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Sample records for dependent viscosity flowing

  1. Viscosity and density dependence during maximal flow in man.

    PubMed

    Staats, B A; Wilson, T A; Lai-Fook, S J; Rodarte, J R; Hyatt, R E

    1980-02-01

    Maximal expiratory flow curves were obtained from ten healthy subjects white breathing air and three other gas mixtures with different densities and viscosities. From these data, the magnitudes of the dependence of maximal flow on gas density and viscosity were obtained. The scaling laws of fluid mechanics, together with a model for the flow-limiting mechanism, were used to obtain a prediction of the relationship between the density dependence and the viscosity dependence of maximal flow. Although the data for individual subjects were too variable to allow a precise comparison with this prediction, the relationship between the mean density dependence and the mean viscosity dependence of all usbjects agreed with the theoretic prediction. This agreement supports the assumption, which is frequently made, that flow resistance rather than tissue visoelasticity is the dominant contributor to peripheral resistance. Information on the relationships between the pressure drop to the flow-limiting segment and flow, gas density and viscosity, and lung volume were also obtained.

  2. Pressure-dependent surface viscosity and its surprising consequences in interfacial lubrication flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikantan, Harishankar; Squires, Todd M.

    2017-02-01

    The surface shear rheology of many insoluble surfactants depends strongly on the surface pressure (or concentration) of that surfactant. Here we highlight the dramatic consequences that surface-pressure-dependent surface viscosities have on interfacially dominant flows, by considering lubrication-style geometries within high Boussinesq (Bo) number flows. As with three-dimensional lubrication, high-Bo surfactant flows through thin gaps give high surface pressures, which in turn increase the local surface viscosity, further amplifying lubrication stresses and surface pressures. Despite their strong nonlinearity, the governing equations are separable, so that results from two-dimensional Newtonian lubrication analyses may be immediately adapted to treat surfactant monolayers with a general functional form of ηs(Π ) . Three paradigmatic systems are analyzed to reveal qualitatively new features: a maximum, self-limiting value for surfactant fluxes and particle migration velocities appears for Π -thickening surfactants, and kinematic reversibility is broken for the journal bearing and for suspensions more generally.

  3. Pressure-dependent surface viscosity and its surprising consequences in interfacial flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikantan, Harishankar; Squires, Todd

    2016-11-01

    The surface shear viscosity of a surfactant monolayer almost always depends strongly on surface pressure, and this oft-ignored rheological feature significantly alters fluid flow and dynamics of particles on the interface. In order to illustrate the qualitatively new phenomena that arise out of pressure-dependent rheology, we focus here on a series of analytically tractable yet paradigmatic examples of lubrication geometries. Thin-gap flows naturally amplify pressure changes, and thus exemplify the effects of pressure-dependent viscosity. We show that much of the mathematical machinery from Newtonian lubrication analyses can be modified in a relatively straightforward manner in such systems. Our analysis reveals novel features such as a self-limiting flux when a surfactant is pumped through a narrow channel, a maximum approach velocity in squeeze flows due to divergent inter-particle forces, and forces perpendicular to the direction of motion that breaks symmetries associated with Newtonian analogs. We discuss the broader implications of these phenomena, especially with regard to interfacial suspension mechanics for which these lubrication geometries provide a convenient limit.

  4. Thin film flow in MHD third grade fluid on a vertical belt with temperature dependent viscosity.

    PubMed

    Gul, Taza; Islam, Saed; Shah, Rehan Ali; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have carried out the influence of temperature dependent viscosity on thin film flow of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) third grade fluid past a vertical belt. The governing coupled non-linear differential equations with appropriate boundary conditions are solved analytically by using Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM). In order to make comparison, the governing problem has also been solved by using Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM). The physical characteristics of the problem have been well discussed in graphs for several parameter of interest.

  5. Viscosity-dependent protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Ilya J; Massari, Aaron M; Fayer, M D

    2007-05-15

    Spectrally resolved stimulated vibrational echo spectroscopy is used to investigate the dependence of fast protein dynamics on bulk solution viscosity at room temperature in four heme proteins: hemoglobin, myoglobin, a myoglobin mutant with the distal histidine replaced by a valine (H64V), and a cytochrome c552 mutant with the distal methionine replaced by an alanine (M61A). Fructose is added to increase the viscosity of the aqueous protein solutions over many orders of magnitude. The fast dynamics of the four globular proteins were found to be sensitive to solution viscosity and asymptotically approached the dynamical behavior that was previously observed in room temperature sugar glasses. The viscosity-dependent protein dynamics are analyzed in the context of a viscoelastic relaxation model that treats the protein as a deformable breathing sphere. The viscoelastic model is in qualitative agreement with the experimental data but does not capture sufficient system detail to offer a quantitative description of the underlying fluctuation amplitudes and relaxation rates. A calibration method based on the near-infrared spectrum of water overtones was constructed to accurately determine the viscosity of small volumes of protein solutions.

  6. The Viscosity-Temperature-Dependence of Liquids,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The viscosity-temperature- dependence of liquids of different types can be represented by the formula lg kinematic viscosity = A/T to the x power + B...if A has a constant value, only one viscosity measurement at one temperature is necessary for the characterization of the viscosity-temperature- dependence . Examples for each different case are given. (Author)

  7. Neoclassical Viscosities and Anomalous Flows in Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, A. S.; Spong, D. A.; Breyfogle, M.; Marine, T.

    2009-05-01

    We present initial work to use neoclassical viscosities calculated with the PENTA code [1] in a transport model that includes Reynolds stress generation of flows [2]. The PENTA code uses a drift kinetic equation solver to calculate neoclassical viscosities and flows in general three-dimensional geometries over a range of collisionalities. The predicted neoclassical viscosities predicted by PENTA can be flux-surfaced average and applied in a 1-D transport model that includes anomalous flow generation. This combination of codes can be used to test the impact of stellarator geometry on anomalous flow generation. As a test case, we apply the code to modeling flows in the HSX stellarator. Due to variations in the neoclassical viscosities, HSX can have strong neoclassical flows in the core region. In turn, these neoclassical flows can provide a seed for anomalous flow generation. [1] D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005). [2] D. E. Newman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 938 (1998).

  8. RETRACTION: Unsteady flow and heat transfer of viscous incompressible fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity due to a rotating disc in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, H. A.

    2007-04-01

    It has come to the attention of the Institute of Physics that this article should not have been submitted for publication owing to its plagiarism of an earlier paper (Hossain A, Hossain M A and Wilson M 2001 Unsteady flow of viscous incompressible fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity due to a rotating disc in presence of transverse magnetic field and heat transfer Int. J. Therm. Sci. 40 11-20). Therefore this article has been retracted by the Institute of Physics and by the author, Hazem Ali Attia.

  9. Neoclassical Viscosities and Anomalous Flows in Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, A. S.; Spong, D. A.

    2008-11-01

    We discuss initial work to use neoclassical viscosities calculated with the PENTA code [1,2] in a transport model that includes Reynolds stress generation of flows [3]. The PENTA code uses a drift kinetic equation solver to calculate neoclassical viscosities and flows in general three-dimensional geometries over a range of collisionalities. The predicted neoclassical viscosities predicted by PENTA can be flux-surfaced average and applied in a 1-D transport model that includes anomalous flow generation. This combination of codes can be used to test the impact of stellarator geometry on anomalous flow generation. [1] D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005). [2] D. A. Spong, Fusion Sci. Technology 50, 343 (2006). [3] D. E. Newman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 938 (1998).

  10. Numerical simulation of peristaltic flow of a biorheological fluid with shear-dependent viscosity in a curved channel.

    PubMed

    Ali, N; Javid, K; Sajid, M; Anwar Bég, O

    2016-01-01

    Peristaltic motion of a non-Newtonian Carreau fluid is analyzed in a curved channel under the long wavelength and low Reynolds number assumptions, as a simulation of digestive transport. The flow regime is shown to be governed by a dimensionless fourth-order, nonlinear, ordinary differential equation subject to no-slip wall boundary conditions. A well-tested finite difference method based on an iterative scheme is employed for the solution of the boundary value problem. The important phenomena of pumping and trapping associated with the peristaltic motion are investigated for various values of rheological parameters of Carreau fluid and curvature of the channel. An increase in Weissenberg number is found to generate a small eddy in the vicinity of the lower wall of the channel, which is enhanced with further increase in Weissenberg number. For shear-thinning bio-fluids (power-law rheological index, n < 1) greater Weissenberg number displaces the maximum velocity toward the upper wall. For shear-thickening bio-fluids, the velocity amplitude is enhanced markedly with increasing Weissenberg number.

  11. Molecular rotors--fluorescent biosensors for viscosity and flow.

    PubMed

    Haidekker, Mark A; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A

    2007-06-07

    Viscosity is a measure of the resistance of a fluid against gradients in flow (shear rate). Both flow and viscosity play an important role in all biological systems from the microscopic (e.g., cellular) to the systemic level. Many methods to measure viscosity and flow have drawbacks, such as the tedious and time-consuming measurement process, expensive instrumentation, or the restriction to bulk sample sizes. Fluorescent environment-sensitive dyes are known to show high sensitivity and high spatial and temporal resolution. Molecular rotors are a group of fluorescent molecules that form twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) states upon photoexcitation and therefore exhibit two competing deexcitation pathways: fluorescence emission and non-radiative deexcitation from the TICT state. Since TICT formation is viscosity-dependent, the emission intensity of molecular rotors depends on the solvent's viscosity. Furthermore, shear-stress dependency of the emission intensity was recently described. Although the photophysical processes are widely explored, the practical application of molecular rotors as sensors for viscosity and the fluid flow introduce additional challenges. Intensity-based measurements are influenced by fluid optical properties and dye concentration, and solvent-dye interaction requires calibration of the measurement system to a specific solvent. Ratiometric dyes and measurement systems help solve these challenges. In addition, the combination of molecular rotors with specific recognition groups allows them to target specific sites, for example the cell membrane or cytoplasm. Molecular rotors are therefore emerging as new biosensors for both bulk and local microviscosity, and for flow and fluid shear stress on a microscopic scale and with real-time response.

  12. Viscosity stratified fluids in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldati, Alfredo; Ahmadi, Somayeh; Roccon, Alessio; Zonta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) is used to study the turbulent Poiseuille flow of two immiscible liquid layers inside a rectangular channel. A thin liquid layer (fluid 1) flows on top of a thick liquid layer (fluid 2), such that their thickness ratio is h1 /h2 = 1 / 9 . The two liquid layers have the same density but different viscosities (viscosity-stratified fluids). In particular, we consider three different values of the viscosity ratio λ =ν1 /ν2 : λ = 1 , λ = 0 . 875 and λ = 0 . 75 . Numerical Simulations are based on a Phase Field method to describe the interaction between the two liquid layers. Compared with the case of a single phase flow, the presence of a liquid-liquid interface produces a remarkable turbulence modulation inside the channel, since a significant proportion of the kinetic energy is subtracted from the mean flow and converted into work to deform the interface. This induces a strong turbulence reduction in the proximity of the interface and causes a substantial increase of the volume-flowrate. These effects become more pronounced with decreasing λ.

  13. Empirical slip and viscosity model performance for microscale gas flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Boyd, Iain D.; McNenly, Matthew J.

    2004-07-01

    For the simple geometries of Couette and Poiseuille flows, the velocity profile maintains a similar shape from continuum to free molecular flow. Therefore, modifications to the fluid viscosity and slip boundary conditions can improve the continuum based Navier-Stokes solution in the non-continuum non-equilibrium regime. In this investigation, the optimal modifications are found by a linear least-squares fit of the Navier-Stokes solution to the non-equilibrium solution obtained using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Models are then constructed for the Knudsen number dependence of the viscosity correction and the slip model from a database of DSMC solutions for Couette and Poiseuille flows of argon and nitrogen gas, with Knudsen numbers ranging from 0.01 to 10. Finally, the accuracy of the models is measured for non-equilibrium cases both in and outside the DSMC database. Flows outside the database include: combined Couette and Poiseuille flow, partial wall accommodation, helium gas, and non-zero convective acceleration. The models reproduce the velocity profiles in the DSMC database within an L{sub 2} error norm of 3% for Couette flows and 7% for Poiseuille flows. However, the errors in the model predictions outside the database are up to five times larger.

  14. Probing equilibrium glass flow up to exapoise viscosities.

    PubMed

    Pogna, Eva Arianna Aurelia; Rodríguez-Tinoco, Cristian; Cerullo, Giulio; Ferrante, Carino; Rodríguez-Viejo, Javier; Scopigno, Tullio

    2015-02-24

    Glasses are out-of-equilibrium systems aging under the crystallization threat. During ordinary glass formation, the atomic diffusion slows down, rendering its experimental investigation impractically long, to the extent that a timescale divergence is taken for granted by many. We circumvent these limitations here, taking advantage of a wide family of glasses rapidly obtained by physical vapor deposition directly into the solid state, endowed with different "ages" rivaling those reached by standard cooling and waiting for millennia. Isothermally probing the mechanical response of each of these glasses, we infer a correspondence with viscosity along the equilibrium line, up to exapoise values. We find a dependence of the elastic modulus on the glass age, which, traced back to the temperature steepness index of the viscosity, tears down one of the cornerstones of several glass transition theories: the dynamical divergence. Critically, our results suggest that the conventional wisdom picture of a glass ceasing to flow at finite temperature could be wrong.

  15. The Temperature Dependence of the Viscosity of Simple Liquids,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The purpose of the work is investigation of the temperature dependence of the viscosity of simple liquids on the basis of the molecular-kinetic...theory. In literature there is vast experimental material on the investigation of the viscosity of liquids and its temperature dependence both based on the

  16. Mantle viscosity stratification and flow geometry - Implications for surface motions on earth and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.

    1993-01-01

    For a fixed heat flow, the surface flow velocity of a convecting layer is not strongly sensitive to the variation of viscosity as a function of depth. Thus, the inferred absence of a low viscosity asthenosphere on Venus can not account for the limited surface motions there. The surface velocity is dependent on the convective geometry. Cartesian geometry convection can produce large surface velocities if the high viscosity surface layer is broken in places by weak zones. On the other hand, a high viscosity surface layer may inhibit the development of large surface velocities in axisymmetric convection.

  17. Self-similarity criteria in anisotropic flows with viscosity stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danaila, L.; Voivenel, L.; Varea, E.

    2017-02-01

    Variable-viscosity flows exhibit a faster trend towards a fully developed turbulent state since fluctuations are produced at a larger amount. A legitimate expectation is that self-similarity to be tenable earlier than in classical, single-viscosity flows. The question which begs to be answered is: which are the self-similarity criteria for variable-viscosity, density-matched, flows? The similarity assumption, i.e., all scales evolve in a similar fashion in space/time, is applied to the transport equation for one- and two-point statistics of anisotropic, variable-viscosity flows. It is shown that the similarity assumption is valid for regions of the flow where viscosity (mean values and the fluctuations root-mean-square) is uniform. In regions where viscosity gradients are important, such as the sheared region and jet boundaries, similarity is not tenable. Our claims are applicable to any decaying flow, isotropic or anisotropic. Support is provided by experimental data obtained in the near field region of a jet issuing into a more viscous environment. The viscosity ratio is 3.5.

  18. Poiseuille flow to measure the viscosity of particle model fluids.

    PubMed

    Backer, J A; Lowe, C P; Hoefsloot, H C J; Iedema, P D

    2005-04-15

    The most important property of a fluid is its viscosity, it determines the flow properties. If one simulates a fluid using a particle model, calculating the viscosity accurately is difficult because it is a collective property. In this article we describe a new method that has a better signal to noise ratio than existing methods. It is based on using periodic boundary conditions to simulate counter-flowing Poiseuille flows without the use of explicit boundaries. The viscosity is then related to the mean flow velocity of the two flows. We apply the method to two quite different systems. First, a simple generic fluid model, dissipative particle dynamics, for which accurate values of the viscosity are needed to characterize the model fluid. Second, the more realistic Lennard-Jones fluid. In both cases the values we calculated are consistent with previous work but, for a given simulation time, they are more accurate than those obtained with other methods.

  19. Influence of shear viscosity of quark-gluon plasma on elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Niemi, H; Denicol, G S; Huovinen, P; Molnár, E; Rischke, D H

    2011-05-27

    We investigate the influence of a temperature-dependent shear viscosity over entropy density ratio η/s on the transverse momentum spectra and elliptic flow of hadrons in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We find that the elliptic flow in √S(NN)=200  GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC is dominated by the viscosity in the hadronic phase and in the phase transition region, but largely insensitive to the viscosity of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). At the highest LHC energy, the elliptic flow becomes sensitive to the QGP viscosity and insensitive to the hadronic viscosity.

  20. Global strong solution to compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density dependent viscosity and temperature dependent heat conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ran; Guo, Ai; Zhu, Changjiang

    2017-04-01

    We obtain existence and uniqueness of global strong solution to one-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations for ideal polytropic gas flow, with density dependent viscosity and temperature dependent heat conductivity under stress-free and thermally insulated boundary conditions. Here we assume viscosity coefficient μ (ρ) = 1 +ρα and heat conductivity coefficient κ (θ) =θβ for all α ∈ [ 0 , ∞) and β ∈ (0 , + ∞).

  1. Torque Transient of Magnetically Drive Flow for Viscosity Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ban, Heng; Li, Chao; Su, Ching-Hua; Lin, Bochuan; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2004-01-01

    Viscosity is a good indicator of structural changes for complex liquids, such as semiconductor melts with chain or ring structures. This paper discusses the theoretical and experimental results of the transient torque technique for non-intrusive viscosity measurement. Such a technique is essential for the high temperature viscosity measurement of high pressure and toxic semiconductor melts. In this paper, our previous work on oscillating cup technique was expanded to the transient process of a magnetically driven melt flow in a damped oscillation system. Based on the analytical solution for the fluid flow and cup oscillation, a semi-empirical model was established to extract the fluid viscosity. The analytical and experimental results indicated that such a technique has the advantage of short measurement time and straight forward data analysis procedures

  2. Probing equilibrium glass flow up to exapoise viscosities

    PubMed Central

    Pogna, Eva Arianna Aurelia; Rodríguez-Tinoco, Cristian; Cerullo, Giulio; Ferrante, Carino; Rodríguez-Viejo, Javier; Scopigno, Tullio

    2015-01-01

    Glasses are out-of-equilibrium systems aging under the crystallization threat. During ordinary glass formation, the atomic diffusion slows down, rendering its experimental investigation impractically long, to the extent that a timescale divergence is taken for granted by many. We circumvent these limitations here, taking advantage of a wide family of glasses rapidly obtained by physical vapor deposition directly into the solid state, endowed with different “ages” rivaling those reached by standard cooling and waiting for millennia. Isothermally probing the mechanical response of each of these glasses, we infer a correspondence with viscosity along the equilibrium line, up to exapoise values. We find a dependence of the elastic modulus on the glass age, which, traced back to the temperature steepness index of the viscosity, tears down one of the cornerstones of several glass transition theories: the dynamical divergence. Critically, our results suggest that the conventional wisdom picture of a glass ceasing to flow at finite temperature could be wrong. PMID:25675511

  3. Prediction of Anomalous Blood Viscosity in Confined Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiébaud, Marine; Shen, Zaiyi; Harting, Jens; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2014-06-01

    Red blood cells play a major role in body metabolism by supplying oxygen from the microvasculature to different organs and tissues. Understanding blood flow properties in microcirculation is an essential step towards elucidating fundamental and practical issues. Numerical simulations of a blood model under a confined linear shear flow reveal that confinement markedly modifies the properties of blood flow. A nontrivial spatiotemporal organization of blood elements is shown to trigger hitherto unrevealed flow properties regarding the viscosity η, namely ample oscillations of its normalized value [η]=(η-η0)/(η0ϕ) as a function of hematocrit ϕ (η0=solvent viscosity). A scaling law for the viscosity as a function of hematocrit and confinement is proposed. This finding can contribute to the conception of new strategies to efficiently detect blood disorders, via in vitro diagnosis based on confined blood rheology. It also constitutes a contribution for a fundamental understanding of rheology of confined complex fluids.

  4. Temperature Dependence of Viscosities of Common Carrier Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Trent S.; Nahir, Tal M.

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidence for the dependence of viscosities of the real gases on temperature is described, suggesting that this dependence is greater than that predicted by the kinetic theory of gases. The experimental results were obtained using common modern instrumentation and could be reproduced by students in analytical or…

  5. Temperature and pressure dependences of kimberlite melts viscosity (experimental-theoretical study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persikov, Eduard; Bykhtiyarov, Pavel; Cokol, Alexsander

    2016-04-01

    Experimental data on temperature and pressure dependences of viscosity of model kimberlite melts (silicate 82 + carbonate 18, wt. %, 100NBO/T = 313) have been obtained for the first time at 100 MPa of CO2 pressure and at the lithostatic pressures up to 7.5 GPa in the temperature range 1350 oC - 1950 oC using radiation high gas pressure apparatus and press free split-sphere multi - anvil apparatus (BARS). Experimental data obtained on temperature and pressure dependences of viscosity of model kimberlite melts at moderate and high pressures is compared with predicted data on these dependences of viscosity of basaltic melts (100NBO/T = 58) in the same T, P - range. Dependences of the viscosity of model kimberlite and basaltic melts on temperature are consistent to the exponential Arrenian equation in the T, P - range of experimental study. The correct values of activation energies of viscous flow of kimberlite melts have been obtained for the first time. The activation energies of viscous flow of model kimberlite melts exponentially increase with increasing pressure and are equal: E = 130 ± 1.3 kJ/mole at moderate pressure (P = 100 MPa) and E = 160 ± 1.6 kJ/mole at high pressure (P = 5.5 GPa). It has been established too that the viscosity of model kimberlite melts exponentially increases on about half order of magnitude with increasing pressures from 100 MPa to 7.5 GPa at the isothermal condition (1800 oC). It has been established that viscosity of model kimberlite melts at the moderate pressure (100 MPa) is lover on about one order of magnitude to compare with the viscosity of basaltic melts, but at high pressure range (5.5 - 7.5 GPa), on the contrary, is higher on about half order of magnitude at the same values of the temperatures. Here we use both a new experimental data on viscosity of kimberlite melts and our structural chemical model for calculation and prediction the viscosity of magmatic melts [1] to determine the fundamental features of viscosity of

  6. The Effect of Variable Viscosities on Micropolar Flow of Two Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, S.; Ahmed, Z.; Saleem, S.

    2016-12-01

    A study of nanofluids is carried out that reveals the effect of rotational inertia and other physical parameters on the heat transfer and fluid flow. Temperature-dependent dynamic viscosity makes the microrotation viscosity parameter and the micro inertia density variant as well. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by introducing suitable similarity transformations. These reduced nonlinear differential equations are then solved numerically by Keller-box method. The obtained numerical and graphical result discloses many interesting behaviour of nanofluids. It is seen that the temperature gradient decreases with the increase in viscosity parameter. Also, it is observed that with the fixed values of micropolar parameter and viscosity parameter, the velocity gradient near the wall increases with increasing values of solid particle volume fraction parameter. A suitable comparison of results is also presented in this study.

  7. NVP melt/magma viscosity: insight on Mercury lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Stefano; Morgavi, Daniele; Namur, Olivier; Vetere, Francesco; Perugini, Diego; Mancinelli, Paolo; Pauselli, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    After more than four years of orbiting Mercury, NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft came to an end in late April 2015. MESSENGER has provided many new and surprising results. This session will again highlight the latest results on Mercury based on MESSENGER observations or updated modelling. The session will further address instrument calibration and science performance both retrospective on MESSENGER and on the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission. Papers covering additional themes related to Mercury are also welcomed. Please be aware that this session will be held as a PICO session. This will allow an intensive exchange of expertise and experience between the individual instruments and mission. NVP melt/magma viscosity: insight on Mercury lava flows S. Rossi1, D. Morgavi1, O. Namur2, D. Perugini1, F.Vetere1, P. Mancinelli1 and C. Pauselli1 1 Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, piazza Università 1, 06123 Perugia, Italy 2 Uni Hannover Institut für Mineralogie, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Callinstraβe 3, 30167 Hannover, Germany In this contribution we report new measurements of viscosity of synthetic komatitic melts, used the behaviour of silicate melts erupted at the surface of Mercury. Composition of Mercurian surface magmas was calculated using the most recent maps produced from MESSENGER XRS data (Weider et al., 2015). We focused on the northern hemisphere (Northern Volcanic Province, NVP, the largest lava flow on Mercury and possibly in the Solar System) for which the spatial resolution of MESSENGER measurements is high and individual maps of Mg/Si, Ca/Si, Al/Si and S/Si were combined. The experimental starting material contains high Na2O content (≈7 wt.%) that strongly influences viscosity. High temperature viscosity measurements were carried out at 1 atm using a concentric cylinder apparatus equipped with an Anton Paar RheolabQC viscometer head at the Department of Physics and Geology (PVRG_lab) at the University of Perugia (Perugia, Italy

  8. Convection in colloidal suspensions with particle-concentration-dependent viscosity.

    PubMed

    Glässl, M; Hilt, M; Zimmermann, W

    2010-07-01

    The onset of thermal convection in a horizontal layer of a colloidal suspension is investigated in terms of a continuum model for binary-fluid mixtures where the viscosity depends on the local concentration of colloidal particles. With an increasing difference between the viscosity at the warmer and the colder boundary the threshold of convection is reduced in the range of positive values of the separation ratio psi with the onset of stationary convection as well as in the range of negative values of psi with an oscillatory Hopf bifurcation. Additionally the convection rolls are shifted downwards with respect to the center of the horizontal layer for stationary convection psi>0 and upwards for the Hopf bifurcation (psi<0.

  9. Flow-induced agitations create a granular fluid: effective viscosity and fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Nichol, Kiri; van Hecke, Martin

    2012-06-01

    We fluidize a granular medium with localized stirring in a split-bottom shear cell. We probe the mechanical response of quiescent regions far from the main flow by observing the vertical motion of cylindrical probes rising, sinking, and floating in the grains. First, we find that the probe motion suggests that the granular material behaves in a liquid-like manner: high-density probes sink and low-density probes float at the depth given by Archimedes' law. Second, we observe that the drag force on moving probes scales linearly with their velocity, which allows us to define an effective viscosity for the system. This effective viscosity is inversely proportional to the rotation rate of the disk which drives the split bottom flow. Moreover, the apparent viscosity depends on radius and mass of the probe: despite the linear dependence of the drag forces on sinking speed of the probe, the granular medium is not simply Newtonian, but exhibits a more complex rheology. The decrease of viscosity with filling height of the cell, combined with the poor correlation between local strain rate and viscosity, suggests that the fluid-like character of the material is set by agitations generated in the stirred region: the relation between applied stress and observed strain rate in one location depends on the strain rate in another location. We probe the nature of the granular fluctuations that we believe mediates these nonlocal interactions by characterizing the small and random up and down motion that the probe experiences. These Gaussian fluctuations exhibit a mix of diffusive and subdiffusive behavior at short times and saturate at a value of roughly 1/10th of a grain diameter longer times, consistent with the picture of a random walker in a potential well. The product of crossover time and effective viscosity is constant, evidencing a direct link between fluctuations and viscosity.

  10. Blood viscosity changes in slow coronary flow patients.

    PubMed

    Ergun-Cagli, Kumral; Ileri-Gurel, Esin; Ozeke, Ozcan; Seringec, Nurten; Yalcinkaya, Adnan; Kocabeyoglu, Sabit; Basar, Fatma Nurcan; Sen, Nihat; Cagli, Kerim; Dikmenoglu, Neslihan

    2011-01-01

    Microvascular dysfunction is implicated in the pathogenesis of slow coronary flow (SCF), but less attention has been paid to intrinsic properties of blood that can also impair the microcirculatory flow. In this study we aimed to evaluate the blood viscosity focusing on erythrocyte aggregation, erythrocyte deformability and plasma viscosity in SCF. Thirty-three patients with SCF (21 male, 54 ± 12.8 years) and 23 subjects with normal coronary arteries (13 male, 59 ± 10.3 years) were included in the study. Coronary flow was quantified by means of thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame count and aggregation and deformability of erythrocytes were measured by an ektacytometer. Plasma viscosity was measured by a cone-plate viscometer. Aggregation amplitude (23 ± 3.8 au vs. 15.7 ± 6.1 au, respectively, p < 0.001) and area A index (area above syllectogram) (153.2 ± 30.7 au.s vs. 124.9 ± 49.3 au.s, respectively, p < 0.01) were higher in SCF patients. Aggregation half-time, aggregation index, elongation index and plasma viscosity values were similar between two groups. Correlation analysis revealed a significant relationship between the TIMI frame count for left anterior descending artery and aggregation amplitude in SCF patients (r = 0.679, p < 0.0001). The result of this study reveals changes in erythrocyte aggregation which may contribute to the pathophysiology of SCF. Larger studies are needed to make more robust conclusions on this issue.

  11. Temperature-Dependent Conformations of Model Viscosity Index Improvers

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Uma Shantini; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-05-01

    Lubricants are comprised of base oils and additives where additives are chemicals that are deliberately added to the oil to enhance properties and inhibit degradation of the base oils. Viscosity index (VI) improvers are an important class of additives that reduce the decline of fluid viscosity with temperature [1], enabling optimum lubricant performance over a wider range of operating temperatures. These additives are typically high molecular weight polymers, such as, but not limited to, polyisobutylenes, olefin copolymer, and polyalkylmethacrylates, that are added in concentrations of 2-5% (w/w). Appropriate polymers, when dissolved in base oil, expand from a coiled to an uncoiled state with increasing temperature [2]. The ability of VI additives to increase their molar volume and improve the temperature-viscosity dependence of lubricants suggests there is a strong relationship between molecular structure and additive functionality [3]. In this work, we aim to quantify the changes in polymer size with temperature for four polyisobutylene (PIB) based molecular structures at the nano-scale using molecular simulation tools. As expected, the results show that the polymers adopt more conformations at higher temperatures, and there is a clear indication that the expandability of a polymer is strongly influenced by molecular structure.

  12. Dynamic topography, gravity and the role of lateral viscosity variations from inversion of global mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ting; Gurnis, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Lateral viscosity variations (LVVs) in the mantle influence geodynamic processes and their surface expressions. With the observed long-wavelength geoid, free-air anomaly, gravity gradient in three directions and discrete, high-accuracy residual topography, we invert for depth- and temperature-dependent and tectonically regionalized mantle viscosity with a mantle flow model. The inversions suggest that long-wavelength gravitational and topographic signals are mainly controlled by the radial viscosity profile; the pre-Cambrian lithosphere viscosity is slightly (˜ one order of magnitude) higher than that of oceanic and Phanerozoic lithosphere; plate margins are substantially weaker than plate interiors; and viscosity has only a weak apparent, dependence on temperature, suggesting either a balancing between factors or a smoothing of actual higher amplitude, but short wavelength, LVVs. The predicted large-scale lithospheric stress regime (compression or extension) is consistent with the world stress map (thrust or normal faulting). Both recent compiled high-accuracy residual topography and the predicted dynamic topography yield ˜1 km amplitude long-wavelength dynamic topography, inconsistent with recent studies suggesting amplitudes of ˜100 to ˜500 m. Such studies use a constant, positive admittance (transfer function between topography and gravity), in contrast to the evidence which shows that the earth has a spatially and wavelength-dependent admittance, with large, negative admittances between ˜4000 and ˜104 km wavelengths.

  13. Flow pattern changes influenced by variation of viscosities of a heterogeneous gas-liquid mixture flow in a vertical channel

    SciTech Connect

    Keska, Jerry K.; Hincapie, Juan; Jones, Richard

    2011-02-15

    In the steady-state flow of a heterogeneous mixture such as an air-liquid mixture, the velocity and void fraction are space- and time-dependent parameters. These parameters are the most fundamental in the analysis and description of a multiphase flow. The determination of flow patterns in an objective way is extremely critical, since this is directly related to sudden changes in spatial and temporal changes of the random like characteristic of concentration. Flow patterns can be described by concentration signals in time, amplitude, and frequency domains. Despite the vital importance and countless attempts to solve or incorporate the flow pattern phenomena into multiphase models, it has still been a very challenging topic in the scientific community since the 1940's and has not yet reached a satisfactory solution. This paper reports the experimental results of the impact of fluid viscosity on flow patterns for two-phase flow. Two-phase flow was created in laboratory equipment using air and liquid as phase medium. The liquid properties were changed by using variable concentrations of glycerol in water mixture which generated a wide-range of dynamic viscosities ranging from 1 to 1060 MPa s. The in situ spatial concentration vs. liquid viscosity and airflow velocity of two-phase flow in a vertical ID=50.8 mm pipe were measured using two concomitant computer-aided measurement systems. After acquiring data, the in situ special concentration signals were analyzed in time (spatial concentration and RMS of spatial concentration vs. time), amplitude (PDF and CPDF), and frequency (PSD and CPSD) domains that documented broad flow pattern changes caused by the fluid viscosity and air velocity changes. (author)

  14. Composition and Temperature Dependence of Shear Viscosity of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    model for viscosity of liquids , we feel that this is a very good correlation between molecular structure and viscosity, and it appears then that the...B. Thole, "The Viscosity of Liquids ," Longmans, Green and Co., London (1914). 15. W. R. Gambill, Chem. Eng, 66, 151 (1959) 16. P. K. Katti and M. M

  15. Frequency-Dependent Viscosity of Xenon Near the Critical Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    1999-01-01

    We used a novel, overdamped oscillator aboard the Space Shuttle to measure the viscosity eta of xenon near its critical density rho(sub c), and temperature T(sub c). In microgravity, useful data were obtained within 0.1 mK of T(sub c), corresponding to a reduced temperature t = (T -T(sub c))/T(sub c) = 3 x 10(exp -7). The data extend two decades closer to T(sub c) than the best ground measurements, and they directly reveal the expected power-law behavior eta proportional to t(sup -(nu)z(sub eta)). Here nu is the correlation length exponent, and our result for the small viscosity exponent is z(sub eta) = 0.0690 +/- 0.0006. (All uncertainties are one standard uncertainty.) Our value for z(sub eta) depends only weakly on the form of the viscosity crossover function, and it agrees with the value 0.067 +/- 0.002 obtained from a recent two-loop perturbation expansion. The measurements spanned the frequency range 2 Hz less than or equal to f less than or equal to 12 Hz and revealed viscoelasticity when t less than or equal to 10(exp -1), further from T(sub c) than predicted. The viscoelasticity scales as Af(tau), where tau is the fluctuation-decay time. The fitted value of the viscoelastic time-scale parameter A is 2.0 +/- 0.3 times the result of a one-loop perturbation calculation. Near T(sub c), the xenon's calculated time constant for thermal diffusion exceeded days. Nevertheless, the viscosity results were independent of the xenon's temperature history, indicating that the density was kept near rho(sub c), by judicious choices of the temperature vs. time program. Deliberately bad choices led to large density inhomogeneities. At t greater than 10(exp -5), the xenon approached equilibrium much faster than expected, suggesting that convection driven by microgravity and by electric fields slowly stirred the sample.

  16. Solvent viscosity dependence of the folding rate of a small protein: distributed computing study.

    PubMed

    Zagrovic, Bojan; Pande, Vijay

    2003-09-01

    By using distributed computing techniques and a supercluster of more than 20,000 processors we simulated folding of a 20-residue Trp Cage miniprotein in atomistic detail with implicit GB/SA solvent at a variety of solvent viscosities (gamma). This allowed us to analyze the dependence of folding rates on viscosity. In particular, we focused on the low-viscosity regime (values below the viscosity of water). In accordance with Kramers' theory, we observe approximately linear dependence of the folding rate on 1/gamma for values from 1-10(-1)x that of water viscosity. However, for the regime between 10(-4)-10(-1)x that of water viscosity we observe power-law dependence of the form k approximately gamma(-1/5). These results suggest that estimating folding rates from molecular simulations run at low viscosity under the assumption of linear dependence of rate on inverse viscosity may lead to erroneous results.

  17. A blood-oxygenation-dependent increase in blood viscosity due to a static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toru; Nagayama, Yuki; Tamura, Mamoru

    2004-07-21

    As the magnetic field of widely used MR scanners is one of the strongest magnetic fields to which people are exposed, the biological influence of the static magnetic field of MR scanners is of great concern. One magnetic interaction in biological subjects is the magnetic torque on the magnetic moment induced by biomagnetic substances. The red blood cell is a major biomagnetic substance, and the blood flow may be influenced by the magnetic field. However, the underlying mechanisms have been poorly understood. To examine the mechanisms of the magnetic influence on blood viscosity, we measured the time for blood to fall through a glass capillary inside and outside a 1.5 T MR scanner. Our in vitro results showed that the blood viscosity significantly increased in a 1.5 T MR scanner, and also clarified the mechanism of the interaction between red blood cells and the external magnetic field. Notably, the blood viscosity increased depending on blood oxygenation and the shear rate of the blood flow. Thus, our findings suggest that even a 1.5 T magnetic field may modulate blood flow.

  18. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shit, G. C.; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-01

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank-Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance.

  19. Viscosity and Shear Flows in Magnetized Dusty Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Bates, E. M.; Birmingham, W. J.; Rivera, W. F.; Takeno, J.; Knop, S.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetized dusty plasma experiments are planned at the Dusty Plasma Laboratory of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), to investigate E x B rotation with dust of at least 500 nm in diameter. At this size, individual particles can be tracked and viscosity, shear flow, and temperature can be measured directly using a methodology similar to that used for linear shear flow configurations [Feng et al. PRL 109, 185002 (2012)]. The experiments are planned with a specially designed Bitter-type magnet that can be configured to achieve up to 10 T for at least 10 seconds, to minutes, with much longer operation times at lower fields also possible. At the highest field, the dust will be fully magnetized and thus we aim to achieve direct E x B rotation of the dust (and not just by ion drag). The motivation for these experiments comes from observations of electron and ion temperatures in excess of 100 eV in E x B rotating plasmas [R. Reid et al. Phys. Plasmas 21, 063305 (2014)]. The experimental setup and planned diagnostics for the magnetized dusty plasma are presented.

  20. A consistent model for fluid distribution, viscosity distribution, and flow-thermal structure in subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shun-suke; Iwamori, Hikaru

    2016-05-01

    Water plays crucial roles in the subduction zone dynamics affecting the thermal-flow structure through the fluid processes. We aim to understand what controls the dynamics and construct a model to solve consistently fluid generation, fluid transport, its reaction with the solid and resultant viscosity, and thermal-flow structure. We highlight the effect of mechanical weakening of rocks associated with hydration. The viscosity of serpentinite (ηserp) in subduction zones critically controls the flow-thermal structure via extent of mechanical coupling between the subducting slab and overlying mantle wedge. When ηserp is greater than 1021 Pa s, the thermal-flow structure reaches a steady state beneath the volcanic zone, and the melting region expands until Cin (initial water content in the subducting oceanic crust) reaches 3 wt %, and it does not expand from 3 wt %. On the other hand, when ηserp is less than 1019 Pa s, the greater water dependence of viscosity (expressed by a larger fv) confines a hot material to a narrower channel intruding into the wedge corner from a deeper part of the back-arc region. Consequently, the overall heat flux becomes less for a larger fv. When ageba (age of back-arc basin as a rifted lithosphere) = 7.5 Ma, the increase in fv weakens but shifts the melting region toward the trench side because of the narrow channel flow intruding into the wedge corner, where as it shuts down melting when ageba=20 Ma. Several model cases (particularly those with ηserp=1020 to 1021 Pa s and a relatively large fv for Cin=2 to 3 wt %) broadly account for the observations in the Northeast Japan arc (i.e., location and width of volcanic chain, extent of serpentinite, surface heat flow, and seismic tomography), although the large variability of surface heat flow and seismic tomographic images does not allow us to constrain the parameter range tightly.

  1. Prediction of Transonic Vortex Flows Using Linear and Nonlinear Turbulent Eddy Viscosity Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional transonic flow over a delta wing is investigated with a focus on the effect of transition and influence of turbulence stress anisotropies. The performance of linear eddy viscosity models and an explicit algebraic stress model is assessed at the start of vortex flow, and the results compared with experimental data. To assess the effect of transition location, computations that either fix transition or are fully turbulent are performed. To assess the effect of the turbulent stress anisotropy, comparisons are made between predictions from the algebraic stress model and the linear eddy viscosity models. Both transition location and turbulent stress anisotropy significantly affect the 3D flow field. The most significant effect is found to be the modeling of transition location. At a Mach number of 0.90, the computed solution changes character from steady to unsteady depending on transition onset. Accounting for the anisotropies in the turbulent stresses also considerably impacts the flow, most notably in the outboard region of flow separation.

  2. Blood viscosity monitoring during cardiopulmonary bypass based on pressure-flow characteristics of a Newtonian fluid.

    PubMed

    Okahara, Shigeyuki; Zu Soh; Takahashi, Shinya; Sueda, Taijiro; Tsuji, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    We proposed a blood viscosity estimation method based on pressure-flow characteristics of oxygenators used during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a previous study that showed the estimated viscosity to correlate well with the measured viscosity. However, the determination of the parameters included in the method required the use of blood, thereby leading to high cost of calibration. Therefore, in this study we propose a new method to monitor blood viscosity, which approximates the pressure-flow characteristics of blood considered as a non-Newtonian fluid with characteristics of a Newtonian fluid by using the parameters derived from glycerin solution to enable ease of acquisition. Because parameters used in the estimation method are based on fluid types, bovine blood parameters were used to calculate estimated viscosity (ηe), and glycerin parameters were used to estimate deemed viscosity (ηdeem). Three samples of whole bovine blood with different hematocrit levels (21.8%, 31.0%, and 39.8%) were prepared and perfused into the oxygenator. As the temperature changed from 37 °C to 27 °C, the oxygenator mean inlet pressure and outlet pressure were recorded for flows of 2 L/min and 4 L/min, and the viscosity was estimated. The value of deemed viscosity calculated with the glycerin parameters was lower than estimated viscosity calculated with bovine blood parameters by 20-33% at 21.8% hematocrit, 12-27% at 31.0% hematocrit, and 10-15% at 39.8% hematocrit. Furthermore, deemed viscosity was lower than estimated viscosity by 10-30% at 2 L/min and 30-40% at 4 L/min. Nevertheless, estimated and deemed viscosities varied with a similar slope. Therefore, this shows that deemed viscosity achieved using glycerin parameters may be capable of successfully monitoring relative viscosity changes of blood in a perfusing oxygenator.

  3. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water.

    PubMed

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10^{-23}m^{3}), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes.

  4. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10-23m3 ), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes.

  5. Viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump for a total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Yurimoto, Terumi; Hara, Shintaro; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ono, Toshiya; Abe, Yusuke

    2016-09-01

    Estimation of pressure and flow has been an important subject for developing implantable artificial hearts. To realize real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow for a total artificial heart, we propose the table estimation method with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump in which systolic high flow and diastolic low flow phased are generated. The table estimation method utilizes three kinds of tables: viscosity, pressure and flow tables. Viscosity is estimated from the characteristic that differential value in motor speed between systolic and diastolic phases varies depending on viscosity. Potential of this estimation method was investigated using mock circulation system. Glycerin solution diluted with salty water was used to adjust viscosity of fluid. In verification of this method using continuous flow data, fairly good estimation could be possible when differential pulse width modulation (PWM) value of the motor between systolic and diastolic phases was high. In estimation under quasi-pulsatile condition, inertia correction was provided and fairly good estimation was possible when the differential PWM value was high, which was not different from the verification results using continuous flow data. In the experiment of real-time estimation applying moving average method to the estimated viscosity, fair estimation could be possible when the differential PWM value was high, showing that real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow would be possible with this novel estimation method when the differential PWM value would be set high.

  6. Sheet-like and plume-like thermal flow in a spherical convection experiment with high viscosity contrast.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futterer, Birgit; Zaussinger, Florian; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Krebs, Andreas; Egbers, Christoph; Breuer, Doris

    2013-04-01

    We introduce our spherical experiments on electro-hydrodynamical driven Rayleigh-Bénard convection that have been performed either with temperature-independent properties of the fluid, called 'GeoFlow I', or with temperature-dependent properties, called 'GeoFlow II'. To set up a self-gravitating force field with radial directed buoyancy, we use a high voltage potential between the inner and outer boundaries and a dielectric insulating liquid and perform the experiment in the microgravity conditions of the ISS [1, 2]. We further run numerical simulations in a 3D spherical geometry to reproduce the results obtained in the GeoFlow experiments. In the experiment the used optical method for flow visualization as delivered by the Optical Diagnostics Module ODM of the Fluid Science Laboratory, is the so called Wollaston-Prism shearing interferometry WSI, which produces fringe pattern images. For the numerical simulations we compute from the temperature field a fringe pattern of convection to compare it then to the experiment data. In this work, we present the flow imaging techniques and their numerical analogues, which were used to compare experimental results with numerical solutions. An important finding is the difference in the flow pattern between our two experiments. We see a sheet-like thermal flow, if the physical properties of the fluid are not varying with temperature - a result from 'GeoFlow I'. In this case the convection patterns have been successfully reproduced by 3D numerical simulations using both the RESPECT [3] and GAIA [4] codes. If we use a liquid with varying (electro-hydrodynamic) volume expansion and temperature-dependent viscosity (GeoFlow II), for which the viscosity contrast measured in the experiment is 2, the structures change significantly and are plume-like. This result is not expected, since the viscosity contrast seems to be too small for this type of solution according to numerical simulations. However, using a viscosity contrast of two

  7. Flow-induced differential lateral migration of deformable particles by inner/outer viscosity ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yeng-Long; Wang, Shih-Hao; Yeh, Wei-Ting

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the practicality of flow-driven separation of deformable particles (DP) such as cells, droplets, and capsules in microfluidic flow. We use lattice Boltzmann-immersed boundary method to model the hydrodynamic coupling between DP and the fluid. We find that whether a DP migrates towards the wall or to the center at steady state depends strongly on particle Reynolds number Re, capillary numbers Ca, and viscosity ratio λ. The lateral steady state position d* and velocity is determined by the competition between the inertia- and deformation-driven forces. In the deformation-dominated regime (Ca >> Re), DP migrates towards the channel centerline and flow faster for sufficiently small λ. In the inertia-dominated regime (Ca<flow slower for small λ. For sufficiently large λ, DP migrates towards the wall as the inertia-driven lift effects increase and the particle velocity decreases. In the intermediate regime (Ca Re), we find that d* has non-monotonic dependence on λ, leading to complicated dependence of particle velocity. We find that the non-monotonic trend is a consequence of inertia-deformation coupling, and only occurs if the inertia- and deformation-driven lift effects are comparable. This result could provide be further utilized for separating soft particles with different internal fluid property. MOST Taiwan, NCTS.

  8. Temperature dependence of viscosity and density of viscous liquids determined from thermal noise spectra of uncalibrated atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    McLoughlin, Neal; Lee, Stephen L; Hähner, Georg

    2007-08-01

    We demonstrate that the thermal response of uncalibrated atomic force microscope cantilevers can be used to extract the density and the viscosity of viscous liquids with good accuracy. Temperature dependent thermal noise spectra were measured in water/poly(ethylene glycol) mixtures. Empirical parameters characteristic of the resonance behavior of the system were extracted from data recorded for one of the solutions at room temperature. These parameters were then employed to determine both viscosity and density values of the solutions simultaneously at different temperatures. In addition, activation energies for viscous flow were determined from the viscosity values obtained. The method presented is both fast and reliable and has the potential to be applied in connection with microfluidic systems, making macroscopic amounts of liquid and separate measurements with a viscometer and a densimeter redundant.

  9. Negative viscosity from negative compressibility and axial flow shear stiffness in a straight magnetic field

    DOE PAGES

    Li, J. C.; Diamond, P. H.

    2017-03-23

    Here, negative compressibility ITG turbulence in a linear plasma device (CSDX) can induce a negative viscosity increment. However, even with this negative increment, we show that the total axial viscosity remains positive definite, i.e. no intrinsic axial flow can be generated by pure ITG turbulence in a straight magnetic field. This differs from the case of electron drift wave (EDW) turbulence, where the total viscosity can turn negative, at least transiently. When the flow gradient is steepened by any drive mechanism, so that the parallel shear flow instability (PSFI) exceeds the ITG drive, the flow profile saturates at a level close to the value above which PSFI becomes dominant. This saturated flow gradient exceeds the PSFI linear threshold, and grows withmore » $$\

  10. Temperature dependence of shear viscosity of SU(3)-gluodynamics within lattice simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrakhantsev, N.; Braguta, V.; Kotov, A.

    2017-03-01

    This report is devoted to the study of temperature dependence of shear viscosity in SU(3)-gluodynamics. To calculate shear viscosity we measured the correlation function of the energy-momentum tensor T12T12 for a set of temperatures in the region T/Tc ∈ (0.9,1.5). The measurements were carried out using multilevel algorithm which considerably improves the accuracy of the data. For determination of the shear viscosity two methods were used: physically motivated ansatz and non-parametrical Backus-Gilbert method. Both methods give consistent results. The calculation allows to determine temperature dependence of the ratio of shear viscosity to the entropy density η/s.

  11. Label-free viscosity measurement of complex fluids using reversal flow switching manipulation in a microfluidic channel

    PubMed Central

    Jun Kang, Yang; Ryu, Jeongeun; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    The accurate viscosity measurement of complex fluids is essential for characterizing fluidic behaviors in blood vessels and in microfluidic channels of lab-on-a-chip devices. A microfluidic platform that accurately identifies biophysical properties of blood can be used as a promising tool for the early detections of cardiovascular and microcirculation diseases. In this study, a flow-switching phenomenon depending on hydrodynamic balancing in a microfluidic channel was adopted to conduct viscosity measurement of complex fluids with label-free operation. A microfluidic device for demonstrating this proposed method was designed to have two inlets for supplying the test and reference fluids, two side channels in parallel, and a junction channel connected to the midpoint of the two side channels. According to this proposed method, viscosities of various fluids with different phases (aqueous, oil, and blood) in relation to that of reference fluid were accurately determined by measuring the switching flow-rate ratio between the test and reference fluids, when a reverse flow of the test or reference fluid occurs in the junction channel. An analytical viscosity formula was derived to measure the viscosity of a test fluid in relation to that of the corresponding reference fluid using a discrete circuit model for the microfluidic device. The experimental analysis for evaluating the effects of various parameters on the performance of the proposed method revealed that the fluidic resistance ratio (RJL/RL, fluidic resistance in the junction channel (RJL) to fluidic resistance in the side channel (RL)) strongly affects the measurement accuracy. The microfluidic device with smaller RJL/RL values is helpful to measure accurately the viscosity of the test fluid. The proposed method accurately measured the viscosities of various fluids, including single-phase (Glycerin and plasma) and oil-water phase (oil vs. deionized water) fluids, compared with conventional methods. The proposed

  12. Label-free viscosity measurement of complex fluids using reversal flow switching manipulation in a microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Jun Kang, Yang; Ryu, Jeongeun; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    The accurate viscosity measurement of complex fluids is essential for characterizing fluidic behaviors in blood vessels and in microfluidic channels of lab-on-a-chip devices. A microfluidic platform that accurately identifies biophysical properties of blood can be used as a promising tool for the early detections of cardiovascular and microcirculation diseases. In this study, a flow-switching phenomenon depending on hydrodynamic balancing in a microfluidic channel was adopted to conduct viscosity measurement of complex fluids with label-free operation. A microfluidic device for demonstrating this proposed method was designed to have two inlets for supplying the test and reference fluids, two side channels in parallel, and a junction channel connected to the midpoint of the two side channels. According to this proposed method, viscosities of various fluids with different phases (aqueous, oil, and blood) in relation to that of reference fluid were accurately determined by measuring the switching flow-rate ratio between the test and reference fluids, when a reverse flow of the test or reference fluid occurs in the junction channel. An analytical viscosity formula was derived to measure the viscosity of a test fluid in relation to that of the corresponding reference fluid using a discrete circuit model for the microfluidic device. The experimental analysis for evaluating the effects of various parameters on the performance of the proposed method revealed that the fluidic resistance ratio ( R J L / R L , fluidic resistance in the junction channel ( R J L ) to fluidic resistance in the side channel ( R L )) strongly affects the measurement accuracy. The microfluidic device with smaller R J L / R L values is helpful to measure accurately the viscosity of the test fluid. The proposed method accurately measured the viscosities of various fluids, including single-phase (Glycerin and plasma) and oil-water phase (oil vs. deionized water) fluids, compared with conventional

  13. Nanostructures study of CNT nanofluids transport with temperature-dependent variable viscosity in a muscular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Abid, Syed Ali; Tripathi, Dharmendra; Mir, Nazir Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    The transport of single-wall carbon nanotube (CNT) nanofluids with temperature-dependent variable viscosity is analyzed by peristaltically driven flow. The main flow problem has been modeled using cylindrical coordinates and flow equations are simplified to ordinary differential equations using long wavelength and low Reynolds' number approximation. Analytical solutions have been obtained for axial velocity, pressure gradient and temperature. Results acquired are discussed graphically for better understanding. It is observed that with an increment in the Grashof number the velocity of the governing fluids starts to decrease significantly and the pressure gradient is higher for pure water as compared to single-walled carbon nanotubes due to low density. As the specific heat is very high for pure water as compared to the multi-wall carbon nanotubes, it raises temperature of the muscles, in the case of pure water, as compared to the multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, it is noticed that the trapped bolus starts decreasing in size as the buoyancy forces are dominant as compared to viscous forces. This model may be applicable in biomedical engineering and nanotechnology to design the biomedical devices.

  14. Determination of whole blood and plasma viscosity by means of flow curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Ruef, Peter; Gehm, Jutta; Gehm, Lothar; Felbinger, Claudia; Pöschl, Johannes; Kuss, Navina

    2014-01-01

    The LS300 viscometer permits automated measurements of viscosity at several shear rates of non-Newtonian fluids. We determined whole blood and plasma viscosity, aggregation, red blood cell deformability, and hematocrit of 66 healthy adults. The effects of the anticoagulants EDTA, heparin and citrate, and of centrifugation on blood viscosity (n=12) and red blood cell geometry (n=5) were investigated. With regard to the whole blood viscosity of adults, the best agreement was obtained by Casson's calculation compared to the methods of Ostwald, Bingham and Newton. The approximated flow curve of plasma showed only marginal differences between the method of Newton and Ostwald, whereas the latter gave the best quality of approximation. Centrifugation and the anticoagulants had a significant impact on whole blood viscosity and yield shear stress, whereas erythrocyte geometry remained unaffected. By linear regression of hematocrit with viscosity and yield shear stress, its impact on blood viscosity could be calculated in a hematocrit range of 0.32-0.50. Determination of whole blood viscosity should be performed in a standardized manner at several shear rates and without centrifugation of the blood samples.

  15. Remark on compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity and discontinuous initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting; Fang, Daoyuan

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we study the free boundary problem for 1D compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity. We focus on the case where the viscosity coefficient vanishes on vacuum. We prove the global existence and uniqueness for discontinuous solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations when the initial density is a bounded variation function, and give a decay result for the density as t-->+[infinity].

  16. Viscosity-dependent inertial spectra of the Burgers and Korteweg–deVries–Burgers equations

    PubMed Central

    Chorin, Alexandre J.; Hald, Ole H.

    2005-01-01

    We show that the inertial range spectrum of the Burgers equation has a viscosity-dependent correction at any wave number when the viscosity is small but not zero. We also calculate the spectrum of the Korteweg–deVries–Burgers equation and show that it can be partially mapped onto the inertial spectrum of a Burgers equation with a suitable effective diffusion coefficient. These results are significant for the understanding of turbulence. PMID:15753299

  17. Fluid friction and wall viscosity of the 1D blood flow model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Nishi, Shohei; Matsukawa, Mami; Ghigo, Arthur; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Fullana, Jose-Maria

    2016-02-29

    We study the behavior of the pulse waves of water into a flexible tube for application to blood flow simulations. In pulse waves both fluid friction and wall viscosity are damping factors, and difficult to evaluate separately. In this paper, the coefficients of fluid friction and wall viscosity are estimated by fitting a nonlinear 1D flow model to experimental data. In the experimental setup, a distensible tube is connected to a piston pump at one end and closed at another end. The pressure and wall displacements are measured simultaneously. A good agreement between model predictions and experiments was achieved. For amplitude decrease, the effect of wall viscosity on the pulse wave has been shown as important as that of fluid viscosity.

  18. Towards adjoint-based inversion of time-dependent mantle convection with non-linear viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dunzhu; Gurnis, Michael; Stadler, Georg

    2017-01-01

    We develop and study an adjoint-based inversion method for the simultaneous recovery of initial temperature conditions and viscosity parameters in time-dependent mantle convection from the current mantle temperature and historic plate motion. Based on a realistic rheological model with temperature- and strain rate-dependent viscosity, we formulate the inversion as a PDE-constrained optimization problem. The objective functional includes the misfit of surface velocity (plate motion) history, the misfit of the current mantle temperature, and a regularization for the uncertain initial condition. The gradient of this functional with respect to the initial temperature and the uncertain viscosity parameters is computed by solving the adjoint of the mantle convection equations. This gradient is used in a preconditioned quasi-Newton minimization algorithm. We study the prospects and limitations of the inversion, as well as the computational performance of the method using two synthetic problems, a sinking cylinder and a realistic subduction model. The subduction model is characterized by the migration of a ridge toward a trench whereby both plate motions and subduction evolve. The results demonstrate: (1) for known viscosity parameters, the initial temperature can be well recovered, as in previous initial condition-only inversions where the effective viscosity was given; (2) for known initial temperature, viscosity parameters can be recovered accurately, despite the existence of trade-offs due to ill-conditioning; (3) for the joint inversion of initial condition and viscosity parameters, initial condition and effective viscosity can be reasonably recovered, but the high dimension of the parameter space and the resulting ill-posedness may limit recovery of viscosity parameters.

  19. Effect of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity on high-speed slip flow between concentric cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T C; Street, R E

    1954-01-01

    Schamberg was the first to solve the differential equations of slip flow, including the Burnett terms, for concentric circular cylinders assuming constant coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity. The problem is solved for variable coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity in this paper by applying a transformation which leads to an iteration method. Starting with the solution for constant coefficients, this method enables one to approximate the solution for variable coefficients very closely after one or two steps. Satisfactory results are shown to follow from Schamberg's solution by using his values of constant coefficients multiplied by a constant factor, leading to what are denoted as the effective coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity.

  20. Effect of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity on high-speed slip flow between concentric cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T C; Street, R E

    1953-01-01

    The differential equations of slip flow, including the Burnett terms, were first solved by Schamberg assuming that the coefficients of viscosity and heat conduction of the gas were constants. The problem is solved herein for variable coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity by applying a transformation leading to an iteration method. The method, starting with the solution for constant coefficients, enables one to approximate the solution for variable coefficients very closely after one or two steps. Satisfactory results are shown to follow from Schamberg's solution by using his values of the constant coefficients multiplied by a constant factor 'N', leading to what are denoted as the effective coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity.

  1. STUDIES ON THE ANOMALOUS VISCOSITY AND FLOW-BIREFRINGENCE OF PROTEIN SOLUTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, A. S. C.; Needham, Joseph; Shen, Shih-Chang

    1944-01-01

    1. A coaxial viscosimeter which permits the simultaneous determination of relative and anomalous viscosity and of flow-birefringence is described. Flow-anomaly and flow-birefringence are regarded as characteristic of elongated micelles and molecules. 2. Such methods have been applied to dilute solutions of proteins. The conditions under which the coaxial (Couette) viscosimeter measures the viscosity of the bulk phase and the surface film phase respectively have been investigated and are described. 3. The general behaviour of protein solutions subjected to shear is summarised. PMID:19873384

  2. Mafic-crystal distributions, viscosities, and lava structures of some Hawaiian lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, Scott K.; Walker, George P. L.

    1988-09-01

    The distribution patterns of mafic phenocrysts in some Hawaiian basalt flows are consistent with simple in situ gravitational settling. We use the patterns to estimate the crystal settling velocity and hence viscosity of the lava, which in turn can be correlated with surface structures. Numerical modeling generates theoretical crystal concentration profiles through lava flow units of different thicknesses for differing settling velocities. By fitting these curves to field data, crystal-settling rates through the lavas can be estimated, from which the viscosities of the flows can be determined using Stokes' Law. Lavas in which the crystal settling velocity was relatively high (on the order of 5 × 10 -4 cm/sec) show great variations in phenocryst content, both from top to bottom of the same flow unit, and from one flow unit to another. Such lava is invariably pahoehoe, flow units of which are usually less than 1 m thick. Lavas in which the crystal-settling velocity was low show a small but measurable variation in phenocryst content. These lavas are part of a progression from a rough pahoehoe to toothpaste lava to a'a. Toothpaste lava is characterized by spiny texture as well as the ability to retain surface grooves during solidification, and flow units are usually thicker than 1 m. In the thickest of Hawaiian a'a flows, those of the distal type, no systematic crystal variations are observed, and high viscosity coupled with a finite yield strength prevented crystal settling. The amount of crystal settling in pahoehoe indicates that the viscosity ranged from 600 to 6000 Pa s. The limited amount of settling in toothpaste lava indicates a viscosity greater than this value, approaching 12,000 Pa s. We infer that distal-type a'a had a higher viscosity still and also possessed a yield strength.

  3. Temperature and density dependence of the shear viscosity of liquid sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, N.; Xu, H.; Wax, J.-F.

    2016-06-01

    The density and temperature dependence of the shear viscosity of liquid sodium is studied. The stress autocorrelation function is calculated by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, which allow us to obtain the value of shear viscosity using the Green-Kubo formula. The Fiolhais potential is used to calculate the interionic interactions, which are validated by comparison between simulation and experimental data along the liquid-gas coexistence curve. The behavior of viscosity over a wide range of the liquid phase of the phase diagram is studied. Along isochoric lines, it presents a minimum, while it monotonically increases along isotherms. An expression is proposed for the viscosity as a function of temperature and density which reproduces our data for liquid sodium at any density in the range [1000-2000 kg m-3 ] and any temperature in the range [700-7000 K]. The validity of the Stokes-Einstein relation over the investigated state points is discussed.

  4. Viscosity Dependence of Some Protein and Enzyme Reaction Rates: Seventy-Five Years after Kramers.

    PubMed

    Sashi, Pulikallu; Bhuyan, Abani K

    2015-07-28

    Kramers rate theory is a milestone in chemical reaction research, but concerns regarding the basic understanding of condensed phase reaction rates of large molecules in viscous milieu persist. Experimental studies of Kramers theory rely on scaling reaction rates with inverse solvent viscosity, which is often equated with the bulk friction coefficient based on simple hydrodynamic relations. Apart from the difficulty of abstraction of the prefactor details from experimental data, it is not clear why the linearity of rate versus inverse viscosity, k ∝ η(-1), deviates widely for many reactions studied. In most cases, the deviation simulates a power law k ∝ η(-n), where the exponent n assumes fractional values. In rate-viscosity studies presented here, results for two reactions, unfolding of cytochrome c and cysteine protease activity of human ribosomal protein S4, show an exceedingly overdamped rate over a wide viscosity range, registering n values up to 2.4. Although the origin of this extraordinary reaction friction is not known at present, the results indicate that the viscosity exponent need not be bound by the 0-1 limit as generally suggested. For the third reaction studied here, thermal dissociation of CO from nativelike cytochrome c, the rate-viscosity behavior can be explained using Grote-Hynes theory of time-dependent friction in conjunction with correlated motions intrinsic to the protein. Analysis of the glycerol viscosity-dependent rate for the CO dissociation reaction in the presence of urea as the second variable shows that the protein stabilizing effect of subdenaturing amounts of urea is not affected by the bulk viscosity. It appears that a myriad of factors as diverse as parameter uncertainty due to the difficulty of knowing the exact reaction friction and both mode and consequences of protein-solvent interaction work in a complex manner to convey as though Kramers rate equation is not absolute.

