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Sample records for depressed eruption rate

  1. Depressed eruption rate of the rat maxillary incisor in a drug-induced uncompensated hemolytic state model

    SciTech Connect

    Giglio, M.J.; Sanz, A.M.; Bozzini, C.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Female rats weighing about 180 g were separated into two groups. One group (A) received phenylhydrazine (PHZ) every other day during three weeks (for induction of an uncompensated hemolytic state), while the control group (C) received saline. The evidence for the establishment of the uncompensated hemolytic state was obtained by hematocrit value, reticulocyte count, and red-cell-volume-59Fe uptake. Body-weight gain (which is a measure of overall body growth rate), body-length gain (which is a measure of longitudinal skeletal growth rate), food intake, and maxillary incisor eruption rate (ER) were significantly depressed in rats of group A during the PHZ-injection period, in relation to rats of group C. These results indicate that anemia and/or associated factors depress ER, along with body growth and skeletal growth.

  2. Eruption rates in explosive eruptions: Ground truth and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Durig, Tobias; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Larsen, Gudrún; Óladóttir, Bergrún A.; Högnadóttir, Thórdís; Oddsson, Björn; Björnsson, Halldór; Gudmundsdóttir, Esther R.

    2015-04-01

    Estimations of eruption rates in explosive eruptions are difficult and error margins are invariably high. In small to moderate sized eruptions effects of wind on plume height can be large and in larger eruptions observations are often difficult due to masking of source by low cloud, pyroclastic density currents and monitoring system saturation. Several medium-sized explosive eruptions in recent years have been an important in sparking off intense research on e.g. atmosphere-plume interaction and associated effects of wind on plume height. Other methods that do not rely on plume height are e.g. infrared satellite monitoring of atmospheric loading of fine tephra, infrasound, analysis of video recordings from vents, and it has been suggested that co-eruptive tilt-meter deformation data can predict eruption intensity. The eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 and Grímsvötn in 2011 provided a wealth of data that potentially can be of use in developing constraints of eruption rates in explosive eruptions. A key parameter in all such comparisons between models and data is as detailed knowledge as possible on tephra fallout. For both Eyjafjallajökull and Grímsvötn intensive field efforts took place to map out the deposits during and immediately after the eruptions. The resulting maps cover both individual phases as well as total fallout. Comparison of these data with plume-based and other models of mass discharge rates is presently work in progress. A desirable future aim is near real time estimates of mass eruption rates based several of the parameters mentioned above. This type of work is currently ongoing within the framework of the EU-funded supersite project FUTUREVOLC.

  3. The Effects of Preeruptive Magma Viscosity on Eruption Styles and Magma Eruption Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiya, A.; Koyaguchi, T.; Kozono, T.; Takeuchi, S.

    2014-12-01

    We have collected data on magma eruption rate, which is one of the most fundamental parameters for a volcanic eruption. There are several compilations on eruption rates, for example, for Plinian eruptions (Carey and Sigurdsson, 1989), basaltic eruptions (Wadge, 1981), lava dome eruptions (Newhall and Melson, 1983), and all combined (Tomiya and Koyaguchi, 1998; Pyle, 2000). However, they did not quantitatively discuss the effects of magma viscosity, which must control eruption rates. Here, we discuss the effects of magma viscosity on eruption rates, by using 'preeruptive magma viscosities', which are important measures of magma eruptibility (Takeuchi, 2011). Preeruptive magma viscosity is the viscosity of magma (melt, dissolved water, and crystals) in the magma chamber at the preeruptive conditions, and can be approximately obtained only by the bulk rock SiO2 and phenocryst content, using an empirical formula (Takeuchi, 2010). We have found some interesting relationships, such as (1) eruption styles and rates are correlated to preeruptive magma viscosity but not correlated to bulk rock composition, and (2) the gap (ratio) in eruption rates between explosive and effusive phases in a series of eruptions is proportional to preeruptive magma viscosity. We also propose, by combining (1) and (2), that (3) the radius (or width) of volcanic conduit is positively correlated with preeruptive magma viscosity. Our data also show that the eruptive magmas are divided into two types. One is the low-viscosity type (basalt ~ phenocryst-poor andesite), characterized by lava flow and sub-Plinian eruptions. The other is the high-viscosity type (phenocryst-rich andesite ~ rhyolite), characterized by lava dome and Plinian eruptions. The boundary is at about 104 Pa s. These two types may be closely linked to the magma generation processes (fractional/batch crystallization vs. extraction from a mushy magma chamber).

  4. Increasing rates of depression.

    PubMed

    Klerman, G L; Weissman, M M

    1989-04-21

    Several recent, large epidemiologic and family studies suggest important temporal changes in the rates of major depression: an increase in the rates in the cohorts born after World War II; a decrease in the age of onset with an increase in the late teenaged and early adult years; an increase between 1960 and 1975 in the rates of depression for all ages; a persistent gender effect, with the risk of depression consistently two to three times higher among women than men across all adult ages; a persistent family effect, with the risk about two to three times higher in first-degree relatives as compared with controls; and the suggestion of a narrowing of the differential risk to men and women due to a greater increase in risk of depression among young men. These trends, drawn from studies using comparable methods and modern diagnostic criteria, are evident in the United States, Sweden, Germany, Canada, and New Zealand, but not in comparable studies conducted in Korea and Puerto Rico and of Mexican-Americans living in the United States. These cohort changes cannot be fully attributed to artifacts of reporting, recall, mortality, or labeling and have implications for understanding the etiology of depression and for clinical practice.

  5. Large, Moderate or Small? The Challenge of Measuring Mass Eruption Rates in Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, M. T.; Dürig, T.; Hognadottir, T.; Hoskuldsson, A.; Bjornsson, H.; Barsotti, S.; Petersen, G. N.; Thordarson, T.; Pedersen, G. B.; Riishuus, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    The potential impact of a volcanic eruption is highly dependent on its eruption rate. In explosive eruptions ash may pose an aviation hazard that can extend several thousand kilometers away from the volcano. Models of ash dispersion depend on estimates of the volcanic source, but such estimates are prone to high error margins. Recent explosive eruptions, including the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland, have provided a wealth of data that can help in narrowing these error margins. Within the EU-funded FUTUREVOLC project, a multi-parameter system is currently under development, based on an array of ground and satellite-based sensors and models to estimate mass eruption rates in explosive eruptions in near-real time. Effusive eruptions are usually considered less of a hazard as lava flows travel slower than eruption clouds and affect smaller areas. However, major effusive eruptions can release large amounts of SO2 into the atmosphere, causing regional pollution. In very large effusive eruptions, hemispheric cooling and continent-scale pollution can occur, as happened in the Laki eruption in 1783 AD. The Bárdarbunga-Holuhraun eruption in 2014-15 was the largest effusive event in Iceland since Laki and at times caused high concentrations of SO2. As a result civil protection authorities had to issue warnings to the public. Harmful gas concentrations repeatedly persisted for many hours at a time in towns and villages at distances out to 100-150 km from the vents. As gas fluxes scale with lava fluxes, monitoring of eruption rates is therefore of major importance to constrain not only lava but also volcanic gas emissions. This requires repeated measurements of lava area and thickness. However, most mapping methods are problematic once lava flows become very large. Satellite data on thermal emissions from eruptions have been used with success to estimate eruption rate. SAR satellite data holds potential in delivering lava volume and eruption rate estimates

  6. Estimates of mass eruption rates in Icelandic eruptions 1913-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Dürig, Tobias; Larsen, Gudrún

    2016-04-01

    In the period from 1913 to 2015 about 35 eruptions occurred in Iceland, although some uncertainty exists about the number of the smallest events, particularly within the ice covered regions. For the smaller events in the earlier part of the period, only order of magnitude estimates of mass eruption rates (MER) are possible, based on the approximate amount of erupted products, duration of eruption, and information on eruption plume height in some cases. After 1947 estimates are more reliable. This is not least due to the detailed observations and interpretations of Sigurdur Thorarinsson and co-workers until the early 1980s. After 1980, various observations and instrumental data, e.g. on plume height, coupled with detailed mapping by several workers of tephra fallout and lava flow extent provide a good basis for MER estimates. The most frequent events are explosive eruptions producing tephra, often basaltic phreatomagmatic eruptions. A contributing factor to the large number of explosive eruptions is unusually frequent eruptions in Hekla since 1947. Eruptions under glaciers are also common, while a majority of these become explosive as they break through the ice. For the initially subglacial eruptions ice melting rates provide the best estimate of the MER in the first and usually most powerful phase. If the whole data set is considered, the magma volumes erupted in a single eruption span three orders of magnitude, ˜0.001 km3 to 1 km3. The range of intensity is similar, with the smallest Krafla or Askja events having maximum mass eruption rates (MER) of order 10-100 tonnes/second while the most powerful ones (Hekla 1947 and Katla 1918) had MER ˜50,000 tonnes/second (˜5 x 107 kg/s). All the events with the highest MER were explosive, including Katla 1918 where initial subglacial melting caused the largest volcanogenic flood observed since the 18th century. The period 1913-2015 had no events that belong to the class of the largest observed eruptions in Iceland. In

  7. Long-Term Volumetric Eruption Rates and Magma Budgets

    SciTech Connect

    Scott M. White Dept. Geological Sciences University of South Carolina Columbia, SC 29208; Joy A. Crisp Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91109; Frank J. Spera Dept. Earth Science University of California, Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, CA 93106

    2005-01-01

    A global compilation of 170 time-averaged volumetric volcanic output rates (Qe) is evaluated in terms of composition and petrotectonic setting to advance the understanding of long-term rates of magma generation and eruption on Earth. Repose periods between successive eruptions at a given site and intrusive:extrusive ratios were compiled for selected volcanic centers where long-term (>104 years) data were available. More silicic compositions, rhyolites and andesites, have a more limited range of eruption rates than basalts. Even when high Qe values contributed by flood basalts (9 ± 2 Å~ 10-1 km3/yr) are removed, there is a trend in decreasing average Qe with lava composition from basaltic eruptions (2.6 ± 1.0 Å~ 10-2 km3/yr) to andesites (2.3 ± 0.8 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr) and rhyolites (4.0 ± 1.4 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr). This trend is also seen in the difference between oceanic and continental settings, as eruptions on oceanic crust tend to be predominately basaltic. All of the volcanoes occurring in oceanic settings fail to have statistically different mean Qe and have an overall average of 2.8 ± 0.4 Å~ 10-2 km3/yr, excluding flood basalts. Likewise, all of the volcanoes on continental crust also fail to have statistically different mean Qe and have an overall average of 4.4 ± 0.8 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr. Flood basalts also form a distinctive class with an average Qe nearly two orders of magnitude higher than any other class. However, we have found no systematic evidence linking increased intrusive:extrusive ratios with lower volcanic rates. A simple heat balance analysis suggests that the preponderance of volcanic systems must be open magmatic systems with respect to heat and matter transport in order to maintain eruptible magma at shallow depth throughout the observed lifetime of the volcano. The empirical upper limit of Å`10-2 km3/yr for magma eruption rate in systems with relatively high intrusive:extrusive ratios may be a consequence of the fundamental parameters

  8. Satellite Based Extrusion Rates for the 2006 Augustine Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehn, J.; Bailey, J. E.; Dean, K. G.; Skoog, R.; Valcic, L.

    2006-12-01

    Extrusion rates were calculated from polar orbiting infrared satellite data for the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska. The pixel integrated brightness temperatures from the satellite data were converted to estimates of ground temperature by making assumptions and using first hand observations about the geometry of the hot area (lava dome, flows and pyroclastic flow deposits) relative to the cold area in the kilometer scale pixels. Extrusion rate is calculated by assuming that at a given temperature, a lava emits an amount of radiation proportional to its volume. On ten occasions during the activity, helicopter based infrared imagers were used to validate the satellite observations. The pre-January 11 thermal activity was not significantly above background in satellite data. The first strong thermal anomalies were recorded during the first explosive phase on January 11. During successive explosive phases in January, bright thermal signals were observed, often saturating the sensors. Large areas (many km2) were observed to be warm in the satellite data, indicative of pyroclastic flows. Sometime during or after January 29, during a phase of sustained ash emission, the thermal signal became persistent, suggesting the beginning of lava effusion. The extrusion rates derived from satellite data varied from 0 to nearly 7 m3/s, giving an eruption rate of 2.7 m3/s. The extrusion event produced two blocky lava flows which moved down the north flank of the volcano. Extrusion occurred through at least March 15 (day 76) when a sharp drop in extrusion rate and thermal signal is observed. Based on the derived extrusion rates, it is estimated that 18 million m3 of lava was extruded during the course of the eruption. This value agreed well with photogrammetric measurements, but does not agree with volumes derived through subtraction of digital elevation models post- and pre- eruption. It should be noted that the thermal approach only works for hot lavas, and does not

  9. Estimates of Lava Eruption Rates at Alba Patera, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, S. M.; Pieri, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    The Martian volcanic complex Alba Patera exhibits a suite of well-defined, long and relatively narrow lava flows qualitatively resembling those found in Hawaii. Even without any information on the duration of the Martian flows, eruption rates (total volume discharge/duration of the extrusion) estimates are implied by the physical dimensions of the flows and the likely conjecture that Stephan-Boltzmann radiation is the dominating thermal loss mechanism. The ten flows in this analysis emanate radially from the central vent and were recently measured in length, plan areas, and average thicknesses by shadow measurement techniques. The dimensions of interest are shown. Although perhaps morphologically congruent to certain Hawaiian flows, the dramatically expanded physical dimensions of the Martian flows argues for some markedly distinct differences in lava flow composition for eruption characteristics.

  10. Estimates of lava eruption rates at Alba Patera, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloga, S. M.; Pieri, D. C.

    1985-04-01

    The Martian volcanic complex Alba Patera exhibits a suite of well-defined, long and relatively narrow lava flows qualitatively resembling those found in Hawaii. Even without any information on the duration of the Martian flows, eruption rates (total volume discharge/duration of the extrusion) estimates are implied by the physical dimensions of the flows and the likely conjecture that Stephan-Boltzmann radiation is the dominating thermal loss mechanism. The ten flows in this analysis emanate radially from the central vent and were recently measured in length, plan areas, and average thicknesses by shadow measurement techniques. The dimensions of interest are shown. Although perhaps morphologically congruent to certain Hawaiian flows, the dramatically expanded physical dimensions of the Martian flows argues for some markedly distinct differences in lava flow composition for eruption characteristics.

  11. Estimating rates of decompression from textures of erupted ash particles produced by 1999-2006 eruptions of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Heather M.N.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Mothes, Patricia A.; Hall, Minard L.; Ruiz, Andrés Gorki; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Persistent low- to moderate-level eruptive activity of andesitic volcanoes is difficult to monitor because small changes in magma supply rates may cause abrupt transitions in eruptive style. As direct measurement of magma supply is not possible, robust techniques for indirect measurements must be developed. Here we demonstrate that crystal textures of ash particles from 1999 to 2006 Vulcanian and Strombolian eruptions of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, provide quantitative information about the dynamics of magma ascent and eruption that is difficult to obtain from other monitoring approaches. We show that the crystallinity of erupted ash particles is controlled by the magma supply rate (MSR); ash erupted during periods of high magma supply is substantially less crystalline than during periods of low magma supply. This correlation is most easily explained by efficient degassing at very low pressures (<<50 MPa) and degassing-driven crystallization controlled by the time available prior to eruption. Our data also suggest that the observed transition from intermittent Vulcanian explosions at low MSR to more continuous periods of Strombolian eruptions and lava fountains at high MSR can be explained by the rise of bubbles through (Strombolian) or trapping of bubbles beneath (Vulcanian) vent-capping, variably viscous (and crystalline) magma.

  12. Magma decompression rates during explosive eruptions of Kīlauea volcano, Hawaii, recorded by melt embayments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, David J.; Gonnermann, Helge M.; Ruprecht, Philipp; Plank, Terry; Hauri, Erik H.; Houghton, Bruce F.; Swanson, Donald A.

    2016-10-01

    The decompression rate of magma as it ascends during volcanic eruptions is an important but poorly constrained parameter that controls many of the processes that influence eruptive behavior. In this study, we quantify decompression rates for basaltic magmas using volatile diffusion in olivine-hosted melt tubes (embayments) for three contrasting eruptions of Kīlauea volcano, Hawaii. Incomplete exsolution of H2O, CO2, and S from the embayment melts during eruptive ascent creates diffusion profiles that can be measured using microanalytical techniques, and then modeled to infer the average decompression rate. We obtain average rates of ~0.05-0.45 MPa s-1 for eruptions ranging from Hawaiian style fountains to basaltic subplinian, with the more intense eruptions having higher rates. The ascent timescales for these magmas vary from around ~5 to ~36 min from depths of ~2 to ~4 km, respectively. Decompression-exsolution models based on the embayment data also allow for an estimate of the mass fraction of pre-existing exsolved volatiles within the magma body. In the eruptions studied, this varies from 0.1 to 3.2 wt% but does not appear to be the key control on eruptive intensity. Our results do not support a direct link between the concentration of pre-eruptive volatiles and eruptive intensity; rather, they suggest that for these eruptions, decompression rates are proportional to independent estimates of mass discharge rate. Although the intensity of eruptions is defined by the discharge rate, based on the currently available dataset of embayment analyses, it does not appear to scale linearly with average decompression rate. This study demonstrates the utility of the embayment method for providing quantitative constraints on magma ascent during explosive basaltic eruptions.

  13. Merapi 2010 eruption-Chronology and extrusion rates monitored with satellite radar and used in eruption forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallister, John S.; Schneider, David J.; Griswold, Julia P.; Keeler, Ronald H.; Burton, William C.; Noyles, Christopher; Newhall, Christopher G.; Ratdomopurbo, Antonius

    2013-07-01

    Despite dense cloud cover, satellite-borne commercial Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) enabled frequent monitoring of Merapi volcano's 2010 eruption. Near-real-time interpretation of images derived from the amplitude of the SAR signals and timely delivery of these interpretations to those responsible for warnings, allowed satellite remote sensing for the first time to play an equal role with in situ seismic, geodetic and gas monitoring in guiding life-saving decisions during a major volcanic crisis. Our remotely sensed data provide an observational chronology for the main phase of the 2010 eruption, which lasted 12 days (26 October-7 November, 2010). Unlike the prolonged low-rate and relatively low explosivity dome-forming and collapse eruptions of recent decades at Merapi, the eruption began with an explosive eruption that produced a new summit crater on 26 October and was accompanied by an ash column and pyroclastic flows that extended 8 km down the flanks. This initial explosive event was followed by smaller explosive eruptions on 29 October-1 November, then by a period of rapid dome growth on 1-4 November, which produced a summit lava dome with a volume of ~ 5 × 106 m3. A paroxysmal VEI 4 magmatic eruption (with ash column to 17 km altitude) destroyed this dome, greatly enlarged the new summit crater and produced extensive pyroclastic flows (to ~ 16 km radial distance in the Gendol drainage) and surges during the night of 4-5 November. The paroxysmal eruption was followed by a period of jetting of gas and tephra and by a second short period (12 h) of rapid dome growth on 6 November. The eruption ended with low-level ash and steam emissions that buried the 6 November dome with tephra and continued at low levels until seismicity decreased to background levels by about 23 November. Our near-real-time commercial SAR documented the explosive events on 26 October and 4-5 November and high rates of dome growth (> 25 m3 s- 1). An event tree analysis for the previous

  14. Rate of Forgetting in Dementia and Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Robert P.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined patients (N=14) with mild Alzheimer's dementia (DAT), patients with major depression (N=10), and normal control subjects (N=14), for rate of forgetting. Suggests that some form of deficient consolidation contributes to memory loss in DAT but not in depression. Implicates the disruption of different psychobiological mechanisms in these…

  15. Magma fluxes and recurreance rate of eruptions at Nevado de Toluca volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Gregor; Probst, Line; Arce, José L.; Caricchi, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Forecasting the frequency and size of volcanic eruptions is a long-term goal for hazard mitigation. The frequency at which a given crustal magmatic system is driven towards a critical state and the magnitude of the resulting volcanic events are linked to the supply rate of fresh magma, crustal properties, and tectonic setting. Our ability to forecast the recurrence rate of eruptions is hampered by the lack of data on key variables such as the average magma flux locally and globally. The aim of this project is to identify the average magma supply rate and injection frequency for eruptions of different magnitude and eruptive style. We centred our study at Nevado de Toluca in Mexico, a subduction-related volcano with an eruptive history spanning about 1.5 million years of comparatively well documented effusive and explosive eruptions dominantly of dacitic composition. We carry out in-situ high precision zircon geochronology for a sequence of eruptions of different magnitude to obtain a distribution of crystal ages from which average crustal magma fluxes can be calculated. Eruptive fluxes will be constrained by extracting lava flow volumes from a digital elevation model. A combination of whole rock and mineral chemistry will provide quantitative insights on petrogenetic processes and on the frequency at which intensive parameters changed within the magma reservoir before the eruptions. Our results will be integrated in a global database including other volcanic systems and literature data to attempt to identify similarities and differences between magmatic reservoirs feeding volcanic eruptions of different magnitude. The final target of this project is to identify the physical factors controlling the recurrence rate of volcanic eruptions at regional and global scale.

  16. Causes of supervolcano eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stix, J.; Girard, G.; Kennedy, B. M.; Hanson, J. B.; Campbell, M. E.; Wilcock, J.

    2009-12-01

    Large explosive eruptions commonly form caldera depressions and emit hundreds to thousands of cubic kilometres of silicic magma. They have profound local, regional, and global impacts. Despite the significance of these eruptions, little is known about the conditions under which large caldera-forming eruptions occur, in particular the underlying causes, the driving mechanisms, and the trigger or triggers. To address these issues, we have undertaken a series of analogue experiments and numerical calculations designed to elucidate linkages among subsurface magma behaviour, caldera collapse dynamics, and large volcanic eruptions. Here we show that five complementary prerequisites are required to generate and sustain a supervolcano eruption. (1) Recharge by mafic and/or silicic magma into a shallow reservoir destabilizes the system, generates overpressure, and partially melts resident crystallized magma. (2) A quantity of low-viscosity liquid magma must be present in the reservoir prior to the eruption, either as resident material or from recharge magma and partial melting. (3) Once the eruption is initiated, this mobile magma flows at high rates to the surface, inducing catastrophic caldera collapse. (4) A shallow magma reservoir facilitates caldera collapse during early stages of the eruption. (5) Subsidence of the caldera stirs and mixes magma in the conduits and reservoir, causing focused flow of magma which can potentially intensify the eruption. These five conditions ensure that a caldera-forming eruption will be large and sustained.

  17. Voluminous eruption from a zoned magma body after an increase in supply rate at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, W. W.; Paduan, J. B.; Clague, D. A.; Dreyer, B. M.; Merle, S. G.; Bobbitt, A. M.; Caress, D. W.; Philip, B. T.; Kelley, D. S.; Nooner, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    Axial Seamount is the best monitored submarine volcano in the world, providing an exceptional window into the dynamic interactions between magma storage, transport, and eruption processes in a mid-ocean ridge setting. An eruption in April 2015 produced the largest volume of erupted lava since monitoring and mapping began in the mid-1980s after the shortest repose time, due to a recent increase in magma supply. The higher rate of magma replenishment since 2011 resulted in the eruption of the most mafic lava in the last 500-600 years. Eruptive fissures at the volcano summit produced pyroclastic ash that was deposited over an area of at least 8 km2. A systematic spatial distribution of compositions is consistent with a single dike tapping different parts of a thermally and chemically zoned magma reservoir that can be directly related to previous multichannel seismic-imaging results.

  18. Effect of radiotherapy on the eruption rate and morphology of the odontogenic region of rat incisors.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Amanda Maria Medeiros; Gomes, Carolina Cintra; de Almeida, Solange Maria; Klamt, Carla Beatriz; Novaes, Pedro Duarte

    2014-11-01

    The goal in this study was to evaluate the results of doses of 5 and 15 Gy of radiation in odontogenic region of the rats inferior mandibular-incisors by a histological analysis and the rate of eruptions. Animals were divided into three groups: control, radiotherapy 5 Gy and radiotherapy 15 Gy. In which tooth-eruption-rate was measured every two days. Animals in Group 5 Gy presented values similar to those of the control group. Animals in Group 15 Gy presented reduction in tooth-eruption-rate as of the sixth day of the experiment, vast disorganization of odontoblasts and ameloblasts, apparent reduction in cell population in the follicle region and alterations in cervical loop formation of the dental organ. It was concluded that there was a difference between the researched doses, and histological alteration at 15 Gy lead to statistical reduction in tooth-eruption-rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Magma Supply Rate Controls Vigor (And Longevity) of Kīlauea's Ongoing East Rift Zone Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, M. P.; Anderson, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    Since 1983, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, has erupted almost continuously from vents on the East Rift Zone—at 32 years and counting, this is the longest-duration eruption in the past 500 years. Although forecasting the onset of eruptive activity using geophysical, geochemical, and geological monitoring has been demonstrated repeatedly at Kīlauea and elsewhere, little progress has been made in forecasting an eruption's waning or end, particularly in the case of long-lived eruptions. This is especially important at Kīlauea for at least two reasons: (1) caldera formation at the end of another decades-long eruption, in the 15th century, raises the possibility of a link between eruption duration and caldera formation; and (2) long-lived eruptions can have an enduring effect on local population and infrastructure, as demonstrated by the repeated destruction of property by Kīlauea's ongoing rift zone eruption. Data from the past 15 years indicate that the magma supply rate to Kīlauea is an important control on eruptive activity. Joint inversions of geophysical, geochemical, and geological observations demonstrate that in 2006 the supply rate was nearly double that of 2000-2001, resulting in an increase in lava discharge, summit inflation, and the formation of new eruptive vents. In contrast, the magma supply during 2012, and likely through 2014, was less than that of 2000-2001. This lower supply rate was associated with a lower lava discharge and may have played a role in the stalling of lava flows above population centers in the Puna District during 2014-2015. Heightened eruptive vigor may be expected if magma supply increases in the future; however, a further decrease in supply rate—which is likely already below the long-term average—may result in cessation of the eruption. Multidisciplinary monitoring, and particularly tracking of CO2 emissions and surface deformation, should be able to detect changes in supply rate before they are strongly manifested at the

  20. High magma decompression rates at the peak of a violent caldera-forming eruption (Lower Pumice 1 eruption, Santorini, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, J. M.; Carey, R. J.; Cas, R. A. F.; Druitt, T. H.

    2017-06-01

    We use the deposit sequence resulting from the first catastrophic caldera collapse event recorded at Santorini (associated with 184 ka Lower Pumice 1 eruption), to study the shallow conduit dynamics at the peak of caldera collapse. The main phase of the Lower Pumice 1 eruption commenced with the development of a sustained buoyant eruption column, producing a clast-supported framework of rhyodacitic white pumice (LP1-A). The clasts have densities of 310-740 kg m-3, large coalesced vesicles that define unimodal size distributions and moderate to high vesicle number densities (1.2 × 109-1.7 × 109 cm-3). Eruption column collapse, possibly associated with incipient caldera collapse, resulted in the development of pyroclastic flows (LP1-B). The resulting ignimbrite is characterised by rhyodacitic white pumice with a narrow density range (250-620 kg m-3) and moderate to high vesicle number densities (1.3 × 109-2.1 × 109 cm-3), comparable to clasts from LP1-A. An absence of deep, basement-derived lithic clast assemblages, together with the occurrence of large vesicles and relatively high vesicle number densities in pumice from the fallout and pyroclastic flow phases, suggests shallow fragmentation depths, a prolonged period of bubble nucleation and growth, and moderate rates of decompression prior to fragmentation (7-11 MPa s-1). Evacuation of magma during the pyroclastic flow phase led to under-pressurisation of the magma reservoir, the propagation of faults (associated with the main phase of caldera collapse) and the formation of 20 m thick lithic lag breccias (LP1-C). Rhyodacitic pumices from the base of the proximal lithic lag breccias show a broader range of density (330-990 kg m-3), higher vesicle number densities (4.5 × 109-1.1 × 1010 cm-3) and higher calculated magma decompression rates of 15-28 MPa s-1 than pyroclasts from the pre-collapse eruptive phases. In addition, the abundance of lithic clasts, including deeper, basement-derived lithic assemblages

  1. Testing the accuracy of a 1-D volcanic plume model in estimating mass eruption rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastin, Larry G.

    2014-03-01

    During volcanic eruptions, empirical relationships are used to estimate mass eruption rate from plume height. Although simple, such relationships can be inaccurate and can underestimate rates in windy conditions. One-dimensional plume models can incorporate atmospheric conditions and give potentially more accurate estimates. Here I present a 1-D model for plumes in crosswind and simulate 25 historical eruptions where plume height Hobs was well observed and mass eruption rate Mobs could be calculated from mapped deposit mass and observed duration. The simulations considered wind, temperature, and phase changes of water. Atmospheric conditions were obtained from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis 2.5° model. Simulations calculate the minimum, maximum, and average values (Mmin, Mmax, and Mavg) that fit the plume height. Eruption rates were also estimated from the empirical formula Mempir = 140Hobs4.14 (Mempir is in kilogram per second, Hobs is in kilometer). For these eruptions, the standard error of the residual in log space is about 0.53 for Mavg and 0.50 for Mempir. Thus, for this data set, the model is slightly less accurate at predicting Mobs than the empirical curve. The inability of this model to improve eruption rate estimates may lie in the limited accuracy of even well-observed plume heights, inaccurate model formulation, or the fact that most eruptions examined were not highly influenced by wind. For the low, wind-blown plume of 14-18 April 2010 at Eyjafjallajökull, where an accurate plume height time series is available, modeled rates do agree better with Mobs than Mempir.

  2. Testing the accuracy of a 1-D volcanic plume model in estimating mass eruption rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, Larry G.

    2014-01-01

    During volcanic eruptions, empirical relationships are used to estimate mass eruption rate from plume height. Although simple, such relationships can be inaccurate and can underestimate rates in windy conditions. One-dimensional plume models can incorporate atmospheric conditions and give potentially more accurate estimates. Here I present a 1-D model for plumes in crosswind and simulate 25 historical eruptions where plume height Hobs was well observed and mass eruption rate Mobs could be calculated from mapped deposit mass and observed duration. The simulations considered wind, temperature, and phase changes of water. Atmospheric conditions were obtained from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis 2.5° model. Simulations calculate the minimum, maximum, and average values (Mmin, Mmax, and Mavg) that fit the plume height. Eruption rates were also estimated from the empirical formula Mempir = 140Hobs4.14 (Mempir is in kilogram per second, Hobs is in kilometer). For these eruptions, the standard error of the residual in log space is about 0.53 for Mavg and 0.50 for Mempir. Thus, for this data set, the model is slightly less accurate at predicting Mobs than the empirical curve. The inability of this model to improve eruption rate estimates may lie in the limited accuracy of even well-observed plume heights, inaccurate model formulation, or the fact that most eruptions examined were not highly influenced by wind. For the low, wind-blown plume of 14–18 April 2010 at Eyjafjallajökull, where an accurate plume height time series is available, modeled rates do agree better with Mobs than Mempir.

