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Sample records for dependent myocardial angiotensin

  1. Acute effects of angiotensin II on myocardial performance.

    PubMed

    Broomé, M; Haney, M; Häggmark, S; Johansson, G; Aneman, A; Biber, B

    2001-10-01

    Specific angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors exist in many organs including peripheral blood vessels, cardiac myocytes and the central nervous system. This suggests multiple sites of actions for Ang II throughout the cardiovascular system. Cardiac effects of Ang II are not completely understood, though its prominent vasoconstrictor actions are well described. This study was designed to assess left ventricular function during administration of Ang II using relatively load-independent methods in a whole-animal model. Ang II was infused in incremental doses (0-200 microg x h(-1)) in anaesthetised instrumented pigs (n=10). Cardiac systolic and diastolic function were evaluated by analysis of the left ventricular pressure-volume relationship. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) increased dose-dependently with Ang II, while cardiac output (CO) remained unchanged. Systolic function indices, end-systolic elastance (Ees) and preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW), demonstrated dose-dependent increases. The diastolic function parameter tau (tau) did not change with increasing Ang II dose. Ang II infusion caused increases in contractility indices in anaesthetised pigs in the doses used in this study. The mechanisms for these systolic function effects may be a direct myocardial effect or modulated through changes in autonomic nervous system activity.

  2. The Divergent Cardiovascular Effects of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin Receptor Blockers on Myocardial Infarction and Death.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Martin H; Hall, Alistair S

    2016-01-01

    The renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) plays a central role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and vascular disease. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) suppress angiotensin II (ANG II) concentrations, whereas angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) block the binding of ANG II to AT1 receptors. ACEis and ARBs are both effective anti-hypertensive agents and have similar risk reductions in stroke - a blood pressure dependent phenomenon. ACEis also reduce the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and mortality in high risk hypertensive patients, as well as in diabetics, the elderly, those with vascular disease, and in congestive heart failure. ARBs, in contrast, do not reduce the risk of MI or death in clinical trials where the comparator has been another active therapy or even a placebo. Systematic reviews of ARBs that include meta-analyses or meta-regression analyses confirm that ARBs lack the cardiovascular protective effects of ACEis, which in part are "independent" of blood pressure lowering. Practice guidelines, especially those in high risk hypertensive patients, should reflect the evidence that ACEis and ARBs have divergent cardiovascular effects - ACEis reduce mortality, whereas ARBs do not. ACEis should be the preferred RAAS inhibitor in high risk patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Noninvasive Imaging of Angiotensin Receptors After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Verjans, Johan W. H.; Lovhaug, Dagfinn; Narula, Navneet; Petrov, Artiom D.; Indrevoll, Bård; Bjurgert, Emma; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Petersen, Lizette B.; Kindberg, Grete M.; Solbakken, Magne; Cuthbertson, Alan; Vannan, Mani A.; Reutelingsperger, Chris P. M.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Hofstra, Leonard; Narula, Jagat

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of noninvasive imaging of angiotensin II (AT) receptor upregulation in a mouse model of post-myocardial infarction (MI) heart failure (HF). BACKGROUND Circulating AT levels do not reflect the status of upregulation of renin-angiotensin axis in the myocardium, which plays a central role in ventricular remodeling and evolution of HF after MI. Appropriately labeled AT or AT receptor blocking agents should be able to specifically target AT receptors by molecular imaging techniques. METHODS AT receptor imaging was performed in 29 mice at various time points after permanent coronary artery ligation or in controls using a fluoresceinated angiotensin peptide analog (APA) and radiolabeled losartan. The APA was used in 19 animals for intravital fluorescence microscopy on a beating mouse heart. Tc-99m losartan was used for in vivo radionuclide imaging and quantitative assessment of AT receptor expression in 10 mice. After imaging, hearts were harvested for pathological characterization using confocal and 2-photon microscopy. RESULTS No or little APA uptake was observed in control animals or within infarct regions on days 0 and 1. Distinct uptake occurred in the infarct area at 1 to 12 weeks after MI; the uptake was at maximum at 3 weeks and reduced markedly at 12 weeks after MI. Ultrasonographic examination demonstrated left ventricular remodeling, and pathologic characterization revealed localization of the APA tracer with collagen-producing myofibroblasts. Tc-99m losartan uptake in the infarct region (0.524 ± 0.212% injected dose/g) increased 2.4-fold as compared to uptake in the control animals (0.215 ± 0.129%; p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS The present study demonstrates the feasibility of in vivo molecular imaging of AT receptors in the remodeling myocardium. Noninvasive imaging studies aimed at AT receptor expression could play a role in identification of subjects likely to develop heart failure. In addition

  4. Comparative effects of a novel angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor versus captopril on plasma angiotensins after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Flores-Monroy, Jazmín; Ferrario, Carlos M; Valencia-Hernández, Ignacio; Hernández-Campos, Maria Elena; Martínez-Aguilar, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The compound 4-tert-butyl-2,6-bis(thiomorpholin-4-ylmethyl)phenol (TBTIF) has molecular characteristics similar to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors of the sulfhydryl subclass. To assess its value as a new therapeutic agent, we performed a comparative analysis of the effect of TBTIF versus captopril on the circulating levels of angiotensin (Ang) peptides and bradykinin as well as ACE and ACE2 expression after myocardial infarction. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: (1) sham-operated rats; (2) rats subjected to 48 h of coronary artery ligation; (3) rats administered captopril (1 mg/kg, i.m.), and (4) a similar group of rats given TBTIF (1 mg/kg, i.m.). Both drugs were administered 30 min before coronary artery ligation and again 24 h later. Acute myocardial infarction lowered both systolic and left ventricular systolic blood pressures compared to the sham group and increased plasma levels of Ang I, Ang II, Ang(1-7) and Ang(1-12). Administration of either captopril or TBTIF reversed the increases in plasma angiotensins. Interestingly, the levels of plasma Ang(1-7) achieved by administration of TBTIF reached values higher than those recorded with captopril. Both agents reversed the decreases in plasma concentrations of bradykinin; in addition, TBTIF upregulated ACE expression, while both agents suppressed the ACE2 upregulation induced by myocardial infarction. These results demonstrate a beneficial effect of the novel compound TBTIF in suppressing the acute surge in the circulating renin-angiotensin system activity induced by myocardial infarction. The greater effects of this compound in augmenting plasma Ang(1-7) concentrations may be highly significant as drugs which augment the concentration of this heptapeptide will exert cardioprotective actions in part by suppressing the hypertrophic and profibrotic actions of Ang II. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme in acute myocardial infarction and angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Rømer, F K; Kornerup, H J

    1981-06-01

    Serum activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme was measured by serial analysis in 19 patients with acute myocardial infarction and in eight patients with angina pectoris. As a rule no changes in enzyme activity occurred during 6 days observations. However, two patients with infarction exhibited a pronounced fall of enzyme activity which could not be related to clinical events. The analysis seems to have no place in the diagnosis and management of patients with myocardial infarction.

  6. Novel role of aminopeptidase-A in angiotensin-(1–7) metabolism post myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Alghamri, Mahmoud S.; Meszaros, J. Gary; Elased, Khalid M.; Grobe, Nadja

    2014-01-01

    Aminopeptidase-A (APA) is a less well-studied enzyme of the renin-angiotensin system. We propose that it is involved in cardiac angiotensin (ANG) metabolism and its pathologies. ANG-(1–7) can ameliorate remodeling after myocardial injury. The aims of this study are to 1) develop mass spectrometric (MS) approaches for the assessment of ANG processing by APA within the myocardium; and 2) investigate the role of APA in cardiac ANG-(1–7) metabolism after myocardial infarction (MI) using sensitive MS techniques. MI was induced in C57Bl/6 male mice by ligating the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. Frozen mouse heart sections (in situ assay) or myocardial homogenates (in vitro assay) were incubated with the endogenous APA substrate, ANG II. Results showed concentration- and time-dependent cardiac formation of ANG III from ANG II, which was inhibited by the specific APA inhibitor, 4-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid. Myocardial APA activity was significantly increased 24 h after LAD ligation (0.82 ± 0.02 vs. 0.32 ± 0.02 ρmol·min−1·μg−1, MI vs. sham, P < 0.01). Both MS enzyme assays identified the presence of a new peptide, ANG-(2–7), m/z 784, which accumulated in the MI (146.45 ± 6.4 vs. 72.96 ± 7.0%, MI vs. sham, P < 0.05). Use of recombinant APA enzyme revealed that APA is responsible for ANG-(2–7) formation from ANG-(1–7). APA exhibited similar substrate affinity for ANG-(1–7) compared with ANG II {Km (ANG II) = 14.67 ± 1.6 vs. Km [ANG-(1–7)] = 6.07 ± 1.12 μmol/l, P < 0.05}. Results demonstrate a novel role of APA in ANG-(1–7) metabolism and suggest that the upregulation of APA, which occurs after MI, may deprive the heart of cardioprotective ANG-(1–7). Thus APA may serve as a potentially novel therapeutic target for management of tissue remodeling after MI. PMID:24464749

  7. Enhanced Angiotensin Receptor-Associated Protein in Renal Tubule Suppresses Angiotensin-Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wakui, Hiromichi; Tamura, Kouichi; Masuda, Shin-ichiro; Tsurumi-Ikeya, Yuko; Fujita, Megumi; Maeda, Akinobu; Ohsawa, Masato; Azushima, Kengo; Uneda, Kazushi; Matsuda, Miyuki; Kitamura, Kenichiro; Uchida, Shinichi; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Yamashita, Akio; Umemura, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that angiotensin II type 1 receptor-associated protein (ATRAP/Agtrap) interacts with the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and promotes constitutive internalization of the receptor so as to inhibit the pathological activation of its downstream signaling but preserve baseline physiological signaling activity. The present study was designed to investigate the role of renal ATRAP in angiotensin II–dependent hypertension. We generated transgenic mice dominantly expressing ATRAP in the renal tubules, including renal distal tubules. The renal ATRAP transgenic mice exhibited no significant change in blood pressure at baseline on normal salt diet. However, in the renal ATRAP transgenic mice compared with wild-type mice, the following took place: (1) the development of high blood pressure in response to angiotensin II infusion was significantly suppressed based on radiotelemetry, (2) the extent of daily positive sodium balance was significantly reduced during angiotensin II infusion in metabolic cage analysis, and (3) the renal Na+-Cl− cotransporter activation and α-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel induction by angiotensin II infusion were inhibited. Furthermore, adenoviral overexpression of ATRAP suppressed the angiotensin II–mediated increase in the expression of α-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel in mouse distal convoluted tubule cells. These results indicate that renal tubule–dominant ATRAP activation provokes no evident effects on blood pressure at baseline but exerts an inhibitory effect on the pathological elevation of blood pressure in response to angiotensin II stimulation, thereby suggesting that ATRAP is a potential target of interest in blood pressure modulation under pathological conditions. PMID:23529167

  8. Apelin Is a Negative Regulator of Angiotensin II-Mediated Adverse Myocardial Remodeling and Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Zhou; Wang, Wang; Jin, Hai-Yan; Chen, Xueyi; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Xu, Ying-Le; Song, Bei; Penninger, Josef M; Oudit, Gavin Y; Zhong, Jiu-Chang

    2017-10-03

    The apelin pathway has emerged as a critical regulator of cardiovascular homeostasis and disease. However, the exact role of pyr1-apelin-13 in angiotensin (Ang) II-mediated heart disease remains unclear. We used apelin-deficient (APLN(-)(/y)) and apolipoprotein E knockout mice to evaluate the regulatory roles of pyr1-apelin-13. The 1-year aged APLN(-)(/y) mice developed myocardial hypertrophy and dysfunction with reduced angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 levels. Ang II infusion (1.5 mg kg(-)(1) d(-)(1)) for 4 weeks potentiated oxidative stress, pathological hypertrophy, and myocardial fibrosis in young APLN(-)(/y) hearts resulting in exacerbation of cardiac dysfunction. Importantly, daily administration of 100 μg/kg pyr1-apelin-13 resulted in upregulated angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 levels, decreased superoxide production and expression of hypertrophy- and fibrosis-related genes leading to attenuated myocardial hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction in the Ang II-infused apolipoprotein E knockout mice. In addition, pyr1-apelin-13 treatment largely attenuated Ang II-induced apoptosis and ultrastructural injury in the apolipoprotein E knockout mice by activating Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation signaling. In cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts, exposure of Ang II decreased angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 protein and increased superoxide generation, cellular proliferation, and migration, which were rescued by pyr1-apelin-13, and Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase agonist stimulation. The increased superoxide generation and apoptosis in cultured cardiofibroblasts in response to Ang II were strikingly prevented by pyr1-apelin-13 which was partially reversed by cotreatment with the Akt inhibitor MK2206. In conclusion, pyr1-apelin-13 peptide pathway is a negative regulator of aging-mediated and Ang II-mediated adverse myocardial remodeling and dysfunction and represents a potential candidate to prevent and treat

  9. Brain renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarct: a review.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Katherine V; Huang, Bing S; Leenen, Frans H H

    2009-12-01

    After a myocardial infarct (MI), a variety of mechanisms contribute to progressive cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. Progressive activation of central sympathoexcitatory pathways appears to depend on a neuromodulatory pathway, involving local production of aldosterone and release of endogenous ouabain-like compounds ('ouabain') possibly from magnocellular neurons in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. 'Ouabain' may lower the membrane potential of neurons and thereby enhance activity of angiotensinergic pathways. These central pathways appear to coordinate progressive activation of several peripheral mechanisms such as sympathetic tone and circulating and cardiac renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Central blockade of aldosterone production, mineralocorticoid receptors, 'ouabain' activity, or AT1 receptors similarly prevents activation of these peripheral mechanisms. Cardiac remodeling after MI involves progressive left ventricular dilation, fibrosis, and decrease in contractile performance. Central blockade of this neuromodulatory pathway causes a marked attenuation of the remodeling and dysfunction, presumably by inhibiting increases in (cardiac) sympathetic activity and RAAS. At the cellular level, these systems may contribute to the cardiac remodeling by activating proinflammatory cytokines and cardiac myocyte apoptosis. New therapeutic approaches, specifically preventing activation of this brain neuromodulatory pathway, may lead to more optimal and specific approaches to the prevention of heart failure after MI.

  10. MiR-30-regulated autophagy mediates angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wei; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chuanfang; Liu, Benrong; Wang, Li; Li, Aiqun; Xiong, Longgen; Liu, Shiming

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulated autophagy may lead to the development of disease. Role of autophagy and the diagnostic potential of microRNAs that regulate the autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy have not been evaluated. A rat model of cardiac hypertrophy was established using transverse abdominal aortic constriction (operation group). Cardiomyocyte autophagy was enhanced in rats from the operation group, compared with those in the sham operation group. Moreover, the operation group showed up-regulation of beclin-1 (an autophagy-related gene), and down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiac tissue. The effects of inhibition and over-expression of the beclin-1 gene on the expression of hypertrophy-related genes and on autophagy were assessed. Angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy was found to be mediated by over-expression of the beclin-1 gene. A dual luciferase reporter assay confirmed that beclin-1 was a target gene of miR-30a. miR-30a induced alterations in beclin-1 gene expression and autophagy in cardiomyocytes. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with miR-30a mimic attenuated the Angiotensin II-induced up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and decreased in the cardiomyocyte surface area. Conversely, treatment with miR-30a inhibitor enhanced the up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and increased the surface area of cardiomyocytes induced by Angiotensin II. In addition, circulating miR-30 was elevated in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, and circulating miR-30 was positively associated with left ventricular wall thickness. Collectively, these above-mentioned results suggest that Angiotensin II induces down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiomyocytes, which in turn promotes myocardial hypertrophy through excessive autophagy. Circulating miR-30 may be an important marker for the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy.

  11. MiR-30-Regulated Autophagy Mediates Angiotensin II-Induced Myocardial Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wei; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chuanfang; Liu, Benrong; Wang, Li; Li, Aiqun; Xiong, Longgen; Liu, Shiming

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulated autophagy may lead to the development of disease. Role of autophagy and the diagnostic potential of microRNAs that regulate the autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy have not been evaluated. A rat model of cardiac hypertrophy was established using transverse abdominal aortic constriction (operation group). Cardiomyocyte autophagy was enhanced in rats from the operation group, compared with those in the sham operation group. Moreover, the operation group showed up-regulation of beclin-1 (an autophagy-related gene), and down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiac tissue. The effects of inhibition and over-expression of the beclin-1 gene on the expression of hypertrophy-related genes and on autophagy were assessed. Angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy was found to be mediated by over-expression of the beclin-1 gene. A dual luciferase reporter assay confirmed that beclin-1 was a target gene of miR-30a. miR-30a induced alterations in beclin-1 gene expression and autophagy in cardiomyocytes. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with miR-30a mimic attenuated the Angiotensin II-induced up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and decreased in the cardiomyocyte surface area. Conversely, treatment with miR-30a inhibitor enhanced the up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and increased the surface area of cardiomyocytes induced by Angiotensin II. In addition, circulating miR-30 was elevated in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, and circulating miR-30 was positively associated with left ventricular wall thickness. Collectively, these above-mentioned results suggest that Angiotensin II induces down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiomyocytes, which in turn promotes myocardial hypertrophy through excessive autophagy. Circulating miR-30 may be an important marker for the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy. PMID:23326547

  12. Angiotensin II induced proteolytic cleavage of myocardial ACE2 is mediated by TACE/ADAM-17: a positive feedback mechanism in the RAS.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaibhav B; Clarke, Nicola; Wang, Zuocheng; Fan, Dong; Parajuli, Nirmal; Basu, Ratnadeep; Putko, Brendan; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Turner, Anthony J; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) 2 is a key negative regulator of the renin-angiotensin system where it metabolizes angiotensin (Ang) II into Ang 1-7. We hypothesize that Ang II suppresses ACE2 by increasing TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE) activity and ACE2 cleavage. Ang II infusion (1.5 mg/kg/day) in wild-type mice for 2 weeks resulted in substantial decrease in myocardial ACE2 protein levels and activity with corresponding increase in plasma ACE2 activity, prevented by AT1R blockade. Ang II resulted in AT1R-mediated increase in myocardial TACE expression and activity, and membrane translocation of TACE. Ang II treatment in Huh7 cells exhibited AT1R-dependent metalloproteinase mediated shedding of ACE2 while transfection with siTACE prevented shedding of ACE2; cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of TACE also prevented shedding of ACE2. Reactive oxygen species played a key role since p47(phox)KO mice were resistant to Ang II-induced TACE phosphorylation and activation with preservation of myocardial ACE2 which dampened Ang II-induced cardiac dysfunction and hypertrophy. In conclusion, Ang II induces ACE2 shedding by promoting TACE activity as a positive feedback mechanism whereby Ang II facilitates the loss of its negative regulator, ACE2. In HF, elevated plasma ACE2 activity likely represents loss of the protective effects of ACE2 in the heart. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Myocardial ischemia and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition: comparison of ischemia during mental and physical stress.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Ronnie; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Zafari, A Maziar; Binongo, Jose N; Sheps, David S

    2013-01-01

    Mental stress provokes myocardial ischemia in many patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) portends a worse prognosis, independent of standard cardiac risk factors or outcome of traditional physical stress testing. Angiotensin II plays a significant role in the physiological response to stress, but its role in MSIMI remains unknown. Our aim was to evaluate whether the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) is associated with a differential effect on the incidence of MSIMI compared with ischemia during physical stress. Retrospective analysis of 218 patients with stable CAD, including 110 on ACEI, was performed. 99m-Tc-sestamibi myocardial perfusion imaging was used to define ischemia during mental stress, induced by a standardized public speaking task, and during physical stress, induced by either exercise or adenosine. Overall, 40 patients (18%) developed MSIMI and 80 patients (37%) developed ischemia during physical stress. MSIMI occurred less frequently in patients receiving ACEIs (13%) compared with those not on ACEIs (24%; p = .030, adjusted odds ratio = 0.42, 95% confidence interval = 0.19-0.91). In contrast, the frequency of myocardial ischemia during physical stress testing was similar in both groups (39% versus 35% in those on and not on ACEIs, respectively); adjusted odds ratio = 0.91, 95% confidence interval = 0.48-1.73). In this retrospective study, patients using ACEI therapy displayed less than half the risk of developing ischemia during mental stress but not physical stress. This possible beneficial effect of ACEIs on MSIMI may be contributing to their salutary effects in CAD.

  14. New angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, azilsartan, attenuates cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuichi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Saitoh, Shu-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2013-01-01

    After an acute myocardial infarction (MI), neurohumoral systems including renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) are activated which in turn aggravate cardiac remodeling. Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are useful drugs for suppression of RAAS. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new ARB, azilsartan, for suppressing cardiac remodeling and progression to heart failure after MI. We created MI by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation in male mice, and these mice were orally administered saline (0.2 mL) in the control group (Group C), 0.1 mg/kg/d of azilsartan in the low dose group (Group L), and 1.0 mg/kg/d in the high dose group (Group H) everyday. Blood pressure was decreased in Group H, but not in Group L, compared to Group C. At 2 weeks after MI creation, infarct size and fibrotic change at the site remote to the myocardial infarcted area were attenuated in Group L and Group H compared to Group C. Echocardiography revealed that cardiac remodeling was suppressed in Group L and Group H compared to Group C. Increases of mRNA expression levels related to fibrotic change were attenuated in Group L and Group H compared to Group C. The new ARB, azilsartan, had a cardiac remodeling suppression effect after MI, and this effect was observed without blood pressure lowering.

  15. PPAR alpha activator fenofibrate inhibits myocardial inflammation and fibrosis in angiotensin II-infused rats.

    PubMed

    Diep, Quy N; Benkirane, Karim; Amiri, Farhad; Cohn, Jeffrey S; Endemann, Dierk; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2004-02-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha is highly expressed in the heart. PPAR alpha may play a role in cardiac hypertrophy, but effects on cardiac function, inflammation, and fibrosis are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the PPAR alpha activator fenofibrate prevents myocardial inflammation and fibrosis in angiotensin (Ang) II-infused rats. Sprague Dawley rats received Ang II (120 ng/kg/min subcutaneously), fenofibrate (100 mg/kg/d p.o.), or Ang II + fenofibrate. After 7 d, systolic blood pressure (mmHg) was elevated (P < 0.01) in Ang II-infused rats (173 +/- 4) vs. controls (115 +/- 2) and reduced by fenofibrate (137 +/- 5). Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that Ang II upregulated cardiac nuclear factor kappa B activity by 50%. Ang II significantly increased cardiac expression of vascular-cell adhesion molecule-1, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Increases in expression of these inflammatory mediators were normalized by fenofibrate. Ang II-induced expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1, collagen deposition, and macrophage infiltration were partially prevented by fenofibrate. The PPAR alpha activator fenofibrate prevented development of hypertension, and improved myocardial inflammation and collagen deposition in Ang II-infused rats. The hypolipidemic drug fenofibrate may be useful in prevention and treatment of myocardial disease associated with hypertension and hyperlipidemia.

  16. Relationship of venous thromboembolism and myocardial infarction with the renin-angiotensin system in African-Americans.

    PubMed

    Hooper, W Craig; Dowling, Nicole F; Wenger, Nanette K; Dilley, Anne; Ellingsen, Dorothy; Evatt, Bruce L

    2002-05-01

    Genetic polymorphisms/mutations associated with venous thrombosis have largely been confined to the genes that encode for proteins in either the coagulant or the anticoagulant pathway. Although genetic alterations in the renin-angiotensin system have been reported to have a role in myocardial infarction and hypertension, there is recent evidence to suggest that there may also be an association with venous thrombosis. To extend our earlier observation of an association between the ACE DD genotype in African-American males and venous thrombosis, other genes in the renin-angiotensin pathway were investigated for possible disease association and were compared with African-Americans with myocardial infarction. African-American patients with a documented history of venous thrombosis or a history of myocardial infarction were eligible for participation as cases in the study. Control subjects were African-American outpatients attending a clinical laboratory for routine blood tests who had comparable age and gender distributions to the cases. Persons with a history of myocardial infarction, stroke, or thrombosis were excluded. Genes that were analyzed for known polymorphisms included angiotensinogen, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), and the angiotensin II type I receptor. Our results showed that the ACE DD genotype was also associated with MI in African-American males but not in females. Racial/ethnic and sex differences were also found with respect to the genotype distribution of the ACE 4656(CT)(2/3) polymorphism. It was observed that the 2/2 genotype had a protective effective in males for myocardial infarction and venous thrombosis. The data also demonstrated that the allele frequencies of the A1166C variant of the angiotensin II type I receptor were different in African-Americans as compared to Caucasians.

  17. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition in myocardial infarction--Part 1: Clinical data.

    PubMed

    Huckell, V F; Bernstein, V; Cairns, J A; Crowell, R; Dagenais, G R; Higginson, L A; Isserow, S; Laramée, P; Liu, P; McCans, J L; Orchard, R C; Prewitt, R; Quinn, B P; Samson, M; Turazza, F; Warnica, J W; Wielgosz, A

    1997-02-01

    There is an increasing body of clinical trial evidence to support the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in the management of patients following myocardial infarction (MI). Enthusiasm for the use of ACE inhibitors in the acute phase of MI had previously been tempered by the adverse results of an early trial. However, exciting new information is available from several large, randomized studies that has not only quelled those initial concerns but also attests to the efficacy of using this class of medication in the first 24 h after an acute MI. A Canadian National Opinion Leader Symposium was held in November 1995 to review the results of the major ACE inhibitor clinical trials and to discuss key issues and controversies surrounding their use in acute MI. The focus of this paper, the first of two parts, is on the results of the major ACE inhibitor clinical trials.

  18. Angiotensine converting enzyme inhibitors In acute myocardial infarction--a review.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, J P S

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery diseases (CADs) are preventable and controllable disorders, but they continue to be a major cause of morbidity and premature mortality across globe. India is projected to have 62 million CAD patients by 2015, with nearly 1/3rd of this burden shared by patients younger than 40 years. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) plays a pivotal role in blood pressure (BP) regulation and fluid and electrolyte homoeostasis. Activation of RAAS has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and benefits of inhibition of RAAS as an effective way to intervene in the pathogenesis of AMI is well documented. In the setting of AMI, angiotensin-II plays a significant detrimental role, contributing to cardiac remodeling, a process that predisposes to subsequent arrhythmia and cardiac failure. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEls) play a key role in the clinical management of several cardiovascular disease (CVD)s such as AMI, by inhibiting the actions of angiotensin-II, ACEIs would be expected to modify unwanted post-AMI events. ACEIs trials have tested AMI patients with two different approaches: selective (those with left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) treated over a long-term) and relatively unselective (those treated early over the course and for a short-period, up to 6 weeks). In general, results are consistent and beneficial as regards to reduction in both short-term & long-term mortality and heart failure. There are evidences that suggest yielding of an extra protection (reduced mortality and occurrence of severe LVD) with early introduction of ACEIs in the course of AMI. Trials have also shown ACEIs effective and consistent protection against re-infarction and management of arrhythmias after AMI. Large clinical trials have proven ACEIs to be superior to ARB, in preventing CV deaths in high-risk AMI subjects. They have proven to be safe & effective in diabetic & older population. With wealth of evidence

  19. Fenofibrate Therapy Restores Antioxidant Protection and Improves Myocardial Insulin Resistance in a Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome and Myocardial Ischemia: The Role of Angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Ibarra-Lara, Luz; Sánchez-Aguilar, María; Sánchez-Mendoza, Alicia; Del Valle-Mondragón, Leonardo; Soria-Castro, Elizabeth; Carreón-Torres, Elizabeth; Díaz-Díaz, Eulises; Vázquez-Meza, Héctor; Guarner-Lans, Verónica; Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther

    2016-12-28

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation promotes oxidative stress which increases the risk of cardiac dysfunction in metabolic syndrome (MetS) and favors local insulin resistance. Fibrates regulate RAS improving MetS, type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. We studied the effect of fenofibrate treatment on the myocardic signaling pathway of Angiotensin II (Ang II)/Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1) and its relationship with oxidative stress and myocardial insulin resistance in MetS rats under heart ischemia. Control and MetS rats were assigned to the following groups: (a) sham; (b) vehicle-treated myocardial infarction (MI) (MI-V); and (c) fenofibrate-treated myocardial infarction (MI-F). Treatment with fenofibrate significantly reduced triglycerides, non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), insulin levels and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) in MetS animals. MetS and MI increased Ang II concentration and AT1 expression, favored myocardial oxidative stress (high levels of malondialdehyde, overexpression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase 4 (NOX4), decreased total antioxidant capacity and diminished expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD)1, SOD2 and catalase) and inhibited expression of the insulin signaling cascade: phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (PkB, also known as Akt)/Glut-4/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In conclusion, fenofibrate treatment favors an antioxidant environment as a consequence of a reduction of the Ang II/AT1/NOX4 signaling pathway, reestablishing the cardiac insulin signaling pathway. This might optimize cardiac metabolism and improve the vasodilator function during myocardial ischemia.

  20. Radionuclide imaging of angiotensin II type 1 receptor upregulation after myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Takahiro; Fukushima, Kenji; Xia, Jinsong; Mathews, William B; Lautamäki, Riikka; Bravo, Paco E; Javadi, Mehrbod S; Dannals, Robert F; Szabo, Zsolt; Bengel, Frank M

    2010-12-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) mediates proapoptotic, profibrotic, and proinflammatory processes in maladaptive conditions. Activation after myocardial infarction may initialize and promote cardiac remodeling. Using a novel positron-emitting ligand, we sought to determine the presence and time course of regional myocardial upregulation of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and the blocking efficacy of various anti-RAS agents. In male Wistar rats (n = 31), ischemia-reperfusion damage was induced by 20- to 25-min ligation of the left coronary artery. The AT1R blocker (11)C-2-butyl-5-methoxymethyl-6-(1-oxopyridin-2-yl)-3-[[2-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)biphenyl-4-yl]methyl]-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine ((11)C-KR31173) was injected intravenously at different times until 6 mo after surgery and sacrifice. Autoradiography, histology, and immunohistochemistry were performed for ex vivo validation. Additional in vivo PET was conducted in 3 animals. A second series of experiments (n = 16) compared untreated animals with animals treated with oral valsartan (50 mg/kg/d), oral enalapril (10 mg/kg/d), and complete intravenous blockage (SK-1080, 2 mg/kg, 10 min before imaging). Transient regional AT1R upregulation was detected in the infarct area, with a peak at 1-3 wk after surgery (autoradiographic infarct-to-remote ratio, 1.07 ± 0.09, 1.68 ± 0.34, 2.54 ± 0.40, 2.98 ± 0.70, 3.16 ± 0.57, 1.86 ± 0.65, and 1.28 ± 0.27 at control, day 1, day 3, week 1, week 3, month 3, and month 6, respectively). The elevated uptake of (11)C-KR31173 in the infarct area was detectable by small-animal PET in vivo, and it was blocked completely by intravenous SK-1080. Although oral treatment with enalapril did not reduce focal tracer uptake, oral valsartan resulted in partial blockade (infarct-to-remote ratio, 2.94 ± 0.52, 2.88 ± 0.60, 2.07 ± 0.25, and 1.26 ± 0.10 for no treatment, enalapril, valsartan, and SK-1080, respectively). After ischemic myocardial damage in a rat model, transient

  1. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers as a first choice in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang Hoon; Bae, Myung Hwan; Yang, Dong Heon; Park, Hun Sik; Cho, Yongkeun; Lee, Won Kee; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Chae, Shung Chull

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) have not been adequately evaluated in patients without left ventricular (LV) dysfunction or heart failure after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods: Between November 2005 and January 2008, 6,781 patients who were not receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or ARBs were selected from the Korean AMI Registry. The primary endpoints were 12-month major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) including death and recurrent AMI. Results: Seventy percent of the patients were Killip class 1 and had a LV ejection fraction ≥ 40%. The prescription rate of ARBs was 12.2%. For each patient, a propensity score, indicating the likelihood of using ARBs during hospitalization or at discharge, was calculated using a non-parsimonious multivariable logistic regression model, and was used to match the patients 1:4, yielding 715 ARB users versus 2,860 ACEI users. The effect of ARBs on in-hospital mortality and 12-month MACE occurrence was assessed using matched logistic and Cox regression models. Compared with ACEIs, ARBs significantly reduced in-hospital mortality(1.3% vs. 3.3%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.379; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.190 to0.756; p = 0.006) and 12-month MACE occurrence (4.6% vs. 6.9%; HR, 0.661; 95% CI, 0.457 to 0.956; p = 0.028). However, the benefit of ARBs on 12-month mortality compared with ACEIs was marginal (4.3% vs. 6.2%; HR, 0.684; 95% CI, 0.467 to 1.002; p = 0.051). Conclusions: Our results suggest that ARBs are not inferior to, and may actually be better than ACEIs in Korean patients with AMI. PMID:26701233

  2. Postconditioning attenuates coronary perivascular and interstitial fibrosis through modulating angiotensin II receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhang-Feng; Wang, Ning-Ping; Harmouche, Suzanna; Philip, Tiji; Pang, Xue-Fen; Bai, Feng; Zhao, Zhi-Qing

    2017-05-01

    Postconditioning (Postcon) is known to reduce infarct size. This study tested the hypothesis that Postcon attenuates the perivascular and interstitial fibrosis after myocardial infarction through modulating angiotensin II-activated fibrotic cascade. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 45-min coronary occlusion followed by 1 and 6 wk of reperfusion. Postcon was applied at the onset of reperfusion with four cycles of 10/10-s reperfusion-ischemia at the onset of reperfusion. Preconditioning (Precon) with two cycles of 5/5-min ischemia-reperfusion was applied before coronary occlusion. Postcon reduced angiotensin-converting enzyme protein and expression in the perivascular area and intermyocardium, coincident with the less-expressed angiotensin II receptor, type 1, enhanced angiotensin II receptor, type 2, and angiotensin converting enzyme 2. Postcon lowered the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and inhibited the populations of interstitial macrophages (60 ± 12 versus 84 ± 9.5 number per high-powered field [HPF] in control, P < 0.05). Along with these modulations, Postcon also downregulated transforming growth factor β1 protein and inhibited proliferation of α-smooth muscle actin expressing myofibroblasts (41 ± 11 versus 79 ± 8.2 number per HPF in control, P < 0.05), consistent with downregulated phospho-Smad2 and phospho-Smad3. Furthermore, the synthesis of collagen I and III was attenuated, and the perivascular-interstitial fibrosis was inhibited by Postcon as demonstrated by reduced perivascular fibrosis ratio (0.6 ± 0.6 versus 1.6 ± 0.5 per HPF in control, P < 0.05) and smaller collagen-rich area (16 ± 4.7 versus 34 ± 9.2% per HPF in control, P < 0.05). Precon conferred a comparable level of protection as Postcon did in all parameters measured, suggesting protection trigged by this endogenous stimulation can be achieved when it was applied either before ischemia or after reperfusion. These results suggest that Postcon

  3. A peptide vaccine targeting angiotensin II attenuates the cardiac dysfunction induced by myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Ryo; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Wakayama, Kouji; Maejima, Yasuhiro; Shimamura, Munehisa; Koriyama, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hironori; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Morishita, Ryuichi; Komuro, Issei; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2017-01-01

    A peptide vaccine targeting angiotensin II (Ang II) was recently developed as a novel treatment for hypertension to resolve the problem of noncompliance with pharmacotherapy. Ang II plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI), which causes heart failure. In the present study, we examined whether the Ang II vaccine is effective in preventing heart failure. The injection of the Ang II vaccine in a rat model of MI attenuated cardiac dysfunction in association with an elevation in the serum anti-Ang II antibody titer. Furthermore, any detrimental effects of the Ang II vaccine were not observed in the rats that underwent sham operations. Treatment with immunized serum from Ang II vaccine-injected rats significantly suppressed post-MI cardiac dysfunction in MI rats and Ang II-induced remodeling-associated signaling in cardiac fibroblasts. Thus, our present study demonstrates that the Ang II vaccine may provide a promising novel therapeutic strategy for preventing heart failure. PMID:28266578

  4. [Relation of intramyocardial collagen remodeling to the changes of myocardial systolic property and angiotensin II on the overtraining rats].

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhen-Jun

    2002-02-01

    To investigate the relation of intramyocardial collagen (IMC) remodeling to the changes of myocardial systolic property (MSP) and angiotensin II (Ang II) on the overtraining rats. Morphologic remodeling of IMC and changes of contents of IMC and Ang II in myocardium local and circulation, and MSP in SD rat overtraining models were observed and determined by RM-6200 polygraph, Beckman-42 automatic biochemistry analyser, and gamma automatic radio-immunity analyzer and S-570 scanning electron microscope under the conditions. IMC forms a spatial three-dimensional network structure, consisting of collagenous fiber connection among myocardial bundles, cardiac muscle cell group, cardiac muscle cells, endocardium and capillary. There are some regularities in its interlacing. Overtraining could lead to over hyperplasia of IMC in myocardial bundles, cardiac muscle cell group, cardiac muscle cell, endocardium and capillary, and serious injury of MLSP. The relation closes to remodeling of IMC and MSP and Ang II on the overtraining.

  5. Elastase-2, an angiotensin II-generating enzyme, contributes to increased Ang II in resistance arteries of mice with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Becari, Christiane; Silva, Marcondes A B; Durand, Marina T; Prado, Cibele M; Oliveira, Eduardo B; Ribeiro, Mauricio S; Salgado, Helio C; Salgado, Maria Cristina O; Tostes, Rita C

    2017-02-21

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), whose generation largely depends on angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, mediates most of the renin-angiotensin-system effects. Elastase-2 (ELA-2), a chymotrypsin-serine protease elastase family member 2A, alternatively generates Ang II in rat arteries. Myocardial infarction (MI) leads to intense RAS activation, but mechanisms involved on Ang II-generation in resistance arteries are unknown. We hypothesized that ELA-2 contributes to vascular Ang II generation and to cardiac damage in mice submitted to MI. Concentration-effect curves to Ang I and Ang II were performed in mesenteric resistance arteries from male wild type (WT) and ELA-2 knockout (ELA-2KO) mice submitted to left anterior descending coronary artery ligation (myocardial infarction, MI). MI size was similar in WT (29.5 ± 9 %) and ELA-2KO (32 ± 4%) mice. Ejection fraction and fractional shortening after MI similarly decreased in both strains. However, MI decreased stroke volume and cardiac output in WT, but not in ELA-2KO mice. Ang I-induced contractions increased in WT mice submitted to MI (MI-WT) compared to Sham-WT mice. No differences were observed in Ang I reactivity between arteries from Sham-ELA-2KO and ELA-2KO submitted to MI (MI-ELA-2KO). Ang I contractions increased in arteries from MI-WT vs. MI-ELA-2KO mice. Chymostatin attenuated Ang I-induced vascular contractions in WT mice (P < 0.05), but did not affect Ang I responses in ELA-2KO arteries. These results provide the first evidence that ELA-2 contributes to increased Ang II formation in resistance arteries and modulates cardiac function after MI, implicating ELA-2 as a key player in ACE-independent dysregulation of the RAS.

  6. Class I HDACs Regulate Angiotensin II-Dependent Cardiac Fibrosis via Fibroblasts and Circulating Fibrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sarah M.; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Ferguson, Bradley S.; Douglas, Katherine B.; Cavasin, Maria A.; Demos-Davies, Kim; Yeager, Michael E.; Stenmark, Kurt R.; McKinsey, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis, which is defined as excessive accumulation of fibrous connective tissue, contributes to the pathogenesis of numerous diseases involving diverse organ systems. Cardiac fibrosis predisposes individuals to myocardial ischemia, arrhythmias and sudden death, and is commonly associated with diastolic dysfunction. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors block cardiac fibrosis in pre-clinical models of heart failure. However, which HDAC isoforms govern cardiac fibrosis, and the mechanisms by which they do so, remains unclear. Here, we show that selective inhibition of class I HDACs potently suppresses angiotensin II (Ang II)-mediated cardiac fibrosis by targeting two key effector cell populations, cardiac fibroblasts and bone marrow-derived fibrocytes. Class I HDAC inhibition blocks cardiac fibroblast cell cycle progression through derepression of the genes encoding the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, p15 and p57. In contrast, class I HDAC inhibitors block agonist-dependent differentiation of fibrocytes through a mechanism involving repression of ERK1/2 signaling. These findings define novel roles for class I HDACs in the control of pathological cardiac fibrosis. Furthermore, since fibrocytes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases, including heart, lung and kidney failure, our results suggest broad utility for isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors as anti-fibrotic agents that function, in part, by targeting these circulating mesenchymal cells. PMID:24374140

  7. Effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker therapy after hospital discharge on subsequent rehospitalization for acute myocardial infarction and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hess, Gregory; Preblick, Ronald; Hill, Jerrold; Plauschinat, Craig A; Yaskin, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines recommend angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) therapy following acute myocardial infarction (MI) or development of heart failure (HF). This study estimated the effects of initiating these therapies after hospitalization for MI or HF on subsequent 1-year rehospitalization rates for MI or HF. A retrospective multivariate analysis of medical claims for 14,327 patients receiving and 7905 not receiving an ACEI or ARB after discharge for MI or HF was conducted. Rehospitalization for MI or HF was lower for treated vs untreated patients (MI: odds ratio [OR]=0.53, P<.001; HF: OR=0.52, P<.001). Rehospitalization was lower in treated patients with high medication compliance (medication possession ratio [MPR]>80%) and medium compliance (MPR 40%-79%) vs patients with low compliance (ORs for MI: high=0.54, medium=0.69; P<.001); ORs for HF: high=0.38, medium=0.62; P<.001). In conclusion, ACEI or ARB therapy initiated after hospitalization for MI or HF reduced risk of rehospitalization, and greater risk reduction was achieved with higher medication compliance.

  8. Angiotensin (1-7) re-establishes heart cell communication previously impaired by cell swelling: implications for myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    De Mello, Walmor C

    2014-05-01

    The influence of hypertonic solution on dye coupling was investigated in cell pairs isolated from the left ventricle of adult Sprague Dawley rats.The hypertonic solution together with Lucifer Yellow CH, were dialyzed into one cell of the pair using the whole cell clamp tecnique, and the diffusion of dye in the dialyzed as well as in non-dialyzed cell, was followed by measuring the intensity of fluorescence in both cells as a function of time.The results indicated that: (1) Lucifer Yellow CH dialyzed into one cell of the pair diffuses easily into the nondialyzed cell through gap junctions; (2) the intracellular dialysis of an hypertonic solution into one cell of the pair, increases the area of the dialyzed cell and reduced the area of the non-dialyzed cell suggesting intercellular movement of water; (3) the hypertonic solution dialyzed into one cell of the pair abolished the dye coupling; (4) the gap junction permeability (Pj) estimated before and after administration of hypertonic solution showed an appreciably decrease of Pj; (5) angiotensin (1-7) (Ang (1-7) (10-9M) administered to the bath re-established the dye coupling abolished by hypertonic solution and reduced the cell area; (6) the effect of Ang (1-7) was related to the activation of Mas receptor and was dependent on the activation of PKA. the reestablishment of dye coupling elicited by Ang (1-7) seen in cell pairs dialyzed with hypertonic solution, might indicate that under similar conditions like that seen during myocardial ischemia, the peptide might be of benefit preventing the impairment of cell communication and impulse propagation associated with cardiac reentrant arrhytmias. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of Jagged1-Hey1 Signal in Angiotensin II-induced Impairment of Myocardial Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ai-Li; He, Tao; Shao, Yi-Bing; Chi, Yi-Fan; Dai, Hong-Yan; Wang, Yan; Xu, Li; Yang, Xuan; Ding, Hua-Min; Cai, Shang-Lang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a major contributor to the development of heart failure. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie this process remain elusive. Inadequate angiogenesis in the myocardium leads to a transition from cardiac hypertrophy to dysfunction, and our previous study showed that Ang II significantly impaired the angiogenesis response. The current study was designed to examine the role of Jagged1-Notch signaling in the effect of Ang II during impaired angiogenesis and cardiac hypertrophy. Methods: Ang II was subcutaneously infused into 8-week-old male C57BL/6 mice at a dose of 200 ng·kg−1·min−1 for 2 weeks using Alzet micro-osmotic pumps. N-[N-(3, 5-difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine tert-butyl ester (DAPT), a γ-secretase inhibitor, was injected subcutaneously during Ang II infusion at a dose of 10.0 mg·kg−1·d−1. Forty mice were divided into four groups (n = 10 per group): control group; Ang II group, treated with Ang II; DAPT group, treated with DAPT; and Ang II + DAPT group, treated with both Ang II and DAPT. At the end of experiments, myocardial (left ventricle [LV]) tissue from each experimental group was evaluated using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance test followed by the least significant difference method or independent samples t-test. Results: Ang II treatment significantly induced cardiac hypertrophy and impaired the angiogenesis response compared to controls, as shown by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and immunohistochemistry for CD31, a vascular marker (P < 0.05 for both). Meanwhile, Jagged1 protein was significantly increased, but gene expression for both Jag1 and Hey1 was decreased in the LV following Ang II treatment, compared to that in controls (relative ratio for Jag1 gene: 0.45 ± 0.13 vs. 0.84 ± 0.15; relative ratio for Hey1 gene: 0.51 ± 0.08 vs. 0.91 ± 0.09; P < 0

  10. Mortality benefit of long-term angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers after successful percutaneous coronary intervention in non-ST elevation acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    González-Cambeiro, María Cristina; López-López, Andrea; Abu-Assi, Emad; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Peña-Gil, Carlos; García-Acuña, José; González-Juanatey, Ramón

    2016-12-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been shown to reduce mortality after myocardial infarction (MI). Current guidelines recommend their prescription in all patients after MI. Limited data are available on whether ACEIs/ARBs still improve prognosis in the contemporary era of non-ST elevation MI (NSTEMI) management. We aimed to evaluate the mortality benefit of ACEIs/ARBs in NSTEMI patients treated successfully with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We analyzed 2784 patients with NSTEMI treated successfully with in-hospital PCI. Two groups were formed based on ACEI/ARB prescription at discharge. Two propensity score (PS) analyses were performed to control for differences in covariates: one with adjustment among the entire cohort, and the other with PS matching (n=1626). The outcome variable was all-cause mortality at four-year follow-up. There were 1902 (68.3%) patients prescribed ACEIs/ARBs at discharge. When adjusted by PS, ACEI/ARB use was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) for mortality of 0.75 (0.60-0.94; absolute risk reduction [ARR] 4.0%) in the whole cohort (p=0.01). After one-to-one PS matching (n=813 in each group), the mortality rate was significantly lower in patients prescribed ACEIs/ARBs, with HR of 0.77 (0.63-0.94; ARR 3.8%) (p=0.03). In this observational study of patients with NSTEMI, all of them treated successfully by PCI, the use of ACEIs/ARBs was significantly associated with a lower risk of four-year all-cause mortality. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Angiotensin-II mediates ACE2 Internalization and Degradation through an Angiotensin-II type I receptor-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lazartigues, Eric; Filipeanu, Catalin M.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin Converting Enzyme type 2 (ACE2) is a pivotal component of the renin-angiotensin system, promoting the conversion of Angiotensin (Ang)-II to Ang-(1-7). We previously reported that decreased ACE2 expression and activity contribute to the development of Ang-II-mediated hypertension in mice. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved in ACE2 down-regulation during neurogenic hypertension. In ACE2-transfected Neuro-2A cells, Ang-II treatment resulted in a significant attenuation of ACE2 enzymatic activity. Examination of the subcellular localization of ACE2 revealed that Ang-II treatment leads to ACE2 internalization and degradation into lysosomes. These effects were prevented by both the Ang-II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker losartan and the lysosomal inhibitor leupeptin. In contrast, in HEK293T cells, which lack endogenous AT1R, Ang-II failed to promote ACE2 internalization. Moreover, this effect could be induced after AT1R transfection. Further, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that AT1R and ACE2 form complexes and these interactions were decreased by Ang-II treatment, which also enhanced ACE2 ubiquitination. In contrast, ACE2 activity was not changed by transfection of AT2 or Mas receptors. In vivo, Ang-II-mediated hypertension was blunted by chronic infusion of leupeptin in wildtype C57Bl/6, but not in ACE2 knockout mice. Overall, this is the first demonstration that elevated Ang-II levels reduce ACE2 expression and activity by stimulation of lysosomal degradation through an AT1R-dependent mechanism. PMID:25225202

  12. Advanced Glycation End Products Activate a Chymase-Dependent Angiotensin II Generating Pathway in Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Koka, Vijay; Wang, Wansheng; Huang, Xiao Ru; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Truong, Luan D.; Lan, Hui Y

    2006-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin II is a key mediator of diabetes-related vascular disease. It is now recognized that in addition to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), chymase is an important alternative angiotensin II generating enzyme in hypertension and diabetes. However, the mechanism of induction of chymase in diabetes remains unknown. Methods and Results: Here we report that chymase is upregulated in coronary and renal arteries in patients with diabetes by immunohistochemistry. Upregulation of vascular chymase is associated with deposition of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), increase in expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), and activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase. In vitro, AGEs can induce chymase expression and chymase-dependent angiotensin II generation in human vascular smooth muscle cells via the RAGE-ERK1/2 MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. This is confirmed by blockade of AGE-induced vascular chymase expression with a neutralizing RAGE antibody and an inhibitor to ERK1/2, and by overexpression of the dominant negative-ERK1/2. Compared to ACE, chymase contributes to the majority of angiotensin II production (more than 70%, p<0.01) in response to AGEs. Further more, AGE-induced Angiotensin II production is blocked by the anti-RAGE antibody and by inhibition of ERK1/2 MAP kinase activities. Conclusions: Advanced glycation end products, a hallmark of diabetes, induce chymase via the RAGE-ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. Chymase initiates an important alternative angiotensin II generating pathway in diabetes and may play a critical role in diabetic vascular disease. PMID:16520412

  13. Lack of weight gain after angiotensin AT1 receptor blockade in diet-induced obesity is partly mediated by an angiotensin-(1–7)/ Mas-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schuchard, Johanna; Winkler, Martina; Stölting, Ines; Schuster, Franziska; Vogt, Florian M; Barkhausen, Jörg; Thorns, Christoph; Santos, Robson A; Bader, Michael; Raasch, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonists induce weight loss; however, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unknown. The Mas receptor agonist angiotensin-(1-7) is a metabolite of angiotensin I and of angiotensin II. As an agonist of Mas receptors, angiotensin-(1-7) has beneficial cardiovascular and metabolic effects. Experimental Approach We investigated the anti-obesity effects of transgenically overexpressed angiotensin-(1-7) in rats. We secondly examined whether weight loss due to telmisartan (8 mg·kg−1·d−1) in diet-induced obese Sprague Dawley (SD) rats can be blocked when the animals were co-treated with the Mas receptor antagonist A779 (24 or 72 μg·kg−1·d−1). Key Results In contrast to wild-type controls, transgenic rats overexpressing angiotensin-(1-7) had 1.) diminished body weight when they were regularly fed with chow; 2.) were protected from developing obesity although they were fed with cafeteria diet (CD); 3.) showed a reduced energy intake that was mainly related to a lower CD intake; 5.) remained responsive to leptin despite chronic CD feeding; 6.) had a higher, strain-dependent energy expenditure, and 7.) were protected from developing insulin resistance despite CD feeding. Telmisartan-induced weight loss in SD rats was partially antagonized after a high, but not a low dose of A779. Conclusions and Implications Angiotensin-(1-7) regulated food intake and body weight and contributed to the weight loss after AT1 receptor blockade. Angiotensin-(1-7)-like agonists may be drug candidates for treating obesity. PMID:25906670

  14. Angiotensin-(1-7) decreases skeletal muscle atrophy induced by angiotensin II through a Mas receptor-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cisternas, Franco; Morales, María Gabriela; Meneses, Carla; Simon, Felipe; Brandan, Enrique; Abrigo, Johanna; Vazquez, Yaneisi; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a pathological condition characterized by the loss of strength and muscle mass, an increase in myosin heavy chain (MHC) degradation and increase in the expression of two muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases: atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. Angiotensin II (AngII) induces muscle atrophy. Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], through its receptor Mas, produces the opposite effects than AngII. We assessed the effects of Ang-(1-7) on the skeletal muscle atrophy induced by AngII. Our results show that Ang-(1-7), through Mas, prevents the effects induced by AngII in muscle gastrocnemius: the decrease in the fibre diameter, muscle strength and MHC levels and the increase in atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. Ang-(1-7) also induces AKT phosphorylation. In addition, our analysis in vitro using C2C12 myotubes shows that Ang-(1-7), through a mechanism dependent on Mas, prevents the decrease in the levels of MHC and the increase in the expression of the atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, both induced by AngII. Ang-(1-7) induces AKT phosphorylation in myotubes; additionally, we demonstrated that the inhibition of AKT with MK-2206 decreases the anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7). Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that Ang-(1-7) counteracts the skeletal muscle atrophy induced by AngII through a mechanism dependent on the Mas receptor, which involves AKT activity. Our study indicates that Ang-(1-7) is novel molecule with a potential therapeutical use to improve muscle wasting associated, at least, with pathologies that present high levels of AngII.

  15. Effect of chronic blockade of angiotensin II-receptor subtypes on aortic compliance in rats with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ceiler, D L; Nelissen-Vrancken, H J; De Mey, J G; Smits, J F

    1998-04-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate changes in aortic geometry and compliance after long-term blockade of angiotensin receptors type 1 (AT1) and AT2 receptors under basal conditions and after myocardial infarction (MI). Sham-operated (sham) or MI rats received either no treatment, AT1 antagonist GR138950C (GR; 2 mg/kg/day i.v.), or AT2 antagonist PD123319 (PD; 3 mg/kg/day s.c.). After 3 weeks, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was measured. Thoracic aorta diastolic diameter (D[dia]), compliance coefficient (CC), and distensibility coefficient (DC) were determined noninvasively in anesthetized rats by using ultrasound and wall tracking. After the rats were killed, histologic measurements were made on aortic cross sections. In sham rats, MAP was reduced by GR treatment (76 +/- 6 vs. 106 +/- 5 mm Hg), but not by PD. D(dia) was reduced in both GR-treated (1.74 +/- 0.08 vs. 2.09 +/- 0.05 mm) and PD-treated (1.83 +/- 0.05 vs. 2.09 +/- 0.05 mm) sham rats. CC and DC were not modified by either treatment. Although media cross-sectional area was not affected by either GR or PD treatment in sham rats, media thickness and media/lumen ratio were increased in both cases. Induction of MI had no effect on aortic structure, geometry, or mechanics; however, treatment with either GR or PD improved DC versus untreated MI rats. We conclude that AT1 and AT2 receptors are involved in angiotensin II-mediated effects on aortic geometry and mechanics under both basal conditions and after MI. Whereas blockade of AT1 receptors most likely influences vascular properties through a depressor mechanism, AT2 receptors induce pressure-independent remodeling.

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 inhibits high-mobility group box 1 and attenuates cardiac dysfunction post-myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Wang, Lei; Shenoy, Vinayak; Krause, Eric; Oh, S. Paul; Pepine, Carl J; Katovich, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) triggers and amplifies inflammation cascade following ischemic injury, and its elevated levels are associated with adverse clinical outcomes in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a key member of vasoprotective axis of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), regulates cardiovascular functions and exerts beneficial effects in cardiovascular disease. However, the association between HMGB1 and ACE2 has not been studied. We hypothesized that overexpression of ACE2 provides cardioprotective effects against MI via inhibiting HMGB1 and inflammation. ACE2 knock-in (KI) mice and littermate wild-type (WT) controls were subjected to either sham or coronary artery ligation surgery to induce MI. Heart function was assessed 4 weeks after surgery using echocardiography and Millar catheterization. Tissues were collected for histology and analysis of the expression of HMGB1, RAS components, and inflammatory cytokines. ACE2 in the heart of the ACE2 KI mice was 58-fold higher than WT controls. ACE2-MI mice exhibited a remarkable preservation of cardiac function and reduction of infarct size in comparison to WT-MI mice. Notably, ACE2 overexpression significantly reduced the MI-induced increase in apoptosis, macrophage infiltration, and HMGB1 and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression (TNF-α and IL-6). Moreover, in an in vitro study, ACE2 activation prevented the hypoxia-induced cell death and upregulation of HMGB1 in adult cardiomyocytes. This protective effect is correlated with downregulation of HMGB1 and downstream pro-inflammatory cascades, which could be useful for the development of novel treatment for ischemic heart disease. PMID:26498282

  17. Angiotensin receptor blocker drugs and inhibition of adrenal beta-arrestin-1-dependent aldosterone production: Implications for heart failure therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Aukszi, Beatrix

    2017-01-01

    Aldosterone mediates many of the physiological and pathophysiological/cardio-toxic effects of angiotensin II (AngII). Its synthesis and secretion from the zona glomerulosa cells of the adrenal cortex, elevated in chronic heart failure (HF), is induced by AngII type 1 receptors (AT1Rs). The AT1R is a G protein-coupled receptor, mainly coupling to Gq/11 proteins. However, it can also signal through β-arrestin-1 (βarr1) or -2 (βarr2), both of which mediate G protein-independent signaling. Over the past decade, a second, Gq/11 protein-independent but βarr1-dependent signaling pathway emanating from the adrenocortical AT1R and leading to aldosterone production has become appreciated. Thus, it became apparent that AT1R antagonists that block both pathways equally well are warranted for fully effective aldosterone suppression in HF. This spurred the comparison of all of the currently marketed angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, AT1R antagonists or sartans) at blocking activation of the two signaling modes (G protein-, and βarr1-dependent) at the AngII-activated AT1R and hence, at suppression of aldosterone in vitro and in vivo. Although all agents are very potent inhibitors of G protein activation at the AT1R, candesartan and valsartan were uncovered to be the most potent ARBs at blocking βarr activation by AngII and at suppressing aldosterone in vitro and in vivo in post-myocardial infarction HF animals. In contrast, irbesartan and losartan are virtually G protein-“biased” blockers at the human AT1R, with very low efficacy for βarr inhibition and aldosterone suppression. Therefore, candesartan and valsartan (and other, structurally similar compounds) may be the most preferred ARB agents for HF pharmacotherapy, as well as for treatment of other conditions characterized by elevated aldosterone. PMID:28400916

  18. Effects of Cardiac Overexpression of the Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor on Remodeling and Dysfunction in Mice Post-Myocardial Infarction RR

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiang; Sun, Ying; Carretero, Oscar A; Zhu, Liping; Harding, Pamela; Shesely, Edward G.; Dai, Xiangguo; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine; Peterson, Edward; Yang, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptors (AT2R) has been considered cardioprotective. However, there are controversial findings regarding the role of overexpressing AT2R in the heart. Using transgenic mice with different levels of AT2R gene overexpression in the heart (1, 4 or 9 copies of the AT2R transgene, Tg1, Tg4 or Tg9), we studied the effect of AT2R overexpression on left ventricular remodeling and dysfunction post-myocardial infarction (MI). Tg1, Tg4, Tg9 and their wild-type (WT) littermates were divided into 1) sham MI, 2) MI + vehicle, and 3) MI + AT2R antagonist. Treatments were started 4 weeks after MI and continued for 8 weeks. AT2R protein and mRNA expression in the heart was significantly increased in transgenic mice and the increase positively correlated with copies of the transgene. AT1R mRNA and protein expression remained unchanged in Tg1 and Tg4 but slightly higher in Tg9 mice. Systolic blood pressure and cardiac phenotypes did not differ among strains under basal conditions. MI caused myocardial hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, ventricular dilatation and dysfunction associated with increased protein expression of Nox2 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression. These pathological responses were diminished in Tg1 and Tg4 mice. Moreover, the protective effects of AT2R were abolished by AT2R antagonist and also absent in Tg9 mice. We thus conclude that whether overexpression of AT2R is beneficial or detrimental to the heart is largely dependent on expression levels and possibly via regulations of Nox2 and TGF-β1 signaling pathways. PMID:24732892

  19. Role of Circulating Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 in Left Ventricular Remodeling following Myocardial Infarction: A Prospective Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Pérez, José T.; Riera, Marta; Bosch, Xavier; De Caralt, Teresa M.; Perea, Rosario J.; Pascual, Julio; Soler, María José

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) cleaves Angiotensin-II to Angiotensin-(1–7), a cardioprotective peptide. Serum soluble ACE2 (sACE2) activity is raised in chronic heart failure, suggesting a compensatory role in left ventricular dysfunction. Our aim was to study the relationship between sACE2 activity, infarct size, left ventricular systolic function and remodeling following ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). A contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance study was performed acutely in 95 patients with first STEMI and repeated at 6 months to measure LV end-diastolic volume index, ejection fraction and infarct size. Baseline sACE2 activities, measured by fluorescent enzymatic assay 24 to 48 hours and at 7 days from admission, were compared to that obtained in 22 matched controls. Patients showed higher sACE2 at baseline than controls (104.4 [87.4–134.8] vs 74.9 [62.8–87.5] RFU/µl/hr, p<0.001). At seven days, sACE2 activity significantly increased from baseline (115.5 [92.9–168.6] RFU/µl/hr, p<0.01). An inverse correlation between sACE2 activity with acute and follow-up ejection fraction was observed (r = −0.519, p<0.001; r = −0.453, p = 0.001, respectively). Additionally, sACE2 directly correlated with infarct size (r = 0.373, p<0.001). Both, infarct size (β = −0.470 [95%CI:−0.691:−0.248], p<0.001) and sACE2 at 7 days (β = −0.025 [95%CI:−0.048:−0.002], p = 0.030) were independent predictors of follow-up ejection fraction. Patients with sACE2 in the upper tertile had a 4.4 fold increase in the incidence of adverse left ventricular remodeling (95% confidence interval: 1.3 to 15.2, p = 0.027). In conclusion, serum sACE2 activity rises in relation to infarct size, left ventricular systolic dysfunction and is associated with the occurrence of left ventricular remodeling. PMID:23630610

  20. Atorvastatin prevents Angiotensin II induced myocardial hypertrophy in vitro via CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yintao; Yu, Shasha; Zhang, Naijin; Li, Yuan; Chen, Shuang; Chang, Ye; Sun, Guozhe; Sun, Yingxian

    2017-04-29

    Previous evidences suggested that atorvastatin not only reduced blood lipids but also reduced myocardial hypertrophy and remodeling. And it was reported that C/EBPβ (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β) played a pivotal role both in the physiologic and pathological cardiac hypertrophy. However, it has not been reported before whether this signaling pathway of C/EBPβ participates in protective effect of atorvastatin for hypertrophy cardiomyocytes. In present study, We found that overexpression of C/EBPβ significantly abrogated the effect of atorvastatin on increasing Bcl-2/Bax and PGC-1α while the early and late apoptosis rate increased and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was reduced. In conclusion, we further identified the protective effect of atorvastatin on hypertrophic cardiomyocytes induced by Angiotensin II by rescuing the MMP and inhibiting apoptosis, which might be at least partly attributed to down-regulation of C/EBPβ. And C/EBPβ might be a new target to rescue mitochondrion function and apoptosis in pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

  1. Hypoxia-induced angiotensin II by the lactate-chymase-dependent mechanism mediates radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guozhu; Liu, Ying; Yao, Qiwei; Zheng, Rong; Zhang, Lanfang; Lin, Jie; Guo, Zhaoze; Du, Shasha; Ren, Chen; Yuan, Quan; Yuan, Yawei

    2017-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a principal determinant of arterial blood pressure and fluid and electrolyte balance. RAS component dysregulation was recently found in some malignancies and correlated with poor patient outcomes. However, the exact mechanism of local RAS activation in tumors is still unclear. Here, we find that the local angiotensin II predominantly exists in the hypoxic regions of tumor formed by nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE2 cells and breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, where these tumor cells autocrinely produce angiotensin II by a chymase-dependent rather than an angiotensin converting enzyme-dependent mechanism. We further demonstrate in nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE2 and 5–8F cells that this chymase-dependent effect is mediated by increased levels of lactate, a by-product of glycolytic metabolism. Finally, we show that the enhanced angiotensin II plays an important role in the intracellular accumulation of HIF-1α of hypoxic nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells and mediates the radiation-resistant phenotype of these nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Thus, our findings reveal the critical role of hypoxia in producing local angiotensin II by a lactate-chymase-dependent mechanism and highlight the importance of local angiotensin II in regulating radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells. PMID:28205588

  2. Brain-Targeted (Pro)Renin Receptor Knockdown attenuates Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wencheng; Peng, Hua; Cao, Theresa; Sato, Ryosuke; McDaniels, Sarah. J.; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L. Gabriel; Feng, Yumei

    2012-01-01

    The (pro)renin receptor is a newly discovered member of the brain renin-angiotensin system. To investigate the role of brain (pro)renin receptor in hypertension, adeno-associated virus-mediated (pro)renin receptor shRNA was used to knockdown (pro)renin receptor expression in the brain of non-transgenic normotensive and human renin-angiotensinogen double transgenic hypertensive mice. Blood pressure was monitored using implanted telemetric probes in conscious animals. Real-time PCR and immunostaining were performed to determine (pro)renin receptor, angiotensin II type 1 receptor and vasopressin mRNA levels. Plasma vasopressin levels were determined by Enzyme-Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay. Double transgenic mice exhibited higher blood pressure, elevated cardiac and vascular sympathetic tone, and impaired spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity. Intracerebroventricular delivery of (pro)renin receptor shRNA significantly reduced blood pressure, cardiac and vasomotor sympathetic tone, and improved baroreflex sensitivity compared to the control virus treatment in double transgenic mice. (Pro)renin receptor knockdown significantly reduced angiotensin II type 1 receptor and vasopressin levels in double transgenic mice. These data indicate that (pro)renin receptor knockdown in the brain attenuates angiotensin II-dependent hypertension and is associated with a decrease insympathetic tone and an improvement of the baroreflex sensitivity. In addition, brain-targeted (pro)renin receptor knockdown is associated with down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and vasopressin levels. We conclude that central (pro)renin receptor contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension in human renin-angiotensinogen transgenic mice. PMID:22526255

  3. Chymase-dependent production of angiotensin II: an old enzyme in old hearts.

    PubMed

    Froogh, Ghezal; Pinto, John T; Le, Yicong; Kandhi, Sharath; Aleligne, Yeabsra; Huang, An; Sun, Dong

    2017-02-01

    Age-dependent alteration of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and generation of angiotensin II (Ang II) are well documented. By contrast, RAS-independent generation of Ang II in aging and its responses to exercise have not been explored. To this end, we examined the effects of chymase, a secretory serine protease, on the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-independent conversion of Ang I to Ang II. We hypothesized that age-dependent alteration of cardiac Ang II formation is chymase dependent in nature and is prevented by exercise training. Experiments were conducted on hearts isolated from young (3 mo), aged sedentary (24 mo), and aged rats chronically exercised on a treadmill. In the presence of low Ang I levels and downregulation of ACE expression/activity, cardiac Ang II levels were significantly higher in aged than young rats, suggesting an ACE-independent response. Aged hearts also displayed significantly increased chymase expression and activity, as well as upregulation of tryptase, a biological marker of mast cells, confirming a mast cell-sourced increase in chymase. Coincidently, cardiac superoxide produced from NADPH oxidase (Nox) was significantly enhanced in aged rats and was normalized by exercise. Conversely, a significant reduction in cardiac expression of ACE2 followed by lower Ang 1-7 levels and downregulation of the Mas receptor (binding protein of Ang 1-7) in aged rats were completely reversed by exercise. In conclusion, local formation of Ang II is increased in aged hearts, and chymase is primarily responsible for this increase. Chronic exercise is able to normalize the age-dependent alterations via compromising chymase/Ang II/angiotensin type 1 receptor/Nox actions while promoting ACE2/Ang 1-7/MasR signaling.

  4. Sildenafil Protects against Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Following Cardiac Arrest in a Porcine Model: Possible Role of the Renin-Angiotensin System.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoxing; Zhang, Qian; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Chunsheng

    2015-11-12

    Sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sold as Viagra, is a cardioprotector against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Our study explored whether sildenafil protects against I/R-induced damage in a porcine cardiac arrest and resuscitation (CAR) model via modulating the renin-angiotensin system. Male pigs were randomly divided to three groups: Sham group, Saline group, and sildenafil (0.5 mg/kg) group. Thirty min after drug infusion, ventricular fibrillation (8 min) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (up to 30 min) was conducted in these animals. We found that sildenafil ameliorated the reduced cardiac function and improved the 24-h survival rate in this model. Sildenafil partly attenuated the increases of plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) and Ang (1-7) levels after CAR. Sildenafil also decreased apoptosis and Ang II expression in myocardium. The increases of expression of angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE), ACE2, Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R), and the Ang (1-7) receptor Mas in myocardial tissue were enhanced after CAR. Sildenafil suppressed AT1R up-regulation, but had no effect on ACE, ACE2, and Mas expression. Sildenafil further boosted the upregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and inducible nitric oxide synthase(iNOS). Collectively, our results suggest that cardioprotection of sildenafil in CAR model is accompanied by an inhibition of Ang II-AT1R axis activation.

  5. Angiotensin-(1-7)-dependent vasorelaxation of the renal artery exhibits unique angiotensin and bradykinin receptor selectivity.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Mariam H M; Benter, Ibrahim F; Diz, Debra I; Chappell, Mark C

    2017-02-10

    Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] exhibits blood pressure lowering actions, inhibits cell growth, and reduces tissue inflammation and fibrosis which may functionally antagonize an activated Ang II-AT1 receptor axis. Since the vascular actions of Ang-(1-7) and the associated receptor/signaling pathways vary in different vascular beds, the current study established the vasorelaxant properties of the heptapeptide in the renal artery of male Wistar male rats. Ang-(1-7) produced an endothelium-dependent vasodilator relaxation of isolated renal artery segments pre-contracted by a sub-maximal concentration of phenylephrine (PE) (3×10(-7)M). Ang-(1-7) induced vasodilation of the rat renal artery with an ED50 of 3±1nM and a maximal response of 42±5% (N=10). The two antagonists (10(-5)M each) for the AT7/Mas receptor (MasR) [D-Pro(7)]-Ang-(1-7) and [D-Ala(7)]-Ang-(1-7) significantly reduced the maximal response to 12±1% and 18±3%, respectively. Surprisingly, the AT2R receptor antagonist PD123319, the AT1R antagonist losartan and B2R antagonist HOE140 (10(-6)M each) also significantly reduced Ang-(1-7)-induced relaxation to 12±2%, 22±3% and 14±7%, respectively. Removal of the endothelium or addition of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) inhibitor ODQ (10(-5)M) essentially abolished the vasorelaxant response to Ang-(1-7) (10±4% and 10±2%, P <0.05). Finally, the NOS inhibitor LNAME (10(-4)M) reduced the response to 13±2% (p<0.05), but the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin failed to block the Ang-(1-7) response. We conclude that Ang-(1-7) exhibits potent vasorelaxant actions in the isolated renal artery that are dependent on an intact endothelium and the apparent stimulation of a NO-sGC pathway. Moreover, Ang-(1-7)-dependent vasorelaxation was sensitive to antagonists against the AT7/Mas, AT1, AT2 and B2 receptor subtypes.

  6. Aldosterone does not require angiotensin II to activate NCC through a WNK4-SPAK-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    van der Lubbe, Nils; Lim, Christina H; Meima, Marcel E; van Veghel, Richard; Rosenbaek, Lena Lindtoft; Mutig, Kerim; Danser, Alexander H J; Fenton, Robert A; Zietse, Robert; Hoorn, Ewout J

    2012-06-01

    We and others have recently shown that angiotensin II can activate the sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) through a WNK4-SPAK-dependent pathway. Because WNK4 was previously shown to be a negative regulator of NCC, it has been postulated that angiotensin II converts WNK4 to a positive regulator. Here, we ask whether aldosterone requires angiotensin II to activate NCC and if their effects are additive. To do so, we infused vehicle or aldosterone in adrenalectomized rats that also received the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan. In the presence of losartan, aldosterone was still capable of increasing total and phosphorylated NCC twofold to threefold. The kinases WNK4 and SPAK also increased with aldosterone and losartan. A dose-dependent relationship between aldosterone and NCC, SPAK, and WNK4 was identified, suggesting that these are aldosterone-sensitive proteins. As more functional evidence of increased NCC activity, we showed that rats receiving aldosterone and losartan had a significantly greater natriuretic response to hydrochlorothiazide than rats receiving losartan only. To study whether angiotensin II could have an additive effect, rats receiving aldosterone with losartan were compared with rats receiving aldosterone only. Rats receiving aldosterone only retained more sodium and had twofold to fourfold increase in phosphorylated NCC. Together, our results demonstrate that aldosterone does not require angiotensin II to activate NCC and that WNK4 appears to act as a positive regulator in this pathway. The additive effect of angiotensin II may favor electroneutral sodium reabsorption during hypovolemia and may contribute to hypertension in diseases with an activated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.

  7. Polydatin prevents angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial superoxide generation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yingying; Zhang, Nan; Yao, Fanrong

    2015-01-01

    Our studies and others recently demonstrate that polydatin, a resveratrol glucoside, has antioxidative and cardioprotective effects. This study aims to investigate the direct effects of polydatin on Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy to explore the potential role of polydatin in cardioprotection. Our results showed that in primary cultured cardiomyocytes, polydatin blocked Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy in a dose-dependent manner, which were associated with reduction in the cell surface area and [3H]leucine incorporation, as well as attenuation of the mRNA expressions of atrial natriuretic factor and β-myosin heavy chain. Furthermore, polydatin prevented rat cardiac hypertrophy induced by Ang II infusion, as assessed by heart weight-to-body weight ratio, cross-sectional area of cardiomyocyte, and gene expression of hypertrophic markers. Further investigation demonstrated that polydatin attenuated the Ang II-induced increase in the reactive oxygen species levels and NADPH oxidase activity in vivo and in vitro. Polydatin also blocked the Ang II-stimulated increases of Nox4 and Nox2 expression in cultured cardiomyocytes and the hearts of Ang II-infused rats. Our results indicate that polydatin has the potential to protect against Ang II-mediated cardiac hypertrophy through suppression of NADPH oxidase activity and superoxide production. These observations may shed new light on the understanding of the cardioprotective effect of polydatin. PMID:25488910

  8. Polydatin prevents angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial superoxide generation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Tan, Yingying; Zhang, Nan; Yao, Fanrong

    2015-10-01

    Our studies and others recently demonstrate that polydatin, a resveratrol glucoside, has antioxidative and cardioprotective effects. This study aims to investigate the direct effects of polydatin on Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy to explore the potential role of polydatin in cardioprotection. Our results showed that in primary cultured cardiomyocytes, polydatin blocked Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy in a dose-dependent manner, which were associated with reduction in the cell surface area and [(3)H]leucine incorporation, as well as attenuation of the mRNA expressions of atrial natriuretic factor and β-myosin heavy chain. Furthermore, polydatin prevented rat cardiac hypertrophy induced by Ang II infusion, as assessed by heart weight-to-body weight ratio, cross-sectional area of cardiomyocyte, and gene expression of hypertrophic markers. Further investigation demonstrated that polydatin attenuated the Ang II-induced increase in the reactive oxygen species levels and NADPH oxidase activity in vivo and in vitro. Polydatin also blocked the Ang II-stimulated increases of Nox4 and Nox2 expression in cultured cardiomyocytes and the hearts of Ang II-infused rats. Our results indicate that polydatin has the potential to protect against Ang II-mediated cardiac hypertrophy through suppression of NADPH oxidase activity and superoxide production. These observations may shed new light on the understanding of the cardioprotective effect of polydatin. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  9. Angiotensin-dependent autonomic dysregulation precedes dilated cardiomyopathy in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Weiss, Robert M; Zimmerman, Kathy; Domenig, Oliver; Cicha, Michael Z; Chapleau, Mark W

    2015-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Is autonomic dysregulation in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy dependent on left ventricular systolic dysfunction and/or activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and does it predict development of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)? What is the main finding and its importance? The results demonstrate that autonomic dysregulation precedes and predicts left ventricular dysfunction and DCM in sarcoglycan-δ-deficient (Sgcd-/-) mice. The autonomic dysregulation is prevented by treatment of young Sgcd-/- mice with the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker losartan. Measurements of RAS activation and autonomic dysregulation may predict risk of DCM, and therapies targeting the RAS and autonomic dysregulation at a young age may slow disease progression in patients. Sarcoglycan mutations cause muscular dystrophy. Patients with muscular dystrophy develop autonomic dysregulation and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), but the temporal relationship and mechanism of autonomic dysregulation are not well understood. We hypothesized that activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) causes autonomic dysregulation prior to development of DCM in sarcoglycan-δ-deficient (Sgcd-/-) mice and that the severity of autonomic dysfunction at a young age predicts the severity of DCM at older ages. At 10-12 weeks of age, when left ventricular function assessed by echocardiography remained normal, Sgcd-/- mice exhibited decreases in arterial pressure, locomotor activity, baroreflex sensitivity and cardiovagal tone and increased sympathetic tone compared with age-matched C57BL/6 control mice (P < 0.05). Systemic and skeletal muscle RAS were activated, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1 R) expression, superoxide and fibrosis were increased in dystrophic skeletal muscle (P < 0.05). Treatment with the AT1 R blocker losartan for 7-9 weeks beginning at 3 weeks of age prevented or strongly attenuated the abnormalities in Sgcd-/- mice (P < 0

  10. Cardiopreventive effect of ethanolic extract of Date Palm Pollen against isoproterenol induced myocardial infarction in rats through the inhibition of the angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Amal; Ben Mefteh, Fedia; Mnafgui, Kais; Turki, Mouna; Jmal, Salwa; Ben Amar, Rawdha; Ayadi, Fatma; ElFeki, Abdelfattah; Abid, Leila; Rateb, Mostafa E; Belbahri, Lassaad; Kadri, Adel; Gharsallah, Neji

    2017-06-20

    The present study aimed to examine the putative preventive effect of the ethanolic extract Date Palm Pollen (DPP, Phoenix dactylifera L., family Arecaceae) on isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Twenty four rats were randomly divided into four groups including control. They were treated with DPP extract (400mg/kg) and clopidogrel (0.2mg/kg) for 7days followed by myocardial injury induction using subcutaneous isoproterenol (100mg/kg) with an interval of 24h for two days (6th and 7th day). Administration of isoproterenol exhibited indicative changes in the ECG pattern evidenced by significant elevation of ST-segment and cardiac injury markers viz.; troponin-T, creatine phosphokinase (CPK), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) by 315%, 71%, 64% and 170%, respectively as compared to control. Additionally, the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity in plasma was increased by 33% associated to histological myocardial necrosis. However, pre-co-treatment with DPP extract improved the cardiac biomarkers injury, normalized cardiac function indices and prevented the ventricular remodeling process through inhibition of ACE activity by 34% and the inhibition of the generation of radical oxygen species. Extensive characterization of this DPP extract using LC-HRMS revealed numerous flavonoids and phenols compounds which could be endowed with cardiopreventive actions. Overall, these results proved that DPP extract has preventive effects on cardiac remodeling process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Angiotensin II Signaling in Human Preadipose Cells: Participation of ERK1,2-Dependent Modulation of Akt

    PubMed Central

    Dünner, Natalia; Quezada, Carolina; Berndt, F. Andrés; Cánovas, José; Rojas, Cecilia V.