  5. One-, two- and three-phase viscosity treatments for basaltic lava flows

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Andrew J. L.; Allen, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Lava flows comprise three-phase mixtures of melt, crystals, and bubbles. While existing one-phase treatments allow melt phase viscosity to be assessed on the basis of composition, water content, and/or temperature, two-phase treatments constrain the effects of crystallinity or vesicularity on mixture viscosity. However, three-phase treatments, allowing for the effects of coexisting crystallinity and vesicularity, are not well understood. We investigate existing one- and two-phase treatments using lava flow case studies from Mauna Loa (Hawaii) and Mount Etna (Italy) and compare these with a three-phase treatment that has not been applied previously to basaltic mixtures. At Etna, melt viscosities of 425 ± 30 Pa s are expected for well-degassed (0.1 w. % H2O), and 135 ± 10 Pa s for less well-degassed (0.4 wt % H2O), melt at 1080°C. Application of a three-phase model yields mixture viscosities (45% crystals, 25–35% vesicles) in the range 5600–12,500 Pa s. This compares with a measured value for Etnean lava of 9400 ± 1500 Pa s. At Mauna Loa, the three-phase treatment provides a fit with the full range of field measured viscosities, giving three-phase mixture viscosities, upon eruption, of 110–140 Pa s (5% crystals, no bubble effect due to sheared vesicles) to 850–1400 Pa s (25–30% crystals, 40–60% spherical vesicles). The ability of the three-phase treatment to characterize the full range of melt-crystal-bubble mixture viscosities in both settings indicates the potential of this method in characterizing basaltic lava mixture viscosity. PMID:21691456

  6. One-, two- and three-phase viscosity treatments for basaltic lava flows.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andrew J L; Allen, John S

    2008-01-01

    Lava flows comprise three-phase mixtures of melt, crystals, and bubbles. While existing one-phase treatments allow melt phase viscosity to be assessed on the basis of composition, water content, and/or temperature, two-phase treatments constrain the effects of crystallinity or vesicularity on mixture viscosity. However, three-phase treatments, allowing for the effects of coexisting crystallinity and vesicularity, are not well understood. We investigate existing one- and two-phase treatments using lava flow case studies from Mauna Loa (Hawaii) and Mount Etna (Italy) and compare these with a three-phase treatment that has not been applied previously to basaltic mixtures. At Etna, melt viscosities of 425 ± 30 Pa s are expected for well-degassed (0.1 w. % H(2)O), and 135 ± 10 Pa s for less well-degassed (0.4 wt % H(2)O), melt at 1080°C. Application of a three-phase model yields mixture viscosities (45% crystals, 25-35% vesicles) in the range 5600-12,500 Pa s. This compares with a measured value for Etnean lava of 9400 ± 1500 Pa s. At Mauna Loa, the three-phase treatment provides a fit with the full range of field measured viscosities, giving three-phase mixture viscosities, upon eruption, of 110-140 Pa s (5% crystals, no bubble effect due to sheared vesicles) to 850-1400 Pa s (25-30% crystals, 40-60% spherical vesicles). The ability of the three-phase treatment to characterize the full range of melt-crystal-bubble mixture viscosities in both settings indicates the potential of this method in characterizing basaltic lava mixture viscosity.

  7. Photochemical and thermal spiropyran (SP)-merocyanine (MC) interconversion: a dichotomy in dependence on viscosity.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jamie; Abdallah, Dalia; Piskorz, Konrad; Wojtyk, James T C; Dust, Julian M; Nunzi, Jean-Michel; Hoz, Shmaryahu; Buncel, Erwin

    2012-10-21

    The current study extends our work with spiropyran-merocyanines (SP-MC) as molecular photoswitches by delving into the effects of viscosity. This has led to the interesting finding of a dichotomy in viscosity dependence. Solutions of SP [6'-nitro-1,3,3-trimethylspiro(indolino-2,2'-benzopyran)] in a wide range of ethylene glycol-methanol (EG-MeOH) media (3.59 to 17.9 M in EG) were irradiated 90 s (365 nm). The absorbance at 90 s of MC (532 nm) formed photolytically varied with solvent. The least viscous medium yielded the highest concentration of MC and yields declined with increasing viscosity. Once irradiation ceased each system achieved thermal equilibrium. Molecular dynamics studies of typical thermal reactions governed by electronic and steric factors show that the transition state is achieved primarily after solvent reorganization has occurred to accommodate the new structure. It follows that in such thermal reactions viscosity may not cause any hindrance to the motion of atoms in molecules because solvent has already rearranged. In contrast, photochemical excitations occur at much higher rates (10(-15) s) than solvent reorganization, i.e. dielectric relaxation (10(-10) to 10(-12) s). The viscosity dependence of photochemical MC formation suggests that a major geometrical change is required for excited SP to be converted to MC. The dichotomy in dependence on viscosity is confirmed by the thermal equilibration of SP and MC. The equilibrium constant for the process increases three-fold (from 0.0535 to 0.158) as the EG content of the medium increases. However, the forward rate constant (SP → MC) is almost invariant with EG content or viscosity. The process is viscosity independent. The increase in the equilibrium constant with EG concentration is a result of a decline in the reverse rate constant for MC cyclisation to SP. This is attributed to special stabilisation of the MC that increases with increasing EG concentration. The present study, to our knowledge

  8. A new non-eddy viscosity subgrid-scale model and its application to channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, K. B.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    To date, most large-eddy simulations (LES) have been carried out with eddy viscosity subgrid scale (SGS) models, with only a few exceptions that used the mixed model. Even though the assumptions behind Smagorinsky's model are rather stringent, it has been applied successfully to a variety of turbulent flows. This success is attributed to the ability of eddy viscosity models to drain energy from large scales, thus simulating the dissipative nature of turbulence. Most SGS models are absolutely dissipative, i.e. they remove energy from the large scales at every instant. However, SGS stresses may transfer energy back to the large scales intermittently; this reverse transfer or backscatter is especially important in geophysical flows and in transition. In a fully developed channel flow, there is reverse flow of energy from small to large scales near the walls, but eddy viscosity models are unable to account for this important feature. The dynamic localization eddy viscosity model of Ghosal et al. (1995) allows backscatter by co-evolving an auxiliary equation for the SGS energy; however, the computational cost is considerably larger than for conventional SGS models (Cabot 1994). In this report, a new non-eddy viscosity model based on local approximation of total quantities in terms of filtered ones is introduced; the scale similarity model of Bardina (1983) is a special case of this model. This procedure does not require the assumption of homogeneity, permits backscatter of energy from small to large scales, and is readily implemented in finite difference codes. The results of applying the proposed model to second order finite volume simulation of plane channel flow at high Reynolds numbers (Re(sub b) = 38,000) is described in this report. Greater emphasis is placed on the high Reynolds number flow since it provides a more rigorous test of the SGS model and its potential application. The results are compared to ones produced by the conventional and dynamic Smagorinsky

  9. Elevated Low-Shear Blood Viscosity is Associated with Decreased Pulmonary Blood Flow in Children with Univentricular Heart Defects.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Andrew L; Takao, Cheryl M; Wenby, Rosalinda B; Meiselman, Herbert J; Wood, John C; Detterich, Jon A

    2016-04-01

    After the Fontan procedure, patients with univentricular hearts can experience long-term complications due to chronic low-shear non-pulsatile pulmonary blood flow. We sought to evaluate hemorheology and its relationship to hemodynamics in children with univentricular hearts. We hypothesized that low-shear blood viscosity and red blood cell (RBC) aggregation would be associated with increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and decreased pulmonary blood flow (PBF). We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 62 children undergoing cardiac catheterization-20 with isolated atrial septal defect (ASD), 22 status post Glenn procedure (Glenn), and 20 status post Fontan procedure (Fontan). Shear-dependent blood viscosity, RBC aggregation and deformability, complete blood count, coagulation panel, metabolic panel, fibrinogen, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were measured. PVR and PBF were calculated using the Fick equation. Group differences were analyzed by ANOVA and correlations by linear regression. Blood viscosity at all shear rates was higher in Glenn and Fontan, partially due to normocytic anemia in ASD. RBC aggregation and deformability were similar between all groups. Low-shear viscosity negatively correlated with PBF in Glenn and Fontan only (R (2) = 0.27, p < 0.001); it also negatively correlated with pulmonary artery pressure in Glenn (R (2) = 0.15, p = 0.01), and positively correlated with PVR in Fontan (R (2) = 0.28, p = 0.02). Our data demonstrate that elevated low-shear blood viscosity is associated with negative hemodynamic perturbations in a passive univentricular pulmonary circulation, but not in a pulsatile biventricular pulmonary circulation.

  10. Unusual linear dependency of viscosity with temperature in ionic liquid/water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Nanda, R

    2016-09-21

    An unusual linear dependency of viscosity with temperature has been observed in aqueous solutions of 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids because of the ion induced structural transition which leads to the violation of both the Stokes-Einstein and fractional Stokes-Einstein equations, suggesting the presence of dynamic heterogeneity in the system.

  11. Numerical and experimental investigation of flow instabilities in the presence of a viscosity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keedy, Ryan; Aliseda, Alberto

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to understand the effect of viscosity ratio on the development of the round jet when a miscible liquid is injected into another stagnant ambient liquid. Altering the viscosity of the injected liquid jet resulted in noticeable changes in the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in the jet's developing region, including the instability wavelength. The change in the formation of structures at the interface is apparent even when several key non-dimensional numbers (Pe , Re) associated with the flow are kept constant. Large, coherent structures in the turbulent jet resulting from the shear instability of the interface may affect the downstream development of the self-similar profile. Hence, it is important to examine and understand the characteristics of the shear layer instability in order to better understand the role that a viscosity gradient plays in turbulent jet development. The spatial stability equations for a flow in which viscosity varies arbitrarily as a function of scalar concentration are presented. These equations are evaluated at various viscosity ratios and the predicted instability frequencies are compared to experimental results in the range of μjet /μamb = 0 . 5 - 2 and Re 104 . Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Time-Dependent Variational Approach to the pure Gauge Theory for Evaluating the Shear Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; Lee, Tong-Gyu; Ishii, Hiroshi

    2009-10-01

    The time-dependent variational approach to the pure Yang-Mills gauge theory, especially a color su(3) gauge theory, is formulated in the functional Schr"odinger picture with a Gaussian wave functional approximation. The equations of motion for the quantum gauge fields are formulated in the Liouville-von Neumann form. This variational approach is applied in order to derive the shear viscosity, which is one of the transport coefficients for the pure gluonic matter, by using the linear response theory. As a result, the contribution to the shear viscosity from the quantum gluons is zero up to the lowest order of the coupling g in the quantum gluonic matter.

  13. An exact solution in a gravitating fluid with a density-dependent viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Nikhil; Schamel, Hans; Schamel

    2013-12-01

    An exact nonlinear solution for a cold fluid in presence of a gravitational field and viscous dissipation is obtained using Lagrange variable. It is shown that with a density-dependent viscosity the nonlinear equation can be exactly solved. The solution indicates that in absence of viscosity and initial fluid velocity shear, density collapse occurs at time of the order of inverse Jeans frequency. The effect of viscosity is to delay the collapse but it can not halt the collapse. The initial fluid velocity shear can act in both directions: a positive one leads to delay, a negative one to a speeding up of the density collapse. This nonlinear solution may have some bearing with the structure formations in the universe.

  14. CONSTRAINTS ON THE VISCOSITY AND MAGNETIC FIELD IN HOT ACCRETION FLOWS AROUND BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B. F.; Taam, Ronald E. E-mail: r-taam@northwestern.edu

    2013-07-15

    The magnitude of the viscosity and magnetic field parameters in hot accretion flows is investigated in low luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). Theoretical studies show that a geometrically thin, optically thick disk is truncated at mass accretion rates less than a critical value by mass evaporated vertically from the disk to the corona, with the truncated region replaced by an advection dominated accretion flow (ADAF). The critical accretion rate for such a truncation is a function of the viscosity and magnetic field. Observations of X-ray photon indices and spectral fits of a number of LLAGNs published in the literature provide an estimate of the critical rate of mass accretion and the truncation radius, respectively. By comparing the observational results with theoretical predictions, the viscosity and magnetic field parameters in the hot accretion flow region are estimated. Specifically, the mass accretion rates inferred in different sources constrain the viscosity parameter, whereas the truncation radii of the disk, as inferred from spectral fits, further constrain the magnetic field parameter. It is found that the value of the viscosity parameter in the corona/ADAF ranges from 0.17 to 0.5, with values clustered about 0.2-0.3. Magnetic pressure is required by the relatively small truncation radii for some LLAGNs and is found to be as high as its equipartition value with the gas pressure. The inferred values of the viscosity parameter are in agreement with those obtained from the observations of non-stationary accretion in stellar mass black hole X-ray transients. This consistency provides support for the paradigm that a geometrically thin disk is truncated by means of a mass evaporation process from the disk to the corona at low mass accretion rates.

  15. Steady flow on to a conveyor belt - Causal viscosity and shear shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syer, D.; Narayan, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    Some hydrodynamical consequences of the adoption of a causal theory of viscosity are explored. Causality is introduced into the theory by letting the coefficient of viscosity go to zero as the flow velocity approaches a designated propagation speed for viscous signals. Consideration is given to a model of viscosity which has a finite propagation speed of shear information, and it is shown that it produces two kinds of shear shock. A 'pure shear shock' corresponds to a transition from a superviscous to a subviscous state with no discontinuity in the velocity. A 'mixed shear shock' has a shear transition occurring at the same location as a normal adiabatic or radiative shock. A generalized version of the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions for mixed shear shocks is derived, and self-consistent numerical solutions to a model 2D problem in which an axisymmetric radially infalling stream encounters a spinning star are presented.

  16. Configurational Variations and Finite-Beta Effects on Neoclassical Viscosities and Flows in Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breyfogle, M.; Marine, T.; Ware, A. S.; Spong, D. A.

    2008-11-01

    The impact of magnetic geometry on neoclassical flows and viscosities for the Helically Symmetric Experiment (HSX) is investigated using the PENTA code [1,2]. Specifically, two topics are investigated: (1) finite-beta effects and (2) configurational variations. The PENTA code is used to calculate flows in HSX with the vacuum magnetic geometry and with finite-beta magnetic surfaces from the VMEC equilibrium code. This is done for the standard quasi-helically symmetric configuration of HSX, a symmetry-breaking mirror configuration and a hill configuration. The impact of these changes in the magnetic geometry on neoclassical viscosities and flows in HSX will be discussed.[0pt] [1] D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005). [0pt] [2] D. A. Spong, Fusion Sci. Technology 50, 343 (2006).

  17. Viscosity controls humidity dependence of N2O5 uptake to citric acid aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gržinić, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Berkemeier, T.; Türler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2015-08-01

    The heterogeneous loss of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) to aerosol particles has a significant impact on the night time nitrogen oxide cycle and therefore the oxidative capacity in the troposphere. Using a 13N short lived radioactive tracer method we studied the uptake kinetics of N2O5 on citric acid aerosol particles as a function of relative humidity (RH). The results show that citric acid exhibits lower reactivity than similar di- and polycarboxylic acids, with uptake coefficients between ~ 3 × 10-4-~ 3 × 10-3 depending on humidity (17-70 % RH). This humidity dependence can be explained by a changing viscosity and, hence, diffusivity in the organic matrix. Since the viscosity of highly concentrated citric acid solutions is not well established, we present four different parameterizations of N2O5 diffusivity based on the available literature data or estimates for viscosity and diffusivity. Above 50 % RH, uptake is consistent with the reacto-diffusive kinetic regime whereas below 50 % RH, the uptake coefficient is higher than expected from hydrolysis of N2O5 within the bulk of the particles, and the uptake kinetics may be limited by loss on the surface only. This study demonstrates the impact of viscosity in highly oxidized and highly functionalized secondary organic aerosol material on the heterogeneous chemistry of N2O5 and may explain some of the unexpectedly low loss rates to aerosol derived from field studies.

  18. Role of Viscosity on Capillary Flow and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawski, Daniel; Yerramilli, Sindhoora; Vasudevan, A. K.

    2011-02-01

    It is documented that the viscosity has a significant effect on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior in terms of the K- da/ dt relation. In order to better understand the role of viscosity and its effect on transport of aqueous solution to the crack tip due to capillary action at the crack tip, experiments were conducted using a glass-metal setup. The confined space between the crack-mouth faces was simulated using wedge-type geometry between a glass slide and 7475 aluminum plate. The space between the glass and aluminum crevice was carefully controlled using spacers. The effect of viscosity was modeled using water, glycerin, and its mixture. According to our best knowledge, this article presents the first simple model of experimental simulation of the capillary flow phenomenon with a goal of arriving at a better understanding of how the viscosity affects the SCC behavior. Experimental results of several materials taken from the literature support the role of viscosity on SCC behavior.

  19. The effects of depth-dependent viscosity in the lithosphere on post-seismic viscous relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, T.; Houseman, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    Following an earthquake elastic strain is relaxed by several mechanisms, including aseismic slip, poroelastic relaxation and viscous relaxation. The observed surface deformation reflects the integrated effect of these mechanisms, and it is therefore essential to evaluate the behaviour of each deformation process in order to advance our understanding of the co-and post-seismic deformations in the earthquake cycle. This evaluation requires mathematical models of the deformation, ground-truthed where possible using geodetic data (GPS and/or InSAR) to measure the surface deformation that accompanies and follows the earthquake. In this study, the effects of depth-dependent viscosity (DDV) variation in the lithosphere on the signature of post-seismic viscous relaxation are compared with the predictions of a uniform viscosity (UNV) model. For this purpose, we use a new parallelized 3-D finite element code, oregano_ve, to solve the linear Maxwell visco-elastic response following an applied internal fault displacement in a rectangular block. The model consists of a visco-elastic layer overlain by an elastic layer; the visco-elastic layer has a depth-dependent viscosity: η = η0exp[c(z0-z)], where η0 is the viscosity at the bottom of the layer, c is a constant (c = 0 for UNV model), z is the depth and z0 is the depth at the bottom of the layer. The fault displacement is implemented using the split node method developed by Melosh and Raefsky (BSSA, 71,1391,1981). We compare the relaxation of displacement that occurs on the surface after an instantaneous strike-slip faulting event for UNV and DDV models. For any given DDV model, we can choose a UNV model which approximately mimics the behaviour of the DDV model, but the required UNV viscosity depends on the distance from the fault; a smaller UNV viscosity is implied for a surface point that is further from the fault. The quality with which a UNV model can match a DDV simulation also depends on distance from the fault. In the

  20. Resolving depth-dependent subduction zone viscosity and afterslip from postseismic displacements following the 2011 Tohoku-oki, Japan earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Andrew M.; Hashima, Akinori; Becker, Thorsten W.; Okaya, David A.; Sato, Hiroshi; Hatanaka, Yuki

    2017-02-01

    We developed a 3-D, viscoelastic finite element model of the M9 2011 Tohoku-oki, Japan earthquake capable of predicting postseismic displacements due to viscoelastic relaxation and afterslip. We consider seismically inferred slab geometries associated with the Pacific and Philippine Sea Plate and a wide range of candidate viscoelastic rheologies. For each case, we invert for afterslip based on residual surface displacements (observed GPS minus that predicted due to viscoelastic relaxation) to develop combined viscoelastic relaxation and afterslip models. We are able to find a mechanical model that fully explains all observed geodetic on-land and seafloor horizontal and vertical postseismic displacements. We find that postseismic displacements are in about equal parts due to viscoelastic relaxation and afterslip, but their patterns are spatially distinct. Accurately predicting both horizontal and vertical on-land postseismic displacements requires a mantle wedge viscosity structure that is depth dependent, reflecting the manner in which temperature, pressure, and water content influence viscosity. No lateral heterogeneities within the mantle wedge viscosity structure beneath northern Honshu are required. Westward-directed postseismic seafloor displacements may be due flow via low-temperature, plastic creep within the lower half of a Pacific lithosphere weakened by plate bending. The distribution of afterslip is controlled by the location of coseismic slip from the Tohoku-oki and other regional historic earthquakes. The paradigm by which afterslip is thought of as the dominant postseismic mechanism immediately following earthquakes, with viscoelastic relaxation to follow in later years, is shown to no longer be valid.

  1. THE INFLUENCE OF PRESSURE-DEPENDENT VISCOSITY ON THE THERMAL EVOLUTION OF SUPER-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Stamenkovic, Vlada; Noack, Lena; Spohn, Tilman; Breuer, Doris E-mail: Lena.Noack@dlr.de E-mail: Tilman.Spohn@dlr.de

    2012-03-20

    We study the thermal evolution of super-Earths with a one-dimensional (1D) parameterized convection model that has been adopted to account for a strong pressure dependence of the viscosity. A comparison with a 2D spherical convection model shows that the derived parameterization satisfactorily represents the main characteristics of the thermal evolution of massive rocky planets. We find that the pressure dependence of the viscosity strongly influences the thermal evolution of super-Earths-resulting in a highly sluggish convection regime in the lower mantles of those planets. Depending on the effective activation volume and for cooler initial conditions, we observe with growing planetary mass even the formation of a conductive lid above the core-mantle boundary (CMB), a so-called CMB-lid. For initially molten planets our results suggest no CMB-lids but instead a hot lower mantle and core as well as sluggish lower mantle convection. This implies that the initial interior temperatures, especially in the lower mantle, become crucial for the thermal evolution-the thermostat effect suggested to regulate the interior temperatures in terrestrial planets does not work for massive planets if the viscosity is strongly pressure dependent. The sluggish convection and the potential formation of the CMB-lid reduce the convective vigor throughout the mantle, thereby affecting convective stresses, lithospheric thicknesses, and heat fluxes. The pressure dependence of the viscosity may therefore also strongly affect the propensity of plate tectonics, volcanic activity, and the generation of a magnetic field of super-Earths.

  2. Couette and Poiseuille flows in a low viscosity asthenosphere: Effects of internal heating rate, Rayleigh number, and plate representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiels, C.; Butler, S. L.

    2015-09-01

    Mantle convection models with a low viscosity asthenosphere and high viscosity surface plates have been shown to produce very large aspect ratio convection cells like those inferred to exist in Earth's mantle and to exhibit two asthenospheric flow regimes. When the surface plate is highly mobile, the plate velocity exceeds the flow velocities in the asthenosphere and the plate drives a Couette-type flow in the asthenospheric channel. For sluggish plates, the flow velocities in the asthenosphere exceed the plate velocity and the asthenospheric flow is more Poiseuille-like. It has been shown that under certain circumstances, flows become increasingly Couette-like as the aspect ratio of the plate is increased in numerical simulations. These models also show an increase in the average surface heat flux with aspect ratio which is counterintuitive, as one would expect that large aspect ratio models would result in older and colder oceanic lithosphere. Previous investigations have used single internal heating rates and Rayleigh numbers and a plate formulation that did not preclude significant deformation within the plate. In this paper, we investigate the conditions necessary for Couette and Poiseuille asthenospheric flows and for surface heat flux to increase with plate aspect ratio by varying the internal heating rate, the Rayleigh number and the representation of surface plates in 2D mantle convection models Plates are represented as a high viscosity layer with (1) a free-slip top surface boundary condition and (2) a force-balance boundary condition that imposes a constant surface velocity within the plate. We find that for models with a free-slip surface boundary condition, the internal heating rate and Rayleigh number do not strongly affect the dominance of Couette or Poiseuille flows in the asthenosphere but the increase in surface heat flux with model aspect ratio in the Poiseuille asthenospheric flow regime increases with internal heating rate. For models using

  3. Explicit discontinuous spectral element method with entropy generation based artificial viscosity for shocked viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, A.; Jacobs, G. B.; Don, W. S.; Abbassi, H.; Mashayek, F.

    2017-03-01

    A spatio-temporal adaptive artificial viscosity (AV) based shock-capturing scheme is proposed for the solution of both inviscid and viscous compressible flows using a high-order parallel Discontinuous Spectral Element Method (DSEM). The artificial viscosity and artificial thermal conduction coefficients are proportional to the viscous and thermal entropy generating terms, respectively, in the viscous entropy conservation law. The magnitude of AV is limited based on the explicit stable CFL criterion, so that the stable artificial viscous time step size is greater than the convective stable time step size. To further ensure the stability of this explicit approach, an adaptive variable order exponential filter is applied, if necessary, in elements where the AV has been limited. In viscous flow computations a modified Jameson's sensor (Ducros et al., 1999 [61]) limits the AV to small values in viscous shear regions, so as to maintain a high-order resolution in smooth regions and an essentially non-oscillatory behavior near sharp gradients/shocks regions. We have performed a systematic and extensive validation of the algorithm with one-dimensional problems (inviscid moving shock and viscous shock-structure interaction), two-dimensional problems (inviscid steady and unsteady shocked flows and viscous shock-boundary layer interaction), and a three-dimensional supersonic turbulent flow over a ramped cavity. These examples demonstrate that the explicit DSEM scheme with adaptive artificial viscosity terms is stable, accurate and efficient.

  4. New correlation for the temperature-dependent viscosity for saturated liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jianxiang; Zhang, Laibin

    2016-11-01

    Based on the recent progress on both the temperature dependence of surface tension [H. L. Yi, J. X. Tian, A. Mulero and I. Cachading, J. Therm. Anal. Calorim. 126 (2016) 1603, and the correlation between surface tension and viscosity of liquids [J. X. Tian and A. Mulero, Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 53 (2014) 9499], we derived a new multiple parameter correlation to describe the temperature-dependent viscosity of liquids. This correlation is verified by comparing with data from NIST Webbook for 35 saturated liquids including refrigerants, hydrocarbons and others, in a wide temperature range from the triple point temperature to the one very near to the critical temperature. Results show that this correlation predicts the NIST data with high accuracy with absolute average deviation (AAD) less than 1% for 21 liquids and more than 3% for only four liquids, and is clearly better than the popularly used Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman (VFT) correlation.

  5. Viscosity-dependent variations in the cell shape and swimming manner of Leptospira.

    PubMed

    Takabe, Kyosuke; Tahara, Hajime; Islam, Md Shafiqul; Affroze, Samia; Kudo, Seishi; Nakamura, Shuichi

    2017-02-01

    Spirochaetes are spiral or flat-wave-shaped Gram-negative bacteria that have periplasmic flagella between the peptidoglycan layer and outer membrane. Rotation of the periplasmic flagella transforms the cell body shape periodically, allowing the cell to swim in aqueous environments. Because the virulence of motility-deficient mutants of pathogenic species is drastically attenuated, motility is thought to be an essential virulence factor in spirochaetes. However, it remains unknown how motility practically contributes to the infection process. We show here that the cell body configuration and motility of the zoonotic spirochaete Leptospira changes depending on the viscosity of the medium. Leptospira swim and reverse the swimming direction by transforming the cell body. Motility analysis showed that the frequency of cell shape transformation was increased by increasing the viscosity of the medium. The increased cell body transformation induced highly frequent reversal of the swimming direction. A simple kinetic model based on the experimental results shows that the viscosity-induced increase in reversal limits cell migration, resulting in the accumulation of cells in high-viscosity regions. This behaviour could facilitate the colonization of the spirochaete on host tissues covered with mucosa.

  6. Vertical two-phase flow regimes and pressure gradients: Effect of viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Da Hlaing, Nan; Sirivat, Anuvat; Siemanond, Kitipat; Wilkes, James O.

    2007-05-15

    The effect of liquid viscosity on the flow regimes and the corresponding pressure gradients along the vertical two-phase flow was investigated. Experiment was carried out in a vertical transparent tube of 0.019 m in diameter and 3 m in length and the pressure gradients were measured by a U-tube manometer. Water and a 50 vol.% glycerol solution were used as the working fluids whose kinematic viscosities were 0.85 x 10{sup -6} and 4.0 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. In our air-liquid annular two-phase flow, the liquid film of various thicknesses flowed adjacent to the wall and the gas phase flowed at the center of the tube. The superficial air velocity, j{sub air}, was varied between 0.0021 and 58.7 m/s and the superficial liquid velocity, j{sub liquid}, was varied between 0 and 0.1053 m/s. In the bubble, the slug and the slug-churn flow regimes, the pressure gradients decreased with increasing Reynolds number. But in the annular and the mist flow regimes, pressure gradients increased with increasing Reynolds number. Finally, the experimentally measured pressure gradient values were compared and are in good agreement with the theoretical values. (author)

  7. The effects of viscosity on the stability of a trailing-line vortex in compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, Jillian A. K.; Duck, Peter W.

    1994-07-01

    We consider the effects of viscosity on the inviscid stability of the Batchelor vortex in a compressible flow. The problem is tackled asymptotically, in the limit of large (streamwise and azimuthal) wavenumbers, together with large Mach numbers. Previous studies, with viscous effects neglected, found that the nature of the solution passes through different regimes as the Mach number increases, relative to the wavenumber. This structure persists when viscous effects are included in the analysis. In the present study the mode present in the incompressible case ceases to be unstable at high Mach numbers and a center mode forms, whose stability characteristics are determined primarily by conditions close to the vortex axis. We find generally that viscosity has a stabilizing influence on the flow, while in the case of center modes, viscous effects become important at much larger Reynolds numbers than for the first class of disturbance.

  8. The effect of viscosity on steady transonic flow with a nodal solution topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owocki, Stanley P.; Zank, Gary P.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of viscosity on a steady, transonic flow for which the inviscid limit has a nodal solution topology near the critical point is investigated. For the accelerating case, viscous solutions tend to repel each other, so that a very delicate choice of initial conditions is required to prevent them from diverging. Only the two critical solutions extend to arbitrarily large distances into both the subsonic and supersonic flows. For the decelerating case, the solutions tend to attract, and so an entire two-parameter family of solutions now extends over large distances. The general effect of viscosity on the solution degeneracy of a nodal topology is thus to reduce or limit it for the accelerating case and to enhance it for the decelerating case. The astrophysical implications of these findings are addressed.

  9. The effects of viscosity on the stability of a trailing-line vortex in compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stott, Jillian A. K.; Duck, Peter W.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the effects of viscosity on the inviscid stability of the Batchelor vortex in a compressible flow. The problem is tackled asymptotically, in the limit of large (streamwise and azimuthal) wavenumbers, together with large Mach numbers. Previous studies, with viscous effects neglected, found that the nature of the solution passes through different regimes as the Mach number increases, relative to the wavenumber. This structure persists when viscous effects are included in the analysis. In the present study the mode present in the incompressible case ceases to be unstable at high Mach numbers and a center mode forms, whose stability characteristics are determined primarily by conditions close to the vortex axis. We find generally that viscosity has a stabilizing influence on the flow, while in the case of center modes, viscous effects become important at much larger Reynolds numbers than for the first class of disturbance.

  10. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible miscible flow with large viscosity ratio and high Péclet number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xuhui; Guo, Zhaoli

    2015-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model with a multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision operator is proposed for incompressible miscible flow with a large viscosity ratio as well as a high Péclet number in this paper. The equilibria in the present model are motivated by the lattice kinetic scheme previously developed by Inamuro et al. [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 360, 477 (2002), 10.1098/rsta.2001.0942]. The fluid viscosity and diffusion coefficient depend on both the corresponding relaxation times and additional adjustable parameters in this model. As a result, the corresponding relaxation times can be adjusted in proper ranges to enhance the performance of the model. Numerical validations of the Poiseuille flow and a diffusion-reaction problem demonstrate that the proposed model has second-order accuracy in space. Thereafter, the model is used to simulate flow through a porous medium, and the results show that the proposed model has the advantage to obtain a viscosity-independent permeability, which makes it a robust method for simulating flow in porous media. Finally, a set of simulations are conducted on the viscous miscible displacement between two parallel plates. The results reveal that the present model can be used to simulate, to a high level of accuracy, flows with large viscosity ratios and/or high Péclet numbers. Moreover, the present model is shown to provide superior stability in the limit of high kinematic viscosity. In summary, the numerical results indicate that the present lattice Boltzmann model is an ideal numerical tool for simulating flow with a large viscosity ratio and/or a high Péclet number.

  11. Entropy-viscosity based LES of turbulent flow in a flexible pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhicheng; Xie, Fangfang; Triantafyllou, Michael; Constantinides, Yiannis; Karniadakis, George

    2016-11-01

    We present large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent flow in a flexible pipe conveying incompressible fluid. We are interested in quantifying the flow-structure interaction in terms of mean quantities and their variances. For the LES, we employ an Entropy Viscosity Method (EVM), implemented in a spectral element code. In previous work, we investigated laminar flow and studied the complex interaction between structural and internal flow dynamics and obtained a phase diagram of the transition between states as function of three non-dimensional quantities: the fluid-tension parameter, the dimensionless fluid velocity, and the Reynolds number. Here we extend our studies in the turbulence regime, Re from 5,000 to 50,000. The motion of the flexible pipe affects greatly the turbulence statistics of the pipe flow, with substantial differences for free (self-sustained) vibrations and prescribed (forced) vibrations.

  12. Upper Limit of the Viscosity Parameter in Accretion Flows around a Black Hole with Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkoti, Shreeram; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-01-01

    Black hole accretion is necessarily transonic; thus, flows must become supersonic and, therefore, sub-Keplerian before they enter into the black hole. The viscous timescale is much longer than the infall timescale close to a black hole. Hence, the angular momentum remains almost constant and the centrifugal force ˜ {l}2/{r}3 becomes increasingly dominant over the gravitational force ˜ 1/{r}2. The slowed down matter piles creating an accretion shock. The flow between shock and inner sonic point is puffed up and behaves like a boundary layer. This so-called Comptonizing cloud/corona produces hard X-rays and jets/outflows and, therefore, is an important component of black hole astrophysics. In this paper, we study steady state viscous, axisymmetric, transonic accretion flows around a Schwarzschild black hole. We adopt a viscosity parameter α and compute the highest possible value of α (namely, {α }{cr}) for each pair of two inner boundary parameters (namely, specific angular momentum carried to horizon, lin and specific energy at inner sonic point, E({x}{in})) which is still capable of producing a standing or oscillating shock. We find that while such possibilities exist for α as high as {α }{cr}=0.3 in very small regions of the flow parameter space, typical {α }{cr} appears to be about ˜0.05-0.1. Coincidentally, this also happens to be the typical viscosity parameter achieved by simulations of magnetorotational instabilities in accretion flows. We therefore believe that all realistic accretion flows are likely to have centrifugal pressure supported shocks unless the viscosity parameter everywhere is higher than {α }{cr}.

  13. Viscosity controls humidity dependence of N2O5 uptake to citric acid aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gržinić, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Berkemeier, T.; Türler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2015-12-01

    The heterogeneous loss of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) to aerosol particles has a significant impact on the night-time nitrogen oxide cycle and therefore the oxidative capacity in the troposphere. Using a 13N short-lived radioactive tracer method, we studied the uptake kinetics of N2O5 on citric acid aerosol particles as a function of relative humidity (RH). The results show that citric acid exhibits lower reactivity than similar dicarboxylic and polycarboxylic acids, with uptake coefficients between ∼ 3 × 10-4-∼ 3 × 10-3 depending on humidity (17-70 % RH). At RH above 50 %, the magnitude and the humidity dependence can be best explained by the viscosity of citric acid as compared to aqueous solutions of simpler organic and inorganic solutes and the variation of viscosity with RH and, hence, diffusivity in the organic matrix. Since the diffusion rates of N2O5 in highly concentrated citric acid solutions are not well established, we present four different parameterizations of N2O5 diffusivity based on the available literature data or estimates for viscosity and diffusivity of H2O. Above 50 % RH, uptake is consistent with the reacto-diffusive kinetic regime whereas below 50 % RH, the uptake coefficient is higher than expected from hydrolysis of N2O5 within the bulk of the particles, and the uptake kinetics is most likely limited by loss on the surface only. This study demonstrates the impact of viscosity in highly oxidized and highly functionalized secondary organic aerosol material on the heterogeneous chemistry of N2O5 and may explain some of the unexpectedly low loss rates to aerosol derived from field studies.

  14. Effects of viscosity in a partially ionized channel flow with thermionic emission

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2009-01-15

    The flow of the partially ionized gas inside thermionic hollow cathodes spans a diverse range of theoretical disciplines in plasma physics and fluid mechanics. Understanding and predicting the evolution of such flows has many practical implications because hollow cathodes are critical components of electric propulsion systems used onboard scientific and commercial spacecraft presently in space or in the mission planning stages. As space missions become more demanding of the propulsion system in terms of throughput, understanding and predicting failure mechanisms of the system becomes imperative. Two-dimensional numerical simulations of the partially ionized gas generated by a thermionic hollow cathode have been performed to quantify the effects of viscosity inside the cylindrical channel of the device. A comparison of the inviscid and fully viscous flow fields shows that viscosity has a significant impact on the atomic species and a lesser effect on the ions. The internal pressure is determined to be more than 40% higher compared to the inviscid solution and the Reynolds number for the flow of atoms is found to be less than 20 inside the channel. Although the Mach number is computed to be <0.1 for approximately 95% of the channel, the solution for the velocity flow field begins to deviate from the Poiseuille (parabolic) solution at about 50% of the channel due mainly to collisional drag with ions.

  15. Stability of viscosity stratified flows down an incline: Role of miscibility and wall slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sukhendu; Usha, R.

    2016-10-01

    The effects of wall velocity slip on the linear stability of a gravity-driven miscible two-fluid flow down an incline are examined. The fluids have the matched density but different viscosity. A smooth viscosity stratification is achieved due to the presence of a thin mixed layer between the fluids. The results show that the presence of slip exhibits a promise for stabilizing the miscible flow system by raising the critical Reynolds number at the onset and decreasing the bandwidth of unstable wave numbers beyond the threshold of the dominant instability. This is different from its role in the case of a single fluid down a slippery substrate where slip destabilizes the flow system at the onset. Though the stability properties are analogous to the same flow system down a rigid substrate, slip is shown to delay the surface mode instability for any viscosity contrast. It has a damping/promoting effect on the overlap modes (which exist due to the overlap of critical layer of dominant disturbance with the mixed layer) when the mixed layer is away/close from/to the slippery inclined wall. The trend of slip effect is influenced by the location of the mixed layer, the location of more viscous fluid, and the mass diffusivity of the two fluids. The stabilizing characteristics of slip can be favourably used to suppress the non-linear breakdown which may happen due to the coexistence of the unstable modes in a flow over a substrate with no slip. The results of the present study suggest that it is desirable to design a slippery surface with appropriate slip sensitivity in order to meet a particular need for a specific application.

  16. Clustering and viscosity in a shear flow of a particulate suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiskinmäki, P.; Åström, J. A.; Kataja, M.; Latva-Kokko, M.; Koponen, A.; Jäsberg, A.; Shakib-Manesh, A.; Timonen, J.

    2003-12-01

    A shear flow of particulate suspension is analyzed for the qualitative effect of particle clustering on viscosity using a simple kinetic clustering model and direct numerical simulations. The clusters formed in a Couette flow can be divided into rotating chainlike clusters and layers of particles at the channel walls. The size distribution of the rotating clusters is scale invariant in the small-cluster regime and decreases rapidly above a characteristic length scale that diverges at a jamming transition. The behavior of the suspension can qualitatively be divided into three regimes. For particle Reynolds number Rep≲0.1, viscosity is controlled by the characteristic cluster size deduced from the kinetic clustering model. For Rep˜1, clustering is maximal, but the simple kinetic model becomes inapplicable presumably due to onset of instabilities. In this transition regime viscosity begins to increase. For Rep≳10, inertial effects become important, clusters begin to breakup, and suspension displays shear thickening. This phenomenon may be attributed to enhanced contribution of solid phase in the total shear stress.

  17. A central-upwind scheme with artificial viscosity for shallow-water flows in channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Duenas, Gerardo; Beljadid, Abdelaziz

    2016-10-01

    We develop a new high-resolution, non-oscillatory semi-discrete central-upwind scheme with artificial viscosity for shallow-water flows in channels with arbitrary geometry and variable topography. The artificial viscosity, proposed as an alternative to nonlinear limiters, allows us to use high-resolution reconstructions at a low computational cost. The scheme recognizes steady states at rest when a delicate balance between the source terms and flux gradients occurs. This balance in irregular geometries is more complex than that taking place in channels with vertical walls. A suitable technique is applied by properly taking into account the effects induced by the geometry. Incorporating the contributions of the artificial viscosity and an appropriate time step restriction, the scheme preserves the positivity of the water's depth. A description of the proposed scheme, its main properties as well as the proofs of well-balance and the positivity of the scheme are provided. Our numerical experiments confirm stability, well-balance, positivity-preserving properties and high resolution of the proposed method. Comparisons of numerical solutions obtained with the proposed scheme and experimental data are conducted, showing a good agreement. This scheme can be applied to shallow-water flows in channels with complex geometry and variable bed topography.

  18. Contact line dynamics of electroosmotic flows of incompressible binary fluid system with density and viscosity contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Pranab Kumar; DasGupta, Debabrata; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-03-01

    We consider electrically driven dynamics of an incompressible binary fluid, with contrasting densities and viscosities of the two phases, flowing through narrow fluidic channel with walls with predefined surface wettabilities. Through phase field formalism, we describe the interfacial kinetics in the presence of electro-hydrodynamic coupling and address the contact line dynamics of the two-fluid system. We unveil the interplay of the substrate wettability and the contrast in the fluid properties culminating in the forms of two distinct regimes—interface breakup regime and a stable interface regime. Through a parametric study, we demarcate the effect of the density and viscosity contrasts along with the electrokinetic parameters such as the surface charge and ionic concentration on the underlying contact-line-dynamics over interfacial scales.

  19. MHD Stagnation point flows in the presence of resistivity and viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Gratton, F.T.; Heyn, M.F.; Biernat, H.K.; Rijnbeek, R.P.; Gnavi, G. )

    1988-07-01

    The authors analyze the steady state situation in which two separate and counterstreaming plasmas (assumed to be incompressible) carrying antiparallel magnetic fields are separated by a resistive current layer. Exact solutions are presented which describe the stagnation point flow pattern and magnetic field behavior which result. They incorporate the effects of viscosity, which enables us to model flows with vorticity. The uniform plasma flow which is obtained at large distances from the current layer allows us to specify finite values of the asymptotic magnetic field. The exact solutions complement those of a different type obtained by B.U.O. Sonnerup and E.R. Priest (1975) which assume potential flow, i.e., zero vorticity. The results they obtain are discussed in relation to observational features at the Earth's magnetopause.

  20. Small viscosity asymptotics for the inertial range of local structure and for the wall region of wall-bounded turbulent shear flow.

    PubMed Central

    Barenblatt, G I; Chorin, A J

    1996-01-01

    The small viscosity asymptotics of the inertial range of local structure and of the wall region in wallbounded turbulent shear flow are compared. The comparison leads to a sharpening of the dichotomy between Reynolds number dependent scaling (power-type) laws and the universal Reynolds number independent logarithmic law in wall turbulence. It further leads to a quantitative prediction of an essential difference between them, which is confirmed by the results of a recent experimental investigation. These results lend support to recent work on the zero viscosity limit of the inertial range in turbulence. PMID:11607688

  1. Better Strategies for Finite Element Solutions of Variable Viscosity Stokes Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenclever, Jörg; Phipps Morgan, Jason; Shi, Chao

    2010-05-01

    Accurate numerical solution of variable viscosity Stokes Flow is one of the most important issues for better geodynamic understanding of mantle convection and mantle melting. While a good Stokes solver is usually an integral part of a good Navier-Stokes solver, typically Navier-Stokes equations are solved for flow of a fluid with uniform viscosity. The lumped-mass-matrix is an excellent and cheap preconditioner for uniform viscosity Stokes flow (cf. Maday and Patera, 1989), therefore for most applications to Navier-Stokes flow the ‘Stokes' part of the problem is viewed as well-resolved. Unfortunately, the inverse-viscosity-scaled lumped mass matrix does not work nearly as well to precondition Stokes flow in a fluid with strongly varying viscosity. This issue is already central to accurate numerical studies of convection in Earth's silicate-fluid mantle (May and Moresi, 2008; van Geenen et al., 2009; Burstedde et al., 2009) and may become central for researchers investigating Navier-Stokes problems with lateral variations in viscosity. Here we discuss several known computational hurdles to progress, and suggest strategies that offer promise in overcoming them. The choices for solving the discrete pressure equation arising from Stokes flow typically involve several tradeoffs between speed and storage requirements. In exact math, the discrete pressure matrix S is symmetric, so that it should be possible to use a symmetric preconditioned conjugate gradient (CG) Krylov algorithm instead of needing an asymmetric GMRES (cf. Saad, 2003) or GCR (Generalized Conjugate Residual, cf. Van der Vorst, 2003) that would require ~10-50 times more storage of past search directions. However, a CG-like method requires that the action of both S and any pressure preconditioner must be almost perfectly symmetric. This means that we must be very careful about the effects of roundoff in any iterative solver-based pressure preconditioner that may introduce numerically asymmetric operators

  2. Nonlinear coupling of acoustic and shear mode in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with a density dependent viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, S.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2016-09-01

    The nonlinear propagation of low frequency waves, in a collisionless, strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP) with a density dependent viscosity, has been studied with a proper Galilean invariant generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model. The well known reductive perturbation technique (RPT) has been employed in obtaining the solutions of the longitudinal and transverse perturbations. It has been found that the nonlinear propagation of the acoustic perturbations govern with the modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation and are decoupled from the sheared fluctuations. In the regions, where transversal gradients of the flow exists, coupling between the longitudinal and transverse perturbations occurs due to convective nonlinearity which is true for the homogeneous case also. The results, obtained here, can have relative significance to astrophysical context as well as in laboratory plasmas.

  3. Surface Tension and Viscosity Measurements in Microgravity: Some Results and Fluid Flow Observations during MSL-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, Robert W.; Trapaga, G.; Flemings, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The viscosity of a liquid metal was successfully measured for the first time by a containerless method, the oscillating drop technique. This method also provides a means to obtain a precise, non-contact measurement of the surface tension of the droplet. This technique involves exciting the surface of the molten sample and then measuring the resulting oscillations; the natural frequency of the oscillating sample is determined by its surface tension, and the damping of the oscillations by the viscosity. These measurements were performed in TEMPUS, a microgravity electromagnetic levitator (EML), on the Space Shuttle as a part of the First Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL-1), which flew in April and July 1997 (STS-83 and STS-94). Some results of the surface tension and viscosity measurements are presented for Pd82Si18. Some observations of the fluid dynamic characteristics (dominant flow patterns, turbulent transition, cavitation, etc.) of levitated droplets are presented and discussed together with magnetohydrodynamic calculations, which were performed to justify these findings.

  4. Lie group analysis for the effect of temperature-dependent fluid viscosity with thermophoresis on magnetohydrodynamic free convective heat and mass transfer over a porous stretching surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, R.; Muhaimin, I.; Amin, Norsarahaida S.

    2010-01-01

    This article concerns with a steady two-dimensional flow of an electrically conducting incompressible fluid over a vertical stretching sheet. A scaling group of transformations is applied to the governing equations. The system remains invariant due to some relations among the parameters of the transformations. Impact of thermophoresis particle deposition in the presence of temperature-dependent fluid viscosity plays an important role on the concentration boundary layer. The results thus obtained are presented graphically and discussed.

  5. Triamine-Modified Polyimides Having Improved Processability and Low Melt Flow Viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A. (Inventor); Nguyen, Baochan N. (Inventor); Eby, Ronald K. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Addition-cured polyimides that contain the reaction product of an aromatic triamine or trianhydride analogue thereof, a reactive end group such as 5-norbornene-2, 3-dicarboxylic acid, ester derivatives of 5-norbornene-2, 3-dicarboxylic acid, anhydride derivatives of 5-norbornene-2, 3-dicarboxylic acid, or 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride, an aromatic diamine, and a dialkyl ester of an aromatic tetracarboxylic acid. The resultant starlike polyimides; exhibit lower melt flow viscosity than its linear counterparts, providing for improved processability of the polyimide. Also disclosed are methods for the synthesis of these polyimides as well as composite structures formed using these polyimides.

  6. A Study of Effects of Viscosity on Flow over Slender Inclined Bodies of Revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, H Julian; Perkins, Edward W

    1951-01-01

    The observed flow field about slender inclined bodies of revolution is compared with the calculated characteristics based upon potential theory. The comparison is instructive in indicating the manner in which the effects of viscosity are manifest. Based on this and other studies, a method is developed to allow for viscous effects on the force and moment characteristics of bodies. The calculated force and moment characteristics of two bodies of high fineness ratio are shown to be in good agreement, for most engineering purposes, with experiment. (author)

  7. A microfluidic device for simultaneous measurement of viscosity and flow rate of blood in a complex fluidic network

    PubMed Central

    Jun Kang, Yang; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Blood viscosity has been considered as one of important biophysical parameters for effectively monitoring variations in physiological and pathological conditions of circulatory disorders. Standard previous methods make it difficult to evaluate variations of blood viscosity under cardiopulmonary bypass procedures or hemodialysis. In this study, we proposed a unique microfluidic device for simultaneously measuring viscosity and flow rate of whole blood circulating in a complex fluidic network including a rat, a reservoir, a pinch valve, and a peristaltic pump. To demonstrate the proposed method, a twin-shaped microfluidic device, which is composed of two half-circular chambers, two side channels with multiple indicating channels, and one bridge channel, was carefully designed. Based on the microfluidic device, three sequential flow controls were applied to identify viscosity and flow rate of blood, with label-free and sensorless detection. The half-circular chamber was employed to achieve mechanical membrane compliance for flow stabilization in the microfluidic device. To quantify the effect of flow stabilization on flow fluctuations, a formula of pulsation index (PI) was analytically derived using a discrete fluidic circuit model. Using the PI formula, the time constant contributed by the half-circular chamber is estimated to be 8 s. Furthermore, flow fluctuations resulting from the peristaltic pumps are completely removed, especially under periodic flow conditions within short periods (T < 10 s). For performance demonstrations, the proposed method was applied to evaluate blood viscosity with respect to varying flow rate conditions [(a) known blood flow rate via a syringe pump, (b) unknown blood flow rate via a peristaltic pump]. As a result, the flow rate and viscosity of blood can be simultaneously measured with satisfactory accuracy. In addition, the proposed method was successfully applied to identify the viscosity of rat blood, which circulates in a

  8. Viscosity-dependent structural fluctuation of the M80-containing Ω-loop of horse ferrocytochrome c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jain, Rishu; Kumar, Rajesh

    2013-06-01

    To determine the effect of solvent viscosity on low-frequency local motions that control the slow changes in structural dynamics of proteins, we have studied the effects of solvent viscosity on the structural fluctuation of presumably the M80-containing Ω-loop by measuring the rate of thermally-driven CO-dissociation from a natively-folded carbonmonoxycytochrome c (NCO-state) in the 0.65-92.5 cP range of viscosity at pH 7.0. At low viscosities (⩽8 cP), the rate coefficient, kdiss for dissociation of CO from the NCO-state varies inversely with the viscosity, but saturates at high viscosities, suggesting that CO-dissociation reaction involves sequential stages that depend differently on solvent friction, i.e., solvent coupled and nonsolvent-coupled stages of the process. In the low viscosity regime (0.65 ⩽ ηs ⩽ 8.0 cP), the rate-viscosity data were fitted to modified Kramers model, kdiss = [A'/(σ + ηs)n]exp(-ΔG/RT), which produced internal friction, σ = 1.35 cP (±0.88), which suggests that the speed of CO-dissociation from NCO at ηs ⩽ 8.0 cP is controlled by internal friction.

  9. A Simple Model for the Viscosity of Rhyolites as a Function of Temperature, Pressure and Water Content: Implications for Obsidian Flow Emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, A. G.; Romine, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics of rhyolitic conduits and lava flows, requires precise knowledge of how viscosity (η) varies with temperature (T), pressure (P) and volatile content (X). In order to address the paucity of viscosity data for high-silica rhyolite at low water contents, which represent water saturation at near-surface conditions, we made 245 viscosity measurements on Mono Craters (California) rhyolites containing between 0.01 and 1.1 wt.% H2O, at temperatures between 796 and 1774 K using parallel plate and concentric cylinder methods at atmospheric pressure. We then developed and calibrated a new empirical model for the log of the viscosity of rhyolitic melts, where non-linear variations due to temperature and water content are nested within a linear dependence of log η on P. The model was fitted to a total of 563 data points: our 245 new data, 255 published data from rhyolites across a wide P-T-X space, and 63 data on haplogranitic and granitic melts under high P-T conditions. Statistically insignificant parameters were eliminated from the model in an effort to increase parsimony and the final model is simple enough for use in numerical models of conduit or lava flow dynamics: log η = -5.142+(13080-2982log⁡(w+0.229))/(T-(98.9-175.9 log⁡(w+0.229)))- P(0.0007-0.76/T ) where η is in Pa s, w is water content in wt.%, P is in MPa and T is in K. The root mean square deviation (rmsd) between the model predictions and the 563 data points used in calibration is 0.39 log units. Experimental constraints have led previously to spurious correlations between P, T, X and η in viscosity data sets, so that predictive models may struggle to correctly resolve the individual effects of P, T and X, and especially their cross-correlations. The increasing water solubility with depth inside a simple isothermal sheet of obsidian suggests that viscosity should decrease by ~1 order of magnitude at ~20m depth and by ~2 orders of magnitude at ~100m depth. If equilibrium water

  10. Dependence of neoclassical toroidal viscosity on the poloidal spectrum of applied nonaxisymmetric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Nikolas C.; Park, Jong -Kyu; Paz-Soldan, Carloa; Lanctot, Matthew J.; Smith, Sterling P.; Burrell, K. H.

    2016-02-05

    This paper presents a single mode model that accurately predicts the coupling of applied nonaxisymmetric fields to the plasma response that induces neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque in DIII-D H-mode plasmas. The torque is measured and modeled to have a sinusoidal dependence on the relative phase of multiple nonaxisymmetric field sources, including a minimum in which large amounts of nonaxisymmetric drive is decoupled from the NTV torque. This corresponds to the coupling and decoupling of the applied field to a NTV-driving mode spectrum. Modeling using the perturbed equilibrium nonambipolar transport (PENT) code confirms an effective single mode coupling between the applied field and the resultant torque, despite its inherent nonlinearity. Lastly, the coupling to the NTV mode is shown to have a similar dependence on the relative phasing as that of the IPEC dominant mode, providing a physical basis for the efficacy of this linear metric in predicting error field correction optima in NTV dominated regimes.

  11. Different elution modes and field programming in gravitational field-flow fractionation: field programming using density and viscosity gradients.

    PubMed

    Plocková, Jana; Chmelík, Josef

    2006-06-23

    In previous papers, several approaches to programming of the resulting force field in GFFF were described and investigated. The experiments were dealing with flow-velocity and channel thickness, i.e. factors influencing hydrodynamic lift forces (HLF). The potential of density and viscosity of carrier liquid for field programming was predicted and demonstrated by preliminary experiments. This work is devoted to experimental verification of the influence of carrier liquid density and viscosity. Several carrier liquid density and simultaneously viscosity gradients using water-methanol mixtures are in this work implemented in the separation of a model silica mixture. Working with the water-methanol gradients, one is not able to separate the influence of density from the contribution of viscosity. However, we found experimental conditions to show the isolated effect of carrier liquid density (two water-methanol mixtures of equal viscosity differing in their densities). In order to demonstrate the isolated effect of viscosity, we implemented in this work a new system of (hydroxypropyl)methyl cellulose (HPMC) carrier liquids. Three different HPMC compositions enabled to vary the viscosity more than two times at almost constant density. With increasing carrier liquid viscosity, the focusing and elevating trend was clearly pronounced for 5 and 10 microm silica particles. By the isolated effect of increased viscosity, the centre of the 10 microm particle zone was elevated to the streamline at 16% of the channel height. These experiments have shown that the influence of carrier liquid viscosity on HLF should be taken into account even at higher levels above the channel bottom, i.e. beyond the near-wall region. Further, it is shown that higher value of carrier liquid viscosity improves the separation of the model mixture in terms of time and resolution.

  12. The effects of rotational flow, viscosity, thickness, and shape on transonic flutter dip phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, Rakesh; Kaza, Krishna Rao V.

    1988-01-01

    The transonic flutter dip phenomena on thin airfoils, which are employed for propfan blades, is investigated using an integrated Euler/Navier-Stokes code and a two degrees of freedom typical section structural model. As a part of the code validation, the flutter characteristics of the NACA 64A010 airfoil are also investigated. In addition, the effects of artificial dissipation models, rotational flow, initial conditions, mean angle of attack, viscosity, airfoil thickness and shape on flutter are investigated. The results obtained with a Euler code for the NACA 64A010 airfoil are in reasonable agreement with published results obtained by using transonic small disturbance and Euler codes. The two artificial dissipation models, one based on the local pressure gradient scaled by a common factor and the other based on the local pressure gradient scaled by a spectral radius, predicted the same flutter speeds except in the recovery region for the case studied. The effects of rotational flow, initial conditions, mean angle of attack, and viscosity for the Reynold's number studied seem to be negligible or small on the minima of the flutter dip.

  13. A Novel Blood Viscosity Estimation Method Based on Pressure-Flow Characteristics of an Oxygenator During Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Okahara, Shigeyuki; Soh, Zu; Miyamoto, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hidenobu; Itoh, Hideshi; Takahashi, Shinya; Sueda, Taijiro; Tsuji, Toshio

    2017-03-01

    During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), blood viscosity conspicuously increases and decreases due to changes in hematocrit and blood temperature. Nevertheless, blood viscosity is typically not evaluated, because there is no technology that can provide simple, continuous, noncontact monitoring. We modeled the pressure-flow characteristics of an oxygenator in a previous study, and in that study we quantified the influence of viscosity on oxygenator function. The pressure-flow monitoring information in the oxygenator is derived from our model and enables the estimation of viscosity. The viscosity estimation method was proposed and investigated in an in vitro experiment. Three samples of whole bovine blood with different hematocrit levels (21.8, 31.0, and 39.8%) were prepared and perfused into the oxygenator. As the temperature changed from 37°C to 27°C, the mean inlet pressure (Pin ) and outlet pressure (Pout ) of the oxygenator and the flow (Q) and viscosity of the blood were measured. The estimated viscosity was calculated from the pressure gradient (ΔP = Pin  - Pout ) and Q and was compared to the measured blood viscosity. A strong correlation was found between the two methods for all samples. Bland-Altman analysis revealed a mean bias of -0.0263 mPa.s, a standard deviation of 0.071 mPa.s, limits of agreement of -0.114-0.166 mPa.s, and a percent error of 5%. Therefore, this method is considered compatible with the torsional oscillation viscometer that has plus or minus 5% measurement accuracy. Our study offers the possibility of continuously estimating blood viscosity during CPB.

  14. A New K-epsilon Eddy Viscosity Model for High Reynolds Number Turbulent Flows: Model Development and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T.-H.; Liou, W. W.; Shabbir, A.; Yang, Z.; Zhu, J.

    1994-01-01

    A new k-epsilon eddy viscosity model, which consists of a new model dissipation rate equation and a new realizable eddy viscosity formulation, is proposed. The new model dissipation rate equation is based on the dynamic equation of the mean-square vorticity fluctuation at large turbulent Reynolds number. The new eddy viscosity formulation is based on the realizability constraints: the positivity of normal Reynolds stresses and Schwarz' inequality for turbulent shear stresses. We find that the present model with a set of unified model coefficients can perform well for a variety of flows. The flows that are examined include: (1) rotating homogeneous shear flows; (2) boundary-free shear flows including a mixing layer, planar and round jets; (3) a channel flow, and flat plate boundary layers with and without a pressure gradient; and (4) backward facing step separated flows. The model predictions are compared with available experimental data. The results from the standard k-epsilon eddy viscosity model are also included for comparison. It is shown that the present model is a significant improvement over the standard k-epsilon eddy viscosity model.

  15. Sheared E×B flow and plasma turbulence viscosity in a Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Regnoli, G.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    The relationship between electromagnetic turbulence and sheared plasma flow in Reversed Field Pinch configuration is addressed. The momentum balance equation for a compressible plasma is considered and the terms involved are measured in the outer region of Extrap-T2R RFP device. It results that electrostatic fluctuations determine the plasma flow through the electrostatic component of Reynolds Stress tensor. This term involves spatial and temporal scales comparable to those of MHD activity. The derived experimental perpendicular viscosity is consistent with anomalous diffusion, the latter being discussed in terms of electrostatic turbulence background and coherent structures emerging from fluctuations. The results indicate a dynamical interplay between turbulence, anomalous transport and mean E×B profiles. The momentum balance has been studied also in non-stationary condition during the application of Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive, which is known to reduce the amplitude of MHD modes.

  16. Motion of nanoprobes in complex liquids within the framework of the length-scale dependent viscosity model.

    PubMed

    Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Sozanski, Krzysztof; Ochab-Marcinek, Anna; Szymanski, Jedrzej; Tabaka, Marcin; Hou, Sen; Holyst, Robert

    2015-09-01

    This paper deals with the recent phenomenological model of the motion of nanoscopic objects (colloidal particles, proteins, nanoparticles, molecules) in complex liquids. We analysed motion in polymer, micellar, colloidal and protein solutions and the cytoplasm of living cells using the length-scale dependent viscosity model. Viscosity monotonically approaches macroscopic viscosity as the size of the object increases and thus gives a single, coherent picture of motion at the nano and macro scale. The model includes interparticle interactions (solvent-solute), temperature and the internal structure of a complex liquid. The depletion layer ubiquitously occurring in complex liquids is also incorporated into the model. We also discuss the biological aspects of crowding in terms of the length-scale dependent viscosity model.

  17. A new correlation in predicting temperature-dependent viscosity of saturated liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jianxiang; Zhang, Laibin; Zheng, Mengmeng

    2017-01-01

    The Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman (VFT) correlation is the known most accurate equation used to estimate and predict temperature-dependent viscosity of fluids. But its accuracy analysis for saturated liquids is still unknown. In this paper, we checked its ability for 49 saturated liquids by using the data in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Webbook. Through detailed accuracy analysis, we found that the VFT correlation works qualitatively but does not work well quantitavely. We shown the temperature ranges in which the VFT correlation holds for absolute average deviations (AADs) of ˜1%, ˜2% and ˜5%. The corresponding coefficients are also obtained for engineers to use it directly. We also proposed a new four-parameter correlation to improve the predictive ability. We show that the new correlation holds for 5 fluids with AAD < 1%, 37 fluids with AAD < 2%, 43 fluids with AAD < 3% and 48 fluids with AAD < 4%.

  18. A lattice Boltzmann method for axisymmetric multicomponent flows with high viscosity ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haihu; Wu, Lei; Ba, Yan; Xi, Guang; Zhang, Yonghao

    2016-12-01

    A color-gradient lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is proposed to simulate axisymmetric multicomponent flows. This method uses a collision operator that is a combination of three separate parts, namely single-component collision operator, perturbation operator, and recoloring operator. A source term is added into the single-component collision operator such that in each single-component region the axisymmetric continuity and momentum equations can be exactly recovered. The interfacial tension effect is realized by the perturbation operator, in which an interfacial force of axisymmetric form is derived using the concept of continuum surface force. A recoloring operator proposed by Latva-Kokko and Rothman is extended to the axisymmetric case for phase segregation and maintenance of the interface. To enhance the method's numerical stability for handling binary fluids with high viscosity ratio, a multiple-relaxation-time model is used for the collision operator. Several numerical examples, including static droplet test, oscillation of a viscous droplet, and breakup of a liquid thread, are presented to test the capability and accuracy of the proposed color-gradient LBM. It is found that the present method is able to accurately capture the phase interface and produce low spurious velocities. Also, the LBM results are all in good agreement with the analytical solutions and/or available experimental data for a very broad range of viscosity ratios.

  19. Numerical simulation of turbulent free surface flow with two-equation k- eddy-viscosity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, V. G.; Mangiavacchi, N.; Tomé, M. F.; Castelo, A.; Cuminato, J. A.; McKee, S.

    2004-02-01

    This paper presents a finite difference technique for solving incompressible turbulent free surface fluid flow problems. The closure of the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is achieved by using the two-equation eddy-viscosity model: the high-Reynolds k- (standard) model, with a time scale proposed by Durbin; and a low-Reynolds number form of the standard k- model, similar to that proposed by Yang and Shih. In order to achieve an accurate discretization of the non-linear terms, a second/third-order upwinding technique is adopted. The computational method is validated by applying it to the flat plate boundary layer problem and to impinging jet flows. The method is then applied to a turbulent planar jet flow beneath and parallel to a free surface. Computations show that the high-Reynolds k- model yields favourable predictions both of the zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate and jet impingement flows. However, the results using the low-Reynolds number form of the k- model are somewhat unsatisfactory.