  3. Lidar surveys reveal eruptive volumes and rates at Etna, 2007-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behncke, Boris; Fornaciai, Alessandro; Neri, Marco; Favalli, Massimiliano; Ganci, Gaetana; Mazzarini, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    The quantification of eruptive activity represents one major challenge in volcanology. Digital comparison of lidar-based elevation models of Etna (Italy) was made to quantify the volumes of volcanics emitted in 2007-2010. During this period, Etna produced several summit paroxysms followed by a flank eruption. We integrated the total volume difference resulting from the subtraction of the 2007 and 2010 digital elevation models with volumes of eruptive products based on field and aerial surveys to attribute volumes with hitherto unrealized precision to poorly constrained eruptions. The total erupted volume of 2007-2010 is >86 × 106 m3, most (~74 × 106 m3) of which is made up by the lava flows of the 2008-2009 flank eruption. The survey also reveals the high lava volume (5.73 × 106 m3) and average eruption rate (~400 m3 s-1) of the 10 May 2008 paroxysm, whose flow front stopped 6.2 km from the vent, not far from the town of Zafferana Etnea.

  4. Role of mechanical erosion in controlling the effusion rate of basaltic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piombo, Antonello; Tallarico, Andrea; Dragoni, Michele

    2016-09-01

    In many basaltic eruptions, observations show that the effusion rate of magma has a typical dependence on time: the effusion rate curves show first a period of increasing and later a decreasing phase by a maximum value. We present a model to explain this behavior by the emptying of a magma reservoir through a vertical cylindrical conduit with elliptical cross section, coupled with the its widening due to mechanical erosion, produced by the magma flow. The model can reproduce the observed dependence on time of effusion rate in basaltic eruptions. Eruption duration and the maximum value of effusion rate depend on the size of magma chamber, on lava viscosity and strongly on erosion rate per unit traction.

  5. Geodesy - the key for constraining rates of magma supply, storage, and eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, Michael; Anderson, Kyle

    2016-04-01

    Volcanology is an inherently interdisciplinary science that requires joint analysis of diverse physical and chemical datasets to infer subsurface processes from surface observations. Among the diversity of data that can be collected, however, geodetic data are critical for elucidating the main elements of a magmatic plumbing system because of their sensitivity to subsurface changes in volume and mass. In particular, geodesy plays a key role in determining rates of magma supply, storage, and eruption. For example, surface displacements are critical for estimating the volume changes and locations of subsurface magma storage zones, and remotely sensed radar data make it possible to place significant bounds on eruptive volumes. Combining these measurements with geochemical indicators of magma composition and volatile content enables modeling of magma fluxes throughout a volcano's plumbing system, from source to surface. We combined geodetic data (particularly InSAR) with prior geochemical constraints and measured gas emissions from Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i, to develop a probabilistic model that relates magma supply, storage, and eruption over time. We found that the magma supply rate to Kīlauea during 2006 was 35-100% greater than during 2000-2001, with coincident increased rates of subsurface magma storage and eruption at the surface. By 2012, this surge in supply had ended, and supply rates were below those of 2000-2001; magma storage and eruption rates were similarly reduced. These results demonstrate the connection between magma supply, storage, and eruption, and the overall importance of magma supply with respect to volcanic hazards at Kīlauea and similar volcanoes. Our model also confirms the importance of geodetic data in modeling these parameters - rates of storage and eruption are, in some cases, almost uniquely constrained by geodesy. Future modeling efforts along these lines should also seek to incorporate gravity data, to better determine magma

  6. The Measurement of Self-Rated Depression: A Multidimensional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolon, Kevin; Barling, Julian

    1980-01-01

    Investigates the capacity of the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale for providing specific multidimensional descriptors of depressive behavior. Ideational, physiological and behavioral depression factors were evident in data from 96 normal, white university student volunteers. (Author/RH)

  7. The Measurement of Self-Rated Depression: A Multidimensional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolon, Kevin; Barling, Julian

    1980-01-01

    Investigates the capacity of the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale for providing specific multidimensional descriptors of depressive behavior. Ideational, physiological and behavioral depression factors were evident in data from 96 normal, white university student volunteers. (Author/RH)

  8. Impact of gamma radiation on the eruption rate of rat incisors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Faramawy, Nabil; El-Haddad, Khaled; Ali, Mohamed; Talaat, Mona

    2015-09-01

    The present work aims to test the effect of gamma radiation on the rate of eruption of rat incisors. One hundred and five adult male albino rats were used and irradiated at different gamma doses. The effects of irradiation were investigated by numerical measurements of eruption rate, histological investigation using light microscope and spectral analysis using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR). No detectable changes were observed in the groups with smaller radiation doses. There was a significant decrease in the eruption rate starting from the 4 Gy radiation dose. The observation of histological sections revealed disturbance in cellular elements responsible for eruption as well as periodontal disturbance in the samples irradiated with 4 and 6 Gy. FTIR Spectroscopy of control group and the group irradiated by 0.5 Gy showed similar absorption bands with minor differences. However, samples irradiated by 1 Gy showed significant changes in both molecular structure and conformation related to carbonates and hydroxyl groups. From the previous results, it could be concluded that gamma irradiation negatively affects the eruption rate of the rat incisors especially with higher doses.

  9. Eruption rates and compositional trends at Los Humeros Volcanic Center, Puebla, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferriz, H.; Mahood, G. A.

    1984-09-01

    The present investigation has the objective to relate chemical trends in the products of the Los Humeros volcanic center to the center's physical evolution. Eruptive products of this young volcanic system span the range basalt through high-silica rhyolite, but show an overall trend with time toward increasingly mafic compositions. It is pointed out that this pattern is most likely a product of an increasing volumetric rate of eruption which exceeded the rate of regeneration of differentiated magma. Representative analytical and petrographic data in the context of establishing petrological trends are presented.

  10. Volumes, rates and related hazards of Etna's 2007-2010 eruptions (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Marco; Behncke, Boris; Fornaciai, Alessandro; Favalli, Massimiliano; Ganci, Gaetana; Mazzarini, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Digital comparison of two LiDAR-based digital elevation models of the summit area and eastern flank of Mount Etna (Italy), acquired in June 2007 and September 2010, were used to quantify with high accuracy the volumes of eruptive products (lava and pyroclastics) emitted in this time interval. During this period, Etna's activity was characterized by a classical sequence of summit paroxysms followed by a voluminous effusive eruption on the upper east flank (May 2008-July 2009). We integrated the total volume difference resulting from the subtraction of the 2007 DEM from the 2010 DEM with individual, well-constrained volumes of eruptive products based on data from field and aerial surveys to attribute more precise volumes to events that have until now remained poorly constrained. The total volume of 2007-2010 eruptive products is ~86 million cubic meter, by far the largest proportion (~73.6 million cubic meter) of which is represented by the lava flows of the 2008-2009 flank eruption. In spite of being one of the longest-standing flank eruptions of Etna of the past ~350 years, its mean effusion rate of 2 cubic meter per second was rather low. The survey also reveals the unusually high lava volume (~5.8 million cubic meter) of the paroxysmal episode of 10 May 2008, which preceded the flank outbreak by three days, and which was emplaced within four hours at an average rate of ~400 cubic meter per second, the flow front stopping at a distance of 6.2 km from the source vent. With a slightly longer duration of this eruptive episode, that lava flow might have come rather close to the outskirts of the nearby town of Zafferana Etnea.

  11. Improvements on the relationship between plume height and mass eruption rate: Implications for volcanic ash cloud forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webley, P. W.; Dehn, J.; Mastin, L. G.; Steensen, T. S.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic ash plumes and the dispersing clouds into the atmosphere are a hazard for local populations as well as for the aviation industry. Volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models, used to forecast the movement of these hazardous ash emissions, require eruption source parameters (ESP) such as plume height, eruption rate and duration. To estimate mass eruption rate, empirical relationships with observed plume height have been applied. Theoretical relationships defined by Morton et al. (1956) and Wilson et al. (1976) use default values for the environmental lapse rate (ELR), thermal efficiency, density of ash, specific heat capacity, initial temperature of the erupted material and final temperature of the material. Each volcano, based on its magma type, has a different density, specific heat capacity and initial eruptive temperature compared to these default parameters, and local atmospheric conditions can produce a very different ELR. Our research shows that a relationship between plume height and mass eruption rate can be defined for each eruptive event for each volcano. Additionally, using the one-dimensional modeling program, Plumeria, our analysis assesses the importance of factors such as vent diameter and eruption velocity on the relationship between the eruption rate and measured plume height. Coupling such a tool with a VATD model should improve pre-eruptive forecasts of ash emissions downwind and lead to improvements in ESP data that VATD models use for operational volcanic ash cloud forecasting.

  12. Implication of the January 1990 Volcanic Eruption on Io for Resurfacing Rates and Energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. V.; Matson, D. L.; Veeder, G. J.; Blaney, D. L.; Goguen, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    The high temperature event observed by ground based infrared radiometry of Io in January of 1990 can be modeled as an extremely active silicate lava flow which increased its area and cooled over a period of three hours. The best model at the start of the observations is a thermal source at 1200 K with an area equal to that of a circle of 5.6 km radius, while at the end of the observation sequence a source with a temperature of 700 K and a 13 km radium provides the best match. Given a flow thickness of 10 m, this implies an eruption rate of 300,000 cubic meters per second. This is large by terrestrial standards but consistent with estimates of lunar eruption rates (Head and Wilson 1981) and some terrestrial eruptions such as the 1800-1801 Hualalai flow in Hawaii (Baloga and Spudis 1992)...

  13. Lunar volcanic eruptions: Mare lava flow eruption rates and implications for mantle melt volumes and dike geometries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L.; Head, J. W., III

    2008-09-01

    Introduction. We have documented the range of eruption styles on the Moon and linked there to processes of magma generation, ascent and eruption [1]. With the availability of high-resolution images of the Moon from new missions, we have been revisiting the range of eruption conditions implied by these surface volcanic features. Here we focus estimating eruption conditions of lunar mare lavas, especially volume eruption rates, V. The youngest and bestpreserved flow units in Mare Imbrium have lengths, X, in the range 300 to 1200 km, widths, w, of order 20 km and thicknesses, d, of ~20 m [2]. Two assumptions can be made about eruption conditions of the flows: they may have been either cooling-limited (stopped due to excessive cooling) or volume-limited (stopped because of exhausted magma supply at the source). We explore the implications of these assumptions and derive estimates of likely eruption conditions, melt volumes, and feeder dike geometries. Cooling-limited flows. If flows were cooling limited they would have stopped when the Gratz number, Gz, defined by Gz = [(16 d2)/(k t)], decreased from an initially large value to the critical limiting value, Gzc, equal to ~300 [3]. Here k = 7 × 10-7 m2 s-1 is the thermal diffusivity of silicate lava and t is the time when lava motion ceased. Assuming a constant flow speed S, X = (S t) where X is the length of the flow. We do not know S and so we eliminate this by noting that V = (S w d) so that we can write 300 = (16 V d)/(k X w) or V = (18.75 k X w)/d. Thus the volume flux can be written in terms of the measurable quantities X, w and d. With X = 300 km, w = 20 km and d = 20 m, we find V = ~4000 m3 s-1, which implies a flow speed S = V/(w d) = ~1 cm s-1 and a time of flow emplacement of t = ~12 months. For the longest flow units with X = 1200 km and the same values of w and d, V = ~16000 m3 s-1, S = 4 cm s-1 and the emplacement time is the same as before, t = 12 months. Volume-limited flows. The other extreme is to

  14. Volumes and eruption rates for the 2008-2009 Chaitén rhyolite lava dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallister, J. S.; Diefenbach, A. K.; Griswold, J.; Muñoz, J.; Lara, L. E.; Valenzuela, C.; Burton, W. C.; Keeler, R.

    2010-12-01

    The 2008 eruption of Chaitén caldera, southern Chile, was one of the most explosive on Earth in the past two decades. The eruption began early on 2 May 2008 (UTC) and produced sub-plinian to plinian ash columns between 2 May and 9 May, before transitioning from explosive eruption of tephra to effusive eruption of rhyolite lava. A series of lava flow lobes accumulated within the caldera between late May and the end of the year, burying most of Chaitén’s prehistoric lava dome. A prominent lava spine was also extruded, starting in late 2008. The spine collapsed on 19 February 2009, producing a pyroclastic flow that extended out of the caldera and 7 km down the Río Chaitén. Dome growth continued through 2009, filling in much of the spine-collapse area and further expanding the composite dome through endogenous growth. Dome volumes are computed and eruption rates estimated using satellite data from 2008-10, photogrammetric analysis of oblique aerial photographs taken in January 2010, and digital elevation models derived from ASTER, SRTM, LIDAR and topographic maps. The 2008-10 dome has a total volume of approximately 0.8 km3. About 0.5 km3 erupted within the first four months, when extrusion rates were in the range 10-100 m3s-1. Extrusion rates decreased exponentially over the eruptive period. The 2008-10 dome is similar in volume and composition to the prehistoric lava dome, which has a volume of at least 0.5 km3. Together the two domes constitute about 20-40% of the 3.5-7 km3 collapse volume of the prehistoric caldera. The unusually rapid extrusion rates during the first four months are among the highest ever measured for silicic lava. Chaitén’s 2008-10 lava is obsidian and microcrystalline rhyolite with 75.35+/-0.02% SiO2. A large volume of low viscosity crystal-poor magma (about 0.1% phenocrysts) coupled with high extrusion pressures during the extended transition from explosive to effusive eruption style resulted in these exceptionally high extrusion rates.

  15. High magma storage rates before the 1983 eruption of kilauea, hawaii

    PubMed

    Cayol; Dieterich; Okamura; Miklius

    2000-06-30

    After a magnitude 7.2 earthquake in 1975 and before the start of the ongoing eruption in 1983, deformation of Kilauea volcano was the most rapid ever recorded. Three-dimensional numerical modeling shows that this deformation is consistent with the dilation of a dike within Kilauea's rift zones coupled with creep over a narrow area of a low-angle fault beneath the south flank. Magma supply is estimated to be 0.18 cubic kilometers per year, twice that of previous estimates. The 1983 eruption may be a direct consequence of the high rates of magma storage within the rift zone that followed the 1975 earthquake.

  16. Ascent Rates of Rhyolitic Magma During the Opening Stages of Explosive Caldera-Forming Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, M.; Wallace, P. J.; Wilson, C. J. N.; Watkins, J. M.; Liu, Y.; Morgan, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the timescales of rhyolitic magma ascent for three supereruptions that show contrasting eruptive behavior at eruption onset: (1) the Bishop Tuff, CA where early fallout graded directly into climactic eruption, (2) the Oruanui eruption, Taupo NZ, which experienced a significant time break between the initial fallout and subsequent activity and (3) the Huckleberry Ridge, Yellowstone where initial activity was episodic, with eruptive pauses totaling days to weeks. During ascent, decompression causes volatile exsolution from the host melt, creating H2O and CO2 gradients in reentrants (REs; unsealed inclusions) that can be modeled to estimate ascent timescales1,2,3. Using a code1 refined to include an error minimization function, we present modeled ascent rates for REs from Huckleberry Ridge (n=10), Bishop (n=14), and Oruanui (n=4), measured using FTIR (20 μm resolution, 4-15 points per RE). Best-fit profiles for the Bishop REs give ascent rates of 0.6-30 m/s, which overlap with those of the Huckleberry (0.3-5.5 m/s), but extend to higher values. Although ascent rate and initial eruptive behavior are somewhat decoupled, there is an increase in the number of faster ascent rates and greater starting depths with higher stratigraphic height in the Huckleberry Ridge and Bishop fall deposits. Preliminary work on Oruanui REs indicates rates of 0.15-2.0 m/s, which overlie the lower end of the Bishop and Huckleberry REs, in agreement with previous data1. Overall, there is significant overlap between the three datasets (average 4±7 m/s). Our calculated ascent rates fall towards the lower end of ascent rates that have been estimated (5-40 m/s4) using theoretical and numerical modeling of conduit flow for Plinian rhyolitic eruptions below the fragmentation depth. 1 Liu Y et al. 2007: J Geophys Res 112, B06204; 2 Humphreys MCS et al. 2008: Earth Planet Sci Lett 270, 25; 3 Lloyd et al., 2014: J Volcanol Geotherm Res 283, 1; 4Rutherford MJ 2008: Rev Mineral Geochem 69

  17. Calculation of Decompression Rates for the Initial Explosive Phase of the 2010 Merapi Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, E.; Genareau, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    The 2010 eruption of Merapi (Java, Indonesia) initiated with an uncharacteristic explosion, followed by rapid lava dome growth and collapse, all of which generated deadly pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). PDC samples from the initial explosion on October 26th were collected from several locations surrounding the edifice. Plagioclase phenocrysts represent the primary component of the dominant ash mode due to the elutriation of the finer ash fraction during PDC transport. Secondary electron images of 45 phenocrysts were taken using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to examine preserved glass coatings on phenocrysts, which represent the interstitial melt within the magma at the point of fragmentation. Using these images, the bubble number densities (BNDs) were determined, and the decompression rate meter of Toramaru (2006) was used to calculate the decompression rate during the initial explosion of the 2010 Merapi eruption. Calculated decompression rates range from 6.08x10^7 Pa/s to 1.4x10^8 Pa/s. Decompression rates have shown to correlate with eruption column height; therefore Merapi's rates should be similar to those of other Vulcanian explosions, because the eruption column was 8-9 km in height. The decompression rates acquired for Merapi using Toramaru's BND meter are higher than the rates calculated with other methods such as microlite number density and extension cracks in crystals. Sakurajima volcano (Japan) experienced decompression rates from 7.0 × 10^3 to 7.8 × 10^4 Pa/s during the later phase of the fall 2011 Vulcanian explosions. Plinian explosions, such as at the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo and the 1980 eruption of St. Helens had much higher column heights compared to the initial 2010 Merapi explosion; 35 km, 19 km, and 8-9 km, respectively, but decompression rates in a comparative range (10^8 Pa/s). Higher decompression rates during the 2010 initial explosion at Merapi likely resulted from increased overpressure in the shallow conduit, the

  18. Probabilistic short-term forecasting of eruption rate at Kīlauea Volcano using a physics-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. R.

    2016-12-01

    Deterministic models of volcanic eruptions yield predictions of future activity conditioned on uncertainty in the current state of the system. Physics-based eruption models are well-suited for deterministic forecasting as they can relate magma physics with a wide range of observations. Yet, physics-based eruption forecasting is strongly limited by an inadequate understanding of volcanic systems, and the need for eruption models to be computationally tractable. At Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii, episodic depressurization-pressurization cycles of the magma system generate correlated, quasi-exponential variations in ground deformation and surface height of the active summit lava lake. Deflations are associated with reductions in eruption rate, or even brief eruptive pauses, and thus partly control lava flow advance rates and associated hazard. Because of the relatively well-understood nature of Kīlauea's shallow magma plumbing system, and because more than 600 of these events have been recorded to date, they offer a unique opportunity to refine a physics-based effusive eruption forecasting approach and apply it to lava eruption rates over short (hours to days) time periods. A simple physical model of the volcano ascribes observed data to temporary reductions in magma supply to an elastic reservoir filled with compressible magma. This model can be used to predict the evolution of an ongoing event, but because the mechanism that triggers events is unknown, event durations are modeled stochastically from previous observations. A Bayesian approach incorporates diverse data sets and prior information to simultaneously estimate uncertain model parameters and future states of the system. Forecasts take the form of probability distributions for eruption rate or cumulative erupted volume at some future time. Results demonstrate the significant uncertainties that still remain even for short-term eruption forecasting at a well-monitored volcano - but also the value of a physics

  19. The 2011 Grímsvötn Eruption From High Rate Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hreinsdottir, S.; Grapenthin, R.; Sigmundsson, F.; Roberts, M. J.; Holmjarn, J.; Geirsson, H.; Arnadottir, T.; Bennett, R. A.; Villemin, T.; Ofeigsson, B. G.; Sturkell, E. C.

    2011-12-01

    High rate geodetic measurements at volcanoes can give displacements at sub second intervals, revealing surface deformation associated with magma movements. The Grímsvötn volcano lies beneath the Vatnajökull icecap, Iceland, limiting the near field monitoring efforts to a single nunatak, Mt. Grímsfjall, on the southern caldera rim. A 5 Hz GPS station and an electronic tilt meter are located at Grímsfjall. The colocation of these instruments (GPS and tilt station) allows us to relate the observed surface deformation to pressure change in a magma chamber assuming a simple Mogi source within an elastic half space. During the 21-28 May 2011 Grímsvötn eruption a continuous stream of data, despite the eruption plume and lightning, was transmitted to Reykjavík. The tiltmeter measures N-S and E-W components of tilt, the N-S component was recorded at 100 samples per second (sps) but the E-W component at 4 sps. The high rate data from the GPS station at Grímsfjall (GFUM) were analyzed using the Track part of GAMIT/GLOBK. We produced kinematic solutions at 5 Hz and 1 Hz intervals using reference stations in 40-120 km distance of the volcano. To minimize multipath effects we applied sidereal filtering and stacked the individual solutions to further improve the signal to noise ratio. The resulting deformation time series suggests a rapid pressure drop starting about 50 minutes prior to the onset of the eruption when over 20 km high plume formed. The characteristics of the GPS and tilt data time series suggests that the main signal was induced by a single source of fixed location and geometry throughout the eruption; a shallow magma chamber. Small deviations in displacement direction prior to the onset of the eruption can be explained by the opening of the feeder dike. We see a total displacement of 57 cm in direction ˜N38.5°W and down at the GPS station, suggesting a source depth of ~1.7 km. About 20% of the displacement preceded the eruption and more than 95% took

  20. Development of an Interview-Based Geriatric Depression Rating Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamison, Christine; Scogin, Forrest

    1992-01-01

    Developed interview-based Geriatric Depression Rating Scale (GDRS) and administered 35-item GDRS to 68 older adults with range of affective disturbance. Found scale to have internal consistency and split-half reliability comparable to those of Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Geriatric Depression Scale. Concurrent validity, construct…

  1. Ascent Rates from Melt Embayments: Insights into the Eruption Dynamics of Arc Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruprecht, P.; Lloyd, A. S.; Hauri, E.; Rose, W. I.; Gonnermann, H. M.; Plank, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    A significant fraction of the magma that is added from the mantle to the subvolcanic plumbing system ultimately erupts at the surface. The initial volatile content of the magmas as well as the interplay between volatile loss and magma ascent plays a significant role in determining the eruption style (effusive versus explosive) as well as the magnitude of the eruption. The October 17, 1974 sub-Plinian eruption of Volcán de Fuego represents a particularly well-characterized system in terms of volatile content and magma chemistry to investigate the relation between initial water content of the magmas and the ascent rate. By modeling volatile element distribution in melt embayments through diffusion and degassing during ascent we can estimate magma ascent from the storage region in the crust to the surface. The novel aspect is the measurement of concentration gradients multiple volatile elements (in particular CO2, H2O, S) at fine-scale (5-10 μm) using the NanoSIMS. The wide range in diffusivity and solubility of these different volatiles provides multiple constraints on ascent timescales over a range of depths. H2O, CO2, and S all decrease toward the embayment outlet bubble documenting the loss of H2O and CO2 compared to an extensive melt inclusion suite from the same day of the eruption. The data is best described by a two-stage model. At high pressure (>145 MPa) decompression is slow (0.05- 0.3 MPa/s) and CO2 is bled off predominantly. At shallow levels decompression accelerates to 0.3-0.5 MPa/s at the point of H2O exsolution, which strongly affects the buoyancy of the ascending magma. The magma ascent rates presented are among the first for explosive basaltic eruptions and demonstrate the potential of the embayment method for quantifying magmatic timescales associated with eruptions of different vigor. [1] Lloyd et al. (2014) JVGR, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2014.06.002

  2. Current Use of Depression Rating Scales in Mental Health Setting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Jeong; Kim, Jung Bum; Shin, Im Hee; Lim, Kyung Hee; Lee, Sang Hee; Cho, Gyung Ah; Sung, Hyung Mo; Jung, Sung Won; Zmimmerman, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was to investigate the current use of depression rating scales by psychiatrists and clinical psychologists in Korea. Methods The questionnaires from many psychiatrists and clinical psychologists were included in the analysis. The questionnaire was composed of items about examining the percentage of patients clinically using depression rating scales, reasons for not use of them, the degree of satisfaction, the perceived agreement rate between the result of depression rating scales and doctor's clinical interview in the evaluation of patients with depressive symptoms. Data were analyzed by χ2 and independent t-test. Results The clinical use of depression rating scales was more frequent in the psychologists than in the psychiatrists. The purposes for using depression rating scales were assessed into six areas, there was no significant difference in between two groups, and both groups pointed out their purpose as rating of severity and screening. The reasons for not using scales were that their interview may be sufficient for diagnosis and assessment of depressive patients and they are not familiar with the use of depression rating scales. The psychiatrists usually prefer the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Symptom Checklist 90-Revision (SCL-90-R) in order of frequency, and the clinical psychologists are more likely to use the BDI, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and SCL-90-R. Overall rate of satisfaction in the use of the scales was 67.29±14.45% and overall perceived agreement rate was 70.89±16.45%. Conclusion Currently used depression rating scales at the clinical practice were not various. Therefore, to heighten clinicians' utility of these depression rating scales measures, either educational efforts or advertisements, or both, will be necessary to spread them wildly. PMID:20927305

  3. Increased rates of large-magnitude explosive eruptions in Japan in the late Neogene and Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, S. H.; Sparks, R. S. J.; Wallace, L. M.; Engwell, S. L.; Scourse, E. M.; Barnard, N. H.; Kandlbauer, J.; Brown, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    Tephra layers in marine sediment cores from scientific ocean drilling largely record high-magnitude silicic explosive eruptions in the Japan arc for up to the last 20 million years. Analysis of the thickness variation with distance of 180 tephra layers from a global data set suggests that the majority of the visible tephra layers used in this study are the products of caldera-forming eruptions with magnitude (M) > 6, considering their distances at the respective drilling sites to their likely volcanic sources. Frequency of visible tephra layers in cores indicates a marked increase in rates of large magnitude explosive eruptions at ˜8 Ma, 6-4 Ma, and further increase after ˜2 Ma. These changes are attributed to major changes in tectonic plate interactions. Lower rates of large magnitude explosive volcanism in the Miocene are related to a strike-slip-dominated boundary (and temporary cessation or deceleration of subduction) between the Philippine Sea Plate and southwest Japan, combined with the possibility that much of the arc in northern Japan was submerged beneath sea level partly due to previous tectonic extension of northern Honshu related to formation of the Sea of Japan. Changes in plate motions and subduction dynamics during the ˜8 Ma to present period led to (1) increased arc-normal subduction in southwest Japan (and resumption of arc volcanism) and (2) shift from extension to compression of the upper plate in northeast Japan, leading to uplift, crustal thickening and favorable conditions for accumulation of the large volumes of silicic magma needed for explosive caldera-forming eruptions.

  4. Increased rates of large‐magnitude explosive eruptions in Japan in the late Neogene and Quaternary

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, R. S. J.; Wallace, L. M.; Engwell, S. L.; Scourse, E. M.; Barnard, N. H.; Kandlbauer, J.; Brown, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tephra layers in marine sediment cores from scientific ocean drilling largely record high‐magnitude silicic explosive eruptions in the Japan arc for up to the last 20 million years. Analysis of the thickness variation with distance of 180 tephra layers from a global data set suggests that the majority of the visible tephra layers used in this study are the products of caldera‐forming eruptions with magnitude (M) > 6, considering their distances at the respective drilling sites to their likely volcanic sources. Frequency of visible tephra layers in cores indicates a marked increase in rates of large magnitude explosive eruptions at ∼8 Ma, 6–4 Ma, and further increase after ∼2 Ma. These changes are attributed to major changes in tectonic plate interactions. Lower rates of large magnitude explosive volcanism in the Miocene are related to a strike‐slip‐dominated boundary (and temporary cessation or deceleration of subduction) between the Philippine Sea Plate and southwest Japan, combined with the possibility that much of the arc in northern Japan was submerged beneath sea level partly due to previous tectonic extension of northern Honshu related to formation of the Sea of Japan. Changes in plate motions and subduction dynamics during the ∼8 Ma to present period led to (1) increased arc‐normal subduction in southwest Japan (and resumption of arc volcanism) and (2) shift from extension to compression of the upper plate in northeast Japan, leading to uplift, crustal thickening and favorable conditions for accumulation of the large volumes of silicic magma needed for explosive caldera‐forming eruptions. PMID:27656115

  5. SOLAR MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES, CORONAL POTENTIAL FIELD MODELS AND ERUPTION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.

    2013-05-10

    We study the evolution of the observed photospheric magnetic field and the modeled global coronal magnetic field during the past 3 1/2 solar activity cycles observed since the mid-1970s. We use synoptic magnetograms and extrapolated potential-field models based on longitudinal full-disk photospheric magnetograms from the National Solar Observatory's three magnetographs at Kitt Peak, the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun vector spectro-magnetograph, the spectro-magnetograph and the 512-channel magnetograph instruments, and from Stanford University's Wilcox Solar Observatory. The associated multipole field components are used to study the dominant length scales and symmetries of the coronal field. Polar field changes are found to be well correlated with active fields over most of the period studied, except between 2003 and 2006 when the active fields did not produce significant polar field changes. Of the axisymmetric multipoles, only the dipole and octupole follow the poles whereas the higher orders follow the activity cycle. All non-axisymmetric multipole strengths are well correlated with the activity cycle. The tilt of the solar dipole is therefore almost entirely due to active-region fields. The axial dipole and octupole are the largest contributors to the global field except while the polar fields are reversing. This influence of the polar fields extends to modulating eruption rates. According to the Computer Aided CME Tracking, Solar Eruptive Event Detection System, and Nobeyama radioheliograph prominence eruption catalogs, the rate of solar eruptions is found to be systematically higher for active years between 2003 and 2012 than for those between 1997 and 2002. This behavior appears to be connected with the weakness of the late-cycle 23 polar fields as suggested by Luhmann. We see evidence that the process of cycle 24 field reversal is well advanced at both poles.

  6. Solar magnetic activity cycles, coronal potential field models and eruption rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon

    2013-07-01

    We study the evolution of the observed photospheric magnetic field and the modeled global coronal magnetic field during the past 3 1/2 solar activity cycles observed since the mid-1970s. We use synoptic magnetograms and extrapolated potential-field models based on longitudinal full-disk photospheric magnetograms from the NSO's three magnetographs at Kitt Peak, the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) vector spectro-magnetograph (VSM), the spectro-magnetograph and the 512-channel magnetograph instruments, and from the U. Stanford's Wilcox Solar Observatory. The associated multipole field components are used to study the dominant length scales and symmetries of the coronal field. Of the axisymmetric multipoles, only the dipole and octupole follow the poles whereas the higher orders follow the activity cycle. All non-axisymmetric multipole strengths are well correlated with the activity cycle. The axial dipole and octupole are the largest contributors to the global field except while the polar fields are reversing. This influence of the polar fields extends to modulating eruption rates. According to the Computer Aided CME Tracking (CACTus), Solar Eruptive Event Detection System (SEEDS), and Nobeyama radioheliograph prominence eruption catalogs, the rate of solar eruptions is found to be systematically higher for active years between 2003-2012 than for those between 1997-2002. This behavior appears to be connected with the weakness of the late-cycle 23 polar fields as suggested by Luhmann. We see evidence that the process of cycle 24 field reversal is well advanced at both poles.