    2013-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system expressed in adipose tissue has been implicated in the modulation of adipocyte formation, glucose metabolism, triglyceride accumulation, lipolysis, and the onset of the adverse metabolic consequences of obesity. As we investigated angiotensin II signal transduction mechanisms in human preadipose cells, an interplay of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1,2) and Akt/PKB became evident. Angiotensin II caused attenuation of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), at serine 473; the p-Akt/Akt ratio decreased to 0.5±0.2-fold the control value without angiotensin II (p<0.001). Here we report that the reduction of phosphorylated Akt associates with ERK1,2 activities. In the absence of angiotensin II, inhibition of ERK1,2 activation with U0126 or PD98059 resulted in a 2.1±0.5 (p<0.001) and 1.4±0.2-fold (p<0.05) increase in the p-Akt/Akt ratio, respectively. In addition, partial knockdown of ERK1 protein expression by the short hairpin RNA technique also raised phosphorylated Akt in these cells (the p-Akt/Akt ratio was 1.5±0.1-fold the corresponding control; p<0.05). Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1,2 activation with U0126 prevented the reduction of p-Akt/Akt by angiotensin II. An analogous effect was found on the phosphorylation status of Akt downstream effectors, the forkhead box (Fox) proteins O1 and O4. Altogether, these results indicate that angiotensin II signaling in human preadipose cells involves an ERK1,2-dependent attenuation of Akt activity, whose impact on the biological functions under its regulation is not fully understood. PMID:24098385

  12. Sympathetic and angiotensin-dependent hypertension during cage-switch stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dexter L; Webb, R Clinton; Brands, Michael W

    2004-12-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the dependence of the acute hypertensive response to a novel model of acute psychosocial stress on the sympathetic and renin-angiotensin systems. Baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and locomotor activity were measured with telemetry in mice for a 1-h period and averaged 98 +/- 1 mmHg, 505 +/- 3 beats/min, and 5 +/- 1 counts, respectively. Stress was induced by placing a mouse into a cage previously occupied by a different male mouse, and this increased MAP, HR, and activity in the control group by 40 +/- 2 mmHg, 204 +/- 25 beats/min, and 68 +/- 6 counts, respectively. Each variable gradually returned to baseline levels by 90 min after beginning cage switch. Pretreatment with terazosin (10 mg/kg ip) significantly reduced the initial increase in MAP to 12 +/- 6 mmHg, whereas MAP for the last 45 min was superimposable on control values. Atenolol (10 mg/ml drinking water) had no effect to blunt the initial increase in MAP but had a growing effect from 10 min onward, decreasing MAP all the way to baseline by 60 min after starting cage switch. Captopril (2 mg/ml drinking water) treatment caused a very similar response. All three treatments significantly decreased the area under the blood pressure curve, and the blood pressure effect could not be attributed uniformly to effects on HR or activity. These data suggest that our novel model of psychosocial stress causes an initial alpha(1)-receptor-dependent increase in MAP. The later phase of the pressor response is blocked similarly by a beta(1)-receptor antagonist and an ACE inhibitor, independent of HR, suggesting that the beta(1)-dependent blood pressure effect is due, in large part, to the renin-angiotensin system.

  13. Molecular and Thermodynamic Mechanisms of the Chloride-dependent Human Angiotensin-I-converting Enzyme (ACE)*

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Christopher J.; Masuyer, Geoffrey; Schwager, Sylva L. U.; Akif, Mohd; Sturrock, Edward D.; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Somatic angiotensin-converting enzyme (sACE), a key regulator of blood pressure and electrolyte fluid homeostasis, cleaves the vasoactive angiotensin-I, bradykinin, and a number of other physiologically relevant peptides. sACE consists of two homologous and catalytically active N- and C-domains, which display marked differences in substrate specificities and chloride activation. A series of single substitution mutants were generated and evaluated under varying chloride concentrations using isothermal titration calorimetry. The x-ray crystal structures of the mutants provided details on the chloride-dependent interactions with ACE. Chloride binding in the chloride 1 pocket of C-domain ACE was found to affect positioning of residues from the active site. Analysis of the chloride 2 pocket R522Q and R522K mutations revealed the key interactions with the catalytic site that are stabilized via chloride coordination of Arg522. Substrate interactions in the S2 subsite were shown to affect chloride affinity in the chloride 2 pocket. The Glu403-Lys118 salt bridge in C-domain ACE was shown to stabilize the hinge-bending region and reduce chloride affinity by constraining the chloride 2 pocket. This work demonstrated that substrate composition to the C-terminal side of the scissile bond as well as interactions of larger substrates in the S2 subsite moderate chloride affinity in the chloride 2 pocket of the ACE C-domain, providing a rationale for the substrate-selective nature of chloride dependence in ACE and how this varies between the N- and C-domains. PMID:24297181

  14. Attenuation of myocardial fibrosis with curcumin is mediated by modulating expression of angiotensin II AT1/AT2 receptors and ACE2 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xue-Fen; Zhang, Li-Hui; Bai, Feng; Wang, Ning-Ping; Garner, Ron E; McKallip, Robert J; Zhao, Zhi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is known to improve cardiac function by balancing degradation and synthesis of collagens after myocardial infarction. This study tested the hypothesis that inhibition of myocardial fibrosis by curcumin is associated with modulating expression of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to Ang II infusion (500 ng/kg/min) using osmotic minipumps for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively, and curcumin (150 mg/kg/day) was fed by gastric gavage during Ang II infusion. Compared to the animals with Ang II infusion, curcumin significantly decreased the mean arterial blood pressure during the course of the observation. The protein level of the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor was reduced, and the Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor was up-regulated, evidenced by an increased ratio of the AT2 receptor over the AT1 receptor in the curcumin group (1.2±0.02%) vs in the Ang II group (0.7±0.03%, P<0.05). These changes were coincident with less locally expressed AT1 receptor and enhanced AT2 receptor in the intracardiac vessels and intermyocardium. Along with these modulations, curcumin significantly decreased the populations of macrophages and alpha smooth muscle actin-expressing myofibroblasts, which were accompanied by reduced expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 and phosphorylated-Smad2/3. Collagen I synthesis was inhibited, and tissue fibrosis was attenuated, as demonstrated by less extensive collagen-rich fibrosis. Furthermore, curcumin increased protein level of ACE2 and enhanced its expression in the intermyocardium relative to the Ang II group. These results suggest that curcumin could be considered as an add-on therapeutic agent in the treatment of fibrosis-derived heart failure patient who is intolerant of ACE inhibitor therapy. PMID:26648693

  15. Angiotensin II dependent cardiac remodeling in the eel Anguilla anguilla involves the NOS/NO system.

    PubMed

    Filice, Mariacristina; Amelio, Daniela; Garofalo, Filippo; David, Sabrina; Fucarino, Alberto; Jensen, Frank Bo; Imbrogno, Sandra; Cerra, Maria Carmela

    2017-05-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII), the principal effector of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS), plays an important role in controlling mammalian cardiac morpho-functional remodelling. In the eel Anguilla anguilla, one month administration of AngII improves cardiac performance and influences the expression and localization of molecules which regulate cell growth. To deeper investigate the morpho-functional chronic influences of AngII on the eel heart and the molecular mechanisms involved, freshwater eels (A. anguilla) were intraperitoneally injected for 2 months with AngII (1 nmol g BW(-1)). Then the isolated hearts were subjected to morphological and western blotting analyses, and nitrite measurements. If compared to control animals, the ventricle of AngII-treated hearts showed an increase in compacta thickness, vascularization, muscle mass and fibrosis. Structural changes were paralleled by a higher expression of AT2 receptor and a negative modulation of the ERK1-2 pathway, together with a decrease in nitrite concentration, indicative of a reduced Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS)-dependent NO production. Moreover, immunolocalization revealed, particularly on the endocardial endothelium (EE) of AngII-treated hearts, a significant reduction of phosphorylated NOS detected by peNOS antibody accompanied by an increased expression of the eNOS disabling protein NOSTRIN, and a decreased expression of the positive regulators of NOS activity, pAkt and Hsp90. On the whole, results suggest that, in the eel, AngII modulates cardiac morpho-functional plasticity by influencing the molecular mechanisms that control NOS activity and the ERK1-2 pathway.

  16. Aldosterone-induced brain MAPK signaling and sympathetic excitation are angiotensin II type-1 receptor dependent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Felder, Robert B

    2012-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling upregulates angiotensin II type-1 receptors (AT(1)R) in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and contributes to AT(1)R-mediated sympathetic excitation in heart failure. Aldosterone has similar effects to increase AT(1)R expression in the PVN and sympathetic drive. The present study was undertaken to determine whether aldosterone also activates the sympathetic nervous system via MAPK signaling and, if so, whether its effect is independent of ANG II and AT(1)R. In anesthetized rats, a 4-h intravenous infusion of aldosterone induced increases (P < 0.05) in phosphorylated (p-) p44/42 MAPK in PVN, PVN neuronal excitation, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean blood pressure (MBP), and heart rate (HR). Intracerebroventricular or bilateral PVN microinjection of the p44/42 MAPK inhibitor PD-98059 reduced the aldosterone-induced RSNA, HR, and MBP responses. Intracerebroventricular pretreatment (5 days earlier) with pooled small interfering RNAs targeting p44/42 MAPK reduced total and p-p44/42 MAPK, aldosterone-induced c-Fos expression in the PVN, and the aldosterone-induced increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. Intracerebroventricular infusion of either the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-28318 or the AT(1)R antagonist losartan blocked aldosterone-induced phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK and prevented the increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. These data suggest that aldosterone-induced sympathetic excitation depends upon that AT(1)R-induced MAPK signaling in the brain. The short time course of this interaction suggests a nongenomic mechanism, perhaps via an aldosterone-induced transactivation of the AT(1)R as described in peripheral tissues.

  17. Aldosterone-induced brain MAPK signaling and sympathetic excitation are angiotensin II type-1 receptor dependent

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling upregulates angiotensin II type-1 receptors (AT1R) in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and contributes to AT1R-mediated sympathetic excitation in heart failure. Aldosterone has similar effects to increase AT1R expression in the PVN and sympathetic drive. The present study was undertaken to determine whether aldosterone also activates the sympathetic nervous system via MAPK signaling and, if so, whether its effect is independent of ANG II and AT1R. In anesthetized rats, a 4-h intravenous infusion of aldosterone induced increases (P < 0.05) in phosphorylated (p-) p44/42 MAPK in PVN, PVN neuronal excitation, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean blood pressure (MBP), and heart rate (HR). Intracerebroventricular or bilateral PVN microinjection of the p44/42 MAPK inhibitor PD-98059 reduced the aldosterone-induced RSNA, HR, and MBP responses. Intracerebroventricular pretreatment (5 days earlier) with pooled small interfering RNAs targeting p44/42 MAPK reduced total and p-p44/42 MAPK, aldosterone-induced c-Fos expression in the PVN, and the aldosterone-induced increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. Intracerebroventricular infusion of either the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-28318 or the AT1R antagonist losartan blocked aldosterone-induced phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK and prevented the increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. These data suggest that aldosterone-induced sympathetic excitation depends upon that AT1R-induced MAPK signaling in the brain. The short time course of this interaction suggests a nongenomic mechanism, perhaps via an aldosterone-induced transactivation of the AT1R as described in peripheral tissues. PMID:22081704

  18. Increased myocardial collagen content in transgenic rats overexpressing cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme is related to enhanced breakdown of N-acetyl-Ser-Asp-Lys-Pro and increased phosphorylation of Smad2/3.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, Saraswati; van Geel, Peter P; Sharma, Umesh C; Cleutjens, Jack P M; Bohnemeier, Holger; Tian, Xiao-Li; Schunkert, Heribert; Crijns, Harry J G M; Paul, Martin; Pinto, Yigal M

    2004-11-09

    Although increased activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been associated with increased cardiac collagen, no studies to date have established a direct cause-and-effect relation between the two. We used transgenic rats that overexpress human ACE selectively in the myocardium. Two independent heterozygous transgenic rat lines were studied, one expressing 2 to 3 copies (L1172) and the other expressing 5 to 10 copies (L1173) of the ACE transgene. These rats were normotensive but developed a proportionate increase in myocardial collagen depending on the ACE gene dose (up to 2.5-fold, P<0.01), but cardiac angiotensin II levels remained normal, whereas collagen content reversed to control levels on ACE inhibition. To explain these changes, we investigated N-acetyl-Ser-Asp-Lys-Pro (AcSDKP), an alternative substrate that is catabolized exclusively by ACE. Increased cardiac expression of ACE was paralleled by a reciprocal decrease in cardiac AcSDKP and a proportionate increase in phosphorylated Smad2 and Smad3, all of which normalized after both ACE inhibition and AcSDKP infusion. Furthermore, a functional link of this signaling cascade was demonstrated, because AcSDKP inhibited Smad3 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner in cultured cardiac fibroblasts and in vivo. Our findings suggest that increased cardiac ACE activity can increase cardiac collagen content by degradation of AcSDKP, an inhibitor of the phosphorylation of transforming growth factor-beta signaling molecules Smad2 and Smad3. This implies that the antifibrotic effects of ACE inhibitors are mediated in part by increasing cardiac AcSDKP, with subsequent inhibition of Smad 2/3 phosphorylation.

  19. Angiotensin receptor blockade and angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibition limit adverse remodeling of infarct zone collagens and global diastolic dysfunction during healing after reperfused ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Jugdutt, Bodh I; Idikio, Halliday; Uwiera, Richard R E

    2007-09-01

    To determine whether therapy with the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB) candesartan and the comparator angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) enalapril during healing after reperfused ST-elevation myocardial infarction (RSTEMI) limit adverse remodeling of infarct zone (IZ) collagens and left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction, we randomized 24 dogs surviving anterior RSTEMI (90-min coronary occlusion) to placebo, candesartan, and enalapril therapy between day 2 and 42. Six other dogs were sham. We measured regional IZ and non-infarct zone (NIZ) collagens (hydroxyproline; types I/III; cross-linking), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and topography at 6 weeks, and hemodynamics, LV diastolic and systolic function, and remodeling over 6 weeks. Compared to sham, placebo-RSTEMI differentially altered regional collagens, with more pronounced increase in TGF-beta, hydroxyproline, and type I, insoluble, and cross-linked collagens in the IZ than NIZ, and increased IZ soluble and type III collagens at 6 weeks, and induced persistent LV filling pressure elevation, diastolic and systolic dysfunction, and LV remodeling over 6 weeks. Compared to placebo-RSTEMI, candesartan and enalapril limited adverse regional collagen remodeling, with normalization of type III, soluble and insoluble collagens and decrease in pyridinoline cross-linking in the IZ at 6 weeks, and attenuation of LV filling pressure, diastolic dysfunction, and remodeling over 6 weeks. The results suggest that candesartan and enalapril during healing after RSTEMI prevent rather than worsen adverse remodeling of IZ collagens and LV diastolic dysfunction, supporting the clinical use of ARBs and ACEIs during subacute RSTEMI.

  20. Impact of the angiotensin II receptor antagonist, losartan, on myocardial fibrosis in patients with end-stage renal disease: assessment by ultrasonic integrated backscatter and biochemical markers.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Yasunobu; Nishiue, Takashi; Masaki, Hiroya; Tamura, Koji; Matsumoto, Noriko; Mori, Yasukiyo; Nishikawa, Mitsushige; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Iwasaka, Toshiji

    2005-10-01

    Myocardial fibrosis commonly occurs in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and has proven to be an important predictor for cardiovascular events. In experimental settings, angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) antagonists have been shown to have anti-fibrotic effects on the myocardium independent of their antihypertensive effects. In this study, to investigate whether the AT1-R antagonist losartan would have such anti-fibrotic effects in patients, we administered losartan or, for purpose of comparison, the angiotensin-converting enzyme enalapril or Ca2+-antagonist amlodipine to patients with ESRD. Thirty-nine ESRD patients with hypertension were randomly assigned to receive losartan (n=13), enalapril (n=13), or amlodipine (n=13). Ultrasonic integrated backscatter (IBS) and serological markers of collagen type I synthesis and degradation were used to assess the degree of myocardial fibrosis just before and after 6 months of treatment. There were no significant differences in antihypertensive effects among the three agents. In the enalapril- and amlodipine-treated groups, the mean calibrated IBS values increased significantly after 6 months of treatment (enalapril: -31.6 +/- 1.3 to -29.4 +/- 1.2 dB, p=0.011; amlodipine: -30.6 +/- 1.4 to -27.2 +/- 1.2 dB, p=0.012). However, the mean calibrated IBS values in the losartan-treated group did not increase after 6 months of treatment (-31.2 +/- 1.7 to -31.3 +/- 1.4 dB, p=0.88). The ratio of the serum concentration of procollagen type I carboxy-terminal peptide to the serum concentration of collagen type I pyridinoline cross-linked carboxy-terminal telopeptide was significantly reduced in the losartan-treated group (42.6 +/- 4.6 to 34.4 +/- 3.6, p=0.038). The present study indicates that losartan more effectively suppresses myocardial fibrosis in patients with ESRD than does enalapril or amlodipine despite a comparable antihypertensive effect among the three drugs.

  1. Fibulin-2 is Essential for Angiotensin II-Induced Myocardial Fibrosis Mediated by Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shaukat A.; Dong, Hailong; Joyce, Jennifer; Sasaki, Takako; Chu, Mon-Li; Tsuda, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis is an ominous pathological process in failing myocardium, but its pathogenesis is poorly understood. We recently reported that loss of an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, fibulin-2, protected against ventricular dysfunction after myocardial infarction (MI) in association with absence of activation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling and suppressed up-regulation of ECM protein expression during myocardial remodeling. Here, we investigated a role of fibulin-2 in the development of myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis induced by continuous pressor-dosage of Ang II infusion. Both wild type (WT) and fibulin-2 null (Fbln2KO) mice developed comparable hypertension and myocardial hypertrophy by Ang II infusion. However, myocardial fibrosis with significant up-regulation of collagen type I and III mRNA was only seen in WT but not in Fbln2KO mice.Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 mRNA and its downstream signal, Smad2, were significantly up-regulated in WT by Ang II, whereas there were no Ang II-induced changes in Flbn2KO, suggesting fibulin-2 is necessary for Ang II-induced TGF-β signaling that induces myocardial fibrosis. To test whether fibulin-2 is sufficient for Ang II-induced TGF-β up-regulation, isolated Flbn2KO cardiac fibroblasts were treated with Ang II after transfecting with fibulin-2 expression vector or pretreating with recombinant fibulin-2 protein. Ang II-induced TGF-β signaling in Fbln2KO cells was partially rescued by exogenous fibulin-2, suggesting that fibulin-2 is required and probably sufficient for Ang II-induced TGF-β activation. Smad2 phosphorylation was induced just by adding recombinant fibulin-2 to KO cells, suggesting that extracellular interaction between fibulin-2 and latent TGF-β triggered initial TGF-β activation. Our study indicates that Ang II cannot induce TGF-β activation without fibulin-2 and that fibulin-2 plays an essential role in Ang II-induced TGF-β signaling and subsequent myocardial fibrosis

  2. The Angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas Axis Counteracts Angiotensin II-Dependent and -Independent Pro-inflammatory Signaling in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Laura A; San Hipólito-Luengo, Álvaro; Ramos-González, Mariella; Cercas, Elena; Vallejo, Susana; Romero, Alejandra; Romacho, Tania; Carraro, Raffaele; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F; Peiró, Concepción

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Targeting inflammation is nowadays considered as a challenging pharmacological strategy to prevent or delay the development of vascular diseases. Angiotensin-(1-7) is a member of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) that binds Mas receptors and has gained growing attention in the last years as a regulator of vascular homeostasis. Here, we explored the capacity of Ang-(1-7) to counteract human aortic smooth muscle cell (HASMC) inflammation triggered by RAS-dependent and -independent stimuli, such as Ang II or interleukin (IL)-1β. Methods and Results: In cultured HASMC, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the release of nitric oxide were stimulated by both Ang II and IL-1β, as determined by Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence or the Griess method, respectively. iNOS induction was inhibited by Ang-(1-7) in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was equally blocked by two different Mas receptor antagonists, A779 and D-Pro(7)-Ang-(1-7), suggesting the participation of a unique Mas receptor subtype. Using pharmacological inhibitors, the induction of iNOS was proven to rely on the consecutive upstream activation of NADPH oxidase and nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Indeed, Ang-(1-7) markedly inhibited the activation of the NADPH oxidase and subsequently of NF-κB, as determined by lucigenin-derived chemiluminescence and electromobility shift assay, respectively. Conclusion: Ang-(1-7) can act as a counter-regulator of the inflammation of vascular smooth muscle cells triggered by Ang II, but also by other stimuli beyond the RAS. Activating or mimicking the Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis may represent a pharmacological opportunity to attenuate the pro-inflammatory environment that promotes and sustains the development of vascular diseases.

  3. The Angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas Axis Counteracts Angiotensin II-Dependent and -Independent Pro-inflammatory Signaling in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Villalobos, Laura A.; San Hipólito-Luengo, Álvaro; Ramos-González, Mariella; Cercas, Elena; Vallejo, Susana; Romero, Alejandra; Romacho, Tania; Carraro, Raffaele; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F.; Peiró, Concepción

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Targeting inflammation is nowadays considered as a challenging pharmacological strategy to prevent or delay the development of vascular diseases. Angiotensin-(1-7) is a member of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) that binds Mas receptors and has gained growing attention in the last years as a regulator of vascular homeostasis. Here, we explored the capacity of Ang-(1-7) to counteract human aortic smooth muscle cell (HASMC) inflammation triggered by RAS-dependent and -independent stimuli, such as Ang II or interleukin (IL)-1β. Methods and Results: In cultured HASMC, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the release of nitric oxide were stimulated by both Ang II and IL-1β, as determined by Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence or the Griess method, respectively. iNOS induction was inhibited by Ang-(1-7) in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was equally blocked by two different Mas receptor antagonists, A779 and D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7), suggesting the participation of a unique Mas receptor subtype. Using pharmacological inhibitors, the induction of iNOS was proven to rely on the consecutive upstream activation of NADPH oxidase and nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Indeed, Ang-(1-7) markedly inhibited the activation of the NADPH oxidase and subsequently of NF-κB, as determined by lucigenin-derived chemiluminescence and electromobility shift assay, respectively. Conclusion: Ang-(1-7) can act as a counter-regulator of the inflammation of vascular smooth muscle cells triggered by Ang II, but also by other stimuli beyond the RAS. Activating or mimicking the Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis may represent a pharmacological opportunity to attenuate the pro-inflammatory environment that promotes and sustains the development of vascular diseases. PMID:28018220

  4. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition ameliorates angiotensin II-dependent hypertension and renal vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Manuel; Sivritas, Sema H; Mergia, Evanthia; Potthoff, Sebastian A; Yang, Guang; Hering, Lydia; Grave, Katharina; Hoch, Henning; Rump, Lars C; Stegbauer, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Changes in renal hemodynamics have a major impact on blood pressure (BP). Angiotensin (Ang) II has been shown to induce vascular dysfunction by interacting with phosphodiesterase (PDE)1 and PDE5. The predominant PDE isoform responsible for renal vascular dysfunction in hypertension is unknown. Here, we measured the effects of PDE5 (sildenafil) or PDE1 (vinpocetine) inhibition on renal blood flow (RBF), BP, and renal vascular function in normotensive and hypertensive mice. During acute short-term Ang II infusion, sildenafil decreased BP and increased RBF in C57BL/6 (WT) mice. In contrast, vinpocetine showed no effect on RBF and BP. Additionally, renal cGMP levels were significantly increased after acute sildenafil but not after vinpocetine infusion, indicating a predominant role of PDE5 in renal vasculature. Furthermore, chronic Ang II infusion (500 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) increased BP and led to impaired NO-dependent vasodilation in kidneys of WT mice. Additional treatment with sildenafil (100 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) attenuated Ang II-dependent hypertension and improved NO-mediated vasodilation. During chronic Ang II infusion, urinary nitrite excretion, a marker for renal NO generation, was increased in WT mice, whereas renal cGMP generation was decreased and restored after sildenafil treatment, suggesting a preserved cGMP signaling after PDE5 inhibition. To investigate the dependency of PDE5 effects on NO/cGMP signaling, we next analyzed eNOS-KO mice, a mouse model characterized by low vascular NO/cGMP levels. In eNOS-KO mice, chronic Ang II infusion increased BP but did not impair NO-mediated vasodilation. Moreover, sildenafil did not influence BP or vascular function in eNOS-KO mice. These results highlight PDE5 as a key regulator of renal hemodynamics in hypertension. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2): comparative modeling of the active site, specificity requirements, and chloride dependence.

    PubMed

    Guy, Jodie L; Jackson, Richard M; Acharya, K Ravi; Sturrock, Edward D; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J

    2003-11-18

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a homologue of ACE, represents a new and potentially important target in cardio-renal disease. A model of the active site of ACE2, based on the crystal structure of testicular ACE, has been developed and indicates that the catalytic mechanism of ACE2 resembles that of ACE. Structural differences exist between the active site of ACE (dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase) and ACE2 (carboxypeptidase) that are responsible for the differences in specificity. The main differences occur in the ligand-binding pockets, particularly at the S2' subsite and in the binding of the peptide carboxy-terminus. The model explains why the classical ACE inhibitor lisinopril is unable to bind to ACE2. On the basis of the ability of ACE2 to cleave a variety of biologically active peptides, a consensus sequence of Pro-X-Pro-hydrophobic/basic for the protease specificity of ACE2 has been defined that is supported by the ACE2 model. The dipeptide, Pro-Phe, completely inhibits ACE2 activity at 180 microM with angiotensin II as the substrate. As with ACE, the chloride dependence of ACE2 is substrate-specific such that the hydrolysis of angiotensin I and the synthetic peptide substrate, Mca-APK(Dnp), are activated in the presence of chloride ions, whereas the cleavage of angiotensin II is inhibited. The ACE2 model is also suggestive of a possible mechanism for chloride activation. The structural insights provided by these analyses for the differences in inhibition pattern and substrate specificity among ACE and its homologue ACE2 and for the chloride dependence of ACE/ACE2 activity are valuable in understanding the function and regulation of ACE2.

  6. Concentration-dependent mode of interaction of angiotensin II receptor blockers with uric acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Takashi; Sato, Masanobu; Maeda, Tomoji; Ogihara, Toshio; Tamai, Ikumi

    2007-01-01

    Serum uric acid (SUA) is currently recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It has been reported that an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), losartan, decreases SUA level, whereas other ARBs, such as candesartan, have no lowering effect. Because the renal uric acid transporter (URAT1) is an important factor controlling the SUA level, we examined the involvement of URAT1 in those differential effects of various ARBs on SUA level at clinically relevant concentrations. This study was done by using URAT1-expressing Xenopus oocytes. Losartan, pratosartan, and telmisartan exhibited cis-inhibitory effects on the uptake of uric acid by URAT1, whereas at higher concentrations, only telmisartan did, and these ARBs reduced the uptake in competitive inhibition kinetics. On the other hand, candesartan, EXP3174 [2-n-butyl-4-chloro-1-[(2'-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)biphenyl-4-yI)methyl]imidazole-5-carboxylic acid] (a major metabolite of losartan), olmesartan, and valsartan were not inhibitory. Preloading of those ARBs in the oocytes enhanced the URAT1-mediated uric acid uptake, showing a trans-stimulatory effect. The present study is a first demonstration of the differential effects of ARBs on URAT1 that some ARBs are both cis-inhibitory and trans-stimulatory, depending on concentration, whereas others exhibit either a trans-stimulatory or cis-inhibitory effect alone, which could explain the clinically observed differential effects of ARBs on SUA level. Furthermore, it was found that such differential effects of ARBs on URAT1 could be predicted from the partial chemical structures of ARBs, which will be useful information for the appropriate use and development of ARBs without an increase of SUA.

  7. Vascular angiotensin II type 2 receptor attenuates atherosclerosis via a kinin/NO-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Takata, Hiroki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Kawahito, Hiroyuki; Kishida, Sou; Irie, Daisuke; Kato, Taku; Wakana, Noriyuki; Miyagawa, Sonoko; Fukui, Kensuke; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2015-06-01

    The angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptor exerts pro-atherogenic action by augmenting oxidative stress, whereas the Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2)-mediated effect on atherosclerosis remains controversial. AT2 transgenic (AT2-Tg) mice, which overexpress AT2 in their vascular smooth muscle cells, were crossed with apoE-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice to generate AT2 transgenic apoE(-/-) mice (AT2-Tg/apoE(-/-)). A subpressor dose of Ang II infusion exaggerated atherosclerosis development in apoE(-/-) mice, which was markedly suppressed in AT2-Tg/apoE(-/-) mice. Inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (L-NAME) or bradykinin type 2 receptor completely abolished AT2-mediated anti-atherogenic actions. The vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression levels and degree of monocyte/macrophage accumulation in the intima were also considerably reduced in AT2-Tg/apoE(-/-) mice; these phenomena were completely reversed by L-NAME treatment. Ang II infusion significantly enhanced the accumulation of dihydroethidium-positive mononuclear cells in the intima and mRNA expression levels of Nox2, a phagocytic cell-type NADPH oxidase subunit in apoE(-/-) mice, which was completely inhibited in AT2-Tg/apoE(-/-) mice. Vascular AT2 stimulation exerts anti-atherogenic actions in an endothelial kinin/NO-dependent manner, and its anti-oxidative effect is likely to be exerted by inhibiting the accumulation of superoxide-producing mononuclear leukocytes. © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Possible role for nephron-derived angiotensinogen in angiotensin-II dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Nirupama; Stuart, Deborah; Calquin, Matias; Wang, Shuping; Niimura, Fumio; Matsusaka, Taiji; Kohan, Donald E

    2016-01-01

    The role of intranephron angiotensinogen (AGT) in blood pressure (BP) regulation is not fully understood. Previous studies showed that proximal tubule-specific overexpression of AGT increases BP, whereas proximal tubule-specific deletion of AGT did not alter BP. The latter study may not have completely eliminated nephron AGT production; in addition, BP was only assessed on a normal salt diet. To evaluate this issue in greater detail, we developed mice with inducible nephron-wide AGT deletion. Mice were generated which were hemizygous for the Pax8-rtTA and LC-1 transgenes and homozygous for loxP-flanked AGT alleles to achieve nephron-wide AGT disruption after doxycycline induction. Compared to controls, AGT knockout (KO) mice demonstrated markedly reduced renal AGT immunostaining, mRNA, and protein levels; unexpectedly AGT KO mice had reduced AGT mRNA levels in the liver along with 50% reduction in plasma AGT levels. BP was significantly lower in the AGT KO mice compared to controls fed a normal, low, or high Na(+) intake, with the highest BP reduction on a low Na(+) diet. Regardless of Na(+) intake, AGT KO mice had higher plasma renin concentration (PRC) and markedly reduced urinary AGT levels compared to controls. Following angiotensin-II (Ang-II) infusion, AGT KO mice demonstrated an attenuated hypertensive response despite similar suppression of PRC in the two groups. Taken together, these data suggest that nephron-derived AGT may be involved in Ang-II-dependent hypertension, however, a clear role for nephron-derived AGT in physiological BP regulation remains to be determined. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  9. Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation and Angiotensin II Sensitivity in Experimental Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    van der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Wiegman, Marjon J.; Plösch, Torsten; Zeeman, Gerda G.; van Buiten, Azuwerus; Henning, Robert H.; Buikema, Hendrik; Faas, Marijke M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We investigated endothelial dysfunction and the role of angiotensin (Ang)-II type I (AT1-R) and type II (AT2-R) receptor in the changes in the Ang-II sensitivity in experimental preeclampsia in the rat. Methods Aortic rings were isolated from low dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infused pregnant rats (experimental preeclampsia; n=9), saline-infused pregnant rats (n=8), and saline (n=8) and LPS (n=8) infused non-pregnant rats. Endothelium-dependent acetylcholine--mediated relaxation was studied in phenylephrine-preconstricted aortic rings in the presence of vehicle, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and/or indomethacin. To evaluate the role for AT1-R and AT2-R in Ang-II sensitivity, full concentration response curves were obtained for Ang-II in the presence of losartan or PD123319. mRNA expression of the AT1-R and AT2-R, eNOS and iNOS, COX1 and COX2 in aorta were evaluated using real-time RT-PCR. Results The role of vasodilator prostaglandins in the aorta was increased and the role of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor and response of the AT1-R and AT2-R to Ang-II was decreased in pregnant saline infused rats as compared with non-pregnant rats. These changes were not observed during preeclampsia. Conclusion Pregnancy induced adaptations in endothelial function, which were not observed in the rat model for preeclampsia. This role of lack of pregnancy induced endothelial adaptation in the pathophysiology of experimental preeclampsia needs further investigation. PMID:24223202

  10. Statins and Renin Angiotensin System Inhibitors Dose-Dependently Protect Hypertensive Patients against Dialysis Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Taiwan has the highest renal disease incidence and prevalence in the world. We evaluated the association of statin and renin–angiotensin system inhibitor (RASI) use with dialysis risk in hypertensive patients. Methods Of 248,797 patients who received a hypertension diagnosis in Taiwan during 2001–2012, our cohort contained 110,829 hypertensive patients: 44,764 who used RASIs alone; 7,606 who used statins alone; 27,836 who used both RASIs and statins; and 33,716 who used neither RASIs or statins. We adjusted for the following factors to reduce selection bias by using propensity scores (PSs): age; sex; comorbidities; urbanization level; monthly income; and use of nonstatin lipid-lowering drugs, metformin, aspirin, antihypertensives, diuretics, and beta and calcium channel blockers. The statin and RASI use index dates were considered the hypertension confirmation dates. To examine the dose–response relationship, we categorized only statin or RASI use into four groups in each cohort: <28 (nonusers), 28–90, 91–365, and >365 cumulative defined daily doses (cDDDs). Results In the main model, PS-adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs; 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) for dialysis risk were 0.57 (0.50–0.65), 0.72 (0.53–0.98), and 0.47 (0.41–0.54) in the only RASI, only statin, and RASI + statin users, respectively. RASIs dose-dependently reduced dialysis risk in most subgroups and in the main model. RASI use significantly reduced dialysis risk in most subgroups, regardless of comorbidities or other drug use (P < 0.001). Statins at >365 cDDDs protected hypertensive patients against dialysis risk in the main model (aHR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.54–0.71), regardless of whether a high cDDD of RASIs, metformin, or aspirin was used. Conclusion Statins and RASIs independently have a significant dose-dependent protective effect against dialysis risk in hypertensive patients. The combination of statins and RASIs can additively protect hypertensive patients against dialysis

  11. Statins and Renin Angiotensin System Inhibitors Dose-Dependently Protect Hypertensive Patients against Dialysis Risk.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju-Chi; Hsu, Yi-Ping; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Taiwan has the highest renal disease incidence and prevalence in the world. We evaluated the association of statin and renin-angiotensin system inhibitor (RASI) use with dialysis risk in hypertensive patients. Of 248,797 patients who received a hypertension diagnosis in Taiwan during 2001-2012, our cohort contained 110,829 hypertensive patients: 44,764 who used RASIs alone; 7,606 who used statins alone; 27,836 who used both RASIs and statins; and 33,716 who used neither RASIs or statins. We adjusted for the following factors to reduce selection bias by using propensity scores (PSs): age; sex; comorbidities; urbanization level; monthly income; and use of nonstatin lipid-lowering drugs, metformin, aspirin, antihypertensives, diuretics, and beta and calcium channel blockers. The statin and RASI use index dates were considered the hypertension confirmation dates. To examine the dose-response relationship, we categorized only statin or RASI use into four groups in each cohort: <28 (nonusers), 28-90, 91-365, and >365 cumulative defined daily doses (cDDDs). In the main model, PS-adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs; 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) for dialysis risk were 0.57 (0.50-0.65), 0.72 (0.53-0.98), and 0.47 (0.41-0.54) in the only RASI, only statin, and RASI + statin users, respectively. RASIs dose-dependently reduced dialysis risk in most subgroups and in the main model. RASI use significantly reduced dialysis risk in most subgroups, regardless of comorbidities or other drug use (P < 0.001). Statins at >365 cDDDs protected hypertensive patients against dialysis risk in the main model (aHR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.54-0.71), regardless of whether a high cDDD of RASIs, metformin, or aspirin was used. Statins and RASIs independently have a significant dose-dependent protective effect against dialysis risk in hypertensive patients. The combination of statins and RASIs can additively protect hypertensive patients against dialysis risk.

  12. Pirfenidone controls the feedback loop of the AT1R/p38 MAPK/renin-angiotensin system axis by regulating liver X receptor-α in myocardial infarction-induced cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunmei; Han, Rui; Kang, Le; Wang, Jianping; Gao, Yonglin; Li, Yanshen; He, Jie; Tian, Jingwei

    2017-01-01

    Pirfenidone (PFD), an anti-fibrotic small molecule drug, is used to treat fibrotic diseases, but its effects on myocardial infarction (MI)-induced cardiac fibrosis are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of PFD on MI-induced cardiac fibrosis and the possible underlying mechanisms in rats. After establishment of the model, animals were administered PFD by gavage for 4 weeks. During the development of MI-induced cardiac fibrosis, we found activation of a positive feedback loop between the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R)/phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) pathway and renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which was accompanied by down-regulation of liver X receptor-α (LXR-α) expression. PFD attenuated body weight, heart weight, left ventricular weight, left ventricular systolic pressure, and ±dp/dtmax changes induced by MI, which were associated with a reduction in cardiac fibrosis, infarct size, and hydroxyproline concentration. Moreover, PFD inhibited the AT1R/p38 MAPK pathway, corrected the RAS imbalance [decreased angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression, but increased ACE2 and angiotensin (1-7) activity and Mas expression] and strongly enhanced heart LXR-α expression. These results indicate that the cardioprotective effects of PFD may be due, in large part, to controlling the feedback loop of the AT1R/p38 MAPK/RAS axis by activation of LXR-α. PMID:28091615

  13. Tumor necrosis factor-α produced in the kidney contributes to angiotensin II-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiandong; Patel, Mehul B; Griffiths, Robert; Mao, Alice; Song, Young-soo; Karlovich, Norah S; Sparks, Matthew A; Jin, Huixia; Wu, Min; Lin, Eugene E; Crowley, Steven D

    2014-12-01

    Immune system activation contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and the resulting progression of chronic kidney disease. In this regard, we recently identified a role for proinflammatory Th1 T-lymphocyte responses in hypertensive kidney injury. Because Th1 cells generate interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), we hypothesized that interferon-γ and TNF-α propagate renal damage during hypertension induced by activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Therefore, after confirming that mice genetically deficient of Th1 immunity were protected from kidney glomerular injury despite a preserved hypertensive response, we subjected mice lacking interferon-γ or TNF-α to our model of hypertensive chronic kidney disease. Interferon deficiency had no impact on blood pressure elevation or urinary albumin excretion during chronic angiotensin II infusion. By contrast, TNF-deficient (knockout) mice had blunted hypertensive responses and reduced end-organ damage in our model. As angiotensin II-infused TNF knockout mice had exaggerated endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in the kidney and enhanced nitric oxide bioavailability, we examined the actions of TNF-α generated from renal parenchymal cells in hypertension by transplanting wild-type or TNF knockout kidneys into wild-type recipients before the induction of hypertension. Transplant recipients lacking TNF solely in the kidney had blunted hypertensive responses to angiotensin II and augmented renal endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression, confirming a role for kidney-derived TNF-α to promote angiotensin II-induced blood pressure elevation by limiting renal nitric oxide generation.

  14. Angiotensin-(1-7) Selectively Induces Relaxation and Modulates Endothelium-Dependent Dilation in Mesenteric Arteries of Salt-Fed Rats.

    PubMed

    Raffai, Gábor; Lombard, Julian H

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the acute effects of angiotensin-(1-7) and AVE0991 on active tone and vasodilator responses to bradykinin and acetylcholine in isolated mesenteric arteries from Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-salt (HS; 4% NaCl) versus a normal salt (NS; 0.4% NaCl) diet. Angiotensin-(1-7) and AVE0991 elicited relaxation, and angiotensin-(1-7) unmasked vasodilator responses to bradykinin in arteries from HS-fed rats. These effects of angiotensin-(1-7) and AVE0991 were inhibited by endothelium removal, A779, PD123319, HOE140 and L-NAME. Angiotensin-(1-7) also restored the acetylcholine-induced relaxation that was suppressed by the HS diet. Vasodilator responses to bradykinin and acetylcholine in the presence of angiotensin-(1-7) were mimicked by captopril and the AT2 receptor agonist CGP42112 in arteries from HS-fed rats. Thus, in contrast to salt-induced impairment of vascular relaxation in response to vasodilator stimuli, angiotensin-(1-7) induces endothelium-dependent and NO-mediated relaxation, unmasks bradykinin responses via activation of mas and AT2 receptors, and restores acetylcholine-induced vasodilation in HS-fed rats. AT2 receptor activation and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition shared the ability of angiotensin-(1-7) to enhance bradykinin and acetylcholine responses in HS-fed rats. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential for mas and/or AT2 receptor activation and ACE inhibition in restoring endothelial function impaired by elevated dietary salt intake or other pathological conditions. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Cross-talk related to insulin and angiotensin II binding on myocardial remodelling in diabetic rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Maharsy, Wael M; Kadi, Lina N; Issa, Nahla G; Bitar, Khalil M; Der-Boghossian, Asdghig H; Abrahamian, Roy; Bikhazi, Anwar B

    2007-06-01

    This study focused on the regulation and affinity modulation of angiotensin II (Ang II) binding to its receptor subtypes (AT(1)- and AT(2)-receptor) in the coronary endothelium (CE) and cardiomyocytes (CM) of Sprague-Dawley male rats in normal (N), normal treated with losartan (NL), streptozotocin-induced diabetic (D), insulin-treated diabetic (DI), losartan-treated diabetic (DL), and diabetic co-treated with insulin and losartan (DIL). Heart perfusion was used to estimate Ang II binding affinity (tau=1/k-(n)) to its receptor subtypes on CE and CM. Diabetes decreased tau value on CE and increased it on CM as compared to normal. In DL group, the tau value decreased on CE but was normalised on CM. Insulin treatment alone (DI) or with losartan (DIL) restored t to normal on both CE and CM. Western blot results for AT(1)-receptor density showed an increase in diabetics compared to normal with no normalising effect with insulin treatment. The AT(1)-receptor density was normalised in the diabetic groups treated with losartan +/- insulin. Results for AT(2)-receptor regulation revealed a significant difference between untreated (D) and losartan-treated (DL, DIL) diabetic groups. All of these data show the interrelated pathway and cross-talk between insulin and Ang II system indicating potentially negative effects on the diabetic heart.

  16. Molecular basis and functional significance of Angiotensin II-induced increase in Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 gene expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    George, Mereena; Vijayakumar, Anupama; Dhanesh, Sivadasan Bindu; James, Jackson; Shivakumar, K

    2016-01-01

    Delineation of mechanisms underlying the regulation of fibrosis-related genes in the heart is an important clinical goal as cardiac fibrosis is a major cause of myocardial dysfunction. This study probed the regulation of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) gene expression and the regulatory links between Angiotensin II, DDR2 and collagen in Angiotensin II-stimulated cardiac fibroblasts. Real-time PCR and western blot analyses showed that Angiotensin II enhances DDR2 mRNA and protein expression in rat cardiac fibroblasts via NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species induction. NF-κB activation, demonstrated by gel shift assay, abolition of DDR2 expression upon NF-κB inhibition, and luciferase and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed transcriptional control of DDR2 by NF-κB in Angiotensin II-treated cells. Inhibitors of Phospholipase C and Protein kinase C prevented Angiotensin II-dependent p38 MAPK phosphorylation that in turn blocked NF-κB activation. Angiotensin II also enhanced collagen gene expression. Importantly, the stimulatory effects of Angiotensin II on DDR2 and collagen were inter-dependent as siRNA-mediated silencing of one abolished the other. Angiotensin II promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation whose inhibition attenuated Angiotensin II-stimulation of collagen but not DDR2. Furthermore, DDR2 knockdown prevented Angiotensin II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, indicating that DDR2-dependent ERK1/2 activation enhances collagen expression in cells exposed to Angiotensin II. DDR2 knockdown was also associated with compromised wound healing response to Angiotensin II. To conclude, Angiotensin II promotes NF-κB activation that up-regulates DDR2 transcription. A reciprocal regulatory relationship between DDR2 and collagen, involving cross-talk between the GPCR and RTK pathways, is central to Angiotensin II-induced increase in collagen expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

  17. Regulation of the Cardiac Sodium/Bicarbonate Cotransporter by Angiotensin II: Potential Contribution to Structural, Ionic and Electrophysiological Myocardial Remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Aiello, Ernesto Alejandro; Giusti, Verónica Celeste De

    2013-01-01

    The sodium/ bicarbonate cotransporter (NBC) is, with the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE), an important alkalinizing mechanism that maintains cellular intracellular pH (pHi). In the heart exists at least three isoforms of NBC, one that promotes the co-influx of 1 molecule of Na+ per 1molecule of HCO3-(electroneutral isoform; nNBC) and two others that generates the co-influx of 1 molecule of Na+ per 2 molecules of HCO3- (electrogenic isoforms; eNBC). In addition, the eNBC generates an anionic repolarizing current that modulate the cardiac action potential (CAP), adding to such isoforms the relevance to modulate the electrophysiological function of the heart. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is one of the main hormones that regulate cardiac physiology. The alkalinizing mechanisms (NHE and NBC) are stimulated by Ang II, increasing pHi and intracellular Na+ concentration, which indirectly, due to the stimulation of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) operating in the reverse form, leads to an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Interestingly, it has been shown that Ang II exhibits an opposite effect on NBC isoforms: it activates the nNBC and inhibits the eNBC. This inhibition generates a CAP prolongation, which could directly increase the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. The regulation of the intracellular Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations is crucial for the cardiac cellular physiology, but these ions are also involved in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and the damage produced by ischemia-reperfusion, suggesting a potential role of NBC in cardiac diseases. PMID:23116057

  18. Enhanced cardioprotective effects mediated by plasmid containing the short-hairpin RNA of angiotensin converting enzyme with a biodegradable hydrogel after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wei-Guo; Jiang, Xue-Jun; Li, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Cui; Yi, Xin; Ren, Shan; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2014-10-01

    The expression of foreign gene was enhanced and prolonged by sustained releasing a target gene to cells from biodegradable dextran-poly(e-caprolactone)-2-hydroxylethylmethacrylate-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (Dex-PCL-HEMA/PNIPAAm) hydrogel in vitro. Moreover, we have demonstrated that injection of the same hydrogel improved post-infarct ventricular remodeling. Therefore, we hypothesized that intramyocardial injection of plasmid containing the short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) with the same hydrogel enhances the cardioprotective effects superior to either alone or after rat myocardial infarction (MI). In this study, equal volume of phosphate-buffered solution (PBS), 10 μg ACE-shRNA plasmids, hydrogel containing 10 μg negative control ACE-shRNA plasmids and hydrogel containing 10 μg ACE-shRNA plasmids were shortly injected into the infarct area of rats after MI, respectively. We found that ACE-shRNA plasmid-loaded hydrogel extended the duration of gene expression in vivo. Moreover, it was shown that direct intramyocardial injection of ACE-shRNA plasmid-loaded hydrogel significantly decreased the expression of local ACE expression, inhibited cell apoptosis, reduced infarct size, and improved cardiac function compared with the injection of either alone 30 days after MI in rats. These results suggest that injection of ACE-shRNA plasmid-loaded hydrogel into impaired myocardium obtains more cardioprotective effects than either alone in rat with MI by prolonging the gene silencing of ACE. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 102A: 3452-3458, 2014.

  19. The Relationship between Angiotensin-II Type 1 Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Repolarization Parameters after a First Anterior Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Unal; Nergiz, Sebnem; Karahan, M. Zulkif

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Genetic influence on T-wave peak to End (Tpe) time in patients with a first anterior acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is uncertain. A polymorphism in the angiotensin-II type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene was discovered recently. The polymorphism consists of an A or C variant, given three different possible genotypes: AA, AC, CC. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of polymorphism of the AT1R gene polymorphism on Tpe after a first anterior AMI. Subjects and Methods The subjects were 142 patients (110 men, 32 women, 58±13 years) with a first anterior AMI; ten patients were excluded from this study. Based on the polymorphism of the AT1R gene, they were classified into two groups: Group 1 (AA genotype) of 91 patients and group 2 (AC and CC genotype) of 41 patients. A 12-lead resting ECG was recorded at admission to the coronary care unit in patients with anterior AMI and were manually measured with a ruler. QTc, QTd, QTcd, Tpe, Tpe/QT parameters were measured. Results There was no significant difference in the baseline characteristics of patients (p>0.05). We found significant reduction in QTc, QTd, QTcd, Tpe, Tpe/QT indices Group 1 (AA genotype) (mean 66±28 ms) than group 2 (AC and CC genotype) (mean 95±34 ms) (p<0.05). Conclusion In patients with a first anterior AMI, AT1R gene polymorphisms may influence on repolarization parameters. Although further studies are required. PMID:27826337

  20. Troglitazone stimulates {beta}-arrestin-dependent cardiomyocyte contractility via the angiotensin II type 1{sub A} receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Tilley, Douglas G.; Nguyen, Anny D.; Rockman, Howard A.

    2010-06-11

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) agonists are commonly used to treat cardiovascular diseases, and are reported to have several effects on cardiovascular function that may be due to PPAR{gamma}-independent signaling events. Select angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) interact with and modulate PPAR{gamma} activity, thus we hypothesized that a PPAR{gamma} agonist may exert physiologic effects via the angiotensin II type 1{sub A} receptor (AT1{sub A}R). In AT1{sub A}R-overexpressing HEK 293 cells, both angiotensin II (Ang II) and the PPAR{gamma} agonist troglitazone (Trog) enhanced AT1{sub A}R internalization and recruitment of endogenous {beta}-arrestin1/2 ({beta}arr1/2) to the AT1{sub A}R. A fluorescence assay to measure diacylglycerol (DAG) accumulation showed that although Ang II induced AT1{sub A}R-G{sub q} protein-mediated DAG accumulation, Trog had no impact on DAG generation. Trog-mediated recruitment of {beta}arr1/2 was selective to AT1{sub A}R as the response was prevented by an ARB- and Trog-mediated {beta}arr1/2 recruitment to {beta}1-adrenergic receptor ({beta}1AR) was not observed. In isolated mouse cardiomyocytes, Trog increased both % and rate of cell shortening to a similar extent as Ang II, effects which were blocked with an ARB. Additionally, these effects were found to be {beta}arr2-dependent, as cardiomyocytes isolated from {beta}arr2-KO mice showed blunted contractile responses to Trog. These findings show for the first time that the PPAR{gamma} agonist Trog acts at the AT1{sub A}R to simultaneously block G{sub q} protein activation and induce the recruitment of {beta}arr1/2, which leads to an increase in cardiomyocyte contractility.

  1. (Pro)renin receptor mediates both angiotensin II-dependent and -independent oxidative stress in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hua; Li, Wencheng; Seth, Dale M; Nair, Anand R; Francis, Joseph; Feng, Yumei

    2013-01-01

    The binding of renin or prorenin to the (pro)renin receptor (PRR) promotes angiotensin (Ang) II formation and mediates Ang II-independent signaling pathways. In the central nervous system (CNS), Ang II regulates blood pressure via inducing oxidative stress; however, the role of PRR-mediated Ang II-independent signaling pathways in oxidative stress in the CNS remains undefined. To address this question, Neuro-2A cells were infected with control virus or an adeno-associated virus encoding the human PRR. Human PRR over-expression alone increased ROS levels, NADPH oxidase activity, as well as NADPH oxidase (NOX) isoforms 2 and 4 mRNA expression levels and these effects were not blocked by losartan. Moreover, the increase in NOX 2 and NOX 4 mRNA levels, NADPH oxidase activity, and ROS levels induced by PRR over-expression was prevented by mitogen activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (MAPK/ERK1/2) inhibition, and phosphoinositide 3 kinase/Akt (IP3/Akt) inhibition, indicating that PRR regulates NOX activity and ROS formation in neuro-2A cells through Ang II-independent ERK1/2 and IP3/Akt activation. Interestingly, at a concentration of 2 nM or higher, prorenin promoted Ang II formation, and thus further increased the ROS levels in cultured Neuro-2A cells via PRR. In conclusion, human PRR over-expression induced ROS production through both angiotensin II-dependent and -independent mechanisms. We showed that PRR-mediated angiotensin II-independent ROS formation is associated with activation of the MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3/Akt signaling pathways and up-regulation of mRNA level of NOX 2 and NOX4 isoforms in neuronal cells.

  2. Time-dependent expression patterns of cardiac aquaporins following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong Zhe; Kim, Moo Hyun; Lim, Ju Hyun; Bae, Hae-Rahn

    2013-03-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are expressed in myocardium and the implication of AQPs in myocardial water balance has been suggested. We investigated the expression patterns of AQP subtypes in normal myocardium and their changes in the process of edema formation and cardiac dysfunction following myocardial infarction (MI). Immunostaining demonstrated abundant expression of AQP1, AQP4, and AQP6 in normal mouse heart; AQP1 in blood vessels and cardiac myocytes, AQP4 exclusively on the intercalated discs between cardiac myocytes and AQP6 inside the myocytes. However, neither AQP7 nor AQP9 proteins were expressed in CD1 mouse myocardium. Echocardiography revealed that cardiac function was reduced at 1 week and recovered at 4 weeks after MI, whereas myocardial water content determined by wet-to-dry weight ratio increased at 1 week and rather reduced below the normal at 4 weeks. The expression of cardiac AQPs was up-regulated in MI-induced groups compared with sham-operated control group, but their time-dependent patterns were different. The time course of AQP4 expression coincided with that of myocardial edema and cardiac dysfunction following MI. However, expression of both AQP1 and AQP6 increased persistently up to 4 weeks. Our findings suggest a different role for cardiac AQPs in the formation and reabsorption of myocardial edema after MI.

  3. Time-Dependent Expression Patterns of Cardiac Aquaporins Following Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong Zhe; Kim, Moo Hyun; Lim, Ju Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are expressed in myocardium and the implication of AQPs in myocardial water balance has been suggested. We investigated the expression patterns of AQP subtypes in normal myocardium and their changes in the process of edema formation and cardiac dysfunction following myocardial infarction (MI). Immunostaining demonstrated abundant expression of AQP1, AQP4, and AQP6 in normal mouse heart; AQP1 in blood vessels and cardiac myocytes, AQP4 exclusively on the intercalated discs between cardiac myocytes and AQP6 inside the myocytes. However, neither AQP7 nor AQP9 proteins were expressed in CD1 mouse myocardium. Echocardiography revealed that cardiac function was reduced at 1 week and recovered at 4 weeks after MI, whereas myocardial water content determined by wet-to-dry weight ratio increased at 1 week and rather reduced below the normal at 4 weeks. The expression of cardiac AQPs was up-regulated in MI-induced groups compared with sham-operated control group, but their time-dependent patterns were different. The time course of AQP4 expression coincided with that of myocardial edema and cardiac dysfunction following MI. However, expression of both AQP1 and AQP6 increased persistently up to 4 weeks. Our findings suggest a different role for cardiac AQPs in the formation and reabsorption of myocardial edema after MI. PMID:23487012

  4. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor-Dependent GLP-1 and PYY Secretion in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Ramona; Rievaj, Juraj; Larraufie, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the key hormone mediator of the renin angiotensin system, which regulates blood pressure and fluid and electrolyte balance in the body. Here we report that in the colonic epithelium, the Ang II type 1 receptor is highly and exclusively expressed in enteroendocrine L cells, which produce the gut hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY (PYY). Ang II stimulated glucagon-like peptide-1 and PYY release from primary cultures of mouse and human colon, which was antagonized by the specific Ang II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan. Ang II raised intracellular calcium levels in L cells in primary cultures, recorded by live-cell imaging of L cells specifically expressing the fluorescent calcium sensor GCaMP3. In Ussing chamber recordings, Ang II reduced short circuit currents in mouse distal colon preparations, which was antagonized by candesartan or a specific neuropeptide Y1 receptor inhibitor but insensitive to amiloride. We conclude that Ang II stimulates PYY secretion, in turn inhibiting epithelial anion fluxes, thereby reducing net fluid secretion into the colonic lumen. Our findings highlight an important role of colonic L cells in whole-body fluid homeostasis by controlling water loss through the intestine. PMID:27447725

  5. ANGIOTENSIN-DEPENDENT AUTONOMIC DYSREGULATION PRECEDES DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY IN A MOUSE MODEL OF MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Weiss, Robert M.; Zimmerman, Kathy; Domenig, Oliver; Cicha, Michael Z.; Chapleau, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoglycan mutations cause muscular dystrophy. Patients with muscular dystrophy develop autonomic dysregulation and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), but the temporal relationship and mechanism of autonomic dysregulation are not well understood. We hypothesized that activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) causes autonomic dysregulation prior to development of DCM in sarcoglycan-delta (Sgcd) deficient mice, and that the severity of autonomic dysfunction at a young age predicts the severity of DCM at older ages. At 10-12 weeks of age, when left ventricular function assessed by echocardiography remained normal, Sgcd−/− mice exhibited decreases in arterial pressure, locomotor activity, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and cardiovagal tone, and increased sympathetic tone compared with age-matched C57BL/6 control mice (P<0.05). Systemic and skeletal muscle RAS were activated, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) expression, superoxide and fibrosis were increased in dystrophic skeletal muscle (P<0.05). Treatment with the AT1R blocker losartan for 7-9 weeks beginning at 3 weeks of age prevented or strongly attenuated the abnormalities in Sgcd−/− mice (P<0.05). Repeated assessment of phenotypes between 10 and 75 weeks of age demonstrated worsening of autonomic function, progressive cardiac dysfunction and DCM, and increased mortality in Sgcd−/− mice. High sympathetic tone predicted subsequent left ventricular dysfunction. We conclude that RAS activation causes severe autonomic dysregulation in young Sgcd−/− mice, which portends a worse long-term prognosis. Therapeutic targeting of RAS at a young age may improve autonomic function and slow disease progression in muscular dystrophy. PMID:25921929

  6. Sex-specific T-cell regulation of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Zheng, Wei; Li, Xiangjun; Liu, Jun; Wu, Xie; Zhang, Monan Angela; Umans, Jason G; Hay, Meredith; Speth, Robert C; Dunn, Shannon E; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2014-09-01

    Studies suggest T cells modulate arterial pressure. Because robust sex differences exist in the immune system and in hypertension, we investigated sex differences in T-cell modulation of angiotensin II-induced increases in mean arterial pressure in male (M) and female (F) wild-type and recombination-activating-gene-1-deficient (Rag1(-/-)) mice. Sex differences in peak mean arterial pressure in wild-type were lost in Rag1(-/-) mice (mm Hg: wild-type-F, 136±4.9 versus wild-type-M, 153±1.7; P<0.02; Rag1(-/-)-F, 135±2.1 versus Rag1(-/-)-M, 141±3.8). Peak mean arterial pressure was 13 mm Hg higher after adoptive transfer of male (CD3(M)→Rag1(-/-)-M) versus female (CD3(F)→Rag1(-/-)-M) T cells. CD3(M)→Rag1(-/-)-M mice exhibited higher splenic frequencies of proinflammatory interleukin-17A (2.4-fold) and tumor necrosis factor-α (2.2-fold)-producing T cells and lower plasma levels (13-fold) and renal mRNA expression (2.4-fold) of interleukin-10, whereas CD3(F)→Rag1(-/-)-M mice displayed a higher activation state in general and T-helper-1-biased renal inflammation. Greater T-cell infiltration into perivascular adipose tissue and kidney associated with increased pressor responses to angiotensin II if the T cell donor was male but not female and these sex differences in T-cell subset expansion and tissue infiltration were maintained for 7 to 8 weeks within the male host. Thus, the adaptive immune response and role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine signaling in hypertension are distinct between the sexes and need to be understood to improve therapeutics for hypertension-associated disease in both men and women.

  7. Identification of a PKCepsilon-dependent regulation of myocardial contraction by epicatechin-3-gallate.

    PubMed

    Li, Daxiang; Yang, Changjun; Chen, Ying; Tian, Jiang; Liu, Lijun; Dai, Qiuping; Wan, Xiaochun; Xie, Zijian

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the effects of tea catechins and tea theaflavins on myocardial contraction were examined in isolated rat hearts using a Langendorff-perfusion system. We found that both tea catechins and theaflavins had positive inotropic effects on the myocardium. Of the tested chemicals, epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG) and theaflavin-3,3'-digallate (TF(4)) appear to be the most effective tea catechin and theaflavin, respectively. Further studies of ECG-induced positive inotropy revealed the following insights. First, unlike digitalis drugs, ECG had no effect on intracellular Ca(2+) level in cultured adult cardiac myocytes. Second, it activated PKCepsilon, but not PKCalpha, in the isolated hearts as well as in cultured cells. Neither a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor (U73122) nor the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) affected the ECG-induced activation of PKCepsilon. Third, inhibition of PKCepsilon by either chelerythrine chloride (CHE) or PKCepsilon translocation inhibitor peptide (TIP) caused a partial reduction of ECG-induced increases in myocardial contraction. Moreover, NAC was also effective in reducing the effects of ECG on myocardial contraction. Finally, pretreatment of the heart with both CHE and NAC completely abolished ECG-induced inotropic effects on the heart. Together, these findings indicate that ECG can regulate myocardial contractility via a novel PKCepsilon-dependent signaling pathway.

  8. Efficacy of Zofenopril Compared With Placebo and Other Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitors in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction and Previous Cardiovascular Risk Factors: A Pooled Individual Data Analysis of 4 Randomized, Double-blind, Controlled, Prospective Studies

    PubMed Central

    Omboni, Stefano; Reggiardo, Giorgio; Bacchelli, Stefano; Degli Esposti, Daniela; Ambrosioni, Ettore

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: In the Survival of Myocardial Infarction Long-term Evaluation (SMILE) 1, 3, and 4 studies, early administration of zofenopril in acute myocardial infarction showed to be prognostically beneficial versus placebo or ramipril. The SMILE-2 showed that both zofenopril and lisinopril are safe and showed no significant differences in the incidence of major cardiovascular (CV) complications. In this pooled analysis of individual data of the SMILE studies, we evaluated whether the superior efficacy of zofenopril is maintained also in patients with ≥1 CV risk factor (CV+, n = 2962) as compared to CV− (n = 668). The primary study end point was set to 1-year combined occurrence of death or hospitalization for CV causes. The risk of CV events was significantly reduced with zofenopril versus placebo either in the CV+ (−37%; hazard ratio: 0.63; 95% confidence interval: 0.51–0.78; P = 0.0001) or in the CV− group (−55%; hazard ratio: 0.45; 0.26–0.78; P = 0.004). Also, the other angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors reduced the risk of major CV outcomes, though the reduction was not statistically significant versus placebo (CV+: 0.78; 0.58–1.05; P = 0.107; CV−: 0.71; 0.36–1.41; P = 0.334). The benefit was larger in patients treated with zofenopril than other angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, with a statistically significant difference for CV+ (0.79; 0.63–0.99; P = 0.039) versus CV− (0.62; 0.37–1.06; P = 0.081). In conclusion, zofenopril administered to patients after acute myocardial infarction has a positive impact on prognosis, regardless of the patient's CV risk profile. PMID:27798417

  9. Angiotensin II–dependent TGF-β signaling contributes to Loeys-Dietz syndrome vascular pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Elena M.; Loch, David C.; Habashi, Jennifer P.; Calderon, Juan F.; Chen, Yichun; Bedja, Djahida; van Erp, Christel; Gerber, Elizabeth E.; Parker, Sarah J.; Sauls, Kimberly; Judge, Daniel P.; Cooke, Sara K.; Lindsay, Mark E.; Rouf, Rosanne; Myers, Loretha; ap Rhys, Colette M.; Kent, Kathleen C.; Norris, Russell A.; Huso, David L.; Dietz, Harry C.

    2013-01-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is a connective tissue disorder that is characterized by a high risk for aneurysm and dissection throughout the arterial tree and phenotypically resembles Marfan syndrome. LDS is caused by heterozygous missense mutations in either TGF-β receptor gene (TGFBR1 or TGFBR2), which are predicted to result in diminished TGF-β signaling; however, aortic surgical samples from patients show evidence of paradoxically increased TGF-β signaling. We generated 2 knockin mouse strains with LDS mutations in either Tgfbr1 or Tgfbr2 and a transgenic mouse overexpressing mutant Tgfbr2. Knockin and transgenic mice, but not haploinsufficient animals, recapitulated the LDS phenotype. While heterozygous mutant cells had diminished signaling in response to exogenous TGF-β in vitro, they maintained normal levels of Smad2 phosphorylation under steady-state culture conditions, suggesting a chronic compensation. Analysis of TGF-β signaling in the aortic wall in vivo revealed progressive upregulation of Smad2 phosphorylation and TGF-β target gene output, which paralleled worsening of aneurysm pathology and coincided with upregulation of TGF-β1 ligand expression. Importantly, suppression of Smad2 phosphorylation and TGF-β1 expression correlated with the therapeutic efficacy of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist losartan. Together, these data suggest that increased TGF-β signaling contributes to postnatal aneurysm progression in LDS. PMID:24355923

  10. LOX-1 dependent overexpression of immunoglobulins in cardiomyocytes in response to angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bum-Yong; Hu, Changping; Prayaga, Sastry; Khaidakov, Magomed; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Seung, Ki-Bae; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2009-02-06

    LOX-1, a cell surface lectin-like receptor, is upregulated by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and angiotensin II (Ang II), and plays an important role in host defense. The specific C-type lectin domain on LOX-1 is essential for ox-LDL binding and internalization, generation of oxidant species and eliciting immune response. Here, we show that LOX-1 deletion alters genes that relate to immune response. Microarray (and qPCR) analysis of cardiac tissues showed downregulated expression of several immunoglobulins (Igk-V8, Igk-C, Igh-6, Igj, Ighg, Igh, and Igl-V1) in the LOX-1 knockout (KO) mice [p<0.05 vs. the wild-type (WT) mice]. The expression of these immunoglobulins was upregulated several-fold in the LOX-1 KO mice hearts when these mice were infused with Ang II (p<0.05, vs. WT mice). Importantly, cultured mouse HL-1 cardiomyocytes expressed these immunoglobulins, and pretreatment of cardiomyocytes with a specific anti-LOX-1 antibody enhanced the generation of immunoglobulins upon subsequent exposure to Ang II. These observations mirrored the data obtained from WT and LOX-1 KO mice hearts in the resting state and following Ang II infusion. This study provides first set of data on immunoglobulin expression in cardiac tissues of WT and LOX-1 KO mice and in cultured HL-1 cardiomyocytes, and demonstrates that LOX-1 inactivation leads to upregulation of immunoglobulins in cardiomyocytes upon challenge with Ang II.

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors in angiotensin-II-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ulu, Arzu; Harris, Todd R; Morisseau, Christophe; Miyabe, Christina; Inoue, Hiromi; Schuster, Gertrud; Dong, Hua; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Liu, Jun-Yan; Weiss, Robert H; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Imig, John D; Hammock, Bruce D

    2013-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory and antihypertensive effects of long-chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) are still unclear. The epoxides of an ω-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid epoxyeicosatrienoic acids also exhibit antihypertensive and anti-inflammatory effects. Thus, we hypothesized that the major ω-3 PUFAs, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may lower the blood pressure and attenuate renal markers of inflammation through their epoxide metabolites. Here, we supplemented mice with an ω-3 rich diet for 3 weeks in a murine model of angiotensin-II-dependent hypertension. Also, because EPA and DHA epoxides are metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), we tested the combination of an sEH inhibitor and the ω-3 rich diet. Our results show that ω-3 rich diet in combination with the sEH inhibitor lowered Ang-II, increased the blood pressure, further increased the renal levels of EPA and DHA epoxides, reduced renal markers of inflammation (ie, prostaglandins and MCP-1), downregulated an epithelial sodium channel, and upregulated angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 message and significantly modulated cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolic pathways. Overall, our findings suggest that epoxides of the ω-3 PUFAs contribute to lowering systolic blood pressure and attenuating inflammation in part by reduced prostaglandins and MCP-1 and by upregulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 in angiotensin-II-dependent hypertension.

  12. Obligatory Role for B Cells in the Development of Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christopher T; Sobey, Christopher G; Lieu, Maggie; Ferens, Dorota; Kett, Michelle M; Diep, Henry; Kim, Hyun Ah; Krishnan, Shalini M; Lewis, Caitlin V; Salimova, Ekaterina; Tipping, Peter; Vinh, Antony; Samuel, Chrishan S; Peter, Karlheinz; Guzik, Tomasz J; Kyaw, Tin S; Toh, Ban-Hock; Bobik, Alexander; Drummond, Grant R

    2015-11-01

    Clinical hypertension is associated with raised serum IgG antibodies. However, whether antibodies are causative agents in hypertension remains unknown. We investigated whether hypertension in mice is associated with B-cell activation and IgG production and moreover whether B-cell/IgG deficiency affords protection against hypertension and vascular remodeling. Angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion (0.7 mg/kg per day; 28 days) was associated with (1) a 25% increase in the proportion of splenic B cells expressing the activation marker CD86, (2) an 80% increase in splenic plasma cell numbers, (3) a 500% increase in circulating IgG, and (4) marked IgG accumulation in the aortic adventitia. In B-cell-activating factor receptor-deficient (BAFF-R(-/-)) mice, which lack mature B cells, there was no evidence of Ang II-induced increases in serum IgG. Furthermore, the hypertensive response to Ang II was attenuated in BAFF-R(-/-) (Δ30±4 mm Hg) relative to wild-type (Δ41±5 mm Hg) mice, and this response was rescued by B-cell transfer. BAFF-R(-/-) mice displayed reduced IgG accumulation in the aorta, which was associated with 80% fewer aortic macrophages and a 70% reduction in transforming growth factor-β expression. BAFF-R(-/-) mice were also protected from Ang II-induced collagen deposition and aortic stiffening (assessed by pulse wave velocity analysis). Finally, like BAFF-R deficiency, pharmacological depletion of B cells with an anti-CD20 antibody attenuated Ang II-induced hypertension by ≈35%. Hence, these studies demonstrate that B cells/IgGs are crucial for the development of Ang II-induced hypertension and vessel remodeling in mice. Thus, B-cell-targeted therapies-currently used for autoimmune diseases-may hold promise as future treatments for hypertension.

  13. Exercise training enhances baroreflex sensitivity by an angiotensin II-dependent mechanism in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Tarek M; Liu, Dongmei; Cornish, Kurtis G; Zucker, Irving H

    2008-03-01

    Exercise training (EX) has become an important modality capable of enhancing the quality of life and survival of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Although 4 wk of EX in animals with CHF evoked a reduction in renal sympathetic nerve activity and ANG II plasma levels and an enhancement in baroreflex sensitivity at rest (Liu JL, Irvine S, Reid IA, Patel KP, Zucker IH, Circulation 102: 1854-1862, 2000; Liu JL, Kulakofsky J, Zucker IH, J Appl Physiol 92: 2403-2408, 2002), it is unclear whether these phenomena are causally related. CHF was induced in rabbits by ventricular pacing (360-380 beats/min) for 3 wk. CHF rabbits were EX for 4 wk at 15-18 m/min, 6 days/wk, 30-40 min/day. Three groups of rabbits were studied: CHF (with no EX), CHF-EX, and CHF-EX + ANG II infusion [in which ANG II levels were kept at or near levels observed in CHF (non-EX) rabbits by subcutaneous osmotic minipump infusion]. EX prevented the increase in plasma ANG II levels shown in CHF rabbits. CHF and CHF-EX + ANG II infusion rabbits had significantly depressed baroreflex sensitivity slopes (P < 0.01 for sodium nitroprusside and P < 0.001 for phenylephrine) and higher baseline renal sympathetic nerve activities than CHF-EX animals. EX downregulated mRNA and protein expression of ANG II type 1 receptors in the rostral ventrolateral medulla in CHF rabbits. This was prevented by ANG II infusion. These data are consistent with the view that the reduction in sympathetic nerve activity and the improvement in baroreflex function in CHF after EX are due to the concomitant reduction in ANG II and angiotensin receptors in the central nervous system.

  14. Myocardial perfusion as assessed by thallium-201 scintigraphy during the discontinuation of mechanical ventilation in ventilator-dependent patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hurford, W.E.; Lynch, K.E.; Strauss, H.W.; Lowenstein, E.; Zapol, W.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Patients who cannot be separated from mechanical ventilation (MV) after an episode of acute respiratory failure often have coexisting coronary artery disease. The authors hypothesized that increased left ventricular (LV) wall stress during periods of spontaneous ventilation (SV) could alter myocardial perfusion in these patients. Using thallium-201 (201TI) myocardial scintigraphy, the authors studied the occurrence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities during periods of SV in 15 MV-dependent patients (nine women, six men; aged 71 {plus minus} 7 yr, mean {plus minus} SD). Fourteen of these patients were studied once with 201TI myocardial scintigraphy during intermittent mechanical ventilation (IMV) and again on another day, after at least 10 min of SV through a T-piece. One patient was studied during SV only. Thirteen of 14 of the patients (93%) studied during MV had abnormal patterns of initial myocardial 201TI uptake, but only 1 patient demonstrated redistribution of 201TI on delayed images. The remainder of the abnormalities observed during MV were fixed defects. SV produced significant alterations of myocardial 201TI distribution or transient LV dilation, or both, in 7 of the 15 patients (47%). Four patients demonstrated new regional decreases of LV myocardial thallium concentration with redistribution of the isotope on delayed images. The patient studied only during SV also had myocardial 201TI defects with redistribution. Five patients (3 also having areas of 201TI redistribution) had transient LV dilation during SV.

  15. Sex-dependent effects of sleep deprivation on myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Krivenko, Anna; Eisenmann, Eric D; Bui, Albert D; Seeley, Sarah L; Fry, Megan E; Johnson, Brandon L; Rorabaugh, Boyd R

    2016-01-01

    Sleep deprivation is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction. However, it is unknown whether the effects of sleep deprivation are limited to increasing the likelihood of experiencing a myocardial infarction or if sleep deprivation also increases the extent of myocardial injury. In this study, rats were deprived of paradoxical sleep for 96 h using the platform-over-water method. Control rats were subjected to the same condition except the control platform was large enough for the rats to sleep. Hearts from sleep deprived and control rats were subjected to 20 min ischemia on a Langendorff isolated heart system. Infarct size and post ischemic recovery of contractile function were unaffected by sleep deprivation in male hearts. In contrast, hearts from sleep-deprived females exhibited significantly larger infarcts than hearts from control females. Post ischemic recovery of rate pressure product and + dP/dT were significantly attenuated by sleep deprivation in female hearts, and post ischemic recovery of end diastolic pressure was significantly elevated in hearts from sleep deprived females compared to control females, indicating that post ischemic recovery of both systolic and diastolic function were worsened by sleep deprivation. These data provide evidence that sleep deprivation increases the extent of ischemia-induced injury in a sex-dependent manner.

