response. The investigation is conducted for a series of 2D shear tests utilizing different FE representations of the plane strain plate with pearlite material properties. The results show for both damage models, using realistic pearlite material parameters, that similar extent of the mesh dependence is obtained and that the possible viscous regularization effects are absent in the current investigation.

  3. A novel optical freezing array for the examination of cooling rate dependence in heterogeneous ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budke, Carsten; Dreischmeier, Katharina; Koop, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Homogeneous ice nucleation is a stochastic process, implying that it is not only temperature but also time dependent. For heterogeneous ice nucleation it is still under debate whether there is a significant time dependence or not. In case of minor time dependence it is probably sufficient to use a singular or slightly modified singular approach, which mainly supposes temperature dependence and just small stochastic variations. We contribute to this discussion using a novel optical freezing array termed BINARY (Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARraY). The setup consists of an array of microliter-sized droplets on a Peltier cooling stage. The droplets are separated from each other with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) spacer to prevent a Bergeron-Findeisen process, in which the first freezing droplets grow at the expense of the remaining liquid ones due to their vapor pressure differences. An automatic detection of nucleation events is realized optically by the change in brightness during freezing. Different types of ice nucleating agents were tested with the presented setup, e. g. pollen and clay mineral dust. Exemplarily, cooling rate dependent measurements are shown for the heterogeneous ice nucleation induced by Snomax®. The authors gratefully acknowledge funding by the German Research Foundation (DFG) through the project BIOCLOUDS (KO 2944/1-1) and through the research unit INUIT (FOR 1525) under KO 2944/2-1. We particularly thank our INUIT partners for fruitful collaboration and sharing of ideas and IN samples.

  4. Strain Rate Dependency of Bronze Metal Matrix Composite Mechanical Properties as a Function of Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lloyd; Joyce, Peter; Radice, Joshua; Gregorian, Dro; Gobble, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Strain rate dependency of mechanical properties of tungsten carbide (WC)-filled bronze castings fabricated by centrifugal and sedimentation-casting techniques are examined, in this study. Both casting techniques are an attempt to produce a functionally graded material with high wear resistance at a chosen surface. Potential applications of such materials include shaft bushings, electrical contact surfaces, and brake rotors. Knowledge of strain rate-dependent mechanical properties is recommended for predicting component response due to dynamic loading or impact events. A brief overview of the casting techniques for the materials considered in this study is followed by an explanation of the test matrix and testing techniques. Hardness testing, density measurement, and determination of the volume fraction of WC particles are performed throughout the castings using both image analysis and optical microscopy. The effects of particle filling on mechanical properties are first evaluated through a microhardness survey of the castings. The volume fraction of WC particles is validated using a thorough density survey and a rule-of-mixtures model. Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) testing of various volume fraction specimens is conducted to determine strain dependence of mechanical properties and to compare the process-property relationships between the two casting techniques. The baseline performances of C95400 bronze are provided for comparison. The results show that the addition of WC particles improves microhardness significantly for the centrifugally cast specimens, and, to a lesser extent, in the sedimentation-cast specimens, largely because the WC particles are more concentrated as a result of the centrifugal-casting process. Both metal matrix composites (MMCs) demonstrate strain rate dependency, with sedimentation casting having a greater, but variable, effects on material response. This difference is attributed to legacy effects from the casting process, namely

  5. Should we maintain baby hatches in our society?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A baby hatch called the “Stork’s Cradle” has been in place at Jikei Hospital in Kumamoto City, Japan, since May 10, 2007. Babyklappes were first established in Germany in 2000, and there are currently more than 90 locations. Attitudes regarding baby hatches are divided in Japan and neither opinions for nor against baby hatches have thus far been overwhelming. To consider the appropriateness of baby hatches, we present and examine the validity of each major objection to establishing baby hatches. Discussion There are various objections to baby hatches as follows: It violates a child’s right to know the identity of his or her biological parents by allowing anonymous birth; it neglects fulfillment of the biological parents’ basic obligation to raise their child and its very availability induces abandonment of infants; some people abuse it for very selfish reasons; it cannot save babies’ lives; the rights of one parent can be ignored if the other surrenders a child without his or her consent; it puts a baby in medical jeopardy; and it has no clear legal basis. The authors would argue that there are many plausible refutations for each objection mainly based on priority of child’s right to life, pregnant women’s vulnerability and necessity of anonymity, social responsibility to protect and raise children, differences between dropping a child off at a baby hatch and child neglect, limited function of social childcare center, inevitability of abuse by a minority of people, necessary distinction between outcomes that occur only because baby hatches exist and those that occur regardless of their existence, important local direct and upmost measures for women in trouble, and difference between ambiguous legality and illegality. Summary We argue that a certain number of baby hatches should continue to be established as a last resort, in a form that can maintain anonymity if the parent dropping the child off so desires. It should be supported if it is

  6. Multi-scale detection of rate changes in spike trains with weak dependencies.

    PubMed

    Messer, Michael; Costa, Kauê M; Roeper, Jochen; Schneider, Gaby

    2017-04-01

    The statistical analysis of neuronal spike trains by models of point processes often relies on the assumption of constant process parameters. However, it is a well-known problem that the parameters of empirical spike trains can be highly variable, such as for example the firing rate. In order to test the null hypothesis of a constant rate and to estimate the change points, a Multiple Filter Test (MFT) and a corresponding algorithm (MFA) have been proposed that can be applied under the assumption of independent inter spike intervals (ISIs). As empirical spike trains often show weak dependencies in the correlation structure of ISIs, we extend the MFT here to point processes associated with short range dependencies. By specifically estimating serial dependencies in the test statistic, we show that the new MFT can be applied to a variety of empirical firing patterns, including positive and negative serial correlations as well as tonic and bursty firing. The new MFT is applied to a data set of empirical spike trains with serial correlations, and simulations show improved performance against methods that assume independence. In case of positive correlations, our new MFT is necessary to reduce the number of false positives, which can be highly enhanced when falsely assuming independence. For the frequent case of negative correlations, the new MFT shows an improved detection probability of change points and thus, also a higher potential of signal extraction from noisy spike trains.

  7. Mass and temperature dependence of metabolic rate in litter and soil invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Timothy D

    2006-01-01

    Metabolic scaling theory provides a framework for modeling the combined mass and temperature dependence of metabolic rate. The theory predicts that whole-organism metabolic rate should scale with body mass raised to the 3/4 power as a consequence of the physical characteristics of internal distribution networks. Metabolic rate is predicted to vary with absolute body temperature, T, according to the Boltzmann factor, e(-E/kT), where E is the apparent activation energy of biochemical reactions, 0.2-1.2 eV, and k is Boltzmann's constant. I evaluated those predictions, using a compilation of published data on the metabolic rates of litter- and soil-dwelling earthworms, isopods, oribatid mites, springtails, and spiders. Earthworms, oribatid mites, springtails, and spiders had mass-scaling exponents that were statistically indistinguishable from the expected value of 0.75. The scaling exponent for terrestrial isopods, 0.91, was significantly greater than expected. All taxa had apparent activation energies within the predicted range of 0.2-1.2 eV. Activation energies for isopods, oribatid mites, springtails, and spiders were not significantly different from the average expected value of 0.6 eV, while the activation energy for earthworms, 0.25 eV, was significantly lower than 0.6 eV. Updated equations for estimating metabolic rate from body mass and environmental temperature are given for investigations into the ecological energetics of litter and soil animals.

  8. Notch Fracture Toughness of Glasses: Dependence on Rate, Age, and Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasoya, Manish; Rycroft, Chris H.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the fracture toughness (resistance) of glasses is a fundamental problem of prime theoretical and practical importance. Here we theoretically study its dependence on the loading rate, the age (history) of the glass, and the notch radius ρ . Reduced-dimensionality analysis suggests that the notch fracture toughness results from a competition between the initial, age- and history-dependent, plastic relaxation time scale τ0pl and an effective loading time scale τext(K˙ I,ρ ) , where K˙ I is the tensile stress-intensity-factor rate. The toughness is predicted to scale with √{ρ } independently of ξ ≡τext/τ0pl for ξ ≪1 , to scale as T √{ρ }log (ξ ) for ξ ≫1 (related to thermal activation, where T is the temperature), and to feature a nonmonotonic behavior in the crossover region ξ ˜O (1 ) (related to plastic yielding dynamics). These predictions are verified using 2D computations, providing a unified picture of the notch fracture toughness of glasses. The theory highlights the importance of time-scale competition and far-from-steady-state elasto-viscoplastic dynamics for understanding the toughness and shows that the latter varies quite significantly with the glass age (history) and applied loading rate. Experimental support for bulk metallic glasses is presented, and possible implications for applications are discussed.

  9. Strain-rate Dependence of Elastic Modulus Reveals Silver Nanoparticle Induced Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Caporizzo, Matthew Alexander; Roco, Charles M; Ferrer, Maria Carme Coll; Grady, Martha E; Parrish, Emmabeth; Eckmann, David M; Composto, Russell John

    Force-displacement measurements are taken at different rates with an atomic force microscope to assess the correlation between cell health and cell viscoelasticity in THP-1 cells that have been treated with a novel drug carrier. A variable indentation-rate viscoelastic analysis, VIVA, is employed to identify the relaxation time of the cells that are known to exhibit a frequency dependent stiffness. The VIVA agrees with a fluorescent viability assay. This indicates that dextran-lysozyme drug carriers are biocompatible and deliver concentrated toxic material (rhodamine or silver nanoparticles) to the cytoplasm of THP-1 cells. By modelling the frequency dependence of the elastic modulus, the VIVA provides three metrics of cytoplasmic viscoelasticity: a low frequency modulus, a high frequency modulus and viscosity. The signature of cytotoxicity by rhodamine or silver exposure is a frequency independent twofold increase in the elastic modulus and cytoplasmic viscosity, while the cytoskeletal relaxation time remains unchanged. This is consistent with the known toxic mechanism of silver nanoparticles, where metabolic stress causes an increase in the rigidity of the cytoplasm. A variable indentation-rate viscoelastic analysis is presented as a straightforward method to promote the self-consistent comparison between cells. This is paramount to the development of early diagnosis and treatment of disease.

  10. A Rate-Dependent Viscoelastic Damage Model for Simulation of Solid Propellant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheson, E. R.; Nguyen, D. Q.

    2006-07-01

    A viscoelastic deformation and damage model (VED) for solid rocket propellants has been developed based on an extensive set of mechanical properties experiments. Monotonic tensile tests performed at several strain rates showed rate and dilatation effects. During cyclic tensile tests, hysteresis and a rate-dependent shear modulus were observed. A tensile relaxation experiment showed significant stress decay in the sample. Taylor impact tests exhibited large dilatations without significant crack growth. Extensive modifications to a viscoelastic-viscoplastic model (VEP) necessary to capture these experimental results have led to development of the VED model. In particular, plasticity has been eliminated in the model, and the multiple Maxwell viscoelastic formulation has been replaced with a time-dependent shear modulus. Furthermore, the loading and unloading behaviors of the material are modeled independently. To characterize the damage and dilatation behavior, the Tensile Damage and Distention (TDD) model is run in conjunction with VED. The VED model is connected to a single-cell driver as well as to the CTH shock physics code. Simulations of tests show good comparisons with tensile tests and some aspects of the Taylor tests.

  11. Distance dependence of the energy transfer rate from a single semiconductor nanostructure to graphene.

    PubMed

    Federspiel, François; Froehlicher, Guillaume; Nasilowski, Michel; Pedetti, Silvia; Mahmood, Ather; Doudin, Bernard; Park, Serin; Lee, Jeong-O; Halley, David; Dubertret, Benoît; Gilliot, Pierre; Berciaud, Stéphane

    2015-02-11

    The near-field Coulomb interaction between a nanoemitter and a graphene monolayer results in strong Förster-type resonant energy transfer and subsequent fluorescence quenching. Here, we investigate the distance dependence of the energy transfer rate from individual, (i) zero-dimensional CdSe/CdS nanocrystals and (ii) two-dimensional CdSe/CdS/ZnS nanoplatelets to a graphene monolayer. For increasing distances d, the energy transfer rate from individual nanocrystals to graphene decays as 1/d(4). In contrast, the distance dependence of the energy transfer rate from a two-dimensional nanoplatelet to graphene deviates from a simple power law but is well described by a theoretical model, which considers a thermal distribution of free excitons in a two-dimensional quantum well. Our results show that accurate distance measurements can be performed at the single particle level using graphene-based molecular rulers and that energy transfer allows probing dimensionality effects at the nanoscale.

  12. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart I of... - Existing California Area Closures (hatched areas extend to 3 miles offshore; cross-hatched areas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Existing California Area Closures (hatched areas extend to 3 miles offshore; cross-hatched areas extend beyond 3 miles offshore) and Optional.... I, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Subpart I of Part 660—Existing California Area Closures (hatched areas...

  13. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart I of... - Existing California Area Closures (hatched areas extend to 3 miles offshore; cross-hatched areas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Existing California Area Closures (hatched areas extend to 3 miles offshore; cross-hatched areas extend beyond 3 miles offshore) and Optional.... I, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Subpart I of Part 660—Existing California Area Closures (hatched areas...

  14. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart I of... - Existing California Area Closures (hatched areas extend to 3 miles offshore; cross-hatched areas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Existing California Area Closures (hatched areas extend to 3 miles offshore; cross-hatched areas extend beyond 3 miles offshore) and Optional.... I, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Subpart I of Part 660—Existing California Area Closures (hatched areas...

  15. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart I of... - Existing California Area Closures (hatched areas extend to 3 miles offshore; cross-hatched areas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing California Area Closures (hatched areas extend to 3 miles offshore; cross-hatched areas extend beyond 3 miles offshore) and Optional.... I, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Subpart I of Part 660—Existing California Area Closures (hatched areas...

  16. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart I of... - Existing California Area Closures (hatched areas extend to 3 miles offshore; cross-hatched areas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Existing California Area Closures (hatched areas extend to 3 miles offshore; cross-hatched areas extend beyond 3 miles offshore) and Optional.... I, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Subpart I of Part 660—Existing California Area Closures (hatched areas...

  17. Stimulus intensity determines experience-dependent modifications in neocortical neuron firing rates

    PubMed Central

    Glazewski, Stanislaw; Barth, Alison L

    2015-01-01

    Although subthreshold inputs of neocortical sensory neurons are broadly tuned, the spiking output is more restricted. These subthreshold inputs provide a substrate for stimulus intensity-dependent changes their spiking output, as well as for experience-dependent plasticity to alter firing properties. Here we investigated how different stimulus intensities modified the firing output of individual neurons in layer 2/3 of the mouse barrel cortex. Decreasing stimulus intensity over a 30-fold range lowered the firing rates evoked by principal whisker stimulation and reduced the overall size of the responding ensemble in whisker-undeprived animals. We then examined how these responses were changed after single-whisker experience (SWE). After 7 days of SWE, the mean magnitude of response to spared whisker stimulation at the highest stimulus intensity was not altered. However, lower-intensity whisker stimulation revealed a more than 10-fold increase in mean firing output compared with control animals. Also, under control conditions, only ∽15% of neurons showed any firing at low stimulus intensity, compared with more than 70% of neurons after SWE. However, response changes measured in the immediately surrounding representations were detected only for the highest stimulus intensity. Overall, these data showed that the measurement of experience-dependent changes in the spike output of neocortical neurons was highly dependent upon stimulus intensity. PMID:25546174

  18. Negative ion formation by Rydberg electron transfer: Isotope-dependent rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Carman, H.S. Jr.; Klots, C.E.; Compton, R.N.

    1991-01-01

    The formation of negative ions during collisions of rubidium atoms in selected ns and nd Rydberg states with carbon disulfide molecules has been studied for a range of effective principal quantum numbers (10 {le} n* {le} 25). For a narrow range of n* near n* = 17, rate constants for CS{sub 2}{sup {minus}} formation are found to depend upon the isotopic composition of the molecule, producing a negative ion isotope ratio (mass 78 to mass 76, amu) up to 10.5 times larger than the natural abundance ratio of CS{sub 2} isotopes in the reagent. The isotope ratio is found to depend strongly upon the initial quantum state of the Rydberg atom and perhaps upon the collision energy and CS{sub 2} temperature. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Corrections to charge exchange spectroscopic measurements in TFTR due to energy-dependent excitation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.B.; Fonck, R.J.; Knize, R.J.; Jaehnig, K.P.

    1988-08-01

    The use of charge exchange spectrocopy to determine plasma rotation speeds and ion temperature is complicated by the energy dependence of the excitation cross sections. The Doppler-broadened spectral line shape is distorted by the relative velocity between the neutral hydrogen atoms of the injected beam and impurity ions. The asymmetric nature of the energy dependence of this cross section causes a non-motional shift of the line center and a non-thermal change in the line width. These effects vary with the angles between the beam direction, rotation velocity direction, and direction of the viewing sightline. When viewing two neutral beams at different angles on TFTR, the two measurements of v/sub phi/(r) show discrepancies about 20 to 30% with each other. The calculation of the spectral intensity profiles, using the excitation rates available, overcorrects these discrepancies and indicates the need for better excitation coefficients. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Elevated time-dependent strengthening rates observed in San Andreas Fault drilling samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, Matt J.; Carpenter, Brett M.; Vogt, Christoph; Kopf, Achim J.

    2016-09-01

    The central San Andreas Fault in California is known as a creeping fault, however recent studies have shown that it may be accumulating a slip deficit and thus its seismogenic potential should be seriously considered. We conducted laboratory friction experiments measuring time-dependent frictional strengthening (healing) on fault zone and wall rock samples recovered during drilling at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), located near the southern edge of the creeping section and in the direct vicinity of three repeating microearthquake clusters. We find that for hold times of up to 3000 s, frictional healing follows a log-linear dependence on hold time and that the healing rate is very low for a sample of the actively shearing fault core, consistent with previous results. However, considering longer hold times up to ∼350,000 s, the healing rate accelerates such that the data for all samples are better described by a power law relation. In general, samples having a higher content of phyllosilicate minerals exhibit low log-linear healing rates, and the notably clay-rich fault zone sample also exhibits strong power-law healing when longer hold times are included. Our data suggest that weak faults, such as the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault, can accumulate interseismic shear stress more rapidly than expected from previous friction data. Using the power-law dependence of frictional healing on hold time, calculations of recurrence interval and stress drop based on our data accurately match observations of discrete creep events and repeating Mw = 2 earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault.

  1. Factors Affecting Egg Hatch of Heterodera mediterranea and Differential Responses of Olive Cultivars to Infestation

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, P.; Vovlas, N.

    2002-01-01

    The influence of temperature and olive root exudates on Heterodera mediterranea egg hatch and the effects of H. mediterranea on the growth of two olive cultivars (Arbequina and Picual) were investigated. Egg hatch occurred over a temperature range of 10 to 30°C and was optimal at 20 to 25°C. There were no differences in egg hatch between sterile deionized distilled water or root exudate dilutions (undiluted, diluted 1:1, and 1:2) of Arbequina and Picual at 20°C. Heterodera mediterranea reproduced on both olive cultivars in growth chambers at 25°C. Soil and root final nematode populations, as well as total number of cysts per plant and reproduction rate, were significantly higher in Arbequina than in Picual. Shoot dry and root fresh weights as well as increases of shoot height, trunk diameter, and numbers of nodes were significantly suppressed by infection with 10,000 eggs + second-stage juveniles/pot in Arbequina but not in Picual. PMID:19265924

  2. Scheduling Maintenance Operations Which Cause Age-Dependent Failure Rate Changes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    ENGI.. UNCLASSIFIED B EBRAHIMIAN ET AL I JUN 83 F/G 5/1 NLmEEmmEEmmmmEE EEIhEIIhEEIII EEIIIIIIIEIIIE EIIIEIIIIIIIEE IEEIhIhEIhEIhE EIIIEEEEEIhIhE...OPERATIONS WHICH CAUSE AGE-DEPENDENT FAILURE RATE CHANGES BY BEHNAM EBRAHIMIAN AND LEONARD SHAW Prepared for Office of Naval Research Contract N00014-75-C-0858... EBRAHIMIAN AND LEONARD SHAW Prepared for Office of Naval Research Contract N00014-75-C-0858 Report No. POLY EE/CS 83-002 Polytechnic Institute of New York

  3. The Mitral Valve Prolapsus: Quantification of the Regurgitation Flow Rate by Experimental Time-Dependant PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billy, F.; Coisne, D.; Sanchez, L.; Perrault, R.

    2001-10-01

    Color Doppler is routinely used for visualisation of intra cardiac flows and quantification of valvular heart disease, Nevertheless the 2D visualization of a complex 3D phenomenon is the major limitation of this technique, In particular, in clinical setting, the flow rate calculation upstream a regurgitant orifice (i,e, mitral valve insufficiency), assumes that the velocity field in the convergent region have hemispheric shapes and introduce miscalculation specially in case of prolaps regurgitant orifices, The main objective of this study was to characterize the dynamic 3D velocity field of the convergent region upstream a prolaps model of regurgitant orifice based on 2D time dependent PIV reconstruction.

  4. Nonlinear Loading-Rate-Dependent Force Response of Individual Vimentin Intermediate Filaments to Applied Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Johanna; Witt, Hannes; Candelli, Andrea; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Janshoff, Andreas; Köster, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical properties of eukaryotic cells are to a great extent determined by the cytoskeleton, a composite network of different filamentous proteins. Among these, intermediate filaments (IFs) are exceptional in their molecular architecture and mechanical properties. Here we directly record stress-strain curves of individual vimentin IFs using optical traps and atomic force microscopy. We find a strong loading rate dependence of the mechanical response, supporting the hypothesis that IFs could serve to protect eukaryotic cells from fast, large deformations. Our experimental results show different unfolding regimes, which we can quantitatively reproduce by an elastically coupled system of multiple two-state elements.

  5. Strong field ionization rates simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction and an absorbing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Pascal; Sonk, Jason A.; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-05-07

    Ionization rates of molecules have been modeled with time-dependent configuration interaction simulations using atom centered basis sets and a complex absorbing potential. The simulations agree with accurate grid-based calculations for the ionization of hydrogen atom as a function of field strength and for charge resonance enhanced ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} as the bond is elongated. Unlike grid-based methods, the present approach can be applied to simulate electron dynamics and ionization in multi-electron polyatomic molecules. Calculations on HCl{sup +} and HCO{sup +} demonstrate that these systems also show charge resonance enhanced ionization as the bonds are stretched.

  6. Optimal control of an influenza model with seasonal forcing and age-dependent transmission rates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeehyun; Kim, Jungeun; Kwon, Hee-Dae

    2013-01-21

    This study considers an optimal intervention strategy for influenza outbreaks. Variations in the SEIAR model are considered to include seasonal forcing and age structure, and control strategies include vaccination, antiviral treatment, and social distancing such as school closures. We formulate an optimal control problem by minimizing the incidence of influenza outbreaks while considering intervention costs. We examine the effects of delays in vaccine production, seasonal forcing, and age-dependent transmission rates on the optimal control and suggest some optimal strategies through numerical simulations.

  7. Size-dependant heating rates of iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic fluid hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Weimuller, Marcela; Zeisberger, Matthias; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2009-07-01

    Using the thermal decomposition of organometallics method we have synthesized high-quality, iron oxide nanoparticles of tailorable size up to ~15nm and transferred them to a water phase by coating with a biocompatible polymer. The magnetic behavior of these particles was measured and fit to a log-normal distribution using the Chantrell method and their polydispersity was confirmed to be very narrow. By performing calorimetry measurements with these monodisperse particles we have unambiguously demonstrated, for the first time, that at a given frequency, heating rates of superparamagnetic particles are dependent on particle size, in agreement with earlier theoretical predictions.

  8. Rate dependent response and failure of a ductile epoxy and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Rae, Philip J; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Stahl, David B

    2010-01-01

    An extensive characterization suite has been performed on the response and failure of a ductile epoxy 55A and uniaxial carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite of IM7 fibers in 55A resin from the quasistatic to shock regime. The quasistatic and intermediate strain rate response, including elastic modulus, yield and failure have are characterized by quasistatic, SHPB, and DMA measurements as a function of fiber orientation and temperature. The high strain rate shock effect of fiber orientation in the composite and response of the pure resin are presented for plate impact experiments. It has previously been shown that at lower impact velocities the shock velocity is strongly dependent on fiber orientation but at higher impact velocity the in-plane and through thickness Hugoniots converge. The current results are compared with previous studies of the shock response of carbon fiber composites with more conventional brittle epoxy matrices. The spall response of the composite is measured and compared with quasistatic fracture toughness measurements.