  7. Increased rates of large-magnitude explosive eruptions in Japan in the late Neogene and Quaternary.

    PubMed

    Mahony, S H; Sparks, R S J; Wallace, L M; Engwell, S L; Scourse, E M; Barnard, N H; Kandlbauer, J; Brown, S K

    2016-07-01

    Tephra layers in marine sediment cores from scientific ocean drilling largely record high-magnitude silicic explosive eruptions in the Japan arc for up to the last 20 million years. Analysis of the thickness variation with distance of 180 tephra layers from a global data set suggests that the majority of the visible tephra layers used in this study are the products of caldera-forming eruptions with magnitude (M) > 6, considering their distances at the respective drilling sites to their likely volcanic sources. Frequency of visible tephra layers in cores indicates a marked increase in rates of large magnitude explosive eruptions at ∼8 Ma, 6-4 Ma, and further increase after ∼2 Ma. These changes are attributed to major changes in tectonic plate interactions. Lower rates of large magnitude explosive volcanism in the Miocene are related to a strike-slip-dominated boundary (and temporary cessation or deceleration of subduction) between the Philippine Sea Plate and southwest Japan, combined with the possibility that much of the arc in northern Japan was submerged beneath sea level partly due to previous tectonic extension of northern Honshu related to formation of the Sea of Japan. Changes in plate motions and subduction dynamics during the ∼8 Ma to present period led to (1) increased arc-normal subduction in southwest Japan (and resumption of arc volcanism) and (2) shift from extension to compression of the upper plate in northeast Japan, leading to uplift, crustal thickening and favorable conditions for accumulation of the large volumes of silicic magma needed for explosive caldera-forming eruptions.

  8. Petrological evidence for non-linear increase of magmatic intrusion rates before eruption at open vent mafic volcanoe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruth, D. C. S.; Costa Rodriguez, F.

    2015-12-01

    The most active volcanoes on earth erupt in a yearly to decadal time scales, typically erupt mafic magmas and are open-vent systems with prominent degassing plumes (e.g. Mayon, Arenal, Llaima, Etna). Here we investigate the plumbing systems, dynamics, and processes that drive eruptions at these systems. These are key questions for improving hazard evaluation, and better understanding the unrest associated with these types of volcanoes. The petrology and geochemistry from six historical eruptions (1947-2006) of Mayon volcano (Philippines) shows that all lavas are basaltic andesite with phenocrysts of plagioclase + orthopyroxene (Opx) + clinopyroxene. Opx crystals show a variety of compositions and zoning patterns (reverse, normal or complex) with Mg# (= 100 *Mg/[Mg+Fe]) varying from 67 to 81. The simplest interpretation is that the low Mg# parts of the crystals resided on an upper crustal and crystal rich reservoir that was intruded by more primitive magmas from which the high Mg# parts of the crystals grew. Modelling Mg-Fe diffusion in Opx shows that times since magma injection and eruption range from a few days up to 3.5 years in all of the investigated eruptions. The longest diffusion times are shorter than the repose times between the eruptions, which implies that crystal recycling between eruptive events is negligible. This is a surprising result that shows that for each eruption a different part of the evolved crystal-rich plumbing system is activated. This can be due to random intrusion location or an irreversibility of the plumbing system that prevents multiple eruptions from the same crystal-rich part. Moreover, we find that the number of intrusions markedly increases before each eruption in a non-linear manner. Such an increased rate of intrusions with time might reflect non-linear rheological properties of the crystal-rich system, of the enclosing rocks, or the non-linear evolution of crystal-melt reaction-dissolution fronts during magma intrusions.

  9. REFIR - The operational FutureVolc multi-parameter system providing a best estimate of mass eruption rate during ongoing eruptions in near real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürig, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash injected into the atmosphere poses a serious threat for aviation. Forecasting the concentration of ash promptly requires detailed knowledge of eruption source parameters. However, monitoring an ongoing eruption and quantifying the mass flux in real-time is a considerable challenge. Due to the large uncertainties affecting present-day models, best estimates are often obtained by the application of integrated approaches. One example for this strategy is represented by the EU supersite project "FutureVolc" which aims to monitor eruptions of volcanoes in Iceland. A quasi-autonomous multi-parameter system, denoted "REFIR", has been developed. REFIR makes use of streaming data provided by a multitude of sensors, e.g. by C- and X-band radars, web-cam based plume height tracking systems, imaging ultra-violet and infrared cameras and electric field sensors. These observations are used with plume models that also consider the current local wind and other atmospheric conditions, and a best estimate of source parameters, including the mass eruption rate, is provided in near real-time (within a time interval of 5 minutes) as soon as an eruption has started. Since neither the time nor the location of the next Icelandic eruption is known the system has been developed with a guiding principle of maximum flexibility, and it can effortlessly be implemented elsewhere needing minimum adoption to local conditions. Moreover, it is designed to be easily upgraded, which allows future extension of the existing monitoring network, learning from new events, and incorporating new technologies and model improvements. Data-flow, features and integrated models within REFIR will be presented and strategies for implementing potential future research developments on ash plume dynamics will be discussed.

  10. Measuring Depression at the End of Life: Is the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale a Valid Instrument?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olden, Megan; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Breitbart, William

    2009-01-01

    Depression at the end of life is a common mental health issue with serious implications for quality of life and decision making. This study investigated the reliability and validity of one of the most frequently used measures of depression, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) in 422 patients with terminal cancer admitted to a palliative…

  11. Measuring Depression at the End of Life: Is the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale a Valid Instrument?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olden, Megan; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Breitbart, William

    2009-01-01

    Depression at the end of life is a common mental health issue with serious implications for quality of life and decision making. This study investigated the reliability and validity of one of the most frequently used measures of depression, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) in 422 patients with terminal cancer admitted to a palliative…

  12. Eruptive probability calculation for the Yucca Mountain site, USA: statistical estimation of recurrence rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang; Smith, Eugene I.; Feuerbach, Daniel L.; Naumann, Terry R.

    1991-12-01

    Investigations are currently underway to evaluate the impact of potentially adverse conditions (e.g. volcanism, faulting, seismicity) on the waste-isolation capability of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. This paper is the first in a series that will examine the probability of disruption of the Yucca Mountain site by volcanic eruption. In it, we discuss three estimating techniques for determining the recurrence rate of volcanic eruption (λ), an important parameter in the Poisson probability model. The first method is based on the number of events occurring over a certain observation period, the second is based on repose times, and the final is based on magma volume. All three require knowledge of the total number of eruptions in the Yucca Mountain area during the observation period ( E). Following this discussion we then propose an estimate of E which takes into account the possibility of polygenetic and polycyclic volcanism at all the volcanic centers near the Yucca Mountain site.

  13. Ground-based measurements of the emission rate and composition of gases from the Holuhraun eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, Melissa A.; Stefánsdóttir, Gerður; Bergsson, Baldur; Barsotti, Sara; Galle, Bo; Conde, Vladimir; Donovan, Amy; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Burton, Mike; Keller, Nicole S.; Askew, Robert A.; Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; La Spina, Alessandro; Sigurðardóttir, Guðmunda M.; Jónasdóttir, Elín B.; Snorrason, Árni; Stefánsson, Andri; Tsanev, Vitchko

    2015-04-01

    The ongoing fissure eruption at Holuhraun is distinguished by high concentrations of gases being released both from the vent(s) where lava is being extruded and from the cooling lava. The conditions for making ground-based measurements of the gases are particularly challenging: remote location, optically dense plume with high SO2 column amounts, low UV intensity, frequent clouds and precipitation, an extensive and hot lava field, and ramparts around the main vent. Three scanning DOASes capable of streaming data in almost real-time have been installed less than 15 km from the fissure. As of writing, there are two scanning DOASes operating while one unrecoverable instrument has been trapped by the lava. Traverses with a car-mounted DOAS are made along the ring road down-wind from the eruption when conditions are favorable. The SO2 emission rate is greater in the long-range traverses than from the near-source DOAS measurements. The data is being examined so that the uncertainty in the DOAS measurements can be constrained. Preliminary SO2 emission rates for the first month and a half of the eruption are ~400 kg/s with some days greater than 1000 kg/s. Plume composition measurements were made by FTIR, MultiGAS, DOAS and filter pack during multiple campaigns in the first two months of the eruption. The FTIR measurements indicated a significantly drier plume than the MultiGAS measurements. The CO2/SO2 ratio measured by MultiGAS and FTIR agree very well. Mobile DOAS traverses indicate that 80-90 % of the SO2 emissions came from the main vent with the remainder being released by the cooling lava. FTIR measured higher HCl/SO2 ratios from the cooling lava than from the main vent. The last campaign that successfully collected data (in October) showed with both FTIR and MultiGAS a drop in CO2/SO2. Since then, there have been no successful campaign measurements. Further ground-based measurements to determine the relative contribution of the lava field to the total emissions and

  14. Mass eruption rates in pulsating eruptions estimated from video analysis of the gas thrust-buoyancy transition—a case study of the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürig, Tobias; Gudmundsson, Magnús Tumi; Karmann, Sven; Zimanowski, Bernd; Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Rietze, Martin; Büttner, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    The 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano was characterized by pulsating activity. Discrete ash bursts merged at higher altitude and formed a sustained quasi-continuous eruption column. High-resolution near-field videos were recorded on 8-10 May, during the second explosive phase of the eruption, and supplemented by contemporary aerial observations. In the observed period, pulses occurred at intervals of 0.8 to 23.4 s (average, 4.2 s). On the basis of video analysis, the pulse volume and the velocity of the reversely buoyant jets that initiated each pulse were determined. The expansion history of jets was tracked until the pulses reached the height of transition from a negatively buoyant jet to a convective buoyant plume about 100 m above the vent. Based on the assumption that the density of the gas-solid mixture making up the pulse approximates that of the surrounding air at the level of transition from the jet to the plume, a mass flux ranging between 2.2 and 3.5 · 104 kg/s was calculated. This mass eruption rate is in good agreement with results obtained with simple models relating plume height with mass discharge at the vent. Our findings indicate that near-field measurements of eruption source parameters in a pulsating eruption may prove to be an effective monitoring tool. A comparison of the observed pulses with those generated in calibrated large-scale experiments reveals very similar characteristics and suggests that the analysis of near-field sensors could in the future help to constrain the triggering mechanism of explosive eruptions.

  15. Seismic and infrasonic eruption tremors and their relation to magma discharge rate: A case study for sub-Plinian events in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, Mie

    2016-10-01

    Magma discharge rate is one of the most important parameters in quantifying volcanic activity. Many previous works have attempted to connect observations of seismic and infrasonic eruption tremors with magma discharge rate. Power law scaling relations with different power indices have been proposed based on various data sets and models. The 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake, Japan, provides an excellent data set with which to investigate these relationships for a sustained explosive eruption sequence. Magma discharge rates are well constrained by geodetic, geologic, and remote sensing methods. Seismic and infrasonic data were recorded close to the vent. Moreover, contributions to ground shaking from infrasound can be distinguished from seismic signals in the seismometer records. As a result, linear power law relationships are found to fit all pairs of variables (seismic eruption tremor power, infrasonic eruption tremor power, and magma discharge rate) in the quasi-stable or slowly growing stages of the sub-Plinian events. Similar relations have been reported for other eruptions but only between seismic eruption tremors and magma discharge rate or between seismic and infrasonic eruption tremors. Existing models do not fully explain the observed relationships. The possibility is proposed that Plinian-type eruptions generate both seismic and infrasonic eruption tremors by successive explosions at the fragmentation surface in the conduit; these linear relationships can therefore be observed only under conditions where flow and fragmentation in the conduit are stable.

  16. Eruption rates at Fernandina volcano, Galapagos archipelago, from cosmogenic helium in surficial lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, M. D.; Rowland, S.; Curtice, J.; Saal, A.; Naumann, T.

    2005-12-01

    Fernandina volcano is considered the center of the Galapagos hotspot because it lies at the leading (western) edge of the archipelago with respect to plate motion, has been the most active in historical times, and is characterized by extremely high 3He/4He. In an effort to determine the growth rate of the volcano, we have measured exposure ages using cosmogenic 3He measurements in olivine phenocrysts from surficially exposed lavas. Using satellite data, Rowland (1996) subdivided these flows into young, intermediate, and old, and calculated their respective surface areas, but had no method for determining ages, except for the few witnessed historical flows. The lava flows studied here span the entire exposed age range, based on both the Rowland (1996) map and field observations of weathering characteristics, vegetation, and stratigraphy. The surface exposure dates are all close to the limit of the method due to their young ages, low olivine contents in the lavas, low equatorial 3He production rates, and exposures near sea level. The oldest surfaces, found as small outcrops on the northern coast of Fernandina are therefore the most reliably dated using cosmogenic 3He, and demonstrate that the subaerial part of the volcano has been entirely resurfaced within the last 5 Ka. These data alone confirm that Fernandina has had relatively high eruption rates during that interval. The ages of the youngest flows cannot be accurately determined because cosmogenic 3He levels are below detection limits (by melting of olivine in vacuo), but they do yield useful age limits, of less than 0.8 Ka. The young flows have a surface area of 358 km2 and an approximate volume of 3.3 km3; using this volume, the minimum eruption rate of Fernandina over the last ~1 Ka has been ~0.005 km3 yr-1. This is a lower limit because the ages are upper limits, and many young flows entered the ocean. There are few eruption rates to compare for ocean island volcanoes, but this lower limit eruption rate is

  17. Temporal structure of the global sequence of volcanic eruptions: Order clustering and intermittent discharge rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. A.

    2008-02-01

    To study the temporal organization of global volcanic activity over time scales from years to centuries, the following three event sequences were studied: two subsets of the regular catalog of eruptions after Siebert and Simkin [Siebert, L., Simkin, T., 2002. Volcanoes of the World… http://www.volcano.si.edu/gvp/world/], and the "ice core volcanic index" (IVI) sequence, based on the volcanic eruption record as acid layers in big glaciers (Robock, A., Free, M.P., 1996. The volcanic record in ice cores for the past 2000 years. In: Jones, P.D., Bradley, R.S., Jouzel, J. (Eds.), Climatic Variations and Forcing Mechanisms of the Last 2000 Years. Springer-Verlag, New York, pp. 533-546). To perform the statistical analysis in a meaningful way, data subsets were extracted from the original data, with size thresholds and time intervals carefully selected to make these subsets nearly homogeneous. The analysis has revealed, generally, the tendency to clustering, manifested in the following three forms: (1) The event rate is not uniform in time: event dates form active episodes ("common" clusters). (2) In the time-ordered, sequential list of sizes of eruptions, larger events do not appear purely randomly; instead, they form tight groups ("order clusters"). (3) The volcanic products discharge rate is significantly non-uniform, and shows episodic (intermittent or bursty) behavior. It was also found that for the volcanic sequences analyzed, the two types of clustering behavior mentioned in (1) and (2) are positively correlated: larger events are concentrated at the periods of higher event rate. Such a relationship is best demonstrated by the fact that there is clear negative correlation between the following two time series: (1) of the exponent b of the power law size-frequency distribution (the analog of b-value of the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes) and (2) of the current event rate. Power spectra of the analyzed sequences mostly follow power laws, with negative

  18. Depression symptom ratings in geriatric patients with bipolar mania.

    PubMed

    Sajatovic, Martha; Al Jurdi, Rayan; Gildengers, Ariel; Greenberg, Rebecca L; Tenhave, Thomas; Bruce, Martha L; Mulsant, Benoit; Young, Robert C

    2011-11-01

    Given the paucity of information available regarding standardized ratings of depression symptoms in bipolar manic states, and in particular those in older adults, we explored depression ratings in symptomatic participants in a multicenter study of treatment of bipolar I disorder in late life. Baseline data was obtained from the first 100 patients enrolled in an NIMH-funded, 9-week, randomized, double-blind RCT comparing treatment with lithium or valproate in patients of age 60 years and older with Type I Bipolar mania or hypomania. This multi-site study was conducted at six academic medical centers in the United States and enrolled inpatients and outpatients with a total Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) score of 18 or greater. Depressive symptoms were evaluated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) and the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). The criterion for at least moderate bipolar depressive symptoms was the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) Consensus Meeting definition of HAM-D 17 total score >20. Eleven percent of patients had mixed symptoms defined by depression scale severity according to ECNP criterion. In the overall sample, total scores on the two depression scales were highly correlated. Total YMRS scores of this mixed symptom group were similar to the remainder of the sample. These preliminary findings suggest that moderate to severe depressive symptoms occur in about one in ten bipolar manic elders. Future studies are needed to further evaluate symptom profiles, clinical correlates, and treatments for bipolar older adults with combined manic and depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Rating scales measuring the severity of psychotic depression

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Søren D.; Rothschild, Anthony J.; Flint, Alastair J.; Mulsant, Benoit H.; Whyte, Ellen M.; Leadholm, Anne Katrine; Bech, Per; Meyers, Barnett S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Unipolar psychotic depression (PD) is a severe and debilitating syndrome, which requires intensive monitoring. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of the rating scales used to assess illness severity in PD. Method Selective review of publications reporting results on non-self-rated, symptom-based rating scales utilized to measure symptom severity in PD. The clinical and psychometric validity of the identified rating scales was reviewed. Results A total of 14 rating scales meeting the predefined criteria were included in the review. These scales grouped into the following categories: I. Rating scales predominantly covering depressive symptoms, II. Rating scales predominantly covering psychotic symptoms, III. Rating scales covering delusions, and IV. Rating scales covering psychotic depression. For the vast majority of the scales, the clinical and psychometric validity had not been tested empirically. The only exception from this general tendency was the 11-item Psychotic Depression Assessment Scale (PDAS), which was developed specifically to assess the severity of PD. Conclusion In PD, the Psychotic Depression Assessment Scale (PDAS) represents the only empirically derived rating scale for the measurement of overall severity of illness. The PDAS should be considered in future studies of PD and in clinical practice. PMID:26016647

  20. Quantitative Approach To Seamount Volumes And Eruption Rates For Serpentinite Mud Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedenczuk, T.; Fryer, P.

    2008-12-01

    for locations where workers do not have a strong geologic familiarity or experience. The oldest serpentinite muds date back to the initiation of subduction in the Mariana region in the Eocene. As a first approximation, dividing the volume of each seamount by 50 Ma yields a long-term eruption rate of 2.4 × 10-5 km3/year for Big Blue (largest seamount), and 3.26 ×10-5 km3/year for Conical (smallest seamount). As a comparison, these rates are approximately three to four orders of magnitude smaller than the igneous eruption rates for the Emperor Seamounts (1.0×10-2 km3/year). These rates are probably underestimates because some of the seamounts may have formed more recently, and because they erupt episodically. Expanding these calculations to include the volumes of all known serpentinite volcanoes in the Mariana forearc would give us a minimum estimate for the serpentinite production rate since the inception of subduction. Finally, we estimate the volume of the source protolith (peridotite) required to form the seamounts, using both a simple cylindrical model and a more complex cylindrical/cone model, assuming that the volume of the seamount approximates the volume of the protolith serpentinized minus the increase in volume (25-30%) caused by serpentinization. The calculated volumes of all of the seamounts needed a source conduit larger than 2km in diameter to produce enough serpentinite, requiring a more complex cone/cylinder model or an additional source of the protolith.

  1. Distinguishing bipolar II depression from unipolar major depressive disorder: Differences in heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-An; Chang, Chuan-Chia; Kuo, Terry B J; Huang, San-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar II (BPII) depression is commonly misdiagnosed as unipolar depression (UD); however, an objective and reliable tool to differentiate between these disorders is lacking. Whether cardiac autonomic function can be used as a biomarker to distinguish BPII from UD is unknown. We recruited 116 and 591 physically healthy patients with BPII depression and UD, respectively, and 421 healthy volunteers aged 20-65 years. Interviewer and self-reported measures of depression/anxiety severity were obtained. Cardiac autonomic function was evaluated by heart rate variability (HRV) and frequency-domain indices of HRV. Patients with BPII depression exhibited significantly lower mean R-R intervals, variance (total HRV), low frequency (LF)-HRV, and high frequency (HF)-HRV but higher LF/HF ratio compared to those with UD. The significant differences remained after adjusting for age. Compared to the controls, the patients with BPII depression showed cardiac sympathetic excitation with reciprocal vagal impairment, whereas the UD patients showed only vagal impairment. Depression severity independently contributed to decreased HRV and vagal tone in both the patients with BPII depression and UD, but increased sympathetic tone only in those with BPII depression. HRV may aid in the differential diagnosis of BPII depression and UD as an adjunct to diagnostic interviews.

  2. Human Life History Evolution Explains Dissociation between the Timing of Tooth Eruption and Peak Rates of Root Growth

    PubMed Central

    Dean, M. Christopher; Cole, Tim J.

    2013-01-01

    We explored the relationship between growth in tooth root length and the modern human extended period of childhood. Tooth roots provide support to counter chewing forces and so it is advantageous to grow roots quickly to allow teeth to erupt into function as early as possible. Growth in tooth root length occurs with a characteristic spurt or peak in rate sometime between tooth crown completion and root apex closure. Here we show that in Pan troglodytes the peak in root growth rate coincides with the period of time teeth are erupting into function. However, the timing of peak root velocity in modern humans occurs earlier than expected and coincides better with estimates for tooth eruption times in Homo erectus. With more time to grow longer roots prior to eruption and smaller teeth that now require less support at the time they come into function, the root growth spurt no longer confers any advantage in modern humans. We suggest that a prolonged life history schedule eventually neutralised this adaptation some time after the appearance of Homo erectus. The root spurt persists in modern humans as an intrinsic marker event that shows selection operated, not primarily on tooth tissue growth, but on the process of tooth eruption. This demonstrates the overarching influence of life history evolution on several aspects of dental development. These new insights into tooth root growth now provide an additional line of enquiry that may contribute to future studies of more recent life history and dietary adaptations within the genus Homo. PMID:23342167

  3. Calculation of lava discharge rates during effusive eruptions: an empirical approach using MODIS Middle InfraRed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Diego; Laiolo, Marco; Cigolini, Corrado

    2016-04-01

    The rate at which the lava is erupted is a crucial parameter to be monitored during any volcanic eruption. However, its accurate and systematic measurement, throughout the whole duration of an event, remains a big challenge, also for volcanologists working on highly studied and well monitored volcanoes. The thermal approach (also known as thermal proxy) is actually one of most promising techniques adopted during effusive eruptions, since it allows to estimate Time Averaged lava Discharge Rates (TADR) from remote-sensed infrared data acquired several time per day. However, due to the complexity of the physic behind the effusive phenomenon and the difficulty to have field validations, the application of the thermal proxy is still debated and limited to few volcanoes only. Here we present the analysis of MODIS Middle InfraRed data, collected by during several distinct eruptions, in order to show how an alternative, empirical method (called radiant density approach; Coppola et al., 2013) permit to estimate TADRs over a wide range of emplacement styles and lava compositions. We suggest that the simplicity of this empirical approach allows its rapid application during eruptive crisis, and provides the basis for more complex models based on the cooling and spreading processes of the active lava bodies.

  4. Prevalence rates for depression by industry: a claims database analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alterman, Toni; Bushnell, P. Timothy; Li, Jia; Shen, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate and interpret differences in depression prevalence rates among industries, using a large, group medical claims database. Methods Depression cases were identified by ICD-9 diagnosis code in a population of 214,413 individuals employed during 2002–2005 by employers based in western Pennsylvania. Data were provided by Highmark, Inc. (Pittsburgh and Camp Hill, PA). Rates were adjusted for age, gender, and employee share of health care costs. National industry measures of psychological distress, work stress, and physical activity at work were also compiled from other data sources. Results Rates for clinical depression in 55 industries ranged from 6.9 to 16.2 %, (population rate = 10.45 %). Industries with the highest rates tended to be those which, on the national level, require frequent or difficult interactions with the public or clients, and have high levels of stress and low levels of physical activity. Conclusions Additional research is needed to help identify industries with relatively high rates of depression in other regions and on the national level, and to determine whether these differences are due in part to specific work stress exposures and physical inactivity at work. Clinical significance Claims database analyses may provide a cost-effective way to identify priorities for depression treatment and prevention in the workplace. PMID:24907896

  5. Source mass eruption rate retrieved from satellite-based data using statistical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouhier, Mathieu; Guillin, Arnaud; Azzaoui, Nourddine; Eychenne, Julia; Valade, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Ash clouds emitted during volcanic eruptions have long been recognized as a major hazard likely to have dramatic consequences on aircrafts, environment and people. Thus, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) established nine Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) around the world, whose mission is to forecast the location and concentration of ash clouds over hours to days, using volcanic ash transport and dispersion models (VATDs). Those models use input parameters such as plume height (PH), particle size distribution (PSD), and mass eruption rate (MER), the latter being a key parameter as it directly controls the amount of ash injected into the atmosphere. The MER can be obtained rather accurately from detailed ground deposit studies, but this method does not match the operational requirements in case of a volcanic crisis. Thus, VAACs use empirical laws to determine the MER from the estimation of the plume height. In some cases, this method can be difficult to apply, either because plume height data are not available or because uncertainties related to this method are too large. We propose here an alternative method based on the utilization of satellite data to assess the MER at the source, during explosive eruptions. Satellite-based techniques allow fine ash cloud loading to be quantitatively retrieved far from the source vent. Those measurements can be carried out in a systematic and real-time fashion using geostationary satellite, in particular. We tested here the relationship likely to exist between the amount of fine ash dispersed in the atmosphere and of coarser tephra deposited on the ground. The sum of both contributions yielding an estimate of the MER. For this purpose we examined 19 eruptions (of known duration) in detail for which both (i) the amount of fine ash dispersed in the atmosphere, and (ii) the mass of tephra deposited on the ground have been estimated and published. We combined these data with contextual information that may

  6. NanoSIMS results from olivine-hosted melt embayments: Magma ascent rate during explosive basaltic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Alexander S.; Ruprecht, Philipp; Hauri, Erik H.; Rose, William; Gonnermann, Helge M.; Plank, Terry

    2014-08-01

    The explosivity of volcanic eruptions is governed in part by the rate at which magma ascends and degasses. Because the time scales of eruptive processes can be exceptionally fast relative to standard geochronometers, magma ascent rate remains difficult to quantify. Here we use as a chronometer concentration gradients of volatile species along open melt embayments within olivine crystals. Continuous degassing of the external melt during magma ascent results in diffusion of volatile species from embayment interiors to the bubble located at their outlets. The novel aspect of this study is the measurement of concentration gradients in five volatile elements (CO2, H2O, S, Cl, F) at fine-scale (5-10 μm) using the NanoSIMS. The wide range in diffusivity and solubility of these different volatiles provides multiple constraints on ascent timescales over a range of depths. We focus on four 100-200 μm, olivine-hosted embayments erupted on October 17, 1974 during the sub-Plinian eruption of Volcán de Fuego. H2O, CO2, and S all decrease toward the embayment outlet bubble, while F and Cl increase or remain roughly constant. Compared to an extensive melt inclusion suite from the same day of the eruption, the embayments have lost both H2O and CO2 throughout the entire length of the embayment. We fit the profiles with a 1-D numerical diffusion model that allows varying diffusivities and external melt concentrations as a function of pressure. Assuming a constant decompression rate from the magma storage region at approximately 220 MPa to the surface, H2O, CO2 and S profiles for all embayments can be fit with a relatively narrow range in decompression rates of 0.3-0.5 MPa/s, equivalent to 11-17 m/s ascent velocity and an 8 to 12 minute duration of magma ascent from ~ 10 km depth. A two stage decompression model takes advantage of the different depth ranges over which CO2 and H2O degas, and produces good fits given an initial stage of slow decompression (0.05-0.3 MPa/s) at high

  7. Co-variation in Magma Compositions, Effusion rates and Seismic Tremor During the 2014-15 Eruption of Fogo volcano, Cape Verde Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Magma compositions vary widely within many eruptions of ocean island volcanoes, particularly those in the Canaries and Cape Verde Islands. The 23 November 2014 to 7 February 2015 eruption of Fogo in the Cape Verde Islands was the first eruption in either the Canaries or the Cape Verdes to be monitored by multiple satellite instruments that measured infrared emissions of the eruption and so enabled continuous quantitative estimation of magma effusion rates and their variation through time. It is also the first eruption in the Cape Verdes for which seismic tremor intensity, indicative of magma ascent dynamics, was continuously recorded. Effusion rates were highest, peaking at about 20 m3/s, in the first five days of eruption but later asymptotic decay in effusion rate was interrupted around 9 and 16 December by pulses of increased effusion. Activity was mainly mildly explosive from December 31, accompanied by intensified seismic tremor. A final pulse of low-rate lava effusion occurred from 17 to 22 January. These data provide a new framework within which to relate compositional variations in the eruption to variations in magma ascent and effusion. We collected a suite of samples whose dates of emplacement have been determined from the date of incandescence of each sample site in high-resolution thermal infrared emissivity maps collected by satellite during the eruption. The samples are highly porphyritic and strongly alkaline in composition, as is typical of Fogo magmas. The first- (November 23/24) and last- (January) erupted magma batches show evidence for hybridization with more evolved magma batches, and the 9 and 16 December magma pulses may be distinct from the magma erupted during the main phase of the eruption. We present data on the samples that allow us to examine the hypothesis that the effusion rate variations were controlled by tapping of different parts of the magma reservoir or reservoirs during the eruption.

  8. Rating scales measuring the severity of psychotic depression.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, S D; Rothschild, A J; Flint, A J; Mulsant, B H; Whyte, E M; Leadholm, A K; Bech, P; Meyers, B S

    2015-11-01

    Unipolar psychotic depression (PD) is a severe and debilitating syndrome, which requires intensive monitoring. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of the rating scales used to assess illness severity in PD. Selective review of publications reporting results on non-self-rated, symptom-based rating scales utilized to measure symptom severity in PD. The clinical and psychometric validity of the identified rating scales was reviewed. A total of 14 rating scales meeting the predefined criteria were included in the review. These scales grouped into the following categories: (i) rating scales predominantly covering depressive symptoms, (ii) rating scales predominantly covering psychotic symptoms, (iii) rating scales covering delusions, and (iv) rating scales covering PD. For the vast majority of the scales, the clinical and psychometric validity had not been tested empirically. The only exception from this general tendency was the 11-item Psychotic Depression Assessment Scale (PDAS), which was developed specifically to assess the severity of PD. In PD, the PDAS represents the only empirically derived rating scale for the measurement of overall severity of illness. The PDAS should be considered in future studies of PD and in clinical practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Alteration of Heart Rate Variability in Patients of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Sunita; Bandhu, Rajiv; Kataria, Dinesh; Gandhi, Asha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Altered cardiac autonomic functions in form of reduced Heart Rate Variability (HRV) have been found to be associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in depressive patients. Aim To investigate the relationship between HRV measures, which is a non-invasive marker of autonomic nervous system and depression. Materials and Methods The study included a convenient sample size of drug naive depressive patients (n=30) diagnosed on basis of ICD-10 and compared with age and gender matched healthy volunteers (n=30). Five minute ECG recording was done for HRV analysis and frequency domain measures like LF (Low Frequency), HF (High Frequency), LF/HF ratio as well as time domain measures like SDNN (Standard Deviation of all NN interval) and RMSSD (Root Mean Square of Successive differences of NN intervals) were obtained. Results In the frequency domain parameters, values of LF (nu) and LF/HF Ratio were found to be significantly higher (p<0.001) whereas, that of HF (nu) was significantly lower (p<0.001) in depression group as compared to control group. However, in the time domain parameters, no significant difference was observed in SDNN and RMSSD values in between the two groups. Conclusion HRV recordings showed significant changes in frequency domain parameters in the patients suffering from depression. Thus, it could be said from our study that autonomic imbalance reflecting enhanced sympathetic activation relative to parasympathetic component is associated with depression. PMID:28208852

  10. Brief self-rated screening for depression on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Donker, Tara; van Straten, Annemieke; Marks, Isaac; Cuijpers, Pim

    2010-05-01

    The Internet offers promising possibilities for the quick screening of depression for treatment and research purposes. This paper aims to validate three self-rated measures to screen for depression on the Internet: SID (single-item depression scale), CES-D (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale) and K10 (Kessler psychological distress scale). Of the 502 subjects aged 18-80 who rated the SID, CES-D and K10 measures on the Internet, 157 (31%) subjects were also interviewed by telephone using the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview (C)IDI) for DSM-IV-disorders. Cronbach's alpha for both web self-rated measures CES-D and K10 was 0.90. The SID correlated 0.68 (P<0.001) with the CES-D and with the K10. The CES-D correlated 0.84 with the K10 (P<0.001). Subjects with a DSM-IV diagnosis for any depressive disorder had significantly higher means (P<0.001) on the three self-rated measures for depressive symptoms than subjects without a diagnosis of any depressive disorder. Using any depressive disorder as the gold standard, the area under the curve (AUC) of the SID was 0.71 (95% CI: 0.63-0.79), which was significantly lower than the AUC of the CES-D (AUC: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.77-0.90, P=0.003) and of the K10 (AUC: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.73-0.88, P=0.0024). The AUCs for the K10 and CES-D did not differ significantly from each other. The CIDI interviews were not recorded, so inter-rater reliability could not be calculated. The CES-D and K10 are reliable, valid tools for care providers to quickly screen depressive patients on the Internet and for researchers to collect data. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Magmatic storage conditions, decompression rate, and incipient caldera collapse of the 1902 eruption of Santa Maria Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Benjamin J.