  16. 17beta-estradiol deficiency reduces potassium excretion in an angiotensin type 1 receptor-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Zheng, Wei; Falconetti, Celine; Roesch, Darren M; Mulroney, Susan E; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2007-07-01

    This study examined the effects of ovariectomy (OVX) and 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) replacement (OVX + E(2)) on renal function in Sprague-Dawley rats. OVX caused a 40% decrease in the fractional excretion of potassium (FE(K(+))) that was prevented by E(2) replacement [Sham, 24.2 +/- 2.9%; OVX, 14.5 +/- 2.1% (P < 0.05 vs. OVX + E(2)); and OVX + E(2), 26.2 +/- 2.7%; n = 7-11] and that corresponded to significant increases in plasma potassium [(in mmol/l): Sham, 3.15 +/- 0.087; OVX, 3.42 +/- 0.048 (P < 0.05 vs. OVX + E(2)); and OVX + E(2), 3.19 +/- 0.11; n = 7-11]. No effects of OVX were detected on plasma levels of sodium and aldosterone. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) densities in ovariectomized rats were 1.4-fold and 1.3-fold higher in glomerular [maximum binding capacity (B(max); in fmol/mg protein): Sham, 482 +/- 21; OVX, 666 +/- 20 (P < 0.05 vs. OVX + E(2)); and OVX + E(2), 504 +/- 26; n = 7-11] and proximal tubular [B(max) (in fmol/mg protein): Sham, 721 +/- 16; OVX, 741 +/- 24 (P < 0.05 vs. OVX + E(2)); and OVX + E(2), 569 +/- 23; n = 7-11] membranes compared with E(2) replete animals, respectively. Both the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril and the AT(1)R antagonist losartan prevented the OVX-induced decrease in the FE(K(+)) and the increase in renal AT(1)R densities, suggesting that E(2) deficiency reduces potassium excretion in an ANG II/AT(1)R-dependent manner. These findings may have implications for renal function in postmenopausal women as well as contribute to the reasons underlying the age-induced increase in susceptibility to hypertension-associated disease in women.

  17. Leptin Inhibits the Proliferation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Induced by Angiotensin II through Nitric Oxide-Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Amaia; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Catalán, Victoria; Fortuño, Ana; Frühbeck, Gema

    2010-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to investigate whether leptin modifies angiotensin (Ang) II-induced proliferation of aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from 10-week-old male Wistar and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), and the possible role of nitric oxide (NO). Methods. NO and NO synthase (NOS) activity were assessed by the Griess and 3H-arginine/citrulline conversion assays, respectively. Inducible NOS (iNOS) and NADPH oxidase subutnit Nox2 expression was determined by Western-blot. The proliferative responses to Ang II were evaluated through enzymatic methods. Results. Leptin inhibited the Ang II-induced proliferative response of VSMCs from control rats. This inhibitory effect of leptin was abolished by NOS inhibitor, NMMA, and iNOS selective inhibitor, L-NIL, and was not observed in leptin receptor-deficient fa/fa rats. SHR showed increased serum leptin concentrations and lipid peroxidation. Despite a similar leptin-induced iNOS up-regulation, VSMCs from SHR showed an impaired NOS activity and NO production induced by leptin, and an increased basal Nox2 expression. The inhibitory effect of leptin on Ang II-induced VSMC proliferation was attenuated. Conclusion. Leptin blocks the proliferative response to Ang II through NO-dependent mechanisms. The attenuation of this inhibitory effect of leptin in spontaneous hypertension appears to be due to a reduced NO bioavailability in VSMCs. PMID:20592755

  18. Replication-dependent downregulation of cellular angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 protein expression by human coronavirus NL63.

    PubMed

    Dijkman, Ronald; Jebbink, Maarten F; Deijs, Martin; Milewska, Aleksandra; Pyrc, Krzysztof; Buelow, Elena; van der Bijl, Anna; van der Hoek, Lia

    2012-09-01

    Like severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), human coronavirus (HCoV)-NL63 employs angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as a receptor for cellular entry. SARS-CoV infection causes robust downregulation of cellular ACE2 expression levels and it has been suggested that the SARS-CoV effect on ACE2 is involved in the severity of disease. We investigated whether cellular ACE2 downregulation occurs at optimal replication conditions of HCoV-NL63 infection. The expression of the homologue of ACE2, the ACE protein not used as a receptor by HCoV-NL63, was measured as a control. A specific decrease for ACE2 protein level was observed when HCoV-NL63 was cultured at 34 °C. Culturing the virus at the suboptimal temperature of 37 °C resulted in low replication of the virus and the effect on ACE2 expression was lost. We conclude that the decline of ACE2 expression is dependent on the efficiency of HCoV-NL63 replication, and that HCoV-NL63 and SARS-CoV both affect cellular ACE2 expression during infection.

  19. Angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro is TAK1-dependent and Smad2/3-independent.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Sarah J; Borthwick, Gillian M; Oakenfull, Rachael; Robson, Andrew; Arthur, Helen M

    2012-04-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy occurs as an adaptation to hypertension but a sustained hypertrophic response can ultimately lead to heart failure. Angiotensin-II (Ang II) is released following hemodynamic overload and stimulates a cardiac hypertrophic response. AngII also increases expression of the regulatory cytokine, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1), which is also implicated in the cardiac hypertrophic response and can stimulate activation of Smad2/3 as well as TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) signaling mediators. To better understand the downstream signaling events in cardiac hypertrophy, we therefore investigated activation of Smad2/3 and TAK1 signaling pathways in response to Ang II and TGFβ1 using primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes to model cardiac hypertrophic responses. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of Smad 2/3 or TAK1 protein or addition of the TGFβ type I receptor inhibitor, SB431542, were used to investigate the role of downstream mediators of TGFβ signaling in the hypertrophic response. Our data revealed that TGFβ1 stimulation leads to cardiomyocyte hypertrophic phenotypes that were indistinguishable from those occurring in response to Ang II. In addition, inhibition of the TGFβ1 type receptor abolished Ang II-induced hypertrophic changes. Furthermore, the hypertrophic response was also prevented following siRNA knockdown of TAK1 protein, but was unaffected by knockdown of Smad2/3 proteins. We conclude that Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro occurs in a TAK1-dependent, but Smad-independent, manner.

  20. Targeting cardiac mast cells: pharmacological modulation of the local renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Reid, Alicia C; Brazin, Jacqueline A; Morrey, Christopher; Silver, Randi B; Levi, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    Enhanced production of angiotensin II and excessive release of norepinephrine in the ischemic heart are major causes of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Mast cell-dependent mechanisms are pivotal in the local formation of angiotensin II and modulation of norepinephrine release in cardiac pathophysiology. Cardiac mast cells increase in number in myocardial ischemia and are located in close proximity to sympathetic neurons expressing angiotensin AT1- and histamine H3-receptors. Once activated, cardiac mast cells release a host of potent pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines, chemokines, preformed mediators (e.g., histamine) and proteases (e.g., renin). In myocardial ischemia, angiotensin II (formed locally from mast cell-derived renin) and histamine (also released from local mast cells) respectively activate AT1- and H3-receptors on sympathetic nerve endings. Stimulation of angiotensin AT1-receptors is arrhythmogenic whereas H3-receptor activation is cardioprotective. It is likely that in ischemia/reperfusion the balance may be tipped toward the deleterious effects of mast cell renin, as demonstrated in mast cell-deficient mice, lacking mast cell renin and histamine in the heart. In these mice, no ventricular fibrillation occurs at reperfusion following ischemia, as opposed to wild-type hearts which all fibrillate. Preventing mast cell degranulation in the heart and inhibiting the activation of a local renin-angiotensin system, hence abolishing its detrimental effects on cardiac rhythmicity, appears to be more significant than the loss of histamine-induced cardioprotection. This suggests that therapeutic targets in the treatment of myocardial ischemia, and potentially congestive heart failure and hypertension, should include prevention of mast cell degranulation, mast cell renin inhibition, local ACE inhibition, ANG II antagonism and H3-receptor activation.

  1. Effect of angiotensin II-induced arterial hypertension on the voltage-dependent contractions of mouse arteries.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Paul; Van Hove, Cor E; Leloup, Arthur J A; Schrijvers, Dorien M; De Meyer, Guido R Y; De Keulenaer, Gilles W

    2016-02-01

    Arterial hypertension (AHT) affects the voltage dependency of L-type Ca(2+) channels in cardiomyocytes. We analyzed the effect of angiotensin II (AngII)-induced AHT on L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated isometric contractions in conduit arteries. AHT was induced in C57Bl6 mice with AngII-filled osmotic mini-pumps (4 weeks). Normotensive mice treated with saline-filled osmotic mini-pumps were used for comparison. Voltage-dependent contractions mediated by L-type Ca(2+) channels were studied in vaso-reactive studies in vitro in isolated aortic and femoral arteries by using extracellular K(+) concentration-response (KDR) experiments. In aortic segments, AngII-induced AHT significantly sensitized isometric contractions induced by elevated extracellular K(+) and depolarization. This sensitization was partly prevented by normalizing blood pressure with hydralazine, suggesting that it was caused by AHT rather than by direct AngII effects on aortic smooth muscle cells. The EC50 for extracellular K(+) obtained in vitro correlated significantly with the rise in arterial blood pressure induced by AngII in vivo. The AHT-induced sensitization persisted when aortic segments were exposed to levcromakalim or to inhibitors of basal nitric oxide release. Consistent with these observations, AngII-treatment also sensitized the vaso-relaxing effects of the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker diltiazem during K(+)-induced contractions. Unlike aorta, AngII-treatment desensitized the isometric contractions to depolarization in femoral arteries pointing to vascular bed specific responses of arteries to hypertension. AHT affects the voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated contraction of conduit arteries. This effect may contribute to the decreased vascular compliance in AHT and explain the efficacy of Ca(2+) channel blockers to reduce vascular stiffness and central blood pressure in AHT.

  2. Dietary peptides from the non-digestible fraction of Phaseolus vulgaris L. decrease angiotensin II-dependent proliferation in HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells through the blockade of the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vital, Diego A; Liang, Katie; González de Mejía, Elvira; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2016-05-18

    This study aimed to determine the ability of peptides present in the non-digestible fraction (NDF) of common beans to decrease angiotensin II (AngII) through the blockade of RAS and its effect on the proliferation of HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells. Pure synthesized peptides GLTSK and GEGSGA and the peptide fractions (PF) of cultivars Azufrado Higuera and Bayo Madero were used. The cells were pretreated with pure peptides, PF or AGT at their IC50 or IC25 values, in comparison with the simultaneous treatment of peptides and AGT. For western blot and microscopy analysis, 100 μM and 0.5 mg mL(-1) were used for pure peptides and PF treatments, respectively. According to the ELISA tests, GLTSK and GEGSGA decreased (p < 0.05) the conversion rate of AGT to angiotensin I (AngI) by 38 and 28%, respectively. All the peptides tested reduced (p < 0.05) the conversion rate of AngI to AngII from 38 to 50%. When the cells were pretreated with both pure peptides and PF before exposure to AGT, the effectiveness inhibiting cell proliferation was higher than the simultaneous treatment suggesting their preventive effects. GLTSK and GEGSGA interacted with the catalytic site of renin, the angiotensin-I converting enzyme, and the AngII receptor, mainly through hydrogen bonds, polar, hydrophobic and cation-π interactions according to molecular docking. Through confocal microscopy, it was determined that GLTSK and GEGSGA caused the decrease (p < 0.05) of AngII-dependent STAT3 nuclear activation in HCT116 cells by 66 and 23%, respectively. The results suggest that peptides present in the common bean NDF could potentially ameliorate the effects of RAS overexpression in colorectal cancer.

  3. Low-Salt Diet and Circadian Dysfunction Synergize to Induce Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension in Mice.

    PubMed

    Pati, Paramita; Fulton, David J R; Bagi, Zsolt; Chen, Feng; Wang, Yusi; Kitchens, Julia; Cassis, Lisa A; Stepp, David W; Rudic, R Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Blood pressure exhibits a robust circadian rhythm in health. In hypertension, sleep apnea, and even shift work, this balanced rhythm is perturbed via elevations in night-time blood pressure, inflicting silent damage to the vasculature and body organs. Herein, we examined the influence of circadian dysfunction during experimental hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry to measure ambulatory blood pressure and activity, the effects of angiotensin II administration were studied in wild-type (WT) and period isoform knockout (KO) mice (Per2-KO, Per2, 3-KO, and Per1, 2, 3-KO/Per triple KO [TKO] mice). On a normal diet, administration of angiotensin II caused nondipping blood pressure and exacerbated vascular hypertrophy in the Period isoform KO mice relative to WT mice. To study the endogenous effects of angiotensin II stimulation, we then administered a low-salt diet to the mice, which does stimulate endogenous angiotensin II in addition to lowering blood pressure. A low-salt diet decreased blood pressure in wild-type mice. In contrast, Period isoform KO mice lost their circadian rhythm in blood pressure on a low-salt diet, because of an increase in resting blood pressure, which was restorable to rhythmicity by the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan. Chronic administration of low salt caused vascular hypertrophy in Period isoform KO mice, which also exhibited increased renin levels and altered angiotensin 1 receptor expression. These data suggest that circadian clock genes may act to inhibit or control renin/angiotensin signaling. Moreover, circadian disorders such as sleep apnea and shift work may alter the homeostatic responses to sodium restriction to potentially influence nocturnal hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Disparate responses of tumour vessels to angiotensin II: tumour volume-dependent effects on perfusion and oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Thews, O; Kelleher, D K; Vaupel, P

    2000-01-01

    Perfusion and oxygenation of experimental tumours were studied during angiotensin II (AT II) administration whereby the rate of the continuous AT II infusion was chosen to increase the mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) by 50–70 mmHg. In subcutaneous DS- sarcomas the red blood cell (RBC) flux was assessed using the laser Doppler technique and the mean tumour oxygen partial pressure (p O 2) was measured polarographically using O 2-sensitive catheter and needle electrodes. Changes in RBC flux with increasing MABP depended mainly on tumour size. In small tumours, RBC flux decreased with rising MABP whereas in larger tumours RBC flux increased parallel to the MABP. As a result of these volume-dependent effects on tumour blood flow, the impact of AT II on tumour p O 2 was also mainly tumour volume-related. In small tumours oxygenation decreased with increasing MABP during AT II infusion, whereas in large tumours a positive relationship between blood pressure and O 2 status was found. This disparate behaviour might be the result of the co-existence of two functionally distinct populations of tumour vessels. In small tumours, perfusion decreases presumably due to vasoconstriction of pre-existing host vessels feeding the tumour. In larger malignancies, newly formed tumour vessels predominate and seem not to have this vasoresponsive capability (lack of smooth muscle cells and/or AT receptors), resulting in an improvement of perfusion which is not tumour-related per se, but is due to the increased perfusion pressure. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10901375

  5. Mechanisms of angiotensin II stimulation of NCC are time-dependent in mDCT15 cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Benjamin; Mistry, Abinash; Hanson, Lauren; Mallick, Rickta; Hoover, Robert S

    2015-04-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) increases thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC) activity both acutely and chronically. ANG II has been implicated as a switch that turns WNK4 from an inhibitor of NCC into an activator of NCC, and ANG II's effect on NCC appears to require WNK4. Chronically, ANG II stimulation of NCC results in an increase in total and phosphorylated NCC, but the role of NCC phosphorylation in acute ANG II actions is unclear. Here, using a mammalian cell model with robust native NCC activity, we corroborate the role that ANG II plays in WNK4 regulation and clarify the role of Ste20-related proline alanine-rich kinase (SPAK)-induced NCC phosphorylation in ANG II action. ANG II was noted to have a biphasic effect on NCC, with a peak increase in NCC activity in the physiologic range of 10(-11) M ANG II. This effect was apparent as early as 15 min and remained sustained through 120 min. These changes correlated with significant increases in NCC surface protein expression. Knockdown of WNK4 expression sharply attenuated the effect of ANG II. SPAK knockdown did not affect ANG II action at early time points (15 and 30 min), but it did attenuate the response at 60 min. Correspondingly, NCC phosphorylation did not increase at 15 or 30 min, but increased significantly at 60 min. We therefore conclude that within minutes of an increase in ANG II, NCC is rapidly trafficked to the cell surface in a phosphorylation-independent but WNK4-dependent manner. Then, after 60 min, ANG II induces SPAK-dependent phosphorylation of NCC.

  6. Mechanisms of angiotensin II stimulation of NCC are time-dependent in mDCT15 cells

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Abinash; Hanson, Lauren; Mallick, Rickta; Hoover, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) increases thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC) activity both acutely and chronically. ANG II has been implicated as a switch that turns WNK4 from an inhibitor of NCC into an activator of NCC, and ANG II's effect on NCC appears to require WNK4. Chronically, ANG II stimulation of NCC results in an increase in total and phosphorylated NCC, but the role of NCC phosphorylation in acute ANG II actions is unclear. Here, using a mammalian cell model with robust native NCC activity, we corroborate the role that ANG II plays in WNK4 regulation and clarify the role of Ste20-related proline alanine-rich kinase (SPAK)-induced NCC phosphorylation in ANG II action. ANG II was noted to have a biphasic effect on NCC, with a peak increase in NCC activity in the physiologic range of 10−11 M ANG II. This effect was apparent as early as 15 min and remained sustained through 120 min. These changes correlated with significant increases in NCC surface protein expression. Knockdown of WNK4 expression sharply attenuated the effect of ANG II. SPAK knockdown did not affect ANG II action at early time points (15 and 30 min), but it did attenuate the response at 60 min. Correspondingly, NCC phosphorylation did not increase at 15 or 30 min, but increased significantly at 60 min. We therefore conclude that within minutes of an increase in ANG II, NCC is rapidly trafficked to the cell surface in a phosphorylation-independent but WNK4-dependent manner. Then, after 60 min, ANG II induces SPAK-dependent phosphorylation of NCC. PMID:25651566

  7. Angiotensin II increases fibronectin and collagen I through the β-catenin-dependent signaling in mouse collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Catherina A; Gonzalez, Alexis A; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Vio, Carlos P; Prieto, Minolfa C

    2015-02-15

    The contribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) to renal and tubular fibrosis has been widely reported. Recent studies have shown that collecting duct cells can undergo mesenchymal transition suggesting that collecting duct cells are involved in interstitial fibrosis. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays an essential role in development, organogenesis, and tissue homeostasis; however, the dysregulation of this pathway has been linked to fibrosis. In this study, we investigated whether AT1 receptor activation induces the expression of fibronectin and collagen I via the β-catenin pathway in mouse collecting duct cell line M-1. ANG II (10(-7) M) treatment in M-1 cells increased mRNA, protein levels of fibronectin and collagen I, the β-catenin target genes (cyclin D1 and c-myc), and the myofibroblast phenotype. These effects were prevented by candesartan, an AT1 receptor blocker. Inhibition of the β-catenin degradation with pyrvinium pamoate (pyr; 10(-9) M) prevented the ANG II-induced expression of fibronectin, collagen I, and β-catenin target genes. ANG II treatment promoted the accumulation of β-catenin protein in a time-dependent manner. Because phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibits β-catenin degradation, we further evaluated the effects of ANG II and ANG II plus pyr on p-ser9-GSK-3β levels. ANG II-dependent upregulation of β-catenin protein levels was correlated with GSK-3β phosphorylation. These effects were prevented by pyr. Our data indicate that in M-1 collecting duct cells, the β-catenin pathway mediates the stimulation of fibronectin and collagen I in response to AT1 receptor activation.

  8. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors in Angiotensin-II Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ulu, Arzu; Harris, Todd R; Morisseau, Christophe; Miyabe, Christina; Inoue, Hiromi; Schuster, Gertrud; Dong, Hua; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Liu, Jun-Yan; Weiss, Robert H; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Imig, John D; Hammock, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory and anti-hypertensive effects of long chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are still unclear. The epoxides of an ω-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid (epoxyeicosatrienoic acids; EETs) also exhibit anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory effects. Thus, we hypothesized that the major ω-3 PUFAs including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may lower blood pressure and attenuate renal markers of inflammation through their epoxide metabolites. Here, we supplemented mice with an ω-3 rich diet for three weeks in a murine model of angiotensin-II dependent hypertension. Also, since EPA and DHA epoxides are metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), we tested the combination of a sEH inhibitor and the ω-3 rich diet. Our results show that ω-3 rich diet in combination with the sEH inhibitor lowered Ang-II increased blood pressure, further increased renal levels of EPA and DHA epoxides, reduced renal markers of inflammation (i.e. prostaglandins and MCP-1), down-regulated an epithelial sodium channel and up-regulated Angiotensin converting enzyme-2 message (ACE-2) and significantly modulated cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolic pathways. Overall, our findings suggest that epoxides of the ω-3 PUFAs contribute to lowering SBP and attenuating inflammation in part by reduced prostaglandins and MCP-1 and by up-regulation of ACE-2 in angiotensin-II dependent hypertension. PMID:23676336

  9. Calcium-dependent inhibition of adrenal TREK-1 channels by angiotensin II and ionomycin.

    PubMed

    Enyeart, John J; Liu, Haiyan; Enyeart, Judith A

    2011-09-01

    Bovine adrenocortical cells express bTREK-1 K(+) (bovine KCNK2) channels that are inhibited by ANG II through a Gq-coupled receptor by separate Ca(2+) and ATP hydrolysis-dependent signaling pathways. Whole cell and single patch clamp recording from adrenal zona fasciculata (AZF) cells were used to characterize Ca(2+)-dependent inhibition of bTREK-1. In whole cell recordings with pipette solutions containing 0.5 mM EGTA and no ATP, the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin (1 μM) produced a transient inhibition of bTREK-1 that reversed spontaneously within minutes. At higher concentrations, ionomycin (5-10 μM) produced a sustained inhibition of bTREK-1 that was reversible upon washing, even in the absence of hydrolyzable [ATP](i). BAPTA was much more effective than EGTA at suppressing bTREK-1 inhibition by ANG II. When intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) was buffered to 20 nM with either 11 mM BAPTA or EGTA, ANG II (10 nM) inhibited bTREK-1 by 12.0 ± 4.5% (n=11) and 59.3 ± 8.4% (n=4), respectively. Inclusion of the water-soluble phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) analog DiC(8)PI(4,5)P(2) in the pipette failed to increase bTREK-1 expression or reduce its inhibition by ANG II. The open probability (P(o)) of unitary bTREK-1 channels recorded from inside-out patches was reduced by Ca(2+) (10-35 μM) in a concentration-dependent manner. These results are consistent with a model in which ANG II inhibits bTREK-1 K(+) channels by a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism that does not require the depletion of membrane-associated PIP(2). They further indicate that the Ca(2+) source is located in close proximity within a "Ca(2+) nanodomain" of bTREK-1 channels, where [Ca(2+)](i) may reach concentrations of >10 μM. bTREK-1 is the first two-pore K(+) channel shown to be inhibited by Ca(2+) through activation of a G protein-coupled receptor.

  10. Familial Analysis of Epistatic and Sex-Dependent Association of Genes of the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System and Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Scurrah, Katrina J; Lamantia, Angela; Ellis, Justine A; Harrap, Stephen B

    2017-06-01

    Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system genes have been inconsistently associated with blood pressure, possibly because of unrecognized influences of sex-dependent genetic effects or gene-gene interactions (epistasis). We tested association of systolic blood pressure with single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at renin (REN), angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1), and aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2), including sex-SNP or SNP-SNP interactions. Eighty-eight tagSNPs were tested in 2872 white individuals in 809 pedigrees from the Victorian Family Heart Study using variance components models. Three SNPs (rs8075924 and rs4277404 at ACE and rs12721297 at AGTR1) were individually associated with lower systolic blood pressure with significant (P<0.00076) effect sizes ≈1.7 to 2.5 mm Hg. Sex-specific associations were seen for 3 SNPs in men (rs2468523 and rs2478544 at AGT and rs11658531 at ACE) and 1 SNP in women (rs12451328 at ACE). SNP-SNP interaction was suggested (P<0.005) for 14 SNP pairs, none of which had shown individual association with systolic blood pressure. Four SNP pairs were at the same gene (2 for REN, 1 for AGT, and 1 for AGTR1). The SNP rs3097 at CYP11B2 was represented in 5 separate pairs. SNPs at key renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system genes associate with systolic blood pressure individually in both sexes, individually in one sex only and only when combined with another SNP. Analyses that incorporate sex-dependent and epistatic effects could reconcile past inconsistencies and account for some of the missing heritability of blood pressure and are generally relevant to SNP association studies for any phenotype. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Actin cytoskeleton-dependent Rab GTPase-regulated angiotensin type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Sun, Yuansheng; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2010-09-01

    The dynamic regulation of the cellular trafficking of human angiotensin (Ang) type 1 receptor (AT1R) is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the cellular trafficking of AT1R-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) (AT1R-EGFP) heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells by determining the change in donor lifetime (AT1R-EGFP) in the presence or absence of acceptor(s) using fluorescence lifetime imaging-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy. The average lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in our donor-alone samples was ~2.33 ns. The basal state lifetime was shortened slightly in the presence of Rab5 (2.01+/-0.10 ns) or Rab7 (2.11+/-0.11 ns) labeled with Alexa 555, as the acceptor fluorophore. A 5-min Ang II treatment markedly shortened the lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in the presence of Rab5-Alexa 555 (1.78+/-0.31 ns) but was affected minimally in the presence of Rab7-Alexa 555 (2.09+/-0.37 ns). A 30-min Ang II treatment further decreased the AT1R-EGFP lifetime in the presence of both Rab5- and Rab7-Alexa 555. Latrunculin A but not nocodazole pretreatment blocked the ability of Ang II to shorten the AT1R-EGFP lifetime. The occurrence of FRET between AT1R-EGFP (donor) and LAMP1-Alexa 555 (acceptor) with Ang II stimulation was impaired by photobleaching the acceptor. These studies demonstrate that Ang II-induced AT1R lysosomal degradation through its association with LAMP1 is regulated by Rab5/7 via mechanisms that are dependent on intact actin cytoskeletons.

  12. Angiotensin II induces the expression of c-reactive protein via MAPK-dependent signal pathway in U937 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Liu, Juntian; Han, Chunjie; Wang, Bin; Pang, Xiaoming; Mao, Junjun

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease in the vessel wall. As an inflammatory molecule, C-reactive protein (CRP) participates in all stages of atherosclerotic process. Although angiotensin II (Ang II) can stimulate the vascular cells to produce CRP, it is unknown whether Ang II induces CRP expression in macrophages. The present study was to observe effect of Ang II on CRP production and the related signal pathway in U937 macrophages so as to provide more evidence for the proinflammatory action of Ang II. The results showed that Ang II significantly increased mRNA and protein expression of CRP in U937 macrophages in time- and concentration-dependent manners. AT(1) receptor blocker losartan blocked Ang II -induced CRP expression in mRNA and protein levels in U937 macrophages. Losartan and complex II inhibitor TIFA decreased Ang II -stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and antioxidant NAC completely abolished Ang II -induced CRP expression in U937 macrophages. The further study indicated that losartan, NAC, MEK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 obviously inhibited ERK1/2 and p38MAPK phosphorylation, and PD98059, SB203580 and NF-κB inhibitor PDTC reduced Ang II -induced mRNA and protein expression of CRP in U937 macrophages. These demonstrate that Ang II is capable of inducing CRP generation in macrophages via AT(1)-ROS-ERK1/2/p38MAPK-NF-κB signal pathway, which contributes to better understanding of the proinflammatory and proatherosclerotic actions of Ang II.

  13. Advances in angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs).

    PubMed

    Swamy, K M K; Lin, Mei-Jung; Sun, Chung-Ming

    2003-09-01

    Hypertension remains one of the most unmet medical needs of this century. While many drugs are available for treating hypertension, efforts are still insufficient to find potent therapeutic agents since cause for hypertension in all patients is not the same. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) have emerged as an important class of drugs in the treatment of hypertension, congestive heart failure (CHF), protenuric renal disease, myocardial infarction and stroke. This class of drugs blocks the conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II and prevents bradykinin breakdown. However, the lack of specificity of ACEIs leads to the frequent side effects like cough and angio-oedema. Recently developed, specific non-peptide and orally active angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have become the prime therapeutics as they alone or co-administration with ACE inhibitors can control the renin angiotensin disorders. This review explores recent developments in the design, synthesis, and structural modifications of ACE inhibitors as well as angiotensin receptor blockers.

  14. Calpain Inhibition Improves Collateral Dependent Perfusion in a Hypercholesterolemic Swine Model of Chronic Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Sabe, Ashraf A.; Potz, Brittany A.; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y.; Liu, Yuhong; Feng, Jun; Abid, M. Ruhul; Abbott, Jinnette D; Senger, Donald R; Sellke, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Calpain over-expression is implicated in aberrant angiogenesis. We hypothesized that calpain inhibition (CI, MDL28170) would improve collateral perfusion in a swine model with hypercholesterolemia and chronic myocardial ischemia. Methods and Results Yorkshire swine fed a high cholesterol diet for 4 weeks underwent surgical placement of an ameroid constrictor to their left circumflex coronary artery. Three weeks later, animals received either: no drug, high cholesterol control group (HCC; n= 8); low dose CI (0.12 mg/kg; LCI, n= 9); or high dose CI (0.25 mg/kg; HCI, n= 8). The heart was harvested after 5 weeks. There was a trend toward increased right to left collateral vessels on angiography with HCI. Myocardial perfusion in ischemic myocardium significantly improved with HCI at rest and with demand pacing (p = 0.016 and 0.011). Endothelium-dependent microvessel relaxation was significantly improved with LCI (p = 0.001). There was a significant increase in capillary density, with LCI and HCI (p= 0.01 and 0.01), and arteriolar density with LCI (p= 0.001). CI significantly increased several proangiogenic proteins including VEGF (p= 0.02), VEGFR1 (p= 0.003), VEGFR2 (p= 0.003) and talin, a microvascular structural protein (p= 0.0002). There was a slight increase in proteins implicated in endothelial-dependent (NO Mediated) relaxation including ERK, p-ERK and iNOS with CI. Conclusions In the setting of hypercholesterolemia, CI improved perfusion, with a trend toward increased collateralization on angiography and increased capillary and arteriolar densities in ischemic myocardium. CI also improved endothelium-dependent microvessel relaxation and increased expression of proteins implicated in angiogenesis and vasodilatation. PMID:26478238

  15. Parametric dependence of myocardial blood oxygen level dependent, balanced steady-state free-precession imaging at 1.5 T: theory and experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangzhi; Tang, Richard; Klein, Rachel; Li, Debiao; Dharmakumar, Rohan

    2010-02-01

    Myocardial blood oxygen level dependent, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging is a relatively new technique for evaluating myocardial oxygenation changes in the presence of coronary artery stenosis. However, the dependence of myocardial bSSFP blood oxygen level dependent signal on imaging parameters has not been well studied. In this work, modeling capillaries as cylinders that act as magnetic perturbers, the Monte Carlo method was used to simulate spin relaxation via diffusion in a field variation inside and outside blood vessels. bSSFP signal changes at various levels of capillary blood oxygen saturation, for a range of pulse repetition times, flip angle, capillary blood volume fraction, vessel wall permeability, water diffusion coefficient, vessel angle to static magnetic field, and the impact of bulk frequency shifts were studied. The theoretical dependence of bSSFP blood oxygen level dependent contrast on pulse repetition times and flip angle was confirmed by experiments in an animal model with controllable coronary stenosis. Results showed that, with the standard bSSFP acquisition, optimum bSSFP blood oxygen level dependent contrast could be obtained at pulse repetition times = 6.0 ms and flip angle = 70 degrees . Additional technical improvements that preserve the image quality may be necessary to further increase the myocardial bSSFP blood oxygen level dependent sensitivity at 1.5 T through even longer pulse repetition times.

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in preventing remodeling and development of heart failure after acute myocardial infarction: results of the German multicenter study of the effects of captopril on cardiopulmonary exercise parameters (ECCE).

    PubMed

    Kleber, F X; Sabin, G V; Winter, U J; Reindl, I; Beil, S; Wenzel, M; Fischer, M; Doering, W

    1997-08-04

    Early action of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors after myocardial infarction (MI) has been shown in large scale clinical trials to reduce mortality over the first weeks. However, the mechanisms involved are yet unclear and several trials showed a tendency toward a small, albeit unexpected, rise in cardiogenic shock or mortality. Since cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) has become a "gold standard" in assessing the severity of heart failure, we studied--after finishing a pilot trial--the effect of captopril versus placebo in 208 patients who were individually titrated (titrated dose, mean 46/69 mg/day after 7 days/4 weeks, respectively) in order to preserve their blood pressure in the acute phase of myocardial infarction; we followed the development of congestive heart failure (CHF) over 4 weeks by measuring oxygen consumption. After 4 weeks, overall oxygen consumption at the anaerobic threshold (VO2-AT; 13.7 vs 13.1), maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max 19.3 vs 18.9 mL/kg per min) and exercise duration (896 vs 839 sec) showed a nonsignificant difference in favor of the captopril group. The predefined, categorized, combined endpoint of severe heart failure or death (heart failure necessitating ACE inhibition, VO2max < 10 mL/kg per min, or death) was significantly reduced in the captopril group (n = 7/104) versus placebo (n = 18/104; p = 0.03). Differences were mainly caused by fewer CHF events (delta n = 10). We conclude that ACE inhibition with individualized dose titration markedly reduces the 4-week incidence of severe heart failure or death; > 10 patients per 100 treated gained major benefits from this therapy.

  17. Patterns of Use of Angiotensin‐Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/Angiotensin Receptor Blockers Among Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction in China From 2001 to 2011: China PEACE‐Retrospective AMI Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiamin; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Spertus, John A.; Wang, Qing; Murugiah, Karthik; Spatz, Erica S.; Li, Jing; Li, Xi; Ross, Joseph S.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Jiang, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Background Chinese and U.S. guidelines recommend angiotensin‐converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs)/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) for all patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the absence of contraindications as either a Class I or Class IIa recommendation. Little is known about the use and trends of ACEI/ARB therapy in China over the past decade. Methods and Results Using nationally representative data from the China Patient‐centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events Retrospective Study of Acute Myocardial Infarction (China PEACE‐Retrospective AMI Study), we assessed use of ACEI/ARB therapy in 2001, 2006, and 2011, overall and across geographic regions and strata of estimated mortality risk, and predictors of ACEI/ARB therapy, among patients with Class I indication by Chinese guidelines. The weighted rate of ACEI/ARB therapy increased from 62.0% in 2001 to 71.4% in 2006, decreasing to 67.6% in 2011. Use was low across all 5 geographic regions. By strata of estimated mortality risk, in 2001, rates of therapy increased with increasing risk; however, by 2011, this reversed and those at higher risk were less likely to be treated (70.7% in lowest‐risk quintile vs. 63.5% in the highest‐risk quintile; P<0.001). Conclusion One third of Chinese AMI patients with Class I indications do not receive ACEI/ARB therapy during hospitalization, with little improvement in rates over time. Patients at higher mortality risk in 2011 were less likely to be treated, highlighting important opportunities to optimize the use of this cost‐effective therapy. Clinical Trial Registration URL: ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01624883. PMID:25713293

  18. High sodium augments angiotensin II-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through the ERK 1/2-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Rahman, Asadur; Nakano, Daisuke; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ma, Hong; Iwamoto, Takahiro; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced vascular injury is exacerbated by high-salt diets. This study examined the effects of high-sodium level on Ang II-induced cell proliferation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The cells were cultured in a standard medium containing 137.5 mmol l−1 of sodium. The high-sodium medium (140 mmol l−1) contained additional sodium chloride. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation was determined by western blot analysis. Cell proliferation was evaluated by [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Ang II (100 nmol l−1) significantly increased ERK 1/2 phosphorylation and cell proliferation in the both medium containing standard sodium and high sodium. High-sodium level augmented Ang II-induced ERK 1/2 phosphorylation and cell proliferation compared with standard sodium. Pre-treatment with candesartan (1 μmol l−1, Ang II type 1 receptor blocker) or PD98095 (10 μmol l−1, ERK kinase iinhibitor) abolished the proliferative effect induced by high sodium/Ang II. Pre-treatment with 5-N,N-hexamethylene amiloride (30 μmol l−1, Na+/H+ exchanger type 1 (NHE-1) inhibitor), but not SN-6 (10 μmol l−1, Na+/Ca2+ exchanger inhibitor) or ouabain (1 mmol l−1, Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitor) attenuated ERK 1/2 phosphorylation or cell proliferation. Osmotic pressure or chloride had no effect on Ang II-induced proliferative changes. High-sodium level did not affect Ang II receptor expression. Ang II increased intracellular pH via NHE-1 activation, and high-sodium level augmented the pH increase induced by Ang II. These data suggest that high-sodium level directly augments Ang II-induced VSMC proliferation through NHE-1- and ERK 1/2-dependent pathways and may offer new insights into the mechanisms of vascular remodeling by high-sodium/Ang II. PMID:24026042

  19. Sex-dependent effects of chronic psychosocial stress on myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Rorabaugh, Boyd R; Krivenko, Anna; Eisenmann, Eric D; Bui, Albert D; Seeley, Sarah; Fry, Megan E; Lawson, Joseph D; Stoner, Lauren E; Johnson, Brandon L; Zoladz, Phillip R

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experience many debilitating symptoms, including intrusive memories, persistent anxiety and avoidance of trauma-related cues. PTSD also results in numerous physiological complications, including increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, characterization of PTSD-induced cardiovascular alterations is lacking, especially in preclinical models of the disorder. Thus, we examined the impact of a psychosocial predator-based animal model of PTSD on myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to psychosocial stress or control conditions for 31 days. Stressed rats were given two cat exposures, separated by a period of 10 days, and were subjected to daily social instability throughout the paradigm. Control rats were handled daily for the duration of the experiment. Rats were tested on the elevated plus maze (EPM) on day 32, and hearts were isolated on day 33 and subjected to 20 min ischemia and 2 h reperfusion on a Langendorff isolated heart system. Stressed male and female rats gained less body weight relative to controls, but only stressed males exhibited increased anxiety on the EPM. Male, but not female, rats exposed to psychosocial stress exhibited significantly larger infarcts and attenuated post-ischemic recovery of contractile function compared to controls. Our data demonstrate that predator stress combined with daily social instability sex-dependently increases myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury. Thus, this manipulation may be useful for studying potential mechanisms underlying cardiovascular alterations in PTSD, as well as sex differences in the cardiovascular stress response.

  20. miR-34a Modulates Angiotensin II-Induced Myocardial Hypertrophy by Direct Inhibition of ATG9A Expression and Autophagic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Ye, Jing; Pan, Wei; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chuanfang; You, Xiangyu; Liu, Benrong; Xiong, Longgen; Liu, Shiming

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by thickening myocardium and decreasing in heart chamber volume in response to mechanical or pathological stress, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be defined. This study investigated altered miRNA expression and autophagic activity in pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. A rat model of myocardial hypertrophy was used and confirmed by heart morphology, induction of cardiomyocyte autophagy, altered expression of autophagy-related ATG9A, LC3 II/I and p62 proteins, and decrease in miR-34a expression. The in vitro data showed that in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes induced by Ang II, miR-34a expression was downregulated, whereas ATG9A expression was up-regulated. Moreover, miR-34a was able to bind to ATG9A 3′-UTR, but not to the mutated 3′-UTR and inhibited ATG9A protein expression and autophagic activity. The latter was evaluated by autophagy-related LC3 II/I and p62 levels, TEM, and flow cytometry in rat cardiomyocytes. In addition, ATG9A expression induced either by treatment of rat cardiomyocytes with Ang II or ATG9A cDNA transfection upregulated autophagic activity and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in both morphology and expression of hypertrophy-related genes (i.e., ANP and β-MHC), whereas knockdown of ATG9A expression downregulated autophagic activity and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. However, miR-34a antagonized Ang II-stimulated myocardial hypertrophy, whereas inhibition of miR-34a expression aggravated Ang II-stimulated myocardial hypertrophy (such as cardiomyocyte hypertrophy-related ANP and β-MHC expression and cardiomyocyte morphology). This study indicates that miR-34a plays a role in regulation of Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by inhibition of ATG9A expression and autophagic activity. PMID:24728149

  1. Shengmai Injection Improved Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Alleviating Myocardial Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Caspase-12 Dependent Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Tang, Yong; Xiang, Yin; Xie, Yu-Quan; Huang, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Ya-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background. Apoptosis plays vital roles in the progression of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy (DOX-CM). Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) could induce specific apoptosis by caspase-12 dependent pathway. Shengmai Injection (SMI), a famous Traditional Chinese Medicine, could alleviate the heart damage via inhibiting myocardial apoptosis. However, it is unknown whether SMI can alleviate ER stress and its specific apoptosis in the setting of DOX-CM. Objective. To explore the effects of SMI on heart function, myocardial ER stress, and apoptosis of DOX-CM rats. Methods. Rats with DOX-CM were treated by SMI. Heart function was assessed by echocardiography and brain natriuretic peptide. Myocardial apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay. ER stress was assessed by detecting the expressions of GRP78 and caspase-12. Results. At the end of eight-week, compared to control, significant heart dysfunction happened in DOX group. The ratio of apoptotic cardiomyocytes and the expressions of GRP78 and caspase-12 increased significantly (P < 0.05). Compared to DOX group, the apoptotic ratio and the expressions of GRP78 and caspase-12 significantly decreased in DOX + SMI group (P < 0.05), accompanied with improved heart function. Conclusion. SMI could alleviate myocardial ER stress and caspase-12 dependent apoptosis, which subsequently helped to improve the heart function of rats with DOX-CM. PMID:25839043

  2. Protein kinase C epsilon-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation involved in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy with angiotensin II stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhuo; Wang, Wei; Geng, Jing; Wang, Liqi; Su, Guohai; Zhang, Yun; Ge, Zhiming; Kang, Weiqiang

    2010-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a critical role in hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes; however, the molecular mechanism, especially the signaling cascades, in cardiomyocytes remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of Ang II in hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes. Ang II rapidly stimulated phosphorylation of protein kinase C epsilon (PKCepsilon) in a time- and dose-dependent manner via Ang II receptor-1 (AT(1)). Furthermore, Ang II-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) phosphorylation and translocation was mediated through a signal pathway that involves AT(1) and PKCepsilon, which resulted in transcriptional activation of myocyte enhancer factor-2C (MEF2C) and hypertrophy. Consequently, inhibiting PKCepsilon or ERK5 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly attenuated Ang II-induced MEF2C activation and hypertrophy of rat cardiomyocytes. These data provide evidence that PKCepsilon-dependent ERK5 phosphorylation and nucleocytoplasmic traffic mediates Ang II-induced MEF2C activation and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. PKCepsilon and ERK5 may be potential targets in the treatment of pathological vascular hypertrophy associated with the enhanced renin-angiotensin system. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Cobalt Chloride Upregulates Impaired HIF-1α Expression to Restore Sevoflurane Post-conditioning-Dependent Myocardial Protection in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianjiang; Yang, Long; Xie, Peng; Yu, Jin; Yu, Tian; Wang, Haiying; Maimaitili, Yiliyaer; Wang, Jiang; Ma, Haiping; Yang, Yining; Zheng, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies from our group have demonstrated that sevoflurane post-conditioning (SPC) protects against myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury via elevating the intranuclear expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). However, diabetic SPC is associated with decreased myocardial protection and disruption of the HIF-1 signaling pathway. Previous studies have demonstrated that cobalt chloride (CoCl2) can upregulate HIF-1α expression under diabetic conditions, but whether myocardial protection by SPC can be restored afterward remains unclear. We established a rat model of type 2 diabetes and a Langendorff isolated heart model of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Prior to reperfusion, 2.4% sevoflurane was used as a post-conditioning treatment. The diabetic rats were treated with CoCl2 24 h before the experiment. At the end of reperfusion, tests were performed to assess myocardial function, infarct size, mitochondrial morphology, nitric oxide (NO), Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial respiratory function and enzyme activity, HIF-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) protein levels. In addition, myocardial protection by SPC was monitored after the blood glucose levels were lowered by insulin. The diabetic state was associated with deficient SPC protection and decreased HIF-1α expression. After treating the diabetic rats with CoCl2, SPC significantly upregulated the expression of HIF-1α, VEGF and eNOS, which markedly improved cardiac function, NO, mitochondrial respiratory function, and enzyme activity and decreased the infarction areas and ROS. In addition, these effects were not influenced by blood glucose levels. This study proved that CoCl2activates the HIF-1α signaling pathway, which restores SPC-dependent myocardial protection under diabetic conditions, and the protective effects of SPC were independent of blood glucose levels. PMID:28659817

  4. Dependence of light fluence on treated depth with photosensitization reaction shortly after photosensitizer injection in rabbit myocardial tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suenari, T.; Matsuo, H.; Ito, A.; Miyoshi, S.; Arai, T.

    2010-02-01

    We investigated experimentally dependence of light fluence on treated depth with photosensitization reaction shortly after photosensitizer injection in rabbit myocardial tissue in vivo. In this particular photosensitization reaction scheme, the photosensitizer accumulation characteristics for target region are not available. Meanwhile, the photosensitizer dose and hospitalization period under restricted light circumstance might be reduced. Since both photosensitizer and oxygen supply are governed by blood flow, this photosensitization reaction is influenced significantly by blood flow variation in particular blood vessel occlusion. We employed the myocardial tissue to keep tissue blood flow during the photosensitization reaction because vessel blood flow speed in myocardial tissue is fast to resist vascular occlusion. Surgically exposed rabbits myocardial tissues were irradiated with the light fluence ranging 25-100 J/cm2 by a 663 nm diode laser 30 min after the injection of 2 mg/kg water soluble chlorin photosensitizer, Talaporfin sodium. Two weeks after the irradiation, the rabbits were sacrificed and the histological specimens of the irradiated area were made to measure scar layer thickness. The scar layer tissue thickness of 0.2-3.0 mm was observed microscopically by the light fluence ranging 25-100 J/cm2. The scarring threshold in the deposit light fluence was estimated to 15-25 J/cm3 based on the above mentioned relation assuming constant and uniform myocardial effective attenuation coefficient of 0.72 mm-1. The estimated scarring threshold in the deposit light fluence was lower than the threshold of conventional PDT. Large variation of the estimated threshold value might be attributed to unconsidered PDT parameter such as flow rate inhomogeneity in the myocardial tissue. These results suggested that the photosensitization reaction investigated in this study would be available to apply arrhythmia therapy such as atrial fibrillation.

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors modulate cellular retinol-binding protein 1 and adiponectin expression in adipocytes via the ACE-dependent signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Karin; Gershome, Cynthia; Trouvain, Caroline; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Fichtlscherer, Stephan; Fleming, Ingrid

    2009-03-01

    Inhibitors of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) decrease angiotensin II production and activate an intracellular signaling cascade that affects gene expression in endothelial cells. Because ACE inhibitors have been reported to delay the onset of type 2 diabetes, we determined ACE signaling-modulated gene expression in endothelial cells and adipocytes. Using differential gene expression analysis, several genes were identified that were 3-fold up- or down-regulated by ramiprilat in cells expressing wild-type ACE versus cells expressing a signaling-dead ACE mutant. One up-regulated gene was the cellular retinol-binding protein 1 (CRBP1). In adipocytes, the overexpression of CRBP1 enhanced (4- to 5-fold) the activity of promoters containing response elements for retinol-dependent nuclear receptors [retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR)] or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). CRBP1 overexpression also enhanced the promoter activity (by 470 +/- 40%) and expression/release of the anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic adipokine adiponectin (cellular adiponectin by 196 +/- 24%, soluble adiponectin by 228 +/- 74%). Significantly increased adiponectin secretion was also observed after ACE inhibitor treatment of human preadipocytes, an effect prevented by small interfering RNA against CRBP1. Furthermore, in ob/ob mice, ramipril markedly potentiated both the basal (approximately 2-fold) and rosiglitazonestimulated circulating levels of adiponectin. In patients with coronary artery disease or type 2 diabetes, ACE inhibition also significantly increased plasma adiponectin levels (1.6- or 2.1-fold, respectively). In summary, ACE inhibitors affect adipocyte homeostasis via CRBP1 through the activation of RAR/RXR-PPAR signaling and up-regulation of adiponectin. The latter may contribute to the beneficial effects of ACE inhibitors on the development of type 2 diabetes in patients with an activated renin-angiotensin system.

  6. A low salt diet and circadian dysfunction synergize to induce angiotensin II-dependent hypertension in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Paramita; Fulton, David J.R.; Bagi, Zsolt; Chen, Feng; Wang, Yusi; Kitchens, Julia; Cassis, Lisa A.; Stepp, David W.; Rudic, R. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Blood pressure exhibits a robust circadian rhythm in health. In hypertension, sleep apnea, and even shift work, this balanced rhythm is perturbed via elevations in nighttime blood pressure, inflicting silent damage to the vasculature and body organs. Herein, we examined the influence of circadian dysfunction during experimental hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry to measure ambulatory blood pressure and activity, the effects of angiotensin II administration were studied in wild-type (WT) and Period isoform knockout mice (Per2-KO, Per2,3-KO and Per1,2,3-KO/PerTKO mice). On a normal diet, administration of Ang II caused caused non-dipping blood pressure and exacerbated vascular hypertrophy in the Period isoform knockout mice. To study the endogenous effects of Ang II stimulation, we then administered a low salt diet to the mice, which does stimulate endogenous Ang II in addition to lowering blood pressure. A low salt diet decreased blood pressure in WT mice. In contrast, Period isoform knockout mice lost their circadian rhythm in blood pressure on a low salt diet, due to an increase in resting blood pressure, which was restorable to rhythmicity by the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan. Chronic low salt caused vascular hypertrophy in Period isoform knockout mice which also exhibited increased renin levels and altered AT1 receptor expression. These data suggest that circadian clock genes may act to inhibit or control renin/angiotensin signaling. Moreover, circadian disorders such as sleep apnea and shift work may alter the homeostatic responses to sodium restriction to potentially influence nocturnal hypertension. PMID:26781276

  7. Treatment of patients with myocardial infarction depends on history of cancer.

    PubMed

    Rohrmann, Sabine; Witassek, Fabienne; Erne, Paul; Rickli, Hans; Radovanovic, Dragana

    2017-09-01

    Although cancer treatment considerably affects cardiovascular health, little is known about how cancer patients are treated for an acute myocardial infarction. We aimed to investigate whether acute myocardial infarction patients with a history of cancer received the same guideline recommended treatment as those acute myocardial infarction patients without and whether they differ with respect to inhospital outcome. All patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, enrolled between 2002 and mid-2015 in the acute myocardial infarction in Switzerland (AMIS Plus) registry with comorbidity data based on the Charlson comorbidity index were analysed. Patients were classified as having cancer if one of the cancer diseases of the Charlson comorbidity index was indicated. Immediate treatment strategies and inhospital outcomes were compared between groups using propensity score matching. Of 35,249 patients, 1981 (5.6%) had a history of cancer. After propensity score matching for age, gender, Killip class >2, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and renal disease (1981 patients per group), significant differences were no longer found for a history of acute myocardial infarction, hypertension, diabetes, heart failure and cerebrovascular disease between cancer and non-cancer patients. However, cancer patients underwent percutaneous coronary intervention less frequently (odds ratio (OR) 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.67-0.88) and received P2Y12 blockers (OR 0.82; 95% CI 0.71-0.94) and statins (OR 0.87; 95% CI 0.76-0.99) less frequently. Inhospital mortality was significantly higher in cancer patients (10.7% vs. 7.6%, OR 1.45; 95% CI 1.17-1.81). However, the main cause of death was cardiac in both groups ( P=0.06). Acute myocardial infarction patients with a history of cancer were less likely to receive guideline recommended treatment and had worse inhospital outcomes than non-cancer patients.

  8. Chronic administration of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, ramipril, prevents fractionated whole-brain irradiation-induced perirhinal cortex-dependent cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tammy C; Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Payne, Valerie; Diz, Debra I; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Kooshki, Mitra; Mustafa, Rashida; Riddle, David R; Zhao, Weiling; Chan, Michael D; Robbins, Mike E

    2012-07-01

    We hypothesized that chronic administration of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, ramipril, to young adult male rats would prevent/ameliorate fractionated whole-brain irradiation-induced perirhinal cortex-dependent cognitive impairment. Eighty 12-14-week-old young adult male Fischer 344 rats received either: (1) sham irradiation, (2) 40 Gy of fractionated whole-brain irradiation delivered as two 5 Gy fractions/week for 4 weeks, (3) sham irradiation plus continuous administration of 15 mg/L of ramipril in the drinking water starting 3 days before irradiation, or (4) fractionated whole-brain irradiation plus ramipril. Cognitive function was assessed using a perirhinal cortex-dependent version of the novel object recognition task 26 weeks after irradiation. Microglial activation was determined in the perirhinal cortex and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus 28 weeks after irradiation using the ED1 antibody. Neurogenesis was assessed in the granular cell layer and subgranular zones of the dentate gyrus using a doublecortin antibody. Fractionated whole-brain irradiation led to: (1) a significant impairment in perirhinal cortex-dependent cognitive function, (2) a significant increase in activated microglia in the dentate gyrus but not in the perirhinal cortex, and (3) a significant decrease in neurogenesis. Continuous administration of ramipril before, during, and after irradiation prevented the fractionated whole-brain irradiation-induced changes in perirhinal cortex-dependent cognitive function, as well as in microglial activation in the dentate gyrus. Thus, as hypothesized, continuous administration of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, ramipril, can prevent the fractionated whole-brain irradiation-induced impairment in perirhinal cortex-dependent cognitive function.

  9. Chronic Administration of the Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor, Ramipril, Prevents Fractionated Whole-Brain Irradiation-Induced Perirhinal Cortex-Dependent Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tammy C.; Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Payne, Valerie; Diz, Debra I.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Kooshki, Mitra; Mustafa, Rashida; Riddle, David R.; Zhao, Weiling; Chan, Michael D.; Robbins, Mike E.

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that chronic administration of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, ramipril, to young adult male rats would prevent/ameliorate fractionated whole-brain irradiation-induced perirhinal cortex-dependent cognitive impairment. Eighty 12–14-week-old young adult male Fischer 344 rats received either: (1) sham irradiation, (2) 40 Gy of fractionated whole-brain irradiation delivered as two 5 Gy fractions/week for 4 weeks, (3) sham irradiation plus continuous administration of 15 mg/L of ramipril in the drinking water starting 3 days before irradiation, or (4) fractionated whole-brain irradiation plus ramipril. Cognitive function was assessed using a perirhinal cortex-dependent version of the novel object recognition task 26 weeks after irradiation. Microglial activation was determined in the perirhinal cortex and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus 28 weeks after irradiation using the ED1 antibody. Neurogenesis was assessed in the granular cell layer and subgranular zones of the dentate gyrus using a doublecortin antibody. Fractionated whole-brain irradiation led to: (1) a significant impairment in perirhinal cortex-dependent cognitive function, (2) a significant increase in activated microglia in the dentate gyrus but not in the perirhinal cortex, and (3) a significant decrease in neurogenesis. Continuous administration of ramipril before, during, and after irradiation prevented the fractionated whole-brain irradiation-induced changes in perirhinal cortex-dependent cognitive function, as well as in microglial activation in the dentate gyrus. Thus, as hypothesized, continuous administration of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, ramipril, can prevent the fractionated whole-brain irradiation-induced impairment in perirhinal cortex-dependent cognitive function. PMID:22687052

  10. Resveratrol promotes regression of renal carcinoma cells via a renin-angiotensin system suppression-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianchang; Qiu, Mingning; Chen, Lieqian; Liu, Lei; Tan, Guobin; Liu, Jianjun

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol on renal carcinoma cells and explore possible renin-angiotensin system-associated mechanisms. Subsequent to resveratrol treatment, the cell viability, apoptosis rate, cytotoxicity levels, caspase 3/7 activity and the levels of angiotensin II (AngII), AngII type 1 receptor (AT1R), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were evaluated in renal carcinoma cells. The effects of AngII, AT1R, VEGF and COX-2 on resveratrol-induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis were also examined. The results indicated that resveratrol treatment may suppress growth, induce apoptosis, and decrease AngII, AT1R, VEGF and COX-2 levels in renal carcinoma ACHN and A498 cells. In addition, resveratrol-induced cell growth suppression and apoptosis were reversed when co-culturing with AT1R or VEGF. Thus, resveratrol may suppress renal carcinoma cell proliferation and induce apoptosis via an AT1R/VEGF pathway. PMID:28356937

  11. MT1-MMP-dependent remodeling of cardiac extracellular matrix structure and function following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Gerald C; Rowe, R Grant; Day, Sharlene M; Sabeh, Farideh; Atkinson, Jeffrey J; Cooke, Kenneth R; Weiss, Stephen J

    2012-05-01

    The myocardial extracellular matrix (ECM), an interwoven meshwork of proteins, glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and glycosaminoglycans that is dominated by polymeric fibrils of type I collagen, serves as the mechanical scaffold on which myocytes are arrayed for coordinated and synergistic force transduction. Following ischemic injury, cardiac ECM remodeling is initiated via localized proteolysis, the bulk of which has been assigned to matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family members. Nevertheless, the key effector(s) of myocardial type I collagenolysis both in vitro and in vivo have remained unidentified. In this study, using cardiac explants from mice deficient in each of the major type I collagenolytic MMPs, including MMP-13, MMP-8, MMP-2, MMP-9, or MT1-MMP, we identify the membrane-anchored MMP, MT1-MMP, as the dominant collagenase that is operative within myocardial tissues in vitro. Extending these observations to an in vivo setting, mice heterozygous for an MT1-MMP-null allele display a distinct survival advantage and retain myocardial function relative to wild-type littermates in an experimental model of myocardial infarction, effects associated with preservation of the myocardial type I collagen network as a consequence of the decreased collagenolytic potential of cardiac fibroblasts. This study identifies MT1-MMP as a key MMP responsible for effecting postinfarction cardiac ECM remodeling and cardiac dysfunction.

  12. Contribution of genetic polymorphism in the renin-angiotensin system to the development of renal complications in insulin-dependent diabetes: Genetique de la Nephropathie Diabetique (GENEDIAB) study group.

    PubMed Central

    Marre, M; Jeunemaitre, X; Gallois, Y; Rodier, M; Chatellier, G; Sert, C; Dusselier, L; Kahal, Z; Chaillous, L; Halimi, S; Muller, A; Sackmann, H; Bauduceau, B; Bled, F; Passa, P; Alhenc-Gelas, F

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a glomerular disease due to uncontrolled diabetes and genetic factors. It can be caused by glomerular hypertension produced by capillary vasodilation, due to diabetes, against constitutional glomerular resistance. As angiotensin II increases glomerular pressure, we studied the relationship between genetic polymorphisms in the renin-angiotensin system-angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensinogen (AGT), and angiotensin II, subtype 1, receptor-and the renal involvement of insulin-dependent diabetic subjects with proliferative retinopathy: those exposed to the risk of nephropathy due to diabetes. Of 494 subjects recruited in 17 centers in France and Belgium (GENEDIAB Study), 157 (32%) had no nephropathy, 104 (21%) incipient (microalbuminuria), 126 (25 %) established (proteinuria), and 107 (22%) advanced (plasma creatinine > or = 150 micromol/liter or renal replacement therapy) nephropathy. The severity of renal involvement was associated with ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism: chi2 for trend 5.135, P = 0.023; adjusted odds ratio attributable to the D allele 1.889 (95% CI 1.209-2.952, P = 0.0052). Renal involvement was not directly linked to other polymorphisms. However, ACE I-D and AGT M235T polymorphisms interacted significantly (P = 0.0166): in subjects with ACE ID and DD genotypes, renal involvement increased from the AGT MM to TT genotypes. Thus, genetic determinants that affect renal angiotensin II and kinin productions are risk factors for the progression of glomerular disease in uncontrolled insulin-dependent diabetic patients. PMID:9120002

  13. Prolonged Subcutaneous Administration of Oxytocin Accelerates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension and Renal Damage in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Phie, James; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja; Newton, Patricia; Constantinoiu, Constantin; Sarnyai, Zoltan; Chilton, Lisa; Kinobe, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Oxytocin and its receptor are synthesised in the heart and blood vessels but effects of chronic activation of this peripheral oxytocinergic system on cardiovascular function are not known. In acute studies, systemic administration of low dose oxytocin exerted a protective, preconditioning effect in experimental models of myocardial ischemia and infarction. In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic administration of low dose oxytocin following angiotensin II-induced hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and renal damage. Angiotensin II (40 μg/Kg/h) only, oxytocin only (20 or 100 ng/Kg/h), or angiotensin II combined with oxytocin (20 or 100 ng/Kg/h) were infused subcutaneously in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats for 28 days. At day 7, oxytocin or angiotensin-II only did not change hemodynamic parameters, but animals that received a combination of oxytocin and angiotensin-II had significantly elevated systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure compared to controls (P < 0.01). Hemodynamic changes were accompanied by significant left ventricular cardiac hypertrophy and renal damage at day 28 in animals treated with angiotensin II (P < 0.05) or both oxytocin and angiotensin II, compared to controls (P < 0.01). Prolonged oxytocin administration did not affect plasma concentrations of renin and atrial natriuretic peptide, but was associated with the activation of calcium-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin, a canonical signalling mechanism in pressure overload-induced cardiovascular disease. These data demonstrate that oxytocin accelerated angiotensin-II induced hypertension and end-organ renal damage, suggesting caution should be exercised in the chronic use of oxytocin in individuals with hypertension.

  14. Prolonged Subcutaneous Administration of Oxytocin Accelerates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension and Renal Damage in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Phie, James; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja; Newton, Patricia; Constantinoiu, Constantin; Sarnyai, Zoltan; Chilton, Lisa; Kinobe, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Oxytocin and its receptor are synthesised in the heart and blood vessels but effects of chronic activation of this peripheral oxytocinergic system on cardiovascular function are not known. In acute studies, systemic administration of low dose oxytocin exerted a protective, preconditioning effect in experimental models of myocardial ischemia and infarction. In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic administration of low dose oxytocin following angiotensin II-induced hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and renal damage. Angiotensin II (40 μg/Kg/h) only, oxytocin only (20 or 100 ng/Kg/h), or angiotensin II combined with oxytocin (20 or 100 ng/Kg/h) were infused subcutaneously in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats for 28 days. At day 7, oxytocin or angiotensin-II only did not change hemodynamic parameters, but animals that received a combination of oxytocin and angiotensin-II had significantly elevated systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure compared to controls (P < 0.01). Hemodynamic changes were accompanied by significant left ventricular cardiac hypertrophy and renal damage at day 28 in animals treated with angiotensin II (P < 0.05) or both oxytocin and angiotensin II, compared to controls (P < 0.01). Prolonged oxytocin administration did not affect plasma concentrations of renin and atrial natriuretic peptide, but was associated with the activation of calcium-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin, a canonical signalling mechanism in pressure overload-induced cardiovascular disease. These data demonstrate that oxytocin accelerated angiotensin-II induced hypertension and end-organ renal damage, suggesting caution should be exercised in the chronic use of oxytocin in individuals with hypertension. PMID:26393919

  15. Oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence used to characterize improved myocardial oxygenation resulting from vasculogenic cytokine therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hiesinger, William; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Atluri, Pavan; Fitzpatrick, J. Raymond; Frederick, John R.; Levit, Rebecca D.; McCormick, Ryan C.; Muenzer, Jeffrey R.; Yang, Elaine C.; Marotta, Nicole A.; MacArthur, John W.; Wilson, David F.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates a therapy for infarct modulation and acute myocardial rescue and utilizes a novel technique to measure local myocardial oxygenation in vivo. Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were targeted to the heart with peri-infarct intramyocardial injection of the potent EPC chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF). Myocardial oxygen pressure was assessed using a noninvasive, real-time optical technique for measuring oxygen pressures within microvasculature based on the oxygen-dependent quenching of the phosphorescence of Oxyphor G3. Myocardial infarction was induced in male Wistar rats (n = 15) through left anterior descending coronary artery ligation. At the time of infarction, animals were randomized into two groups: saline control (n = 8) and treatment with SDF (n = 7). After 48 h, the animals underwent repeat thoracotomy and 20 μl of the phosphor Oxyphor G3 was injected into three areas (peri-infarct myocardium, myocardial scar, and remote left hindlimb muscle). Measurements of the oxygen distribution within the tissue were then made in vivo by applying the end of a light guide to the beating heart. Compared with controls, animals in the SDF group exhibited a significantly decreased percentage of hypoxic (defined as oxygen pressure ≤ 15.0 Torr) peri-infarct myocardium (9.7 ± 6.7% vs. 21.8 ± 11.9%, P = 0.017). The peak oxygen pressures in the peri-infarct region of the animals in the SDF group were significantly higher than the saline controls (39.5 ± 36.7 vs. 9.2 ± 8.6 Torr, P = 0.02). This strategy for targeting EPCs to vulnerable peri-infarct myocardium via the potent chemokine SDF-1α significantly decreased the degree of hypoxia in peri-infarct myocardium as measured in vivo by phosphorescence quenching. This effect could potentially mitigate the vicious cycle of myocyte death, myocardial fibrosis, progressive ventricular dilatation, and eventual heart failure seen after acute myocardial infarction. PMID

  16. Rapid CKD progression in a new mouse kidney remnant model: strain-dependent resistance is overcome by angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Yan, Qin; Hu, Xuzhen; Eisner, Christoph; Huang, Yuning; Chen, Richard; Mizel, Diane; Zhou, Hua; Wright, Elizabeth C.; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Schnermann, Jürgen; Yuen, Peter S.T.; Star, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    The remnant kidney model in C57BL6 mice does not develop progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study we modified the model to mimic features of human CKD and to define accelerants of disease progression using three strains of mice. Following the procedure there was a progressive increase in albuminuria, progressive loss in renal function, severe glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis, hypertension, cardiac fibrosis, and anemia by 4 weeks in CD-1 mice and by 12 weeks in 129S3 mice. In contrast, even after 16 weeks, the C57BL/6 mice with a remnant kidney had modestly increased albuminuria without increased blood pressure and without developing CKD or cardiac fibrosis. The baseline blood pressure, determined by radiotelemetry in conscious animals, correlated with CKD progression rates in each strain. Administering angiotensin II overcame the resistance of C57BL/6 mice to CKD following renal mass reduction displaying high blood pressure and albuminuria, severe glomerulosclerosis, and loss of renal function by 4 weeks. Decreasing blood pressure with olmesartan but not hydralazine in CD-1 mice with a remnant kidney reduced CKD progression and cardiac fibrosis. C57BL/6 mice with a remnant kidney and DOCA-salt hypertension developed modest CKD. Each strain had similar degrees of interstitial fibrosis in three different normotensive models of renal fibrosis. Thus reducing renal mass in CD-1 or 129S3 mice mimics many features of human CKD. Angiotensin II can convert the C57BL/6 strain from CKD-resistant to susceptible in this disease model. PMID:20736988

  17. Dose-dependent, therapeutic potential of angiotensin-(1–7) for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Breitling, Siegfried; Krauszman, Adrienn; Parihar, Richa; Walther, Thomas; Friedberg, Mark K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effects of the heptapeptide angiotensin-(1–7) (Ang-(1–7)), via its receptor Mas, oppose many of the effects of the classic angiotensin II signaling pathway, and pharmacological exploitation of this effect is currently actively pursued for a wide range of cardiovascular, neoplastic, or immunological disorders. On the basis of its vasodilatory and antiproliferative properties, Ang-(1–7) has consequentially also been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In this study, we tested the effectiveness of Ang-(1–7) and its stable, cyclic analog cAng-(1–7) over a range of doses for their therapeutic potential in experimental PAH. In the monocrotaline (MCT) rat model of PAH, Ang-(1–7) or cAng-(1–7) were injected in doses of 30, 100, 300, or 900 μg kg−1 day−1, and effects on pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular remodeling were assessed. Five weeks after MCT injection, right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) was significantly reduced for 3 dose groups treated with Ang-(1–7) (100, 300, and 900 μg kg−1 day−1) and for all dose groups treated with cAng-(1–7), as compared to untreated controls, yet the total reduction of RVSP was <50% at best and thus markedly lower than that with a positive treatment control with ambrisentan. Medial-wall thickness in pulmonary arterioles was only slightly reduced, without reaching significance, for any of the tested Ang-(1–7) compounds and doses. The reported moderate attenuation of PAH does not confirm the previously postulated high promise of this strategy, and the therapeutic usefulness of Ang-(1–7) may be limited in PAH relative to that in other cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26697172

  18. Akt-dependent Girdin phosphorylation regulates repair processes after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hayano, Shinji; Takefuji, Mikito; Maeda, Kengo; Noda, Tomonori; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Koichi; Enomoto, Atsushi; Asai, Naoya; Takahashi, Masahide; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-11-01

    Myocardial infarction is a leading cause of death, and cardiac rupture following myocardial infarction leads to extremely poor prognostic feature. A large body of evidence suggests that Akt is involved in several cardiac diseases. We previously reported that Akt-mediated Girdin phosphorylation is essential for angiogenesis and neointima formation. The role of Girdin expression and phosphorylation in myocardial infarction, however, is not understood. Therefore, we employed Girdin-deficient mice and Girdin S1416A knock-in (Girdin(SA/SA)) mice, replacing the Akt phosphorylation site with alanine, to address this question. We found that Girdin was expressed and phosphorylated in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro and that its phosphorylation was crucial for the proliferation and migration of cardiac fibroblasts. In vivo, Girdin was localized in non-cardiomyocyte interstitial cells and phosphorylated in α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells, which are likely to be cardiac myofibroblasts. In an acute myocardial infarction model, Girdin(SA/SA) suppressed the accumulation and proliferation of cardiac myofibroblasts in the infarcted area. Furthermore, lower collagen deposition in Girdin(SA/SA) mice impaired cardiac repair and resulted in increased mortality attributed to cardiac rupture. These findings suggest an important role of Girdin phosphorylation at serine 1416 in cardiac repair after acute myocardial infarction and provide insights into the complex mechanism of cardiac rupture through the Akt/Girdin-mediated regulation of cardiac myofibroblasts.

  19. Soluble uric acid increases intracellular calcium through an angiotensin II-dependent mechanism in immortalized human mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Albertoni, Guilherme; Maquigussa, Edgar; Pessoa, Edson; Barreto, Jose Augusto; Borges, Fernanda; Schor, Nestor

    2010-07-01

    Hyperuricemia is associated with increases in cardiovascular risk and renal disease. Mesangial cells regulate glomerular filtration rates through the release of hormones and vasoactive substances. This study evaluates the signaling pathway of uric acid (UA) in immortalized human mesangial cells (ihMCs). To evaluate cell proliferation, ihMCs were exposed to UA (6-10 mg/dL) for 24-144 h. In further experiments, ihMCs were treated with UA (6-10 mg/dL) for 12 and 24 h simultaneously with losartan (10(-7) mmol/L). Angiotensin II (AII) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) were assessed using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. Pre-pro-ET mRNA was evaluated by the real-time PCR technique. It was observed that soluble UA (8 and 10 mg/dL) stimulated cellular proliferation. UA (10 mg/dL) for 12 h significantly increased AII protein synthesis and ET-1 expression and protein production was increased after 24 h. Furthermore, UA increased [Ca(2+)](i), and this effect was significantly blocked when ihMCs were preincubated with losartan. Our results suggested that UA triggers reactions including AII and ET-1 production in mesangial cells. In addition, UA can potentially affect glomerular function due to UA-induced proliferation and contraction of mesangial cells. The latter mechanism could be related to the long-term effects of UA on renal function and chronic kidney disease.

  20. Artifact-reduced two-dimensional cine steady state free precession for myocardial blood- oxygen-level-dependent imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangzhi; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A; Liu, Ying; Tang, Richard; Klein, Rachel; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Li, Debiao; Dharmakumar, Rohan

    2010-04-01

    To minimize image artifacts in long TR cardiac phase-resolved steady state free precession (SSFP) based blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) imaging. Nine healthy dogs (four male, five female, 20-25 kg) were studied in a clinical 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner to investigate the effect of temporal resolution, readout bandwidth, and motion compensation on long repetition time (TR) SSFP images. Breath-held 2D SSFP cine sequences with various temporal resolutions (10-204 ms), bandwidths (239-930 Hz/pixel), with and without first-order motion compensation were prescribed in the basal, mid-ventricular, and apical along the short axis. Preliminary myocardial BOLD studies in dogs with controllable coronary stenosis were performed to assess the benefits of artifact-reduction strategies. Shortening the readout time by means of increasing readout bandwidth had no observable reduction in image artifacts. However, increasing the temporal resolution in the presence of first-order motion compensation led to significant reduction in image artifacts. Preliminary studies demonstrated that BOLD signal changes can be reliably detected throughout the cardiac cycle. Artifact-reduction methods used in this study provide significant improvement in image quality compared with conventional long TR SSFP BOLD MRI. It is envisioned that the methods proposed here may enable reliable detection of myocardial oxygenation changes throughout the cardiac cycle with long TR SSFP-based myocardial BOLD MRI. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Transforming growth factor type beta 1 increases the expression of angiotensin II receptor type 2 by a SMAD- and p38 MAPK-dependent mechanism in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Painemal, Paula; Acuña, María José; Riquelme, Cecilia; Brandan, Enrique; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, a condition known as fibrosis, is a hallmark of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Among the factors that trigger muscle fibrosis are transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and angiotensin II (Ang-II). Ang-II belongs to the renin-angiotensin system, and its biological effects are exerted by Ang-II receptors type 1 and type 2 (AT-1 and AT-2, respectively). This study aims to determine the effect of TGF-β1 on the expression of AT-1 and AT-2 receptor in skeletal muscle. C2 C12 myoblasts exposed to TGF-β1 showed a dose-dependent increase in AT-2 expression but with no effect on AT-1 levels. Injection of TGF-β1 in the skeletal muscle of mice increased the levels of AT-2 and ECM protein but unchanged AT-1 levels. We also detected higher expression levels of AT-2 receptor in dystrophic skeletal muscle of mdx mice than in normal mice. The induction of AT-2 was mediated by the canonical TGF-β pathway because under the inhibitory conditions of the kinase activity of TGFβ receptor I or the knockdown of Smad2/3 levels, TGF-β-induced AT-2 receptor increase was strongly inhibited. Furthermore, we demonstrated that p38MAPK activity in response to TGF-β is also required for AT-2 increase as evaluated by a p38MAPK inhibitor. Our results show that the levels of AT-2 but not AT-1 receptor are modulated by the pro-fibrotic factor TGF-β1 in myoblasts and mouse skeletal muscle. This finding suggests that AT-2 might be involved in the physiopathology of fibrosis in dystrophic skeletal muscle.

  2. Synthetic Generation of Myocardial Blood-Oxygen-Level-Dependent MRI Time Series via Structural Sparse Decomposition Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Rusu, Cristian; Morisi, Rita; Boschetto, Davide; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to identify approaches that generate appropriate synthetic data (computer generated) for Cardiac Phase-resolved Blood-Oxygen-Level-Dependent (CP–BOLD) MRI. CP–BOLD MRI is a new contrast agent- and stress-free approach for examining changes in myocardial oxygenation in response to coronary artery disease. However, since signal intensity changes are subtle, rapid visualization is not possible with the naked eye. Quantifying and visualizing the extent of disease relies on myocardial segmentation and registration to isolate the myocardium and establish temporal correspondences and ischemia detection algorithms to identify temporal differences in BOLD signal intensity patterns. If transmurality of the defect is of interest pixel-level analysis is necessary and thus a higher precision in registration is required. Such precision is currently not available affecting the design and performance of the ischemia detection algorithms. In this work, to enable algorithmic developments of ischemia detection irrespective to registration accuracy, we propose an approach that generates synthetic pixel-level myocardial time series. We do this by (a) modeling the temporal changes in BOLD signal intensity based on sparse multi-component dictionary learning, whereby segmentally derived myocardial time series are extracted from canine experimental data to learn the model; and (b) demonstrating the resemblance between real and synthetic time series for validation purposes. We envision that the proposed approach has the capacity to accelerate development of tools for ischemia detection while markedly reducing experimental costs so that cardiac BOLD MRI can be rapidly translated into the clinical arena for the noninvasive assessment of ischemic heart disease. PMID:24691119

  3. Synthetic generation of myocardial blood-oxygen-level-dependent MRI time series via structural sparse decomposition modeling.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Cristian; Morisi, Rita; Boschetto, Davide; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims to identify approaches that generate appropriate synthetic data (computer generated) for cardiac phase-resolved blood-oxygen-level-dependent (CP-BOLD) MRI. CP-BOLD MRI is a new contrast agent- and stress-free approach for examining changes in myocardial oxygenation in response to coronary artery disease. However, since signal intensity changes are subtle, rapid visualization is not possible with the naked eye. Quantifying and visualizing the extent of disease relies on myocardial segmentation and registration to isolate the myocardium and establish temporal correspondences and ischemia detection algorithms to identify temporal differences in BOLD signal intensity patterns. If transmurality of the defect is of interest pixel-level analysis is necessary and thus a higher precision in registration is required. Such precision is currently not available affecting the design and performance of the ischemia detection algorithms. In this work, to enable algorithmic developments of ischemia detection irrespective to registration accuracy, we propose an approach that generates synthetic pixel-level myocardial time series. We do this by 1) modeling the temporal changes in BOLD signal intensity based on sparse multi-component dictionary learning, whereby segmentally derived myocardial time series are extracted from canine experimental data to learn the model; and 2) demonstrating the resemblance between real and synthetic time series for validation purposes. We envision that the proposed approach has the capacity to accelerate development of tools for ischemia detection while markedly reducing experimental costs so that cardiac BOLD MRI can be rapidly translated into the clinical arena for the noninvasive assessment of ischemic heart disease.