  20. Hydrodynamic force depends not only on the viscosity of solution but also on the molecular weights of viscogens.

    PubMed

    Lv, Chunmei; Zou, Dawei; Qin, Meng; Meng, Wei; Cao, Yi; Wang, Wei

    2013-08-27

    Many cellular processes, such as the diffusion of biomacromolecules, the movement of molecular motors, and the conformational dynamics of proteins, are subjected to hydrodynamic forces because of the high viscosities of cellular environments. However, it is still unknown how hydrodynamic forces are related to the physical properties of different viscogens. Here, using the atomic force microscope-based force spectroscopy technique, we directly measured the hydrodynamic forces acting on a moving cantilever in various viscogen solutions. We found that the hydrodynamic force is not only dependent on the viscosity but also related to the molecular weight of viscogens. Counterintuitively, at the same macroscopic viscosity, the hydrodynamic force rises with the increasing molecular weight of viscogens, although the local microscopic viscosity of the solution decreases. This finding provides insights into the origin of hydrodynamic forces in biomolecule solutions and could inspire many force-spectroscopy-based techniques to measure the molecular weight and conformational changes of biomacromolecules in biological settings directly.

  1. STUDIES ON THE ANOMALOUS VISCOSITY AND FLOW-BIREFRINGENCE OF PROTEIN SOLUTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, A. S. C.; Miall, Margaret; Needham, Joseph; Shen, Shih-Chang

    1944-01-01

    1. An extensive investigation has been made of protein particle shape using the methods of flow-birefringence and anomalous viscosity measurement in the coaxial cell. 2. As a result of investigations on a number of proteins, it is concluded that they may be divided into four groups. Group A consists of those which show flow-anomaly both in the bulk phase and in the surface film. These also show flow-birefringence in the bulk phase. Examples: tobacco mosaic disease virus nucleoprotein; myosin. Though corpuscular proteins, they have elongated particles before denaturation. Group B consists of those which show flow-anomaly only (in the first instance) in the surface film, and no flow-birefringence in the bulk phase. They are probably close to spherical in shape in solution, but form elongated particles as they denature in the surface film. After this process has been completed, they may show flow-anomaly also in the bulk phase. Some proteins show flow-anomaly in the surface film immediately it forms, others only show it after a certain time has elapsed for the building up of the film. We designate the former as group B1 and the latter as group B2. Group B1, immediate surface film flow-anomaly. Examples: serum euglobulin, amphibian embryo euglobulin b. Group B2, slowly appearing surface film flow-anomaly. After the film has once been fully formed and then dispersed by shaking, the solution may have the properties of that of a protein in group B1; i.e., anomalous flow in the film may occur immediately on testing in the viscosimeter. Examples: avian ovalbumin, amphibian embryo pseudoglobulin. Group C consists of those proteins which show flow-anomaly neither in the bulk phase nor in the surface film, under the conditions used by us. They are probably close to spherical in shape. Examples: insulin, methaemoglobin, amphibian embryo euglobulin c, mucoproteins. 3. The theoretical significance of protein fibre molecules, whether native or formed by denaturation in the living

  2. Online measurements of surface tensions and viscosities based on the hydrodynamics of Taylor flow in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yanhong; Guo, Chaohong; Jiang, Yuyan; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Lei

    2016-11-01

    This paper demonstrates an online measurement technique which can measure both surface tension and viscosity for confined fluids in microfluidic systems. The surface tension and viscosity are determined by monitoring the liquid film thickness deposited in a microchannel based on the hydrodynamics of Taylor flow. Measurements were carried out for pure liquids and binary aqueous liquid mixtures. The results agreed well with reference data and theoretical models. This novel method has considerable potential for measuring dynamic interfacial tension of complex mixtures. Furthermore, it offers opportunity for integrating property measurement with two-phase flow in microchannel, opening new lines of applications.

  3. Online measurements of surface tensions and viscosities based on the hydrodynamics of Taylor flow in a microchannel.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanhong; Guo, Chaohong; Jiang, Yuyan; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Lei

    2016-11-01

    This paper demonstrates an online measurement technique which can measure both surface tension and viscosity for confined fluids in microfluidic systems. The surface tension and viscosity are determined by monitoring the liquid film thickness deposited in a microchannel based on the hydrodynamics of Taylor flow. Measurements were carried out for pure liquids and binary aqueous liquid mixtures. The results agreed well with reference data and theoretical models. This novel method has considerable potential for measuring dynamic interfacial tension of complex mixtures. Furthermore, it offers opportunity for integrating property measurement with two-phase flow in microchannel, opening new lines of applications.

  4. Effect of fluid viscosity on the liquid-feeding flow phenomena of a female mosquito.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo Heum; Ha, Hojin; Seo, Eun Seok; Lee, Sang Joon

    2013-03-15

    Liquid-sucking phenomena by the two-pump system of female mosquitoes were investigated to understand the feeding mechanism. In most previous experimental studies on liquid-feeding insects, the net increase of mass was divided by the feeding time and fluid density to evaluate the intake rate. However, this weighting method is not so precise for mosquitoes, because they are too lightweight to measure the gain of mass accurately. In this study, the intake rate of female mosquitoes feeding on various sucrose solutions was estimated using a micro-particle image velocimetry technique. As the sucrose concentration increased from 1% to 50%, the intake rate decreased from 17.3 to 5.8 nl s(-1). In addition, the temporal volume variations of the two pump chambers were estimated based on the velocity and acceleration information of the flow at the center of the food canal of the proboscis. One pumping period was divided into four elementary phases, which are related to the different operational modes of the two pumps. According to the hypothetical model established in this study, the phase shift () between the two pump chambers increases from 14 to 28 ms and the percentage of reverse flow to forward flow in a pumping period decreases from 7.6% to 1.7% with increasing viscosity. The developed analytical methodology thus aids in the study of an insect's feeding mechanism.

  5. Design of a High Viscosity Couette Flow Facility for Patterned Surface Drag Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Tyler; Lang, Amy

    2009-11-01

    Direct drag measurements can be difficult to obtain with low viscosity fluids such as air or water. In this facility, mineral oil is used as the working fluid to increase the shear stress across the surface of experimental models. A mounted conveyor creates a flow within a plexiglass tank. The experimental model of a flat or patterned surface is suspended above a moving belt. Within the gap between the model and moving belt a Couette flow with a linear velocity profile is created. PIV measurements are used to determine the exact velocities and the Reynolds numbers for each experiment. The model is suspended by bars that connect to the pillow block housing of each bearing. Drag is measured by a force gauge connected to linear roller bearings that slide along steel rods. The patterned surfaces, initially consisting of 2-D cavities, are embedded in a plexiglass plate so as to keep the total surface area constant for each experiment. First, the drag across a flat plate is measured and compared to theoretical values for laminar Couette flow. The drag for patterned surfaces is then measured and compared to a flat plate.

  6. Global Stability for Thermal Convection in a Couple-Stress Fluid with Temperature and Pressure Dependent Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil; Choudhary, Shalu; Bharti, P. K.

    2013-09-01

    We show that the global nonlinear stability threshold for convection in a couple-stress fluid with temperature and pressure dependent viscosity is exactly the same as the linear instability boundary. This optimal result is important because it shows that linearized instability theory has captured completely the physics of the onset of convection. It has also been found that the couplestress fluid is more stable than the ordinary viscous fluid and then the effect of couple-stress parameter (F) and variable dependent viscosity (Γ) on the onset of convection is also analyzed.

  7. Determination of whole blood and plasma viscosity in term neonates by flow curve analysis with the LS300 viscometer1.

    PubMed

    Kuss, N; Bauknecht, E; Felbinger, C; Gehm, J; Gehm, L; Pöschl, J; Ruef, P

    2015-10-06

    Determination of shear stresses at given shear rates allow approximation of flow curves by mathematical models and to calculate viscosities of non-Newtonian fluids. In term neonates, the mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) is markedly below that of adults, therefore rheological properties of blood play an important role in maintaining perfusion. Whole blood viscosity was measured in umbilical cord blood taken from 62 term neonates using the LS 300 viscometer. Individual parameters that influence the viscosity of whole blood were measured: red blood cell (RBC) aggregation, plasma viscosity, hematocrit, and RBC deformability. The flow curve of whole blood of neonates was approximated by the method of Ostwald with the highest quality whereas in adults the best approximation was found by the method of Casson. With hematocrits of 0.40, the viscosity of whole blood in newborns approximated by Ostwald (9.84 ± 5.12 mPa·s) was significantly lower than that of adults (15.34 ± 3.01 mPa·s). The aggregation index of the blood of newborns was markedly lower (2.98 ± 2.12) than in adults (14.63 ± 3.50) whereas RBC deformability was higher in neonates. The viscosity of plasma determined by Ostwald revealed a lower exponent (n) in neonates (0.94 ± 022) compared to adults (1.01 ± 0.12) and the viscosity determined by Newton was lower in neonates (1.04 ± 0.16 mPa·s) than in adults (1.19 ± 0.07 mPa·s). The flow curve of neonatal blood which is best approximated by the model of Ostwald emphasizes its important viscous properties necessary for conditions with physiologically low blood pressure.

  8. Dependence of neoclassical toroidal viscosity on the poloidal spectrum of applied nonaxisymmetric fields

    DOE PAGES

    Logan, Nikolas C.; Park, Jong -Kyu; Paz-Soldan, Carloa; ...

    2016-02-05

    This paper presents a single mode model that accurately predicts the coupling of applied nonaxisymmetric fields to the plasma response that induces neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque in DIII-D H-mode plasmas. The torque is measured and modeled to have a sinusoidal dependence on the relative phase of multiple nonaxisymmetric field sources, including a minimum in which large amounts of nonaxisymmetric drive is decoupled from the NTV torque. This corresponds to the coupling and decoupling of the applied field to a NTV-driving mode spectrum. Modeling using the perturbed equilibrium nonambipolar transport (PENT) code confirms an effective single mode coupling between themore » applied field and the resultant torque, despite its inherent nonlinearity. Lastly, the coupling to the NTV mode is shown to have a similar dependence on the relative phasing as that of the IPEC dominant mode, providing a physical basis for the efficacy of this linear metric in predicting error field correction optima in NTV dominated regimes.« less

  9. Simultaneous effects of single wall carbon nanotube and effective variable viscosity for peristaltic flow through annulus having permeable walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzadi, Iqra; Nadeem, S.; Rabiei, Faranak

    The current article deals with the combine effects of single wall carbon nanotubes and effective viscosity for the peristaltic flow of nanofluid through annulus. The nature of the walls is assumed to be permeable. The present theoretical model can be considered as mathematical representation to the motion of conductive physiological fluids in the existence of the endoscope tube which has many biomedical applications such as drug delivery system. The outer tube has a wave of sinusoidal nature that is travelling along its walls while the inner tube is rigid and uniform. Lubrication approach is used for the considered analysis. An empirical relation for the effective variable viscosity of nanofluid is proposed here interestingly. The viscosity of nanofluid is the function of radial distance and the concentration of nanoparticles. Exact solution for the resulting system of equations is displayed for various quantities of interest. The outcomes show that the maximum velocity of SWCNT-blood nanofluid enhances for larger values of viscosity parameter. The pressure gradient in the more extensive part of the annulus is likewise found to increase as a function of variable viscosity parameter. The size of the trapped bolus is also influenced by variable viscosity parameter. The present examination also revealed that the carbon nanotubes have many applications related to biomedicine.

  10. Anisotropic eddy viscosity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, D.; Cabot, W.

    1996-01-01

    A general discussion on the structure of the eddy viscosity tensor in anisotropic flows is presented. The systematic use of tensor symmetries and flow symmetries is shown to reduce drastically the number of independent parameters needed to describe the rank 4 eddy viscosity tensor. The possibility of using Onsager symmetries for simplifying further the eddy viscosity is discussed explicitly for the axisymmetric geometry.

  11. Viscosity of liquid anorthite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cukierman, M.; Uhlmann, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    The viscosity of liquid anorthite has been determined over the temperature ranges between 1450 to 1620 C and 820 to 950 C. The high-temperature data agree well with previous experimental data and with predictions of the Bottinga and Weill model. The overall log (viscosity) versus 1/T relation exhibits pronounced and rather continuous curvature. The viscosity of anorthite is higher at any given temperature and more strongly temperature-dependent than that of the anorthite-rich lunar compositions 14259, 14310, and 15418. The room-temperature density of glassy anorthite (2.64 gm/cu cm) and the thermal expansion coefficients of glassy and liquid anorthite have also been determined. The volume expansion coefficient for the glass is about 0.000018 per deg C, and that for the liquid is about 0.000048 per deg C. These values are used to relate the high-temperature flow data to the predictions of free-volume theories.

  12. Viscosity-dependent drain current noise of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor in polar liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J. Y.; Hsu, C. P.; Kang, Y. W.; Fang, K. C.; Kao, W. L.; Yao, D. J.; Chen, C. C.; Li, S. S.; Yeh, J. A.; Wang, Y. L.; Lee, G. Y.; Chyi, J. I.; Hsu, C. H.; Huang, Y. F.; Ren, F.

    2013-11-28

    The drain current fluctuation of ungated AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) measured in different fluids at a drain-source voltage of 0.5 V was investigated. The HEMTs with metal on the gate region showed good current stability in deionized water, while a large fluctuation in drain current was observed for HEMTs without gate metal. The fluctuation in drain current for the HEMTs without gate metal was observed and calculated as standard deviation from a real-time measurement in air, deionized water, ethanol, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethylene glycol, 1,2-butanediol, and glycerol. At room temperature, the fluctuation in drain current for the HEMTs without gate metal was found to be relevant to the dipole moment and the viscosity of the liquids. A liquid with a larger viscosity showed a smaller fluctuation in drain current. The viscosity-dependent fluctuation of the drain current was ascribed to the Brownian motions of the liquid molecules, which induced a variation in the surface dipole of the gate region. This study uncovers the causes of the fluctuation in drain current of HEMTs in fluids. The results show that the AlGaN/GaN HEMTs may be used as sensors to measure the viscosity of liquids within a certain range of viscosity.

  13. Interfacial dynamics in pressure-driven two-layer laminar channel flow with high viscosity ratios.

    PubMed

    Matar, O K; Lawrence, C J; Sisoev, G M

    2007-05-01

    The large-scale dynamics of an interface separating two immiscible fluids in a channel is studied in the case of large viscosity contrasts. A long-wave analysis in conjunction with the Kármán-Polhausen method to approximate the velocity profile in the less viscous fluid is used to derive a single equation for the interface. This equation accounts for the presence of interfacial stress, capillarity, and viscous retardation as well as inertia in the less viscous fluid layer where the flow is considered to be quasistatic; the equation is shown to reduce to a Benney-type equation and the Kuramoto-Sivashinskiy equation in the relevant limits. The solutions of this equation are parametrized by an initial thickness ratio h0 and a dimensionless parameter S , which measures the relative significance of inertial to capillary forces. A parametric continuation technique is employed, which reveals that nonuniqueness of periodic solutions is possible in certain regions of (h0,S) space. Transient numerical simulations are also reported, whose results demonstrate good agreement with the bifurcation structure obtained from the parametric continuation results.

  14. Modelling transverse turbulent mixing in a shallow flow by using an eddy viscosity approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, C.

    2009-04-01

    The mixing of contaminants in streams and rivers is a significant problem in environmental fluid mechanics and rivers engineering since to understand the impact and the fate of pollutants in these water bodies is a primary goal of water quality management. Since most rivers have a high aspect ratio, that is the width to depth ratio, discharged pollutants become vertically mixed within a short distance from the source and vertical mixing is only important in the so-called near-field. As a rule of thumb, neutrally buoyant solute becomes fully mixed vertically within 50-75 depths from the source. Notably, vertical mixing analysis relies on well-known theoretical basis, that is Prandtl mixing length model, which assumes the hypothesis of plane turbulent shear flow and provides theoretical predictions of the vertical turbulent diffusivity which closely match experimental results. In the mid-field, the vertical concentration gradients are negligible and both subsequent transverse and longitudinal changes of the depth-averaged concentrations of the pollutants should be addressed. In the literature, for the application of one-dimensional water quality models the majority of research efforts were devoted to estimate the rate of longitudinal mixing of a contaminant, that is the development of a plume resulting from a temporally varying pollutant source once it has become cross-sectionally well-mixed, in the far-field. Although transverse mixing is a significant process in river engineering when dealing with the discharge of pollutants from point sources or the mixing of tributary inflows, no theoretical basis exists for the prediction of its rate, which is indeed based upon the results of experimental works carried on in laboratory channels or in streams and rivers. Turbulence models based on the eddy viscosity approach, such as the k-ɛ model, k-? and their variation are the most widely used turbulence models and this is largely due to their ease in implementation

  15. Effects of viscosity and conductivity stratification on the linear stability and transient growth within compressible Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Bijaylakshmi; Ramachandran, Ashwin; Sinha, Krishnendu; Govindarajan, Rama

    2017-02-01

    Accurate prediction of laminar to turbulent transition in compressible flows is a challenging task, as it can be affected by a combination of factors. Compressibility causes large variations in thermodynamic as well as transport properties of a gas, which in turn are known to affect flow stability. We study the stratification of individual transport properties and their combined behavior. We also examine the effect of a change in the magnitude of viscosity and conductivity on flow stability. The Couette flow of a perfect gas is our model problem and both modal and non-modal analyses are carried out. We notice a large destabilizing role of the increase in the conductivity value and a dramatic stabilizing effect of mean viscosity stratification, over a range of free-stream Mach number, Reynolds number, Prandtl number, and disturbance wavenumber. In the combined case, viscosity stratification plays a dominant role. We find this to be the case for finite-time transient growth in the parameter regime below linear instability as well as asymptotically at large time. A budget of the transient growth energy amplification is also shown to identify the effects of transport properties on the constituents of perturbation energy. The extensive results presented in this paper, we believe should motivate those studying more realistic flows to examine how these contrasting effects of stratification come together.

  16. Hartmann flow with temperature-dependent physical properties. [magnetohydrodynamics of liquid metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linn, G. T.; Walker, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Attention is given to the steady, fully developed, one-dimensional flow of a liquid metal in which thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, and viscosity are functions of temperature. It is found that the properties are decreasing functions of temperature and the first differences between temperature-dependent and constant properties are discussed.

  17. Plasma viscosity: a forgotten variable.

    PubMed

    Késmárky, Gábor; Kenyeres, Péter; Rábai, Miklós; Tóth, Kálmán

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation of plasma viscosity has been underutilized in the clinical practice. Plasma viscosity is determined by water-content and macromolecular components. Plasma is a highly concentrated protein solution, therefore weak protein-protein interactions can play a role that is not characterized by electrophoresis. The effect of a protein on plasma viscosity depends on its molecular weight and structure. The less spheroid shape, the higher molecular weight, the higher aggregating capacity, and the higher temperature or pH sensitivity a protein has, the higher plasma viscosity results. Plasma is a Newtonian fluid, its viscosity does not depend on flow characteristics, therefore it is simple to measure, especially in capillary viscosimeters. Its normal value is 1.10-1.30 mPa s at 37 degrees C and independent of age and gender. The measurement has high stability and accuracy, thus little alterations may be pathologically important. Inflammations, tissue injuries resulting in plasma protein changes can increase its value with high sensitivity, though low specificity. It can increase in parallel with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), but it is not influenced by hematocrit (anemia, polycytemia), or time to analysis. Based on these favorable features, in 1942 plasma viscosity was recommended to substitute ESR. In hyperviscosity syndromes plasma viscosity is better in follow-up than ESR. In rheumatoid arthritis, its sensitivity and specificity are better than that of ESR or C-reactive protein. Plasma fibrinogen concentration and plasma viscosity are elevated in unstable angina pectoris and stroke and their higher values are associated with higher rate of major adverse clinical events. Elevation of plasma viscosity correlates to the progression of coronary and peripheral artery diseases. In conclusion, plasma viscosity should be measured routinely in medical practice.

  18. Effects of Erythrocyte Deformability and Aggregation on the Cell Free Layer and Apparent Viscosity of Microscopic Blood Flows

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junfeng; Johnson, Paul C.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2010-01-01

    Concentrated erythrocyte (i.e., red blood cell) suspensions flowing in microchannels have been simulated with an immersed-boundary lattice Boltzmann algorithm, to examine the cell layer development process and the effects of cell deformability and aggregation on hemodynamic and hemorheological behaviors. The cells are modeled as two-dimensional deformable biconcave capsules and experimentally measured cell properties have been utilized. The aggregation among cells is modeled by a Morse potential. The flow development process demonstrates how red blood cells migrate away from the boundary toward the channel center, while the suspending plasma fluid is displaced to the cell free layer regions left by the migrating cells. Several important characteristics of microscopic blood flows observed experimentally have been well reproduced in our model, including the cell free layer, blunt velocity profile, changes in apparent viscosity, and the Fahraeus effect. We found that the cell free layer thickness increases with both cell deformability and aggregation strength. Due to the opposing effects of the cell free layer lubrication and the high viscosity of cell-concentrated core, the influence of aggregation is complex but. The lubrication effect appears to dominate, causing the relative apparent viscosity to decrease with aggregation. It appears therefore that the immersed-boundary lattice Boltzmann numerical model may be useful in providing valuable information on microscopic blood flows in various microcirculation situations. PMID:19323969

  19. Effects of shear rate and suspending viscosity on deformation and frequency of red blood cells tank-treading in shear flows.

    PubMed

    Oulaid, Othmane; Saad, Abdul-Khalik W; Aires, Pedro S; Zhang, Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    The tank-treading rotation of red blood cells (RBCs) in shear flows has been studied extensively with experimental, analytical, and numerical methods. Even for this relatively simple system, complicated motion and deformation behaviors have been observed, and some of the underlying mechanisms are still not well understood. In this study, we attempt to advance our knowledge of the relationship among cell motion, deformation, and flow situations with a numerical model. Our simulation results agree well with experimental data, and confirm the experimental finding of the decrease in frequency/shear-rate ratio with shear rate and the increase of frequency with suspending viscosity. Moreover, based on the detailed information from our simulations, we are able to interpret the frequency dependency on shear rate and suspending viscosity using a simple two-fluid shear model. The information obtained in this study thus is useful for understanding experimental observations of RBCs in shear and other flow situations; the good agreement to experimental measurements also shows the potential usefulness of our model for providing reliable results for microscopic blood flows.

  20. Thermal and Mechanical Erosion by Low-Viscosity Lava Flows at Hrad Vallis, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, J.; Leverington, D. W.

    2012-12-01

    involving lava flows with depths of 5 to 20 m and dynamic viscosities on the order of ~1 Pa s. These rates of incision are estimated to have been associated with lava discharges as great as ~100,000 to 600,000 cubic meters per second and Reynolds numbers well in excess of 10,000, suggesting fully turbulent flow. Consistent with the findings of recent modeling efforts (Hurwitz et al., 2012, Journal of Geophysical Research-Planets, v.117), incision rates by thermal mechanisms are estimated to have been especially significant at Hrad Vallis as a result of the low channel slopes typical of this system, and should have exceeded mechanical incision rates for slopes less than 0.09 degrees. A volcanic origin for the Hrad Vallis system is in accord with the volcanic origins recently suggested for other Martian outflow systems, and correspondingly has important implications regarding our understanding of the past nature of surface conditions on Mars, and the planet's near-surface volatile content.

  1. A carbon-free lithium-ion solid dispersion redox couple with low viscosity for redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhaoxiang; Koenig, Gary M.

    2016-08-01

    A new type of non-aqueous redox couple without carbon additives for flow batteries is proposed and the target anolyte chemistry is demonstrated. The so-called "Solid Dispersion Redox Couple" incorporates solid electroactive materials dispersed in organic lithium-ion battery electrolyte as its flowing suspension. In this work, a unique and systematic characterization approach has been used to study the flow battery redox couple in half cell demonstrations relative to a lithium electrode. An electrolyte laden with Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) has been characterized in multiple specially designed lithium half cell configurations. The flow battery redox couple described in this report has relatively low viscosity, especially in comparison to other flow batteries with solid active materials. The lack of carbon additive allows characterization of the electrochemical properties of the electroactive material in flow without the complication of conductive additives and unambiguous observation of the electrorheological coupling in these dispersed particle systems.

  2. Rayleigh convection in a closed cylinder--Experiments and a three-dimensional model with temperature-dependent viscosity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, A. X.; Moates, F. C.; Narayanan, R.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper our most recent research results on natural convection in a closed cylinder, where our interest focuses on pattern structure dependence on aspect ratio and on temperature-dependent viscosity, are summarized. The main results are (a) the experiments on the onset pattern and conditions for pure Rayleigh convection in circular cylinders compare favorably with linearized stability results of Hardin et al. [Int. J. Num. Methods Fluids 10, 79 (1990)], as well as three-dimensional nonlinear calculations made by us; and (b) experiments and nonlinear calculations indicate a variation of the patterns at and near the codimension two points when large temperature differences are introduced, so as to cause a substantial change in viscosity.

  3. Temperature Dependence of Density, Viscosity and Electrical Conductivity for Hg-Based II-VI Semiconductor Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.; Scripa, R. N.; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    2004-01-01

    The relaxation phenomenon of semiconductor melts, or the change of melt structure with time, impacts the crystal growth process and the eventual quality of the crystal. The thermophysical properties of the melt are good indicators of such changes in melt structure. Also, thermophysical properties are essential to the accurate predication of the crystal growth process by computational modeling. Currently, the temperature dependent thermophysical property data for the Hg-based II-VI semiconductor melts are scarce. This paper reports the results on the temperature dependence of melt density, viscosity and electrical conductivity of Hg-based II-VI compounds. The melt density was measured using a pycnometric method, and the viscosity and electrical conductivity were measured by a transient torque method. Results were compared with available published data and showed good agreement. The implication of the structural changes at different temperature ranges was also studied and discussed.

  4. Global well-posedness for the incompressible MHD equations with density-dependent viscosity and resistivity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Xin; Ye, Xia

    2016-10-01

    This paper concerns an initial-boundary value problem of the inhomogeneous incompressible MHD equations in a smooth bounded domain. The viscosity and resistivity coefficients are density-dependent. The global well-posedness of strong solutions is established, provided the initial norms of velocity and magnetic field are suitably small in some sense, or the lower bound of the transport coefficients are large enough. More importantly, there is not any smallness condition on the density and its gradient.

  5. Density- and viscosity-stratified gravity currents: Insight from laboratory experiments and implications for submarine flow deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amy, L. A.; Peakall, J.; Talling, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    Vertical stratification of particle concentration is a common if not ubiquitous feature of submarine particulate gravity flows. To investigate the control of stratification on current behaviour, analogue stratified flows were studied using laboratory experiments. Stratified density currents were generated by releasing two-layer glycerol solutions into a tank of water. Flows were sustained for periods of tens of seconds and their velocity and concentration measured. In a set of experiments the strength of the initial density and viscosity stratification was increased by progressively varying the lower-layer concentration, CL. Two types of current were observed indicating two regimes of behaviour. Currents with a faster-moving high-concentration basal region that outran the upper layer were produced if CL < 75%. Above this critical value of CL, currents were formed with a relatively slow, high-concentration base that lagged behind the flow front. The observed transition in behaviour is interpreted to indicate a change from inertia- to viscosity-dominated flow with increasing concentration. The reduction in lower-layer velocity at high concentrations is explained by enhanced drag at low Reynolds numbers. Results show that vertical stratification produces longitudinal stratification in the currents. Furthermore, different vertical and temporal velocity and concentration profiles characterise the observed flow types. Implications for the deposit character of particle-laden currents are discussed and illustrated using examples from ancient turbidite systems.

  6. g-Jitter mixed convective slip flow of nanofluid past a permeable stretching sheet embedded in a Darcian porous media with variable viscosity.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammed J; Khan, Waqar A; Amin, Norsarahaida S

    2014-01-01

    The unsteady two-dimensional laminar g-Jitter mixed convective boundary layer flow of Cu-water and Al2O3-water nanofluids past a permeable stretching sheet in a Darcian porous is studied by using an implicit finite difference numerical method with quasi-linearization technique. It is assumed that the plate is subjected to velocity and thermal slip boundary conditions. We have considered temperature dependent viscosity. The governing boundary layer equations are converted into non-similar equations using suitable transformations, before being solved numerically. The transport equations have been shown to be controlled by a number of parameters including viscosity parameter, Darcy number, nanoparticle volume fraction, Prandtl number, velocity slip, thermal slip, suction/injection and mixed convection parameters. The dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles as well as friction factor and heat transfer rates are presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the velocity reduces with velocity slip parameter for both nanofluids for fluid with both constant and variable properties. It is further found that the skin friction decreases with both Darcy number and momentum slip parameter while it increases with viscosity variation parameter. The surface temperature increases as the dimensionless time increases for both nanofluids. Nusselt numbers increase with mixed convection parameter and Darcy numbers and decreases with the momentum slip. Excellent agreement is found between the numerical results of the present paper with published results.

  7. g-Jitter Mixed Convective Slip Flow of Nanofluid past a Permeable Stretching Sheet Embedded in a Darcian Porous Media with Variable Viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammed J.; Khan, Waqar A.; Amin, Norsarahaida S.

    2014-01-01

    The unsteady two-dimensional laminar g-Jitter mixed convective boundary layer flow of Cu-water and Al2O3-water nanofluids past a permeable stretching sheet in a Darcian porous is studied by using an implicit finite difference numerical method with quasi-linearization technique. It is assumed that the plate is subjected to velocity and thermal slip boundary conditions. We have considered temperature dependent viscosity. The governing boundary layer equations are converted into non-similar equations using suitable transformations, before being solved numerically. The transport equations have been shown to be controlled by a number of parameters including viscosity parameter, Darcy number, nanoparticle volume fraction, Prandtl number, velocity slip, thermal slip, suction/injection and mixed convection parameters. The dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles as well as friction factor and heat transfer rates are presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the velocity reduces with velocity slip parameter for both nanofluids for fluid with both constant and variable properties. It is further found that the skin friction decreases with both Darcy number and momentum slip parameter while it increases with viscosity variation parameter. The surface temperature increases as the dimensionless time increases for both nanofluids. Nusselt numbers increase with mixed convection parameter and Darcy numbers and decreases with the momentum slip. Excellent agreement is found between the numerical results of the present paper with published results. PMID:24927277

  8. Investigating plasma viscosity with fast framing photography in the ZaP-HD Flow Z-Pinch experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weed, Jonathan Robert

    The ZaP-HD Flow Z-Pinch experiment investigates the stabilizing effect of sheared axial flows while scaling toward a high-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP > 100 GPa). Stabilizing flows may persist until viscous forces dissipate a sheared flow profile. Plasma viscosity is investigated by measuring scale lengths in turbulence intentionally introduced in the plasma flow. A boron nitride turbulence-tripping probe excites small scale length turbulence in the plasma, and fast framing optical cameras are used to study time-evolved turbulent structures and viscous dissipation. A Hadland Imacon 790 fast framing camera is modified for digital image capture, but features insufficient resolution to study turbulent structures. A Shimadzu HPV-X camera captures the evolution of turbulent structures with great spatial and temporal resolution, but is unable to resolve the anticipated Kolmogorov scale in ZaP-HD as predicted by a simplified pinch model.

  9. Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) examination on blood flow through a multiple stenosed artery with variable nanofluid viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, S.; Ijaz, S.

    2015-10-01

    The present theoretical model deals with the analysis of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity of a single wall carbon nanotube within the considered base fluid flowing through multiple stenosed arteries. A mathematical model is presented for the mild stenosis case and then solved by using symmetry boundary conditions to determine the exact solution of temperature, axial velocity and pressure gradient. The main hemodynamics due to multiple stenosis is also computed under the influence of a SWCNT. Numerical simulations are presented for the SWCNT with different values of nanoparticles volume fraction. The behavior of fluid flow for blood based SWCNT is discussed through graphs and streamlines.

  10. Temperature dependent performance of piezoelectric MEMS resonators for viscosity and density determination of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfusterschmied, G.; Kucera, M.; Wistrela, E.; Manzaneque, T.; Ruiz-Díez, V.; Sánchez-Rojas, J. L.; Bittner, A.; Schmid, U.

    2015-10-01

    It is the objective of this paper to report on the performance of piezoelectric MEMS resonators for viscosity and density measurements at elevated temperatures. A custom-built temperature controlled measurement setup is designed for fluid temperatures up to 100 °C. Piezoelectric single-side clamped resonators are fabricated, excited in 2nd order of the roof tile-shaped mode (13-mode) and exposed to several liquids (i.e. D5, N10, N35, PAO8, olive oil, ester oil and N100). At the next step, these results are analysed applying a straightforward evaluation model, thus demonstrating that with piezoelectric MEMS resonators the density (i.e. from {ρ\\min}=785 kg m-3 to {ρ\\max}=916 kg m-3) and viscosity (i.e. from {μ\\min}=1.20 mPa s to {μ\\max}=286.36 mPa s) values of liquids can be precisely determined in a wide range. Compared to standard measurement techniques, the results show for the first parameter a mean deviation of about 1.04% at 100 °C for all the liquids investigated. For the second parameter, the standard evaluation model implies a systematic deviation in viscosity with respect to the calibration being N35 in this study. This inherent lack of strength has a significant influence on the accuracy, especially at 100 °C due to fluids having a viscosity reduced by a factor of 30 for N100 compared to room temperature. This leads to relative deviations of about 23% at 100 °C and indicates the limits of the evaluation model.

  11. High viscosity gas fluidization of fine particles: An extended window of quasihomogeneous flow.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Jose Manuel; Castellanos, Antonio

    2006-08-01

    We explore the role of gas viscosity in the behavior of gas-fluidized beds of fine powders by means of experimental measurements using nitrogen and neon as fluidizing gases, and theoretical considerations. The existence of a nonbubbling fluidlike regime has been recently observed in beds of fine powders fluidized with nitrogen. Our experiments with neon reveal a discontinuous transition from heterogeneous fluidization to a highly expanded homogeneous fluidization state. We point out that increasing gas viscosity enhances the coherence of agglomerate swarms, which promotes a local void-splitting mechanism, thus improving the uniformity of fluidization. Our theoretical analysis predicts that further increase of gas viscosity would produce a full suppression of the bubbling regime, i.e., the uniformly fluidized bed would undergo a direct transition to a turbulent regime as seen in beds of nanoparticles fluidized by nitrogen and in liquid-fluidized beds of moderate-density beads.

  12. Drifting solutions with elliptic symmetry for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    An, Hongli; Yuen, Manwai

    2014-05-15

    In this paper, we investigate the analytical solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with dependent-density viscosity. By using the characteristic method, we successfully obtain a class of drifting solutions with elliptic symmetry for the Navier-Stokes model wherein the velocity components are governed by a generalized Emden dynamical system. In particular, when the viscosity variables are taken the same as Yuen [M. W. Yuen, “Analytical solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations,” J. Math. Phys. 49, 113102 (2008)], our solutions constitute a generalization of that obtained by Yuen. Interestingly, numerical simulations show that the analytical solutions can be used to explain the drifting phenomena of the propagation wave like Tsunamis in oceans.

  13. Predictions of flow through an isothermal serpentine passage with linear eddy-viscosity Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes models.

    SciTech Connect

    Laskowski, Gregory Michael

    2005-12-01

    Flows with strong curvature present a challenge for turbulence models, specifically eddy viscosity type models which assume isotropy and a linear and instantaneous equilibrium relation between stress and strain. Results obtained from three different codes and two different linear eddy viscosity turbulence models are compared to a DNS simulation in order to gain some perspective on the turbulence modeling capability of SIERRA/Fuego. The Fuego v2f results are superior to the more common two-layer k-e model results obtained with both a commercial and research code in terms of the concave near wall behavior predictions. However, near the convex wall, including the separated region, little improvement is gained using the v2f model and in general the turbulent kinetic energy prediction is fair at best.

  14. Influence of temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity structures on postseismic deformation predictions for the large 1946 Nankai subduction zone earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagi, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Shoichi; Hashimoto, Manabu

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the influence of spatial change of viscosity on postseismic deformation associated with the interplate 1946 Nankai earthquake (M 8.0) at the Nankai Trough, southwest Japan, we newly constructed a realistic viscoelastic structure model, taking into account temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity of materials. For this purpose, we first compiled leveling and triangulation data during postseismic periods and clarified characteristics of the amount and spatial patterns of postseismic vertical displacement and principal strain fields. Then, we calculated the spatial distributions of viscosity from temperature and flow fields, which were obtained from 2D subduction models. By incorporating the obtained viscosity structure into 3D viscoelastic finite element models, we constructed a temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity structure model (MODEL P2). Based on MODEL P2, we constructed a viscoelastic structure model, taking into account Poisson's ratio for the oceanic plate and low-velocity regions and the existence of low-viscosity materials beneath the Shikoku and Chugoku districts (MODEL P3), which were revealed from seismic tomography. We also constructed a conventional layered viscoelastic structure model (MODEL L1) and plate subduction model (MODEL P1) with constant viscosity for each region and evaluated the effects of different viscoelastic structures on postseismic surface deformations, using the coseismic slip distribution obtained by inversion analyses of geodetic data. We also compared the calculated surface deformations with the observed postseismic crustal deformations in and around Shikoku. The results show that postseismic surface deformation fields for the newly constructed MODEL P2 are rather different from those for MODELs L1 and P1. Landward horizontal displacements for MODEL P2 are smaller than those for MODELs L1 and P1, seaward horizontal displacements are negligible, and vertical displacement is characterized by small subsidence

  15. Free convection in a vertical duct of square cross section with variable viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Payvar, P. . Dept.of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    Nusselt numbers and dimensionless flow rates have been calculated as functions of Prandtl number, Grashof number, and a viscosity parameter that takes into account variation of viscosity with temperature. The dependence of heat transfer coefficient and flow rate on the viscosity parameter is shown to be strong enough to require consideration of temperature variation of viscosity for accurate calculations. The results are useful in the design of heat sink assemblies having square vertical slots.

  16. Magnetic viscosity by localized shear flow instability in magnetized accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, R.; Tajima, T.

    1995-01-01

    Differentially rotating disks are subject to the axisymmetric instability for perfectly conducting plasma in the presence of poloidal magnetic fields. For nonaxisymmetric perturbations, the authors find localized unstable eigenmodes whose eigenfunction is confined between two Alfven singularities at {omega}{sub d} = {+-} {omega}{sub A}, where {omega}{sub d} is the Doppler-shifted wave frequency, and {omega}{sub A} = k{parallel}v{sub A} is the Alfven frequency. The radial width of the unstable eigenfunction is {Delta}x {approximately} {omega}{sub A}/(Ak{sub y}), where A is the Oort`s constant, and k{sub y} is the azimuthal wave number. The growth rate of the fundamental mode is larger for smaller value of k{sub y}/k{sub z}. The maximum growth rate when k{sub y}/k{sub z} {approximately} 0.1 is {approximately} 0.2{Omega} for the Keplerian disk with local angular velocity {Omega}. It is found that the purely growing mode disappears when k{sub y}/k{sub z} > 0.12. In a perfectly conducting disk, the instability grows even when the seed magnetic field is infinitesimal. Inclusion of the resistivity, however, leads to the appearance of an instability threshold. When the resistivity {eta} depends on the instability-induced turbulent magnetic fields {delta}B as {eta}([{delta}B{sup 2}]), the marginal stability condition self-consistently determines the {alpha} parameter of the angular momentum transport due to the magnetic stress. For fully ionized disks, the magnetic viscosity parameter {alpha}{sub B} is between 0.001 and 1. The authors` three-dimensional MHD simulation confirms these unstable eigenmodes. It also shows that the {alpha} parameter observed in simulation is between 0.01 and 1, in agreement with theory. The observationally required smaller {alpha} in the quiescent phase of accretion disks in dwarf novae may be explained by the decreased ionization due to the temperature drop.

  17. Molecular structure, configurational entropy and viscosity of silicate melts: link through the Adam and Gibbs theory of viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, Charles; Neuville, Daniel R.

    2016-04-01

    The rheological and thermodynamic properties of silicate melts played a crucial role in the formation and the evolution of the Earth. For instance, they influenced the evolution of a plausible primordial magma ocean, and, as a result, the differentiation of the Earth mantle and crust. Further, they control the dynamic of volcanic eruptions. Because of that, modelling the viscosity or the heat capacity of silicate melts is crucial in order to model the physical processes they are involved in. The Adam and Gibbs theory of viscous flow offers a thermodynamic framework that assumes that the viscosity η (Pa s) at a temperature T (K) of a melt can be expressed as: log(η) = A + ----Be--- e T Sconf(T) (1) with Ae a pre-exponential constant related to the viscosity at infinite temperature, Be (J mol-1) a constant proportional to the potential energy barrier opposed to the cooperative rearrangement of the liquid structure and Sconf(T) (J mol-1 K-1) the melt configurational entropy. With expressing Sconf(T) as the sum of the residual entropy of the glass and of the variation in melt configurational heat capacity, it is possible to link existing thermodynamic and viscosity data for melts with various chemical composition, e.g., SiO2, NaAlSi3O8 or CaAl2Si2O8. Further, it also is possible to describe the viscosity variation induced by mixing Ca and Mg or Na and K in silicate melts, under the assumption that such mixing produces an ideal excess entropy of mixing. An interesting point in the Adam and Gibbs framework is that it assumes that viscous flow occurs through the cooperative re-arrangement of molecular sub-regions in the melt. From high temperature 29Si NMR and Raman spectroscopy data, it actually is known that viscous flow occurs because of the cooperative exchange of oxygen atoms between tetrahedral SiO2 units, allowing their motions. Therefore, it is tempting to link such structural knowledge to heat capacity and viscosity data through the use of equation 1. In this

  18. Trehalose-mediated inhibition of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase from Kluyveromyces lactis: dependence on viscosity and temperature.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, José G; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A; Uribe, Salvador

    2002-08-01

    The effect of increasing trehalose concentrations on the kinetics of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase from Kluyveromyces lactis was studied at different temperatures. At 20 degrees C, increasing concentrations of trehalose (0.2 to 0.8 M) decreased V(max) and increased S(0.5) (substrate concentration when initial velocity equals 0.5 V(max)), mainly at high trehalose concentrations (0.6 to 0.8 M). The quotient V(max)/S(0.5) decreased from 5.76 micromol of ATP mg of protein(-1) x min(-1) x mM(-1) in the absence of trehalose to 1.63 micromol of ATP mg of protein(-1) x min(-1) x mM(-1) in the presence of 0.8 M trehalose. The decrease in V(max) was linearly dependent on solution viscosity (eta), suggesting that inhibition was due to hindering of protein domain diffusional motion during catalysis and in accordance with Kramer's theory for reactions in solution. In this regard, two other viscosity-increasing agents, sucrose and glycerol, behaved similarly, exhibiting the same viscosity-enzyme inhibition correlation predicted. In the absence of trehalose, increasing the temperature up to 40 degrees C resulted in an exponential increase in V(max) and a decrease in enzyme cooperativity (n), while S(0.5) was not modified. As temperature increased, the effect of trehalose on V(max) decreased to become negligible at 40 degrees C, in good correlation with the temperature-mediated decrease in viscosity. The trehalose-mediated increase in S(0.5) was similar at all temperatures tested, and thus, trehalose effects on V(max)/S(0.5) were always observed. Trehalose increased the activation energy for ATP hydrolysis. Trehalose-mediated inhibition of enzymes may explain why yeast rapidly hydrolyzes trehalose when exiting heat shock.

  19. Dependence of viscosity of suspensions of ceramic nanopowders in ethyl alcohol on concentration and temperature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results of measurements of viscosity of suspensions including yttrium oxide (Y2O3), yttrium aluminum garnet (Y3Al5O12) and magnesium aluminum spinel (MgAl2O4) nanopowders in ethanol. Nanoparticles used in our research were either commercially available (Baikowski) or nanopowders newly developed in the Institute of Ceramics and Building Materials in Warsaw, Poland. The study was conducted in a wide range of shear rates (0.01 to 2,000 s−1) and temperature interval from -15°C to 20°C. A Haake Mars 2 rheometer from Thermo Fisher, Germany, was used in the Biophysics Laboratory at Rzeszów University of Technology. Most of the samples show a non-Newtonian behaviour. It was confirmed with a Rheo-NMR system from Bruker that 10% by weight of Y2O3 suspension is a non-Newtonian fluid. In this work, we also report an unexpected behaviour of the viscosity of some samples (Y2O3 and Y3Al5O12) due to sedimentation effect. PMID:22824064

  20. It takes three to tango: 1. Simulating buoyancy-driven flow in the presence of large viscosity contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suckale, Jenny; Nave, Jean-Christophe; Hager, Bradford H.

    2010-07-01

    Buoyancy-driven flow is of fundamental importance for numerous geodynamic phenomena. Since the equations of motion governing multiphase flow are rarely amenable to analytical solutions, numerical simulations provide a compelling alternative. They offer the ability to carefully analyze flow phenomena under differing regimes, initial conditions, and flow dynamics. The three key challenges in these computations are (1) the accurate solution of the equations of motion in the presence of large viscosity contrasts, (2) the representation of strongly deforming interfaces between different fluids, and (3) the accurate coupling of fluid and interface solver. In three dimensions, these challenges become even more intricate, and the appropriate choice of numerical scheme has a profound influence on the tractability, accuracy, robustness, and efficiency of the computational simulation. This is the first paper of two that examine numerical simulations of buoyancy-driven flow in the presence of large viscosity contrasts. In this paper, we present our numerical approach which tackles the above three main challenges through a combination of three numerical methods, namely, (1) an extended ghost fluid type discretization which we developed specifically for the Stokes regime, (2) the level set method, and (3) the extension velocity technique. We find that all three components are crucial to obtain a versatile numerical tool for simulating complex structures in evolving flow. We validate our code by reproducing four benchmark problems in two and three dimensions. We devote special attention to comparing our method to other existing techniques, detailing the advantages of this approach. Finally, we highlight several types of geophysical flow problems for which we believe our method to be well suited.

  1. Application of Light-Emitting Diodes and Photodiodes Coupled to Optic Fibers to Study the Dependence of Liquid Viscosity on Temperature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Victoria, L.; Arenas, A.

    2004-01-01

    A device designed to demonstrate the dependence of viscosity on temperature and to check the validity of the exponential relationship is described. The device has the advantage of versatility as it can be adapted to different types of viscosimeters.

  2. Experimental study on the relationship between the frequency-dependent shear viscosity and the intermediate scattering function of representative viscous liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-11-01

    The frequency-dependent shear viscosity of two representative viscous liquids, o-terphenyl and glycerin, was experimentally determined at several temperatures and compared with the intermediate scattering functions reported in the literature. A comparison based on mode-coupling theory succeeded in relating the frequency-dependent shear viscosity with the intermediate scattering function at the main peak of the static structure factor. It suggests that the slow relaxation mode of the shear viscosity of both liquids is governed by the density fluctuation at the main peak of the static structure factor, in spite of the differences in the details of their intermolecular interactions.

  3. Nucleosome and DNA-protein condensed structures in solution from flow birefringence and intrinsic viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, R.E.

    1980-10-01

    Highly sensitive streaming birefringence measurements combined with intrinsic viscosity are used to characterize the shape anisometry and optical anisotropy of nucleosomes over a range of salt concentration > 30 mM KCl and of structures obtained by the condensation of high molecular weight DNA with polylysine. These measurements appear useful for several reasons. Both streaming birefringence and intrinsic viscosity are hydrodynamic properties based upon the rotational diffusion of macromolecular particles and hence are inherently more sensitive to details of particle anisometry than are hydrodynamic properties based upon translational diffusion. An established body of both hydrodynamic and continuum dielectric optical theory is available with which to interpret streaming birefringence results. Extinction angles (i.e., mean orientation angles of particles in a velocity gradient) are entirely hydrodynamic properties, and hence can be interpreted through the rotational coefficient to characterize particle anisometry and to estimate absolute dimensions. The ratio of Maxwell coefficient to intrinsic viscosity is proportional to the absolute particle anisotropy. The high optical anisotropy of DNA relative to that of associated protein permits certain details of tertiary structure and shape anisometry to be estimated from the observed optical anisotropy compared to optical models involving the DNA alone. The method is essentially independent of solvent.

  4. Conditional stability for thermal convection in a rotating couple-stress fluid saturating a porous medium with temperature and pressure dependent viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil; Choudhary, Shalu; Mahajan, Amit

    2013-08-01

    A nonlinear stability threshold for rotation in a couple-stress fluid heated from below saturating a porous medium with temperature and pressure dependent viscosity is exactly the same as the linear instability boundary. This optimal result is important because it shows that linearized instability theory has captured completely the physics of the onset of convection. The effects of couple-stress parameter, variable dependent viscosity, medium permeability, Taylor number and Darcy-Brinkman number on the onset of convection are also analysed.

  5. Measurement of temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity of alumina and titania thermal oil nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśliński, Janusz T.; Ronewicz, Katarzyna; Smoleń, Sławomir

    2015-12-01

    In this study the results of simultaneous measurements of dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and pH of two nanofluids, i.e., thermal oil/Al2O3 and thermal oil/TiO2 are presented. Thermal oil is selected as a base liquid because of possible application in ORC systems as an intermediate heating agent. Nanoparticles were tested at the concentration of 0.1%, 1%, and 5% by weight within temperature range from 20 °C to 60 °C. Measurement devices were carefully calibrated by comparison obtained results for pure base liquid (thermal oil) with manufacturer's data. The results obtained for tested nanofluids were compared with predictions made by use of existing models for liquid/solid particles mixtures.

  6. A numerical study of magnetohydrodynamic transport of nanofluids over a vertical stretching sheet with exponential temperature-dependent viscosity and buoyancy effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Tripathi, Dharmendra; Khan, Zafar Hayat; Bég, O. Anwar

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a mathematical study is conducted of steady incompressible flow of a temperature-dependent viscous nanofluid from a vertical stretching sheet under applied external magnetic field and gravitational body force effects. The Reynolds exponential viscosity model is deployed. Electrically-conducting nanofluids are considered which comprise a suspension of uniform dimension nanoparticles suspended in viscous base fluid. The nanofluid sheet is extended with a linear velocity in the axial direction. The Buonjiornio model is utilized which features Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects. The partial differential equations for mass, momentum, energy and species (nano-particle concentration) are formulated with magnetic body force term. Viscous and Joule dissipation effects are neglected. The emerging nonlinear, coupled, boundary value problem is solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta fourth order method along with a shooting technique. Graphical solutions for velocity, temperature, concentration field, skin friction and Nusselt number are presented. Furthermore stream function plots are also included. Validation with Nakamura's finite difference algorithm is included. Increasing nanofluid viscosity is observed to enhance temperatures and concentrations but to reduce velocity magnitudes. Nusselt number is enhanced with both thermal and species Grashof numbers whereas it is reduced with increasing thermophoresis parameter and Schmidt number. The model is applicable in nano-material manufacturing processes involving extruding sheets.

  7. Confinement and viscosity ratio effect on droplet break-up in a concentrated emulsion flowing through a narrow constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khor, Jian Wei; Gai, Ya; Tang, Sindy

    2016-11-01

    We describe the dimensionless groups that determine the break-up probability of droplets in a concentrated emulsion during its flow in a tapered microchannel consisting of a narrow constriction. Such channel geometry is commonly used in droplet microfluidics to investigate the content of droplets from a concentrated emulsion. In contrast to solid wells in multi-well plates, drops are metastable, and are prone to break-up which compromises the accuracy and the throughput of the assay. Unlike single drops, the break-up process in a concentrated emulsion is stochastic. Analysis of the behavior of a large number of drops (N >5000) shows that the probability of break-up increases with applied flow rate, the size of the drops relative to the size of the constriction, and the viscosity ratio of the emulsion. We found that the break-up probability collapses into a single curve when plotted as a function of the product of capillary number, viscosity ratio, and confinement factor defined as the un-deformed radius of the drop relative to the hydraulic radius of the constriction. The results represent a critical step towards the understanding of the physics governing instability in concentrated emulsions.

  8. A study of wall shear stress in 12 aneurysms with respect to different viscosity models and flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Evju, Øyvind; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Mardal, Kent-André

    2013-11-15

    Recent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies relate abnormal blood flow to rupture of cerebral aneurysms. However, it is still debated how to model blood flow with sufficient accuracy. Common assumptions made include Newtonian behaviour of blood, traction free outlet boundary conditions and inlet boundary conditions based on available literature. These assumptions are often required since the available patient specific data is usually restricted to the geometry of the aneurysm and the surrounding vasculature. However, the consequences of these assumptions have so far been inadequately addressed. This study investigates the effects of 4 different viscosity models, 2 different inflow conditions and 2 different outflow conditions in 12 middle cerebral artery aneurysms. The differences are quantified in terms of 3 different wall shear stress (WSS) metrics, involving maximal WSS, average WSS, and proportion of aneurysm sac area with low WSS. The results were compared with common geometrical metrics such as volume, aspect ratio, size ratio and parent vessel diameter and classifications in terms of sex and aneurysm type. The results demonstrate strong correlations between the different viscosity models and boundary conditions. The correlation between the different WSS metrics range from weak to medium. No strong correlations were found between the different WSS metrics and the geometrical metrics or classifications.

  9. Dynamics of a high viscosity layer in response to shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaili, Ehsan; Staples, Anne

    2016-11-01

    We use the Shan-Chen multicomponent Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to investigate the time evolution of a thin liquid film (phase I) coating a solid surface under the action of a shearing force imposed by a surrounding fluid (phase II), whose viscosity is significantly lower than that of the film. The goal of this study is to use LBM to capture the contact line motion and interfacial dynamics for an oil-like liquid film which is driven by the upper phase (water) movement as a first approach to modeling thin film dewetting in wave swept marine environments. Lubrication theory is used to validate the results for the driven thin film, and the LBM simulations investigate the effects of the upper phase movement, lower phase thickness, and angle of the imposed shearing force on the thin film profile. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1437387.

  10. Rough dependence upon initial data exemplified by explicit solutions and the effect of viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. Charles

    2017-03-01

    In this article, we present some interesting non-steady explicit solutions to the 2D Euler and Navier–Stokes equations. Explicit calculations on the explicit solutions show that Navier–Stokes (and Euler) equations have the novel property of rough dependence upon initial data in contrast to the sensitive dependence upon initial data found in chaos. Through the explicit calculations, we are able to obtain a lower bound on the norm of the Fréchet derivative of the solution operator at the explicit solutions to the Navier–Stokes equations. The lower bound approaches infinity as the Reynolds number approaches infinity. For Euler equations, this lower bound is indeed infinity. The rough dependence property in the inviscid case is closely related to the theorem of Cauchy. The viscous effect on the theorem of Cauchy and the rough dependence property is also studied.

  11. Nonlinear evolution of resistive tearing mode instability with shear flow and viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Morrison, P. J.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of shear flow on the nonlinear evolution of the tearing mode is investigated via numerical solutions of the resistive MHD equations in slab geometry, using a finite-difference alternative-direction implicit method. It was found that, when the shear flow is small (V less than 0.3), the tearing mode saturates within one resistive time, whereas for larger flows the nonlinear saturation develops on longer time scales. The magnetic energy release decreases and the saturation time increases with increasing values of V for both small and large resistivity. Shear flow was found to decrease the saturated magnetic island width and to generate currents far from the tearing layer. Results suggest that equilibrium shear flow may improve the confinement of tokamak plasma.

  12. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of contact angle and its hysteresis in two-phase flow with large viscosity difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haihu; Ju, Yaping; Wang, Ningning; Xi, Guang; Zhang, Yonghao

    2015-09-01

    Contact angle hysteresis is an important physical phenomenon omnipresent in nature and various industrial processes, but its effects are not considered in many existing multiphase flow simulations due to modeling complexity. In this work, a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is developed to simulate the contact-line dynamics with consideration of the contact angle hysteresis for a broad range of kinematic viscosity ratios. In this method, the immiscible two-phase flow is described by a color-fluid model, in which the multiple-relaxation-time collision operator is adopted to increase numerical stability and suppress unphysical spurious currents at the contact line. The contact angle hysteresis is introduced using the strategy proposed by Ding and Spelt [Ding and Spelt, J. Fluid Mech. 599, 341 (2008), 10.1017/S0022112008000190], and the geometrical wetting boundary condition is enforced to obtain the desired contact angle. This method is first validated by simulations of static contact angle and dynamic capillary intrusion process on ideal (smooth) surfaces. It is then used to simulate the dynamic behavior of a droplet on a nonideal (inhomogeneous) surface subject to a simple shear flow. When the droplet remains pinned on the surface due to hysteresis, the steady interface shapes of the droplet quantitatively agree well with the previous numerical results. Four typical motion modes of contact points, as observed in a recent study, are qualitatively reproduced with varying advancing and receding contact angles. The viscosity ratio is found to have a notable impact on the droplet deformation, breakup, and hysteresis behavior. Finally, this method is extended to simulate the droplet breakup in a microfluidic T junction, with one half of the wall surface ideal and the other half nonideal. Due to the contact angle hysteresis, the droplet asymmetrically breaks up into two daughter droplets with the smaller one in the nonideal branch channel, and the behavior of

  13. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of contact angle and its hysteresis in two-phase flow with large viscosity difference.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haihu; Ju, Yaping; Wang, Ningning; Xi, Guang; Zhang, Yonghao

    2015-09-01

    Contact angle hysteresis is an important physical phenomenon omnipresent in nature and various industrial processes, but its effects are not considered in many existing multiphase flow simulations due to modeling complexity. In this work, a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is developed to simulate the contact-line dynamics with consideration of the contact angle hysteresis for a broad range of kinematic viscosity ratios. In this method, the immiscible two-phase flow is described by a color-fluid model, in which the multiple-relaxation-time collision operator is adopted to increase numerical stability and suppress unphysical spurious currents at the contact line. The contact angle hysteresis is introduced using the strategy proposed by Ding and Spelt [Ding and Spelt, J. Fluid Mech. 599, 341 (2008)JFLSA70022-112010.1017/S0022112008000190], and the geometrical wetting boundary condition is enforced to obtain the desired contact angle. This method is first validated by simulations of static contact angle and dynamic capillary intrusion process on ideal (smooth) surfaces. It is then used to simulate the dynamic behavior of a droplet on a nonideal (inhomogeneous) surface subject to a simple shear flow. When the droplet remains pinned on the surface due to hysteresis, the steady interface shapes of the droplet quantitatively agree well with the previous numerical results. Four typical motion modes of contact points, as observed in a recent study, are qualitatively reproduced with varying advancing and receding contact angles. The viscosity ratio is found to have a notable impact on the droplet deformation, breakup, and hysteresis behavior. Finally, this method is extended to simulate the droplet breakup in a microfluidic T junction, with one half of the wall surface ideal and the other half nonideal. Due to the contact angle hysteresis, the droplet asymmetrically breaks up into two daughter droplets with the smaller one in the nonideal branch channel, and the

  14. Optical viscosity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cheng-Ling; Peyroux, Juliette; Perez, Alex; Tsui, Chi-Leung; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2009-03-01

    Viscosity measurement by bend loss of fiber is presented. The sensing principle makes use of the damping characteristic of a vibrating optical fiber probe with fix-free end configuration. By measuring the displacement of the fiber probe, the viscosity can be determined by matching the probe's displacement with the displacement built in the database obtained by either experimental method or Finite element calculation. Experimental results are presented by measuring the sucrose and glycerol solutions of different concentrations with a viscosity varying from 1 to 15 cP. Stokes' flow assumption is utilized to attenuate the mass density effect and simplify the viscosity measurement.

  15. Viscosity measurement techniques in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study two main groups of viscosity measurement techniques are used to measure the viscosity of a simple fluid using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, DPD. In the first method, a microscopic definition of the pressure tensor is used in equilibrium and out of equilibrium to measure the zero-shear viscosity and shear viscosity, respectively. In the second method, a periodic Poiseuille flow and start-up transient shear flow is used and the shear viscosity is obtained from the velocity profiles by a numerical fitting procedure. Using the standard Lees-Edward boundary condition for DPD will result in incorrect velocity profiles at high values of the dissipative parameter. Although this issue was partially addressed in Chatterjee (2007), in this work we present further modifications (Lagrangian approach) to the original LE boundary condition (Eulerian approach) that will fix the deviation from the desired shear rate at high values of the dissipative parameter and decrease the noise to signal ratios in stress measurement while increases the accessible low shear rate window. Also, the thermostat effect of the dissipative and random forces is coupled to the dynamic response of the system and affects the transport properties like the viscosity and diffusion coefficient. We investigated thoroughly the dependency of viscosity measured by both Eulerian and Lagrangian methodologies, as well as numerical fitting procedures and found that all the methods are in quantitative agreement.

  16. Study of blood viscosity at low shear rate and its flow through viscoelastic tubes and ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, N.; Sarkar, A.; Srinivas, A.; Kapusetti, G.

    2012-02-01

    A nonlinear mathematical model is developed analytically to study the flow characteristics of visco-elastic fluid through a visco-elastic pipe when it is subjected to external body acceleration. The equations governing the motion of the system are solved analytically with the use of appropriate boundary conditions. For the present scope of study the flow of visco-elastic fluid (blood) in smaller artery which is visco-elastic in nature has been taken. The artery is assumed to be a flexible cylindrical tube containing a non-Newtonian fluid. The unsteady flow mechanism in the artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from the normal functioning of the heart and also the external body acceleration. Numerical models have finally been developed for Newtonian and Non-Newtonian fluid in order to have a thorough quantitative measure of the effects of body acceleration on the flow velocity, volume flow rate and the wall shear stress of blood in normal human artery and when the artery gets stiffer, just to validate the applicability of the present mathematical model.

  17. Direct Determination of the Dependence of the Surface Shear and Dilatational Viscosities on the Thermodynamic State of the Interface: Theoretical Foundations.

    PubMed

    Lopez; Hirsa

    1998-10-01

    Recent developments in nonlinear optical techniques for noninvasive probing of a surfactant influenced gas/liquid interface allow for the measurement of the surfactant surface concentration, c, and thus provide new opportunities for the direct determination of its intrinsic viscosities. Here, we present the theoretical foundations, based on the Boussinesq-Scriven surface model without the usual simplification of constant viscosities, for an experimental technique to directly measure the surface shear (µs) and dilatational (kappas) viscosities of a Newtonian interface as functions of the surfactant surface concentration. This ability to directly measure the surfactant concentration permits the use of a simple surface flow for the measurement of the surface viscosities. The requirements are that the interface must be nearly flat, and the flow steady, axisymmetric, and swirling; these flow conditions can be achieved in the deep-channel viscometer driven at relatively fast rates. The tangential stress balance on such an interface leads to two equations; the balance in the azimuthal direction involves only µs and its gradients, and the balance in the radial direction involves both µs and kappas and their gradients. By further exploiting recent developments in laser-based flow measuring techniques, the surface velocities and their gradients which appear in the two equations can be measured directly. The surface tension gradient, which appears in the radial balance equation, is incorporated from the equation of state for the surfactant system and direct measurements of the surfactant surface concentration distribution. The stress balance equations are then ordinary differential equations in the surface viscosities as functions of radial position, which can be readily integrated. Since c is measured as a function of radial position, we then have a direct measurement of µs and kappas as functions of c. Numerical computations of the Navier-Stokes equations are performed

  18. Collision energy dependence of viscous hydrodynamic flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chun; Heinz, Ulrich

    2012-05-01

    Using a (2+1)-dimensional viscous hydrodynamical model, we study the dependence of flow observables on the collision energy ranging from s=7.7A GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to s=2760A GeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). With a realistic equation of state, Glauber model initial conditions, and a small specific shear viscosity η/s=0.08, the differential charged hadron elliptic flow v2ch(pT,s) is found to exhibit a very broad maximum as a function of s around top RHIC energy, rendering it almost independent of collision energy for 39⩽s⩽2760A GeV. Compared to ideal fluid dynamical simulations, this “saturation” of elliptic flow is shifted to higher collision energies by shear viscous effects. For color-glass-motivated Monte Carlo-Kharzeev-Levin-Nardi initial conditions, which require a larger shear viscosity η/s=0.2 to reproduce the measured elliptic flow, a similar saturation is not observed up to LHC energies, except for very low pT. We emphasize that this saturation of the elliptic flow is not associated with the QCD phase transition, but arises from the interplay between radial and elliptic flow, which shifts with s depending on the fluid's viscosity and leads to a subtle cancellation between increasing contributions from light particles and decreasing contributions from heavy particles to v2 in the s range, where v2ch(pT,s) at fixed pT is maximal. By generalizing the definition of spatial eccentricity ɛx to isothermal hypersurfaces, we calculate ɛx on the kinetic freeze-out surface at different collision energies. Up to top RHIC energy, s=200A GeV, the fireball is still out-of-plane deformed at freeze-out, while at LHC energy the final spatial eccentricity is predicted to approach zero.