  9. Xylem cavitation resistance can be estimated based on time-dependent rate of acoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Nolf, Markus; Beikircher, Barbara; Rosner, Sabine; Nolf, Anton; Mayr, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) analysis allows nondestructive monitoring of embolism formation in plant xylem, but signal interpretation and agreement of acoustically measured hydraulic vulnerability with reference hydraulic techniques remain under debate. We compared the hydraulic vulnerability of 16 species and three crop tree cultivars using hydraulic flow measurements and acoustic emission monitoring, proposing the use of time-dependent AE rates as a novel parameter for AE analysis. There was a linear correlation between the water potential (Ψ) at 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity (P50 ) and the Ψ at maximum AE activity (Pmaxrate ), where species with lower P50 also had lower Pmaxrate (P < 0.001, R(2)  = 0.76). Using AE rates instead of cumulative counts for AE analysis allows more efficient estimation of P50 , while excluding problematic AE at late stages of dehydration.

  10. Master equation approach to time-dependent escape rate over a periodically oscillating barrier.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Xin; Bao, Jing-Dong

    2011-01-01

    We propose a master equation approach to investigate the transition function and the escape dynamics of a general damping particle in a metastable potential. The transition function in the master equation is obtained analytically from the Langevin dynamics. We apply it to the oscillating barrier problem, in which the potential is structured by a harmonic potential smoothly linking with an inverse harmonic one, and thus both the barrier height and the curvature of potential change periodically with time. We use a Monte Carlo method to simulate the master equation and then calculate a time-dependent escape rate. This can decrease the coarse grain and save more computing time in comparison with the Langevin simulation. Our result has shown that there is a resonant activation phenomenon for the escape rate in the underdamped case.

  11. Temperature dependent growth rates of the upper-hybrid waves and solar radio zebra patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benáček, J.; Karlický, M.; Yasnov, L. V.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The zebra patterns observed in solar radio emission are very important for flare plasma diagnostics. The most promising model of these patterns is based on double plasma resonance instability, which generates upper-hybrid waves, which can be then transformed into the zebra emission. Aims: We aim to study in detail the double plasma resonance instability of hot electrons, together with a much denser thermal background plasma. In particular, we analyse how the growth rate of the instability depends on the temperature of both the hot plasma and background plasma components. Methods: We numerically integrated the analysed model equations, using Python and Wolfram Mathematica. Results: We found that the growth-rate maxima of the upper-hybrid waves for non-zero temperatures of both the hot and background plasma are shifted towards lower frequencies comparing to the zero temperature case. This shift increases with an increase of the harmonic number s of the electron cyclotron frequency and temperatures of both hot and background plasma components. We show how this shift changes values of the magnetic field strength estimated from observed zebras. We confirmed that for a relatively low hot electron temperature, the dependence of growth rate vs. both the ratio of the electron plasma and electron cyclotron frequencies expresse distinct peaks, and by increasing this temperature these peaks become smoothed. We found that in some cases, the values of wave number vector components for the upper-hybrid wave for the maximal growth rate strongly deviate from their analytical estimations. We confirmed the validity of the assumptions used when deriving model equations.

  12. A new rate-dependent unidirectional composite model - Application to panels subjected to underwater blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaoding; de Vaucorbeil, Alban; Tran, Phuong; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we developed a finite element fluid-structure interaction model to understand the deformation and failure mechanisms of both monolithic and sandwich composite panels. A new failure criterion that includes strain-rate effects was formulated and implemented to simulate different damage modes in unidirectional glass fiber/matrix composites. The laminate model uses Hashin's fiber failure criterion and a modified Tsai-Wu matrix failure criterion. The composite moduli are degraded using five damage variables, which are updated in the post-failure regime by means of a linear softening law governed by an energy release criterion. A key feature in the formulation is the distinction between fiber rupture and pull-out by introducing a modified fracture toughness, which varies from a fiber tensile toughness to a matrix tensile toughness as a function of the ratio of longitudinal normal stress to effective shear stress. The delamination between laminas is modeled by a strain-rate sensitive cohesive law. In the case of sandwich panels, core compaction is modeled by a crushable foam plasticity model with volumetric hardening and strain-rate sensitivity. These constitutive descriptions were used to predict deformation histories, fiber/matrix damage patterns, and inter-lamina delamination, for both monolithic and sandwich composite panels subjected to underwater blast. The numerical predictions were compared with experimental observations. We demonstrate that the new rate dependent composite damage model captures the spatial distribution and magnitude of damage significantly more accurately than previously developed models.

  13. Fruit removal rate depends on neighborhood fruit density, frugivore abundance, and spatial context.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam D; McWilliams, Scott R

    2014-03-01

    Fleshy-fruited plants depend fundamentally on interactions with frugivores for effective seed dispersal. Recent models of frugivory within spatially explicit networks make two general predictions regarding these interactions: rate of fruit removal increases (i.e., is facilitated) as densities of conspecific neighborhood fruits increase, and fruit removal rate varies positively with frugivore abundance. We conducted a field experiment that constitutes the first empirical and simultaneous test of these two primary predictions. We manipulated neighborhood abundances of arrowwood (Viburnum recognitum and Viburnum dentatum) fruits in southern New England's maritime shrub community and monitored removal rates by autumn-migrating birds. Focal arrowwood plants in neighborhoods with high conspecific fruit density sustained moderately decreased fruit removal rates (i.e., competition) relative to those in low-density neighborhoods, a result that agrees with most field research to date but contrasts with theoretical expectation. We suggest the spatial contexts that favor competition (i.e., high-abundance neighborhoods and highly aggregated landscapes) are considerably more common than the relatively uniform, low-aggregation fruiting landscapes that promote facilitation. Patterns of arrowwood removal by avian frugivores generally varied positively with, and apparently in response to, seasonal changes in migratory frugivore abundance. However, we suggest that dense stands of arrowwood concentrated frugivore activity at the neighborhood scale, thus counteracting geographic patterns of frugivore abundance. Our results underscore the importance of considering spatial context (e.g., fruit distribution and aggregation, frugivory hubs) in plant-avian frugivore interactions.

  14. Calcium dependence of the rate of exocytosis in a synaptic terminal.

    PubMed

    Heidelberger, R; Heinemann, C; Neher, E; Matthews, G

    1994-10-06

    Rapid calcium-dependent exocytosis underlies neurotransmitter release from nerve terminals. Despite the fundamental importance of this process, neither the relationship between presynaptic intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) and rate of exocytosis, nor the maximal rate of secretion is known quantitatively. To provide this information, we have used flash photolysis of caged Ca2+ to elevate [Ca2+]i rapidly and uniformly in synaptic terminals, while measuring membrane capacitance as an index of exocytosis and monitoring [Ca2+]i with a Ca(2+)-indicator dye. When [Ca2+]i was abruptly increased to > 10 microM, capacitance rose at a rate that increased steeply with [Ca2+]i. The steepness suggested that at least four calcium ions must bind to activate synaptic vesicle fusion. Half-saturation was at 194 microM, and the maximal rate constant was 2,000-3,000 s-1. A given synaptic vesicle can exocytose with high probability within a few hundred microseconds, if [Ca2+]i rises above 100 microM. These properties provide for the extremely rapid signalling required for neuronal communication.

  15. Effects of freshwater petroleum contamination on amphibian hatching and metamorphosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahaney, P.A. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1994-02-01

    This study examined the effects of freshwater petroleum contamination on amphibian reproduction. The primary objectives were to assess the potential environmental and physiological impacts of runoff petroleum products on amphibians, using the green tree frog (Hyla cinerea) as a target species and engine crankcase oil as a contaminant. Egg hatching success, tadpole growth, and successful metamorphosis were measured in four concentrations of oil. The effects of oil on food source was also studied. Hatching success was not measurably influenced by the presence of oil. Tadpole and alga growth were negatively associated with the presence of oil. No tadpoles from the high concentration of oil treatments successfully metamorphosed.

  16. Reynolds-number dependence of the dimensionless dissipation rate in homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Berera, Arjun; Goldstraw, Erin E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the behavior of the dimensionless dissipation rate Cɛ for stationary and nonstationary magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the presence of external forces. By combining with previous studies for freely decaying MHD turbulence, we obtain here both the most general model equation for Cɛ applicable to homogeneous MHD turbulence and a comprehensive numerical study of the Reynolds number dependence of the dimensionless total energy dissipation rate at unity magnetic Prandtl number. We carry out a series of medium to high resolution direct numerical simulations of mechanically forced stationary MHD turbulence in order to verify the predictions of the model equation for the stationary case. Furthermore, questions of nonuniversality are discussed in terms of the effect of external forces as well as the level of cross- and magnetic helicity. The measured values of the asymptote Cɛ ,∞ lie between 0.193 ≤Cɛ ,∞≤0.268 for free decay, where the value depends on the initial level of cross- and magnetic helicities. In the stationary case we measure Cɛ ,∞=0.223 .

  17. Reynolds-number dependence of the dimensionless dissipation rate in homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Linkmann, Moritz; Berera, Arjun; Goldstraw, Erin E

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the behavior of the dimensionless dissipation rate C_{ɛ} for stationary and nonstationary magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the presence of external forces. By combining with previous studies for freely decaying MHD turbulence, we obtain here both the most general model equation for C_{ɛ} applicable to homogeneous MHD turbulence and a comprehensive numerical study of the Reynolds number dependence of the dimensionless total energy dissipation rate at unity magnetic Prandtl number. We carry out a series of medium to high resolution direct numerical simulations of mechanically forced stationary MHD turbulence in order to verify the predictions of the model equation for the stationary case. Furthermore, questions of nonuniversality are discussed in terms of the effect of external forces as well as the level of cross- and magnetic helicity. The measured values of the asymptote C_{ɛ,∞} lie between 0.193≤C_{ɛ,∞}≤0.268 for free decay, where the value depends on the initial level of cross- and magnetic helicities. In the stationary case we measure C_{ɛ,∞}=0.223.

  18. Rate dependence of cell-to-cell variations of lithium-ion cells

    PubMed Central

    An, Fuqiang; Chen, Lufan; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Jianbo; Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-ion cells are commonly used in a multicell configuration in power devices and electric vehicles, making the cell-to-cell variation (CtCV) a key factor to consider in system design and management. Previous studies on CtCV have two major limitations: the number of cells is usually less than one hundred, and the cells are usually commercial cells already subjected to cell-screenings. In this article, we first make a statistical analysis on the CtCV of 5473 fresh cells from an automotive battery manufacturer before the cell-screening process. Secondly, 198 cells are randomly selected from these 5473 cells and the rate dependence of the CtCV is examined, focusing on the correlations of capacity versus weight and capacity versus resistance, corresponding to thermodynamic and kinetic factors, respectively. The rate dependence of these two correlations is explained from a phenomenological model. Finally, eight cells from the 198 cells are further characterized with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method to elucidate the kinetic origins of the CtCV. PMID:27725767

  19. Bimolecular Rate Constants for FAD-Dependent Glucose Dehydrogenase from Aspergillus terreus and Organic Electron Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruoka, Nozomu; Sadakane, Takuya; Hayashi, Rika; Tsujimura, Seiya

    2017-01-01

    The flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FAD-GDH) from Aspergillus species require suitable redox mediators to transfer electrons from the enzyme to the electrode surface for the application of bioelectrical devices. Although several mediators for FAD-GDH are already in use, they are still far from optimum in view of potential, kinetics, sustainability, and cost-effectiveness. Herein, we investigated the efficiency of various phenothiazines and quinones in the electrochemical oxidation of FAD-GDH from Aspergillus terreus. At pH 7.0, the logarithm of the bimolecular oxidation rate constants appeared to depend on the redox potentials of all the mediators tested. Notably, the rate constant of each molecule for FAD-GDH was approximately 2.5 orders of magnitude higher than that for glucose oxidase from Aspergillus sp. The results suggest that the electron transfer kinetics is mainly determined by the formal potential of the mediator, the driving force of electron transfer, and the electron transfer distance between the redox active site of the mediator and the FAD, affected by the steric or chemical interactions. Higher k2 values were found for ortho-quinones than for para-quinones in the reactions with FAD-GDH and glucose oxidase, which was likely due to less steric hindrance in the active site in the case of the ortho-quinones. PMID:28287419

  20. Self-similar slip instability on interfaces with rate- and state-dependent friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, Robert C.

    2016-08-01

    We examine the development of a frictional instability, with diverging sliding rate, at the interface of elastic bodies in contact. Evolution of friction is determined by a slip rate and state dependence. Following Viesca (2016 Phys. Rev. E 93, 060202(R). (doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.93.060202)), we show through an appropriate change of variable, the existence of blow-up solutions that are fixed points of a dynamical system. The solutions show self-similarity of the simple variety: separable dependence of time and space. For an interface with uniform frictional properties, there is a single-problem parameter. We examine the linear stability of these fixed points, as this problem parameter is varied. Specifically, we consider two archetypical elastic settings of the slip surface, in which interactions between points on the surface are either local or non-local. We show that, independent of the nature of elastic interactions, the fixed-points lose stability in the same matter as the parameter is increased towards a limit value: an apparently infinite sequence of Hopf bifurcations. However, for any value of the parameter, the nonlinear development of the instability is attraction, if not asymptotic convergence, towards these fixed points, owing to the existence of stable eigenmodes. For comparison, we perform numerical solutions of the original evolution equations and find precise agreement with the results of the analysis.

  1. Rate dependence of cell-to-cell variations of lithium-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Fuqiang; Chen, Lufan; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Jianbo; Li, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-ion cells are commonly used in a multicell configuration in power devices and electric vehicles, making the cell-to-cell variation (CtCV) a key factor to consider in system design and management. Previous studies on CtCV have two major limitations: the number of cells is usually less than one hundred, and the cells are usually commercial cells already subjected to cell-screenings. In this article, we first make a statistical analysis on the CtCV of 5473 fresh cells from an automotive battery manufacturer before the cell-screening process. Secondly, 198 cells are randomly selected from these 5473 cells and the rate dependence of the CtCV is examined, focusing on the correlations of capacity versus weight and capacity versus resistance, corresponding to thermodynamic and kinetic factors, respectively. The rate dependence of these two correlations is explained from a phenomenological model. Finally, eight cells from the 198 cells are further characterized with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method to elucidate the kinetic origins of the CtCV.

  2. Apparent triggering function of aftershocks resulting from rate-dependent incompleteness of earthquake catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainzl, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    The onset of the aftershock decay after main shocks is controversial. Physical models predict that the onset time is stress dependent, and catalog analysis shows a clear increase of the c value of the Omori-Utsu law with increasing main shock magnitude. However, earthquake catalogs are known to have variable quality and completeness levels; in particular, they miss events directly after main shocks. Thus, it has been also argued that the delayed onset of recorded aftershock activity triggered by large earthquakes is simply an artifact of the time-varying completeness. Here I utilize a recent approach describing the detection probability of earthquakes as function of the actual earthquake rate. I derive an analytical relation between apparent and true earthquake rate which only depends on the blind time of detection algorithms after the occurrence of an earthquake. This relation is tested and verified for synthetic simulations of Omori-type aftershock sequences. For a comparison, I analyze earthquake sequences occurred in Southern California and Taiwan, finding that the derived analytical decay function consistently explains the empirical aftershock activity in the catalogs. This indicates that the observed scaling of the Omori c value is mainly related to catalog incompleteness and not to any underlying physical process.

  3. Pre-hatching fluoxetine-induced neurochemical, neurodevelopmental, and immunological changes in newly hatched cuttlefish.

    PubMed

    Bidel, Flavie; Di Poi, Carole; Imarazene, Boudjema; Koueta, Noussithé; Budzinski, Hélène; Van Delft, Pierre; Bellanger, Cécile; Jozet-Alves, Christelle

    2016-03-01

    Embryonic and early postembryonic development of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis (a cephalopod mollusk) occurs in coastal waters, an environment subject to considerable pressure from xenobiotic pollutants such as pharmaceutical residues. Given the role of serotonin in brain development and its interaction with neurodevelopmental functions, this study focused on fluoxetine (FLX), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, antidepressant). The goal was to determine the effects of subchronic waterborne FLX exposure (1 and 10 μg L(-1)) during the last 15 days of embryonic development on neurochemical, neurodevelopmental, behavioral, and immunological endpoints at hatching. Our results showed for the first time that organic contaminants, such as FLX, could pass through the eggshell during embryonic development, leading to a substantial accumulation of this molecule in hatchlings. We also found that FLX embryonic exposure (1 and 10 μg L(-1)) (1) modulated dopaminergic but not serotonergic neurotransmission, (2) decreased cell proliferation in key brain structures for cognitive and visual processing, (3) did not induce a conspicuous change in camouflage quality, and (4) decreased lysozyme activity. In the long term, these alterations observed during a critical period of development may impair complex behaviors of the juvenile cuttlefish and thus lead to a decrease in their survival. Finally, we suggest a different mode of action by FLX between vertebrate and non-vertebrate species and raise questions regarding the vulnerability of early life stages of cuttlefish to the pharmaceutical contamination found in coastal waters.

  4. Nonlinear decline-rate dependence and intrinsic variation of typeIa supernova luminosities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lifan; Strovink, Mark; Conley, Alexander; Goldhaber,Gerson; Kowalski, Marek; Perlmutter, Saul; Siegrist, James

    2005-12-14

    Published B and V fluxes from nearby Type Ia supernova are fitted to light-curve templates with 4-6 adjustable parameters. Separately, B magnitudes from the same sample are fitted to a linear dependence on B-V color within a post-maximum time window prescribed by the CMAGIC method. These fits yield two independent SN magnitude estimates B{sub max} and B{sub BV}. Their difference varies systematically with decline rate {Delta}m{sub 15} in a form that is compatible with a bilinear but not a linear dependence; a nonlinear form likely describes the decline-rate dependence of B{sub max} itself. A Hubble fit to the average of B{sub max} and B{sub BV} requires a systematic correction for observed B-V color that can be described by a linear coefficient R = 2.59 {+-} 0.24, well below the coefficient R{sub B} {approx} 4.1 commonly used to characterize the effects of Milky Way dust. At 99.9% confidence the data reject a simple model in which no color correction is required for SNe that are clustered at the blue end of their observed color distribution. After systematic corrections are performed, B{sub max} and B{sub BV} exhibit mutual rms intrinsic variation equal to 0.074 {+-} 0.019 mag, of which at least an equal share likely belongs to B{sub BV}. SN magnitudes measured using maximum-luminosity or cmagic methods show comparable rms deviations of order {approx}0.14 mag from the Hubble line. The same fit also establishes a 95% confidence upper limit of 486 km s{sup -1} on the rms peculiar velocity of nearby SNe relative to the Hubble flow.

  5. Experience-dependent firing rate remapping generates directional selectivity in hippocampal place cells

    PubMed Central

    Navratilova, Zaneta; Hoang, Lan T.; Schwindel, C. Daniela; Tatsuno, Masami; McNaughton, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    When rodents engage in irregular foraging in an open-field environment, hippocampal principal cells exhibit place-specific firing that is statistically independent of the direction of traverse through the place field. When the path is restricted to a track, however, in-field rates differ substantially in opposite directions. Frequently, the representations of the track in the two directions are essentially orthogonal. We show that this directionally selective firing is not hard-wired, but develops through experience-dependent plasticity. During the rats' first pass in each direction, place fields were highly directionally symmetric, whereas over subsequent laps, the firing rates in the two directions gradually but substantially diverged. We conclude that, even on a restricted track, place cell firing is initially determined by allocentric position, and only later, the within-field firing rates change in response to differential sensory information or behavioral cues in the two directions. In agreement with previous data, place fields near local cues, such as textures on the track, developed less directionality than place fields on a uniform part of the track, possibly because the local cues reduced the net difference in sensory input at a given point. Directionality also developed in an open environment without physical restriction of the animal's path, when rats learned to run along a specified path. In this case, directionality developed later than on the running track, only after the rats began to run in a stereotyped manner. Although the average population firing rates exhibited little if any change over laps in either direction, the direction-specific firing rates in a given place field were up-or down-regulated with about equal probability and magnitude, which was independent in the two directions, suggesting some form of competitive mechanism (e.g., LTP/LTD) acting coherently on the set of synapses conveying external information to each cell. PMID:22363267

  6. Effects of Vocational Consultation on Relapse Rate and Hope among Drug Dependents in Bojnurd, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hojjat, Seyed Kaveh; Raufpoor, Roghieh; Khalili, Mina Norozi; Hamidi, Mahin; Danesh, Mahsa; Ziarat, Hadiseh Monadi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Drug addiction is one of the most flagrant social damages that can easily enervate the socio-cultural foundation of a country as well as endanger human dynamism. One of the prevalent problems among most addicted people is their low hope and relapse of drug dependence. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of vocational consultation (for training on problem-solving skills) on hope and relapse rate of patients treated in methadone maintenance clinics. Methods This experiment was conducted on 60 drug abusers treated in a methadone maintenance program in drug addiction centers in Bojnurd, Iran, in 2014. The patients were randomly and equally allocated into two study and control groups. All patients completed the Miller Hope Questionnaire before and after the intervention. Ten sessions of vocational consultation were held for the study group while the control group received no special treatment. Patients were followed up on for relapses for six months. Data were analyzed using SPSS (version 16) and the paired-samples t-test technique. Results The results indicated that the mean and standard deviation of hope on the pre-test in the study group increased on the post-test (from M=175.5, SD=31.8, to M=198.5, SD=20.4), while in the control group the mean of hope decreased from the pre-test to past-test stage (M=184.7, SD=27.7, to M=183.3, SD=26.1), showing a significant relationship, t(56)= 5.657, p<0.05. The relapse rate was not significantly different in the two groups. Conclusion The vocational consultation positively affects hope among drug dependents but did not affect their relapse rate during the six-month follow-up. Increasing the hope in these groups of patients may be effective in other aspects of treatment success in long-term follow-up. PMID:26955440

  7. Functional characterization of normal and degraded bovine meniscus: rate-dependent indentation and friction studies.

    PubMed

    Baro, Vincent J; Bonnevie, Edward D; Lai, Xiaohan; Price, Christopher; Burris, David L; Wang, Liyun

    2012-08-01

    The menisci are known to play important roles in normal joint function and the development of diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, our understanding of meniscus' load bearing and lubrication properties at the tissue level remains limited. The objective of this investigation was to characterize the site- and rate-dependency of the compressive and frictional responses of the meniscus under a spherical contact load. Using a custom testing device, indentation tests with rates of 1, 10, 25, 50, and 100μm/s were performed on bovine medial meniscus explants, which were harvested from five locations including the femoral apposing surface at the anterior, central, and posterior locations and the central portion at the deep layer and at the tibial apposing surface (n=5 per location). Sliding tests with rates of 0.05, 0.25, 1, and 5mm/s were performed on the central femoral aspect and central tibial aspect superficial samples (n=6 per location). A separate set of superficial samples were subjected to papain digestion and tested prior to and post treatment. Our findings are: i) the Hertz contact model can be used to fit the force responses of meniscus under the conditions tested; ii) the anterior region is significantly stiffer than the posterior region and tissue modulus does not vary with tissue depth at the central region; iii) the friction coefficient of the meniscus is on the order of 0.02 under migratory contacts and the femoral apposing surface tends to show lower friction than the tibial apposing surface; iv) the meniscus exhibits increased modulus and lubrication with increased indentation and sliding rates; v) matrix degradation impedes the functional load support and lubrication properties of the tissue. The site- and rate-dependent properties of the meniscus may be attributed to spatial variations of the tissue's biphasic structure. These properties substantiate the role of the meniscus as one of the important bearing surfaces of the knee. These data

  8. Rate-dependent phase transitions in Li2FeSiO4 cathode nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xia; Wei, Huijing; Chiu, Hsien-Chieh; Gauvin, Raynald; Hovington, Pierre; Guerfi, Abdelbast; Zaghib, Karim; Demopoulos, George P.