  4. Transmural stretch-dependent regulation of contractile properties in rat heart and its alteration after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Cazorla, Olivier; Szilagyi, Szabolcs; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves; Vassort, Guy; Lacampagne, Alain

    2005-01-01

    The "stretch-sensitization" response is essential to the regulation of heart contractility. An increase in diastolic volume improves systolic contraction. The cellular mechanisms of this modulation, the Frank-Starling law, are still uncertain. Moreover, their alterations in heart failure remains controversial. Here, using left ventricular skinned rat myocytes, we show a nonuniform stretch-sensitization of myofilament activation across the ventricular wall. Stretch-dependent Ca2+ sensitization of myofilaments increases from sub-epicardium to sub-endocardium and is correlated with an increase in passive tension. This passive tension-dependent component of myofibrillar activation is not associated with expression of titin isoforms, changes in troponin I level, and phosphorylation status. Instead, we observe that stretch induces phosphorylation of ventricular myosin light chain 2 isoform (VLC2b) in sub-endocardium specifically. Thus, VLC2b phosphorylation could act as a stretch-dependent modulator of activation tuned within normal heart. Moreover, in postmyocardial infarcted rat, the gradient of stretch-dependent Ca2+ sensitization disappears associated with a lack of VLC2b phosphorylation in sub-endocardium. In conclusion, nonuniformity is a major characteristic of the normal adult left ventricle (LV). The heterogeneous myocardial deformation pattern might be caused not only by the morphological heterogeneity of the tissue in the LV wall, but also by the nonuniform contractile properties of the myocytes across the wall. The loss of a contractile transmural gradient after myocardial infarction should contribute to the impaired LV function.

  5. Propofol reduced myocardial contraction of vertebrates partly by mediating the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaotong; Zhang, Xinyu; Bo, Qiyu; Meng, Tao; Lei, Zhen; Li, Jingxin; Hou, Yonghao; Yu, Xiaoqian; Yu, Jingui

    2016-07-15

    Propofol inhibits myocardial contraction in a dose dependent manner. The present study is designed to examine the effect of propofol on PKA mediated myocardial contraction in the absence of adrenoreceptor agonist. The contraction of isolated rat heart was measured in the presence or absence of PKA inhibitor H89 or propofol, using a pressure transducer. The levels of cAMP and PKA kinase activity were detected by ELISA. The mRNA and total protein or phosphorylation level of PKA and downstream proteins were tested in the presence or absence of PKA inhibitor H89 or propofol, using RT-PCR, QPCR and western blotting. The phosphorylation level of PKA was examined thoroughly using immunofluorescence and PKA activity non-radioactive detection kit. Propofol induced a dose-dependent negative contractile response on the rat heart. The inhibitory effect of high concentration propofol (50μM) with 45% decease of control could be partly reversed by the PKA inhibitor H89 (10μM) and the depressant effect of propofol decreased from 45% to 10%. PKA kinase activity was inhibited by propofol in a dose-dependent manner. Propofol also induced a decrease in phosphorylation of PKA, which was also inhibited by H89, but did not alter the production of cAMP and the mRNA levels of PKA. The downstream proteins of PKA, PLN and RyR2 were phosphorylated to a lesser extent with propofol or H89 than control. These results demonstrated that propofol induced a negative myocardial contractile response partly by mediating the PKA phosphorylation pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The renal protective effect of angiotensin receptor blockers depends on intra-individual response variation in multiple risk markers

    PubMed Central

    Schievink, Bauke; de Zeeuw, Dick; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Rossing, Peter; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aims Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are renoprotective and targeted to blood pressure. However, ARBs have multiple other (off-target) effects which may affect renal outcome. It is unknown whether on-target and off-target effects are congruent within individuals. If not, this variation in short term effects may have important implications for the prediction of individual long term renal outcomes. Our aim was to assess intra-individual variability in multiple parameters in response to ARBs in type 2 diabetes. Methods Changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP), albuminuria, potassium, haemoglobin, cholesterol and uric acid after 6 months of losartan treatment were assessed in the RENAAL database. Improvement in predictive performance of renal outcomes (ESRD or doubling serum creatinine) for each individual using ARB-induced changes in all risk markers was assessed by the relative integrative discrimination index (RIDI). Results SBP response showed high variability (mean –5.7 mmHg, 5th to 95th percentile –36.5 to +24.0 mmHg) between individuals. Changes in off-target parameters also showed high variability between individuals. No congruency was observed between responses to losartan in multiple parameters within individuals. Using individual responses in all risk markers significantly improved renal risk prediction (RIDI 30.4%, P < 0.01) compared with using only SBP changes. Results were successfully replicated in two independent trials with irbesartan, IDNT and IRMA-2. Conclusions In this post hoc analysis we showed that ARBs have multiple off-target effects which vary between and within individuals. Combining all ARB-induced responses beyond SBP provides a more accurate prediction of who will benefit from ARB therapy. Prospective trials are required to validate these findings. PMID:25872610

  7. Myocardial viability.

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Y; Kloner, R A

    1996-01-01

    Left ventricular function is a major predictor of outcome in patients with coronary artery disease. Acute ischemia, postischemic dysfunction (stunning), myocardial hibernation, or a combination of these 3 are among the reversible forms of myocardial dysfunction. In myocardial stunning, dysfunction occurs despite normal myocardial perfusion, and function recovers spontaneously over time. In acute ischemia and hibernation, there is regional hypoperfusion. Function improves only after revascularization. Evidence of myocardial viability usually relies on the demonstration of uptake of various metabolic tracers, such as thallium (thallous chloride TI 201) or fludeoxyglucose F 18, by dysfunctional myocardium or by the demonstration of contractile reserve in a dysfunctional region. This can be shown as an augmentation of function during the infusion of various sympathomimetic agents. The response of ventricular segments to increasing doses of dobutamine may indicate the underlying mechanism of dysfunction. Stunned segments that have normal perfusion show dose-dependent augmentation of function. If perfusion is reduced as in hibernating myocardium, however, a biphasic response usually occurs: function improves at low doses of dobutamine, whereas higher doses may induce ischemia and, hence, dysfunction. But in patients with severely impaired perfusion, even low doses may cause ischemia. Myocardial regions with subendocardial infarction or diffuse scarring may also have augmented contractility during catecholamine infusion due to stimulation of the subepicardial layers. In these cases, augmentation of function after revascularization is not expected. Because the underlying mechanism, prognosis, and therapy may differ among these conditions, it is crucial to differentiate among dysfunctional myocardial segments that are nonviable and have no potential to regain function, hibernating or ischemic segments in which recovery of function occurs only after revascularization, and

  8. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion impairs neurogenesis and hippocampal-dependent learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Evonuk, Kirsten S; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Young, Martin E; DeSilva, Tara M

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of cognitive impairment in cardiovascular disease (CVD) patients has increased, adversely impacting quality of life and imposing a significant economic burden. Brain imaging of CVD patients has detected changes in the hippocampus, a brain region critical for normal learning and memory. However, it is not clear whether adverse cardiac events or other associated co-morbidities impair cognition. Here, using a murine model of acute myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), where the coronary artery was occluded for 30min followed by reperfusion, we tested the hypothesis that acute myocardial infarction triggers impairment in cognitive function. Two months following cardiac I/R, behavioral assessments specific for hippocampal cognitive function were performed. Mice subjected to cardiac I/R performed worse in the fear-conditioning paradigm as well as the object location memory behavioral test compared to sham-operated mice. Reactive gliosis was apparent in the hippocampal subregions CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus 72h post-cardiac I/R as compared with sham, which was sustained two months post-cardiac I/R. Consistent with the inflammatory response, the abundance of doublecortin positive newborn neurons was decreased in the dentate gyrus 72h and 2months post-cardiac I/R as compared with sham. Therefore, we conclude that following acute myocardial infarction, rapid inflammatory responses negatively affect neurogenesis, which may underlie long-term changes in learning and memory.

  9. A novel, view-independent method for strain mapping in myocardial elastography: eliminating angle and centroid dependence.

    PubMed

    Zervantonakis, I K; Fung-Kee-Fung, S D; Lee, W-N; Konofagou, E E

    2007-07-21

    Robust indices of regional and global cardiac function are a key factor in detection and treatment of heart disease as well as understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of a healthy heart. Myocardial elastography provides a noninvasive method for imaging and measuring displacement and strain of the myocardium for the early detection of cardiovascular disease. However, two-dimensional in-plane axial and lateral strains measured depend on the sonographic view used. This becomes especially critical in a clinical setting and may induce large variations in the measured strains, potentially leading to false diagnoses. A novel method in myocardial elastography is proposed for eliminating this view dependence by deriving the polar, principal and classified principal strains. The performance of the proposed methodology is assessed by employing 3D finite-element left-ventricular models of a control and an ischemic canine heart. Although polar strains are angle-independent, they are sensitive to the selected reference coordinate system, which requires the definition of a centroid of the left ventricle (LV). In contrast, principal strains derived through eigenvalue decomposition exhibit the inherent characteristic of coordinate system independence, offering view (i.e., angle and centroid)-independent strain measurements. Classified principal strains are obtained by assigning the principal components in the physical ventricular coordinate system. An extensive strain analysis illustrates the improvement in interpretation and visualization of the full-field myocardial deformation by using the classified principal strains, clearly depicting the ischemic and non-ischemic regions. Strain maps, independent of sonographic views and imaging planes, that can be used to accurately detect regional contractile dysfunction are demonstrated.

  10. The effects of beta-adrenergic stimulation on the length-dependent regulation of myocardial function in coronary surgery patients.

    PubMed

    De Hert, S G; Van der Linden, P J; Broecke, P W; Rodrigus, I E; Sermeus, L A; Moulijn, A C; Gillebert, T C

    1999-10-01

    Increasing cardiac load by leg elevation identifies patients with load-dependent impairment of left ventricular (LV) function. This impairment is related to a deficient length-dependent regulation of LV function. We investigated the effects of dobutamine on length-dependent regulation of LV function in coronary surgery patients (n = 25). High-fidelity LV pressure tracings were obtained at end-expiration, while hearts were paced at a fixed rate of 90 bpm. Effects of leg elevation on contraction and relaxation were compared before and during dobutamine 5 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1). Effects on contraction were evaluated by analysis of changes in dP/dtmax. Effects on relaxation were assessed by analysis of R (slope of the relation between the time constant of isovolumic relaxation and end-systolic pressure). Correlations were calculated with linear regression analysis using Pearson's coefficient r. The effects of leg elevation on variables of contraction and relaxation were coupled. We found a close relationship between changes in dP/dtmax and individual values of R (r = 0.84; P < 0.001). Dobutamine improved myocardial function and accelerated LV pressure decrease. Under dobutamine, the increase in dP/dtmax with leg elevation was larger (P < 0.001) and load dependence of LV relaxation was reduced (P = 0.001). Dobutamine improved the effects of leg elevation on LV function, reflecting improved length-dependent regulation of LV function. This study demonstrated that beta-adrenoreceptor stimulation with dobutamine improved length-dependent regulation of myocardial function assessed during leg elevation in cardiac surgical patients.

  11. Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers

    MedlinePlus

    ... side effects include: Dizziness Elevated blood potassium level (hyperkalemia) Localized swelling of tissues (angioedema) There have been ... 31, 2016. Townsend RR. Major side effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers. http://www.uptodate. ...

  12. Intracellular angiotensin II activates rat myometrium

    PubMed Central

    Deliu, Elena; Tica, Andrei A.; Motoc, Dana; Brailoiu, G. Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II is a modulator of myometrial activity; both AT1 and AT2 receptors are expressed in myometrium. Since in other tissues angiotensin II has been reported to activate intracellular receptors, we assessed the effects of intracellular administration of angiotensin II via microinjection on myometrium, using calcium imaging. Intracellular injection of angiotensin II increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in myometrial cells in a dose-dependent manner. The effect was abolished by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan but not by the AT2 receptor antagonist PD-123319. Disruption of the endo-lysosomal system, but not that of Golgi apparatus, prevented the angiotensin II-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. Blockade of AT1 receptor internalization had no effect, whereas blockade of microautophagy abolished the increase in [Ca2+]i produced by intracellular injection of angiotensin II; this indicates that microautophagy is a critical step in transporting the peptide into the endo-lysosomes lumenum. The response to angiotensin II was slightly reduced in Ca2+-free saline, indicating a major involvement of Ca2+ release from internal stores. Blockade of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors with heparin and xestospongin C or inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) with U-73122 abolished the response to angiotensin II, supporting the involvement of PLC-IP3 pathway. Angiotensin II-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was slightly reduced by antagonism of ryanodine receptors. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that in myometrial cells, intracellular angiotensin II activates AT1-like receptors on lysosomes and activates PLC-IP3-dependent Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum; the response is further augmented by a Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism via ryanodine receptors activation. PMID:21613610

  13. Angiotensin II receptor blockade or deletion of vascular endothelial ACE does not prevent vascular dysfunction and remodeling in 20-HETE-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Victor; Joseph, Gregory; Shkolnik, Brian; Ding, Yan; Zhang, Frank Fan; Gotlinger, Katherine; Falck, John R; Dakarapu, Rambabu; Capdevila, Jorge H; Bernstein, Kenneth E; Schwartzman, Michal Laniado

    2015-07-01

    Increased vascular 20-HETE is associated with hypertension and activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) through induction of vascular angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) expression. Cyp4a12tg mice, whose Cyp4a12-20-HETE synthase expression is under the control of a tetracycline (doxycycline, DOX) promoter, were used to assess the contribution of ACE/RAS to microvascular remodeling in 20-HETE-dependent hypertension. Treatment of Cyp4a12tg mice with DOX increased systolic blood pressure (SBP; 136 ± 2 vs. 102 ± 1 mmHg; P < 0.05), and this increase was prevented by administration of 20-HEDGE, lisinopril, or losartan. DOX-induced hypertension was associated with microvascular dysfunction and remodeling of preglomerular microvessels, which was prevented by 20-HEDGE, a 20-HETE antagonist, yet only lessened, but not prevented, by lisinopril or losartan. In ACE 3/3 mice, which lack vascular endothelial ACE, administration of 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a known inducer of 20-HETE production, increased SBP; however, the increase was about 50% of that in wild-type (WT) mice (151 ± 1 vs. 126 ± 1 mmHg). Losartan and 20-HEDGE prevented the DHT-induced increase in SBP in WT and ACE 3/3 mice. DHT treatment increased 20-HETE production and microvascular remodeling in WT and ACE 3/3 mice; however, remodeling was attenuated in the ACE 3/3 mice as opposed to WT mice (15.83 ± 1.11 vs. 22.17 ± 0.92 μm; P < 0.05). 20-HEDGE prevented microvascular remodeling in WT and ACE 3/3 mice, while losartan had no effect on microvascular remodeling in ACE 3/3. Taken together, these results suggest that RAS contributes to 20-HETE-mediated microvascular remodeling in hypertension and that 20-HETE-driven microvascular remodeling independent of blood pressure elevation does not fully rely on ACE activity in the vascular endothelium.

  14. Angiotensin II receptor blockade or deletion of vascular endothelial ACE does not prevent vascular dysfunction and remodeling in 20-HETE-dependent hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Gregory; Shkolnik, Brian; Ding, Yan; Zhang, Frank Fan; Gotlinger, Katherine; Falck, John R.; Dakarapu, Rambabu; Capdevila, Jorge H.; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Schwartzman, Michal Laniado

    2015-01-01

    Increased vascular 20-HETE is associated with hypertension and activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) through induction of vascular angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) expression. Cyp4a12tg mice, whose Cyp4a12-20-HETE synthase expression is under the control of a tetracycline (doxycycline, DOX) promoter, were used to assess the contribution of ACE/RAS to microvascular remodeling in 20-HETE-dependent hypertension. Treatment of Cyp4a12tg mice with DOX increased systolic blood pressure (SBP; 136 ± 2 vs. 102 ± 1 mmHg; P < 0.05), and this increase was prevented by administration of 20-HEDGE, lisinopril, or losartan. DOX-induced hypertension was associated with microvascular dysfunction and remodeling of preglomerular microvessels, which was prevented by 20-HEDGE, a 20-HETE antagonist, yet only lessened, but not prevented, by lisinopril or losartan. In ACE 3/3 mice, which lack vascular endothelial ACE, administration of 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a known inducer of 20-HETE production, increased SBP; however, the increase was about 50% of that in wild-type (WT) mice (151 ± 1 vs. 126 ± 1 mmHg). Losartan and 20-HEDGE prevented the DHT-induced increase in SBP in WT and ACE 3/3 mice. DHT treatment increased 20-HETE production and microvascular remodeling in WT and ACE 3/3 mice; however, remodeling was attenuated in the ACE 3/3 mice as opposed to WT mice (15.83 ± 1.11 vs. 22.17 ± 0.92 μm; P < 0.05). 20-HEDGE prevented microvascular remodeling in WT and ACE 3/3 mice, while losartan had no effect on microvascular remodeling in ACE 3/3. Taken together, these results suggest that RAS contributes to 20-HETE-mediated microvascular remodeling in hypertension and that 20-HETE-driven microvascular remodeling independent of blood pressure elevation does not fully rely on ACE activity in the vascular endothelium. PMID:25924878

  15. Quercetin and catechin synergistically inhibit angiotensin II-induced redox-dependent signalling pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells from hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Analía; Estrella, Natalia; Lorenzo, Andrea Gil; Cruzado, Montserrat; Castro, Claudia

    2012-05-01

    Dietary flavonoids, present in different amount in foods, are associated with the prevention of hypertension, but little is known about the interactions between them. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of quercetin (Q), catechin (C) and the mixture, on Angiotensin II (AngII)-induced redox-dependent signalling pathways and cell behaviour. Mesenteric smooth muscle cells (MesSMC) from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were incubated with AngII (0.1 μmol/L) alone, or with the mixture of low concentrations of Q and C. AngII-increased ROS production was reduced by the mixture of separately ineffective low concentration of Q (15 μmol/L) plus C (20 μmol/L). This mixture reduced AngII-stimulated NAD(P)H oxidase activation and p47phox translocation to the cell membrane, without affecting Nox2 expression. Co-incubation of Q + C significantly inhibited AngII-induced migration and proliferation, and these effects were independent of p-ERK1/2 and related with reduced p38MAPK phosphorylation. These findings demonstrated that low concentrations of singly non-effective flavonoids when are combined exert a synergistic effect in inhibiting AngII-induced redox-sensitive signalling pathways.

  16. Diacylglycerol kinase theta is translocated and phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependently activated by noradrenaline but not angiotensin II in intact small arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, A J; Draeger, A; Houssa, B; van Blitterswijk , W J; Ohanian, V; Ohanian, J

    2001-01-01

    Diacylglycerol (DG) kinase (DGK) phosphorylates the lipid second messenger DG to phosphatidic acid. We reported previously that noradrenaline (NA), but not angiotensin II (AII), increases membrane-associated DGK activity in rat small arteries [Ohanian and Heagerty (1994) Biochem. J. 300, 51-56]. Here, we have identified this DGK activity as DGKtheta, present in both smooth muscle and endothelial cells of these small vessels. Subcellular fractionation of artery homogenates revealed that DGKtheta was present in nuclear, plasma membrane (and/or Golgi) and cytosolic fractions. Upon NA stimulation, DGKtheta translocated towards the membrane and cytosol (155 and 153% increases relative to the control, respectively) at 30 s, followed by a return to near-basal levels at 5 min; AII was without effect. Translocation to the membrane was to both Triton-soluble and -insoluble fractions. NA, but not AII, transiently increased DGKtheta activity in immunoprecipitates (126% at 60 s). Membrane translocation and DGKtheta activation were regulated differently: NA-induced DGKtheta activation, but not translocation, was dependent on transient activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K). In addition, DGK activity co-immunoprecipitated with protein kinase B, a downstream effector of PI 3-K, and was increased greatly by NA stimulation. The rapid and agonist-specific activation of DGKtheta suggests that this pathway may have a physiological role in vascular smooth-muscle responses. PMID:11115406

  17. Angiotensin II acts through the angiotensin 1a receptor to upregulate pendrin

    PubMed Central

    Verlander, Jill W.; Hong, Seongun; Pech, Vladimir; Bailey, James L.; Agazatian, Diana; Matthews, Sharon W.; Coffman, Thomas M.; Le, Thu; Inagami, Tadashi; Whitehill, Florence M.; Weiner, I. David; Farley, Donna B.; Kim, Young Hee

    2011-01-01

    Pendrin is an anion exchanger expressed in the apical regions of B and non-A, non-B intercalated cells. Since angiotensin II increases pendrin-mediated Cl− absorption in vitro, we asked whether angiotensin II increases pendrin expression in vivo and whether angiotensin-induced hypertension is pendrin dependent. While blood pressure was similar in pendrin null and wild-type mice under basal conditions, following 2 wk of angiotensin II administration blood pressure was 31 mmHg lower in pendrin null than in wild-type mice. Thus pendrin null mice have a blunted pressor response to angiotensin II. Further experiments explored the effect of angiotensin on pendrin expression. Angiotensin II administration shifted pendrin label from the subapical space to the apical plasma membrane, independent of aldosterone. To explore the role of the angiotensin receptors in this response, pendrin abundance and subcellular distribution were examined in wild-type, angiotensin type 1a (Agtr1a) and type 2 receptor (Agtr2) null mice given 7 days of a NaCl-restricted diet (< 0.02% NaCl). Some mice received an Agtr1 inhibitor (candesartan) or vehicle. Both Agtr1a gene ablation and Agtr1 inhibitors shifted pendrin label from the apical plasma membrane to the subapical space, independent of the Agtr2 or nitric oxide (NO). However, Agtr1 ablation reduced pendrin protein abundance through the Agtr2 and NO. Thus angiotensin II-induced hypertension is pendrin dependent. Angiotensin II acts through the Agtr1a to shift pendrin from the subapical space to the apical plasma membrane. This Agtr1 action may be blunted by the Agtr2, which acts through NO to reduce pendrin protein abundance. PMID:21921024

  18. Angiotensin II-dependent hypertension requires cyclooxygenase 1-derived prostaglandin E2 and EP1 receptor signaling in the subfornical organ of the brain.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xian; Peterson, Jeffrey R; Wang, Gang; Anrather, Josef; Young, Colin N; Guruju, Mallikarjuna R; Burmeister, Melissa A; Iadecola, Costantino; Davisson, Robin L

    2012-04-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived prostanoids have long been implicated in blood pressure (BP) regulation. Recently prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and its receptor EP(1) (EP(1)R) have emerged as key players in angiotensin II (Ang II)-dependent hypertension (HTN) and related end-organ damage. However, the enzymatic source of PGE(2,) that is, COX-1 or COX-2, and its site(s) of action are not known. The subfornical organ (SFO) is a key forebrain region that mediates systemic Ang II-dependent HTN via reactive oxygen species (ROS). We tested the hypothesis that cross-talk between PGE(2)/EP(1)R and ROS signaling in the SFO is required for Ang II HTN. Radiotelemetric assessment of blood pressure revealed that HTN induced by infusion of systemic "slow-pressor" doses of Ang II was abolished in mice with null mutations in EP(1)R or COX-1 but not COX-2. Slow-pressor Ang II-evoked HTN and ROS formation in the SFO were prevented when the EP(1)R antagonist SC-51089 was infused directly into brains of wild-type mice, and Ang-II-induced ROS production was blunted in cells dissociated from SFO of EP(1)R(-/-) and COX-1(-/-) but not COX-2(-/-) mice. In addition, slow-pressor Ang II infusion caused a ≈3-fold increase in PGE(2) levels in the SFO but not in other brain regions. Finally, genetic reconstitution of EP(1)R selectively in the SFO of EP(1)R-null mice was sufficient to rescue slow-pressor Ang II-elicited HTN and ROS formation in the SFO of this model. Thus, COX 1-derived PGE(2) signaling through EP(1)R in the SFO is required for the ROS-mediated HTN induced by systemic infusion of Ang II and suggests that EP(1)R in the SFO may provide a novel target for antihypertensive therapy.

  19. Endotoxin-induced skeletal muscle wasting is prevented by angiotensin-(1-7) through a p38 MAPK-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Morales, María Gabriela; Olguín, Hugo; Di Capua, Gabriella; Brandan, Enrique; Simon, Felipe; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy induced during sepsis syndrome produced by endotoxin in the form of LPS (lipopolysaccharide), is a pathological condition characterized by the loss of strength and muscle mass, an increase in MHC (myosin heavy chain) degradation, and an increase in the expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 (muscle-specific RING-finger protein 1), two ubiquitin E3 ligases belonging to the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Ang-(1-7) [Angiotensin-(1-7)], through its Mas receptor, has beneficial effects in skeletal muscle. We evaluated in vivo the role of Ang-(1-7) and Mas receptor on the muscle wasting induced by LPS injection into C57BL/10J mice. In vitro studies were performed in murine C2C12 myotubes and isolated myofibres from EDL (extensor digitorum longus) muscle. In addition, the participation of p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) in the Ang-(1-7) effect on the LPS-induced muscle atrophy was evaluated. Our results show that Ang-(1-7) prevents the decrease in the diameter of myofibres and myotubes, the decrease in muscle strength, the diminution in MHC levels and the induction of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expression, all of which are induced by LPS. These effects were reversed by using A779, a Mas antagonist. Ang-(1-7) exerts these anti-atrophic effects at least in part by inhibiting the LPS-dependent activation of p38 MAPK both in vitro and in vivo. We have demonstrated for the first time that Ang-(1-7) counteracts the skeletal muscle atrophy induced by endotoxin through a mechanism dependent on the Mas receptor that involves a decrease in p38 MAPK phosphorylation. The present study indicates that Ang-(1-7) is a novel molecule with a potential therapeutic use to improve muscle wasting during endotoxin-induced sepsis syndrome.

  20. Clathrin-dependent internalization of the angiotensin II AT₁A receptor links receptor internalization to COX-2 protein expression in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Morinelli, Thomas A; Walker, Linda P; Velez, Juan Carlos Q; Ullian, Michael E

    2015-02-05

    The major effects of Angiotensin II (AngII) in vascular tissue are mediated by AngII AT1A receptor activation. Certain effects initiated by AT1A receptor activation require receptor internalization. In rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (RASMC), AngII stimulates cyclooxygenase 2 protein expression. We have previously shown this is mediated by β-arrestin-dependent receptor internalization and NF-κB activation. In this study, a specific inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), pitstop-2, was used to test the hypothesis that clathrin-dependent internalization of activated AT1A receptor mediates NF-κB activation and subsequent cyclooxygenase 2 expression. Radioligand binding assays, real time qt-PCR and immunoblotting were used to document the effects of pitstop-2 on AngII binding and signaling in RASMC. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) was used to image pitstop-2׳s effects on AT1 receptor/GFP internalization in HEK-293 cells and p65 NF-κB nuclear localization in RASMC. Pitstop-2 significantly inhibited internalization of AT1A receptor (44.7% ± 3.1% Control vs. 13.2% ± 8.3% Pitstop-2; n=3) as determined by radioligand binding studies in RASMC. Studies utilizing AT1A receptor/GFP expressed in HEK 293 cells and LSCM confirmed these findings. Pitstop-2 significantly inhibited AngII-induced p65 NF-κB phosphorylation and nuclear localization, COX-2 message and protein expression in RASMC without altering activation of p42/44 ERK or TNFα signaling. Pitstop-2, a specific inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, confirms that internalization of activated AT1A receptor mediates AngII activation of cyclooxygenase 2 expression in RASMC. These data provide support for additional intracellular signaling pathways activated through β-arrestin mediated internalization of G protein-coupled receptors, such as AT1A receptors.

  1. CARMA3/Bcl10/MALT1-dependent NF-κB activation mediates angiotensin II-responsive inflammatory signaling in nonimmune cells

    PubMed Central

    McAllister-Lucas, Linda M.; Ruland, Jürgen; Siu, Katy; Jin, Xiaohong; Gu, Shufang; Kim, David S. L.; Kuffa, Peter; Kohrt, Dawn; Mak, Tak W.; Nuñez, Gabriel; Lucas, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a peptide hormone that, like many cytokines, acts as a proinflammatory agent and growth factor. After injury to the liver, the hormone assists in tissue repair by stimulating hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells to synthesize extracellular matrix proteins and secrete secondary cytokines and by stimulating myofibroblasts to proliferate. However, under conditions of chronic liver injury, all of these effects conspire to promote pathologic liver fibrosis. Much of this effect of Ang II results from activation of the proinflammatory NF-κB transcription factor in response to stimulation of the type 1 Ang II receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor. Here, we characterize a previously undescribed signaling pathway mediating Ang II-dependent activation of NF-κB, which is composed of three principal proteins, CARMA3, Bcl10, and MALT1. Blocking the function of any of these proteins, through the use of either dominant-negative mutants, RNAi, or gene targeting, effectively abolishes Ang II-dependent NF-κB activation in hepatocytes. In addition, Bcl10−/− mice show defective hepatic cytokine production after Ang II treatment. Evidence also is presented that this pathway activates NF-κB through ubiquitination of IKKγ, the regulatory subunit of the IκB kinase complex. These results elucidate a concrete series of molecular events that link ligand activation of the type 1 Ang II receptor to stimulation of the NF-κB transcription factor. These findings also uncover a function of the CARMA, Bcl10, and MALT1 proteins in cells outside the immune system. PMID:17101977

  2. Sex-dependent association between angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism and obesity in relation to sodium intake in children.

    PubMed

    Yang, Soo Jin; Kim, Sunyoung; Park, Hyesoon; Kim, Seon-Mee; Choi, Kyung-Mook; Lim, Yunsook; Lee, Myoungsook

    2013-03-01

    Obesity is a complex condition that is influenced by genetic and environmental factors and is associated with an increased risk for diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is well characterized in the control of blood pressure. This study investigated whether the ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism affects obesity in relation to sodium intake in children. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1260 elementary schoolchildren (633 boys and 627 girls). Subjects were assessed for the degree of obesity, sodium intake, and ACE I/D genotype, and associations were evaluated between the ACE I/D polymorphism and obesity in relation to sodium intake. Sodium intake was significantly correlated with the obesity index (r = 0.048, P = 0.016) and was particularly high in obese D-carrier boys compared with normal D-carrier boys. D-carrier boys did not show any association with the degree of obesity, whereas D-carrier girls with a high sodium intake exhibited a significant association (odds ratio 0.551, P = 0.042) and a negative correlation between the D allele and obesity as a continuous variable (regression coefficient -3.095, P = 0.020), showing gender-dependent associations between the ACE I/D polymorphism and obesity in relation to sodium intake. These findings demonstrate that the association between the ACE I/D polymorphism and obesity in relation to sodium intake is gender dependent in children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibitor, Tadalafil, Protects against Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion through Protein-Kinase G Dependent Generation of Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Fadi N.; Chau, Vinh Q.; Hoke, Nicholas N.; Abbate, Antonio; Varma, Amit; Ockaili, Ramzi A.; Toldo, Stefano; Kukreja, Rakesh C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tadalafil is a novel long acting inhibitor of phosphodiesterase-5. Since cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) signaling plays a key role in cardioprotection, we hypothesized that PKG activation with tadalafil would limit myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and dysfunction. Additionally, we contemplated that cardioprotection with tadalafil is mediated by hydrogen sulfide (H2S) signaling in a PKG-dependent fashion. Methods and Results After baseline transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), adult ICR mice were injected i.p. with vehicle (10% DMSO) or tadalafil (1 mg/kg) with or without KT5823 (KT, PKG blocker, 1 mg/kg) or dl-propargylglycine [PAG, Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE, H2S-producing enzyme) blocker; 50 mg/kg] 1 h prior to coronary artery ligation for 30 min and reperfusion for 24 h, whereas C57BL-wild type and CSE-knockout mice were treated with either vehicle or tadalafil. After reperfusion, TTE was performed and hearts were collected for infarct size (IS) measurement using TTC staining. Survival was increased with tadalafil (95%) compared with control (65%, P<0.05). Infarct size was reduced with tadalafil (13.2±1.7%) compared to vehicle (40.6±2.5%; P<0.05). KT and PAG abolished tadalafil-induced protection (IS: 39.2±1% and 51.2±2.4%, respectively) similar to genetic deletion of CSE (47.2±5.1%). Moreover, tadalafil preserved fractional shortening (FS: 31±1.5%) compared to control (FS: 22±4.8%, P<0.05). Baseline FS was 44±1.7%. KT and PAG abrogated the preservation of LV function with tadalafil by a decline in FS to 17±1% and 23±3%, respectively. Compared to vehicle, myocardial H2S production was significantly increased with tadalafil and was abolished with KT. Conclusion PKG activation with tadalafil limits myocardial infarction and preserves LV function through H2S signaling. PMID:19752383

  4. Efficacy of myocardial protection with hypothermic blood cardioplegia depends on oxygen.

    PubMed

    Vinten-Johansen, J; Julian, J S; Yokoyama, H; Johnston, W E; Smith, T D; McGee, D S; Cordell, A R

    1991-10-01

    The role of oxygen (O2) in blood cardioplegia (BCP) remains controversial. On the one hand, O2 reduces ischemic injury between BCP infusions by maintaining energy production through oxidative pathways. On the other hand, O2 carried by blood may not be released to the tissue at 4 degrees C or potentially provides substrate for deleterious O2 radical species. This study tests the hypothesis that O2 is a critical component in myocardial protection afforded by BCP. In 17 anesthetized dogs, left ventricular performance was measured by left ventricular end-systolic pressure-volume relations using the position of the end-systolic pressure-volume relation quantitated by the left ventricular midrange volume intercept at 100 mm Hg (V100) to describe performance. After 30 minutes of global normothermic ischemia, hearts were protected with multidose 4 degrees C BCP for 1 hour of arrest. Oxygen content in BCP was adjusted to 1.1 +/- 0.2 vol% (n = 7; desaturated BCP group), 4.3 +/- 0.5 vol% (n = 5; intermediate oxygenated BCP group), or 10.2 +/- 0.6 vol% (n = 5; saturated BCP group) using a membrane oxygenator interposed in the BCP circuit and aerated with an appropriate mixture of O2, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. After 1 hour of 37 degrees C reperfusion, 3 of the 7 dogs in the desaturated BCP group failed to generate sufficient cardiac output to discontinue bypass. In the remaining 4 dogs, severe left ventricular depression caused a rightward shift in V100 from 17 +/- 4 to 47 +/- 9 mL (p = 0.02). With intermediate BCP, all hearts were weaned from bypass with marginal left ventricular depression (V100, 20 +/- 5 versus 46 +/- 16 mL; p = 0.10). In contrast, hearts protected with saturated BCP showed no significant increase in V100 (13 +/- 4 versus 24 +/- 13 mL; p = 0.23). We conclude that O2 in BCP is critical to its myocardial protective properties.

  5. T-lymphocyte induction of human monocyte angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is not dependent upon T-lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Vuk-Pavlovic, Z.; Rohrbach, M.S.

    1986-03-05

    Human peripheral blood monocytes cultured in serum free media for seven days show a basal activity of the ectoenzyme ACE which is augmented 2-3 times by the presence of autologous peripheral blood T-lymphocytes. Since these two cell types are also involved in autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction if serum is present, the authors compared the ability of T-cells to stimulate ACE activity in the presence or absence of proliferation (measured by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation). By the seventh day, cultures with 5% AB/sup +/ serum showed significant increase in proliferation but no increase in ACE activity compared to the serum free cultures. Even higher proliferation rate achieved by co-culturing T-lymphocytes with allogeneic monocytes did not increase ACE production; on the contrary, ACE activity remained at the basal level. Monocyte-T-cell co-cultures stimulated with increasing concentrations of ConA or PHA showed dose dependent increases in proliferation but parallel decreases in ACE activity. Addition of soluble antigen (Candida albicans) also enhanced proliferation but not ACE synthesis. They conclude that T-lymphocyte induction of monocyte ACE is a result of cooperation between autologous cells which is not dependent upon T-cell proliferation.

  6. Oral administration of bisphenol A induces high blood pressure through angiotensin II/CaMKII-dependent uncoupling of eNOS.

    PubMed

    Saura, Marta; Marquez, Susana; Reventun, Paula; Olea-Herrero, Nuria; Arenas, María Isabel; Moreno-Gómez-Toledano, Rafael; Gómez-Parrizas, Mónica; Muñóz-Moreno, Carmen; González-Santander, Marta; Zaragoza, Carlos; Bosch, Ricardo J

    2014-11-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is found in human urine and fat tissue. Higher urinary BPA concentrations are associated with arterial hypertension. To shed light on the underlying mechanism, we orally administered BPA (4 nM to 400 μM in drinking water) to 8-wk-old CD11 mice over 30 d. Mice developed dosage-dependent high blood pressure (systolic 130 ± 12 vs. 170 ± 12 mmHg; EC50 0.4 μM), impairment of acetylcholine (AcH)-induced carotid relaxation (0.66 ± 0.08 vs. 0.44 ± 0.1 mm), a 1.7-fold increase in arterial angiotensin II (AngII), an 8.7-fold increase in eNOS mRNA and protein, and significant eNOS-dependent superoxide and peroxynitrite accumulation. AngII inhibition with 0.5 mg/ml losartan reduced oxidative stress and normalized blood pressure and endothelium-dependent relaxation, which suggests that AngII uncouples eNOS and contributes to the BPA-induced endothelial dysfunction by promoting oxidative and nitrosative stress. Microarray analysis of mouse aortic endothelial cells revealed a 2.5-fold increase in expression of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-α (CaMKII-α) in response to 10 nM BPA, with increased expression of phosphorylated-CaMKII-α in carotid rings of BPA-exposed mice, whereas CaMKII-α inhibition with 100 nM autocamptide-2-related inhibitor peptide (AIP) reduced BPA-mediated increase of superoxide. Administration of CaMKII-α inhibitor KN 93 reduced BPA-induced blood pressure and carotid blood velocity in mice, and reverted BPA-mediated carotid constriction in response to treatment with AcH. Given that CaMKII-α inhibition prevents BPA-mediated high blood pressure, our data suggest that BPA regulates blood pressure by inducing AngII/CaMKII-α uncoupling of eNOS.

  7. [Peculiarities of the development and clinical course of myocardial infarction depending on solar activity].

    PubMed

    Kornilova, L S; Nikitin, G A

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of 214,908 calls for ambulance demonstrated a significant (p = 0.95) rise in the frequency of acute myocardial infanction (AMI) in men in a year of low solar activity (LSA) and in women during a year with high solar activity (HSA). The increased incidence of sudden death, clinical death, cardiogenic shock, and pulmonary oedema was associated with HSA. The largest number of calls for AMI patients was recorded between 9.00 and 12.00, the lowest from 3.00 to 6.00. The frequency of AMI in the daytime was higher than at night. This difference was also apparent in "astronomic" seasons and half years with low and high solar activity. The incidence of AMI was highest during "astronomic" autumn and lowered in winter time. It was elevated in December of the LSA year and in May of the HSA year, in Mondays of HSA and Thursdays of LSA years. The minimal number of AMI episodes was recorded in weekends. Short daylight period and low air temperature combined with changes of atmospheric pressure and relative humidity during the cold period of the LSA year associated with a significant rise in the incidence of AIM. The overall frequency of AMI significantly increased during magnetic storms compared with the preceding days or immediately after them at both HSA and LSA. Mean daily frequency of AMI significantly increased within 24 hours before a magnetic storm only in the HAS year.

  8. Nox4 NAD(P)H Oxidase Mediates Src-dependent Tyrosine Phosphorylation of PDK-1 in Response to Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Block, Karen; Eid, Assaad; Griendling, Kathy K.; Lee, Duck-Yoon; Wittrant, Yohann; Gorin, Yves

    2008-01-01

    Activation of glomerular mesangial cells (MCs) by angiotensin II (Ang II) leads to hypertrophy and extracellular matrix accumulation. Here, we demonstrate that, in MCs, Ang II induces an increase in PDK-1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1) kinase activity that required its phosphorylation on tyrosine 9 and 373/376. Introduction into the cells of PDK-1, mutated on these tyrosine residues or kinase-inactive, attenuates Ang II-induced hypertrophy and fibronectin accumulation. Ang II-mediated PDK-1 activation and tyrosine phosphorylation (total and on residues 9 and 373/376) are inhibited in cells transfected with small interfering RNA for Src, indicating that Src is upstream of PDK-1. In cells expressing oxidation-resistant Src mutant C487A, Ang II-induced hypertrophy and fibronectin expression are prevented, suggesting that the pathway is redox-sensitive. Ang II also up-regulates Nox4 protein, and siNox4 abrogates the Ang II-induced increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Small interfering RNA for Nox4 also inhibits Ang II-induced activation of Src and PDK-1 tyrosine phosphorylation (total and on residues 9 and 373/376), demonstrating that Nox4 functions upstream of Src and PDK-1. Importantly, inhibition of Nox4, Src, or PDK-1 prevents the stimulatory effect of Ang II on fibronectin accumulation and cell hypertrophy. This work provides the first evidence that Nox4-derived ROS are responsible for Ang II-induced PDK-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and activation through stimulation of Src. Importantly, this pathway contributes to Ang II-induced MC hypertrophy and fibronectin accumulation. These data shed light on molecular processes underlying the oxidative signaling cascade engaged by Ang II and identify potential targets for intervention to prevent renal hypertrophy and fibrosis. PMID:18559349

  9. Angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress resets the Ca2+ dependence of Ca2+-calmodulin protein kinase II and promotes a death pathway conserved across different species.

    PubMed

    Palomeque, Julieta; Rueda, Omar Velez; Sapia, Luciana; Valverde, Carlos A; Salas, Margarita; Petroff, Martin Vila; Mattiazzi, Alicia

    2009-12-04

    Angiotensin (Ang) II-induced apoptosis was reported to be mediated by different signaling molecules. Whether these molecules are either interconnected in a single pathway or constitute different and alternative cascades by which Ang II exerts its apoptotic action, is not known. To investigate in cultured myocytes from adult cat and rat, 2 species in which Ang II has opposite inotropic effects, the signaling cascade involved in Ang II-induced apoptosis. Ang II (1 micromol/L) reduced cat/rat myocytes viability by approximately 40%, in part, because of apoptosis (TUNEL/caspase-3 activity). In both species, apoptosis was associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK)II, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) activation and was prevented by the ROS scavenger MPG (2-mercaptopropionylglycine) or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI (diphenyleneiodonium) by CaMKII inhibitors (KN-93 and AIP [autocamtide 2-related inhibitory peptide]) or in transgenic mice expressing a CaMKII inhibitory peptide and by the p38MAPK inhibitor, SB202190. Furthermore, p38MAPK overexpression exacerbated Ang II-induced cell mortality. Moreover, although KN-93 did not affect Ang II-induced ROS production, it prevented p38MAPK activation. Results further show that CaMKII can be activated by Ang II or H(2)O(2), even in the presence of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM, in myocytes and in EGTA-Ca(2+)-free solutions in the presence of the calmodulin inhibitor W-7 in in vitro experiments. (1) The Ang II-induced apoptotic cascade converges in both species, in a common pathway mediated by ROS-dependent CaMKII activation which results in p38MAPK activation and apoptosis. (2) In the presence of Ang II or ROS, CaMKII may be activated at subdiastolic Ca(2+) concentrations, suggesting a new mechanism by which ROS reset the Ca(2+) dependence of CaMKII to extremely low Ca(2+) levels.

  10. Gene Therapy With Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Protects Against Myocardial Infarction via a Cyclooxygenase-2—Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qianhong; Guo, Yiru; Xuan, Yu-Ting; Lowenstein, Charles J.; Stevenson, Susan C.; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Wu, Wen-Jian; Zhu, Yanqing; Bolli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Although the inducible isoform of NO synthase (iNOS) mediates late preconditioning (PC), it is unknown whether iNOS gene transfer can replicate the cardioprotective effects of late PC, and the role of this protein in myocardial ischemia is controversial. Thus, the cDNA for human iNOS was cloned behind the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) promoter to create adenovirus (Ad) 5/iNOS lacking E1, E2a, and E3 regions. Intramyocardial injection of Ad5/iNOS in mice increased local iNOS protein expression and activity and markedly reduced infarct size. The infarct-sparing effects of Ad5/iNOS were at least as powerful as those of ischemic PC. The increased iNOS expression was associated with increased cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression and prostanoid levels. Pretreatment with the COX-2–selective inhibitor NS-398 completely abrogated the infarct-sparing actions of Ad5/iNOS, demonstrating that COX-2 is an obligatory downstream effector of iNOS-dependent cardioprotection. We conclude that gene transfer of iNOS (an enzyme commonly thought to be detrimental) affords powerful cardioprotection the magnitude of which is equivalent to that of late PC. This is the first report that upregulation of iNOS, in itself, is sufficient to reduce infarct size. The results provide proof-of-principle for gene therapy against ischemia/reperfusion injury, which increases local myocardial NO synthase levels without the need for continuous intravenous infusion of NO donors and without altering systemic hemodynamics. The data also reveal the existence of a close coupling between iNOS and COX-2, whereby induction of the former enzyme leads to secondary induction of the latter, which in turn mediates the cytoprotective effects of iNOS. We propose that iNOS and COX-2 form a stress-responsive functional module that mitigates ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:12702642

  11. Antagonism of angiotensin 1–7 prevents the therapeutic effects of recombinant human ACE2

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vaibhav B.; Takawale, Abhijit; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Das, Subhash K.; Basu, Ratnadeep; Grant, Maria B.; Hall, David A.; Kassiri, Zamaneh

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the angiotensin 1–7/Mas receptor (MasR) axis counteracts angiotensin II (Ang II)-mediated cardiovascular disease. Recombinant human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (rhACE2) generates Ang 1–7 from Ang II. We hypothesized that the therapeutic effects of rhACE2 are dependent on Ang 1–7 action. Wild type male C57BL/6 mice (10–12 weeks old) were infused with Ang II (1.5 mg/kg/d) and treated with rhACE2 (2 mg/kg/d). The Ang 1–7 antagonist, A779 (200 ng/kg/min), was administered to a parallel group of mice. rhACE2 prevented Ang II-induced hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction while A779 prevented these beneficial effects and precipitated systolic dysfunction. rhACE2 effectively antagonized Ang II-mediated myocardial fibrosis which was dependent on the action of Ang 1–7. Myocardial oxidative stress and matrix metalloproteinase 2 activity was further increased by Ang 1–7 inhibition even in the presence of rhACE2. Activation of Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) by rhACE2 were suppressed by the antagonism of Ang 1–7 while the activation of pathological signaling pathways was maintained. Blocking Ang 1–7 action prevents the therapeutic effects of rhACE2 in the setting of elevated Ang II culminating in systolic dysfunction. These results highlight a key cardioprotective role of Ang 1–7, and increased Ang 1–7 action represents a potential therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25874965

  12. Angiotensin-II-dependent Hypertension Requires Cyclooxygenase 1-derived Prostaglandin E2 and EP1 Receptor Signaling in the Subfornical Organ of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xian; Peterson, Jeffrey R.; Wang, Gang; Anrather, Josef; Young, Colin N.; Guruju, Mallikarjuna R.; Burmeister, Melissa A.; Iadecola, Costantino; Davisson, Robin L.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived prostanoids have long been implicated in blood pressure (BP) regulation. Recently prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and its receptor EP1R have emerged as key players in angiotensin II (Ang-II)-dependent hypertension (HTN) and related end-organ damage. However, the enzymatic source of PGE2, ie COX-1 or COX-2, and its site(s) of action are not known. The subfornical organ (SFO) is a key forebrain region that mediates systemic Ang-II-dependent HTN via reactive oxygen species (ROS). We tested the hypothesis that cross-talk between PGE2/EP1R and ROS signaling in the SFO is required for Ang-II HTN. Radiotelemetric assessment of BP revealed that HTN induced by infusion of systemic “slow-pressor” doses of Ang-II was abolished in mice with null mutations in EP1R or COX-1 but not COX-2. Slow-pressor Ang-II-evoked HTN and ROS formation in the SFO were prevented when the EP1R antagonist SC-51089 was infused directly into brains of wild-type mice, and Ang-II-induced ROS production was blunted in cells dissociated from SFO of EP1R−/− and COX-1−/− but not COX-2−/− mice. In addition, slow-pressor Ang-II infusion caused a ~3-fold increase in PGE2 levels in the SFO but not in other brain regions. Finally, genetic reconstitution of EP1R selectively in the SFO of EP1R-null mice was sufficient to rescue slow-pressor AngII-elicited HTN and ROS formation in the SFO of this model. Thus, COX-1-derived PGE2 signaling through EP1R in the SFO is required for the ROS-mediated HTN induced by systemic infusion of Ang-II, and suggests that EP1R in the SFO may provide a novel target for antihypertensive therapy. PMID:22371360

  13. NF-κB-Dependent Upregulation of NCX1 Induced by Angiotensin II Contributes to Calcium Influx in Rat Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bei; Yang, Lixia; Zhang, Bin; Kuang, Chenwei; Huang, Shiliang; Guo, Ruiwei

    2016-11-01

    The reverse mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) 1 can transport Ca(2+) into cells and is involved in the contractile regulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the development of hypertension. We hypothesized that upregulation of NCX1 expression induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) could be dependent on activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and contributes to Ca(2+) influx in VSMCs. An osmotic minipump was implanted for administration of Ang II in Sprague-Dawley rats, and blood pressure, as well as NCX1 expression, in the aorta was measured. VSMCs were cultured to verify that Ang II-upregulated NCX1 expression is dependent on activation of NF-κB and contributes to Ca(2+) influx. Ang II-upregulated NCX1 expression in rat aortas (2.1-fold at day 6) and VSMCs (1.7-fold at 24 hours) and NF-κB knockdown and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor resulted in 2.1- and 2.0-fold decreases in Ang II-upregulated NCX1 expression in VSMCs. KB-R7943 (an inhibitor of NCX1 reversal) and NCX1 knockdown decreased Ang II-induced Ca(2+) influx 1.4- and 1.3- fold, respectively. KB-R7943 and removal of extracellular Na(+) decreased Ang II-initiated store depletion-mediated Ca(2+) entry by 1.5- and 1.3-fold, respectively. Moreover, NF-κB knockdown and use of a p38 MAPK inhibitor resulted in about 1.3-fold decreases in Ang II-induced Ca(2+) influx through activation of reverse-mode NCX1. Ang II upregulates NCX1 expression through p38 MAPK and NF-κB pathways, and reverse-mode NCX1 plays an important part in Ang II-induced Ca(2+) influx in VSMCs, which may be associated with Ang II-initiated store-operated channel entry. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of angiotensin II on intracellular Ca2+ and pH in isolated beating rabbit hearts and myocytes loaded with the indicator indo-1.

    PubMed Central

    Ikenouchi, H; Barry, W H; Bridge, J H; Weinberg, E O; Apstein, C S; Lorell, B H

    1994-01-01

    1. Angiotensin II increases myocardial contractility in several species, including the rabbit and man. However, it is controversial whether the predominant mechanism is an increase in free cytosolic [Ca2+]i or a change in myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity. To address this question, we infused angiotensin II in isolated perfused rabbit hearts loaded with the Ca2+ indicator indo-1 AM and measured changes in beat-to-beat surface transients of the Ca2+i-sensitive 400:500 nm ratio and left ventricular contractility. The effects of angiotensin II were compared with the response to a Ca(2+)-dependent increase in the inotropic state produced by a change in the perfusate [Ca2+] from 0.9 to 3.6 nM. 2. In the isolated beating heart, an increase in perfusate [Ca2+] caused an increase in left ventricular pressure +dP/dt in association with an increase in peak systolic [Ca2+]i. Angiotensin II perfusion caused a similar increase in left ventricular +dP/dt in the absence of any increase in peak systolic [Ca2+]i. 3. To exclude any contribution of non-myocyte sources of Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescence which may be present in the intact heart, we also compared the effects of angiotensin II and a change in superfusate [Ca2+] in collagenase-dissociated paced adult rabbit ventricular myocytes loaded with indo-1 AM. In the isolated rabbit myocytes a change in perfusate [Ca2+] from 0.9 to 3.6 mM caused an increase in peak systolic cell shortening coincident with an increase in peak systolic [Ca2+]i. In contrast, angiotensin II caused a similar increase in peak systolic cell shortening whereas there was no increase in peak systolic [Ca2+]i. There was also no change in inward Ca2+ current (ICa) in response to angiotensin II. 4. To investigate further the mechanism of the positive inotropic action of angiotensin II, its effects on intracellular pH were studied in isolated rabbit myocytes loaded with the fluorescent H+ probe SNARF 1. These experiments demonstrated that angiotensin II induced a 0.2 p

  15. Myocardial oxidative damage is induced by cardiac Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways in human cocaine-related overdose

    PubMed Central

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Cerretani, Daniela; Cantatore, Santina; Fiaschi, Anna Ida; Frati, Paola; Micheli, Lucia; Neri, Margherita; Cipolloni, Luigi; Di Paolo, Marco; Pinchi, Enrica; Riezzo, Irene; Santurro, Alessandro; Vullo, Annamaria; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse cardiac specimens from human cocaine-related overdose, to verify the hypothesis that cardiac toxicity by acute exposure to high dosage of cocaine could be mediated by unbalanced myocardial oxidative stress, and to evaluate the apoptotic response. To address these issues, biochemical and immunohistological markers of oxidative/nitrosative stress were evaluated. We found that i-NOS, NOX2 and nitrotyrosine expression were significantly higher in the hearts of subjects who had died from high doses of cocaine, compared to the control group. Increase of these markers was associated with a dramatic increase in 8-OHdG, another marker of oxidative stress. A high number of TUNEL-positive apoptotic myocells was observed in the study group compared to the control group. The immunoexpression of TNF-α was significantly higher in the cocaine group compared to the control group. Furthermore, we detected a significantly stronger immunoresponse to anti-SMAC/DIABLO in our study group compared to control cases. Both cardiac Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways appeared to be activated to a greater extent in the cocaine group than in the control group. Our results highlight the central role of oxidative stress in cocaine toxicity. High levels of NOS can promote the oxidation process and lead to apoptosis. PMID:28281685

  16. Angiotensin II Stimulates Thick Ascending Limb NO Production via AT2 Receptors and Akt1-dependent Nitric-oxide Synthase 3 (NOS3) Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Marcela; Garvin, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) acutely stimulates thick ascending limb (TAL) NO via an unknown mechanism. In endothelial cells, activation of Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2) stimulates NO. Akt1 activates NOS3 by direct phosphorylation. We hypothesized that Ang II stimulates TAL NO production via AT2-mediated Akt1 activation, which phosphorylates NOS3 at serine 1177. We measured NO production by fluorescence microscopy. In isolated TALs, Ang II (100 nm) increased NO production by 1.1 ± 0.2 fluorescence units/min (p < 0.01). Ang II increased cGMP accumulation by 4.9 ± 1.3 fmol/μg (p < 0.01). Upon adding the AT2 antagonist PD123319 (1 μm), Ang II failed to stimulate NO (0.1 ± 0.1 fluorescence units/min; p < 0.001 versus Ang II); adding the AT1 antagonist losartan (1 μm) resulted in Ang II stimulating NO by 0.9 ± 0.1 fluorescence units/min. Akt inhibitor (5 μm) blocked Ang II-stimulated NO (−0.1 ± 0.2 fluorescence units/min versus inhibitor alone). Phospho-Akt1 increased by 72% after 5 min (p < 0.006), returning to basal after 10 min. Phospho-Akt2 did not change after 5 min but increased by 115 and 163% after 10 and 15 min (p < 0.02). Phospho-Akt3 did not change. An AT2 agonist increased pAkt1 by 78% (p < 0.02), PI3K inhibition blocked this effect. In TALs transduced with dominant negative Akt1, Ang II failed to stimulate NO (0.1 ± 0.2 fluorescence units/min versus 1.2 ± 0.2 for controls; p < 0.001). Ang II increased phospho-NOS3 at serine 1177 by 130% (p < 0.01) and 150% after 5 and 10 min (p < 0.02). Ang II increased phosphoNOS3 at serine 633 by 50% after 5 min (p < 0.01). Akt inhibition prevented NOS3 phosphorylation. We concluded that Ang II enhances TAL NO production via activation of AT2 and Akt1-dependent phosphorylation of NOS3 at serines 1177 and 633. PMID:20299462

  17. Angiotensin II stimulates thick ascending limb NO production via AT(2) receptors and Akt1-dependent nitric-oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) activation.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Marcela; Garvin, Jeffrey L

    2010-05-14

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) acutely stimulates thick ascending limb (TAL) NO via an unknown mechanism. In endothelial cells, activation of Ang II type 2 receptor (AT(2)) stimulates NO. Akt1 activates NOS3 by direct phosphorylation. We hypothesized that Ang II stimulates TAL NO production via AT(2)-mediated Akt1 activation, which phosphorylates NOS3 at serine 1177. We measured NO production by fluorescence microscopy. In isolated TALs, Ang II (100 nm) increased NO production by 1.1 +/- 0.2 fluorescence units/min (p < 0.01). Ang II increased cGMP accumulation by 4.9 +/- 1.3 fmol/microg (p < 0.01). Upon adding the AT(2) antagonist PD123319 (1 microm), Ang II failed to stimulate NO (0.1 +/- 0.1 fluorescence units/min; p < 0.001 versus Ang II); adding the AT(1) antagonist losartan (1 microm) resulted in Ang II stimulating NO by 0.9 +/- 0.1 fluorescence units/min. Akt inhibitor (5 microm) blocked Ang II-stimulated NO (-0.1 +/- 0.2 fluorescence units/min versus inhibitor alone). Phospho-Akt1 increased by 72% after 5 min (p < 0.006), returning to basal after 10 min. Phospho-Akt2 did not change after 5 min but increased by 115 and 163% after 10 and 15 min (p < 0.02). Phospho-Akt3 did not change. An AT(2) agonist increased pAkt1 by 78% (p < 0.02), PI3K inhibition blocked this effect. In TALs transduced with dominant negative Akt1, Ang II failed to stimulate NO (0.1 +/- 0.2 fluorescence units/min versus 1.2 +/- 0.2 for controls; p < 0.001). Ang II increased phospho-NOS3 at serine 1177 by 130% (p < 0.01) and 150% after 5 and 10 min (p < 0.02). Ang II increased phosphoNOS3 at serine 633 by 50% after 5 min (p < 0.01). Akt inhibition prevented NOS3 phosphorylation. We concluded that Ang II enhances TAL NO production via activation of AT(2) and Akt1-dependent phosphorylation of NOS3 at serines 1177 and 633.

  18. ZYZ-168 alleviates cardiac fibrosis after myocardial infarction through inhibition of ERK1/2-dependent ROCK1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shanshan; Hieu, Tran Ba; Ma, Fenfen; Yu, Ying; Cao, Zhonglian; Wang, Minjun; Wu, Weijun; Mao, Yicheng; Rose, Peter; Law, Betty Yuen-Kwan; Zhu, Yi Zhun

    2017-01-01

    Selective treatments for myocardial infarction (MI) induced cardiac fibrosis are lacking. In this study, we focus on the therapeutic potential of a synthetic cardio-protective agent named ZYZ-168 towards MI-induced cardiac fibrosis and try to reveal the underlying mechanism. ZYZ-168 was administered to rats with coronary artery ligation over a period of six weeks. Ecocardiography and Masson staining showed that ZYZ-168 substantially improved cardiac function and reduced interstitial fibrosis. The expression of α–smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Collagen I were reduced as was the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These were related with decreased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and expression of Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1). In cardiac fibroblasts stimulated with TGF-β1, phenotypic switches of cardiac fibroblasts to myofibroblasts were observed. Inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation or knockdown of ROCK1 expectedly reduced TGF-β1 induced fibrotic responses. ZYZ-168 appeared to inhibit the fibrotic responses in a concentration dependent manner, in part via a decrease in ROCK 1 expression through inhibition of the phosphorylation status of ERK1/2. For inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation with a specific inhibitor reduced the activation of ROCK1. Considering its anti-apoptosis activity in MI, ZYZ-168 may be a potential drug candidate for treatment of MI-induced cardiac fibrosis. PMID:28266583

  19. ANGIOTENSIN II-INDUCED VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL MIGRATION AND GROWTH ARE MEDIATED BY CYTOCHROME P450 1B1-DEPENDENT SUPEROXIDE GENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Yaghini, Fariborz A.; Song, Chi Young; Lavrentyev, Eduard N.; Ghafoor, Hafiz U. B.; Fang, Xiao R.; Estes, Anne M.; Campbell, William B.; Malik, Kafait U.

    2010-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1, expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells, can metabolize arachidonic acid in vitro into several products including 12- and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids that stimulate vascular smooth muscle cell growth. This study was conducted to determine if cytochrome P450 1B1 contributes to angiotensin II-induced rat aortic smooth muscle cell migration, proliferation and protein synthesis. Ang II stimulated migration of these cells, measured by the wound healing approach, by 1.78 fold and DNA synthesis, measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation, by 1.44 fold after 24 hours, and protein synthesis, measured by [3H]leucine incorporation, by 1.40 fold after 48 hours. Treatment of vascular smooth muscle cells with the cytochrome P450 1B1 inhibitor, 2, 4, 3′, 5′-tetramethoxystilbene, or transduction of these cells with adenovirus cytochrome P450 1B1 shRNA, but not its scrambled control, reduced the activity of this enzyme and abolished angiotensin II- and arachidonic acid-induced cell migration, [3H]thymidine and [3H]leucine incorporation. Metabolism of arachidonic acid to 5-, 12-, 15- and 20-hydoxyeicosatetraenoic acids in these cells was not altered, but angiotensin II- and arachidonic acid-induced reactive oxygen species production and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, activity were inhibited by 2, 4, 3′, 5′-tetramethoxystilbene and cytochrome P450 1B1 shRNA, and by tempol that inactivates reactive oxygen species. Tempol did not alter cytochrome P450 1B1 activity. These data suggest that angiotensin II-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration and growth are mediated by reactive oxygen species generated from arachidonic acid by cytochrome P450 1B1 and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. PMID:20439821

  20. Neonatal Growth Restriction-Related Leptin Deficiency Enhances Leptin-Triggered Sympathetic Activation and Central Angiotensin II Receptor-Dependent Stress-Evoked Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Peotta, Veronica; Rahmouni, Kamal; Segar, Jeffrey L.; Morgan, Donald A.; Pitz, Kate M.; Rice, Olivia M.; Roghair, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Neonatal growth restriction (nGR) leads to leptin deficiency and increases the risk of hypertension. Previous studies have shown nGR-related hypertension is normalized by neonatal leptin (nLep) and exacerbated by psychological stress. With recent studies linking leptin and angiotensin signaling, we hypothesized that nGR-induced nLep deficiency increases adult leptin sensitivity; leading to leptin- or stress-induced hypertension, through a pathway involving central angiotensin II type 1 receptors. Methods We randomized mice with incipient nGR, by virtue of their presence in large litters, to vehicle or physiologic nLep supplementation (80 ng/g/d). Adult caloric intake and arterial pressure were monitored at baseline, during intracerebroventricular losartan infusion and during systemic leptin administration. Results nGR increased leptin-triggered renal sympathetic activation and hypertension with increased leptin receptor expression in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus; all of those nGR-associated phenotypes were normalized by nLep. nGR mice also had stress-related hyperphagia and hypertension, but only the stress hypertension was blocked by central losartan infusion. Conclusion nGR leads to stress hypertension through a pathway that involves central angiotensin II receptors, and nGR-associated leptin deficiency increases leptin-triggered hypertension in adulthood. These data suggest potential roles for preservation of neonatal growth and nLep supplementation in the prevention of nGR-related hypertension. PMID:27049292

  1. Myocardial infarction. Considerations for geriatric patients.

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, D.

    1994-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is common among the elderly. Presentation is often atypical, and symptoms include confusion, weakness, chest pain, dyspnea, and vomiting. Serial electrocardiograms and cardiac enzyme determination lead to diagnosis. Postmyocardial treatments include acetylsalicylic acid, beta-blockers, nitrates, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Thrombolytic agents are safe and useful. Angioplasty and cardiac surgery should be considered for certain patients. PMID:7912578

  2. [Angiotensin I biosynthesis and electrolytes].

    PubMed

    Tögel, E; Jarosch, E; Rammal, E

    1983-01-01

    An influence on the production of Angiotensin-I by different ions is demonstrated. Plasma Renin activity was thereby measured by the methods of Boyd et al. (pH 7.5) and of Fyhrquist et al. (pH 6.0) at a concentration of each ion of 50 mmol/L. Ions of different size were used, ranging from Lithium to the Ammonium-ion. A definitive dependency of this effect on the Angiotensin production by the ion size could be shown. With Sodium the concentration in serum was varied at 5 levels (130-170 mmol/L) and Renin measured at Potassium concentrations in low (3.4-3.7 mmol/L) or high (4.8-5.1 mmol/L) so-called normal ranges. A marked increase of the production of Angiotensin-I with increasing sodium concentrations at a low Potassium range was observed and the opposite was true at high Potassium concentrations. These effects have to be taken into account when assaying Plasma Renin activity. In addition, they offer also an explanation of the well-known but unsolved facts of the influence of Sodium and Potassium on the pathogenesis of hypertonia.

  3. Combination of angiotensin-(1–7) with perindopril is better than single therapy in ameliorating diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Panpan; Yang, Jianmin; Liu, Yanping; Zhang, Mingxiang; Zhang, Kai; Gao, Fei; Chen, Yuguo; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    We recently found that overexpression of angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme 2, which metabolizes Ang-II to Ang-(1–7) and Ang-I to Ang-(1–9), may improve left ventricular remodeling in diabetic cardiomyopathy. Here we aimed to test whether chronic infusion of Ang-(1–7) can dose-dependently ameliorate left ventricular remodeling and function in a rat model of diabetic cardiomyopathy and whether the combination of Ang-(1–7) and Ang-converting enzyme inhibition may be superior to single therapy. Our results showed that Ang-(1–7) treatment dose-dependently ameliorated left ventricular remodeling and dysfunction in diabetic rats by attenuating myocardial fibrosis, myocardial hypertrophy and myocyte apoptosis via both the Mas receptor and angiotensin II type 2 receptor. Furthermore, combining Ang-(1–7) with perindopril provided additional cardioprotection relative to single therapy. Ang-(1–7) administration provides a novel and promising approach for treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25740572

  4. Intrarenal Renin Angiotensin System Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Marcus; Kaminski, Henriette; Castrop, Hayo; Bader, Michael; Himmerkus, Nina; Bleich, Markus; Bachmann, Sebastian; Theilig, Franziska

    2010-01-01

    The existence of a local renin angiotensin system (RAS) of the kidney has been established. Angiotensinogen (AGT), renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin receptors, and high concentrations of luminal angiotensin II have been found in the proximal tubule. Although functional data have documented the relevance of a local RAS, the dualism between biosynthesis and endocytotic uptake of its components and their cellular processing has been incompletely understood. To resolve this, we have selectively analyzed their distribution, endocytosis, transcytosis, and biosynthesis in the proximal tubule. The presence of immunoreactive AGT, restricted to the early proximal tubule, was due to its retrieval from the ultrafiltrate and storage in endosomal and lysosomal compartments. Cellular uptake was demonstrated by autoradiography of radiolabeled AGT and depended on intact endocytosis. AGT was identified as a ligand of the multiple ligand-binding repeats of megalin. AGT biosynthesis was restricted to the proximal straight tubule, revealing substantial AGT mRNA expression. Transgenic AGT overexpression under the control of an endogenous promoter was also restricted to the late proximal tubule. Proximal handling of renin largely followed the patterns of AGT, whereas its local biosynthesis was not significant. Transcytotic transport of AGT in a proximal cell line revealed a 5% recovery rate after 1 h. ACE was expressed along late proximal brush-border membrane, whereas ACE2 was present along the entire segment. Surface expression of ACE and ACE2 differed as a function of endocytosis. Our data on the localization and cellular processing of RAS components provide new aspects of the functional concept of a “self-contained” renal RAS. PMID:20966072

  5. Angiotensin II formation in the intact human heart. Predominance of the angiotensin-converting enzyme pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Zisman, L S; Abraham, W T; Meixell, G E; Vamvakias, B N; Quaife, R A; Lowes, B D; Roden, R L; Peacock, S J; Groves, B M; Raynolds, M V

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that the contribution of myocardial tissue angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to angiotensin II (Ang II) formation in the human heart is low compared with non-ACE pathways. However, little is known about the actual in vivo contribution of these pathways to Ang II formation in the human heart. To examine angiotensin II formation in the intact human heart, we administered intracoronary 123I-labeled angiotensin I (Ang I) with and without intracoronary enalaprilat to orthotopic heart transplant recipients. The fractional conversion of Ang I to Ang II, calculated after separation of angiotensin peptides by HPLC, was 0.415 +/- 0.104 (n = 5, mean +/- SD). Enalaprilat reduced fractional conversion by 89%, to a value of 0.044 +/- 0.053 (n = 4, P = 0.002). In a separate study of explanted hearts, a newly developed in vitro Ang II-forming assay was used to examine cardiac tissue ACE activity independent of circulating components. ACE activity in solubilized left ventricular membrane preparations from failing hearts was 49.6 +/- 5.3 fmol 125I-Ang II formed per minute per milligram of protein (n = 8, +/- SE), and 35.9 +/- 4.8 fmol/min/mg from nonfailing human hearts (n = 7, P = 0.08). In the presence of 1 microM enalaprilat, ACE activity was reduced by 85%, to 7.3 +/- 1.4 fmol/min/mg in the failing group and to 4.6 +/- 1.3 fmol/min/mg in the nonfailing group (P < 0.001). We conclude that the predominant pathway for angiotensin II formation in the human heart is through ACE. Images PMID:7657820

  6. Angiotensin-(1-7)-induced renal vasodilation in hypertensive humans is attenuated by low sodium intake and angiotensin II co-infusion.

    PubMed

    van Twist, Daan J L; Houben, Alfons J H M; de Haan, Michiel W; Mostard, Guy J M; Kroon, Abraham A; de Leeuw, Peter W

    2013-10-01

    Current evidence suggests that angiotensin-(1-7) plays an important role in the regulation of tissue blood flow. This evidence, however, is restricted to studies in animals and human forearm. Therefore, we studied the effects of intrarenal angiotensin-(1-7) infusion on renal blood flow in hypertensive humans. To assess the influence of renin-angiotensin system activity, sodium intake was varied and co-infusion with angiotensin II was performed in a subgroup. In 57 hypertensive patients who were scheduled for renal angiography, renal blood flow was measured ((133)Xenon washout method) before and during intrarenal infusion of angiotensin-(1-7) (3 incremental doses: 0.27, 0.9, and 2.7 ng/kg per minute). Patients were randomized into low or high sodium intake. These 2 groups of patients received angiotensin-(1-7), with or without intrarenal co-infusion of angiotensin II (0.3 ng/kg per minute). Angiotensin-(1-7) infusion resulted in intrarenal vasodilation in patients adhering to a sodium-rich diet. This vasodilatory effect of angiotensin-(1-7) was clearly attenuated by low sodium intake, angiotensin II co-infusion, or both. Regression analyses showed that the prevailing renin concentration was the only independent predictor of angiotensin-(1-7)-induced renal vasodilation. In conclusion, angiotensin-(1-7) induces renal vasodilation in hypertensive humans, but the effect of angiotensin-(1-7) is clearly attenuated by low sodium intake and co-infusion of angiotensin II. This supports the hypothesis that angiotensin-(1-7) induced renal vasodilation depends on the degree of renin-angiotensin-system activation.

  7. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas Axis Protects Brain from Ischemic Injury with a Tendency of Age-dependence

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiao-Lin; Li, Guang-Ze; Chen, Shu-Zhen; Wang, Jin-Ju; Olson, James E.; Xia, Hui-Jing; Lazartigues, Eric; Zhu, Yu-Lan; Chen, Yan-Fang

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background The angiotensin (Ang) converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway is an important component of the renin–angiotensin system and has been suggested to exert beneficial effects in ischemic stroke. Aims This study explored whether the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway has a protective effect on cerebral ischemic injury and whether this effect is affected by age. Methods We used three-month and eight-month transgenic mice with neural over-expression of ACE2 (SA) and their age-matched non-transgenic (NT) controls. Neurological deficits and ischemic stroke volume were determined following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). In oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) experiments on brain slices, the effects of the Mas receptor agonist (Ang1-7) or antagonist (A779) on tissue swelling, Nox2/Nox4 expression reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cell death were measured. Results (1) Middle cerebral artery occlusion -induced ischemic injury and neurological deficit were reduced in SA mice, especially in eight-month animals; (2) OGD-induced tissue swelling and cell death were decreased in SA mice with a greater reduction seen in eight-month mice; (3) Ang-(1–7) and A779 had opposite effects on OGD-induced responses, which correlated with changes in Nox2/Nox4 expression and ROS production. Conclusions Angiotensin converting enzyme 2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis protects brain from ischemic injury via the Nox/ROS signaling pathway, with a greater effect in older animals. PMID:24581232

  8. Neuroendocrine activation after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    McAlpine, H M; Morton, J J; Leckie, B; Rumley, A; Gillen, G; Dargie, H J

    1988-01-01

    The extent of neuroendocrine activation, its time course, and relation to left ventricular dysfunction and arrhythmias were investigated in 78 consecutive patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction. High concentrations of arginine vasopressin were found within six hours of symptoms, even in the absence of myocardial infarction (n = 18). Plasma catecholamine concentrations also were highest on admission, whereas renin and angiotensin II concentrations rose progressively over the first three days, not only in those with heart failure but also in patients with no clinical complications. Heart failure, ventricular tachycardia, and deaths were associated with extensive myocardial infarction, low left ventricular ejection fraction, and persistently high concentrations of catecholamines, renin, and angiotensin II up to 10 days after admission, whereas in uncomplicated cases concentrations had already returned to normal. PMID:3415870

  9. Stimulation of α₁-adrenoceptor or angiotensin type 1 receptor enhances DNA synthesis in human-induced pluripotent stem cells via Gq-coupled receptor-dependent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Toshiaki; Goshima, Hazuki; Ozawa, Ayako; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2013-08-15

    Stimulation of either α₁-adrenoceptor or angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT₁ receptor) induces proliferation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Both α₁-adrenoceptor and AT₁ receptor are guanine nucleotide-binding protein q polypeptide (Gq)-coupled receptors. However, it is not fully understood whether stimulation of these Gq-coupled receptors exert a similar effect in human iPS cells, i.e. proliferation of human iPS cells. In this study, we evaluated the involvement of α₁-adrenoceptor and AT₁ receptor in the DNA synthesis of human iPS cells. Treatment with either l-phenylephrine (a selective α₁-adrenoceptor agonist) or angiotensin II (Ang II) significantly increased DNA synthesis in human iPS cells. Enhanced DNA synthesis was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor, or phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Treatment with either l-phenylephrine or Ang II significantly increased Akt and p44/42 MAPK phosphorylation. Short interfering RNA (siRNA) directed against Gq significantly inhibited DNA synthesis and phosphorylation of Akt and p44/42 MAPK enhanced by l-phenylephrine or Ang II. These results suggest that stimulation of α₁-adrenoceptor or AT₁ receptor may enhance DNA synthesis in human iPS cells via Gq-coupled receptor-dependent signaling pathways.

  10. [Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors as neutralizers of hydroxyl radical].

    PubMed

    Mira, M L; Silva, M M; Queirós, M J; Manso, C

    1992-05-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors are utilized in the treatment of essential hypertension and of chronic cardiac failure. They are also employed in the treatment of the myocardial lesion of ischemia-reperfusion, which involves oxygen free radicals. In the present study we investigated the possibility of three angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (captopril, enalapril, lisinopril) to act as hydroxyl radical scavengers. The rate constants for reactions of those compounds with .OH were determined using the deoxyribose method. All there compounds proved to be good scavengers of .OH with rate constants of about 10(10)M-1s-1 and are iron chelators specially enalapril. The fact that captopril possesses a thiol group does not confer an higher antioxidative capacity. These results suggest that scavenging of oxygen free radicals may be a possible mechanism contributing to the therapeutic effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors.

  11. Inhibition of myocardial Ca2+ channels by three dihydropyridines with different structural features: potential-dependent blockade by Ro 18-3981.

    PubMed Central

    Holck, M.; Osterrieder, W.

    1987-01-01

    Inhibition of myocardial Ca2+ channels was investigated for three dihydropyridines with different structural features: Ro 18-3981, darodipine (PY 108-068) and nifedipine. Ro 18-3981 contains a sulphamoyl acetyl side-chain. In voltage-clamps experiments with isolated cardiac myocytes of guinea-pig, Ro 18-3981 caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of the Ca2+ current, which was influenced by the membrane holding potential. A markedly greater inhibition by Ro 18-3981 was observed when myocytes were depolarized (to +10 mV) from a holding potential (Vh) of -20 mV (IC50 = 2.3 nm) than at -50 mV (IC50 = 100 nM). The three dihydropyridines caused a concentration-dependent reduction in contractile force of isolated, electrically-stimulated left atria of the guinea-pig. Elevation of the extracellular K+ concentration from 5.9 to 24 mM resulted in a significant reduction in negative inotropic IC50 values for Ro 18-3981 (137 fold), darodipine (8 fold) and nifedipine (20 fold). The affinity of these drugs for the high-affinity (+)-[3H]-PN 200-110 binding site was determined in guinea-pig cardiac membranes. The KD value of Ro 18-3981 (1.0 nM) was similar to the IC50 value for blockade of ICa at a Vh of -20 mV (2.3 nM), i.e. at a level of near-maximal depolarization. Thus, structurally-different dihydropyridines exert potential-dependent inhibition of myocardial Ca2+ channel activity consistent with the modulated receptor hypothesis. These results demonstrate that blockade of myocardial excitation-contraction coupling by Ca2+ entry blockers is also potential-dependent. PMID:2439160

  12. Myocardial Ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... pectoris: Chest pain caused by myocardial ischemia. www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 1, 2015. Deedwania PC. Silent myocardial ischemia: Epidemiology and pathogenesis. www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 1, 2015. Mann DL, ...