    2014-08-01

    Phase equilibria experiments and analysis of natural pumice and phenocryst compositions indicate the 1902 Santa Maria dacite was stored at ~ 140-170 MPa and 840-850 °C prior to eruption. H2O-saturated, cold-seal experiments conducted in vessels with an intrinsic log fO2 of NNO + 1 ± 0.5 show that the natural phase assemblage (melt + plagioclase + amphibole + orthopyroxene + Fe-Ti oxides + apatite) is stable from approximately 115-140 MPa at temperatures below ~ 825 °C, to ~ 840-860 °C at 150 MPa, to > 850 and < 875 °C at 200 MPa. Natural plagioclase phenocrysts have rim compositions that range from An40-An45; this range of compositions defines a ~ 20 °C band that intersects the stable phase assemblage at ~ 150 MPa and 850 °C. Plagioclase hosted melt inclusions were analyzed using FTIR and commonly contain < 5 wt.% H2O, which corresponds to a pressure of ~ 170 MPa at 850 °C, under pure H2O saturated conditions. Amphibole geothermobarometry (Ridolfi et al., 2010) applied to experimental samples suggest two populations of amphiboles, phenocrysts grown during the experiments and inherited xenocrysts, but the pressure-temperature conditions returned by the geothermobarometer are routinely > 50 MPa and > 50 °C greater than experimental run conditions; precise estimates of magmatic conditions based solely upon amphibole composition are likely inaccurate. The experimental results and analysis of natural crystals suggest that although the natural amphiboles likely record a broad range of magmatic conditions, only the lower bounds of that range reflect pre-eruptive storage conditions. Comparison of Santa Maria microlite abundances with decompression experiments examining other silicic systems from the literature suggests that the 1902 dacite decompressed at the rate of ~ 0.005 to 0.01 MPa/s during the eruption. Applying the decompression rate with the previously described eruption rate of approximately 2-3 × 108 kg/s (Williams and Self, 1983; Carey and Sparks, 1986

  12. Teacher and Parent Ratings of Children with Depressive Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattison, Richard E.; Carlson, Gabrielle A.; Cantwell, Dennis P.; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum

    2007-01-01

    The fields of child psychology and psychiatry have not yet established the clinical presentation in school of children and adolescents who have been diagnosed as having a depressive disorder. To address this issue, the authors used teacher ratings on scale oriented to the third, revised edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of…

  13. Teacher and Parent Ratings of Children with Depressive Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattison, Richard E.; Carlson, Gabrielle A.; Cantwell, Dennis P.; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum

    2007-01-01

    The fields of child psychology and psychiatry have not yet established the clinical presentation in school of children and adolescents who have been diagnosed as having a depressive disorder. To address this issue, the authors used teacher ratings on scale oriented to the third, revised edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of…

  14. The Validity and Utility of the Depression Proneness Rating Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemore, Robert; And Others

    The development of the Depression Proneness Rating Scale (DPRS) and three investigations into its reliability, validity, and factor structure are described. Subjects of all three studies were university undergraduates. The first study (n=100) found a stability coefficient of 0.82 for the DPRS over a test-retest (Time 1-Time 2) interval of 9 weeks.…

  15. Automatic Real-Time Estimation of Plume Height and Mass Eruption Rate Using Radar Data During Explosive Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arason, P.; Barsotti, S.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Jónsson, S.; Arngrímsson, H.; Bergsson, B.; Pfeffer, M. A.; Petersen, G. N.; Bjornsson, H.

    2016-12-01

    Plume height and mass eruption rate are the principal scale parameters of explosive volcanic eruptions. Weather radars are important instruments in estimating plume height, due to their independence of daylight, weather and visibility. The Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) operates two fixed position C-band weather radars and two mobile X-band radars. All volcanoes in Iceland can be monitored by IMO's radar network, and during initial phases of an eruption all available radars will be set to a more detailed volcano scan. When the radar volume data is retrived at IMO-headquarters in Reykjavík, an automatic analysis is performed on the radar data above the proximity of the volcano. The plume height is automatically estimated taking into account the radar scanning strategy, beam width, and a likely reflectivity gradient at the plume top. This analysis provides a distribution of the likely plume height. The automatically determined plume height estimates from the radar data are used as input to a numerical suite that calculates the eruptive source parameters through an inversion algorithm. This is done by using the coupled system DAKOTA-PlumeMoM which solves the 1D plume model equations iteratively by varying the input values of vent radius and vertical velocity. The model accounts for the effect of wind on the plume dynamics, using atmospheric vertical profiles extracted from the ECMWF numerical weather prediction model. Finally, the resulting estimates of mass eruption rate are used to initialize the dispersal model VOL-CALPUFF to assess hazard due to tephra fallout, and communicated to London VAAC to support their modelling activity for aviation safety purposes.

  16. Measuring motor activity in major depression: the association between the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and actigraphy.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Nadja; Horn, Helge; Koschorke, Philipp; Hügli, Simone; Höfle, Oliver; Müller, Thomas; Strik, Werner; Walther, Sebastian

    2011-12-30

    Despite the use of actigraphy in depression research, the association of depression ratings and quantitative motor activity remains controversial. In addition, the impact of recurring episodes on motor activity is uncertain. In 76 medicated inpatients with major depression (27 with a first episode, 49 with recurrent episodes), continuous wrist actigraphy for 24h and scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) were obtained. In addition, 10 subjects of the sample wore the actigraph over a period of 5 days, in order to assess the reliability of a 1-day measurement. Activity levels were stable over 5 consecutive days. Actigraphic parameters did not differ between patients with a first or a recurrent episode, and quantitative motor activity failed to correlate with the HAMD total score. However, of the motor-related single items of the HAMD, the item activities was associated with motor activity parameters, while the items agitation and retardation were not. Actigraphy is consistent with clinical observation for the item activities. Expert raters may not correctly rate the motor aspects of retardation and agitation in major depression.

  17. Symptom Frequency Characteristics of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale of Major Depressive Disorder in Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wiglusz, Mariusz S; Landowski, Jerzy; Michalak, Lidia; Cubała, Wiesław J

    2015-09-01

    Depressive disorders are common among patients with epilepsy (PWE). The aim of this study was to explore symptom frequencies of 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) and recognize the clinical characteristics of Major Depressive Disorder in PWE. A sample of 40 adults outpatients with epilepsy and depression was diagnosed using SCID-I for DSM-IV-TR and HDRS-17. The total HDRS-17 score was analysed followed by the exploratory analysis based on the hierarchical model. The frequencies of HDRS-17 items varied widely in this study. Insomnia related items and general somatic symptoms items as well as insomnia and somatic factors exhibited constant and higher frequency. Feeling guilty, suicide, psychomotor retardation and depressed mood showed relatively lower frequencies. Other symptoms had variable frequencies across the study population. Depressive disorders are common among PWE. In the study group insomnia and somatic symptoms displayed highest values which could represent atypical clinical features of mood disorders in PWE. There is a need for more studies with a use of standardized approach to the problem.

  18. Detection and estimation of volcanic eruption onset and mass flow rate using weather radar and infrasonic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzano, Frank S.; Mereu, Luigi; Montopoli, Mario; Picciotti, Errico; Di Fabio, Saverio; Bonadonna, Costanza; Marchetti, Emanuele; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    The explosive eruption of sub-glacial Eyjafjallajökull volcano in 2010 was of modest size, but ash was widely dispersed over Iceland and Europe. The Eyjafjallajökull pulsating explosive activity started on April 14 and ended on May 22. The combination of a prolonged and sustained ejection of volcanic ash and persistent northwesterly winds resulted in dispersal the volcanic cloud over a large part of Europe. Tephra dispersal from an explosive eruption is a function of multiple factors, including magma mass flow rate (MFR), degree of magma fragmentation, vent geometry, plume height, particle size distribution (PSD) and wind velocity. One of the most important geophysical parameters, derivable from the analysis of tephra deposits, is the erupted mass, which is essential for the source characterization and assessment of the associated hazards. MFR can then be derived by dividing the erupted mass by the eruption duration (if known) or based on empirical and analytical relations with plume height. Microwave weather radars at C and X band can provide plume height, ash concentration and loading, and, to some extent, PSD and MFR. Radar technology is well established and can nowadays provide fast three-dimensional (3D) scanning antennas together with Doppler and dual polarization capabilities. However, some factors can limit the detection and the accuracy of the radar products aforementioned. For example, the sensitivity of microwave radar measurements depends on the distance between the radar antenna and the target, the transmitter central wavelength, receiver minimum detachable power and the resolution volume. In addition, radar measurements are sensitive to particle sizes larger than few tens of microns thus limiting the radar-based quantitative estimates to the larger portion of the PSD. Volcanic activity produces infrasonic waves (i.e., acoustic waves below 20 Hz), which can propagate in the atmosphere useful for the remote monitoring of volcanic activity. Infrasound

  19. Ice-melt rates during volcanic eruptions within water-drained, low-pressure subglacial cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, D. C.; Lane, S. J.; Gilbert, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    Subglacial volcanism generates proximal and distal hazards including large-scale flooding and increased levels of explosivity. Direct observation of subglacial volcanic processes is infeasible; therefore, we model heat transfer mechanisms during subglacial eruptions under conditions where cavities have become depressurized by connection to the atmosphere. We consider basaltic eruptions in a water-drained, low-pressure subglacial cavity, including the case when an eruption jet develops. Such drained cavities may develop on sloping terrain, where ice may be relatively shallow and where gravity drainage of meltwater will be promoted. We quantify, for the first time, the heat fluxes to the ice cavity surface that result from steam condensation during free convection at atmospheric pressure and from direct and indirect radiative heat transfer from an eruption jet. Our calculations indicate that the direct radiative heat flux from a lava fountain (a "dry" end-member eruption jet) to ice is c. 25 kW m-2 and is a minor component. The dominant heat transfer mechanism involves free convection of steam within the cavity; we estimate the resulting condensation heat flux to be c. 250 kW m-2. Absorption of radiation from a lava fountain by steam enhances convection, but the increase in condensing heat flux is modest at c. 25 kW m-2. Overall, heat fluxes to the ice cavity surface are likely to be no greater than c. 300 kW m-2. These are comparable with heat fluxes obtained by single phase convection of water in a subglacial cavity but much less than those obtained by two-phase convection.

  20. Content, Imagery, Social Desirability, & Emotionality Ratings for Depressed & Nondepressed Personal Adjectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derry, Paul A.; Kuiper, Nicholas A.

    Recent studies have suggested that depressives process personal information in a biased and negative self-referential manner. Normative ratings on a variety of "depressed" and "nondepressed" adjectives were obtained to investigate the exact nature of information processing in depressives. Subjects rated adjectives on depressive content, imagery,…

  1. The 2008 "silent" eruption of Nevados de Chillán (Chile) detected from space: Effusive rates and trends from the MIROVA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, D.; Laiolo, M.; Lara, L. E.; Cigolini, C.; Orozco, G.

    2016-11-01

    On January 2008, a "silent" eruption took place on the northeast flank of Nevados de Chillán volcanic complex (Chile). The eruption had an effusive character and persisted for several months during which a small lava field ( 0.12 km2) was emplaced. Although occurring at < 10 km from several mountain resorts, and < 70 km from Chillán city ( 150 k inhabitants) this eruption was completely unnoticed by local authorities and was only inferred a year after, based on field reconnaissance. However, the post processing of MODIS-derived thermal images, by means of the MIROVA system (Middle Infrared Observation of Volcanic Activity), revealed that the eruptive episode produced a clear and detectable thermal signal for the whole duration of the effusion. Based on the thermal flux and a sequence of Landsat images, we suggest that the eruption was fed by three distinct segments of an ENE-oriented dike and characterized by two main effusive phases. About 1.4 Mm3 of dacitic lava have been gently erupted (mean output rate of 0.075 m3 s- 1) without producing any evident manifestation (i.e. explosions, volcanic plumes, tremors, sounds) noticeable from distance. The results presented here demonstrate the capacity of thermal satellite data not only to detect but also to quantify the eruptive flux of a "silent" eruption, otherwise unreported.

  2. Emission rates of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide from Redoubt Volcano, Alaska during the 1989-1990 eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casadevall, T.J.; Doukas, M.P.; Neal, C.A.; McGimsey, R.G.; Gardner, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    Airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide emission rates in the gas plume emitted from fumaroles in the summit crater of Redoubt Volcano were started on March 20, 1990 using the COSPEC method. During the latter half of the period of intermittent dome growth and destruction, between March 20 and mid-June 1990, sulfur dioxide emission rates ranged from approximately 1250 to 5850 t/d, rates notably higher than for other convergent-plate boundary volcanoes during periods of active dome growth. Emission rates following the end of dome growth from late June 1990 through May 1991 decreased steadily to less than 75 t/d. The largest mass of sulfur dioxide was released during the period of explosive vent clearing when explosive degassing on December 14-15 injected at least 175,000 ?? 50,000 tonnes of SO2 into the atmosphere. Following the explosive eruptions of December 1989, Redoubt Volcano entered a period of intermittent dome growth from late December 1989 to mid-June 1990 during which Redoubt emitted a total mass of SO2 ranging from 572,000 ?? 90,000 tonnes to 680,000 ?? 90,000 tonnes. From mid-June 1990 through May 1991, the volcano was in a state of posteruption degassing into the troposphere, producing approximately 183,000 ?? 50,000 tonnes of SO2. We estimate that Redoubt Volcano released a minimum mass of sulfur dioxide of approximately 930,000 tonnes. While COSPEC data were not obtained frequently enough to enable their use in eruption prediction, SO2 emission rates clearly indicated a consistent decline in emission rates between March through October 1990 and a continued low level of emission rates through the first half of 1991. Values from consecutive daily measurements of sulfur dioxide emission rates spanning the March 23, 1990 eruption decreased in the three days prior to eruption. That decrease was coincident with a several-fold increase in the frequency of shallow seismic events, suggesting partial sealing of the magma conduit to gas loss that resulted in

  3. Seismic Moment Rate Function Inversions from Very Long Period Signals Associated with Strombolian Eruptions at Mount Erebus, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, C.; Aster, R. C.; Borchers, B.; Kyle, P.

    2005-12-01

    Mount Erebus, Antarctica, shows persistent Strombolian activity, principally in the form of impulsive eruptions of simple and very large (up to 10 m diameter) gas bubbles through its long-lived phonolitic lava lake. Eruptions produce oscillatory near-field very long period (VLP; ~8-20 s period) seismic signals due to processes occurring (seconds) before, during, and (up to several minutes) following the characteristic bubble bursts that mark the onset of short period (>1 Hz) seismoacoustic signals. Coupled broadband seismoacoustic and video analysis shows that this signal is associated with three corresponding component processes: 1) the bubble ascent phase characterized by gas/lava mass transport within the conduit system that can produce a positive or negative vertical rate of momentum change, depending on the event; 2) the eruptive evisceration of the lava lake to a depth of up to 10's of m in the explosive surface decompression of the gas bubble; 3) the refilling and reestablishment gravitational equilibrium within the conduit system. We employ a new method for efficiently solving the inverse problem of finding either independent or proportional moment-tensor element rate functions using three-component near-field seismograms recorded at multiple seismic stations. The method incorporates a frequency-domain deconvolution that, in its most general formulation, solves for six independent moment rate tensor force couple time functions plus a vertical force time function. We present an efficient scheme for solving this problem using conjugate gradient methods and apply it to Erebus VLP signals from the past several years of activity.

  4. Eruptive history of a low-frequency and low-output rate Pleistocene volcano, Ciomadul, South Harghita Mts., Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szakács, Alexandru; Seghedi, Ioan; Pécskay, Zoltán; Mirea, Viorel

    2015-02-01

    Based on a new set of K-Ar age data and detailed field observations, the eruptive history of the youngest volcano in the whole Carpathian-Pannonian region was reconstructed. Ciomadul volcano is a dacitic dome complex located at the southeastern end of the Călimani-Gurghiu-Harghita Neogene volcanic range in the East Carpathians. It consists of a central group of extrusive domes (the Ciomadul Mare and Haramul Mare dome clusters and the Köves Ponk dome) surrounded by a number of isolated peripheral domes, some of them strongly eroded (Bálványos, Puturosul), and others topographically well preserved (Haramul Mic, Dealul Mare). One of the domes (Dealul Cetăţii) still preserves part of its original breccia envelope. A large number of bread-crust bombs found mostly along the southern slopes of the volcano suggest that the dome-building activity at Ciomadul was punctuated by short Vulcanian-type explosive events. Two late-stage explosive events that ended the volcanic activity of Ciomadul left behind two topographically well-preserved craters disrupting the central group of domes: the larger-diameter, shallower, and older Mohoş phreatomagmatic crater and the smaller, deeper and younger Sf. Ana (sub)Plinian crater. Phreatomagmatic products of the Mohoş center, including accretionary lapilli-bearing base-surge deposits and poorly sorted airfall deposits with impact sags, are known close to the eastern crater rim. A key section studied in detail south of Băile Tuşnad shows the temporal succession of eruptive episodes related to the Sf. Ana (sub)Plinian event, as well as relationships with the older dome-building stages. The age of this last eruptive event is loosely constrained by radiocarbon dating of charcoal pieces and paleosoil organic matter at ca. 27-35 ka. The age of the Mohoş eruption is not constrained, but we suggest that it is closely related to the Sf. Ana eruption. The whole volcanic history of Ciomadul spans over ca. 1 Myr, starting with the building

  5. Comparison of physician-rating and self-rating scales for patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hua; Lu, Mei-Jou; Wong, Julielynn; Chen, Cheng-Chung

    2014-12-01

    Physician-rating scales remain the standard in antidepressant clinical trials. The current study aimed to examine the discrepancies between physician-rating scales and self-rating scales for symptoms and functioning, before and after treatment, in newly hospitalized patients. A total of 131 acutely ill inpatients with major depressive disorder were enrolled to receive 20 mg of fluoxetine daily for 6 weeks. Symptom severity and functioning were assessed at baseline and again at week 6. Symptom severity was rated using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) and the Zung Self-rating Depression Scale (ZDS). Functioning was measured by the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS). Pearson correlation coefficients (r) between HDRS-17 and ZDS and between GAF and WSAS were calculated at week 0 and week 6. Sensitivity to change was measured using effect sizes. One-hundred twelve patients completed the 6-week trial. After 6 weeks of treatment, correlations between HDRS-17 and ZDS or correlations between GAF and WSAS became larger from baseline to end point. All correlations were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Effect sizes measured by physician-rating scales (ie, HDRS-17 and GAF) were larger than by self-rating scales (ie, ZDS and WSAS). Correlations between baseline physician-rating scale scores and self-rating scale scores improved after 6 weeks of treatment. Physician-rating scales had larger effect sizes than self-rating scales. Physician-rating scales were more sensitive in detecting symptom or functional changes than self-rating scales.

  6. Rate of oxygen consumption in seasonal and non-seasonal depression.

    PubMed

    Pinchasov, Boris B; Grischin, Oleg V; Putilov, Arcady A

    2002-04-01

    Most depressives suffer from weight loss, anorexia and insomnia, while for winter depressives the typical symptoms are weight gain, carbohydrate craving, overeating, oversleeping and extreme lack of energy. It is important to know whether winter depressives differ from most other depressives on measures of energy regulation. In wintertime, we evaluated the rate of oxygen consumption in relationship to neuro-vegetative depressive symptoms in 92 Siberian women. The seated subjects underwent oxyspirography in the mid-morning (1.5 hours after a standard breakfast). It was found that the oxygen consumption rate was similar in non-depressed women (n = 25) and depressed women with non-seasonal depression (n = 27). The comparatively lower values were obtained in women with winter depression (n = 40). This finding supports the suggestion that the behaviour disturbances typical for winter depression may represent a physiological feedback loop to energy conservation.

  7. Effects of stress, depression, and their interaction on heart rate, skin conductance, finger temperature, and respiratory rate: sympathetic-parasympathetic hypothesis of stress and depression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiao-Pei; Lin, Hung-Yu; Lin, Wei-Lun; Huang, Andrew Chih-Wei

    2011-10-01

    We examined effects of stress, depression, and their interaction on sympathetic-parasympathetic responses, including percentage heart rate (PHR), percentage skin conductance (PSC), percentage finger temperature (PTEMP), and percentage respiratory rate (PRESPR). Participants were categorized into normal, low-risk, and high-risk depression groups under stress or no-stress by measuring psychophysiological responses. Stress increased PHR and PSC and decreased PTEMP. Depression negatively correlated with PHR and PTEMP. PSC and PTEMP were significantly dependent on and positively correlated with depression. PTEMP was significantly affected by the stress and depression interaction. Stress affects sympathetic, rather than parasympathetic, activity. Depression and the interaction between stress and depression initially associated with the sympathetic division and are then correlated with parasympathetic activity. A sympathetic-parasympathetic hypothesis and its clinical implications are discussed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Isotopic Insights Into the Degassing and Secondary Hydration Rates of Volcanic Glass From the 1980 Eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seligman, A. N.; Bindeman, I. N.; Van Eaton, A. R.; Hoblitt, R. P.

    2016-12-01

    Following eruption, volcanic glass undergoes hydration in its depositional environment, which overprints the history of magmatic degassing recorded in the glass. However, the rates of secondary hydration of volcanic glass used for paleoclimate studies are poorly constrained. Here, we present our results of a natural experiment using products of the 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens. We measured the δD of extracted water and the δ18O of the bulk glass of samples collected during the dry summer months of 1980 and compared them with material resampled in August of 2015. Results demonstrate that only samples collected from the subsurface near gas escape pipes show elevated water concentrationss (near 2.0 wt.%) and low δD (-110 to -130 ‰) and δ18O (6.0 to 6.6 ‰) values, and that the initial process of secondary hydration is not always a simple addition of low δD waters at ambient temperature. On average, the 2015 surface samples have slightly higher water contents (0.1-0.2 wt.%) and similar δ18O (6.8 - 6.9 ‰) to those collected in 1980. Given the moderate vesicularity of the samples and the slow rate of surface temperature diffusion, we attribute these observations to hydration during cooling, with only little exchange after. We also compare our results to rapidly quenched air fall pumice from the May 18th eruption, which shows moderate δD values (-74 ‰) and water concentrations (0.3 wt.%) that are closer to those for the 1980 samples. Surprisingly, the 2015 surface samples show higher δD values (+15 ‰), which we attribute to any of four possibilities: (1) evaporation or (2) degassing of underlying deposits; (3) exchange of hydrogen with local vegetation; and/or (4) microlite crystallization that aided diffusion of water. Reconstructed δD-H2O trends for the Mount St. Helens samples collected in 1980 support previous studies proposing that exsolved volatiles were trapped within a rapidly rising magma that degassed at shallow depths. The dacitic Mount

  9. Lava discharge rate estimates from thermal infrared satellite data for Pacaya volcano, Guatemala: Implications for time-averaged eruption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, H. A.; Harris, A. J.; Rose, W. I.

    2011-12-01

    The Pacaya volcanic complex has been producing lava flows nearly continuously since 1961. Matías (2009) compiled a detailed database including information such as length, surface area, volume, duration, and effusion rates for each of the 248 lava flows that occurred during this time. In this investigation, time-averaged discharge rates (TADR) were estimated for a subset of lava flows using a satellite-based method initially applied to infrared satellite data for Etna by Harris et al. (1997). Satellite-based estimates potentially provide a quicker, safer, and less expensive alternative to ground-based measurements and are therefore valuable for hazard mitigation. The excellent record of recent activity at Pacaya provides a unique opportunity to calibrate results from the satellite-based method by comparing them with reliable ground-based measurements. Imagery from two sensors of differing temporal and spatial resolutions were analyzed in order to produce a comprehensive dataset: MODIS (one image every 6 hours, 1-km pixels) and GOES (one image every 15 minutes, 4-km pixels). As of August 2011, 2403 MODIS and 2642 GOES images have been analyzed. Due to the relatively low intensity of Pacaya's effusive activity, each image was searched manually for volcanic "hot spots". It was found that MODIS data allowed better estimations of TADR than did GOES data. We suggested that the very small, sub-resolution flows typical of Pacaya may have surpassed the limits of low-resolution GOES imagery for this particular application. TADR derived from MODIS data were used to describe and parameterize eruptive cycles, as well as to explore conduit models. A pattern was found over the past two decades of short high-TADR periods followed by longer low-TADR periods. We suggested that the low TADR experienced during longer "bleeding" of the conduit may approximate the magma supply rate to the shallow system, while high TADR eruptions may represent the release of volumes collected during

  10. Evaluation of depressive symptoms in patients with coronary artery disease using the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale.

    PubMed

    Bunevicius, Adomas; Staniute, Margarita; Brozaitiene, Julija; Pommer, Antoinette M; Pop, Victor J M; Montgomery, Stuart A; Bunevicius, Robertas

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), factor structure and psychometric properties of the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) to identify patients with current major depressive episode (MDE). The construct validity of the MADRS against self-rating scales was also evaluated. Consecutive 522 CAD patients at admission to the cardiac rehabilitation program were interviewed for the severity of depressive symptoms using the MADRS and for current MDE using the structured MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Also, all patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory-II. The MADRS had one-factor structure and high internal consistency (Cronbach's coefficient α=0.82). Confirmative factor analysis indicated an adequate fit: comparative fit index=0.95, normed fit index=0.91, and root mean square error of approximation=0.07. At a cut-off value of 10 or higher, the MADRS had good psychometric properties for the identification of current MDE (positive predictive value=42%, with sensitivity=88% and specificity=85%). There was also a moderate to strong correlation of MADRS scores with scores on self-rating depression scales. In sum, in CAD patients undergoing rehabilitation, the MADRS is a unidimensional instrument with high internal consistency and can be used for the identification of depressed CAD patients. The association between MADRS and self-rating depression scores is moderate to strong.

  11. Depression and Daydreaming: An Analysis Based on Self-Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giambra, Leonard M.; Traynor, Thomas D.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between depression and daydreaming characteristics in a non-hospitalized sample. Use was made of self-report psychometric instruments that measure depression and aspects of depression and other activity such as mindwandering, boredom, distractibility, and curiosity. (Editor/RK)

  12. NanoSIMS results from olivine-hosted melt embayments: Modeling ascent rate in explosive basaltic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, A. S.; Plank, T.; Ruprecht, P.; Hauri, E. H.; Gonnermann, H. M.; Rose, W. I.

    2012-12-01

    A critical parameter governing the explosivity of volcanic eruptions is the rate at which magma ascends and degases, because this affects bubble nucleation, coalescence, and ultimately fragmentation. Although several methods have been used to determine magma ascent rates, it remains a poorly constrained parameter for most eruptions. One promising method employs diffusion modeling of H2O and CO2 concentration gradients in melt embayments/open melt inclusions [1,2]. Here we utilize the fine spatial resolution of the nanoSIMS to obtain concentration gradients for five volatile species, improving upon previous efforts that were more limited in spatial resolution (FTIR, [1]) and in number of volatile analytes (H2O only by BSE, [2]). Focusing on explosive basaltic eruptions, for which very little is known about ascent rates, we chose ash and lapilli samples from the Oct 1974 sub-plinian eruption of Volcán de Fuego. Glassy, olivine-hosted embayments with evidence of outlet bubbles were analyzed by nanoSIMS at a minimum distance between spots of 15 μm. Major element zonation in the embayments was investigated by EMP, and high resolution BSE images were captured to complement the nanoSIMS spot measurements for H2O (as in [2]). We report analyses for 5 embayments that vary in length from 100 to 350 μm. Low-solubility volatiles (CO2, H2O, S) decrease towards the embayment outlet, consistent with diffusive reequilibration with the more-degassed surrounding melt. High-solubility volatiles (Cl, F) increase towards the outlet, apparently behaving as magmaphile elements. Major elements exhibit constant concentrations along the embayment, except for a 20-50 μm wide zone near the embayment outlet, perhaps representing a boundary layer at the outlet bubble, where concentrations vary consistent with olivine and clinopyroxene microlite growth. BSE grayscale values are thus affected by both H2O diffusion and major element zonation at the embayment outlet, and cannot be used to

  13. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Rates of Depression Among Preretirement Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Dorothy D.; Song, Jing; Lyons, John S.; Manheim, Larry M.; Chang, Rowland W.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated racial/ethnic differences in rates of major depression and investigated possible mediators. Methods. Depression prevalence rates among African American, Hispanic, and White adults were estimated from a population-based national sample and adjusted for potential confounders. Results. African Americans (odds ratio [OR] = 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.93, 1.44) and Hispanics (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.02, 2.04) exhibited elevated rates of major depression relative to Whites. After control for confounders, Hispanics and Whites exhibited similar rates, and African Americans exhibited significantly lower rates than Whites. Conclusions. Major depression and factors associated with depression were more frequent among members of minority groups than among Whites. Elevated depression rates among minority individuals are largely associated with greater health burdens and lack of health insurance, factors amenable to public policy intervention. PMID:14600071

  14. Observer-rated depression in long-term care: frequency and risk factors.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Jane; Cole, Martin G; Voyer, Philippe; Monette, Johanne; Champoux, Nathalie; Ciampi, Antonio; Vu, Minh; Dyachenko, Alina; Belzile, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) to describe the prevalence and 6-month incidence of observer-rated depression in residents age 65 and over of long-term care (LTC) facilities; (2) to describe risk factors for depression, at baseline and over time. A multisite, prospective observational study was conducted in residents aged 65 and over of 7 LTC facilities. The Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) was completed by nurses monthly for 6 months. We measured demographic, medical, and functional factors at baseline and monthly intervals, using data from research assessments, nurse interviews, and chart reviews. 274 residents were recruited and completed baseline depression assessments. The prevalence of depression (CSDD score of 6+) was 19.0%. The incidence of depression among those without prevalent depression was 73.3 per 100 person-years. A delirium diagnosis, pain, and diabetes were independently associated with prevalent depression. CSDD score at baseline and development of severe cognitive impairment at follow-up were independent risk factors for incident depression. A diagnosis of delirium and uncorrected visual impairment at follow-up occurred concurrently with incident depression. The results of this study have implications for the detection and prevention of depression in LTC. Delirium diagnosis, pain and diabetes at baseline were associated with prevalent depression; depression symptoms at baseline and development of severe cognitive impairment at follow-up were risk factors for incident depression.