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured lithium metal orthosilicate materials hold a lot of promise as next generation cathodes but their full potential realization is hampered by complex crystal and electrochemical behavior. In this work Li2FeSiO4 crystals are synthesized using organic-assisted precipitation method. By varying the annealing temperature different structures are obtained, namely the monoclinic phase at 400°C, the orthorhombic phase at 900°C, and a mixed phase at 700°C. The three Li2FeSiO4 crystal phases exhibit totally different charge/discharge profiles upon delithiation/lithiation. Thus the 400°C monoclinic nanocrystals exhibit initially one Li extraction via typical solid solution reaction, while the 900°C orthorhombic crystals are characterized by unacceptably high cell polarization. In the meantime the mixed phase Li2FeSiO4 crystals reveal a mixed cycling profile. We have found that the monoclinic nanocrystals undergo phase transition to orthorhombic structure resulting in significant progressive deterioration of the material's Li storage capability. By contrast, we discovered when the monoclinic nanocrystals are cycled initially at higher rate (C/20) and subsequently subjected to low rate (C/50) cycling the material's intercalation performance is stabilized. The discovered rate-dependent electrochemically-induced phase transition and stabilization of lithium metal silicate structure provides a novel and potentially rewarding avenue towards the development of high capacity Li-ion cathodes. PMID:25715655

  9. Scale dependence of the alignment between strain rate and rotation in turbulent shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiscaletti, D.; Elsinga, G. E.; Attili, A.; Bisetti, F.; Buxton, O. R. H.

    2016-10-01

    The scale dependence of the statistical alignment tendencies of the eigenvectors of the strain-rate tensor ei, with the vorticity vector ω , is examined in the self-preserving region of a planar turbulent mixing layer. Data from a direct numerical simulation are filtered at various length scales and the probability density functions of the magnitude of the alignment cosines between the two unit vectors | ei.ω ̂| are examined. It is observed that the alignment tendencies are insensitive to the concurrent large-scale velocity fluctuations, but are quantitatively affected by the nature of the concurrent large-scale velocity-gradient fluctuations. It is confirmed that the small-scale (local) vorticity vector is preferentially aligned in parallel with the large-scale (background) extensive strain-rate eigenvector e1, in contrast to the global tendency for ω to be aligned in parallel with the intermediate strain-rate eigenvector [Hamlington et al., Phys. Fluids 20, 111703 (2008), 10.1063/1.3021055]. When only data from regions of the flow that exhibit strong swirling are included, the so-called high-enstrophy worms, the alignment tendencies are exaggerated with respect to the global picture. These findings support the notion that the production of enstrophy, responsible for a net cascade of turbulent kinetic energy from large scales to small scales, is driven by vorticity stretching due to the preferential parallel alignment between ω and nonlocal e1 and that the strongly swirling worms are kinematically significant to this process.

  10. Cooling rate dependence of simulated Cu64.5Zr35.5 metallic glass structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryltsev, R. E.; Klumov, B. A.; Chtchelkatchev, N. M.; Shunyaev, K. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations with embedded atom model potential, we study structural evolution of Cu64.5Zr35.5 alloy during the cooling in a wide range of cooling rates γ ∈ (1.5 ṡ 109, 1013) K/s. Investigating short- and medium-range orders, we show that the structure of Cu64.5Zr35.5 metallic glass essentially depends on cooling rate. In particular, a decrease of the cooling rate leads to an increase of abundances of both the icosahedral-like clusters and Frank-Kasper Z16 polyhedra. The amounts of these clusters in the glassy state drastically increase at the γmin = 1.5 ṡ 109 K/s. Analysing the structure of the glass at γmin, we observe the formation of nano-sized crystalline grain of Cu2Zr intermetallic compound with the structure of Cu2Mg Laves phase. The structure of this compound is isomorphous with that for Cu5Zr intermetallic compound. Both crystal lattices consist of two types of clusters: Cu-centered 13-atom icosahedral-like cluster and Zr-centered 17-atom Frank-Kasper polyhedron Z16. That suggests the same structural motifs for the metallic glass and intermetallic compounds of Cu-Zr system and explains the drastic increase of the abundances of these clusters observed at γmin.

  11. Rates of digestion of bacteria by marine phagotrophic protozoa: temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Sherr, B F; Sherr, E B; Rassoulzadegan, F

    1988-05-01

    The effect of temperature on length of time for digestion of bacteria was evaluated, by using fluorescently labeled bacteria (FLB), for phagotrophic flagellates and ciliates isolated from coastal northwest Mediterranean waters. Accumulation of FLB in protozoan food vacuoles was followed until a plateau of FLB per cell occurred; then after a 1:10 dilution of FLB with unlabeled bacteria, disappearance of FLB in food vacuoles was monitored. For both 3- to 5-mum flagellates and 10- to 40-mum ciliates, the absolute linear slopes of FLB uptake and disappearance were nearly identical in individual experiments over a temperature range of 12 to 22 degrees C. We inferred from these results that the leveling off of the uptake curves resulted when equilibrium between ingestion and digestion of bacteria was attained. The time to leveling off then represented the average time needed for complete digestion of the bacteria ingested at the start of the experiment, and the inverse of this time represented a bacterial digestion rate. The digestion rate increased exponentially from 12 to 22 degrees C for both a mixed flagellate assemblage and the oligotrichous ciliate Strombidium sulcatum, with a Q(10) of 2.8 for the flagellates and 2.0 for the ciliate. Although bacterial ingestion rates varied greatly, depending on protozoan cell size, total bacterial abundance, and temperature, digestion times appeared to be significantly influenced only by protozoan cell size (or type of protozoan) and by temperature.

  12. Timing and Variability of Galactose Metabolic Gene Activation Depend on the Rate of Environmental Change.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Huu, Truong D; Gupta, Chinmaya; Ma, Bo; Ott, William; Josić, Krešimir; Bennett, Matthew R

    2015-07-01

    Modulation of gene network activity allows cells to respond to changes in environmental conditions. For example, the galactose utilization network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated by the presence of galactose but repressed by glucose. If both sugars are present, the yeast will first metabolize glucose, depleting it from the extracellular environment. Upon depletion of glucose, the genes encoding galactose metabolic proteins will activate. Here, we show that the rate at which glucose levels are depleted determines the timing and variability of galactose gene activation. Paradoxically, we find that Gal1p, an enzyme needed for galactose metabolism, accumulates more quickly if glucose is depleted slowly rather than taken away quickly. Furthermore, the variability of induction times in individual cells depends non-monotonically on the rate of glucose depletion and exhibits a minimum at intermediate depletion rates. Our mathematical modeling suggests that the dynamics of the metabolic transition from glucose to galactose are responsible for the variability in galactose gene activation. These findings demonstrate that environmental dynamics can determine the phenotypic outcome at both the single-cell and population levels.

  13. Hypnotizability-dependent modulation of the changes in heart rate control induced by upright stance.

    PubMed

    Santarcangelo, Enrica L; Balocchi, Rita; Scattina, Eliana; Manzoni, Diego; Bruschini, Luca; Ghelarducci, Brunello; Varanini, Maurizio

    2008-03-28

    Subjects with high (Highs) and low (Lows) susceptibility to hypnosis show differences in the sensory-motor integration for postural control and in the cardiovascular response to stress and experimental pain. Aim of the experiment was to assess whether the cardiac response to gravity-related stimulation depending on changes in the body position were different in the two groups. Thus, heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) were evaluated in sitting and upright position in Highs and Lows. Position-related HRV changes were studied in the time (statistical indexes, Poincaré Plot) and frequency (spectral analysis) domain. Results indicated that upright stance was associated with similar changes in heart rate and different modulation of HRV in the two groups. The association of time and frequency domain analyses allowed hypothesizing different control mechanisms as responsible for the cardiac response to upright stance in Highs and Lows, likely due to a different role of the Very Low Frequency (VLF) spectral component of HRV in the two groups. The results are in line with previous findings indicating a natural protection of Highs against cardiovascular events and suggest that the Highs' cardiac function might be less impaired by microgravity than the Lows' one.

  14. Dependence of O+ escape rate from the Venusian upper atmosphere on IMF directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunaga, K.; Futaana, Y.; Stenberg, G.; Barabash, S.; Zhang, T. L.; Fedorov, A.; Okano, S.; Terada, N.

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the dependence of the O+ escape rate from the Venusian upper atmosphere on the upstream interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction. Using the data obtained from the Analyser of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA-4) instrument and the magnetometer (MAG) onboard Venus Express, O+ fluxes observed in the night side region is statistically calculated. The data is classified into two cases: the perpendicular IMF case and the parallel IMF case, where IMF is nearly perpendicular to the solar wind velocity and nearly parallel to it. In the period between June 21 2006 and May 31, 2010, the O+ escape rates of (5.8 ± 2.9) × 10^24 s^-1 (perpendicular IMF case) and (4.9 ± 2.2) × 10^24 s^-1 (parallel IMF case) are obtained. Since these values are not significantly different, we conclude that the IMF direction does not affect the total amount of O+ outflow from Venus. Several acceleration mechanisms must balance each other in order to keep the escape rate constant.

  15. Strain rate dependent calcite microfabric evolution - an experiment carried out by nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, Anna; Grasemann, Bernhard; Rice, A. Hugh N.; Huet, Benjamin; Habler, Gerlinde

    2013-04-01

    can be observed in the dislocation creep regime. Textures and the degree of intracrystalline deformation have been measured by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). While the host-rock grains do not show any significant crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO), those within the CE show a clear preferred orientation of both the c- and a-axes. Depending on the degree of recrystallization, the orientation of the c-axis changes from oblique to perpendicular to the CE-boundary while the a-axes begin to form a girdle within the CE-boundary. The results of this study will be compared with experimental data, closing the gap between experimental and natural geological strain rates.

  16. Dependence of the firearm-related homicide rate on gun availability: a mathematical analysis.

    PubMed

    Wodarz, Dominik; Komarova, Natalia L

    2013-01-01

    In the USA, the relationship between the legal availability of guns and the firearm-related homicide rate has been debated. It has been argued that unrestricted gun availability promotes the occurrence of firearm-induced homicides. It has also been pointed out that gun possession can protect potential victims when attacked. This paper provides a first mathematical analysis of this tradeoff, with the goal to steer the debate towards arguing about assumptions, statistics, and scientific methods. The model is based on a set of clearly defined assumptions, which are supported by available statistical data, and is formulated axiomatically such that results do not depend on arbitrary mathematical expressions. According to this framework, two alternative scenarios can minimize the gun-related homicide rate: a ban of private firearms possession, or a policy allowing the general population to carry guns. Importantly, the model identifies the crucial parameters that determine which policy minimizes the death rate, and thus serves as a guide for the design of future epidemiological studies. The parameters that need to be measured include the fraction of offenders that illegally possess a gun, the degree of protection provided by gun ownership, and the fraction of the population who take up their right to own a gun and carry it when attacked. Limited data available in the literature were used to demonstrate how the model can be parameterized, and this preliminary analysis suggests that a ban of private firearm possession, or possibly a partial reduction in gun availability, might lower the rate of firearm-induced homicides. This, however, should not be seen as a policy recommendation, due to the limited data available to inform and parameterize the model. However, the model clearly defines what needs to be measured, and provides a basis for a scientific discussion about assumptions and data.

  17. Rate-of-Change Dependence of the Performance of Two CGM Systems During Induced Glucose Swings

    PubMed Central

    Pleus, Stefan; Schoemaker, Michael; Morgenstern, Karin; Schmelzeisen-Redeker, Günther; Haug, Cornelia; Link, Manuela; Zschornack, Eva; Freckmann, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The accuracy of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems is often assessed with respect to blood glucose (BG) readings. CGM readings are affected by a physiological and a technical time delay when compared to BG readings. In this analysis, the dependence of CGM performance parameters on the BG rate of change was investigated for 2 CGM systems. Methods: Data from a previously published study were retrospectively analyzed. An established CGM system (Dexcom G4, Dexcom, San Diego, CA; system A) and a prototype system (Roche Diagnostics GmbH, Mannheim, Germany; system B) with 2 sensors each were worn by 10 subjects in parallel. Glucose swings were induced to achieve rapidly changing BG concentrations. Mean absolute relative differences (MARD) were calculated in different BG rate-of-change categories. In addition, sensor-to-sensor precision was assessed. Results: At BG rates of change of –1 mg/dl/min to 0 mg/dl/min and 0 mg/dl/min to +1 mg/dl/min, MARD results were 12.6% and 11.3% for system A and 8.2% and 10.0% for system B. At rapidly changing BG concentrations (<–3 mg/dl/min and ≥+3 mg/dl/min), higher MARD results were found for both systems, but system B was less affected (system A: 24.9% and 29.6%, system B: 10.6% and 16.3%). The impact of rate of change on sensor-to-sensor precision was less pronounced. Conclusions: Both systems were affected by rapidly changing BG concentrations to some degree, although system B was mostly unaffected by decreasing BG concentrations. It would seem that technological advancements in CGM systems might allow for a more precise tracking of BG concentrations even at rapidly changing BG concentrations. PMID:25852074

  18. Dependence of the Firearm-Related Homicide Rate on Gun Availability: A Mathematical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wodarz, Dominik; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2013-01-01

    In the USA, the relationship between the legal availability of guns and the firearm-related homicide rate has been debated. It has been argued that unrestricted gun availability promotes the occurrence of firearm-induced homicides. It has also been pointed out that gun possession can protect potential victims when attacked. This paper provides a first mathematical analysis of this tradeoff, with the goal to steer the debate towards arguing about assumptions, statistics, and scientific methods. The model is based on a set of clearly defined assumptions, which are supported by available statistical data, and is formulated axiomatically such that results do not depend on arbitrary mathematical expressions. According to this framework, two alternative scenarios can minimize the gun-related homicide rate: a ban of private firearms possession, or a policy allowing the general population to carry guns. Importantly, the model identifies the crucial parameters that determine which policy minimizes the death rate, and thus serves as a guide for the design of future epidemiological studies. The parameters that need to be measured include the fraction of offenders that illegally possess a gun, the degree of protection provided by gun ownership, and the fraction of the population who take up their right to own a gun and carry it when attacked. Limited data available in the literature were used to demonstrate how the model can be parameterized, and this preliminary analysis suggests that a ban of private firearm possession, or possibly a partial reduction in gun availability, might lower the rate of firearm-induced homicides. This, however, should not be seen as a policy recommendation, due to the limited data available to inform and parameterize the model. However, the model clearly defines what needs to be measured, and provides a basis for a scientific discussion about assumptions and data. PMID:23923062

  19. 46 CFR 196.15-20 - Hatches and other openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... responsibility of the master to assure himself that all exposed hatches and other openings in the hull of his... all respects properly secured for sea before leaving protected waters. (b) The openings to which this... not relieve the master of his responsibility for the safety of his vessel, equipment or persons...

  20. 46 CFR 196.15-20 - Hatches and other openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... responsibility of the master to assure himself that all exposed hatches and other openings in the hull of his... all respects properly secured for sea before leaving protected waters. (b) The openings to which this... not relieve the master of his responsibility for the safety of his vessel, equipment or persons...

  1. 46 CFR 97.15-20 - Hatches and other openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... stated in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, it shall be the responsibility of the master to assure... secured for sea before leaving protected waters. (2) A vessel engaged in a voyage exclusively on Great... not relieve the master of any responsibility for the securing and protection of his hatches during...

  2. 46 CFR 196.15-20 - Hatches and other openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... responsibility of the master to assure himself that all exposed hatches and other openings in the hull of his... all respects properly secured for sea before leaving protected waters. (b) The openings to which this... not relieve the master of his responsibility for the safety of his vessel, equipment or persons...

  3. 11. BUOY DECK, NEAR PILOT HOUSE SUPERSTRUCTURE, LOOKING TOWARDS HATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. BUOY DECK, NEAR PILOT HOUSE SUPERSTRUCTURE, LOOKING TOWARDS HATCH DOOR INTO WINCH ROOM IN THE SUPERSTRUCTURE (LABELED AT PASSAGE & HYDRAULIC MACHINERY ON PLAN). - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  4. 6. Detail of forward fuselage showing open cockpit hatch and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail of forward fuselage showing open cockpit hatch and ladder. View to southeast. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  5. 45 CFR 1226.10 - Hatch Act restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hatch Act restrictions. 1226.10 Section 1226.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY..., watcher or challenger for any party or faction, transporting voters to or from the polls, or...

  6. 45 CFR 1226.10 - Hatch Act restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hatch Act restrictions. 1226.10 Section 1226.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY..., watcher or challenger for any party or faction, transporting voters to or from the polls, or...

  7. 45 CFR 1226.10 - Hatch Act restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hatch Act restrictions. 1226.10 Section 1226.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY..., watcher or challenger for any party or faction, transporting voters to or from the polls, or...

  8. Oxygenation of anoxic sediments triggers hatching of zooplankton eggs.

    PubMed

    Broman, Elias; Brüsin, Martin; Dopson, Mark; Hylander, Samuel

    2015-10-22

    Many coastal marine systems have extensive areas with anoxic sediments and it is not well known how these conditions affect the benthic-pelagic coupling. Zooplankton lay their eggs in the pelagic zone, and some sink and lie dormant in the sediment, before hatched zooplankton return to the water column. In this study, we investigated how oxygenation of long-term anoxic sediments affects the hatching frequency of dormant zooplankton eggs. Anoxic sediments from the brackish Baltic Sea were sampled and incubated for 26 days with constant aeration whereby, the sediment surface and the overlying water were turned oxic. Newly hatched rotifers and copepod nauplii (juveniles) were observed after 5 and 8 days, respectively. Approximately 1.5 × 10(5) nauplii m(-2) emerged from sediment turned oxic compared with 0.02 × 10(5) m(-2) from controls maintained anoxic. This study demonstrated that re-oxygenation of anoxic sediments activated a large pool of buried zooplankton eggs, strengthening the benthic-pelagic coupling of the system. Modelling of the studied anoxic zone suggested that a substantial part of the pelagic copepod population can derive from hatching of dormant eggs. We suggest that this process should be included in future studies to understand population dynamics and carbon flows in marine pelagic systems.

  9. Oxygenation of anoxic sediments triggers hatching of zooplankton eggs

    PubMed Central

    Broman, Elias; Brüsin, Martin; Dopson, Mark; Hylander, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Many coastal marine systems have extensive areas with anoxic sediments and it is not well known how these conditions affect the benthic–pelagic coupling. Zooplankton lay their eggs in the pelagic zone, and some sink and lie dormant in the sediment, before hatched zooplankton return to the water column. In this study, we investigated how oxygenation of long-term anoxic sediments affects the hatching frequency of dormant zooplankton eggs. Anoxic sediments from the brackish Baltic Sea were sampled and incubated for 26 days with constant aeration whereby, the sediment surface and the overlying water were turned oxic. Newly hatched rotifers and copepod nauplii (juveniles) were observed after 5 and 8 days, respectively. Approximately 1.5 × 105 nauplii m−2 emerged from sediment turned oxic compared with 0.02 × 105 m−2 from controls maintained anoxic. This study demonstrated that re-oxygenation of anoxic sediments activated a large pool of buried zooplankton eggs, strengthening the benthic–pelagic coupling of the system. Modelling of the studied anoxic zone suggested that a substantial part of the pelagic copepod population can derive from hatching of dormant eggs. We suggest that this process should be included in future studies to understand population dynamics and carbon flows in marine pelagic systems. PMID:26468249

  10. HATCH CONNECTING TEMPERED AIR CHAMBER AND HOT AIR CHAMBER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HATCH CONNECTING TEMPERED AIR CHAMBER AND HOT AIR CHAMBER OF PLENUM WITH ATTACHED DRAFT REGULATOR. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Superior Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  11. PLAN SECTIONS AND DETAILS OF CELL HATCHES MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PLAN SECTIONS AND DETAILS OF CELL HATCHES MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP-601). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0601-00-291-103256. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 542-11-F-302. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. 29 CFR 1918.42 - Hatch beam and pontoon bridles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... inch (2.54 cm) longer than twice the largest diameter of the holes into which they are placed. (c... reach the holes, rings, or other lifting attachments on the hatch beams and pontoons easily; (2) Of adequate strength to lift the load safely; and (3) Properly maintained, including covering or blunting...

  13. 29 CFR 1918.42 - Hatch beam and pontoon bridles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... inch (2.54 cm) longer than twice the largest diameter of the holes into which they are placed. (c... reach the holes, rings, or other lifting attachments on the hatch beams and pontoons easily; (2) Of adequate strength to lift the load safely; and (3) Properly maintained, including covering or blunting...

  14. 3. VIEW OF WATER TANKS FROM ACCESS ROAD TO HATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF WATER TANKS FROM ACCESS ROAD TO HATCH ADIT. VIEW NORTH. LUCKY TIGER MILL OFFICE (FEATURE B-I) IN DISTANCE. (OCTOBER, 1995) - Nevada Lucky Tiger Mill & Mine, Water Tanks, East slope of Buckskin Mountain, Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, NV

  15. 11. BUOY DECK, NEAR PILOT HOUSE SUPERSTRUCTURE, LOOKING TOWARDS HATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. BUOY DECK, NEAR PILOT HOUSE SUPERSTRUCTURE, LOOKING TOWARDS HATCH DOOR INTO WINCH ROOM IN THE SUPERSTRUCTURE (LABELED AS FASSAGE & HYDRAULIC MACHINERY ON PLAN), SHOWING UNDERSIDE OF GEARED WHEEL OF BOOM. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE LUPINE, U.S. Coast Guard Station Rockland, east end of Tillson Avenue, Rockland, Knox County, ME

  16. DETAIL OF MISSILE TUBE HATCH WITH MILLED FITTINGS AT GROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF MISSILE TUBE HATCH WITH MILLED FITTINGS AT GROUND FLOOR LEVEL. VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. 2. WEST REAR, WITH PORTHOLE ESCAPE HATCH ABOVE ENTRY DOOR. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WEST REAR, WITH PORTHOLE ESCAPE HATCH ABOVE ENTRY DOOR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Endogenous and exogenous estrogens during embryonic development affect timing of hatch and growth in the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Cruze, Lori; Roark, Alison M; Rolland, Gabrielle; Younas, Mona; Stacy, Nicole; Guillette, Louis J

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal exposure to estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can affect length of gestation and body mass and size of offspring. However, the dose, timing, and duration of exposure as well as sex and strain of the experimental animals determine the direction and magnitude of these effects. In this study, we examined the effects of a one-time embryonic exposure to either 17 β-estradiol (E2) or bisphenol A (BPA) on rate of development and growth in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). Our results indicate that BPA and E2-treated alligators hatched approximately 1.4 days earlier than vehicle-treated (control) alligators, suggesting that estrogenic chemicals hasten hatching in these animals. We assessed growth rates, growth allometry, and body condition for 21 weeks after hatching and found that BPA-treated alligators grew more quickly shortly after hatching but more slowly thereafter compared to control alligators. Conversely, E2-treated alligators grew more slowly shortly after hatching but more quickly thereafter compared to control alligators. As a result of differences in growth rate, BPA-treated alligators were heavier, longer, and fatter than control alligators at age 5 weeks but were similar in size and leaner than control alligators at age 21 weeks. Biochemical analytes were examined at the end of the 21-week study to assess overall metabolic condition. We found that E2-treated alligators had significantly higher circulating plasma concentrations of cholesterol and triglycerides than control alligators while BPA-treated alligators had blood profiles comparable to control alligators. Our results provide important insights into the effects of exogenous estrogens on morphology and metabolism in an oviparous, semi-aquatic reptile.