  19. Viscosity to entropy ratio of QGP in relativistic heavy ion collisions: The second-order viscose hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi Pari, Sharareh; Taghavi Shahri, Fatemeh; Javidan, Kurosh

    2016-10-01

    The nuclear suppression factor RAA and elliptic flow ν2 are calculated by considering the effects of shear viscosity to the entropy density ratio η/s, using the viscose hydrodynamics at the first- and second-orders of approximation and considering temperature dependent coupling αs(T). It is shown that the second-order viscose hydrodynamics (varying shear viscosity to entropy ratio) with averaged value of 4πη/s = 1.5 ± 0.1 gives the best results of RAA and ν2 in comparison to the experimental data.

  20. Buckling of thin viscous sheets with inhomogenous viscosity under extensional flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Siddarth; Wei, Zhiyan; Mahadevan, L.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the dynamics, shape and stability of a thin viscous sheet subjected to an extensional flow under an imposed non-uniform temperature field. Using finite element simulations, we first solve for the stretching flow to determine the pre-buckling sheet thickness and in-plane flow velocities. Next, we use this solution as the base state and solve the linearized partial differential equation governing the out-of-plane deformation of the mid-surface as a function of two dimensionless operating parameters: the normalized stretching ratio α and a dimensionless width of the heating zone β. We show the sheet can become unstable via a buckling instability driven by the development of localized compressive stresses, and determine the global shape and growth rates of the most unstable mode. The growth rate is shown to exhibit a transition from stationary to oscillatory modes in region upstream of the heating zone. Finally, we investigate the effect of surface tension and present an operating diagram that indicates regions of the parameter space that minimizes or entirely suppresses the instability while achieving desired outlet sheet thickness. Therefore, our work is directly relevant to various industrial processes including the glass redraw & float-glass method.

  1. Whole Blood Viscosity in Individuals with Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus: Exploring the Role of the Porous Bed Viscometer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    diabetes mellitus and to investigate the role that various cellular and plasma components play in determining blood viscosity at physiologic shear rates... diabetes mellitus and to investigate the role that various cellular and plasma components play in determining blood viscosity at physiologic shear rates.

  2. Extreme river flow dependence in Northern Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villoria, M. Franco; Scott, M.; Hoey, T.; Fischbacher-Smith, D.

    2012-04-01

    Various methods for the spatial analysis of hydrologic data have been developed recently. Here we present results using the conditional probability approach proposed by Keef et al. [Appl. Stat. (2009): 58,601-18] to investigate spatial interdependence in extreme river flows in Scotland. This approach does not require the specification of a correlation function, being mostly suitable for relatively small geographical areas. The work is motivated by the Flood Risk Management Act (Scotland (2009)) which requires maps of flood risk that take account of spatial dependence in extreme river flow. The method is based on two conditional measures of spatial flood risk: firstly the conditional probability PC(p) that a set of sites Y = (Y 1,...,Y d) within a region C of interest exceed a flow threshold Qp at time t (or any lag of t), given that in the specified conditioning site X > Qp; and, secondly the expected number of sites within C that will exceed a flow Qp on average (given that X > Qp). The conditional probabilities are estimated using the conditional distribution of Y |X = x (for large x), which can be modeled using a semi-parametric approach (Heffernan and Tawn [Roy. Statist. Soc. Ser. B (2004): 66,497-546]). Once the model is fitted, pseudo-samples can be generated to estimate functionals of the joint tails of the distribution of (Y,X). Conditional return level plots were directly compared to traditional return level plots thus improving our understanding of the dependence structure of extreme river flow events. Confidence intervals were calculated using block bootstrapping methods (100 replicates). We report results from applying this approach to a set of four rivers (Dulnain, Lossie, Ewe and Ness) in Northern Scotland. These sites were chosen based on data quality, spatial location and catchment characteristics. The river Ness, being the largest (catchment size 1839.1km2) was chosen as the conditioning river. Both the Ewe (441.1km2) and Ness catchments have

  3. Impact behavior of a high viscosity magnetorheological fluid-based energy absorber with a radial flow mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Benyuan; Liao, Changrong; Li, Zhuqiang; Xie, Lei; Zhang, Peng; Jian, Xiaochun

    2017-02-01

    High viscosity linear polysiloxane magnetorheological fluid (HVLP MRF) was demonstrated with excellent suspension stability. Such material is suitable for application in the magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAs) under axial impact loading conditions. On this basis, a new energy absorber incorporating a radial valve with high magnetic field utilization and a corrugated tube is proposed. In energy absorption applications where the MREA is rarely if ever used, our MREA takes the ultra-stable HVLP MRF as controlled medium in order for a long-term stability. For MREA performing at very high shear rates where the minor losses are important contributing factors to damping, a nonlinear analytical model, based on the Herschel-Bulkley flow model (HB model), is developed taking into account the effects of minor losses (called HBM model). The HB model parameters are determined by rheological experiments with a commercial shear rheometer. Then, continuity equation and governing differential equation of the HVLP MRF in radial flow are established. Based on the HB model, the expressions of radial velocity distribution are deduced. The influences of minor losses on pressure drop are analyzed with mean fluid velocities. Further, mechanical behavior of the corrugated tube is investigated via drop test. In order to verify the theoretical methodology, a MREA is fabricated and tested using a high-speed drop tower facility with a 600 kg mass at different drop heights and in various magnetic fields. The experiment results show that the HBM model is capable of well predicting the impact behavior of the proposed MREA.

  4. Lie group analysis for the effect of temperature-dependent fluid viscosity with thermophoresis and chemical reaction on MHD free convective heat and mass transfer over a porous stretching surface in the presence of heat source/sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, Ramasamy; Muhaimin, Ismoen; Saim, Hashim Bin

    2010-08-01

    This paper concerns with a steady two-dimensional flow of an electrically conducting incompressible fluid over a vertical stretching sheet. The flow is permeated by a uniform transverse magnetic field. The fluid viscosity is assumed to vary as a linear function of temperature. A scaling group of transformations is applied to the governing equations. The system remains invariant due to some relations among the parameters of the transformations. After finding three absolute invariants a third-order ordinary differential equation corresponding to the momentum equation and two second-order ordinary differential equation corresponding to energy and diffusion equations are derived. The equations along with the boundary conditions are solved numerically. It is found that the decrease in the temperature-dependent fluid viscosity makes the velocity to decrease with the increasing distance of the stretching sheet. At a particular point of the sheet the fluid velocity decreases with the decreasing viscosity but the temperature increases in this case. It is found that with the increase of magnetic field intensity the fluid velocity decreases but the temperature increases at a particular point of the heated stretching surface. Impact of thermophoresis particle deposition with chemical reaction in the presence of heat source/sink plays an important role on the concentration boundary layer. The results thus obtained are presented graphically and discussed.

  5. Measurement of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and viscosity of TiO{sub 2}-water nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Duangthongsuk, Weerapun; Wongwises, Somchai

    2009-04-15

    Nanofluid is an innovative heat transfer fluid with superior potential for enhancing the heat transfer performance of conventional fluids. Many attempts have been made to investigate its thermal conductivity and viscosity, which are important thermophysical properties. No definitive agreements have emerged, however, about these properties. This article reports the thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity of nanofluids experimentally. TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles dispersed in water with volume concentration of 0.2-2 vol.% are used in the present study. A transient hot-wire apparatus is used for measuring the thermal conductivity of nanofluids whereas the Bohlin rotational rheometer (Malvern Instrument) is used to measure the viscosity of nanofluids. The data are collected for temperatures ranging from 15 C to 35 C. The results show that the measured viscosity and thermal conductivity of nanofluids increased as the particle concentrations increased and are higher than the values of the base liquids. Furthermore, thermal conductivity of nanofluids increased with increasing nanofluid temperatures and, conversely, the viscosity of nanofluids decreased with increasing temperature of nanofluids. Moreover, the measured thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids are quite different from the predicted values from the existing correlations and the data reported by other researchers. Finally, new thermophysical correlations are proposed for predicting the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids. (author)

  6. Free convective heat transfer of MHD Cu-kerosene nanofluid over a cone with temperature dependent viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, C. S. K.; Sandeep, N.; Malvandi, A.

    2016-12-01

    Nanofluids are potential heat transfer fluids with enhanced thermal and physical properties can be applied in many areas. External magnetic field have tendency to set the thermal and physical properties of nanofluids. With this motivation, we investigated the effects of temperature dependent viscosity, heat source/sink and viscous dissipation on natural convective heat transfer of radiative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) non-Newtonian nanofluid caused by a cone. For this study, a simulation is performed by mixing of copper nanoparticles in the kerosene. The self similar transformed governing equations are solved by enforcing Runge-Kutta based shooting technique. We acquire the significant accuracy of the recent results by comparing with the published results. In addition, it is indicated that the dual solutions exist for both the base fluid and nanofluid cases. The effects of dimensionless parameters including Eckert number, Weissenberg number, Power-law index, viscous variation parameter, heat source/sink, thermal radiation parameter, and magnetic field parameter on velocity and temperature fields along with the friction factor coefficient and the local Nusselt number are discussed with the help of graphs and tables. It is shown that nanoparticles inclusion into the non-Newtonian fluids has a positive effect on thermal performance. In addition, the viscous variation parameter has a tendency to encourage the friction factor coefficient as well as the heat transfer rate. Moreover, Cu-kerosene nanofluid signifies a better thermal performance than the Ag-kerosene nanofluid.

  7. Universality of Viscosity Dependence of Translational Diffusion Coefficients of Carbon Monoxide, Diphenylacetylene, and Diphenylcyclopropenone in Ionic Liquids under Various Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Y; Kida, Y; Matsushita, Y; Yasaka, Y; Ueno, M; Takahashi, K

    2015-06-25

    Translational diffusion coefficients of diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP), diphenylacetylene (DPA), and carbon monoxide (CO) in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([BMIm][NTf2]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([EMIm][NTf2]) were determined by the transient grating (TG) spectroscopy under pressure from 0.1 to 200 MPa at 298 K and from 298 to 373 K under 0.1 MPa. Diffusion coefficients of these molecules at high temperatures in tributylmethylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([P4441][NTf2]), and tetraoctylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([P8888][NTf2]), and also in the mixtures of [BMIm][NTf2], N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([Pp13][NTf2]), and trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([P66614][NTf2]) with ethanol or chloroform have been determined. Diffusion coefficients except in ILs of phosphonium cations were well scaled by the power law of T/η, i.e., (T/η)(P), where T and η are the absolute temperature and the viscosity, irrespective of the solvent species, pressure and temperature, and the compositions of mixtures. The values of the exponent P were smaller for the smaller size of the molecules. On the other hand, the diffusion coefficients in ILs of phosphonium cations with longer alkyl chains were larger than the values expected from the correlation obtained by other ILs and conventional liquids. The deviation becomes larger with increasing the number of carbon atoms of alkyl-chain of cation, and with decreasing the molecular size of diffusing molecules. The molecular size dependence of the diffusion coefficient was correlated by the ratio of the volume of the solute to that of the solvent as demonstrated by the preceding work (Kaintz et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2013 , 117 , 11697 ). Diffusion coefficients have been well correlated with the power laws of both T/η and the relative volume of the solute to the solvent.

  8. Excited-state dynamics and viscosity-dependent internal conversion in 3,3-dimethyl-2-phenyl-3H-indole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belletête, Michel; Sarpal, Ranjit S.; Durocher, Gilles

    1993-01-01

    The fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes (τ F) of 3,3-dimethyl-2-phenyl-3H-indole ( 1), in a series of eighteen nonpolar, polar aprotic and/or protic solvents, range from 2.4 X 10 -4 to 0.12 and from 1 to 520 ps, respectively, as a result of viscosity dependent fast internal conversion. Rates of internal conversion are shown to be dependent upon the bulk viscosity of the solvent as opposed to the microviscosity (free volume effect of the solvent). Both φ F (or τ F) = Cη 2/3 with an identical value of C whatever the nature of the solvent is. This molecule may then be regarded as an excellent viscosity probe for heterogeneous systems and polymers over a large range of viscosities. Various solvatochromic methods have been used to evaluate the ground and excited state dipole moments of 1. The Bilot—Kawski method gives optimized values of 3.8 and 7.8 D, respectively, with a negligible polarizability of the molecule.

  9. Continuum modeling of rate-dependent granular flows in SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Ryan C.; Andrade, José E.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss a constitutive law for modeling rate-dependent granular flows that has been implemented in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We model granular materials using a viscoplastic constitutive law that produces a Drucker-Prager-like yield condition in the limit of vanishing flow. A friction law for non-steady flows, incorporating rate-dependence and dilation, is derived and implemented within the constitutive law. We compare our SPH simulations with experimental data, demonstrating that they can capture both steady and non-steady dynamic flow behavior, notably including transient column collapse profiles. This technique may therefore be attractive for modeling the time-dependent evolution of natural and industrial flows.

  10. Exploring the relationship between protein secondary structures, temperature-dependent viscosities, and technological treatments in egg yolk and LDL by FTIR and rheology.

    PubMed

    Blume, K; Dietrich, K; Lilienthal, S; Ternes, W; Drotleff, A M

    2015-04-15

    Egg yolk and its main component, low-density lipoproteins (LDL), were consecutively pasteurised, optimally freeze-dried, and dispersed in various NaCl solutions (0-10%). Heat-induced changes in the protein secondary structures which accompanied viscosity-increasing aggregation processes were monitored using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to determine the intensities of intermolecular β-sheets (1622 cm(-1)) and results were compared with the temperature-dependent viscosities. Considerable changes in secondary structures observed after reconstitution of freeze-dried LDL had no detectable effect on the characteristic heat-induced viscosity curves but suggest that LDL plays a particular role in the unwanted gel formation of egg yolk after conventional freezing. For all egg yolk samples and all NaCl-containing LDL samples, the sigmoidal changes in the absorbance units vs. temperature curves corresponded with the first increase in heat-induced viscosity. Both analytical methods showed that the presence of ionic strength caused a shift in curve progressions towards higher temperatures, indicating increased thermal stability.

  11. Dilatational viscosity of dilute particle-laden fluid interface at different contact angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lishchuk, Sergey V.

    2016-12-01

    We consider a solid spherical particle adsorbed at a flat interface between two immiscible fluids and having arbitrary contact angle at the triple contact line. We derive analytically the flow field corresponding to dilatational surface flow in the case of a large ratio of dynamic shear viscosities of two fluids. Considering a dilute assembly of such particles we calculate numerically the dependence on the contact angle of the effective surface dilatational viscosity particle-laden fluid interface. The effective surface dilatational viscosity is proportional to the size and surface concentration of particles and monotonically increases with the increase in protrusion of particles into the fluid with larger shear viscosity.

  12. Flow regimes and parameter dependence in nanochannel flows.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chong; Li, Zhigang

    2009-09-01

    Nanoscale fluid flow systems involve both microscopic and macroscopic parameters, which compete with each another and lead to different flow regimes. In this work, we investigate the interactions of four fundamental parameters, including the fluid-fluid, fluid-wall binding energies, temperature of the system, and driving force, and their effects on the flow motion in nanoscale Poiseuille flows. By illustrating the fluid flux as a function of a dimensionless number, which represents the effective surface effect on the fluid, we show that the fluid motion in nanochannels falls into different regimes, each of which is associated with a distinct mechanism. The mechanisms in different situations reveal the effects of the parameters on the fluid dynamics.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the flow of binary immiscible fluids with different viscosities using the Shan-Chen microscopic interaction model.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jonathan; Boek, Edo S; Coveney, Peter V

    2002-03-15

    We present a lattice Boltzmann study of the flow of a binary fluid where the fluid components have different viscosities. For this purpose, a microscopic interaction model (due to Shan & Chen) is used. The model is validated for Poiseuille flow of layered immiscible binary fluids and the dispersion of a capillary wave. We then study the unstable displacement of a viscous fluid by a less viscous fluid in a two-dimensional channel. Although a finger-like structure was observed in many simulations, it is not clear if this structure was produced due to viscous fingering or due to other effects.

  14. Turbulence Locality and Granularlike Fluid Shear Viscosity in Collisional Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzi, Diego; Fraccarollo, Luigi

    2015-11-01

    We reanalyze previous experimental measurements of solid volume fraction, mean velocity, and velocity fluctuations in collisional suspensions of plastic cylinders and water flowing over inclined, erodible beds. We show that the particle pressure scales with the granular temperature, as predicted by kinetic theory of granular gases. The assumption that the particle shear stress is also well predicted by kinetic theory permits us to determine the fluid shear stress and the effective fluid viscosity from the experiments. The fluid viscosity can be decomposed into turbulent and granularlike components: the turbulent viscosity can be modeled using a mixing length, which is a decreasing function of the local volume fraction and does not depend upon the distance from the bed; the granularlike viscosity, associated with the transfer of momentum due to the conjugate motion of the fluid mass added to the particles, can be modeled by replacing the particle density with the density of the added fluid mass in the viscosity of kinetic theory.

  15. Role of surface in apparent viscosity of glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramov, I.

    2014-03-01

    Two problems have intrigued experts for a long time: The one is within the context of the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows and the second is the inaccuracy appearing in very old thermometers of famous scientists. We relate this with the role of the surface on the apparent viscosity of glasses. The apparent viscosity could deviate from the bulk viscosity if the fraction w of the surface molecules, of small samples, is sufficiently large. The effect is more prominent at low temperatures, correspondingly at high viscosities. The interpretation is within the Avramov and Milchev viscosity model, combined with the predictions of the change of heat capacity for extremely small samples. We find that the apparent glass transition temperature could depend on the sample size, in agreement with experimental observations existing in the literature. In addition to glasses, the present results could be of importance for thin films and foams.

  16. Role of surface in apparent viscosity of glasses.

    PubMed

    Avramov, I

    2014-03-01

    Two problems have intrigued experts for a long time: The one is within the context of the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows and the second is the inaccuracy appearing in very old thermometers of famous scientists. We relate this with the role of the surface on the apparent viscosity of glasses. The apparent viscosity could deviate from the bulk viscosity if the fraction w of the surface molecules, of small samples, is sufficiently large. The effect is more prominent at low temperatures, correspondingly at high viscosities. The interpretation is within the Avramov and Milchev viscosity model, combined with the predictions of the change of heat capacity for extremely small samples. We find that the apparent glass transition temperature could depend on the sample size, in agreement with experimental observations existing in the literature. In addition to glasses, the present results could be of importance for thin films and foams.

  17. Time Dependent Simulation of Turbopump Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, Dochan; Chan, William; Williams, Robert

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this viewgraph presentation is to enhance incompressible flow simulation capability for developing aerospace vehicle components, especially unsteady flow phenomena associated with high speed turbo pumps. Unsteady Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME)-rig1 1 1/2 rotations are completed for the 34.3 million grid points model. The moving boundary capability is obtained by using the DCF module. MLP shared memory parallelism has been implemented and benchmarked in INS3D. The scripting capability from CAD geometry to solution is developed. Data compression is applied to reduce data size in post processing and fluid/structure coupling is initiated.

  18. Scaling group transformation for the effect of temperature-dependent nanofluid viscosity on an mhd boundary layer past a porous stretching surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, R.; Muhaimin, I.; Kamachi, G.

    2011-12-01

    This paper deals with a steady two-dimensional flow of an electrically conducting incompressible fluid over a porous vertical stretching sheet. The flow is permeated by a uniform transverse magnetic field. The fluid viscosity is assumed to vary as a linear function of temperature. The partial differential equations governing the problem under consideration are transformed by a special form of Lie group transformations, namely, scaling group of transformations, into a system of ordinary differential equations, which are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Gill algorithm and the shooting method. The conclusion is drawn that the flow field and temperature profiles are significantly influenced by the Lewis number, Brownian motion number, and thermophoresis number.

  19. Extensional flow of low-viscosity fluids in capillary bridges formed by pulsed surface acoustic wave jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, P. K.; McDonnell, A. G.; Prabhakar, R.; Yeo, L. Y.; Friend, J.

    2011-02-01

    Forming capillary bridges of low-viscosity (lsim10 mPa s) fluids is difficult, making the study of their capillary-thinning behavior and the measurement of the fluid's extensional viscosity difficult as well. Current techniques require some time to form a liquid bridge from the stretching of a droplet. Rapidly stretching a liquid bridge using these methods can cause its breakup if the viscosity is too low. Stretching more slowly allows the bridge to thin and break up before a suitable bridge geometry can be established to provide reliable and accurate rheological data. Using a pulsed surface acoustic wave to eject a jet from a sessile droplet, a capillary bridge may be formed in about 7.5 ms, about seven times quicker than current methods. With this approach, capillary bridges may be formed from Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids having much lower viscosities—water, 0.04% by weight solution of high-molecular-weight (7 MDa) polystyrene in dioctyl phthalate and 0.25% fibrinogen solution in demineralized water, for example. Details of the relatively simple system used to achieve these results are provided, as are experimental results indicating deviations from a Newtonian response by the low-viscosity non-Newtonian fluids used in our study.

  20. Rankine models for time-dependent gravity spreading of terrestrial source flows over subplanar slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijermars, R.; Dooley, T. P.; Jackson, M. P. A.; Hudec, M. R.

    2014-09-01

    Geological mass flows extruding from a point source include mud, lava, and salt issued from subsurface reservoirs and ice from surface feeders. The delivery of the material may occur via a salt stock, a volcanic pipe (for magma and mud flows), or a valley glacier (for ice). All these source flows are commonly skewed by a superposed far-field velocity vector imposed by the topographic slope and thus develop plumes having a wide range of shapes. The morphological evolution of the perimeter of the plumes (in plan view) can be simulated by varying the key parameters in a simple analytical flow description on the basis of Rankine equations. Our model systematically varies the strength of the point source relative to the downslope far-field velocity of its expelled mass. The flow lines are critically controlled by the relative speed of the two rates, which can be concisely expressed by the dimensionless Rankine number (Rk, introduced in this study). For steady flows, plume widths can be expressed as a function of Rk. The viscosity of the rock, mud, or lava mass involved in the gravity flow affects Rk and thus the appearance of the plumes. For unsteady source strength, Rk becomes time dependent and the plume width varies over time. The model flow shapes suggest that the plume shapes of natural gravity flows of terrestrial surface materials (mud, lava, salt, and ice) commonly express fast initial flux of the source, followed by an exponential decline of the source strength. Flows having initially higher Rk but otherwise equal life cycles create broader plumes. Peaks in the source flux due to magmatic pulsing during the eruption cycle can explain the formation of pillow lavas. Rather than instantaneously reaching full strength before declining, some natural source flows start by swelling slowly, leading to the creation of unique plume shapes like a flying saucer.

  1. Microfluidic flow-dependent optical particle trapping and circulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, David; Blakely, Thomas; Gordon, Reuven

    2007-11-01

    Through the planar integration of microfluidics and fiber optics, flow-dependent optical trapping and stable circulation are achieved. Two configurations are demonstrated: Single tapered fiber traps aligned with the up-stream flow direction; and dual fiber cross-flow optical traps with alignment bias relative to the flow direction. In both configurations, particle trapping results from a combination of flow-induced drag force and optical scattering forces. In the tapered fiber traps, the stable particle trapping is achieved through a balance of forward scattering and fluid drag force, with particle position indicating the relative strength each. In the dual fiber traps, two fibers are oriented in the cross-stream direction. Employing a bias in the optical fiber in-plane alignment angle results in a flow dependence for stability and circulation. The result is a microfluidic flow-dependent circulating optical trap which may be employed to indicate flow direction, magnitude, or employed to mix co-laminar streams. A strong dependence on particle size also indicates potential for stream-wise particle sorting by size. Lastly, two extensions of this work are discussed: Microfluidic and optical interactions in multiphase (oil-water-particle) systems; and flow dependencies of optically-trapped linear arrays of particles.

  2. Relative humidity-dependent viscosity of secondary organic material from toluene photo-oxidation and possible implications for organic particulate matter over megacities

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mijung; Liu, Pengfei F.; Hanna, Sarah J.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Potter, Katie; You, Yuan; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2016-01-01

    To improve predictions of air quality, visibility, and climate change, knowledge of the viscosities and diffusion rates within organic particulate matter consisting of secondary organic material (SOM) is required. Most qualitative and quantitative measurements of viscosity and diffusion rates within organic particulate matter have focused on SOM particles generated from biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as α-pinene and isoprene. In this study, we quantify the relative humidity (RH)-dependent viscosities at 295±1K of SOM produced by photo-oxidation of toluene, an anthropogenic VOC. The viscosities of toluene-derived SOM were 2 × 10₋1 to ~6 ×106Pa s from 30 to 90%RH, and greater than ~2 × 108 Pa s (similar to or greater than the viscosity of tar pitch) for RH ≤ 17%. These viscosities correspond to Stokes–Einstein-equivalent diffusion coefficients for large organic molecules of ~2 ×10₋15cm2s₋1 for 30 % RH, and lower than ~3 × 10₋17cm2s₋1 for RH ≤ 17 %. Based on these estimated diffusion coefficients, the mixing time of large organic molecules within 200 nm toluene-derived SOM particles is 0.1–5 h for 30% RH, and higher than ~100 h for RH ≤ 17%. As a starting point for understanding the mixing times of large organic molecules in organic particulate matter over cities, we applied the mixing times determined for toluene-derived SOM particles to the world's top 15 most populous megacities. If the organic particulate matter in these megacities is similar to the toluene-derived SOM in this study, in Istanbul, Tokyo, Shanghai, and São Paulo, mixing times in organic particulate matter during certain periods of the year may be very short, and the particles may be well-mixed. On the other hand, the mixing times of large organic molecules in organic particulate matter in Beijing, Mexico City, Cairo, and Karachi may be long and the

  3. Relative humidity-dependent viscosity of secondary organic material from toluene photo-oxidation and possible implications for organic particulate matter over megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mijung; Liu, Pengfei F.; Hanna, Sarah J.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Potter, Katie; You, Yuan; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2016-07-01

    To improve predictions of air quality, visibility, and climate change, knowledge of the viscosities and diffusion rates within organic particulate matter consisting of secondary organic material (SOM) is required. Most qualitative and quantitative measurements of viscosity and diffusion rates within organic particulate matter have focused on SOM particles generated from biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as α-pinene and isoprene. In this study, we quantify the relative humidity (RH)-dependent viscosities at 295 ± 1 K of SOM produced by photo-oxidation of toluene, an anthropogenic VOC. The viscosities of toluene-derived SOM were 2 × 10-1 to ˜ 6 × 106 Pa s from 30 to 90 % RH, and greater than ˜ 2 × 108 Pa s (similar to or greater than the viscosity of tar pitch) for RH ≤ 17 %. These viscosities correspond to Stokes-Einstein-equivalent diffusion coefficients for large organic molecules of ˜ 2 × 10-15 cm2 s-1 for 30 % RH, and lower than ˜ 3 × 10-17 cm2 s-1 for RH ≤ 17 %. Based on these estimated diffusion coefficients, the mixing time of large organic molecules within 200 nm toluene-derived SOM particles is 0.1-5 h for 30 % RH, and higher than ˜ 100 h for RH ≤ 17 %. As a starting point for understanding the mixing times of large organic molecules in organic particulate matter over cities, we applied the mixing times determined for toluene-derived SOM particles to the world's top 15 most populous megacities. If the organic particulate matter in these megacities is similar to the toluene-derived SOM in this study, in Istanbul, Tokyo, Shanghai, and São Paulo, mixing times in organic particulate matter during certain periods of the year may be very short, and the particles may be well-mixed. On the other hand, the mixing times of large organic molecules in organic particulate matter in Beijing, Mexico City, Cairo, and Karachi may be long and the particles may not be well-mixed in the afternoon (15:00-17:00 LT) during certain times of the

  4. Time-Dependent Simulations of Turbopump Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan; Chan, William; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Unsteady flow simulations for RLV (Reusable Launch Vehicles) 2nd Generation baseline turbopump for one and half impeller rotations have been completed by using a 34.3 Million grid points model. MLP (Multi-Level Parallelism) shared memory parallelism has been implemented in INS3D, and benchmarked. Code optimization for cash based platforms will be completed by the end of September 2001. Moving boundary capability is obtained by using DCF module. Scripting capability from CAD (computer aided design) geometry to solution has been developed. Data compression is applied to reduce data size in post processing. Fluid/Structure coupling has been initiated.

  5. Negative-viscosity lattice gases

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, D.H. )

    1989-08-01

    A new irreversible collision rule is introduced for lattice-gas automata. The rule maximizes the flux of momentum in the direction of the local momentum gradient, yielding a negative shear viscosity. Numerically results in 2D show that the negative viscosity leads to the spontaneous ordering of the velocity field, with vorticity resolvable down to one lattice-link length. The new rule may be used in conjunction with previously proposed collision rules to yield a positive shear viscosity lower than the previous rules provide. In particular, Poiseuille flow tests demonstrate a decrease in viscosity by more than a factor of 2.

  6. Effective viscosity of dilute bacterial suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Brian M.

    This dissertation explores the bulk (volume averaged) properties of suspensions of microswimmers in a fluid. A microswimmer is a microscopic object that propels itself through a fluid. A common example of a microswimmer is a bacterium, such as Bacillus subtilis. Our particular interest is the bulk rheological properties of suspensions of bacteria -- that is, studying how such a suspension deforms under the application of an external force. In the simplest case, the rheology of a fluid can be described by a scalar effective viscosity. The goal of this dissertation is to find explicit formulae for the effective viscosity in terms of known geometric and physical parameters characterizing bacteria and use them to explain experimental observations. Throughout the dissertation, we consider bacterial suspensions in the dilute limit, where bacteria are assumed to be so far apart that interactions between them are negligible. This simplifies calculations significantly and is the regime in which the most striking experimental results have been observed. We first study suspensions of self-propelled particles using a two-dimensional (2D) Partial Differential Equation (PDE) model. A bacterium is modeled as a disk in 2D with self-propulsion provided by a point force in the fluid. A formula is obtained for the effective viscosity of such suspensions in the dilute limit. This formula includes the two terms that are found in the 2D version of Einstein's classical result for a passive suspension of spheres. To this, our main contribution is added, an additional term due to self-propulsion which depends on the physical and geometric properties of the suspension. This work demonstrates how bacterial self-propulsion can alter the viscosity of a fluid and highlights the importance of bacterial orientation. Next, we present a more realistic PDE model for dilute suspensions of swimming bacteria in a three-dimensional fluid. In this work, a bacterium is modeled as a prolate spheroid with

  7. Viscosity and electric properties of water aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavlov, A. V.; Sokolov, I. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    The flow of water mist in a narrow duct has been studied experimentally. The profile of the velocity of drops has been measured, and the viscosity of the mist has been calculated using the Navier-Stokes equation. It has been found that at low gradients of the rate of shear the viscosity of the mist can exceed that of clean air by tens and even hundreds of times. The electric charge of the drops has been measured. It has been found that the viscosity of the mist differs from that of clean air at gradients of the rate of shear that are less than the frequency of the establishment of electric equilibrium between the drops. A comparative analysis of the viscosities of the mist and a drop cluster has been carried out, and the dependence of the viscosity of the water aerosol on the radius and the charge of the drops has been predicted. The possible role of aerosols that contain submicron drops in the known "clear air turbulence" problem has been shown.

  8. Concentration dependences of density, viscosity, refractive index, and other derived properties of metoclopramide aqueous solutions at 303.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawale, R. T.; Deosarkar, S. D.; Kalyankar, T. M.

    2015-07-01

    Density ( ρ), viscosity ( η) and refractive index ( n D) of an antiemetic drug metoclopramide (4-amino-5-chloro- N-(2-(diethylamino)ethyl)-2-methoxybenzamide hydrochloride) solutions containing amino acids (glycine, D-alanine, L-cystine and L-histidine) were measured in the concentration range 0.01-0.17 mol/dm3 at 303.15 K. The apparent molar volume (φv) of this drug in aqueous amino acid solutions was calculated from the density data and fitted to the Massons relation, and the partial molar volume φ{v/0} of the drug was determined graphically. The partial molar volumes of transfer (Δtrφ{v/0}) of drug at infinite dilution from pure water to aqueous amino acid solutions were calculated and interpreted in terms of different interactions between the drug and amino acids.

  9. Viscosity Measurement for Tellurium Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of high temperature Te melt was measured using a new technique in which a rotating magnetic field was applied to the melt sealed in a suspended ampoule, and the torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall was measured. Governing equations for the coupled melt flow and ampoule torsional oscillation were solved, and the viscosity was extracted from the experimental data by numerical fitting. The computational result showed good agreement with experimental data. The melt velocity transient initiated by the rotating magnetic field reached a stable condition quickly, allowing the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt to be determined in a short period.

  10. Does optic flow parsing depend on prior estimation of heading?

    PubMed

    Warren, Paul A; Rushton, Simon K; Foulkes, Andrew J

    2012-10-11

    We have recently suggested that neural flow parsing mechanisms act to subtract global optic flow consistent with observer movement to aid in detecting and assessing scene-relative object movement. Here, we examine whether flow parsing can occur independently from heading estimation. To address this question we used stimuli comprising two superimposed optic flow fields comprising limited lifetime dots (one planar and one radial). This stimulus gives rise to the so-called optic flow illusion (OFI) in which perceived heading is biased in the direction of the planar flow field. Observers were asked to report the perceived direction of motion of a probe object placed in the OFI stimulus. If flow parsing depends upon a prior estimate of heading then the perceived trajectory should reflect global subtraction of a field consistent with the heading experienced under the OFI. In Experiment 1 we tested this prediction directly, finding instead that the perceived trajectory was biased markedly in the direction opposite to that predicted under the OFI. In Experiment 2 we demonstrate that the results of Experiment 1 are consistent with a positively weighted vector sum of the effects seen when viewing the probe together with individual radial and planar flow fields. These results suggest that flow parsing is not necessarily dependent on prior estimation of heading direction. We discuss the implications of this finding for our understanding of the mechanisms of flow parsing.

  11. The viscosity of planetary tholeiitic melts: A configurational entropy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehlke, Alexander; Whittington, Alan G.

    2016-10-01

    The viscosity (η) of silicate melts is a fundamental physical property controlling mass transfer in magmatic systems. Viscosity can span many orders of magnitude, strongly depending on temperature and composition. Several models are available that describe this dependency for terrestrial melts quite well. Planetary basaltic lavas however are distinctly different in composition, being dominantly alkali-poor, iron-rich and/or highly magnesian. We measured the viscosity of 20 anhydrous tholeiitic melts, of which 15 represent known or estimated surface compositions of Mars, Mercury, the Moon, Io and Vesta, by concentric cylinder and parallel plate viscometry. The planetary basalts span a viscosity range of 2 orders of magnitude at liquidus temperatures and 4 orders of magnitude near the glass transition, and can be more or less viscous than terrestrial lavas. We find that current models under- and overestimate superliquidus viscosities by up to 2 orders of magnitude for these compositions, and deviate even more strongly from measured viscosities toward the glass transition. We used the Adam-Gibbs theory (A-G) to relate viscosity (η) to absolute temperature (T) and the configurational entropy of the system at that temperature (Sconf), which is in the form of log η =Ae +Be /TSconf . Heat capacities (CP) for glasses and liquids of our investigated compositions were calculated via available literature models. We show that the A-G theory is applicable to model the viscosity of individual complex tholeiitic melts containing 10 or more major oxides as well or better than the commonly used empirical equations. We successfully modeled the global viscosity data set using a constant Ae of -3.34 ± 0.22 log units and 12 adjustable sub-parameters, which capture the compositional and temperature dependence on melt viscosity. Seven sub-parameters account for the compositional dependence of Be and 5 for Sconf. Our model reproduces the 496 measured viscosity data points with a 1

  12. Effective Viscosity Coefficient of Nanosuspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.; Egorov, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    Systematic calculations of the effective viscosity coefficient of nanosuspensions have been performed using the molecular dynamics method. It is established that the viscosity of a nanosuspension depends not only on the volume concentration of the nanoparticles but also on their mass and diameter. Differences from Einstein's relation are found even for nanosuspensions with a low particle concentration.

  13. Hematocrit dependence of flow signal in optical coherence tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianlong; Su, Johnny; Wang, Jie; Men, Silu; Jia, Yali; Huang, David; Liu, Gangjun

    2017-01-01

    The hematocrit dependence of flow signal (split-spectrum amplitude decorrelation angiography-SSADA decorrelation value) was investigated in this paper. Based on the normalized field temporal correlation function and concentration dependent particle scattering properties, the relationship between hematocrit and flow signal was analytically derived. Experimental verification of the relationship was performed with custom-designed microfluidic chips and human blood with 45%, 40% and 32% hematocrit. It was found that, in large flow channels and blood vessels, the normal hematocrit is near the decorrelation saturation point and therefore a change in hematocrit has little effect on the SSADA decorrelation value (flow signal). However, in narrow channels in the capillary size range, the effective hematocrit (adjusted for the overlap between OCT beam and channel) is in the range of 6.7-9.5% and therefore variation in hematocrit does significantly affect the flow signal. PMID:28270984

  14. Effects of chemical reaction and variable viscosity on hydromagnetic mixed convection heat and mass transfer for Hiemenz flow through porous media with radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddeek, M. A.; Darwish, A. A.; Abdelmeguid, M. S.

    2007-03-01

    The effect of chemical reaction and variable viscosity on hydromagnetic mixed convection heat and mass transfer for Hiemenz flow through porous media has been studied in the presence of radiation and magnetic field. The plate surface is embedded in a uniform Darcian porous medium in order to allow for possible fluid wall suction or blowing and has a power-law variation of both the wall temperature and concentration. The similarity solution is used to transform the system of partial differential equations, describing the problem under consideration, into a boundary value problem of coupled ordinary differential equations, and an efficient numerical technique is implemented to solve the reduced system. Numerical calculations are carried out, for various values of the dimensionless parameters of the problem, which include a variable viscosity, chemical reactions, radiation, magnetic field, porous medium and power index of the wall temperature parameters. Comparisons with previously published works are performed and excellent agreement between the results is obtained. The results are presented graphically and the conclusion is drawn that the flow field and other quantities of physical interest are significantly influenced by these parameters.

  15. Isotope effect studies of chicken liver NADP malic enzyme: role of the metal ion and viscosity dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Grissom, C.B.; Cleland, W.W.

    1988-04-19

    The role of the metal ion in the oxidative decarboxylation of malate by chicken liver NADP malic enzyme and details of the reaction mechanism have been investigated by /sup 13/C isotope effects. With saturating NADP and the indicated metal ion at a total concentration 10-fold higher than its K/sub m/, the following primary /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effects at C/sub 4/ of malate (/sup 13/(VK/sub mal/)) were observed at pH 8.0: Mg/sup 2 +/, 1.0336; Mn/sup 2 +/, 1.0365; Cd/sup 2 +/, 1.0366; Zn/sup 2 +/, 1.0337; Co/sup 2 +/, 1.0283; Ni/sup 2 +/, 1.025. Knowing the partitioning of the intermediate oxalacetate between decarboxylation to pyuvate and reduction to malate allows calculation of the intrinsic carbon isotope effect for decarboxylation to pyuvate and reduction to malate allows calculation of the intrinsic carbon isotope effect for decarboxylation. For Mg/sup 2 +/ as activator, this was 1.049 with NADP and 1.046 with 3-acetylpyridine adenine dinucleotide phosphate, although the intrinsic primary deuterium isotope effects on dehydrogenation were 5.6 and 4.2, and the partition ratios of the oxalacetate intermediate for decarboxylation as opposed to hydride transfer were 0.11 and 3.96. It was not possible to calculate reasonable intrinsic carbon isotope effects with the other metal ions by use of the partitioning ratio of oxalacetate because of decarboxylation by another mechanism. The variation of /sup 13/(VK/sub mal/) with pH was used to dissect the total forward and external components. When the authors attempted to use the variation of /sup 13/(VK/sub mal/) with solution viscosity to determine the internal and external commitments, incorrect values were obtained because of a specific effect of the viscosogen in decreasing the K/sub m/ for malate, so that VK/sub mal/ actually increased with viscosity instead of decreasing, as theory predicts.

  16. Effective viscosity of magnetic nanofluids through capillaries.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajesh

    2012-02-01

    The simultaneous effect of magnetic field and temperature on the capillary viscosity of magnetic nanofluid is an important parameter for a new class of applications such as nanoduct flow, nanomotors, micro- and nanofluidic devices, for transformer cooling, magnetic targeted drug delivery, etc. The effective viscosity of a nanofluid is explained based on the rotation of the particles and the effect of torque on it due to an externally applied magnetic field. Two types of fluids are used here, temperature-sensitive and non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids. In both types of fluids, decrease in effective viscosity with temperature is observed, but in both cases the mechanism for the decrement is quite different. One is due to temperature dependence of the magnetic moment and the other is due to removal of the secondary surfactant. For temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids, a Curie temperature of ~80 °C is extracted from this study. For non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids ~65% of the secondary surfactant is removed for a change in temperature, ΔT = 40 °C. This is analogous with removal of a drug from magnetic particles for targeted drug delivery. Further, a linear dependence of effective viscosity with different capillary size and ξ (angle between magnetic field and flow direction, ξε[0,π/2]) is also observed. This linear dependence can also be a good approximation for the study of magnetic drug targeting, as in the human body the capillaries are of different sizes, and the externally applied magnetic field is not always parallel or perpendicular to the drug flow direction.

  17. Effective viscosity of magnetic nanofluids through capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Rajesh

    2012-02-01

    The simultaneous effect of magnetic field and temperature on the capillary viscosity of magnetic nanofluid is an important parameter for a new class of applications such as nanoduct flow, nanomotors, micro- and nanofluidic devices, for transformer cooling, magnetic targeted drug delivery, etc. The effective viscosity of a nanofluid is explained based on the rotation of the particles and the effect of torque on it due to an externally applied magnetic field. Two types of fluids are used here, temperature-sensitive and non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids. In both types of fluids, decrease in effective viscosity with temperature is observed, but in both cases the mechanism for the decrement is quite different. One is due to temperature dependence of the magnetic moment and the other is due to removal of the secondary surfactant. For temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids, a Curie temperature of ˜80 ∘C is extracted from this study. For non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluids ˜65% of the secondary surfactant is removed for a change in temperature, ΔT = 40 ∘C. This is analogous with removal of a drug from magnetic particles for targeted drug delivery. Further, a linear dependence of effective viscosity with different capillary size and ξ (angle between magnetic field and flow direction, ξ∈[0,π/2]) is also observed. This linear dependence can also be a good approximation for the study of magnetic drug targeting, as in the human body the capillaries are of different sizes, and the externally applied magnetic field is not always parallel or perpendicular to the drug flow direction.

  18. System Size and Shape Dependence of the Viscous Damping of Anisotropic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelrahman, Niseem

    2017-01-01

    We present recent STAR measurements of the anisotropic flow coefficients vn (n = 1 - 6) in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, Cu+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV and U+U collisions at √{sNN} = 193 GeV. For a given system, the differential vn measurements indicate acoustic scaling patterns which reflect the detailed dependence of vn on collision-system size and eccentricity (ɛn). These measurements constrain the viscous coefficient which encodes the specific shear viscosity η / s . Our measurements show that all the collision-systems give the same viscous coefficient after scaling-out the collision-system size and eccentricity. For the STAR Collaboration.

  19. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Shear thirning will cause a normally viscous fluid -- such as pie filling or whipped cream -- to deform and flow more readily under high shear conditions. In shear thinning, a pocket of fluid will deform and move one edge forward, as depicted here.

  20. The effects of depth-dependent crustal viscosity variation on visco-elastic response to inflation/deflation of magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    Development of the satellite observations (GPS and/or InSAR) has allowed us to precisely measure surface deformation. However any geodetic observation by itself does not tell us a mechanism of the deformation. All we can do the most is to compare such an observation to some quantitative predictions, only from which we can deduce a possible deformation mechanism. We therefore need to understand characteristic deformation pattern for a given source mechanism. This study particularly pays attention to magmatic activity in depth as the source, aiming to distinguish magma-induced crustal deformation by better knowing how the activity can be reflected in geodetically observable surface deformation. A parallelized 3-D finite element code, OREGANO_VE [e.g., Yamasaki and Houseman, 2015, J. Geodyn., 88, 80-89], is used to solve the linear Maxwell visco-elastic response to an applied internal inflation/deflation of magma chamber. The rectangular finite element model is composed with a visco-elastic layer overlaid by an elastic layer with thickness of H, and the visco-elastic layer extends over the rest of crust and the uppermost mantle. The visco-elastic crust has a depth-dependent viscosity (DDV) as an exponential function of depth due to temperature-dependent viscosity: hc = h0 exp[c(1 - z/L0)], where h0 is the viscosity at the bottom of the crust, c is a constant; c > 0 for DDV model and c = 0 for uniform viscosity (UNV) model, z is the depth, and L0 is a reference length-scale. The visco-elastic mantle has a spatially uniform viscosity hm. The inflation and/or deflation of sill-like magma chamber is implemented by using the split node method developed by Melosh and Raefsky [1981, Bull. Seism. Soc. Am., 71, 1391-1400]. UNV model with c = 0 employed in this study shows that the inflation-induced surface uplift would abate with time by visco-elastic relaxation. The post-inflation subsidence would erase the uplift in ~ 50 - 100 times Maxwell relaxation time of the crust

  1. An inverse method for non-invasive viscosity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullana, J.-M.; Dispot, N.; Flaud, P.; Rossi, M.

    2007-04-01

    A procedure is presented which allows to compute in a non-invasive manner, blood viscosity through flow measurements obtained at a fixed vessel cross-section. The data set is made of measurements (artery radius and spatially discrete velocity profiles) performed at given time intervals for which the signal to noise ratio is typical of U.S. Doppler velocimetry in clinical situation. This identification approach is based on the minimization, through a backpropagation algorithm, of a cost function quantifying the distance between numerical data obtained through Navier-Stokes simulations and experimental measurements. Since this cost function implicitly depends on the value of viscosity used in numerical simulations, its minimization determines an effective viscosity which is shown to be robust to measurement errors and sampling time. Such an approach is shown to work in an in vitro experiment, and seems to be suitable for in vivo measurements of viscosity by the atraumatic techniques of Doppler echography.

  2. Extension of Einstein's viscosity equation to that for concentrated dispersions of solutes and particles.

    PubMed

    Toda, Kiyoshi; Furuse, Hisamoto

    2006-12-01

    A viscosity equation for concentrated solutions or suspensions is derived as an extension of Einstein's hydrodynamic viscosity theory for dilute dispersions of spherical particles. The derivation of the equation is based on the calculation of dissipation of mechanical energy into heat in the dispersion, subtracting the energy dissipation in the portion of solutes or particles. The viscosity equation derived thus was well fitted to the viscosity-concentration relationship of the concentrated aqueous solutions of glucose and sucrose. For the suspensions of bakers' yeast, the concentration dependency of viscosity was expressed well with some modification for the flow pattern around suspended particles. It is suggested that these viscosity equations can be widely applied to both diluted and concentrated dispersions of various solutes and particles.

  3. A DEM contact model for history-dependent powder flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashibon, Adham; Schubert, Raphael; Breinlinger, Thomas; Kraft, Torsten

    2016-11-01

    Die filling is an important part of the powder handling process chain that greatly influences the characteristic structure and properties of the final part. Predictive modelling and simulation of the die-filling process can greatly contribute to the optimization of the part and the whole production procedure, e.g. by predicting the resulting powder compaction structure as a function of filling process parameters. The rheology of powders can be very difficult to model especially if heterogeneous agglomeration or time-dependent consolidation effects occur. We present a new discrete element contact force model that enables modelling complex powder flow characteristics including direct time-dependent consolidation effects and load history-dependent cohesion to describe the filling process of complex, difficult to handle powders. The model is demonstrated for simple flow and an industrial powder flow.

  4. Flow dependence of the PRD in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghetti, D.

    1994-12-31

    The linear (and Doppler) feedback components of the power reactivity decrement (PRD) for various loading configurations of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) have been reported. (The PRD at a power is here the negative of the reactivity required to bring the reactor from zero-power, hot-critical, to that power.) The delineation of the feedback components into power dependent and power-to-flow dependent parts have also been reported. The nonlinear feedback component, primarily due to bowings of the subassembly ducts, is deduced by subtraction of the calculated total linear (and small Doppler) component from the measured values of PRD as a function of reactor power. Furthermore, this component is generally assumed to be a function of the power-to-flow ratio of the reactor for purposes of estimating PRD values at differing flows. If the nonlinear reactivity component is indeed solely power-to-flow dependent, then the values of measured total PRDs for differing flows should lie for the respective power values, corresponding to equivalent power-to-flow values, on a straight line having a negative slope. (This slope would be the power rate of the solely power part of the linear component of the PRD). Evidence that this may not be a reasonable assumption is reported.

  5. Flow parsing and heading perception show similar dependence on quality and quantity of optic flow.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Andrew J; Rushton, Simon K; Warren, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Here we examine the relationship between the perception of heading and flow parsing. In a companion study we have investigated the pattern of dependence of human heading estimation on the quantity (amount of dots per frame) and quality (amount of directional noise) of motion information in an optic flow field. In the present study we investigated whether the flow parsing mechanism, which is thought to aid in the assessment of scene-relative object movement during observer movement, exhibits a similar pattern of dependence on these stimulus manipulations. Finding that the pattern of flow parsing effects was similar to that observed for heading thresholds would provide some evidence that these two complementary roles for optic flow processing are reliant on the same, or similar, neural computation. We found that the pattern of flow parsing effects observed does indeed display a striking similarity to the heading thresholds. As with judgements of heading, there is a critical value of around 25 dots per frame; below this value flow parsing effects rapidly deteriorate and above this value flow parsing effects are stable [see Warren et al. (1988) for similar results for heading]. Also, as with judgements of heading, when there were 50 or more dots there was a systematic effect of noise on the magnitude of the flow parsing effect. These results are discussed in the context of different possible schemes of flow processing to support both heading and flow parsing mechanisms.

  6. Group analysis for the effects of the temperature-dependent fluid viscosity and chemical reaction on free convective heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, R.; Muhaimin, I.; Bin Saim, Hashim

    2010-12-01

    A group analysis has been carried out to study heat and mass transfer characteristics of an incompressible Newtonian fluid having a temperature-dependent viscosity over a vertical stretching surface in the presence of thermal radiation and a chemical reaction. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in the energy equation. The vertical surface is assumed to be permeable so as to allow for possible wall suction or injection. The governing differential equations are derived and transformed using the Lie group analysis. The transformed equations are solved numerically by applying the Runge—Kutta—Gill scheme with the shooting technique. Favorable comparisons with previously published works on various special cases of the problem are obtained

  7. Hydrodynamic Viscosity in Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duschl, Wolfgang J.; Strittmatter, Peter A.; Biermann, Peter L.

    We propose a generalized accretion disk viscosity prescription based on hydrodynamically driven turbulence at the critical effective Reynolds number. This approach is consistent with recent re-analysis by Richard & Zahn (1999) of experimental results on turbulent Couette-Taylor flows. This new β-viscosity formulation applies to both selfgravitating and non-selfgravitating disks and is shown to yield the standard α-disk prescription in the case of shock dissipation limited, non-selfgravitating disks.

  8. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  9. Noninvasive average flow estimation for an implantable rotary blood pump: a new algorithm incorporating the role of blood viscosity.

    PubMed

    Malagutti, Nicolò; Karantonis, Dean M; Cloherty, Shaun L; Ayre, Peter J; Mason, David G; Salamonsen, Robert F; Lovell, Nigel H

    2007-01-01

    The effect of blood hematocrit (HCT) on a noninvasive flow estimation algorithm was examined in a centrifugal implantable rotary blood pump (iRBP) used for ventricular assistance. An average flow estimator, based on three parameters, input electrical power, pump speed, and HCT, was developed. Data were collected in a mock loop under steady flow conditions for a variety of pump operating points and for various HCT levels. Analysis was performed using three-dimensional polynomial surfaces to fit the collected data for each different HCT level. The polynomial coefficients of the surfaces were then analyzed as a function of HCT. Linear correlations between estimated and measured pump flow over a flow range from 1.0 to 7.5 L/min resulted in a slope of 1.024 L/min (R2=0.9805). Early patient data tested against the estimator have shown promising consistency, suggesting that consideration of HCT can improve the accuracy of existing flow estimation algorithms.

  10. Acoustic scaling of anisotropic flow in shape-engineered events: implications for extraction of the specific shear viscosity of the quark gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Roy A.; Reynolds, D.; Taranenko, A.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alexander, J. M.; Liu, Fu-Hu; Gu, Yi; Mwai, A.

    2016-10-01

    It is shown that the acoustic scaling patterns of anisotropic flow for different event shapes at a fixed collision centrality (shape-engineered events), provide robust constraints for the event-by-event fluctuations in the initial-state density distribution from ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. The empirical scaling parameters also provide a dual-path method for extracting the specific shear viscosity {(η /s)}{QGP} of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) produced in these collisions. A calibration of these scaling parameters via detailed viscous hydrodynamical model calculations, gives {(η /s)}{QGP} estimates for the plasma produced in collisions of Au + Au (\\sqrt{{s}{NN}}=0.2 {TeV}) and Pb + Pb (\\sqrt{{s}{NN}}=2.76 {TeV}). The estimates are insensitive to the initial-state geometry models considered.

  11. Viscosity of Campi Flregrei (Italy) magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiti, Valeria; Vetere, Francesco; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Behrens, Harald; Mangiacapra, Annarita; Freda, Carmela

    2010-05-01

    Viscosity is an important factor governing both intrusive and volcanic processes. The most important parameters governing silicate melts viscosity are bulk composition of melt and temperature. Pressure has only minor effect at crustal depths, whereas crystals and bubbles have significant influence. Among compositional parameters, the water content is critical above all in terms of rheological behaviour of melts and explosive style of an eruption. Consequently, without an appropriate knowledge of magma viscosity depending on the amount of dissolved volatiles, it is not possible to model the processes (i.e., magma ascent, fragmentation, and dispersion) required to predict realistic volcanic scenarios and thus forecast volcanic hazards. The Campi Flegrei are a large volcanic complex (~150 km2) located west of the city of Naples, Italy, that has been the site of volcanic activity for more than 60 ka and represents a potential volcanic hazard owing to the large local population. In the frame of a INGV-DPC (Department of Civil Protection) project devoted to design a multidisciplinary system for short-term volcano hazard evaluation, we performed viscosity measurements, under dry and hydrous conditions, of primitive melt compositions representative of two Campi Flegrei eruptions (Minopoli-shoshonite and Fondo Riccio-latite). Viscosity of the two melts have been investigated in the high temperature/low viscosity range at atmospheric pressure in dry samples and at 0.5 GPa in runs having water content from nominally anhydrous to about 3 wt%. Data in the low temperature/high viscosity range were obtained near the glass transition temperature at atmospheric pressure on samples whose water contents vary from 0.3 up to 2.43 wt%. The combination of high- and low-viscosity data permits a general description of the viscosity as a function of temperature and water content using a modified Tamman-Vogel-Fulcher equation. logν = a+ --b--+ --d--×exp(g × w-) (T - c) (T - e) T (1) where

  12. Mechanical History Dependence in Carbon Black Suspensions for Flow Batteries: A Rheo-Impedance Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We studied the effects of shear and its history on suspensions of carbon black (CB) in lithium ion battery electrolyte via simultaneous rheometry and electrical impedance spectroscopy. Ketjen black (KB) suspensions showed shear thinning and rheopexy and exhibited a yield stress. Shear step experiments revealed a two time scale response. The immediate effect of decreasing the shear rate is an increase in both viscosity and electronic conductivity. In a much slower secondary response, both quantities change in the opposite direction, leading to a reversal of the initial change in the conductivity. Stepwise increases in the shear rate lead to similar responses in the opposite direction. This remarkable behavior is consistent with a picture in which agglomerating KB particles can stick directly on contact, forming open structures, and then slowly interpenetrate and densify. The fact that spherical CB particles show the opposite slow response suggests that the fractal structure of the KB primary units plays an important role. A theoretical scheme was used to analyze the shear and time-dependent viscosity and conductivity. Describing the agglomerates as effective hard spheres with a fractal architecture and using an effective medium approximation for the conductivity, we found the changes in the derived suspension structure to be in agreement with our qualitative mechanistic picture. This behavior of KB in flow has consequences for the properties of the gel network that is formed immediately after the cessation of shear: both the yield stress and the electronic conductivity increase with the previously applied shear rate. Our findings thus have clear implications for the operation and filling strategies of semisolid flow batteries. PMID:28122184

  13. Endothelial-dependent vasodilators preferentially increase subendocardial blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pelc, L.R.; Gross, G.J.; Warltier, D.C.

    1986-03-05

    Interference with arachidonic acid metabolism on the effect of acetylcholine (Ach) or arachidonic acid (AA) to preferentially increase subendocardial perfusion was investigated in anesthetized dogs. Hemodynamics, regional myocardial blood flow (MBF (ml/min/g):radioactive microspheres) and the left ventricular transmural distribution of flow (endo/epi) were measured. Intracoronary infusion of Ach (10 ..mu..g/min) and AA (585 ..mu..g/min) significantly (P < .05*) increased myocardial perfusion and selectively redistributed flow to the subendocardium (increased endo/epi) without changes in systemic hemodynamics. Inhibition of phospholipase A/sub 2/ by quinacrine (Q; 600 ..mu..g/min, ic) attenuated the increase in myocardial perfusion produced by Ach but not by AA and inhibited the redistribution of flow to the subendocardium. The present results suggest that endothelium-dependent vasodilators produce a preferential increase in subendocardial perfusion via a product of AA metabolism.

  14. Flow dependent performance of microfluidic microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Vigolo, Daniele; Al-Housseiny, Talal T; Shen, Yi; Akinlawon, Fiyinfoluwa O; Al-Housseiny, Saif T; Hobson, Ronald K; Sahu, Amaresh; Bedkowski, Katherine I; DiChristina, Thomas J; Stone, Howard A

    2014-06-28

    The integration of Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) in a microfluidic geometry can significantly enhance the power density of these cells, which would have more active bacteria per unit volume. Moreover, microfluidic MFCs can be operated in a continuous mode as opposed to the traditional batch-fed mode. Here we investigate the effect of fluid flow on the performance of microfluidic MFCs. The growth and the structure of the bacterial biofilm depend to a large extent on the shear stress of the flow. We report the existence of a range of flow rates for which MFCs can achieve maximum voltage output. When operated under these optimal conditions, the power density of our microfluidic MFC is about 15 times that of a similar-size batch MFC. Furthermore, this optimum suggests a correlation between the behaviour of bacteria and fluid flow.

  15. Dependence of advection-diffusion-reaction on flow coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenbo; Luna, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    A study on an advection-diffusion-reaction system is presented. Variability of the reaction process in such a system triggered by a highly localized source is quantified. It is found, for geophysically motivated parameter regimes, that the difference in bulk concentration subject to realizations of different source locations is highly correlated with the local flow topology of the source. Such flow topologies can be highlighted by Lagrangian coherent structures. Reaction is relatively enhanced in regions of strong stretching, and relatively suppressed in regions where vortices are present. In any case, the presence of a divergence-free background flow helps speed up the reaction process, especially when the flow is time-dependent. Probability density of various quantities characterizing the reaction processes is also obtained. This reveals the inherent complexity of the reaction-diffusion process subject to nonlinear background stirring.

  16. Birefringence of Polymer Solutions in Time-Dependent Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geffroy-Aguilar, Enrique

    1990-01-01

    This is a study of changes of conformation of macromolecules in polymeric solutions which are subjected to time-dependent extensional flows generated by a two -roll mill flow device. The flows produced by the two-roll mill are linear, and two-dimensional. It has a stagnation point at the center of the flow field where the magnitudes of the strain-rates are greater than the vorticity. This study of conformational changes is based on data around the vicinity of the stagnation point, I for steady state flows, and several transient flow histories such as start -up, cessation, and double-step flows. We also present an analytical solution for the creeping flow generated by an infinitely long two-roll mill embedded in an unbounded fluid. This solution is used as a benchmark to compare the behavior of the polymer solutions when subjected to flows with different values for the ratio of rate-of-strain to vorticity. The conformational changes are determined experimentally using the Two-color Flow-Birefringence which provides an instantaneous and point-wise measure of the anisotropy of the fluid, together with the relative orientation of the anisotropy with respect to the principal axes of the flow field. Based on relaxation of the fluid anisotropy the characteristic time-scales of the polymer have been evaluated as a function of the flow field properties and the degree of conformational change of the macromolecules. Data for two polymeric solutions is presented. The first polymer system is the so-called test-fluid M1. This polymeric solution is shown to degrade significantly, even for small values of the velocity gradient, as measured by the changes in the macroscopic relaxation time-scales. The second solution is a concentrated polystyrene solution that presents overshoots and undershoots of the polymer conformation dependent of the ratio of vorticity to rate-of-strain. When subjected to large deformations, this polystyrene solution shows not only the possibility of a

  17. Accounting for flow dependence of respiratory resistance during exercise.

    PubMed

    de Bisschop, Claire; Pichon, Aurélien; Guénard, Hervé; Denjean, André

    2003-06-12

    Studies of airway function during exercise have produced conflicting results both in healthy and diseased subjects. Respiratory resistance (Rrs) was measured using an impulse oscillation technique. A flow/resistance curve was established for each of 16 healthy males during voluntary hyperventilation (VHV) at rest. Then, Rrs and flow were measured immediately (t(0)) and 90 sec (t(90)) after exercise on a cycle ergometer at 60, 70, and 80% of maximal aerobic power. The flow/resistance relationship at rest during VHV was used to assess the flow dependence of Rrs. Rrs at t(0) was higher than at rest (P <0.01) but lower than Rrs obtained at matched flow during VHV (P <0.05). In healthy subjects, the linear increase in Rrs with VHV indicates airflow dependency of Rrs following Rohrer's equation. The relative decrease in Rrs with exercise suggests bronchodilation. The bronchodilating effect disappeared promptly when exercise was stopped suggesting that it may have been related to a reflex mechanism.

  18. Role of salt sources in density-dependent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Juan J.; Carrera, Jesús; Medina, AgustíN.

    2009-05-01

    Flow equation expresses mass conservation for a fluid phase. In density-dependent problems, fluid consists of at least two components, termed salt and water here. Salt sources are usually properly accounted for when salt is dissolved in water (i.e., as a solute) but are neglected otherwise. An analysis of the effect of neglecting pure salt sources on flow regime and concentration distribution is performed. Two test cases are used to illustrate the issue. The first one is the saltwater bucket problem, which consists of adding salt to an otherwise isolated domain. The second one is the Elder problem. Discrepancies in concentrations are moderate for reasonably small salt mass fractions. However, currently available codes yield head drops in response to the addition of salt because fluid mass is kept constant while its density increases. Such results contradict basic physical principles and lead to an inversion in the flow direction.

  19. Distributed energy storage: Time-dependent tree flow design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, A.; Ziaei, S.; Lorente, S.

    2016-05-01

    This article proposes "distributed energy storage" as a basic design problem of distributing energy storage material on an area. The energy flows by fluid flow from a concentrated source to points (users) distributed equidistantly on the area. The flow is time-dependent. Several scenarios are analyzed: sensible-heat storage, latent-heat storage, exergy storage vs energy storage, and the distribution of a finite supply of heat transfer surface between the source fluid and the distributed storage material. The chief conclusion is that the finite amount of storage material should be distributed proportionally with the distribution of the flow rate of heating agent arriving on the area. The total time needed by the source stream to "invade" the area is cumulative (the sum of the storage times required at each storage site) and depends on the energy distribution paths and the sequence in which the users are served by the source stream. Directions for future designs of distributed storage and retrieval are outlined in the concluding section.

  20. Vigorous Mantle Convection with a Very High Mid-mantle Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, G. T.

    2015-12-01

    Two dimensional numerical models of mantle convection in a cylindrical shell are employed to investigate the impact of the very high viscosities in the lower mantle as proposed by Mitrovica and Forte (2004) and Steinberger and Calderwood (2006). Models are considered with and without mineral phase transitions. Our viscosity profiles are depth dependent with deep mantle viscosities increasing to values of 300 times the viscosity of the upper mantle and then decreasing dramatically on approaching the core-mantle boundary. Although phase transitions produce small secondary effects on the flow structure the main effect is that of the viscosity decrease near the core mantle boundary. Models with a high viscosity structure extending down to the core-mantle boundary are very sluggish with large aspect ratios, whereas models with a low viscosity just above the core mantle boundary overturn rapidly with aspect ratios close to unity. The latter models resemble uniformly low viscosity models despite the high viscosity region at mid-depths of the lower mantle.

  1. Identification of the wave speed and the second viscosity of cavitation flows with 2D RANS computations - Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaix, J.; Alligné, S.; Nicolet, C.; Avellan, F.; Münch, C.