  15. The structure of the Montgomery-Åsberg depression rating scale over the course of treatment for depression.

    PubMed

    Quilty, Lena C; Robinson, Jennifer J; Rolland, Jean-Pierre; Fruyt, Filip De; Rouillon, Frédéric; Bagby, R Michael

    2013-09-01

    The Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) is a widely used clinician-rated measure of depressive severity. Empirical support for the factor structure of the MADRS is mixed; further, the comparison of MADRS scores within and between patients requires the demonstration of consistent instrument properties. The objective of the current investigation was to evaluate MADRS factor structure as well as MADRS factorial invariance across time and gender. The MADRS was administered to 821 depressed outpatients participating in a large-scale effectiveness study of combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy for depression. Treatment outcome did not differ across treatment groups. Factor structure and invariance was evaluated via confirmatory factor analysis. A four-factor model consisting of Sadness, Negative Thoughts, Detachment and Neurovegetative symptoms demonstrated a good fit to the data. This four-factor structure was invariant across time and gender. A hierarchical model, in which these four factors served as indicators of a general depression factor, was also supported. A limitation of the current study is the lack of comprehensive characterization of patient clinical features; results need to be replicated in more severely depressed or treatment refractory patients. Overall, evidence supported the use of the MADRS total score as well as subscales focused on affective, cognitive, social and somatic aspects of depression in male and female outpatients. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Validity and reliability of the Minimum Data Set Depression Rating Scale (MDSDRS) for older adults in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Rachel L; Buckwalter, Kathleen C; Buchanan, Robert J; Maas, Meridean L; Imhof, Sara L

    2003-07-01

    this research examined the psychometric properties of the Minimum Data Set Depression Rating Scale for use among older adults living in nursing homes. interviews with 145 older adults in three nursing homes were conducted to complete the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Geriatric Depression Scale. Information relevant to completing the Minimum Data Set Depression Rating Scale was gathered from the Minimum Data Set. the Minimum Data Set Depression Rating Scale did not perform well when validated against the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Geriatric Depression Scale. Minimum Data Set Depression Rating Scale cut-off levels of > or =2 and > or =3 were associated with relatively low total score correlations and sensitivity rates, but acceptable specificity. findings suggest that the Minimum Data Set Depression Rating Scale may be of limited clinical value to identify depression among older adults living in nursing homes.

  17. Toward continuous quantification of lava extrusion rate: Results from the multidisciplinary analysis of the 2 January 2010 eruption of Piton de la Fournaise volcano, La Réunion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibert, Clement; Mangeney, Anne; Polacci, Margherita; Di Muro, Andrea; Vergniolle, Sylvie; Ferrazzini, Valérie; Peltier, Aline; Taisne, Benoit; Burton, Mike; Dewez, Thomas; Grandjean, Gilles; Dupont, Aurélien; Staudacher, Thomas; Brenguier, Florent; Kowalski, Philippe; Boissier, Patrice; Catherine, Philippe; Lauret, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of the 2-12 January 2010 effusive eruption at Piton de la Fournaise volcano were examined through seismic and infrasound records, time-lapse photography, SO2 flux measurements, deformation data, and direct observations. Digital elevation models were constructed for four periods of the eruption, thus providing an assessment of the temporal evolution of the morphology, the volume and the extrusion rate of the lava flow. These data were compared to the continuous recording of the seismic and infrasonic waves, and a linear relationship was found between the seismic energy of the tremor and the lava extrusion rate. This relationship is supported by data from three other summit eruptions of Piton de la Fournaise and gives total volume and average lava extrusion rate in good agreement with previous studies. We can therefore provide an estimate of the lava extrusion rate for the January 2010 eruption with a very high temporal resolution. We found an average lava extrusion rate of 2.4 m3.s-1 with a peak of 106.6 m3.s-1 during the initial lava fountaining phase. We use the inferred average lava extrusion rate during the lava fountaining phase (30.23 m3.s-1) to estimate the value of the initial overpressure in the magma reservoir, which we found to range from 3.7×106 Pa to 5.9×106 Pa. Finally, based on the estimated initial overpressure, the volume of magma expelled during the lava fountaining phase and geodetic data, we inferred the volume of the magma reservoir using a simple Mogi model, between 0.25 km3 and 0.54 km3, which is in good agreement with previous studies. The multidisciplinary analysis presented in our study sheds light on crucial qualitative and quantitative relations between eruption dynamics, seismic and infrasonic signals, and especially on the direct link between the lava extrusion rate and the seismic energy of the volcanic tremor. If this relationship is confirmed for other eruptions, generalization of its use will lead to a better

  18. The Influence of Sub-Type of Depression on Self-Rating Scale Validity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Judith; And Others

    Most patients with diagnosable major depression may fail to show the classic symptom pattern for which standard assessment instruments were designed. To investigate the influence of subtype of depressive illness on Zung Self-Rating Scale (SDS) and Hamilton Rating Scale (HRS) validity, 36 in-patients, who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual…

  19. Temporal Variations in Lava Effusion Rates at Basaltic Volcanoes Determined for 106 Eruptions, at 35 Volcanoes, over the last 15 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonny, E.; Wright, R.

    2016-12-01

    Basaltic lava flows spread laterally and longitudinally, and thus their areas change with time during eruptions. Satellite imagery can be used to quantify this change and estimate the rate at which the lava is erupted, and ultimately the total amount. The lava effusion rate, defined as the volumetric flux of lava from the vent, is of great utility in lava flow forecasting and understanding eruption dynamics. Three methods which use infrared satellite data to estimate lava effusion rates are prevalent in the literature: i) Harris et al., 1997, ii) Wright et al., 2001 and iii) Coppola et al., 2012. This work tests how well these methods agree with each other using NASA's MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to estimate effusion rates for 106 eruptions from 35 volcanoes over the last 15 years. We used freely accessible MODIS data from the MODVOLC system that detects volcanic "hot spots" anywhere around the world during effusive eruptions with about four acquisitions per day. Our study found that although these methods may seem on the surface to be equivalent they give different results. The final volume of lava erupted was estimated from our effusion rate time-series using both Harris et al. 1997 and Coppola et al. 2012 methods, for all eruptions, and was then compared with ground-based estimates of final flow volume found in the literature. The method of Wright et al. 2001 is a simplification of the method from Harris et al., 1997 and we found that the results follow the same trend as the latter with a small offset; we therefore concentrated only on the first and last methods (Harris et al. and Coppola et al.). We found that in general the first method of Harris et al. 1997 correlates better with the field measurements than the method of Coppola et al., 2012. We discuss the reasons for these discrepancies and investigate how and when the satellite-derived lava effusion rates (and volume estimations) correlate better (or worse) with "ground-truth".

  20. Perfectionism, ego defense styles, and depression: a comparison of self-reports versus informant ratings.

    PubMed

    Flett, Gordon L; Besser, Avi; Hewitt, Paul L

    2005-10-01

    The present study examined the associations among perfectionism, defense styles, and depression in an Israeli community sample of young adults. This study involved a comparison of self-reports and informant ratings on all measures. A community sample of 210 pairs of same-sex best friends from Israel completed the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Defense Styles Questionnaire - 40, and a depression measure. Analyses confirmed that socially prescribed perfectionism is associated with depression, not only in terms of self-reports but also in terms of informant ratings. In addition, informant ratings revealed a link between other-oriented perfectionism and depression. Both self-reports and informant ratings also indicated that socially prescribed perfectionism is associated with immature defense styles and neurotic defense styles. Further simultaneous Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) analyses of self-reports and informant ratings showed that maladaptive defense styles mediate the link between socially prescribed perfectionism and depression. The practical and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. Ash-Plume Dynamics, Mass Discharge Rate and Atmosphere Interaction by Infrasound and Thermal Imagery: the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripepe, M.; Bonadonna, C.; Folch, A.; Delle Donne, D.; Lacanna, G.

    2012-04-01

    The long-lasting Eyjafjallajökull ash plume activity was recorded during 4-21 May 2010 using a 4-element small (100 m) infrasonic array located ~7km from the volcano. The array measured pressure perturbations with frequencies ranging from 0.1-4 Hz down to 1-2 mHz (typical of acoustic-gravity waves) and was able to provide the time history of the excess pressure, suggesting that the explosive emission of gas drove the plume dynamics. The combination of infrasound measurements and thermal camera imagery allows the infrasound source to be constrained and the plume exit velocity(45-124 m/s) to be estimated based on the acoustic signal. Exit velocities are converted into mass eruption rates using additional constraints on vent radius and mixture density, resulting in a discharge rate ranging from 106 kg/s during the high explosive phase of May 4-6 to 105 kg/s during the final stage of the eruption. Finally, mass eruption rate is used to estimate plume heights using field-based relationships and 1D radially averaged simulations of plume rise with and without the influence of the local wind field and using a reconstructed granulometry. Obtained heights are in good agreement with independent measurements (IMO radar). We conclude that the use of infrasonic monitoring may lead to important understanding of the plume dynamics and real-time determination of eruption source parameters (e.g., mixture exit velocity and mass eruption rate). This could improve substantially the forecast of volcano-related hazards, with important implications for civil aviation safety.

  2. Phenylthiocarbamide tasting and family history of depression, revisited: low rates of depression in families of supertasters.

    PubMed

    Joiner, Thomas E; Perez, Marisol

    2004-04-15

    Past studies suggest that phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) taste status is related to vulnerability to depression, such that those sensitive to PTC are more vulnerable. We questioned this, reasoning that those insensitive to PTC may be more vulnerable (because they may have lower hedonic tone and higher risk for alcohol abuse). Forty-two volunteers responded to questionnaires regarding family history of depression, and were assigned to supertaster, taster, or non-taster categories based on taste reactions to a 3.80 x 1.43 cm piece of commercially prepared paper treated with PTC. Supertasters were significantly less likely to report first-degree relatives with a history of depression than were tasters and non-tasters. Supertasters may be afforded some protection from depression; elucidating the mechanisms of this protection is a potentially interesting avenue for future research.

  3. Rates and risk factors associated with depressive symptoms during pregnancy and with postpartum onset.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Nancy; Da Costa, Deborah; Marchand, André; Ireland, Kierla; Dritsa, Maria; Khalifé, Samir

    2014-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of depressive symptoms in the third trimester of pregnancy and at 3 months postpartum and to prospectively identify risk factors associated with elevated depressive symptoms during pregnancy and with postpartum onset. About 364 women attending antenatal clinics or at the time of their ultrasound were recruited and completed questionnaires in pregnancy and 226 returned their questionnaires at 3 months postpartum. Depressed mood was assessed by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS; score of ≥ 10). The rate of depressed mood during pregnancy was 28.3% and 16.4% at 3 months postpartum. Among women with postpartum depressed mood, 6.6% were new postpartum cases. In the present study, belonging to a non-Caucasian ethnic group, a history of emotional problems (e.g. anxiety and depression) or of sexual abuse, comorbid anxiety, higher anxiety sensitivity and having experienced stressful events were associated with elevated depressed mood during pregnancy. Four risk factors emerged as predictors of new onset elevated depressed mood at 3 months postpartum: higher depressive symptomatology during pregnancy, a history of emotional problems, lower social support during pregnancy and a delivery that was more difficult than expected. The importance of identifying women at risk of depressed mood early in pregnancy and clinical implications are discussed.

  4. The clinical manifestations of lumbar disease are correlated with self-rating depression scale scores.

    PubMed

    Tetsunaga, Tomoko; Misawa, Haruo; Tanaka, Masato; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Tetsunaga, Tomonori; Takigawa, Tomoyuki; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2013-05-01

    Depression can exacerbate symptoms of chronic pain and worsen disability. The symptoms of lumbar disease may be particularly sensitive to psychological state, but statistical associations between low back pain (LBP) severity and mental health status have not been established. Of the 151 patients with LBP, 122 completed questionnaires probing depressive symptoms, LBP severity, and degree of disability. In addition to completing self-report questionnaires, patients provided demographic and clinical information. A self-rating depression scale (SDS) was used to screen for depression. Pain and disability were assessed by the visual analog scale (VAS) and the Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (RDQ), respectively. Overall clinical severity was assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score. Kendall's tau correlation coefficients were calculated to examine the relationships among these variables. Ninety-four patients (77 %) were in a depressive state as indicated by SDS score ≥40, including mild depression group (47 patients, SDS score from 40 to 49) and depression group (47 patients, SDS score ≥50). There were only 28 patients in the no depression group (SDS score ≤39). There was no significant difference in both age and pain duration among the three groups. The mean VAS score in the depression group (70 ± 19 mm) was higher than both no depression (41 ± 24 mm) and mild depression groups (52 ± 21 mm). The mean JOA score in the no depression group (14 ± 5.0 points) was higher than both mild depression (12 ± 4.0 points) and depression groups (10 ± 6.0 points). The mean RDQ in the depression group (15.1 ± 6.0 points) was higher than both no depression (6.4 ± 5.0 points) and mild depression groups (10.9 ± 5.4 points). Factors significantly correlated with SDS score included VAS, JOA score, and RDQ score. In contrast, SDS did not correlate with patient age or pain duration. The majority of chronic LBP patients examined

  5. Emergence of depression following job loss prospectively predicts lower rates of reemployment.

    PubMed

    Stolove, Catherine A; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Bonanno, George A

    2017-03-22

    Job loss has been associated with the emergence of depression and subsequent long-term diminished labor market participation. In a sample of 500 adults who lost their jobs, trajectories of depression severity from four years before to four years after job loss were identified using Latent Growth Mixture Modeling. Rates of unemployment by trajectory were compared at two and four years following job loss. Four trajectories demonstrated optimal model fit including resilience (72%), chronic pre-to-post job loss depression (9%), emergent depression (10%), and remitting depression (9%). Logistic regression comparing reemployment status by class while controlling for age, gender, and education at two-years post job loss revealed no significant differences by class. An identical logistic regression on four-year reemployment revealed significant differences by class with post-hoc analyses revealing emergent depression resulting in a 33.3% reemployment rate compared to resilient individuals (60.4%) together indicating that depression affects reemployment rather than lack of reemployment causing the emergence of depression. The emergence of depression following job loss significantly increases the risk of continued unemployment. However, observed high rates of resilience with resulting downstream benefits in reemployment mitigates significant concern about the effects of wide spread unemployment on ongoing global economic recovery following the Great Recession.

  6. Use of digital aerophotogrammetry to determine rates of lava dome growth, Mount St. Helens, Washington, 2004-2005: Chapter 8 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, Steve P.; Thompson, Ren A.; Messerich, James A.; Iwatsubo, Eugene Y.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Successful application of aerophotogrammetry was possible during the critical earliest parts of the eruption because we had baseline data and photogrammetric infrastructure in place before the eruption began. The vertical aerial photographs, including the DEMs and calculations derived from them, were one of the most widely used data sets collected during the 2004-5 eruption, as evidenced in numerous contributions to this volume. These data were used to construct photogeologic maps, deformation vector fields, and profiles of the evolving dome and glacier. Extruded volumes and rates proved to be critical parameters to constrain models and hypotheses of eruption dynamics and thus helped to assess volcano hazards.

  7. Assessing depression in patients with chronic pain: a comparison of three rating scales.

    PubMed

    Wong, W S; Chen, P P; Yap, J; Mak, K H; Tam, B K H; Fielding, R

    2011-09-01

    Considerable evidence has suggested depression is significantly more prevalent in patients with chronic pain. A number of studies exclusively based on Western samples have evaluated the effectiveness of depression rating scales in assessing depression in the chronic pain context. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to compare within a Chinese chronic pain sample three depression rating scales commonly used in identifying depression. A total of 366 Chinese patients with chronic pain attending either an orthopedic specialist clinic (n=185) or a multidisciplinary pain clinic (n=181) in Hong Kong completed a structured interview using CIS-R and two depression rating scales, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI standard and short form) and the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D). Patient scores on the BDI and CES-D were then assessed against their responses on the CIS-R to determine their effectiveness. The prevalence of depression was 20.2% and 57.8% in the Orthopedics and Pain Clinic sample respectively. Results of ROC analyses showed that all the three measures performed well at predicting depression with AUC ≥ 0.89 and high sensitivity and specificity. Our findings suggest that the three depression measures assessed have good predictive validity in the Chinese chronic pain context, and they could be used as screening or diagnostic measures of depression in Chinese chronic pain patients. The decision of using a specific measure and a specific cutoff score should be based on study aim and setting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Childhood Depression Subscales Using Repeated Sessions on Children's Depression Rating Scale – Revised (CDRS-R) Scores

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Ira; Trivedi, Madhukar; Mayes, Taryn; Kennard, Betsy; Emslie, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Although acute treatments have been shown to be effective in treating early-onset depression, only one-third or thereabouts reach a remission within 3 months. Unfortunately, delayed time to remission in early-onset depression leads to poorer therapeutic outcomes. Clearly, there is a need to identify, diagnose, and provide effective treatment of a depressed patient quickly. A sophisticated understanding of depression subscales and their change over time with treatment could enhance pathways to individualized treatment approaches for childhood depression. Objective: Previous studies have found that the clinician-measured instrument, Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R) measures multiple subscales (or components) of depression. The aim of this study was to see how these subscales may change over the course of a 12-week study. This knowledge will help determine if dimensions/subscales of childhood depression (paralleling the adult literature) using the subscales derived from factor analysis procedure is useful. Methods: We examined two clinical trials in which youth (n=234) with major depressive disorder (MDD) were treated openly with fluoxetine for eight sessions spread over 12 weeks. The CDRS-R was completed based on clinician interviews with parent and child at each session. Classical test theory and component analysis with associated parallel analysis (oblique rotation) were conducted on each week's scores. Results: Although more factors were needed for the baseline and first two therapy sessions, a two-factor solution sufficed thereafter. Depressed facial affect, listless speech, and hypoactivity best defined Factor I, whereas sleep problems, appetite disturbance, physical symptoms, irritability, guilt, and weeping best defined Factor II. All other symptoms cross-loaded almost equally on the two factors. The scale's reliability (internal consistency) improved from baseline to exit sessions (α=0.65–0.91). As a result, the

  9. Efficacy of aripiprazole augmentation in Japanese patients with major depressive disorder: a subgroup analysis and Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression item analyses of the Aripiprazole Depression Multicenter Efficacy study.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Norio; Otsubo, Tempei; Kato, Masaki; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Ono, Hiroaki; Kamijima, Kunitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Results from this randomized, placebo-controlled study of aripiprazole augmentation to antidepressant therapy (ADT) in Japanese patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) (the Aripiprazole Depression Multicenter Efficacy [ADMIRE] study) revealed that aripiprazole augmentation was superior to ADT alone and was well tolerated. In subgroup analyses, we investigated the influence of demographic- and disease-related factors on the observed responses. We also examined how individual symptom improvement was related to overall improvement in MDD. Data from the ADMIRE study were analyzed. Subgroup analyses were performed on the primary outcome measures: the mean change in the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score from the end of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)/serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) treatment to the end of the randomized treatment. Changes in the MADRS total scores were consistently greater with aripiprazole than placebo in each of the subgroups. Efficacy was not related to sex, age, number of adequate ADT trials in the current episode, MDD diagnosis, number of depressive episodes, duration of the current episode, age at first depressive episode, time since the first depressive episode, type of SSRI/SNRI, or severity at the end of SSRI/SNRI treatment phase. Compared to placebo, aripiprazole resulted in significant and rapid improvement on seven of the 10 MADRS items, including sadness. These post-hoc analyses indicated that aripiprazole was effective for a variety of Japanese patients with MDD who had exhibited inadequate responses to ADT. Additionally, we suggest that aripiprazole significantly and rapidly improved the core depressive symptoms. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  10. Difference in the binocular rivalry rate between depressive episodes and remission.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ting; Ye, Xing; Wei, Qiang; Xie, Wen; Cai, Chunlan; Mu, Jingjing; Dong, Yi; Hu, Panpan; Hu, Xinglong; Tian, Yanghua; Wang, Kai

    2015-11-01

    Binocular rivalry refers to a phenomenon in which, when different images are presented to each eye simultaneously, perception alternates spontaneously between monocular views rather than being a superposition of the two images. Recently, the involvement of serotonin systems has been reported to be related to the phenomenon. There is abundant evidence for abnormalities of the serotonin systems in depression and the antidepressants that enhance 5-HT transmission, which in turn improves mood and behavior. However, the available data with respect to rivalry rates in depression are less clear. Therefore, we aimed to explore whether perceptual rivalry was affected by a dysfunctional serotonin system in patients with depression and whether there was a rivalry rate difference between episode and remission states in depression patients. Twenty-eight patients with depression and 30 healthy controls were recruited in the study. We assessed the rivalry rate and the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) in patients with depression during clinical episode and remission states. The results suggested that alternation rates for patients during episodes were significantly slower than during remission and than in healthy controls. Also, alternation rates for patients during remission were slower than in healthy controls. These results may provide further clues to serotonergic neural systems contributing to the dynamics of perception rivalry and may foster enlightenment regarding the field of binocular rivalry in psychiatric disorders other than bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Heart Rate Variability and the Efficacy of Biofeedback in Heroin Users with Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Lin, I-Mei; Ko, Jiun-Min; Fan, Sheng-Yu; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Objective Low heart rate variability (HRV) has been confirmed in heroin users, but the effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback in heroin users remain unknown. This study examined (1) correlations between depression and HRV indices; (2) group differences in HRV indices among a heroin-user group, a group with major depressive disorder but no heroin use, and healthy controls; and (3) the effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback on depressive symptoms, HRV indices, and respiratory rates within the heroin group. Methods All participants completed a depression questionnaire and underwent electrocardiogram measurements, and group differences in baseline HRV indices were examined. The heroin group underwent electrocardiogram and respiration rate measurements at baseline, during a depressive condition, and during a happiness condition, before and after which they took part in the heart-rate-variability–biofeedback program. The effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback on depressive symptoms, HRV indices, and respiration rates were examined. Results There was a negative correlation between depression and high frequency of HRV, and a positive correlation between depression and low frequency to high frequency ratio of HRV. The heroin group had a lower overall and high frequency of HRV, and a higher low frequency/high frequency ratio than healthy controls. The heart-rate-variability–biofeedback intervention increased HRV indices and decreased respiratory rates from pre-intervention to post-intervention. Conclusion Reduced parasympathetic and increased sympathetic activations were found in heroin users. Heart-rate-variability–biofeedback was an effective non-pharmacological intervention to restore autonomic balance. PMID:27121428

  12. Acneiform eruptions.

    PubMed

    Dessinioti, Clio; Antoniou, Christina; Katsambas, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Is it acne or is it not? When this question arises, we can presume that we have crossed the boundaries of "acneiform eruptions" of the face. Although acne may be considered a condition fairly easy to diagnose, it is not rare for the practicing dermatologist or the general physician to wonder when faced with an acneiform eruption before establishing a diagnosis. In this review, we address facial acneiform eruptions in children and in adults, including perioral dermatitis, granulomatous periorificial dermatitis, nevus comedonicus, acne cosmetica, rosacea, demodicosis, folliculitis, acneiform presentation of cutaneous lymphomas, and drug-induced [epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, steroids, etc.] acneiform eruptions, along with their diagnosis and therapeutic approaches. The major distinguishing factor in acneiform eruptions is that, in contrast to acne, there are no comedones (whiteheads or blackheads). © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... The depression generally lifts during spring and summer. Bipolar disorder is different from depression but is included in this list is because someone with bipolar disorder experiences episodes of extreme low moods (depression). But ...

  14. Evaluating response to mood stabilizers in patients with mixed depression: A study of agreement between three different mania rating scales and a depression rating scale.

    PubMed

    Shansis, Flávio Milman; Reche, Mateus; Capp, Edison

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate agreement between three pairs formed by one of three mania scales (Young Mania Rating Scale [YMRS], Bech-Rafaelsen Mania Scale [BRMS], or the Clinician-Administered Rating Scale for Mania [CARS-M]) and a single depression scale (21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [21-HAM-D]) for evaluation of response to mood stabilizers in patients with mixed bipolar disorder. Between 2010 and 2014, 68 consecutive bipolar type I and II outpatients with mixed depression as per DSM-IV-TR and Cincinnati criteria were included in this 8-week open-label trial to randomly receive carbamazepine, lithium carbonate, or valproic acid as monotherapy. Patterns of response (defined as a reduction of at least 50% in one of the mania scales and on the 21-HAM-D) were strikingly similar: 21-HAM-D+YMRS=22.1%, 21-HAM-D+BRMS=20.6%, and 21-HAM-D+CARS-M=23.5% (p<0.368). Assessment of agreement revealed very high kappa coefficients: 21-HAM-D+YMRS vs. 21-HAM-D+CARS-M, kappa=0.87; 21-HAM-D+YMRS vs. 21-HAM-D+BRMS, kappa=0.78; 21-HAM-D+CARS-M vs. 21-HAM-D+BRMS, kappa=0.91 (p<0.001). The decision to combine a depression rating scale with any one mania rating scale to assess treatment response in patients with mixed depression is questionable. The present study suggests that any one of the three tested mania rating scales (YMRS, BRMS, and CARS-M) can be combined with the 21-HAM-D to assess treatment response in patients with mixed bipolar disorder. This should give clinicians an added measure of confidence in using this strategy until valid, and specific instruments are developed for assessment of mixed states. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Depression rating scales in Parkinson's disease: A critical review updating recent literature.

    PubMed

    Torbey, Elizabeth; Pachana, Nancy A; Dissanayaka, Nadeeka N W

    2015-09-15

    Depression is a prominent non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD). Assessing depression in PD remains a challenge due to the overlap of somatic symptoms between depression and PD. Other neuropsychiatric manifestations associated with PD, such as cognitive decline, also complicate assessment of depression. Therefore it is critical to investigate the validity of depression rating scales for use in PD. This will allow evaluation of observer- and self-report instruments to be administered in neurologically ill geriatric populations such as PD, and identification of appropriate scales to use in cognitively challenged PD patients. The present review includes all studies examining the validity of depression rating scales in PD. It discusses the usefulness of 13 depression rating scales in PD. The clinician-rated and widely used HAMD-17 and the self-report GDS scales are recommended for screening and measuring severity of depression in PD. The GDS-15 may be a preferred choice due to its brevity and ease of use design for older adults. Other valid and reliable instruments to use in PD include self-rated scales, such as the HADS-D, HDI, and the BDI, and the observer-report, MADRS. The CSDD displayed satisfactory validity and reliability for identification of PD patients with and without dementia. The PHQ-2, PHQ-10, SDS, CES-D, UPDRS-Depression item, IDS-SR, and IDS-C each showed some evidence of validity or reliability, however further research on the psychometric properties of these scales when used in a PD population are required.

  16. Bayesian estimation of magma supply, storage, and eruption rates using a multiphysical volcano model: Kīlauea Volcano, 2000-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Kyle R.; Poland, Michael P.

    2016-08-01

    Estimating rates of magma supply to the world's volcanoes remains one of the most fundamental aims of volcanology. Yet, supply rates can be difficult to estimate even at well-monitored volcanoes, in part because observations are noisy and are usually considered independently rather than as part of a holistic system. In this work we demonstrate a technique for probabilistically estimating time-variable rates of magma supply to a volcano through probabilistic constraint on storage and eruption rates. This approach utilizes Bayesian joint inversion of diverse datasets using predictions from a multiphysical volcano model, and independent prior information derived from previous geophysical, geochemical, and geological studies. The solution to the inverse problem takes the form of a probability density function which takes into account uncertainties in observations and prior information, and which we sample using a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Applying the technique to Kīlauea Volcano, we develop a model which relates magma flow rates with deformation of the volcano's surface, sulfur dioxide emission rates, lava flow field volumes, and composition of the volcano's basaltic magma. This model accounts for effects and processes mostly neglected in previous supply rate estimates at Kīlauea, including magma compressibility, loss of sulfur to the hydrothermal system, and potential magma storage in the volcano's deep rift zones. We jointly invert data and prior information to estimate rates of supply, storage, and eruption during three recent quasi-steady-state periods at the volcano. Results shed new light on the time-variability of magma supply to Kīlauea, which we find to have increased by 35-100% between 2001 and 2006 (from 0.11-0.17 to 0.18-0.28 km3/yr), before subsequently decreasing to 0.08-0.12 km3/yr by 2012. Changes in supply rate directly impact hazard at the volcano, and were largely responsible for an increase in eruption rate of 60-150% between 2001 and

  17. Bayesian estimation of magma supply, storage, and eruption rates using a multiphysical volcano model: Kīlauea Volcano, 2000–2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Kyle R.; Poland, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Estimating rates of magma supply to the world's volcanoes remains one of the most fundamental aims of volcanology. Yet, supply rates can be difficult to estimate even at well-monitored volcanoes, in part because observations are noisy and are usually considered independently rather than as part of a holistic system. In this work we demonstrate a technique for probabilistically estimating time-variable rates of magma supply to a volcano through probabilistic constraint on storage and eruption rates. This approach utilizes Bayesian joint inversion of diverse datasets using predictions from a multiphysical volcano model, and independent prior information derived from previous geophysical, geochemical, and geological studies. The solution to the inverse problem takes the form of a probability density function which takes into account uncertainties in observations and prior information, and which we sample using a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Applying the technique to Kīlauea Volcano, we develop a model which relates magma flow rates with deformation of the volcano's surface, sulfur dioxide emission rates, lava flow field volumes, and composition of the volcano's basaltic magma. This model accounts for effects and processes mostly neglected in previous supply rate estimates at Kīlauea, including magma compressibility, loss of sulfur to the hydrothermal system, and potential magma storage in the volcano's deep rift zones. We jointly invert data and prior information to estimate rates of supply, storage, and eruption during three recent quasi-steady-state periods at the volcano. Results shed new light on the time-variability of magma supply to Kīlauea, which we find to have increased by 35–100% between 2001 and 2006 (from 0.11–0.17 to 0.18–0.28 km3/yr), before subsequently decreasing to 0.08–0.12 km3/yr by 2012. Changes in supply rate directly impact hazard at the volcano, and were largely responsible for an increase in eruption rate of 60–150% between

  18. Depression and Anxiety Following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Are Associated With Higher Six-Month Unemployment Rates.

    PubMed

    Al Yassin, Altaib; Ouyang, Bichun; Temes, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Although survival has dramatically improved following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), the reasons for persistent high rates of unemployment in this population remain unknown. Retrospective review for medical records of patients with aSAH admitted to Rush University Medical Center was undertaken. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to test the association of either depression or anxiety with the 6-month employment status. Among the 29 patients who developed depression or anxiety, 86.2% were unemployed at 6 months following their aSAH. After controlling for confounding factors, anxiety and depression were significantly associated with higher 6-month unemployment rates (odds ratio [OR]=0.08, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.02-0.3, p=0.0002). Depression and anxiety are common following aSAH and are associated with increased unemployment rates 6 months post aSAH.