  19. Next-Generation MKIII Lightweight HUT/Hatch Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, Mike; Toscano, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    The MK III (H-1) carbon-graphite/ epoxy Hard Upper Torso (HUT)/Hatch assembly was designed, fabricated, and tested in the early 1990s. The spacesuit represented an 8.3 psi (˜58 kPa) technology demonstrator model of a zero prebreathe suit. The basic torso shell, brief, and hip areas of the suit were composed of a carbon-graphite/epoxy composite lay-up. In its current configuration, the suit weighs approximately 120 lb (˜54 kg). However, since future planetary suits will be designed to operate at 0.26 bar (˜26 kPa), it was felt that the suit's re-designed weight could be reduced to 79 lb (˜35 kg) with the incorporation of lightweight structural materials. Many robust, lightweight structures based on the technologies of advanced honeycomb materials, revolutionary new composite laminates, metal matrix composites, and recent breakthroughs in fullerene fillers and nanotechnology lend themselves well to applications requiring materials that are both light and strong. The major problem involves the reduction in weight of the HUT/ Hatch assembly for use in lunar and/or planetary applications, while at the same time maintaining a robust structural design. The technical objective is to research, design, and develop manufacturing methods that support fa b rica - tion of a lightweight HUT/Hatch assembly using advanced material and geometric redesign as necessary. Additionally, the lightweight HUT/Hatch assembly will interface directly with current MK III hardware. Using the new operating pressure and current MK III (H-1) interfaces as a starting block, it is planned to maximize HUT/Hatch assembly weight reduction through material selection and geometric redesign. A hard upper torso shell structure with rear-entry closure and corresponding hatch will be fabricated. The lightweight HUT/Hatch assembly will retrofit and interface with existing MK III (H-1) hardware elements, providing NASA with immediate "plug-andplay" capability. NASA crewmembers will have a lightweight

  20. Analysis of proton exchange kinetics with time-dependent exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Kierdaszuk, Borys; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2010-04-01

    Mass spectrometry is used to probe the kinetics of hydrogen-deuterium exchange in lysozyme in pH 5, 6 and 7.4. An analysis based on a Verhulst growth model is proposed and effectively applied to the kinetics of the hydrogen exchange. The data are described by a power-like function which is based on a time-dependence of the exchange rate. Experimental data ranging over many time scales is considered and accurate fits of a power-like function are obtained. Results of fittings show correlation between faster hydrogen-deuterium exchange and increase of pH. Furthermore a model is presented that discriminates between easily exchangeable hydrogens (located in close proximity to the protein surface) and those protected from the exchange (located in the protein interior). A possible interpretation of the model and its biological significance are discussed.

  1. The dependence of irradiation creep in austenitic alloys on displacement rate and helium to dpa ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1998-03-01

    Before the parametric dependencies of irradiation creep can be confidently determined, analysis of creep data requires that the various creep and non-creep strains be separated, as well as separating the transient, steady-state, and swelling-driven components of creep. When such separation is attained, it appears that the steady-state creep compliance, B{sub o}, is not a function of displacement rate, as has been previously assumed. It also appears that the formation and growth of helium bubbles under high helium generation conditions can lead to a significant enhancement of the irradiation creep coefficient. This is a transient influence that disappears as void swelling begins to dominate the total strain, but this transient can increase the apparent creep compliance by 100--200% at relatively low ({le}20) dpa levels.

  2. High initiation rates at the ribosomal gene promoter do not depend upon spacer transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Labhart, P; Reeder, R H

    1989-01-01

    We report experiments that test the model that in Xenopus laevis, RNA polymerase I is "handed over" in a conservative fashion from the T3 terminator to the adjacent gene promoter. We have introduced transcription-terminating lesions into the ribosomal DNA repeat by irradiating cultured cells with ultraviolet light. We used isolated nuclei to measure the effect of such lesions on transcription. UV damage sufficient to prevent all elongating RNA polymerase from reaching T3 from upstream had no adverse effect on the density of RNA polymerase at the very 5' end of the gene. We conclude that high rates of transcription initiation at the gene promoter do not depend upon polymerase passing from one repeat to the next or on polymerase initiating at the spacer promoters. Images PMID:2470092

  3. Irradiation swelling behavior and its dependence on temperature, dose rate and dislocation structure evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Surh, M P; Sturgeon, J B; Wolfer, W G

    2004-01-16

    The microstructural evolution of high purity steel under irradiation is modeled including a dislocation density that evolves simultaneously with void nucleation and growth. The predicted void swelling trends versus temperature, flux, and time are compared to experiment and to earlier calculations with a fixed dislocation density. The behavior is further analyzed within a simplified picture of segregation of irradiation defects to microstructural sinks. Agreement with experimental swelling behavior improves when dislocations co-evolve with the void content versus simulations with a fixed dislocation density. The time-dependent dislocation content dictates the rate of void nucleation and shapes the overall void size distribution so as to give steady swelling behavior over long times.

  4. Temperature dependence of the NO + O3 reaction rate from 195 to 369 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Allen, J. E., Jr.; Brobst, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the NO + O3 reaction rate was examined by means of the fast flow technique. Several different experimental conditions and detection schemes were employed. With excess NO or excess O3, NO2 chemiluminescence was monitored. In addition, with excess O3, NO was followed by fluorescence induced by an NO microwave discharge lamp. The results of the three independent sets of data are compared and found to agree within experimental error, indicating the absence of secondary chemistry which might complicate the kinetics. The data exhibit curvature on an Arrhenius plot; however, the simple Arrhenius expression k = (2.6 + or - 0.8) x 10 to the -12th exp(-1435 + or - 64/T) cu cm/molecule s is an adequate description for T between 195 and 369 K. This result is compared to earlier determinations.

  5. [Electron transfer between globular proteins. Dependence of the rate of transfer on distance].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Chuev, G N; Ustinin, M N; Komarov, V M

    1998-01-01

    Based on the assumption that electron transfer between globular proteins occurs by a collective excitation of polaron type, the dependence of the rate of this process on the distance between the donor and acceptor centers with regard to their detailed electron structure was calculated. The electron structure of the heme was calculated by the quantum-chemical MNDO-PM3 method. The results were compared with experimental data on interprotein and intraglobular electron transfer. It is shown that, in the framework of this model, the electron transfer is not exponential and does not require a particular transfer pathway since the whole protein macromolecule is involved in the formation of the electron excited state.

  6. A Model for Rate-Dependent Hysteresis in Piezoceramic Materials Operating at Low Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ralph C.; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Wieman, Robert

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses the modeling of certain rate-dependent mechanisms which contribute to hysteresis inherent to piezoelectric materials operating at low frequencies. While quasistatic models are suitable for initial material characterization in some applications, the reduction in coercive field and polarization values which occur as frequencies increase must be accommodated to achieve the full capabilities of the materials. The model employed here quantifies the hysteresis in two steps. In the first, anhysteretic polarization switching is modeled through the application of Boltzmann principles to balance the electrostatic and thermal energy. Hysteresis is then incorporated through the quantification of energy required to translate and bend domain walls pinned at inclusions inherent to the materials. The performance of the model is illustrated through a fit to low frequency data (0.1 Hz - 1 Hz) from a PZT5A wafer.

  7. Pressure dependence on the reaction propagation rate of PETN at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Foltz, M.F.

    1993-04-01

    The reaction propagation rate (RPR) of the sensitive high explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) was measured in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) over the pressure range of 2--20 GPa. The experimental technique used is the same as that previously reported. The RPR data shows that it burns one to two orders of magnitude faster in the DAC than 1,3,5,-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and nitromethane (CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}) respectively. The PETN RPR curve did not show sample pressure-dependent behavior like that of nitromethane, but instead varied abruptly like the RPR curve of TATB. In order to interpret these changes, static-pressure DAC mid-IR FTIR spectra were taken of micro-pellets of PETN embedded in KBr. The relationship between changes in the spectra, the RPR curve, and published single crystal PETN wedge test data are discussed.

  8. Interpretation of the temperature dependence of rate constants in biosensor studies.

    PubMed

    Winzor, Donald J; Jackson, Craig M

    2005-02-15

    A comparison is made between Arrhenius and transition-state analyses of the temperature dependence of rate constants reported in four published biosensor studies. Although the Eyring transition-state theory seemingly affords a more definitive solution to the problem of characterizing the activation energetics, the analysis is equivocal because of inherent assumptions about reaction mechanism and the magnitude of the transmission coefficient. In view of those uncertainties it is suggested that a preferable course of action entails reversion to the empirical Arrhenius analysis with regard to the energy of activation and a preexponential factor. The former is essentially equivalent to the enthalpy of activation, whereas the magnitude of the latter indicates directly the extent of disparity between the frequency of product formation and the universal frequency factor (temperature multiplied by the ratio of the Boltzmann and Planck constants) and hence the likelihood of a more complicated kinetic mechanism than that encompassed by the Eyring transition-state theory.

  9. Oncogenic transformation through the cell cycle and the LET dependent inverse dose rate effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geard, C. R.; Miller, R. C.; Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.; Wachholz, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Synchronised populations of mouse C3H/10T-1/2 cells were obtained by a stringent mitotic dislodgment procedure. Mitotic cells rapidly attach and progress sequentially through the cell cycle. Irradiation (3 Gy of X rays) was carried out at intervals from 0 to 18 h after initiating cell cycle progression of the mitotic cells. Oncogenic transformation was enhanced 10-fold over cells irradiated soon after replating (G1 and S phases) for cells in a near 2 h period corresponding to cells in G2 phase but not in mitosis. The cell surviving fraction had a 2-1/2-fold variation with resistant peaks corresponding to the late G1 and late S phases. These findings provide experimental support for the hypothesis initiated by Rossi and Kellerer and developed by Brenner and Hall to explain the LET dependent inverse dose rate effect for oncogenic transformation.

  10. Rate-Dependent Stiffness and Recovery in Interpenetrating Network Hydrogels through Sacrificial Metal Coordination Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Menyo, Matthew S.; Hawker, Craig J.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Four-arm poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) star polymers modified with 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone (HOPO) end groups were shown to form transient, coordination networks upon addition of trivalent cations In3+, Fe3+, and Al3+. These coordination-based hydrogels exhibited high activation energies of viscoelasticity (34 kT) and characteristic bond lifetimes tunable over 2 orders of magnitude and could be incorporated into poly(hydroxyethylacrylamide)-based covalent scaffolds to create interpenetrating network hydrogels. Measurements carried out in compression and tension demonstrate that the secondary coordination network imparts toughness and stiffness to the overall material, and unlike traditional interpenetrating networks (IPNs), the extent of toughening is dependent on the rate at which the materials are deformed. The dynamic character of the coordination network also allows recovery after mechanical damage following high amplitude strains. PMID:27818845

  11. Earthquake nucleation on faults with rate-and state-dependent strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    Dieterich, J.H., 1992. Earthquake nucleation on faults with rate- and state-dependent strength. In: T. Mikumo, K. Aki, M. Ohnaka, L.J. Ruff and P.K.P. Spudich (Editors), Earthquake Source Physics and Earthquake Precursors. Tectonophysics, 211: 115-134. Faults with rate- and state-dependent constitutive properties reproduce a range of observed fault slip phenomena including spontaneous nucleation of slip instabilities at stresses above some critical stress level and recovery of strength following slip instability. Calculations with a plane-strain fault model with spatially varying properties demonstrate that accelerating slip precedes instability and becomes localized to a fault patch. The dimensions of the fault patch follow scaling relations for the minimum critical length for unstable fault slip. The critical length is a function of normal stress, loading conditions and constitutive parameters which include Dc, the characteristic slip distance. If slip starts on a patch that exceeds the critical size, the length of the rapidly accelerating zone tends to shrink to the characteristic size as the time of instability approaches. Solutions have been obtained for a uniform, fixed-patch model that are in good agreement with results from the plane-strain model. Over a wide range of conditions, above the steady-state stress, the logarithm of the time to instability linearly decreases as the initial stress increases. Because nucleation patch length and premonitory displacement are proportional to Dc, the moment of premonitory slip scales by D3c. The scaling of Dc is currently an open question. Unless Dc for earthquake faults is significantly greater than that observed on laboratory faults, premonitory strain arising from the nucleation process for earthquakes may by too small to detect using current observation methods. Excluding the possibility that Dc in the nucleation zone controls the magnitude of the subsequent earthquake, then the source dimensions of the smallest

  12. Growth rates of rhizosphere microorganisms depend on competitive abilities of plants for nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Littschwager, Johanna; Lauerer, Marianna; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2010-05-01

    Rhizosphere - one of the most important ‘hot spots' in soil - is characterized not only by accelerated turnover of microbial biomass and nutrients but also by strong intra- and inter-specific competition. Intra-specific competition occurs between individual plants of the same species, while inter-specific competition can occur both at population level (plant species-specific, microbial species-specific interactions) and at community level (plant - microbial interactions). Such plant - microbial interactions are mainly governed by competition for available N sources, since N is one of the main growth limiting nutrients in natural ecosystems. Functional structure and activity of microbial community in rhizosphere is not uniform and is dependent on quantity and quality of root exudates which are plant specific. It is still unclear how microbial growth and turnover in the rhizosphere are dependent on the features and competitive abilities of plants for N. Depending on C and N availability, acceleration and even retardation of microbial activity and carbon mineralization can be expected in the rhizosphere of plants with high competitive abilities for N. We hypothesized slower microbial growth rates in the rhizosphere of plants with smaller roots, as they usually produce less exudates compared to plants with small shoot-to-root ratio. As the first hypothesis is based solely on C availability, we also expected the greater effect of N availability on microbial growth in rhizosphere of plants with smaller root mass. These hypothesis were tested for two plant species of strawberry: Fragaria vesca L. (native species), and Duchesnea indica (Andrews) Focke (an invasive plant in central Europe) growing in intraspecific and interspecific competition. Microbial biomass and the kinetic parameters of microbial growth in the rhizosphere were estimated by dynamics of CO2 emission from the soil amended with glucose and nutrients. Specific growth rate (µ) of soil microorganisms was

  13. Hatch: Moving towards seamless database protocols for ecological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremier, A. K.; Blair, C.; Smith, S.; Weigel, D.; Newsom, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Data collection and ecological processes do not occur at similar scales. Monitoring our environment, therefore, requires research approaches that integrate data across spatial and temporal scales. Despite the enormous amount of data being collected annually, many government agencies are only now beginning to build coordinated data management systems. With efficient data flows and coded analysis tools, researchers will be better prepared to quickly answer key ecological questions across datasets. In this project, we designed an online platform for seamless data management, called Hatch. Our aim is to improve database protocols and data access to allow timely analysis of existing data, across time and space. Hatch is being developed for ecological monitoring of stream ecosystems in the Methow River basin in Washington State; however, the platform is general enough for managing multiple forms of database types. Hatch currently applies both a schema and schema-less database structure to link data collection events. It applies data standards developed and accepted across the Columbia River Basin. Initial data capture is driven by data needs for a mechanism-based model of ecosystem processes (namely periphyton production). Input data files, both past and current flows, are validated and stored along with metadata. Data search tools are being designed in accordance with data sharing agreements with appropriate security. The goal of Hatch is to defragment the analysis workspace by integrating data capture, search and analysis. Hatch helps researchers capture, search and analyze data in an online, flexible platform while conforming to project a specific schema. With less fragmented database protocols, scientists will be better prepared to efficiently answer scientific questions at relevant ecological scales.

  14. Physical analysis of the state- and rate-dependent friction law. II. Dynamic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, T.; Berthoud, P.; Caroli, C.

    1999-08-01

    We report an extensive study of dynamic friction at nonlubricated multicontact interfaces between nominally flat bodies, rough on the micrometer scale, made of identical polymer glasses. This work, which complements a previous study of static friction on the same systems, has been performed at temperatures ranging from 20 °C to close below the glass transitions. The data are analyzed within the framework of the Rice-Ruina state- and rate-dependent friction model. We show that this phenomenology is equivalent to a generalized Tabor decomposition of the friction force into the product of an age-dependent load-bearing area and of a velocity-strengthening interfacial shear stress. Quantitative analysis of this latter term leads to associate velocity strengthening with thermal activation of basic dynamical units of nanometer dimensions. We interpret our results with the help of a model due to Persson, in which shear is localized in a nanometer-thick interfacial adhesive layer, pinned elastically at a low shear level. Sliding proceeds via uncorrelated depinning of ``nanoblocks'' which constitute the layer. It is the competition between the drive-induced loading of these blocks up to their depinning stress and the thermally activated premature depinning events which leads to the velocity-strengthening contribution to the interfacial strength. In our interpretation, friction therefore appears as the localized elastoplastic response of a confined amorphous interfacial layer.

  15. Temperature dependence of the NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate for spin-1/2 chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coira, E.; Barmettler, P.; Giamarchi, T.; Kollath, C.

    2016-10-01

    We use recent developments in the framework of a time-dependent matrix product state method to compute the nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation rate 1 /T1 for spin-1/2 chains under magnetic field and for different Hamiltonians (XXX, XXZ, isotropically dimerized). We compute numerically the temperature dependence of the 1 /T1 . We consider both gapped and gapless phases, and also the proximity of quantum critical points. At temperatures much lower than the typical exchange energy scale, our results are in excellent agreement with analytical results, such as the ones derived from the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) theory and bosonization, which are valid in this regime. We also cover the regime for which the temperature T is comparable to the exchange coupling. In this case analytical theories are not appropriate, but this regime is relevant for various new compounds with exchange couplings in the range of tens of Kelvin. For the gapped phases, either the fully polarized phase for spin chains or the low-magnetic-field phase for the dimerized systems, we find an exponential decrease in Δ /(kBT ) of the relaxation time and can compute the gap Δ . Close to the quantum critical point our results are in good agreement with the scaling behavior based on the existence of free excitations.

  16. Model for charge/discharge-rate-dependent plastic flow in amorphous battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosrownejad, S. M.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-09-01

    Plastic flow is an important mechanism for relaxing stresses that develop due to swelling/shrinkage during charging/discharging of battery materials. Amorphous high-storage-capacity Li-Si has lower flow stresses than crystalline materials but there is evidence that the plastic flow stress depends on the conditions of charging and discharging, indicating important non-equilibrium aspects to the flow behavior. Here, a mechanistically-based constitutive model for rate-dependent plastic flow in amorphous materials, such as LixSi alloys, during charging and discharging is developed based on two physical concepts: (i) excess energy is stored in the material during electrochemical charging and discharging due to the inability of the amorphous material to fully relax during the charging/discharging process and (ii) this excess energy reduces the barriers for plastic flow processes and thus reduces the applied stresses necessary to cause plastic flow. The plastic flow stress is thus a competition between the time scales of charging/discharging and the time scales of glassy relaxation. The two concepts, as well as other aspects of the model, are validated using molecular simulations on a model Li-Si system. The model is applied to examine the plastic flow behavior of typical specimen geometries due to combined charging/discharging and stress history, and the results generally rationalize experimental observations.

  17. An information-theoretic approach to evaluating the size and temperature dependence of metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    White, Craig R; Frappell, Peter B; Chown, Steven L

    2012-09-07

    The effects of body mass and temperature on metabolic rate (MR) are among the most widely examined physiological relationships. Recently, these relationships have been incorporated into the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) that links the ecology of populations, communities and ecosystems to the MR of individual organisms. The fundamental equation of MTE derives the relation between mass and MR using first principles and predicts the temperature dependence of MR based on biochemical kinetics. It is a deliberately simple, zeroth-order approximation that represents a baseline against which variation in real biological systems can be examined. In the present study, we evaluate the fundamental equation of MTE against other more parameter-rich models for MR using an information-theoretic approach to penalize the inclusion of additional parameters. Using a comparative database of MR measurements for 1359 species, from 11 groups ranging from prokaryotes to mammals, and spanning 16 orders of magnitude in mass and a 59°C range in body temperature, we show that differences between taxa in the mass and temperature dependence of MR are sufficiently large as to be retained in the best model for MR despite the requirement for estimation of 22 more parameters than the fundamental equation of MTE.

  18. An information-theoretic approach to evaluating the size and temperature dependence of metabolic rate

    PubMed Central

    White, Craig R.; Frappell, Peter B.; Chown, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of body mass and temperature on metabolic rate (MR) are among the most widely examined physiological relationships. Recently, these relationships have been incorporated into the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) that links the ecology of populations, communities and ecosystems to the MR of individual organisms. The fundamental equation of MTE derives the relation between mass and MR using first principles and predicts the temperature dependence of MR based on biochemical kinetics. It is a deliberately simple, zeroth-order approximation that represents a baseline against which variation in real biological systems can be examined. In the present study, we evaluate the fundamental equation of MTE against other more parameter-rich models for MR using an information-theoretic approach to penalize the inclusion of additional parameters. Using a comparative database of MR measurements for 1359 species, from 11 groups ranging from prokaryotes to mammals, and spanning 16 orders of magnitude in mass and a 59°C range in body temperature, we show that differences between taxa in the mass and temperature dependence of MR are sufficiently large as to be retained in the best model for MR despite the requirement for estimation of 22 more parameters than the fundamental equation of MTE. PMID:22673353

  19. Diffusion dependence of proton NMR relaxation rates in the presence of ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Michael; Hammel, P. Chris

    2009-03-01

    Ferritin is the predominant iron-storage protein in living organisms. It may serve as an indicator of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. Measuring brain ferritin concentration non-invasively via MRI could enable better diagnoses and treatments of such diseases. Quantitative MRI determination of the ferritin concentration requires an understanding of the NMR relaxation mechanisms of hydrogen protons in the presence of ferritin. In aqueous solutions, ferritin enhances the transverse relaxation rate (R2) of the protons. This is thought to occur due to a diffusive mechanism, where protons diffusing near ferritin pass through a region of elevated magnetic field, and a chemical exchange mechanism, where protons bind to the protein for a period of time, experiencing an even higher magnetic field. These two mechanisms exhibit different dependencies on the self-diffusion coefficient of the protons. By adding glycerol to aqueous solutions, we control the self-diffusion of protons. We measure the R2 of protons in ferritin-containing binary mixtures of water and glycerol using CPMG sequences, and compare the experimental results to theoretical predictions of diffusion dependence in order to distinguish the relative importance of the mechanisms.

  20. Zebrafish high-throughput screening to study the impact of dissolvable metal oxide nanoparticles on the hatching enzyme, ZHE1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sijie; Zhao, Yan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Ear, Jason; Chang, Chong Hyun; Zhang, Haiyuan; Low-Kam, Cecile; Yamada, Kristin; Meng, Huan; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Rong; Pokhrel, Suman; Mädler, Lutz; Damoiseaux, Robert; Xia, Tian; Godwin, Hilary A; Lin, Shuo; Nel, André E

    2013-05-27

    The zebrafish is emerging as a model organism for the safety assessment and hazard ranking of engineered nanomaterials. In this Communication, the implementation of a roboticized high-throughput screening (HTS) platform with automated image analysis is demonstrated to assess the impact of dissolvable oxide nanoparticles on embryo hatching. It is further demonstrated that this hatching interference is mechanistically linked to an effect on the metalloprotease, ZHE 1, which is responsible for degradation of the chorionic membrane. The data indicate that 4 of 24 metal oxide nanoparticles (CuO, ZnO, Cr2 O3 , and NiO) could interfere with embryo hatching by a chelator-sensitive mechanism that involves ligation of critical histidines in the ZHE1 center by the shed metal ions. A recombinant ZHE1 enzymatic assay is established to demonstrate that the dialysates from the same materials responsible for hatching interference also inhibit ZHE1 activity in a dose-dependent fashion. A peptide-based BLAST search identifies several additional aquatic species that express enzymes with homologous histidine-based catalytic centers, suggesting that the ZHE1 mechanistic paradigm could be used to predict the toxicity of a large number of oxide nanoparticles that pose a hazard to aquatic species.