  13. Regulation of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase effected high glucose-induced myocardial cell injury through c-Src dependent NADPH oxidase/ROS pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaofei; Xun, Meng; Dou, Xiaojuan; Wu, Litao; Han, Yan; Zheng, Jin

    2017-08-15

    Depressed Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity has long been reported to be involved in diabetic-related cardiomyocyte death and cardiac dysfunction. However, the nature of directly regulating Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in diabetic-related myocardial diseases remains unknown. Hyperglycemia is believed as one of major factors responsible for diabetic-related myocardial apoptosis and dysfunction. In this study, whether inhibiting Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase by ouabain or activating Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase by DRm217 has functions on high glucose (HG) -induced myocardial injury was investigated. Here we found that addition of DRm217 or ouabain to HG-treated cells had opposite effects. DRm217 decreased but ouabain increased HG-induced cell injury and apoptosis. This was mediated by changing Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase cell surface expression. The inhibition of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase endocytosis alleviated HG-induced ROS accumulation. Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase·c-Src dependent NADPH oxidase/ROS pathway was also involved in the effects of ouabain and DRm217 on HG-induced cell injury. These novel results may help us to understand the important role of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in diabetic cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and GLP-1 reduce myocardial infarct size in a glucose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Hausenloy, Derek J; Whittington, Hannah J; Wynne, Abigail M; Begum, Shah S; Theodorou, Louise; Riksen, Niels; Mocanu, Mihaela M; Yellon, Derek M

    2013-10-22

    The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors Sitagliptin and Vildagliptin lower blood glucose by augmenting endogenous levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an incretin which also confers cardioprotection. As such, we hypothesized that treatment with DPP-4 inhibitors are also cardioprotective. In ex vivo experiments: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive by oral gavage either Vildagliptin (20 mg/kg/day), Sitagliptin (100 mg/kg/day), or water for 2 weeks. Excised hearts were Langendorff-perfused with buffer containing either 5 mmol/L or 11 mmol/L glucose and subjected to 35 minutes ischaemia/120 minutes reperfusion. In in vivo experiments: Male young Wistar and Sprague-Dawley rats, middle aged Wistar and Goto-Kakizaki diabetic rats were randomized to receive by oral gavage either Sitagliptin (100 mg/kg/day), or water for 2 weeks. Rats were then subjected to 30 minutes ischaemia/120 minutes reperfusion and infarct size ascertained. Two weeks pre-treatment with either Vildagliptin or Sitagliptin reduced ex vivo myocardial infarction (MI) size in hearts perfused with buffer containing 11 mmol/L glucose but not 5 mmol/L glucose. This effect was abolished by Exendin 9-39 (GLP-1 receptor antagonist) and H-89 (PKA antagonist). Treatment of perfused hearts with native GLP-1 was also glucose-sensitive, reducing MI size, at glucose concentrations 7, 9, and 11 mmol/L but not at 5 mmol/L. Finally, Sitagliptin reduced in vivo MI size in middle aged Wistar (7-8 mmol/L glucose) and Goto-Kakizaki (9-10 mmol/L glucose) rats where blood glucose was elevated, but not in young Wistar (5 mmol/L glucose) or Sprague-Dawley (5 mmol/L glucose) rats, where blood glucose was normal. We find that chronic treatment with DPP-4 inhibitors reduced MI size, via the GLP-1 receptor-PKA pathway, in a glucose-dependent manner. Glucose-sensitive cardioprotection of endogenous GLP-1 in diabetic patients may in part explain why intensive control of serum glucose

  15. Heterogeneity of myocardial iron distribution in response to chelation therapy in patients with transfusion-dependent anemias.

    PubMed

    Hanneman, Kate; Raju, Vikram M; Moshonov, Hadas; Ward, Richard; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Crean, Andrew M; Ross, Heather; Nguyen, Elsie T

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of different iron chelation regimens on the distribution of myocardial iron in patients with transfusion-dependent anemias. Institutional review board approval was obtained. Patients treated with iron chelation therapy who had undergone baseline and 1-year follow-up cardiac T2* MR studies in a four-year period were identified retrospectively. One hundred and eight patients (44 % male, mean age 31.6 ± 9.7 years) were included. The interventricular septum on three short-axis slices (basal, mid and apical) was divided into anterior and inferior regions of interest for T2* analysis. Cardiac iron concentration (CIC) was calculated from T2* values. Statistical analysis included analysis of variance and paired t-test, using Bonferroni adjustment in all pairwise comparisons. At baseline, T2* measurements varied significantly across all six regions (p < 0.001): lowest in the mid anteroseptum (mean 22.3 ± 10.1 ms) and highest in the apical inferoseptum (mean 26.2 ± 12.8 ms). At follow-up, T2* and CIC values improved significantly in all segments [mean change of 3.78 ms (95 % CI (2.93, 4.62), p < 0.001) and 0.23 mg/g (95 % CI (0.16, 0.29), p < 0.001), respectively]. Change in T2* values varied significantly between segments (p < 0.001) with greatest improvement in the apical inferoseptum [4.26 ms, 95 % CI (2.42, 6.11)] and least improvement in the basal anteroseptum [2.95 ms, 95 % CI (1.37, 4.54)]. The largest improvement in T2* values was noted in patients treated with deferiprone [4.96 ms, 95 % CI (2.34, 7.58)]. There was a statistically significant difference in improvement in CIC values between chelation regimens (p = 0.016). This is the first study to report heterogeneity in response to iron chelating drugs with variable segmental changes in T2* values.

  16. Liver Angiotensinogen Is the Primary Source of Renal Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Niimura, Fumio; Shimizu, Akihiro; Pastan, Ira; Saito, Akihiko; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Akira; Ichikawa, Iekuni

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II content in the kidney is much higher than in the plasma, and it increases more in kidney diseases through an uncertain mechanism. Because the kidney abundantly expresses angiotensinogen mRNA, transcriptional dysregulation of angiotensinogen within the kidney is one potential cause of increased renal angiotensin II in the setting of disease. Here, we observed that kidney-specific angiotensinogen knockout mice had levels of renal angiotensinogen protein and angiotensin II that were similar to those levels of control mice. In contrast, liver-specific knockout of angiotensinogen nearly abolished plasma and renal angiotensinogen protein and renal tissue angiotensin II. Immunohistochemical analysis in mosaic proximal tubules of megalin knockout mice revealed that angiotensinogen protein was incorporated selectively in megalin-intact cells of the proximal tubule, indicating that the proximal tubule reabsorbs filtered angiotensinogen through megalin. Disruption of the filtration barrier in a transgenic mouse model of podocyte-selective injury increased renal angiotensin II content and markedly increased both tubular and urinary angiotensinogen protein without an increase in renal renin activity, supporting the dependency of renal angiotensin II generation on filtered angiotensinogen. Taken together, these data suggest that liver-derived angiotensinogen is the primary source of renal angiotensinogen protein and angiotensin II. Furthermore, an abnormal increase in the permeability of the glomerular capillary wall to angiotensinogen, which characterizes proteinuric kidney diseases, enhances the synthesis of renal angiotensin II. PMID:22518004

  17. The renoprotective effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in experimental chronic renal failure is not dependent on enhanced kinin activity.

    PubMed

    Nabokov, A; Amann, K; Gassmann, P; Schwarz, U; Orth, S R; Ritz, E

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been shown to ameliorate the progression of glomerulosclerosis both in experimental models of uraemia and in patients with renal failure. It has not been documented, however, whether this is due to a decrease in angiotensin II generation or is a consequence of elevated local level of bradykinin. Morphometric investigation of renal tissue was performed in 5/6 nephrectomized (SNx) rats, i.e. untreated or treated with the ACE inhibitor ramipril (SNx-RAM), the B2 kinin receptor antagonist HOE 140 (SNx-HOE), or a combination of both (SNx-RAM + HOE) over 8 weeks. A further group of SNx received delayed treatment with ramipril from week 5 onward (SNx-RAMD). In addition, a sham-operated (SHAM) control group was studied. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower in both SNx-RAM and SNx-RAM + HOE groups compared to (untreated) SNx. The glomerulosclerosis index (GSI) was substantially higher in the (untreated) SNx group (0.24 +/- 0.04) vs SHAM (0.02 +/- 0.01). A significantly higher GSI was found in the SNx-HOE group (0.45 +/- 0.08) as compared to (untreated) SNx. However, in the SNx-RAM, SNx-RAM + HOE, and SNx-RAMD groups, the GSI was lowered to a similar extent (0.1 +/- 0.02, 0.09 +/- 0.02, and 0.07 +/- 0.01 respectively). In addition, a concomitant attenuation of tubulointerstitial damage was noted in all the above groups. Increased kinin activity does not appear to play a major role in the renoprotective effect of ACE inhibitors in the remnant kidney model.

  18. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists and heart failure: angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors remain the first-line option.

    PubMed

    2005-10-01

    (1) Some angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) reduce mortality in patients with heart failure (captopril, enalapril, ramipril and trandolapril), and in patients with recent myocardial infarction and heart failure or marked left ventricular dysfunction (captopril, ramipril and trandolapril). (2) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists, otherwise known as angiotensin receptor blockers, have haemodynamic effects similar to ACE inhibitors, but differ in their mechanism of action and certain adverse effects. (3) Five clinical trials have evaluated angiotensin II receptor antagonists (candesartan, losartan and valsartan) in terms of their effect on mortality and on the risk of clinical deterioration in patients with symptomatic heart failure, but without severe renal failure, hyperkalemia or hypotension. In these trials, candesartan and valsartan were used at much higher doses than those recommended for the treatment of arterial hypertension. (4) In patients with heart failure who were not taking an angiotensin II receptor antagonist or an ACE inhibitor at enrollment, no significant difference was found between losartan and captopril in terms of mortality or the risk of clinical deterioration. (5) In patients with heart failure who had stopped taking an ACE inhibitor because of adverse effects, candesartan had no effect on mortality as compared with placebo, but it did reduce the risk of clinical deterioration (3 fewer hospitalisations per year per 100 patients). However, candesartan was associated with adverse effects such as renal failure and hyperkalemia, especially in patients who had experienced these same adverse effects while taking an ACE inhibitor. (6) In patients with heart failure who were already taking an ACE inhibitor, adjunctive candesartan or valsartan treatment did not influence mortality in comparison to the addition of a placebo. Adding candesartan or valsartan reduced the risk of hospitalisation (between 1 and 3 fewer hospitalisations

  19. Usefulness of myocardial strain imaging in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A

    2010-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin. Heart involvement is a classical complication in this disease and leads progressively to heart failure. Detecting latent myocardial involvement is essential in this disease because early use of drugs like angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors may delay the progression of heart disease. Myocardial strain imaging is an application of the tissue Doppler imaging. By assessing regional myocardial function, this tool might help clinicians to detect latent myocardial involvement in DMD patients.

  20. Detailing magnetic field strength dependence and segmental artifact distribution of myocardial effective transverse relaxation rate at 1.5, 3.0, and 7.0 T.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Antonella; Hezel, Fabian; Positano, Vincenzo; Keilberg, Petra; Pepe, Alessia; Lombardi, Massimo; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-06-01

    Realizing the challenges and opportunities of effective transverse relaxation rate (R2 *) mapping at high and ultrahigh fields, this work examines magnetic field strength (B0 ) dependence and segmental artifact distribution of myocardial R2 * at 1.5, 3.0, and 7.0 T. Healthy subjects were considered. Three short-axis views of the left ventricle were examined. R2 * was calculated for 16 standard myocardial segments. Global and mid-septum R2 * were determined. For each segment, an artifactual factor was estimated as the deviation of segmental from global R2 * value. The global artifactual factor was significantly enlarged at 7.0 T versus 1.5 T (P = 0.010) but not versus 3.0 T. At 7.0 T, the most severe susceptibility artifacts were detected in the inferior lateral wall. The mid-septum showed minor artifactual factors at 7.0 T, similar to those at 1.5 and 3.0 T. Mean R2 * increased linearly with the field strength, with larger changes for global heart R2 * values. At 7.0 T, segmental heart R2 * analysis is challenging due to macroscopic susceptibility artifacts induced by the heart-lung interface and the posterior vein. Myocardial R2 * depends linearly on the magnetic field strength. The increased R2 * sensitivity at 7.0 T might offer means for susceptibility-weighted and oxygenation level-dependent MR imaging of the myocardium. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. An ethanolic extract of Lindera obtusiloba stems causes NO-mediated endothelium-dependent relaxations in rat aortic rings and prevents angiotensin II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Ok; Oak, Min-Ho; Jung, Sang Hoon; Park, Dong Hyun; Auger, Cyril; Kim, Kyoung Rak; Lee, Seung-Woo; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2011-06-01

    Lindera obtusiloba is a medical herb traditionally used in Asia for the improvement of blood circulation, treatment of inflammation, and prevention of liver damage. The possibility that L. obtusiloba affects vascular reactivity remains to be examined. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate both the in vitro and in vivo vascular effects of an ethanolic extract of L. obtusiloba stems (LOE). Vascular reactivity was assessed in organ chambers using rat aortic rings and the activation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. LOE induced endothelium-dependent relaxations, which were abolished by inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (N (ω)-nitro-L: -arginine) and guanylyl cyclase (1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxalin-L-one), significantly reduced by inhibitors of PI3 kinase (wortmannin and LY294002), and not affected by inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (indomethacin) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated responses (charybdotoxin plus apamin). LOE prevented contractile responses to phenylephrine and angiotensin II in rings with endothelium, but not in those without endothelium. LOE caused a concentration-dependent phosphorylation of Akt at Serine473 and eNOS at Serine1177 in endothelial cells. Thereafter, the vasoprotective effect of LOE was investigated in an experimental model of hypertension in rats. Intake of LOE prevented the angiotensin II-induced increase in systolic blood pressure, and endothelial dysfunction to acetylcholine and oxidative stress as assessed using dihydroethidine in aortic rings. The present findings indicate that LOE has vasoprotective and antihypertensive properties most likely by stimulating the endothelial formation of NO and inhibiting oxidative stress.

  2. Cardiovascular effects of the angiotensin type 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Faria-Costa, Gabriel; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago

    2014-01-01

    The angiotensin type 2 receptor, AT2R, has been described as having opposite effects to the angiotensin type 1 receptor, AT1R. Although the quantities of the AT2R found in the adult are low, its expression rises in pathological situations. The AT2R has three major signaling pathways: activation of serine/threonine phosphatases (promoting apoptosis and antioxidant effects), activation of the bradykinin/NO/cGMP pathway (promoting vasodilation), and activation of phospholipase A2 (associated with regulation of potassium currents). The AT2R appears to have effects in vascular remodeling, atherosclerosis prevention and blood pressure lowering (when associated with an AT1R inhibitor). After myocardial infarction, the AT2R appears to decrease infarct size, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and to improve cardiac function. However, its role in the heart is controversial. In the kidney, the AT2R promotes natriuresis. Until now, treatment directed at the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system has been based on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin type 1 receptor blockers. The study of the AT2R has been revolutionized by the discovery of a direct agonist, C21, which promises to become part of the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  3. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor-Dependent Pathway Drives Epicardial Adipose Tissue Formation After Myocardial Injury.

    PubMed

    Zangi, Lior; Oliveira, Marcela S; Ye, Lillian Y; Ma, Qing; Sultana, Nishat; Hadas, Yoav; Chepurko, Elena; Später, Daniela; Zhou, Bin; Chew, Wei Leong; Ebina, Wataru; Abrial, Maryline; Wang, Qing-Dong; Pu, William T; Chien, Kenneth R

    2017-01-03

    Epicardial adipose tissue volume and coronary artery disease are strongly associated, even after accounting for overall body mass. Despite its pathophysiological significance, the origin and paracrine signaling pathways that regulate epicardial adipose tissue's formation and expansion are unclear. We used a novel modified mRNA-based screening approach to probe the effect of individual paracrine factors on epicardial progenitors in the adult heart. Using 2 independent lineage-tracing strategies in murine models, we show that cells originating from the Wt1(+) mesothelial lineage, which includes epicardial cells, differentiate into epicardial adipose tissue after myocardial infarction. This differentiation process required Wt1 expression in this lineage and was stimulated by insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) activation. IGF1R inhibition within this lineage significantly reduced its adipogenic differentiation in the context of exogenous, IGF1-modified mRNA stimulation. Moreover, IGF1R inhibition significantly reduced Wt1 lineage cell differentiation into adipocytes after myocardial infarction. Our results establish IGF1R signaling as a key pathway that governs epicardial adipose tissue formation in the context of myocardial injury by redirecting the fate of Wt1(+) lineage cells. Our study also demonstrates the power of modified mRNA -based paracrine factor library screening to dissect signaling pathways that govern progenitor cell activity in homeostasis and disease. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid (HETE)-dependent Hypertension in Human Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A11 Transgenic Mice: NORMALIZATION OF BLOOD PRESSURE BY SODIUM RESTRICTION, HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE, OR BLOCKADE OF THE TYPE 1 ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR.

    PubMed

    Savas, Üzen; Wei, Shouzou; Hsu, Mei-Hui; Falck, John R; Guengerich, F Peter; Capdevila, Jorge H; Johnson, Eric F

    2016-08-05

    Male and female homozygous 129/Sv mice carrying four copies of the human cytochrome P450 4A11 gene (CYP4A11) under control of its native promoter (B-129/Sv-4A11(+/+)) develop hypertension (142 ± 8 versus 113 ± 7 mm Hg systolic blood pressure (BP)), and exhibit increased 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in kidney and urine. The hypertension is reversible by a low-sodium diet and by the CYP4A inhibitor HET0016. B-129/Sv-4A11(+/+) mice display an 18% increase of plasma potassium (p < 0.02), but plasma aldosterone, angiotensin II (ANGII), and renin activities are unchanged. This phenotype resembles human genetic disorders with elevated activity of the sodium chloride co-transporter (NCC) and, accordingly, NCC abundance is increased by 50% in transgenic mice, and NCC levels are normalized by HET0016. ANGII is known to increase NCC abundance, and renal mRNA levels of its precursor angiotensinogen are increased 2-fold in B-129/Sv-4A11(+/+), and blockade of the ANGII receptor type 1 with losartan normalizes BP. A pro-hypertensive role for 20-HETE was implicated by normalization of BP and reversal of renal angiotensin mRNA increases by administration of the 20-HETE antagonists 2-((6Z,15Z)-20-hydroxyicosa-6,15-dienamido)acetate or (S)-2-((6Z,15Z)-20-hydroxyicosa-6,15-dienamido)succinate. SGK1 expression is also increased in B-129/Sv-4A11(+/+) mice and paralleled increases seen for NCC. Losartan, HET0016, and 20-HETE antagonists each normalized SGK1 mRNA expression. These results point to a potential 20-HETE dependence of intrarenal angiotensinogen production and ANGII receptor type 1 activation that are associated with increases in NCC and SGK1 and identify elevated P450 4A11 activity and 20-HETE as potential risk factors for salt-sensitive human hypertension by perturbation of the renal renin-angiotensin axis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Debate: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers--a gap in evidence-based medicine.

    PubMed

    Ball, Stephen G; White, William B

    2003-05-22

    In this article, 2 leading physicians debate the strength of outcome data on the efficacy of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for reducing the incidence of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renovascular events. Dr. Stephen G. Ball notes that the efficacy of ACE inhibitors for reducing the risk for myocardial infarction independent of their effects on blood pressure is controversial. In the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) study, ramipril treatment in high-risk patients was associated with a 20% reduction in the risk for myocardial infarction; mean reduction in blood pressure was 3 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure and 1 mm Hg for diastolic blood pressure. The HOPE investigators propose that the 20% reduction was much greater than would be expected based on the observed blood pressure reduction. However, a meta-regression analysis of blood pressure reduction in >20 antihypertensive therapy outcome trials found that the reduction in myocardial infarction risk with ramipril observed in HOPE was consistent with the modest blood pressure reduction seen with that agent. Nevertheless, there are convincing data for prevention of myocardial infarction with ACE inhibitors in patients with heart failure, including those with heart failure after myocardial infarction, as well as supportive evidence from studies in patients with diabetes mellitus and concomitant hypertension. On the other hand, Dr. William B. White takes the position that ARBs are well-tolerated antihypertensive agents that specifically antagonize the angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor and provide a more complete block of the pathologic effects of angiotensin II-which are mediated via the AT(1) receptor-than ACE inhibitors. The Evaluation of Losartan in the Elderly (ELITE) II study and the Valsartan Heart Failure Trial (ValHeFT) suggest that ARBs reduce the risk for mortality in patients with congestive heart failure. The Losartan

  6. The effects of allitridi and amiodarone on the conduction system and reverse use-dependence in the isolated hearts of rats with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yanwei; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Jie; Gao, Yonghong; Niu, Weizhen; Zhao, Mingjing; Zhu, Haiyan; Guo, Lili; Lu, Peng; Wang, Shuoren

    2012-06-01

    Allium sativum L. (DaSuan in Mandarin) is a traditional Chinese herb that has been used to prevent and heal cardiovascular diseases. To study the effects of allitridi (an active constituent of Allium sativum L.) and amiodarone on the conduction system and on reverse use-dependence in the isolated hearts of normal rats and rats with myocardial infarction (MI). Male Sprague Dawley rats, with a ligated left anterior descending coronary artery, were used as myocardial infarction models to investigate the biological effects of the traditional Chinese herb. A single-phase electrode assay and isolated heart perfusion administration methods were employed to study and compare the electrophysiological effects of allitridi and amiodarone on normal and MI rats. Monophasic action potential (MAP) in vitro, effective refractory period (ERP) and monophasic action potential duration (MAPD)/ERP were measured to investigate reverse use-dependence (RUD) with allitridi and amiodarone. Moreover, bundle maps and heart rates were analyzed to evaluate the electrophysiological effects of allitridi on the conduction system of the cardiac muscles. Coronary flow was used to study the beneficial effects of the two drugs on the bundle of His in myocardial infraction. (1) Allitridi and amiodarone can reduce the infarction model of the His bundle (A-H, H-V) conduction and cardiac sinus rhythm in normal rats and isolated rat hearts. After washing in physiological solution (AK-H) for 15 min, the allitridi group partially recovered, but the amiodarone group did not recover. (2) Allitridi and amiodarone had no significant effects on the change of MAPD(90) or ERP in normal and MI rat hearts at different pacing frequencies (200, 250 and 300 beats/min), which indicated no RUD. In addition, the effects of allitridi on prolonging MAPD(90) and ERP were weaker than those of amiodarone (P<0.01). The effects of allitridi on myocardial repolarization and its variation rate were also weaker than those of

  7. (Pro)renin Receptor Triggers Distinct Angiotensin II-Independent Extracellular Matrix Remodeling and Deterioration of Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Moilanen, Anne-Mari; Rysä, Jaana; Serpi, Raisa; Mustonen, Erja; Szabò, Zoltán; Aro, Jani; Näpänkangas, Juha; Tenhunen, Olli; Sutinen, Meeri; Salo, Tuula; Ruskoaho, Heikki

    2012-01-01

    Background Activation of the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) plays a key pathophysiological role in heart failure in patients with hypertension and myocardial infarction. However, the function of (pro)renin receptor ((P)RR) is not yet solved. We determined here the direct functional and structural effects of (P)RR in the heart. Methodology/Principal Findings (P)RR was overexpressed by using adenovirus-mediated gene delivery in normal adult rat hearts up to 2 weeks. (P)RR gene delivery into the anterior wall of the left ventricle decreased ejection fraction (P<0.01), fractional shortening (P<0.01), and intraventricular septum diastolic and systolic thickness, associated with approximately 2–fold increase in left ventricular (P)RR protein levels at 2 weeks. To test whether the worsening of cardiac function and structure by (P)RR gene overexpression was mediated by angiotensin II (Ang II), we infused an AT1 receptor blocker losartan via osmotic minipumps. Remarkably, cardiac function deteriorated in losartan-treated (P)RR overexpressing animals as well. Intramyocardial (P)RR gene delivery also resulted in Ang II-independent activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase1/2 phosphorylation and myocardial fibrosis, and the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 and connective tissue growth factor genes. In contrast, activation of heat shock protein 27 phosphorylation and apoptotic cell death by (P)RR gene delivery was Ang II-dependent. Finally, (P)RR overexpression significantly increased direct protein–protein interaction between (P)RR and promyelocytic zinc-finger protein. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate for the first time that (P)RR triggers distinct Ang II-independent myocardial fibrosis and deterioration of cardiac function in normal adult heart and identify (P)RR as a novel therapeutic target to optimize RAS blockade in failing hearts. PMID:22911790

  8. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI: A novel technique for the assessment of myocardial ischemia as identified by nuclear imaging SPECT.

    PubMed

    Egred, M; Waiter, G D; Redpath, T W; Semple, S K I; Al-Mohammad, A; Walton, S

    2007-12-01

    The different levels of deoxyhemoglobin in the ischemic myocardium, induced by stressors such as dipyridamole, can be detected by blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI and may be used to diagnose myocardial ischemia. The aim of this study was to assess the signal change in the myocardium on BOLD MRI as well as wall thickening between rest and dipyridamole stress images in ischemic and non-ischemic myocardium as identified on SPECT imaging. Twelve patients with stress-induced myocardial ischemia on SPECT underwent rest and dipyridamole stress MRI using a double breath-hold, T2()-weighted, ECG-gated sequence to produce BOLD contrast images as well as cine-MRI for wall thickening assessment in 10 of the 12 patients. Signal change on BOLD MRI and wall thickening were compared between rest and stress images in ischemic and non-ischemic myocardial segments as identified on SPECT. In each patient, two MRI slices containing 16 segments per slice were analysed. In total, there were 384 segments for BOLD analysis and 320 for wall thickening. For BOLD signal 137 segments correlated to segments with reversible ischemia on SPECT and 247 to normal segments, while for wall thickening 112 segments correlated to segments with reversible ischemia and 208 to normal segments. The average BOLD MRI signal intensity change was -13.8 (+/-16.3)% in the ischemic segments compared to -10.3 (+/-14.7)% in the non-ischemic segments (p=0.05). The average wall thickening was 6.4 (+/-3.4) mm in the ischemic segments compared to 8.7 (+/-3.8) mm in the non-ischemic segments (p<0.0001). Stress-induced ischemic myocardium has a different signal change and wall thickening than non-ischemic myocardium and may be differentiated on BOLD MRI. Larger studies are needed to define a threshold for detection and to determine the sensitivity and specificity of this technique.

  9. Nox4 NADPH Oxidase Mediates Peroxynitrite-dependent Uncoupling of Endothelial Nitric-oxide Synthase and Fibronectin Expression in Response to Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Doug-Yoon; Wauquier, Fabien; Eid, Assaad A.; Roman, Linda J.; Ghosh-Choudhury, Goutam; Khazim, Khaled; Block, Karen; Gorin, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Activation of glomerular mesangial cells (MCs) by angiotensin II (Ang II) leads to extracellular matrix accumulation. Here, we demonstrate that, in MCs, Ang II induces endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling with enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased production of NO. Ang II promotes a rapid increase in 3-nitrotyrosine formation, and uric acid attenuates Ang II-induced decrease in NO bioavailability, demonstrating that peroxynitrite mediates the effects of Ang II on eNOS dysfunction. Ang II rapidly up-regulates Nox4 protein. Inhibition of Nox4 abolishes the increase in ROS and peroxynitrite generation as well as eNOS uncoupling triggered by Ang II, indicating that Nox4 is upstream of eNOS. This pathway contributes to Ang II-mediated fibronectin accumulation in MCs. Ang II also elicits an increase in mitochondrial abundance of Nox4 protein, and the oxidase contributes to ROS production in mitochondria. Overexpression of mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase prevents the stimulatory effects of Ang II on mitochondrial ROS production, loss of NO availability, and MC fibronectin accumulation, whereas manganese superoxide dismutase depletion increases mitochondrial ROS, NO deficiency, and fibronectin synthesis basally and in cells exposed to Ang II. This work provides the first evidence that uncoupled eNOS is responsible for Ang II-induced MC fibronectin accumulation and identifies Nox4 and mitochondrial ROS as mediators of eNOS dysfunction. These data shed light on molecular processes underlying the oxidative signaling cascade engaged by Ang II and identify potential targets for intervention to prevent renal fibrosis. PMID:23940049

  10. Sex-dependent effects of antenatal glucocorticoids on insulin sensitivity in adult sheep: role of the adipose tissue renin angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Massmann, G Angela; Zhang, Jie; Seong, Won Joon; Kim, Minhyoung; Figueroa, Jorge P

    2017-06-01

    Exposure to glucocorticoids in utero is associated with changes in organ function and structure in the adult. The aims of this study were to characterize the effects of antenatal exposure to glucocorticoids on glucose handling and the role of adipose tissue. Pregnant sheep received betamethasone (Beta, 0.17 mg/kg) or vehicle 24 h apart at 80 days of gestation and allowed to deliver at term. At 9 mo, male and female offspring were fed at either 100% of nutritional allowance (lean) or ad libitum for 3 mo (obese). At 1 yr, they were chronically instrumented under general anesthesia. Glucose tolerance was evaluated using a bolus of glucose (0.25 g/kg). Adipose tissue was harvested after death to determine mRNA expression levels of angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) 1, ACE2, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ). Data are expressed as means ± SE and analyzed by ANOVA. Sex, obesity, and Beta exposure had significant effects on glucose tolerance and mRNA expression. Beta impaired glucose tolerance in lean females but not males. Superimposed obesity worsened the impairment in females and unmasked the defect in males. Beta increased ACE1 mRNA in females and males and AGT in females only (P < 0.05 by three-way ANOVA). Obesity increased AGT in females but had no effect on ACE1 in either males or females. PPAR-γ mRNA exhibited a significant sex (F = 42.8; P < 0.01) and obesity (F = 6.9; P < 0.05) effect and was significantly higher in males (P < 0.01 by three-way ANOVA). We conclude that adipose tissue may play an important role in the sexually dimorphic response to antenatal glucocorticoids. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. The Attenuation of Central Angiotensin II-dependent Pressor Response and Intra-neuronal Signaling by Intracarotid Injection of Nanoformulated Copper/Zinc Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaugh, Erin G.; Roat, James; Gao, Lie; Yang, Rui-Fang; Manickam, Devika S.; Yin, Jing-Xiang; Schultz, Harold D.; Bronich, Tatiana K.; Batrakova, Elena V.; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Zucker, Irving H.; Zimmerman, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of the intracellular superoxide (O2•−) scavenging enzyme copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) in the brain attenuates central angiotensin II (AngII)-induced cardiovascular responses. However, the therapeutic potential for adenoviral vectors is weakened by toxicity and the inability of adenoviral vectors to target the brain following peripheral administration. Therefore, we developed a non-viral delivery system in which CuZnSOD protein is electrostatically bound to a synthetic poly(ethyleneimine)-poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEI-PEG) polymer to form a polyion complex (CuZnSOD nanozyme). We hypothesized that PEI-PEG polymer increases transport of functional CuZnSOD to neurons, which inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling. The AngII-induced increase in O2•−, as measured by dihydroethidium fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, was significantly inhibited in CuZnSOD nanozyme-treated neurons compared to free CuZnSOD- and non-treated neurons. CuZnSOD nanozyme also attenuated the AngII-induced inhibition of K+ current in neurons. Intracarotid injection of CuZnSOD nanozyme into rabbits significantly inhibited the pressor response of intracerebroventricular-delivered AngII; however, intracarotid injection of free CuZnSOD or PEI-PEG polymer alone failed to inhibit this response. Importantly, neither the PEI-PEG polymer alone nor the CuZnSOD nanozyme induced neuronal toxicity. These findings indicate that CuZnSOD nanozyme inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling in vitro and in vivo. PMID:20378166

  12. Phosphorylation of rat kidney Na-K pump at Ser938 is required for rapid angiotensin II-dependent stimulation of activity and trafficking in proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Massey, Katherine J; Li, Quanwen; Rossi, Noreen F; Keezer, Susan M; Mattingly, Raymond R; Yingst, Douglas R

    2016-02-01

    How angiotensin (ANG) II acutely stimulates the Na-K pump in proximal tubules is only partially understood, limiting insight into how ANG II increases blood pressure. First, we tested whether ANG II increases the number of pumps in plasma membranes of native rat proximal tubules under conditions of rapid activation. We found that exposure to 100 pM ANG II for 2 min, which was previously shown to increase affinity of the Na-K pump for Na and stimulate activity threefold, increased the amount of the Na-K pump in plasma membranes of native tubules by 33%. Second, we tested whether previously observed increases in phosphorylation of the Na-K pump at Ser(938) were part of the stimulatory mechanism. These experiments were carried out in opossum kidney cells, cultured proximal tubules stably coexpressing the ANG type 1 (AT1) receptor, and either wild-type or a S938A mutant of rat kidney Na-K pump under conditions found by others to stimulate activity. We found that 10 min of incubation in 10 pM ANG II stimulated activity of wild-type pumps from 2.3 to 3.5 nmol K · mg protein(-1) · min(-1) and increased the amount of the pump in the plasma membrane by 80% but had no effect on cells expressing the S938A mutant. We conclude that acute stimulation of Na-K pump activity in native rat proximal tubules includes increased trafficking to the plasma membrane and that phosphorylation at Ser(938) is part of the mechanism by which ANG II directly stimulates activity and trafficking of the rat kidney Na-K pump in opossum kidney cells.

  13. Loss of Smooth Muscle α-Actin Leads to NF-κB-Dependent Increased Sensitivity to Angiotensin II in Smooth Muscle Cells and Aortic Enlargement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiyuan; Peters, Andrew; Papke, Christina L; Villamizar, Carlos; Ringuette, Lea-Jeanne; Cao, Jiumei; Wang, Shanzhi; Ma, Shuangtao; Gong, Limin; Byanova, Katerina L; Xiong, Jian; Zhu, Michael X; Madonna, Rosalinda; Kee, Patrick; Geng, Yong-Jian; Brasier, Allan R; Davis, Elaine C; Prakash, Siddharth; Kwartler, Callie S; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2017-06-09

    Mutations in ACTA2, encoding the smooth muscle isoform of α-actin, cause thoracic aortic aneurysms, acute aortic dissections, and occlusive vascular diseases. We sought to identify the mechanism by which loss of smooth muscle α-actin causes aortic disease. Acta2(-/-) mice have an increased number of elastic lamellae in the ascending aorta and progressive aortic root dilation as assessed by echocardiography that can be attenuated by treatment with losartan, an angiotensin II (AngII) type 1 receptor blocker. AngII levels are not increased in Acta2(-/-) aortas or kidneys. Aortic tissue and explanted smooth muscle cells from Acta2(-/-) aortas show increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased basal nuclear factor κB signaling, leading to an increase in the expression of the AngII receptor type I a and activation of signaling at 100-fold lower levels of AngII in the mutant compared with wild-type cells. Furthermore, disruption of smooth muscle α-actin filaments in wild-type smooth muscle cells by various mechanisms activates nuclear factor κB signaling and increases expression of AngII receptor type I a. These findings reveal that disruption of smooth muscle α-actin filaments in smooth muscle cells increases reactive oxygen species levels, activates nuclear factor κB signaling, and increases AngII receptor type I a expression, thus potentiating AngII signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells without an increase in the exogenous levels of AngII. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Phosphorylation of rat kidney Na-K pump at Ser938 is required for rapid angiotensin II-dependent stimulation of activity and trafficking in proximal tubule cells

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Katherine J.; Li, Quanwen; Rossi, Noreen F.; Keezer, Susan M.; Mattingly, Raymond R.

    2015-01-01

    How angiotensin (ANG) II acutely stimulates the Na-K pump in proximal tubules is only partially understood, limiting insight into how ANG II increases blood pressure. First, we tested whether ANG II increases the number of pumps in plasma membranes of native rat proximal tubules under conditions of rapid activation. We found that exposure to 100 pM ANG II for 2 min, which was previously shown to increase affinity of the Na-K pump for Na and stimulate activity threefold, increased the amount of the Na-K pump in plasma membranes of native tubules by 33%. Second, we tested whether previously observed increases in phosphorylation of the Na-K pump at Ser938 were part of the stimulatory mechanism. These experiments were carried out in opossum kidney cells, cultured proximal tubules stably coexpressing the ANG type 1 (AT1) receptor, and either wild-type or a S938A mutant of rat kidney Na-K pump under conditions found by others to stimulate activity. We found that 10 min of incubation in 10 pM ANG II stimulated activity of wild-type pumps from 2.3 to 3.5 nmol K·mg protein−1·min−1 and increased the amount of the pump in the plasma membrane by 80% but had no effect on cells expressing the S938A mutant. We conclude that acute stimulation of Na-K pump activity in native rat proximal tubules includes increased trafficking to the plasma membrane and that phosphorylation at Ser938 is part of the mechanism by which ANG II directly stimulates activity and trafficking of the rat kidney Na-K pump in opossum kidney cells. PMID:26582472

  15. Comparative effects of contraction and angiotensin II on growth of adult feline cardiocytes in primary culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, H.; Zile, M. R.; Ivester, C. T.; Cooper, G. 4th; McDermott, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether angiotensin II causes growth of adult feline cardiocytes in long-term culture, 2) to compare the growth effects of angiotensin II with those resulting from electrically stimulated contraction, and 3) to determine whether the anabolic effects of contraction are exerted via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. Adult feline cardiocytes were cultured on laminin-coated trays in a serum-free medium. Cardiocytes were either electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulse duration, alternating polarity) or were nonstimulated and quiescent. Quiescent cells were studied as controls and after treatment with angiotensin II (10(-8) M), losartan (10(-6) M; an angiotensin type 1-receptor antagonist), or angiotensin II plus losartan. Contracting cells were studied in the presence and absence of angiotensin II or losartan. In quiescent cardiocytes, angiotensin II treatment on day 7 significantly increased protein synthesis rates by 22% and protein content per cell by 17%. The effects of angiotensin II were completely blocked by losartan. Electrically stimulated contraction on days 4 and 7 in culture significantly increased protein synthesis rate by 18 and 38% and protein content per cell by 19 and 46%, respectively. Angiotensin II treatment did not further increase protein synthesis rate or protein content in contracting cardiocytes. Furthermore, losartan did not block the anabolic effects of contraction on protein synthesis rates or protein content. In conclusion, angiotensin II can exert a modest anabolic effect on adult feline cardiocytes in culture. In contracting feline cardiocytes, angiotensin II has no effect on growth. Growth caused by electrically stimulated contraction occurs more rapidly and is greater in magnitude than that caused by angiotensin II. Growth of contracting adult feline cardiocytes is not dependent on activation of the angiotensin receptor.

  16. Comparative effects of contraction and angiotensin II on growth of adult feline cardiocytes in primary culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, H.; Zile, M. R.; Ivester, C. T.; Cooper, G. 4th; McDermott, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether angiotensin II causes growth of adult feline cardiocytes in long-term culture, 2) to compare the growth effects of angiotensin II with those resulting from electrically stimulated contraction, and 3) to determine whether the anabolic effects of contraction are exerted via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. Adult feline cardiocytes were cultured on laminin-coated trays in a serum-free medium. Cardiocytes were either electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulse duration, alternating polarity) or were nonstimulated and quiescent. Quiescent cells were studied as controls and after treatment with angiotensin II (10(-8) M), losartan (10(-6) M; an angiotensin type 1-receptor antagonist), or angiotensin II plus losartan. Contracting cells were studied in the presence and absence of angiotensin II or losartan. In quiescent cardiocytes, angiotensin II treatment on day 7 significantly increased protein synthesis rates by 22% and protein content per cell by 17%. The effects of angiotensin II were completely blocked by losartan. Electrically stimulated contraction on days 4 and 7 in culture significantly increased protein synthesis rate by 18 and 38% and protein content per cell by 19 and 46%, respectively. Angiotensin II treatment did not further increase protein synthesis rate or protein content in contracting cardiocytes. Furthermore, losartan did not block the anabolic effects of contraction on protein synthesis rates or protein content. In conclusion, angiotensin II can exert a modest anabolic effect on adult feline cardiocytes in culture. In contracting feline cardiocytes, angiotensin II has no effect on growth. Growth caused by electrically stimulated contraction occurs more rapidly and is greater in magnitude than that caused by angiotensin II. Growth of contracting adult feline cardiocytes is not dependent on activation of the angiotensin receptor.

  17. Wenxin-Keli Regulates the Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Signal Transduction Pathway and Inhibits Cardiac Arrhythmia in Rats with Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yanwei; Gao, Yonghong; Chen, Jianxin; Zhu, Haiyan; Wu, Aiming; Yang, Qing; Teng, Fei; Zhang, Dong-mei; Xing, Yanhui; Gao, Kuo; He, Qingyong; Zhang, Zhenpeng; Wang, Jie; Shang, Hongcai

    2013-01-01

    Wenxin-Keli (WXKL) is a Chinese herbal compound reported to be of benefit in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia, cardiac inflammation, and heart failure. Amiodarone is a noncompetitive inhibitor of the α- and β-adrenergic receptors and prevents calcium influx in the slow-response cells of the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes. Overexpression of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in transgenic mice results in heart failure and arrhythmias. We hypothesised that administration of WXKL and amiodarone can reduce the incidence of arrhythmias by regulating CaMKII signal transduction. A total of 100 healthy Sprague Dawley rats were used in the study. The rats were randomly divided into four groups (a sham group, a myocardial infarction (MI) group, a WXKL-treated group, and an amiodarone-treated group). A myocardial infarction model was established in these rats by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery for 4 weeks. Western blotting was used to assess CaMKII, p-CaMKII (Thr-286), PLB, p-PLB (Thr-17), RYR2, and FK binding protein 12.6 (FKBP12.6) levels. The Ca2+ content in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and the calcium transient amplitude were studied by confocal imaging using the fluorescent indicator Fura-4. In conclusion, WXKL may inhibit heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias by regulating the CaMKII signal transduction pathway similar to amiodarone. PMID:23781262

  18. Wenxin-Keli Regulates the Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Signal Transduction Pathway and Inhibits Cardiac Arrhythmia in Rats with Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yanwei; Gao, Yonghong; Chen, Jianxin; Zhu, Haiyan; Wu, Aiming; Yang, Qing; Teng, Fei; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Xing, Yanhui; Gao, Kuo; He, Qingyong; Zhang, Zhenpeng; Wang, Jie; Shang, Hongcai

    2013-01-01

    Wenxin-Keli (WXKL) is a Chinese herbal compound reported to be of benefit in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia, cardiac inflammation, and heart failure. Amiodarone is a noncompetitive inhibitor of the α - and β -adrenergic receptors and prevents calcium influx in the slow-response cells of the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes. Overexpression of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in transgenic mice results in heart failure and arrhythmias. We hypothesised that administration of WXKL and amiodarone can reduce the incidence of arrhythmias by regulating CaMKII signal transduction. A total of 100 healthy Sprague Dawley rats were used in the study. The rats were randomly divided into four groups (a sham group, a myocardial infarction (MI) group, a WXKL-treated group, and an amiodarone-treated group). A myocardial infarction model was established in these rats by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery for 4 weeks. Western blotting was used to assess CaMKII, p-CaMKII (Thr-286), PLB, p-PLB (Thr-17), RYR2, and FK binding protein 12.6 (FKBP12.6) levels. The Ca(2+) content in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and the calcium transient amplitude were studied by confocal imaging using the fluorescent indicator Fura-4. In conclusion, WXKL may inhibit heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias by regulating the CaMKII signal transduction pathway similar to amiodarone.

  19. Diurnal variations in myocardial metabolism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The heart is challenged by a plethora of extracellular stimuli over the course of a normal day, each of which distinctly influences myocardial contractile function. It is therefore not surprising that myocardial metabolism also oscillates in a time-of-day dependent manner. What is becoming increasin...

  20. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase prevents the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1-dependent slow force response to rat myocardial stretch.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Lorena A; Díaz, Romina G; Swenson, Erik R; Pérez, Néstor G; Álvarez, Bernardo V

    2013-07-15

    Myocardial stretch is an established signal that leads to hypertrophy. Myocardial stretch induces a first immediate force increase followed by a slow force response (SFR), which is a consequence of an increased Ca(2+) transient that follows the NHE1 Na(+)/H(+) exchanger activation. Carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) binds to the extreme COOH terminus of NHE1 and regulates its transport activity. We aimed to test the role of CAII bound to NHE1 in the SFR. The SFR and changes in intracellular pH (pHi) were evaluated in rat papillary muscle bathed with CO2/HCO3(-) buffer and stretched from 92% to 98% of the muscle maximal force development length for 10 min in the presence of the CA inhibitor 6-ethoxzolamide (ETZ, 100 μM). SFR control was 120 ± 3% (n = 8) of the rapid initial phase and was fully blocked by ETZ (99 ± 4%, n = 6). The SFR corresponded to a maximal increase in pHi of 0.18 ± 0.02 pH units (n = 4), and pHi changes were blocked by ETZ (0.04 ± 0.04, n = 6), as monitored by epifluorescence. NHE1/CAII physical association was examined in the SFR by coimmunoprecipitation, using muscle lysates. CAII immunoprecipitated with an anti-NHE1 antibody and the CAII immunoprecipitated protein levels increased 58 ± 9% (n = 6) upon stretch of muscles, assessed by immunoblots. The p90(RSK) kinase inhibitor SL0101-1 (10 μM) blocked the SFR of heart muscles after stretch 102 ± 2% (n = 4) and reduced the binding of CAII to NHE1, suggesting that the stretch-induced phosphorylation of NHE1 increases its binding to CAII. CAII/NHE1 interaction constitutes a component of the SFR to heart muscle stretch, which potentiates NHE1-mediated H(+) transport in the myocardium.

  1. Attenuation of Myocardial Injury by HMGB1 Blockade during Ischemia/Reperfusion Is Toll-Like Receptor 2-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Iskandar, Franziska; Habeck, Katharina; Zimmermann, René; Schumann, Ralf R.; Koch, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Genetic or pharmacological ablation of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury (MI/R). However, the endogenous ligand responsible for TLR2 activation has not yet been detected. The objective of this study was to identify HMGB1 as an activator of TLR2 signalling during MI/R. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) or TLR2−/−-mice were injected with vehicle, HMGB1, or HMGB1 BoxA one hour before myocardial ischemia (30 min) and reperfusion (24 hrs). Infarct size, cardiac troponin T, leukocyte infiltration, HMGB1 release, TLR4-, TLR9-, and RAGE-expression were quantified. HMGB1 plasma levels were measured in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. HMGB1 antagonist BoxA reduced cardiomyocyte necrosis during MI/R in WT mice, accompanied by reduced leukocyte infiltration. Injection of HMGB1 did, however, not increase infarct size in WT animals. In TLR2−/−-hearts, neither BoxA nor HMGB1 affected infarct size. No differences in RAGE and TLR9 expression could be detected, while TLR2−/−-mice display increased TLR4 and HMGB1 expression. Plasma levels of HMGB1 were increased MI/R in TLR2−/−-mice after CABG surgery in patients carrying a TLR2 polymorphism (Arg753Gln). We here provide evidence that absence of TLR2 signalling abrogates infarct-sparing effects of HMGB1 blockade. PMID:24371373

  2. PKC-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway is involved in the inhibition of Ib on AngiotensinII-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yu; Yan Tianhua; Wang Qiujuan Wang Wei; Xu Jinyi; Wu Xiaoming; Ji Hui

    2008-10-10

    AngiotensinII (AngII) induces vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which plays an important role in the development and progression of hypertension. AngII-induced cellular events have been implicated, in part, in the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). In the present study, we investigated the effect of Ib, a novel nonpeptide AngII receptor type 1 (AT{sub 1}) antagonist, on the activation of PKC and ERK1/2 in VSMC proliferation induced by AngII. MTT, and [{sup 3}H]thymidine incorporation assay showed that AngII-induced VSMC proliferation was inhibited significantly by Ib. The specific binding of [{sup 125}I]AngII to AT{sub 1} receptors was blocked by Ib in a concentration-dependent manner with IC{sub 50} value of 0.96 nM. PKC activity assay and Western blot analysis demonstrated that Ib significantly inhibited the activation of PKC and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 induced by AngII, respectively. Furthermore, AngII-induced ERK1/2 activation was obviously blocked by GF109203X, a PKC inhibitor. These findings suggest that the suppression of Ib on AngII-induced VSMC proliferation may be attributed to its inhibitory effect on PKC-dependent ERK1/2 pathway.

  3. Heavy metals bound to fine particulate matter from northern China induce season-dependent health risks: A study based on myocardial toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Ji, Xiaotong; Ku, Tingting; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2016-09-01

    Substantial epidemiological evidence has consistently reported that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular outcomes. PM2.5 is a complex mixture of extremely small particles and liquid droplets composed of multiple components, and there has been high interest in identifying the specific health-relevant physical and/or chemical toxic constituents of PM2.5. In the present study, we analyzed 8 heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, Mn and Co) in the PM2.5 collected during four different seasons in Taiyuan, a typical coal-burning city in northern China. Our results indicated that total concentrations of the 8 heavy metals differed among the seasons. Zn and Pb, which are primarily derived from the anthropogenic source, coal burning, were the dominant elements, and high concentrations of these two elements were observed during the spring and winter. To clarify whether these heavy metals in the locally collected PM2.5 were associated with health effects, we conducted health risk assessments using validated methods. Interestingly, Pb was responsible for greater potential health risks to children. Because cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a main contributor to the mortality associated with PM2.5 exposure, we performed experimental assays to evaluate the myocardial toxicity. Our in vitro experiments showed that the heavy metal-containing PM2.5 induced season-dependent apoptosis in rat H9C2 cells through a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated inflammatory response. Our findings suggested that heavy metals bound to PM2.5 produced by coal burning play an important role in myocardial toxicity and contribute to season-dependent health risks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Angiotensin II receptors in testes

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Aguilera, G.

    1988-05-01

    Receptors for angiotensin II (AII) were identified and characterized in testes of rats and several primate species. Autoradiographic analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled (Sar1,Ile8)AII to rat, rhesus monkey, cebus monkey, and human testicular slide-mounted frozen sections indicated specific binding to Leydig cells in the interstitium. In rat collagenase-dispersed interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptor content was parallel to that of hCG receptors, confirming that the AII receptors are in the Leydig cells. In rat dispersed Leydig cells, binding was specific for AII and its analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.8 nM), with a receptor concentration of 15 fmol/10(6) cells. Studies of AII receptors in rat testes during development reveals the presence of high receptor density in newborn rats which decreases toward the adult age (4934 +/- 309, 1460 +/- 228, 772 +/- 169, and 82 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein at 5, 15, 20, and 30 days of age, respectively) with no change in affinity. At all ages receptors were located in the interstitium, and the decrease in binding was parallel to the decrease in the interstitial to tubular ratio observed with age. AII receptor properties in membrane-rich fractions from prepuberal testes were similar in the rat and rhesus monkey. Binding was time and temperature dependent, reaching a plateau at 60 min at 37 C, and was increased by divalent cations, EGTA, and dithiothreitol up to 0.5 mM. In membranes from prepuberal monkey testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.2 nM) with a receptor concentration of 7599 +/- 1342 fmol/mg protein. The presence of AII receptors in Leydig cells in rat and primate testes in conjunction with reports of the presence of other components of the renin-angiotensin system in the testes suggests that the peptide has a physiological role in testicular function.

  5. Outcomes with Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitors vs Other Antihypertensive Agents in Hypertensive Blacks.

    PubMed

    Bangalore, Sripal; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Gyamfi, Joyce; Guo, Yu; Roy, Jason; Goldfeld, Keith; Torgersen, Christopher; Capponi, Louis; Phillips, Christopher; Shah, Nirav R

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are used widely in the treatment of patients with hypertension. However, their efficacy in hypertensive blacks when compared with other antihypertensive agents is not well established. We performed a cohort study of patients using data from a clinical data warehouse of 434,646 patients from New York City's Health and Hospitals Corporation from January 2004 to December 2009. Patients were divided into the following comparison groups: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors vs calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors vs thiazide diuretics, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors vs β-blockers. The primary outcome was a composite of death, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Secondary outcomes included the individual components and heart failure. In the propensity score-matched angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors vs calcium channel blocker comparison cohort (4506 blacks in each group), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were associated with a higher risk of primary outcome (hazard ratio [HR], 1.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19-1.77; P = .0003), myocardial infarction (HR, 3.40; 95% CI, 1.25-9.22; P = .02), stroke (HR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.29-2.57; P = .001), and heart failure (HR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.30-2.42; P = .0003) when compared with calcium channel blockers. For the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors vs thiazide diuretics comparison (5337 blacks in each group), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were associated with a higher risk of primary outcome (HR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.33-2.05; P < .0001), death (HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.03-1.76; P = .03), myocardial infarction (HR, 4.00; 95% CI, 1.34-11.96; P = .01), stroke (HR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.34-2.92; P = .001), and heart failure (HR, 3.00; 95% CI, 1.99-4.54; P < .0001). For the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors vs β-blocker comparison, the outcomes between the groups were not significantly different. In a real-world cohort of

  6. Differential regeneration of myocardial infarction depending on the progression of disease and the composition of biomimetic hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Yoon, So Jeong; Hong, Soyoung; Fang, Yong Hu; Song, Myeongjin; Son, Kuk Hui; Son, Ho Sung; Kim, Sook Kyoung; Sun, Kyung; Park, Yongdoo

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogel has been used for regenerating myocardial infraction (MI) as a delivery vehicle for cells and growth factors. This study showed that injectable hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogels alone would effectively regenerate the damaged infarcted heart tissue. We found that there are two major factors of regeneration in MI. One is molecular weight of HA and another is the progression of MI; sub-acute and chronic. Rat MI model was prepared by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Four weeks after injection of hydrogel, functional analysis of the heart and histological analysis was assessed. When different molecular weight HA-based hydrogels with 50 kDa, 130 kDa, and 170 kDa were applied to the infarcted area in the sub-acute model, 50 kDa HA-based hydrogel showed the most significant regeneration of myocardium as well as functional recovery among samples. For the disease progression, 50 kDa HA-based hydrogels were injected to sub-acute and chronic MI models. The regeneration activity was significantly decreased in the chronic models reflecting that injection timing of the therapeutic agents is also major determinants in the regeneration process. These results suggest that injection time and composition of hydrogel are two major points treating MI. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. T2-prepared steady-state free precession blood oxygen level-dependent MR imaging of myocardial perfusion in a dog stenosis model.

    PubMed

    Shea, Steven M; Fieno, David S; Schirf, Brian E; Bi, Xiaoming; Huang, Jie; Omary, Reed A; Li, Debiao

    2005-08-01

    To assess the ability of a T2-prepared steady-state free precession blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequence to depict changes in myocardial perfusion during stress testing in a dog stenosis model. Study was approved by the institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. A hydraulic occluder was placed in the left circumflex coronary artery (LCX) in 10 dogs. Adenosine was administered intravenously to increase coronary blood flow, and stenosis was achieved in the LCX with the occluder. A T2-prepared two-dimensional steady-state free precession sequence was used for BOLD imaging at a spatial resolution of 1.5 x 1.2 x 5.0 mm3, and first-pass perfusion images were acquired for visual comparison. Microspheres were injected to provide regional perfusion information. Mixed-effect regression analysis was performed to assess normalized MR signal intensity ratios and microsphere-measured perfusion differences. For the same data, 95% prediction intervals were calculated to determine the smallest perfusion change detectable. Means +/- standard deviations were calculated for myocardial regional comparison data. A two-tailed Student t test was used to determine if significant differences (P < .01) existed between different myocardial regions. Under maximal adenosine stress, MR clearly depicted stenotic regions and showed regional signal differences between the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD)-fed myocardium and the stenosed LCX-fed myocardium. Visual comparisons with first-pass images were also excellent. Regional MR signal intensity differences between LAD and LCX-fed myocardium (1.24 +/- 0.08) were significantly different (P < .01) from differences between LAD and septal-fed myocardium (1.02 +/- 0.07), which was in agreement with microsphere-measured flow differences (LAD/LCX, 3.38 +/- 0.83; LAD/septal, 1.26 +/- 0.49). The linear mixed-effect regression model showed good correlation (R = 0.79) between MR differences and

  8. Angiotensin converting enzyme genotype in cardiovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, K.M.; Huggard, P.R.; West, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) catalyses formation of angiotensin II and degradation of bradykinin, vasoactive peptides with opposing properties. The result of ACE action is to promote vasoconstriction and cell growth. PCR is used to detect a common polymorphism due to the insertion of an Alu repeat element of 287 bp into intron 16. ACE genotype has been implicated in risk for myocardial infarction (MI) and hypertension in humans. We have studied a group of 640 patients (61% male aged 64 {plus_minus} 11 years) with myocardial ischaemic syndromes, followed for 12 months after initial hospital admission. In this group, the frequency of the insertion (I) allele was 0.47 (N=1170 chromosomes), not significantly higher than the frequency of 0.46 in 112 local blood donors (50% male aged 59 {plus_minus}5 years). In the 300 patients with diagnosed MI, I allele frequency was 0.48. This is significantly higher ({chi}{sup 2}=5.78, P=0.015) than the frequency of 0.42 reported in a multi-centre study of ACE genotype in 600 male European patients with MI . There was a non-significant increase in the frequency of a cardiac event within 6 months of hospital admission in those of II genotype (N=464, 47 events to date). These results suggest that in our population, the I allele and/or II genotype may be associated with risk of MI. This contrasts with the study cited above, where the D (deletion) allele and DD genotype frequency were raised in patients compared with controls. Hypertension is associated with the ACE D allele, and does not explain the heart disease risk, which may be associated with the I allele, in this group of survivors of myocardial ischaemic disease. The difference between our results and the previous study may be due to ascertainment or ethnic differences or to problems amplifying the I allele in some heterozygotes. Clearly, the role of ACE genotype in these diseases is complex.

  9. Central administration of angiotensin IV rapidly enhances novel object recognition among mice.

    PubMed

    Paris, Jason J; Eans, Shainnel O; Mizrachi, Elisa; Reilley, Kate J; Ganno, Michelle L; McLaughlin, Jay P

    2013-07-01

    Angiotensin IV (Val(1)-Tyr(2)-Ile(3)-His(4)-Pro(5)-Phe(6)) has demonstrated potential cognitive-enhancing effects. The present investigation assessed and characterized: (1) dose-dependency of angiotensin IV's cognitive enhancement in a C57BL/6J mouse model of novel object recognition, (2) the time-course for these effects, (3) the identity of residues in the hexapeptide important to these effects and (4) the necessity of actions at angiotensin IV receptors for procognitive activity. Assessment of C57BL/6J mice in a novel object recognition task demonstrated that prior administration of angiotensin IV (0.1, 1.0, or 10.0, but not 0.01 nmol, i.c.v.) significantly enhanced novel object recognition in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were time dependent, with improved novel object recognition observed when angiotensin IV (0.1 nmol, i.c.v.) was administered 10 or 20, but not 30 min prior to the onset of the novel object recognition testing. An alanine scan of the angiotensin IV peptide revealed that replacement of the Val(1), Ile(3), His(4), or Phe(6) residues with Ala attenuated peptide-induced improvements in novel object recognition, whereas Tyr(2) or Pro(5) replacement did not significantly affect performance. Administration of the angiotensin IV receptor antagonist, divalinal-Ang IV (20 nmol, i.c.v.), reduced (but did not abolish) novel object recognition; however, this antagonist completely blocked the procognitive effects of angiotensin IV (0.1 nmol, i.c.v.) in this task. Rotorod testing demonstrated no locomotor effects with any angiotensin IV or divalinal-Ang IV dose tested. These data demonstrate that angiotensin IV produces a rapid enhancement of associative learning and memory performance in a mouse model that was dependent on the angiotensin IV receptor.

  10. Myocardial infarction in Antigua. 1990 to 1995.

    PubMed

    Martin, T C; Van Longhuyzen, H W; Amaraswamy, R; Tangutoori, R; Bennett, B

    1997-09-01

    Between January 1990 and May 1995, 117 patients were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit at Holberton Hospital, Antigua, for chest pain due to suspected acute myocardial infarction. 39 (45%) of 86 patients whose records were available for retrospective review had confirmed (27 patients) or probable (12 patients) acute myocardial infarction. Risk factors identified among the patients included hypertension, diabetes, tobacco smoking, hypercholesterolaemia and obesity. On admission, 82% were Killip class I and 18% were Killip class II. Medications in the Intensive Care Unit included nitrates, aspirin, calcium channel blockers, beta-adrenergic blockers, heparin and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (21%). No thrombolytic agents were available. The average hospital stay was 10 days and the in-hospital mortality rate was 13%. These data indicate that early mortality from acute myocardial infarction can be reduced in developing countries by early admission to an Intensive Care Unit and use of drugs known to be effective in its treatment.

  11. Different regulation of miR-29a-3p in glomeruli and tubules in an experimental model of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension: potential role in renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Castoldi, Giovanna; di Gioia, Cira; Giollo, Fabrizio; Carletti, Raffaella; Bombardi, Camila; Antoniotti, Marco; Roma, Francesca; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Stella, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the angiotensin II (Ang II) induced-differential miRNA expression in renal glomerular and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis in an experimental model of Ang II-dependent hypertension. To clarify this issue, Sprague Dawley rats were treated with Ang II (200 ng/kg per minute, n = 15) or physiological saline (n = 14) for 4 weeks. Systolic blood pressure and albuminuria were measured every 2 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, renal glomerular and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis was evaluated by histomorphometric analysis, after Sirius-Red and Masson's trichrome staining. Ang II increased systolic blood pressure (P < 0.0001), albuminuria (P < 0.01) and both glomerular and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis (P < 0.01). Using laser capture microdissection and miRNA microarray analysis this study showed that miR-29a-3p was down-regulated in renal tubules and up-regulated in glomeruli. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments confirmed in Ang II-treated rats a down-regulation of miR-29a-3p in tubules (P < 0.01), while no significant changes were observed in glomeruli. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was identified as putative miR-29a-3p target (by TargetScan, miRanda, Tarbase software) and functionally confirmed by luciferase activity assay. These data demonstrate that the effects of Ang II on miR-29a-3p expression in renal tubules is different from the one exerted in the glomeruli and that miR-29a-3p targets MMP-2. These results suggest that the development of renal fibrosis at glomerular and tubulo-interstitial level depends on different molecular mechanisms. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  13. Benidipine reduces myocardial infarct size involving reduction of hydroxyl radicals and production of protein kinase C-dependent nitric oxide in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ningyuan; Minatoguchi, Shinya; Chen, Xue-Hai; Arai, Masazumi; Uno, Yoshihiro; Lu, ChuanJiang; Misao, Yu; Nagai, Hiroshi; Takemura, Genzou; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi

    2004-06-01

    Japanese white rabbits underwent 30 minutes of ischemia and 48 hours of reperfusion. Benidipine (3 or 10 microg/kg, i.v.) was administered 10 minutes before ischemia with and without pretreatment with L-NAME (10 mg/kg, i.v., a NOS inhibitor), chelerythrine (5 mg/kg, i.v., a PKC blocker) or 5-HD (5 mg/kg, i.v. a mitochondrial KATP channel blocker), genistein (5 mg/kg, i.v. a protein tyrosin kinase blocker). SNAP (2.5 mg/kg/min x 70 minutes, i.v., an NO donor) was also administered 10 minutes before ischemia. Benidipine significantly reduced the infarct size in a dose-dependent manner (3 microg/kg: 29.0 +/- 2.7%, n = 8, 10 microg/kg: 23.0 +/- 2.4%, n = 10) compared with the control (41.6 +/- 3.3%, n = 10). This effect was completely blocked by L-NAME (39.9 +/- 3.6%, n = 8) and chelerythrine (35.5 +/- 2.4%, n = 8) but not by 5-HD (23.0 +/- 2.4%, n = 10) or genistein (24.6 +/- 3.1%, n = 10). SNAP also reduced the infarct size (24.6 +/- 3.1%, n = 8). Benidipine significantly increased the expression of eNOS mRNA at 30 minutes after reperfusion and significantly increased the expression of eNOS protein at 3 hours after reperfusion in the ischemic area of the left ventricle. Benidipine and SNAP significantly decreased myocardial interstitial 2,5-DHBA levels, an indicator of hydroxyl radicals, during ischemia and reperfusion. Benidipine increased myocardial interstitial NOx levels, which effect was blocked by chelerythrine, during 0 to 30 minutes and 150 to 180 minutes after reperfusion. Benidipine reduces the infarct size through PKC-dependent production of nitric oxide and decreasing hydroxyl radicals but not through involving protein tyrosine kinase or mitochondrial KATP channels in rabbits.

  14. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Captopril Reverses the Adverse Cardiovascular Effects of Polymerized Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ronghua; Yao, Yusheng; Yang, Qian; Zhou, Cheng; Wu, Wei; Li, Qian; You, Zhen; Zhao, Xiaolin; Yang, Linhui; Li, Chen; Zhu, Da; Qiu, Yanhua; Luo, Ming; Tan, Zhaoxia; Li, Huan; Chen, Yanfang; Gong, Gu; Feng, Yuan; Dian, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Cell-free hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) may increase the risk of myocardial infarction and death. We studied the effect of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on HBOC-induced adverse cardiovascular outcomes and elucidated the underlying mechanisms. Results: With a dog cardiopulmonary bypass model, we demonstrated that a high-dose HBOC (3%, w/v) did not reduce—but aggravated—cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury. Animals administered a high-dose HBOC experienced coronary artery constriction and depression of cardiac function. Exposure of isolated coronary arteries or human umbilical vein endothelial cells to high-dose HBOC caused impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, increased endothelial cell necrosis/apoptosis, and elevated NAD(P)H oxidase expression (gp91phox, p47phox, p67phox, and Nox1) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All observed adverse outcomes could be suppressed by the ACE inhibitor captopril (100 μM). Co-incubation with free radical scavenger tempol or NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor apocynin had no effect on captopril action, suggesting that the positive effects of captopril are ROS- and NAD(P)H oxidase dependent. ACE inhibition by captopril also contributed to these effects. In addition, bioavailable nitrite oxide (NO) reduced by high-dose HBOC was preserved by captopril. Furthermore, HBOC, at concentrations greater than 0.5%, inhibited large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel currents in vascular smooth muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner, although captopril failed to improve current activity, providing additional evidence that captopril's effects are mediated by the endothelium, but not by the smooth muscle. Innovation and Conclusion: Captopril alleviates high-dose HBOC-induced endothelial dysfunction and myocardial toxicity, which is mediated by synergistic depression of NAD(P)H oxidase subunit overproduction and increases in vascular NO bioavailability. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2095

  15. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril reverses the adverse cardiovascular effects of polymerized hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Zhou, Ronghua; Yao, Yusheng; Yang, Qian; Zhou, Cheng; Wu, Wei; Li, Qian; You, Zhen; Zhao, Xiaolin; Yang, Linhui; Li, Chen; Zhu, Da; Qiu, Yanhua; Luo, Ming; Tan, Zhaoxia; Li, Huan; Chen, Yanfang; Gong, Gu; Feng, Yuan; Dian, Ke; Liu, Jin

    2014-11-20

    Cell-free hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) may increase the risk of myocardial infarction and death. We studied the effect of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on HBOC-induced adverse cardiovascular outcomes and elucidated the underlying mechanisms. With a dog cardiopulmonary bypass model, we demonstrated that a high-dose HBOC (3%, w/v) did not reduce-but aggravated-cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury. Animals administered a high-dose HBOC experienced coronary artery constriction and depression of cardiac function. Exposure of isolated coronary arteries or human umbilical vein endothelial cells to high-dose HBOC caused impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, increased endothelial cell necrosis/apoptosis, and elevated NAD(P)H oxidase expression (gp91(phox), p47(phox), p67(phox), and Nox1) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All observed adverse outcomes could be suppressed by the ACE inhibitor captopril (100 μM). Co-incubation with free radical scavenger tempol or NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor apocynin had no effect on captopril action, suggesting that the positive effects of captopril are ROS- and NAD(P)H oxidase dependent. ACE inhibition by captopril also contributed to these effects. In addition, bioavailable nitrite oxide (NO) reduced by high-dose HBOC was preserved by captopril. Furthermore, HBOC, at concentrations greater than 0.5%, inhibited large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel currents in vascular smooth muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner, although captopril failed to improve current activity, providing additional evidence that captopril's effects are mediated by the endothelium, but not by the smooth muscle. Captopril alleviates high-dose HBOC-induced endothelial dysfunction and myocardial toxicity, which is mediated by synergistic depression of NAD(P)H oxidase subunit overproduction and increases in vascular NO bioavailability.

  16. Effect of a reduction in uric acid on renal outcomes during losartan treatment: a post hoc analysis of the reduction of endpoints in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with the Angiotensin II Antagonist Losartan Trial.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yan; Ottenbros, Stefan A; Laverman, Goos D; Brenner, Barry M; Cooper, Mark E; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Grobbee, Diederick E; Shahinfar, Shahnaz; de Zeeuw, Dick; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J

    2011-07-01

    Emerging data show that increased serum uric acid (SUA) concentration is an independent risk factor for end-stage renal disease. Treatment with the antihypertensive drug losartan lowers SUA. Whether reductions in SUA during losartan therapy are associated with renoprotection is unclear. We therefore tested this hypothesis. In a post hoc analysis of 1342 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and nephropathy participating in the Reduction of Endpoints in Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus With the Angiotensin II Antagonist Losartan Trial, we determined the relationship between month 6 change in SUA and renal endpoints, defined as a doubling of serum creatinine or end-stage renal disease. Baseline SUA was 6.7 mg/dL in placebo and losartan-treated subjects. During the first 6 months, losartan lowered SUA by -0.16 mg/dL (95% CI: -0.30 to -0.01; P=0.031) as compared with placebo. The risk of renal events was decreased by 6% (95% CI: 10% to 3%) per 0.5-mg/dL decrement in SUA during the first 6 months. This effect was independent of other risk markers, including estimate glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria. Adjustment of the overall treatment effects for SUA attenuated losartan's renoprotective effect from 22% (95% CI: 6% to 35%) to 17% (95% CI: 1% to 31%), suggesting that approximately one fifth of losartan's renoprotective effect could be attributed to its effect on SUA. Losartan lowers SUA levels compared with placebo treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and nephropathy. The degree of reduction in SUA is subsequently associated with the degree in long-term renal risk reduction and explains part of losartan's renoprotective effect. These findings support the view that SUA may be a modifiable risk factor for renal disease.

  17. Nox4 NAD(P)H oxidase mediates Src-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of PDK-1 in response to angiotensin II: role in mesangial cell hypertrophy and fibronectin expression.

    PubMed

    Block, Karen; Eid, Assaad; Griendling, Kathy K; Lee, Duck-Yoon; Wittrant, Yohann; Gorin, Yves

    2008-08-29

    Activation of glomerular mesangial cells (MCs) by angiotensin II (Ang II) leads to hypertrophy and extracellular matrix accumulation. Here, we demonstrate that, in MCs, Ang II induces an increase in PDK-1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1) kinase activity that required its phosphorylation on tyrosine 9 and 373/376. Introduction into the cells of PDK-1, mutated on these tyrosine residues or kinase-inactive, attenuates Ang II-induced hypertrophy and fibronectin accumulation. Ang II-mediated PDK-1 activation and tyrosine phosphorylation (total and on residues 9 and 373/376) are inhibited in cells transfected with small interfering RNA for Src, indicating that Src is upstream of PDK-1. In cells expressing oxidation-resistant Src mutant C487A, Ang II-induced hypertrophy and fibronectin expression are prevented, suggesting that the pathway is redox-sensitive. Ang II also up-regulates Nox4 protein, and siNox4 abrogates the Ang II-induced increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Small interfering RNA for Nox4 also inhibits Ang II-induced activation of Src and PDK-1 tyrosine phosphorylation (total and on residues 9 and 373/376), demonstrating that Nox4 functions upstream of Src and PDK-1. Importantly, inhibition of Nox4, Src, or PDK-1 prevents the stimulatory effect of Ang II on fibronectin accumulation and cell hypertrophy. This work provides the first evidence that Nox4-derived ROS are responsible for Ang II-induced PDK-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and activation through stimulation of Src. Importantly, this pathway contributes to Ang II-induced MC hypertrophy and fibronectin accumulation. These data shed light on molecular processes underlying the oxidative signaling cascade engaged by Ang II and identify potential targets for intervention to prevent renal hypertrophy and fibrosis.

  18. A review of the preclinical cardiovascular pharmacology of cilazapril, a new angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Waterfall, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    1 Cilazapril is the monoethyl ester prodrug form of the di-acid cilazaprilat, a new angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. Cilazaprilat has an IC50 of 1.9 nM as an inhibitor of rabbit lung ACE in vitro making it one of the most potent ACE inhibitors currently available. Studies on a wide range of other enzymes show that the inhibition is highly specific. 2 An oral dose of 0.1 mg kg-1 cilazapril evoked the same maximum degree of plasma ACE inhibition (∼76%) in the rat as 0.25 mg kg-1 enalapril. Cilazapril (0.25 mg kg-1 p.o.) inhibited plasma ACE by > 95%. The rate of recovery of ACE activity was slower with cilazapril (5-6% h-1) than with enalapril (10% h-1). 3 In anaesthetised rats cilazaprilat was equipotent with ramiprilat and slightly more potent (1.5×) than enalaprilat as an inhibitor of the angiotensin I pressor response. 4 Following oral administration to conscious rats and intravenous administration to anaesthetised dogs, cilazapril was 2-4.5× more potent than enalapril as an ACE inhibitor. 5 In cats cilazapril (0.1 and 0.3 mg kg-1 p.o.) dose dependently decreased plasma ACE activity and the angiotensin pressor response. Peak effects occurred at 2 h after dosing and plasma ACE inhibition was maintained at ≥ 50% for up to 18 h. Mean arterial pressure was also decreased dose dependently with a peak effect at 3-4 h. 6 Daily oral dosing of cilazapril (30 mg kg-1 p.o.) to spontaneously hypertensive rats evoked a progressive and prolonged (24 h) antihypertensive response with a maximum decrease in systolic blood pressure of 110 mm Hg. 7 Cilazapril (10 mg kg-1 p.o. twice daily for 3.5 days) progressively decreased blood pressure in volume depleted renal hypertensive dogs. The maximum fall in systolic pressure was 39 ± 6 mm Hg. 8 Haemodynamic studies in open chest anaesthetised dogs showed that the hypotensive response to intravenous cilazapril was accompanied by a reduction in total peripheral resistance. Small decreases in cardiac output and

  19. Quantification of myocardial oxygenation in heart failure using blood-oxygen-level-dependent T2* magnetic resonance imaging: Comparison with cardiopulmonary exercise test.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Michinobu; Yamasaki, Yuzo; Kawanami, Satoshi; Kamitani, Takeshi; Sagiyama, Koji; Higo, Taiki; Ide, Tomomi; Takemura, Atsushi; Ishizaki, Umiko; Fukushima, Kenji; Watanabe, Yuji; Honda, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Quantification of myocardial oxygenation (MO) in heart failure (HF) has been less than satisfactory. This has necessitated the use of invasive techniques to measure MO directly or to determine the oxygen demand during exercise using the cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) test. We propose a new quantification method for MO using blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) myocardial T2* magnetic resonance imaging (M-T2* MRI), and investigate its correlation with CPX results. Thirty patients with refractory HF who underwent cardiac MRI and CPX test for heart transplantation, and 24 healthy, age-matched volunteers as controls were enrolled. M-T2* imaging was performed using a 3-Tesla and multi-echo gradient-echo sequence. M-T2* was calculated by fitting the signal intensity data for the mid-left ventricular septum to a decay curve. M-T2* was measured under room-air (T2*-air) and after inhalation of oxygen for 10min at a flow rate of 10L/min (T2*-oxy). MO was defined as the difference between the two values (ΔT2*). Changes in M-T2* at the two conditions and ΔT2* between the two groups were compared. Correlation between ΔT2* and CPX results was analyzed using the Pearson coefficient. T2*-oxy was significantly greater than T2*-air in patients with HF (29.9±7.3ms vs. 26.7±6.0ms, p<0.001), whereas no such difference was observed in controls (25.5±4.0ms vs. 25.4±4.4ms). ΔT2* was significantly greater for patients with HF than for controls (3.2±4.5ms vs. -0.1±1.3ms, p<0.001). A significant correlation between ΔT2* and CPX results (peak VO2, r=-0.46, p<0.05; O2 pulse, r=-0.54, p<0.005) was observed. ΔT2* is increased T2*-oxy is greater in patients with HF, and is correlated with oxygen metabolism during exercise as measured by the CPX test. Hence, ΔT2* can be used as a surrogate marker of MO instead of CPX test. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of Angiotensin(1-7) on Heart Function in an Experimental Rat Model of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Blanke, Katja; Schlegel, Franziska; Raasch, Walter; Bader, Michael; Dähnert, Ingo; Dhein, Stefan; Salameh, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Obesity is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Recently it was shown that overexpression of the Mas-receptor antagonist angiotensin(1-7) could prevent from diet-induced obesity. However, it remained unclear whether diet-induced obesity and angiotensin(1-7) overexpression might also have effects on the cardiovascular system in these rats. Methods:Twenty three male Sprague Dawley rats were fed with standard chow (SD+chow, n = 5) or a cafeteria diet (SD+CD, n = 6) for 5 months. To investigate the effect of angiotensin(1-7) transgenic rats, expressing an angiotensin(1-7)-producing fusion protein in testis were used. These transgenic rats also received a 5 month's feeding period with either chow (TGR+chow, n = 6) or cafeteria diet (TGR+CD, n = 6), respectively. Hemodynamic measurements (pressure-volume loops) were carried out to assess cardiac function and blood pressure. Subsequently, hearts were explanted and investigated according to the Langendorff technique. Furthermore, cardiac remodeling in these animals was investigated histologically. Results:After 5 months cafeteria diet feeding rats showed a significantly increased body weight, which could be prevented in transgenic rats. However, there was no effect on cardiac performance after cafeteria diet in non-transgenic and transgenic rats. Moreover, overexpression of angiotensin(1-7) deteriorated cardiac contractility as indicated by impaired dp/dt. Furthermore, histological analysis revealed that cafeteria diet led to myocardial fibrosis in both, control and transgenic rats and this was not inhibited by an overproduction of angiotensin(1-7). Conclusion:These results indicate that an overexpression of circulating angiotensin(1-7) prevents a cafeteria diet-induced increase in body weight, but does not affect cardiac performance in this experimental rat model of obesity. Furthermore, overexpression of angiotensin(1-7) alone resulted in an impairment of cardiac function. PMID:26733884

  1. Lysyl oxidase overexpression accelerates cardiac remodeling and aggravates angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Galán, María; Varona, Saray; Guadall, Anna; Orriols, Mar; Navas, Miquel; Aguiló, Silvia; de Diego, Alicia; Navarro, María A; García-Dorado, David; Rodríguez-Sinovas, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Rodriguez, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) controls matrix remodeling, a key process that underlies cardiovascular diseases and heart failure; however, a lack of suitable animal models has limited our knowledge with regard to the contribution of LOX to cardiac dysfunction. Here, we assessed the impact of LOX overexpression on ventricular function and cardiac hypertrophy in a transgenic LOX (TgLOX) mouse model with a strong cardiac expression of human LOX. TgLOX mice exhibited high expression of the transgene in cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts, which are associated with enhanced LOX activity and H2O2 production and with cardiofibroblast reprogramming. LOX overexpression promoted an age-associated concentric remodeling of the left ventricle and impaired diastolic function. Furthermore, LOX transgenesis aggravated angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction, which triggered a greater fibrotic response that was characterized by stronger collagen deposition and cross-linking and high expression of fibrotic markers. In addition, LOX transgenesis increased the Ang II-induced myocardial inflammatory infiltrate, exacerbated expression of proinflammatory markers, and decreased that of cardioprotective factors. Mechanistically, LOX overexpression enhanced oxidative stress and potentiated the Ang II-mediated cardiac activation of p38 MAPK while reducing AMPK activation. Our findings suggest that LOX induces an age-dependent disturbance of diastolic function and aggravates Ang II-induced hypertrophy, which provides novel insights into the role of LOX in cardiac performance.-Galán, M., Varona, S., Guadall, A., Orriols, M., Navas, M., Aguiló, S., de Diego, A., Navarro, M. A., García-Dorado, D., Rodríguez-Sinovas, A., Martínez-González, J., Rodriguez, C. Lysyl oxidase overexpression accelerates cardiac remodeling and aggravates angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy. © FASEB.