    2015-12-01

    1D hydro-electric models are useful to predict dynamic behaviour of hydro-power plants. Regarding vortex rope and cavitation surge in Francis turbines, the 1D models require some inputs that can be provided by numerical simulations. In this paper, a 2D cavitating Venturi is considered. URANS computations are performed to investigate the dynamic behaviour of the cavitation sheet depending on the frequency variation of the outlet pressure. The results are used to calibrate and to assess the reliability of the 1D models.

  2. Concentration Dependence of VO2+ Crossover of Nafion for Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Jamie; Jones, Amanda; Zawodzinski, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    The VO2+ crossover, or permeability, through Nafion in a vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) was monitored as a function of sulfuric acid concentration and VO2+ concentration. A vanadium rich solution was flowed on one side of the membrane through a flow field while symmetrically on the other side a blank or vanadium deficit solution was flowed. The blank solution was flowed through an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) cavity and the VO2+ concentration was determined from the intensity of the EPR signal. Concentration values were fit using a solution of Fick s law that allows for the effect of concentration change on the vanadium rich side. The fits resulted in permeability values of VO2+ ions across the membrane. Viscosity measurements of many VO2+ and H2SO4 solutions were made at 30 60 C. These viscosity values were then used to determine the effect of the viscosity of the flowing solution on the permeability of the ion. 2013 The Electrochemical Society. [DOI: 10.1149/2.004306jes] All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of the Fibre Bed on Resin Viscosity in Liquid Composite Moulding Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascons, Marc; Blanco, Norbert; Simacek, Pavel; Peiro, Joaquim; Advani, Suresh; Matthys, Koen

    2012-06-01

    In the past, simulation of liquid composite moulding processes was often based on the assumption that resin viscosity could be implemented as a constant value. However, viscosity can be subject to changes during the infusion process and now, non-constant and process parameter dependent expressions have become more common in simulation practice. Nevertheless, even with the inclusion of more advanced resin viscosity models, the prediction of flow front propagation in large, thick composite parts or in slow infusion processes is often still inaccurate when compared to the real application. Discrepancies are found to be most pronounced in the final stages of the infusion process, exactly where high accuracy predictions are most valued. A new simulation method based on an infusion time-dependent resin viscosity expression is proposed in this work. The method not only incorporates non-linear viscosity behaviour, but also takes into account the impact of reinforcement fibre sizing and fibre bed architecture on resin viscosity characteristics. Such fibre bed effects are not identifiable in neat resin viscosity characterization tests but are thought to have substantial impact on in-situ viscosity values during infusion, especially for large, thick composite part applications and slow infusion processes. An application case study has been included to demonstrate the prediction capability of the proposed simulation method. The design of an infusion process for a composite pressure vessel was selected for this purpose. Results show high predictive power throughout the infusion process, with most pronounced benefit in the final infusion stages.

  4. Dissipative particle dynamics simulations of the viscosities of molten TNT and molten TNT suspensions containing nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Li, Yixue; Qian, Wen; He, Bi

    2016-09-01

    Based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods and experimental data, we used an empirical relationship between the DPD temperature and the real temperature to build a model that describes the viscosity of molten TNT fluids. The errors in the predicted viscosity based on this model were no more than 2.3 %. We also studied the steady-state shear rheological behavior of molten TNT fluids containing nanoparticles ("nanofluids"). The dependence of the nanofluid viscosity on the temperature was found to satisfy an Arrhenius-type equation, η = Ae (B/T) , where B, the flow activation energy, depends on particle content, size, and shape. We modified the Einstein-type viscosity model to account for the effects of nanoparticle solvation in TNT nanofluids. The resulting model was able to correctly predict the viscosities of suspensions containing nano- to microsized particles, and did not require any changes to the physical background of Einstein's viscosity theory. Graphical Abstract The revised Einstein viscosity model that correctly predict the viscosity of TNT suspensions containing nanoparticles.

  5. HIV and chronic methamphetamine dependence affect cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Ances, Beau M; Vaida, Florin; Cherner, Mariana; Yeh, Melinda J; Liang, Christine L; Gardner, Carly; Grant, Igor; Ellis, Ronald J; Buxton, Richard B

    2011-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and methamphetamine (METH) dependence are independently associated with neuronal dysfunction. The coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and neuronal activity is the basis of many task-based functional neuroimaging techniques. We examined the interaction between HIV infection and a previous history of METH dependence on CBF within the lenticular nuclei (LN). Twenty-four HIV-/METH-, eight HIV-/METH+, 24 HIV+/METH-, and 15 HIV+/METH+ participants performed a finger tapping paradigm. A multiple regression analysis of covariance assessed associations and two-way interactions between CBF and HIV serostatus and/or previous history of METH dependence. HIV+ individuals had a trend towards a lower baseline CBF (-10%, p = 0.07) and greater CBF changes for the functional task (+32%, p = 0.01) than HIV- subjects. Individuals with a previous history of METH dependence had a lower baseline CBF (-16%, p = 0.007) and greater CBF changes for a functional task (+33%, p = 0.02). However, no interaction existed between HIV serostatus and previous history of METH dependence for either baseline CBF (p = 0.53) or CBF changes for a functional task (p = 0.10). In addition, CBF and volume in the LN were not correlated. A possible additive relationship could exist between HIV infection and a history of METH dependence on CBF with a previous history of METH dependence having a larger contribution. Abnormalities in CBF could serve as a surrogate measure for assessing the chronic effects of HIV and previous METH dependence on brain function.

  6. Time-dependent local density measurements in unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Monson, D. J.; Exberger, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique for measuring the relative time-dependent density fluctuations in unsteady or turbulent flows is demonstrated. Using a 1.5-W continuous-wave Kr(+) laser, measurements have been obtained in 0.1-mm diameter by 1-mm-long sampling volumes in a Mach 3 flow of N2 seeded with biacetyl vapor. A signal amplitude resolution of 2% was achieved for a detection frequency bandwidth of 10 kHz. The measurement uncertainty was found to be dominated by noise behaving as photon statistical noise. The practical limits of signal-to-noise ratios have been characterized for a wide range of detection frequency bandwidths that encompasses those of interest in supersonic turbulence measurements.

  7. Study of viscosity of mono-, di-, and trialkylamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswal, S. L.; Sindhe, R. G.; Patel, A. T.; Dave, J. P.; Patel, S. G.; Patel, B. M.

    1992-07-01

    Viscosities of several mono-, di-, and trialkylamines have been measured in the temperature range 298 to 333 K. It is observed that viscosities are highly dependent on shape, size, and association through H-bond or through dipole. Following the transition state theory, energy, Gibbs free energy, and entropy of activation of viscous flow have been calculated. The values of expansion energy for these liquids have also been calculated using free volume theory, and subsequently amines have been classified as volume-restrained or energy-restrained liquids. The group contribution method of Van Velzen, Cardozo, and Langenkamp for estimating viscosity has been examined with the present and literature data, and the new group contribution increments ΔN i and ΔB i for amines have been evaluated.

  8. Room-temperature serial crystallography at synchrotron X-ray sources using slowly flowing free-standing high-viscosity microstreams.

    PubMed

    Botha, Sabine; Nass, Karol; Barends, Thomas R M; Kabsch, Wolfgang; Latz, Beatrice; Dworkowski, Florian; Foucar, Lutz; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Wang, Meitian; Shoeman, Robert L; Schlichting, Ilme; Doak, R Bruce

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in synchrotron sources, beamline optics and detectors are driving a renaissance in room-temperature data collection. The underlying impetus is the recognition that conformational differences are observed in functionally important regions of structures determined using crystals kept at ambient as opposed to cryogenic temperature during data collection. In addition, room-temperature measurements enable time-resolved studies and eliminate the need to find suitable cryoprotectants. Since radiation damage limits the high-resolution data that can be obtained from a single crystal, especially at room temperature, data are typically collected in a serial fashion using a number of crystals to spread the total dose over the entire ensemble. Several approaches have been developed over the years to efficiently exchange crystals for room-temperature data collection. These include in situ collection in trays, chips and capillary mounts. Here, the use of a slowly flowing microscopic stream for crystal delivery is demonstrated, resulting in extremely high-throughput delivery of crystals into the X-ray beam. This free-stream technology, which was originally developed for serial femtosecond crystallography at X-ray free-electron lasers, is here adapted to serial crystallography at synchrotrons. By embedding the crystals in a high-viscosity carrier stream, high-resolution room-temperature studies can be conducted at atmospheric pressure using the unattenuated X-ray beam, thus permitting the analysis of small or weakly scattering crystals. The high-viscosity extrusion injector is described, as is its use to collect high-resolution serial data from native and heavy-atom-derivatized lysozyme crystals at the Swiss Light Source using less than half a milligram of protein crystals. The room-temperature serial data allow de novo structure determination. The crystal size used in this proof-of-principle experiment was dictated by the available flux density. However, upcoming

  9. Surface dilatational viscosity of Langmuir monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Vogel, Michael; Hirsa, Amir

    2003-11-01

    With increased interest in microfluidic systems, interfacial phenomena is receiving more attention. As the length scales of fluid problems decrease, the surface to volume ratio increases and the coupling between interfacial flow and bulk flow becomes increasingly dominated by effects due to intrinsic surface viscosities (shear and dilatational), in comparison to elastic effects (due to surface tension gradients). The surface shear viscosity is well-characterized, as cm-scale laboratory experiments are able to isolate its effects from other interfacial processes (e.g., in the deep-channel viscometer). The same is not true for the dilatational viscosity, because it acts in the direction of surface tension gradients. Their relative strength scale with the capillary number, and for cm-scale laboratory flows, surface tension effects tend to dominate. In microfluidic scale flows, the scaling favors viscosity. We have devised an experimental apparatus which is capable of isolating and enhancing the effects of dilatational viscosity at the cm scales by driving the interface harmonically in time, while keeping the interface flat. In this talk, we shall present both the theory for how this works as well as experimental measurements of surface velocity from which we deduce the dilatational viscosity of several monolayers on the air-water interface over a substantial range of surface concentrations. Anomalous behavior over some range of concentration, which superficially indicates negative viscosity, maybe explained in terms of compositional effects due to large spatial and temporal variations in concentration and corresponding viscosity.

  10. Viscosity test standards for engine oils

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a compilation of 10 ASTM standards that cover both low and high temperature viscosity tests for automotive engine oils, with respect to low temperature flow properties and performance requirements under high temperature, high shear rate conditions. Society of Automotive Engineer's Engine Oil Viscosity Classification SAE J300 is included to provide low temperature high shear rate method.

  11. Constructing minimum-cost flow-dependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Doreen A.; Weng, Jia F.

    2002-09-01

    In the construction of a communication network, the length of the network is an important but not unique factor determining the cost of the network. Among many possible network models, Gilbert proposed a flow-dependent model in which flow demands are assigned between each pair of points in a given point set A, and the cost per unit length of a link in the network is a function of the flow through the link. In this paper we first investigate the properties of this Gilbert model: the concavity of the cost function, decomposition, local minimality, the number of Steiner points and the maximum degree of Steiner points. Then we propose three heuristics for constructing minimum cost Gilbert networks. Two of them come from the fact that generally a minimum cost Gilbert network stands between two extremes: the complete network G(A) on A and the edge-weighted Steiner minimal tree W(A) on A. The first heuristic starts with G(A) and reduces the cost by splitting angles; the second one starts with both G(A) and W(A), and reduces the cost by selecting low cost paths. As a generalisation of the second heuristic, the third heuristic constructs a new Gilbert network of less cost by hybridising known Gilbert networks. Finally we discuss some considerations in practical applications.

  12. Charge-dependent anisotropic flow in Cu + Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niida, Takafumi

    2016-12-01

    We present the first measurements of charge-dependent directed flow in Cu+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV. The directed flow has been measured as functions of the transverse momentum and pseudorapidity with the STAR detector. The results show a small but finite difference between positively and negatively charged particles. The difference is qualitatively explained by the patron-hadron-string-dynamics (PHSD) model including the effect of the electric field, but much smaller than the model calculation, which indicates only a small fraction of all final state quarks are created within the lifetime of the initial electric field. Higher-order azimuthal anisotropic flow is also presented up to the fourth-order for unidentified charged particles and up to the third-order for identified charged particles (π, K, and p). For unidentified particles, the results are reasonably described by the event-by-event viscous hydrodynamic model with η / s = 0.08 - 0.16. The trends observed for identified particles in Cu+Au collisions are similar to those observed in symmetric (Au+Au) collisions.

  13. Tracking the permeable porous network during strain-dependent magmatic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Hess, K.-U.; Heap, M. J.; Gaunt, H. E.; Meredith, P. G.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-06-01

    Rheological variations have been postulated as the cause of transitions from effusive to explosive volcanic eruption style. Rheology is integrally linked to the composition and textural state (porosity, crystallinity) of magma as well as the stress, temperature and strain rate operative during flow. This study characterises the rheological behaviour and, importantly, the evolution of physical properties of two magmas (with different crystallinity and porosity) from Volcán de Colima (Mexico) - a volcanic system known for its rapid fluctuations in eruption style. Magma samples deformed in a uniaxial press at a constant stress of 2.8, 12 or 24 MPa, a constant temperature of 940-945 °C (comparable to upper conduit or lava dome conditions) to strains of 20 or 30% displayed different mechanical behaviour and significant differences in measured strain rates (10- 2-10- 5 s- 1). The evolution of porosity, permeability, dynamic Young's modulus and dynamic Poisson's ratio illustrate a complex evolution of the samples manifested as strain-hardening, visco-elastic, constant-rate and strain-weakening deformation. Both magmas behave as shear-thinning non-Newtonian liquids and viscosity decreases as a function of strain. We find that strain localisation during deformation leads to the rearrangement and closure of void space (a combination of pores and cracks) followed by preferentially aligned fracturing (in the direction of the maximum principal stress) to form damage zones as well as densification of other areas. In a dome setting, highly viscous, low permeability magmas carry the potential to block volcanic conduits with a magma plug, resulting in the build-up of pressures in the conduit. Above a certain threshold of strain (dependent upon stress/strain rate), the initiation, propagation and coalescence of fractures leads to mechanical degradation of the magma samples, which then supersedes magmatic flow and crystal rearrangement as the dominant form of deformation. This

  14. VNAP2: a computer program for computation of two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible, turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, M.C.

    1981-08-01

    VNAP2 is a computer program for calculating turbulent (as well as laminar and inviscid), steady, and unsteady flow. VNAP2 solves the two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either an algebraic mixing-length model, a one-equation model, or the Jones-Launder two-equation model. The geometry may be a single- or a dual-flowing stream. The interior grid points are computed using the unsplit MacCormack scheme. Two options to speed up the calculations for high Reynolds number flows are included. The boundary grid points are computed using a reference-plane-characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source functions. An explicit artificial viscosity is included for shock computations. The fluid is assumed to be a perfect gas. The flow boundaries may be arbitrary curved solid walls, inflow/outflow boundaries, or free-jet envelopes. Typical problems that can be solved concern nozzles, inlets, jet-powered afterbodies, airfoils, and free-jet expansions. The accuracy and efficiency of the program are shown by calculations of several inviscid and turbulent flows. The program and its use are described completely, and six sample cases and a code listing are included.

  15. VNAP2: A Computer Program for Computation of Two-dimensional, Time-dependent, Compressible, Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program, VNAP2, for calculating turbulent (as well as laminar and inviscid), steady, and unsteady flow is presented. It solves the two dimensional, time dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either an algebraic mixing length model, a one equation model, or the Jones-Launder two equation model. The geometry may be a single or a dual flowing stream. The interior grid points are computed using the unsplit MacCormack scheme. Two options to speed up the calculations for high Reynolds number flows are included. The boundary grid points are computed using a reference plane characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source functions. An explicit artificial viscosity is included for shock computations. The fluid is assumed to be a perfect gas. The flow boundaries may be arbitrary curved solid walls, inflow/outflow boundaries, or free jet envelopes. Typical problems that can be solved concern nozzles, inlets, jet powered afterbodies, airfoils, and free jet expansions. The accuracy and efficiency of the program are shown by calculations of several inviscid and turbulent flows. The program and its use are described completely, and six sample cases and a code listing are included.

  16. Intrinsic viscosity and rheological properties of natural and substituted guar gums in seawater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shibin; He, Le; Guo, Jianchun; Zhao, Jinzhou; Tang, Hongbiao

    2015-05-01

    The intrinsic viscosity and rheological properties of guar gum (GG), hydroxypropyl guar (HPG) and carboxymethyl guar (CMG) in seawater and the effects of shear rate, concentration, temperature and pH on these properties were investigated. An intrinsic viscosity-increasing effect was observed with GG and HPG in seawater (SW) compared to deionized water (DW), whereas the intrinsic viscosity of CMG in seawater was much lower than that in DW due to a screening effect that reduced the repulsion between the polymer chains. Regardless of the functional groups, all sample solutions was well characterized by a modified Cross model that exhibited the transition from Newtonian to pseudoplastic in the low shear rate range at the concentrations of interest to industries, and their viscosity increased with the increase in their concentration but decreased with the increase in temperature. In contrast to nonionic GG or HPG, anionic CMG had a slightly decreased viscosity property in SW, exhibiting polyelectrolyte viscosity behavior. The α value in the zero-shear rate viscosity vs. concentration power-law equation for the samples gave the order of CMG>HPG>GG while the SW solution of CMG had the lowest viscous flow activation energy and exhibited a strong pH-dependent viscosity by a different shear rate.

  17. Myosin IIA dependent retrograde flow drives 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2010-04-21

    Epithelial cell migration is an essential part of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration, yet their migration is least understood. Using our three-dimensional (3D) motility analysis, migrating epithelial cells formed an atypical polarized cell shape with the nucleus leading the cell front and a contractile cell rear. Migrating epithelial cells exerted traction forces to deform both the anterior and posterior extracellular matrix toward the cell body. The cell leading edge exhibited a myosin II-dependent retrograde flow with the magnitude and direction consistent with surrounding network deformation. Interestingly, on a two-dimensional substrate, myosin IIA-deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type cells, but in a 3D gel, these myosin IIA-deficient cells were unpolarized and immobile. In contrast, the migration rates of myosin IIB-deficient cells were similar to wild-type cells. Therefore, myosin IIA, not myosin IIB, is required for 3D epithelial cell migration.

  18. Anomalous - viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, Thomas H.; Ono, Masayuki

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

  19. Conditional stability for thermal convection in a rotating couple-stress fluid saturating a porous media with temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity using a thermal non-equilibrium model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil; Choudhary, Shalu; Mahajan, Amit

    2014-06-01

    A nonlinear stability threshold for convection in a rotating couple-stress fluid saturating a porous medium with temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity using a thermal non-equilibrium model is found to be exactly the same as the linear instability boundary. This optimal result is important because it shows that linear theory has completely captured the physics of the onset of convection. The effects of couple-stress fluid parameter F, temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity Γ, interface heat transfer coefficient H, Taylor number TA, Darcy-Brinkman number D˜a, and porosity modified conductivity ratio γ on the onset of convection have been investigated. Asymptotic analysis for both small and large values of interface heat transfer coefficient H is also presented. An excellent agreement is found between the exact solutions and asymptotic solutions.

  20. Predicting human blood viscosity in silico

    SciTech Connect

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Pan, Wenxiao; Caswell, Bruce; Gompper, Gerhard; Karniadakis, George E.

    2011-07-05

    Cellular suspensions such as blood are a part of living organisms and their rheological and flow characteristics determine and affect majority of vital functions. The rheological and flow properties of cell suspensions are determined by collective dynamics of cells, their structure or arrangement, cell properties and interactions. We study these relations for blood in silico using a mesoscopic particle-based method and two different models (multi-scale/low-dimensional) of red blood cells. The models yield accurate quantitative predictions of the dependence of blood viscosity on shear rate and hematocrit. We explicitly model cell aggregation interactions and demonstrate the formation of reversible rouleaux structures resulting in a tremendous increase of blood viscosity at low shear rates and yield stress, in agreement with experiments. The non-Newtonian behavior of such cell suspensions (e.g., shear thinning, yield stress) is analyzed and related to the suspension’s microstructure, deformation and dynamics of single cells. We provide the flrst quantitative estimates of normal stress differences and magnitude of aggregation forces in blood. Finally, the flexibility of the cell models allows them to be employed for quantitative analysis of a much wider class of complex fluids including cell, capsule, and vesicle suspensions.

  1. Three-dimensional time dependent computation of turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The three-dimensional, primitive equations of motion are solved numerically for the case of isotropic box turbulence and the distortion of homogeneous turbulence by irrotational plane strain at large Reynolds numbers. A Gaussian filter is applied to governing equations to define the large scale field. This gives rise to additional second order computed scale stresses (Leonard stresses). The residual stresses are simulated through an eddy viscosity. Uniform grids are used, with a fourth order differencing scheme in space and a second order Adams-Bashforth predictor for explicit time stepping. The results are compared to the experiments and statistical information extracted from the computer generated data.

  2. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-01-01

    Simulations and measurements have established that water moves through carbon nanotubes with exceptionally high rates due to nearly frictionless interfaces1–4. These observations have stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for applications that range from desalination to nano-filtration and energy harvesting5–10, yet the exact water transport mechanisms inside the nanotubes and at the water-carbon interface continue to be controversially discussed11,12 because existing theories fail to provide a satisfying explanation for the limited number of experimental results available to date13. This is because even though controlled and systematic studies have explored transport through individual nanotubes8,9,14–7, none has met the considerable technical challenge of unambiguously measuring the permeability of a single nanotube11. Here we show that the pressure-driven flow rate across individual nanotubes can be determined with unprecedented sensitivity and without dyes from the hydrodynamics of water jets as they emerge from single nanotubes into a surrounding fluid. Our measurements reveal unexpectedly large and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes (CNT), and no slippage in boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNT) that are crystallographically similar to CNTs but differ electronically. This pronounced contrast between the two systems must originate from subtle differences in atomic-scale details of their solid-liquid interfaces, strikingly illustrating that nanofluidics is the frontier where the continuum picture of fluid mechanics confronts the atomic nature of matter. PMID:27604947

  3. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-09-01

    Measurements and simulations have found that water moves through carbon nanotubes at exceptionally high rates owing to nearly frictionless interfaces. These observations have stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for applications including desalination, nano-filtration and energy harvesting, yet the exact mechanisms of water transport inside the nanotubes and at the water-carbon interface continue to be debated because existing theories do not provide a satisfactory explanation for the limited number of experimental results available so far. This lack of experimental results arises because, even though controlled and systematic studies have explored transport through individual nanotubes, none has met the considerable technical challenge of unambiguously measuring the permeability of a single nanotube. Here we show that the pressure-driven flow rate through individual nanotubes can be determined with unprecedented sensitivity and without dyes from the hydrodynamics of water jets as they emerge from single nanotubes into a surrounding fluid. Our measurements reveal unexpectedly large and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes, and no slippage in boron nitride nanotubes that are crystallographically similar to carbon nanotubes, but electronically different. This pronounced contrast between the two systems must originate from subtle differences in the atomic-scale details of their solid-liquid interfaces, illustrating that nanofluidics is the frontier at which the continuum picture of fluid mechanics meets the atomic nature of matter.

  4. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-09-08

    Measurements and simulations have found that water moves through carbon nanotubes at exceptionally high rates owing to nearly frictionless interfaces. These observations have stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for applications including desalination, nano-filtration and energy harvesting, yet the exact mechanisms of water transport inside the nanotubes and at the water-carbon interface continue to be debated because existing theories do not provide a satisfactory explanation for the limited number of experimental results available so far. This lack of experimental results arises because, even though controlled and systematic studies have explored transport through individual nanotubes, none has met the considerable technical challenge of unambiguously measuring the permeability of a single nanotube. Here we show that the pressure-driven flow rate through individual nanotubes can be determined with unprecedented sensitivity and without dyes from the hydrodynamics of water jets as they emerge from single nanotubes into a surrounding fluid. Our measurements reveal unexpectedly large and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes, and no slippage in boron nitride nanotubes that are crystallographically similar to carbon nanotubes, but electronically different. This pronounced contrast between the two systems must originate from subtle differences in the atomic-scale details of their solid-liquid interfaces, illustrating that nanofluidics is the frontier at which the continuum picture of fluid mechanics meets the atomic nature of matter.

  5. An exponential chemorheological model for viscosity dependence on degree-of-cure of a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin during the post-gel curing stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, JC; Oliet, M.; Alonso, M. V.; Rodriguez, F.; Madsen, B.

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the chemorheological behavior of a bio-based polyfurfuryl alcohol (PFA) resin has been determined by rheological isothermal tests at different curing temperatures for the post-gel curing stage of the resin, using three different amounts of catalyst (2, 4 and 6 wt %). Instead of modeling the evolution of the complex viscosity using a widely used chemorheological model such as the Arrhenius model for each tested temperature, the change of the complex viscosity as a function of the degree-of-cure was predicted using a new exponential type model. In this model, the logarithm of the normalized degree-of-cure is used to predict the behavior of the logarithm of the normalized complex viscosity. The model shows good quality of fitting with the experimental data for 4 and 6 wt % amounts of catalyst. For the 2 wt % amount of catalyst, scattered data leads to a slightly lower quality of fitting. Altogether, it is demonstrated that the new exponential model is a good alternative to conventional chemorheological models due to its simplicity and suitability.

  6. Flow-Dependent Mass Transfer May Trigger Endothelial Signaling Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Vandrangi, Prashanthi; Sosa, Martha; Shyy, John Y.-J.; Rodgers, Victor G. J.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that fluid mechanical forces directly impact endothelial signaling pathways. But while this general observation is clear, less apparent are the underlying mechanisms that initiate these critical signaling processes. This is because fluid mechanical forces can offer a direct mechanical input to possible mechanotransducers as well as alter critical mass transport characteristics (i.e., concentration gradients) of a host of chemical stimuli present in the blood stream. However, it has recently been accepted that mechanotransduction (direct mechanical force input), and not mass transfer, is the fundamental mechanism for many hemodynamic force-modulated endothelial signaling pathways and their downstream gene products. This conclusion has been largely based, indirectly, on accepted criteria that correlate signaling behavior and shear rate and shear stress, relative to changes in viscosity. However, in this work, we investigate the negative control for these criteria. Here we computationally and experimentally subject mass-transfer limited systems, independent of mechanotransduction, to the purported criteria. The results showed that the negative control (mass-transfer limited system) produced the same trends that have been used to identify mechanotransduction-dominant systems. Thus, the widely used viscosity-related shear stress and shear rate criteria are insufficient in determining mechanotransduction-dominant systems. Thus, research should continue to consider the importance of mass transfer in triggering signaling cascades. PMID:22558132

  7. Plasma viscosity elevations with simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, D. G.; Convertino, V. A.; Goldwater, D.; Ferguson, E. W.; Schoomaker, E. B.

    1986-01-01

    A hypothesis correlating an increase in blood viscosity during bed rest to a decrease in aerobic capacity during simulated weightlessness is tested. Eight human subjects were studied on the sixth day of bed rest during two consecutive 10-d bed rest periods separated by a 14-d recovery interval designed to simulate the flight-layover schedule of Shuttle astronauts. Plasma viscosity and volume were measured, together with maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max). An increase in hematocrit, plasma protein, and fibrinogen concentrations was found, contributing to an elevation in plasma viscosity. VO2max decreased significantly in the first, but not the second bed rest cycle, and though many individuals exhibited a decrease in plasma volume and aerobic capacity coupled with elevated plasma viscosity, correlations between these variables were lacking. It is concluded that the decrease in VO2max observed following simulated weightlessness cannot be attributed to alterations in muscle blood flow resulting from increased blood viscosity.

  8. Validity of Taylor's Dissipation-Viscosity Independence Postulate in Variable-Viscosity Turbulent Fluid Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kurnchul; Girimaji, Sharath S.; Kerimo, Johannes

    2008-08-01

    G. I. Taylor’s postulate [Proc. R. Soc. APRLAAZ0080-4630 151, 421 (1935)10.1098/rspa.1935.0158] that dissipation is independent of viscosity at high Reynolds numbers is the foundation of many single-fluid turbulence theories and closure models. The validity of this key postulate in an important class of flows, turbulent mixtures, is not yet clearly established. We devise a simple numerical experiment of decaying turbulence in a mixture of two fluids of vastly different viscosities to examine dissipation scaling. Initially, the two fluids are segregated, and dissipation is directly proportional to viscosity. As turbulence evolves and fluids mix, the velocity gradients rapidly adapt to the viscosity field, and within one-half eddy turnover time, dissipation-viscosity independence is established. Viscosity-weighted velocity-gradient skewness is shown to be constant, leading to the validity of Taylor’s postulate in turbulent mixtures.

  9. Velocity dependence of biphasic flow structuration: steady-state and oscillating flow effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tore Tallakstad, Ken; Jankov, Mihailo; Løvoll, Grunde; Toussaint, Renaud; Jørgen Mâløy, Knut; Grude Flekkøy, Eirik; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Schäfer, Gerhard; Méheust, Yves; Arendt Knudsen, Henning

    2010-05-01

    We study various types of biphasic flows in quasi-two-dimensional transparent porous models. These flows imply a viscous wetting fluid, and a lowly viscous one. The models are transparent, allowing the displacement process and structure to be monitored in space and time. Three different aspects will be presented: 1. In stationary biphasic flows, we study the relationship between the macroscopic pressure drop (related to relative permeability) and the average flow rate, and how this arises from the cluster size distribution of the lowly viscous fluid [1]. 2. In drainage situations, we study how the geometry of the invader can be explained, and how it gives rise to apparent dynamic capillary effects. We show how these can be explained by viscous effects on evolving geometries of invading fluid [2]. 3. We study the impact of oscillating pressure fields superimposed to a background flow over the flow regimes patterns [3]. Steady-State Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media: Statistics and Transport Properties. First, in stationary flow with a control of the flux of both fluids, we show how the pressure drop depends on the flow rate. We will show that the dynamics is dominated by the interplay between a viscous pressure field from the wetting fluid and bubble transport of a less viscous, nonwetting phase. In contrast with more studied displacement front systems, steady-state flow is in equilibrium, statistically speaking. The corresponding theoretical simplicity allows us to explain a data collapse in the cluster size distribution of lowly viscous fluid in the system, as well as the relation |?P|∞√Ca--. This allows to explain so called relative permeability effects by the morphological changes of the cluster size distribution. Influence of viscous fingering on dynamic saturation-pressure curves in porous media. Next, we study drainage in such models, and investigate the relationship between the pressure field and the morphology of the invading fluid. This allows to model

  10. Determination of shear viscosity of molecular nitrogen (N2): molecular dynamic hard rotor methodology and the results.

    PubMed

    Strak, Paweł; Krukowski, Stanisław

    2011-04-21

    Determination of shear viscosity of molecular nitrogen (N(2)) by molecular dynamics (MD) in the high density range needs explicit incorporation of the rotational motion and therefore precise knowledge of angular dependence of N(2)-N(2) intermolecular potential. Newly designed Couette flow nonequilibrium molecular dynamic (NEMD) simulation procedure employs corrugated moving boundary, coupling the moving walls to translational and rotational motion exactly. Low density data on nitrogen viscosity show good agreement between MD data and experiment, confirming the radial dependence of the potential derived from quantum mechanical (QM) high precision calculations (coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples corrections [CCSD(T)]). Additionally, the angular dependence of the potential is verified using shear viscosity data for high density region, obtained from newly developed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It was demonstrated that the corrugated wall flow simulations provide results that are independent of the details of wall potential, fulfilling a basic requirement for application of MD simulations. These results are in good agreement with the equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) viscosity, derived from the Green-Kubo formula. Derived analytical dependence of the shear viscosity on the density and temperature shows that the MD data are in good agreement with experiment. Thus, MD simulations indicate that the CCSD(T) potential angular form is sufficiently precise for determination of the viscosity in a wide range of temperature and pressure.

  11. Conditions of viscosity measurement for detecting irradiated peppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Toru; Todoriki, Setsuko; Okadome, Hiroshi; Kohyama, Kaoru

    1995-04-01

    Viscosity of gelatinized suspensions of black and white peppers decreased depending upon dose. The viscosity was influenced by gelatinization and viscosity measurement conditions. The difference between unirradiated pepper and an irradiated one was larger at a higher pH and temperature for gelatinization. A viscosity parameter normalized with the starch content of pepper sample and the viscosity of a 5% suspension of corn starch could get rid of the influence of the conditions for viscosity measurement such as a type of viscometer, shear rate and temperature.

  12. Reducing blood viscosity with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.; Huang, K.

    2011-07-01

    Blood viscosity is a major factor in heart disease. When blood viscosity increases, it damages blood vessels and increases the risk of heart attacks. Currently, the only method of treatment is to take drugs such as aspirin, which has, however, several unwanted side effects. Here we report our finding that blood viscosity can be reduced with magnetic fields of 1 T or above in the blood flow direction. One magnetic field pulse of 1.3 T lasting ˜1 min can reduce the blood viscosity by 20%-30%. After the exposure, in the absence of magnetic field, the blood viscosity slowly moves up, but takes a couple of hours to return to the original value. The process is repeatable. Reapplying the magnetic field reduces the blood viscosity again. By selecting the magnetic field strength and duration, we can keep the blood viscosity within the normal range. In addition, such viscosity reduction does not affect the red blood cells’ normal function. This technology has much potential for physical therapy.

  13. New constitutive equation for the volume viscosity in fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Ash, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    The traditional volume viscosity, Stokes' hypothesis, and acoustical relaxation are reviewed. The lossy Navier-Stokes Equation is applied to periodic (acoustic) flow, and it is shown that the traditional volume viscosity leads to a result which contradicts that describing acoustical relaxation. It is demonstrated that the addition of a second volume viscosity term to the constitutive equation, to account for pressure relaxation, resolves the conflict, and leads to a direct correspondence between the volume viscosity parameters and the acoustical relaxation parameters. The representation of volume viscosity is formulated for the case of multiple relaxations, as occur in air. Finally, an application of the new constitutive equation to a simple convective compressible flow, namely a linearly accelerating flow, demonstrates the impact of volume viscosity upon the flow and the physical conditions for which it is important.

  14. Viscosity measuring using microcantilevers

    DOEpatents

    Oden, Patrick Ian

    2001-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the viscosity of a fluid uses a micromachined cantilever mounted on a moveable base. As the base is rastered while in contact with the fluid, the deflection of the cantilever is measured and the viscosity determined by comparison with standards.

  15. Viscosity and Solvation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses theories underlying the phenomena of solution viscosities, involving the Jones and Dole equation, B-coefficient determination, and flickering cluster model. Indicates that viscosity measurements provide a basis for the study of the structural effects of ions in aqueous solutions and are applicable in teaching high school chemistry. (CC)

  16. Density, refractive index, interfacial tension, and viscosity of ionic liquids [EMIM][EtSO4], [EMIM][NTf2], [EMIM][N(CN)2], and [OMA][NTf2] in dependence on temperature at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Fröba, Andreas P; Kremer, Heiko; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-10-02

    The density, refractive index, interfacial tension, and viscosity of ionic liquids (ILs) [EMIM][EtSO 4] (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate), [EMIM][NTf 2] (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide), [EMIM][N(CN) 2] (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanimide), and [OMA][NTf 2] (trioctylmethylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide) were studied in dependence on temperature at atmospheric pressure both by conventional techniques and by surface light scattering (SLS). A vibrating tube densimeter was used for the measurement of density at temperatures from (273.15 to 363.15) K and the results have an expanded uncertainty ( k = 2) of +/-0.02%. Using an Abbe refractometer, the refractive index was measured for temperatures between (283.15 and 313.15) K with an expanded uncertainty ( k = 2) of about +/-0.0005. The interfacial tension was obtained from the pendant drop technique at a temperature of 293.15 K with an expanded uncertainty ( k = 2) of +/-1%. For higher and lower temperatures, the interfacial tension was estimated by an adequate prediction scheme based on the datum at 293.15 K and the temperature dependence of density. For the ILs studied within this work, at a first order approximation, the quantity directly accessible by the SLS technique was the ratio of surface tension to dynamic viscosity. By combining the experimental results of the SLS technique with density and interfacial tension from conventional techniques, the dynamic viscosity could be obtained for temperatures between (273.15 and 333.15) K with an estimated expanded uncertainty ( k = 2) of less than +/-3%. The measured density, refractive index, and viscosity are represented by interpolating expressions with differences between the experimental and calculated values that are comparable with but always smaller than the expanded uncertainties ( k = 2). Besides a comparison with the literature, the influence of structural variations on the thermophysical properties of the

  17. Development of a simple droplet-based microfluidic capillary viscometer for low-viscosity Newtonian fluids.

    PubMed

    DeLaMarre, Michael F; Keyzer, Alec; Shippy, Scott A

    2015-05-05

    Viscosity is an easily measured macroscopic property that provides molecular information and is widely used across the sciences and engineering. Here we report a microfluidic capillary viscometer that forms droplets from aqueous samples in an immiscible carrier phase and encodes information about sample viscosity in the droplet spacing. The device shows exceptional calibration stability, with only a 0.6% drift in calibration factor from run to run, the ability to handle aqueous and nonaqueous samples, and the ability to operate with sample volumes as low as 38 nL. Operating range for aqueous sample viscosity was characterized, and was found to be 0.96-52 cP. Operating range for aqueous shear rate was found to depend on aqueous viscosity and varied from 1.9 × 10(1)-4.4 × 10(2) s(-1) for high viscosity samples to 4.1 × 10(2)-6.0 × 10(3) s(-1) for low viscosity samples. Accuracy was tested by comparing measured viscosities of several samples including crème de menthe peppermint liquor, human urine, and baby oil to viscosities of the same samples obtained with a U-tube viscometer. The device was found to be very accurate, with differences between methods as low as 0.1%. The viscometer presented requires only a basic T junction and can utilize off-chip fluorescence to measure viscosity, which could allow for easy addition of viscometric measurement capabilities to existing droplet platforms. Furthermore, the device is capable of performing measurements on Newtonian fluids without precise control over pressures or flow rates, which significantly simplifies device operation.

  18. Probing the shear viscosity of an active nematic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillamat, Pau; Ignés-Mullol, Jordi; Shankar, Suraj; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Sagués, Francesc

    2016-12-01

    In vitro reconstituted active systems, such as the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-driven microtubule bundle suspension developed by the Dogic group [T. Sanchez, D. T. Chen, S. J. DeCamp, M. Heymann, and Z. Dogic, Nature (London) 491, 431 (2012), 10.1038/nature11591], provide a fertile testing ground for elucidating the phenomenology of active liquid crystalline states. Controlling such novel phases of matter crucially depends on our knowledge of their material and physical properties. In this Rapid Communication, we show that the shear viscosity of an active nematic film can be probed by varying its hydrodynamic coupling to a bounding oil layer. Using the motion of disclinations as intrinsic tracers of the flow field and a hydrodynamic model, we obtain an estimate for the shear viscosity of the nematic film. Knowing this now provides us with an additional handle for robust and precision tunable control of the emergent dynamics of active fluids.

  19. Dynamical influences on the moment of inertia tensor from lateral viscosity variations inferred from seismic tomographic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Shuxia; Yuen, David A.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the influences of lateral variations of viscosity on the moment of inertia tensor from viscous flows due to the density anomalies in the mantle inferred from seismic tomographic models. The scaling relations between the density and the seismic anomalies is taken as either a constant or a function increasing with depth in accord with the recent high-pressure experimental studies. The viscosity is taken as an exponential function of the 3D density anomaly. In models with an isoviscous background, the effects on the perturbed moment of inertia tensor from the lateral viscosity variations are smaller than those due to variations in the radial viscosity profiles. In mantle models with a background viscosity increasing with depth, the influences of the lateral viscosity variations are significant. The most striking feature in the latter case is that the two off-diagonal elements delta I(sub xz) and delta I(sub yz) in the inertia tensor exhibit greatest sensitivity to lateral variations of the viscosity. While the other elements of the inertia change by only about a few tens of percent in the range of lateral viscosity contrast considered (less than 300), delta I(sub xz) and delta I(sub yz) can vary up to 40 times even with a change in sign, depending on the radial viscosity stratification and the location of the strongest lateral variations. The increase in the velocity-density scaling relation with depth can reduce the influences of the lateral viscosity variations, but it does not change the overall sensitive nature of delta I(sub xz) and delta I(sub yz). This study demonstrates clearly that the lateral viscosity variations, especially in the upper mantle, must be considered in the determination of long-term polar wander, since the variations in the delta I(sub xz) and delta I(sub yz) terms are directly responsible for exciting rotational movements.

  20. Lagrangian numerical techniques for modelling multicomponent flow in the presence of large viscosity contrasts: Markers-in-bulk versus Markers-in-chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyukova, Elvira; Dabrowski, Marcin; Steinberger, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Many problems in geodynamic applications may be described as viscous flow of chemically heterogeneous materials. Examples include subduction of compositionally stratified lithospheric plates, folding of rheologically layered rocks, and thermochemical convection of the Earth's mantle. The associated time scales are significantly shorter than that of chemical diffusion, which justifies the commonly featured phenomena in geodynamic flow models termed contact discontinuities. These are spatially sharp interfaces separating regions of different material properties. Numerical modelling of advection of fields with sharp interfaces is challenging. Typical errors include numerical diffusion, which arises due to the repeated action of numerical interpolation. Mathematically, a material field can be represented by discrete indicator functions, whose values are interpreted as logical statements (e.g. whether or not the location is occupied by a given material). Interpolation of a discrete function boils down to determining where in the intermediate node-positions one material ends, and the other begins. The numerical diffusion error thus manifests itself as an erroneous location of the material-interface. Lagrangian advection-schemes are known to be less prone to numerical diffusion errors, compared to their Eulerian counterparts. The tracer-ratio method, where Lagrangian markers are used to discretize the bulk of materials filling the entire domain, is a popular example of such methods. The Stokes equation in this case is solved on a separate, static grid, and in order to do it - material properties must be interpolated from the markers to the grid. This involves the difficulty related to interpolation of discrete fields. The material distribution, and thus material-properties like viscosity and density, seen by the grid is polluted by the interpolation error, which enters the solution of the momentum equation. Errors due to the uncertainty of interface-location can be

  1. Moving Forward to Constrain the Shear Viscosity of QCD Matter.

    PubMed

    Denicol, Gabriel; Monnai, Akihiko; Schenke, Björn

    2016-05-27

    We demonstrate that measurements of rapidity differential anisotropic flow in heavy-ion collisions can constrain the temperature dependence of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η/s of QCD matter. Comparing results from hydrodynamic calculations with experimental data from the RHIC, we find evidence for a small η/s≈0.04 in the QCD crossover region and a strong temperature dependence in the hadronic phase. A temperature independent η/s is disfavored by the data. We further show that measurements of the event-by-event flow as a function of rapidity can be used to independently constrain the initial state fluctuations in three dimensions and the temperature dependent transport properties of QCD matter.

  2. Moving Forward to Constrain the Shear Viscosity of QCD Matter

    DOE PAGES

    Denicol, Gabriel; Monnai, Akihiko; Schenke, Björn

    2016-05-26

    In this work, we demonstrate that measurements of rapidity differential anisotropic flow in heavy-ion collisions can constrain the temperature dependence of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η/s of QCD matter. Comparing results from hydrodynamic calculations with experimental data from the RHIC, we find evidence for a small η/s ≈ 0.04 in the QCD crossover region and a strong temperature dependence in the hadronic phase. A temperature independent η/s is disfavored by the data. We further show that measurements of the event-by-event flow as a function of rapidity can be used to independently constrain the initial state fluctuations inmore » three dimensions and the temperature dependent transport properties of QCD matter.« less

  3. Moving Forward to Constrain the Shear Viscosity of QCD Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Denicol, Gabriel; Monnai, Akihiko; Schenke, Björn

    2016-05-26

    In this work, we demonstrate that measurements of rapidity differential anisotropic flow in heavy-ion collisions can constrain the temperature dependence of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η/s of QCD matter. Comparing results from hydrodynamic calculations with experimental data from the RHIC, we find evidence for a small η/s ≈ 0.04 in the QCD crossover region and a strong temperature dependence in the hadronic phase. A temperature independent η/s is disfavored by the data. We further show that measurements of the event-by-event flow as a function of rapidity can be used to independently constrain the initial state fluctuations in three dimensions and the temperature dependent transport properties of QCD matter.

  4. System Size, Energy, Pseudorapidity, and Centrality Dependence of Elliptic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M. P.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.; Kulinich, P.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Vale, C.; Nieuwenhuizen, G. J. van; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.

    2007-06-15

    This Letter presents measurements of the elliptic flow of charged particles as a function of pseudorapidity and centrality from Cu-Cu collisions at 62.4 and 200 GeV using the PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow in Cu-Cu collisions is found to be significant even for the most central events. For comparison with the Au-Au results, it is found that the detailed way in which the collision geometry (eccentricity) is estimated is of critical importance when scaling out system-size effects. A new form of eccentricity, called the participant eccentricity, is introduced which yields a scaled elliptic flow in the Cu-Cu system that has the same relative magnitude and qualitative features as that in the Au-Au system.

  5. Effect of workpiece viscosity on strain unevenness during equal channel angular extrusion: CFD 2D solution of Navier-Stokes equations for the physical variables ‘flow velocities—punching pressure’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perig, Alexander V.; Golodenko, Nikolai N.

    2016-11-01

    The present article addresses strain unevenness effects during equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) of physical models of polymer workpieces with viscosity flow features through a Segal die with channel intersection angle of 2θ = 90°. Computational viscous flow lines, flow velocity fields, and material dead zone formation in the physical simulation of ECAE have been numerically derived for planar flow of viscous incompressible continua in an angular die with 2θ = 90°. This is accomplished through the introduction of Navier-Stokes equations with the following dimensionless physical variables: polymer model local flow velocities u, v and punching pressure p. Derived experimental results are grounded on the application of the following physical simulation techniques: marker method, based on harder disperse particles partially forcing into the front faces of soft workpieces; layered model production by assembling the workpiece soft model with different layers, and circular gridlines use with viscous flow of the polymer soft model. Good agreement has been found between the computational and observable physical simulation results. Based on the obtained results, recommendations are made for polymer ECAE technology enhancement and angular die design for polymer workpiece pressure forming.

  6. Viscosity of Sheared Helical filament Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartucci, Matthew; Urbach, Jeff; Blair, Dan; Schwenger, Walter

    The viscosity of suspensions can be dramatically affected by high aspect ratio particles. Understanding these systems provides insight into key biological functions and can be manipulated for many technological applications. In this talk, the viscosity as a function of shear rate of suspensions of helical filaments is compared to that of suspensions of straight rod-like filaments. Our goal is to determine the impact of filament geometry on low volume fraction colloidal suspensions in order to identify strategies for altering viscosity with minimal volume fraction. In this research, the detached flagella of the bacteria Salmonella Typhimurium are used as a model system of helical filaments and compared to mutated straight flagella of the Salmonella. We compare rheological measurements of the suspension viscosity in response to shear flow and use a combination of the rheology and fluorescence microscopy to identify the microstructural changes responsible for the observed rheological response.

  7. Effective Viscosity of Microswimmer Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaï, Salima; Jibuti, Levan; Peyla, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of a quantitative and macroscopic parameter to estimate the global motility of a large population of swimming biological cells is a challenge. Experiments on the rheology of active suspensions have been performed. Effective viscosity of sheared suspensions of live unicellular motile microalgae (Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii) is far greater than for suspensions containing the same volume fraction of dead cells. In addition, suspensions show shear thinning behavior. We relate these macroscopic measurements to the orientation of individual swimming cells under flow and discuss our results in the light of several existing models.

  8. Effective viscosity of microswimmer suspensions.

    PubMed

    Rafaï, Salima; Jibuti, Levan; Peyla, Philippe

    2010-03-05

    The measurement of a quantitative and macroscopic parameter to estimate the global motility of a large population of swimming biological cells is a challenge. Experiments on the rheology of active suspensions have been performed. Effective viscosity of sheared suspensions of live unicellular motile microalgae (Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii) is far greater than for suspensions containing the same volume fraction of dead cells. In addition, suspensions show shear thinning behavior. We relate these macroscopic measurements to the orientation of individual swimming cells under flow and discuss our results in the light of several existing models.

  9. Scale-Dependence of Natural Variability of Flow Regimes in a Forested Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, S. E.; Creed, I. F.

    2005-12-01

    The natural flow paradigm states that rivers should be managed to preserve their natural flow regimes. Maintaining natural variability in the flow regime is critical for conserving the structure and function of riverine ecosystems. This research seeks to determine relations between natural variability in the flow regime and basin scale. A distributed hydrologic model was used to characterize the natural flow regime of basins from first to fifth order within tributaries of the Batchawana River in the Algoma Highlands of central Ontario using the Range of Variability Approach (RVA). A thirty-year simulated flow record was used to calculate natural variability in the flow regime, defined as the S80 ((90th percentile - 10th percentile) / median). A scale-dependence in the S80 of these flows, and particularly low-flow parameters, was observed. Basins less than a threshold between ca. 400 and 600 ha had a large range in S80, while basins greater than 600 ha had a smaller range that converged towards a constant with increasing area. This represents the potential for a representative elementary area (REA) to exist with regard to interannual variability of some flow parameters. Below the REA, the mean of the ln (/To tan B) distribution was significantly related to the S80 mean summer flow and 90-day minimum flow (p<0.001). This research demonstrates the scale-dependence of natural variability of flows, important for establishing reference conditions against which impacts of disturbance on flows throughout a drainage basin may be measured.

  10. Oxygen and carbon dioxide transport in time-dependent blood flow past fiber rectangular arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierenberg, Jennifer R.; Fujioka, Hideki; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bartlett, Robert H.; Grotberg, James B.

    2009-03-01

    The influence of time-dependent flows on oxygen and carbon dioxide transport for blood flow past fiber arrays arranged in in-line and staggered configurations was computationally investigated as a model for an artificial lung. Both a pulsatile flow, which mimics the flow leaving the right heart and passing through a compliance chamber before entering the artificial lung, and a right ventricular flow, which mimics flow leaving the right heart and directly entering the artificial lung, were considered in addition to a steady flow. The pulsatile flow was modeled as a sinusoidal perturbation superimposed on a steady flow while the right ventricular flow was modeled to accurately depict the period of flow acceleration (increasing flow) and deceleration (decreasing flow) during systole followed by zero flow during diastole. It was observed that the pulsatile flow yielded similar gas transport as compared to the steady flow, while the right ventricular flow resulted in smaller gas transport, with the decrease increasing with Re. The pressure drop across the fiber array (a measure of the resistance), work (an indicator of the work required of the right heart), and shear stress (a measure of potential blood cell activation and damage) are lowest for steady flow, followed by pulsatile flow, and then right ventricular flow. The pressure drop, work, shear stress, and Sherwood numbers (a measure of the gas transport efficiency) decrease with increasing porosity and are smaller for AR <1 as compared to AR >1 (AR is the distance between fibers in the flow direction/distance between fibers in direction perpendicular to flow), although for small porosities the Sherwood numbers are of similar magnitude. In general, for any fiber array geometry, high pressure drop, work, and shear stresses correlate with high Sherwood numbers, and low pressure drop, work, and shear stresses correlate with low Sherwood numbers creating a need for a compromise between pressure drop/work/shear stresses

  11. Modulated single-bubble sonoluminescence: Dependence of phase of flashes, their intensity and rise/decay times on viscosity, the modulation strength, and frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastikhin, Igor; Djurkovic, Borko

    2004-05-01

    The single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) signal was studied for the case of driving frequency modulated by lower frequency with an offset. In our work, the driving frequency of 28 kHz and the modulation frequencies of 25-1000 Hz were used. The modulation strength of 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8 was defined as the difference of highest and lowest pressures over modulation period. The measurements were performed for water-glycerol mixtures of various viscosities. The measured SBSL signal appeared as a train of flashes for modulation frequencies below 250 Hz, and as a continuous modulated signal for higher frequencies. At the same frequency, the flashes covered similar phase intervals for different modulation strengths and, accordingly, pressure ranges. At higher glycerol concentrations (up to 24%) both the intensity and the stability of flashes increased, due to damped shape instabilities and reduced dancing; however, the phase interval of flashes remained about the same. Such phase-locked behavior can be explained by translational movements of the bubble due to modulated Bjerknes force and changes in the symmetry of the bubble collapse. The changes in intensities and rise/decay times can serve as a measure of the gas exchange between the bubble and its surroundings during silent and luminescent intervals.

  12. Analysis of cationic structure in some room-temperature molten fluorides and dependence of their ionic conductivity and viscosity on hydrofluoric acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Tomohiro; Nakai, Takaaki; Inoue, Hidemi; Nakanishi, Kenta; Kohara, Shinji; Saito, Morihiro; Inaba, Minoru; Tasaka, Akimasa

    2011-08-11

    To understand the ionic and nonionic species in (CH(3))(4)NF·mHF, (CH(3))(3)N·mHF, (C(2)H(5))(4)NF·mHF, and (C(2)H(5))(3)N·mHF melts, the structures of these melts were investigated by infrared spectroscopy, NMR, and high-energy X-ray diffraction. Infrared spectra revealed that three kinds of fluorohydrogenate anions, (FH)(n)F(-) (n = 1, 2, and 3), and molecular hydrofluoric acid (HF) are present in every melt. Ionic conductivity and viscosity of these melts were measured and correlated with their cationic structure. The ionic conductivity of the R(4)N(+)-systems was higher than that of corresponding R(3)NH(+)-systems because a strong N-H···F(HF)(n) interaction prevents the motion of R(3)NH(+) cations in the R(3)N·mHF melts. (CH(3))(4)N(+) and (CH(3))(3)NH(+) cations gave higher ionic conductivity than (C(2)H(5))(4)N(+) and (C(2)H(5))(3)NH(+) cations, respectively, because the ionic radii of former cations were smaller than those of latter. It was concluded that these effects on ionic conductivity can be explained by the cationic structure and the concentration of molecular HF in the melts.

  13. Reduction of viscosity in suspension of swimming bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I. S.; Sokolov, A.; Chen, L.; Jin, Q.; Materials Science Division

    2009-09-29

    Measurements of the shear viscosity in suspensions of swimming Bacillus subtilis in free-standing liquid films have revealed that the viscosity can decrease by up to a factor of 7 compared to the viscosity of the same liquid without bacteria or with nonmotile bacteria. The reduction in viscosity is observed in two complementary experiments: one studying the decay of a large vortex induced by a moving probe and another measuring the viscous torque on a rotating magnetic particle immersed in the film. The viscosity depends on the concentration and swimming speed of the bacteria.

  14. Reduction of viscosity in suspension of swimming bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of the shear viscosity in suspensions of swimming Bacillus subtilis in free-standing liquid films have revealed that the viscosity can decrease by up to a factor of 7 compared to the viscosity of the same liquid without bacteria or with nonmotile bacteria. The reduction in viscosity is observed in two complementary experiments: one studying the decay of a large vortex induced by a moving probe and another measuring the viscous torque on a rotating magnetic particle immersed in the film. The viscosity depends on the concentration and swimming speed of the bacteria.

  15. Activation energy and entropy for viscosity of wormlike micelle solutions.

    PubMed

    Chandler, H D

    2013-11-01

    The viscosities of two surfactant solutions which form wormlike micelles (WLMs) were studied over a range of temperatures and strain rates. WLM solutions appear to differ from many other shear thinning systems in that, as the shear rate increases, stress-shear rate curves tend to converge with temperature rather than diverge and this can sometimes lead to higher temperature curves crossing those at lower. Behaviour was analysed in terms of activation kinetics. It is suggested that two mechanisms are involved: Newtonian flow, following an Arrhenius law superimposed on a non-Newtonian flow described by a stress assisted kinetic law, this being a more general form of the Arrhenius law. Anomalous flow is introduced into the kinetic equation via a stress dependent activation entropy term.

  16. Quartz resonator fluid density and viscosity monitor

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Stephen J.; Wiczer, James J.; Cernosek, Richard W.; Frye, Gregory C.; Gebert, Charles T.; Casaus, Leonard; Mitchell, Mary A.

    1998-01-01

    A pair of thickness-shear mode resonators, one smooth and one with a textured surface, allows fluid density and viscosity to be independently resolved. A textured surface, either randomly rough or regularly patterned, leads to trapping of liquid at the device surface. The synchronous motion of this trapped liquid with the oscillating device surface allows the device to weigh the liquid; this leads to an additional response that depends on liquid density. This additional response enables a pair of devices, one smooth and one textured, to independently resolve liquid density and viscosity; the difference in responses determines the density while the smooth device determines the density-viscosity product, and thus, the pair determines both density and viscosity.

  17. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid’s viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop’s motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop’s effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated viscosity within the precursor film to hinder spreading. A low-order model provides explicit predictions of the variances in spreading rate and drop location, which are validated against simulations. PMID:27843398

  18. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver E.

    2016-10-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid's viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop's motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop's effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated viscosity within the precursor film to hinder spreading. A low-order model provides explicit predictions of the variances in spreading rate and drop location, which are validated against simulations.

  19. Non-invasive fluid density and viscosity measurement

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    The noninvasively measurement of the density and viscosity of static or flowing fluids in a section of pipe such that the pipe performs as the sensing apparatus, is described. Measurement of a suitable structural vibration resonance frequency of the pipe and the width of this resonance permits the density and viscosity to be determined, respectively. The viscosity may also be measured by monitoring the decay in time of a vibration resonance in the pipe.

  20. Effects of surface roughness on shear viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolaou, Michail; Frank, Michael; Drikakis, Dimitris

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the effect of surface roughness on fluid viscosity using molecular dynamics simulations. The three-dimensional model consists of liquid argon flowing between two solid walls whose surface roughness was modeled using fractal theory. In tandem with previously published experimental work, our results show that, while the viscosity in smooth channels remains constant across the channel width, in the presence of surface roughness it increases close to the walls. The increase of the boundary viscosity is further accentuated by an increase in the depth of surface roughness. We attribute this behavior to the increased momentum transfer at the boundary, a result of the irregular distribution of fluid particles near rough surfaces. Furthermore, although the viscosity in smooth channels has previously been shown to be independent of the strength of the solid-liquid interaction, here we show that in the presence of surface roughness, the boundary viscosity increases with the solid's wettability. The paper concludes with an analytical description of the viscosity as a function of the distance from the channel walls, the walls' surface roughness, and the solid's wetting properties. The relation can potentially be used to adjust the fluid dynamics equations for a more accurate description of microfluidic systems.

  1. On the viscosity of the amorphizing Co-(Cr,Fe)-Si-B melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lad'yanov, V. I.; L; Sterkhova, I. V.; Kamaeva, L. V.; Maslov, V. V.; Kerel'chuk, V. A.

    2009-01-01

    The study of the temperature and time viscosity dependences of the amorphizing Co65.5Fe6.5Si18B10, Co65.5Cr6.5Si18B10, Co69Cr3Si18B10 melts has been performed. It has been shown that the temperature and time viscosity dependences for each alloy are of the same nature. The anomaly attended by the changing of the energy activation of the viscous flow has been first determined in the viscosity polytherms under heating conditions in the vicinity of t* (t* is the characteristic temperature for each alloy, i.e. the temperature of the anomaly on the polytherm of the viscosity). This anomaly is caused by the change of the short-ordering type in the liquid phase in this temperature region as well as by the transition of its low-temperature structure into the high-temperature one. The latter being further cooled is retained up to the solidification temperatures and results in the viscosity hysteresis. It has been shown that the decrease of the alloying element concentration results in a substantial displacement of the anomaly temperature, t*, to the lower temperature region (t*=1360°C for Co65.5Fe6.5Si18B10, Co65.5Cr6.5Si18B10 and 1220°C for Co69Cr3Si18B10).

  2. The effect of the salt viscosity on future evolution of the Gorleben salt diapir, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemia, Z.; Schmeling, H.; Koyi, H.

    2009-08-01

    The Gorleben diapir, which has been targeted for radioactive waste disposal, contains large blocks of anhydrite. Numerical models that depict the geometrical configuration of the Gorleben diapir are used to understand internal structure of diapir caused by movement of the anhydrite blocks for various salt rheologies. It is shown that the rheology of the salt plays a significant role in how and at which rate the anhydrite blocks sink within the diapir. The mobility of anhydrite blocks depends on the effective viscosity of salt which has to be lower than threshold value of around 10 18-10 19 Pa s. Decreasing salt viscosity allows the previously "stationary" anhydrite blocks to sink. If the effective viscosity of salt in post-depositional stage of the Gorleben diapir falls below this threshold value, induced internal flow due to the present anhydrite layer might disturb any repository within the diapir.

  3. Addition of simultaneous heat and solute transport and variable fluid viscosity to SEAWAT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorne, D.; Langevin, C.D.; Sukop, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    SEAWAT is a finite-difference computer code designed to simulate coupled variable-density ground water flow and solute transport. This paper describes a new version of SEAWAT that adds the ability to simultaneously model energy and solute transport. This is necessary for simulating the transport of heat and salinity in coastal aquifers for example. This work extends the equation of state for fluid density to vary as a function of temperature and/or solute concentration. The program has also been modified to represent the effects of variable fluid viscosity as a function of temperature and/or concentration. The viscosity mechanism is verified against an analytical solution, and a test of temperature-dependent viscosity is provided. Finally, the classic Henry-Hilleke problem is solved with the new code. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siria, Alessandro; Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-11-01

    Nanofluidics is the frontier where the continuum picture of fluid mechanics confronts the atomic nature of matter. Recent reports indicate that carbon nanotubes exhibit exceptional water transport properties due to nearly frictionless interfaces and this has stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for desalination, nano-filtration, and energy harvesting. However, the fundamental mechanisms of water transport inside nanotubes and at water-carbon interfaces remain controversial, as existing theories fail to provide a satisfying explanation for the limited experimental results. We report a study of water jets emerging from single nanotubes made of carbon and boron-nitride materials. Our experiments reveal extensive and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes (CNT). In stark contrast, boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNT), which are crystallographically similar to CNTs but electronically different, exhibit no slippage. This shows that slippage originates in subtle atomic-scale details of the solid-liquid interface. ERC StG - NanoSOFT.

  5. Parallel Computation and Visualization of Three-dimensional, Time-dependent, Thermal Convective Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P.; Li, P.

    1998-01-01

    A high-resolution numerical study on parallel systems is reported on three-dimensional, time-dependent, thermal convective flows. A parallel implentation on the finite volume method with a multigrid scheme is discussed, and a parallel visualization systemm is developed on distributed systems for visualizing the flow.

  6. DENSITY-DEPENDENT FLOW IN ONE-DIMENSIONAL VARIABLY-SATURATED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A one-dimensional finite element is developed to simulate density-dependent flow of saltwater in variably saturated media. The flow and solute equations were solved in a coupled mode (iterative), in a partially coupled mode (non-iterative), and in a completely decoupled mode. P...

  7. The Mitral Valve Prolapsus : Quantification of the Regurgitation Flow Rate by Experimental Time-Dependant PIV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The Mitral Valve Prolapsus : Quantification of the Regurgitation Flow Rate by Experimental Time-Dependant PIV. F. Billy1, D. Coisne1,2, L. Sanchez1... mitral valve insufficiency), assumes that the velocity field in the convergent region have hemispheric shapes and introduce miscalculation specially...upstream a prolaps model of regurgitant orifice based on 2D time dependent PIV reconstruction. Keywords- Mitral Valve , Prolapsus, Regurgitation Flow

  8. Motion of Molecular Probes and Viscosity Scaling in Polyelectrolyte Solutions at Physiological Ionic Strength

    PubMed Central

    Sozanski, Krzysztof; Wisniewska, Agnieszka; Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Sznajder, Anna; Holyst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We investigate transport properties of model polyelectrolyte systems at physiological ionic strength (0.154 M). Covering a broad range of flow length scales—from diffusion of molecular probes to macroscopic viscous flow—we establish a single, continuous function describing the scale dependent viscosity of high-salt polyelectrolyte solutions. The data are consistent with the model developed previously for electrically neutral polymers in a good solvent. The presented approach merges the power-law scaling concepts of de Gennes with the idea of exponential length scale dependence of effective viscosity in complex liquids. The result is a simple and applicable description of transport properties of high-salt polyelectrolyte solutions at all length scales, valid for motion of single molecules as well as macroscopic flow of the complex liquid. PMID:27536866

  9. Splash Suppression by Solvent Viscosity in Dense Suspension Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wendy; Dodge, Kevin; Peters, Ivo; Klein Schaarsberg, Martin; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2015-03-01

    When a dense suspension droplet impacts a hard surface, it will either break apart (``splash'') or remain in a compact configuration without ejecting any particles. We use experiments and discrete particle simulations in which relative particle motions are penalized by lubrication-flow drag to analyze the influence of solvent viscosity on splashing. We find that suspension splash is driven by particle inertia. It can be suppressed in 2 different ways. At low solvent viscosity, lubrication drag due to viscous flow has a negligible effect. Splash is suppressed by surface tension overcoming particle inertia. At high solvent viscosity, lubrication drag alone suppresses splashing. Because impact produces an expanding flow that stretches the suspension radially, suppression in the high-viscosity regime is largely accomplished by lubrication-flow drag preventing initially nearby particle pairs from separating fully. Energy dissipation by viscous flow during collisions plays a smaller role. Present Address: Physics of Fluids Group, University of Twente.