  1. Depth-dependence of the production rate of in-situ 14-C in quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupker, Maarten; Hippe, Kristina; Kober, Florian; Wacker, Lukas; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier; Vidal Romani, Juan; Wieler, Rainer

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides provide a means to document and quantify the rates of changes of the landscape at the Earth's surface and have therefore received an increasing attention over the past decade. The short lived in-situ produced 14-C has recently emerged as a complement to other longer lived cosmogenic nuclides such as 10-Be or 26-Al. The short half-life (5730 yr) of 14-C makes it suitable to investigate surface processes such as denudation rates or sediment residence times on ka scales. The wide application of in-situ 14-C for quantitative studies is however bound to the proper calibration of its production mechanisms and rates. As other cosmogenic nuclides, 14-C is produced at the Earth's surface by nuclear reactions with incoming neutrons and muons. The production rate of 14-C has been determined for quartz exposed at the surface where neutrons dominate the overall production [1]. At depth, however, the muon production pathway starts to dominate, because the mean attenuation length of muons is considerably longer than that of neutrons. So far, the muon derived in-situ 14-C production rate is solely based on theoretical and experimental work [2] that has not been tested on natural objects. We measured the 14-C concentration in quartz along the Leymon High core (42.065 N, 7.014 E - alt: 1277 m; Northwestern Spain) using the ETH 14-C extraction line [3] and the MICADAS gas source AMS [4]. This core has been drilled down to 20 m in a quartz dyke and has already been used to refine the depth-dependent production rate of 10-Be and 26-Al [5]. Our results on 14 samples of this core spanning a depth range from 1 to 1545 cm allow us to estimate the muogenic contribution to the overall 14-C concentrations measured along the core. This data set yields a local surface muon production rate of 3.9 (+3.1, -0.6) at.g-1.yr-1, which translates into a surface Sea Level High Latitude muon production rate of 2.2 (+1.8, -0.4) at.g-1.yr-1. This is ca. 17 % of the SLHL

  2. Size and shape dependent photoluminescence and excited state decay rates of diamondoids.

    PubMed

    Richter, Robert; Wolter, David; Zimmermann, Tobias; Landt, Lasse; Knecht, Andre; Heidrich, Christoph; Merli, Andrea; Dopfer, Otto; Reiss, Philipp; Ehresmann, Arno; Petersen, Jens; Dahl, Jeremy E; Carlson, Robert M K; Bostedt, Christoph; Möller, Thomas; Mitric, Roland; Rander, Torbjörn

    2014-02-21

    We present photoluminescence spectra and excited state decay rates of a series of diamondoids, which represent molecular structural analogues to hydrogen-passivated bulk diamond. Specific isomers of the five smallest diamondoids (adamantane-pentamantane) have been brought into the gas phase and irradiated with synchrotron radiation. All investigated compounds show intrinsic photoluminescence in the ultraviolet spectral region. The emission spectra exhibit pronounced vibrational fine structure which is analyzed using quantum chemical calculations. We show that the geometrical relaxation of the first excited state of adamantane, exhibiting Rydberg character, leads to the loss of Td symmetry. The luminescence of adamantane is attributed to a transition from the delocalized first excited state into different vibrational modes of the electronic ground state. Similar geometrical changes of the excited state structure have also been identified in the other investigated diamondoids. The excited state decay rates show a clear dependence on the size of the diamondoid, but are independent of the particle geometry, further indicating a loss of particle symmetry upon electronic excitation.

  3. On the temperature dependence of the rate coefficient of formation of C2+ from C + CH+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampino, S.; Pastore, M.; Garcia, E.; Pacifici, L.; Laganà, A.

    2016-08-01

    We carry out quasi-classical trajectory calculations for the C + CH+→ C_2^+ + H reaction on an ad hoc computed high-level ab initio potential energy surface. Thermal rate coefficients at the temperatures of relevance in cold interstellar clouds are derived and compared with the assumed, temperature-independent estimates publicly available in kinetic data bases KIDA and UDfA. For a temperature of 10 K the data base value overestimates by a factor of 2 the one obtained by us (thus improperly enhancing the destruction route of CH+ in astrochemical kinetic models) which is seen to double in the temperature range 5-300 K with a sharp increase in the first 50 K. The computed values are fitted via the popular Arrhenius-Kooij formula and best-fitting parameters α = 1.32 × 10-9 cm3 s-1, β = 0.1 and γ = 2.19 K to be included in the online mentioned data bases are provided. Further investigation shows that the temperature dependence of the thermal rate coefficient better conforms to the recently proposed so-called `deformed Arrhenius' law by Aquilanti and Mundim.

  4. Long range dependence in the high frequency USD/INR exchange rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dilip

    2014-02-01

    Using high frequency data, this paper examines the long memory property in the unconditional and conditional volatility of the USD/INR exchange rate at different time scales using the Local Whittle (LW), the Exact Local Whittle (ELW) and the FIAPARCH models. Results indicate that the long memory property remains quite stable across different time scales for both unconditional and conditional volatility measures. Results from the non-overlapping moving window approach indicate that the extreme events (such as the subprime crisis and the European debt crisis) resulted in highly persistent behavior of the USD/INR exchange rate and thus lead to market inefficiency. This paper also examines the long memory property in the realized volatility based on different time scale data. Results indicate that the realized volatility measures based on different scales of the high frequency data exhibit a consistent and stable long memory property. However, the realized volatility measures based on daily data exhibit lower degree of long-range dependence. This study has implications for traders and investors (with different trading horizons) and can be helpful in predicting expected future volatility and in designing and implementing trading strategies at different time scales.

  5. Comparing Time-Dependent Geomagnetic and Atmospheric Effects on Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Rate Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    A recently published cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling model based on analytical fits to Monte Carlo simulations of atmospheric cosmic ray flux spectra (both of which agree well with measured spectra) (Lifton et al., 2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 386, 149-160: termed the LSD model) provides two main advantages over previous scaling models: identification and quantification of potential sources of bias in the earlier models, and the ability to generate nuclide-specific scaling factors easily for a wide range of input parameters. The new model also provides a flexible framework for exploring the implications of advances in model inputs. In this work, the scaling implications of two recent time-dependent spherical harmonic geomagnetic models spanning the Holocene will be explored. Korte and Constable (2011, Phys. Earth Planet. Int. 188, 247-259) and Korte et al. (2011, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 312, 497-505) recently updated earlier spherical harmonic paleomagnetic models used by Lifton et al. (2014) with paleomagnetic measurements from sediment cores in addition to archeomagnetic and volcanic data. These updated models offer improved accuracy over the previous versions, in part to due to increased temporal and spatial data coverage. With the new models as input, trajectory-traced estimates of effective vertical cutoff rigidity (RC- the standard method for ordering cosmic ray data) yield significantly different time-integrated scaling predictions when compared to the earlier models. These results will be compared to scaling predictions using another recent time-dependent spherical harmonic model of the Holocene geomagnetic field by Pavón-Carrasco et al. (2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 388, 98-109), based solely on archeomagnetic and volcanic paleomagnetic data, but extending to 14 ka. In addition, the potential effects of time-dependent atmospheric models on LSD scaling predictions will be presented. Given the typical dominance of altitudinal over

  6. Factors Affecting Growth of Tengmalm’s Owl (Aegolius funereus) Nestlings: Prey Abundance, Sex and Hatching Order

    PubMed Central

    Zárybnická, Markéta; Riegert, Jan; Brejšková, Lucie; Šindelář, Jiří; Kouba, Marek; Hanel, Jan; Popelková, Alena; Menclová, Petra; Tomášek, Václav; Šťastný, Karel

    2015-01-01

    In altricial birds, energy supply during growth is a major predictor of the physical condition and survival prospects of fledglings. A number of experimental studies have shown that nestling body mass and wing length can vary with particular extrinsic factors, but between-year observational data on this topic are scarce. Based on a seven-year observational study in a central European Tengmalm’s owl population we examine the effect of year, brood size, hatching order, and sex on nestling body mass and wing length, as well as the effect of prey abundance on parameters of growth curve. We found that nestling body mass varied among years, and parameters of growth curve, i.e. growth rate and inflection point in particular, increased with increasing abundance of the owl’s main prey (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles), and pooled prey abundance (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles, and Sorex shrews). Furthermore, nestling body mass varied with hatching order and between sexes being larger for females and for the first-hatched brood mates. Brood size had no effect on nestling body mass. Simultaneously, we found no effect of year, brood size, hatching order, or sex on the wing length of nestlings. Our findings suggest that in this temperate owl population, nestling body mass is more sensitive to prey abundance than is wing length. The latter is probably more limited by the physiology of the species. PMID:26444564

  7. Biomolecular Origin of The Rate-Dependent Deformation of Prismatic Enamel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J; Hsiung, L

    2006-07-05

    Penetration deformation of columnar prismatic enamel was investigated using instrumented nanoindentation testing, carried out at three constant strain rates (0.05 s{sup -1}, 0.005 s{sup -1}, and 0.0005 s{sup -1}). Enamel demonstrated better resistance to penetration deformation and greater elastic modulus values were measured at higher strain rates. The origin of the rate-dependent deformation was rationalized to be the shear deformation of nanoscale protein matrix surrounding each hydroxyapatite crystal rods. And the shear modulus of protein matrix was shown to depend on strain rate in a format: G{sub p} = 0.213 + 0.021 ln {dot {var_epsilon}}. Most biological composites compromise reinforcement mineral components and an organic matrix. They are generally partitioned into multi-level to form hierarchical structures that have supreme resistance to crack growth [1]. The molecular mechanistic origin of toughness is associated with the 'sacrificial chains' between the individual sub-domains in a protein molecule [2]. As the protein molecule is stretched, these 'sacrificial chains' break to protect its backbone and dissipate energy [3]. Such fresh insights are providing new momentum toward updating our understanding of biological materials [4]. Prismatic enamel in teeth is one such material. Prismatic microstructure is frequently observed in the surface layers of many biological materials, as exemplified in mollusk shells [5] and teeth [6]. It is a naturally optimized microstructure to bear impact loading and penetration deformation. In teeth, the columnar prismatic enamel provides mechanical and chemical protection for the relatively soft dentin layer. Its mechanical behavior and reliability are extremely important to ensure normal tooth function and human health. Since enamel generally contains up to 95% hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals and less than 5% protein matrix, it is commonly believed to be a weak and brittle material with little resistance to fracture [7]. This

  8. Ensemble Monte Carlo calculation of the hole initiated impact ionization rate in bulk GaAs and silicon using a k-dependent, numerical transition rate formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oguzman, Ismail H.; Wang, Yang; Kolnik, Jan; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1995-01-01

    The hole initiated impact ionization rate in bulk silicon and GaAs is calculated using a numerical formulation of the impact ionization transition rate incorporated into an ensemble Monte Carlo simulation. The transition rate is calculated from Fermi's golden rule using a two-body screened Coulomb interaction including a wavevector dependent dielectric function. It is found that the effective threshold for hole initiated ionization is relatively soft in both materials, that the split-off band dominates the ionization process in GaAs. and that no clear dominance by any one band is observed in silicon, though the rate out of the light hole band is greatest.

  9. Relative contribution of articular cartilage's constitutive components to load support depending on strain rate.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, J M Párraga; Wilson, W; Ito, K; van Donkelaar, C C

    2017-02-01

    Cartilage is considered a biphasic material in which the solid is composed of proteoglycans and collagen. In biphasic tissue, the hydraulic pressure is believed to bear most of the load under higher strain rates and its dissipation due to fluid flow determines creep and relaxation behavior. In equilibrium, hydraulic pressure is zero and load bearing is transferred to the solid matrix. The viscoelasticity of the collagen network also contributes to its time-dependent behavior, and the osmotic pressure to load bearing in equilibrium. The aim of the present study was to determine the relative contributions of hydraulic pressure, viscoelastic collagen stress, solid matrix stiffness and osmotic pressure to load carriage in cartilage under transient and equilibrium conditions. Unconfined compression experiments were simulated using a fibril-reinforced poroviscoelastic model of articular cartilage, including water, fibrillar viscoelastic collagen and non-fibrillar charged glycosaminoglycans. The relative contributions of hydraulic and osmotic pressures and stresses in the fibrillar and non-fibrillar network were evaluated in the superficial, middle and deep zone of cartilage under five different strain rates and after relaxation. Initially upon loading, the hydraulic pressure carried most of the load in all three zones. The osmotic swelling pressure carried most of the equilibrium load. In the surface zone, where the fibers were loaded in tension, the collagen network carried 20 % of the load for all strain rates. The importance of these fibers was illustrated by artificially modifying the fiber architecture, which reduced the overall stiffness of cartilage in all conditions. In conclusion, although hydraulic pressure dominates the transient behavior during cartilage loading, due to its viscoelastic nature the superficial zone collagen fibers carry a substantial part of the load under transient conditions. This becomes increasingly important with higher strain rates. The

  10. Gas-phase ozonolysis of β-ocimene: Temperature dependent rate coefficients and product distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona-Colmán, Elizabeth; Blanco, María B.; Barnes, Ian; Teruel, Mariano A.

    2016-12-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction of β-ocimene with O3 molecules have been determined over the temperature range 288-311 K at 750 Torr total pressure of nitrogen using the relative rate technique. The investigations were performed in a large volume reaction vessel using long-path in-situ Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to monitor the reactants and products. A value of k(β-ocimene + O3) = (3.74 ± 0.92) × 10-16 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 has been obtained for the reaction at 298 K. The temperature dependence of the reaction is best described by the Arrhenius expression k = (1.94 ± 0.02) × 10-14 exp [(-1181 ± 51)/T] cm3 molecule-1 s-1. In addition, a product study has been carried out at 298 K in 750 Torr of synthetic air and the following products with yields in molar % were observed: formaldehyde (36 ± 2), acetone (15 ± 1), methylglyoxal (9.5 ± 0.4) and hydroxyacetone (19 ± 1). The formation of formaldehyde can be explained by the addition of O3 to the C1sbnd C2 double bond of the β-ocimene. Addition of O3 to the C6sbnd C7 double bond leads to the formation of acetone and the CH3C·(OO·)CH3 biradical, which can through isomerization/stabilization form methylglyoxal (hydroperoxide channel) and hydroxyacetone. The formed products will contribute to the formation of PAN and derivatives in polluted environments and also the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere.

  11. Fundamental Study on Temperature Dependence of Deposition Rate of Silicic Acid - 13270

    SciTech Connect

    Shinmura, Hayata; Niibori, Yuichi; Mimura, Hitoshi

    2013-07-01

    The dynamic behavior of the silicic acid is one of the key factors to estimate the condition of the repository system after the backfill. This study experimentally examined the temperature dependence of dynamic behavior of supersaturated silicic acid in the co-presence of solid phase, considering Na ions around the repository, and evaluated the deposition rate constant, k, of silicic acid by using the first-order reaction equation considering the specific surface area. The values of k were in the range of 1.0x10{sup -11} to 1.0x10{sup -9} m/s in the temperature range of 288 K to 323 K. The deposition rate became larger with increments of temperature under the Na ion free condition. Besides, in the case of Na ions 0.6 M, colloidal silicic acid decreased dramatically at a certain time. This means that the diameter of the colloidal silicic acid became larger than the pore size of filter (0.45 μm) due to bridging of colloidal silicic acid. Furthermore, this study estimated the range of altering area and the aperture of flow-path in various value of k corresponding to temperature by using advection-dispersion model. The concentration in the flow-path became lower with increments of temperature, and when the value of k is larger than 1.0x10{sup -11} m/s, the deposition range of supersaturated silicic acid was estimated to be less than 20 m around the repository. In addition, the deposition of supersaturated silicic acid led the decrement of flow-path aperture, which was remarkable under the condition of relatively high temperature. Such a clogging in flow paths is expected as a retardation effect of radionuclides. (authors)

  12. Linker dependence of interfacial electron transfer rates in Fe(II)-polypyridine sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, David N.; Mukherjee, Sriparna; Barnes, Lyndsay J.; Jakubikova, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) convert solar energy to electricity employing dye molecules attached to a semiconductor surface. Some of the most efficient DSSCs use Ru-based chromophores. Fe-based dyes represent a cheaper and more environmentally friendly alternative to these expensive and toxic dyes. The photoactive state of Fe-based chromophores responsible for charge-separation at the dye-semiconductor interface is, however, deactivated on a sub-picosecond time scale via the intersystem crossing (ISC) into a manifold of low-lying photo-inactive quintet states. Therefore, development of Fe-based dyes capable of fast interfacial electron transfer (IET) leading to efficient charge separation on a time scale competitive with the ISC events is important. This work investigates how linker groups anchoring a prototypical Fe-based dye [Fe(bpy-L)2(CN)2] (bpy = 2,2‧-bipyridine, L = linker group) onto the TiO2 semiconductor surface influence the IET rates in the dye-semiconductor assemblies. Linker groups investigated include carboxylic acid, phosphonic acid, hydroxamate, catechol, and acetylacetonate. We employ time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to obtain absorption spectra of [Fe(bpy-L)2(CN)2] with each linker, and quantum dynamics simulations to investigate the IET rates between the dye and the (101) TiO2 anatase surface. For all attachments, TD-DFT calculations show similar absorption spectra with two main bands corresponding to the metal-to-ligand charge transfer transitions. The quantum dynamics simulations predict that the utilization of the hydroxamate linker instead of the commonly used carboxylic acid linker will lead to a more efficient IET and better photon-to-current conversion efficiencies in Fe(II)-polypyridine sensitized solar cells.

  13. Cold Season Mortality Under Natural Conditions and Subsequent Hatching Response of Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Eggs in a Subtropical City of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Javier Orlando; Fischer, Sylvia; Zalazar, Laura; Stein, Marina

    2015-09-01

    In temperate and subtropical regions, populations of Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (L.) survive unfavorable winter conditions in the egg stage. Knowing their survival rates can be of great interest for the health authorities in charge of control activities. In this study, we analyzed the mortality of Ae. aegypti eggs exposed to the cold season as well as their hatching patterns under laboratory conditions in the city of Resistencia, Chaco, Argentina. The mortality rate was 48.6%. No statistically significant differences were observed in the mortality of eggs exposed at different sites. Hatching response differed significantly among the successive postexposure immersions, with the highest proportion of hatched eggs during the first immersion. These results show that the mortality rate of Ae. aegypti eggs exposed to the cold season in a subtropical city of Argentina was higher than those from temperate climate region. The additional mortality of eggs in our study might be related to fungal development (an unexpected event), which was not observed in research in temperate climate. The hatching pattern observed in this study ensures a rapid increase of the population at the beginning of the favorable breeding season, but it also maintains a batch with delayed hatching eggs, posing a risk for the community.

  14. Efficacy of polymers in combination with biocides as sanitizer of salmonella inoculated broiler hatching eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella contamination of broiler hatching eggs can be carried through the hatchery and with the hatched chick into the broiler house. Commercially available chemical hatching egg sanitizers have achieved acceptable levels of eggshell decontamination of >70% reductions when applied prior to setti...

  15. 9 CFR 82.9 - Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interstate movement of hatching eggs... hatching eggs from a quarantined area. Hatching eggs from birds or poultry not known to be infected with or... eggs are accompanied by a permit obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (b) Copies of the...

  16. Egg characteristics and hatch performance of Athens Canadian Random Bred 1955 meat-type chickens and 2013 Cobb 500 broilers.

    PubMed

    Collins, K E; McLendon, B L; Wilson, J L

    2014-09-01

    Athens Canadian Random Bred (ACRB) chickens, a 1955 meat-type control strain, were incubated with the 2013 Cobb 500 broiler to determine differences in egg composition, conductance values, incubation duration, hatch performance, and yolk utilization. Unincubated ACRB eggs had greater percentage solids than Cobb 500 eggs. The ACRB eggs had a greater solid portion as yolk, whereas the Cobb 500 devoted more solid percentage to albumen. Percentage shell was not different between the strains, but ACRB eggs had 2.7% greater percentage moisture loss after 18 d of incubation than Cobb 500 eggs. Conductance, conductance constant, and conductance standardized to a 100 g egg weight basis were all higher for ACRB eggs than Cobb 500 eggs at 12 and 18 d of incubation. The Cobb 500 chicks hatched 6 h earlier than ACRB chicks. The Cobb 500 incubation duration was 498 h, and the ACRB incubation duration was 504 h. There was no difference between the strains for percentage infertile eggs, embryonic mortality, hatchability, or salable chicks. The ACRB chicks hatched with a smaller dried residual yolk sac as a percentage of chick weight compared with the Cobb 500. Both strains had an average relative yolk-free chick weight of 61% of average initial egg weight. Thus the Cobb 500 eggs had decreased gas exchange across the eggshell, which may have contributed to the earlier hatch and decreased yolk utilization. Modern Cobb 500 broiler embryonic metabolism appears to have either become more dependent on albumen rather than yolk or has become more efficient with yolk reserves during development. Broiler hatch performance does not appear to have changed over the past 58 yr.

  17. Language-Dependent Pitch Encoding Advantage in the Brainstem Is Not Limited to Acceleration Rates that Occur in Natural Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T.; Smalt, Christopher J.; Bidelman, Gavin M.

    2010-01-01

    Experience-dependent enhancement of neural encoding of pitch in the auditory brainstem has been observed for only specific portions of native pitch contours exhibiting high rates of pitch acceleration, irrespective of speech or nonspeech contexts. This experiment allows us to determine whether this language-dependent advantage transfers to…

  18. Temperature dependences of growth rates and carrying capacities of marine bacteria depart from metabolic theoretical predictions.

    PubMed

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan; Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Díaz-Pérez, Laura; Morán, Xosé Anxelu G

    2015-10-01

    Using the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) framework, we evaluated over a whole annual cycle the monthly responses to temperature of the growth rates (μ) and carrying capacities (K) of heterotrophic bacterioplankton at a temperate coastal site. We used experimental incubations spanning 6ºC with bacterial physiological groups identified by flow cytometry according to membrane integrity (live), nucleic acid content (HNA and LNA) and respiratory activity (CTC+). The temperature dependence of μ at the exponential phase of growth was summarized by the activation energy (E), which was variable (-0.52 to 0.72 eV) but followed a seasonal pattern, only reaching the hypothesized value for aerobic heterotrophs of 0.65 eV during the spring bloom for the most active bacterial groups (live, HNA, CTC+). K (i.e. maximum experimental abundance) peaked at 4 × 10(6) cells mL(-1) and generally covaried with μ but, contrary to MTE predictions, it did not decrease consistently with temperature. In the case of live cells, the responses of μ and K to temperature were positively correlated and related to seasonal changes in substrate availability, indicating that the responses of bacteria to warming are far from homogeneous and poorly explained by MTE at our site.

  19. GAMA/H-ATLAS: common star formation rate indicators and their dependence on galaxy physical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Norberg, P.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Heinis, S.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bourne, N.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M. E.; Cooray, A.; da Cunha, E.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Grootes, M. W.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R.; Lacey, C.; Lara-Lopez, M. A.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oteo, I.; Owers, M. S.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, D. J. B.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; van der Werf, P.

    2016-09-01

    We compare common star formation rate (SFR) indicators in the local Universe in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) equatorial fields (˜160 deg2), using ultraviolet (UV) photometry from GALEX, far-infrared and sub-millimetre (sub-mm) photometry from Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey, and Hα spectroscopy from the GAMA survey. With a high-quality sample of 745 galaxies (median redshift = 0.08), we consider three SFR tracers: UV luminosity corrected for dust attenuation using the UV spectral slope β (SFRUV, corr), Hα line luminosity corrected for dust using the Balmer decrement (BD) (SFRH α, corr), and the combination of UV and infrared (IR) emission (SFRUV + IR). We demonstrate that SFRUV, corr can be reconciled with the other two tracers after applying attenuation corrections by calibrating Infrared excess (IRX; i.e. the IR to UV luminosity ratio) and attenuation in the Hα (derived from BD) against β. However, β, on its own, is very unlikely to be a reliable attenuation indicator. We find that attenuation correction factors depend on parameters such as stellar mass (M*), z and dust temperature (Tdust), but not on Hα equivalent width or Sérsic index. Due to the large scatter in the IRX versus β correlation, when compared to SFRUV + IR, the β-corrected SFRUV, corr exhibits systematic deviations as a function of IRX, BD and Tdust.

  20. A mechanism of stick-slip fault sliding without friction rate dependence and supersonic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, Iuliia; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Stick-slip sliding is often observed at various scales and in particular in fault sliding and the accompanied seismic events. Stick-slip is conventionally associated with rate-dependent friction, in particular the intermittent change between static and kinetic friction. However the accumulation of elastic energy in the sliding plates on both sides of the fault can produce oscillations in the velocity of sliding even if the friction coefficient is constant. This manifests itself in terms of oscillations in the sliding velocity somewhat resembling the stick-slip movement. Furthermore, over long faults the sliding exhibits wave-like propagation. We present a model that shows that the zones of non-zero sliding velocities propagate along the fault with the velocity of p-wave. The mechanism of such fast wave propagation is the normal (tensile/compressive) stresses in the neighbouring elements (normal stresses on the planes normal to the fault surface). The strains associated with these stresses are controlled by the Young's modulus rather than shear modulus resulting in the p-wave velocity of propagation of the sliding zone. This manifests itself as a supersonic (with respect to the s-waves) propagation of an apparent shear rupture.