  19. A literature review of heart rate variability in depressive and bipolar disorders.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Darryl

    2016-06-01

    Autonomic nervous system dysfunction has the potential to adversely impact general medical health and is known to exist in a number of psychiatric disorders. It reflects alterations in the function of several regions of the central nervous system. Measurement of heart rate variability provides a non-invasive tool for studying autonomic function. While the literature relating to the technical process of heart rate variability and aspects of depressive disorders has been reviewed in the past, research relating to both depressive and bipolar disorders has not been comprehensively reviewed. This paper critically considers the published research in heart rate variability in both depressive and bipolar affective disorders. A literature search using Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, ProQuest Psychology and references included in published literature was conducted using the following keywords: 'heart rate variability and autonomic, combined with depression, depressive disorder, bipolar, mania and sleep'. The evidence demonstrates that, using heart rate variability measures, significant distortions of autonomic function are evident in both depressive and bipolar disorders and from most of their pharmacological treatments. The autonomic dysfunction evident in both unipolar and bipolar affective disorders, and many psychotropic medications, has significant implications for our understanding of the neurophysiology of these disorders, their treatment and associated general health. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  20. Effusion rates, volumes and emplacement style using MODIS MIR data: the 2014-15 Holuhraun eruption (Bárðarbunga, Iceland) tracked by MIROVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Diego; Laiolo, Marco; Cigolini, Corrado; Barsotti, Sara; Jónasdóttir, Elin; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    MIROVA (Middle InfraRed Observation of Volcanic Activity) is a new volcanic hot-spot detection system, based on the near-real time analysis of infrared data acquired by the MODIS sensor (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). During the Holuhraun (Bárðarbunga) eruption, which lasted from the end of August 2014 to February 2015, MIROVA has been used to detect, locate and measure the heat radiated by the evolving lava field. After peaking during the first two week of activity, the eruption produced a slow but persistent decay of MIR-derived thermal flux, that was coupled with a gradual transition from channel- to tube-fed dominated emplacement style. This was coupled with a modification of the principal growing process of the flow field that shifted from lengthening to widening and finally to thickening. Despite the evident evolution of the emplacement style our results suggest that the decreasing trend of the thermal flux was essentially controlled by the slow reduction of the effusion rates, rather than by the increasing insulation of the flow field. In fact, we provide evidence that the changing emplacement style, from channel- to tube-fed activity , did not affected (substantially) the area of radiating lava surface, but had simply a strong impact in transporting the lava farther from the vent. This suggests that during the Holuhraun eruption, as well as during many other effusive eruptions, the MIR-derived radiant flux essentially mimic the trend of lava discharge rates, with only a minor influences due to the emplacement style.

  1. Sensitivity to detect change and the correlation of clinical factors with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory in depressed inpatients.

    PubMed

    Schneibel, Rebecca; Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Wilbertz, Gregor; Dykierek, Petra; Zobel, Ingo; Schramm, Elisabeth

    2012-06-30

    Discrepancies between scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), as well as differences regarding their sensitivity to detect change, have been reported. This study investigates discrepancies and their potential prediction on the basis of demographic, personality, and clinical factors in depressed inpatients and analyzes the sensitivity to change. The HAMD and the BDI were administered to 105 inpatients with major depressive disorder randomized to 5 weeks of either interpersonal psychotherapy or clinical management. Personality was assessed with the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. Low extraversion and high neuroticism were associated with relatively higher endorsement of depressive symptoms on the BDI compared with the HAMD. The HAMD presented a greater reduction of symptom scores than the BDI. Patients with high BDI scores, high HAMD scores or both revealed the greatest change, possibly due to a statistical effect of regression to the mean. Restricted by sample size, analyses were not differentiated by treatment condition. Regression to the mean cannot be tested directly, but it might be considered as a possible explanation. The HAMD and the BDI should be regarded as two complementary rather than redundant or competing instruments as the discrepancy is associated with personality characteristics. Attributing large effect sizes solely to effective treatment and a sensitive measure may be misleading.

  2. Jupiter Eruptions

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-01-25

    NASA Hubble Space Telescope shows detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances .

  3. Fetal heart rate variability mediates prenatal depression effects on neonatal neurobehavioral maturity.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Bárbara; Pinto, Tiago Miguel; Pacheco, Alexandra; Field, Tiffany

    2017-02-01

    This study analyzed the mediating role of fetal heart rate variability (FHR) on prenatal depression and neonatal neurobehavioral maturity. A sample of 104 pregnant women was recruited and divided into two groups according to their Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) scores (depressed/non-depressed). FHR variability in response to speech stimuli was assessed at term (between 37 and 39 weeks gestation). The neonates were then assessed on the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS) during the first 5days after birth. The fetuses of non-depressed pregnant women showed higher HR variability than the fetuses of depressed pregnant women in response to speech stimuli, and later as neonates they performed more optimally on the NBAS (on autonomic stability and total scores). FHR variability mediated the relationship between the mother's prenatal depression and the neonatés NBAS performance. Prenatal depression effects on neonatal behavior may be partially explained by its adverse effects on fetal neurobehavioral maturity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Yoga on Heart Rate Variability and Depressive Symptoms in Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Chu, I-Hua; Wu, Wen-Lan; Lin, I-Mei; Chang, Yu-Kai; Lin, Yuh-Jen; Yang, Pin-Chen

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of a 12-week yoga program on heart rate variability (HRV) and depressive symptoms in depressed women. This was a randomized controlled trial. Twenty-six sedentary women scoring ≥14 on the Beck Depression Inventory-II were randomized to either the yoga or the control group. The yoga group completed a 12-week yoga program, which took place twice a week for 60 min per session and consisted of breathing exercises, yoga pose practice, and supine meditation/relaxation. The control group was instructed not to engage in any yoga practice and to maintain their usual level of physical activity during the course of the study. Participants' HRV, depressive symptoms, and perceived stress were assessed at baseline and post-test. The yoga group had a significant increase in high-frequency HRV and decreases in low-frequency HRV and low frequency/high frequency ratio after the intervention. The yoga group also reported significantly reduced depressive symptoms and perceived stress. No change was found in the control group. A 12-week yoga program was effective in increasing parasympathetic tone and reducing depressive symptoms and perceived stress in women with elevated depressive symptoms. Regular yoga practice may be recommended for women to cope with their depressive symptoms and stress and to improve their HRV.

  5. Validity of depression rating scales during pregnancy and the postpartum period: impact of trimester and parity.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shuang; Long, Qi; Newport, D Jeffrey; Na, Hyeji; Knight, Bettina; Zach, Elizabeth B; Morris, Natalie J; Kutner, Michael; Stowe, Zachary N

    2011-02-01

    The objective of the current study was to delineate the optimal cutpoints for depression rating scales during pregnancy and the postpartum period and to assess the perinatal factors influencing these scores. Women participating in prospective investigations of maternal mental illness were enrolled prior to 28 weeks gestation and followed through 6 months postpartum. At each visit, subjects completed self-rated depression scales--Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and clinician-rated scales--Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD(17) and HRSD(21)). These scores were compared to the SCID Mood Module for the presence of fulfilling diagnostic criteria for a major depressive episode (MDE) during 6 perinatal windows: preconception; first trimester; 2nd trimester; 3rd trimester; early postpartum; and later postpartum. Optimal cutpoints were determined by maximizing the sum of each scale's sensitivity and specificity. Stratified ROC analyses determined the impact of previous pregnancy and comparison of initial to follow-up visits. A total of 534 women encompassing 640 pregnancies and 4025 follow-up visits were included. ROC analysis demonstrated that all 4 scales were highly predictive of MDE. The AUCs ranged from 0.857 to 0.971 and were all highly significant (p < .0001). Optimal cutpoints were higher at initial visits and for multigravidas and demonstrated more variability for the self-rated scales. These data indicate that both clinician-rated and self-rated scales can be effective tools in identifying perinatal episodes of major depression. However, the results also suggest that prior childbirth experiences and the use of scales longitudinally across the perinatal period influence optimal cutpoints. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of externally rated job demand and control on depression diagnosis claims in an industrial cohort.

    PubMed

    DeSanto Iennaco, Joanne; Cullen, Mark R; Cantley, Linda; Slade, Martin D; Fiellin, Martha; Kasl, Stanislav V

    2010-02-01

    This study examined whether externally rated job demand and control were associated with depression diagnosis claims in a heavy industrial cohort. The retrospective cohort sample consisted of 7,566 hourly workers aged 18-64 years who were actively employed at 11 US plants between January 1, 1996, and December 31, 2003, and free of depression diagnosis claims during an initial 2-year run-in period. Logistic regression analysis was used to model the effect of tertiles of demand and control exposure on depression diagnosis claims. Demand had a significant positive association with depression diagnosis claims in bivariate models and models adjusted for demographic (age, gender, race, education, job grade, tenure) and lifestyle (smoking status, body mass index, cholesterol level) variables (high demand odds ratio = 1.39, 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.86). Control was associated with greater risk of depression diagnosis at moderate levels in unadjusted models only (odds ratio = 1.47, 95% confidence interval: 1.12, 1.93), while low control, contrary to expectation, was not associated with depression. The effects of the externally rated demand exposure were lost with adjustment for location. This may reflect differences in measurement or classification of exposure, differences in depression diagnosis by location, or other location-specific factors.

  7. Effects of Externally Rated Job Demand and Control on Depression Diagnosis Claims in an Industrial Cohort

    PubMed Central

    DeSanto Iennaco, Joanne; Cullen, Mark R.; Cantley, Linda; Slade, Martin D.; Fiellin, Martha; Kasl, Stanislav V.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether externally rated job demand and control were associated with depression diagnosis claims in a heavy industrial cohort. The retrospective cohort sample consisted of 7,566 hourly workers aged 18–64 years who were actively employed at 11 US plants between January 1, 1996, and December 31, 2003, and free of depression diagnosis claims during an initial 2-year run-in period. Logistic regression analysis was used to model the effect of tertiles of demand and control exposure on depression diagnosis claims. Demand had a significant positive association with depression diagnosis claims in bivariate models and models adjusted for demographic (age, gender, race, education, job grade, tenure) and lifestyle (smoking status, body mass index, cholesterol level) variables (high demand odds ratio = 1.39, 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.86). Control was associated with greater risk of depression diagnosis at moderate levels in unadjusted models only (odds ratio = 1.47, 95% confidence interval: 1.12, 1.93), while low control, contrary to expectation, was not associated with depression. The effects of the externally rated demand exposure were lost with adjustment for location. This may reflect differences in measurement or classification of exposure, differences in depression diagnosis by location, or other location-specific factors. PMID:20035011

  8. Bulimia and anorexia nervosa in winter depression: lifetime rates in a clinical sample.

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, N P; Dilsaver, S C

    1996-01-01

    Symptoms of an eating disorder (hyperphagia, carbohydrate craving, and weight gain) are characteristic of wintertime depression. Recent findings suggest that the severity of bulimia nervosa peaks during fall and winter months, and that persons with this disorder respond to treatment with bright artificial light. However, the rates of eating disorders among patients presenting for the treatment of winter depression are unknown. This study was undertaken to determine these rates among 47 patients meeting the DSM-III-R criteria for major depression with a seasonal pattern. All were evaluated using standard clinical interviews and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R. Twelve (25.5%) patients met the DSM-III-R criteria for an eating disorder. Eleven patients had onset of mood disorder during childhood or adolescence. The eating disorder followed the onset of the mood disorder. Clinicians should inquire about current and past symptoms of eating disorders when evaluating patients with winter depression. PMID:8580121

  9. A Comparison of Self-Rated and Female Partner-Rated Scales in the Assessment of Paternal Prenatal Depression.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Mizuho; Tachibana, Yoshiyuki; Tang, Julian; Takehara, Kenji; Kubo, Takahiko; Hashimoto, Keiji; Kitazawa, Hiroshi; Saito, Hirohisa; Ohya, Yukihiro

    2016-11-01

    Maternal depression has been widely studied but paternal depression is often overlooked. Depression in men is generally more difficult to detect as the symptoms are not apparent. Furthermore, Japanese couples tend to suppress their real emotions to avoid confrontation. We aimed to investigate the reliability and validity of the K6, K10 and PHQ-9 in assessing the mental health status of men when used by their pregnant partners, as well as the prevalence of paternal prenatal depression in a Japanese study sample. A total of 136 couples participated in this study. The prevalence of paternal prenatal depression reported by the men themselves was higher compared to that reported by their female partners (K6, 10.3 %; K10, 6.6 %; PHQ-9, 3.7 % vs. K6-FP, 2.2 %; K10-FP, 1.5 %; PHQ-9-FP, 0 %, respectively). Mental health issues in men may not be accurately rated by their female partners, suggesting the importance of self-rating and direct consultation.

  10. Silicic Submarine Eruptions: what can erupted pyroclasts tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, R.; Allen, S.; McPhie, J.; Fiske, R. S.; Tani, K.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of submarine volcanism is in its infancy with respect to subaerial eruption processes. Two fundamental differences between eruptions in seawater compared to those on land are that (1) eruptions occur at higher confining pressures, and (2) in a seawater medium, which has a higher heat capacity, density and viscosity than air. Together with JAMSTEC collaborators we have a sample suite of submarine pumice deposits from modern volcanoes of known eruption depths. This sample suite spans a spectrum of eruption intensities, from 1) powerful explosive caldera-forming (Myojin Knoll caldera); to 2) weakly explosive cone building (pre-caldera Myojin Knoll pumice and Kurose-Nishi pumice); to 3) volatile-driven effusive dome spalling (Sumisu knoll A); to 4) passive dome effusion (Sumisu knoll B and C). This sample suite has exceptional potential, not simply because the samples have been taken from well-constrained, sources but because they have similar high silica contents, are unaltered and their phenocrysts contain melt inclusions. Microtextural quantitative analysis has revealed that (i) clast vesicularities remain high (69-90 vol.%) regardless of confining pressure, mass eruption rate or eruption style , (ii) vesicle number densities scale with inferred eruption rate, and (iii) darcian and inertial permeabilities of submarine effusive and explosive pyroclasts overlap with explosively-erupted subaerial pyroclasts.

  11. Using effort-reward imbalance theory to understand high rates of depression and anxiety among clergy.

    PubMed

    Proeschold-Bell, Rae Jean; Miles, Andrew; Toth, Matthew; Adams, Christopher; Smith, Bruce W; Toole, David

    2013-12-01

    The clergy occupation is unique in its combination of role strains and higher calling, putting clergy mental health at risk. We surveyed all United Methodist clergy in North Carolina, and 95% (n = 1,726) responded, with 38% responding via phone interview. We compared clergy phone interview depression rates, assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), to those of in-person interviews in a representative United States sample that also used the PHQ-9. The clergy depression prevalence was 8.7%, significantly higher than the 5.5% rate of the national sample. We used logistic regression to explain depression, and also anxiety, assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. As hypothesized by effort-reward imbalance theory, several extrinsic demands (job stress, life unpredictability) and intrinsic demands (guilt about not doing enough work, doubting one's call to ministry) significantly predicted depression and anxiety, as did rewards such as ministry satisfaction and lack of financial stress. The high rate of clergy depression signals the need for preventive policies and programs for clergy. The extrinsic and intrinsic demands and rewards suggest specific actions to improve clergy mental health.

  12. The Montgomery Asberg and the Hamilton ratings of depression: a comparison of measures.

    PubMed

    Carmody, Thomas J; Rush, A John; Bernstein, Ira; Warden, Diane; Brannan, Stephen; Burnham, Daniel; Woo, Ada; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2006-12-01

    The 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD(17)) and the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) are two widely used clinician-rated symptom scales. A 6-item version of the HRSD (HRSD(6)) was created by Bech to address the psychometric limitations of the HRSD(17). The psychometric properties of these measures were compared using classical test theory (CTT) and item response theory (IRT) methods. IRT methods were used to equate total scores on any two scales. Data from two distinctly different outpatient studies of nonpsychotic major depression: a 12-month study of highly treatment-resistant patients (n=233) and an 8-week acute phase drug treatment trial (n=985) were used for robustness of results. MADRS and HRSD(6) items generally contributed more to the measurement of depression than HRSD(17) items as shown by higher item-total correlations and higher IRT slope parameters. The MADRS and HRSD(6) were unifactorial while the HRSD(17) contained 2 factors. The MADRS showed about twice the precision in estimating depression as either the HRSD(17) or HRSD(6) for average severity of depression. An HRSD(17) of 7 corresponded to an 8 or 9 on the MADRS and 4 on the HRSD(6). The MADRS would be superior to the HRSD(17) in the conduct of clinical trials.

  13. Prevalence Rate and Risk Factors of Depression in Outpatients with Premature Ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiansheng; Liu, Jishuang; Xia, Lei; Yang, Jiajia; Hao, Zongyao; Zhou, Jun; Liang, Chaozhao

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence rate and risk factors of depression in outpatients who were diagnosed with PE. Therefore, between September 2009 and September 2011, 1801 outpatients at andrology clinics were enrolled and consented to participate in our survey by completed a verbal questionnaire. It included the following: (1) demographic data (e.g., age, body mass index), (2) PE duration, medical history, and sexual history, (3) self-estimated intravaginal ejaculatory latency times, (4) the Zung Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS), and (5) the National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) and (6) the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5). The results showed that a total of 1,206 patients were diagnosed with PE. The prevalence rate of depression in these PE patients was 26.78%. Depression was associated with PE duration, NIH-CPSI score, and IIEF-5 score. Risk factors for depression specifically included PE durations for 13–24, 25–60, or ≥61 months, CPSI scores of 15–30 or ≥31, and IIEF-5 scores <22. These findings suggested that several associated factors (PE duration, CPSI scores, and IIEF-5 scores) were the risk factors of depression in men with PE. PMID:23844361

  14. Common Genes Contribute to Depressive Symptoms and Heart Rate Variability: The Twins Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shaoyong; Lampert, Rachel; Lee, Forrester; Bremner, J. Douglas; Snieder, Harold; Jones, Linda; Murrah, Nancy V.; Goldberg, Jack

    2010-01-01

    Depression and reduced heart rate variability (HRV) are predictors of coronary artery disease (CAD), and highly correlated with each other. However, little is known to what extend this correlation can be explained by common genetic components. We examined 198 middle-aged male twins (121 monozygotic and 77 dizygotic) from the Vietnam Era Twin Registry. Current depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory-II and HRV was assessed on 24-hour electrocardiographic Holter recordings. Five frequency domain variables were used, including ultra low frequency (ULF), very low frequency (VLF), low frequency (LF), high frequency (HF) and total power (TPow). Structural equation modeling was used to estimate shared genetic effects for depressive symptoms and the HRV frequency domains. Both depressive symptoms (h2=.5) and all measurements of HRV showed high heritability (h2=.43–.63). A significant inverse correlation was found between depressive symptoms and all HRV indices except LF and HF, with the highest coefficient (r) for TPow (r = −.24, P = .01) and ULF (r = −.24, P = .01). Bivariate genetic modeling revealed significant genetic correlations between depressive symptoms and TPow (rA = −.21, P = .04), as well as ULF (rA = −.23, P = .02). Of the total covariance between depressive symptoms and these two HRV indices, over 80% was due to the same genetic factors. In conclusion, depressive symptoms are associated with decreased HRV and this association is due, in large part, to a shared genetic effect. These results suggest that a common neurobiological dysfunction links depression and autonomic dysregulation. PMID:20158303

  15. Executive function moderates the relationship between depressive symptoms and resting heart rate variability in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gathright, Emily C; Walter, Fawn A; Hawkins, Misty A W; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Hughes, Joel W; Gunstad, John

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with high rates of depression. In turn, depression is associated with reduced heart rate variability (HRV), a marker of parasympathetic dysfunction and poorer cardiac outcomes. Cognitive impairment--especially executive dysfunction--is also highly prevalent in HF, but it is unknown whether executive function (EF) impacts the depression-HRV relationship. The primary objective of this paper is to examine whether EF moderates the relationship between depression and HRV in HF. Participants were 109 HF patients. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory-II. EF was assessed using a composite of age-adjusted T scores on the Frontal Assessment Battery, Trail Making Test B, and Stroop Color Word subtest. Parasympathetic function was assessed using resting high frequency HRV (HF-HRV). Multiple hierarchical regression was used to conduct BDI × EF moderation analyses. BDI scores were associated with reduced resting HF-HRV (p < .05). No main effects were detected between EF and resting HF-HRV (p > .05). However, EF moderated the relationship between BDI scores and resting HF-HRV (β = 0.59, p < .01). Simple slope analyses revealed that among participants with poorer EF, higher BDI scores were associated with lower resting HF-HRV (p < .001). Structural brain changes common in HF may contribute to lower EF, increased depression, and poorer autonomic functioning. Alternatively, the results may indicate that individuals with intact EF engage in self-care strategies that negate the detrimental impact of depression on autonomic function. Additional work is needed to clarify these possibilities and the potential benefits of treating depression in HF patients with different cognitive abilities.

  16. 40Ar/39Ar dating, geochemistry, and isotopic analyses of the quaternary Chichinautzin volcanic field, south of Mexico City: implications for timing, eruption rate, and distribution of volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, J. L.; Layer, P. W.; Lassiter, J. C.; Benowitz, J. A.; Macías, J. L.; Ramírez-Espinosa, J.

    2013-12-01

    Monogenetic structures located at the southern and western ends of the Chichinautzin volcanic field (Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central Mexico) yield 40Ar/39Ar ages ranging from 1.2 Ma in the western portion of the field to 1.0-0.09 Ma in the southern portion, all of which are older than the <0.04 Ma age previously established for the entire volcanic field. These new ages indicate: (1) an eruption rate of 0.47 km3/kyr, which is much lower than the 11.7 km3/kyr previously estimated; (2) that the Chichinautzin magmatism coexisted with the Zempoala (0.7 Ma) and La Corona (1.0 Ma) polygenetic volcanoes on the southern edge of Las Cruces Volcanic Range (Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt); and confirm (3) that the drainage system between the Mexico and Cuernavaca basins was closed during early Pleistocene forming the Texcoco Lake. Whole-rock chemistry and Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic data indicate heterogeneous magmatism throughout the history of Chichinautzin activity that likely reflects variable degrees of slab and sediment contributions to the mantle wedge, fractional crystallization, and crustal assimilation. Even with the revised duration of volcanism within the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field, its eruption rate is higher than most other volcanic fields of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and is comparable only to the Tacámbaro-Puruaran area in the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field to the west. These variations in eruption rates among different volcanic fields may reflect a combination of variable subduction rates of the Rivera and Cocos plates along the Middle America Trench, as well as different distances from the trench, variations in the depth with respect to the subducted slab, or the upper plate characteristics.

  17. Self-Rated Health and Long-Term Prognosis of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ambresin, Gilles; Chondros, Patty; Dowrick, Christopher; Herrman, Helen; Gunn, Jane M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Indicators of prognosis should be considered to fully inform clinical decision making in the treatment of depression. This study examines whether self-rated health predicts long-term depression outcomes in primary care. METHODS Our analysis was based on the first 5 years of a prospective 10-year cohort study underway since January 2005 conducted in 30 randomly selected Australian primary care practices. Participants were 789 adult patients with a history of depressive symptoms. Main outcome measures include risks, risk differences, and risk ratios of major depressive syndrome (MDS) on the Patient Health Questionnaire. RESULTS Retention rates during the 5 years were 660 (84%), 586 (74%), 560 (71%), 533 (68%), and 517 (66%). At baseline, MDS was present in 27% (95% CI, 23%–30%). Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data showed participants reporting poor or fair self-rated health had greater odds of chronic illness, MDS, and lower socioeconomic status than those reporting good to excellent self-rated health. For participants rating their health as poor to fair compared with those rating it good to excellent, risk ratios of MDS were 2.10 (95% CI, 1.60–2.76), 2.38 (95% CI, 1.77–3.20), 2.22 (95% CI, 1.70–2.89), 1.73 (95% CI, 1.30–2.28), and 2.15 (95% CI, 1.59–2.90) at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years, after accounting for missing data using multiple imputation. After adjusting for age, sex, multimorbidity, and depression status and severity, self-rated health remained a predictor of MDS up to 5 years. CONCLUSIONS Self-rated health offers family physicians an efficient and simple way to identify patients at risk of poor long-term depression outcomes and to inform therapeutic decision making. PMID:24445104

  18. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... the winter months, when there is less natural sunlight. Return to top What causes depression? There is ... alone. Others with moderate to severe depression might benefit from antidepressants. It may take a few weeks ...

  19. Depressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... judgment and mental functioning nausea and vomiting memory loss (depressants can cause users to have no memory of events that happened while they were under the influence) Long-Term Effects When people misuse depressants over a long ...

  20. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... the birth of a baby. Some people get seasonal affective disorder in the winter. Depression is one part of bipolar disorder. There are effective treatments for depression, including antidepressants, talk therapy, or ...

  1. Depressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... of depressants, including alcohol and the illegal drugs GHB and Rohypnol , come in liquid or powder form ... by prescription only. Some depressants, including Rohypnol and GHB, are illegal in the United States. Illegal possession ...

  2. Polymorphous light eruption

    MedlinePlus

    Polymorphous light eruption (PMLE) is a common skin reaction in people who are sensitive to sunlight (ultraviolet light). ... Polymorphic light eruption; Photodermatosis; PMLE; Benign summer light eruption

  3. Excellent reliability of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-21) in Indonesia after training.

    PubMed

    Istriana, Erita; Kurnia, Ade; Weijers, Annelies; Hidayat, Teddy; Pinxten, Lucas; de Jong, Cor; Schellekens, Arnt

    2013-09-01

    The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) is the most widely used depression rating scale worldwide. Reliability of HDRS has been reported mainly from Western countries. The current study tested the reliability of HDRS ratings among psychiatric residents in Indonesia, before and after HDRS training. The hypotheses were that: (i) prior to the training reliability of HDRS ratings is poor; and (ii) HDRS training can improve reliability of HDRS ratings to excellent levels. Furthermore, we explored cultural validity at item level. Videotaped HDRS interviews were rated by 30 psychiatric residents before and after 1 day of HDRS training. Based on a gold standard rating, percentage correct ratings and deviation from the standard were calculated. Correct ratings increased from 83% to 99% at item level and from 70% to 100% for the total rating. The average deviation from the gold standard rating improved from 0.07 to 0.02 at item level and from 2.97 to 0.46 for the total rating. HDRS assessment by psychiatric trainees in Indonesia without prior training is unreliable. A short, evidence-based HDRS training improves reliability to near perfect levels. The outlined training program could serve as a template for HDRS trainings. HDRS items that may be less valid for assessment of depression severity in Indonesia are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Depression: Problem-solving appraisal and self-rated health among Hong Kong Chinese migrant women.

    PubMed

    Chow, Susan K Y; Chan, Wing Chi

    2010-09-01

    This cross-sectional survey explored the depression status of new migrant women and its relationship with self-rated health in the Hong Kong Chinese context. A convenience sample of 68 migrant women volunteered to participate in the study. The data were collected by using the Problem Solving Inventory, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression questionnaire, and a self-rated health scale. The respondents were found to have a lesser degree of problem-solving appraisal, compared with other populations, and almost half of the volunteers were found to be depressed. Approximately 50% of the women reported their general health as "excellent", "very good", or "good". The Pearson's correlation showed a positive significant correlation between problem-solving appraisal, depression, and self-rated health. The results of the regression analysis showed that family income, self-rated health, and problem-solving confidence are predictive factors of depression. Community nurses could consider using multidisciplinary interventions that focus on life-skills training in order to promote the psychological and general wellness of migrant women in addition to the use of counseling or medication interventions.

  5. The Montgomery Äsberg and the Hamilton Ratings of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Carmody, Thomas; Rush, A. John; Bernstein, Ira; Warden, Diane; Brannan, Stephen; Burnham, Daniel; Woo, Ada; Trivedi, Madhukar

    2007-01-01

    The 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) and the Montgomery Äsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) are two widely used clinicianrated symptom scales. A 6-item version of the HRSD (HRSD6) was created by Bech to address the psychometric limitations of the HRSD17. The psychometric properties of these measures were compared using classical test theory (CTT) and item response theory (IRT) methods. IRT methods were used to equate total scores on any two scales. Data from two distinctly different outpatient studies of nonpsychotic major depression: a 12-month study of highly treatment-resistant patients (n=233) and an 8-week acute phase drug treatment trial (n=985) were used for robustness of results. MADRS and HRSD6 items generally contributed more to the measurement of depression than HRSD17 items as shown by higher item-total correlations and higher IRT slope parameters. The MADRS and HRSD6 were unifactorial while the HRSD17 contained 2 factors. The MADRS showed about twice the precision in estimating depression as either the HRSD17 or HRSD6 for average severity of depression. An HRSD17 of 7 corresponded to an 8 or 9 on the MADRS and 4 on the HRSD6. The MADRS would be superior to the HRSD17 in the conduct of clinical trials. PMID:16769204

  6. Effect of inbreeding depression on outcrossing rates among populations of a tropical pine.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo, R F; Trujillo, S

    2008-01-01

    Inbreeding depression is common among plants and may distort mating system estimates. Mating system studies traditionally ignore this effect, nonetheless an assessment of inbreeding depression that may have occurred before progeny evaluation could be necessary. In the neotropical Pinus chiapensis inbreeding depression was evaluated using regression analysis relating progeny F-values with seed germinability, the mating system was analysed in three populations with contrasting size, using isozymes, obtained a corrected outcrossing rate. Selfing decreased seed viability by 19%, relative to an outcrossed plant. Multilocus outcrossing rates, t(m), varied widely among populations. In the two smallest populations t(m) congruent with 1. Therefore, inbreeding depression did not affect the estimates, but overestimated t(m) by 10% in the third population, which has a true mixed mating system (selfing was the major source of inbreeding), and an unusually low t(m) for pines (t(m) = 0.54, uncorrected, t(m) = 0.49, corrected). Inbreeding depression may be an uneven source of bias for outcrossing estimates even at the infraspecific level. Accuracy [corrected] but not precision [corrected] may be gained by including inbreeding depression in outcrossing estimates. Therefore, caution should be taken when comparing t(m) among species or even populations within the same species.

  7. Dopamine, Depressive Symptoms and Decision-Making: The Relationship between Spontaneous Eyeblink Rate and Depressive Symptoms Predicts Iowa Gambling Task Performance

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Kaileigh A.; Norris, Dominique D.; Worthy, Darrell A.

    2016-01-01

    Depressive symptomatology has been associated with alterations in decision-making, although conclusions have been mixed with depressed individuals showing impairments in some contexts, but advantages in others. The dopaminergic system may link depressive symptoms with decision-making performance. We assessed the role of striatal dopamine D2 receptor density, using spontaneous eyeblink rate, in moderating the relationship between depressive symptoms and decision-making performance in a large undergraduate sample that had not been screened for mental illness (N=104). Regression results revealed that eyeblink rate moderated the relationship between depressive symptoms and advantageous decisions on the IGT in which individuals with more depressive symptomatology and high blink rates (higher striatal dopamine D2 receptor density) performed better on the task. Computational modeling results demonstrated that depressive symptoms alone were associated with enhanced loss aversive behavior, while individuals with high blink rates and elevated depressive symptoms tended to persevere in selecting options that led to net gains (avoiding options with net losses). These findings suggest that variation in striatal dopamine D2 receptor availability in individuals with depressive symptoms may contribute to differences in decision-making behavior. PMID:26383904

  8. Influence of depressive mood on quality of life ratings of women with epilepsy of childbearing age.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Koraliya S; Kaprelyan, Ara G

    2013-01-01

    Depressive disorders are the most frequent psychiatric comorbidity in epilepsy. Depressive mood affects negatively quality of life (QOL) ratings, sometimes having greater impact than seizure-related variables. Women with epilepsy are a specific subgroup at risk of comorbid depression in consequence of certain biopsychosocial demands. The AIM of this study was to assess the relative contribution of mood, seizure-related and demographic variables on QOL scores in women with epilepsy of childbearing age. A psychiatric assessment was carried out of 65 women with epilepsy (aged 18-55, mean 37.23 +/- 11.83 yrs). Comorbid depressive disorder was diagnosed according to ICD-10 criteria. Its severity was evaluated on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17). A questionnaire for demographic and seizure-related variables was completed. Two self-assessment questionnaires were administered: the Seizure Severity Questionnaire (SSQ) and the Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory-31 (QOLIE-31). The data were analysed using SPSS for Windows (version 17.0). Univariate correlation and multiple stepwise regression analyses were performed to explore the association between possible prognostic variables (independent variables) and QOLIE-31 overall and subscale scores (dependent variables). Analysis showed that demographic factors: employment and education; seizure-related factors: seizure severity, seizure frequency, antiepileptic drug therapy and comorbid depressive disorder were the variables significantly associated with QOLIE-31 overall score (p < 0.01). A three variable model accounted for 64.8% of the variance in QOLIE-31 overall score including seizure severity, comorbid depression and seizure frequency. Clinical factors are the strongest predictors of QOL of women with epilepsy in our study, seizure severity and comorbid depression being the main contributors. Paying attention to the psychological needs of women with epilepsy will have a positive effect on their QOL.