  2. Angiotensin type I receptor blockade in conjunction with enhanced Akt activation restores coronary collateral growth in the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Rashmi; Dodd, Tracy; Smith, Erika; Bailey, Erin; DeLucia, Angelo L.; Russell, James C.; Madison, Rowan; Potter, Barry; Walsh, Kenneth; Jo, Hanjoong

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Akt was required for repetitive ischemia (RI)-induced coronary collateral growth (CCG) in healthy rats but was not activated by RI in the metabolic syndrome (JCR:LA-cp rats) where CCG was impaired. Here we hypothesized that failure of angiotensin type I receptor (AT1R) blockers to restore Akt activation is a key determinant of their inability to completely restore CCG in the metabolic syndrome. Therefore, we investigated whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of constitutively active Akt (MyrAkt-Adv) in conjunction with AT1R blockade (candesartan) was able to restore RI-induced CCG in JCR:LA-cp rats. Successful myocardial MyrAkt-Adv delivery was confirmed by a >80% transduction efficiency and an approximately fourfold increase in Akt expression and activation. CCG was assessed by myocardial blood flow measurements in the normal and collateral-dependent zones. MyrAkt-Adv alone significantly increased RI-induced CCG in JCR:LA-cp rats (∼30%), but it completely restored CCG in conjunction with administration of candesartan. In contrast, dominant negative Akt (DN-Akt-Adv) reversed the beneficial effect of candesartan on CCG in JCR:LA-cp rats. We conclude that optimal restoration of coronary collateral growth in JCR:LA-cp rats requires a combination of AT1R blockade with constitutive Akt activation. These findings may carry implications for metabolic syndrome patients in need of coronary revascularization. PMID:21335466

  3. Arsenic causes aortic dysfunction and systemic hypertension in rats: Augmentation of angiotensin II signaling.

    PubMed

    Waghe, Prashantkumar; Sarath, Thengumpallil Sasindran; Gupta, Priyanka; Kandasamy, Kannan; Choudhury, Soumen; Kutty, Harikumar Sankaran; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath

    2015-07-25

    The groundwater pollutant arsenic can cause various cardiovascular disorders. Angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, plays an important role in vascular dysfunction by promoting changes in endothelial function, vascular reactivity, tissue remodeling and oxidative stress. We investigated whether modulation of angiotensin II signaling and redox homeostasis could be a mechanism contributing to arsenic-induced vascular disorder. Rats were exposed to arsenic at 25, 50 and 100ppm of sodium arsenite through drinking water consecutively for 90 days. Blood pressure was recorded weekly. On the 91st day, the rats were sacrificed for blood collection and isolation of thoracic aorta. Angiotensin converting enzyme and angiotensin II levels were assessed in plasma. Aortic reactivity to angiotensin II was assessed in organ-bath system. Western blot of AT1 receptors and G protein (Gαq/11), ELISA of signal transducers of MAP kinase pathway and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were assessed in aorta. Arsenic caused concentration-dependent increase in systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure from the 10th, 8th and 7th week onwards, respectively. Arsenic caused concentration-dependent enhancement of the angiotensin II-induced aortic contractile response. Arsenic also caused concentration-dependent increase in the plasma levels of angiotensin II and angiotensin converting enzyme and the expression of aortic AT1 receptor and Gαq/11 proteins. Arsenic increased aortic protein kinase C activity and the concentrations of protein tyrosine kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 and vascular endothelial growth factor. Further, arsenic increased aortic mRNA expression of Nox2, Nox4 and p22phox, NADPH oxidase activity and ROS generation. The results suggest that arsenic-mediated enhancement of angiotensin II signaling could be an important mechanism in the arsenic-induced vascular disorder, where ROS could augment the angiotensin II signaling through activation

  4. Calcitonin, angiotensin II and FPP significantly modulate mouse sperm function.

    PubMed

    Fraser, L R; Pondel, M D; Vinson, G P

    2001-03-01

    Fertilization-promoting peptide (FPP) regulates the adenylyl cyclase (AC)/cAMP pathway to elicit capacitation-dependent responses, stimulating capacitation in uncapacitated spermatozoa and then arresting it in capacitated cells, thereby inhibiting spontaneous acrosome reactions. Like FPP, calcitonin and angiotensin II are found in seminal plasma and so might affect sperm function; this study investigated responses in uncapacitated and capacitated mouse spermatozoa to these three peptides. Both calcitonin (5 ng/ml) and angiotensin II (1 and 10nmol/l), like FPP (100nmol/l), significantly stimulated capacitation, assessed using chlortetracycline (CTC) fluorescence and fertilization in vitro analyses. Combinations of two or three peptides, at high and low, non-stimulatory concentrations, were more stimulatory than the individual peptides, suggesting that they may act on the same signalling pathway, plausibly AC/cAMP; preliminary data indicate that calcitonin does stimulate cAMP production. In capacitated cells, FPP and calcitonin elicited pertussis toxin-sensitive inhibition of spontaneous acrosome loss, suggesting involvement of inhibitory G proteins; angiotensin II had no detectable effect. When all three peptides were used, angiotensin II did not interfere with inhibitory responses to FPP/calcitonin. These results suggest that angiotensin II, calcitonin and FPP may somehow modulate the AC/cAMP signal transduction pathway, but the precise mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated.

  5. The mechanistic basis for the disparate effects of angiotensin II on coronary collateral growth.

    PubMed

    Reed, Ryan; Kolz, Christopher; Potter, Barry; Rocic, Petra

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesize that controversial effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) are attributable to its regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent signaling. Coronary collateral growth (CCG) was stimulated in normal (WKY) and syndrome X (JCR) rats by transient/repetitive ischemia (RI). Blood flow was measured in the normal (NZ) and the collateral-dependent (CZ) zone. In WKY, RI increased CZ flow (0.84 mL/min/g), but RI+subpressor Ang II increased it more (1.24 mL/min/g). This was associated with transient p38 and sustained Akt activation. A hypertensive dose of Ang II decreased CZ flow (0.69 mL/min/g), which was associated with sustained p38 and transient Akt activation. AT1R blockade by candesartan abrogated CZ flow in WKY (0.58 mL/min/g), reduced myocardial superoxide, and blocked p38 and Akt activation. RI-induced CZ flow in JCR was significantly decreased compared with WKY (0.12 mL/min/g), associated with a large increase in superoxide and lack of p38 and Akt activation. CZ flow in JCR was partially restored by candesartan (0.45 mL/min/g), accompanied by reduction in superoxide and partial restoration of p38 and Akt activation. Ang II/AT1R blockade, at least in part, regulates CCG via generating optimal ROS amounts and activating redox-sensitive signaling.

  6. Carbohydrates regulate the dimerization of angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kost, O A; Orth, T A; Nikolskaya, I I; Nametkin, S N; Levashov, A V

    1998-03-01

    Regulation of the catalytic activity and supramolecular structure of angiotensin-converting enzyme was studied in reverse micelles of Aerosol OT in octane as biomembrane model. The kinetic experiments and the sedimentation analysis demonstrated that the enzyme can function both in monomeric and dimeric form. The degree of dimerization was strongly dependent on the concentration and structure of mono- and disaccharides added to the media, indicating the specific role of carbohydrates in forming the supramolecular structure of angiotensin-converting enzyme. The existence of carbohydrate-binding center on the enzyme molecule is proposed.

  7. The past, present and future of renin–angiotensin aldosterone system inhibition☆

    PubMed Central

    Mentz, Robert J.; Bakris, George L.; Waeber, Bernard; McMurray, John J.V.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Ruilope, Luis M.; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Swedberg, Karl; Piña, Ileana L.; Fiuzat, Mona; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Zannad, Faiez; Pitt, Bertram

    2014-01-01

    The renin–angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) is central to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. RAAS inhibition can reduce blood pressure, prevent target organ damage in hypertension and diabetes, and improve outcomes in patients with heart failure and/or myocardial infarction. This review presents the history of RAAS inhibition including a summary of key heart failure, myocardial infarction, hypertension and atrial fibrillation trials. Recent developments in RAAS inhibition are discussed including implementation and optimization of current drug therapies. Finally, ongoing clinical trials, opportunities for future trials and issues related to the barriers and approvability of novel RAAS inhibitors are highlighted. PMID:23121914

  8. [Ventricular "remodeling" after myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Cohen-Solal, A; Himbert, D; Guéret, P; Gourgon, R

    1991-06-01

    Cardiac failure is the principal medium-term complication of myocardial infarction. Changes in left ventricular geometry are observed after infarction, called ventricular remodeling, which, though compensatory initially, cause ventricular failure in the long-term. Experimental and clinical studies suggest that early treatment by coronary recanalisation, trinitrin and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may prevent or limit the expansion and left ventricular dilatation after infarction, so improving ventricular function, and, at least in the animal, reduce mortality. Large scale trials with converting enzyme inhibitors are currently under way to determine the effects of this new therapeutic option. It would seem possible at present, independently of any reduction in the size of the infarction, to reduce or delay left ventricular dysfunction by interfering with the natural process of dilatation and ventricular modeling after infarction.

  9. Acute Myocardial Response to Stretch: What We (don't) Know

    PubMed Central

    Neves, João S.; Leite-Moreira, André M.; Neiva-Sousa, Manuel; Almeida-Coelho, João; Castro-Ferreira, Ricardo; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial stretch, as result of acute hemodynamic overload, is one of the most frequent challenges to the heart and the ability of the heart to intrinsically adapt to it is essential to prevent circulatory congestion. In this review, we highlight the historical background, the currently known mechanisms, as well as the gaps in the understanding of this physiological response. The systolic adaptation to stretch is well-known for over 100 years, being dependent on an immediate increase in contractility—known as the Frank-Starling mechanism—and a further progressive increase—the slow force response. On the other hand, its diastolic counterpart remains largely unstudied. Mechanosensors are structures capable of perceiving mechanical signals and activating pathways that allow their transduction into biochemical responses. Although the connection between these structures and stretch activated pathways remains elusive, we emphasize those most likely responsible for the initiation of the acute response. Calcium-dependent pathways, including angiotensin- and endothelin-related pathways; and cGMP-dependent pathways, comprising the effects of nitric oxide and cardiac natriuretic hormones, embody downstream signaling. The ischemic setting, a paradigmatic situation of acute hemodynamic overload, is also touched upon. Despite the relevant knowledge accumulated, there is much that we still do not know. The quest for further understanding the myocardial response to acute stretch may provide new insights, not only in its physiological importance, but also in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26779036

  10. Effect of renin-angiotensin system on sodium intake.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, E

    1976-01-01

    1. Water and saline intake was measured in rats depleted of Na by I.P. dialysis. Na intake was prevented 180 min but not 60-90 min after bilateral nephrectomy. Unilateral nephrectomy as well as ureteral ligature had no effect on Na intake. 2. Renin (3u.) injected I.P. re-established the Na appetite abolished by nephrectomy. 3. Angiotensin I (5 ng) or II (5-40 ng) injected into the 3rd ventricle, also restored the Na intake and this effect was dose-dependent. 4. The angiotensin converting-enzyme inhibitor Sq 20,881 (1 mg/kg) inhibited the effect of AI but not that of AII in restoring Na intake. 5. It is concluded that the kidneys might play a role in the regulation of Na intake through the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:1255521

  11. Integrative network analysis reveals time-dependent molecular events underlying left ventricular remodeling in post-myocardial infarction patients.

    PubMed

    Pinet, Florence; Cuvelliez, Marie; Kelder, Thomas; Amouyel, Philippe; Radonjic, Marijana; Bauters, Christophe

    2017-02-03

    To elucidate the time-resolved molecular events underlying the LV remodeling (LVR) process, we developed a large-scale network model that integrates the 24 molecular variables (plasma proteins and non-coding RNAs) collected in the REVE-2 study at four time points (baseline, 1month, 3months and 1year) after MI. The REVE-2 network model was built by extending the set of REVE-2 variables with their mechanistic context based on known molecular interactions (1310 nodes and 8639 edges). Changes in the molecular variables between the group of patients with high LVR (>20%) and low LVR (<20%) were used to identify active network modules within the clusters associated with progression of LVR, enabling assessment of time-resolved molecular changes. Although the majority of molecular changes occur at the baseline, two network modules specifically show an increasing number of active molecules throughout the post-MI follow up: one involved in muscle filament sliding, containing the major troponin forms and tropomyosin proteins, and the other associated with extracellular matrix disassembly, including matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases and laminin proteins. For the first time, integrative network analysis of molecular variables collected in REVE-2 patients with known molecular interactions allows insight into time-dependent mechanisms associated with LVR following MI, linking specific processes with LV structure alteration. In addition, the REVE-2 network model provides a shortlist of prioritized putative novel biomarker candidates for detection of LVR after MI event associated with a high risk of heart failure and is a valuable resource for further hypothesis generation.

  12. Characterization of angiotensin-binding sites in the bovine adrenal and the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rogulja, I.

    1989-01-01

    The first study was designed to determine whether systemically administered MSG affects neurons in the CVOs that are potentially important in mediating angiotensin-dependent responses. Rats were pretreated with MSG and the receptors for angiotensin II were assayed by radioligand binding in brain homogenates from the septum anteroventral third ventricular region (AV3V) and the thalamus/hypothalamus region using {sup 125}I-angiotensin II as the radioligand. The results of this experiment indicate that systematically administered MSG in the rat significantly reduced the number (Bmax) of Ang II receptors in a tissue sample which contained both extra blood-brain barrier organs as well as tissue within the blood-brain barrier with no change in the affinity (Kd) of the binding sites. The second chapter reports the successful solubilization of bovine adrenal {sup 125}I Ang II and {sup 125}I Sar{sup 1},Ile{sup 8}-Ang II binding sites with the detergent CHAPS. The results of our studies indicate the presence of two angiotensin binding sites. The one site is specific for naturally occurring angiotensins as well as sarcosine-1 substituted angiotensin analogues. The other site which can be optimally stabilized be re-addition of 0.3% CHAPS into the incubation assay binds sarcosine-1 substituted angiotensins exclusively. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography experiments suggest that these sites, possibly, represent distinct proteins. The third chapter discusses the successful solubilization and partial characterization of the rat brain angiotensin receptor.

  13. Hypotensive effect of angiotensin II after AT1-receptor blockade with losartan.

    PubMed

    Matys, T; Pawlak, R; Kucharewicz, I; Chabielska, E; Buczko, W

    2000-03-01

    Recent data suggest that hypotensive effect of losartan may not be attributed solely to AT1-receptor blockade, but also to excessive AT2 or other receptors stimulation by elevated angiotensin II and its derivative peptides. Therefore in the present study we examined the effect of angiotensin II on mean blood pressure after AT -receptor blockade with losartan. Male Wistar rats were anaesthetised and received injection of either losartan (30 mg/kg, 1 ml/kg, i.v.) or saline (the same volume and route) followed by bolus injection of angiotensin II (100, 300 or 1,000 ng/kg; 1 ml/kg, i.v.) or 1-hour infusion of angiotensin II (200 ng/kg/min; 2.5 ml/kg/h, i.v.). Control animals received saline instead. Angiotensin II, given either as the injection or the infusion, caused an evident increase in mean blood pressure (p ranged from 0.05 to 0.001 depending on the experimental group). Losartan caused a rapid drop in mean blood pressure and blunted the hypertensive effect of angiotensin II (p < 0.01). Moreover, in the losartan-pretreated animals the hypotensive phase was enhanced by the infusion, but not single injection of angiotensin II, which was most evident from the 30 th minute of observation (p < 0.05 vs control). In conclusion, hypotensive effect of losartan may be amplified by simultaneous increase in angiotensin II level, the situation observed during chronic AT1-receptor blockade.

  14. Azilsartan: a newly approved angiotensin II receptor blocker.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sum

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a common chronic disease that leads to significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Blood pressure control is essential to prevent end-organ complications, such as stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, or kidney disease. Azilsartan is the eighth angiotensin II receptor blocker approved for the management of hypertension, alone or in combination with other agents. At the approved dosage, it reduces systolic blood pressure by 12 to 15 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure by 7 to 8 mm Hg. A higher dose of azilsartan (80 mg) was superior to valsartan 320 mg or olmesartan 40 mg in lowering systolic blood pressure in short-term studies. Additional blood pressure reduction is expected when azilsartan is used adjunctively with a diuretic. However, the effects of azilsartan on cardiovascular morbidity or mortality are still lacking. Azilsartan is well tolerated; the most common side effects are headache and diarrhea. No cases of hyperkalemia have been reported in 6-week clinical trials. Worsening of renal function and hypotension should be monitored, particularly in those with baseline risk factors. It is unknown whether azilsartan would join angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and other angiotensin receptor blockers as the preferred hypertensive agents for end-organ protection. At this time, azilsartan should be considered as an alternative agent for mild-to-moderate hypertension, or as an adjunctive therapy when preferred agents fail to maintain optimal blood pressure control. It is also an option for those patients who have contraindications or cannot tolerate other antihypertensive agents, including dry cough induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

  15. Angiotensin III as well as angiotensin II regulates water flow through aquaporins in a clam worm.

    PubMed

    Satou, Ryousuke; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Ido, Hiroki; Tomomatsu, Masayuki; Suzuki, Fumiaki; Nakamura, Yukio

    2005-07-01

    Angiotensin III has been reported to exist in various animals and tissues. The physiological role, however, is still unclear except that brain angiotensin III is a central regulator of vasopressin release. In this study, angiotensin III as well as angiotensin II enhanced an increase in body weight of clam worms of Perinereis sp. under a hypo-osmotic condition and suppressed a decrease in body weight under a hyper-osmotic condition. When clam worms were treated with tetrachloroaurate (III) after angiotensin-treatment, these enhancing and suppressive effects of the angiotensins under hypo- and hyper-osmotic conditions were inhibited. In contrast, when clam worms were pretreated with tetrachloroaurate (III) before angiotensin-treatment, these effects of angiotensins were not inhibited. Since tetrachloroaurate (III) is a representative blocker of aquaporins, these results indicate that angiotensin III as well as angiotensin II regulates water flow through aquaporins in clam worms.

  16. Spliced stromal cell-derived factor-1α analog stimulates endothelial progenitor cell migration and improves cardiac function in a dose-dependent manner after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hiesinger, William; Frederick, John R.; Atluri, Pavan; McCormick, Ryan C.; Marotta, Nicole; Muenzer, Jeffrey R.; Woo, Y. Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α is a potent endogenous endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) chemokine and key angiogenic precursor. Recombinant SDF-1α has been demonstrated to improve neovasculogenesis and cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI) but SDF-1α is a bulky protein with a short half-life. Small peptide analogs might provide translational advantages, including ease of synthesis, low manufacturing costs, and the potential to control delivery within tissues using engineered biomaterials. We hypothesized that a minimized peptide analog of SDF-1α, designed by splicing the N-terminus (activation and binding) and C-terminus (extracellular stabilization) with a truncated amino acid linker, would induce EPC migration and preserve ventricular function after MI. Methods EPC migration was first determined in vitro using a Boyden chamber assay. For in vivo analysis, male rats (n=48) underwent left anterior descending coronary artery ligation. At infarction, the rats were randomized into 4 groups and received peri-infarct intramyocardial injections of saline, 3 μg/kg of SDF-1α, 3 μg/kg of spliced SDF analog, or 6 μg/kg spliced SDF analog. After 4 weeks, the rats underwent closed chest pressure volume conductance catheter analysis. Results EPCs showed significantly increased migration when placed in both a recombinant SDF-1α and spliced SDF analog gradient. The rats treated with spliced SDF analog at MI demonstrated a significant dose-dependent improvement in end-diastolic pressure, stroke volume, ejection fraction, cardiac output, and stroke work compared with the control rats. Conclusions A spliced peptide analog of SDF-1α containing both the N- and C- termini of the native protein induced EPC migration, improved ventricular function after acute MI, and provided translational advantages compared with recombinant human SDF-1α. PMID:20951261

  17. Spliced stromal cell-derived factor-1α analog stimulates endothelial progenitor cell migration and improves cardiac function in a dose-dependent manner after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hiesinger, William; Frederick, John R; Atluri, Pavan; McCormick, Ryan C; Marotta, Nicole; Muenzer, Jeffrey R; Woo, Y Joseph

    2010-11-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α is a potent endogenous endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) chemokine and key angiogenic precursor. Recombinant SDF-1α has been demonstrated to improve neovasculogenesis and cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI) but SDF-1α is a bulky protein with a short half-life. Small peptide analogs might provide translational advantages, including ease of synthesis, low manufacturing costs, and the potential to control delivery within tissues using engineered biomaterials. We hypothesized that a minimized peptide analog of SDF-1α, designed by splicing the N-terminus (activation and binding) and C-terminus (extracellular stabilization) with a truncated amino acid linker, would induce EPC migration and preserve ventricular function after MI. EPC migration was first determined in vitro using a Boyden chamber assay. For in vivo analysis, male rats (n = 48) underwent left anterior descending coronary artery ligation. At infarction, the rats were randomized into 4 groups and received peri-infarct intramyocardial injections of saline, 3 μg/kg of SDF-1α, 3 μg/kg of spliced SDF analog, or 6 μg/kg spliced SDF analog. After 4 weeks, the rats underwent closed chest pressure volume conductance catheter analysis. EPCs showed significantly increased migration when placed in both a recombinant SDF-1α and spliced SDF analog gradient. The rats treated with spliced SDF analog at MI demonstrated a significant dose-dependent improvement in end-diastolic pressure, stroke volume, ejection fraction, cardiac output, and stroke work compared with the control rats. A spliced peptide analog of SDF-1α containing both the N- and C- termini of the native protein induced EPC migration, improved ventricular function after acute MI, and provided translational advantages compared with recombinant human SDF-1α. Copyright © 2010 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Impaired myocardial development resulting in neonatal cardiac hypoplasia alters postnatal growth and stress response in the heart.

    PubMed

    Drenckhahn, Jörg-Detlef; Strasen, Jette; Heinecke, Kirsten; Langner, Patrick; Yin, Kom Voy; Skole, Friederike; Hennig, Maria; Spallek, Bastian; Fischer, Robert; Blaschke, Florian; Heuser, Arnd; Cox, Timothy C; Black, Mary Jane; Thierfelder, Ludwig

    2015-04-01

    Foetal growth has been proposed to influence cardiovascular health in adulthood, a process referred to as foetal programming. Indeed, intrauterine growth restriction in animal models alters heart size and cardiomyocyte number in the perinatal period, yet the consequences for the adult or challenged heart are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate postnatal myocardial growth pattern, left ventricular function, and stress response in the adult heart after neonatal cardiac hypoplasia in mice. Utilizing a new mouse model of impaired cardiac development leading to fully functional but hypoplastic hearts at birth, we show that myocardial mass is normalized until early adulthood by accelerated physiological cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Compensatory hypertrophy, however, cannot be maintained upon ageing, resulting in reduced organ size without maladaptive myocardial remodelling. Angiotensin II stress revealed aberrant cardiomyocyte growth kinetics in adult hearts after neonatal hypoplasia compared with normally developed controls, characterized by reversible overshooting hypertrophy. This exaggerated growth mainly depends on STAT3, whose inhibition during angiotensin II treatment reduces left ventricular mass in both groups but causes contractile dysfunction in developmentally impaired hearts only. Whereas JAK/STAT3 inhibition reduces cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area in the latter, it prevents fibrosis in control hearts, indicating fundamentally different mechanisms of action. Impaired prenatal development leading to neonatal cardiac hypoplasia alters postnatal cardiac growth and stress response in vivo, thereby linking foetal programming to organ size control in the heart. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Renin angiotensin system inhibitors for patients with stable coronary artery disease without heart failure: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Fakheri, Robert; Wandel, Simon; Toklu, Bora; Wandel, Jasmin; Messerli, Franz H

    2017-01-01

    Objective To critically evaluate the efficacy of renin angiotensin system inhibitors (RASi) in patients with coronary artery disease without heart failure, compared with active controls or placebo. Design Meta-analysis of randomized trials. Data sources PubMed, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases until 1 May 2016. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Randomized trials of RASi versus placebo or active controls in patients with stable coronary artery disease without heart failure (defined as left ventricular ejection fraction ≥40% or without clinical heart failure). Each trial had to enroll at least 100 patients with coronary artery disease without heart failure, with at least one year’s follow-up. Studies were excluded if they were redacted or compared use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors with angiotensin receptor blockers. Outcomes were death, cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, heart failure, revascularization, incident diabetes, and drug withdrawal due to adverse effects. Results 24 trials with 198 275 patient years of follow-up were included. RASi reduced the risk of all cause mortality (rate ratio 0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.72 to 0.98), cardiovascular mortality (0.74, 0.59 to 0.94), myocardial infarction (0.82, 0.76 to 0.88), stroke (0.79, 0.70 to 0.89), angina, heart failure, and revascularization when compared with placebo but not when compared with active controls (all cause mortality, 1.05, 0.94 to 1.17; Pinteraction=0.006; cardiovascular mortality, 1.08, 0.93 to 1.25, Pinteraction<0.001; myocardial infarction, 0.99, 0.87 to 1.12, Pinteraction=0.01; stroke, 1.10, 0.93 to 1.31; Pinteraction=0.002). Bayesian meta-regression analysis showed that the effect of RASi when compared with placebo on all cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality was dependent on the control event rate, such that RASi was only beneficial in trials with high control event rates (>14.10 deaths and >7.65 cardiovascular deaths per

  20. New Perspectives in the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) II: Albumin Suppresses Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Activity in Human

    PubMed Central

    Fagyas, Miklós; Úri, Katalin; Siket, Ivetta M.; Fülöp, Gábor Á.; Csató, Viktória; Daragó, Andrea; Boczán, Judit; Bányai, Emese; Szentkirályi, István Elek; Maros, Tamás Miklós; Szerafin, Tamás; Édes, István; Papp, Zoltán; Tóth, Attila

    2014-01-01

    About 8% of the adult population is taking angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to treat cardiovascular disease including hypertension, myocardial infarction and heart failure. These drugs decrease mortality by up to one-fifth in these patients. We and others have reported previously that endogenous inhibitory substances suppress serum ACE activity, in vivo, similarly to the ACE inhibitor drugs. Here we have made an effort to identify this endogenous ACE inhibitor substance. ACE was crosslinked with interacting proteins in human sera. The crosslinked products were immunoprecipitated and subjected to Western blot. One of the crosslinked products was recognized by both anti-ACE and anti-HSA (human serum albumin) antibodies. Direct ACE-HSA interaction was confirmed by binding assays using purified ACE and HSA. HSA inhibited human purified (circulating) and human recombinant ACE with potencies (IC50) of 5.7±0.7 and 9.5±1.1 mg/mL, respectively. Effects of HSA on the tissue bound native ACE were tested on human saphenous vein samples. Angiotensin I evoked vasoconstriction was inhibited by HSA in this vascular tissue (maximal force with HSA: 6.14±1.34 mN, without HSA: 13.54±2.63 mN), while HSA was without effects on angiotensin II mediated constrictions (maximal force with HSA: 18.73±2.17 mN, without HSA: 19.22±3.50 mN). The main finding of this study is that HSA was identified as a potent physiological inhibitor of the ACE. The enzymatic activity of ACE appears to be almost completely suppressed by HSA when it is present in its physiological concentration. These data suggest that angiotensin I conversion is limited by low physiological ACE activities, in vivo. PMID:24691203

  1. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Tikellis, Chris; Thomas, Merlin C; Golledge, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a homolog of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) which generates angiotensin II from angiotensin I. ACE, its product angiotensin II and the downstream angiotensin type I receptor are important components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Angiotensin II, the most important component of the RAS, promotes the development of atherosclerosis. The identification of ACE2 in 2000 opened a new chapter of research on the regulation of the RAS. ACE2 degrades pro-atherosclerotic angiotensin II and generates anti-atherosclerotic angiotensin 1-7. In this review, we explored the importance of ACE2 in protecting experimental animals from developing atherosclerosis and its involvement in human atherosclerosis. We also examined the published evidence assessing the importance of ACE2 in different cell types relevant to atherosclerosis and putative underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms linking ACE2 with protection from atherosclerosis. ACE2 shifts the balance from angiotensin II to angiotensin 1-7 inhibiting the progression of atherosclerosis in animal models. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction : Clinical practice update].

    PubMed

    Ertl, G; Brenner, S; Angermann, C E

    2017-02-01

    Heart failure remains a frequent cause of death and is the leading reason for hospitalization in Germany although therapeutic options have significantly increased over the past years particularly in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Clinical symptoms are usually preceded by cardiac remodeling, which was originally defined only by left ventricular dilatation and depressed function but is also associated with typical cellular and molecular processes. Healing after acute myocardial infarction is characterized by inflammation, cellular migration and scar formation. Cardiac remodeling is accompanied by adaptive changes of the peripheral cardiovascular system. Since prevention is the primary goal, rapid diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction are mandatory. Early reperfusion therapy limits infarct size and enables the best possible preservation of left ventricular function. Standard pharmacotherapy includes angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-1-receptor blockers and beta blockers. In addition, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists have proven beneficial. Compounds specifically targeting infarct healing processes are currently under development.

  3. Drinking behaviour in rats treated with isoprenaline, angiotensin II or angiotensin antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, Emma

    1979-01-01

    1. Isoprenaline hydrochloride injected subcutaneously in rats given a choice test of 1·8% NaCl and water, first induced saline intake which started immediately and was almost concluded in 15 min, followed by a copious water intake. When either saline or water were given in a separate test, saline intake surpassed the water intake in the first 15 min. 2. The delay of 15, 30 or 60 min after injection of isoprenaline, 100 μg/kg, before drinking was allowed, significantly reduced saline intake but did not modify the amount of water subsequently drunk. 3. Isoprenaline caused a sudden drop in arterial blood pressure, the extent and duration depending on the dose. The time of maximum drop 3-4 min after injection coincided with the time the rat drank salt. 4. Isoprenaline-induced saline drinking was significantly reduced after bilateral nephrectomy but water intake was unaffected. 5. The beta-adrenoceptor blocking agent, propranolol, inhibited isoprenaline-induced NaCl and water intake, while the alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist phenoxybenzamine abolished isoprenaline-induced NaCl intake and enhanced water intake. 6. Saralasin acetate (P-113), a competitive inhibitor of angiotensin II, given into the third brain ventricle, prevented the isoprenaline-induced NaCl and water intake as well as angiotensin II-induced drinking. The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor SQ-20881 reduced the isoprenaline-induced NaCl and water intake. 7. In conclusion, hypotension might be a component of salt drinking evoked by isoprenaline although the dipsogenic action of beta-stimulation is mainly due to endogenous renin-angiotensin activation. PMID:231100

  4. Increased Titin Compliance Reduced Length-Dependent Contraction and Slowed Cross-Bridge Kinetics in Skinned Myocardial Strips from Rbm (20ΔRRM) Mice.

    PubMed

    Pulcastro, Hannah C; Awinda, Peter O; Methawasin, Mei; Granzier, Henk; Dong, Wenji; Tanner, Bertrand C W

    2016-01-01

    Titin is a giant protein spanning from the Z-disk to the M-band of the cardiac sarcomere. In the I-band titin acts as a molecular spring, contributing to passive mechanical characteristics of the myocardium throughout a heartbeat. RNA Binding Motif Protein 20 (RBM20) is required for normal titin splicing, and its absence or altered function leads to greater expression of a very large, more compliant N2BA titin isoform in Rbm20 homozygous mice (Rbm20 (ΔRRM) ) compared to wild-type mice (WT) that almost exclusively express the stiffer N2B titin isoform. Prior studies using Rbm20 (ΔRRM) animals have shown that increased titin compliance compromises muscle ultrastructure and attenuates the Frank-Starling relationship. Although previous computational simulations of muscle contraction suggested that increasing compliance of the sarcomere slows the rate of tension development and prolongs cross-bridge attachment, none of the reported effects of Rbm20 (ΔRRM) on myocardial function have been attributed to changes in cross-bridge cycling kinetics. To test the relationship between increased sarcomere compliance and cross-bridge kinetics, we used stochastic length-perturbation analysis in Ca(2+)-activated, skinned papillary muscle strips from Rbm20 (ΔRRM) and WT mice. We found increasing titin compliance depressed maximal tension, decreased Ca(2+)-sensitivity of the tension-pCa relationship, and slowed myosin detachment rate in myocardium from Rbm20 (ΔRRM) vs. WT mice. As sarcomere length increased from 1.9 to 2.2 μm, length-dependent activation of contraction was eliminated in the Rbm20 (ΔRRM) myocardium, even though myosin MgADP release rate decreased ~20% to prolong strong cross-bridge binding at longer sarcomere length. These data suggest that increasing N2BA expression may alter cardiac performance in a length-dependent manner, showing greater deficits in tension production and slower cross-bridge kinetics at longer sarcomere length. This study also supports the

  5. Increased Titin Compliance Reduced Length-Dependent Contraction and Slowed Cross-Bridge Kinetics in Skinned Myocardial Strips from Rbm20ΔRRM Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pulcastro, Hannah C.; Awinda, Peter O.; Methawasin, Mei; Granzier, Henk; Dong, Wenji; Tanner, Bertrand C. W.

    2016-01-01

    Titin is a giant protein spanning from the Z-disk to the M-band of the cardiac sarcomere. In the I-band titin acts as a molecular spring, contributing to passive mechanical characteristics of the myocardium throughout a heartbeat. RNA Binding Motif Protein 20 (RBM20) is required for normal titin splicing, and its absence or altered function leads to greater expression of a very large, more compliant N2BA titin isoform in Rbm20 homozygous mice (Rbm20ΔRRM) compared to wild-type mice (WT) that almost exclusively express the stiffer N2B titin isoform. Prior studies using Rbm20ΔRRM animals have shown that increased titin compliance compromises muscle ultrastructure and attenuates the Frank-Starling relationship. Although previous computational simulations of muscle contraction suggested that increasing compliance of the sarcomere slows the rate of tension development and prolongs cross-bridge attachment, none of the reported effects of Rbm20ΔRRM on myocardial function have been attributed to changes in cross-bridge cycling kinetics. To test the relationship between increased sarcomere compliance and cross-bridge kinetics, we used stochastic length-perturbation analysis in Ca2+-activated, skinned papillary muscle strips from Rbm20ΔRRM and WT mice. We found increasing titin compliance depressed maximal tension, decreased Ca2+-sensitivity of the tension-pCa relationship, and slowed myosin detachment rate in myocardium from Rbm20ΔRRM vs. WT mice. As sarcomere length increased from 1.9 to 2.2 μm, length-dependent activation of contraction was eliminated in the Rbm20ΔRRM myocardium, even though myosin MgADP release rate decreased ~20% to prolong strong cross-bridge binding at longer sarcomere length. These data suggest that increasing N2BA expression may alter cardiac performance in a length-dependent manner, showing greater deficits in tension production and slower cross-bridge kinetics at longer sarcomere length. This study also supports the idea that passive

  6. Nanoparticle-Mediated Delivery of Irbesartan Induces Cardioprotection from Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Antagonizing Monocyte-Mediated Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Yasuhiro; Matoba, Tetsuya; Tokutome, Masaki; Funamoto, Daiki; Katsuki, Shunsuke; Ikeda, Gentaro; Nagaoka, Kazuhiro; Ishikita, Ayako; Nakano, Kaku; Koga, Jun-Ichiro; Sunagawa, Kenji; Egashira, Kensuke

    2016-07-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury limits the therapeutic effect of early reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), in which the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes plays a causative role. Here we develop bioabsorbable poly-lactic/glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles incorporating irbesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ agonistic effect (irbesartan-NP). In a mouse model of IR injury, intravenous PLGA nanoparticles distribute to the IR myocardium and monocytes in the blood and in the IR heart. Single intravenous treatment at the time of reperfusion with irbesartan-NP (3.0 mg kg-1 irbesartan), but not with control nanoparticles or irbesartan solution (3.0 mg kg-1), inhibits the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to the IR heart, and reduces the infarct size via PPARγ-dependent anti-inflammatory mechanisms, and ameliorates left ventricular remodeling 21 days after IR. Irbesartan-NP is a novel approach to treat myocardial IR injury in patients with AMI.

  7. Nanoparticle-Mediated Delivery of Irbesartan Induces Cardioprotection from Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Antagonizing Monocyte-Mediated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yasuhiro; Matoba, Tetsuya; Tokutome, Masaki; Funamoto, Daiki; Katsuki, Shunsuke; Ikeda, Gentaro; Nagaoka, Kazuhiro; Ishikita, Ayako; Nakano, Kaku; Koga, Jun-ichiro; Sunagawa, Kenji; Egashira, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury limits the therapeutic effect of early reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), in which the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes plays a causative role. Here we develop bioabsorbable poly-lactic/glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles incorporating irbesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ agonistic effect (irbesartan-NP). In a mouse model of IR injury, intravenous PLGA nanoparticles distribute to the IR myocardium and monocytes in the blood and in the IR heart. Single intravenous treatment at the time of reperfusion with irbesartan-NP (3.0 mg kg−1 irbesartan), but not with control nanoparticles or irbesartan solution (3.0 mg kg−1), inhibits the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to the IR heart, and reduces the infarct size via PPARγ-dependent anti-inflammatory mechanisms, and ameliorates left ventricular remodeling 21 days after IR. Irbesartan-NP is a novel approach to treat myocardial IR injury in patients with AMI. PMID:27403534

  8. Mouse Sirt3 promotes autophagy in AngII-induced myocardial hypertrophy through the deacetylation of FoxO1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingyuan; Chen, Tongshuai; Xiao, Ming; Li, Na; Wang, Shujian; Su, Hongyan; Guo, Xiaobin; Liu, Hui; Yan, Fangying; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Yun; Bu, Peili

    2016-01-01

    Sirt3, a mitochondrial NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, is the only member proven to promote longevity in mammalian Sirtuin family. The processed short form of Sirt3 has been demonstrated to target many mediators of energy metabolism and mitochondrial stress adaptive program. Autophagy serves as a dynamic recycling mechanism and provides energy or metabolic substrates. Among the mechanisms triggered by cardiac stress, opinions vary as to whether autophagy is a protective or detrimental response. Here, by inducing the Sirt3-knockout mice to myocardial hypertrophy with chronic angiotensin II infusion for four weeks, we determined the role of Sirt3 in myocardial hypertrophy and autophagy. In this study, the Sirt3-knockout mice developed deteriorated cardiac function and impaired autophagy compared to wild-type mice. What's more, the overexpression of Sirt3 by lentivirus transfection attenuated cardiomyocytes hypertrophy by promoting autophagy. We further demonstrated that Sirt3 could bind to FoxO1 and activate its deacetylation. Sequentially, deacetylated FoxO1 translocates to the nucleus where it facilitates downstream E3 ubiquitin ligases such as Muscle RING Finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx, Atrogin1). Altogether, these results revealed that Sirt3 activation is essential to improve autophagy flux by reducing the acetylation modification on FoxO1, which in turn alleviates myocardial hypertrophy. PMID:27880725

  9. Localized accumulation of angiotensin II and production of angiotensin-(1-7) in rat luteal cells and effects on steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pepperell, John R; Nemeth, Gabor; Yamada, Yuji; Naftolin, Frederick; Merino, Maricruz

    2006-08-01

    These studies aim to investigate subcellular distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) in rat luteal cells, identify other bioactive angiotensin peptides, and investigate a role for angiotensin peptides in luteal steroidogenesis. Confocal microscopy showed ANG II distributed within the cytoplasm and nuclei of luteal cells. HPLC analysis showed peaks that eluted with the same retention times as ANG-(1-7), ANG II, and ANG III. Their relative concentrations were ANG II >or= ANG-(1-7) > ANG III, and accumulation was modulated by quinapril, an inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), Z-proprolinal (ZPP), an inhibitor of prolyl endopeptidase (PEP), and parachloromercurylsulfonic acid (PCMS), an inhibitor of sulfhydryl protease. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), a serine protease inhibitor, did not affect peptide accumulation. Quinapril, ZPP, PCMS, and PMSF, as well as losartan and PD-123319, the angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonists, were used in progesterone production studies. ZPP significantly reduced luteinizing hormone (LH)-dependent progesterone production (P < 0.05). Quinapril plus ZPP had a greater inhibitory effect on LH-stimulated progesterone than either inhibitor alone, but this was not reversed by exogenous ANG II or ANG-(1-7). Both PCMS and PMSF acutely blocked LH-stimulated progesterone, and PCMS blocked LH-sensitive cAMP accumulation. Losartan inhibited progesterone production in permeabilized but not intact luteal cells and was reversed by ANG II. PD-123319 had no significant effect on luteal progesterone production in either intact or permeabilized cells. These data suggest that steroidogenesis may be modulated by angiotensin peptides that act in part through intracellular AT1 receptors.

  10. Cardioprotective Effects of Telmisartan against Heart Failure in Rats Induced By Experimental Autoimmune Myocarditis through the Modulation of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme-2/Angiotensin 1-7/Mas Receptor Axis

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Vijayakumar; Veeraveedu, Punniyakoti T.; Gurusamy, Narasimman; Yamaguchi, Ken'ichi; Lakshmanan, Arun Prasath; Ma, Meilei; Suzuki, Kenji; Kodama, Makoto; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2) is a homolog of ACE that preferentially forms angiotensin-(ANG)-1-7 from angiotensin II (ANG II). We investigated the cardioprotective effects of telmisartan, a well-known angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) against experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM). EAM was induced in Lewis rats by immunization with porcine cardiac myosin. The rats were divided into two groups and treated with telmisartan (10 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 21 days. Myocardial functional parameters were significantly improved by treatment with telmisartan compared with vehicle-treated rats. Telmisartan lowered myocardial protein expressions of NADPH oxidase subunits 3-nitrotyrosine, p47phox, p67 phox, Nox-4 and superoxide production significantly than vehicle-treated rats. In contrast myocardial protein levels of ACE-2, ANG 1-7 mas receptor were upregulated in the telmisartan treated group compared with those of vehicle-treated rats. The myocardial protein expression levels of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factor (TRAF)-2, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein (GRP) 78 were decreased in the telmisartan treated rats compared with those of vehicle-treated rats. In addition, telmisartan treatment significantly decreased the protein expression levels of phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phospho-JNK, phospho-ERK and phospho (MAPK) activated protein kinase-2 than with those of vehicle-treated rats. Moreover, telmisartan significantly decreased the production of proinflammatory cytokines, myocardial apoptotic markers and caspase-3 positive cells compared with those of vehicle-treated rats. Therefore, we suggest that telmisartan was beneficial protection against heart failure in rats, at least in part by suppressing inflammation, oxidative stress, ER stress as well as signaling pathways through the modulation of ACE2/ANG1-7/Mas receptor axis. PMID:21927577

  11. Tissue renin angiotensin systems: theoretical implications for the development of hyperkalemia using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schlueter, W; Keilani, T; Batlle, D C

    1994-02-01

    In patients with renal insufficiency, as the number of functioning nephrons is reduced, potassium balance is maintained by an increase in potassium excretion in the remaining nephrons. This adaptive response is, in part, mediated by an increase in aldosterone production by the adrenal gland. Use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in these patients can result in hyperkalemia by suppressing aldosterone production by the adrenal gland. Inhibition of aldosterone production depends on the degree of inhibition of angiotensin II formation in the circulation as well as the degree of inhibition of angiotensin II formed locally in the adrenal gland. Recent experimental evidence suggests that the latter process may be important for the tonic regulation of aldosterone production. Because the various ACE inhibitors exhibit different degrees of ACE inhibition at the tissue level, it is reasonable to postulate that angiotensin II-dependent aldosterone production will be inhibited to a lesser degree by agents that have low tissue specificity for the adrenal gland. This feature would be most advantageous in treating patients with chronic renal insufficiency and congestive heart failure who are at risk for hyperkalemia. Therefore, the ideal ACE inhibitor should not suppress aldosterone secretion in such patients.

  12. Azilsartan: Novel Angiotensin Receptor Blocker.

    PubMed

    Dargad, Ramesh R; Parekh, Jai D; Dargad, Rohit R; Kukrety, Shweta

    2016-03-01

    To describe the efficacy and safety profile of the new angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), "Azilsartan Medoxomil", reviewing data available from both clinical and pre-clinical studies. We completed a review of the English literature from PubMed using the keywords- azilsartan medoxomil, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and hypertension. Many clinical trials have been conducted comparing the efficacy of azilsartan with other ARB's and also with the ACEi ramipril. The trials have shown azilsartan to be more effective in reducing the mean 24-hour systolic blood pressure compared to its counterparts. Azilsartan is a recently approved ARB and appears to be more efficacious in reducing blood pressure (BP) than the other ARBs with a similar safety and tolerability profile. Azilsartan's very high affinity to and slow dissociation from the angiotensin 1 receptor (AT1R) along with its inverse agonistic properties make it a very good candidate for clinical effects beyond simple BP control, potentially counteracting cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis and insulin resistance, together with improved reno-protection and atherosclerotic plaque stabilization.

  13. Effect of Wenxin Granule on Ventricular Remodeling and Myocardial Apoptosis in Rats with Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Aiming; Zhai, Jianying; Zhang, Dongmei; Lou, Lixia; Zhu, Haiyan; Gao, Yonghong; Chai, Limin; Xing, Yanwei; Lv, Xiying; Zhu, Lingqun; Zhao, Mingjing; Wang, Shuoren

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the effect of a Chinese herbal compound named Wenxin Granule on ventricular remodeling and myocardial apoptosis in rats with myocardial infarction (MI). Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups: the control group, the model group, the metoprolol group, and the Wenxin Granule group (WXKL group) with sample size (n) of 7 rats in each group. An MI model was established in all rats by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (the control group was without occlusion). Wenxin Granule (1.35 g/kg/day), metoprolol (12 mg/kg/day), and distilled water (5 mL/kg/day for the control and model groups) were administered orally for 4 weeks. Ultrasonic echocardiography was used to examine cardiac structural and functional parameters. Myocardial histopathological changes were observed using haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) dyeing. Myocardial apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Serum angiotensin II (Ang II) concentration was measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results. It was found that Wenxin Granule could partially reverse ventricular remodeling, improve heart function, alleviate the histopathological damage, inhibit myocardial apoptosis, and reduce Ang II concentration in rats with MI. Conclusions. The results of the current study suggest that Wenxin Granule may be a potential alternative and complementary medicine for the treatment of MI. PMID:23997803

  14. Myocardial Tagging With SSFP

    PubMed Central

    Herzka, Daniel A.; Guttman, Michael A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the first implementation of myocardial tagging with refocused steady-state free precession (SSFP) and magnetization preparation. The combination of myocardial tagging (a noninvasive method for quantitative measurement of regional and global cardiac function) with the high tissue signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) obtained with SSFP is shown to yield improvements in terms of the myocardium–tag contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and tag persistence when compared to the current standard fast gradient-echo (FGRE) tagging protocol. Myocardium–tag CNR and tag persistence were studied using numerical simulations as well as phantom and human experiments. Both quantities were found to decrease with increasing imaging flip angle (α) due to an increased tag decay rate and a decrease in myocardial steady-state signal. However, higher α yielded better blood–myocardium contrast, indicating that optimal α is dependent on the application: higher α for better blood–myocardium boundary visualization, and lower α for better tag persistence. SSFP tagging provided the same myocardium–tag CNR as FGRE tagging when acquired at four times the bandwidth and better tag– and blood–myocardium CNRs than FGRE tagging when acquired at equal or twice the receiver bandwidth (RBW). The increased acquisition efficiency of SSFP allowed decreases in breath-hold duration, or increases in temporal resolution, as compared to FGRE. PMID:12541254

  15. Effect of des-aspartate-angiotensin I on the actions of angiotensin II in the isolated renal and mesenteric vasculature of hypertensive and STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Dharmani, M; Mustafa, M R; Achike, F I; Sim, M K

    2005-07-15

    The present study investigated the action of des-aspartate-angiotensin I (DAA-I) on the pressor action of angiotensin II in the renal and mesenteric vasculature of WKY, SHR and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Angiotensin II-induced a dose-dependent pressor response in the renal vasculature. Compared to the WKY, the pressor response was enhanced in the SHR and reduced in the STZ-induced diabetic rat. DAA-I attenuated the angiotensin II pressor action in renal vasculature of WKY and SHR. The attenuation was observed for DAA-I concentration as low as 10(-18) M and was more prominent in SHR. However, the ability of DAA-I to reduce angiotensin II response was lost in the STZ-induced diabetic kidney. Instead, enhancement of angiotensin II pressor response was seen at the lower doses of the octapeptide. The effect of DAA-I was not inhibited by PD123319, an AT2 receptor antagonist, and indomethacin, a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor in both WKY and SHR, indicating that its action was not mediated by angiotensin AT2 receptor and prostaglandins. The pressor responses to angiotensin II in mesenteric vascular bed were also dose-dependent but smaller in magnitude compared to the renal vasculature. The responses were significantly smaller in SHR but no significant difference was observed between STZ-induced diabetic and WKY rat. Similarly, PD123319 and indomethacin had no effect on the action of DAA-I. The findings reiterate a regulatory role for DAA-I in vascular bed of the kidney and mesentery. By being active at circulating level, DAA-I subserves a physiological role. This function appears to be present in animals with diseased state of hypertension and diabetes. It is likely that DAA-I functions are modified to accommodate the ongoing vascular remodeling.

  16. Angiotensin II Stimulates H+-ATPase Activity in Intercalated Cells from Isolated Mouse Connecting Tubules and Cortical Collecting Ducts

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Carsten A.; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Uhlig, Ulrike; Giebisch, Gerhard H.; Breton, Sylvie; Brown, Dennis; Geibel, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Intercalated cells in the collecting duct system express V-type H+-ATPases which participate in acid extrusion, bicarbonate secretion, and chloride absorption depending on the specific subtype. The activity of H+-ATPases is regulated by acid-base status and several hormones, including angiotensin II and aldosterone. Angiotensin II stimulates chloride absorption mediated by pendrin in type B intercalated cells and this process is energized by the activity of H+-ATPases. Moreover, angiotensin II stimulates bicarbonate secretion by the connecting tubule (CNT) and early cortical collecting duct (CCD). In the present study we examined the effect of angiotensin II (10 nM) on H+-ATPase activity and localization in isolated mouse connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts. Angiotensin II stimulated Na+-independent intracellular pH recovery about 2-3 fold, and this was abolished by the specific H+-ATPase inhibitor concanamycin. The effect of angiotensin II was mediated through type 1 angiotensin II receptors (AT1-receptors) because it could be blocked by saralasin. Stimulation of H+-ATPase activity required an intact microtubular network - it was completely inhibited by colchicine. Immunocytochemistry of isolated CNT/CCDs incubated in vitro with angiotensin II suggests enhanced membrane associated staining of H+-ATPases in pendrin expressing intercalated cells. In summary, angiotensin II stimulates H+-ATPases in CNT/CCD intercalated cells, and may contribute to the regulation of chloride absorption and bicarbonate secretion in this nephron segment. PMID:22116365

  17. Intramyocardial BNP gene delivery improves cardiac function through distinct context-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Moilanen, Anne-Mari; Rysä, Jaana; Mustonen, Erja; Serpi, Raisa; Aro, Jani; Tokola, Heikki; Leskinen, Hanna; Manninen, Aki; Levijoki, Jouko; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Ruskoaho, Heikki

    2011-07-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is an endogenous peptide produced under physiological and pathological conditions mainly by ventricular myocytes. It has natriuretic, diuretic, blood pressure-lowering, and antifibrotic actions that could mediate cardiorenal protection in cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we used BNP gene transfer to examine functional and structural effects of BNP on left ventricular (LV) remodeling. Human BNP was overexpressed by using adenovirus-mediated gene delivery in normal rat hearts and in hearts during the remodeling process after infarction and in an experimental model of angiotensin II-mediated hypertension. In healthy hearts, BNP gene delivery into the anterior wall of the LV decreased myocardial fibrosis (P<0.01, n=7 to 8) and increased capillary density (P<0.05, n=7 to 8) associated with a 7.3-fold increase in LV BNP peptide levels. Overexpression of BNP improved LV fractional shortening by 22% (P<0.05, n=6 to 7) and ejection fraction by 19% (P<0.05, n=6 to 7) after infarction. The favorable effect of BNP gene delivery on cardiac function after infarction was associated with normalization of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase expression and phospholamban Thr17-phosphorylation. BNP gene delivery also improved fractional shortening and ejection fraction in angiotensin II-mediated hypertension as well as decreased myocardial fibrosis and LV collagen III mRNA levels but had no effect on angiogenesis or Ca(2+)-ATPase expression and phospholamban phosphorylation. Local intramyocardial BNP gene delivery improves cardiac function and attenuates adverse postinfarction and angiotensin II-induced remodeling. These results also indicate that myocardial BNP has pleiotropic, context-dependent, favorable actions on cardiac function and suggest that BNP acts locally as a key mechanical load-activated regulator of angiogenesis and fibrosis.

  18. Measurement of immunoreactive angiotensin peptides in rat tissues: some pitfalls in angiotensin II analysis.

    PubMed

    De Silva, P E; Husain, A; Smeby, R R; Khairallah, P A

    1988-10-01

    Angiotensin II, the major effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system, is an endocrine and paracrine regulator of tissue function. To determine its physiological role, it is important to quantify angiotensin II and related fragment peptides in tissues and plasma as a first step toward understanding angiotensin II metabolism within tissues. A fully characterized, sensitive, and reproducible immunochemical assay has been developed for quantitating angiotensin II immunoreactivity in tissues and plasma. We identified two methodological events of critical importance, incompletely addressed in previously reported studies. First, the nonspecific interference resulting from Sep-Pak processing was found to be due to hydrophobic impurities in the octade-casilane absorbent which were eliminated by washing the Sep-Pak with tetrahydrofuran and hexane before use. Second, a significant discrepancy was observed in the recoveries of angiotensin II and 125I-angiotensin II added to tissue extracts following high-pressure liquid chromatography. Angiotensin II immunoreactivity extracted from decapitated rat adrenal gland, brain, and kidney (target organs for angiotensin II), ovary and uterus (potential target organs for angiotensin II), and plasma has been characterized. The predominant component of the angiotensin II immunoreactivity was the biologically active octapeptide angiotensin II. However, in the brain, the ratio of angiotensin II to C-terminal angiotensin II immunoreactive fragments was lower than observed in other tissues studied. Other angiotensin II C-terminal immunoreactive peptide fragments-the biologically active heptapeptide and the biologically inactive angiotensin(3-8) and angiotensin(4-8)--were also detected in variable quantities in the various tissues.

  19. Activation of Local Chorionic Villi Angiotensin II Levels But Not Angiotensin (1–7) in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Lauren; Merrill, David C.; Neves, Liomar A.A.; Stovall, Kathryn; Gallagher, Patricia E.; Diz, Debra I.; Moorefield, Cheryl; Gruver, Courtney; Ferrario, Carlos M.; Brosnihan, K. Bridget

    2009-01-01

    The chorionic villi in the placenta are responsible for the regulation of fetal oxygen and nutrient transport. Although the peripheral renin-angiotensin system is activated during normal pregnancy, the regulation of the local chorionic villi renin-angiotensin system remains unknown. Therefore, placental chorionic villous tissue was collected from nulliparous third-trimester normotensive or preeclamptic subjects and was analyzed for angiotensin peptide content, angiotensinogen, renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), ACE2, neprilysin, angiotensin II type 1 (AT1), angiotensin II type 2, Mas receptor mRNAs, and angiotensin receptor density and subtype. Angiotensin II in chorionic villi was significantly higher in preeclamptic subjects, whereas angiotensin (1–7) was not different. Angiotensinogen and AT1 receptor gene expression was significantly higher in preeclamptic subjects. No differences were observed in renin, ACE, ACE2, or neprilysin gene expression. Mas receptor mRNA in preeclamptic subjects was decreased. The AT1 receptor was the predominant receptor subtype in normal and preeclamptic chorionic villi. There was no difference in the density of the AT1, angiotensin II type 2, and angiotensin (1–7) receptors. These results indicate that enhanced chorionic villous expression of angiotensin II may result from increased angiotensinogen. Elevated angiotensin II, acting through the AT1 receptor, may favor vasoconstriction in placental chorionic villi and contribute to impaired fetal blood flow and decreased fetal nutrition observed during preeclampsia. PMID:18259034

  20. Dietary sodium intake modulates renal excretory responses to intrarenal angiotensin (1-7) administration in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Julie; Corbett, Alan; Johns, Edward J

    2013-02-01

    Angiotensin II at the kidney regulates renal hemodynamic and excretory function, but the actions of an alternative metabolite, angiotensin (1-7), are less clear. This study investigated how manipulation of dietary sodium intake influenced the renal hemodynamic and excretory responses to intrarenal administration of angiotensin (1-7). Renal interstitial infusion of angiotensin (1-7) in anesthetized rats fed a normal salt intake had minimal effects on glomerular filtration rate but caused dose-related increases in urine flow and absolute and fractional sodium excretions ranging from 150 to 200%. In rats maintained for 2 wk on a low-sodium diet angiotensin (1-7) increased glomerular filtration rate by some 45%, but the diuretic and natriuretic responses were enhanced compared with those in rats on a normal sodium intake. By contrast, renal interstitial infusion of angiotensin (1-7) in rats maintained on a high-sodium intake had no effect on glomerular filtration rate, whereas the diuresis and natriuresis was markedly attenuated compared with those in rats fed either a normal or low-sodium diet. Plasma renin and angiotensin (1-7) were highest in the rats on the low-sodium diet and depressed in the rats on a high-sodium diet. These findings demonstrate that the renal hemodynamic and excretory responses to locally administered angiotensin (1-7) is dependent on the level of sodium intake and indirectly on the degree of activation of the renin-angiotensin system. The exact way in which angiotensin (1-7) exerts its effects may be dependent on the prevailing levels of angiotensin II and its receptor expression.

  1. Myocardial Autophagy after Severe Burn in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiong; Shi, Xiao-hua; Huang, Yue-sheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Autophagy plays a major role in myocardial ischemia and hypoxia injury. The present study investigated the effects of autophagy on cardiac dysfunction in rats after severe burn. Methods Protein expression of the autophagy markers LC3 and Beclin 1 were determined at 0, 1, 3, 6, and 12 h post-burn in Sprague Dawley rats subjected to 30% total body surface area 3rd degree burns. Autophagic, apoptotic, and oncotic cell death were evaluated in the myocardium at each time point by immunofluorescence. Changes of cardiac function were measured in a Langendorff model of isolated heart at 6 h post-burn, and the autophagic response was measured following activation by Rapamycin and inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA). The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor enalaprilat, the angiotensin receptor I blocker losartan, and the reactive oxygen species inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI) were also applied to the ex vivo heart model to examine the roles of these factors in post-burn cardiac function. Results Autophagic cell death was first observed in the myocardium at 3 h post-burn, occurring in 0.008 ± 0.001% of total cardiomyocytes, and continued to increase to a level of 0.022 ± 0.005% by 12 h post-burn. No autophagic cell death was observed in control hearts. Compared with apoptosis, autophagic cell death occurred earlier and in larger quantities. Rapamycin enhanced autophagy and decreased cardiac function in isolated hearts 6 h post-burn, while 3-MA exerted the opposite response. Enalaprilat, losartan, and DPI all inhibited autophagy and enhanced heart function. Conclusion Myocardial autophagy is enhanced in severe burns and autophagic cell death occurred early at 3 h post-burn, which may contribute to post-burn cardiac dysfunction. Angiotensin II and reactive oxygen species may play important roles in this process by regulating cell signaling transduction. PMID:22768082

  2. Exacerbation of myocardial dysfunction and autonomic imbalance contributes to the estrogen-dependent chronic hypotensive effect of ethanol in female rats.

    PubMed

    el-Mas, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2012-03-15

    Our previous studies showed that the hypotensive effect of chronic ethanol in female rats is reduced by ovariectomy (OVX) rats and was restored after estrogen replacement (OVXE(2)). Further, in randomly cycling rats, chronic ethanol increased cardiac parasympathetic dominance and subsequently reduced myocardial contractility and blood pressure (BP). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that alterations in myocardial contractility and sympathovagal control account for the E(2) exacerbation of the hemodynamic effects of ethanol. BP, myocardial contractility (+dP/dt(max)), and spectral cardiovascular autonomic profiles were evaluated in radiotelemetered OVX, and OVXE(2) rats receiving liquid diet with or without ethanol (5%, w/v) for 13 weeks. In OVX rats, ethanol caused modest hypotension along with significant increases in +dP/dt(max) during weeks 2-5. The high-frequency (IBI(HF), 0.75-3 Hz) and low-frequency (IBI(LF), 0.25-0.75 Hz) bands of interbeat intervals were briefly increased and decreased, respectively, by ethanol. Compared with its effects in OVX rats, chronic treatment of OVXE(2) rats with ethanol elicited significantly greater and more sustained reductions in systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures and +dP/dt(max). Altered sympathovagal balance and parasympathetic overactivity were more evident in ethanol-treated OVXE(2) rats as suggested by the sustained: (i) increases in high-frequency bands of interbeat intervals (IBI(HF), 0.75-3 Hz), and (ii) decreases in low-frequency IBI bands (IBI(LF), 0.25-0.75 Hz), IBI(LF/HF) ratio and +dP/dt(max). The plasma ethanol concentration was not affected by changes in the hormonal milieu. These findings suggest that estrogen exacerbates the ethanol-evoked reductions in myocardial contractility and BP and the associated parasympathetic overactivity in female rats.

  3. Antithrombotic effect of captopril and losartan is mediated by angiotensin-(1-7).

    PubMed

    Kucharewicz, Iwona; Pawlak, Robert; Matys, Tomasz; Pawlak, Dariusz; Buczko, Wlodzimierz

    2002-11-01

    It is well established that renin-angiotensin system blockers exert NO/prostacyclin-dependent antithrombotic effects. Because some beneficial effects of these drugs are mediated by angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7), in the present study we examined if their antithrombotic action could be mediated by Ang-(1-7). Intravenous infusion of Ang-(1-7) (1, 10, or 100 pmol/kg per minute for 2 hours) into rats developing venous thrombosis caused 50% to 70% reduction of the thrombus weight. This effect was dose-dependently reversed by cotreatment with A-779 (selective Ang-[1-7] receptor antagonist) or EXP 3174 (angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist) but not by PD 123,319 (angiotensin type 2 receptor antagonist). Similarly, the antithrombotic effects of captopril (ACE inhibitor) and losartan (angiotensin type 1 receptor blocker) were attenuated by A-779 in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of Ang-(1-7) was completely abolished by concomitant administration of NO synthase inhibitor (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester) and prostacyclin synthesis inhibitor (indomethacin), as has been shown previously for captopril and losartan. Thus, the antithrombotic effect of renin-angiotensin system blockers involves Ang-(1-7)-evoked release of NO and prostacyclin.

  4. Activation of Central PPAR-γ Attenuates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg/min) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2 and angiotensin II type-1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26101342

  5. Activation of central PPAR-γ attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that the activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg per minute) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Diurnal variations in myocardial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bray, Molly S; Young, Martin E

    2008-07-15

    The heart is challenged by a plethora of extracellular stimuli over the course of a normal day, each of which distinctly influences myocardial contractile function. It is therefore not surprising that myocardial metabolism also oscillates in a time-of-day dependent manner. What is becoming increasingly apparent is that the heart exhibits diurnal variations in its intrinsic properties, including responsiveness to extracellular stimuli. This article summarizes our current knowledge regarding the mechanism(s) mediating diurnal variations in myocardial metabolism. Particular attention is focused towards the intramyocardial circadian clock, a cell autonomous molecular mechanism that appears to regulate myocardial metabolism both directly (e.g. triglyceride and glycogen metabolism) and indirectly (through modulation of the responsiveness of the myocardium to workload, insulin, and fatty acids). In doing so, the circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte allows the heart to anticipate environmental stimuli (such as changes in workload, feeding status) prior to their onset. This synchronization between the myocardium and its environment is enhanced by regular feeding schedules. Conversely, loss of synchronization may occur through disruption of the circadian clock and/or diurnal variations in neurohumoral factors (as observed during diabetes mellitus). Here, we discuss the possibility that loss of synchronization between the heart and its environment predisposes the heart to metabolic maladaptation and subsequent myocardial contractile dysfunction.

  7. 3,3',4',5,7-Pentamethylquercetin reduces angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy and apoptosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhangfan; Liang, Yuanxin; Du, Xinling; Sun, Zongquan

    2009-09-01

    Quercetin has been shown to possess beneficial pharmacological properties in treatment of heart disease, but lack of stability and bioavailability limits its clinical use. In this study, we investigated for the first time the effect of a methylated form of quercetin, 3,3',4',5,7-pentamethylquercetin (PMQ), on myocardial protection in rats. Angiotensin II was delivered to Sprague-Dawley rats subcutaneously, while PMQ (5 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage; blood pressure was monitored daily. The production of NADPH oxidase was measured, and cardiac hypertrophy and apoptosis were detected. The results revealed that PMQ could downregulate the expression of the NADPH oxidase gene and reduce angiotensin II- induced cardiac hypertrophy and apoptosis in rats. Therefore, we believe that PMQ showed beneficial effects on myocardium in angiotensin II-administered rats, and its potential to be used for treatment of cardiovascular disease deserves further attention.

  8. The Angiotensin-melatonin axis.

    PubMed

    Campos, Luciana A; Cipolla-Neto, Jose; Amaral, Fernanda G; Michelini, Lisete C; Bader, Michael; Baltatu, Ovidiu C

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that various biological and neuroendocrine circadian rhythms may be disrupted in cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. These circadian alterations may contribute to the progression of disease. Our studies direct to an important role of angiotensin II and melatonin in the modulation of circadian rhythms. The brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) may modulate melatonin synthesis, a hormone with well-established roles in regulating circadian rhythms. Angiotensin production in the central nervous system may not only influence hypertension but also appears to affect the circadian rhythm of blood pressure. Drugs acting on RAS have been proven effective in the treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders including hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM). On the other hand, since melatonin is capable of ameliorating metabolic abnormalities in DM and insulin resistance, the beneficial effects of RAS blockade could be improved through combined RAS blocker and melatonin therapy. Contemporary research is evidencing the existence of specific clock genes forming central and peripheral clocks governing circadian rhythms. Further research on the interaction between these two neurohormones and the clock genes governing circadian clocks may progress our understanding on the pathophysiology of disease with possible impact on chronotherapeutic strategies.

  9. Role of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in the management of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Anis, Rafik R

    2009-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common clinical arrhythmia, and is difficult to treat. Current treatment strategies are far from optimal. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy to maintain sinus rhythm is limited by inadequate efficacy and potentially serious side effects. New areas of research include targeting the AF substrate and examining whether drugs can produce atrial structural and/or electrophysiological remodelling, and whether this results in a reduction in AF burden. There are two approaches to the treatment of AF. The first approach is cardioversion and treatment with antiarrhythmic drugs to maintain sinus rhythm. The other approach is the use of rate-controlling drugs allowing AF to persist. In both approaches, the use of anticoagulant drugs is recommended. There is an increasing interest in novel therapeutic approaches that target AF-substrate development. Recent trials suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor II blockers (ARBs) may be useful, particularly in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, hypertension, chronic heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction. While experimental studies have shown that the pathogenic structural and electrical remodelling of the atria are prevented by inhibition of angiotensin II, the clinical potential and mechanisms of this approach are still under active investigation. The present article will discuss information pertaining to the mechanism of action and clinical use of ACEIs and ARBs in AF. It will also review the current data on the use of ACEIs and ARBs in a high-risk group of AF patients (heart failure, hypertensive with left ventricular hypertrophy, and myocardial infarction), together with the potential benefit of this class type of pharmacological therapy in direct current cardioversion and after radiofrequency catheter ablation. PMID:19492029

  10. Left ventricular diastolic function following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Thune, Jens Jakob; Solomon, Scott D

    2006-12-01

    An acute myocardial infarction causes a loss of contractile fibers which reduces systolic function. Parallel to the effect on systolic function, a myocardial infarction also impacts diastolic function, but this relationship is not as well understood. The two physiologic phases of diastole, active relaxation and passive filling, are both influenced by myocardial ischemia and infarction. Active relaxation is delayed following a myocardial infarction, whereas left ventricular stiffness changes depending on the extent of infarction and remodeling. Interstitial edema and fibrosis cause an increase in wall stiffness which is counteracted by dilation. The effect on diastolic function is correlated to an increased incidence of adverse outcomes. Moreover, patients with comorbid conditions that are associated with worse diastolic function tend to have more adverse outcomes after infarction. There are currently no treatments aimed specifically at treating diastolic dysfunction following a myocardial infarction, but several new drugs, including aldosterone antagonists, may offer promise.

  11. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in chronic renal disease: safety issues.

    PubMed

    Mangrum, Amy J; Bakris, George L

    2004-03-01

    Reducing the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) slows nephropathy progression in patients with or without diabetes. These drug classes have proven therapeutic benefits, particularly in patients with renal insufficiency (ie, serum creatinine level 133-265 micromol/L [1.5-3.0 mg/dL]). This class of drugs could also provide renoprotective effects that are nonblood pressure-dependent when used as part of combination antihypertensive therapy in patients with more advanced renal disease. Although many studies demonstrate the use of ACE inhibitors and ARBs to delay the decline in renal function and reduce proteinuria, many physicians fail to use these drug classes in patients with renal insufficiency for fear that either serum creatinine or potassium levels will rise. Thus, because of these issues, patients are deprived of known strategies that delay progression of renal disease. A strong association exists between acute increases in serum creatinine of up to 30% to 35% after initiating ACE inhibitor therapy and long-term preservation of renal function. This association is predominantly present in people with a baseline serum creatinine of up to 3 mg/dL and usually stablizes within 2 to 3 months of therapy given blood pressure is reduced to goal. Moreover, the appropriate use of diuretics mitigates against profound increases in serum potassium. Thus, withdrawal of an ACE inhibitor in such patients should occur only when the rise in creatinine exceeds this threshold over a shorter period of time or hyperkalemia develops, ie, serum potassium level of 5.6 mmol/L or greater.

  12. Cardiac protective effects of irbesartan via the PPAR-gamma signaling pathway in angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Zhou; Shang, Qian-Hui; Jin, Hai-Yan; Song, Bei; Oudit, Gavin Y; Lu, Lin; Zhou, Tong; Xu, Ying-Le; Gao, Ping-Jin; Zhu, Ding-Liang; Penninger, Josef M; Zhong, Jiu-Chang

    2013-09-25

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a monocarboxypeptidase which metabolizes angiotensin II (Ang II) to generate Ang-(1-7), has been shown to prevent cardiac hypertrophy and injury but the mechanism remains elusive. Irbesartan has the dual actions of angiotensin receptor blockade and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) activation. We hypothesized that irbesartan would exert its protective effects on ACE2 deficiency-mediated myocardial fibrosis and cardiac injury via the PPARγ signaling. 10-week-old ACE2 knockout (ACE2KO; Ace2(-/y)) mice received daily with irbesartan (50 mg/kg) or saline for 2 weeks. The wild-type mice (Ace2(+/y)) were used to the normal controls. We examined changes in myocardial ultrastructure, fibrosis-related genes and pathological signaling by real-time PCR gene array, Western blotting, Masson trichrome staining and transmission electron microscope analyses, respectively. Compared with the Ace2(+/y) mice, cardiac expression of PPARα and PPARγ were reduced in Ace2(-/y) mice and the myocardial collagen volume fraction (CVF) and expression of fibrosis-related genes were increased, including transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), collagen I and collagen III. Moreover, ACE2 deficiency triggered cardiac hypertrophy, increased myocardial fibrosis and adverse ultrastructure injury in ACE2KO hearts with higher levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), without affecting cardiac systolic function. Intriguingly, treatment with irbesartan significantly reversed ACE2 deficiency-mediated pathological hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis in Ace2(-/y) mice linked with enhancement of plasma Ang-(1-7) level and downregulation of AT1 receptor in heart. Consistent with attenuation of myocardial fibrosis and ultrastructure injury, the myocardial CVF and levels of ANF, TGFβ1, CTGF, collagen I, collagen III and phosphorylated ERK1

  13. Angiotensin II receptor blockers in the treatment of the cardiovascular disease continuum.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2008-01-01

    The cardiovascular disease (CVD) continuum is a chain of events that begins with a host of risk factors, including dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, visceral obesity, and smoking. If left untreated, it might progress to atherosclerosis, left ventricular hypertrophy, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, left ventricular remodeling, left ventricular enlargement, and eventually endstage heart disease and death. Initiation of treatment, at any stage in its course, might prevent or delay its further progression. This review discusses data from doubleblind, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have investigated the effects of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) on various stages of the CVD continuum. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for relevant English-language double-blind RCTs using the years 1995 to 2008 and the terms angiotensin type II receptor blocker, renin-angiotensin system, hypertension, heart failure, left ventricular hypertropby, renal disease, stroke, and cerebrovascular disease. A total of 13 studies were included in this review. The results suggest that ARB-based therapy has cardioprotective, cerebroprotective, and renoprotective effects, including regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, reduction in the risk of stroke, and slowing of the progression of renal disease. Treatment of CVD risk factors, including hypertension, is increasingly recognized as a way to interrupt the CVD continuum. Activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contributes to the development and progression of CVD, and RAS blockade has been reported to be beneficial at all stages of the CVD continuum.

  14. Protective effects of coenzyme Q10 against angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Tokai, Emi; Suzuki, Takashi; Seki, Takayuki; Okubo, Kyosuke; Wada, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Tadashi; Koya, Sakuji; Kimura, Ikuko; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu

    2013-02-15

    Angiotensin II is the major effector in the renin-angiotensin system, and angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are profoundly implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we investigated the effect of an antioxidant reagent, coenzyme Q10, on angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to assess its potential usefulness for antioxidant therapy. Treatment of HUVEC with coenzyme Q10 (1-10μM) increased its intracellular levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Coenzyme Q10 (10μM) prevented the actions of angiotensin II (100nM): overproduction of reactive oxygen species, increases in expression of p22(phox) and Nox2 subunits of NADPH oxidase, and inhibition of insulin-induced nitric oxide production. In addition, coenzyme Q10 prevented angiotensin II-induced upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in HUVEC, and inhibited their adhesion to U937 monocytic cells. Moreover, treatment of HUVEC with coenzyme Q10 effectively ameliorated angiotensin II-induced increases in expression of Nox2 subunit of NADPH oxidase, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1. These results provide the first in vitro evidence that coenzyme Q10 is an efficient antioxidant reagent to improve angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, possibly relevant to the causes of cardiovascular disease.