  1. Flow rate dependent extra-column variance from injection in capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Pankaj; Liu, Kun; Sharma, Sonika; Lawson, John S; Dennis Tolley, H; Lee, Milton L

    2015-02-06

    Efficiency and resolution in capillary liquid chromatography (LC) can be significantly affected by extra-column band broadening, especially for isocratic separations. This is particularly a concern in evaluating column bed structure using non-retained test compounds. The band broadening due to an injector supplied with a commercially available capillary LC system was characterized from experimental measurements. The extra-column variance from the injection valve was found to have an extra-column contribution independent of the injection volume, showing an exponential dependence on flow rate. The overall extra-column variance from the injection valve was found to vary from 34 to 23 nL. A new mathematical model was derived that explains this exponential contribution of extra-column variance on chromatographic performance. The chromatographic efficiency was compromised by ∼130% for a non-retained analyte because of injection valve dead volume. The measured chromatographic efficiency was greatly improved when a new nano-flow pumping system with integrated injection valve was used.

  2. The recombination rate coefficient of a protonated acetone dimer with electrons: indication of a temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosík, Juraj; Plasil, Radek

    2000-10-01

    The formation and recombination of a protonated acetone dimer with electrons was studied in the flowing afterglow. H3O+ ions were formed in the early post-discharge region. The subsequent addition of acetone leads to the formation of the protonated ions CH3COCH3H+. These ions further associate with acetone forming the cluster ions H+·(CH3COCH3)2 that react further with acetone, but very slowly. This facilitates the creation of an afterglow plasma with a dominant population of H+·(CH3COCH3)2. The evolution of electron number density (ne) and electron temperature (Te) is measured using the Langmuir probe. The recombination rate coefficients that are obtained indicate a negative temperature dependence: α = (3.4±1)×10-6 cm3 s-1 at Te = (580±150) K and α = (7±2.5)×10-6 cm3 s-1 at Te = (450±100) K.

  3. Ultimate Control of Rate-Dependent Adhesion for Reversible Transfer Process via a Thin Elastomeric Layer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan; Yoon, Min-Ah; Jang, Bongkyun; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Kim, Kwang-Seop

    2017-03-30

    Adhesion between a stamp with an elastomeric layer and various devices or substrates is crucial to successfully fabricate flexible electronics using a transfer process. Although various transfer processes using stamps with different adhesion strengths have been suggested, the controllable range of adhesion is still limited to a narrow range. To precisely transfer devices onto selected substrates, however, the difference in adhesion between the picking and placing processes should be large enough to achieve a high yield. Herein, we report a simple way to extend the controllable adhesion range of stamps, which can be achieved by adjusting the thickness of the elastomeric layer and the separation velocity. The adhesion strength increased with decreasing layer thickness on the stamp due to a magnification of the confinement and rate-dependent effects on the adhesion. This enabled the controllable range of the adhesion strength for a 15 μm-thick elastomeric layer to be extended up to 12 times that of the bulk under the same separation conditions. The strategy of designing stamps using simple adhesion tests is also introduced, and the reversible transfer of thin Si chips was successfully demonstrated. Tuning and optimizing the adhesion strength of a stamp according to the design process suggested here can be applied to various materials for the selective transfer and replacement of individual devices.

  4. Temperature-dependent, relative-rate study of the reactions of 1- and 2-butoxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D.; Cassanelli, P.; Cox, R. A.

    2003-04-01

    Alkoxyl radicals (RO\\cdot) are important intermediates in the chains of free radical reactions that constitute the gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Generally there are a number of different reaction pathways available to alkoxyl radicals and, depending on conditions of temperature and the structure of RO\\cdot, these may be in competition. The major reactions of RO\\cdot are (1) reaction with O_2 to yield a carbonyl product and a hydroperoxy, HO_2, radical, (2) decomposition to yield a carbonyl product and a radical fragment, and (3) isomerisation via a six-membered transition state to yield a d-hydroxylated radical species. Thus the chemistry of alkoxyl radicals determines the atmospheric impact of the oxidation of a given VOC, in terms of the immediate effects of closed-shell products, and as a result of the further chemistry of free radical products. HO_2 can react with NO to yield photolabile NO_2 (and hence contribute to photochemical ozone formation), and organic radical fragments act to propagate the oxidation chain of reactions. As ozone has been identified to be an important greenhouse gas in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) region it is important to understand how temperature affects the relative rates of reactions (1) to (3), and thus how the presence of VOCs in the UTLS region affects the coupled chemistries of HO_x and O_3. In the present study, we have looked at the reactions of 1- and 2-butoxyl radicals (formed in the reaction of OH with butane) in terms of the relative rates of their bimolecular reactions with O_2 (1) and unimolecular processes (2,3). The two butoxyl radicals were studied separately and were formed directly from the photolysis of 1- or 2-butylnitrite. Experiments were carried out using a metre-long photochemical flow cell made of quartz. The temperature of the cell could be controlled and for the experiments carried out in the present study was operated between about 250 and 340 K. Reactant

  5. Hatching Time and Alevin Growth Prior to the Onset of Exogenous Feeding in Farmed, Wild and Hybrid Norwegian Atlantic Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Monica Favnebøe; Fjelldal, Per Gunnar; Nilsen, Frank; Glover, Kevin Alan

    2014-01-01

    The onset of exogenous feeding, when juveniles emerge from the gravel, is a critical event for salmonids where early emergence and large size provide a competitive advantage in the wild. Studying 131 farmed, hybrid and wild Norwegian Atlantic salmon families, originating from four wild populations and two commercial strains, we investigated whether approximately 10 generations of selection for faster growth has also resulted in increased somatic growth prior to the onset of exogenous feeding. In addition, we tested whether relaxed selection in farms has allowed for alterations in hatching time between farmed and wild salmon. Across three cohorts, wild salmon families hatched earlier than farmed salmon families, while hybrid families displayed intermediate hatching times. While the observed differences were small, i.e., 1–15 degree-days (0–3 days, as water temperatures were c. 5–6°C), these data suggest additive genetic variation for hatching time. Alevin length prior to exogenous feeding was positively related to egg size. After removal of egg size effects, no systematic differences in alevin length were observed between the wild and farmed salmon families. While these results indicate additive genetic variation for egg development timing, and wild salmon families consistently hatched earlier than farmed salmon families, these differences were so small they are unlikely to significantly influence early life history competition of farmed and wild salmon in the natural environment. This is especially the case given that the timing of spawning among females can vary by several weeks in some rivers. The general lack of difference in size between farmed and wild alevins, strongly suggest that the documented differences in somatic growth rate between wild and farmed Norwegian Atlantic salmon under hatchery conditions are first detectable after the onset of exogenous feeding. PMID:25438050

  6. Hatching time and alevin growth prior to the onset of exogenous feeding in farmed, wild and hybrid Norwegian Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Solberg, Monica Favnebøe; Fjelldal, Per Gunnar; Nilsen, Frank; Glover, Kevin Alan

    2014-01-01

    The onset of exogenous feeding, when juveniles emerge from the gravel, is a critical event for salmonids where early emergence and large size provide a competitive advantage in the wild. Studying 131 farmed, hybrid and wild Norwegian Atlantic salmon families, originating from four wild populations and two commercial strains, we investigated whether approximately 10 generations of selection for faster growth has also resulted in increased somatic growth prior to the onset of exogenous feeding. In addition, we tested whether relaxed selection in farms has allowed for alterations in hatching time between farmed and wild salmon. Across three cohorts, wild salmon families hatched earlier than farmed salmon families, while hybrid families displayed intermediate hatching times. While the observed differences were small, i.e., 1-15 degree-days (0-3 days, as water temperatures were c. 5-6°C), these data suggest additive genetic variation for hatching time. Alevin length prior to exogenous feeding was positively related to egg size. After removal of egg size effects, no systematic differences in alevin length were observed between the wild and farmed salmon families. While these results indicate additive genetic variation for egg development timing, and wild salmon families consistently hatched earlier than farmed salmon families, these differences were so small they are unlikely to significantly influence early life history competition of farmed and wild salmon in the natural environment. This is especially the case given that the timing of spawning among females can vary by several weeks in some rivers. The general lack of difference in size between farmed and wild alevins, strongly suggest that the documented differences in somatic growth rate between wild and farmed Norwegian Atlantic salmon under hatchery conditions are first detectable after the onset of exogenous feeding.

  7. Effects of Myracrodruon urundeuva extracts on egg hatching and larval exsheathment of Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Lorena Mayana Beserra; Bevilaqua, Claudia Maria Leal; Macedo, Iara Tersia Freitas; de Morais, Selene Maia; Machado, Lyeghyna Karla Andrade; Campello, Claudio Cabral; de Aquino Mesquita, Mayara

    2011-09-01

    The anthelmintic resistance has limited the control of gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants and thus has awakened interest in the study of tanniferous plants as a source of anthelmintics. These experiments were carried out to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of Myracrodruon urundeuva leaf extract (LE) and stem extract (SE) against Haemonchus contortus. An inhibitor of tannins, polyvinyl polypyrrolidone (PVPP), was used to verify if these metabolites are involved in the anthelmintic activity of the extracts. To evaluate the ovicidal effect, H. contortus eggs were incubated with the extracts (0.31 to 5 mg/mL) for 48 h. In the larval artificial exsheathment assay, third-stage larvae of this nematode were incubated with extracts (0.31 mg/mL) for 3 h and then were exposed to a sodium hypochlorite solution. The exsheathment process was evaluated for 60 min. The results were subjected to the Kruskal-Wallis test (P < 0.05). The extracts showed dose-dependent ovicidal effects, although the LE was more effective, inhibiting egg hatching by 97.73% at 1.25 mg/mL, while the SE inhibited hatching by 83.56% at 5 mg/mL. Contact with the extracts blocked the larval exsheathment (P < 0.05). The addition of PVPP confirmed the role of tannins, as there was a substantial reduction in egg hatching and larval exsheathment percentage. These results suggest that M. urundeuva can be used to control gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants and that the anthelmintic activity of this plant is probably related to tannins; however, in vivo studies should be conducted.

  8. Rate-dependent changes of twitch force duration in rat cardiac trabeculae: a property of the contractile system

    PubMed Central

    Kassiri, Z; Myers, R; Kaprielian, R; Banijamali, H S; Backx, P H

    2000-01-01

    We examined the mechanisms for rate-dependent changes in twitch force duration by simultaneously measuring force and [Ca2+]i in rat cardiac trabeculae. Peak force decreased when the rate of stimulation was increased from 0.2 to 0.5 Hz, whilst it increased from 1 to 2 Hz. Over the same range of frequencies, peak [Ca2+]i transients increased monotonically, whilst both force and [Ca2+]i transient duration were abbreviated. Changes in peak force or peak [Ca2+]i transients were not responsible for the changes in force or [Ca2+]i transient duration. The changes in twitch force and [Ca2+]i transient duration were completed roughly within one beat following an abrupt change in the rate of stimulation. Rate-dependent changes resembled those observed with isoproterenol (isoprenaline) application. However, kinase inhibitors (i.e. K252-a, H-89, KN-62 and KN-93) had no effect on the rate-dependent changes of twitch force and [Ca2+]i transient kinetics, suggesting that protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase G (PKG) and Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM/kinase II) were not responsible for these kinetic changes. Despite the changes in twitch force and [Ca2+]i transient kinetics, the rate-limiting step for the rate-dependent force relaxation still resides at the level of the contractile proteins. Our results suggest that rate-dependent changes in force and [Ca2+]i transients do not depend on PKA or CaM/kinase II activity but might result from intrinsic features of the contractile and/or Ca2+-handling proteins. PMID:10747194

  9. Dependence of the CaOx and MgOx Growth Rates on Solution Stoichiometry. Non-Kossel Crystal Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.; Rashkovich, L. N.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental data on step rates on the CaOx and MgOx faces are presented and discussed in terms of non-Kossel crystal growth theory. The theory well describes the major feature - maximum of the growth rate in stoichiometric solution. More precise analyses is needed to fit details of this dependence.

  10. Embryogenesis, hatching and larval development of Artemia during orbital spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Spooner, B S; DeBell, L; Armbrust, L; Guikema, J A; Metcalf, J; Paulsen, A

    1994-01-01

    Developmental biology studies, using gastrula-arrested cysts of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana, were conducted during two flights of the space shuttle Atlantis (missions STS-37 and STS-43) in 1991. Dehydrated cysts were activated, on orbit, by addition of salt water to the cysts, and then development was terminated by the addition of fixative. Development took place in 5 ml syringes, connected by tubing to activation syringes, containing salt water, and termination syringes, containing fixative. Comparison of space results with simultaneous ground control experiments showed that equivalent percentages of naupliar larvae hatched in the syringes (40%). Thus, reactivation of development, completion of embryogenesis, emergence and hatching took place, during spaceflight, without recognizable alteration in numbers of larvae produced. Post-hatching larval development was studied in experiments where development was terminated, by introduction of fixative, 2 days, 4 days, and 8 days after reinitiation of development. During spaceflight, successive larval instars or stages, interrupted by molts, occurred, generating brine shrimp at appropriate larval instars. Naupliar larvae possessed the single naupliar eye, and development of the lateral pair of adult eyes also took place in space. Transmission electron microscopy revealed extensive differentiation, including skeletal muscle and gut endoderm, as well as the eye tissues. These studies demonstrate the potential value of Artemia for developmental biology studies during spaceflight, and show that extensive degrees of development can take place in this microgravity environment.

  11. Embryogenesis, hatching and larval development of Artemia during orbital spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Debell, L.; Armbrust, L.; Guikema, J. A.; Metcalf, J.; Paulsen, A.

    1994-08-01

    Developmental biology studies, using gastrula-arrested cysts of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana, were conducted during two flights of the space shuttle Atlantis (missions STS-37 and STS-43) in 1991. Dehydrated cysts were activated, on orbit, by addition of salt water to the cysts, and then development was terminated by the addition of fixative. Development took place in 5 ml syringes, connected by tubing to activation syringes, containing salt water, and termination syringes, containing fixative. Comparison of space results with simultaneous ground control experiments showed that equivalent percentages of naupliar larvae hatched in the syringes (40%). Thus, reactivation of development, completion of embryogenesis, emergence and hatching took place, during spaceflight, without recognizable alteration in numbers of larvae produced. Post-hatching larval development was studied in experiments where development was terminated, by intrduction of fixative, 2 days, 4 days, and 8 days after reinitiation of development. During spaceflight, successive larval instars or stages, interrupted by molts, occurred, generating brine shrimp at appropriate larval instars. Naupliar larvae possessed the single naupliar eye, and development of the lateral pair of adult eyes also took place in space. Transmission electron microscopy revealed extensive differentiation, including skeletal muscle and gut endoderm, as well as the eye tissues. These studies demonstrate the potential value of Artemia for developmental biology studies during spaceflight, and show that extensive degress of development can take place in this microgravity environment.

  12. Embryogenesis, hatching and larval development of Artemia during orbital spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Debell, L.; Armbrust, L.; Guikema, J. A.; Metcalf, J.; Paulsen, A.

    1994-01-01

    Developmental biology studies, using gastrula-arrested cysts of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana, were conducted during two flights of the space shuttle Atlantis (missions STS-37 and STS-43) in 1991. Dehydrated cysts were activated, on orbit, by addition of salt water to the cysts, and then development was terminated by the addition of fixative. Development took place in 5 ml syringes, connected by tubing to activation syringes, containing salt water, and termination syringes, containing fixative. Comparison of space results with simultaneous ground control experiments showed that equivalent percentages of naupliar larvae hatched in the syringes (40%). Thus, reactivation of development, completion of embryogenesis, emergence and hatching took place, during spaceflight, without recognizable alteration in numbers of larvae produced. Post-hatching larval development was studied in experiments where development was terminated, by introduction of fixative, 2 days, 4 days, and 8 days after reinitiation of development. During spaceflight, successive larval instars or stages, interrupted by molts, occurred, generating brine shrimp at appropriate larval instars. Naupliar larvae possessed the single naupliar eye, and development of the lateral pair of adult eyes also took place in space. Transmission electron microscopy revealed extensive differentiation, including skeletal muscle and gut endoderm, as well as the eye tissues. These studies demonstrate the potential value of Artemia for developmental biology studies during spa ceflight, and show that extensive degrees of development can take place in this microgravity environment.

  13. Modeling cross-hatch surface morphology in growing mismatched layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, A. M.; Speck, J. S.; Romanov, A. E.; Bobeth, M.; Pompe, W.

    2002-02-01

    We propose and investigate a model for the development of cross-hatch surface morphology in growing mismatched layers. The model incorporates two important elements: (i) strain relaxation due to dislocation glide in the layer (film) interior that is also associated with misfit dislocation formation at the film/substrate interface and (ii) lateral surface transport that eliminates surface steps that originated from dislocation glide. A combination of dislocation-assisted strain relaxation and surface step flow leads to the appearance of surface height undulations during layer growth. A Monte Carlo simulation technique was applied to model dislocation nucleation events in the course of strain relaxation. The simulation was used to model the influence of dislocations on film surface height profiles. The surface height displacement was calculated from the analytic elasticity solutions for edge dislocations near a free surface. The results of the modeling predict that the average amplitude of the surface undulations and their apparent wavelength both increase with increasing film relaxation and film thickness. The developed cross-hatch pattern is characterized by an atomically smooth but mesoscopically (lateral dimensions ˜0.1-10 μm) rough surface morphology. The conclusions of the model are in agreement with atomic force microscopy observations of cross-hatch surface relief in In0.25Ga0.75As/GaAs samples grown well beyond the critical thickness for misfit dislocation formation.

  14. Method to determine the position-dependant metal correction factor for dose-rate equivalent laser testing of semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.

    2013-07-09

    A method reconstructs the charge collection from regions beneath opaque metallization of a semiconductor device, as determined from focused laser charge collection response images, and thereby derives a dose-rate dependent correction factor for subsequent broad-area, dose-rate equivalent, laser measurements. The position- and dose-rate dependencies of the charge-collection magnitude of the device are determined empirically and can be combined with a digital reconstruction methodology to derive an accurate metal-correction factor that permits subsequent absolute dose-rate response measurements to be derived from laser measurements alone. Broad-area laser dose-rate testing can thereby be used to accurately determine the peak transient current, dose-rate response of semiconductor devices to penetrating electron, gamma- and x-ray irradiation.

  15. Heart rate variability biofeedback in patients with alcohol dependence: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Penzlin, Ana Isabel; Siepmann, Timo; Illigens, Ben Min-Woo; Weidner, Kerstin; Siepmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective In patients with alcohol dependence, ethyl-toxic damage of vasomotor and cardiac autonomic nerve fibers leads to autonomic imbalance with neurovascular and cardiac dysfunction, the latter resulting in reduced heart rate variability (HRV). Autonomic imbalance is linked to increased craving and cardiovascular mortality. In this study, we sought to assess the effects of HRV biofeedback training on HRV, vasomotor function, craving, and anxiety. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled study in 48 patients (14 females, ages 25–59 years) undergoing inpatient rehabilitation treatment. In the treatment group, patients (n=24) attended six sessions of HRV biofeedback over 2 weeks in addition to standard rehabilitative care, whereas, in the control group, subjects received standard care only. Psychometric testing for craving (Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale), anxiety (Symptom Checklist-90-Revised), HRV assessment using coefficient of variation of R-R intervals (CVNN) analysis, and vasomotor function assessment using laser Doppler flowmetry were performed at baseline, immediately after completion of treatment or control period, and 3 and 6 weeks afterward (follow-ups 1 and 2). Results Psychometric testing showed decreased craving in the biofeedback group immediately postintervention (OCDS scores: 8.6±7.9 post-biofeedback versus 13.7±11.0 baseline [mean ± standard deviation], P<0.05), whereas craving was unchanged at this time point in the control group. Anxiety was reduced at follow-ups 1 and 2 post-biofeedback, but was unchanged in the control group (P<0.05). Following biofeedback, CVNN tended to be increased (10.3%±2.8% post-biofeedback, 10.1%±3.5% follow-up 1, 10.1%±2.9% follow-up 2 versus 9.7%±3.6% baseline; P=not significant). There was no such trend in the control group. Vasomotor function assessed using the mean duration to 50% vasoconstriction of cutaneous vessels after deep inspiration was improved following biofeedback

  16. Ixodes pacificus Ticks Maintain Embryogenesis and Egg Hatching after Antibiotic Treatment of Rickettsia Endosymbiont

    PubMed Central

    Kurlovs, Andre H.; Li, Jinze; Cheng, Du; Zhong, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Rickettsia is a genus of intracellular bacteria that causes a variety of diseases in humans and other mammals and associates with a diverse group of arthropods. Although Rickettsia appears to be common in ticks, most Rickettsia-tick relationships remain generally uncharacterized. The most intimate of these associations is Rickettsia species phylotype G021, a maternally and transstadially transmitted endosymbiont that resides in 100% of I. pacificus in California. We investigated the effects of this Rickettsia phylotype on I. pacificus reproductive fitness using selective antibiotic treatment. Ciprofloxacin was 10-fold more effective than tetracycline in eliminating Rickettsia from I. pacificus, and quantitative PCR results showed that eggs from the ciprofloxacin-treated ticks contained an average of 0.02 Rickettsia per egg cell as opposed to the average of 0.2 in the tetracycline-treated ticks. Ampicillin did not significantly affect the number of Rickettsia per tick cell in adults or eggs compared to the water-injected control ticks. We found no relationship between tick embryogenesis and rickettsial density in engorged I. pacificus females. Tetracycline treatment significantly delayed oviposition of I. pacificus ticks, but the antibiotic’s effect was unlikely related to Rickettsia. We also demonstrated that Rickettsia-free eggs could successfully develop into larvae without any significant decrease in hatching compared to eggs containing Rickettsia. No significant differences in the incubation period, egg hatching rate, and the number of larvae were found between any of the antibiotic-treated groups and the water-injected tick control. We concluded that Rickettsia species phylotype G021 does not have an apparent effect on embryogenesis, oviposition, and egg hatching of I. pacificus. PMID:25105893

  17. Effects of injected methylmercury on the hatching of common loon (Gavia immer) eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenow, Kevin P.; Meyer, Michael W.; Rossmann, Ronald; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, Annette; Gray, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the level of in ovo methylmercury (MeHg) exposure that results in detrimental effects on fitness and survival of loon embryos and hatched chicks, we conducted a field study in which we injected eggs with various doses of MeHg on day 4 of incubation. Eggs were collected following about 23 days of natural incubation and artificially incubated to observe hatching. Reduced embryo survival was evident in eggs injected at a rate of ≥1.3 μg Hg/g wet-mass. When maternally deposited Hg and injected Hg were considered together, the median lethal concentration of Hg (LC50) was estimated to be 1.78 μg Hg/g wet-mass. Organ mass patterns from eggs of chicks injected at a rate of 2.9 μg Hg/g differed from that of controls and chicks from the 0.5 μg Hg/g treatment, largely related to a negative relation between yolk sac mass and egg mercury concentration. Chicks from eggs in the 2.9 μg Hg/g treatment were also less responsive to a frightening stimulus than controls and chicks from the 0.5 μg Hg/g treatment. We also found that the length of incubation period increased with increasing egg mercury concentration. Tissue Hg concentrations were strongly associated (r2 ≥ 0.80) with egg Hg concentration.