  10. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, E.G.D.; Schepper, I.M. de

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  11. Dependence of the aftershock flow on the main shock magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, A. V.; Zavyalov, A. D.; Zotov, O. D.; Lavrov, I. P.

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we predicted and then observed in practice the property of aftershocks which consists in the statistically regular clustering of events in time during the first hours after the main shock. The characteristic quasi-period of clustering is three hours. This property is associated with the cumulative action of the surface waves converging to the epicenter, whereas the quasi-period is mainly determined by the time delay of the round-the-world seismic echo. The quasi-period varies from case to case. In the attempt to find the cause of this variability, we have statistically explored the probable dependence of quasi-period on the magnitude of the main shock. In this paper, we present the corresponding result of analyzing global seismicity from the USGS/NEIC earthquake catalog. We succeeded in finding a significant reduction in the quasiperiod of the strong earthquakes clustering with growth in the magnitude of the main shock. We suggest the interpretation of this regularity from the standpoint of the phenomenological theory of explosive instability. It is noted that the phenomenon of explosive instability is fairly common in the geophysical media. The examples of explosive instability in the radiation belt and magnetospheric tail are presented. The search for the parallels in the evolution of explosive instability in the lithosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth will enrich both the physics of the earthquakes and physics of the magnetospheric pulsations.

  12. Viscosity of Mixtures of α-Tocopherol Acetate + Mesitylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwajczaka, Elżbieta; Stagraczyński, Ryszard; Herba, Henryk; Świergielb, Jolanta; Jadżyn, Jan

    2009-08-01

    The paper presents results of the share viscosity measurements performed as a function of temperature and concentration for mixtures of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamine E acetate) and mesitylene, two liquids of essentially different viscosity (four order of magnitude difference at 280 K). The viscosity/ temperature dependence for pure α-tocopherol acetate as well as for the mixtures studied can be well described with the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation. The viscosities of the mixtures exhibit a strong negative deviation from the rule of additive dependence on concentration and for increasing temperature the maximum value of the deviation shows an exponential decreasing.

  13. Modelling droplet collision outcomes for different substances and viscosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerfeld, Martin; Kuschel, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    The main objective of the present study is the derivation of models describing the outcome of binary droplet collisions for a wide range of dynamic viscosities in the well-known collision maps (i.e. normalised lateral droplet displacement at collision, called impact parameter, versus collision Weber number). Previous studies by Kuschel and Sommerfeld (Exp Fluids 54:1440, 2013) for different solution droplets having a range of solids contents and hence dynamic viscosities (here between 1 and 60 mPa s) revealed that the locations of the triple point (i.e. coincidence of bouncing, stretching separation and coalescence) and the critical Weber number (i.e. condition for the transition from coalescence to separation for head-on collisions) show a clear dependence on dynamic viscosity. In order to extend these findings also to pure liquids and to provide a broader data basis for modelling the viscosity effect, additional binary collision experiments were conducted for different alcohols (viscosity range 1.2-15.9 mPa s) and the FVA1 reference oil at different temperatures (viscosity range 3.0-28.2 mPa s). The droplet size for the series of alcohols was around 365 and 385 µm for the FVA1 reference oil, in each case with fixed diameter ratio at Δ= 1. The relative velocity between the droplets was varied in the range 0.5-3.5 m/s, yielding maximum Weber numbers of around 180. Individual binary droplet collisions with defined conditions were generated by two droplet chains each produced by vibrating orifice droplet generators. For recording droplet motion and the binary collision process with good spatial and temporal resolution high-speed shadow imaging was employed. The results for varied relative velocity and impact angle were assembled in impact parameter-Weber number maps. With increasing dynamic viscosity a characteristic displacement of the regimes for the different collision scenarios was also observed for pure liquids similar to that observed for solutions. This

  14. Viscosity of mafic magmas at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochain, B.; Sanloup, C.; Leroy, C.; Kono, Y.

    2017-01-01

    While it is accepted that silica-rich melts behave anomalously with a decrease of their viscosity at increased pressures (P), the viscosity of silica-poor melts is much less constrained. However, modeling of mantle melts dynamics throughout Earth's history, including the magma ocean era, requires precise knowledge of the viscous properties of silica-poor magmas. We extend here our previous measurements on fayalite melt to natural end-members pyroxenite melts (MgSiO3 and CaSiO3) using in situ X-ray radiography up to 8 GPa. For all compositions, viscosity decreases with P, rapidly below 5 GPa and slowly above. The magnitude of the viscosity decrease is larger for pyroxene melts than for fayalite melt and larger for the Ca end-member within pyroxene melts. The anomalous viscosity decrease appears to be a universal behavior for magmas up to 13 GPa, while the P dependence of viscosity beyond this remains to be measured. These results imply that mantle melts are very pervasive at depth.

  15. Application of SEAWAT to select variable-density and viscosity problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dausman, Alyssa M.; Langevin, Christian D.; Thorne, Danny T.; Sukop, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    SEAWAT is a combined version of MODFLOW and MT3DMS, designed to simulate three-dimensional, variable-density, saturated groundwater flow. The most recent version of the SEAWAT program, SEAWAT Version 4 (or SEAWAT_V4), supports equations of state for fluid density and viscosity. In SEAWAT_V4, fluid density can be calculated as a function of one or more MT3DMS species, and optionally, fluid pressure. Fluid viscosity is calculated as a function of one or more MT3DMS species, and the program also includes additional functions for representing the dependence of fluid viscosity on temperature. This report documents testing of and experimentation with SEAWAT_V4 with six previously published problems that include various combinations of density-dependent flow due to temperature variations and/or concentration variations of one or more species. Some of the problems also include variations in viscosity that result from temperature differences in water and oil. Comparisons between the results of SEAWAT_V4 and other published results are generally consistent with one another, with minor differences considered acceptable.

  16. Measuring Viscosities of Gases at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Hoshang, Chegini

    1987-01-01

    Variant of general capillary method for measuring viscosities of unknown gases based on use of thermal mass-flowmeter section for direct measurement of pressure drops. In technique, flowmeter serves dual role, providing data for determining volume flow rates and serving as well-characterized capillary-tube section for measurement of differential pressures across it. New method simple, sensitive, and adaptable for absolute or relative viscosity measurements of low-pressure gases. Suited for very complex hydrocarbon mixtures where limitations of classical theory and compositional errors make theoretical calculations less reliable.

  17. Gravimetric capillary method for kinematic viscosity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Iwan, J.; Alexander, D.; Jin, Wei-Qing

    1992-01-01

    A novel version of the capillary method for viscosity measurements of liquids is presented. Viscosity data can be deduced in a straightforward way from mass transfer data obtained by differential weighing during the gravity-induced flow of the liquid between two cylindrical chambers. Tests of this technique with water, carbon tetrachloride, and ethanol suggest that this arrangement provides an accuracy of about +/- 1 percent. The technique facilitates operation under sealed, isothermal conditions and, thus can readily be applied to reactive and/or high vapor pressure liquids.

  18. A transport equation for eddy viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.; Yang, Z.

    1992-01-01

    A transport equation for eddy viscosity is proposed for wall bounded turbulent flows. The proposed model reduces to a quasi-homogeneous form far from surfaces. Near to a surface, the nonhomogeneous effect of the wall is modeled by an elliptic relaxation model. All the model terms are expressed in local variables and are coordinate independent; the model is intended to be used in complex flows. Turbulent channel flow and turbulent boundary layer flows with/without pressure gradient are calculated using the present model. Comparisons between model calculations and direct numerical simulation or experimental data show good agreement.

  19. Transition from time-dependent to stationary flow patterns in the Taylor-Dean system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutabazi, Innocent; Andereck, C. David

    1991-11-01

    The flow between two horizontal coaxial cylinders with a partially filled gap, the Taylor-Dean system, is investigated for the case in which the outer cylinder rotates while the inner cylinder remains at rest. The initial instability is to a mixed state of both traveling inclined rolls and laminar base flow. At a larger rotation rate, the entire flow becomes time dependent. At a still larger rotation rate, the flow undergoes a subcritical transition to a stationary roll pattern, a process previously observed only in binary fluid mixtures.

  20. Effect of Viscosity on Liquid Curtain Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Suszynski, Wieslaw; Francis, Lorraine; Carvalho, Marcio; Dow Chemical Company Collaboration; PUC Rio Collaboration; University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The effect of viscosity on the stability of Newtonian liquid curtains was explored by high-speed visualization. Glycerol/water solutions with viscosity ranging from 19.1 to 210 mPa.s were used as coating liquids. The experimental set-up used a slide die delivery and steel tube edge guides. The velocity along curtain at different positions was measured by tracking small particles at different flow conditions. The measurements revealed that away from edge guides, velocity is well described by free fall effect. However, close to edge guides, liquid moves slower, revealing formation of a viscous boundary layer. The size of boundary layer and velocity near edge guides are strong function of viscosity. The critical condition was determined by examining flow rate below which curtain broke. Curtain failure was initiated by growth of a hole within liquid curtain, close to edge guides. Visualization results showed that the hole forms in a circular shape then becomes elliptical as it grows faster in vertical direction compared to horizontal direction. As viscosity rises, minimum flow rate for destabilization of curtain increased, indicating connection between interaction with edge guides and curtain stability. We would like to acknowledge the financial support from the Dow Chemical Company.

  1. Turbulent rotating plane Couette flow: Reynolds and rotation number dependency of flow structure and momentum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Takuya; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Plane Couette flow under spanwise, anticyclonic system rotation [rotating plane Couette flow (RPCF)] is studied experimentally using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry for different Reynolds and rotation numbers in the fully turbulent regime. Similar to the laminar regime, the turbulent flow in RPCF is characterized by roll cells, however both instantaneous snapshots of the velocity field and space correlations show that the roll cell structure varies with the rotation number. All three velocity components are measured and both the mean flow and all four nonzero Reynolds stresses are obtained across the central parts of the channel. This also allows us to determine the wall shear stress from the viscous stress and the Reynolds stress in the center of the channel, and for low rotation rates the wall shear stress increases with increasing rotation rate as expected. The results show that zero absolute vorticity is established in the central parts of the channel of turbulent RPCF for high enough rotation rates, but also that the mean velocity profile for certain parameter ranges shows an S shape giving rise to a negative velocity gradient in the center of the channel. We find that from an analysis of the Reynolds stress transport equation using the present data there is a transport of the Reynolds shear stress towards the center of the channel, which may then result in a negative mean velocity gradient there.

  2. Model for charge/discharge-rate-dependent plastic flow in amorphous battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosrownejad, S. M.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-09-01

    Plastic flow is an important mechanism for relaxing stresses that develop due to swelling/shrinkage during charging/discharging of battery materials. Amorphous high-storage-capacity Li-Si has lower flow stresses than crystalline materials but there is evidence that the plastic flow stress depends on the conditions of charging and discharging, indicating important non-equilibrium aspects to the flow behavior. Here, a mechanistically-based constitutive model for rate-dependent plastic flow in amorphous materials, such as LixSi alloys, during charging and discharging is developed based on two physical concepts: (i) excess energy is stored in the material during electrochemical charging and discharging due to the inability of the amorphous material to fully relax during the charging/discharging process and (ii) this excess energy reduces the barriers for plastic flow processes and thus reduces the applied stresses necessary to cause plastic flow. The plastic flow stress is thus a competition between the time scales of charging/discharging and the time scales of glassy relaxation. The two concepts, as well as other aspects of the model, are validated using molecular simulations on a model Li-Si system. The model is applied to examine the plastic flow behavior of typical specimen geometries due to combined charging/discharging and stress history, and the results generally rationalize experimental observations.

  3. Viscosities of Binary Mixtures Containing Isomeric Chlorobutanes and Diisopropylether: Experimental and Predicted Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaño, D.; Guerrero, H.; Bandrés, I.; López, M. C.; Lafuente, Carlos

    2010-03-01

    In this work, viscosities of binary mixtures of isomeric chlorobutanes with diisopropylether have been determined as a function of composition under atmospheric pressure and in the temperature range from 283.15 K to 313.15 K with steps of 5 K. Kinematics viscosities were measured using an Ubbelohde viscosimeter; absolute viscosities were obtained from kinematic viscosities and densities. Finally, we have used the Asfour method for predicting the dependence of viscosity with composition and comparing it with our experimental data.

  4. Viscosity of Xenon Examined in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    Why does water flow faster than honey? The short answer, that honey has a greater viscosity, merely rephrases the question. The fundamental answer is that viscosity originates in the interactions between a fluid s molecules. These interactions are so complicated that, except for low-density gases, the viscosity of a fluid cannot be accurately predicted. Progress in understanding viscosity has been made by studying moderately dense gases and, more recently, fluids near the critical point. Modern theories predict a universal behavior for all pure fluids near the liquid-vapor critical point, and they relate the increase in viscosity to spontaneous fluctuations in density near this point. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX) experiment tested these theories with unprecedented precision when it flew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-85) in August 1997. Near the critical point, xenon is a billion times more compressible than water, yet it has about the same density. Because the fluid is so "soft," it collapses under its own weight when exposed to the force of Earth s gravity - much like a very soft spring. Because the CVX experiment is conducted in microgravity, it achieves a very uniform fluid density even very close to the critical point. At the heart of the CVX experiment is a novel viscometer built around a small nickel screen. An oscillating electric field forces the screen to oscillate between pairs of electrodes. Viscosity, which dampens the oscillations, can be calculated by measuring the screen motion and the force applied to the screen. So that the fluid s delicate state near the critical point will not be disrupted, the screen oscillations are set to be both slow and small.

  5. Shear viscosity of the quark-gluon plasma in a kinetic theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Puglisi, A.; Plumari, S.; Scardina, F.; Greco, V.

    2014-05-09

    One of the main results of heavy ions collision (HIC) at relativistic energy experiments is the very small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of the Quark-Gluon Plasma, close to the conjectured lower bound η/s=1/4π for systems in the infinite coupling limit. Transport coefficients like shear viscosity are responsible of non-equilibrium properties of a system: Green-Kubo relations give us an exact expression to compute these coefficients. We compute shear viscosity numerically using Green-Kubo relation in the framework of Kinetic Theory solving the relativistic transport Boltzmann equation in a finite box with periodic boundary conditions. We investigate a system of particles interacting via anisotropic and energy dependent cross-section in the range of temperature of interest for HIC. Green-Kubo results are in agreement with Chapman-Enskog approximation while Relaxation Time approximation can underestimates the viscosity of a factor 2. The correct analytic formula for shear viscosity can be used to develop a transport theory with a fixed η/s and have a comparison with physical observables like elliptic flow.

  6. Viscosity Meaurement Technique for Metal Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, Heng; Kennedy, Rory

    2015-02-09

    Metallic fuels have exceptional transient behavior, excellent thermal conductivity, and a more straightforward reprocessing path, which does not separate out pure plutonium from the process stream. Fabrication of fuel containing minor actinides and rare earth (RE) elements for irradiation tests, for instance, U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1.0RE-15Zr samples at the Idaho National Laboratory, is generally done by melt casting in an inert atmosphere. For the design of a casting system and further scale up development, computational modeling of the casting process is needed to provide information on melt flow and solidification for process optimization. Therefore, there is a need for melt viscosity data, the most important melt property that controls the melt flow. The goal of the project was to develop a measurement technique that uses fully sealed melt sample with no Americium vapor loss to determine the viscosity of metallic melts and at temperatures relevant to the casting process. The specific objectives of the project were to: develop mathematical models to establish the principle of the measurement method, design and build a viscosity measurement prototype system based on the established principle, and calibrate the system and quantify the uncertainty range. The result of the project indicates that the oscillation cup technique is applicable for melt viscosity measurement. Detailed mathematical models of innovative sample ampoule designs were developed to not only determine melt viscosity, but also melt density under certain designs. Measurement uncertainties were analyzed and quantified. The result of this project can be used as the initial step toward the eventual goal of establishing a viscosity measurement system for radioactive melts.

  7. Predicting slag viscosity from coal ash composition

    SciTech Connect

    Laumb, J.; Benson, S.A.; Katrinak, K.A.; Schwalbe, R.; McCollor, D.P.

    1999-07-01

    Management of slag flow from cyclone-fired utility boilers requires accurate prediction of viscosity. Cyclones tend to build up slag when the cyclone combustion temperature is less than the temperature required to melt and tap the ash from the coal being fired. Cyclone-fired boilers designed for lignite are equipped with predry systems, which remove 6-9% of the moisture from the coal. Cyclones tend to slag when the as-received heating value of the fuel is less than 6350 Btu/lb and T250 (temperature where viscosity equals 250 poise) is greater than 2350 F. The T250 value, as well as the rest of the viscosity-temperature relationship, can be predicted using models based on coal ash composition. The focus of this work is to evaluate several models in terms of their agreement with measured viscosities. Viscosity measurements were made for ten samples, including nine lignite coals and one lignite-derived slag. Model performance is related to the SiO{sub 2}, CaO, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents of the slag. The Sage and McIlroy and Kalmanovitch models worked best for high SiO{sub 2} and low Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} fuels. The Senior model worked best when Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} content was moderate to high.

  8. Validation of a model for flow-dependent carbon dioxide exchange in artificial lungs.

    PubMed

    Hout, M S; Hattler, B G; Federspiel, W J

    2000-02-01

    The exchange rate of CO2 in artificial lungs depends on the sweep gas flow rate. Control of the amount of CO2 removed by an artificial lung requires quantitative knowledge of the flow dependence. A simple model of the dependence of CO2 exchange on sweep gas flow rate in artificial lungs has been previously presented (1). For a given partial pressure of CO2 in the blood phase, sweep gas flow rate, and CO2 exchange rate, the model indicates how close the CO2 exchange rate is to the maximum level attainable by the artificial lung. The focus of this study was to validate the model experimentally by testing 2 commercial artificial lungs in an in vitro test loop. The CO2 exchange rate for each artificial lung was measured over a range of sweep gas flow rates. Linear regression was used to fit the data to the model and estimate the maximum possible CO2 exchange rate and the average water-side PCO2 (PCO2w). The difference between the measured and regressed values of PCO2w was used as an indicator of the ability of the model to quantitatively predict the dependence of CO2 exchange on gas flow rate. This difference was less than 5% for each experiment, indicating that the model can be used to guide control of CO2 exchange rates in artificial lungs.

  9. Surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effects on the electro-thermo nonlocal wave propagation of SWBNNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A.; Roudbari, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the electro-thermal nonlocal wave propagation of fluid-conveying single-walled Boron Nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) using nonlocal piezoelasticity with surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effect. SWBNNT is embedded in a vicsoelastic medium which is simulated as visco-Pasternak foundation. Using Euler-Bernoulli beam (EBB) model, Hamilton's principle and nonlocal piezoelasticity theory, the higher order governing equation is derived. A detailed parametric study is conducted, focusing on the combined effects of the electric parameters, viscoelastic medium, initial stress, surface stress, Knudsen number (Kn) and small scale on the wave propagation behaviour of the fluid-conveying SWBNNT. The results show that for smaller values of wave number the dispersion relation for different fluid viscosities seems to be similar. At the higher values of wave numbers, increase in the wave frequency values is remarkable due to increase in fluid viscosity. The electric field as a smart controller, surface effect, initial stress, temperature change and slip velocity effect have significant role on the wave frequency. The results of this work is hoped to be of use in design and manufacturing of smart MEMS/NEMS in advanced medical applications such as drug delivery systems with great applications in biomechanics.

  10. Cyclooxygenase blockade limits blood flow to collateral-dependent myocardium during exercise.

    PubMed

    Altman, J D; Klassen, C L; Bache, R J

    1995-11-01

    Cyclooxygenase blockade has been found to cause vasoconstriction of coronary collateral vessels in open-chest animals. This study was carried out to determine whether cyclooxygenase blockade can limit blood flow to collateral-dependent myocardium during exercise. Studies were performed in 8 adult mongrel dogs in which intermittent followed by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery produced an area of collateral-dependent myocardium. Myocardial blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres at rest and during treadmill exercise to produce heart rates of 215 +/-0 7 beats/min. At rest collateral zone blood flow (1.00 +/- 0.10 ml/min per g) was significantly less than normal zone flow (1.23 +/- 0.14) (P < 0.05). During control exercise blood flow increased 91 +/- 22% in the collateral zone and 102 +/- 28% in the normal zone (each P < 0.05). Thirty minutes after cyclooxygenase blockade with indomethacin (5 mg/kg i.v.) blood flow in the normal zone and the collateral zone was not different from control during resting conditions. Indomethacin did not change heart rate or arterial pressure during exercise, but significantly increased the aortic-to-distal coronary pressure gradient from 33 +/- 3 to 40 +/- 5 mmHg (P < 0.05). Indomethacin increased transcollateral resistance during exercise by 42 +/- 10% (P < 0.05); this was associated with a 27 +/- 11% decrease in subendocardial flow in the collateral zone (P < 0.05) with no significant change in subepicardial flow, and no change in normal zone blood flow. These findings demonstrate that in the intact awake animal cyclooxygenase blockade causes coronary collateral vasoconstriction which can impair blood flow to the dependent myocardium during exercise.

  11. Evidence of population resistance to extreme low flows in a fluvial-dependent fish species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, Rachel A.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Extreme low streamflows are natural disturbances to aquatic populations. Species in naturally intermittent streams display adaptations that enhance persistence during extreme events; however, the fate of populations in perennial streams during unprecedented low-flow periods is not well-understood. Biota requiring swift-flowing habitats may be especially vulnerable to flow reductions. We estimated the abundance and local survival of a native fluvial-dependent fish species (Etheostoma inscriptum) across 5 years encompassing historic low flows in a sixth-order southeastern USA perennial river. Based on capturemark-recapture data, the study shoal may have acted as a refuge during severe drought, with increased young-of-the-year (YOY) recruitment and occasionally high adult immigration. Contrary to expectations, summer and autumn survival rates (30 days) were not strongly depressed during low-flow periods, despite 25%-80% reductions in monthly discharge. Instead, YOY survival increased with lower minimum discharge and in response to small rain events that increased low-flow variability. Age-1+ fish showed the opposite pattern, with survival decreasing in response to increasing low-flow variability. Results from this population dynamics study of a small fish in a perennial river suggest that fluvial-dependent species can be resistant to extreme flow reductions through enhanced YOY recruitment and high survival

  12. On the effect of viscosity and thermal conductivity on sound propagation in ducts: A re-visit to the classical theory with extensions for higher order modes and presence of mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokumaci, Erkan

    2014-10-01

    The dispersion equation for the axisymmetric modes of viscothermal acoustic wave propagation in uniform hard-walled circular ducts containing a quiescent perfect gas is classical. This has been extended to cover the non-axisymmetric modes and real fluids in contemporary studies. The fundamental axisymmetric mode has been the subject of a large number of studies proposing approximate solutions and the characteristics of the propagation constants for narrow and wide ducts with or without mean flow is well understood. In contrast, there are only few publications on the higher order modes and the current knowledge about their propagation characteristics is rather poor. On the other hand, there is a void of papers in the literature on the effect of the mean flow on the quiescent modes of propagation. The present paper aims to contribute to the filling of these gaps to some extent. The classical theory is re-considered with a view to cover all modes of acoustic propagation in circular ducts carrying a real fluid moving axially with a uniform subsonic velocity. The analysis reveals a new branch of propagation constants for the axisymmetric modes, which appears to have escaped attention hitherto. The solution of the governing wave equation is expressed in a modal transfer matrix form in frequency domain and numerical results are presented to show the effects over wide ranges of frequency, viscosity and mean flow parameters on the propagation constants. The theoretical formulation allows for the duct walls to have finite impedance, but no numerical results are presented for lined ducts or ducts carrying a sheared mean flow.

  13. Solution of 3-dimensional time-dependent viscous flows. Part 3: Application to turbulent and unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, B. C.; Mcdonald, H.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical scheme is developed for solving the time dependent, three dimensional compressible viscous flow equations to be used as an aid in the design of helicopter rotors. In order to further investigate the numerical procedure, the computer code developed to solve an approximate form of the three dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations employing a linearized block implicit technique in conjunction with a QR operator scheme is tested. Results of calculations are presented for several two dimensional boundary layer flows including steady turbulent and unsteady laminar cases. A comparison of fourth order and second order solutions indicate that increased accuracy can be obtained without any significant increases in cost (run time). The results of the computations also indicate that the computer code can be applied to more complex flows such as those encountered on rotating airfoils. The geometry of a symmetric NACA four digit airfoil is considered and the appropriate geometrical properties are computed.

  14. Impact of gas injection on the apparent viscosity and viscoelastic property of waste activated sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Bobade, Veena; Baudez, Jean Christophe; Evans, Geoffery; Eshtiaghi, Nicky

    2017-05-01

    Gas injection is known to play a major role on the particle size of the sludge, the oxygen transfer rate, as well as the mixing efficiency of membrane bioreactors and aeration basins in the waste water treatment plants. The rheological characteristics of sludge are closely related to the particle size of the sludge floc. However, particle size of sludge floc depends partly on the shear induced in the sludge and partly on physico-chemical nature of the sludge. The objective of this work is to determine the impact of gas injection on both the apparent viscosity and viscoelastic property of sludge. The apparent viscosity of sludge was investigated by two methods: in-situ and after sparging. Viscosity curves obtained by in-situ measurement showed that the apparent viscosity decreases significantly from 4000 Pa s to 10 Pa s at low shear rate range (below 10 s(-1)) with an increase in gas flow rate (0.5LPM to 3LPM); however the after sparging flow curve analysis showed that the reduction in apparent viscosity throughout the shear rate range is negligible to be displayed. Torque and displacement data at low shear rate range revealed that the obtained lower apparent viscosity in the in-situ method is not the material characteristics, but the slippage effect due to a preferred location of the bubbles close to the bob, causing an inconsistent decrease of torque and increase of displacement at low shear rate range. In linear viscoelastic regime, the elastic and viscous modulus of sludge was reduced by 33% & 25%, respectively, due to gas injection because of induced shear. The amount of induced shear measured through two different tests (creep and time sweep) were the same. The impact of this induced shear on sludge structure was also verified by microscopic images.

  15. A computer program for calculating laminar and turbulent boundary layers for two-dimensional time-dependent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Carr, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program is described which provides solutions of two dimensional equations appropriate to laminar and turbulent boundary layers for boundary conditions with an external flow which fluctuates in magnitude. The program is based on the numerical solution of the governing boundary layer equations by an efficient two point finite difference method. An eddy viscosity formulation was used to model the Reynolds shear stress term. The main features of the method are briefly described and instructions for the computer program with a listing are provided. Sample calculations to demonstrate its usage and capabilities for laminar and turbulent unsteady boundary layers with an external flow which fluctuated in magnitude are presented.

  16. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  17. Drop Spreading with Random Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Airway mucus acts as a barrier to protect the lung. However as a biological material, its physical properties are known imperfectly and can be spatially heterogeneous. In this study we assess the impact of these uncertainties on the rate of spreading of a drop (representing an inhaled aerosol) over a mucus film. We model the film as Newtonian, having a viscosity that depends linearly on the concentration of a passive solute (a crude proxy for mucin proteins). Given an initial random solute (and hence viscosity) distribution, described as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure, we seek to quantify the uncertainties in outcomes as the drop spreads. Using lubrication theory, we describe the spreading of the drop in terms of a system of coupled nonlinear PDEs governing the evolution of film height and the vertically-averaged solute concentration. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to predict the variability in the drop centre location and width (1D) or area (2D). We show how simulation results are well described (at much lower computational cost) by a low-order model using a weak disorder expansion. Our results show for example how variability in the drop location is a non-monotonic function of the solute correlation length increases. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  18. Higher order FE-FV method on unstructured grids for transport and two-phase flow with variable viscosity in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, K. S.; Geiger, S.; Sorbie, K. S.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents higher order methods for the numerical modeling of two-phase flow with simultaneous transport and adsorption of viscosifying species within the individual phases in permeable porous media. The numerical scheme presented addresses the three major challenges in simulating this process. Firstly, the component transport is strongly coupled with the viscous and capillary forces that act on the movement of the carrier phase. The discretization of the capillary parts is especially difficult since its effect on flow yields non-linear parabolic conservation equations. These are amenable to non-linear finite elements (FEs), while the capillary contribution on the component transport is first-order hyperbolic, where classical FEs are unsuitable. We solve this efficiently by a Strang splitting that uses finite volumes (FVs) with explicit time-stepping for the viscous parts and a combined finite element-finite volume (FEFV) scheme with implicit time-stepping for the capillary parts. Secondly, the components undergo hydrodynamic dispersion and discerning between numerical and physical dispersion is essential. We develop higher-order formulations for the phase and component fluxes that keep numerical dispersion low and combine them with implicit FEs such that the non-linearities of the dispersion tensor are fully incorporated. Thirdly, subsurface permeable media show strong spatial heterogeneity, with coefficients varying over many orders of magnitude and geometric complexity that make the use of unstructured grids essential. In this work, we employ node-centered FVs that combine their ability to resolve flow with the flexibility of FEs. Numerical examples of increasing complexity are presented that demonstrate the convergence and robustness of our approach and prove its versatility for highly heterogeneous, and geometrically complex fractured porous media.

  19. Scale-dependence of natural variability of flow regimes in a forested landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, S. E.; Creed, I. F.; Tague, C. L.; Beall, F. D.; Buttle, J. M.

    2007-08-01

    The ecological integrity of riverine ecosystems is dependent upon the natural flow regime of the river system. Maintaining natural variability in the flow regime is critical for conserving the structure and function of riverine ecosystems. This research seeks to determine relations between natural variability in the flow regime and basin scale. A distributed hydrologic model was used to characterize the natural flow regime of basins from first to fifth order within tributaries of the Batchawana River in the Algoma Highlands of central Ontario using the range of variability approach (RVA). A 30-year simulated flow record was used to calculate natural variability in the flow regime, defined by the S80 [(90th percentile - 10th percentile)/median]. Flow variability under wetter conditions was similar across all basins, regardless of scale. Conversely, flow variability under drier conditions was scale-dependent, with smaller basins (<600 ha) showing a large range in variability and larger basins (>600 ha) showing a smaller range in variability that converged toward a constant with increasing area. The effect of basin area on flow variability suggested the existence of a representative elementary area (REA). Within the REA, morphometric sources of natural variability were determined through multivariate regression analyses. A combination of indices describing the near-stream riparian area within a basin, median basin residence time, and basin curvature was significantly related to flow variability under drier conditions. These findings present a potential management template for establishing reference conditions against which impacts of disturbance on flows throughout a regional drainage basin may be measured.

  20. VISCOSITY IN PLANETARY RINGS WITH SPINNING SELF-GRAVITATING PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Yuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji; Daisaka, Hiroshi

    2012-05-15

    Using local N-body simulation, we examine viscosity in self-gravitating planetary rings. We investigate the dependence of viscosity on various parameters in detail, including the effects of particle surface friction. In the case of self-gravitating rings with low optical depth, viscosity is determined by particle random velocity. Inclusion of surface friction slightly reduces both random velocity and viscosity when particle random velocity is determined by inelastic collisions, while surface friction slightly increases viscosity when gravitational encounters play a major role in particle velocity evolution, so that viscous heating balances with increased energy dissipation at collisions due to surface friction. We find that including surface friction changes viscosity in dilute rings up to a factor of about two. In the case of self-gravitating dense rings, viscosity is significantly increased due to the effects of gravitational wakes, and we find that varying restitution coefficients also change viscosity in such dense rings by a factor of about two. We confirm that our numerical results for viscosity in dense rings with gravitational wakes can be well approximated by a semianalytic expression that is consistent with a previously obtained formula. However, we find that this formula seems to overestimate viscosity in dense rings far from the central planet, where temporary gravitational aggregates form. We derive semianalytic expressions that reproduce our numerical results well for the entire range of examined parameters.

  1. Topographic height dependence of internal wave generation by tidal flow over random topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiajun; Zhang, Likun; Swinney, Harry L.

    2015-10-01

    Internal waves (IWs) generated by tidal flow over the seafloor play a critical role in ocean circulation and climate. We determine the dependence of the radiated IW power on topographic parameters in numerical simulations of tidal flow over two-dimensional random topographic profiles that have the spectrum of oceanic abyssal hills. The IW power increases as the horizontal spatial resolution scale is decreased, but below a certain spatial scale the power saturates at a level less than the linear theory prediction. For increasing topographic RMS height Hrms the emergent interference of the tide and the IWs from different generation sites leads to a transition in the IW power dependence on Hrms from quadratic to linear. This transition in the scaling of the IW power depends on the slopes of a valley's nearest neighboring peaks. Our results should guide the modeling of IW generation by tidal flow over small-scale ocean topography.

  2. Shock capturing by the spectral viscosity method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, Eitan

    1989-01-01

    A main disadvantage of using spectral methods for nonlinear conservation laws lies in the formation of Gibbs phenomenon, once spontaneous shock discontinuities appear in the solution. The global nature of spectral methods than pollutes the unstable Gibbs oscillations overall the computational domain, and the lack of entropy dissipation prevents convergences in these cases. The Spectral Viscosity method, which is based on high frequency dependent vanishing viscosity regularization of the classical spectral methods is discussed. It is shown that this method enforces the convergence of nonlinear spectral approximations without sacrificing their overall spectral accuracy.

  3. Fluorescence-based Broad Dynamic Range Viscosity Probes.

    PubMed

    Dragan, Anatoliy; Graham, August E; Geddes, Chris D

    2014-03-01

    We introduce two new fluorescent viscosity probes, SYBR Green (SG) and PicoGreen (PG), that we have studied over a broad range of viscosity and in collagen solutions. In water, both dyes have low quantum yields and excited state lifetimes, while in viscous solvents or in complex with DNA both parameters dramatically (300-1000-fold) increase. We show that in log-log scale the dependence of the dyes' quantum yield vs. viscosity is linear, the slope of which is sensitive to temperature. Application of SG and PG, as a fluorescence-based broad dynamic range viscosity probes, to the life sciences is discussed.

  4. The importance of context dependency for understanding the effects of low flow events on fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, Annika W.

    2014-01-01

    The natural hydrology of streams and rivers has been extensively altered by dam construction, water diversion, and climate change. An increased frequency of low-flow events will affect fish by changing habitat availability, resource availability, and reproductive cues. I reviewed the literature to characterize the approaches taken to assess low-flow events and fish, the main effects of low-flow events on fish, and the associated mechanistic drivers. Most studies are focused on temperate streams and are comparative in nature. Decreased stream flow is associated with decreased survival, growth, and abundance of fish populations and shifts in community composition, but effects are variable. This variability in effects is probably caused by context dependence. I propose 3 main sources of context dependence that drive the variation in fish responses to low-flow events: attributes of the low-flow event, attributes of the habitat, and attributes of the fish. Awareness of these sources of context dependence can help managers interpret and explain data, predict vulnerability of fish communities, and prioritize appropriate management actions.

  5. Photoacoustic measurement of liquid viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Cunguang; Xing, Da

    2010-05-01

    In this letter, we report on the use of photoacoustic method to measure the viscosity of viscous liquids. The theoretical and experimental study was performed on the influence of viscosity effects on photoacoustic generation. We provide evidence that the frequency spectrum of photoacoustic signal is precisely related to the viscosity. Measurements are validated on different water-glycerol mixtures. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained. This present method provides an insight into in situ viscosity measurements, which has potential for noninvasive detection of blood viscosity.

  6. A predictive, size-dependent continuum model for dense granular flows

    PubMed Central

    Henann, David L.; Kamrin, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Dense granular materials display a complicated set of flow properties, which differentiate them from ordinary fluids. Despite their ubiquity, no model has been developed that captures or predicts the complexities of granular flow, posing an obstacle in industrial and geophysical applications. Here we propose a 3D constitutive model for well-developed, dense granular flows aimed at filling this need. The key ingredient of the theory is a grain-size-dependent nonlocal rheology—inspired by efforts for emulsions—in which flow at a point is affected by the local stress as well as the flow in neighboring material. The microscopic physical basis for this approach borrows from recent principles in soft glassy rheology. The size-dependence is captured using a single material parameter, and the resulting model is able to quantitatively describe dense granular flows in an array of different geometries. Of particular importance, it passes the stringent test of capturing all aspects of the highly nontrivial flows observed in split-bottom cells—a geometry that has resisted modeling efforts for nearly a decade. A key benefit of the model is its simple-to-implement and highly predictive final form, as needed for many real-world applications. PMID:23536300

  7. Time-dependent coronary blood flow distribution in left ventricular wall.

    PubMed

    Beyar, R; Sideman, S

    1987-02-01

    A mathematical model of the coronary circulation in the left ventricular (LV) wall, which describes the time-dependent local blood perfusion throughout the myocardium and the coronary flow in the epicardial vessels, is presented. The myocardial perfusion is essentially controlled by the intramyocardial resistance and the coronary pressure driving force, whereas the epicardial arterial flow is dominated by the epicardial and intramyocardial arterial capacitance and the local transmural pressure on the vessels. The temporal and spatial intramural pressure [P im(y,t)], calculated based on a nested-shell spheroidal model of the LV, is used to evaluate the local intramural resistance to flow and the corresponding zero flow pressure. The calculation of the instantaneous flow in each layer is based on a local, time-dependent modification of the back-pressure concept. A function representing the local tonus of the small blood vessels [T wf(y)] is used to adjust the average coronary flow rate to the metabolic demand of each layer. The calculated results are compared with experimental data, and the assumptions of the model are examined against a variety of experimental conditions. The model provides a qualitative tool for comprehending the distributed flow phenomenon within the myocardium and its relation to cardiac mechanics and autoregulation.

  8. Effect of isospin dependence of radius on transverse flow and fragmentation in isobaric pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Sakshi

    2013-11-01

    We study the role of nuclear structure effects through radius in reaction dynamics via transverse flow and multifragmentation of isobaric colliding pairs. Our study reveals that isospin-dependent radius [proposed by Royer and Rousseau [Eur. Phys. J. A10.1140/epja/i2008-10745-8 42, 541 (2009)] has significant effect towards isospin effects. The collective flow behavior and fragmentation pattern of neutron-rich system with respect to neutron-deficient system is found to get reversed with isospin-dependent radius compared to that with liquid drop radius.

  9. Viscosity of Anhydrous and Hydrous Basalt Melts at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinker, D.; Lesher, C. E.; Baxter, G. M.; Uchida, T.; Wang, Y.; Zhao, Y.

    2004-12-01

    We performed in situ falling-sphere experiments to determine the viscosity of anhydrous and hydrous basaltic (48 wt% SiO2) melts from 1.5 to 5.3 GPa between 1600 and 1840 K, using the T-25 MA8 multianvil apparatus at the GSECARS 13-ID-D beamline at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Lab. These falling-sphere experiments included monitoring the simultaneous settling of Pt and Mo spheres, an approach that provides redundant viscosity measurements for individual experiments and offers the opportunity to recover simultaneously melt density. Our results show that the viscosity of anhydrous basalt melt decreases with pressure up to 5.3 GPa, with an activation volume for viscous flow of -8.1 to -9.5 cm3/mol between 2 and 5.3 GPa. The addition of a few wt. % water reduces melt viscosity by roughly 0.5 log units; however, there is no resolvable influence on activation volume. This negative pressure dependence is consistent with previous results for basaltic melts up to 3 GPa [1, 2], while the activation volume at low pressure is indistinguishable from the activation volume for O self-diffusion in the same bulk composition [3]. Application of the Eyring equation using O self-diffusion data for basaltic melt [3] predicts anhydrous melt viscosities that are 30-90% of the values determined in this study. This result is in stark contrast with our recent results for dacitic melt (68 wt% SiO2) melt [4], in which the Eyring equation overestimates viscosity by as much as 40% at pressures < 5 GPa. The limited utility of the Eyring equation for naturally-occurring silicate melts illustrates the difficulties in relating O self-diffusion to viscous flow in polymerized liquids. Adam-Gibbs theory [5] provides a means for addressing structural controls on these transport properties. The negative pressure dependence for anhydrous and hydrous basalt viscosity suggests that the extraction of partial melts from mantle source regions will be enhanced with pressure to 5.3 GPa. Future

  10. Polyfunctional dispersants for controlling viscosity of phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2006-07-25

    This invention provides phyllosilicates and polyfunctional dispersants which can be manipulated to selectively control the viscosity of phyllosilicate slurries. The polyfunctional dispersants used in the present invention, which include at least three functional groups, increase the dispersion and exfoliation of phyllosilicates in polymers and, when used in conjunction with phyllosilicate slurries, significantly reduce the viscosity of slurries having high concentrations of phyllosilicates. The functional groups of the polyfunctional dispersants are capable of associating with multivalent metal cations and low molecular weight organic polymers, which can be manipulated to substantially increase or decrease the viscosity of the slurry in a concentration dependent manner. The polyfunctional dispersants of the present invention can also impart desirable properties on the phyllosilicate dispersions including corrosion inhibition and enhanced exfoliation of the phyllosilicate platelets.

  11. Diffusion, Viscosity and Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myerson, Allan S.

    1996-01-01

    The diffusivity of TriGlycine Sulfate (TGS), Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP), Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate (ADF) and other compounds of interest to microgravity crystal growth, in supersaturated solutions as a function of solution concentration, 'age' and 'history was studied experimentally. The factors that affect the growth of crystals from water solutions in microgravity have been examined. Three non-linear optical materials have been studied, potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) and triglycine sulfate (TGC). The diffusion coefficient and viscosity of supersaturated water solutions were measured. Also theoretical model of diffusivity and viscosity in a metastable state, model of crystal growth from solution including non-linear time dependent diffusivity and viscosity effect and computer simulation of the crystal growth process which allows simulation of the microgravity crystal growth were developed.

  12. Bistability in a simple fluid network due to viscosity contrast.

    PubMed

    Geddes, John B; Storey, Brian D; Gardner, David; Carr, Russell T

    2010-04-01

    We study the existence of multiple equilibrium states in a simple fluid network using Newtonian fluids and laminar flow. We demonstrate theoretically the presence of hysteresis and bistability, and we confirm these predictions in an experiment using two miscible fluids of different viscosity-sucrose solution and water. Possible applications include blood flow, microfluidics, and other network flows governed by similar principles.

  13. Human recombinant erythropoietin alters the flow-dependent vasodilatation of in vitro perfused rat mesenteric arteries with unbalanced endothelial endothelin-1 / nitric oxide ratio.

    PubMed

    Barhoumi, Tlili; Jallat, Isabelle; Berthelot, Alain; Laurant, Pascal

    2011-06-01

    Chronic use of human recombinant erythropoietin (r-HuEPO) is accompanied by serious vascular side effects related to the rise in blood viscosity and shear stress. We investigated the direct effects of r-HuEPO on endothelium and nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vasodilatation induced by shear stress of cannulated and pressurized rat mesenteric resistance arteries. Intravascular flow was increased in the presence or absence of the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10(-4) mol/L). In the presence of r-HuEPO, the flow-dependent vasodilatation was attenuated, while L-NAME completely inhibited it. The association of r-HuEPO and L-NAME caused a vasoconstriction in response to the rise in intravascular flow. Bosentan (10(-5) mol/L), an inhibitor of endothelin-1 (ET-1) receptors, corrected the attenuated vasodilatation observed with r-HuEPO and inhibited the vasoconstriction induced by flow in the presence of r-HuEPO and L-NAME. r-HuEPO and L-NAME exacerbated ET-1 vasoconstriction. At shear stress values of 2 and 14 dyn/cm(2) (1 dyn = 10(-5) N), cultured EA.hy926 endothelial cells incubated with r-HuEPO, L-NAME, or both released greater ET-1 than untreated cells. In conclusion, r-HuEPO diminishes flow-induced vasodilatation. This inhibitory effect seems to implicate ET-1 release. NO withdrawal exacerbates the vascular effects of ET-1 in the presence of r-HuEPO. These findings support the importance of a balanced endothelial ET-1:NO ratio to avoid the vasopressor effects of r-HuEPO.

  14. Viscosity of human bile sampled from the common bile duct.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Walter H; Näf, Gabriela; Werth, Baseli

    2010-01-01

    Cholestasis is a frequent gastroenterological problem, which is tackled by endoscopic procedures. Little is known about bile viscosity, a major determinant of its flow. We measured the viscosity of bile from the common bile duct during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Bile was aspirated immediately after cannulation of the papilla and deep-frozen. Viscosity was measured with a rotational viscometer at 37 degrees C and a broad range of shear rates (0.08-69.5 s(-1)). The majority of the 138 patients (64.5%) had bile viscosities between water (0.7 mPa.s) and the lower limit of plasma (1.1 mPa.s). In 20 patients (14.5%) it was above that of plasma (>1.4 mPa.s), and showed a non-Newtonian behaviour, i.e. the viscosity increased exponentially with decreasing shear rate. Cholecystectomized patients had a lower bile viscosity. Bile viscosities did not differ between patient groups with either choledocholithiasis, sludge, cholangitis, biliary pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, or cholangiocarcinoma. We conclude that bile viscosity in the common bile duct is usually lower than that of plasma, in 15% it is higher and increases exponentially with decreasing flow rate, which may lead to a vicious cycle.

  15. Viscosity of bubble- and crystal- bearing magmas: Analogue results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiki, A.; Manga, M.

    2006-12-01

    Natural magmas often include both phenocrysts and bubbles. Such magmas can be regarded as suspensions including particles and bubbles and should have a viscosity different from the particle- and bubble- free melt. Viscosity is one of the key physical properties that affects eruption dynamics and magma flow. To understand the relation between the viscosity and the volume fraction of bubbles and particles, we directly measure the viscosity of suspensions with both particles and bubbles. Measurements are performed with the 4 degree cone-and-plate type rheometer (Thermo HAAKE Rheoscope 1), which allows us to observe the samples in situ during the measurement. The suspending fluid is corn syrup whose viscosity is 1.7 Pa·s at 23 °C. Particles are Techpolymer (polymethylmethacrylate) 40 μm diameter spheres. Bubbles are made by dissolving baking soda and citric acid; reaction between them generates carbon dioxide. No surfactant is added. The Peclet number is sufficiently large that Brownian motion does not influence our results. The measured viscosity for the suspensions with particles, and with both particles and bubbles, show strong shear thinning. The measured viscosities during increasing and decreasing shear rate differ from each other, indicating that the microstructure is modified by flow. When the deformation of bubbles is not significant, the measured viscosity with bubbles is higher than that without bubbles, and vice versa.

  16. Viscosity Destabilizes Sonoluminescing Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toegel, Ruediger; Luther, Stefan; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-03-01

    In single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) microbubbles are trapped in a standing sound wave, typically in water or water-glycerol mixtures. However, in viscous liquids such as glycol, methylformamide, or sulphuric acid it is not possible to trap the bubble in a stable position. This is very peculiar as larger viscosity normally stabilizes the dynamics. Suslick and co-workers call this new mysterious state of SBSL “moving-SBSL.” We identify the history force (a force nonlocal in time) as the origin of this destabilization and show that the instability is parametric. A force balance model quantitatively accounts for the observed quasiperiodic bubble trajectories.

  17. Viscosity destabilizes sonoluminescing bubbles.

    PubMed

    Toegel, Ruediger; Luther, Stefan; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-03-24

    In single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) microbubbles are trapped in a standing sound wave, typically in water or water-glycerol mixtures. However, in viscous liquids such as glycol, methylformamide, or sulphuric acid it is not possible to trap the bubble in a stable position. This is very peculiar as larger viscosity normally stabilizes the dynamics. Suslick and co-workers call this new mysterious state of SBSL "moving-SBSL." We identify the history force (a force nonlocal in time) as the origin of this destabilization and show that the instability is parametric. A force balance model quantitatively accounts for the observed quasiperiodic bubble trajectories.

  18. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The sample cell at the heart of CVX-2 will sit inside a thermostat providing three layers of insulation. The cell itself comprises a copper body that conducts heat efficiently and smoothes out thermal variations that that would destroy the xenon's uniformity. Inside the cell, the oscillating screen viscometer element is supported between two pairs of electrodes that deflect the screen and then measure screen motion.

  19. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2001 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. This is a detail view of MSFC 0100143.

  20. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Because xenon near the critical point will collapse under its own weight, experiments on Earth (green line) are limited as they get closer (toward the left) to the critical point. CVX in the microgravity of space (red line) moved into unmeasured territory that scientists had not been able to reach.

  1. Simulation of substrate erosion and sulphate assimilation by Martian low-viscosity lava flows: implications for the genesis of precious metal-rich sulphide mineralisation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Raphael; Baratoux, David; Gaillard, Fabrice; Fiorentini, Marco

    2016-04-01

    On Earth, high temperature mafic to ultramafic lava flows, such as komatiites and ferropicrites of the Archean and Proterozic eons, can be hosts to Ni-Cu-PGE sulphide mineralisation. Mechanical/thermo-mechanical erosion and assimilation of sulphur-rich crustal rocks is ascribed as the principal mechanism that leads to sulphide supersaturation, batch segregation and subsequent accumulation of metal-enriched magmatic sulphides (e.g., Bekker et al., Science, 2009). In order to investigate the likelihood of the occurrence of similar sulphide mineralisation in extraterrestrial magmatic systems, we numerically modelled erosion and assimilation during the turbulent emplacement of Martian lavas, some of which display chemical and rheological analogies with terrestrial komatiites and ferropicrites, on a variety of consolidated sedimentary sulphate-rich substrates. The modelling approach relies on the integration of i) mathematical lava erosion models for turbulent flows (Williams et al., J. Geophys. Res., 1998), ii) thermodynamic volatile degassing models (Gaillard et al., Space Sci. Rev., 2013), and iii) formulations on the stability of sulphides (Fortin et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2015). A series of scenarios are examined in which various Martian mafic to ultramafic mantle-derived melts emplace over, and assimilate consolidated sulphate-rich substrates, such as the sedimentary lithologies (i.e., conglomerates, sandstones and mudstones) recently discovered at the Gale Crater landing site. Our modellings show that lavas emplacing over consolidated sedimentary substrate rather than stiff basaltic crust, are governed by relatively high cooling and substrate erosion rates. The rapid assimilation of sulphate, which serves as a strongly oxidising agent, could result in dramatic sulphur loss due to increased volatile degassing rates at fO2 ≳QFM-1. This effect is further enhanced with increased temperature. Nevertheless, sulphide supersaturation in the way of sulphate

  2. Mimicking of cerebral autoregulation by flow-dependent cerebrovascular resistance: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Tim A S; Wong, Kai C; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2012-04-01

    Understanding circulatory autoregulation is essential for improving physiological control of rotary blood pumps and support conditions during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Cerebral autoregulation (CAR), arguably the most critical, is the body's intrinsic ability to maintain sufficient cerebral blood flow (CBF) despite changes in aortic perfusion pressure. It is therefore imperative to include this mechanism into computational fluid dynamics (CFD), particle image velocimetry (PIV), or mock circulation loop (MCL) studies. Without such inclusions, potential losses of CBF are overestimated. In this study, a mathematical model to mimic CAR is implemented in a MCL- and PIV-validated CFD model. A three-dimensional model of the human vascular system was created from magnetic resonance imaging records. Numerical flow simulations were performed for physiological conditions and CPB. The inlet flow was varied between 4.5 and 6 L/min. Arterial outlets were modeled using vessel-specific, flow-dependent cerebrovascular resistances (CVRs), resulting in a variation of the pressure drop between 0 and 80mmHg. CBF is highly dependent on the level of CAR during CPB. By varying the CVR parameters up to the beginning of plateau phase, it can be regulated between 0 and 80% of physiological CBF. So while implementing autoregulation, CBF remains unchanged during a simulated native cardiac output of 5L/min or CPB support of 6L/min. Neglecting CAR, constant backflow from the brain occurs for some cannula positions. Using flow-dependent CVR, CBF returns to its baseline at a rate of recovery of 0.25s. Results demonstrate that modeling of CAR by flow-dependent CVR delivers feasible results. The presented method can be used to optimize physiological control of assist devices dependent upon different levels of CAR representing different patients.

  3. Spatial estimation of debris flows-triggering rainfall and its dependence on rainfall severity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destro, Elisa; Marra, Francesco; Nikolopoulos, Efthymios; Zoccatelli, Davide; Creutin, Jean-Dominique; Borga, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Forecasting the occurrence of landslides and debris flows (collectively termed 'debris flows' hereinafter) is fundamental for issuing hazard warnings, and focuses largely on rainfall as a triggering agent. Debris flow forecasting relies very often on the identification of combinations of depth and duration of rainfall - rainfall thresholds - that trigger widespread debris flows. Rainfall estimation errors related to the sparse nature of raingauge data are enhanced in case of convective rainfall events characterized by limited spatial extent. Such errors have been shown to cause underestimation of the rainfall thresholds and, thus, less efficient forecasts of debris flows occurrence. This work examines the spatial organization of debris flows-triggering rainfall around the debris flow initiation points using high-resolution, carefully corrected radar data for a set of short duration (<30 h) storm events occurred in the eastern Italian Alps. The set includes eleven debris-flow triggering rainfall events that occurred in the study area between 2005 and 2014. The selected events are among the most severe in the region during this period and triggered a total of 99 debris flows that caused significant damage to people and infrastructures. We show that the spatial rainfall organisation depends on the severity (measured via the estimated return time-RT) of the debris flow-triggering rainfall. For more frequent events (RT<20 yrs) the rainfall spatial pattern systematically shows that debris flow location coincides with a local minimum, whereas for less frequent events (RT>20 yrs) the triggering rainfall presents a local peak corresponding to the debris flow initiation point. Dependence of these features on rainfall duration is quite limited. The characteristics of the spatial rainfall organisation are exploited to understand the performances and results of three different rainfall interpolation techniques: nearest neighbour (NN), inverse distance weighting (IDW) and

  4. Adrenergically stimulated blood flow in brown adipose tissue is not dependent on thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo; Hagberg, Carolina E; Spalding, Kirsty L; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis relies on blood flow to be supplied with nutrients and oxygen and for the distribution of the generated heat to the rest of the body. Therefore, it is fundamental to understand the mechanisms by which blood flow is regulated and its relation to thermogenesis. Here, we present high-resolution laser-Doppler imaging (HR-LDR) as a novel method for noninvasive in vivo measurement of BAT blood flow in mice. Using HR-LDR, we found that norepinephrine stimulation increases BAT blood flow in a dose-dependent manner and that this response is profoundly modulated by environmental temperature acclimation. Surprisingly, we found that mice lacking uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) have fully preserved BAT blood flow response to norepinephrine despite failing to perform thermogenesis. BAT blood flow was not directly correlated to systemic glycemia, but glucose injections could transiently increase tissue perfusion. Inguinal white adipose tissue, also known as a brite/beige adipose tissue, was also sensitive to cold acclimation and similarly increased blood flow in response to norepinephrine. In conclusion, using a novel noninvasive method to detect BAT perfusion, we demonstrate that adrenergically stimulated BAT blood flow is qualitatively and quantitatively fully independent of thermogenesis, and therefore, it is not a reliable parameter for the estimation of BAT activation and heat generation.

  5. Water nano-hydrodynamics: The interplay between interfacial viscosity, slip and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2012-02-01

    The understanding and the ability to manipulate fluids at the nanoscale is a matter of continuously growing scientific and technological interest. Fluid flow in nano-confined geometries is relevant for biology, polymer science and geophysics. The applications range from gene sequencing to protein segregation, cell sorting, sensors, nanotribology and diffusion through porous media. Here, we present experiments which show how the interfacial viscosity of water strongly depends on the wetting properties of the confining surfaces. This dependence is fully explained by considering water slippage at the stationary solid surface. The interfacial viscous forces as a function of six surfaces with different wettability are fitted with a modified form of the Newtonian definition of viscosity, which takes into consideration the fluid slip. This simple relationship can explain the viscosity measurements and permits us to extract a ``slip parameter'' for each investigated surface. This slip parameter is found to increase with the static contact angle of the solid surface as expected from previous work, bringing clear evidence of the relationship between viscosity and slip.

  6. Time dependent behavior of impact angle in turbulkent pipe flows experience erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Amador; Oyarzun, Diego; Walczak, Magdalena; Aguirre, Javiera

    Erosion-corrosion in pipe systems transporting slurry turbulent flows is of a great importance in industrial and mining applications, where large volumes of suspended solids are sent up to hundreds of kilometers, to be further processed. The slurry is typically sent over large diameter steel pipes, which not always have an anti-abrasion coating. During the transport, the thickness of the pipe diminishes and eventually leaks and breaks, due to the combined effects of wear and corrosion. The processes of pipe degradation are further enhanced by the content of the slurry electrolytes that might switch from neutral to aggressive. The understanding of these processes in terms of operational parameters is critical for anticipating and mitigating a catastrophic outcome. This paper describes turbulent flow numerical simulations in a slurry transporting steel pipe with an emphasis on the correlation between the time dependent impact angle in the vicinity of the steel pipe and the rate of material loss. Full numerical simulations in a 3D long domain by using an Eulerian -Eulerian two phase flow approach coupled to a κ-epsilon turbulent model are performed for different solid particle concentration and flow velocity and compared to existing experimental and numerical results for validation with and without gravity. Time-dependent axisymmetric turbulent flow simulations are performed for determining both the time dependent behavior of the axial and radial velocities near the pipe wall and the impact angle. Finantial support from Conicyt through the Fondecyt proposal 1141107 is acknowledged.

  7. Taylor-Aris dispersion in time-dependent laminar channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedel, Søren; Bruus, Henrik

    2010-11-01

    The effective axial diffusion of solute concentrations advected in channel flows is known as Taylor-Aris dispersion [1,2]. Due to the no-slip condition, particles near the walls are displaced less than those close to the channel center axis, leading to concentration gradient perpendicular to the axis and an enhanced axial diffusivity. In many applications the velocity field is unsteady, but concentration dispersion in such time-dependent flows is largely unexplored, except for transient dispersion of an initial concentration profile in a steady flow [3], and dispersion in a velocity field with one harmonically oscillating component superimposed on a steady component [4]. We present a mathematical theory for Taylor-Aris dispersion in a straight channel with an arbitrary time- dependent flow, based on Fourier expansion of the velocity field, valid for all times and all values of the P'eclet number. The theory is applied to different time-dependent flows in channels of different cross sections, and we discuss the new phenomena arising by adding an increasing number of higher harmonics. [1] Taylor, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A 219, 186 (1953)[2] Aris, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A 235, 67 (1956)[3] Barton, J. Fluid Mech. 126, 205 (1983)[4] Mukherjee and Mazumder, Acta Mech. 74, 107 (1988)

  8. GodunovSPH with shear viscosity: implementation and tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Seung-Hoon; Wood, Matt A.

    2016-05-01

    The acceleration and energy dissipation terms due to the shear viscosity have been implemented and tested in GodunovSPH. The double summation method has been employed to avoid the well-known numerical noise of the second derivative in particle based codes. The plane Couette flow with various initial and boundary conditions have been used as tests, and the numerical and analytical results show a good agreement. Not only the viscosity-only calculation, but the full hydrodynamics simulations have been performed, and they show expected results as well. The very low kinematic viscosity simulations show a turbulent pattern when the Reynolds number exceeds ˜102. The critical value of the Reynolds number at the transition point of the laminar and turbulent flows coincides with the previous works approximately. A smoothed dynamic viscosity has been suggested to describe the individual kinematic viscosity of particles. The infinitely extended Couette flow which has two layers of different viscosities has been simulated to check the smoothed dynamic viscosity, and the result agrees well with the analytic solution. In order to compare the standard smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and GodunovSPH, the two layers test has been performed again with a density contrast. GodunovSPH shows less dispersion than the standard SPH, but there is no significant difference in the results. The results of the viscous ring evolution has also been presented as well, and the numerical results agrees with the analytic solution.

  9. Interstellar flow direction from pickup ion cut-off dependence on longitude, flow and solar wind speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möbius, Eberhard; Lee, Martin A.; Drews, Christian; Gloeckler, George

    2016-03-01

    The precise interstellar neutral (ISN) flow direction is important because of its strong leverage on the plane subtended by the ISN and magnetic field vectors, which controls the heliospheric shape and interaction with the interstellar medium. IBEX measurements provide a very precise relation between ISN flow longitude and speed via the hyperbolic trajectory equation, forming a 4-dimensional tube in the ISN parameter space, with substantially larger uncertainty along this tube and thus for the longitude alone. As demonstrated before, the interstellar pickup ion (PUI) cut-off speed is a function of the ratio of the radial ISN flow component and the solar wind speed at the observer location. The former is largest precisely upwind and decreases symmetrically with the angle from the upwind direction. Using this functional dependence and the observed solar wind speed, the PUI cut-off can be constructed solely as a function of the ISN flow longitude. From ACE SWICS and STEREO PLASTIC, data sets that span 18+ years are available. We will show, in particular, that by selecting observations for local interplanetary magnetic fields perpendicular to the solar wind and transforming the observed distributions into the solar wind frame, a comparison with data can be devised that is much less sensitive to PUI production and transport effects than methods that rely on pickup ion fluxes.

  10. Eigenmodes of Ducted Flows With Radially-Dependent Axial and Swirl Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kousen, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    This report characterizes the sets of small disturbances possible in cylindrical and annular ducts with mean flow whose axial and tangential components vary arbitrarily with radius. The linearized equations of motion are presented and discussed, and then exponential forms for the axial, circumferential, and time dependencies of any unsteady disturbances are assumed. The resultant equations form a generalized eigenvalue problem, the solution of which yields the axial wavenumbers and radial mode shapes of the unsteady disturbances. Two numerical discretizations are applied to the system of equations: (1) a spectral collocation technique based on Chebyshev polynomial expansions on the Gauss-Lobatto points, and (2) second and fourth order finite differences on uniform grids. The discretized equations are solved using a standard eigensystem package employing the QR algorithm. The eigenvalues fall into two primary categories: a discrete set (analogous to the acoustic modes found in uniform mean flows) and a continuous band (analogous to convected disturbances in uniform mean flows) where the phase velocities of the disturbances correspond to the local mean flow velocities. Sample mode shapes and eigensystem distributions are presented for both sheared axial and swirling flows. The physics of swirling flows is examined with reference to hydrodynamic stability and completeness of the eigensystem expansions. The effect of assuming exponential dependence in the axial direction is discussed.

  11. Examples of deformation-dependent flow simulations of conjunctive use with MF-OWHM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, R. T.; Traum, J.; Boyce, S. E.; Schmid, W.; Hughes, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    The dependency of surface- and groundwater flows and aquifer hydraulic properties on deformation induced by changes in aquifer head is not accounted for in the standard version of MODFLOW. A new USGS integrated hydrologic model, MODFLOW-OWHM, incorporates this dependency by linking subsidence and mesh deformation with changes in aquifer transmissivity and storage coefficient, and with flows that also depend on aquifer characteristics and land-surface geometry. This new deformation-dependent approach is being used for the further development of the integrated Central Valley hydrologic model (CVHM) in California. Preliminary results from this application and from hypothetical test cases of similar systems show that changes in canal flows, stream seepage, and evapotranspiration from groundwater (ETgw) are sensitive to deformation. Deformation feedback has been shown to also have an indirect effect on conjunctive surface- and groundwater use components with increased stream seepage and streamflows influencing surface-water deliveries and return flows. In the Central Valley model, land subsidence may significantly degrade the ability of the major canals to deliver surface water from the Delta to the San Joaquin and Tulare basins. Subsidence can also affect irrigation demand and ETgw, which, along with altered surface-water supplies, causes a feedback response resulting in changed estimates of groundwater pumping for irrigation. This modeling feature also may improve the impact assessment of dewatering-induced land subsidence/uplift (following irrigation pumping or coal-seam gas extraction) on surface receptors, inter-basin transfers, and surface infrastructure integrity.