  9. Daily Mood Ratings via Text Message as a Proxy for Clinic Based Depression Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Adrian; Schueller, Stephen; Leykin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Mobile and automated technologies are increasingly becoming integrated into mental healthcare and assessment. The purpose of this study was to determine how automated daily mood ratings are related to the Patient Health Questionnaire–9 (PHQ-9), a standard measure in the screening and tracking of depression symptoms. Results There was a significant relationship between daily mood scores and one-week average mood scores and PHQ-9 scores controlling for linear change in depression scores. PHQ9 scores were not related to the average of two week mood ratings. This study also constructed models using variance, maximum, and minimum values of mood ratings in the preceding week and two-week periods as predictors of PHQ-9. None of these variables significantly predicted PHQ-9 scores when controlling for daily mood ratings and the corresponding averages for each period. Limitations This study only assessed patients who were in treatment for depression therefore do not account for the relationship between text message mood ratings for those who are not depressed. The sample was also predominantly Spanish speaking and low-income making generalizability to other populations uncertain. Conclusions Our results show that automatic text message based mood ratings can be a clinically useful proxy for the PHQ9. Importantly, this approach avoids the limitations of the PHQ9 administration, which include length and a higher requirement for literacy. PMID:25679202

  10. Attachment Status Affects Heart Rate Responses to Experimental Ostracism in Inpatients with Depression

    PubMed Central

    De Rubeis, Jannika; Sütterlin, Stefan; Lange, Diane; Pawelzik, Markus; van Randenborgh, Annette; Victor, Daniela; Vögele, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Depression is assumed to be both a risk factor for rejection and a result of it, and as such constitutes an important factor in rejection research. Attachment theory has been applied to understand psychological disorders, such as depression, and can explain individual differences in responses to rejection. Research on autonomic nervous system activity to rejection experiences has been contradictory, with opposing strings of argumentation (activating vs. numbing). We investigated autonomic nervous system-mediated peripheral physiological responses (heart rate) to experimentally manipulated ostracism (Cyberball) in 97 depressed patients with organized (n = 52) and disorganized attachment status (n = 45). Controlling for baseline mean heart rate levels, depressed patients with disorganized attachment status responded to ostracism with significantly higher increases in heart rate than depressed patients with organized attachment status (p = .029; ηp2 = .051). These results suggest that attachment status may be a useful indicator of autonomic responses to perceived social threat, which in turn may affect the therapeutic process and the patient-therapist relationship. PMID:26943924

  11. Attachment Status Affects Heart Rate Responses to Experimental Ostracism in Inpatients with Depression.

    PubMed

    De Rubeis, Jannika; Sütterlin, Stefan; Lange, Diane; Pawelzik, Markus; van Randenborgh, Annette; Victor, Daniela; Vögele, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Depression is assumed to be both a risk factor for rejection and a result of it, and as such constitutes an important factor in rejection research. Attachment theory has been applied to understand psychological disorders, such as depression, and can explain individual differences in responses to rejection. Research on autonomic nervous system activity to rejection experiences has been contradictory, with opposing strings of argumentation (activating vs. numbing). We investigated autonomic nervous system-mediated peripheral physiological responses (heart rate) to experimentally manipulated ostracism (Cyberball) in 97 depressed patients with organized (n = 52) and disorganized attachment status (n = 45). Controlling for baseline mean heart rate levels, depressed patients with disorganized attachment status responded to ostracism with significantly higher increases in heart rate than depressed patients with organized attachment status (p = .029; ηp2 = .051). These results suggest that attachment status may be a useful indicator of autonomic responses to perceived social threat, which in turn may affect the therapeutic process and the patient-therapist relationship.

  12. Watchful waiting for minor depression in primary care: remission rates and predictors of improvement.

    PubMed

    Hegel, Mark T; Oxman, Thomas E; Hull, Jay G; Swain, Karin; Swick, Holly

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine remission rates and predictors of improvement for minor depression following a 1-month watchful waiting period in primary care and to describe the watchful waiting processes. Prior to randomization into a clinical trial for minor depression, 111 participants were entered into a 1-month watchful waiting period. Depression severity and predictors of improvement were measured at the start of watchful waiting. At the end of watchful waiting, remission rates were calculated and predictor variables were analyzed for their contribution toward predicting improvement. Remission rates were low, ranging from 9% to 13%, depending on the measure. Avoidant coping style and frequency of engaging in active pleasant events at baseline accounted for the majority of change in depression. During watchful waiting, about one fifth of the sample (21%) had at least one contact with their physician and 27% reported using self-initiated treatments. There is a low likelihood of spontaneous remission for treatment-seeking samples with minor depression in primary care. An avoidant coping style seriously interferes with remission, and engaging in regular active pleasant events confers an advantage. Feasible interventions for primary care that promote activity and decrease avoidant coping styles may improve outcomes. These findings may not generalize to community and non-treatment-seeking samples.

  13. New-onset depression following stable, slow, and rapid rate of prescription opioid dose escalation.

    PubMed

    Salas, Joanne; Scherrer, Jeffrey F; Schneider, Frank David; Sullivan, Mark D; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Burroughs, Thomas; Copeland, Laurel A; Ahmedani, Brian K; Lustman, Patrick J

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that longer durations of opioid use, independent of maximum morphine equivalent dose (MED) achieved, is associated with increased risk of new-onset depression (NOD). Conversely, other studies, not accounting for duration, found that higher MED increased probability of depressive symptoms. To determine whether rate of MED increase is associated with NOD, a retrospective cohort analysis of Veterans Health Administration data (2000-2012) was conducted. Eligible patients were new, chronic (>90 days) opioid users, aged 18 to 80, and without depression diagnoses for 2 years before start of follow-up (n = 7051). Mixed regression models of MED across follow-up defined 4 rate of dose change categories: stable, decrease, slow increase, and rapid increase. Cox proportional hazard models assessed the relationship of rate of dose change and NOD, controlling for pain, duration of use, maximum MED, and other confounders using inverse probability of treatment-weighted propensity scores. Incidence rate for NOD was 14.1/1000PY (person-years) in stable rate, 13.0/1000PY in decreasing, 19.3/1000PY in slow increasing, and 27.5/1000PY in rapid increasing dose. Compared with stable rate, risk of NOD increased incrementally for slow (hazard ratio = 1.22; 95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.42) and rapid (hazard ratio = 1.58; 95% confidence interval: 1.30-1.93) rate of dose increase. Faster rates of MED escalation contribute to NOD, independent of maximum dose, pain, and total opioid duration. Dose escalation may be a proxy for loss of control or undetected abuse known to be associated with depression. Clinicians should avoid rapid dose increase when possible and discuss risk of depression with patients if dose increase is warranted for pain.

  14. Perception of teratogenic risk and the rated likelihood of pregnancy termination: association with maternal depression.

    PubMed

    Walfisch, Asnat; Sermer, Corey; Matok, Ilan; Einarson, Adrienne; Koren, Gideon

    2011-12-01

    Women are often exposed to various medications and medical conditions during pregnancy. Unrealistically high maternal teratogenic risk perception, related to these exposures, may lead to abrupt discontinuation of therapy and (or) termination of a wanted pregnancy. The association between maternal depression and the teratogenic risk perception has not been studied, nor were the actions resulting from this perception. Our objectives were to explore the association between maternal depression, teratogenic risk perception, and the rated likelihood to terminate pregnancy. Additionally, we evaluated possible benefits of counselling. We administered the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to all women who attended the Motherisk Clinic between October 2007 and April 2010. A visual analogue scale was used to determine maternal risk perception in relation to the specific exposure, and the rated likelihood to terminate the pregnancy, before and after counselling. We analyzed data from 413 women. Maternal teratogenic risk perception and the rated likelihood to terminate the pregnancy were significantly lower following counselling. An EPDS score of 13 or more was significantly associated with a higher rated likelihood to terminate the pregnancy (P = 0.03). In a multivariable regression analysis, an EPDS score of 13 or more was found to be an independent predictor of a higher personal teratogenic risk perception (P = 0.03). Both maternal depression and exposure-directed counselling are associated with maternal risk perception and the rated likelihood to terminate pregnancy. Appropriate counselling may reduce fear of teratogenicity and the likelihood of pregnancy termination.

  15. Financial incentives for smoking cessation among depression-prone pregnant and newly postpartum women: effects on smoking abstinence and depression ratings.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Alexa A; Skelly, Joan M; Higgins, Stephen T

    2015-04-01

    We examined whether pregnant and newly postpartum smokers at risk for postpartum depression respond to an incentive-based smoking-cessation treatment and how the intervention impacts depression ratings. This study is a secondary data analysis. Participants (N = 289; data collected 2001-2013) were smokers at the start of prenatal care who participated in 4 controlled clinical trials on the efficacy of financial incentives for smoking cessation. Women were assigned either to an intervention wherein they earned vouchers exchangeable for retail items contingent on abstaining from smoking or to a control condition wherein they received vouchers of comparable value independent of smoking status. Treatments were provided antepartum through 12-weeks postpartum. Depression ratings (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]-1A) were examined across 7 antepartum/postpartum assessments. Women who reported a history of prior depression or who had BDI scores ≥ 17 at the start of prenatal care were categorized as depression-prone (Dep+), while those meeting neither criterion were categorized as depression-negative (Dep-). The intervention increased smoking abstinence independent of depression status (p < .001), and it decreased mean postpartum BDI ratings as well as the proportion of women scoring in the clinical range (≥17 and >21) compared with the control treatment (ps ≤ .05). Treatment effects on depression ratings were attributable to changes in Dep+ women. These results demonstrate that depression-prone pregnant and newly postpartum women respond well to this incentive-based smoking-cessation intervention in terms of achieving abstinence, and the intervention also reduces the severity of postpartum depression ratings in this at-risk population. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Changes in Heart Rate Variability of Depressed Patients after Electroconvulsive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Royster, Erica B.; Trimble, Lisa M.; Cotsonis, George; Schmotzer, Brian; Manatunga, Amita; Rushing, Natasha N.; Pagnoni, Giuseppe; Auyeung, S. Freda; Brown, Angelo R.; Schoenbeck, Joel; Murthy, Smitha; McDonald, William M.; Musselman, Dominique L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. As few, small studies have examined the impact of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) upon the heart rate variability of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), we sought to confirm whether ECT-associated improvement in depressive symptoms would be associated with increases in HRV linear and nonlinear parameters. Methods. After providing consent, depressed study participants (n = 21) completed the Beck Depression Index (BDI), and 15-minute Holter monitor recordings, prior to their 1st and 6th ECT treatments. Holter recordings were analyzed for certain HRV indices: root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), low-frequency component (LF)/high-frequency component (HF) and short-(SD1) versus long-term (SD2) HRV ratios. Results. There were no significant differences in the HRV indices of RMSDD, LF/HF, and SD1/SD2 between the patients who responded, and those who did not, to ECT. Conclusion. In the short term, there appear to be no significant improvement in HRV in ECT-treated patients whose depressive symptoms respond versus those who do not. Future studies will reveal whether diminished depressive symptoms with ECT are reliably associated with improved sympathetic/parasympathetic balance over the long-term, and whether acute changes in sympathetic/parasympathetic balance predict improved mental- and cardiac-related outcomes. PMID:22966422

  17. [The ICD-10 Symptom Rating (ISR): validation of the depression scale in a clinical sample].

    PubMed

    Brandt, Wolfram Alexis; Loew, Thomas; von Heymann, Friedrich; Stadtmüller, Godehard; Georgi, Alexander; Tischinger, Michael; Strom, Frederik; Mutschler, Friederike; Tritt, Karin

    2015-06-01

    The ICD-10 Symptom Rating (ISR) 1 measures the severity of psychiatric disorders with 29 items on 5 subscales as comprehensively as possible. The following syndromes are measured: Depressive syndrome, anxiety syndrome, obsessive-compulsive syndrome, Somatoform syndrome, eating disorder syndrome as well as additional items that cover various mental syndromes, and an overall score. The study reports findings on the validity and sensitivity to change of the depression subscale (ISR-D). In a clinical sample of N=949 inpatients with depression spectrum disorders the convergent validity was determined by correlation with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) 3 and the subscale "depression" of the Symptom-Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) 4. The high correlation between the different instruments confirms the validity of the ISR-Depression Scale. The sensitivity to change of the ISR seems higher than that of the BDI and the SCL-90. Because of its economy and the good psychometric properties the ISR is recommended for use in clinical samples.

  18. A Reappraisal of Seismicity and Eruptions of Pantelleria Island and the Sicily Channel (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spampinato, Salvatore; Ursino, Andrea; Barbano, Maria Serafina; Pirrotta, Claudia; Rapisarda, Salvatore; Larocca, Graziano; Platania, Pier Raffaele

    2017-07-01

    Three main tectonic depressions (the Pantelleria, Linosa and Malta troughs), the expression of a continental rift, characterize the Sicily Channel, a region with recent volcanic activity attested by the Pantelleria and Linosa volcanic islands, as well as numerous seamounts. To understand the seismic and eruptive behaviour of this area, we compare historical and instrumental seismicity retrieved from catalogues with recordings from both a mobile seismic network and a permanent station deployed at Pantelleria. A review of historical eruptions affecting the Sicily Channel is also presented. Recent instrumental seismicity shows that the Sicily Channel is characterized by a low level of seismicity, with earthquakes mainly occurring as isolated events, rather than swarms as observed during the few documented eruptive periods. The results of a seismic survey in 2006-2007, as well as the signals recorded by a permanent station in 2010-2014, enable stating that also Pantelleria is characterized by a very low rate of seismicity. The available, though scant, historical information suggests a recurrence time of about a century for the volcanic activity and that eruptions are usually preceded by seismic swarms. In the only historical known eruption of Pantelleria, in addition to shocks, uplifting and increasing fumarole activity, were observed. Notwithstanding the lack of eruptions over the past century, and despite the low recent seismic rate, we believe that the geophysical monitoring of the Sicily Channel needs improving since it is an area of potentially high seismic and volcanic hazard given the presence of several active submarine eruptive centres.

  19. Eruptive pseudoangiomatosis.

    PubMed

    Larralde, Margarita; Ballona, Rosalía; Correa, Noemí; Schroh, Roberto; Coll, N

    2002-01-01

    We describe two children with acute onset and spontaneous resolution of angioma-like papules during a viral illness. The biopsy specimens from both patients showed a unique histologic appearance consisting of dilated dermal blood vessels with plump, hobnail-shaped endothelial cells. On the basis of the natural history and the histopathologic features we suggest the diagnosis of eruptive pseudoangiomatosis.

  20. Popocatepetl Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Popocatepetl Volcano, almost 30 miles south of Mexico City, erupted yesterday (December 18, 2000) in what authorities are calling its most spectacular eruption since 800 A.D. This morning, Popocatepetl (pronounced poh-poh-kah-TEH-peh-til) continued spewing red-hot rocks as well as a column of smoke and ash about 2.5 miles high into the atmosphere. This true-color image of the volcano was acquired today by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite. In this image, Popocatepetl's plume (greyish pixels) can be seen blowing southward, away from Mexico City. There is a large cloud bank (bright white pixels) just to the east of the volcanic plume. Although Popocatepetl has been active since 1994-when it awoke from a 70-year slumber-this most recent eruption is most concerning to the greater Mexico City region's 20 million residents. The volcano demonstrated what it can do in 800 A.D. when it belched forth enough lava to fill many of the valleys in the surrounding region. Earlier, scientists warned the citizens of Mexico that there is a dome of lava at the base of the volcano that is causing pressure to build inside. They are concerned that, if it continues to build unabated, this pressure could cause even larger eruptions in the future. Image provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  1. Popocatepetl Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Popocatepetl Volcano, almost 30 miles south of Mexico City, erupted yesterday (December 18, 2000) in what authorities are calling its most spectacular eruption since 800 A.D. This morning, Popocatepetl (pronounced poh-poh-kah-TEH-peh-til) continued spewing red-hot rocks as well as a column of smoke and ash about 2.5 miles high into the atmosphere. This true-color image of the volcano was acquired today by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite. In this image, Popocatepetl's plume (greyish pixels) can be seen blowing southward, away from Mexico City. There is a large cloud bank (bright white pixels) just to the east of the volcanic plume. Although Popocatepetl has been active since 1994-when it awoke from a 70-year slumber-this most recent eruption is most concerning to the greater Mexico City region's 20 million residents. The volcano demonstrated what it can do in 800 A.D. when it belched forth enough lava to fill many of the valleys in the surrounding region. Earlier, scientists warned the citizens of Mexico that there is a dome of lava at the base of the volcano that is causing pressure to build inside. They are concerned that, if it continues to build unabated, this pressure could cause even larger eruptions in the future. Image provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  2. Survey of breast implant patients: characteristics, depression rate, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Kalaaji, Amin; Bjertness, Cecilie Bergsmark; Nordahl, Cathrine; Olafsen, Kjell

    2013-02-01

    Quality of life (QOL) among breast augmentation patients is a growing research area, with newly worrisome data on psychological health in this group. The authors investigate characteristics of breast implant patients, including motivations for surgery, depression rate, effect of surgery on daily activity and work activity, and overall psychosocial and cosmetic changes through a self-reported survey. Of 121 consecutive breast augmentation patients treated by the senior author (AK) between 2005 and 2008, a total of 93 patients were reachable via e-mail and were sent a 47-question survey, which they could return anonymously. Answers were processed by QuestBack mail system (QuestBack AS, Oslo, Norway) and sent to the authors as diagrams and figures, rather than as raw data. The response rate for this survey was 67%. Average follow-up was 2.8 years. For 65%, the motivation for surgery was cosmetic; 48% replied it was for emotional reasons (reduced self-esteem), 22% for intimate reasons, and 10% for physical reasons. Before the operation, 6% of respondents reported diagnosed depression. The postoperative changes were equal between improved and worsened depression. In 27%, the operation increased motivation for daily activities; 73% felt like a "whole" person, and 26% experienced improvement in social skills. In terms of the cosmetic result, 93% were satisfied or very satisfied. However, 27% indicated they were unsatisfied or very unsatisfied with skin sensation. Although in some cases depression increased postoperatively, the depression rate in our study was still lower than the published range in the general population in Norway. Breast enlargement increased motivation to perform daily activities in our patients. The procedure improved QOL in both psychosocial and cosmetic aspects. However, the relatively high percentage of patients who experienced reduced breast skin sensitivity postoperatively can represent a challenge for the surgeon. Multicenter/clinic studies are

  3. Polymorphic light eruption sine eruption.

    PubMed

    Dover, J S; Hawk, J L

    1988-01-01

    We describe seven patients, four female and three male, who developed intense pruritus on sun-exposed skin without visible change. The clinical features resembled those of polymorphic light eruption (PLE) without rash. Four patients also occasionally developed typical PLE upon sun exposure, but sun-induced pruritus alone occurred most frequently. No patient was taking any drug therapy. One patient developed similar pruritus following solar simulated irradiation, and one following PUVA therapy. All other laboratory investigations were negative. Treatment with low dose UVB phototherapy or PUVA therapy was effective. The condition, which we have called polymorphic light eruption sine eruptione (PLESE), appears to be a variant of PLE not previously reported.

  4. [Validation of the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Cano, Juan Fernando; Gomez Restrepo, Carlos; Rondón, Martín

    2016-01-01

    To adapt and to validate the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) in Colombia. Observational study for scale validation. Validity criteria were used to determine the severity cut-off points of the tool. Taking into account sensitivity and specificity values, those cut points were contrasted with ICD-10 criteria for depression severity. A a factor analysis was performed. The internal consistencY was determined with the same sample of patients used for the validity criteria. Inter-rater reliability was assessed by evaluating the 22 records of the patients that consented to a video interview. Sensitivity to change was established through a second application of the scale in 28 subjects after a lapse of 14 to 28 days. The study was performed in Bogotá, the tool was applied in 150 patients suffering from major depressive disorder. The cut-off point for moderate depression was 20 (sensitivity, 98%; specificity, 96%), and the cut-off point for severe depression was 34 (sensitivity, 98%; specificity, 92%). The tool appears as a unidimensional scale, which possesses a good internal consistency with (α=.9168). The findings of inter-rater reliability evaluation showed the scale as highly reliable (intraclass correlation coefficient=.9833). The instrument has a good sensitivity to change. The Colombian version of the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale has good psychometric properties and can be used in clinical practice and in clinical research in the field of depressive disorder. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. The largest volcanic eruptions on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukstins Peate, I.; Bryan, S. E.; Peate, D. W.; Self, S.; Mawby, M.; Jerram, D. A.; Marsh, J.

    2010-12-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs) host the most frequently recurring, largest volume basaltic & silicic eruptions on Earth. Understanding magma volumes, eruptive mechanisms, frequency and aerosol emissions are critical to interpret climate forcing and environmental change. The largest volume (>1000 km3 dre) and magnitude (>M8) eruptions produce areally extensive (104-105 km2) basaltic flow fields and silicic ignimbrites that are the main building blocks of LIPs. Magma volumes >1000 km3 are also emplaced as high-level basaltic and rhyolitic sills in LIPs, and may contribute substantial aerosol emissions through shallow degassing and crystallization. Basaltic and silicic eruptions have comparable magnitudes, but silicic ignimbrite volumes may be significantly underestimated due to unrecognized and correlated, but voluminous co-ignimbrite ash deposits. Magma composition appears to be no barrier to individual eruption volume. Despite similar magnitudes, flood basaltic and silicic eruptions are very different in eruption mechanism, duration, intensity, vent configuration, and emplacement style. Flood basalts are dominantly effusive Hawaiian-Strombolian, with magma discharge rates of ~107-108 kg/s, and produce dominantly compound pahoehoe flow fields over eruption durations most likely >10 yrs. Some large-volume silicic lavas were emplaced by effusive and fissure eruptions, but discharge rates are unknown and may be up to an order of magnitude greater than those of flood basalt lavas for emplacement to be on realistic time scales (<10 years). Most silicic eruptions are moderately to highly explosive, producing co-current pyroclastic fountains (rarely Plinian) with discharge rates of 109-1011 kg/s that emplace welded to rheomorphic ignimbrites. Stratospheric ash and aerosol injections may be greater from co-ignimbrite ash clouds than eruption plumes. At present, durations for large-magnitude silicic eruptions are unconstrained. At discharge rates of 109 kg/s, equivalent to

  6. Modeling the ascent rate of the 2004 Mount St. Helens lava body using pre-eruption airborne thermal infrared camera data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, M.; Schneider, D.; Wessels, R.; Clark, M.

    2005-12-01

    A helicopter-mounted forward-looking infrared radiometer (FLIR) was deployed by the Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) during the initial phases of renewed volcanic activity at Mount St. Helens (MSH). The instrument began collecting data on October 1, 2004, and was flown twice daily (weather permitting) during the first month of the eruption. Thermal infrared (TIR) data collected during the first seven flight-days imaged the 1980 crater floor, phreatic explosion pits, and ash cooling on the surface. However, it was not until October 11, 2004, that the FLIR data confirmed a lava body was present at the surface. After the initial extrusion of new dome rock, subsequent surveys from the helicopter-mounted and a hand-held FLIR were used to model its rise rate and volume. During the pre-extrusive phase of the eruption, the FLIR camera commonly imaged the same regions of the older lava dome and portions of the uplifted crater floor. Qualitative changes in the heat flux were noted at the time, but the rapid escalation in activity and long days of field work precluded a more quantitative approach. In an effort to understand the early phases of the eruption process, FLIR data from times prior to October 11 have been re-analyzed. Data from these days were ideal because of good weather conditions, relative stability of ground surface features, and a minimal amount of plume within the crater itself. Two distinct geomorphic features identifiable in each day's data were clipped from the full resolution images. The data were first corrected for distance, atmospheric pathlength energy, and surface emissivity and then converted to radiant flux. Assuming the radiative heat output at these locations is related to the conductive heat loss from the magma body below, heat balance models can be employed to estimate the depth of the magma. Assumptions that must be made for such an approach include: 1) the average pre-eruptive temperature for dacitic magma; 2) the contribution of convective

  7. The large and destructive 1669 AD eruption at Etna volcano: reconstruction of the lava flow field evolution and effusion rate trend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branca, Stefano; De Beni, Emanuela; Proietti, Cristina

    2013-02-01

    The 1669 AD flank eruption was the most destructive event on Etna volcano in historical times (˜700 BC) and provided, because of the presence of numerous quarries and subsurface data, the opportunity for a unique case study in which we directly measured the thickness of the lava field. Moreover, analysis of historical documents allowed reconstruction of the temporal evolution of the lava field and estimation of the average effusion rate. One hundred and thirty-eight thickness measurements, acquired from field surveys and subsurface data, allowed us to divide the lava field into 12 zones of homogenous mean thickness and to calculate a total lava volume of (607 ± 105) × 106 m3, corresponding to an average effusion rate of 58 ± 10 m3/s. This new volume differs by -24 % up to +64 %, from previously published values. The temporal evolution of the cumulative volume and average effusion rate were reconstructed for the first fourteen days, from field data and analysis of historical records. A short initial phase was characterized by a rapid increase in effusion rate, which reached a peak of ˜640 m3/s after 3 days. This was followed by a longer phase in which the flow rate decreased. The first 14 days were crucial for the development of the lava field, and in this time it covered 72 % of its final area and produced most of the damage. Thereafter, the growth of a complex lava tube network promoted lava field lengthening to the city of Catania, 17 km away from the vent. Effusion rate trends like those of the 1669 eruption can be adopted for future investigations aimed at assessing the effects of similar events on Etna's most highly urbanized area and at other effusive basaltic volcanoes.

  8. Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Stress Relief Program for Depression*. A Replicated Single-Subject Design.

    PubMed

    Hartogs, Bregje M A; Bartels-Velthuis, Agna; Van der Ploeg, Karen; Bos, Elske H

    2017-07-19

    Depressive disorders often have a chronic course and the efficacy of evidence-based treatments may be overestimated. To examine the effectiveness of the Heart Rate Variability Stress Reduction Program (SRP) as a supplement to standard treatment in patients with depressive disorders. The SRP was individually administered in eight weekly sessions. Seven participants completed the full protocol and were enrolled in a single-subject ABA multiple baseline experimental design. To perform interrupted time-series analyses, daily measures were completed in a diary (depression, resilience, happiness, heart coherence and a personalized outcome measure). Five out of seven patients improved in depressed mood and/or a personalized outcome measure. The effect of treatment was reversed in four patients during the withdrawal phase. One patient reliably improved on depression, whereas two patients recovered on autonomy and one on social optimism. No consistent relationship was found between the heart rate variability-related level of coherence and self-reported mood levels. The SRP is beneficial in some domains and for some patients. A prolonged treatment or continued home practice may be required for enduring effects. The intervention had more clinical impact on resilience-related outcome measures than on symptoms. The small sample size does not permit generalization of the results. We recommend future investigation of the underlying mechanisms of the SRP.

  9. Seasonality of Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B.; Pyle, D. M.; Dade, W. B.; Jupp, T.

    2001-12-01

    An analysis of volcanic activity in the last three hundred years reveals that the frequency of onset of volcanic eruptions varies systematically with the time of year. We analysed the Smithsonian catalogue of more than 3200 subaerial eruptions recorded during the last 300 years. We also investigated continuous records, which are not part of the general catalogue, of individual explosions at Sakurajima volcano (Japan, 150 events per year since 1955) and Semeru (Indonesia, 100,000 events during the period 1997-2000). A higher proportion (as much as 18 percent of the average monthly rate) of eruptions occur worldwide between December and March. This observation is statistically significant at above the 99 percent level. This pattern is independent of the time interval considered, and emerges whether individual eruptions are counted with equal weight or with weights proportional to event explosivity. Elevated rates of eruption onset in boreal winter months are observed in northern and southern hemispheres alike, as well as in most volcanically-active regions including, most prominently, the 'Ring of Fire' surrounding the Pacific basin. Key contributors to this regional pattern include volcanoes in Central and South America, the volcanic provinces of the northwest Pacific rim, Indonesia and the southwest Pacific basin. On the smallest spatial scales, some individual volcanoes for which detailed histories exist exhibit peak levels in eruption activity during November-January. Seasonality is attributed to one or more mechanisms associated with the annual hydrological cycle, and may correspond to the smallest time-scale over which fluctuations in stress due to the redistribution of water-masses are felt by the Earth's crust. Our findings have important ramifications for volcanic risk assessment, and offer new insight into possible changes in volcanic activity during periods of long-term changes in global sea level.

  10. Seasonality of volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B.; Pyle, D.; Dade, B.; Jupp, T.

    2003-04-01

    An analysis of volcanic activity in the last three hundred years reveals that the frequency of onset of volcanic eruptions varies systematically with the time of year. We analysed the Smithsonian catalogue of more than 3200 subaerial eruptions recorded during the last 300 years. We also investigated continuous records, which are not part of the general catalogue, of individual explosions at Sakurajima volcano (Japan, 150 events per year since 1955) and Semeru (Indonesia, 100,000 events during the period 1997-2000). A higher proportion (as much as 18 percent of the average monthly rate) of eruptions occur worldwide between December and March. This observation is statistically significant at above the 99 percent level. This pattern is independent of the time interval considered, and emerges whether individual eruptions are counted with equal weight or with weights proportional to event explosivity. Elevated rates of eruption onset in boreal winter months are observed in northern and southern hemispheres alike, as well as in most volcanically-active regions including, most prominently, the 'Ring of Fire' surrounding the Pacific basin. Key contributors to this regional pattern include volcanoes in Central and South America, the volcanic provinces of the northwest Pacific rim, Indonesia and the southwest Pacific basin. On the smallest spatial scales, some individual volcanoes for which detailed histories exist exhibit peak levels in eruption activity during November-January. Seasonality is attributed to one or more mechanisms associated with the annual hydrological cycle, and may correspond to the smallest time-scale over which fluctuations in stress due to the redistribution of water-masses are felt by the Earth's crust. Our findings have important ramifications for volcanic risk assessment, and offer new insight into possible changes in volcanic activity during periods of long-term changes in global sea level.

  11. Effect of population outcrossing rate on inbreeding depression in Pinus contorta var. murrayana seedlings.

    Treesearch

    Frank C. Sorensen

    2001-01-01

    Seft and cross families from three populatons (A, low-density, ecologically marginal site for lodgepole pine, and B + C, normal sites) were cultured in a common outdoor nursery for 2 yrs. Previous results results had shown higher natural selfing rates and lower inbreeding depression in embryo survival in A than in B + C. In the nursery test, selfing decreased means of...