  18. Dependence of the rate of LiF ion pairing on the description of molecular interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pluharova, Eva; Baer, Marcel D.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Jungwirth, Pavel; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2016-03-03

    We present an analysis of the dynamics of ion-pairing of Lithium Fluoride (LiF) in aqueous solvent using both detailed molecular simulation as well as reduced models within a Gener- alized Langevin Equation (GLE) framework. We explored the sensitivity of the ion-pairing phenomena to the details of descriptions of molecular interaction, comparing two empirical potentials to explicit quantum based density functional theory. We find quantitative differences in the potentials of mean force for ion-pairing as well as time dependent frictions that lead to variations in the rate constant and reactive flux correlation functions. These details reflect differences in solvent response to ion-pairing between different representations of molecular interaction and influence anharmonicity of the dynamic response. We find that the short time anharmonic response is recovered with a GLE parameterization. Recovery of the details of long time response may require extensions to the reduced model. We show that the utility of using a reduced model leads to a straight forward application of variational transition state the- ory concepts to the condensed phase system. The significance of this is reflected in the analysis of committor distributions and the variation of planar hypersurfaces, leading to an improved understanding of factors that determine the rate of LiF ion-pairing. CJM and GKS are supported by the U.S. Department of Energy‘s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest Na- tional Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle. MDB is grateful for the support of Laboratory Directed Research and Development funding under the auspices of PNNL’s Laboratory Initiative Materials Synthesis and Simulation across Scales (MS3). Additional computing resources were generously allocated by PNNL’s Institutional Computing program. EP acknowledges support from PNNL’s Alternate Sponsored

  19. Survival rates of radio-collared female polar bears and their dependent young

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Durner, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    Polar bears are hunted throughout most of their range. In addition to hunting, polar bears of the Beaufort Sea region are exposed to mineral and hydrocarbon extraction and related human activities such as shipping, road building, and seismic testing. As human populations increase and demands for polar bears and other arctic resources escalate, reliable estimates of survivorship of polar bears are needed to predict and manage the impacts of those activities. We used the Kaplan-Meier model to estimate annual survival (with 95% confidence intervals) for radio-collared female polar bears and their dependent young that were followed during a 12-year study in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea. Survival of adult female polar bears was higher than had been previously thought: S = 0.969 (range 0.952-0.983). If human-caused mortalities were deleted, the computed survival rate was 0.996 (0.990-1.002). Survival of young from den exit to weaning was 0.676 (0.634-0.701). Survival during the second year of life, 0.860 (0.751-0.903), was substantially higher than during the first year, 0.651 (0.610-0.675). Shooting by local hunters accounted for 85% of the documented deaths of adult female polar bears. Conversely, 90% of documented losses of young were independent of litter size (P = 0.36), indicating that parental investment in single cubs was not different from investment in litters of two or more. Precise estimates of the survival of independent juveniles and adult males still need to be developed.

  20. Pregnancy achieved by transfer of thawed day 3 embryos that had been frozen after assisted hatching: a case report.

    PubMed

    Haydardedeoğlu, Bülent; Kılıçdağ, Esra Bulgan; Bağış, Tayfun

    2010-01-01

    Assisted Hatching (AH) is performed to increase implantation rates in assisted reproductive techniques, especially recurrent implantation failure and older age group. AH can be performed to four different techniques as laser, mechanical, enzymatic, chemical methods. In the literature, there is limited data about embryo freezing after AH. Herein, a successful pregnancy, which was achieved by transfer of thawed 3rd day embryos that had been frozen after AH, is presented.

  1. Influence of Herbicide Application to Soybeans on Soybean Cyst Nematode Egg Hatching

    PubMed Central

    Levene, Brian C.; Owen, Micheal D. K; Tylka, Gregory L.

    1998-01-01

    The hatching of Heterodera glycines eggs in soybean root exudates collected after postemergence application of three herbicides, and the hatching potential of H. glycines eggs from females feeding on herbicide-treated plants, were measured in vitro. Hatching in all root exudate solutions (RES) was greater than in deionized water but less than in 0.003 M ZnSO₄ solution. Filtering RES with a 0.22-μm-filter increased H. glycines hatching in RES. Application of acifluorfen, bentazon, and lactofen to foliage of soybean plants inhibited hatching of H. glycines eggs from the same plants. Hatching in RES from the different herbicide-treated soybeans was similar. Application of crop oil concentrate and non-ionic surfactant adjuvant to foliage did not affect hatching of H. glycines eggs from soybean plants. PMID:19274227

  2. To hatch and hatch not: similar selective trade-offs but different responses to egg predators in two closely related, syntopic treefrogs.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Mestre, Ivan; Warkentin, Karen M

    2007-08-01

    Risk-sensitive hatching is adaptive for species facing a trade-off between egg-stage and post-hatching risks, and environmental variation in one or both stages. Such plasticity has been found in amphibians, fishes, reptiles and spiders, with red-eyed treefrogs (Agalychnis callidryas) being the best-studied case. We assessed hatching plasticity and egg- and larval-stage risks in a closely related, syntopic species, the gliding leaf-frog (Agalychnis spurrelli). We found a lower hatching response to egg-eating snakes in A. spurrelli (9-28% of embryos escaped) than in A. callidryas (59-80% escaped). Levels of snake predation were similarly high for clutches of both species monitored at a pond in Costa Rica, and in fish predation experiments early-hatched A. spurrelli tadpoles were more vulnerable than later hatchlings, as has been shown for A. callidryas. A. spurrelli thus face a risk trade-off similar to A. callidryas, and likely would benefit from predator-induced hatching; their lower responsiveness to snakes appears nonadaptive. A. spurrelli embryos showed a stronger hatching response (57% hatched in 1 h) to submergence underwater than to snake attacks even though submergence is a less frequent risk. This suggests they have a greater capacity for early hatching than is expressed in the context of snake attacks, but have much lower sensitivity to snake cues than to flooding cues. Development in A. spurrelli is accelerated compared to syntopic A. callidryas, and spontaneous hatching is earlier and more synchronous. This is congruent with predictions based on selection by egg predators in the absence of a strong escape hatching response.

  3. Scaling of Viscous Shear Zones with Depth Dependent Viscosity and Power Law Stress-strain Rate Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltzer, A.; Ancuta, L. D.; Carlson, R. W.; Caves, J. K.; Chamberlain, C. P.; Gosse, J. C.; Idleman, B. D.; Ionov, D. A.; McDannell, K. T.; Tamra, M.; Mix, H.; Munkhuu, U.; Russo, R.; Sabaj-Perez, M.; Sahagian, D. L.; Sjostrom, D. J.; Smith, S. G.; Stachnik, J. C.; Tsagaan, B.; Wegmann, K. W.; Winnick, M. J.; Zeitler, P. K.; Prousevitch, A.

    2014-12-01

    Central Mongolia sits deep in the Asian continental interior between the Siberian craton to the north, the edge of the India-Asia collision to the south, and far-field subduction of the Pacific plate to the east. It has a complex geologic history comprising Archean to Early Proterozoic crystalline rocks modified by accretionary events in the Paleozoic, and Cenozoic deformation and basalt volcanism that continues today. Within central Mongolia, the broad domal Hangay upland is embedded in the greater Mongolian Plateau. Elevations within the dome average ~1.5 km above the regional trend and locally reach ~4000 m. This elevated landscape hosts a low-relief surface cut into crystalline basement, and a 30 Ma record of intermittent basalt magmatism. Here we integrate observations from geomorphology, geochronology, paleoaltimetry, biogeography, petrology, geochemistry, and seismology to document the timing, rate, and pattern of surface uplift in the Hangay and more broadly to understand the geodynamics of the Mongolian plateau. Results from mantle and crustal xenoliths, seismology, thermochronology, and basalt geochemistry are consistent with: a high geothermal gradient with temperatures reaching ~900°C at 60 km depth, intercepting the mantle adiabat at ~90 km depth; an uppermost mantle composed mostly of fertile peridotites; low-volume Cenozoic basaltic magmatism sourced below the lithosphere, with isotopic characteristics similar to much east-Asian Cenozoic mafic volcanism; a 42-57 km-thick crust of island-arc affinity formed during accretion of the Central Asia Orogenic Belt; elevations supported primarily by crustal isostasy; slow exhumation (30-100 m/My) over hundreds of millions of years; and long-term thermal stability of the upper crust and relief lowering since the Mesozoic. Results from geomorphology, paleoaltimetry, fish genetics, and basalt geochronology imply that drainage divides are stable since the mid-Miocene with modest surface uplift (up to 1 km) and

  4. Modeling the Rate-Dependent Durability of Reduced-Ag SAC Interconnects for Area Array Packages Under Torsion Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Vikram; Menon, Sandeep; Osterman, Michael; Pecht, Michael G.

    2013-08-01

    Solder durability models frequently focus on the applied strain range; however, the rate of applied loading, or strain rate, is also important. In this study, an approach to incorporate strain rate dependency into durability estimation for solder interconnects is examined. Failure data were collected for SAC105 solder ball grid arrays assembled with SAC305 solder that were subjected to displacement-controlled torsion loads. Strain-rate-dependent (Johnson-Cook model) and strain-rate-independent elastic-plastic properties were used to model the solders in finite-element simulation. Test data were then used to extract damage model constants for the reduced-Ag SAC solder. A generalized Coffin-Manson damage model was used to estimate the durability. The mechanical fatigue durability curve for reduced-silver SAC solder was generated and compared with durability curves for SAC305 and Sn-Pb from the literature.

  5. Somatosensory Gating Is Dependent on the Rate of Force Recruitment in the Human Orofacial System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreatta, Richard D.; Barlow, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Functional orofacial behaviors vary in their force endpoint and rate of recruitment. This study assessed the gating of orofacial cutaneous somatosensation during different cyclic lip force recruitment rates. Understanding how differences in the rate of force recruitment influences trigeminal system function is an important step toward…

  6. On the time dependence of rate coefficients of irreversible reactions between reactants with anisotropic reactivity in liquid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Lukzen, Nikita N.; Doktorov, Alexander B.

    2016-08-01

    Time dependence of the rate coefficients of sterically specific reactions is analyzed theoretically. Generally, such reactions exhibit a non-trivial dependence of their rate constant on the steric factor, f < 1, which is defined as the fraction of reactive surface area. Notably, the rate constant of a diffusion-controlled reaction is proportional not to f but, counter-intuitively, to √{ f } due to partial averaging of the reaction anisotropy by translational diffusion. Here we demonstrate that the effective steric factor of a diffusion-influenced reaction is strongly time-dependent, increasing from f to √{ f } . When reactants have several active sites, these sites "interfere" each other in the sense that the rate constant depends on their relative positions. We demonstrate that such an interference effect is strongly time-dependent as well: it is absent at t = 0 but builds up with time. We argue that the outlined effects are also of importance for calculating the fluorescence quenching rate constants.

  7. The location of "8"-shaped hatching influences inner cell mass formation in mouse blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Yohei; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Goto, Mayumi; Anzai, Mibuki; Ono, Natsuki; Shirasawa, Hiromitsu; Sato, Wataru; Miura, Hiroshi; Sato, Naoki; Sato, Akira; Kumazawa, Yukiyo; Terada, Yukihiro

    2017-01-01

    The hatching of a blastocyst where the blastocyst portions on the inside and the outside of the zona pellucida feature a figure-of-eight shape is termed "8"-shaped hatching; this type of hatching has been reported to affect the proper presentation of the inner cell mass (ICM) in both human and mouse embryos. Here, our aim was to investigate the factors that affect ICM presentation during "8"-shaped hatching. We performed IVF by using B6D2F1 female mice and ICR male mice, and used the 104 captured blastocysts. Embryos were maintained in KSOM at 37°C in a 5% CO2, 5% O2, and 90% N2 environment, and their growth behavior was monitored individually and continuously using time-lapse cinematography. At 120 h after insemination, embryos were immunostained and examined under a confocal microscope. We used the hatching form to identify "8"-shaped hatching, and we classified the "8"-shaped-hatching blastocysts into two groups, one in which the hatching site was near the ICM center, and the other in which the hatching site was far from the ICM center. We measured each group for ICM size and the number of Oct3/4-positive cells. Of the 95 hatching or hatched embryos, 74 were "8"-shaped-hatching blastocysts, and in these embryos, the ICM was significantly wider when the hatching site was near the ICM than when the hatching site was far from the ICM (P = 0.0091). Moreover, in the "8"-shaped-hatching blastocysts in which the ICM was included in the blastocyst portion outside the zona pellucida-the portion defined as the "outside blastocyst"-after the collapse of this outside blastocyst, the ICM adhered to the trophectoderm of the outside blastocyst, opposite the hatching site. Our results indicate that in "8"-shaped-hatching blastocysts, the hatching site and the collapse of outside blastocyst affect ICM formation. Thus, the assessment of "8"-shaped hatching behaviors could yield indices for accurately evaluating embryo quality.

  8. Dependence of earthquake size distributions on convergence rates at subduction zones

    SciTech Connect

    Mccaffrey, R.

    1994-10-01

    The correlation of numbers of thrust earthquakes of moment magnitude 7 or greater in this century at subduction zones with convergence rate results from a combination of lower recurrence intervals for earthquakes of a given size where slip rates are high and peak in the global distribution of subduction zone convergence rates at high values (55 to 90 mm/yr). Hence, physical mechanisms related to convergence rate, such as plate interface force, slab pull, or thermal effects, are not required to explain the distribution of large earthquakes with convergence rate. The seismic coupling coefficient ranges from 10% to 100% at subduction zone segments where convergence is faster than 45 mm/yr but does not correlate with rate. The coefficient is generally orders of magnitude lower at rates below 40 mm/yr which may be due to long recurrence intervals and a short sampling period (94 years).

  9. Implementation of Improved Transverse Shear Calculations and Higher Order Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Analyses of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Lin-Fa; Kim, Soo; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed to investigate the nonlinear and strain rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composite laminated plates under high strain rate impact loadings. A recently developed strength of materials based micromechanics model, incorporating a set of nonlinear, strain rate dependent constitutive equations for the polymer matrix, is extended to account for the transverse shear effects during impact. Four different assumptions of transverse shear deformation are investigated in order to improve the developed strain rate dependent micromechanics model. The validities of these assumptions are investigated using numerical and theoretical approaches. A method to determine through the thickness strain and transverse Poisson's ratio of the composite is developed. The revised micromechanics model is then implemented into a higher order laminated plate theory which is modified to include the effects of inelastic strains. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the mechanical response of composite plates under high strain rate loadings. Results show the transverse shear stresses cannot be neglected in the impact problem. A significant level of strain rate dependency and material nonlinearity is found in the deformation response of representative composite specimens.

  10. Use of DNA strand damage (Comet assay) and embryo hatching effects to assess contaminant exposure in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.F.; Steinert, S.A.; Nakayama, K.; Oshima, Y.

    1999-07-01

    After fertilization, blue crab eggs are embedded in a sponge which is attached to the female abdomen during embryo development. Embryos after 9 stages in the egg sac hatch into a swimming zoea stage (stage 10). The authors have developed a bioassay where embryo development is monitored in culture plates with and without toxicants in the water. Toxicant effects are based on determining the percentage of embryos which hatch to zoea. Hatching EC{sub 50} (toxicant concentration at which 50% of the embryos fail to hatch) for a number of pesticides, organometallics and metals were determined. The test takes from 2 to 6 days depending on the embryo stage selected for the study. In addition to embryo development effects the prevalence of DNA single-strand breaks in individual embryo cells were determined using the single cell gel electrophoresis method (Comet assay). A good correlation between DNA strand breakage and embryo defects was found after exposure to genotoxic contaminants. Thus, the bioassay linking DNA damage to embryo hatching effects is rapid, sensitive and mechanistically relevant.

  11. pH and urea dependence of amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates in the beta-trefoil protein hisactophilin.

    PubMed

    Houliston, R Scott; Liu, Chengsong; Singh, Laila M R; Meiering, Elizabeth M

    2002-01-29

    Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange rates were measured as a function of pH and urea for 37 slowly exchanging amides in the beta-trefoil protein hisactophilin. The rank order of exchange rates is generally maintained under different solution conditions, and trends in the pH and urea dependence of exchange rates are correlated with the rank order of exchange rates. The observed trends are consistent with the expected behavior for exchange of different amides via global and/or local unfolding. Analysis of the pH dependence of exchange in terms of rate constants for structural opening and closing reveals a wide range of rates in different parts of the hisactophilin structure. The slowest exchanging amides have the slowest opening and closing rates. Many of the slowest exchanging amides are located in trefoil 2, but there are also some slow exchanging amides in trefoils 1 and 3. Slow exchangers tend to be near the interface between the beta-barrel and the beta-hairpin triplet portions of this single-domain structure. The pattern of exchange behaviour in hisactophilin is similar to that observed previously in interleukin-1 beta, indicating that exchange properties may be conserved among beta-trefoil proteins. Comparisons of opening and closing rates in hisactophilin with rates obtained for other proteins reveal clear trends for opening rates; however, trends in closing rates are less apparent, perhaps due to inaccuracies in the values used for intrinsic exchange rates in the data fitting. On the basis of the pH and urea dependence of exchange rates and optical measurements of stability and folding, EX2 is the main exchange mechanism in hisactophilin, but there is also evidence for varying levels of EX1 exchange at low and high pH and high urea concentrations. Equilibrium intermediates in which subglobal portions of structure are cooperatively disrupted are not apparent from analysis of the urea dependence of exchange rates. There is, however, a strong correlation between

  12. An improved Prandtl-Ishlinskii model for compensating rate-dependent hysteresis in fast steering mirror system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wan-ting; Guo, Jin; Fang, Chu; Jiang, Zhen-hua; Wang, Ting-feng

    2016-11-01

    To solve the rate-dependent hysteresis compensation problem in fast steering mirror (FSM) systems, an improved Prandtl-Ishlinskii (P-I) model is proposed in this paper. The proposed model is formulated by employing a linear density function into the STOP operator. By this way, the proposed model has a relatively simple mathematic format, which can be applied to compensate the rate-dependent hysteresis directly. Adaptive differential evolution algorithm is utilized to obtain the accurate parameters of the proposed model. A fast steering mirror control system is established to demonstrate the validity and feasibility of the improved P-I model. Comparative experiments with different input signals are performed and analyzed, and the results show that the proposed model not only suppresses the rate-dependent hysteresis effectively, but also obtains high tracking precision.

  13. Demographic, mechanistic and density-dependent determinants of population growth rate: a case study in an avian predator.

    PubMed Central

    Hone, Jim; Sibly, Richard M

    2002-01-01

    Identifying the determinants of population growth rate is a central topic in population ecology. Three approaches (demographic, mechanistic and density-dependent) used historically to describe the determinants of population growth rate are here compared and combined for an avian predator, the barn owl (Tyto alba). The owl population remained approximately stable (r approximately 0) throughout the period from 1979 to 1991. There was no evidence of density dependence as assessed by goodness of fit to logistic population growth. The finite (lambda) and instantaneous (r) population growth rates were significantly positively related to food (field vole) availability. The demographic rates, annual adult mortality, juvenile mortality and annual fecundity were reported to be correlated with vole abundance. The best fit (R(2) = 0.82) numerical response of the owl population described a positive effect of food (field voles) and a negative additive effect of owl abundance on r. The numerical response of the barn owl population to food availability was estimated from both census and demographic data, with very similar results. Our analysis shows how the demographic and mechanistic determinants of population growth rate are linked; food availability determines demographic rates, and demographic rates determine population growth rate. The effects of food availability on population growth rate are modified by predator abundance. PMID:12396509

  14. Mercury in wing and tail feathers of hatch-year and adult tidal marsh sparrows.

    PubMed

    Warner, Sarah E; Shriver, W Gregory; Olsen, Brian J; Greenberg, Russell G; Taylor, Robert J

    2012-11-01

    We estimated mercury exposure and bioaccumulation in sparrow feathers to determine variation among age groups, between sparrow species, and between feather types. Results of feather mercury studies in piscivorous birds indicate that mercury concentrations tend to increase with age and differ between feather types; however, data for insectivorous birds are lacking. We estimated mercury exposure of two insectivorous and sympatric tidal marsh sparrows: coastal plain swamp sparrow (Melospiza georgiana nigrescens), and seaside sparrow (Ammodramous maritimus). Tidal marshes have favorable conditions for mercury methlyation, thus it is likely that tidal marsh sparrows are exposed to methylmercury. We found no difference in mercury concentrations between males and female birds of both species. Adult swamp sparrow feather mercury concentrations did not differ among adult age groups; therefore, mercury was not found to increase with age in sparrows at the site. Hatch-year birds had significantly greater feather mercury concentrations compared with adult birds for both species. Mercury concentrations in adult seaside sparrows were twice as high as those in adult swamp sparrows suggesting species-specific variation, although concentrations in hatch-year sparrow species did not differ. Mercury concentrations differed between feather types in adults of both species. The first primary feather of both species had at least three times greater mercury concentrations than the outer tail feather possibly reflecting varying depuration rates with feather type.

  15. Egg-hatching synchrony and larval cannibalism in the dock leaf beetle Gastrophysa viridula (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Kutcherov, Dmitry

    2015-12-01

    Females of leaf beetles and many other herbivorous insects lay eggs in coherent batches. Hatchlings emerge more or less simultaneously and often prey on their late-hatching clutchmates. It is not certain, however, whether this synchrony of hatching is a mere by-product of cannibalism or whether an additional synchronizing factor exists. The following simple experiment was aimed at determining the causal relationship between cannibalism and simultaneous larval emergence. Egg clutches of the dock leaf beetle Gastrophysa viridula were split into two halves. These halves were either kept as coherent groups in two separate dishes or, alternatively, only one half remained whole, whereas the other one was divided into single eggs, each of which was incubated in a separate dish. Halving of a clutch into coherent groups only slightly disrupted the synchrony of emergence. The consequence of individual isolation was more dramatic. Half-clutches consisting of disconnected solitary eggs required almost twice as much time for complete emergence of all larvae, which was significantly more than cannibalism as a sole synchronizing factor might explain. Moreover, survival rates were the same in coherent half-clutches (in the presence of cannibalism) and among isolated individuals. This group effect and the small contribution of cannibalism suggest the existence of an additional synchronizing factor. Possible mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon are discussed.

  16. Multiple Metazoan Life-span Interventions Exhibit a Sex-specific Strehler-Mildvan Inverse Relationship Between Initial Mortality Rate and Age-dependent Mortality Rate Acceleration.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Landis, Gary N; Tower, John

    2017-01-01

    The Gompertz equation describes survival in terms of initial mortality rate (parameter a), indicative of health, and age-dependent acceleration in mortality rate (parameter b), indicative of aging. Gompertz parameters were analyzed for several published studies. In Drosophila females, mating increases egg production and decreases median life span, consistent with a trade-off between reproduction and longevity. Mating increased parameter a, causing decreased median life span, whereas time parameter b was decreased. The inverse correlation between parameters indicates the Strehler-Mildvan (S-M) relationship, where loss of low-vitality individuals yields a cohort with slower age-dependent mortality acceleration. The steroid hormone antagonist mifepristone/RU486 reversed these effects. Mating and mifepristone showed robust S-M relationships across genotypes, and dietary restriction showed robust S-M relationship across diets. Because nutrient optima differed between females and males, the same manipulation caused opposite effects on mortality rates in females versus males across a range of nutrient concentrations. Similarly, p53 mutation in Drosophila and mTOR mutation in mice caused increased median life span associated with opposite direction changes in mortality rate parameters in females versus males. The data demonstrate that dietary and genetic interventions have sex-specific and sometimes sexually opposite effects on mortality rates consistent with sexual antagonistic pleiotropy.

  17. The temperature dependence of the rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurylo, M. J.; Cornett, K. D.; Murphy, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid in the 225-443 K temperature range has been measured by means of the flash photolysis resonance fluorescence technique. Above 300 K, the rate constant levels off in a way that can only be explained by the occurrence of two reaction channels, of which one, operative at low temperatures, proceeds through the formation of an adduct intermediate. The implications of these rate constant values for stratospheric reaction constants is discussed.