  12. Examples of deformation-dependent flow simulations of conjunctive use with MF-OWHM

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Randall T.; Traum, Jonathan A.; Boyce, Scott E.; Schmid, Wolfgang; Hughes, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    The dependency of surface- and groundwater flows and aquifer hydraulic properties on deformation induced by changes in aquifer head is not accounted for in the standard version of MODFLOW. A new USGS integrated hydrologic model, MODFLOW-OWHM, incorporates this dependency by linking subsidence and mesh deformation with changes in aquifer transmissivity and storage coefficient, and with flows that also depend on aquifer characteristics and land-surface geometry. This new deformation-dependent approach is being used for the further development of the integrated Central Valley hydrologic model (CVHM) in California. Preliminary results from this application and from hypothetical test cases of similar systems show that changes in canal flows, stream seepage, and evapotranspiration from groundwater (ETgw) are sensitive to deformation. Deformation feedback has been shown to also have an indirect effect on conjunctive surface- and groundwater use components with increased stream seepage and streamflows influencing surface-water deliveries and return flows. In the Central Valley model, land subsidence may significantly degrade the ability of the major canals to deliver surface water from the Delta to the San Joaquin and Tulare basins. Subsidence can also affect irrigation demand and ETgw, which, along with altered surface-water supplies, causes a feedback response resulting in changed estimates of groundwater pumping for irrigation. This modeling feature also may improve the impact assessment of dewatering-induced land subsidence/uplift (following irrigation pumping or coal-seam gas extraction) on surface receptors, inter-basin transfers, and surface infrastructure integrity.

  13. Flow-Dependent Topographic and Hydrodynamic Variability Control Channel Change in Mountain Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. A.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2013-12-01

    An emerging view in fluvial geomorphology is that rivers are systems with multiple scales of variability. This is especially true in mountain rivers that have spatially variable alluvial-bedrock boundaries as multiple scales of topography, from individual boulders to valley scale deposits, can steer flow paths affecting the erosion and deposition patterns of transported sediments. We hypothesize that depending on flow discharge and stage, different scales of channel topography can become dominant in routing sediment such that the resulting topography is a layered sequence of past flows. Here we evaluate gravel and cobble channel change associated with hydraulic unit to reach scale (e.g. 10-1-102 channel widths) changes in topographic and stage-dependent hydrodynamic variability in a mixed alluvial-bedrock river canyon. This study takes advantage of a unique opportunity where 4,535 metric tons of gravel ranging from 6-128 mm was augmented directly below a dam for spawning habitat rehabilitation in a 1,200 m long mountain river reach with no other sources of gravel sediment supply and an existing substrate of bedrock, large cobbles (>250mm), angular shot rock (>0.5m) and boulders (>1m). While the study site is a regulated river flows above 117 m3/s, just below the bankfull discharge, still overtop the dam so natural aspects of the hydrograph are still retained such that the reach still experiences large floods capable of considerable topographic change. We utilize kite-blimp aerial photography, kayak-based surveying, topographic change detection, and 2D modeling to understand how flow discharge can activate topographic features that ultimately control channel change following a controlled gravel injection upstream of a mountain river with no other gravel or cobble sediment inputs. The spatial covariance of flow width and bed elevation are strongly associated with the volume of gravel deposition and erosion, but this also changes depending on flow discharge as

  14. Flow-dependent porosity and other biomechanical properties of mysticete baleen.

    PubMed

    Werth, Alexander J

    2013-04-01

    Despite its vital function in a highly dynamic environment, baleen is typically assumed to be a static material. Its biomechanical and material properties have not previously been explored. Thus I tested sections of baleen from bowhead whales, Balaena mysticetus, and humpback whales, Megaptera novaeangliae, alone or in groups representing miniature 'racks', in a flow tank through which water and buoyant particles circulated with variable flow velocity. Kinematic sequences were recorded through an endoscopic camera or viewing window. One set of experiments investigated particle capture; another series analyzed biomechanical behavior, including fringe spacing, movement and interaction. Baleen fringe porosity directly correlates, in a mostly linear fashion, with velocity of incident water flow. However, undulation and interaction of fringes (especially of bowheads) at higher flow velocities can decrease porosity. Fringe porosity depends on distance from the baleen plate. Porosity also varies, with fringe length, by position along the length of an individual plate. Plate orientation, which varied from 0 to 90 deg relative to water flow, is crucial in fringe spacing and particle capture. At all flow velocities, porosity is lowest with plates aligned parallel to water flow. Turbulence introduced when plates rotate perpendicular to flow (as in cross-flow filtration) increases fringe interaction, so that particles more easily strike fringes yet more readily dislodge. Baleen of bowhead whales, which feed by continuous ram filtration, differs biomechanically from that of humpbacks, which use intermittent lunge filtration. The longer, finer fringes of bowhead baleen readily form a mesh-like mat, especially at higher flow velocities, to trap tiny particles.

  15. Effect of bulk viscosity on a hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, George

    1992-03-01

    The bulk viscosity mu(b) is generally set equal to zero (Stokes' hypothesis). For certain gases, such as CO2, mu(b)/mu exceeds 1000, where mu is the shear viscosity. In this circumstance, the bulk viscosity may substantially alter a hypersonic boundary layer. A general, nonsimilar, laminar, boundary-layer formulation is provided in which the bulk viscosity terms are included as a correction. To obtain explicit results, flow over a flat plate is considered. In addition to the heat transfer, the transverse pressure gradient inside the boundary layer is not zero, whereas the skin friction is unaltered by the bulk viscosity. This analysis is relevant to aerogravity-assisted maneuvers in planetary atmospheres that largely consist of CO2.

  16. Effect of bulk viscosity on a hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, George

    1992-03-01

    The bulk viscosity μb is generally set equal to zero (Stokes' hypothesis). For certain gases, such as CO2, μb/μ exceeds 103, where μ is the shear viscosity. In this circumstance, the bulk viscosity may substantially alter a hypersonic boundary layer. A general, nonsimilar, laminar, boundary-layer formulation is provided in which the bulk viscosity terms are included as a correction. To obtain explicit results, flow over a flat plate is considered. In addition to the heat transfer, the transverse pressure gradient inside the boundary layer is not zero, whereas the skin friction is unaltered by the bulk viscosity. This analysis is relevant to aerogravity-assisted maneuvers in planetary atmospheres that largely consist of CO2.

  17. Measurement and correlation of jet fuel viscosities at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schruben, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and procedures were developed to measure jet fuel viscosity for eight current and future jet fuels at temperatures from ambient to near -60 C by shear viscometry. Viscosity data showed good reproducibility even at temperatures a few degrees below the measured freezing point. The viscosity-temperature relationship could be correlated by two linear segments when plotted as a standard log-log type representation (ASTM D 341). At high temperatures, the viscosity-temperature slope is low. At low temperatures, where wax precipitation is significant, the slope is higher. The breakpoint between temperature regions is the filter flow temperature, a fuel characteristic approximated by the freezing point. A generalization of the representation for the eight experimental fuels provided a predictive correlation for low-temperature viscosity, considered sufficiently accurate for many design or performance calculations.

  18. Precision assessment of biofluid viscosity measurements using molecular rotors.

    PubMed

    Akers, Walter J; Haidekker, Mark A

    2005-06-01

    Blood viscosity changes with many pathologic conditions, but its importance has not been fully investigated because the current methods of measurement are poorly suited for clinical applications. The use of viscosity-sensitive fluorescent molecular rotors to determine fluid viscosity in a nonmechanical manner has been investigated recently, but it is unknown how the precision of the fluorescence-based method compares to established mechanical viscometry. Human blood plasma viscosity was modulated with high-viscosity plasma expanders, dextran, pentastarch, and hetastarch. The samples were divided into a calibration and a test set. The relationship between fluorescence emission and viscosity was established using the calibration set. Viscosity of the test set was determined by fluorescence and by cone-and-plate viscometer, and the precision of both methods compared. Molecular rotor fluorescence intensity showed a power law relationship with solution viscosity. Mechanical measurements deviated from the theoretical viscosity value by less than 7.6%, while fluorescence-based measurements deviated by less than 6%. The average coefficient of variation was 6.9% (mechanical measurement) and 3.4% to 3.8% (fluorescence-based measurement, depending on the molecular rotor used). Fluorescence-based viscometry exhibits comparable precision to mechanical viscometry. Fluorescence viscometry does not apply shear and is therefore more practical for biofluids which have apparent non-Newtonian properties. In addition, fluorescence instrumentation makes very fast serial measurements possible, thus promising new areas of application in laboratory and clinical settings.

  19. Time-dependent modes associated with finite time instabilities in unstable fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaee, Hessam; Sapsis, Themistoklis

    2015-11-01

    We apply a recently developed variational formulation for the determination of a finite-dimensional, time-dependent, orthonormal basis that captures the directions associated with finite-time instabilities. We demonstrate the capability of the method for two problems: the Orr-Sommerfeld/Squire operator and the vertical jet in crossflow. In the first problem we demonstrate that the time-dependent subspace captures the strongly transient non-normal energy growth (in the short time regime), while for longer times the modes capture the expected asymptotic behavior of the dynamics. We also consider the vertical jet in crossflow at the jet Reynolds number of Rej = 900 . We demonstrate that the subspace instantaneously captures the most unstable directions of the time-dependent flow. We explore the connection between the shear flow, non-normal growth and persistent instabilities. Supported by ARO Award # 66710-EG-YIP.

  20. Sensor for Viscosity and Shear Strength Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, J.; Moore, J.E. Jr.; Ebadian, M.A.; Jones, W.K.

    1998-10-20

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. The work for this project will be performed in three phases. The first phase, carried out in FY96, involved (1) an evaluation of acoustic and other methods for viscosity measurement; (2) measurement of the parameters of slurries over the range of percent solids found in tanks and transport systems; (3) a comparison of physical properties (e.g., viscosity and density) to percent solids found composition; and (4) the design of a prototype sensor. The second phase (FY97) will involve the fabrication of a prototype hybrid sensor to measure the viscosity and mechanical properties of slurries in remote, high-radiation environments. Two different viscometer designs are being investigated in this study: a magnetostrictive pulse wave guide viscometer; an oscillating cylinder viscometer. In FY97, the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU), which has printed circuit, thick film, thin film, and co-fired ceramic fabrication capability, will fabricate five probes for demonstration after technology selection and evaluation.

  1. Viscosity properties of sodium borophosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, S.; Tincher, B.; Petit, L. Richardson, K.

    2009-05-06

    The viscosity behavior of (1 - x)NaPO{sub 3}-xNa{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} glasses (x = 0.05-0.20) have been measured as a function of temperature using beam-bending and parallel-plate viscometry. The viscosity was found to shift to higher temperatures with increasing sodium borate content. The kinetic fragility parameter, m, estimated from the viscosity curve, decreases from 52 to 33 when x increases from 0.05 to 0.20 indicating that the glass network transforms from fragile to strong with the addition of Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}. The decrease in fragility with increasing x is due to the progressive depolymerization of the phosphate network by the preferred four-coordinated boron atoms present in the low alkali borate glasses. As confirmed by Raman spectroscopy increasing alkali borate leads to enhanced B-O-P linkages realized with the accompanying transition from solely four-coordinated boron (in BO{sub 4} units) to mixed BO{sub 4}/BO{sub 3} structures. The glass viscosity characteristics of the investigated glasses were compared to those of P-SF67 and N-FK5 commercial glasses from SCHOTT. We showed that the dependence of the viscosity of P-SF67 was similar to the investigated glasses due to similar phosphate network organization confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, whereas N-FK5 exhibited a very different viscosity curve and fragility parameter due to its highly coordinated silicate network.

  2. Effect of viscosity ratio on the self-sustained instabilities in planar immiscible jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammisola, Outi; Loiseau, Jean-Christophe; Brandt, Luca

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that intermediate magnitude of surface tension has a counterintuitive destabilizing effect on two-phase planar jets. In the present study, the transition process in confined two-dimensional jets of two fluids with varying viscosity ratio is investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNSs). The outer fluid coflow velocity is 17 % of that of the central jet. Neutral curves for the appearance of persistent oscillations are found by recording the norm of the velocity residuals in DNS for over 1000 nondimensional time units or until the signal has reached a constant level in a logarithmic scale, either a converged steady state or a "statistically steady" oscillatory state. Oscillatory final states are found for all viscosity ratios ranging from 10-1 to 10. For uniform viscosity (m =1 ), the first bifurcation is through a surface-tension-driven global instability. On the other hand, for low viscosity of the outer fluid, there is a mode competition between a steady asymmetric Coanda-type attachment mode and the surface-tension-induced mode. At moderate surface tension, the first bifurcation is through the Coanda-type attachment, which eventually triggers time-dependent convective bursts. At high surface tension, the first bifurcation is through the surface-tension-dominated mode. For high viscosity of the outer fluid, persistent oscillations appear due to a strong convective instability, although it is shown that absolute instability may be possible at even higher viscosity ratios. Finally, we show that the jet is still convectively and absolutely unstable far from the inlet when the shear profile is nearly constant. Comparing this situation to a parallel Couette flow (without inflection points), we show that in both flows, a hidden interfacial mode brought out by surface tension becomes temporally and absolutely unstable in an intermediate Weber and Reynolds regime. By an energy analysis of the Couette flow case, we show that surface

  3. Viscosity of the earth's core.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the viscosity of the core at the boundary of the inner and outer core. It is assumed that this boundary is a melting transition and the viscosity limits of the Andrade (1934,1952) hypothesis (3.7 to 18.5 cp) are adopted. The corresponding kinematic viscosities are such that the precessional system explored by Malkus (1968) would be unstable. Whether it would be sufficiently unstable to overcome a severely subadiabatic temperature gradient cannot be determined.

  4. Crustal Viscosity Structure Estimated from Multi-Phase Mixing Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinevar, W. J.; Behn, M. D.; Hirth, G.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of lower crustal viscosity are typically constrained by analyses of isostatic rebound, post seismic creep, and laboratory-derived flow laws for crustal rocks and minerals. Here we follow a new approach for calculating the viscosity structure of the lower continental crust. We use Perple_X to calculate mineral assemblages for different crustal compositions. Effective viscosity is then calculated using the rheologic mixing model of Huet et al. (2014) incorporating flow laws for each mineral phase. Calculations are performed along geotherms appropriate for the Basin and Range, Tibetan Plateau, Colorado Plateau, and the San Andreas Fault. To assess the role of crustal composition on viscosity, we examined two compositional gradients extending from an upper crust with ~67 wt% SiO2 to a lower crust that is either: (i) basaltic with ~53 wt% SiO2 (Rudnick and Gao, 2003), or (ii) andesitic with ~64% SiO2 (Hacker et al., 2011). In all cases, the middle continental crust has a viscosity that is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than that inferred for wet quartz, a common proxy for mid-crustal viscosities. An andesitic lower crust results in viscosities of 1020-1021 Pa-s and 1021-1022 Pa-s for hotter and colder crustal geotherms, respectively. A mafic lower crust predicts viscosities that are an order of magnitude higher for the same geotherm. In all cases, the viscosity calculated from the mixing model decreases less with depth compared to single-phase estimates. Lastly, for anhydrous conditions in which alpha quartz is stable, we find that there is a strong correlation between Vp/Vs and bulk viscosity; in contrast, little to no correlation exists for hydrous conditions.

  5. Viscosity measuring instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinstein, S. P. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for enabling the measurement of the viscosity of substances, especially those containing volatiles at elevated temperatures, with greater accuracy and at less cost than before. The apparatus includes a cylinder with a narrow exit opening at one end and a piston which closely slides within the cylinder to apply force against a sample in the cylinder to force the sample through the exit opening. In order to more rapidly heat a sample the ends of the cylinder and piston are tapered and the sample is correspondingly tapered, to provide a large surface to volume ratio. A corresponding coal sample is formed by compressing particles of coal under high pressure in a mold of appropriate shape.

  6. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of liquid xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Resembling a tiny bit of window screen, the oscillator at the heart of CVX-2 will vibrate between two pairs of paddle-like electrodes. The slight bend in the shape of the mesh has no effect on the data. What counts are the mesh's displacement in the xenon fluid and the rate at which the displacement dampens. The unit shown here is encased in a small test cell and capped with a sapphire windown to contain the xenon at high pressure.

  7. The Relation between Vaporization Enthalpies and Viscosities: Eyring's Theory Applied to Selected Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Bonsa, Anne-Marie; Paschek, Dietmar; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Verevkin, Sergey P; Ludwig, Ralf

    2017-03-08

    Key properties for the use of ionic liquids as electrolytes in batteries are low viscosities, low vapor pressure and high vaporization enthalpies. Whereas the measurement of transport properties is well established, the determination of vaporization enthalpies of these extremely low volatile compounds is still a challenge. At a first glance both properties seem to describe different thermophysical phenomena. However, eighty years ago Eyring suggested a theory which related viscosities and vaporization enthalpies to each other. The model is based on Eyring's theory of absolute reaction rates. Recent attempts to apply Eyring's theory to ionic liquids failed. The motivation of our study is to show that Eyring's theory works, if the assumptions specific for ionic liquids are fulfilled. For that purpose we measured the viscosities of three well selected protic ionic liquids (PILs) at different temperatures. The temperature dependences of viscosities were approximated by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamann (VFT) relation and extrapolated to the high-temperature regime up to 600 K. Then the VFT-data could be fitted to the Eyring-model. The values of vaporization enthalpies for the three selected PILs predicted by the Eyring model have been very close to the experimental values measured by well-established techniques. We conclude that the Eyring theory can be successfully applied to the chosen set of PILs, if the assumption that ionic pairs of the viscous flow in the liquid and the ionic pairs in the gas phase are similar is fulfilled. It was also noticed that proper transfer of energies can be only derived if the viscosities and the vaporization energies are known for temperatures close to the liquid-gas transition temperature. The idea to correlate easy measurable viscosities of ionic liquids with their vaporization enthalpies opens a new way for a reliable assessment of these thermodynamic properties for a broad range of ionic liquids.

  8. Simulating Regional Groundwater Flow Patterns in South Florida Using Density-Dependent Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, S. M.; Stevens, G. T.

    2008-05-01

    Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) is the storage of fresh water in an aquifer via injection during times when water is available, and recovery of the water from the same aquifer via pumping during times when it is needed. ASR is one of the proposed alternatives recommended by the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) to help with water supply, storage, and distribution of water in South Florida. To evaluate the numerous design considerations and the variation in aquifer response resulting from CERP ASR, regional density- dependent numerical modeling of the Floridan Aquifer System (FAS) in the southern half of Florida is in progress. This modeling incorporates use of two density-dependent numerical codes, SEAWAT and WASH123D, and the synthesis of regional knowledge of the FAS in terms of geologic parameters, groundwater flow patterns, and salinity influences. Several challenges have been discovered in replicating the existing regional groundwater flow patterns, most notably, that in south-central Florida the simulated heads are considerably lower than observed values. Recent model studies of several factors that could affect south Florida regional flow patterns indicate that the inclusion of preferential flow as well as the effects of temperature on groundwater density yield results that are more consistent with observed values. Future work will focus on the investigation of field data to support the application of preferential flow and the addition of groundwater injection and withdrawal including existing and proposed ASR projects.

  9. Turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces with shear-dependent slip length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosh Aghdam, Sohrab; Seddighi, Mehdi; Ricco, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    Motivated by recent experimental evidence, shear-dependent slip length superhydrophobic surfaces are studied. Lyapunov stability analysis is applied in a 3D turbulent channel flow and extended to the shear-dependent slip-length case. The feedback law extracted is recognized for the first time to coincide with the constant-slip-length model widely used in simulations of hydrophobic surfaces. The condition for the slip parameters is found to be consistent with the experimental data and with values from DNS. The theoretical approach by Fukagata (PoF 18.5: 051703) is employed to model the drag-reduction effect engendered by the shear-dependent slip-length surfaces. The estimated drag-reduction values are in very good agreement with our DNS data. For slip parameters and flow conditions which are potentially realizable in the lab, the maximum computed drag reduction reaches 50%. The power spent by the turbulent flow on the walls is computed, thereby recognizing the hydrophobic surfaces as a passive-absorbing drag-reduction method, as opposed to geometrically-modifying techniques that do not consume energy, e.g. riblets, hence named passive-neutral. The flow is investigated by visualizations, statistical analysis of vorticity and strain rates, and quadrants of the Reynolds stresses. Part of this work was funded by Airbus Group. Simulations were performed on the ARCHER Supercomputer (UKTC Grant).

  10. Quantitatively Mapping Cellular Viscosity with Detailed Organelle Information via a Designed PET Fluorescent Probe

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianyu; Liu, Xiaogang; Spring, David R.; Qian, Xuhong; Cui, Jingnan; Xu, Zhaochao

    2014-01-01

    Viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that influences diffusion in biological processes. The distribution of intracellular viscosity is highly heterogeneous, and it is challenging to obtain a full map of cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information. In this work, we report 1 as the first fluorescent viscosity probe which is able to quantitatively map cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information based on the PET mechanism. This probe exhibited a significant ratiometric fluorescence intensity enhancement as solvent viscosity increases. The emission intensity increase was attributed to combined effects of the inhibition of PET due to restricted conformational access (favorable for FRET, but not for PET), and the decreased PET efficiency caused by viscosity-dependent twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT). A full map of subcellular viscosity was successfully constructed via fluorescent ratiometric detection and fluorescence lifetime imaging; it was found that lysosomal regions in a cell possess the highest viscosity, followed by mitochondrial regions. PMID:24957323

  11. Quantitatively Mapping Cellular Viscosity with Detailed Organelle Information via a Designed PET Fluorescent Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyu; Liu, Xiaogang; Spring, David R.; Qian, Xuhong; Cui, Jingnan; Xu, Zhaochao

    2014-06-01

    Viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that influences diffusion in biological processes. The distribution of intracellular viscosity is highly heterogeneous, and it is challenging to obtain a full map of cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information. In this work, we report 1 as the first fluorescent viscosity probe which is able to quantitatively map cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information based on the PET mechanism. This probe exhibited a significant ratiometric fluorescence intensity enhancement as solvent viscosity increases. The emission intensity increase was attributed to combined effects of the inhibition of PET due to restricted conformational access (favorable for FRET, but not for PET), and the decreased PET efficiency caused by viscosity-dependent twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT). A full map of subcellular viscosity was successfully constructed via fluorescent ratiometric detection and fluorescence lifetime imaging; it was found that lysosomal regions in a cell possess the highest viscosity, followed by mitochondrial regions.

  12. Quantitatively mapping cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information via a designed PET fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianyu; Liu, Xiaogang; Spring, David R; Qian, Xuhong; Cui, Jingnan; Xu, Zhaochao

    2014-06-24

    Viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that influences diffusion in biological processes. The distribution of intracellular viscosity is highly heterogeneous, and it is challenging to obtain a full map of cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information. In this work, we report 1 as the first fluorescent viscosity probe which is able to quantitatively map cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information based on the PET mechanism. This probe exhibited a significant ratiometric fluorescence intensity enhancement as solvent viscosity increases. The emission intensity increase was attributed to combined effects of the inhibition of PET due to restricted conformational access (favorable for FRET, but not for PET), and the decreased PET efficiency caused by viscosity-dependent twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT). A full map of subcellular viscosity was successfully constructed via fluorescent ratiometric detection and fluorescence lifetime imaging; it was found that lysosomal regions in a cell possess the highest viscosity, followed by mitochondrial regions.

  13. Static and Dynamic Viscosity of a Single Layer Dusty Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, Peter; Sandor, Mate Cs.; Kovacs, Aniko; Donko, Zoltan

    2011-11-29

    We measured the static and dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a single layer complex plasma by applying, respectively, a stationary and a periodically modulated shear stress induced by the light pressure of manipulating laser beams. Under static conditions the shear viscosity reproduced the numerically predicted shear rate dependence, the so called shear-thinning effect. Under oscillating shear both the magnitude and the ratio of the dissipative and elastic contributions to the complex viscosity show strong frequency dependence. Accompanying molecular dynamics simulations explain and support the experimental observations.

  14. The Mitral Valve Prolapsus: Quantification of the Regurgitation Flow Rate by Experimental Time-Dependant PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billy, F.; Coisne, D.; Sanchez, L.; Perrault, R.

    2001-10-01

    Color Doppler is routinely used for visualisation of intra cardiac flows and quantification of valvular heart disease, Nevertheless the 2D visualization of a complex 3D phenomenon is the major limitation of this technique, In particular, in clinical setting, the flow rate calculation upstream a regurgitant orifice (i,e, mitral valve insufficiency), assumes that the velocity field in the convergent region have hemispheric shapes and introduce miscalculation specially in case of prolaps regurgitant orifices, The main objective of this study was to characterize the dynamic 3D velocity field of the convergent region upstream a prolaps model of regurgitant orifice based on 2D time dependent PIV reconstruction.

  15. The rate dependence of the saturation flow stress of Cu and 1100 Al

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, D.L.; Tonks, D.L.; Wallace, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The strain-rate dependence of the saturation flow stress of OFHC Cu and 1100 Al from 10{sup {minus}3}s{sup {minus}1} to nearly to 10{sup 12}s{sup {minus}1} is examined. The flow stress above 10{sup 9}s{sup {minus}1} is estimated using Wallace's theory of overdriven shocks in metals. A transition to the power-law behavior {Psi} {approximately} {tau}{sub s}{sup 5} occurs at a strain rate of order 10{sup 5}s{sup {minus}1}. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Solution of 3-dimensional time-dependent viscous flows. Part 2: Development of the computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, B. C.; Mcdonald, H.

    1980-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing a numerical scheme for solving the time dependent viscous compressible three dimensional flow equations to aid in the design of helicopter rotors. The development of a computer code to solve a three dimensional unsteady approximate form of the Navier-Stokes equations employing a linearized block emplicit technique in conjunction with a QR operator scheme is described. Results of calculations of several Cartesian test cases are presented. The computer code can be applied to more complex flow fields such as these encountered on rotating airfoils.

  17. Time dependence and local structure of tracer dispersion in oscillating liquid Hele-Shaw flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roht, Y. L.; Auradou, H.; Hulin, J.-P.; Salin, D.; Chertcoff, R.; Ippolito, I.

    2015-10-01

    Passive tracer dispersion in oscillating Poiseuille liquid flows of zero net velocity is studied experimentally in a Hele-Shaw cell and numerically by 2D simulations: this study is particularly focused on the time dependence and local properties of the dispersion. The dispersion mechanism is found to be controlled by the ratio τm/T of the molecular diffusion time across the gap and the oscillation period (when molecular diffusion parallel to the flow is negligible). The 2D numerical simulations complement the experiments by providing the local concentration c(x, z, t) at a given distance z from the cell walls (instead of only the average over z). Above a time lapse scaling like τm, the variation of c with the distance x along the flow becomes a Gaussian of width constant with z while the mean distance x ¯ may depend both on z and t. For τm/T ≲ 2, the front spreads through Taylor-like dispersion and the normalized dispersivity scales as τm/T. The front oscillates parallel to the flow with an amplitude constant across the gap; its width increases monotonically at a rate modulated at twice the flow frequency, due to variations of the instantaneous dispersivity. For τm/T ≳ 20, the molecular diffusion distance during a period of the flow is smaller than the gap and the normalized dispersivity scales as (τm/T)-1. The oscillations of the different points of the front follow the local fluid velocity: this produces a reversible modulation of the global front width at twice the flow frequency and in quadrature with that in the Taylor-like regime.

  18. Geometry Properties of Porosity Waves during Magma Migration: The Influence of Viscosities and Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Z.; Bercovici, D.

    2014-12-01

    Partial melting occurs along grain boundaries and migrates through porous flow, leading to magma segregation in the mantle. Solitary porosity waves created by a perturbation in melting have been studied in the flow of a low viscosity fluid in a deformable matrix (McKenzie 1984, Scott and Stevenson 1986, Barcilon and Richter 1986, Spiegelman 1993, Wiggins and Spiegelman 1995). However, in a fairly complicated multi-physics, multi-scale process of magma migration, the geometry and instability of porosity waves can be affected by both mechanical and thermal factors, leaving different propagation signatures. In this work we develop a two-dimensional, two-phase damage model of magma-fracturing, and study the influence of viscosities and damage (void generation and microcracking) on the geometry properties of porosity waves. We first benchmark our solitary solutions with previous works and solve 2-D finite-amplitude waves numerically using spectral and semi-spectral method. We show that damage, decompaction weakening of the matrix and porosity-driven viscosities can alter the geometry of stable porosity waves, and result in an elongated or flattened wave front with a trail of smaller porosity. Such trails may localize subsequent waves and form porosity passage in the matrix. Scaling analysis of the time-dependent porosity waves are conducted and amount of magma reaching to the top of the melting region are estimated. Future work will include evaluating the thermal and seismic signatures during and after melt migration in two-phase porous flow.

  19. Effect of momentum dependent interactions and nucleonic cross-section on directed flow (v{sub 1})

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Anupriya; Vinayak, Karan Singh; Kumar, Suneel

    2013-07-15

    The descriptive analysis for the effect of momentum dependent interactions and nucleonic cross-section (isospin dependent and isospin-independent) on the neutron–proton directed flow (v{sub 1}), within the framework of the isospin dependent quantum molecular dynamics model is presented. Our study shows that, the directed flow of both neutrons and protons is affected by the momentum dependence of nuclear equation of state and the isospin dependence of nucleon–nucleon cross-section. A soft momentum dependent (SM) equation of state is found to be more compatible with the experimental data. -- Highlights: •Role of rapidity cut on transverse flow has been explored. •p{sub t} differential flow for protons and neutrons has been studied. •Role of MDI on directed flow has been studied.

  20. Contribution of the flow effect caused by shear-dependent RBC aggregation to NIR spectroscopic signals.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Minoru; Ohtomo, Manabu; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2006-10-15

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is widely used to record activation-related blood oxygenation changes in human brain tissue. However, the changes in the NIRS signal upon increased flow are influenced not only by the hemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin concentrations but also by changes in light scattering by various brain constituents. This paper points out the large contribution of flow-dependent red blood cell (RBC) aggregation as a cause of this altered light scattering, a phenomenon which has not previously been considered in the theoretical analysis of NIRS signals. Here, we show that RBCs, which constitute a major chromophore in the tissue, not only absorb light at hemoglobin molecules but also scatter it strongly at the cell membranes of aggregated RBCs, and that the blood optical density per se changes greatly with the size of the plasma gap, which varies according to flow. When local blood flow increases by 50%, the amount of the optical attenuation due to RBC dispersion/disaggregation (the flow effect) can reach 90% of the NIRS signal change for venous blood. The reasons why the optical signal due to blood oxygenation alone can be amount to less than 10% of the total are because the near-infrared lies in the most unfavorable range in the hemoglobin absorption spectrum for determining blood oxygenation, while the flow effect in the NIR range is large. We conclude that reported activation-related changes in brain blood oxygenation, at least in the peripheral region around the activation focus, based on NIRS can be mainly ascribed to the flow effect arising from RBC dispersion/disaggregation with increased flow in the venous system.

  1. The Effect of Exercise on Salivary Viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Ligtenberg, Antoon J. M.; Liem, Erwin H. S.; Brand, Henk S.; Veerman, Enno C. I.

    2016-01-01

    A common experience after exercise is the presence of a thick and sticky saliva layer on the oral surfaces, which causes a feeling of a dry mouth. Since the salivary mucin MUC5B is responsible for the visco-elastic behavior of saliva, in the present study we explored the effect of exercise on both the salivary viscosity and the secretion of MUC5B in saliva. Twenty healthy dental students performed an aerobic exercise by cycling for 15 min on cycle-ergometers at a heart rate of 130–140 beats per minute. Saliva was collected at three time points: before exercise, immediately after exercise and after 30 min recovery. Salivary flow rate, viscosity, amylase activity, total protein, carbohydrate and MUC5B concentration were determined. Salivary flow rate, protein and amylase did not change significantly. Immediately after exercise, the salivary viscosity and carbohydrate concentration were significantly higher than at baseline and after 30 min recovery. Immediately after exercise, the MUC5B concentration was significantly higher than after 30 min recovery. It is concluded that the presence of thick saliva after exercise is at least partially due to an increased secretion of MUC5B. PMID:27854320

  2. Entropy production and effective viscosity in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yu. B.; Soldatov, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    The entropy production and an effective viscosity in central Au+Au collisions are estimated in a wide range of incident energies 3.3 GeV ≤ √{s_{NN}}≤ 39 GeV. The simulations are performed within a three-fluid model employing three different equations of state with and without deconfinement transition, which are equally good in the reproduction of the momentum-integrated elliptic flow of charged particles in the considered energy range. It is found that more than 80% entropy is produced during a short early collision stage which lasts ˜ 1 fm/ c at the highest considered energies √{s_{NN}}≳ 20 GeV. The estimated values of the viscosity-to-entropy ratio (η/ s) are approximately the same in all considered scenarios. At the final stages of the system expansion they range from ˜ 0.05 at the highest considered energies to ˜ 0.5 at the lowest ones. It is found that the η/ s ratio decreases with the temperature ( T) rise, approximately as ˜ 1/T4, and exhibits a rather weak dependence on the net-baryon density.

  3. Neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity in the vicinity of the magnetic axis in tokamaks with broken symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaing, K. C.; Lee, H.; Seol, J.; Aydemir, A. Y.

    2015-08-01

    Theory for neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity in the low collisionality regime is extended to the vicinity of the magnetic axis in tokamaks with broken symmetry. The toroidal viscosity is induced by particles drifting off the perturbed magnetic surface under the influence of the symmetry breaking magnetic field. In the region away from the magnetic axis, the drift orbit dynamics is governed by the bounce averaged drift kinetic equation in the low collisionality regimes. In the vicinity of the magnetic axis, it is the drift kinetic equation, averaged over the trapped particle orbits, i.e., potato orbits, that governs the drift dynamics. The orbit averaged drift kinetic equation is derived when collision frequency is low enough for trapped particles to complete their potato trajectories. The resultant equation is solved in the 1 /ν regime to obtain transport fluxes and, thus, toroidal plasma viscosity through flux-force relation. Here, ν is the collision frequency. The viscosity does not vanish on the magnetic axis, and has the same scalings as that in the region away from magnetic axis, except that the fraction of bananas is replaced by the fraction of potatoes. It also has a weak radial dependence. Modeling of plasma flow velocity V for the case where the magnetic surfaces are broken is also discussed.

  4. Quantifying Uncertainty in Inferred Viscosity and Basal Shear Stress Over Ice Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilien, D.; Joughin, I.; Smith, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Basal friction and ice viscosity are both essential controls on glacier motion that cannot be measured by remote sensing. In order to initialize models, it is common practice to use inverse methods to determine the basal shear stress over grounded ice and the viscosity of floating ice. It is difficult to quantify the uncertainty in the inferred parameters due to the computational expense of the procedure, the choice of regularization parameter, and the errors in the various measurements used as input, as well as differences in inversion method. Various methods can be used to perform the inversion, and these differing procedures cause discrepancies in the inferred properties of the ice streams. Additionally, the inferred parameters depend on the sophistication of the approximation for ice flow that is used, e.g. full-Stokes or the shallow-shelf approximation. We analyze the impact the choices of modeling procedure and inversion method have on inferred ice properties. To do this we perform a number of inversions for basal shear stress and for ice shelf viscosity over Smith, Pope, and Kohler Glaciers in West Antarctica and assess the sensitivity to modelers' choices. We use both a three dimensional full-Stokes model and a two dimensional shallow-shelf model, with both Robin and adjoint type inversion procedures, to infer basal shear stress and ice viscosity. We compare the results of these different methods and evaluate their implication on uncertainty in the unknown parameters.

  5. Correlation between the critical viscosity and ash fusion temperatures of coal gasifier ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Peter Y.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Bennett, James

    2015-09-27

    Coal gasification yields synthesis gas, an important intermediate in chemical manufacturing. It is also vital to the production of liquid fuels through the Fischer-Tropsch process and electricity in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle power generation. Minerals naturally present in coal become molten in entrained-flow slagging gasifiers. Molten coal ash slag penetrates and dissolves refractory bricks, leading to costly plant shutdowns. The extent of coal ash slag penetration and refractory brick dissolution depends on the slag viscosity, the gasification temperature, and the composition of slag and bricks. Here, we measured the viscosity of several synthetic coal ash slags with a high-temperature rotary viscometer and their ash fusion temperatures through optical image analysis. We made all measurements in a carbon monoxide-carbon dioxide reducing atmosphere that approximates coal gasification conditions. Empirical correlation models based on ash fusion temperatures were used to calculate critical viscosity temperatures based on the coal ash compositions. These values were then compared with those obtained from thermodynamic phase-transition models. Finally, an understanding of slag viscosity as a function of ash composition is important to reducing refractory wear in slagging coal gasifiers, which would help to reduce the cost and environmental impact of coal for chemical and electricity production.

  6. Constraints on Crustal Viscosity from Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houseman, Gregory

    2015-04-01

    Laboratory measurements of the ductile deformation of crustal rocks demonstrate a range of crystal deformation mechanisms that may be represented by a viscous deformation law, albeit one in which the effective viscosity may vary by orders of magnitude, depending on temperature, stress, grain size, water content and other factors. In such measurements these factors can be separately controlled and effective viscosities can be estimated more or less accurately, though the measured deformation occurs on much shorter time scales and length scales than are typical of geological deformation. To obtain bulk measures of the in situ crustal viscosity law for actual geological processes, estimated stress differences are balanced against measured surface displacement or strain rates: at the continental scale, surface displacement and strain rates can be effectively measured using GPS, and stress differences can be estimated from the distribution of gravitational potential energy; this method has provided constraints on a depth-averaged effective viscosity for the lithosphere as a whole in regions that are actively deforming. Another technique measures the post-seismic displacements that are interpreted to occur in the aftermath of a large crustal earthquake. Stress-differences here are basically constrained by the co-seismic deformation and the elastic rigidity (obtained from seismic velocity) and the strain rates are again provided by GPS. In this technique the strain is a strong function of position relative to the fault, so in general the interpretation of this type of data depends on a complex calculation in which various simplifying assumptions must be made. The spatial variation of displacement history on the surface in this case contains information about the spatial variation of viscosity within the crust. Recent post-seismic studies have shown the potential for obtaining measurements of both depth variation and lateral variation of viscosity in the crust beneath

  7. Evaluation of the time dependent surface shear stress in turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandborn, V. A.

    1979-01-01

    The time dependent surface shear stress has been evaluated using surface heat transfer measurements. For fully developed turbulent pipe and open channel water flows, and incompressible and compressible turbulent boundary layer air flows the measurements indicate the absolute magnitude of the surface shear stress fluctuations will be greater than two times the mean values. The root-mean-square shear stress fluctuations were of the order of 0.2 to 0.4 times the mean surface shear values. Due to these large surface shear stress fluctuations and the nonlinear relation between heat transfer and shear stress, a special technique has been developed to evaluate the measurements. It was found that the non-linear averaging errors for a hot film-surface shear stress gauge in a fully developed pipe flow was of the order of 10 percent at low velocities. A hot wire-surface shear stress gauge was employed for measurements of turbulent boundary layers in air.

  8. Butterfly scales and their local surface drag dependence on flow orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Amy; Jones, Robert

    2011-11-01

    An experimental study was carried out to measure surface drag over embedded cavity models based on the geometry of butterfly wing scales. Monarch (Danaus plexippus) scales, each measuring about 0.1 mm in length, were observed using microscopy to evaluate the microgeometry. Two separate, fabricated models scaled up (300:1) the geometry for dynamically similar testing in a Couette flow oil tank facility. The drag induced over the patterned surfaces was measured using a force gauge. Flow transverse to the rows of scales resulted in a significant drag decrease (>30%), with dependence on Re. This drag reduction is attributed to the formation of embedded vortices forming between the rows of scales resulting in a ``roller bearing'' effect. Flow parallel to the rows, as expected, resulted in larger drag increases, especially at lower Re. Both effects may prove beneficial to the butterfly, during flapping and gliding flight, and will be discussed based on the observed orientation of the scales on real specimens.

  9. Time-dependent liquid metal flows with free convection and free surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M.A.

    1990-11-01

    A finite element analysis is given for time-dependent liquid metal flows with free convection and free surfaces. Consideration is given to a two-dimensional shallow trough with vertical walls maintained at different temperatures. The spatial formulation incorporates mixed Lagrangian approximations to the velocity, pressure, temperature, and interface position. The time integration method is performed using the Trapezoid Rule with step-size control. The Galerkin method is employed to reduce the problem to a set of nonlinear algebraic equations which are solved with the Newton-Raphson method. Calculations are performed for conditions relevant to the electron beam vaporization of refractory metals. The Prandtl number is 0.015, and Grashof numbers are in the transition region between laminar and turbulent flow. The results reveal the effects of flow intensity, surface-tension gradients, and mesh and time-step refinement.

  10. Low viscosity oils. [oxidation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.W.; Schaap, L.A.; Udelhofen, J.H.

    1981-08-04

    An improved low viscosity (I.E.) 5 W to 7 1/2 W engine oil resistant to oxidation and consumption comprising a major portion of a lubricating oil stock, a sulfurized oil, a dispersant, an anti-corrosion agent, an anti-rust agent, a detergent, an antioxidant, and a viscosity index improver.

  11. U.S. Geological Survey Combined Well-Bore Flow and Depth-Dependent Water Sampler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, John A.; Christensen, Allen H.; Hanson, Randall T.; Martin, Peter; Crawford, Steven M.; Smith, Gregory A.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a combined well-bore flow and depth-dependent sample collection tool. It is suitable for use in existing production wells having limited access and clearances as small as 1 inch. The combination of well-bore flow and depth-dependent water-quality data is especially effective in assessing changes in aquifer properties and water quality with depth. These are direct measures of changes in well yield and ground-water quality with depth under actual operating conditions. Combinations of other geophysical tools capable of making these measurements, such as vertical-axis current meters used with wire-line samplers, are commercially available but these tools are large and can not easily enter existing production wells.

  12. Time-dependent study of a black-hole laser in a flowing atomic condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nova, J. R. M.; Finazzi, S.; Carusotto, I.

    2016-10-01

    We numerically study the temporal evolution of a black-hole laser configuration displaying a pair of black- and white-hole horizons in a flowing atomic condensate. This configuration is initially prepared starting from a homogeneous flow via a suitable space-dependent change of the interaction constant and the evolution is then followed up to long times. Depending on the values of the system parameters, the system typically either converges to the lowest-energy solution by evaporating away the horizons or displays a continuous and periodic coherent emission of solitons. By making a physical comparison with optical laser devices, we identify the latter regime of continuous emission of solitons as the proper black-hole laser effect.

  13. Estimation of collection efficiency depended on feed particle concentration for axial flow cyclone dust collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Akira

    1999-09-01

    A cyclone dust collector is applied in many industries. Especially the axial flow cyclone is the most simple construction and it keeps high reliability for maintenance. On the other hand, the collection efficiency of the cyclone depends not only on the inlet gas velocity but also on the feed particle concentration. The collection efficiency increases with increasing feed particle concentration. However until now the problem of how to estimate the collection efficiency depended on the feed particle concentration is remained except the investigation by Muschelknautz & Brunner[6]. Therefore in this paper one of the estimate method for the collection efficiency of the axial flow cyclones is proposed. The application to the geometrically similar type of cyclone of the body diameters D 1=30, 50, 69 and 99 mm showed in good agreement with the experimental results of the collection efficiencies which were described in detail in the paper by Ogawa & Sugiyama[8].

  14. A time-dependent approach for calculating steady inverse boundary-layer flows with separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.

    1983-01-01

    An unsteady inverse boundary-layer method is developed which can be used to calculate steady flows with separation. Two versions of Keller's box method with the Mechul function formulation developed by Cebeci (1976) are employed, depending on the complexity of the flow. The regular box is employed in regions of positive streamwise velocity component u, whereas the zigzag box is employed in regions where u becomes negative (t greater than 0). The regular box with the FLARE approximation is employed when t = 0 and u becomes negative in some region across the layer. Results of calculations show that the use of a time-dependent inverse boundary-layer method in which time is used as an iteration parameter provides a good approach in improving the accuracy of the solutions obtained from the FLARE approximation.

  15. Vesicles in Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Danker, Gerrit; Vlahovska, Petia M; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2009-04-10

    Blood microcirculation critically depends on the migration of red cells towards the flow centerline. We identify theoretically the ratio of the inner over the outer fluid viscosities lambda as a key parameter. At low lambda, the vesicle deforms into a tank-treading ellipsoid shape far away from the flow centerline. The migration is always towards the flow centerline, unlike drops. Above a critical lambda, the vesicle tumbles or breaths and migration is suppressed. A surprising coexistence of two types of shapes at the centerline, a bulletlike and a parachutelike shape, is predicted.

  16. Eruptive viscosity and volcano morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posin, Seth B.; Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    Terrestrial central volcanoes formed predominantly from lava flows were classified as shields, stratovolcanoes, and domes. Shield volcanoes tend to be large in areal extent, have convex slopes, and are characterized by their resemblance to inverted hellenic war shields. Stratovolcanoes have concave slopes, whereas domes are smaller and have gentle convex slopes near the vent that increase near the perimeter. In addition to these differences in morphology, several other variations were observed. The most important is composition: shield volcanoes tend to be basaltic, stratovolcanoes tend to be andesitic, and domes tend to be dacitic. However, important exceptions include Fuji, Pico, Mayon, Izalco, and Fuego which have stratovolcano morphologies but are composed of basaltic lavas. Similarly, Ribkwo is a Kenyan shield volcano composed of trachyte and Suswa and Kilombe are shields composed of phonolite. These exceptions indicate that eruptive conditions, rather than composition, may be the primary factors that determine volcano morphology. The objective of this study is to determine the relationships, if any, between eruptive conditions (viscosity, erupted volume, and effusion rate) and effusive volcano morphology. Moreover, it is the goal of this study to incorporate these relationships into a model to predict the eruptive conditions of extraterrestrial (Martian) volcanoes based on their morphology.

  17. The minimum mantle viscosity of an accreting earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooperman, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The minimum mantle viscosity in an earth accreting from planetesimals is estimated. A plausible distribution of planetesimal sizes deposits enough energy to melt the outer nine-tenths of earth's mass; however, vigorous convection keeps temperatures near the solidus. Viscosity is significantly lower than prevails now. The temperature-dependent viscosity provides self-regulation so there is a continuing balance between accretional energy input and heat transfer out. This allows calculation of the minimum viscosity necessary to transfer out heat by a Nu/Ra-number relation. Typical viscosities are 0.1 to a million sq m/sec, lowest at mid-accretion when the mass growth rate is largest. Terrestrial planets are compared, and minimum iron descent times to central lithospheres are calculated.

  18. Quantitative characterization of the viscosity of a microemulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Huang, John S.

    1987-01-01

    The viscosity of the three-component microemulsion water/decane/AOT has been measured as a function of temperature and droplet volume fraction. At temperatures well below the phase-separation temperature the viscosity is described by treating the droplets as hard spheres suspended in decane. Upon approaching the two-phase region from low temperature, there is a large (as much as a factor of four) smooth increase of the viscosity which may be related to the percolation-like transition observed in the electrical conductivity. This increase in viscosity is not completely consistent with either a naive electroviscous model or a simple clustering model. The divergence of the viscosity near the critical point (39 C) is superimposed upon the smooth increase. The magnitude and temperature dependence of the critical divergence are similar to that seen near the critical points of binary liquid mixtures.

  19. Unitarity Bounds and RG Flows in Time Dependent Quantum Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xi; Horn, Bart; Silverstein, Eva; Torroba, Gonzalo; /Stanford U., ITP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2012-04-05

    We generalize unitarity bounds on operator dimensions in conformal field theory to field theories with spacetime dependent couplings. Below the energy scale of spacetime variation of the couplings, their evolution can strongly affect the physics, effectively shifting the infrared operator scaling and unitarity bounds determined from correlation functions in the theory. We analyze this explicitly for large-N double-trace flows, and connect these to UV complete field theories. One motivating class of examples comes from our previous work on FRW holography, where this effect explains the range of flavors allowed in the dual, time dependent, field theory.

  20. Linear analysis of time dependent properties of Child-Langmuir flow

    SciTech Connect

    Rokhlenko, A.

    2013-01-15

    We continue our analysis of the time dependent behavior of the electron flow in the Child-Langmuir system, removing an approximation used earlier. We find a modified set of oscillatory decaying modes with frequencies of the same order as the inverse of the electron transient time. This range (typically MHz) allows simple experimental detection and maybe exploitation. We then study the time evolution of the current in response to a slow change of the anode voltage where the same modes of oscillations appear too. The cathode current in this case is systematically advanced or retarded depending on the direction of the voltage change.

  1. Volatiles Which Increase Magma Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.

    2015-12-01

    The standard model of an erupting volcano is one in which the viscosity of a decompressing magma increases as the volatiles leave the melt structure to form bubbles. It has now been observed that the addition of the "volatiles" P, Cl and F result in an increase in silicate melt viscosity. This observation would mean that the viscosity of selected degassing magmas would decrease rather than increase. Here we look at P, Cl and F as three volatiles which increase viscosity through different structural mechanisms. In all three cases the volatiles increase the viscosity of peralkaline composition melts, but appear to always decrease the viscosity of peraluminous melts. Phosphorus causes the melt to unmix into a Na-P rich phase and a Na-poor silicate phase. Thus as the network modifying Na (or Ca) are removed to the phosphorus-rich melt, the matrix melt viscosity increases. With increasing amounts of added phosphorus (at network modifying Na ~ P) the addition of further phosphorus causes a decrease in viscosity. The addition of chlorine to Fe-free aluminosilicate melts results in an increase in viscosity. NMR data on these glass indicates that the chlorine sits in salt-like structures surrounded by Na and/or Ca. Such structures would remove network-modifying atoms from the melt structure and thus result in an increase in viscosity. The NMR spectra of fluorine-bearing glasses shows that F takes up at least 5 different structural positions in peralkaline composition melts. Three of these positions should result in a decrease in viscosity due to the removal of bridging oxygens. Two of the structural positons of F, however, should result in an increase in viscosity as they require the removal of network-modifying atoms from the melt structure (with one of the structures being that observed for Cl). This would imply that increasing amounts of F might result in an increase in viscosity. This proposed increase in viscosity with increasing F has now been experimentally confirmed.

  2. Flow-dependent myosin recruitment during Drosophila cellularization requires zygotic dunk activity

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Adam; Wieschaus, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Actomyosin contractility underlies force generation in morphogenesis ranging from cytokinesis to epithelial extension or invagination. In Drosophila, the cleavage of the syncytial blastoderm is initiated by an actomyosin network at the base of membrane furrows that invaginate from the surface of the embryo. It remains unclear how this network forms and how it affects tissue mechanics. Here, we show that during Drosophila cleavage, myosin recruitment to the cleavage furrows proceeds in temporally distinct phases of tension-driven cortical flow and direct recruitment, regulated by different zygotic genes. We identify the gene dunk, which we show is transiently transcribed when cellularization starts and functions to maintain cortical myosin during the flow phase. The subsequent direct myosin recruitment, however, is Dunk-independent but requires Slam. The Slam-dependent direct recruitment of myosin is sufficient to drive cleavage in the dunk mutant, and the subsequent development of the mutant is normal. In the dunk mutant, cortical myosin loss triggers misdirected flow and disrupts the hexagonal packing of the ingressing furrows. Computer simulation coupled with laser ablation suggests that Dunk-dependent maintenance of cortical myosin enables mechanical tension build-up, thereby providing a mechanism to guide myosin flow and define the hexagonal symmetry of the furrows. PMID:27226317

  3. Reduced viscosity interpreted for fluid/gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis predicts decrease in fluid viscosity by comparing pressure profile of fluid/gas mixture with that of power-law fluid. Fluid is taken to be viscous, non-Newtonian, and incompressible; the gas to be ideal; the flow to be inertia-free, isothermal, and one dimensional. Analysis assists in design of flow systems for petroleum, coal, polymers, and other materials.

  4. Computer program for calculating laminar, transitional, and turbulent boundary layers for a compressible axisymmetric flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.; Gregg, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Finite-difference computer program calculates viscous compressible boundary layer flow over either planar or axisymmetric surfaces. Flow may be initially laminar and progress through transitional zone to fully turbulent flow, or it may remain laminar, depending on imposed boundary conditions, laws of viscosity, and numerical solution of momentum and energy equations.

  5. On the viscosity stratification in temporal mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danaila, Luminita; Taguelmimt, Noureddine; Hadjadj, Abdellah; Turbulence Team

    2015-11-01

    We assess the effects of viscosity variations in low-speed temporally-evolving turbulent mixing layer. The two streams are density-matched, but the slow fluid is Rv times more viscous than the rapid stream. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are performed for several viscosity ratios, Rv varying between 1 and 9. The space-time evolution of Variable-Viscosity Flow (VVF) is compared with that of the Constant-Viscosity Flow (CVF). The velocity fluctuations occur earlier and are more enhanced for VVF. In particular, the kinetic energy peaks earlier and is up to three times larger for VVF than for CVF at the earliest stages of the flow. Over the first stages of the flow, the temporal growth rate of the fluctuations kinetic energy is exponential, in full agreement with linear stability theory. The transport equation for the fluctuations kinetic energy is favourably compared with simulations data. The enhanced kinetic energy for VVF is mainly due to an increased production at the interface between the two fluids, in tight correlation with enlarged values of mean velocity gradient at the inflection point of the mean velocity profile. The transport equations of the one-and two-point kinetic energy show that self-preservation cannot be complete in variable-viscosity flows. ANR is acknowledged for financial support.

  6. A simulation of gas flow: The dependence of the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient on molecular mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, William W.; Suaning, Gregg J.; McKenzie, David R.

    2016-09-01

    The tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC) influences the rate of pressure driven flow of a gas in a channel. The manner in which TMAC depends on the molecular mass is of importance as it influences the extent to which gas flow rates are affected by their mass, but there are conflicting opinions in the literature concerning the extent and even the sign of this dependence. We simulate the flow of the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe using molecular dynamics with Lennard-Jones potentials. The interaction with the wall is made realistic by simulating five layers of mobile atoms and allowing for adsorbed gas on the wall. With increasing mass of the gas, the TMAC exhibits asymptotic behaviour in approaching the value assumed to apply for an entrapped atom. Either increasing or decreasing TMAC with respect to an increasing molecular mass is produced, depending on the assumed TMAC of an entrapped atom. This resolves a conflict in the literature, where both increasing and decreasing trends are observed with mass.

  7. Beam-Energy and Centrality Dependence of Directed Flow of Identified Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmuganathan, Prashanth

    2016-12-01

    These proceedings present directed flow (v1) measurements in Au+Au collisions from STAR's Beam Energy Scan (BES) program at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, for p, p ‾, Λ, Λ ‾, K±, KS0 and π±. At intermediate centrality, protons show a minimum in directed flow slope, dv1 / dy|y≤0.8, as a function of beam energy. Proton dv1 / dy changes sign near 10 GeV, and the directed flow for Λ is consistent with the proton result. The directed flow slope for net protons shows a clear minimum at 14.5 GeV and becomes positive at beam energies below 10 GeV and above 30 GeV. New results for net-kaon directed flow slope resemble net protons from high energy down to 14.5 GeV, but remain negative at lower energies. The slope dv1 / dy shows a strong centrality dependence, especially for p and Λ at the lower beam energies. Available model calculations are in poor agreement.

  8. Direction of information flow in large-scale resting-state networks is frequency-dependent.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Arjan; Tewarie, Prejaas; van Dellen, Edwin; Yu, Meichen; Carbo, Ellen W S; Douw, Linda; Gouw, Alida A; van Straaten, Elisabeth C W; Stam, Cornelis J

    2016-04-05

    Normal brain function requires interactions between spatially separated, and functionally specialized, macroscopic regions, yet the directionality of these interactions in large-scale functional networks is unknown. Magnetoencephalography was used to determine the directionality of these interactions, where directionality was inferred from time series of beamformer-reconstructed estimates of neuronal activation, using a recently proposed measure of phase transfer entropy. We observed well-organized posterior-to-anterior patterns of information flow in the higher-frequency bands (alpha1, alpha2, and beta band), dominated by regions in the visual cortex and posterior default mode network. Opposite patterns of anterior-to-posterior flow were found in the theta band, involving mainly regions in the frontal lobe that were sending information to a more distributed network. Many strong information senders in the theta band were also frequent receivers in the alpha2 band, and vice versa. Our results provide evidence that large-scale resting-state patterns of information flow in the human brain form frequency-dependent reentry loops that are dominated by flow from parieto-occipital cortex to integrative frontal areas in the higher-frequency bands, which is mirrored by a theta band anterior-to-posterior flow.

  9. Direction of information flow in large-scale resting-state networks is frequency-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Hillebrand, Arjan; Tewarie, Prejaas; van Dellen, Edwin; Yu, Meichen; Carbo, Ellen W. S.; Douw, Linda; Gouw, Alida A.; van Straaten, Elisabeth C. W.; Stam, Cornelis J.

    2016-01-01

    Normal brain function requires interactions between spatially separated, and functionally specialized, macroscopic regions, yet the directionality of these interactions in large-scale functional networks is unknown. Magnetoencephalography was used to determine the directionality of these interactions, where directionality was inferred from time series of beamformer-reconstructed estimates of neuronal activation, using a recently proposed measure of phase transfer entropy. We observed well-organized posterior-to-anterior patterns of information flow in the higher-frequency bands (alpha1, alpha2, and beta band), dominated by regions in the visual cortex and posterior default mode network. Opposite patterns of anterior-to-posterior flow were found in the theta band, involving mainly regions in the frontal lobe that were sending information to a more distributed network. Many strong information senders in the theta band were also frequent receivers in the alpha2 band, and vice versa. Our results provide evidence that large-scale resting-state patterns of information flow in the human brain form frequency-dependent reentry loops that are dominated by flow from parieto-occipital cortex to integrative frontal areas in the higher-frequency bands, which is mirrored by a theta band anterior-to-posterior flow. PMID:27001844

  10. Rheology and tribology of lubricants with polymeric viscosity modifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babak, LotfizadehDehkordi

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) theory has been used to model the lubrication state of antifriction machine elements, where initial viscosity and pressure viscosity coefficients are essential parameters in film thickness modeling. Since the pressures of lubricants in the contact zone can be very high, it is important to know the rheological properties of lubricants in these pressure and temperature regimes. The characteristics of viscosity behavior as a function of pressure are also essential for a universal definition of the pressure viscosity coefficient in order to estimate film thickness in an EHL regime. In this study, viscosities and pressure-viscosity coefficients of ten commercial engine and gear oils and seventeen laboratory-produced oil/polymer viscosity modifiers (VM) additives are measured up to 1.3 GPa at 40, 75 and 100 °C. For the first time, a sharp increase in the viscosity and piezoviscous factor is observed in both mineral-based and synthetic-based oils with different VMs. Analysis of the experimental results indicates that sharp increase in viscosity observed in these experiments are believed to arise from physical changes in the VMs, that is liquid-solid phase transition. Evidence is offered that polymer properties such as molecular weight, concentration and structure influence the onset of the phase transitions. A modified Yasutomi model, which normally describes the pressure dependence of the viscosity of lubricants very well, fails to predict the viscosity of the specimens above the onset of sharp increase in viscosity. A design of experiment (DOE) analysis using Design-Expert software indicates that pressure and temperature are the most critical parameters in the viscosity variation. Tribological tests demonstrate that wear in the contact, zone occurs at temperatures and stresses that coincides with the VM phase transitions in both commercial and laboratory synthesized oil/VMs. Tribological results also indicate that the onset of the

  11. Afterload-dependent flow fluctuation of centrifugal pump: should it be actively fixed?

    PubMed

    Nishida, H; Akazawa, T; Nishinaka, T; Aomi, S; Endo, M; Koyanagi, H

    1998-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical meaning and effects of afterload-dependent flow fluctuation in a centrifugal pump, concomitant measurement of flow rate and mixed venous oxygen saturation (SVO2) was performed in 5 cases of open heart surgery in which the patients underwent cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) with the Terumo Capiox centrifugal pump. Continuous measurement of SVO2 using the 3M CDI System 100 was performed with a disposable cuvette incorporated into the drainage circuit. After the target flow rate of 2.4 L/min/m2 was obtained under a nonbeating condition, the pump rotational speed was fixed. During the cooling and low temperature period, SVO2 decreased as the flow rate spontaneously decreased but still stayed around 80% even with a 15-20% decrease in blood flow rate. This indicates that a luxury perfusion condition is ensured as long as the body temperature is kept low. In contrast, during the rewarming period, SVO2 decreased to around 70-75% despite a 15-25% spontaneous increase in flow rate. Although this level of SVO2 still indicates adequate systemic perfusion, there is a possibility of regional hypoperfusion in patients with such conditions as cerebrovascular disease. In conclusion, although diligent adjustment of the physiological fluctuating flow rate in the centrifugal pump seems unnecessary during conventional open heart surgery, manual control may be necessary especially during the rewarming period, normothermic surgery, or circulatory assist for shocked patients. From this study, we also conclude that the major benefit of the afterload-independent autoflow control system of the centrifugal pump is the improvement of safety in terms of the fixed reservoir level and the handling of cardiopulmonary bypass.

  12. Effect of varying experimental conditions on the viscosity of α-pinene derived secondary organic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, J. W.; Zhang, Y.; Mutzel, A.; Renbaum-Wolff, L.; Böge, O.; Kamal, S.; Herrmann, H.; Martin, S. T.; Bertram, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    To predict the role of secondary organic material (SOM) particles in climate, visibility, and health, information on the viscosity of particles containing SOM is required. In this study we investigate the viscosity of SOM particles as a function of relative humidity and SOM particle mass concentration during SOM synthesis. The SOM was generated via the ozonolysis of α-pinene at < 5 % relative humidity (RH). Experiments were carried out using the poke-and-flow technique, which measures the experimental flow time (τexp, flow) of SOM after poking the material with a needle. In the first set of experiments, we show that τexp, flow increased by a factor of 3600 as the RH increased from < 0.5 to 50 % RH, for SOM with a production mass concentration of 121 μg m-3. Based on simulations, the viscosities of the particles were between 6 × 105 and 5 × 107 Pa s at < 0.5 % RH and between 3 × 102 and 9 × 103 Pa s at 50 % RH. In the second set of experiments we show that under dry conditions τexp, flow decreased by a factor of 45 as the production mass concentration increased from 121 to 14 000 μg m-3. From simulations of the poke-and-flow experiments, the viscosity of SOM with a production mass concentration of 14 000 μg m-3 was determined to be between 4 × 104 and 1.5 × 106 Pa s compared to between 6 × 105 and 5 × 107 Pa s for SOM with a production mass concentration of 121 μg m-3. The results can be rationalised by a dependence of the chemical composition of SOM on production conditions. These results emphasise the shifting characteristics of SOM, not just with RH and precursor type, but also with the production conditions, and suggest that production mass concentration and the RH at which the viscosity was determined should be considered both when comparing laboratory results and when extrapolating these results to the atmosphere.

  13. Effect of varying experimental conditions on the viscosity of α-pinene derived secondary organic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, James W.; Zhang, Yue; Mutzel, Anke; Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Boge, Olaf; Kamal, Saeid; Herrmann, Hartmut; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the viscosity of particles containing secondary organic material (SOM) is useful for predicting reaction rates and diffusion in SOM particles. In this study we investigate the viscosity of SOM particles as a function of relative humidity and SOM particle mass concentration, during SOM synthesis. The SOM was generated via the ozonolysis of α-pinene at < 5 % relative humidity (RH). Experiments were carried out using the poke-and-flow technique, which measures the experimental flow time (τexp, flow) of SOM after poking the material with a needle. In the first set of experiments, we show that τexp, flow increased by a factor of 3600 as the RH increased from < 0.5 RH to 50 % RH, for SOM with a production mass concentration of 121 μg m-3. Based on simulations, the viscosities of the particles were between 6 x 105 and 5 x 107 Pa s at < 0.5 % RH and between 3 x 102 and 9 x 103 Pa s at 50 % RH. In the second set of experiments we show that under dry conditions τexp, flow decreased by a factor of 45 as the production mass concentration increased from 121 to 14 000 μg m-3. From simulations of the poke-and-flow experiments, the viscosity of SOM with a production mass concentration of 14 000 μg m-3 was determined to be between 4 x 104 and 1.5 x 106 Pa s compared to between 6 x 105 and 5 x 107 Pa s for SOM with a production mass concentration of 121 μg m-3. The results can be rationalized by a dependence of the chemical composition of SOM on production conditions. These results emphasize the shifting characteristics of SOM, not just with RH and precursor type, but also with the production conditions, and suggest that production mass concentration and the RH at which the viscosity was determined should be considered both when comparing laboratory results and when extrapolating these results to the atmosphere.