  15. Substance P Inhibits the Collagen Synthesis of Rat Myocardial Fibroblasts Induced by Ang II

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xinzhong; Guo, Naipeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the regulating effects of Substance P (SP) on the collagen synthesis of rat myocardial fibroblasts (CFBs) induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and its potential mechanism. Material/Methods The CFBs of a neonatal SD rat were separately cultured and divided into the control group, Ang II treatment group, and treatment groups with different concentrations of SP, Ang II +; each group was given corresponding treatment respectively. Results Ang II successfully induced the collagen synthesis of CFBs. Compared with the control group, the phosphorylation levels of TGF-β, erk, and smad2/3 were higher (p<0.05). Different concentrations of SP had an effect on Ang II-induced CFBs, reduced the collagen synthesis of CFBs, and increased the expressions of SP receptors, accompanied by lowering TGF-β protein, erk protein phosphorylation level, and smad2/3 protein phosphorylation level (p<0.05). Moreover, the higher the concentrations of SP, the more obvious of an effect it exerted. Treating the Ang II + SP group with aprepitant reduced the inhibiting effects of SP on collagen synthesis. The expression changes of collagen I and collagen III detected by immunocytochemistry were exactly in accordance with the results of qPCR and Western blotting. Conclusions SP can inhibit collagen synthesis of CFBs after Ang II inducing which may adjust the downstream signaling pathways associated protein including TGF-β, erk and smad2/3. SP can block the progress of myocardial fibrosis and is dose dependent, which is expected to be a promising target for the treatment of myocardial fibrosis. PMID:27980320

  16. Substance P Inhibits the Collagen Synthesis of Rat Myocardial Fibroblasts Induced by Ang II.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xinzhong; Guo, Naipeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Sheng

    2016-12-16

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to explore the regulating effects of Substance P (SP) on the collagen synthesis of rat myocardial fibroblasts (CFBs) induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and its potential mechanism. MATERIAL AND METHODS The CFBs of a neonatal SD rat were separately cultured and divided into the control group, Ang II treatment group, and treatment groups with different concentrations of SP, Ang II +; each group was given corresponding treatment respectively. RESULTS Ang II successfully induced the collagen synthesis of CFBs. Compared with the control group, the phosphorylation levels of TGF-β, erk, and smad2/3 were higher (p<0.05). Different concentrations of SP had an effect on Ang II-induced CFBs, reduced the collagen synthesis of CFBs, and increased the expressions of SP receptors, accompanied by lowering TGF-β protein, erk protein phosphorylation level, and smad2/3 protein phosphorylation level (p<0.05). Moreover, the higher the concentrations of SP, the more obvious of an effect it exerted. Treating the Ang II + SP group with aprepitant reduced the inhibiting effects of SP on collagen synthesis. The expression changes of collagen I and collagen III detected by immunocytochemistry were exactly in accordance with the results of qPCR and Western blotting. CONCLUSIONS SP can inhibit collagen synthesis of CFBs after Ang II inducing which may adjust the downstream signaling pathways associated protein including TGF-β, erk and smad2/3. SP can block the progress of myocardial fibrosis and is dose dependent, which is expected to be a promising target for the treatment of myocardial fibrosis.

  17. Triptolide Upregulates Myocardial Forkhead Helix Transcription Factor p3 Expression and Attenuates Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Jing-Mei; Guo, Feng-Jie; Liu, Ya; Tong, Yang-Fei; Pan, Xi-Chun; Lu, Xiao-Lan; Ye, Wen; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Hai-Gang

    2016-01-01

    The forkhead/winged helix transcription factor (Fox) p3 can regulate the expression of various genes, and it has been reported that the transfer of Foxp3-positive T cells could ameliorate cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Triptolide (TP) can elevate the expression of Foxp3, but its effects on cardiac hypertrophy remain unclear. In the present study, neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) were isolated and stimulated with angiotensin II (1 μmol/L) to induce hypertrophic response. The expression of Foxp3 in NRVM was observed by using immunofluorescence assay. Fifty mice were randomly divided into five groups and received vehicle (control), isoproterenol (Iso, 5 mg/kg, s.c.), one of three doses of TP (10, 30, or 90 μg/kg, i.p.) for 14 days, respectively. The pathological morphology changes were observed after Hematoxylin and eosin, lectin and Masson’s trichrome staining. The levels of serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and troponin I were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and chemiluminescence, respectively. The mRNA and protein expressions of α- myosin heavy chain (MHC), β-MHC and Foxp3 were determined using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. It was shown that TP (1, 3, 10 μg/L) treatment significantly decreased cell size, mRNA and protein expression of β-MHC, and upregulated Foxp3 expression in NRVM. TP also decreased heart weight index, left ventricular weight index and, improved myocardial injury and fibrosis; and decreased the cross-scetional area of the myocardium, serum cardiac troponin and BNP. Additionally, TP markedly reduced the mRNA and protein expression of myocardial β-MHC and elevated the mRNA and protein expression of α-MHC and Foxp3 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, TP can effectively ameliorate myocardial damage and inhibit cardiac hypertrophy, which is at least partly related to the elevation of Foxp3 expression in cardiomyocytes. PMID:27965581

  18. DIOL Triterpenes Block Profibrotic Effects of Angiotensin II and Protect from Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jurado-López, Raquel; Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; Gómez-Hurtado, Nieves; Delgado, Carmen; Visitación Bartolomé, Maria; San Román, José Alberto; Cordova, Claudia; Lahera, Vicente; Nieto, Maria Luisa; Cachofeiro, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    myofibroblasts. They inhibit the angiotensin II-induced proliferation in a PPAR-γ-dependent manner, while at high doses they activate pathways of programmed cell death that are dependent on JNK and PPAR-γ. PMID:22844495

  19. The role of Jak/STAT signaling in heart tissue renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Mascareno, E; Siddiqui, M A

    2000-09-01

    The involvement of the Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) and the role of its primary effector, angiotensin II (Ang II), in etiology of myocardial hypertrophy and ischemia is well documented. In several animal models, the RAS is activated in cardiac cell types that express the receptor AT1, and/or AT2, through which the Ang II mediated effects are promoted. In this article, we briefly review recent experimental evidence on the critical role of a prominent signaling pathway, the Jak/STAT pathway in activation and maintenance of the local RAS in cardiac hypertrophy and ischemia. Recent studies in our laboratory document that the promoter of the prohormone angiotensinogen (Ang) gene serves as the target site for STAT proteins, thereby linking the Jak/STAT pathway to activation of heart tissue autocrine Ang II loop. STAT5A and STAT6, are selectively activated when the heart is subjected to ischemic injury, whereas activation of STAT3 and STAT5A is involved in myocardial hypertrophy. Blockage of RAS activation by treatment with specific inhibitor promotes a remarkable recovery in functional hemodynamics of the myocardium. Thus, activation of selective sets of STAT proteins constitutes the primary signaling event in the pathogenesis of myocardial hypertrophy and ischemia.

  20. The evolution of renin-angiotensin blockade: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors as the starting point.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2010-04-01

    The renin-angiotensin system has been a target in the treatment of hypertension for close to three decades. Several medication classes that block specific aspects of this system have emerged as useful therapies, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and, most recently, direct renin inhibitors. There has been a natural history to the development of each of these three drug classes, starting with their use as antihypertensive agents; thereafter, in each case they have been employed as end-organ protective agents. To date, there has been scant evidence to favor angiotensin receptor blockers or direct renin inhibitors over angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in treating hypertension or in affording end-organ protection; thus, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors remain the standard of care when renin-angiotensin system blockade is warranted.

  1. Regulation of the instantaneous inward rectifier and the delayed outward rectifier potassium channels by Captopril and Angiotensin II via the Phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway in volume-overload-induced hypertrophied cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alvin, Zikiar; Laurence, Graham G.; Coleman, Bernell R.; Zhao, Aiqiu; Hajj-Moussa, Majd; Haddad, Georges E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Early development of cardiac hypertrophy may be beneficial but sustained hypertrophic activation leads to myocardial dysfunction. Regulation of the repolarizing currents can be modulated by the activation of humoral factors, such as angiotensin II (ANG II) through protein kinases. The aim of this work is to assess the regulation of IK and IK1 by ANG II through the PI3-K pathway in hypertrophied ventricular myocytes. Material/Methods Cardiac eccentric hypertrophy was induced through volume-overload in adult male rats by aorto-caval shunt (3 weeks). After one week half of the rats were given captopril (2 weeks; 0.5 g/l/day) and the other half served as control. The voltage-clamp and western blot techniques were used to measure the delayed outward rectifier potassium current (IK) and the instantaneous inward rectifier potassium current (IK1) and Akt activity, respectively. Results Hypertrophied cardiomyocytes showed reduction in IK and IK1. Treatment with captopril alleviated this difference seen between sham and shunt cardiomyocytes. Acute administration of ANG II (10−6M) to cardiocytes treated with captopril reduced IK and IK1 in shunts, but not in sham. Captopril treatment reversed ANG II effects on IK and IK1 in a PI3-K-independent manner. However in the absence of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition, ANG II increased both IK and IK1 in a PI3-K-dependent manner in hypertrophied cardiomyocytes. Conclusions Thus, captopril treatment reveals a negative effect of ANG II on IK and IK1, which is PI3-K independent, whereas in the absence of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition IK and IK1 regulation is dependent upon PI3-K. PMID:21709626

  2. Angiotensin II receptors in the gonads

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, G.; Millan, M.A.; Harwood, J.P.

    1989-05-01

    The presence of components of the renin-angiotensin system in ovaries and testes suggests that angiotensin II (AII) is involved in gonadal function, and thus we sought to characterize receptors for AII in rat and primate gonads. In the testes, autoradiographic studies showed receptors in the interstitium in all species. In rat interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptors coincided with hCG receptors indicating that AII receptors are located on the Leydig cells. In Leydig cells and membranes from rat and rhesus monkey prepuberal testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogues and of high affinity (Kd=nM). During development, AII receptor content in rat testes decreases with age parallel to a fall in the ratio of interstitial to tubular tissue. In the ovary, the distribution of AII receptors was dependent on the stage of development, being high in the germinal epithelium and stromal tissue between five and 15 days, and becoming localized in secondary follicles in 20-and 40-day-old rats. No binding was found in primordial or primary follicles. In rhesus monkey ovary, AII receptors were higher in stromal tissue and lower in granulosa and luteal cells of the follicles. Characterization of the binding in rat and monkey ovarian membranes showed a single class of sites with a Kd in the nmol/L range and specificity similar to that of the adrenal glomerulosa and testicular AII receptors. Receptors for AII were also present in membrane fractions from PMSG/hCG primed rat ovaries. Infusion of AII (25 ng/min) or captopril (1.4 micrograms/min) during the PMSG/hCG induction period had no effect on ovarian weight or AII receptor concentration in the ovaries.

  3. The Renal Renin-Angiotensin System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison-Bernard, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a critical regulator of sodium balance, extracellular fluid volume, vascular resistance, and, ultimately, arterial blood pressure. In the kidney, angiotensin II exerts its effects to conserve salt and water through a combination of the hemodynamic control of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate and…

  4. The Renal Renin-Angiotensin System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison-Bernard, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a critical regulator of sodium balance, extracellular fluid volume, vascular resistance, and, ultimately, arterial blood pressure. In the kidney, angiotensin II exerts its effects to conserve salt and water through a combination of the hemodynamic control of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate and…

  5. Cardioprotective effect of polydatin on ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction in coronary artery ligation rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Gao, Jianping; Chen, Changxun; Wang, Huilin; Guo, Juan; Wu, Rong

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of polydatin on ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction in coronary artery ligation rats and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. A rat model of ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction was established by left coronary artery ligation. Rats with coronary artery ligation were randomly divided into five groups: control, plus 40 mg/kg captopril, plus 25 mg/kg polydatin, plus 50 mg/kg polydatin, and plus 100 mg/kg polydatin. The sham-operated group was used as a negative control. Rats were administered intragastrically with the corresponding drugs or drinking water for seven weeks. At the end of the treatment, the left ventricular weight index and heart weight index were assessed. The cross-sectional size of cardiomyocytes was measured by staining myocardium tissue with hematoxylin and eosin. Collagen content was counted by Sirius red in aqueous saturated picric acid. The concentrations of angiotensin I, angiotensin II, aldosterone, and endothelin 1 in myocardium or serum were determined by radioimmunoassay. Hydroxyproline and nitric oxide concentrations and glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities in serum were measured by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. Our results showed that seven weeks of polydatin treatment resulted in a significantly reduced left ventricular weight index, heart weight index, serum concentrations of hydroxyproline and aldosterone, an increased concentration of nitric oxide as well as enhanced activities of glutathione peroxidase and catalase. Myocardial angiotensin I, angiotensin II, and endothelin 1 levels were also reduced. The cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area and collagen deposition diminished. This study suggests that polydatin may attenuate ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction in coronary artery ligation rats through restricting the excessive activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and inhibiting peroxidation. Georg Thieme

  6. Angiotensin II, sodium, and cardiovascular hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Harrap, S B; Mitchell, G A; Casley, D J; Mirakian, C; Doyle, A E

    1993-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) may cause cardiovascular hypertrophy as a consequence of increased blood pressure or possibly by direct trophic actions. To dissociate Ang II and blood pressure in young spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), we used sodium loading during angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor treatment. Animals were treated between 6 and 10 weeks of age with perindopril to lower Ang II and blood pressure, or with perindopril and 1% saline drinking fluid or perindopril and aldosterone infusion to lower Ang II but maintain high blood pressure. Blood pressure, heart weight, and media/lumen ratio of mesenteric resistance arteries were studied while rats were on treatment at 10 weeks of age and 15 weeks after treatment at 25 weeks of age. Perindopril lowered blood pressure and inhibited the development of cardiovascular hypertrophy. Saline or aldosterone restored high blood pressure during perindopril treatment and resulted in increased heart weight/body weight and resistance artery media/lumen ratios in direct proportion to the elevation of blood pressure. Because increased structure occurred despite perindopril treatment, we conclude that direct trophic actions of Ang II are not essential for the development of cardiovascular hypertrophy in young SHR and that the antitrophic actions of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors depend more on changes in blood pressure than on Ang II. However, restoration of blood pressure and structure by sodium during perindopril treatment raises the possibility that the design of the cardiovascular system and blood pressure may depend indirectly on Ang II through effects on sodium metabolism.

  7. Central interactions of aldosterone and angiotensin II in aldosterone- and angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Beltz, Terry G; Yu, Yang; Guo, Fang; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Hay, Meredith; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2011-02-01

    Many studies have implicated both angiotensin II (ANG II) and aldosterone (Aldo) in the pathogenesis of hypertension, the progression of renal injury, and cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. In several cases, ANG II and Aldo have been shown to have synergistic interactions in the periphery. In the present studies, we tested the hypothesis that ANG II and Aldo interact centrally in Aldo- and ANG II-induced hypertension in male rats. In rats with blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) measured by DSI telemetry, intracerebroventricular (icv) infusions of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and RU28318 or the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonist irbesartan significantly inhibited Aldo-induced hypertension. In ANG II-induced hypertension, icv infusion of RU28318 significantly reduced the increase in BP. Moreover, icv infusions of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger tempol or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin attenuated Aldo-induced hypertension. To confirm these effects of pharmacological antagonists, icv injections of either recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying siRNA silencers of AT1aR (AT1aR-siRNA) or MR (MR-siRNA) significantly attenuated the development of Aldo-induced hypertension. The immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses of AT1aR-siRNA- or MR-siRNA-injected rats showed a marked reduction in the expression of AT1R or MR in the paraventricular nucleus compared with scrambled siRNA rats. When animals from all studies underwent ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium, there was a smaller reduction in the fall of BP in animals receiving icv AT1R or MR antagonists. These results suggest that ANG II and Aldo interact in the brain in a mutually cooperative manner such that the functional integrity of both brain AT1R and MR are necessary for hypertension to be induced by either systemic ANG II or Aldo. The pressor effects produced by systemic ANG II or Aldo involve increased central ROS and

  8. Reproduction and the renin-angiotensin system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganong, W. F.

    1995-01-01

    A unique aspect of the circulating renin-angiotensin system and the many independent tissue renin-angiotensin systems is their interactions at multiple levels with reproduction. These interactions, which have received relatively little attention, include effects of estrogens and possibly androgens on hepatic and renal angiotensinogen mRNA; effects of androgens on the Ren-2 gene and salivary renin in mice; the prorenin surge that occurs with but outlasts the LH surge during the menstrual cycle; the inhibitory effects of estrogens on thirst and water intake; the tissue renin-angiotensin systems in the brain, the anterior pituitary, and the ovaries and testes, that is, in all the components of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis; the presence of some components of the renin-angiotensin system in the uterus and the fetoplacental unit; and the possible relation of renin and angiotensin to ovulation and fetal well-being. These interactions are described and their significance considered in this short review.

  9. Reproduction and the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1995-01-01

    A unique aspect of the circulating renin-angiotensin system and the many independent tissue renin-angiotensin systems is their interactions at multiple levels with reproduction. These interactions, which have received relatively little attention, include effects of estrogens and possibly androgens on hepatic and renal angiotensinogen mRNA; effects of androgens on the Ren-2 gene and salivary renin in mice; the prorenin surge that occurs with but outlasts the LH surge during the menstrual cycle; the inhibitory effects of estrogens on thirst and water intake; the tissue renin-angiotensin systems in the brain, the anterior pituitary, and the ovaries and testes, that is, in all the components of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis; the presence of some components of the renin-angiotensin system in the uterus and the fetoplacental unit; and the possible relation of renin and angiotensin to ovulation and fetal well-being. These interactions are described and their significance considered in this short review.

  10. Angiotensin-Converting-Enzyme Inhibition in Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are effective in reducing the risk of heart failure, myocardial infarction, and death from cardiovascular causes in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction or heart failure. ACE inhibitors have also been shown to reduce atherosclerotic complications in patients who have vascular disease without heart failure. METHODS In the Prevention of Events with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibition (PEACE) Trial, we tested the hypothesis that patients with stable coronary artery disease and normal or slightly reduced left ventricular function derive therapeutic benefit from the addition of ACE inhibitors to modern conventional therapy. The trial was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in which 8290 patients were randomly assigned to receive either trandolapril at a target dose of 4 mg per day (4158 patients) or matching placebo (4132 patients). RESULTS The mean (±SD) age of the patients was 64±8 years, the mean blood pressure 133±17/78±10 mm Hg, and the mean left ventricular ejection fraction 58±9 percent. The patients received intensive treatment, with 72 percent having previously undergone coronary revascularization and 70 percent receiving lipid-lowering drugs. The incidence of the primary end point — death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction, or coronary revascularization — was 21.9 percent in the trandolapril group, as compared with 22.5 percent in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the trandolapril group, 0.96; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.88 to 1.06; P=0.43) over a median follow-up period of 4.8 years. CONCLUSIONS In patients with stable coronary heart disease and preserved left ventricular function who are receiving “current standard” therapy and in whom the rate of cardiovascular events is lower than in previous trials of ACE inhibitors in patients with vascular disease, there is no evidence that the addition of an ACE inhibitor provides further benefit in

  11. The Ovarian Renin-Angiotensin System (OVRAS): A Major Factor in Ovarian Function and Disease.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Angela; Ávila, Julio; Naftolin, Frederick

    2016-12-01

    This contribution summarizes the pivotal role of the ovarian renin-angiotensin system (OVRAS) in ovarian physiology and disease, with particular emphasis on human clinical implications and established translational applications. The presence of a complete OVRAS in all studied species has been known for decades. The OVRAS has major effects on follicle development/atresia and ovulation and steroid hormone secretion, that is, it is necessary for normal reproduction. It is well established that OVRAS activity is regulated by gonadotropins and depends on activation of proteases in the area of growing follicles. Angiotensin and angiotensin receptors are widely distributed in the ovarian follicle, preovulatory theca and granulosa cells, and postovulatory mural granulosa-lutein cells and regulate steroidogenesis. Molecular blockade of the OVRAS inhibits oocyte maturation and ovulation. Pathologically abnormal OVRAS function has been associated with infertility, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), and ovarian cancer. Both hyperandrogenism in PCOS and third space fluid accumulation in OHSS have been convincingly linked to overexpression of renin and angiotensin. Blockade of angiotensin receptors is under study for the treatment of gynecologic cancer, OHSS, and PCOS. However, a full understanding of the OVRAS and translational applications is lacking. In part, this is due to the discovery in recent years of previously unknown renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components and novel functions of "classical" RAS components that remain to be integrated into translational studies; newer, more specific agents to block RAS components are available only now for such research and treatment. The need for further studies is evident.

  12. Increased intracellular free calcium and sensitivity to angiotensin II in platelets of preeclamptic women.

    PubMed

    Haller, H; Oeney, T; Hauck, U; Distler, A; Philipp, T

    1989-04-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by a generalized vasoconstriction and increased vascular sensitivity to angiotensin II. Intracellular free calcium, implicated in vascular smooth muscle contraction, has been found to be elevated in platelets of other hypertensive disorders. We therefore measured intracellular free calcium concentrations by using the fluorescent probe quin-2 in platelets of six patients with preeclampsia and compared them to measurements in ten normotensive pregnant women and ten age-matched nonpregnant women. Intracellular free calcium was also determined in the preeclamptic women after delivery. We found that intracellular free calcium was slightly elevated in normal pregnancy (102 +/- 13 nmol/L v 87 +/- 17 nmol/L) but was markedly increased in preeclampsia (138 +/- 13 nmol/L, P less than .05). This increase disappeared six weeks after delivery (84 + 10 nmol/L, P less than .01). To investigate whether the increased intracellular free calcium was related to angiotensin II, the platelets were exposed to thrombin and angiotensin II in vitro. Exposure to thrombin and angiotensin II caused a dose-dependent increase in intracellular free calcium. The intracellular response to thrombin was not significantly different in the three groups. However, stimulation with angiotensin II revealed an increased response in intracellular free calcium in preeclampsia (P less than .05) that disappeared after delivery. Our findings show a sustained increase in platelet intracellular free calcium in preeclampsia and suggest a functional alteration of the angiotensin II receptor in this disease.

  13. Angiotensin II has acute effects on TRPC6 channels in podocytes of freshly isolated glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Ilatovskaya, Daria V.; Palygin, Oleg; Chubinskiy-Nadezhdin, Vladislav; Negulyaev, Yuri A.; Ma, Rong; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A key role for podocytes in the pathogenesis of proteinuric renal diseases has been established. Angiotensin II causes depolarization and increased intracellular calcium concentration in podocytes; members of the cation TRPC channels family, particularly TRPC6, are proposed as proteins responsible for calcium flux. Angiotensin II evokes calcium transient through TRPC channels and mutations in the gene encoding the TRPC6 channel result in the development of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Here we examined the effects of angiotensin II on intracellular calcium ion levels and endogenous channels in intact podocytes of freshly isolated decapsulated mouse glomeruli. An ion channel with distinct TRPC6 properties was identified in wild type, but was absent in TRPC6 knockout mice. Single channel electrophysiological analysis found that angiotensin II acutely activated native TRPC-like channels in both podocytes of freshly isolated glomeruli and TRPC6 channels transiently overexpressed in CHO cells; the effect was mediated by changes in the channel open probability. Angiotensin II evoked intracellular calcium transients in the wild type podocytes, which was blunted in TRPC6 knockout glomeruli. Pan-TRPC inhibitors gadolinium and SKF 96365 reduced the response in wild type glomerular epithelial cells, whereas the transient in TRPC6 knockout animals was not affected. Thus, angiotensin II-dependent activation of TRPC6 channels in podocytes may have a significant role in the development of kidney diseases. PMID:24646854

  14. Nitrite Therapy Ameliorates Myocardial Dysfunction via H2S and Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 (Nrf2)-Dependent Signaling in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Donnarumma, Erminia; Bhushan, Shashi; Bradley, Jessica M; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Donnelly, Erinn L; Lefer, David J; Islam, Kazi N

    2016-07-29

    Bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is reduced in heart failure (HF). Recent studies suggest cross-talk between NO and H2S signaling. We previously reported that sodium nitrite (NaNO2) ameliorates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and HF. Nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates the antioxidant proteins expression and is upregulated by H2S. We examined the NaNO2 effects on endogenous H2S bioavailability and Nrf2 activation in mice subjected to ischemia-induced chronic heart failure (CHF). Mice underwent 60 minutes of left coronary artery occlusion and 4 weeks of reperfusion. NaNO2 (165 μg/kgic) or vehicle was administered at reperfusion and then in drinking water (100 mg/L) for 4 weeks. Left ventricular (LV), ejection fraction (EF), LV end diastolic (LVEDD) and systolic dimensions (LVESD) were determined at baseline and at 4 weeks of reperfusion. Myocardial tissue was analyzed for oxidative stress and respective gene/protein-related assays. We found that NaNO2 therapy preserved LVEF, LVEDD and LVSD at 4 weeks during ischemia-induced HF. Myocardial malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl content were significantly reduced in NaNO2-treated mice as compared to vehicle, suggesting a reduction in oxidative stress. NaNO2 therapy markedly increased expression of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase during 4 weeks of reperfusion. Furthermore, NaNO2 upregulated the activity of Nrf2, as well as H2S-producing enzymes, and ultimately increased H2S bioavailability in ischemia-induced CHF in mice as compared with vehicle. Our results demonstrate that NaNO2 therapy significantly improves LV function via increasing H2S bioavailability, Nrf2 activation, and antioxidant defenses. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  15. Myocardial infarction and stroke associated with diuretic based two drug antihypertensive regimens: population based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Boger-Megiddo, Inbal; Heckbert, Susan R; Weiss, Noel S; McKnight, Barbara; Furberg, Curt D; Wiggins, Kerri L; Delaney, Joseph A C; Siscovick, David S; Larson, Eric B; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Smith, Nicholas L; Rice, Kenneth M; Glazer, Nicole L

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of myocardial infarction and stroke incidence with several commonly used two drug antihypertensive treatment regimens. Design Population based case-control study. Setting Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA, USA. Participants Cases (n=353) were aged 30-79 years, had pharmacologically treated hypertension, and were diagnosed with a first fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction or stroke between 1989 and 2005. Controls (n=952) were a random sample of Group Health members who had pharmacologically treated hypertension. We excluded individuals with heart failure, evidence of coronary heart disease, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease. Exposures One of three common two drug combinations: diuretics plus β blockers; diuretics plus calcium channel blockers; and diuretics plus angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. Main outcome measures Myocardial infarction or stroke. Results Compared with users of diuretics plus β blockers, users of diuretics plus calcium channel blockers had an increased risk of myocardial infarction (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.98, 95% confidence interval 1.37 to 2.87) but not of stroke (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.64). The risks of myocardial infarction and stroke in users of diuretics plus angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers were slightly but not significantly lower than in users of diuretics plus β blockers (myocardial infarction: OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.52 to 1.11; stroke: OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.46 to 1.10). Conclusions In patients with hypertension, diuretics plus calcium channel blockers were associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction than other common two drug treatment regimens. A large trial of second line antihypertensive treatments in patients already on low dose diuretics is required to provide a solid basis for treatment recommendations. PMID:20100777

  16. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor antagonist attenuate tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils toward an antitumor phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sanjeeb; Noh, Jae Myoung; Kim, Shin-Yeong; Ham, Hwa-Yong; Kim, Yeon-Ja; Yun, Young-Jin; Kim, Min-Ju; Kwon, Min-Soo; Song, Dong-Keun; Hong, Chang-Won

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor microenvironments polarize neutrophils to protumoral phenotypes. Here, we demonstrate that the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) antagonist attenuate tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils toward an antitumoral phenotype. The ACEis or AGTR1 antagonist enhanced hypersegmentation of human neutrophils and increased neutrophil cytotoxicity against tumor cells. This neutrophil hypersegmentation was dependent on the mTOR pathway. In a murine tumor model, ACEis and AGTR1 antagonist attenuated tumor growth and enhanced neutrophil hypersegmentation. ACEis inhibited tumor-induced polarization of neutrophils to a protumoral phenotype. Neutrophil depletion reduced the antitumor effect of ACEi. Together, these data suggest that the modulation of Ang II pathway attenuates tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils to an antitumoral phenotype. PMID:26942086

  17. Myocardial imaging. Coxsackie myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.G.; Ruskin, J.A.; Sty, J.R.

    1986-09-01

    A 3-week-old male neonate with heart failure associated with Coxsackie virus infection was imaged with Tc-99m PYP and TI-201. The abnormal imaging pattern suggested myocardial infarction. Autopsy findings indicated that the cause was myocardial necrosis secondary to an acute inflammatory process. Causes of abnormal myocardial uptake of Tc-99m PYP in pediatrics include infarction, myocarditis, cardiomyopathy, bacterial endocarditis, and trauma. Myocardial imaging cannot provide a specific cause diagnosis. Causes of myocardial infarction in pediatrics are listed in Table 1.

  18. Increased Angiotensin II Sensitivity Contributes to Microvascular Dysfunction in Women Who Have Had Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Jandu, Sandeep; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Alexander, Lacy M

    2017-08-01

    Women who have had preeclampsia have increased cardiovascular disease risk; however, the mechanism(s) responsible for this association remain unclear. Microvascular damage sustained during a preeclamptic pregnancy may persist postpartum. The putative mechanisms mediating this dysfunction include a reduction in NO-dependent dilation and an increased sensitivity to angiotensin II. In this study, we evaluated endothelium-dependent dilation, angiotensin II sensitivity, and the therapeutic effect of angiotensin II receptor blockade (losartan) on endothelium-dependent dilation in vivo in the microvasculature of women with a history of preeclampsia (n=12) and control women who had a healthy pregnancy (n=12). We hypothesized that preeclampsia would have (1) reduced endothelium-dependent dilation, (2) reduced NO-mediated dilation, and (3) increased sensitivity to angiotensin II. We further hypothesized that localized losartan would increase endothelium-dependent vasodilation in preeclampsia. We assessed microvascular endothelium-dependent vasodilator function by measurement of cutaneous vascular conductance responses to graded infusion of acetylcholine (acetylcholine; 10(-7)-102 mmol/L) and a standardized local heating protocol in control sites and sites treated with 15 mmol/L L-NAME (N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester; NO-synthase inhibitor) or 43 µmol/L losartan. Further, we assessed microvascular vasoconstrictor sensitivity to angiotensin II (10(-20)-10(-4) mol/L). Preeclampsia had significantly reduced endothelium-dependent dilation (-0.3±0.5 versus -1.0±0.4 logEC50; P<0.001) and NO-dependent dilation (16±3% versus 39±6%; P=0.006). Preeclampsia also had augmented vasoconstrictor sensitivity to angiotensin II (-10.2±1.3 versus -8.3±0.5; P=0.006). Angiotensin II type I receptor inhibition augmented endothelium-dependent vasodilation and NO-dependent dilation in preeclampsia but had no effect in healthy pregnancy. These data suggest that women who have had

  19. Coronary flow reserve varies depending upon the location within the artery it is assessed and the TIMI myocardial perfusion grade: a PROTECT TIMI-30 analysis.

    PubMed

    Kunadian, Vijayalakshmi; Pride, Yuri B; Buros, Jacqueline L; Ciaglo, Lauren N; Morrow, David A; Gibson, C Michael

    2011-11-01

    Coronary flow reserve (CFR) is a measure of the capacity of the epicardial coronary artery and the microvasculature to achieve maximal blood flow in response to hyperemic stimulation. It is not known whether the CFR varies along the length of the artery. Likewise, the interaction between CFR and the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) myocardial perfusion grade (TMPG) is unknown. CFR was measured using the number of cineframes required for the contrast to traverse the same length of the coronary artery before and following the administration of intracoronary adenosine. Following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), CFR was assessed both proximal and distal to the lesion in 192 consecutive patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTEACS) from the PROTECT TIMI-30 trial. TMPG was also assessed. The difference between the distal and proximal CFR for patients with TMPG 0/1 (n = 76) was 0.11 (95% CI 0.01-0.20, P = 0.026), while among those with TMPG 2/3 (n = 114) it was -0.02 (95% CI -0.09-0.06, P = 0.65). The difference in the CFR between the distal and proximal segments among patients with TMPG 0/1 and TMPG 2/3 was significant (P interaction = 0.044). Following PCI among patients with impaired TMPG (0/1) in the setting of NSTEACS, CFR varies significantly between the proximal and distal segment of coronary arteries and is associated with higher (greater) distal CFR.

  20. Locally expressed IGF1 propeptide improves mouse heart function in induced dilated cardiomyopathy by blocking myocardial fibrosis and SRF-dependent CTGF induction

    PubMed Central

    Touvron, Melissa; Escoubet, Brigitte; Mericskay, Mathias; Angelini, Aude; Lamotte, Luciane; Santini, Maria Paola; Rosenthal, Nadia; Daegelen, Dominique; Tuil, David; Decaux, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Cardiac fibrosis is critically involved in the adverse remodeling accompanying dilated cardiomyopathies (DCMs), which leads to cardiac dysfunction and heart failure (HF). Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a profibrotic cytokine, plays a key role in this deleterious process. Some beneficial effects of IGF1 on cardiomyopathy have been described, but its potential role in improving DCM is less well characterized. We investigated the consequences of expressing a cardiac-specific transgene encoding locally acting IGF1 propeptide (muscle-produced IGF1; mIGF1) on disease progression in a mouse model of DCM [cardiac-specific and inducible serum response factor (SRF) gene disruption] that mimics some forms of human DCM. Cardiac-specific mIGF1 expression substantially extended the lifespan of SRF mutant mice, markedly improved cardiac functions, and delayed both DCM and HF. These protective effects were accompanied by an overall improvement in cardiomyocyte architecture and a massive reduction of myocardial fibrosis with a concomitant amelioration of inflammation. At least some of the beneficial effects of mIGF1 transgene expression were due to mIGF1 counteracting the strong increase in CTGF expression within cardiomyocytes caused by SRF deficiency, resulting in the blockade of fibroblast proliferation and related myocardial fibrosis. These findings demonstrate that SRF plays a key role in the modulation of cardiac fibrosis through repression of cardiomyocyte CTGF expression in a paracrine fashion. They also explain how impaired SRF function observed in human HF promotes fibrosis and adverse cardiac remodeling. Locally acting mIGF1 efficiently protects the myocardium from these adverse processes, and might thus represent a therapeutic avenue to counter DCM. PMID:22563064

  1. The Prognostic Value of the Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction Is Dependent upon the Severity of Mitral Regurgitation in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Sun; Youn, Ho-Joong; Her, Sung-Ho; Park, Maen Won; Kim, Chan Joon; Park, Gyung-Min; Jeong, Myung Ho; Cho, Jae Yeong; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Kye Hun; Park, Jong Chun; Seung, Ki Bae; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Kim, Young Jo; Han, Kyoo Rok; Kim, Hyo Soo

    2015-07-01

    The prognostic value of the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been questioned even though it is an accurate marker of left ventricle (LV) systolic dysfunction. This study aimed to examine the prognostic impact of LVEF in patients with AMI with or without high-grade mitral regurgitation (MR). A total of 15,097 patients with AMI who received echocardiography were registered in the Korean Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) between January 2005 and July 2011. Patients with low-grade MR (grades 0-2) and high-grade MR (grades 3-4) were divided into the following two sub-groups according to LVEF: LVEF ≤ 40% (n = 2,422 and 197, respectively) and LVEF > 40% (n = 12,252 and 226, respectively). The primary endpoints were major adverse cardiac events (MACE), cardiac death, and all-cause death during the first year after registration. Independent predictors of mortality in the multivariate analysis in AMI patients with low-grade MR were age ≥ 75 yr, Killip class ≥ III, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide > 4,000 pg/mL, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ≥ 2.59 mg/L, LVEF ≤ 40%, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, PCI was an independent predictor in AMI patients with high-grade MR. No differences in primary endpoints between AMI patients with high-grade MR (grades 3-4) and EF ≤ 40% or EF > 40% were noted. MR is a predictor of a poor outcome regardless of ejection fraction. LVEF is an inadequate method to evaluate contractile function of the ischemic heart in the face of significant MR.

  2. Sex- and age-related differences in the chronic pressure-natriuresis relationship: role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Mirabito, Katrina M; Hilliard, Lucinda M; Kett, Michelle M; Brown, Russell D; Booth, Sean C; Widdop, Robert E; Moritz, Karen M; Evans, Roger G; Denton, Kate M

    2014-10-15

    Sex hormones regulate the renin-angiotensin system. For example, estrogen enhances expression of the angiotensin type 2 receptor. We hypothesized that activation of the angiotensin type 2 receptor shifts the chronic pressure-natriuresis relationship leftward in females compared with males and that this effect is lost with age. Mean arterial pressure was measured by radiotelemetry in adult (4 mo old) and aged (14 mo old) wild-type and angiotensin type 2 receptor knockout male and female mice. Chronic pressure-natriuresis curves were constructed while mice were maintained on a normal-salt (0.26%) diet and following 6 days of high salt (5.0%) diet. Mean arterial pressure was lower in adult wild-type females than males (88 ± 1 and 97 ± 1 mmHg, respectively), a difference that was maintained with age, but was absent in adult knockout mice. In wild-type females, the chronic pressure-natriuresis relationship was shifted leftward compared with knockout females, an effect that was lost with age. In males, the chronic pressure-natriuresis relationship was not influenced by angiotensin type 2 receptor deficiency. Compared with age-matched females, the chronic pressure-natriuresis relationships in male mice were shifted rightward. Renal expression of the angiotensin type 2 receptor was fourfold greater in adult wild-type females than males. With age, the angiotensin type 2 receptor-to-angiotensin type 1 receptor balance was reduced in females. Conversely, in males, angiotensin receptor expression did not vary significantly with age. In conclusion, the angiotensin type 2 receptor modulates the chronic pressure-natriuresis relationship in an age- and sex-dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Inhibitory effects of losartan and azelnidipine on augmentation of blood pressure variability induced by angiotensin II in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Danfeng; Kawagoe, Yukiko; Kuwasako, Kenji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Kato, Johji

    2017-07-05

    Increased blood pressure variability has been shown to be associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recently we reported that continuous infusion of angiotensin II not only elevated blood pressure level, but also increased blood pressure variability in a manner assumed to be independent of blood pressure elevation in rats. In the present study, the effects of the angiotensin type I receptor blocker losartan and the calcium channel blocker azelnidipine on angiotensin II-induced blood pressure variability were examined and compared with that of the vasodilator hydralazine in rats. Nine-week-old male Wistar rats were subcutaneously infused with 240 pmol/kg/min angiotensin II for two weeks without or with oral administration of losartan, azelnidipine, or hydralazine. Blood pressure variability was evaluated using a coefficient of variation of blood pressure recorded every 15min under an unrestrained condition via an abdominal aortic catheter by a radiotelemetry system. Treatment with losartan suppressed both blood pressure elevation and augmentation of systolic blood pressure variability in rats infused with angiotensin II at 7 and 14 days. Azelnidipine also inhibited angiotensin II-induced blood pressure elevation and augmentation of blood pressure variability; meanwhile, hydralazine attenuated the pressor effect of angiotensin II, but had no effect on blood pressure variability. In conclusion, angiotensin II augmented blood pressure variability in an angiotensin type 1 receptor-dependent manner, and azelnidipine suppressed angiotensin II-induced augmentation of blood pressure variability, an effect mediated by the mechanism independent of the blood pressure-lowering action. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Serum creatinine elevation after renin-angiotensin system blockade and long term cardiorenal risks: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Kathryn E; Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Nitsch, Dorothea; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Smeeth, Liam; Tomlinson, Laurie A

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine long term cardiorenal outcomes associated with increased concentrations of creatinine after the start of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker treatment. Design Population based cohort study using electronic health records from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink and Hospital Episode Statistics. Setting UK primary care, 1997-2014. Participants Patients starting treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (n=122 363). Main outcome measures Poisson regression was used to compare rates of end stage renal disease, myocardial infarction, heart failure, and death among patients with creatinine increases of 30% or more after starting treatment against those without such increases, and for each 10% increase in creatinine. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, calendar period, socioeconomic status, lifestyle factors, chronic kidney disease, diabetes, cardiovascular comorbidities, and use of other antihypertensive drugs and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Results Among the 2078 (1.7%) patients with creatinine increases of 30% or more, a higher proportion were female, were elderly, had cardiorenal comorbidity, and used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, loop diuretics, or potassium sparing diuretics. Creatinine increases of 30% or more were associated with an increased adjusted incidence rate ratio for all outcomes, compared with increases of less than 30%: 3.43 (95% confidence interval 2.40 to 4.91) for end stage renal disease, 1.46 (1.16 to 1.84) for myocardial infarction, 1.37 (1.14 to 1.65) for heart failure, and 1.84 (1.65 to 2.05) for death. The detailed categorisation of increases in creatinine concentrations (<10%, 10-19%, 20-29%, 30-39%, and ≥40%) showed a graduated relation for all outcomes (all P values for trends <0.001). Notably, creatinine increases of less than 30% were also associated with increased incidence rate ratios for all outcomes

  5. Primary Systemic Amyloidosis and High Levels of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Praena-Segovia, J.; Sanchez-Gastaldo, A.; Bernabeu-Wittel, M.; Ocete-Pérez, R.; Ávila-Polo, R.; Martino, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Infiltrative heart diseases are caused by a heterogeneous group of disorders; amyloidosis and sarcoidosis are two frequent causes of myocardial infiltration, which differ in clinical and biological outcome and treatment issues. The presence of high levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in a patient with infiltrative heart disease may increase suspicion of sarcoidosis. Nevertheless, no mention about increased ACE levels in extracerebral primary systemic amyloidosis is available. We present two cases of primary systemic amyloidosis, which are cardiac involvement and elevated ACE levels. PMID:24826302

  6. Complete blockade of the vasorelaxant effects of angiotensin-(1–7) and bradykinin in murine microvessels by antagonists of the receptor Mas

    PubMed Central

    Peiró, Concepción; Vallejo, Susana; Gembardt, Florian; Palacios, Erika; Novella, Susana; Azcutia, Verónica; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Hermenegildo, Carlos; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F; Walther, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The heptapeptide angiotensin-(1–7) is a biologically active metabolite of angiotensin II, the predominant peptide of the renin–angiotensin system. Recently, we have shown that the receptor Mas is associated with angiotensin-(1–7)-induced signalling and mediates, at least in part, the vasodilatory properties of angiotensin-(1–7). However, it remained controversial whether an additional receptor could account for angiotensin-(1–7)-induced vasorelaxation. Here, we used two different angiotensin-(1–7) antagonists, A779 and d-Pro-angiotensin-(1–7), to address this question and also to study their influence on the vasodilatation induced by bradykinin. Isolated mesenteric microvessels from both wild-type and Mas-deficient C57Bl/6 mice were precontracted with noradrenaline, and vascular reactivity to angiotensin-(1–7) and bradykinin was subsequently studied using a small-vessel myograph. Furthermore, mechanisms for Mas effects were investigated in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Both angiotensin-(1–7) and bradykinin triggered a concentration-dependent vasodilatation in wild-type microvessels, which was absent in the presence of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. In these vessels, the pre-incubation with the Mas antagonists A779 or d-Pro-angiotensin-(1–7) totally abolished the vasodilatory capacity of both angiotensin-(1–7) and bradykinin, which was nitric oxide mediated. Accordingly, Mas-deficient microvessels lacked the capacity to relax in response to either angiotensin-(1–7) or bradykinin. Pre-incubation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with A779 prevented bradykinin-mediated NO generation and NO synthase phosphorylation at serine 1177. The angiotensin-(1–7) antagonists A779 and d-Pro-angiotensin-(1–7) equally block Mas, which completely controls the angiotensin-(1–7)-induced vasodilatation in mesenteric microvessels. Importantly, Mas also appears to be a critical player in NO-mediated vasodilatation induced by

  7. Complete blockade of the vasorelaxant effects of angiotensin-(1-7) and bradykinin in murine microvessels by antagonists of the receptor Mas.

    PubMed

    Peiró, Concepción; Vallejo, Susana; Gembardt, Florian; Palacios, Erika; Novella, Susana; Azcutia, Verónica; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Hermenegildo, Carlos; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F; Walther, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    The heptapeptide angiotensin-(1-7) is a biologically active metabolite of angiotensin II, the predominant peptide of the renin-angiotensin system. Recently, we have shown that the receptor Mas is associated with angiotensin-(1-7)-induced signalling and mediates, at least in part, the vasodilatory properties of angiotensin-(1-7). However, it remained controversial whether an additional receptor could account for angiotensin-(1-7)-induced vasorelaxation. Here, we used two different angiotensin-(1-7) antagonists, A779 and d-Pro-angiotensin-(1-7), to address this question and also to study their influence on the vasodilatation induced by bradykinin. Isolated mesenteric microvessels from both wild-type and Mas-deficient C57Bl/6 mice were precontracted with noradrenaline, and vascular reactivity to angiotensin-(1-7) and bradykinin was subsequently studied using a small-vessel myograph. Furthermore, mechanisms for Mas effects were investigated in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Both angiotensin-(1-7) and bradykinin triggered a concentration-dependent vasodilatation in wild-type microvessels, which was absent in the presence of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. In these vessels, the pre-incubation with the Mas antagonists A779 or d-Pro-angiotensin-(1-7) totally abolished the vasodilatory capacity of both angiotensin-(1-7) and bradykinin, which was nitric oxide mediated. Accordingly, Mas-deficient microvessels lacked the capacity to relax in response to either angiotensin-(1-7) or bradykinin. Pre-incubation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with A779 prevented bradykinin-mediated NO generation and NO synthase phosphorylation at serine 1177. The angiotensin-(1-7) antagonists A779 and d-Pro-angiotensin-(1-7) equally block Mas, which completely controls the angiotensin-(1-7)-induced vasodilatation in mesenteric microvessels. Importantly, Mas also appears to be a critical player in NO-mediated vasodilatation induced by renin-angiotensin system

  8. Functional tests for myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, J.R.; Guiney, T.E.; Boucher, C.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Functional tests for myocardial ischemia are numerous. Most depend upon a combination of either exercise or pharmacologic intervention with analysis of the electrocardiogram, of regional perfusion with radionuclide imaging, or of regional wall motion with radionuclide imaging or echocardiography. While each test has unique features, especially at the research level, they are generally quite similar in clinical practice, so the clinician is advised to concentrate on one or two in which local expertise is high.22 references.

  9. Diagnosis and management of ST elevation myocardial infarction: a review of the recent literature and practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Sigrid A; Chandler, Charles

    2006-01-01

    There is a large volume of literature available to guide the peri-infarct management of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Most of this literature focuses on improving the availability and efficacy of reperfusion therapy. The purpose of this article is to review contemporary scientific evidence and guideline recommendations regarding the diagnosis and therapy of STEMI. Studies and epidemiological data were identified using Medline, the Cochrane Database, and an Internet search engine. Medline was searched for landmark and recent publications using the following key words: STEMI, guidelines, epidemiology, reperfusion, fibrinolytics, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), facilitated PCI, transfer, delay, clopidogrel, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), beta-blockers, nitrates, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. The data accessed indicate that urgent reperfusion with either fibrinolytics or percutaneous intervention should be considered for every patient having symptoms of myocardial infarction with ST segment elevation or a bundle branch block. The utility of combined mechanical and pharmacological reperfusion is currently under investigation. Ancillary treatments may utilize clopidogrel, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors, or low molecular weight heparin, depending on the primary reperfusion strategy used. Comprehensive clinical practice guidelines incorporate much of the available contemporary evidence, and are important resources for the evidence-based management of STEMI.

  10. Is there any difference between angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers for heart failure?

    PubMed

    Rain, Carmen; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-07-06

    Angiotensin receptor blockers are usually considered as equivalent to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors for patients with heart failure and low-ejection fraction. Some guidelines even recommend the former as first line treatment given their better adverse effects profile. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified four systematic reviews including eight pertinent randomized controlled trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded angiotensin receptor blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors probably have a similar effect on mortality, and they might be equivalent in reducing hospitalization risk too. Treatment withdrawal due to adverse effects is probably lower with angiotensin receptor blockers than with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors.

  11. Effects of angiotensin II on the pericyte-containing microvasculature of the rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Hajime; Kobayashi, Masato; Li, Qing; Yamanishi, Shigeki; Katsumura, Kozo; Minami, Masahiro; Wu, David M; Puro, Donald G

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms by which angiotensin II alters the physiology of the pericyte-containing microvasculature of the retina. Despite evidence that this vasoactive signal regulates capillary perfusion by inducing abluminal pericytes to contract and thereby microvascular lumens to constrict, little is known about the events linking angiotensin exposure with pericyte contraction. Here, using microvessels freshly isolated from the adult rat retina, we monitored pericyte currents via perforated-patch pipettes, measured pericyte calcium levels with fura-2 and visualized pericyte contractions and lumen constrictions by time-lapse photography. We found that angiotensin activates nonspecific cation (NSC) and calcium-activated chloride channels; the opening of these channels induces a depolarization that is sufficient to activate the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) expressed in the retinal microvasculature. Associated with these changes in ion channel activity, intracellular calcium levels rise, pericytes contract and microvascular lumens narrow. Our experiments revealed that an influx of calcium through the NSC channels is an essential step linking the activation of AT1 angiotensin receptors with pericyte contraction. Although not required in order for angiotensin to induce pericytes to contract, calcium entry via VDCCs serves to enhance the contractile response of these cells. In addition to activating nonspecific cation, calcium-activated chloride and voltage-dependent calcium channels, angiotensin II also causes the functional uncoupling of pericytes from their microvascular neighbours. This inhibition of gap junction-mediated intercellular communication suggests a previously unappreciated complexity in the spatiotemporal dynamics of the microvascular response to angiotensin II. PMID:15486015

  12. Deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B rescues against myocardial anomalies in high fat diet-induced obesity: Role of AMPK-dependent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kandadi, Machender R; Panzhinskiy, Evgeniy; Roe, Nathan D; Nair, Sreejayan; Hu, Dahai; Sun, Aijun

    2015-02-01

    Obesity-induced cardiomyopathy may be mediated by alterations in multiple signaling cascades involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) is an important negative regulator of insulin signaling. This study was designed to evaluate the role of PTP1B in high fat diet-induced cardiac contractile anomalies. Wild-type and PTP1B knockout mice were fed normal (10%) or high (45%) fat diet for 5months prior to evaluation of cardiac function. Myocardial function was assessed using echocardiography and an Ion-Optix MyoCam system. Western blot analysis was employed to evaluate levels of AMPK, mTOR, raptor, Beclin-1, p62 and LC3-II. RT-PCR technique was employed to assess genes involved in hypertrophy and lipid metabolism. Our data revealed increased LV thickness and LV chamber size as well as decreased fractional shortening following high fat diet intake, the effect was nullified by PTP1B knockout. High fat diet intake compromised cardiomyocyte contractile function as evidenced by decreased peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening, intracellular Ca²⁺ release as well as prolonged duration of relengthening and intracellular Ca²⁺ decay, the effects of which were alleviated by PTP1B knockout. High fat diet resulted in enlarged cardiomyocyte area and increased lipid accumulation, which were attenuated by PTP1B knockout. High fat diet intake dampened myocardial autophagy as evidenced by decreased LC3-II conversion and Beclin-1, increased p62 levels as well as decreased phosphorylation of AMPK and raptor, the effects of which were significantly alleviated by PTP1B knockout. Pharmacological inhibition of AMPK using compound C disengaged PTP1B knockout-conferred protection against fatty acid-induced cardiomyocyte contractile anomalies. Taken together, our results suggest that PTP1B knockout offers cardioprotection against high fat diet intake through activation of AMPK. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled

  13. Angiotensin and insulin resistance: conspiracy theory.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Raymond R

    2003-04-01

    Resistance to the metabolic effects of insulin is a contender for the short list of major cardiovascular risk factors. Since the elements of the syndrome of insulin resistance were first articulated together in 1988, numerous epidemiologic investigations and treatment endeavors have established a relationship between the metabolic disarray of impaired insulin action and cardiovascular disease. Angiotensin II, the primary effector of the renin-angiotensin system, has also achieved a place in the chronicles of cardiovascular risk factors. Conspiracy mechanisms by which angiotensin II and insulin resistance interact in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease are reviewed, with particular attention to recent developments in this engaging area of human research.

  14. Mechanism of pulmonary conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II in the dog.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oparil, S.; Tregear, G. W.; Koerner, T.; Barnes, B. A.; Haber, E.

    1971-01-01

    The conversion mechanism was studied in vivo in the pulmonary circulation of the intact anesthetized dog and in vitro in plasma by using L-Leu-angiotensin I, D-Leu-angiotensin I, and des-Leu-angiotensin I which had been synthesized by the solid-phase technique. The results obtained indicate that pulmonary conversion in vivo and plasma conversion in vitro occur via a dipeptidylcarboxypeptidase and that a D-amino acid at the C-terminus prevents conversion.

  15. Slow-pressor angiotensin II hypertension and concomitant dendritic NMDA receptor trafficking in estrogen receptor β-containing neurons of the mouse hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus are sex and age dependent.

    PubMed

    Marques-Lopes, Jose; Van Kempen, Tracey; Waters, Elizabeth M; Pickel, Virginia M; Iadecola, Costantino; Milner, Teresa A

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of hypertension increases after menopause. Similar to humans, "slow-pressor" doses of angiotensin II (AngII) increase blood pressure in young males, but not in young female mice. However, AngII increases blood pressure in aged female mice, paralleling reproductive hormonal changes. These changes could influence receptor trafficking in central cardiovascular circuits and contribute to hypertension. Increased postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is crucial for the sympathoexcitation driving AngII hypertension. Estrogen receptors β (ERβs) are present in PVN neurons. We tested the hypothesis that changes in ovarian hormones with age promote susceptibility to AngII hypertension, and influence NMDA receptor NR1 subunit trafficking in ERβ-containing PVN neurons. Transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in ERβ-containing cells were implanted with osmotic minipumps delivering AngII (600 ng/kg/min) or saline for 2 weeks. AngII increased blood pressure in 2-month-old males and 18-month-old females, but not in 2-month-old females. By electron microscopy, NR1-silver-intensified immunogold (SIG) was mainly in ERβ-EGFP dendrites. At baseline, NR1-SIG density was greater in 2-month-old females than in 2-month-old males or 18-month-old females. After AngII infusion, NR1-SIG density was decreased in 2-month-old females, but increased in 2-month-old males and 18-month-old females. These findings suggest that, in young female mice, NR1 density is decreased in ERβ-PVN dendrites thus reducing NMDA receptor activity and preventing hypertension. Conversely, in young males and aged females, NR1 density is upregulated in ERβ-PVN dendrites and ultimately leads to the neurohumoral dysfunction driving hypertension.

  16. Cytochrome P450 1B1 contributes to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Brett L; Sahan-Firat, Seyhan; Estes, Anne M; Das, Kanak; Farjana, Nasreen; Fang, Xiao R; Gonzalez, Frank J; Malik, Kafait U

    2010-10-01

    Hypertension is the leading cause of cardiovascular diseases, and angiotensin II is one of the major components of the mechanisms that contribute to the development of hypertension. However, the precise mechanisms for the development of hypertension are unknown. Our recent study showing that angiotensin II-induced vascular smooth muscle cell growth depends on cytochrome P450 1B1 led us to investigate its contribution to hypertension caused by this peptide. Angiotensin II was infused via miniosmotic pump into rats (150 ng/kg per minute) or mice (1000 μg/kg per day) for 13 days resulting in increased blood pressure, increased cardiac and vascular hypertrophy, increased vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictor agents, increased vascular reactive oxygen species production, and endothelial dysfunction in both species. The increase in blood pressure and associated pathophysiological changes were minimized by the cytochrome P450 1B1 inhibitor 2,3',4,5'-tetramethoxystilbene in both species and was markedly reduced in Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. These data suggest that cytochrome P450 1B1 contributes to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated pathophysiological changes. Moreover, 2,3',4,5'-tetramethoxystilbene, which prevents both cytochrome P450 1B1-dependent and -independent components of angiotensin II-induced hypertension and inhibits associated pathophysiological changes could be clinically useful in the treatment of hypertension and associated cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases.

  17. CYTOCHROME P450 1B1 CONTRIBUTES TO ANGIOTENSIN II-INDUCED HYPERTENSION AND ASSOCIATED PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Brett L.; Sahan-Firat, Seyhan; Estes, Anne M.; Das, Kanak; Farjana, Nasreen; Fang, Xiao R.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Malik, Kafait U.

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is the leading cause of cardiovascular diseases, and angiotensin II is one of the major components of the mechanisms that contribute to the development of hypertension. However, the precise mechanisms for the development of hypertension are unknown. Our recent study that angiotensin II-induced vascular smooth muscle cell growth is dependent on cytochrome P450 1B1 led us to investigate its contribution to hypertension caused by this peptide. Angiotensin II was infused via miniosmotic pump into rats (150 ng/kg/min) or mice (1000 μg/kg/day) for 13 days resulting in increased blood pressure, increased cardiac and vascular hypertrophy, increased vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictor agents, increased reactive oxygen species production, and endothelial dysfunction in both species. The increase in blood pressure and associated pathophysiological changes were minimized by the cytochrome P450 1B1 inhibitor, 2,3′,4,5′-tetramethoxystilbene in both species and was markedly reduced in Cyp1b1-/- mice. These data suggest that cytochrome P450 1B1 contributes to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated pathophysiological changes. Moreover, 2,3′,4,5′-tetramethoxystilbene which prevents both cytochrome P450 1B1-dependent and independent components of angiotensin II-induced hypertension and inhibits associated pathophysiological changes could be clinically useful in the treatment of hypertension and associated cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. PMID:20805442

  18. Anthocyans-rich Aronia melanocarpa extract possesses ability to protect endothelial progenitor cells against angiotensin II induced dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Parzonko, Andrzej; Oświt, Aleksandra; Bazylko, Agnieszka; Naruszewicz, Marek

    2015-12-15

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) may provide protection against atherosclerosis and plaque rupture by their innate ability to replace dysfunctional or damaged endothelial cells in plaque microvessels. There is evidence that angiotensin II may impair the angiogenic functions of EPCs in the atherosclerotic plaque by accelerating senescence and inhibiting their proliferation through oxidative stress induction. In this study, we examined whether chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) fruit extract, containing mainly anthocyanins with potent antioxidative properties, could protect EPCs against angiotensin-induced oxidative stress. EPCs were isolated from peripheral blood of young healthy volunteers and cultivated on fibronectin-coated plates in the presence or absence of angiotensin II (1 µM) and chokeberry extract (1-25 µg/ml). EPCs exposed to chokeberry extract prior to angiotensin II showed a significant increase of proliferation and telomerase activity, and a decrease in the percentage of senescent cells and intracellular ROS formation in comparison to angiotensin II treated cells. Furthermore, extract increased migration ability, adhesion to fibronectin and the angiogenic potential of EPC in vitro diminished by angiotensin II in a concentration-dependent manner. That effect was related to the activation of the Nrf2 transcription factor and the increase of HO-1 expression. Our results suggested that chokeberry extract may protect EPCs against angiotensin II-induced dysfunction and could play a potential role in the prevention of coronary artery disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated augmentation of renal interstitial fluid angiotensin II in angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Akira; Seth, Dale M; Navar, L Gabriel

    2003-10-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-dependent hypertension is associated with augmented intrarenal concentrations of Ang II; however, the distribution of the increased intrarenal Ang II has not been fully established. To determine the changes in renal interstitial fluid Ang II concentrations in Ang II-induced hypertension and the consequences of treatment with an angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker. Rats were selected to receive vehicle (5% acetic acid subcutaneously; n = 6), Ang II (80 ng/min subcutaneously, via osmotic minipump; n = 7) or Ang II plus an AT1 receptor antagonist, candesartan cilexetil (10 mg/kg per day, in drinking water; n = 6) for 13-14 days, at which time, experiments were performed on anesthetized rats. Microdialysis probes were implanted in the renal cortex and were perfused at 2 microl/min. The effluent dialysate concentrations of Ang I and Ang II were measured by radioimmunoassay and reported values were corrected for the equilibrium rates at this perfusion rate. Ang II-infused rats developed greater mean arterial pressures (155 +/- 7 mmHg) than vehicle-infused rats (108 +/- 3 mmHg). Ang II-infused rats showed greater plasma (181 +/- 30 fmol/ml) and kidney (330 +/- 38 fmol/g) Ang II concentrations than vehicle-infused rats (98 +/- 14 fmol/ml and 157 +/- 22 fmol/g, respectively). Renal interstitial fluid Ang II concentrations were much greater than plasma concentrations, averaging 5.74 +/- 0.26 pmol/ml in Ang II-infused rats - significantly greater than those in vehicle-infused rats (2.86 +/- 0.23 pmol/ml). Candesartan treatment prevented the hypertension (87 +/- 3 mmHg) and led to increased plasma Ang II concentrations (441 +/- 27 fmol/ml), but prevented increases in kidney (120 +/- 15 fmol/g) and renal interstitial fluid (2.15 +/- 0.12 pmol/ml) Ang II concentrations. These data indicate that Ang II-infused rats develop increased renal interstitial fluid concentrations of Ang II, which may contribute to the increased vascular resistance and

  20. Angiotensin converting enzyme gene polymorphism in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, B; Peric, S.; Ross, D.

    1994-09-01

    An insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) gene is a useful predictor of human plasma ACE levels. ACE levels tend to be lowest in subjects with ACE genotype DD and intermediate in subjects with ACE genotype ID. Angiotensin II (Ang II) as a product of ACE is a cardiac growth factor and produces a marked hypertrophy of the chick myocyte in cell culture. Rat experiments also suggest that a small dose of ACE inhibitor that does not affect the afterload results in prevention or regression of cardiac hypertrophy. In order to study the relationship of ACE and the severity of hypertrophy, the ACE genotype has been determined in 28 patients with a clinical diagnosis of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) and 51 normal subjects. The respective frequencies of I and D alleles were: 0.52 and 0.48 (in FHC patients) and 0.44 and 0.56 (in the normal controls). There was no significant difference in the allele frequencies between FHC and normal subjects ({chi}{sup 2}=0.023, p>0.05). The II, ID, and DD genotypes were present in 7, 15, and 6 FHC patients, respectively. The averages of maximal thickness of the interventricular septum measured by echocardiography or at autopsy were 18 {plus_minus}3, 19{plus_minus}4, and 19{plus_minus}3 mm in II, ID and DD genotypes, respectively. The ACE gene polymorphism did not correlate with the severity of left ventricular hypertrophy in FHC patients (r{sub s}=0.231, p>0.05). These results do not necessarily exclude the possible effect of Ang II on the hypertrophy since the latter may be produced through the action of chymase in the human ventricles. However, ACE gene polymorphism is not a useful predictor of the severity of myocardial hypertrophy in FHC patients.

  1. Renin and angiotensin levels in children.

    PubMed Central

    Broughton Pipkin, F; Smales, O R; O'Callaghan, M

    1981-01-01

    Plasma renin activity, plasma renin concentration, and angiotensin II levels were measured in 63 normal children aged between 2 months and 12 years. The results showed that the high levels of renin and angiotensin II present in infancy remained above adult levels throughout the first decade of life but that there was a decline with age. Boys less than 8 years old had lower plasma renin activity and angiotensin II levels than girls of a similar age; this may be due to a relative substrate deficiency. Serum urea levels were inversely correlated with plasma renin activity in both sexes. A significant inverse relationship was found between both plasma renin activity and angiotensin II, and serum sodium in the girls; a similar, although not statistically significant, relationship was seen with plasma renin activity in the boys. An inverse correlation was found between plasma renin concentration and diastolic blood pressure for the group as a whole. PMID:7018406

  2. Early post-myocardial infarction survival in MRL mice is mediated by attenuated apoptosis and inflammation but depends on genetic background

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Darlene L.; Campbell, Patrick H.; Zambon, Alexander C.; Vranizan, Karen; Evans, Sylvia M.; Kuo, Hai-Chien; Yamaguchi, Ken D.; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    The Murphy Roths Large (MRL) mouse, a strain capable of regenerating right ventricular myocardium, has a high post-myocardial infarction (MI) survival rate compared with C57BL/6J (C57) mice. The biological processes responsible for this survival advantage are unknown. To assess the effect of genetic background, the LG/J strain, which harbors 75% of the MRL composite genome, was included in the study. The MRL survival advantage versus C57 mice (92% vs. 68%, P < 0.05) occurred primarily in the first 5 days; LG/J survival was intermediate (P = NS). Microarray data analysis revealed an attenuation of apoptotic (P < 0.05) and stress response transcripts in MRL hearts compared with C57 hearts after MI. Supporting the microarray results, there were fewer TUNEL-positive cells 1 day post-MI in MRL infarcts compared with C57 infarcts (P = 0.001) and fewer CD45-positive cells in the MRL infarct border zone 2 days post-MI (P < 0.01). LG/J results were intermediate (P = NS). MRL hearts had smaller infarct scars and attenuated ventricular dilation 30 days post-MI compared with C57 hearts (P < 0.05). We conclude that the early post-MI survival advantage of MRL mice over the C57 strain is mediated at least in part by reductions in apoptosis and inflammatory infiltration, and that these reductions may influence chronic remodeling. The intermediate survival, apoptosis and inflammation profile of LG/J mice suggests this high tolerance for MI in the MRL could be derived from its shared genetic background with the LG/J. PMID:21967898

  3. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonists inhibit platelet adhesion and aggregation by nitric oxide release.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Leszek; Matys, Tomasz; Chabielska, Ewa; Buczko, Włodzimierz; Malinski, Tadeusz

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated the process of nitric oxide (NO) release from platelets after stimulation with different angiotensin II type 1 (AT1)-receptor antagonists and its effect on platelet adhesion and aggregation. Angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets was compared with that in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by using a highly sensitive porphyrinic microsensor. In vitro and ex vivo effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on platelet adhesion to collagen and thromboxane A2 analog U46619-induced aggregation were evaluated. Losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan alone caused NO release from platelets and endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner in the range of 0.01 to 100 micro mol/L, which was attenuated by NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. The angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists had more than 70% greater potency in NO release in platelets than in endothelial cells. The degree of inhibition of platelet adhesion (collagen-stimulated) and aggregation (U46619-stimulated) elicited by losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan, either in vitro or ex vivo, closely correlated with the NO levels produced by each of these drugs alone. The inhibiting effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on collagen-stimulated adhesion and U46619-stimulated aggregation of platelets were significantly reduced by pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Neither the AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319, the cyclooxygenase synthase inhibitor indomethacin, nor the selective thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor antagonist SQ29,548 had any effect on angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets and endothelial cells. The presented studies clearly indicate a crucial role of NO in the arterial antithrombotic effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists.

  4. Cytochrome P450 1B1 contributes to renal dysfunction and damage caused by angiotensin II in mice.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Brett L; Anderson, Larry J; Estes, Anne M; Yaghini, Fariborz A; Fang, Xiao R; Porter, Jason; Gonzalez, Frank J; Campbell, William B; Malik, Kafait U

    2012-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1 contributes to the development of angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated cardiovascular pathophysiology. In view of the critical role of angiotensin II in the kidney, as well as in salt and water homeostasis, and blood pressure regulation, we determined the contribution of cytochrome P450 1B1 to renal dysfunction and injury associated with angiotensin II-induced hypertension in male Cyp1b1(+/+) and Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II infusion (700 ng/kg per minute) given by miniosmotic pumps for 13 and 28 days increased systolic blood pressure in Cyp1b1(+/+) mice; this increase was significantly reduced in Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II increased renal Cyp1b1 activity, vascular resistance, and reactivity to vasoconstrictor agents and caused endothelial dysfunction in Cyp1b1(+/+) but not Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II increased water consumption and urine output, decreased urine osmolality, increased urinary Na(+) and K(+) excretion, and caused proteinuria and albuminuria in Cyp1b1(+/+) mice that was diminished in Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Infusion of angiotensin II for 28 but not 13 days caused renal fibrosis, tubular damage, and inflammation in Cyp1b1(+/+) mice, which was minimized in Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II increased levels of 12- and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids; reactive oxygen species; and activity of NADPH oxidase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and c-Src in the kidneys of Cyp1b1(+/+) but not Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. These data suggest that increased thirst, renal dysfunction, and injury and inflammation associated with angiotensin II-induced hypertension in mice depend on cytochrome P450 1B1 activity, thus indicating that cytochrome P450 1B1 could serve as a novel target for treating renal disease and hypertension.

  5. Measurement and characterization of angiotensin peptides in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, K.; Ganten, D.; Unger, T.; Bayer, C.; Lang, R.E.

    1988-06-01

    We report a method for the extraction of angiotensin peptides from plasma with a mixture of acetone, 1 mol/L HCl, and water (40/1/5 by vol). The method is highly reproducible for the measurement of angiotensin I and angiotensin II in small sample volumes, with analytical recoveries of about 80% for both peptides. We investigated the influence of sample handling and found a standard procedure for blood collection, plasma preparation, and extraction was essential. The method was used to measure angiotensin I and II in rat and human plasma. In rat plasma, the mean (+/- SEM) concentrations of angiotensin I and angiotensin II were determined to be 67 (+/- 8) and 14 (+/- 1) pmol/L (n = 10), respectively. Neither angiotensin I nor angiotensin II was detectable 24 h after bilateral nephrectomy. Acute oral administration of the converting-enzyme inhibitor ramipril caused a significant increase of angiotensin I from 85 (+/- 6) to 257 (+/- 33) pmol/L (n = 10; P less than 0.001) and a significant decrease of angiotensin II from 12 (+/- 1) to 7 (+/- 0.4) pmol/L in rat plasma (n = 9; P less than 0.001). In human plasma, angiotensin I and angiotensin II values of 21 (+/- 1) and 6.6 (+/- 0.5) pmol/L (n = 10) were found. A single oral dose of the diuretic furosemide increased angiotensin I significantly from 21 (+/- 1) to 32 (+/- 1.7) pmol/L (n = 5); P less than 0.001), whereas angiotensin II remained unchanged, 6.6 (+/- 0.5) vs 6.4 (+/- 0.4) pmol/L (n = 5). Extracted peptides could be identified as (IIe5)-angiotensin I and (IIe5)-angiotensin II by HPLC in combination with specific radioimmunoassays for angiotensin I and angiotensin II.

  6. High-Saturated-Fat Diet Increases Circulating Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme, Which Is Enhanced by the rs4343 Polymorphism Defining Persons at Risk of Nutrient-Dependent Increases of Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Schüler, Rita; Osterhoff, Martin A; Frahnow, Turid; Seltmann, Anne-Cathrin; Busjahn, Andreas; Kabisch, Stefan; Xu, Li; Mosig, Alexander S; Spranger, Joachim; Möhlig, Matthias; Hornemann, Silke; Kruse, Michael; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H

    2017-01-17

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) plays a major role in blood pressure regulation and cardiovascular homeostasis. Contrary to the assumption that ACE levels are stable, circulating ACE has been shown to be altered in obesity and weight loss. We sought to examine effects of a high-saturated-fat (HF) diet on ACE within the NUtriGenomic Analysis in Twins (NUGAT) study. Forty-six healthy and nonobese twin pairs initially consumed a carbohydrate-rich, low-fat diet over a period of 6 weeks to standardize for nutritional behavior prior to the study, followed by 6 weeks of HF diet under isocaloric conditions. After 6 weeks of HF diet, circulating ACE concentrations increased by 15% (P=1.6×10(-30)), accompanied by an increased ACE gene expression in adipose tissue (P=3.8×10(-6)). Stratification by ACE rs4343, a proxy for the ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism (I/D), revealed that homozygous carriers (GG) of the variant had higher baseline ACE concentrations (P=7.5×10(-8)) and additionally showed a 2-fold increase in ACE concentrations in response to the HF diet as compared to non- or heterozygous carriers (AA/AG, P=2×10(-6)). GG carriers also responded with higher systolic blood pressure as compared to AA/AG carriers (P=0.008). The strong gene-diet interaction was confirmed in a second independent, cross-sectional cohort, the Metabolic Syndrome Berlin Potsdam (MeSyBePo) study. The HF-diet-induced increase of ACE serum concentrations reveals ACE to be a potential molecular link between dietary fat intake and hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The GG genotype of the ACE rs4343 polymorphism represents a robust nutrigenetic marker for an unfavorable response to high-saturated-fat diets. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01631123. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  7. Activation of the Cardiac Renin-Angiotensin System in High Oxygen-Exposed Newborn Rats: Angiotensin Receptor Blockade Prevents the Developmental Programming of Cardiac Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolli, Mariane; Dios, Anne; Béland-Bonenfant, Sarah; Gascon, Gabrielle; Sutherland, Megan; Lukaszewski, Marie-Amélie; Cloutier, Anik; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Nuyt, Anne Monique

    2016-04-01

    Newborn rats exposed to high oxygen (O2), mimicking preterm birth-related neonatal stress, develop later in life cardiac hypertrophy, dysfunction, fibrosis, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Cardiac renin-angiotensin system activation in O2-exposed adult rats is characterized by an imbalance in angiotensin (Ang) receptors type 1/2 (AT1/2), with prevailing AT1 expression. To study the role of renin-angiotensin system in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction, we assessed Ang receptor expression during neonatal high O2 exposure and whether AT1 receptor blockade prevents cardiac alterations in early adulthood. Sprague-Dawley newborn rats were kept with their mother in 80% O2 or room air (control) from days 3 to 10 (P3-P10) of life. Losartan or water was administered by gavage from P8 to P10 (n=9/group). Rats were studied at P3 (before O2 exposure), P5, P10 (end of O2), and P28. Losartan treatment had no impact on growth or kidney development. AT1 and Ang type 2 receptors were upregulated in the left ventricle by high O2 exposure (P5 and P10), which was prevented by Losartan treatment at P10. Losartan prevented the cardiac AT1/2 imbalance at P28. Losartan decreased cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis and improved left ventricle fraction of shortening in P28 O2-exposed rats, which was associated with decreased oxidation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, inhibition of the transforming growth factor-β/SMAD3 pathway, and upregulation of cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. In conclusion, short-term Ang II blockade during neonatal high O2 prevents the development of cardiac alterations later in life in rats. These findings highlight the key role of neonatal renin-angiotensin system activation in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction induced by deleterious neonatal conditions.

  8. Angiotensin I conversion to angiotensin II stimulates cortical collecting duct sodium transport.

    PubMed

    Komlosi, Peter; Fuson, Amanda L; Fintha, Attila; Peti-Peterdi, János; Rosivall, Laszlo; Warnock, David G; Bell, Phillip Darwin

    2003-08-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II directly stimulates epithelial sodium channel activity in the rabbit cortical collecting duct. Because Ang I and converting enzyme analogues might be present in the distal nephron, this raises the possibility of intraluminal generation of Ang II. Conversion of Ang I to Ang II was monitored by Ang II-dependent changes in intracellular sodium concentration as a reflection of sodium transport across the apical membrane. This involved imaging-based fluorescence microscopy with sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate in isolated, perfused, cortical collecting-duct segments from rabbit kidney. Principal and intercalated cells were differentiated by rhodamine-conjugated peanut lectin. Control principal cell intracellular sodium concentration, during perfusion with 25 mmol/L NaCl and zero sodium in the bath plus monensin (10(-5) mol/L) averaged 5.8+/-0.14 mmol/L (n=156). The increase in intracellular sodium concentration, when luminal NaCl was increased from 25 to 150 mmol/L, was elevated by 3.5-fold in the presence of intraluminal Ang I (10(-6) mol/L). Also, the effects of Ang I on sodium transport were not significantly different from the effects of Ang II (10(-9) mol/L). Ang I was used in micromolar concentrations to ensure that there was sufficient substrate available for conversion to Ang II. Inhibition of the angiotensin-converting enzyme with captopril reduced the stimulatory effect of Ang I. These results suggest that intraluminal conversion of Ang I to Ang II can occur in the cortical collecting duct, resulting in enhanced apical sodium entry.

  9. Angiotensin-(1-7) blocks the angiotensin II-stimulated superoxide production.

    PubMed

    Polizio, Ariel Héctor; Gironacci, Mariela Mercedes; Tomaro, Maria Luján; Peña, Clara

    2007-07-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7), a bioactive compound of the renin-angiotensin system, exerts effects leading to blood pressure reduction which counterbalance Ang II pressor actions. The present study was conducted to examine Ang-(1-7) and Ang II effects on superoxide anion production in rat aorta using the lucigenin chemiluminescence method. Ang II dose-dependently increased superoxide anion formation when compared to control levels; a maximal increase (2.5-fold) was observed with 1 x 10(-10)M peptide concentration. The Ang II-stimulated superoxide formation was blocked by 1 x 10(-10)M losartan, the specific AT(1) receptor antagonist, but not by 1 x 10(-10)M PD 123319, the AT(2) receptor antagonist, suggesting that the increased superoxide levels caused by Ang II are mediated through AT(1) receptors activation. The Ang II-stimulated superoxide production was not modified by 2 x 10(-8)M allopurinol or 1 x 10(-7)M indomethacin, but was completely abolished by NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors: 1 x 10(-8)M diphenylene iodonium, or 2 x 10(-8)M apocynin, demonstrating that NAD(P)H oxidase participates in such response. In contrast to Ang II, Ang-(1-7) concentrations ranging 1 x 10(-12) to 1 x 10(-6)M did not modify superoxide anion levels, but prevented the Ang II-enhanced superoxide production. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Ang-(1-7) blocks the pro-oxidant effects of Ang II, thus reducing the superoxide anion production and delaying the hypertension development.