  18. Strong Field Ionization Rate Depends on the Sign of the Magnetic Quantum Number

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    xenon and krypton . It was found that spin-orbital coupling does not suppress the dependency of strong field ionization on atomic orientation. These...both   xenon  and   krypton .  It  was  found  that  spin-­‐orbital  coupling  does  not  suppress  the   dependency  of...spin-­‐orbital   coupling   in   krypton   and   xenon  does   not   suppress   the   dependency  of  strong  field

  19. Lipid-rich bovine serum albumin improves the viability and hatching ability of porcine blastocysts produced in vitro

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Chie; SAKAGUCHI, Yosuke; HOSHI, Hiroyoshi; YOSHIOKA, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The effects of lipid-rich bovine serum albumin (LR-BSA) on the development of porcine blastocysts produced in vitro were examined. Addition of 0.5 to 5 mg/ml LR-BSA to porcine blastocyst medium (PBM) from Day 5 (Day 0 = in vitro fertilization) significantly increased the hatching rates of blastocysts on Day 7 and the total cell numbers in Day-7 blastocysts. When Day-5 blastocysts were cultured with PBM alone, PBM containing LR-BSA, recombinant human serum albumin or fatty acid-free BSA, addition of LR-BSA significantly enhanced hatching rates and the cell number in blastocysts that survived compared with other treatments. The diameter, ATP content and numbers of both inner cell mass and total cells in Day-6 and Day-7 blastocysts cultured with PBM containing LR-BSA were significantly higher than in blastocysts cultured with PBM alone, whereas LR-BSA had no effect on mitochondrial membrane potential. The mRNA levels of enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism and β-oxidation (ACSL1, ACSL3, CPT1, CPT2 and KAT) in Day-7 blastocysts were significantly upregulated by the addition of LR-BSA. The results indicated that LR-BSA enhanced hatching ability and quality of porcine blastocysts produced in vitro, as determined by ATP content, blastocyst diameter and expression levels of the specific genes, suggesting that the stimulatory effects of LR-BSA arise from lipids bound to albumin. PMID:26582048

  20. Lipid-rich bovine serum albumin improves the viability and hatching ability of porcine blastocysts produced in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Chie; Sakaguchi, Yosuke; Hoshi, Hiroyoshi; Yoshioka, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The effects of lipid-rich bovine serum albumin (LR-BSA) on the development of porcine blastocysts produced in vitro were examined. Addition of 0.5 to 5 mg/ml LR-BSA to porcine blastocyst medium (PBM) from Day 5 (Day 0 = in vitro fertilization) significantly increased the hatching rates of blastocysts on Day 7 and the total cell numbers in Day-7 blastocysts. When Day-5 blastocysts were cultured with PBM alone, PBM containing LR-BSA, recombinant human serum albumin or fatty acid-free BSA, addition of LR-BSA significantly enhanced hatching rates and the cell number in blastocysts that survived compared with other treatments. The diameter, ATP content and numbers of both inner cell mass and total cells in Day-6 and Day-7 blastocysts cultured with PBM containing LR-BSA were significantly higher than in blastocysts cultured with PBM alone, whereas LR-BSA had no effect on mitochondrial membrane potential. The mRNA levels of enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism and β-oxidation (ACSL1, ACSL3, CPT1, CPT2 and KAT) in Day-7 blastocysts were significantly upregulated by the addition of LR-BSA. The results indicated that LR-BSA enhanced hatching ability and quality of porcine blastocysts produced in vitro, as determined by ATP content, blastocyst diameter and expression levels of the specific genes, suggesting that the stimulatory effects of LR-BSA arise from lipids bound to albumin.

  1. Plasticity of hatching in amphibians: evolution, trade-offs, cues and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Karen M

    2011-07-01

    Many species of frogs and salamanders, in at least 12 families, alter their timing of hatching in response to conditions affecting mortality of eggs or larvae. Some terrestrially laid or stranded embryos wait to hatch until they are submerged in water. Some embryos laid above water accelerate hatching if the eggs are dehydrating; others hatch early if flooded. Embryos can hatch early in response to predators and pathogens of eggs or delay hatching in response to predators of larvae; some species do both. The phylogenetic pattern of environmentally cued hatching suggests that similar responses have evolved convergently in multiple amphibian lineages. The use of similar cues, including hypoxia and physical disturbance, in multiple contexts suggests potential shared mechanisms underlying the capacity of embryos to respond to environmental conditions. Shifts in the timing of hatching often have clear benefits, but we know less about the trade-offs that favor plasticity, the mechanisms that enable it, and its evolutionary history. Some potentially important types of cued hatching, such as those involving embryo-parent interactions, are relatively unexplored. I discuss promising directions for research and the opportunities that the hatching of amphibians offers for integrative studies of the mechanisms, ecology and evolution of a critical transition between life-history stages.

  2. The relationship between energy-dependent phagocytosis and the rate of oxygen consumption in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Skriver, L; Nilsson, J R

    1978-12-01

    The induction of high rates of food vacuole formation in Tetrahymena pyriformis increased the rate of respiration in exponentially growing cells by 17% and in starving cells by 47.5%. The increased rate of oxygen uptake was caused by phagocytosis itself, as shown by comparing the rates of respiration of a Tetrahymena mutant exposed to particles at the permissive or restrictive temperatures for food vacuole formation. During cell division, heat-synchronized cells in rich, particle-supplemented medium showed a significant decrease in the rate of respiration. Furthermore, dimethyl sulphoxide, in concentrations sufficient to block food vacuole formation, suppressed the rate of respiration to a level similar to that of starved cells. Cytochalasin B, fowever, did not reduce the rate of oxygen uptake despite the inability of the cells to complete the formation of food vacuoles during treatment; a possible explanation for this finding is discussed. There was a strong correlation between formation of food vacuoles and a high metabolic rate in Tetrahymena.

  3. College Graduation Rates Depend Mainly on the Students--But Colleges Matter Too. Here's How Much.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joy, Stephen P.

    2017-01-01

    College graduation rates are a source of concern; many students fail to complete degree programs and therefore miss out on the socioeconomic benefits accruing to college graduates. Some have proposed that colleges be evaluated based on their graduation rates, with financial aid dollars directed away from poor performers. However, none of these…

  4. Can Two Psychotherapy Process Measures Be Dependably Rated Simultaneously? A Generalizability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulvenes, Pal G.; Berggraf, Lene; Hoffart, Asle; Levy, Raymon A.; Ablon, J. Stuart; McCullough, Leigh; Wampold, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    Observer ratings in psychotherapy are a common way of collecting information in psychotherapy research. However, human observers are imperfect instruments, and their ratings may be subject to variability from several sources. One source of variability can be raters' assessing more than 1 instrument at a time. The purpose of this research is to…

  5. Rate-dependent variation in the duration of the QRS complex with left anterior fascicular block.

    PubMed

    Mirvis, D M; Bandura, J P; Brody, D A

    1977-10-01

    The case of a 67-year-old man with combined ischemic and valvular heart disease is presented. Electrocardiographic abnormalities included left anterior fascicular block with a variable duration of the QRS complex. The width of the QRS complex was dependent on the length of the cycle, being broader with short than with long preceding R-R intervals. This is interpreted as a tachycardia-dependent focal block coexisting with a fixed delay in fascicular conduction.

  6. Astronaut Vance Brand practices operating Docking Module hatch for ASTP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Astronaut Vance D. Brand, command module pilot of the American Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) prime crew, practices operating a Docking Module hatch during ASTP pre-flight training at JSC. The Docking Module is designed to link the Apollo and Soyuz spacecraft during their docking in Earth orbit mission. Gary L. Doerre of JSC's Crew Training and Procedures Division is working with Brand. Doerre is wearing a face mask to help prevent possible exposure to Brand of disease prior to the ASTP launch.

  7. Need for higher fuel burnup at the Hatch Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Beckhman, J.T.

    1996-03-01

    Hatch is a BWR 4 and has been in operation for some time. The first unit became commercial about 1975. Obtaining higher burnups, or higher average discharge exposures, is nothing new at Hatch. Since we have started, the discharge exposure of the plant has increased. Now, of course, we are not approaching the numbers currently being discussed but, the average discharge exposure has increased from around 20,000 MWD/MTU in the early to mid-1980s to 34,000 MWD/MTU in 1994, I am talking about batch average values. There are also peak bundle and peak rod values. You will have to make the conversions if you think in one way or the other because I am talking in batch averages. During Hatch`s operating history we have had some problems with fuel failure. Higher burnup fuel raises a concern about how much fuel failure you are going to have. Fuel failure is, of course, an economic issue with us. Back in the early 1980s, we had a problem with crud-induced localized corrosion, known as CILC. We have gotten over that, but we had some times when it was up around 27 fuel failures a year. That is not a pleasant time to live through because it is not what you want from an economic viewpoint or any other. We have gotten that down. We have had some fuel failures recently, but they have not been related to fuel burnup or to corrosion. In fact, the number of failures has decreased from the early 1980s to the 90s even though burnup increased during that time. The fuel failures are more debris-related-type failures. In addition to increasing burnups, utilities are actively evaluating or have already incorporated power uprate and longer fuel cycles (e.g., 2-year cycles). The goal is to balance out the higher power density, longer cycles, higher burnup, and to have no leakers. Why do we as an industry want to have higher burnup fuel? That is what I want to tell you a little bit about.

  8. Plasticity of hatching and the duration of planktonic development in marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Oyarzun, Fernanda X; Strathmann, Richard R

    2011-07-01

    Plasticity in hatching potentially adjusts risks of benthic and planktonic development for benthic marine invertebrates. The proportionate effect of hatching plasticity on duration of larval swimming is greatest for animals that can potentially brood or encapsulate offspring until hatching near metamorphic competence. As an example, early hatching of the nudibranch mollusk Phestilla sibogae is stimulated by scattering of encapsulated offspring, as by a predator feeding on the gelatinous egg ribbon. When egg ribbons are undisturbed, hatching is at or near metamorphic competence. Disturbance of an unguarded benthic egg mass can insert 4 or more days of obligate larval dispersal into the life history. As another example, the spionid annelid Boccardia proboscidea broods capsules, each with both cannibalistic and developmentally arrested planktivorous siblings plus nurse eggs. Early hatching produces mainly planktivorous larvae with a planktonic duration of 15 days. Late hatching produces mainly adelphophages who have eaten their planktivorous siblings and metamorphose with little or no period of swimming. Mothers actively hatch their offspring by tearing the capsules, and appeared to time hatching in response to their environment and not to the stage of development of their offspring. Higher temperature increased the variance of brooding time. Females appeared to hatch capsules at an earlier developmental stage at lower temperatures. Species that release gametes or zygotes directly into the plankton have less scope for plasticity in stage at hatching. Their embryos develop singly with little protection and hatch at early stages, often as blastulae or gastrulae. Time of hatching cannot be greatly advanced, and sensory capabilities of blastulae may be limited.

  9. MD simulations of loading rate dependence of detwinning deformation in nanocrystalline Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hao; Tang, QiHeng

    2013-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the deformation behavior of nanocrystalline Ni with pre-twin atom structure. The simulation sample is composed of four grains with average size 12 nm. The simulation technique of isobaric-isothermal ensemble (NPT) with high pressure is applied to obtain a sample with two circle twins. Under uniaxial tensile and shear loading, as well as different detwinning deformation behaviors are observed. Under uniaxial tension the detwinning deformation is induced by the event of grain growth, and it is supported by local energy analysis. Under the shear loading the detwinning deformation is related to the loading rate. The results show that there may be a critical shear rate. As the shear rate is sufficiently high the circle twin is found to be failed; as the shear rate is less than that rate, the size of circle twin become smaller and gradually approach a constant value. Our simulation results are in good agreement with experiment observation.

  10. Dose-rate dependent stochastic effects in radiation cell-survival models.

    PubMed

    Sachs, R K; Hlatky, L R

    1990-01-01

    When cells are subjected to ionizing radiation the specific energy rate (microscopic analog of dose-rate) varies from cell to cell. Within one cell, this rate fluctuates during the course of time; a crossing of a sensitive cellular site by a high energy charged particle produces many ionizations almost simultaneously, but during the interval between events no ionizations occur. In any cell-survival model one can incorporate the effect of such fluctuations without changing the basic biological assumptions. Using stochastic differential equations and Monte Carlo methods to take into account stochastic effects we calculated the dose-survival relationships in a number of current cell survival models. Some of the models assume quadratic misrepair; others assume saturable repair enzyme systems. It was found that a significant effect of random fluctuations is to decrease the theoretically predicted amount of dose-rate sparing. In the limit of low dose-rates neglecting the stochastic nature of specific energy rates often leads to qualitatively misleading results by overestimating the surviving fraction drastically. In the opposite limit of acute irradiation, analyzing the fluctuations in rates merely amounts to analyzing fluctuations in total specific energy via the usual microdosimetric specific energy distribution function, and neglecting fluctuations usually underestimates the surviving fraction. The MOnte Carlo methods interpolate systematically between the low dose-rate and high dose-rate limits. As in other approaches, the slope of the survival curve at low dose-rates is virtually independent of dose and equals the initial slope of the survival curve for acute radiation.

  11. Estimation of daily age and timing of hatching of exotic Asian swamp eels Monopterus albus (Zuiew, 1793) in a backwater marsh of the Chattahoochee River, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, James M.; Lafleur, C.

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths were used to estimate daily age, growth, and hatching date of the exotic Asian swamp eel (Monopterus albus) captured from a backwater marsh of the Chattahoochee River, Georgia, USA. The eels were sampled using leaf litter traps (N = 140) from 17 July to 28 August 2008. The captured (N = 15) Asian swamp eels ranged in total length from 4.9 cm to 12.2 cm, and were estimated to be from 21 to 51 days old (N = 13), and hatched from 13 June to 7 August 2008. Assuming linear growth, these individuals grew an average rate of 0.2 cm per day. To the authors' knowledge, this was the first time otoliths were used to estimate daily age, growth, and hatching date for M. albus, which can be useful for understanding the ecology of this species in the wild.

  12. Estimation of daily age and timing of hatching of exotic Asian swamp eels Monopterus albus (Zuiew, 1793) in a backwater marsh of the Chattahoochee River, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, J.M.; Lafleur, C.

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths were used to estimate daily age, growth, and hatching date of the exotic Asian swamp eel (Monopterus albus) captured from a backwater marsh of the Chattahoochee River, Georgia, USA. The eels were sampled using leaf litter traps (N=140) from 17 July to 28 August 2008. The captured (N=15) Asian swamp eels ranged in total length from 4.9cm to 12.2cm, and were estimated to be from 21 to 51days old (N=13), and hatched from 13 June to 7 August 2008. Assuming linear growth, these individuals grew an average rate of 0.2cm per day. To the authors' knowledge, this was the first time otoliths were used to estimate daily age, growth, and hatching date for M. albus, which can be useful for understanding the ecology of this species in the wild. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. Sensitivity study of forecasted aftershock seismicity based on Coulomb stress calculation and rate- and state-dependent frictional response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, M.; Hainzl, S.; Catalli, F.; Enescu, B.; Lombardi, A. M.; Woessner, J.

    2010-05-01

    We use the Dieterich (1994) physics-based approach to simulate the spatiotemporal evolution of seismicity caused by stress changes applied to an infinite population of nucleating patches modeled through a rate- and state-dependent friction law. According to this model, seismicity rate changes depend on the amplitude of stress perturbation, the physical constitutive properties of faults (represented by the parameter Aσ), the stressing rate, and the background seismicity rate of the study area. In order to apply this model in a predictive manner, we need to understand the impact of physical model parameters and the correlations between them. First, we discuss different definitions of the reference seismicity rate and show their impact on the computed rate of earthquake production for the 1992 Landers earthquake sequence as a case study. Furthermore, we demonstrate that all model parameters are strongly correlated for physical and statistical reasons. We discuss this correlation, emphasizing that the estimations of the background seismicity rate, stressing rate, and Aσ are strongly correlated to reproduce the observed aftershock productivity. Our analytically derived relation demonstrates the impact of these model parameters on the Omori-like aftershock decay: the c value and the productivity of the Omori law, implying a p value smaller than or equal to 1. Finally, we discuss an optimal strategy to constrain model parameters for near-real-time forecasts.

  14. Entrainment Rate in Shallow Cumuli: Dependence on Entrained Dry Air Sources and Probability Density Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Liu, Y.; Niu, S.; Vogelmann, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    In situ aircraft cumulus observations from the RACORO field campaign are used to estimate entrainment rate for individual clouds using a recently developed mixing fraction approach. The entrainment rate is computed based on the observed state of the cloud core and the state of the air that is laterally mixed into the cloud at its edge. The computed entrainment rate decreases when the air is entrained from increasing distance from the cloud core edge; this is because the air farther away from cloud edge is drier than the neighboring air that is within the humid shells around cumulus clouds. Probability density functions of entrainment rate are well fitted by lognormal distributions at different heights above cloud base for different dry air sources (i.e., different source distances from the cloud core edge). Such lognormal distribution functions are appropriate for inclusion into future entrainment rate parameterization in large scale models. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that probability density functions of entrainment rate have been obtained in shallow cumulus clouds based on in situ observations. The reason for the wide spread of entrainment rate is that the observed clouds are affected by entrainment mixing processes to different extents, which is verified by the relationships between the entrainment rate and cloud microphysics/dynamics. The entrainment rate is negatively correlated with liquid water content and cloud droplet number concentration due to the dilution and evaporation in entrainment mixing processes. The entrainment rate is positively correlated with relative dispersion (i.e., ratio of standard deviation to mean value) of liquid water content and droplet size distributions, consistent with the theoretical expectation that entrainment mixing processes are responsible for microphysics fluctuations and spectral broadening. The entrainment rate is negatively correlated with vertical velocity and dissipation rate because entrainment

  15. Nest-site selection and hatching success of waterbirds in coastal Virginia: some results of habitat manipulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rounds, R.A.; Erwin, R.M.; Portera, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    Rising sea levels in the mid-Atlantic region pose a long-term threat to marshes and their avian inhabitants. The Gull-billed Tern (Sterna nilotica), Common Tern (S. hirundo), Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger), and American Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus), species of concern in Virginia, nest on low shelly perimeters of salt marsh islands on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. Marsh shellpiles are free of mammalian predators, but subject to frequent floods that reduce reproductive success. In an attempt to examine nest-site selection, enhance habitat, and improve hatching success, small (2 ? 2 m) plots on five island shellpiles were experimentally elevated, and nest-site selection and hatching success were monitored from 1 May to 1 August, 2002. In addition, location, elevation, and nesting performance of all other nests in the colonies were also monitored. No species selected the elevated experimental plots preferentially over adjacent control plots at any of the sites. When all nests were considered, Common Tern nests were located significantly lower than were random point elevations at two sites, as they tended to concentrate on low-lying wrack. At two other sites, however, Common Tern nests were significantly higher than were random points. Gull-billed Terns and American Oystercatchers showed a weak preference for higher elevations on bare shell at most sites. Hatching success was not improved on elevated plots, despite the protection they provided from flooding. Because of a 7 June flood, when 47% of all nests flooded, hatching success for all species was low. Nest elevation had the strongest impact on a nest's probability of hatching, followed by nest-initiation date. Predation rates were high at small colonies, and Ruddy Turnstones (Arenaria interpres) depredated 90% of early Gull-billed Tern nests at one shellpile. The importance of nest elevation and flooding on hatching success demonstrates the potential for management of certain waterbird nesting sites

  16. Effects of copper exposure on the hatching status and antioxidant defense at different developmental stages of embryos and larvae of goldfish Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xianghui; Jiang, Hongxia; Wang, Shuping; Wu, Xiangmin; Fei, Wei; Li, Li; Nie, Guoxing; Li, Xuejun

    2013-09-01

    This study aims to assess the effects of copper exposure on hatching status and antioxidant defense at different stages of embryos and larvae of goldfish Carassius auratus. In this study, day-old embryos were randomly grouped after fertilization and then exposed to copper concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.4, 0.7, and 1.0mgL(-1). Copper-exposed fish embryos were sampled every 24h to determine superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities, as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) content. In addition, cumulative mortality and larval deformity were also investigated. The findings showed that cumulative mortality and larval deformity rate increased gradually with copper concentration increase. SOD and CAT activities were inhibited at higher copper concentrations. At a lower concentration (0.1mgL(-1)), SOD activity increased in larvae, whereas CAT activity showed no significant change (p>0.05). MDA, as the lipid peroxidation product, gradually accumulated in embryos and larvae with increasing copper concentration and the extension of exposure time. At 0.4mgL(-1) and more, copper toxicity was shown in embryos and larvae. In conclusion, copper-exposed effects on hatching status and antioxidant defense in C. auratus embryos and larvae showed concentration- and time-dependent patterns. The biochemical parameters in this study can be used as effective indicators for evaluating the responses of copper-exposed fish embryos. In addition, this study demonstrates that 0.4mgL(-1) copper (corresponding to 1mgL(-1) copper sulfate), used to kill parasites in aquaculture, is not safe concentration, because it can result in toxicity to larvae. Therefore, the copper concentration to kill pathogen should be less than 0.4mgL(-1) for C. auratus.

  17. Stress State and Stress Rate Dependencies of Stiffness of Soft Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teachavorasinskun, Supot

    The influence of the stress anisotropy imposed during consolidation on the stiffness of soft Bangkok clays was explored using the triaxial equipment. Several testing conditions were imposed on the samples to examine the effects of stress state as well as the rate of loading. It was found the stiffness at moderate strain levels was almost independent to the stress state; i.e., the deviator stress level. On the contrary, the rate of stress application played a very important role. The faster the rate of stress application, the higher the values of the stiffness at moderate strains. Nevertheless, a simple empirical equation can be given based on the test results to represent the influence of rate of application on the stiffness of soft clay.

  18. Dependence of growth rate of quartz in fused silica on pressure and impurity content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fratello, V. J.; Hays, J. F.; Turnbull, D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of pressure, temperature, and some variations in impurity content on the growth rate u of quartz into fused silica were measured. Under all conditions the growth rate was interface controlled and increased exponentially with pressure with an activation volume averaging -21.2 cu cm/mole. The activation enthalpy for all specimens is extrapolated to a zero pressure value of 64 kcal/mole, within the experimental uncertainty. At a given stoichiometry the effect of hydroxyl content on growth rate is described entirely by a linear term C(OH) in the prefactor of the equation for the growth rate. The effect of chlorine impurity can be described similarly. Also u is increased as the ideal stoichiometry is approached from the partially reduced state.

  19. Critical mutation rate has an exponential dependence on population size in haploid and diploid populations.

    PubMed

    Aston, Elizabeth; Channon, Alastair; Day, Charles; Knight, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effect of population size on the key parameters of evolution is particularly important for populations nearing extinction. There are evolutionary pressures to evolve sequences that are both fit and robust. At high mutation rates, individuals with greater mutational robustness can outcompete those with higher fitness. This is survival-of-the-flattest, and has been observed in digital organisms, theoretically, in simulated RNA evolution, and in RNA viruses. We introduce an algorithmic method capable of determining the relationship between population size, the critical mutation rate at which individuals with greater robustness to mutation are favoured over individuals with greater fitness, and the error threshold. Verification for this method is provided against analytical models for the error threshold. We show that the critical mutation rate for increasing haploid population sizes can be approximated by an exponential function, with much lower mutation rates tolerated by small populations. This is in contrast to previous studies which identified that critical mutation rate was independent of population size. The algorithm is extended to diploid populations in a system modelled on the biological process of meiosis. The results confirm that the relationship remains exponential, but show that both the critical mutation rate and error threshold are lower for diploids, rather than higher as might have been expected. Analyzing the transition from critical mutation rate to error threshold provides an improved definition of critical mutation rate. Natural populations with their numbers in decline can be expected to lose genetic material in line with the exponential model, accelerating and potentially irreversibly advancing their decline, and this could potentially affect extinction, recovery and population management strategy. The effect of population size is particularly strong in small populations with 100 individuals or less; the exponential model has

  20. Modeling the influence of preferential flow on the spatial variability and time-dependence of mineral weathering rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Sachin; Rajaram, Harihar

    2016-12-01

    Inferences of weathering rates from laboratory and field observations suggest significant scale and time-dependence. Preferential flow induced by heterogeneity (manifest as permeability variations or discrete fractures) has been suggested as one potential mechanism causing scale/time-dependence. We present a quantitative evaluation of the influence of preferential flow on weathering rates using reactive transport modeling. Simulations were performed in discrete fracture networks (DFNs) and correlated random permeability fields (CRPFs), and compared to simulations in homogeneous permeability fields. The simulations reveal spatial variability in the weathering rate, multidimensional distribution of reactions zones, and the formation of rough weathering interfaces and corestones due to preferential flow. In the homogeneous fields and CRPFs, the domain-averaged weathering rate is initially constant as long as the weathering front is contained within the domain, reflecting equilibrium-controlled behavior. The behavior in the CRPFs was influenced by macrodispersion, with more spread-out weathering profiles, an earlier departure from the initial constant rate and longer persistence of weathering. DFN simulations exhibited a sustained time-dependence resulting from the formation of diffusion-controlled weathering fronts in matrix blocks, which is consistent with the shrinking core mechanism. A significant decrease in the domain-averaged weathering rate is evident despite high remaining mineral volume fractions, but the decline does not follow a 1/t dependence, characteristic of diffusion, due to network scale effects and advection-controlled behavior near the inflow boundary. The DFN simulations also reveal relatively constant horizontally averaged weathering rates over a significant depth range, challenging the very notion of a weathering front.