  14. ZBLAN Viscosity Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William

    2001-01-01

    The past year's contribution from Dr. Kaukler's experimental effort consists of these 5 parts: a) Construction and proof-of-concept testing of a novel shearing plate viscometer designed to produce small shear rates and operate at elevated temperatures; b) Preparing nonlinear polymeric materials to serve as standards of nonlinear Theological behavior; c) Measurements and evaluation of above materials for nonlinear rheometric behavior at room temperature using commercial spinning cone and plate viscometers available in the lab; d) Preparing specimens from various forms of pitch for quantitative comparative testing in a Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer, Thermal Mechanical Analyzer; and Archeological Analyzer; e) Arranging to have sets of pitch specimens tested using the various instruments listed above, from different manufacturers, to form a baseline of the viscosity variation with temperature using the different test modes offered by these instruments by compiling the data collected from the various test results. Our focus in this project is the shear thinning behavior of ZBLAN glass over a wide range of temperature. Experimentally, there are no standard techniques to perform such measurements on glasses, particularly at elevated temperatures. Literature reviews to date have shown that shear thinning in certain glasses appears to occur, but no data is available for ZBLAN glass. The best techniques to find shear thinning behavior require the application of very low rates of shear. In addition, because the onset of the thinning behavior occurs at an unknown elevated temperature, the instruments used in this study must provide controlled low rates of shear and do so for temperatures approaching 600 C. In this regard, a novel shearing parallel plate viscometer was designed and a prototype built and tested.

  15. Viscosity of liquid ferric sulfate solutions and application to the formation of gullies on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrier, Vincent F.; Ulrich, Richard; Altheide, Travis S.

    2009-06-01

    We studied the viscosity of ferric sulfate Fe2(SO4)3 solutions as a model for low-temperature liquids on the surface of Mars and their implication in the formation of gullies. Viscosity varies with temperature and concentration, ranging from 7.0 × 10-3 Pa s for 38.8 wt % at 285.15 K to 4.6 Pa s for 58.2 wt % at 260.15 K. Using the experimental results, we built a semiempirical equation of viscosity as a function of temperature and salt concentration, which was combined with a numerical model to estimate the effect of these solutions on the formation of gullies. Calculated fluid velocities ranged from 0.5 to 14 m s-1, in accordance with estimates from image analyses. Turbulent flow occurs in the majority of the conditions and is characterized by a constant velocity (˜8.5 m s-1). At very low temperature and high concentration, the laminar regime shows reduced velocities (down to ˜0.5 m s-1). In between, a transitional regime presents high velocities, up to 14 m s-1. Using the velocities, we determined the size threshold for boulders to be moved by the liquid flow. Depending on the regime, boulders of diameter inferior to 3 m (turbulent), 4 m (transition), and down to 0.5 m (laminar) are displaced. Since laminar flow occurs only in an extremely limited range of conditions, for low temperatures (<240 K) and supersaturated solutions, the abundance of small boulders (˜0.5 m) in gully channels requires lower velocities and higher viscosities than ferric sulfate solution or any other water-based liquid can reach. This suggests an important participation of debris mixed with the liquid phase.

  16. Amplified temperature dependence in ecosystems developing on the lava flows of Mauna Loa, Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J; Vitousek, Peter M; Brown, James H

    2008-01-08

    Through its effect on individual metabolism, temperature drives biologically controlled fluxes and transformations of energy and materials in ecological systems. Because primary succession involves feedbacks among multiple biological and abiotic processes, we expected it to exhibit complex dynamics and unusual temperature dependence. We present a model based on first principles of chemical kinetics to explain how biologically mediated temperature dependence of "reactant" concentrations can inflate the effective temperature dependence of such processes. We then apply this model to test the hypothesis that the temperature dependence of early primary succession is amplified due to more rapid accumulation of reactants at higher temperatures. Using previously published data from the lava flows of Mauna Loa, HI, we show that rates of vegetation and soil accumulation as well as rates of community compositional change all display amplified temperature dependence (Q(10) values of approximately 7-50, compared with typical Q(10) values of 1.5-3 for the constituent biological processes). Additionally, in young ecosystems, resource concentrations increase with temperature, resulting in inflated temperature responses of biogeochemical fluxes. Mauna Loa's developing ecosystems exemplify how temperature-driven, biologically mediated gradients in resource availability can alter the effective temperature dependence of ecological processes. This mechanistic theory should contribute to understanding the complex effects of temperature on the structure and dynamics of ecological systems in a world where regional and global temperatures are changing rapidly.

  17. Amplified temperature dependence in ecosystems developing on the lava flows of Mauna Loa, Hawai'i

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Vitousek, Peter M.; Brown, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Through its effect on individual metabolism, temperature drives biologically controlled fluxes and transformations of energy and materials in ecological systems. Because primary succession involves feedbacks among multiple biological and abiotic processes, we expected it to exhibit complex dynamics and unusual temperature dependence. We present a model based on first principles of chemical kinetics to explain how biologically mediated temperature dependence of “reactant” concentrations can inflate the effective temperature dependence of such processes. We then apply this model to test the hypothesis that the temperature dependence of early primary succession is amplified due to more rapid accumulation of reactants at higher temperatures. Using previously published data from the lava flows of Mauna Loa, HI, we show that rates of vegetation and soil accumulation as well as rates of community compositional change all display amplified temperature dependence (Q10 values of ≈7–50, compared with typical Q10 values of 1.5–3 for the constituent biological processes). Additionally, in young ecosystems, resource concentrations increase with temperature, resulting in inflated temperature responses of biogeochemical fluxes. Mauna Loa's developing ecosystems exemplify how temperature-driven, biologically mediated gradients in resource availability can alter the effective temperature dependence of ecological processes. This mechanistic theory should contribute to understanding the complex effects of temperature on the structure and dynamics of ecological systems in a world where regional and global temperatures are changing rapidly. PMID:18156366

  18. Critical Viscosity of Xenon investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Dr. Robert F. Berg (right), principal investigator and Dr. Micheal R. Moldover (left), co-investigator, for the Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX/CVX-2) experiment. They are with the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Although it does not easily combine with other chemicals, its viscosity at the critical point can be used as a model for a range of chemicals.

  19. Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronaut Mike Fincke places droplets of honey onto the strings for the Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) investigation onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The FMVM experiment measures the time it takes for two individual highly viscous fluid droplets to coalesce or merge into one droplet. Different fluids and droplet size combinations were tested in the series of experiments. By using the microgravity environment, researchers can measure the viscosity or 'thickness' of fluids without the influence of containers and gravity using this new technique. Understanding viscosity could help scientists understand industrially important materials such as paints, emulsions, polymer melts and even foams used to produce pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic products.

  20. A new numerical method to calculate inhomogeneous and time-dependent large deformation of two-dimensional geodynamic flows with application to diapirism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, L.; Schmeling, H.

    2013-08-01

    A key to understand many geodynamic processes is studying the associated large deformation fields. Finite deformation can be measured in the field by using geological strain markers giving the logarithmic strain f = log 10(R), where R is the ellipticity of the strain ellipse. It has been challenging to accurately quantify finite deformation of geodynamic models for inhomogeneous and time-dependent large deformation cases. We present a new formulation invoking a 2-D marker-in-cell approach. Mathematically, one can describe finite deformation by a coordinate transformation to a Lagrangian reference frame. For a known velocity field the deformation gradient tensor, F, can be calculated by integrating the differential equation DtFij = LikFkj, where L is the velocity gradient tensor and Dt the Lagrangian derivative. The tensor F contains all information about the minor and major semi-half axes and orientation of the strain ellipse and the rotation. To integrate the equation centrally in time and space along a particle's path, we use the numerical 2-D finite difference code FDCON in combination with a marker-in-cell approach. For a sufficiently high marker density we can accurately calculate F for any 2-D inhomogeneous and time-dependent creeping flow at any point for a deformation f up to 4. Comparison between the analytical and numerical solution for the finite deformation within a Poiseuille-Couette flow shows an error of less than 2 per cent for a deformation up to f = 1.7. Moreover, we determine the finite deformation and strain partitioning within Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTIs) of different viscosity and layer thickness ratios. These models provide a finite strain complement to the RTI benchmark of van Keken et al. Large finite deformation of up to f = 4 accumulates in RTIs within the stem and near the compositional boundaries. Distinction between different stages of diapirism shows a strong correlation between a maximum occurring deformation of f = 1, 3 and

  1. A measure of scale-dependent asymmetry in turbulent boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guala, Michele; Singh, Arvind

    2015-11-01

    The distribution of scale-dependent, streamwise velocity increments is investigated in turbulent boundary layer flows at laboratory and atmospheric Reynolds number, using the SAFL wind tunnel (Singh et al. Phys. of Fluids 2014) and the SLTEST data (Metzger et al. Phil. Trans Royal Soc. A 2007). The third order moments of velocity increments, or asymmetry index As(a,z), is computed for varying wall distance z and scale separation a, where it was observed to leave a robust, distinct signature in the form of a hump, independent of Reynolds number and located across the inertial subrange. The hump is observed for z + <5000, with a tendency to increase in amplitude, and shift towards smaller timescales, as the wall is approached. Comparing the two datasets, the hump vertical location, obeying to inner wall scaling, is regarded to as a genuine feature of the canonical turbulent boundary layer. The magnitude cumulant analysis of the scale-dependent velocity increments indicates that intermittency is also enhanced in the same flow region. The combination of asymmetry and intermittency is inferred to point at non-local energy transfer across a range of scales and may thus be used to quantify interactions between structural types in boundary layer flows.

  2. Modeling of stochastic dynamics of time-dependent flows under high-dimensional random forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaee, Hessam; Karniadakis, George

    2016-11-01

    In this numerical study the effect of high-dimensional stochastic forcing in time-dependent flows is investigated. To efficiently quantify the evolution of stochasticity in such a system, the dynamically orthogonal method is used. In this methodology, the solution is approximated by a generalized Karhunen-Loeve (KL) expansion in the form of u (x , t ω) = u ̲ (x , t) + ∑ i = 1 N yi (t ω)ui (x , t) , in which u ̲ (x , t) is the stochastic mean, the set of ui (x , t) 's is a deterministic orthogonal basis and yi (t ω) 's are the stochastic coefficients. Explicit evolution equations for u ̲ , ui and yi are formulated. The elements of the basis ui (x , t) 's remain orthogonal for all times and they evolve according to the system dynamics to capture the energetically dominant stochastic subspace. We consider two classical fluid dynamics problems: (1) flow over a cylinder, and (2) flow over an airfoil under up to one-hundred dimensional random forcing. We explore the interaction of intrinsic with extrinsic stochasticity in these flows. DARPA N66001-15-2-4055, Office of Naval Research N00014-14-1-0166.

  3. Gas flow dependence for plasma-needle disinfection of S. mutans bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goree, J.; Liu, Bin; Drake, David

    2006-08-01

    The role of gas flow and transport mechanisms are studied for a small low-power impinging jet of weakly-ionized helium at atmospheric pressure. This plasma needle produces a non-thermal glow discharge plasma that kills bacteria. A culture of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) was plated onto the surface of agar, and spots on this surface were then treated with plasma. Afterwards, the sample was incubated and then imaged. These images, which serve as a biological diagnostic for characterizing the plasma, show a distinctive spatial pattern for killing that depends on the gas flow rate. As the flow is increased, the killing pattern varies from a solid circle to a ring. Images of the glow reveal that the spatial distribution of energetic electrons corresponds to the observed killing pattern. This suggests that a bactericidal species is generated in the gas phase by energetic electrons less than a millimetre from the sample surface. Mixing of air into the helium plasma is required to generate the observed O and OH radicals in the flowing plasma. Hydrodynamic processes involved in this mixing are buoyancy, diffusion and turbulence.

  4. Peristalsis of nonconstant viscosity Jeffrey fluid with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvi, N.; Latif, T.; Hussain, Q.; Asghar, S.

    Mixed convective peristaltic activity of variable viscosity nanofluids is addressed. Unlike the conventional consideration of constant viscosity; the viscosity is taken as temperature dependent. Constitutive relations for linear viscoelastic Jeffrey fluid are employed and uniform magnetic field is applied in the transverse direction. For nanofluids, the formulation is completed in presence of Brownian motion, thermophoresis, viscous dissipation and Joule heating. Consideration of temperature dependence of viscosity is not a choice but the realistic requirement of the wall temperature and the heat generated due to the viscous dissipation. Well established large wavelength and small Reynolds number approximations are invoked. Non-linear coupled system is analytically solved for the convergent series solutions identifying the interval of convergence explicitly. A comparative study between analytical and numerical solution is made for certainty. Influence of the parameters undertaken for the description of the problem is pointed out and its physics explained.

  5. Molten Composition B Viscosity at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, David K.; Núñez, Marcel P.; Zucker, Jonathan M.

    2016-10-01

    A shear-thinning viscosity model is developed for molten Composition B at elevated temperature from analysis of falling ball viscometer data. Results are reported with the system held at 85, 110, and 135°C. Balls of densities of 2.7, 8.0, and 15.6 g/cm3 are dropped to generate a range of strain rates in the material. Analysis of video recordings gives the speed at which the balls fall. Computer simulation of the viscometer is used to determine parameters for a non-Newtonian model calibrated to measured speeds. For the first time, viscosity is shown to be a function of temperature and strain rate-dependent maximum RDX (cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine) particle volume fraction.

  6. RELAP-7 Numerical Stabilization: Entropy Viscosity Method

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Berry; M. O. Delchini; J. Ragusa

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL's modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5's capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios. RELAP-7 utilizes a single phase and a novel seven-equation two-phase flow models as described in the RELAP-7 Theory Manual (INL/EXT-14-31366). The basic equation systems are hyperbolic, which generally require some type of stabilization (or artificial viscosity) to capture nonlinear discontinuities and to suppress advection-caused oscillations. This report documents one of the available options for this stabilization in RELAP-7 -- a new and novel approach known as the entropy viscosity method. Because the code is an ongoing development effort in which the physical sub models, numerics, and coding are evolving, so too must the specific details of the entropy viscosity stabilization method. Here the fundamentals of the method in their current state are presented.

  7. Pollen-mediated gene flow from transgenic cotton under greenhouse conditions is dependent on different pollinators

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shuo; Zhu, Jialin; Zhu, Weilong; Li, Zhen; Shelton, Anthony M.; Luo, Junyu; Cui, Jinjie; Zhang, Qingwen; Liu, Xiaoxia

    2015-01-01

    With the large-scale release of genetically modified (GM) crops, there are ecological concerns on transgene movement from GM crops to non-GM counterparts and wild relatives. In this research, we conducted greenhouse experiments to measure pollen-mediated gene flow (PGF) in the absence and presence of pollinators (Bombus ignitus, Apis mellifera and Pieris rapae) in one GM cotton (resistant to the insect Helicoverpa armigera and the herbicide glyphosate) and two non-GM lines (Shiyuan321 and Hai7124) during 2012 and 2013. Our results revealed that: (1) PGF varied depending on the pollinator species, and was highest with B. ignitus (10.83%) and lowest with P. rapae (2.71%); (2) PGF with B. ignitus depended on the distance between GM and non-GM cottons; (3) total PGF to Shiyuan321 (8.61%) was higher than to Hai7124 (4.10%). To confirm gene flow, we tested hybrids carrying transgenes for their resistance to glyphosate and H. armigera, and most hybrids showed strong resistance to the herbicide and insect. Our research confirmed that PGF depended on pollinator species, distance between plants and the receptor plant. PMID:26525573

  8. Dependence of fluid flows in an evaporating sessile droplet on the characteristics of the substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barash, Lev

    2015-11-01

    Temperature distributions and the corresponding vortex structures in an evaporating sessile droplet are obtained by performing detailed numerical calculations. A Marangoni convection induced by thermal conduction in the drop and the substrate is demonstrated to be able to result not only in a single vortex, but also in two or three vortices, depending on the ratio of substrate to fluid thermal conductivities, on the substrate thickness and the contact angle. The ``phase diagrams'' containing information on the number, orientation and spatial location of the vortices for quasistationary fluid flows are presented and analysed. The results obtained demonstrate that the fluid flow structure in evaporating droplets can be influenced in a controlled manner by selecting substrates with appropriate properties.

  9. Neoclassical toroidal viscosity and error-field penetration in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Andrew

    2007-11-01

    A model for field error penetration is developed that includes both resonant and non-resonant perturbed 3-D magnetic fields [1]. The non-resonant components give rise to a global neoclassical toroidal viscous [NTV] torque while a single resonant component produces a localized electromagnetic braking torque on its respective resonant surface. The NTV torque tries to keep the plasma flowing at a rate comparable to the ion diamagnetic flow. A phenomenological cross-field viscosity is included which resists the resonant electromagnetic torque in the vicinity of the resonant surface. Steady-state toroidal momentum balance across the resonant layer gives a solubility condition determining the ``critical'' resonant error-field strength---termed the penetration threshold---above which rotational shielding is lost and the resonant surface locks to the lab frame. Such locking occurs in low-density start-up tokamak plasmas [2], leading to plasma disruptions or confinement degradation and is a key issue for ITER. The toroidal momentum balance equation admits a WKB-type solution which implies that NTV acts to enhance cross-field viscosity in the vicinity of the resonant surface. This enhancement makes the plasma less sensitive to error-field penetration than previously predicted [3]. In particular, if τEne (neo-Alcator-like) and the perpendicular momentum confinement time has no density dependence, we find the penetration threshold scales linearly with electron density---a result giving quantitative agreement for the first time between theory and experiment [2]. [1] A.J. Cole, C.C. Hegna, and J.D. Callen, to be published in PRL (2007). [2] S.M. Wolfe, I.R. Hutchinson, et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056110 (2005) and refs. cited therein. [3] A.J. Cole and R. Fitzpatrick, Phys. Plasmas 13, 032503 (2006) and refs. cited therein.

  10. Viscosity Depressants for Coal Liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalfayan, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed process modification incorporates viscosity depressants to prevent coal from solidifying during liquefaction. Depressants reduce amount of heat needed to liquefy coal. Possible depressants are metallic soaps, such as stearate, and amides, such as stearamide and dimer acid amides.

  11. Understanding pseudorapidity dependence of elliptic flow in heavy-ion collisions using a transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasim, Md.; Esha, Roli; Huang, Huan Zhong

    2016-04-01

    A systematic study of the pseudorapidity dependence of elliptic flow parameter using transport models (e.g., a multiphase transport model, AMPT, and ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics, UrQMD) has been presented. We have observed that while at mid-pseudorapidity the elliptic flow measured using the event-plane method differs significantly from that measured by actual reaction plane method, both the event-plane and reaction-plane methods give the same elliptic flow for far forward and backward pseudorapidity. This indicates that the magnitude of measured v2 around midrapidity strongly depends on the analysis method. Therefore, one should use the same procedure (as used in data analysis) in model calculations while comparing model results and experimental data. We find the shape of v2(η ) measured by the PHOBOS experiment is not reproduced by using actual v2 (i.e., measured with respect to the reaction plane) from AMPT and UrQMD models. The shape and magnitude of measured v2(η ) can be explained by the AMPT model with string-melting mode only if one uses the same procedure as used in data analysis. Magnitude of elliptic flow can be reproduced for all pseudorapidity range by taking the parton-parton interaction cross section to be 3 mb at √{sN N}=62.4 and 200 GeV. This implies that the partonic interactions are necessary to reproduce data at √{sN N}=62.4 and 200 GeV and the strength of partonic interactions at far forward and backward rapidity is as strong as at midrapidity. Both UrQMD and AMPT with default mode fail to explain the data.

  12. A simple model for the viscosity of rhyolites as a function of temperature, pressure and water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romine, William L.; Whittington, Alan G.

    2015-12-01

    In order to better constrain the viscosity (η) of high-silica rhyolite at low to moderate water contents (X), which represent water saturation at near-surface pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions, we made 211 viscosity measurements on Mono Craters rhyolites containing between 0.01 and 1.2 wt.% H2O, at temperatures between 796 and 1774 K using parallel plate and concentric cylinder methods at atmospheric pressure. We then developed and calibrated a new empirical model for the rhyolitic melt viscosity, where non-linear variations due to temperature (T), and water content (X) are nested within linear and exponential dependencies of log η on pressure (P). The model was fitted to a total of 691 data points including published data on rhyolites, granites and haplogranites. The significance of model parameters was evaluated at the 95% confidence level. The model is simple enough for use in numerical models of conduit or lava flow dynamics: where η is viscosity in Pa s, w is water content in wt.%, P is pressure in MPa and T is temperature in K. The root mean square error (RMSE) between the model and the 691 data points used in calibration is 0.43 log units, and analysis of the residuals shows that the model fits all modeled regions of P-T-X (H2O) space to a similar degree of quality. In both regards, the new model outperforms previous models for rhyolite viscosity. Multi-level modeling enabled us to show that higher temperatures and higher water contents both independently favor a more negative pressure-dependence of viscosity. The model suggests that the effect of pressure on viscosity undergoes a transition from a positive to a negative effect as temperatures rise above ∼1175 K for anhydrous rhyolites, and above ∼865 K for melts containing 5 wt.% H2O. We validated the model by examination of the few published viscosity data where P is varied but T and X(H2O) remain approximately constant. Experimental constraints have led to spurious correlations between P, T, X

  13. Understanding the Rapidity Dependence of the Elliptic Flow and the HBT Radii at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Csanad, M.; Loerstad, B.

    2006-04-11

    The pseudo-rapidity dependence of the elliptic flow at various excitation energies measured by the PHOBOS Collaboration in Au+Au collisions at RHIC is one of the surprising results that has not been explained before in terms of hydrodynamical models. Here we show that these data are in agreement with theoretical predictions and satisfy the universal scaling relation predicted by the Buda-Lund hydrodynamical model, based on exact solutions of perfect fluid hydrodynamics. We also show a theoretical prediction on the rapidity and transverse momentum scaling of the HBT radii measured in heavy ion collisions, based on the Buda-Lund model.

  14. Time-Dependent Thermally-Driven Interfacial Flows in Multilayered Fluid Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Borhan, A.

    1996-01-01

    A computational study of thermally-driven convection in multilayered fluid structures will be performed to examine the effect of interactions among deformable fluid-fluid interfaces on the structure of time-dependent flow in these systems. Multilayered fluid structures in two models configurations will be considered: the differentially heated rectangular cavity with a free surface, and the encapsulated cylindrical liquid bridge. An extension of a numerical method developed as part of our recent NASA Fluid Physics grant will be used to account for finite deformations of fluid-fluid interfaces.

  15. Computational modelling on 2D magnetohydrodynamic flow of Sisko fluid over a time dependent stretching surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, T.; Shahzad, A.; Iqbal, Z.; Ahmed, J.; Khan, M.

    A study is presented for the flow and heat transfer of Sisko fluid model over an unsteady stretching sheet in the presence of uniform magnetic field. While taking newly developed similarity transformations, the governing time dependent partial differential equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Numerical solutions of the reduced nonlinear differential equations are found by employing Shooting method. The influence of physical parameters of interest on the velocity and temperature profiles are highlighted graphically and examined in detail. Moreover, the skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are tabulated against influential parameters. Skin friction coefficient increases with unsteadiness parameter, magnetic field and suction parameter.

  16. Solution of 3-dimensional time-dependent viscous flows. Part 1: Investigation of candidate algoriths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, B. C.; Mcdonald, H.

    1979-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing a numerical scheme for solving the time dependent viscous compressible three dimensional flow to aid in the design of helicopter rotors. Numerical algorithms are examined to determine their overall suitability for the efficient and routine solution of an appropriate system of partial differential equations. It is concluded that a consistently split time linearized block implicit scheme using either quintic B spline collocation or the generalized operator compact implicit approach to generate a fourth order accurate algorithm is particularly well suited for use on the present problem. High cell Reynolds number behavior leads to favoring the generalized operator compact implicit approach over the quintic B spline collocation method.

  17. Honeybees' Speed Depends on Dorsal as Well as Lateral, Ventral and Frontal Optic Flows

    PubMed Central

    Portelli, Geoffrey; Ruffier, Franck; Roubieu, Frédéric L.; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Flying insects use the optic flow to navigate safely in unfamiliar environments, especially by adjusting their speed and their clearance from surrounding objects. It has not yet been established, however, which specific parts of the optical flow field insects use to control their speed. With a view to answering this question, freely flying honeybees were trained to fly along a specially designed tunnel including two successive tapering parts: the first part was tapered in the vertical plane and the second one, in the horizontal plane. The honeybees were found to adjust their speed on the basis of the optic flow they perceived not only in the lateral and ventral parts of their visual field, but also in the dorsal part. More specifically, the honeybees' speed varied monotonically, depending on the minimum cross-section of the tunnel, regardless of whether the narrowing occurred in the horizontal or vertical plane. The honeybees' speed decreased or increased whenever the minimum cross-section decreased or increased. In other words, the larger sum of the two opposite optic flows in the horizontal and vertical planes was kept practically constant thanks to the speed control performed by the honeybees upon encountering a narrowing of the tunnel. The previously described ALIS (“AutopiLot using an Insect-based vision System”) model nicely matches the present behavioral findings. The ALIS model is based on a feedback control scheme that explains how honeybees may keep their speed proportional to the minimum local cross-section of a tunnel, based solely on optic flow processing, without any need for speedometers or rangefinders. The present behavioral findings suggest how flying insects may succeed in adjusting their speed in their complex foraging environments, while at the same time adjusting their distance not only from lateral and ventral objects but also from those located in their dorsal visual field. PMID:21589861

  18. Honeybees' speed depends on dorsal as well as lateral, ventral and frontal optic flows.

    PubMed

    Portelli, Geoffrey; Ruffier, Franck; Roubieu, Frédéric L; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2011-05-12

    Flying insects use the optic flow to navigate safely in unfamiliar environments, especially by adjusting their speed and their clearance from surrounding objects. It has not yet been established, however, which specific parts of the optical flow field insects use to control their speed. With a view to answering this question, freely flying honeybees were trained to fly along a specially designed tunnel including two successive tapering parts: the first part was tapered in the vertical plane and the second one, in the horizontal plane. The honeybees were found to adjust their speed on the basis of the optic flow they perceived not only in the lateral and ventral parts of their visual field, but also in the dorsal part. More specifically, the honeybees' speed varied monotonically, depending on the minimum cross-section of the tunnel, regardless of whether the narrowing occurred in the horizontal or vertical plane. The honeybees' speed decreased or increased whenever the minimum cross-section decreased or increased. In other words, the larger sum of the two opposite optic flows in the horizontal and vertical planes was kept practically constant thanks to the speed control performed by the honeybees upon encountering a narrowing of the tunnel. The previously described ALIS ("AutopiLot using an Insect-based vision System") model nicely matches the present behavioral findings. The ALIS model is based on a feedback control scheme that explains how honeybees may keep their speed proportional to the minimum local cross-section of a tunnel, based solely on optic flow processing, without any need for speedometers or rangefinders. The present behavioral findings suggest how flying insects may succeed in adjusting their speed in their complex foraging environments, while at the same time adjusting their distance not only from lateral and ventral objects but also from those located in their dorsal visual field.

  19. An analytic model of convection in a system with layered viscosity and plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, John W.; O'Connell, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    We present an analytic boundary layer model for thermal convection with a finite-strength plate and depth-dependent viscosity. The model permits solutions in which convective flow rates in the mantle exceed the plate velocity. The energy balance equations for the lithosphere and convective cell are distinct and the model yields the plate velocity, plate thickness and heat flow, as well as the laterally averaged horizontal flow profile for a convective cell. We demonstrate, by inspection of the lithospheric energy balance, that the dominant plate driving force depends not only on the material properties of the mantle and lithosphere, but also on the velocity of the plate. Multiple solutions are possible with three solution branches for the plate velocity representing three distinct modes of thermal convection. The branch of solutions with the largest plate velocity corresponds to the classic boundary layer solution, with a plate velocity approximately equal to the maximum mantle velocity. This branch reproduces the classic convective scaling laws for an isoviscous fluid and its dynamics are controlled by the mantle material properties. The branch of solutions with intermediate plate velocity represents a convective cell with a sluggish-lid and a plate velocity that is less than the underlying mantle velocity. The dynamics for this solution branch depend on the material properties of both the mantle and the lithosphere. Finally, the lower branch of solutions for the plate velocity yields a convective solution in which the plate velocity is determined entirely by the local dynamics of a thick and strong (relative to the mantle) lithosphere. The dynamics of this solution branch are independent of the material properties of the mantle and depend entirely on the properties of the lithosphere. The introduction of an asthenosphere or low viscosity layer (LVL) beneath the plate can significantly alter the dynamics of the system by affecting plate-mantle coupling. Lowering

  20. Viscosity of molten lithium, thorium and beryllium fluorides mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzlyakov, Alexander V.; Ignatiev, Victor V.; Abalin, Sergei S.

    2011-12-01

    Considering development of Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) concept, following Molten Salt fluorides mixtures have been chosen as an object for viscosity studies in this work (in mol%): 78LiF-22ThF 4; 71LiF-27ThF 4-2BeF 2 and 75LiF-20ThF 4-5BeF 2. Additionally, the effect of the 3 mol% CeF 3 additives on viscosity of the molten 75LiF-20ThF 4-5BeF 2 (mol%) salt mixture has been investigated experimentally. The method of torsional oscillations of cylindrical crucible filled by molten fluorides mixture has been chosen for kinematic viscosity measurement at temperatures up to 800-850 °C. In temperature ranges, where melts behave as normal liquids, dependences on viscosity vs. temperature are received: ν = А exp [B/T(K)], where ν - kinematic viscosity, m 2/s; T - temperature, K. The kinematic viscosity Rout mean squares (RMS) estimated in the assumption about dispersion homoscedasticity is (0.04-0.12) × 10 -6 (m 2/s). Discrepancies left in the data of viscosity for molten mixtures of LiF, BeF 2 and ThF 4 received by different researchers need further investigations in this area to be continued.

  1. Temperature dependence of convective heat transfer with Al2O3 nanofluids in the turbulent flow region.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Younghwan; Lee, Kwangho; Park, Minchan; Koo, Kyoungmin; Lee, Jaekeun; Doh, Youngjin; Lee, Soowon; Kim, Doohyun; Jung, Yoongho

    2013-12-01

    An experimental investigation on the characteristics of the convective heat transfer in the fully developing region of a circular straight tube with a constant heat flux was carried out with Al2O3 nanofluids. Stable nanofluids, which were water-based suspensions of Al2O3 nanoparticles, were prepared by two-step method. The effects of the thermal conductivity, viscosity, and heat capacity of the nanofluids on convective heat transfer were investigated. The result showed that the coefficient enhancement of the convective heat transfer in the Al2O3 nanofluids was increased with increasing fluid temperature compared to that of water at a volume fraction of 3.0% in the turbulent flow region. Thermal conductivity was increased from 8% to 20%, and the increment of convective heat transfer coefficient was enhanced from 14% to 30% with fluid temperature from 22 degrees C to 75 degrees C, respectively. We observed that the increment of convective heat transfer coefficient in nanofluids was much higher than that of the thermal conductivity at a given temperature condition. The enhancement of Brownian motion due to the decreasing kinematic viscosity led to a higher convective heat transfer coefficient at a higher temperature condition.

  2. Subcellular localization-dependent changes in EGFP fluorescence lifetime measured by time-resolved flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Gohar, Ali Vaziri; Cao, Ruofan; Jenkins, Patrick; Li, Wenyan; Houston, Jessica P.; Houston, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular protein transport and localization to subcellular regions are processes necessary for normal protein function. Fluorescent proteins can be fused to proteins of interest to track movement and determine localization within a cell. Currently, fluorescence microscopy combined with image processing is most often used to study protein movement and subcellular localization. In this contribution we evaluate a high-throughput time-resolved flow cytometry approach to correlate intracellular localization of human LC3 protein with the fluorescence lifetime of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Subcellular LC3 localization to autophagosomes is a marker of the cellular process called autophagy. In breast cancer cells expressing native EGFP and EGFP-LC3 fusion proteins, we measured the fluorescence intensity and lifetime of (i) diffuse EGFP (ii) punctate EGFP-LC3 and (iii) diffuse EGFP-ΔLC3 after amino acid starvation to induce autophagy-dependent LC3 localization. We verify EGFP-LC3 localization with low-throughput confocal microscopy and compare to fluorescence intensity measured by standard flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate that time-resolved flow cytometry can be correlated to subcellular localization of EGFP fusion proteins by measuring changes in fluorescence lifetime. PMID:24010001

  3. Holocinematographic velocimeter for measuring time-dependent, three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeler, George B.; Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1987-01-01

    Two simulatneous, orthogonal-axis holographic movies are made of tracer particles in a low-speed water tunnel to determine the time-dependent, three-dimensional velocity field. This instrument is called a Holocinematographic Velocimeter (HCV). The holographic movies are reduced to the velocity field with an automatic data reduction system. This permits the reduction of large numbers of holograms (time steps) in a reasonable amount of time. The current version of the HCV, built for proof-of-concept tests, uses low-frame rate holographic cameras and a prototype of a new type of water tunnel. This water tunnel is a unique low-disturbance facility which has minimal wall effects on the flow. This paper presents the first flow field examined by the HCV, the two-dimensional von Karman vortex street downstream of an unswept circular cylinder. Key factors in the HCV are flow speed, spatial and temporal resolution required, measurement volume, film transport speed, and laser pulse length. The interactions between these factors are discussed.

  4. Time-dependent experimental analysis of a thermal transpiration rarefied gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Cárdenas, Marcos; Graur, Irina; Perrier, Pierre; Méolans, J. Gilbert

    2013-07-01

    Thermal transpiration is the macroscopic movement induced in a rarefied gas by a temperature gradient. The gas moves from the lower to the higher temperature zone. An original method is proposed here to measure the stationary mass flow rate of gas created by thermal transpiration in a micro-tube heated at its outlet. In addition, by means of a time-dependent study, parameters such as the pressure variation, the pressure variation speed, and the characteristic time of the system are analyzed. The experimental system is composed of a glass tube of circular cross section and two reservoirs positioned one at the inlet and one at the outlet of the capillary. The reservoirs are connected to two fast response time capacitance diaphragm gauges. By monitoring the pressure variation with time inside both reservoirs, it is possible to measure the macroscopic movement of the gas along the tube. Three gases, nitrogen, argon, and helium, are studied and three temperature differences ΔT = 37, 53.5, and 71 K are applied to the tube. The analyzed gas rarefaction conditions vary from near free molecular to slip regime. Finally, Poiseuille counter flows consistent with the experimental zero flow conditions of the thermal transpiration process are proved to be possible.

  5. Reynolds number dependence of large-scale friction control in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canton, Jacopo; Örlü, Ramis; Chin, Cheng; Hutchins, Nicholas; Monty, Jason; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-11-01

    The present study reconsiders the control scheme proposed by Schoppa & Hussain, using new direct numerical simulations (DNS). The DNS are performed in a turbulent channel at friction Reynolds number (Reτ) between 104 (employed value in original study) and 550. The aim is to better characterise the physics of the control, investigate the optimal parameters and Re dependence. The former purpose lead to a re-design of the method: moving from imposing the mean flow to the application of a volume force. Results show that the original method only provides transient drag reduction (DR) but actually increases the drag for longer times. The forcing method, instead, leads to sustained DR, and is therefore superior for all wavelengths investigated. A DR of 18% is obtained at the lowest Reτ for a viscous-scaled spanwise wavelength of the vortices of 230; the optimal wavelength increases with Reτ , but the efficiency is reduced, leading to a zero DR for Reτ = 550 , confining the method to low Re for internal flows. Although the findings by Schoppa & Hussain are invalidated, the forcing method is currently implemented in a spatially developing boundary layer to check whether it might lead to a different conclusion in external flows.

  6. New scheduling rules for a dynamic flexible flow line problem with sequence-dependent setup times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kia, Hamidreza; Ghodsypour, Seyed Hassan; Davoudpour, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    In the literature, the application of multi-objective dynamic scheduling problem and simple priority rules are widely studied. Although these rules are not efficient enough due to simplicity and lack of general insight, composite dispatching rules have a very suitable performance because they result from experiments. In this paper, a dynamic flexible flow line problem with sequence-dependent setup times is studied. The objective of the problem is minimization of mean flow time and mean tardiness. A 0-1 mixed integer model of the problem is formulated. Since the problem is NP-hard, four new composite dispatching rules are proposed to solve it by applying genetic programming framework and choosing proper operators. Furthermore, a discrete-event simulation model is made to examine the performances of scheduling rules considering four new heuristic rules and the six adapted heuristic rules from the literature. It is clear from the experimental results that composite dispatching rules that are formed from genetic programming have a better performance in minimization of mean flow time and mean tardiness than others.

  7. Simulations of cardiovascular blood flow accounting for time dependent deformational forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters Randles, Amanda; Melchionna, Simone; Latt, Jonas; Succi, Sauro; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is currently the leading cause of death in the United States, and early detection is critical. Despite advances in imaging technology, 50% of these deaths occur suddenly and with no prior symptoms. The development and progression of coronary diseases such as atherosclerosis has been linked to prolonged areas of low endothelial shear stress (ESS); however, there is currently no way to measure ESS in vivo. We will present a patient specific fluid simulation that applies the Lattice Boltzmann equation to model the blood flow in the coronary arteries whose geometries are derived from computed tomography angiography data. Using large-scale supercomputers up to 294,912 processors, we can model a full heartbeat at the resolution of the red blood cells. We are investigating the time dependent deformational forces exerted on the arterial flows from the movement of the heart. The change in arterial curvature that occurs over a heartbeat has been shown to have significant impact on flow velocity and macroscopic quantities like shear stress. We will discuss a method for accounting for these resulting forces by casting them into a kinetic formalism via a Gauss-Hermite projection and their impact on ESS while maintaining the static geomtry obtained from CTA data.

  8. Holocinematographic velocimeter for measuring time-dependent, three-dimensional flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, George B.; Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1987-06-01

    Two simulatneous, orthogonal-axis holographic movies are made of tracer particles in a low-speed water tunnel to determine the time-dependent, three-dimensional velocity field. This instrument is called a Holocinematographic Velocimeter (HCV). The holographic movies are reduced to the velocity field with an automatic data reduction system. This permits the reduction of large numbers of holograms (time steps) in a reasonable amount of time. The current version of the HCV, built for proof-of-concept tests, uses low-frame rate holographic cameras and a prototype of a new type of water tunnel. This water tunnel is a unique low-disturbance facility which has minimal wall effects on the flow. This paper presents the first flow field examined by the HCV, the two-dimensional von Karman vortex street downstream of an unswept circular cylinder. Key factors in the HCV are flow speed, spatial and temporal resolution required, measurement volume, film transport speed, and laser pulse length. The interactions between these factors are discussed.

  9. Structural Uncertainties in RANS Models: Reynolds Stress Transport contra Eddy Viscosity Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Aashwin; Edeling, Wouter; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2016-11-01

    A vast majority of turbulent flow studies, both in academia and industry, utilize Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes based models. There are different RANS modeling frameworks to select from, depending on their complexity and computational requirements, such as eddy viscosity based models, second moment closures, etc. While the relative strengths and weaknesses of each modeling paradigm (vis-a-vis their predictive fidelity, realizability, etc) are roughly established for disparate flows, there are no extant comparative estimates on the relative uncertainty in their predictions. In this investigation, we estimate the structural uncertainty inherent to different RANS modeling approaches for select internal flows. This involves comparisons between models conforming to the same framework, and, across different modeling frameworks. We establish, compare, analyze and explicate the model inadequacy for flows such as in parallel, curved, converging and diverging channels for different models. One of the novel facets of this study involves the estimation of the structural uncertainties of established Reynolds Stress Transport models, and, contrasting these against simpler eddy viscosity models. This work was supported under the DARPA EQUiPS project(Technical Monitor: Fariba Fahroo).

  10. Dependence of charge transfer phenomena during solid-air two-phase flow on particle disperser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanoue, Ken-ichiro; Suedomi, Yuuki; Honda, Hirotaka; Furutani, Satoshi; Nishimura, Tatsuo; Masuda, Hiroaki

    2012-12-01

    An experimental investigation of the tribo-electrification of particles has been conducted during solid-air two-phase turbulent flow. The current induced in a metal plate by the impact of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particles in a high-speed air flow was measured for two different plate materials. The results indicated that the contact potential difference between the particles and a stainless steel plate was positive, while for a nickel plate it was negative. These results agreed with theoretical contact charge transfer even if not only the particle size but also the kind of metal plate was changed. The specific charge of the PMMA particles during solid-air two-phase flow using an ejector, a stainless steel branch pipe, and a stainless steel straight pipe was measured using a Faraday cage. Although the charge was negative in the ejector, the particles had a positive specific charge at the outlet of the branch pipe, and this positive charge increased in the straight pipe. The charge decay along the flow direction could be reproduced by the charging and relaxation theory. However, the proportional coefficients in the theory changed with the particle size and air velocity. Therefore, an unexpected charge transfer occurred between the ejector and the branch pipe, which could not be explained solely by the contact potential difference. In the ejector, an electrical current in air might have been produced by self-discharge of particles with excess charge between the nickel diffuser in the ejector and the stainless steel nozzle or the stainless steel pipe due to a reversal in the contact potential difference between the PMMA and the stainless steel. The sign of the current depended on the particle size, possibly because the position where the particles impacted depended on their size. When dual coaxial glass pipes were used as a particle disperser, the specific charge of the PMMA particles became more positive along the particle flow direction due to the contact

  11. Dimensional crossover in Rayleigh Taylor flows driven by time dependent accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the nature of dimensional crossover i.e. transition between the nearly isotropic 3D square bubbflows les to highly anisotropic 2D flows in Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability. Power law time dependence of the acceleration is considered with the emphasis on sub-regime, where the behavior is RT type. We consider flow with rectangular symmetry and obtain the 3D square and 2D limits with leading order rectangular corrections. Solutions evolve as power law and solutions form a two parameter family parametrized by the principal curvatures of the bubble. The bubbles with ``near circular contour'' separate the 2-dimensional solution space into two distinct regimes having distinct properties under the dimensional crossover. In one regime, the elongated bubbles transform to 2D solutions, whereas in the other the elongated bubbles flatten under a dimensional crossover. 3D square bubbles are universally stable whereas 2D bubbles are unstable with respect to 3D modulations, implying that the dimensional crossover is discontinuous. The time dependence affects the growth/decay of perturbations and has no consequence on the overall stability properties of the solution. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  12. Time-dependent flow fields around the spherical colonial alga Volvox carteri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumley, Douglas; Polin, Marco; Morez, Constant; Goldstein, Raymond; Pedley, Timothy

    2011-11-01

    Volvox carteri is a spherical colonial alga, consisting of thousands of biflagellate cells. The somatic cells embedded on the surface of the colony beat their flagella approximately towards the south pole, producing a net fluid motion. Using high-speed imaging and particle image velocimetry (PIV) we have been able to accurately analyse the time-dependent flow fields around such colonies. The somatic cells on the colony surface may beat their flagella in a perfectly synchronised fashion, or may exhibit behaviour in which the coordination wanders periodically between forward and backward propagating metachronal waves. We analyse the dependence of this synchronisation on fundamental parameters in the system such as colony radius, characterise the speed and wavelength of metachronal waves propagating on the surface, and investigate the extent to which hydrodynamic interactions are responsible for the exhibited behaviour. The time-averaged flow fields agree with previous experiments involving freely swimming colonies (Phys. Rev. Lett. 105:168101, 2010) and Blake's squirmer model (J. Fluid Mech. 46, 199-208, 1971b).

  13. Analysis/forecast experiments with a flow-dependent correlation function using FGGE data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. E.; Bloom, S. C.; Carus, H.; Nestler, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    The use of a flow-dependent correlation function to improve the accuracy of an optimum interpolation (OI) scheme is examined. The development of the correlation function for the OI analysis scheme used for numerical weather prediction is described. The scheme uses a multivariate surface analysis over the oceans to model the pressure-wind error cross-correlation and it has the ability to use an error correlation function that is flow- and geographically-dependent. A series of four-day data assimilation experiments, conducted from January 5-9, 1979, were used to investigate the effect of the different features of the OI scheme (error correlation) on forecast skill for the barotropic lows and highs. The skill of the OI was compared with that of a successive correlation method (SCM) of analysis. It is observed that the largest difference in the correlation statistics occurred in barotropic and baroclinic lows and highs. The comparison reveals that the OI forecasts were more accurate than the SCM forecasts.

  14. Magnetic viscosity studies in hard magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, E.W.; Hadjipanayis, G.C. )

    1990-05-01

    The magnetic viscosity behavior has been studied in several hard magnets with different magnetization reversal mechanisms including barium ferrite powders, Cu-Mn-Al, ferrite magnets, Nd-Fe-B, and SmCo{sub 5}, Sm{sub 2}(Co,Fe,Cu,Zr){sub 17}. The measurements were made with a vibrating sample magnetometer for times up to 60 s and a SQUID magnetometer for longer times in the range of 60--2300 s. For most of the samples the magnetization was found to vary logarithmically with time. The field and temperature dependence of the magnetic viscosity coefficient {ital S} was studied. Here, {ital S} was found to vary with the applied field and it usually peaked around the coercive field {ital H}{sub {ital c}}. The measured values of {ital S}{sub max} at 10 K range from 0.004 to 1.853 emu/g for Cu-Mn-Al and Sm{sub 2}(Co,Fe,Cu,Zr){sub 17}, respectively. The magnetic viscosity coefficient was used together with the magnetic susceptibility to determine the activation volume.

  15. Calcineurin-dependent cofilin activation and increased retrograde actin flow drive 5-HT-dependent neurite outgrowth in Aplysia bag cell neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Hyland, Callen; Van Goor, David; Forscher, Paul

    2012-12-01

    Neurite outgrowth in response to soluble growth factors often involves changes in intracellular Ca(2+); however, mechanistic roles for Ca(2+) in controlling the underlying dynamic cytoskeletal processes have remained enigmatic. Bag cell neurons exposed to serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) respond with a threefold increase in neurite outgrowth rates. Outgrowth depends on phospholipase C (PLC) → inositol trisphosphate → Ca(2+) → calcineurin signaling and is accompanied by increased rates of retrograde actin network flow in the growth cone P domain. Calcineurin inhibitors had no effect on Ca(2+) release or basal levels of retrograde actin flow; however, they completely suppressed 5-HT-dependent outgrowth and F-actin flow acceleration. 5-HT treatments were accompanied by calcineurin-dependent increases in cofilin activity in the growth cone P domain. 5-HT effects were mimicked by direct activation of PLC, suggesting that increased actin network treadmilling may be a widespread mechanism for promoting neurite outgrowth in response to neurotrophic factors.

  16. Singularities and Entropy in Bulk Viscosity Dark Energy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xin-He; Dou, Xu

    2011-11-01

    In this paper bulk viscosity is introduced to describe the effects of cosmic non-perfect fluid on the cosmos evolution and to build the unified dark energy (DE) with (dark) matter models. Also we derive a general relation between the bulk viscosity form and Hubble parameter that can provide a procedure for the viscosity DE model building. Especially, a redshift dependent viscosity parameter ζ ∝ λ0 + λ1(1 + z)n proposed in the previous work [X.H. Meng and X. Dou, Commun. Theor. Phys. 52 (2009) 377] is investigated extensively in this present work. Further more we use the recently released supernova dataset (the Constitution dataset) to constrain the model parameters. In order to differentiate the proposed concrete dark energy models from the well known ΛCDM model, statefinder diagnostic method is applied to this bulk viscosity model, as a complementary to the Om parameter diagnostic and the deceleration parameter analysis performed by us before. The DE model evolution behavior and tendency are shown in the plane of the statefinder diagnostic parameter pair {r, s} as axes where the fixed point represents the ΛCDM model. The possible singularity property in this bulk viscosity cosmology is also discussed to which we can conclude that in the different parameter regions chosen properly, this concrete viscosity DE model can have various late evolution behaviors and the late time singularity could be avoided. We also calculate the cosmic entropy in the bulk viscosity dark energy frame, and find that the total entropy in the viscosity DE model increases monotonously with respect to the scale factor evolution, thus this monotonous increasing property can indicate an arrow of time in the universe evolution, though the quantum version of the arrow of time is still very puzzling.

  17. RAS one-equation turbulence model with non-singular eddy-viscosity coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Agarwal, R. K.; Siikonen, T.

    2016-02-01

    A simplified consistency formulation for Pk/ε (production to dissipation ratio) is devised to obtain a non-singular Cμ (coefficient of eddy-viscosity) in the explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model of Gatski and Speziale. The coefficient Cμ depends non-linearly on both rotational/irrotational strains and is used in the framework of an improved RAS (Rahman-Agarwal-Siikonen) one-equation turbulence model to calculate a few well-documented turbulent flows, yielding predictions in good agreement with the direct numerical simulation and experimental data. The strain-dependent Cμ assists the RAS model in constructing the coefficients and functions such as to benefit complex flows with non-equilibrium turbulence. Comparisons with the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model and the shear stress transport k-ω model demonstrate that Cμ improves the response of RAS model to non-equilibrium effects.

  18. Flow properties of concentrated suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hattori, K.; Izumi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The viscosity and flow behavior of a concentrated suspension, with special emphasis on fresh concrete containing a superplasticizer, is analyzed according to Newton's law of viscosity. The authors interpreted Newton's law in a new way, and explain non-Newton flow from Newton's law. The outline of this new theory is given. Viscosity of suspensions, and the effect of dispersants are analyzed.

  19. Viscosities of aqueous blended amines

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.H.; Li, M.H.

    1997-07-01

    Solutions of alkanolamines are an industrially important class of compounds used in the natural gas, oil refineries, petroleum chemical plants, and synthetic ammonia industries for the removal of acidic components like CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S from gas streams. The viscosities of aqueous mixtures of diethanolamine (DEA) + N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), DEA + 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP), and monoethanolamine (MEA) + 2-piperidineethanol (2-PE) were measured from 30 C to 80 C. A Redlich-Kister equation for the viscosity deviation was applied to represent the viscosity. On the basis of the available viscosity data for five ternary systems, MEA + MDEA + H{sub 2}O, MEA + AMP + H{sub 2}O, DEA + MDEA + H{sub 2}O, DEA + AMP + H{sub 2}O, and MEA + 2-PE + H{sub 2}O, a generalized set of binary parameters were determined. For the viscosity calculation of the systems tested, the overall average absolute percent deviation is about 1.0% for a total of 499 data points.

  20. Textured-surface quartz resonator fluid density and viscosity monitor

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Stephen J.; Wiczer, James J.; Cernosek, Richard W.; Frye, Gregory C.; Gebert, Charles T.; Casaus, Leonard; Mitchell, Mary A.

    1998-08-25

    A pair of thickness-shear mode resonators, one smooth and one with a textured surface, allows fluid density and viscosity to be independently resolved. A textured surface, either randomly rough or regularly patterned, leads to trapping of liquid at the device surface. The synchronous motion of this trapped liquid with the oscillating device surface allows the device to weigh the liquid; this leads to an additional response that depends on liquid density. This additional response enables a pair of devices, one smooth and one textured, to independently resolve liquid density and viscosity; the difference in responses determines the density while the smooth device determines the density-viscosity product, and thus, the pair determines both density and viscosity.

  1. Viscosity measurements of metallic melts using the oscillating drop technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintzmann, P.; Yang, F.; Schneider, S.; Lohöfer, G.; Meyer, A.

    2016-06-01

    By means of benchmarking reduced gravity experiments, we have verified the measured viscosity of binary Zr-Ni glass forming liquids utilizing the oscillating drop technique combined with ground-based electrostatic levitation (ESL). Reliable viscosity data can be obtained as long as internal viscous damping of a single oscillation mode of a levitated drop dominates external perturbations. This can be verified by the absence of a sample mass dependence of the results. Hence, ESL is an excellent tool for studying the viscosity of metallic glass forming melts in the range of about 10-250 mPa s, with sample masses below 100 mg. To this end, we show that, for binary Zr-Ni melts, the viscosity is qualitatively controlled by the packing density.

  2. Viscosity behavior of carbon dioxide treated Cut Bank crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Cady, G.V.; Mosawi, H.

    1995-12-31

    Carbon dioxide injection, either by huff and puff or displacement operations, results in a crude oil viscosity reduction at pressures below the miscibility conditions. Carbon dioxide miscibility occurs in reservoirs at miscible temperature and pressure, but these conditions are not possible in shallow reservoirs. Improved oil recovery in a shallow reservoir depends on the degree of viscosity reduction at the reservoir temperature and pressure. A recovery project`s success depends on the interaction between the carbon dioxide and the reservoir system. A research project carried out at Montana Tech to study the viscosity reduction and carbon dioxide solubility in Cut Bank crude oil at the reservoir`s prevailing temperature and near fracture pressure shows a viscosity reduction ratio (crude-carbon dioxide mixture to original dead oil viscosity) of 0.22 at a pressure of 1,000 psig and 90 F. An original mobility of 20 Md/cp improves to 91 Md/cp under a carbon dioxide recovery process at or near the reservoir`s fracture pressure. Based on the authors` research, improved oil recovery operations in the Cut Bank Field, Montana, is viable when using a commercial on site carbon dioxide recovery or generating system to minimize the cost of CO{sub 2} transportation. The major benefits are oil viscosity reduction, mobility ratio improvement, gas drive, and crude oil swelling.

  3. Viscosity of alumina nanoparticles dispersed in car engine coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kole, Madhusree; Dey, T.K.

    2010-09-15

    The present paper, describes our experimental results on the viscosity of the nanofluid prepared by dispersing alumina nanoparticles (<50 nm) in commercial car coolant. The nanofluid prepared with calculated amount of oleic acid (surfactant) was tested to be stable for more than 80 days. The viscosity of the nanofluids is measured both as a function of alumina volume fraction and temperature between 10 and 50 C. While the pure base fluid display Newtonian behavior over the measured temperature, it transforms to a non-Newtonian fluid with addition of a small amount of alumina nanoparticles. Our results show that viscosity of the nanofluid increases with increasing nanoparticle concentration and decreases with increase in temperature. Most of the frequently used classical models severely under predict the measured viscosity. Volume fraction dependence of the nanofluid viscosity, however, is predicted fairly well on the basis of a recently reported theoretical model for nanofluids that takes into account the effect of Brownian motion of nanoparticles in the nanofluid. The temperature dependence of the viscosity of engine coolant based alumina nanofluids obeys the empirical correlation of the type: log ({mu}{sub nf}) = A exp(BT), proposed earlier by Namburu et al. (author)

  4. Methods of Viscosity Measurements in Sealed Ampoules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    1999-01-01

    Viscosity of semiconductor and metallic melts is usually measured by oscillating cup method. This method utilizes the melts contained in vacuum sealed silica ampoules, thus the problems related to volatility, contamination, and high temperature and pressure can be alleviated. In a typical design, the time required for a single measurement is of the order of one hour. In order to reduce this time to a minute range, a high resolution (0.05 arc.sec) angular detection system is implemented in our design of the viscometer. Furthermore, an electromagnet generating a rotational magnetic field (RMF) is incorporated into the apparatus. This magnetic field can be used to remotely and non intrusively measure the electrical conductivity of the melt. It can also be used to induce a well controlled rotational flow in the system. The transient behavior of this flow can potentially yield the viscosity of the fluid. Based on RMF implementation, two novel viscometry methods are proposed in this work: a) the transient torque method, b) the resonance method. A unified theoretical approach to the three methods (oscillating cup, transient torque, and resonance) is presented along with the initial test results of the constructed apparatus. Advantages of each of the method are discussed.

  5. Real-time method for NO(2) flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Darrah, R C; Andrews, M L; Garscadden, A; Bletzinger, P

    1978-07-01

    Measurements of NO(2) flows are made without requiring prior experimental calibration of the flow meter. A tapered, variable area flow meter with a diameter ratio scale is used to make the real-time NO(2) flow measurements. The necessary parameters and calculations used to determine the viscosity and density of the flowing N(2)O(4)2NO(2) gas are presented. The limits of error associated with these parameters and errors associated with controlled flow measurement conditions are considered. Disregarding the scale reading error, which depends on the flow meter utilized, the limits of error are found to yield a measurement error less than 7%.

  6. The role of bulk viscosity on the decay of compressible, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Eric; Pan, Shaowu

    2016-11-01

    The practice of neglecting bulk viscosity in studies of compressible turbulence is widespread. While exact for monatomic gases and unlikely to strongly affect the dynamics of fluids whose bulk-to-shear viscosity ratio is small and/or of weakly compressible turbulence, this assumption is not justifiable for compressible, turbulent flows of gases whose bulk viscosity is orders of magnitude larger than their shear viscosities (e.g., CO2). To understand the mechanisms by which bulk viscosity and the associated phenomena affect compressible turbulence, we conduct DNS of freely decaying compressible, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence for ratios of bulk-to-shear viscosity ranging from 0-1000. Our simulations demonstrate that bulk viscosity increases the decay rate of turbulent kinetic energy; while enstrophy exhibits little sensitivity to bulk viscosity, dilatation is reduced by an order of magnitude within the two eddy turnover time. Via a Helmholtz decomposition of the flow, we determined that bulk viscosity damps the dilatational velocity and reduces dilatational-solenoidal exchanges, as well as pressure-dilatation coupling. In short, bulk viscosity renders compressible turbulence incompressible by reducing energy transfer between translational and internal modes.

  7. Modelling of Continental Lithosphere Breakup and Rifted Margin Formation in Response to an Upwelling Divergent Flow Field Incorporating a Temperature Dependent Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tymms, V. J.; Kusznir, N. J.

    2005-05-01

    We numerically model continental lithosphere deformation leading to breakup and sea floor spreading initiation in response to an imposed upwelling and divergent flow field applied to continental lithosphere and asthenosphere. The model is used to predict rifted continental margin lithosphere thinning and temperature structure. Model predictions are compared with observed rifted margin structure for four diverse case studies. Prior to application of the upwelling divergent flow field the continental lithosphere is undeformed with a uniform temperature gradient. The upwelling divergent flow field is defined kinematically using boundary conditions consisting of the upwelling velocity Vz at the divergence axis and the half divergence rate Vx . The resultant velocity field throughout the continuum is computed using finite element (FE) code incorporating a Newtonian temperature dependent rheology. The flow field is used to advect the continental lithosphere material and lithospheric and asthenospheric temperatures. Viscosity structure is hence modified and the velocities change correspondingly in a feedback loop. We find the kinematic boundary conditions Vz and Vx to be of first order importance. A high Vz/Vx (greater than10), corresponding to buoyancy assisted flow, leads to minimal mantle exhumation and a well defined continent ocean transition consistent with observations at volcanic margins. For Vz/Vx near unity, corresponding to plate boundary driven divergence, mantle exhumation over widths of up to 100 km is predicted which is consistent with observations at non-volcanic margins. The FE method allows the upwelling velocity Vz to be propagated upwards from the top of the asthenosphere to the Earth's surface without the requirement of imposing Vx. When continental breakup is achieved the half divergence velocity Vx can be applied at the lithosphere surface and the upwelling velocity Vz left free. We find this time and space dependent set of boundary conditions is

  8. Deformation microstructure and positive temperature dependence of flow stress in Ni{sub 3}Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Solov’eva, Yulia Starenchenko, Vladimir Starenchenko, Svetlana Solov’ev, Artem

    2016-01-15

    Single crystalline specimens of Ni{sub 3}Ge were compressed along [0 0 1] at different temperatures. Temperature dependence of the critical resolved shear stress (τ{sub 0}(T)) has been obtained. Detailed measurements at cryogen temperatures (4.2-77 K temperature interval) showed that the increase of the yield stress with temperature starts at liquid helium temperature. The values of the apparent activation volume (V*) have been obtained as a result of stress relaxation tests repeated along the stress-strain curve at different stress levels at seven temperatures (77, 293, 373, 473, 573, 673, 773 K). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods were used to analyze the evolution of dislocation structure with temperature and strain. The measurements of the straight dislocations fraction determined as δ = ρ{sub sd} / ρ, (ρ{sub sd} is the straight dislocation density, ρ is a total dislocation density) have been performed. The experimental data obtained in different tests in Ni{sub 3}Ge confirm two-stage nature of the positive temperature dependence of the flow stress of alloys with the L1{sub 2} structure. The model of thermal strengthening considering two different types of mechanisms, first acting at low temperatures and second at high has been proposed. Using this model the temperature dependence of the critical resolved shear stress has been approximated and the activation parameters of thermal strengthening of Ni{sub 3}Ge have been obtained.

  9. Hypoxic viscosity and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Rimmer, T; Fleming, J; Kohner, E M

    1990-01-01

    Diabetic and sickle retinopathy have features in common--for example, venous dilatation, microaneurysms, and capillary closure preceding neovascularisation. Bearing in mind that haemoglobin in poorly controlled diabetes is abnormal and that extremely low oxygen tensions (known to cause sickling) exist in the healthy cat retina, we wished to explore the possibility that diabetic blood, like that of sickle cell disease, may become more viscous when deoxygenated. To do this we measured whole blood viscosity, under oxygenated and deoxygenated conditions, of 23 normal persons, 23 diabetic patients without retinopathy, and 34 diabetic patients with retinopathy. The shear rate used was 230 s-1, which is similar to that thought to prevail in the major retinal veins. The viscosity of blood from normal persons, corrected for packed cell volume, did not change significantly on deoxygenation: mean 4.54 (SD 0.38) cps, versus, 4.57 (0.39) paired t test, p = 0.66. Similarly the blood from diabetics without retinopathy showed no change: 4.42 (0.45) versus 4.42 (0.30), p = 0.98; whereas the blood from patients with retinopathy changed from 4.82 (0.48) to 4.95 (0.63), p = 0.027. The hypoxic viscosity ratio (deoxygenated divided by oxygenated viscosity) correlated with total serum cholesterol (r = 0.44, p = 0.018) but not with HbA1, serum glucose, triglycerides, or age. A disproportionate increase in venous viscosity relative to arterial viscosity would lead to increased intraluminal and transmural pressure and therefore exacerbate leakage across capillary walls. PMID:2378855

  10. Cytokine modulation of human blood viscosity from vivax malaria patients.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Edson Fredulin; Cantarini, Déborah Giovanna; Siqueira, Renan; Ribeiro, Elton Brito; Braga, Érika Martins; Honório-França, Adenilda Cristina; França, Eduardo Luzía

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is a major infectious disease in several countries and is caused by protozoa of the genus Plasmodium. In vivax malaria patients, inflammatory processes occur, as well as changes in cytokines and blood flow. The present study analyzed the cytokine modulation of blood viscosity from patients infected with Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax). Blood samples were collected from 42 non-infected individuals (control group) and 37 individuals infected with P. vivax. The IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNFα, TGF-β and IL-17 cytokine concentrations in the serum were assessed, and the blood rheological properties were determined. The analysis of blood viscosity for shear rates revealed that the blood viscosity of the infected patients was significantly greater than that of the non-infected individuals. The viscosity of the blood was greater in the infected individuals than in the non-infected subjects. The serum from individuals with P. vivax infections exhibited higher IFN-γ and IL-17 concentrations and lower TGF-β levels. Incubation of the blood from infected individuals with IL-17 or IL-17 associated with IFN-γ reduced the viscosity to rates equivalent to the blood from non-infected individuals. Independently of cytokine modulation, no correlation was found between the parasitemia and blood viscosity of the infected patients. These data suggest that the alterations of blood viscosity are relevant as an auxiliary tool for the clinical diagnosis of disease. In malaria, erythrocytes are more sensitive to osmotic shock, and the reduction of viscosity by IL-17 may be related to a possible immunomodulator agent during infection.

  11. Viscosity measurements of crystallizing andesite from Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador).

    PubMed

    Chevrel, Magdalena Oryaëlle; Cimarelli, Corrado; deBiasi, Lea; Hanson, Jonathan B; Lavallée, Yan; Arzilli, Fabio; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-03-01

    Viscosity has been determined during isothermal crystallization of an andesite from Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador). Viscosity was continuously recorded using the concentric cylinder method and employing a Pt-sheathed alumina spindle at 1 bar and from 1400°C to subliquidus temperatures to track rheological changes during crystallization. The disposable spindle was not extracted from the sample but rather left in the sample during quenching thus preserving an undisturbed textural configuration of the crystals. The inspection of products quenched during the crystallization process reveals evidence for heterogeneous crystal nucleation at the spindle and near the crucible wall, as well as crystal alignment in the flow field. At the end of the crystallization, defined when viscosity is constant, plagioclase is homogeneously distributed throughout the crucible (with the single exception of experiment performed at the lowest temperature). In this experiments, the crystallization kinetics appear to be strongly