  10. Angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors: clinical potential in heart failure and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jagdeep SS; Lang, Chim C

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure remains a major concern across the globe as life expectancies and delivery of health care continue to improve. There has been a dearth of new developments in heart failure therapies in the last decade until last year, with the release of the results from the PARADIGM-HF Trial heralding the arrival of a promising new class of drug, ie, the angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor. In this review, we discuss the evolution of our incremental understanding of the neurohormonal mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of heart failure, which has led to our success in modulating its various pathways. We start by examining the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, followed by the challenges of modulating the natriuretic peptide system. We then delve deeper into the pharmacology and mechanisms by which angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors achieve their significant cardiovascular benefits. Finally, we also consider the potential application of this new class of drug in other areas, such as heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, hypertension, patients with renal impairment, and following myocardial infarction. PMID:26082640

  11. Angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors: clinical potential in heart failure and beyond.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagdeep S S; Lang, Chim C

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure remains a major concern across the globe as life expectancies and delivery of health care continue to improve. There has been a dearth of new developments in heart failure therapies in the last decade until last year, with the release of the results from the PARADIGM-HF Trial heralding the arrival of a promising new class of drug, ie, the angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor. In this review, we discuss the evolution of our incremental understanding of the neurohormonal mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of heart failure, which has led to our success in modulating its various pathways. We start by examining the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, followed by the challenges of modulating the natriuretic peptide system. We then delve deeper into the pharmacology and mechanisms by which angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors achieve their significant cardiovascular benefits. Finally, we also consider the potential application of this new class of drug in other areas, such as heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, hypertension, patients with renal impairment, and following myocardial infarction.

  12. Targeting angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 as a new therapeutic target for cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Nirmal; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Patel, Vaibhav B; Wang, Wang; Putko, Brendan; Mori, Jun; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2014-07-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a monocarboxypeptidase that metabolizes several vasoactive peptides, including angiotensin II (Ang-II; a vasoconstrictive/proliferative peptide), which it converts to Ang-(1-7). Ang-(1-7) acts through the Mas receptor to mediate vasodilatory/antiproliferative actions. The renin-angiotensin system involving the ACE-Ang-II-Ang-II type-1 receptor (AT1R) axis is antagonized by the ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-Mas receptor axis. Loss of ACE2 enhances adverse remodeling and susceptibility to pressure and volume overload. Human recombinant ACE2 may act to suppress myocardial hypertrophy, fibrosis, inflammation, and diastolic dysfunction in heart failure patients. The ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-Mas axis may present a new therapeutic target for the treatment of heart failure patients. This review is mainly focused on the analysis of ACE2, including its influence and potentially positive effects, as well as the potential use of human recombinant ACE2 as a novel therapy for the treatment cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension and heart failure.

  13. Crystal structure of the human angiotensin-converting enzyme-lisinopril complex.

    PubMed

    Natesh, Ramanathan; Schwager, Sylva L U; Sturrock, Edward D; Acharya, K Ravi

    2003-01-30

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has a critical role in cardiovascular function by cleaving the carboxy terminal His-Leu dipeptide from angiotensin I to produce a potent vasopressor octapeptide, angiotensin II. Inhibitors of ACE are a first line of therapy for hypertension, heart failure, myocardial infarction and diabetic nephropathy. Notably, these inhibitors were developed without knowledge of the structure of human ACE, but were instead designed on the basis of an assumed mechanistic homology with carboxypeptidase A. Here we present the X-ray structure of human testicular ACE and its complex with one of the most widely used inhibitors, lisinopril (N2-[(S)-1-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]-L-lysyl-L-proline; also known as Prinivil or Zestril), at 2.0 A resolution. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of ACE shows that it bears little similarity to that of carboxypeptidase A, but instead resembles neurolysin and Pyrococcus furiosus carboxypeptidase--zinc metallopeptidases with no detectable sequence similarity to ACE. The structure provides an opportunity to design domain-selective ACE inhibitors that may exhibit new pharmacological profiles.

  14. The role of angiotensin-converting enzyme polymorphism in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Pilati, Mara; Cicoira, Mariantonietta; Zanolla, Luisa; Nicoletti, Ilaria; Muraglia, Simone; Zardini, Piero

    2004-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc metallopeptidase, with primary known functions of converting angiotensin I into the vasoactive and aldosterone-stimulating peptide angiotensin II and inactivating bradykinin. There is high variability among individuals in ACE concentrations, mainly due to the presence of a genetic polymorphism. The ACE gene has, in fact, insertion/deletion polymorphism in intron 16, consisting of a 287-base pair Alu repeat sequence, with three genotypes: insertion polymorphism, insertion/deletion polymorphism, and deletion polymorphism. The genetic effect accounts for 47% of the total variance of serum ACE. The determination of this polymorphism has allowed researchers to study the implications of the ACE gene in many case-control studies of cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction and hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy. We review the current knowledge about the ACE gene polymorphism and its implications in heart failure secondary to ischemic or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Interpretation of the results of studies about the role of this polymorphism are controversial. The repetition of epidemio-genetic studies and the creation of adequate experimental studies will help to definitively establish the pathogenetic role of the permanent increase in ACE expression associated with the deletion polymorphism genotype.

  15. Extracellular signal regulated kinase and SMAD signaling both mediate the angiotensin II driven progression towards overt heart failure in homozygous TGR(mRen2)27.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Rudolf A; Pokharel, Saraswati; Flesch, Markus; van Kampen, Derk A; Suurmeijer, Albert J H; Boomsma, Frans; van Gilst, Wiek H; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Pinto, Yigal M

    2004-10-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II is a key player in left ventricular (LV) remodeling and cardiac fibrosis. Its effects are thought to be transferred at least in part by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1, and the Smad pathway. In this study we sought to elucidate whether Ang II related effects on LV dysfunction and fibrosis in vivo are mediated via MAPK or rather via Smad stimulation. We treated homozygous REN2 rats (7-11 weeks) with placebo, Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker or tyrphostin A46 (TYR), an inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase that blocks extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity. REN2 rats had LV hypertrophy (LVH) and LV dysfunction that progressed to heart failure between 10 and 13 weeks. Blood pressure normalized over time. Renin, N-terminal atrial natriuretic peptide (N-ANP), and ERK were activated while p38 MAPK was not. Treatment with AT1 receptor blockade prevented LVH and right ventricular hypertrophy, normalized systolic and diastolic d P/d t, N-ANP levels, and reduced collagen apposition. Similarly, TYR reduced LVH, N-ANP levels, and collagen apposition. Myocardial ERK activation did not depend on AT1 receptor signaling as it was not affected by AT1 receptor blockade. TYR abolished myocardial ERK activity. Smad2 activation was inhibited by AT1 receptor blockade but was unaltered by TYR. Ang II induced LV remodeling and fibrosis are dependent on both ERK and Smad2 activation. This process is prevented by both AT1 receptor blockade and TYR, and therefore inhibition of either pathway is equally efficacious in restoring LV function and architecture.

  16. Angiotensin converting enzyme from sheep mammary, lingual and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Rao, N Mallikarjuna; Udupa, E G Padmanabha

    2007-11-01

    Occurrence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in mammary gland and tongue taste epithelium was demonstrated for the first time. Six times higher ACE activity in lactating mammary gland, than non-lactating mammary gland, suggested pregnancy and lactation hormonal dependent expression of ACE in female mammals. ACE activity was highest in choroid plexus, less in spinal cord and moderate in cerebrum, medulla, cerebellum and pons. Distribution of ACE in different regions of skin, kidney and among other tissues was different. Presence of ACE in adrenal glands, pancreas, bone marrow and thyroid gland indicated functions other than blood pressure homeostasis for this enzyme.

  17. The effect of angiotensin, noradrenaline and vasopressin on blood flow distribution in the rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Finberg, J. P. M.; Peart, W. S.

    1972-01-01

    1. The effect of val5-angiotensin II amide, noradrenaline and vasopressin, on kidney volume and intrarenal distribution of carbon particles and thioflavine S was examined in the rat. 2. Angiotensin produced a dose-dependent shrinkage of the kidney coinciding with the rise in systemic blood pressure. Noradrenaline and vasopressin, however, produced reduction in kidney volume only in much higher doses than were necessary to produce a pressor effect. 3. An intravenous infusion of angiotensin sufficient to produce a diuretic response resulted in a striking increase in glomerular content of injected carbon particles, and a marked reduction in filling of the capillary plexuses of the subcortex and outer medulla. The reduction in outer medullary filling was also observed using the thioflavine S technique. 4. Noradrenaline infused in amounts sufficient to produce diuresis, aortic constriction above the kidney and vasopressin injection produced no measurable change in carbon particle distribution. 5. The reduction in capillary blood flow produced by angiotensin may result in impaired tubular reabsorptive capacity by reducing peritubular removal of reabsorbate, or by reducing oxygen availability. Thus the vasoconstrictor effects of angiotensin may explain its diuretic action. ImagesPlate 1Plate 2 PMID:4333828

  18. ACE2: Angiotensin II/Angiotensin-(1-7) balance in cardiorenal injury

    PubMed Central

    Varagic, Jasmina; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Nagata, Sayaka; Ferrario, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Our current recognition of the renin-angiotensin system is more convoluted than originally thought due to the discovery of multiple novel enzymes, peptides, and receptors inherent to this interactive biochemical cascade. Over the last decade angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has emerged as a key player in the pathophysiology of hypertension and cardiovascular and renal disease due to its pivotal role in metabolizing vasoconstrictive/hypertrophic/proliferative angiotensin II into favorable angiotensin-(1-7). This review addresses a considerable advancement in research on the role of tissue ACE2 in development and progression of hypertension and cardiorenal injury. We also summarize the results from recent clinical and experimental studies suggesting that serum or urine soluble ACE2 may serve as a novel biomarker or independent risk factor relevant for diagnosis and prognosis of cardiorenal disease. Recent proceedings on novel therapeutic approaches to enhance ACE2/angiotensin-(1-7) axis are also reviewed. PMID:24510672

  19. High-density lipoprotein inhibits mechanical stress-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy and cardiac hypertrophy through angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Liu, Xuebo; Xu, Jianfeng; Weng, Liqing; Ren, Jun; Ge, Junbo; Zou, Yunzeng

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical stress triggers cardiac hypertrophy and autophagy through an angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT1) receptor-dependent mechanism. Low level of high density lipoprotein (HDL) is an independent risk factor for cardiac hypertrophy. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of HDL on mechanical stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and autophagy. A 48-hr mechanical stretch and a 4-week transverse aortic constriction were employed to induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo, respectively, prior to the assessment of myocardial autophagy using LC3b-II and beclin-1. Our results indicated that HDL significantly reduced mechanical stretch-induced rise in autophagy as demonstrated by LC3b-II and beclin-1. In addition, mechanical stress up-regulated AT1 receptor expression in both cultured cardiomyocytes and in mouse hearts, whereas HDL significantly suppressed the AT1 receptor. Furthermore, the role of Akt phosphorylation in HDL-mediated action was assessed using MK-2206, a selective inhibitor for Akt phosphorylation. Our data further revealed that MK-2206 mitigated HDL-induced beneficial responses on cardiac remodelling and autophagy. Taken together, our data revealed that HDL inhibited mechanical stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and autophagy through downregulation of AT1 receptor, and HDL ameliorated cardiac hypertrophy and autophagy via Akt-dependent mechanism. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  20. Sodium Ferulate Protects against Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy in Mice by Regulating the MAPK/ERK and JNK Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Song, Jian-Tao; Ji, Xian-Fei; Liu, Zun-Qi; Cong, Mu-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective. It has been reported that sodium ferulate (SF) has hematopoietic function against anemia and immune regulation, inflammatory reaction inhibition, inhibition of tumor cell proliferation, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular protection, and other functions. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the effects of SF on angiotensin II- (AngII-) induced cardiac hypertrophy in mice through the MAPK/ERK and JNK signaling pathways. Methods. Seventy-two male C57BL/6J mice were selected and divided into 6 groups: control group, PBS group, model group (AngII), model + low-dose SF group (AngII + 10 mg/kg SF), model + high-dose SF group (AngII + 40 mg/kg SF), and model + high-dose SF + agonist group (AngII + 40 mg/kg SCU + 10 mg/kg TBHQ). After 7 d/14 d/28 days of treatments, the changes of blood pressure and heart rates of mice were compared. The morphology of myocardial tissue and the apoptosis rate of myocardial cells were observed. The mRNA and protein expressions of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), collagen III (Col III), and MAPK/ERK and JNK pathway-related proteins were detected after 28 days of treatments. Results. SF improved the mice's cardiac abnormality and decreased the apoptosis rate of myocardial cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner (all P < 0.05). MAPK/ERK pathway activator inhibited the protective effect of SF in myocardial tissue of mice (P < 0.05). SF could inhibit the expression of p-ERK, p-p38MAPK, and p-JNK and regulate the expressions of ANP, TGF-β, and Col III (all P < 0.05). Conclusion. Our findings provide evidence that SF could protect against AngII-induced cardiac hypertrophy in mice by downregulating the MAPK/ERK and JNK pathways. PMID:28164119

  1. Cardiac remodeling and physical training post myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Garza, Michael A; Wason, Emily A; Zhang, John Q

    2015-01-01

    After myocardial infarction (MI), the heart undergoes extensive myocardial remodeling through the accumulation of fibrous tissue in both the infarcted and noninfarcted myocardium, which distorts tissue structure, increases tissue stiffness, and accounts for ventricular dysfunction. There is growing clinical consensus that exercise training may beneficially alter the course of post-MI myocardial remodeling and improve cardiac function. This review summarizes the present state of knowledge regarding the effect of post-MI exercise training on infarcted hearts. Due to the degree of difficulty to study a viable human heart at both protein and molecular levels, most of the detailed studies have been performed by using animal models. Although there are some negative reports indicating that post-MI exercise may further cause deterioration of the wounded hearts, a growing body of research from both human and animal experiments demonstrates that post-MI exercise may beneficially alter the course of wound healing and improve cardiac function. Furthermore, the improved function is likely due to exercise training-induced mitigation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, improved balance between matrix metalloproteinase-1 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, favorable myosin heavy chain isoform switch, diminished oxidative stress, enhanced antioxidant capacity, improved mitochondrial calcium handling, and boosted myocardial angiogenesis. Additionally, meta-analyses revealed that exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation has proven to be effective, and remains one of the least expensive therapies for both the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease, and prevents re-infarction. PMID:25717353

  2. Renin angiotensin system inhibitors for patients with stable coronary artery disease without heart failure: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Bangalore, Sripal; Fakheri, Robert; Wandel, Simon; Toklu, Bora; Wandel, Jasmin; Messerli, Franz H

    2017-01-19

     To critically evaluate the efficacy of renin angiotensin system inhibitors (RASi) in patients with coronary artery disease without heart failure, compared with active controls or placebo.  Meta-analysis of randomized trials.  PubMed, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases until 1 May 2016.  Randomized trials of RASi versus placebo or active controls in patients with stable coronary artery disease without heart failure (defined as left ventricular ejection fraction ≥40% or without clinical heart failure). Each trial had to enroll at least 100 patients with coronary artery disease without heart failure, with at least one year's follow-up. Studies were excluded if they were redacted or compared use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors with angiotensin receptor blockers. Outcomes were death, cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, heart failure, revascularization, incident diabetes, and drug withdrawal due to adverse effects.  24 trials with 198 275 patient years of follow-up were included. RASi reduced the risk of all cause mortality (rate ratio 0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.72 to 0.98), cardiovascular mortality (0.74, 0.59 to 0.94), myocardial infarction (0.82, 0.76 to 0.88), stroke (0.79, 0.70 to 0.89), angina, heart failure, and revascularization when compared with placebo but not when compared with active controls (all cause mortality, 1.05, 0.94 to 1.17; Pinteraction=0.006; cardiovascular mortality, 1.08, 0.93 to 1.25, Pinteraction<0.001; myocardial infarction, 0.99, 0.87 to 1.12, Pinteraction=0.01; stroke, 1.10, 0.93 to 1.31; Pinteraction=0.002). Bayesian meta-regression analysis showed that the effect of RASi when compared with placebo on all cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality was dependent on the control event rate, such that RASi was only beneficial in trials with high control event rates (>14.10 deaths and >7.65 cardiovascular deaths per 1000 patient years) but not in those with low control event rates.  In patients

  3. Unexpected binding of an octapeptide to the angiotensin II receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Soffer, R.L.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Rosenberg, E.; Hoeprich, P.; Teitelbaum, A.; Brunck, T.; Colby, C.B.; Gloff, C.

    1987-12-01

    An octapeptide, TBI-22 (Lys-Gly-Val-Tyr-Ile, His-Ala-Leu), inhibited binding of angiotensin II by a solubilized angiotensin receptor partially purified from rabbit liver. This inhibition appears to result from competition for binding to the same receptor. Radioiodinated TBI-22, like angiotensin II, bound to the solubilized receptor with an affinity such that the binding was inhibited 50% by unlabeled TBI-22 or angiotensin II at nanomolar concentrations. The binding reaction, like that for angiotensin II, required p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and was reversed in the presence of dithiothreitol. TBI-22 and angiotensin II share the sequence Val-Tyr-Ile-His; this tetrapeptide alone, however, did not inhibit binding of angiotensin II. Replacement of the tyrosine residue by aspartic acid in TBI-22 greatly reduced the ability of the peptide to compete with angiotensin II for binding, suggesting an important contribution of this residue to the configuration required for recognition by the receptor.

  4. Angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) is an independent prognosticator of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and promotes cells proliferation via mTOR activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shau-Hsuan; Lu, Hung-I; Chang, Alice Y.W.; Huang, Wan-Ting; Lin, Wei-Che; Lee, Ching-Chang; Tien, Wan-Yu; Lan, Ya-Chun; Tsai, Hsin-Ting; Chen, Chang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the angiotensin II/ angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) and angiotensin II type II receptor (AT2R) signaling pathway in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the expression levels of AT1R and AT2R in tissues from 152 surgically resected ESCC patients, and those expression levels were then correlated with treatment outcomes. The angiotensin II/AT1R/AT2R signaling pathway and its biological effects in the context of ESCC were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Results In human samples, AT1R overexpression was univariately associated with inferior overall survival and remained multivariately independent (hazard ratio=1.812). In vitro, angiotensin II stimulated the growth of ESCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with irbesartan or AT1R-RNAi knockdown but not treatment with PD123319 significantly decreased the level of angiotensin II-induced ESCC cell proliferation. Angiotensin II also caused mTOR activation in a dose-dependent manner, and everolimus or mTOR-RNAi knockdown significantly suppressed the level of angiotensin II-induced ESCC cell proliferation. Furthermore, AT1R-RNAi knockdown suppressed the activation of mTOR. Clinically, AT1R expression was also correlated with phosphorylated mTOR expression. In a xenograft model, local angiotensin II injection enhanced tumor growth, and this effect could be decreased by treatment with irbesartan or everolimus. In a 4-NQO-induced-ESCC murine model, irbesartan significantly decreased the incidence of esophageal tumor. Conclusions These findings suggest that AT1R overexpression is an independent adverse prognosticator for patients with ESCC and that angiotensin II/AT1R signaling stimulates ESCC growth, in part through mTOR activation. PMID:27564102

  5. FGF23 promotes myocardial fibrosis in mice through activation of β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hairuo; Chen, Zhenhuan; Xie, Jiahe; Xuan, Wanling; Liao, Wangjun; Bin, Jianping; Huang, Xiaobo; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Liao, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) has been reported to induce left ventricular hypertrophy, but it remains unclear whether FGF23 plays a role in cardiac fibrosis. This study is attempted to investigate the role of FGF23 in post-infarct myocardial fibrosis in mice. We noted that myocardial and plasma FGF23 and FGF receptor 4 were increased in mice with heart failure as well as in cultured adult mouse cardiac fibroblasts (AMCFs) exposed to angiotensin II, phenylephrine, soluble fractalkine. Recombinant FGF23 protein increased active β-catenin , procollagen I and procollagen III expression in cultured AMCFs. Furthermore, intra-myocardial injection of adeno-associated virus-FGF23 in mice significantly increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and myocardial fibrosis, and markedly upregulated active β-catenin, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), procollagen I and procollagen III in both myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia/reperfusion (IR) mice, while β-catenin inhibitor or silencing of β-catenin antagonized the FGF23-promoted myocardial fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. These findings indicate that FGF23 promotes myocardial fibrosis and exacerbates diastolic dysfunction induced by MI or IR, which is associated with the upregulation of active β-catenin and TGF-β. PMID:27579618

  6. Angiotensin II Blockade and Renal Protection

    PubMed Central

    Kobori, Hiroyuki; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Nishiyama, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Current national guidelines have recommended the use of renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, including angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), in preference to other antihypertensive agents for treating hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease. However, the mechanisms underlying the renoprotective effects of ARBs are multiple and complex. Blood pressure reduction by systemic vasodilation with an ARB contributes to its beneficial effects in treating kidney disease. Furthermore, ARB-induced renal vasodilation results in an increase in renal blood flow, leading to improvement of renal ischemia and hypoxia. ARBs are also effective in reducing urinary albumin excretion through a reduction in intraglomerular pressure and the protection of glomerular endothelium and/or podocyte injuries. In addition to blocking angiotensin II-induced renal cell and tissue injuries, ARBs can decrease intrarenal angiotensin II levels by reducing proximal tubular angiotensinogen and production of collecting duct renin, as well as angiotensin II accumulation in the kidney. In this review, we will briefly summarize our current understanding of the pharmacological effects of an ARB in the kidney. We will also discuss the possible mechanisms responsible for the renoprotective effects of ARBs on type 2 diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23176216

  7. Multiple roles of angiotensin in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) cells express renin and chymase through which they can activate angiotensin. Renin expression is induced by hyperglycemic conditions. As angiotensinogen is produced in the liver, CRC cells that can activate angiotensin have an enhanced ability to metastasize to this organ. In human CRC cases, patients with diabetes have higher activities of rennin and angiotensin-II in primary tumors, and on average, have a more progressed disease stage, especially with respect to liver metastasis. These patients exhibit a stronger association with Hemoglobin A1c levels and metastasis compared to patients without diabetes. In a combined diabetes/CRC liver metastasis mouse model, concurrent treatment with anti-angiotensin and hypoglycemic agents shows a synergic effect in terms of reduced liver metastasis and improved survival. The effect of anti-angiotensin treatment and blood sugar control as a baseline management for colon cancer patients with diabetes needs to be examined in clinical trials to establish whether it can prevent liver metastasis. PMID:23293754

  8. In silico analysis and molecular docking studies of potential angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor using quercetin glycosides

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Fatima, Nighat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the inhibitory action of quercetin glycosides by computational docking studies. For this, natural metabolite quercetin glycosides isolated from buckwheat and onions were used as ligand for molecular interaction. The crystallographic structure of molecular target angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) (peptidyl-dipeptidase A) was obtained from PDB database (PDB ID: 1O86). Enalapril, a well-known brand of ACE inhibitor was taken as the standard for comparative analysis. Computational docking analysis was performed using PyRx, AutoDock Vina option based on scoring functions. The quercetin showed optimum binding affinity with a molecular target (angiotensin-converting-enzyme) with the binding energy of −8.5 kcal/mol as compared to the standard (−7.0 kcal/mol). These results indicated that quercetin glycosides could be one of the potential ligands to treat hypertension, myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. PMID:26109757

  9. [Urinary levels of angiotensin-(1-7) and angiotensin II in patients with severe aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    López-de la Vega, César; Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Lomelí-Estrada, Catalina; Pastelín-Hernández, Gustavo; del Valle-Mondragón, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    Strengthen knowledge about the pathophysiology of aortic stenosis. Urinary levels of angiotensin-(1-7) and angiotensin II were compared between two samples: A) forty five patients with severe aortic stenosis, without systemic arterial hypertension and with normal kidney and normal left ventricular systolic function; B) control group: twenty one persons without cardiovascular disease. there would be no difference between urinary levels. The average of angiotensin-(1-7) urinary concentration in severe aortic stenosis patients was 2.102 pmol/mL and 5.591 pmol/mL for the control group. The average of Ang II was 0.704 pmol/mL and 0.185 pmol/mL respectively. Using t-Student test, we determine that the difference in urinary concentration of angiotensin-(1-7) [p=0.633] and the difference of angiotensin II (p=0.631), were statistically significant. documented a statistically significant difference in urinary levels angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-7) within the group of patients with severe aortic stenosis.

  10. Periodontitis and myocardial hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Hiroki; Kaneko, Makoto; Yoshida, Asuka; Aoyama, Norio; Akimoto, Shouta; Wakayama, Kouji; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Izumi, Yuichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Komuro, Issei

    2017-04-01

    There is a deep relationship between cardiovascular disease and periodontitis. It has been reported that myocardial hypertrophy may be affected by periodontitis in clinical settings. Although these clinical observations had some study limitations, they strongly suggest a direct association between severity of periodontitis and left ventricular hypertrophy. However, the detailed mechanisms between myocardial hypertrophy and periodontitis have not yet been elucidated. Recently, we demonstrated that periodontal bacteria infection is closely related to myocardial hypertrophy. In murine transverse aortic constriction models, a periodontal pathogen, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans markedly enhanced cardiac hypertrophy with matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation, while another pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) did not accelerate these pathological changes. In the isoproterenol-induced myocardial hypertrophy model, P.g. induced myocardial hypertrophy through Toll-like receptor-2 signaling. From our results and other reports, regulation of chronic inflammation induced by periodontitis may have a key role in the treatment of myocardial hypertrophy. In this article, we review the pathophysiological mechanism between myocardial hypertrophy and periodontitis.

  11. Renin angiotensin aldosterone inhibition in the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Carlos M; Mullick, Adam E

    2017-11-01

    A collective century of discoveries establishes the importance of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system in maintaining blood pressure, fluid volume and electrolyte homeostasis via autocrine, paracrine and endocrine signaling. While research continues to yield new functions of angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-7), the gap between basic research and clinical application of these new findings is widening. As data accumulates on the efficacy of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers as drugs of fundamental importance in the treatment of cardiovascular and renal disorders, it is becoming apparent that the achieved clinical benefits is suboptimal and surprisingly no different than what can be achieved with other therapeutic interventions. We discuss this issue and summarize new pathways and mechanisms effecting the synthesis and actions of angiotensin II. The presence of renin-independent non-canonical pathways for angiotensin II production are largely unaffected by agents inhibiting renin angiotensin system activity. Hence, new efforts should be directed to develop drugs that can effectively block the synthesis and/or action of intracellular angiotensin II. Improved drug penetration into cardiac or renal sites of disease, inhibiting chymase the primary angiotensin II forming enzyme in the human heart, and/or inhibiting angiotensinogen synthesis would all be more effective strategies to inhibit the system. Additionally, given the role of angiotensin II in the maintenance of renal homeostatic mechanisms, any new inhibitor should possess greater selectivity of targeting pathogenic angiotensin II signaling processes and thereby limit inappropriate inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in high vascular risk.

    PubMed

    Potier, Louis; Roussel, Ronan; Elbez, Yedid; Marre, Michel; Zeymer, Uwe; Reid, Christopher M; Ohman, Magnus; Eagle, Kim A; Bhatt, Deepak L; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2017-09-01

    ACE inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are widely prescribed in patients with high cardiovascular (CV) risk. However, whether both classes have equivalent effectiveness to prevent CV events remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of major CV events between ACEI and ARB users. The Reduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health registry is an observational study who enrolled 69 055 individuals with high CV risk. Among them, 40 625 patients (ACEIs 67.9% and ARBs 32.1%) were included. Main outcome was rates of CV mortality, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke or hospitalisation for CV disease at 4 years. In a propensity score-adjusted cohort, the incidence of the primary outcome was lower in patients on ARBs compared with ACEIs (29.2% vs 33.4%; adjusted HR 0.90; 95% CI 0.86 to 0.95; p<0.001). Similar results were observed for CV (6.9% vs 8.2%; HR 0.83; 95% CI 0.75 to 0.93; p=0.001) and all-cause mortality (11.6% vs 12.6%; HR 0.89; 95% CI 0.82 to 0.97; p=0.005). Analyses using propensity score matching yielded similar results. History of diabetes or estimated glomerular filtration rate did not affect the results. ARB use was associated with lower rates of all-cause mortality in secondary prevention but not in primary prevention patients (p-value for interaction=0.03). ARB use appears to be associated with 10% lower rates of CV events compared with ACEIs, especially in patients with established CV disease. Our results suggest that ARBs may provide superior protection against CV events than ACEIs in high-risk patients in real-world practice. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Current trend of acute myocardial infarction in Korea (from the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry from 2006 to 2013).

    PubMed

    Kook, Hyun Yi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Oh, Sangeun; Yoo, Sung-Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Ju Han; Chai, Leem Soon; Kim, Young Jo; Kim, Chong Jin; Chan Cho, Myeong

    2014-12-15

    Although the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Korea has been rapidly changed because of westernization of diet, lifestyle, and aging of the population, the recent trend of the myocardial infarction have not been reported by classification. We investigated recent trends in the incidence and mortality associated with the 2 major types of AMI. We reviewed 39,978 patients registered in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry for either ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI) or non-ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) from 2006 to 2013. When the rate for AMI were investigated according to each year, the incidence rates of STEMI decreased markedly from 60.5% in 2006 to 48.1% in 2013 (p <0.001). In contrast, a gradual increase in the incidence rates of NSTEMI was observed from 39.5% in 2006 to 51.9% in 2013 (p <0.001). As risk factors, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia were much more common in patients with NSTEMI than STEMI. Among medical treatments, the use of β blockers, angiotensin receptor blocker, and statin were increased from 2006 to 2013 in patients with STEMI and NSTEMI. Patients with STEMI and NSTEMI were more inclined to be increasingly treated by invasive treatments with percutaneous coronary intervention. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the trend of myocardial infarction has been changed rapidly in the aspect of risk factors, ratio of STEMI versus NSTEMI, and therapeutic strategies during the recent 8 years in Korea.

  14. Central and peripheral cardiovascular effects of angiotensin III in trout.

    PubMed

    Mimassi, N; Lancien, F; Le Mével, J C

    2009-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the central and peripheral actions of trout angiotensin III (ANG III) on heart rate (HR) and mean dorsal aortic blood pressure (P(DA)) in the unanaesthetized rainbow trout. Intracerebroventricular injection of ANG III (5-100 pmol) produced a significant and dose-dependent increase in HR without significant change in P(DA). In contrast, when injected peripherally ANG III (5-50 pmol) evoked a significant and dose-dependent increase in P(DA). The hypertensive responses were accompanied by a bradycardia that reached significance only for the highest dose of ANG III tested. In conclusion, our results have shown that ANG III has potent and contrasting cardiovascular actions depending on whether its site of action is the brain or the peripheral circulation. Endogenous ANG III may have important physiological functions in teleost fishes.

  15. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition and the kidney

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenberg, N. K.

    1988-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) induces a marked reduction in renal blood flow at doses well below those required to induce a pressor response, and as blood flow falls there is a decline in glomerular filtration rate and sodium excretion. This striking sensitivity of the renal blood supply led many workers to consider the possibility that angiotensin functions as a local renal hormone. As angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) was found in particular abundance in the lung, it seemed reasonable to suspect that most of the conversion occurred there, and that the function of Ang II would be primarily systemic, rather than intrarenal. In this review, I will explore the evidence that has accumulated on these two possibilities, since they have important implications for our current understanding of normal kidney function and derangements of kidney function in disease.

  16. Angiotensins as therapeutic targets beyond heart disease.

    PubMed

    Passos-Silva, Danielle Gomes; Brandan, Enrique; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2015-05-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular and hydro-electrolyte homeostasis. Blockade of the RAS as a therapeutic strategy for treating hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases is well established. However, actions of the RAS go far beyond the targets initially described. In this regard, the recent identification of novel components of the RAS, including angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], Ang-(1-9), and alamandine, have opened new possibilities for interfering with the development and manifestations of cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular diseases. In this article, we briefly review novel targets for angiotensins and its therapeutic implications in diverse areas, including cancer, inflammation, and glaucoma.

  17. The pleiotropic effects of angiotensin receptor blockers.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G; Chrysant, George S

    2006-04-01

    The angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are very effective and safe antihypertensive drugs. They exert their antihypertensive effect through blockage of the angiotensin II, type 1 receptor and quite possibly through stimulation by angiotensin II of the unoccupied type 2 receptor. Besides hypertension, the ARBs have been found recently to be of value in the treatment of heart failure and diabetic nephropathy. In addition, ARBs have emerged lately as being very effective and perhaps superior to other antihypertensive drugs in the prevention of de novo or recurrent strokes. Other actions that may account for their stroke-protective effects include their antiatherogenic, antidiabetic, antiplatelet aggregating, hypouricemic, and atrial antifibrillatory actions. All these actions make the ARBs a true pleiotropic class of drugs. Each of the foregoing effects will be discussed briefly in this concise review.

  18. Angiotensin-(1-7): an active member of the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Kucharewicz, I; Pawlak, R; Matys, T; Chabielska, E; Buczko, W

    2002-12-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] is an active member of renin-angiotensin system (RAS). It counterbalances vasoconstriction, mitogenic, arrhythmogenic and prothrombotic actions of Ang II. Inducing natiuresis and diuresis opposes also the water and sodium retention produced by Ang II. Till now the specific receptor side for Ang-(1-7) has been not cloned, but the current data strongly suggest that an interaction (cross-talk) between angiotensin receptors may play a role in the effects of Ang-(1-7).

  19. Intrarenal alterations of the angiotensin-converting enzyme type 2/angiotensin 1-7 complex of the renin-angiotensin system do not alter the course of malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Husková, Zuzana; Kopkan, Libor; Červenková, Lenka; Doleželová, Šárka; Vaňourková, Zdeňka; Škaroupková, Petra; Nishiyama, Akira; Kompanowska-Jezierska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Janusz; Kramer, Herbert J; Červenka, Luděk

    2016-04-01

    The role of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the pathophysiology of malignant hypertension is not fully understood. Accumulating evidence indicates that the recently discovered vasodilator axis of the RAS, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) type 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin 1-7 (ANG 1-7), constitutes an endogenous system counterbalancing the hypertensiogenic axis, ACE/angiotensin II (ANG II)/AT1 receptor. This study aimed to evaluate the role of the intrarenal vasodilator RAS axis in the pathophysiology of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension was induced by 13 days' dietary administration of indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural xenobiotic that activates the mouse renin gene in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. It was hypothesized that pharmacologically-induced inhibition of the ACE2/ANG 1-7 complex should aggravate, and activation of this axis should attenuate, the course of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension. Blood pressure (BP) was monitored by radiotelemetry. ACE2 inhibitor (DX 600, 0.2 μg/day) and ACE2 activator (DIZE, 1 mg/day) were administrated via osmotic minipumps. Even though ACE2 inhibitor significantly decreased and ACE2 activator increased intrarenal ANG 1-7 concentrations, the course of BP, as well as of albuminuria, cardiac hypertrophy and renal glomerular damage, were not altered. It was shown that intrarenal alterations in the ACE2/ANG 1-7 complex did not significantly modify the course of malignant hypertension in I3C-induced Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. Thus, in our experimental setting alterations of this intrarenal vasodilator complex of the RAS do not significantly modify the form of malignant hypertension that clearly depends on the inappropriately increased activity of the ACE/ANG II/AT1 receptor axis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. [Angiotensin II receptor antagonists: different or equivalent?].

    PubMed

    Mounier-Vehier, C; Devos, P

    ARA-II: Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA-II) belong to a recent class of antihypertensive drugs whose mechanism of action is similar to converting enzyme inhibitors (CEI). ARA-II are particularly interesting due to the excellent clinical and biological tolerance, similar to placebo, and their antihypertensive efficacy, comparable with classical drug classes. PUBLISHED TRIALS: A meta-analysis, published by Conlin in the American Journal of Hypertension, suggests that ARA-II, specifically losartan, valsartan, irbesartan and candesartan, have an equipotent blood pressure lowering effect. The careful lecture of this meta-analysis however discloses a faulty methodology from which no valid conclusion can be drawn. Since this early publication, several other comparative studies have been published. These multicentric, randomized double-blind studies enrolled a sufficient number of patients and demonstrated a clinical difference between certain ARA-II at usual dosages. CLINICAL PRACTICE: These studies do have an impact on everyday practice. For the practitioner, the goal is to obtain and then maintain a long-term and optimal reduction in the blood pressure level (reduction or prevention of target-organ disorders and cardiovascular complications of high blood pressure). This reduction in the cardiovascular risk will also depend directly on tolerance and compliance to the antihypertensive treatment. This element must also be considered in assessing treatment efficacy, independent of the blood pressure lowering effect. The results of several other studies will be published in 2001-2003. These large-scale studies on ARA-II related morbidity and mortality will be most useful in determining the role of these drugs in different therapeutic strategies compared with other drug classes.

  1. Effects of enalapril on myocardial noradrenaline overflow during exercise in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, I P; Fraser, A G; Lewis, M J; Henderson, A H

    1989-01-01

    The effects of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril on myocardial sympathetic tone, as represented by noradrenaline overflow, were studied in 14 men with congestive heart failure (mean ejection fraction 20%) in a double blind crossover comparison with placebo. Arterial and coronary sinus catecholamine concentrations and oxygen content, and coronary sinus blood flow, were measured at rest and during peak symptom limited upright exercise on a bicycle ergometer. There were no significant changes four hours after the first dose of enalapril, but after six weeks of treatment (10-20 mg/day) enalapril reduced myocardial overflow of noradrenaline at peak exercise. The external workload (exercise duration) increased from baseline values after both placebo and enalapril, and there was no difference between placebo and enalapril at six weeks. Heart work, however, was lower after enalapril: stroke work index was reduced at rest and the double product was lower at peak exercise. The reduction in maximal myocardial oxygen consumption after enalapril did not reach statistical significance. Coronary sinus adrenaline concentrations after enalapril and after placebo were not significantly different. The long term reduction of myocardial sympathetic activity on exercise may represent a significant benefit from angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition in heart failure and may reflect a reduced cardiac workload. PMID:2537095

  2. [Depression and myocardial infaction].

    PubMed

    Testuz, A

    2009-03-04

    Several works show an association between depression and the occurence of a first myocardial infarction. Depression after myocardial infarction seems to be a marker of poorer outcome, regardless of other risk factors or severity of the myocardial infarction. Dysautonomia and alteration of platelet activation are a few physiopathological changes shared by both affections, through which they might be related. Treatment of depression is not associated with better cardiovascular outcome, but selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been shown safe and efficient among patients with coronary heart disease. Cognitivo-comportemental approach and cardiovascular rehabilitation program after myocardial infarction also play a role in improving quality of life of the depressed patient with coronary heart disease.

  3. Renal Sympathetic Denervation in Rats Ameliorates Cardiac Dysfunction and Fibrosis Post-Myocardial Infarction Involving MicroRNAs.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoxin; Li, Xiaoyan; Lyu, Yongnan; He, Yiyu; Wan, Weiguo; Jiang, Xuejun

    2016-08-04

    BACKGROUND The role of renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) in ameliorating post-myocardial infarction (MI) left ventricular (LV) fibrosis via microRNA-dependent regulation of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) remains unknown. MATERIAL AND METHODS MI and RSD were induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by ligating the left coronary artery and denervating the bilateral renal nerves, respectively. Norepinephrine, renin, angiotensin II and aldosterone in plasma, collagen, microRNA21, microRNA 101a, microRNA 133a and CTGF in heart tissue, as well as cardiac function were evaluated six weeks post-MI. RESULTS In the RSD group, parameters of cardiac function were significantly improved as evidenced by increased LV ejection fraction (p<0.01), LV end-systolic diameter (p<0.01), end-diastolic diameter (p<0.05), LV systolic pressure (p<0.05), maximal rate of pressure rise and decline (dP/dtmax and dP/dtmin, p<0.05), and decreased LV end-diastolic pressure (p<0.05) when compared with MI rats. Further, reduced collagen deposition in peri-infarct myocardium was observed in RSD-treated rats along with higher microRNA101a and microRNA133a (p<0.05) and lower microRNA21 expression (p<0.01) than in MI rats. CTGF mRNA and protein levels were decreased in LV following RSD (p<0.01), accompanied by decreased expression of norepinephrine, renin, angiotensin II and aldosterone in plasma (p<0.05) compared with untreated MI rats. CONCLUSIONS The potential therapeutic effects of RSD on post-MI LV fibrosis may be partly mediated by inhibition of CTGF expression via upregulation of microRNA 101a and microRNA 133a and downregulation of microRNA21.

  4. Ginseng protects rodent hearts from acute myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury through GR/ER-activated RISK pathway in an endothelial NOS-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua; Hou, Shao Zhen; Luo, Pei; Zeng, Bao; Wang, Jing Rong; Wong, Yuen Fan; Jiang, Zhi Hong; Liu, Liang

    2011-05-17

    Ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) is widely used in Asian communities for treating cardiovascular diseases. However, the mechanism by which it protects the myocardium in ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury remains unclear. In this study, we aim to investigate whether a standardized ginseng extract (RSE) protects rodent hearts against I/R injury and if glucocorticoid and/or estrogen receptor-mediated activation of Akt and Erk1/2 (the reperfusion injury salvage kinase pathway, RISK) and subsequent nitric oxide (NO) synthesis signaling are involved in this effect. Rats or gene-deleted mice were subjected to 30 min ischemia by occluding the left anterior descending coronary artery and 90 min reperfusion. Infarct size, serum level of creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and NO, expression and phosphorylation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), estrogen receptor (ER), phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), Akt, NO synthase (NOS), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) 1/2, p38, and c-Jun NH2 terminal kinases (JNK) were examined in rat or mice treated with or without RSE in the absence or presence of pharmacological inhibitors. RSE significantly reduced infarct size in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the incidence of arrhythmia, increased serum NO production, reduced serum activities of creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase. The infarct size reduction effect of RSE was abolished by RU468 (an inhibitor of GR), tamoxifen (an inhibitor of ER), LY294002 (an inhibitor of PI3K), Akt inhibitor IV (an inhibitor of Akt protein kinase), U0126 (an inhibitor of Erk1/2) and NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (an inhibitor of NOS), but not actinomycin D (an inhibitor of transcription process). RSE also significantly increased the activation of GR/ER, PI3K-Akt-eNOS cascades and Erk1/2 signaling in rat heart. However, RSE did not markedly reduce infarct size in endothelium NOS(-/-) mice. This differs from its effect in inducible NOS(-/-) and wild type

  5. Enalapril protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in a swine model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoxing; Zhang, Qian; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence to suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) protect against local myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. This study was designed to explore whether ACEIs exert cardioprotective effects in a swine model of cardiac arrest (CA) and resuscitation. Male pigs were randomly assigned to three groups: sham-operated group, saline treatment group and enalapril treatment group. Thirty minutes after drug infusion, the animals in the saline and enalapril groups were subjected to ventricular fibrillation (8 min) followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (up to 30 min). Cardiac function was monitored, and myocardial tissue and blood were collected for analysis. Enalapril pre-treatment did not improve cardiac function or the 6-h survival rate after CA and resuscitation; however, this intervention ameliorated myocardial ultrastructural damage, reduced the level of plasma cardiac troponin I and decreased myocardial apoptosis. Plasma angiotensin (Ang) II and Ang-(1–7) levels were enhanced in the model of CA and resuscitation. Enalapril reduced the plasma Ang II level at 4 and 6 h after the return of spontaneous circulation whereas enalapril did not affect the plasma Ang-(1–7) level. Enalapril pre-treatment decreased the myocardial mRNA and protein expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Enalapril treatment also reduced the myocardial ACE/ACE2 ratio, both at the mRNA and the protein level. Enalapril pre-treatment did not affect the upregulation of ACE2, Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and MAS after CA and resuscitation. Taken together, these findings suggest that enalapril protects against ischemic injury through the attenuation of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis after CA and resuscitation in pigs. These results suggest the potential therapeutic value of ACEIs in patients with CA. PMID:27633002

  6. Role of p47phox in Vascular Oxidative Stress and Hypertension Caused by Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Landmesser, Ulf; Cai, Hua; Dikalov, Sergey; McCann, Louise; Hwang, Jinah; Jo, Hanjoong; Holland, Steven M.; Harrison, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension caused by angiotensin II is dependent on vascular superoxide (O2·–) production. The nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD[P]H) oxidase is a major source of vascular O2·– and is activated by angiotensin II in vitro. However, its role in angiotensin II–induced hypertension in vivo is less clear. In the present studies, we used mice deficient in p47phox, a cytosolic subunit of the NADPH oxidase, to study the role of this enzyme system in vivo. In vivo, angiotensin II infusion (0.7 mg/kg per day for 7 days) increased systolic blood pressure from 105±2 to 151±6 mm Hg and increased vascular O2·– formation 2- to 3-fold in wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, in p47phox−/− mice the hypertensive response to angiotensin II infusion (122±4 mm Hg; P<0.05) was markedly blunted, and there was no increase of vascular O2·– production. In situ staining for O2·– using dihydroethidium revealed a marked increase of O2·–production in both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells of angiotensin II–treated WT mice, but not in those of p47phox−/− mice. To directly examine the role of the NAD(P)H oxidase in endothelial production of O2·–, endothelial cells from WT and p47phox−/− mice were cultured. Western blotting confirmed the absence of p47phox in p47phox−/− mice. Angiotensin II increased O2·– production in endothelial cells from WT mice, but not in those from p47phox−/− mice, as determined by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These results suggest a pivotal role of the NAD(P)H oxidase and its subunit p47phox in the vascular oxidant stress and the blood pressure response to angiotensin II in vivo. PMID:12364355

  7. Angiotensin protects cortical neurons from hypoxic-induced apoptosis via the angiotensin type 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Grammatopoulos, Tom; Morris, Katherine; Ferguson, Paul; Weyhenmeyer, James

    2002-03-28

    The effects of angiotensin on mouse cortical neuronal cultures exposed to chemical-induced hypoxia was investigated. Cultures exposed to 10 mM sodium azide for 5 min showed a 17% increase in apoptosis when assayed 24 h postinsult. The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist MK-801 blocked sodium azide-induced cell death suggesting that the NMDA receptor contributes to the mediated cell death. Pretreatment of cultured neurons with angiotensin decreased sodium azide-induced apoptosis by 94%. When the AT(1) receptor was blocked by its receptor antagonist, losartan, angiotensin activation of the AT(2) receptor completely inhibited sodium azide-induced apoptosis. Pretreatment of neurons with the AT(2) receptor antagonist PD123319 resulted in angiotensin reducing sodium azide-induced apoptosis by 48%. These results demonstrate that angiotensin can significantly attenuate sodium azide-induced apoptosis primarily through activation of the AT(2) receptor and suggests that angiotensin may have a protective role in neurons undergoing ischemic injury.

  8. Myocardial Noncompaction Presenting With Myocardial Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yuechun; Li, Xinchun; Lu, Dongfeng; Xiao, Aiyi; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myocardial noncompaction, namly isolated noncompaction of the left ventricular myocardium (NVM), is a rare congenital disease. It can be either seen in the absence of other cardiac anomalies, or associated with other congenital cardiac defects, mostly stenotic lesions of the left ventricular outflow tract. A myocardial bridge (MB) is thought being associated with coronary heart disease, such as coronary spasm, arrhythmia, and so on. The significance of MB in association with other congenital cardiac conditions is unknown. We report a novel case who was presented NVM and MB. A 34-year-old man complained of chest prickling-like pain and dizzy for 1 year. His blood pressure was 110/70 mm Hg. Echocardiograph revealed increased trabeculations below the level of papillary muscle of left ventricle (LV); deep intertrabecular recesses in the endocardial wall of LV particularly in apex free wall; and LV ejection fraction of 57%. A coronary computerized tomography scan showed that part, 38.9 cm, of left descending artery tunnel was surrounding by cardiac muscles rather than resting on top of the myocardium. The therapeutics interventions included lifestyle cares, agents of anti-ischemia and improvement myocardial cell metabolism. The patient was followed up for 2.6 years, and his general condition was stable. This case indicates that NVM can be developed with MB, and the complete diagnosis of NVM and MB should be made by different image studies. PMID:26356695

  9. Myocardial Na,K-ATPase: Clinical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Kjeldsen, Keld

    2003-01-01

    The specific binding of digitalis glycosides to Na,K-ATPase is used as a tool for Na,K-ATPase quantification with high accuracy and precision. In myocardial biopsies from patients with heart failure, total Na,K-ATPase concentration is decreased by around 40%; a correlation exists between a decrease in heart function and a decrease in Na,K-ATPase concentration. During digitalization, around 30% of remaining pumps are occupied by digoxin. Myocardial Na,K-ATPase is also influenced by other drugs used for the treatment of heart failure. Thus, potassium loss during diuretic therapy has been found to reduce myocardial Na,K-ATPase, whereas angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors may stimulate Na,K pump activity. Furthermore, hyperaldosteronism induced by heart failure has been found to decrease Na,K-ATPase activity. Accordingly, treatment with the aldosterone antagonist, spironolactone, may also influence Na,K-ATPase activity. The importance of Na,K pump modulation with heart disease, inhibition in digitalization and other effects of medication should be considered in the context of sodium, potassium and calcium regulation. It is recommended that digoxin be administered to heart failure patients who, after institution of mortality-reducing therapy, still have heart failure symptoms, and that the therapy be continued if symptoms are revealed or reduced. Digitalis glycosides are the only safe inotropic drugs for oral use that improve hemodynamics in heart failure. An important aspect of myocardial Na,K pump affection in heart disease is its influence on extracellular potassium (Ke) homeostasis. Two important aspects should be considered: potassium handling among myocytes, and effects of potassium entering the extracellular space of the heart via the bloodstream. It should be noted that both of these aspects of Ke homeostasis are affected by regulatory aspects, eg, regulation of the Na,K pump by physiological and pathophysiological conditions, as well as by medical

  10. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor induced hyperkalaemic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, D; Fischler, M; McClung, A

    2001-01-01

    Secondary hyperkalaemic paralysis is a rare condition often mimicking the Guillain-Barré syndrome. There have been a few case reports of hyperkalaemia caused by renal failure, trauma, and drugs where the presentation has been with muscle weakness. A case of hyperkalaemic paralysis caused by an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor is reported.


Keywords: hyperkalaemia; paralysis; ACE inhibitors PMID:11161080

  11. Cardiovascular actions of angiotensin-(1-7).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A J; Santos, R A S

    2005-04-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) is now considered to be a biologically active member of the renin-angiotensin system. The functions of Ang-(1-7) are often opposite to those attributed to the main effector component of the renin-angiotensin system, Ang II. Chronic administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) increases 10- to 25-fold the plasma levels of this peptide, suggesting that part of the beneficial effects of ACEI could be mediated by Ang-(1-7). Ang-(1-7) can be formed from Ang II or directly from Ang I. Other enzymatic pathways for Ang-(1-7) generation have been recently described involving the novel ACE homologue ACE2. This enzyme can form Ang-(1-7) from Ang II or less efficiently by the hydrolysis of Ang I to Ang-(1-9) with subsequent Ang-(1-7) formation. The biological relevance of Ang-(1-7) has been recently reinforced by the identification of its receptor, the G-protein-coupled receptor Mas. Heart and blood vessels are important targets for the formation and actions of Ang-(1-7). In this review we will discuss recent findings concerning the biological role of Ang-(1-7) in the heart and blood vessels, taking into account aspects related to its formation and effects on these tissues. In addition, we will discuss the potential of Ang-(1-7) and its receptor as a target for the development of new cardiovascular drugs.

  12. The Role of Calcium-Sensing Receptors in Endothelin-1-Dependent Effects on Adult Rat Ventricular Cardiomyocytes: Possible Contribution to Adaptive Myocardial Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Dyukova, Elena; Schreckenberg, Rolf; Arens, Christoph; Sitdikova, Guzel; Schlüter, Klaus-Dieter

    2017-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-deficiency as it occurs during endothelial dysfunction activates the endothelin-1 (ET-1) system and increases the expression of receptor activity modifying protein (RAMP)-1 that acts as a chaperon for calcium-sensing receptors (CaR) that have recently been identified to improve cardiac function. Here, we hypothesized that ET-1 increases the cardiac expression of CaR and thereby induces an adaptive type of hypertrophy. Expressions of RAMP-1, endothelin receptors, and CaR were analyzed by RT-PCR in left ventricular tissues of L-NAME-treated rats. Effects of ET-1 on CaR expression and cell function (load free cell shortening) were analyzed in adult rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. siRNA directed against CaR and RAMP-1 was used to investigate a causal relationship. PD142893 and BQ788 were used to dissect the contribution of ETB1 , ETB2 , and ETA receptors. Non-specific NO synthase inhibition with L-Nitro arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) caused a cardiac upregulation of ETB receptors and CaR suggesting a paracrine effect of ET-1 on cardiomyocytes. Indeed, ET-1 induced the expression of CaR in cultured cardiomyocytes. Under these conditions, cardiomyocytes increased cell size (hypertrophy) but maintained normal function. Inhibition of ETA and ETB1 receptors led to ET-1-dependent reduction in cell shortening and attenuated up-regulation of CaR. Down-regulation of RAMP-1 reduced CaR responsiveness. In conclusion, ET-1 causes an adaptive type of hypertrophy by up-regulation of CaR in cardiomyocytes via ETA and/or ETB1 receptors. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2508-2518, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Angiotensin II-related hypertension and eye diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marin Garcia, Pablo Jesus; Marin-Castaño, Maria Encarna

    2014-01-01

    Systemic vascular disease, especially hypertension, has been suspected as a risk factor for some eye diseases including, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. Hypertension can contribute to chronic diseases by hemodynamic injury and/or cellular actions induced by hypertension-related hormones or growth factors. Among the most important is Angiotensin II (Ang II), which controls blood pressure and induces different cellular functions that may be dependent or independent of its effect on blood pressure. Importantly, as is true for heart, kidney and other organs, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is present in the eye. So, even in the absence of hypertension, local production of Ang II could be involved in eye diseases. The goal of this manuscript is to review the most relevant scientific evidence supporting the role of the RAS activation, in the development of age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy, and highlight the importance of Ang II in the etiology of these diseases. PMID:25276298

  14. Characterization of a new selective antagonist for angiotensin-(1-7), D-pro7-angiotensin-(1-7).

    PubMed

    Santos, Robson A S; Haibara, Andréa S; Campagnole-Santos, Maria José; Simões e Silva, Ana C; Paula, Renata D; Pinheiro, Sérgio V B; Leite, Maria Fátima; Lemos, Virginia S; Silva, Denise M R; Guerra, Mateus T; Khosla, Mahesh C

    2003-03-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] has biological actions that can often be distinguished from those of angiotensin II (Ang II). Recent studies indicate that the effects of Ang-(1-7) are mediated by specific receptor(s). We now report the partial characterization of a new antagonist selective for Ang-(1-7), D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7). D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7) (50 pmol) inhibited the hypertensive effect induced by microinjection of Ang-(1-7) [4+/-1 vs 21+/-2 mm Hg, 25 pmol Ang-(1-7) alone] into the rostral ventrolateral medulla without changing the effect of Ang II (16+/-2.5 vs 19+/-2.5 mm Hg after 25 pmol Ang II alone). At 10(-7) mol/L concentration, it completely blocked the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation produced by Ang-(1-7) (10(-10) to 10(-6) mol/L) in the mouse aorta. The antidiuresis produced by Ang-(1-7) (40 pmol/100 g body weight) in water-loaded rats was also blocked by its analog [1 microg/100 g body weight; 3.08+/-0.8 vs 1.27+/-0.33 mL in Ang-(1-7)-treated rats]. D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7) at a molar ratio of 40:1 did not change the hypotensive effect of bradykinin. Moreover, D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7) did not affect the dipsogenic effect produced by intracerebroventricular administration of Ang II (11.4+/-1.15 vs 8.8+/-1.2 mL/h after Ang II) and did not show any demonstrable angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity in assays with the synthetic substrate Hip-His-Leu and rat plasma as a source of enzyme. Autoradiography studies with 125I-Ang-(1-7) in mouse kidney slices showed that D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7) competed for the binding of Ang-(1-7) to the cortical supramedullary region. In Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the AT1 receptor subtype, D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7) did not compete for the specific binding of 125I-Ang-II in concentrations up to 10(-6) mol/L. There was also no significant displacement of Ang II binding to angiotensin type 2 receptors in membrane preparations of adrenal medulla. These data indicate that D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7) is a selective antagonist for Ang-(1

  15. Pressor responsiveness to angiotensin II in female mice is enhanced with age: role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pressor response to angiotensin II (AngII) is attenuated in adult females as compared to males via an angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R)-dependent pathway. We hypothesized that adult female mice are protected against AngII-induced hypertension via an enhanced AT2R-mediated pathway and that in reproductively senescent females this pathway is no longer operative. Methods Mean arterial pressure was measured via telemetry in 4-month-old (adult) and 16-month-old (aged) and aged ovariectomized (aged-OVX) wild-type and AT2R knockout (AT2R-KO) female mice during baseline and 14-day infusion of vehicle (saline) or AngII (600 ng/kg/min s.c.). Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine renal gene expression of angiotensin receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in response to 14-day treatment with vehicle or AngII. Results Basal mean arterial pressure was similar between the groups. The pressor response to AngII was augmented in adult AT2R-KO compared to adult wild-type mice (29 ± 3 mmHg versus 10 ± 4 mmHg, respectively, on day 14 as compared to basal mean arterial pressure, P = 0.002). In wild-type mice, pressor responsiveness to AngII was augmented with age, such that the pressor response to AngII was similar between aged AT2R-KO and wild-type female mice (31 ± 4 mmHg versus 34 ± 3 mmHg, respectively, on day 14, P = 0.9). There were no significant differences in pressor responsiveness to AngII between aged and aged-OVX mice. Vehicle-treated aged wild-type mice had a lower renal AT2R/AT1R balance as compared to adult counterparts. In response to AngII, the renal AT2R/AT1R balance in aged wild-type females was greater than that observed in vehicle-treated aged wild-type females and adult wild-type females, yet the protective effects of AT2R activation were not restored. Conclusions The protective role of the AT2R depressor pathway is lost with age in female mice. Therefore

  16. Combined Angiotensin Receptor Antagonism and Neprilysin Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Hubers, Scott A.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure affects approximately 5.7 million people in the United States alone. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, and aldosterone antagonists have improved mortality in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, but mortality remains high. In July 2015, the FDA approved the first of a new class of drugs for the treatment of heart failure; valsartan/sacubitril (formerly known as LCZ696 and currently marketed by Novartis as Entresto) combines the angiotensin receptor blocker valsartan and the neprilysin inhibitor prodrug sacubitril in a 1:1 ratio in a sodium supramolecular complex. Sacubitril is converted by esterases to LBQ657, which inhibits neprilysin, the enzyme responsible for the degradation of the natriuretic peptides and many other vasoactive peptides. Thus, this combined angiotensin receptor antagonist and neprilysin inhibitor addresses two of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of heart failure - activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and decreased sensitivity to natriuretic peptides. In the Prospective comparison of ARNI with ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) trial, valsartan/sacubitril significantly reduced mortality and hospitalization for heart failure, as well as blood pressure, compared to enalapril in patients with heart failure, reduced ejection fraction, and an elevated circulating level of brain natriuretic peptide or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the role of valsartan/sacubitril in the treatment of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and hypertension. We review here the mechanisms of action of valsartan/sacubitril, the pharmacologic properties of the drug, and its efficacy and safety in the treatment of heart failure and hypertension. PMID:26976916

  17. Combined Angiotensin Receptor Antagonism and Neprilysin Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hubers, Scott A; Brown, Nancy J

    2016-03-15

    Heart failure affects ≈5.7 million people in the United States alone. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, β-blockers, and aldosterone antagonists have improved mortality in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, but mortality remains high. In July 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the first of a new class of drugs for the treatment of heart failure: Valsartan/sacubitril (formerly known as LCZ696 and currently marketed by Novartis as Entresto) combines the angiotensin receptor blocker valsartan and the neprilysin inhibitor prodrug sacubitril in a 1:1 ratio in a sodium supramolecular complex. Sacubitril is converted by esterases to LBQ657, which inhibits neprilysin, the enzyme responsible for the degradation of the natriuretic peptides and many other vasoactive peptides. Thus, this combined angiotensin receptor antagonist and neprilysin inhibitor addresses 2 of the pathophysiological mechanisms of heart failure: activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and decreased sensitivity to natriuretic peptides. In the Prospective Comparison of ARNI With ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) trial, valsartan/sacubitril significantly reduced mortality and hospitalization for heart failure, as well as blood pressure, compared with enalapril in patients with heart failure, reduced ejection fraction, and an elevated circulating level of brain natriuretic peptide or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the role of valsartan/sacubitril in the treatment of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and hypertension. We review here the mechanisms of action of valsartan/sacubitril, the pharmacological properties of the drug, and its efficacy and safety in the treatment of heart failure and hypertension.

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Silencing Blunts the Slow Force Response to Myocardial Stretch.

    PubMed

    Brea, María S; Díaz, Romina G; Escudero, Daiana S; Caldiz, Claudia I; Portiansky, Enrique L; Morgan, Patricio E; Pérez, Néstor G

    2016-10-15

    Myocardial stretch increases force biphasically: the Frank-Starling mechanism followed by the slow force response (SFR). Based on pharmacological strategies, we proposed that epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR or ErbB1) activation is crucial for SFR development. Pharmacological inhibitors could block ErbB4, a member of the ErbB family present in the adult heart. We aimed to specifically test the role of EGFR activation after stretch, with an interference RNA incorporated into a lentiviral vector (small hairpin RNA [shRNA]-EGFR). Silencing capability of p-shEGFR was assessed in EGFR-GFP transiently transfected HEK293T cells. Four weeks after lentivirus injection into the left ventricular wall of Wistar rats, shRNA-EGFR-injected hearts showed ≈60% reduction of EGFR protein expression compared with shRNA-SCR-injected hearts. ErbB2 and ErbB4 expression did not change. The SFR to stretch evaluated in isolated papillary muscles was ≈130% of initial rapid phase in the shRNA-SCR group, while it was blunted in shRNA-EGFR-expressing muscles. Angiotensin II (Ang II)-dependent Na+/H+ exchanger 1 activation was indirectly evaluated by intracellular pH measurements in bicarbonate-free medium, demonstrating an increase in shRNA-SCR-injected myocardium, an effect not observed in the silenced group. Ang II- or EGF-triggered reactive oxygen species production was significantly reduced in shRNA-EGFR-injected hearts compared with that in the shRNA-SCR group. Chronic lentivirus treatment affected neither the myocardial basal redox state (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) nor NADPH oxidase activity or expression. Finally, Ang II or EGF triggered a redox-sensitive pathway, leading to p90RSK activation in shRNA-SCR-injected myocardium, an effect that was absent in the shRNA-EGFR group. Our results provide evidence that specific EGFR activation after myocardial stretch is a key factor in promoting the redox-sensitive kinase activation pathway, leading to SFR

  19. Myocardial T1 Mapping: Techniques and Potential Applications

    PubMed Central

    Burt, Jeremy R.; Zimmerman, Stefan L.; Kamel, Ihab R.; Halushka, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial fibrosis is a common endpoint in a variety of cardiac diseases and a major independent predictor of adverse cardiac outcomes. Short of histopathologic analysis, which is limited by sampling bias, most diagnostic modalities are limited in their depiction of myocardial fibrosis. Cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has the advantage of providing detailed soft-tissue characterization, and a variety of novel quantification methods have further improved its usefulness. Contrast material–enhanced cardiac MR imaging depends on differences in signal intensity between regions of scarring and adjacent normal myocardium. Diffuse myocardial fibrosis lacks these differences in signal intensity. Measurement of myocardial T1 times (T1 mapping) with gadolinium-enhanced inversion recovery–prepared sequences may depict diffuse myocardial fibrosis and has good correlation with ex vivo fibrosis content. T1 mapping calculates myocardial T1 relaxation times with image-based signal intensities and may be performed with standard cardiac MR imagers and radiologic workstations. Myocardium with diffuse fibrosis has greater retention of contrast material, resulting in T1 times that are shorter than those in normal myocardium. Early studies have suggested that diffuse myocardial fibrosis may be distinguished from normal myocardium with T1 mapping. Large multicenter studies are needed to define the role of T1 mapping in developing prognoses and therapeutic assessments. However, given its strengths as a noninvasive method for direct quantification of myocardial fibrosis, T1 mapping may eventually play an important role in the management of cardiac disease. © RSNA, 2014 PMID:24617686

  20. Hypertrophic response to hemodynamic overload: role of load vs. renin-angiotensin system activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koide, M.; Carabello, B. A.; Conrad, C. C.; Buckley, J. M.; DeFreyte, G.; Barnes, M.; Tomanek, R. J.; Wei, C. C.; Dell'Italia, L. J.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1999-01-01

    Myocardial hypertrophy is one of the basic mechanisms by which the heart compensates for hemodynamic overload. The mechanisms by which hemodynamic overload is transduced by the cardiac muscle cell and translated into cardiac hypertrophy are not completely understood. Candidates include activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and angiotensin II receptor (AT1) stimulation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that load, independent of the RAS, is sufficient to stimulate cardiac growth. Four groups of cats were studied: 14 normal controls, 20 pulmonary artery-banded (PAB) cats, 7 PAB cats in whom the AT1 was concomitantly and continuously blocked with losartan, and 8 PAB cats in whom the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was concomitantly and continuously blocked with captopril. Losartan cats had at least a one-log order increase in the ED50 of the blood pressure response to angiotensin II infusion. Right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy was assessed using the RV mass-to-body weight ratio and ventricular cardiocyte size. RV hemodynamic overload was assessed by measuring RV systolic and diastolic pressures. Neither the extent of RV pressure overload nor RV hypertrophy that resulted from PAB was affected by AT1 blockade with losartan or ACE inhibition with captopril. RV systolic pressure was increased from 21 +/- 3 mmHg in normals to 68 +/- 4 mmHg in PAB, 65 +/- 5 mmHg in PAB plus losartan and 62 +/- 3 mmHg in PAB plus captopril. RV-to-body weight ratio increased from 0.52 +/- 0.04 g/kg in normals to 1.11 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB, 1.06 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB plus losartan and 1.06 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB plus captopril. Thus 1) pharmacological modulation of the RAS with losartan and captopril did not change the extent of the hemodynamic overload or the hypertrophic response induced by PAB; 2) neither RAS activation nor angiotensin II receptor stimulation is an obligatory and necessary component of the signaling pathway that acts as an intermediary coupling load to the

  1. Hypertrophic response to hemodynamic overload: role of load vs. renin-angiotensin system activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koide, M.; Carabello, B. A.; Conrad, C. C.; Buckley, J. M.; DeFreyte, G.; Barnes, M.; Tomanek, R. J.; Wei, C. C.; Dell'Italia, L. J.; Cooper, G. 4th; hide

    1999-01-01

    Myocardial hypertrophy is one of the basic mechanisms by which the heart compensates for hemodynamic overload. The mechanisms by which hemodynamic overload is transduced by the cardiac muscle cell and translated into cardiac hypertrophy are not completely understood. Candidates include activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and angiotensin II receptor (AT1) stimulation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that load, independent of the RAS, is sufficient to stimulate cardiac growth. Four groups of cats were studied: 14 normal controls, 20 pulmonary artery-banded (PAB) cats, 7 PAB cats in whom the AT1 was concomitantly and continuously blocked with losartan, and 8 PAB cats in whom the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was concomitantly and continuously blocked with captopril. Losartan cats had at least a one-log order increase in the ED50 of the blood pressure response to angiotensin II infusion. Right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy was assessed using the RV mass-to-body weight ratio and ventricular cardiocyte size. RV hemodynamic overload was assessed by measuring RV systolic and diastolic pressures. Neither the extent of RV pressure overload nor RV hypertrophy that resulted from PAB was affected by AT1 blockade with losartan or ACE inhibition with captopril. RV systolic pressure was increased from 21 +/- 3 mmHg in normals to 68 +/- 4 mmHg in PAB, 65 +/- 5 mmHg in PAB plus losartan and 62 +/- 3 mmHg in PAB plus captopril. RV-to-body weight ratio increased from 0.52 +/- 0.04 g/kg in normals to 1.11 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB, 1.06 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB plus losartan and 1.06 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB plus captopril. Thus 1) pharmacological modulation of the RAS with losartan and captopril did not change the extent of the hemodynamic overload or the hypertrophic response induced by PAB; 2) neither RAS activation nor angiotensin II receptor stimulation is an obligatory and necessary component of the signaling pathway that acts as an intermediary coupling load to the

  2. Effects of captopril on the human foetal placental circulation: an interaction with bradykinin and angiotensin I.

    PubMed Central

    de Moura, R; Lopes, M A

    1995-01-01

    1. The mechanism underlying the foetal toxicity induced by captopril is not well understood. Since bradykinin and angiotensin II appear to be important in the regulation of the placental circulation, experiments were performed to assess the effects of captopril on the vascular actions of these peptides on the human foetal placental circulation. 2. Full-term human placentas, obtained from normal pregnancy, were perfused with a modified Tyrode solution bubbled with O2 using a pulsatile pump. The placental perfusion pressure was measured with a Statham pressure transducer and recorded continuously on a Hewlett-Packard polygraph. 3. Bradykinin (0.1, 0.3 and 1.0 nmol) injected into the placental arterial circulation produced an increase in placental perfusion pressure in all experiments. This effect of bradykinin was significantly inhibited by indomethacin (3 x 10(-7) M). 4. Captopril (10(-7) M) significantly potentiated the pressor effect of bradykinin on the human placental circulation (n = 6). This effect of captopril was reversed by indomethacin (3 x 10(-7) M). 5. Angiotensin I (n = 6) and angiotensin II (n = 6), injected into the placental arterial circulation, both produced dose-dependent increases in placental perfusion pressure. The dose-response curves to angiotensin I (n = 6) were significantly displaced to the right by captopril in a concentration-dependent manner. 6. We suggest that the toxic effects of captopril on the foetus, rather than reflecting an inhibition of angiotensin II formation, may instead be related to a potentiation of the vasoconstrictor effect of bradykinin on the foetal placental circulation, thereby reducing blood flow and causing foetal damage. The reasons for this are discussed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7669485

  3. Quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Tsui, B M; Frey, E C; LaCroix, K J; Lalush, D S; McCartney, W H; King, M A; Gullberg, G T

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the clinical application of attenuation compensation to myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with the promise that accurate quantitative images can be obtained to improve clinical diagnoses. The different attenuation compensation methods that are available create confusion and some misconceptions. Also, attenuation-compensated images reveal other image-degrading effects including collimator-detector blurring and scatter that are not apparent in uncompensated images. This article presents basic concepts of the major factors that degrade the quality and quantitative accuracy of myocardial perfusion SPECT images, and includes a discussion of the various image reconstruction and compensation methods and misconceptions and pitfalls in implementation. The differences between the various compensation methods and their performance are demonstrated. Particular emphasis is directed to an approach that promises to provide quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT images by accurately compensating for the 3-dimensional (3-D) attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter effects. With advances in the computer hardware and optimized implementation techniques, quantitatively accurate and high-quality myocardial perfusion SPECT images can be obtained in clinically acceptable processing time. Examples from simulation, phantom, and patient studies are used to demonstrate the various aspects of the investigation. We conclude that quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT, which holds great promise to improve clinical diagnosis, is an achievable goal in the near future.

  4. RGS4 inhibits angiotensin II signaling and macrophage localization during renal reperfusion injury independent of vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Paul; Jin, Xiaohua; Proctor, Brandon M.; Farley, Michelle; Roy, Nilay; Chin, Matthew S.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Vollmann, Elisabeth; Perro, Mario; Hoffman, Ryan J.; Chung, Joseph; Chauhan, Nikita; Mistri, Murti; Muslin, Anthony J.; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Siedlecki, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is a major contributor to the severity of acute kidney injury. In the context of vasospasm-independent reperfusion injury we studied the potential anti-inflammatory role of the Gα-related RGS protein, RGS4. Transgenic RGS4 mice were resistant to 25 minute injury, although post-ischemic renal arteriolar diameter was equal to the wild type early after injury. A 10 minute unilateral injury was performed to study reperfusion without vasospasm. Eighteen hours after injury blood flow was decreased in the inner cortex of wild type mice with preservation of tubular architecture. Angiotensin II levels in the kidneys of wild type and transgenic mice were elevated in a sub-vasoconstrictive range 12 and 18 hours after injury. Angiotensin II stimulated pre-glomerular vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) to secrete the macrophage chemoattractant, RANTES; a process decreased by angiotensin II R2 (AT2) inhibition. However, RANTES increased when RGS4 expression was suppressed implicating Gα protein activation in an AT2-RGS4-dependent pathway. RGS4 function, specific to VSMC, was tested in a conditional VSMC-specific RGS4 knockout showing high macrophage density by T2 MRI compared to transgenic and non-transgenic mice after the 10 minute injury. Arteriolar diameter of this knockout was unchanged at successive time points after injury. Thus, RGS4 expression, specific to renal VSMC, inhibits angiotensin II-mediated cytokine signaling and macrophage recruitment during reperfusion, distinct from vasomotor regulation. PMID:25469849

  5. Dopamine and Angiotensin Type 2 Receptors Cooperatively Inhibit Sodium Transport in Human Renal Proximal Tubule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gildea, John J.; Wang, Xiaoli; Shah, Neema; Tran, Hanh; Spinosa, Michael; Van Sciver, Robert; Sasaki, Midori; Yatabe, Junichi; Carey, Robert M.; Jose, Pedro A.; Felder, Robin A.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known regarding how the kidney shifts from a sodium and water reclaiming state (antinatriuresis) to a state where sodium and water are eliminated (natriuresis). In human renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs), sodium reabsorption is decreased by the dopamine D1-like receptors (D1R/D5R) and the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R), while the angiotensin type 1 receptor increases sodium reabsorption. Aberrant control of these opposing systems is thought to lead to sodium retention and subsequently hypertension. We show that D1R/D5R stimulation increased plasma membrane AT2R 4-fold via a D1R-mediated, cAMP-coupled, and PP2A-dependent specific signaling pathway. D1R/D5R stimulation also reduced the ability of angiotensin II to stimulate phospho-ERK, an effect that was partially reversed by an AT2R antagonist. Fenoldopam did not increase AT2R recruitment in RPTCs with D1Rs uncoupled from adenylyl cyclase, suggesting a role of cAMP in mediating these events. D1Rs and AT2Rs heterodimerized and cooperatively increased cAMP and cGMP production, PP2A activation, sodium-potassium-ATPase internalization and sodium transport inhibition. These studies shed new light on the regulation of renal sodium transport by the dopaminergic and angiotensin systems and potential new therapeutic targets for selectively treating hypertension. PMID:22710646

  6. Dopamine and angiotensin type 2 receptors cooperatively inhibit sodium transport in human renal proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Gildea, John J; Wang, Xiaoli; Shah, Neema; Tran, Hanh; Spinosa, Michael; Van Sciver, Robert; Sasaki, Midori; Yatabe, Junichi; Carey, Robert M; Jose, Pedro A; Felder, Robin A

    2012-08-01

    Little is known regarding how the kidney shifts from a sodium and water reclaiming state (antinatriuresis) to a state where sodium and water are eliminated (natriuresis). In human renal proximal tubule cells, sodium reabsorption is decreased by the dopamine D(1)-like receptors (D(1)R/D(5)R) and the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT(2)R), whereas the angiotensin type 1 receptor increases sodium reabsorption. Aberrant control of these opposing systems is thought to lead to sodium retention and, subsequently, hypertension. We show that D(1)R/D(5)R stimulation increased plasma membrane AT(2)R 4-fold via a D(1)R-mediated, cAMP-coupled, and protein phosphatase 2A-dependent specific signaling pathway. D(1)R/D(5)R stimulation also reduced the ability of angiotensin II to stimulate phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase, an effect that was partially reversed by an AT(2)R antagonist. Fenoldopam did not increase AT(2)R recruitment in renal proximal tubule cells with D(1)Rs uncoupled from adenylyl cyclase, suggesting a role of cAMP in mediating these events. D(1)Rs and AT(2)Rs heterodimerized and cooperatively increased cAMP and cGMP production, protein phosphatase 2A activation, sodium-potassium-ATPase internalization, and sodium transport inhibition. These studies shed new light on the regulation of renal sodium transport by the dopaminergic and angiotensin systems and potential new therapeutic targets for selectively treating hypertension.

  7. Angiotensin II, sympathetic nerve activity and chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Seto, Sai-Wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity has been reported to be increased in both humans and animals with chronic heart failure. One of the mechanisms believed to be responsible for this phenomenon is increased systemic and cerebral angiotensin II signaling. Plasma angiotensin II is increased in humans and animals with chronic heart failure. The increase in angiotensin II signaling enhances sympathetic nerve activity through actions on both central and peripheral sites during chronic heart failure. Angiotensin II signaling is enhanced in different brain sites such as the paraventricular nucleus, the rostral ventrolateral medulla and the area postrema. Blocking angiotensin II type 1 receptors decreases sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex when therapy is administered to the paraventricular nucleus. Injection of an angiotensin receptor blocker into the area postrema activates the sympathoinhibitory barorefle