  12. One-Year Prevalence Rates of Major Depressive Disorder in First-Year University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, E. Lisa; McLeod, Peter J.; Gleich, Stephen S.; Hand, Denise

    2006-01-01

    First-year university students may be more at risk for experiencing Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) than the general population given associated risk factors of this age range. A two-phase procedure was used to estimate the one-year prevalence rate of MDD and comorbid Major Anxiety Disorders among first-year university students at a small Canadian…

  13. Prevalence Rates of Depression, Anxiety, and Somatization among Rural Southwestern Native American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Carolyn T.; Morris, Christopher; Crowley, Susan L.

    Internalizing symptoms, which include anxiety and depression, may be the most common pattern of psychopathology found in children. However, the knowledge base targeting internalizing symptomology in Native American children of the Southwest is surprisingly limited. This paper reports on a study of prevalence rates of internalizing disorders among…

  14. Rates and processes of channel development and recovery following the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, D.F.; Martinson, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    Stream channel development in response to the eruption of Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980, resulted in some of the largest sediment yields documented anywhere on earth. Development of new channels on the 2.7 km3 debris-avalanche deposit in the North Fork Toutle River caused net erosion of as much as 1.3 X 105 t km-2 annually. The principal effect of the blast on channels throughout the 550 km2 devastated area was the subsequent rapid delivery of sand- and silt-size sediment eroded from hillslopes. Since 1984, instability and sedimentation in lahar and blast-affected channels have been within the range of pre-1980 levels. -from Authors

  15. Evaluating and monitoring treatment response in depression using measurement-based assessment and rating scales.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2013-07-01

    Even with many treatment options available for major depressive disorder, many patients fail to achieve remission and return to their presymptomatic levels of functioning at work, in leisure activities, and in relationships. Throughout treatment, clinicians should implement measurement-based care by systematically monitoring patients' response using self-rated scales, such as the PHQ-9, QIDS-SR, or BDI. By tracking depressive symptoms, as well as suicidality, treatment adherence, and side effects, clinicians can adjust treatment to help patients achieve the best outcomes. Measurement-based care enables clinicians to make informed decisions at critical points throughout the treatment process and to involve patients in making those decisions.

  16. Plasma neurotransmitters, blood pressure, and heart rate during supine-resting, orthostasis, and moderate exercise conditions in major depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Lechin, F; van der Dijs, B; Orozco, B; Lechin, M E; Báez, S; Lechin, A E; Rada, I; Acosta, E; Arocha, L; Jiménez, V

    1995-08-01

    Major depressed patients showed greater heart rate, noradrenaline, and free-serotonin values than normal. Conversely, platelet-serotonin values in major depressed patients were significantly lower than normal. Patients registered the normal differential blood pressure reduction during orthostasis. They also revealed progressive and significantly higher heart rate rises during orthostasis and exercise periods, when compared to normals. Whereas noradrenaline showed maximal rises during the two last periods, adrenaline only showed small but significant increase during exercise. The analysis of correlations, together with the above data, suggests that major depressed patients register maximal neural sympathetic activity as well as adrenal glands sympathetic hypoactivity. In addition, these patients show hyperparasympathetic activity, as reflected by the free-serotonin profile. Finally, the fact that both the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the self-rating Beck Depression Inventory correlated positively with noradrenaline/adrenaline ratio and free-serotonin values strongly suggests that both neural sympathetic and cholinergic mechanisms are involved in major depression.

  17. Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  18. Heart rate variability and depressed mood in physical education students: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Pichon, Aurélien; Nuissier, Frédéric; Chapelot, Didier

    2010-08-25

    Autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity, and more specifically its parasympathetic component, has been reported to be associated with depression. The objective of this longitudinal study was to assess whether changes in heart rate variability (HRV) and in depressive moods were interrelated in healthy young subjects. Thirty students in physical education with a high physical load, were followed over the university year at 3 periods: October (P1), February (P2) and May (P3). Depressive mood was assessed by the score on the Depression subscale of the profile of mood state (POMS) questionnaire. HRV was assessed in supine and during an active orthostatic test with total power (TPms(2)) as the sum of the very low (VLF), low (LF) and high frequency (HF) bands, LF/HF ratio representing sympathetic and HFms(2) parasympathetic modulations. Results showed that changes in Depression scores between P1 and P2 were negatively and positively associated with changes in TPms(2), LFms(2), and HFms(2) in supine position and during orthostatism respectively. Although Anger/Aggressivity, Fatigue, and Vigor scores of the POMS were also correlated with changes in some HRV indices, Depression was the only significant predictive factor of changes in TPms(2) and HFms(2) between P1 and P2 in supine position and during orthostatism. These results were not observed between P2 and P3. In conclusion, in a healthy young sample of population, changes in depressive moods are associated with changes in total rhythmical power of HRV and more specifically its parasympathetic component.

  19. The largest volcanic eruptions on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Scott; Peate, David; Ukstins Peate, Ingrid; Self, Stephen; Mawby, Michael; Jerram, Dougal; Marsh, Goonie

    2010-05-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs) are sites of the most frequently recurring, largest volume basaltic and silicic eruptions in Earth history. The magma volumes, eruptive mechanisms, frequency and associated aerosol emissions of these eruptions are critical for understanding any interpreted climate forcing and environmental change by LIPs. The largest volume (>1000 km3 dense rock equivalent) and magnitude (>M8) eruptions produce areally extensive (104-105 km2) basaltic lava flow fields and silicic ignimbrites and are the main building blocks of LIPs. Available information on the largest eruptive units are primarily from the Columbia River and Deccan provinces for the dimensions of flood basalt eruptions, and the Paraná-Etendeka and Afro-Arabian provinces for the silicic ignimbrite eruptions. In addition, three large-volume (675- 2,000 km3) silicic lava flows have also been mapped out in the Mesoproterozoic Gawler Range province (Australia), an interpreted LIP remnant. Magma volumes of >1000 km3 have also been emplaced as high-level basaltic and rhyolitic sills in LIPs, and may contribute substantial aerosol emissions through shallow degassing and crystallisation. The data sets indicate comparable eruption magnitudes between the basaltic and silicic eruptions, but due to considerable volumes residing as co-ignimbrite ash deposits, the current volume constraints for the silicic ignimbrite eruptions may be considerably underestimated. Magma composition thus appears to be no barrier to the volume of magma emitted during an individual eruption. Despite this general similarity in magnitude, flood basaltic and silicic eruptions are very different in terms of eruption style, duration, intensity, vent configuration, and emplacement style. Flood basaltic eruptions are dominantly effusive and Hawaiian-Strombolian in style, with magma discharge rates of ~107-108 kg s-1 producing dominantly compound pahoehoe lava flow fields. The major flood basalt eruption durations are most

  20. Prevalence rates and psychosocial characteristics associated with depression in pregnancy and postpartum in Maltese women.

    PubMed

    Felice, Ethel; Saliba, Joseph; Grech, Victor; Cox, John

    2004-10-15

    Investigators have commented on the apparent high prevalence of psychiatric symptoms in pregnancy. In Malta there is lack of epidemiological data and therefore, the prevalence of depression during pregnancy and at 8 weeks postpartum among a community sample of Maltese women was carried out. A random sample of 239 pregnant women were interviewed at booking using a detailed sociodemographic history, the revised version of the clinical interview schedule (CIS-R) and Maltese translation of the Edinburgh postnatal depression scale (EPDS). The CIS-R was again administered over the phone at 36 weeks and the EPDS sent by post. At 8 weeks postpartum, the CIS-R, modified version of the social maladjustment schedule and the EPDS were again administered to 95.8% of women. The point prevalence of depression meeting ICD-10 research criteria was 15.5% at booking, 11.1% in the third trimester and 8.7% postpartum of which only 3.9% had an onset since delivery. The low rate of new onset postpartum depression compared with other studies in our sample may be attributable to the social support available to women living in a cohesive Catholic island community. The follow-up was limited to 8 weeks postpartum. No control group was used to compare the prevalence of depression in women who did not recently have a baby.

  1. Depression Screening Using Daily Mental-Health Ratings from a Smartphone Application for Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junetae; Lim, Sanghee; Min, Yul Ha; Shin, Yong-Wook; Lee, Byungtae; Sohn, Guiyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Lee, Jae-Ho; Son, Byung Ho; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Shin, Soo-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background Mobile mental-health trackers are mobile phone apps that gather self-reported mental-health ratings from users. They have received great attention from clinicians as tools to screen for depression in individual patients. While several apps that ask simple questions using face emoticons have been developed, there has been no study examining the validity of their screening performance. Objective In this study, we (1) evaluate the potential of a mobile mental-health tracker that uses three daily mental-health ratings (sleep satisfaction, mood, and anxiety) as indicators for depression, (2) discuss three approaches to data processing (ratio, average, and frequency) for generating indicator variables, and (3) examine the impact of adherence on reporting using a mobile mental-health tracker and accuracy in depression screening. Methods We analyzed 5792 sets of daily mental-health ratings collected from 78 breast cancer patients over a 48-week period. Using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) as the measure of true depression status, we conducted a random-effect logistic panel regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to evaluate the screening performance of the mobile mental-health tracker. In addition, we classified patients into two subgroups based on their adherence level (higher adherence and lower adherence) using a k-means clustering algorithm and compared the screening accuracy between the two groups. Results With the ratio approach, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) is 0.8012, indicating that the performance of depression screening using daily mental-health ratings gathered via mobile mental-health trackers is comparable to the results of PHQ-9 tests. Also, the AUC is significantly higher (P=.002) for the higher adherence group (AUC=0.8524) than for the lower adherence group (AUC=0.7234). This result shows that adherence to self-reporting is associated with a higher accuracy of depression screening. Conclusions Our results

  2. Mothers' Depressive State "Distorts" the Ratings of Depression They Give for Their Sons with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitsika, Vicki; Sharpley, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    Depression is highly prevalent in children who have an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), potentially confounding accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. Although information about the depressive status of a child is often collected from parents, there is evidence of distortion in parental assessments of their offspring's depression. This…

  3. Mothers' Depressive State "Distorts" the Ratings of Depression They Give for Their Sons with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitsika, Vicki; Sharpley, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    Depression is highly prevalent in children who have an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), potentially confounding accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. Although information about the depressive status of a child is often collected from parents, there is evidence of distortion in parental assessments of their offspring's depression. This…

  4. The effect of metabolic depression on proton leak rate in mitochondria from hibernating frogs.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, J; Brand, M D; Boutilier, R G

    2000-05-01

    Futile cycling of protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane accounts for 20 % or more of the total standard metabolic rate of a rat. Approximately 15 % of this total is due to proton leakage inside the skeletal muscle alone. This study examined whether the rate of proton leak is down-regulated as a part of a coordinated response to energy conservation during metabolic depression in cold-submerged frogs. We compared the proton leak rate of skeletal muscle mitochondria isolated from frogs at different stages of hibernation (control, 1 month and 4 months of submergence in normoxia and hypoxia). The kinetics of mitochondrial proton leak rate was unaltered throughout normoxic and hypoxic submergence. The state 4 respiration rates did not differ between control animals and frogs hibernating in normoxia. In contrast, the state 4 respiration rates obtained from frogs submerged in hypoxic water for 4 months were half those of control animals. This 50 % reduction in respiration rate in hypoxic hibernation was due to a reduction in electron transport chain activity and consequent decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. We conclude that proton leak rate is reduced during metabolic depression as a secondary result of a decrease in electron transport chain activity, but that the proton conductance is unchanged. In addition, we show that the rate of proton leakage and the activity of the electron transport chain are lower in frogs than in rats, strengthening the observation that mitochondria from ectotherms have a lower proton conductance than mitochondria from endotherms.

  5. Predictive value of self-reported and observer-rated defense style in depression treatment.

    PubMed

    Van Henricus, L; Dekker, Jack; Peen, Jaap; Abraham, Robert E; Schoevers, Robert

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the predictive value of observer-rated and self-reported defensive functioning on the outcome of psychotherapy for the treatment of depression. Defense styles were measured according to the Developmental Profile (DP) and the Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ) in 81 moderately severely depressed patients. All patients were treated with Short-term Psychodynamic Supportive Psychotherapy (SPSP). At baseline, women appeared to have a more mature level of overall defensive functioning. A lower level of defensive function was found in patients with recurrent depressions. We also found a rather modest relationship between self-reported and observer-rated defense. Remitted patients had a more mature overall defensive functioning on the DP and the DSQ. In particular, patients with a symbiotic defense style (giving up, apathetic withdrawal) were at risk for poor outcome. This exploratory study provides further evidence of the relevance of defense styles for depression. It suggests a differential predictive value of separate defense levels, which may help to tailor psychotherapeutic strategies.

  6. Semantic Organizational Strategy Predicts Verbal Memory and Remission Rate of Geriatric Depression

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko; Gunning, Faith M.; Kanellopoulos, Dora; Murphy, Christopher F.; Klimstra, Sibel A.; Kelly, Robert E.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study tests the hypothesis that the use of a semantic organizational strategy, during the free recall phase of a verbal memory task predicts remission of geriatric depression. METHODS 65 elderly patients with major depression participated in a 12-week escitalopram treatment trial. Neuropsychological performance was assessed at baseline after a 2-week drug washout period. The Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R)(Brandt 2001) was used to assess verbal learning and memory. Remission was defined as a Hamilton Depression Rating Scale Score (HDRS) less than or equal to 7 for two consecutive weeks and no longer meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for major depression. The association between the number of clusters used at the final learning trial (Trial 3) and remission was examined using Cox’s proportional hazards survival analysis. The relationship between the number of clusters utilized in the final learning trial and words recalled after a 25 minute delay was examined in a regression with age and education as covariates. RESULTS Greater number of clusters utilized predicted remission rate (Hazard ratio (95% CI) = 1.26 (1.04–1.54), χ2 =4.23, df=3, p=0.04). There was a positive relationship between the total number of clusters used by the end of the third learning trial and the total number of words recalled at the delayed recall trial (F(3,58)=7.93;p<.001) CONCLUSIONS Effective semantic strategy use at baseline on a verbal list learning task by elderly depressed patients was associated with greater rate of remission with antidepressant treatment. This result provides support for previous findings indicating that measures of executive functioning at baseline are useful in predicting antidepressant response. PMID:21618287

  7. Race, life course socioeconomic position, racial discrimination, depressive symptoms and self-rated health.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Darrell L; Puterman, Eli; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Matthews, Karen A; Adler, Nancy E

    2013-11-01

    Greater levels of socioeconomic position (SEP) are generally associated with better health. However results from previous studies vary across race/ethnicity and health outcomes. Further, the majority of previous studies do not account for the effects of life course SEP on health nor the effects of racial discrimination, which could moderate the effects of SEP on health. Using data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, we examined the relationship between a life course SEP measure on depressive symptoms and self-rated health. A life course SEP was constructed for each participant, using a framework that included parental education and occupation along with respondents' highest level of education and occupation. Interaction terms were created between life course SEP and racial discrimination to determine whether the association between SEP and health was moderated by experiences of racial discrimination. Analyses revealed that higher levels of life course SEP were inversely related to depressive symptoms. Greater life course SEP was positively associated with favorable self-rated health. Racial discrimination was associated with more depressive symptoms and poorer self-rated health. Analyses indicated a significant interaction between life course SEP and racial discrimination on depressive symptoms in the full sample. This suggested that for respondents with greater levels of SEP, racial discrimination was associated with reports of more depressive symptoms. Future research efforts should be made to examine whether individuals' perceptions and experiences of racial discrimination at the interpersonal and structural levels limits their ability to acquire human capital as well as their advancement in education and occupational status. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Depression, depressive symptoms, and rate of hippocampal atrophy in a longitudinal cohort of older men and women.

    PubMed

    Elbejjani, M; Fuhrer, R; Abrahamowicz, M; Mazoyer, B; Crivello, F; Tzourio, C; Dufouil, C

    2015-07-01

    Several studies have reported smaller hippocampal volume (HcV) in depression patients; however, the temporality of the association remains unknown. One proposed hypothesis is that depression may cause HcV loss. This study evaluates whether previous depression and recent depressive symptoms are associated with HcV and HcV loss. We used a prospective cohort of older adults (n = 1328; age = 65-80 years) with two cerebral magnetic resonance imaging examinations at baseline and 4-year follow-up. Using multivariable linear regression models, we estimated, in stratified analyses by gender, the association between indicators of history of depression and its severity (age at onset, recurrence, hospitalization for depression), proximal depressive symptoms [Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale], baseline antidepressant use, and the outcomes: baseline HcV and annual percentage change in HcV. At baseline, women with more depressive symptoms had smaller HcV [-0.05 cm3, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.1 to -0.01 cm3 per 10-unit increase in CES-D scores]. History of depression was associated with a 0.2% faster annual HcV loss in women (95% CI 0.01-0.36%). More baseline depressive symptoms and worsening of these symptoms were also associated with accelerated HcV loss in women. No associations were observed in men. Treatment for depression was associated with slower HcV loss in women and men. While only concomitant depressive symptoms were associated with HcV, both previous depression and more proximal depressive symptoms were associated with faster HcV loss in women.

  9. Airborne Measurement of CO2, SO2, and H2S Emission Rates During the 2004-2005 Eruption of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doukas, M. P.; McGee, K. A.; Gerlach, T. M.

    2005-12-01

    Volcanic gas measurements by helicopter and fixed-wing aircraft began on 27 September 2004 during the initial unrest. Target gases included CO2, SO2, and H2S measured by remote (COSPEC, FLYSPEC) and extraction (LI-COR, Interscan) techniques. These measurements defined periods of negligible, wet, and dry volcanic degassing. Measurements during the period of early seismic unrest on September 2-30 showed little or no CO2 above atmospheric levels; SO2 and H2S were absent. These results suggest involvement of degassed magma, confinement of gases because of reduction in permeability since the 1980-86 dome eruptions, or almost complete gas scrubbing at high water to gas mass ratios. Following the first steam and ash explosion on October 1, a large increase in the number of fumaroles on the 1980-86 dome and frequent detection of CO2 above atmospheric levels together with more frequent detection of H2S characterized the period of wet volcanic degassing. Wet degassing of CO2 and H2S included observed emission by ejection of large bubbles through pools of water, however the few CO2 emission rates available for this period were <150 metric tonnes/day (t/d). Dry volcanic degassing commenced on October 5-6 as temperatures rose, steaming increased, and rock adjacent to the invading magma dried out. These conditions enabled a buoyant plume to rise above the crater and enter higher elevation winds, facilitating airborne measurements of gas emission rates. Gas emission rates have been notably low and declined gradually throughout the eruption. Emission rates of CO2 were mostly in the 500-1000 t/d range until early February 2005, when they fell to 150-500 t/d and remained there. Emission rates of SO2 rose to 240 t/d during 2004 then declined and remained below 100 t/d (often <50 t/d) after January 2005. Emission rates of H2S were variable but always <8 t/d. The average emission rates through the end of July 2005, were approximately 650 t/d (CO2) and 100 t/d (SO2).

  10. Variations in eruptive style and depositional processes associated with explosive, phonolitic composition, caldera-forming eruptions: The 151 ka Sutri eruption, Vico Caldera, central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, A. N.; Cas, R. A. F.; Giordano, G.

    2009-07-01

    Vico Volcano in central Italy, experienced a complex eruptive history (419-95 ka). The Vico volcanic edifice was constructed by voluminous (50 km 3) leucitite composition effusive lava flows and minor explosive activity over a 50 ka period (305-258 ka). The summit of the edifice was destroyed during the Sutri eruption (151 ka) that resulted in the formation of the 8 km caldera depression. A revised stratigraphy for the eruptive products produced by the Sutri eruption (Sutri Formation) is proposed, based on extensive field observations, detailed stratigraphic logging and petrographic analysis; the Sutri A unit consists of a fallout deposit of limited dispersal; the Sutri B unit consists of a small volume, variably welded pumice-rich ignimbrite; the Sutri C unit is a lithic and spatter clast-rich co-ignimbrite lag-flow breccia; the Sutri D unit is a fines-depleted pumice-rich ignimbrite; Sutri (E1-E3) subunits consist of spatter clast-rich ignimbrite; Sutri E4 (sbx) is a spatter clast-rich co-ignimbrite lag-flow breccia; the Sutri E4 (lsbx) subunit is a lithic, pumice and spatter clast-rich co-ignimbrite lag-flow breccia; the climactic Sutri E5 unit is a variably zeolitised spatter and pumice-rich ignimbrite (with lithic-rich base; Sutri E4 flsbx) to the west). The reconstruction of the Sutri eruption leading up to and including formation of the Vico Caldera based on the new stratigraphy of the Sutri Formation, consists of three distinct phases: Phase 1—Initial Plinian activity produced a fallout deposit (Sutri A) deposited to the south, followed by partial eruption column collapse that generated a pyroclastic flow directed to the south/southeast (Sutri B). Vent widening in response to vent-wall rock instabilities and increased magma discharge rate overloaded the eruption column with dense, lithic debris resulting in southward collapse and deposition of a thick co-ignimbrite lag breccia in the deflation zone (Sutri C). A change in clast supply at vent from lithic

  11. High-Precision 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology and Geology of St. George Island, Pribilof Islands, Alaska: Implications for Eruption Rates in the Bering Sea Basalt Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, T. C.; Cosca, M. A.; Hamblock, J. M.; Underwood, S. J.

    2007-12-01

    New high-precision 40Ar/39Ar ages and geologic mapping establish an eruptive chronology for St. George Island, Pribilof Islands, Alaska. St. George is part of the Bering Sea basalt province (BSBP), a group of 15 late Cenozoic (mostly < 6 Ma) alkalic to tholeiitic basaltic volcanic fields widely distributed on islands in the Bering Sea, along the west coast of Alaska, and along the coast of northeast Russia. Twelve samples of washed, but otherwise untreated, whole-rock basalts from St. George were cut with a micro-wire saw into chips ~3 mm3 in size and irradiated for 40Ar/39Ar analysis. The chips were incrementally heated with a CO2 laser equipped with an integrator lens, and analyzed using a NU Instruments Noblesse mass spectrometer equipped with a Faraday cup and two ion counting electron multipliers. Detector intercalibration was done using automated air pipettes. A minimum of 20 heating steps were measured per sample, with the data often defining age plateaux. Isochron plots of the data yield ages ranging from 1.57 ± 0.04 to 2.89 ± 0.11 Ma, with trapped 40Ar/36Ar ratios ranging from 312 to 330. The stratigraphic positions of the dated rocks are known directly from field relations and there are no discrepancies between the 40Ar/39Ar ages and this sequence. Geochemical data combined with the age data indicate no progressive petrologic trends during evolution of the magmatic system, except for intermittent eruption of distinctive plagioclase-phyric basalts with low to moderate MgO contents (7 - 5 wt%) beginning at ~2.0 Ma. The new age data combined with volume estimates indicate an average subaerial eruption rate of ~107 m3km-2yr-1, which is adjusted for 3% sedimentary and ultramafic basement rocks beneath the volcanic pile, an average vesicularity of 5%, and an assumed surficial erosion value of 20%. This rate is identical to the estimate (110 m3km-2yr-1) by Mukasa et al. (JGR 112, 2007) for St. George Island. Both estimates, however, do not account for

  12. The self-reported Montgomery-Åsberg depression rating scale is a useful evaluative tool in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fantino, Bruno; Moore, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of Patient-reported Outcomes (PROs) as secondary endpoints in the development of new antidepressants has grown in recent years. The objective of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the 9-item, patient-administered version of the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-S). Methods Data from a multicentre, double-blind, 8-week, randomised controlled trial of 278 outpatients diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder were used to evaluate the validity, reliability and sensitivity to change of the MADRS-S using psychometric methods. A Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted to identify the most appropriate threshold to define perceived remission. Results No missing values were found at the item level, indicating good acceptability of the scale. The construct validity was satisfactory: all items contributed to a common underlying concept, as expected. The correlation between MADRS-S and physicians' MADRS was moderate (r = 0.54, p < 0.001) indicating that MADRS-S is complementary rather than redundant to the MADRS. Cronbach's alpha was 0.84, and the stability over time of the scale, estimated on a sub-sample of patients whose health status did not change during the first week of the study, was good (intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.78). MADRS-S sensitivity to change was shown. Using a threshold value of 5, the definition of "perceived remission" reached a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 75%. Conclusion Taking account of patient's perceptions of the severity of their own symptoms along with the psychometric properties of the MADRS-S enable its use for evaluative purposes in the development of new antidepressant drugs. PMID:19473506

  13. Depression and anxiety in ovarian cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prevalence rates

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Sam; Prescott, Philip; Mason, Jessica; McLeod, Natalie; Lewith, George

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To systematically review the literature pertaining to the prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients with ovarian cancer as a function of treatment stage. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Participants 3623 patients with ovarian cancer from primary research investigations. Primary outcome measure The prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients with ovarian cancer as a function of treatment stage. Results We identified 24 full journal articles that met the inclusion criteria for entry into the meta-analysis resulting in a pooled sample size of 3623 patients. The meta-analysis of prevalence rates identified pretreatment, on-treatment and post-treatment depression prevalences of 25.34% (CI 22.79% to 28.07%), 22.99% (CI 19.85% to 26.46%) and 12.71% (CI 10.14% to 15.79%), respectively. Pretreatment, on-treatment and post-treatment anxiety prevalences were 19.12% (CI 17.11% to 21.30%), 26.23% (CI 22.30% to 30.56%) and 27.09% (CI 23.10% to 31.49%). Conclusions Our findings suggest that the prevalence of depression and anxiety in women with ovarian cancer, across the treatment spectrum, is significantly greater than in the healthy female population. With the growing emphasis on improving the management of survivorship and quality of life, we conclude that further research is warranted to ensure psychological distress in ovarian cancer is not underdiagnosed and undertreated. PMID:26621509

  14. Preliminary Psychometric Evaluation of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale in Methamphetamine Dependence.

    PubMed

    Hellem, Tracy; Scholl, Lindsay; Ferguson, Hayden; McGlade, Erin; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah; Renshaw, Perry; Hildreth, Laura

    2017-08-18

    The purpose of this study was to test the initial psychometric properties of the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) in individuals with and without major depressive disorder who use methamphetamine. We used data from two completed studies and two ongoing clinical trials. The HAM-D has well established reliability and validity in a variety of populations. However, there are no published reports of reliability and validity of the HAM-D in a methamphetamine using population. HAM-D and depression status data were extracted from four separate studies for this psychometric assessment. Using these data, we evaluated three measures of construct validity: internal consistency, contrasted groups validity and factorial validity. We found potential concerns with the construct validity of the HAM-D in users of methamphetamine. Intercorrelations between items were primarily less than 0.20 and the Cronbach's alpha value in this sample was 0.58 indicating potential issues with internal consistency. The results of a two sample t-tests suggest concerns with contrasted group validity, as no significant difference in average scores were found for nine items. Consistent with previous studies, a principal component analysis indicates that the HAM-D is multidimensional. The 17-item HAM-D might not reliably and validly measure depression severity in a methamphetamine using population. Given our small sample, additional research is needed, though, to further test the psychometric properties of the HAM-D in individuals who use methamphetamine.

  15. Estimation of lava flow field volumes and volumetric effusion rates from airborne radar profiling and other data: Monitoring of the Nornahraun (Holuhraun) 2014/15 eruption in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürig, Tobias; Gudmundsson, Magnús; Högnadóttir, Thordís; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Gudbjörnsson, Snaebjörn; Lárusson, Örnólfur; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Riishuus, Morten; Magnússon, Eyjólfur

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring of lava-producing eruptions involves systematic measurement of flow field volumes, which in turn can be used to obtain average magma discharge over the period of observation. However, given inaccessibility to the interior parts of active lava fields, remote sensing techniques must be applied. Several satellite platforms provide data that can be geo-referenced, allowing area estimation. However, unless sterographic or tandem satellite data are available, the determination of thicknesses is non-trivial. The ongoing eruption ('Nornaeldar')at Dyngjusandurin the Icelandic highlands offers an opportunity to monitor the temporal and spatial evolution of a typical Icelandic lava flow field. The mode of emplacementis complex and includesboth horizontal and vertical stacking, inflation of lobes and topographic inversions. Due to the large extent of the flow field (>83 km2 on 5 Jan 2015, and still growing) and its considerable local variation in thickness (30 m) and surface roughness, obtaining robust quantification of lava thicknesses is very challenging,despite the lava is being emplaced onto a low-relief sandur plain. Creative methods have been implemented to obtain as reliable observation as possible into the third dimension: Next to areal extent measurements from satellites and maps generated with airborne synthetic-aperture radar (SAR), lava thickness profiles are regularly obtained by low-level flights with a fixed-wing aircraft that is equipped with a ground clearance radar coupled witha submeter DGPS,a system originally designed for monitoring surface changes of glaciers above geothermally active areas.The resulting radar profile data are supplemented by analyses of aerial photos and complemented by results from an array of ground based thickness measurement methods. The initial results indicate that average effusion ratewas ~200 m3/s in the first weeks of the eruption (end August, early September) but declined to 50-100 m3/s in November to December period

  16. Perinatal Depression Among HIV-Infected Women in KwaZulu-Natal South Africa: Prenatal Depression Predicts Lower Rates of Exclusive Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Tuthill, Emily L; Pellowski, Jennifer A; Young, Sera L; Butler, Lisa M

    2017-06-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) provides infants with optimal nutrition, and together with appropriate antiretroviral therapy has also been shown to decrease mother-to-child transmission of HIV from 45 to less than 1 %. However, rates of EBF are particularly low in South Africa, where rates of HIV are some of the highest in the world. Although perinatal depression has been identified as a potential barrier to EBF, little is known about its impact on EBF among HIV-infected women. A cohort study was conducted as part of a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) examining the effect of an Information, Motivation and Behavioral skills-based intervention promoting EBF among South African women living with HIV in their third trimester (28-42 weeks) of pregnancy. At baseline and follow-up, participants were interviewed on depression symptoms (PHQ-9), and breastfeeding intentions and behavior. Multivariate logistic regressions were conducted to determine predictors of EBF at 6-weeks postpartum. A total of 68 women were enrolled and 58 women completed both baseline and follow-up assessments. Most (80.9 %) of the sample reported at least some symptoms of depression prenatally. Rates of depression were lower postpartum (47.1 %). In multivariate models, higher prenatal depression scores significantly predicted lower likelihood of EBF at 6-weeks postpartum after adjusting for demographics, condition, and intentions (AOR = 0.68, p < 0.05). Postpartum depression was not a significant predictor of EBF rates (AOR = 0.99, p = 0.96). These findings demonstrate the negative impact of prenatal depression on breastfeeding behavior. Future interventions focused on depression are warranted to identify those at risk for sub-optimal EBF. Improving maternal psychosocial well-being could be a new frontier to improving infant and young child feeding and reducing pre/postnatal transmission.

  17. The Association between Neuroticism and Heart Rate Variability Is Not Fully Explained by Cardiovascular Disease and Depression.

    PubMed

    Čukić, Iva; Bates, Timothy C

    2015-01-01

    Neuroticism is associated with cardiovascular disease, autonomic reactivity, and depression. Here we address the extent to which neuroticism accounts for the excess heart disease risk associated with depression and test whether cardiac autonomic tone plays a role as mediator. Subjects were derived from a nationally representative sample (n = 1,255: mean age 54.5, SD = 11.5). Higher neuroticism was associated with reduced heart rate variability equally under rest and stress. The baseline structural equation model revealed significant paths from neuroticism to heart rate variability, cardiovascular disease and depression, and between depression and cardiovascular disease, controlling for age, sex, height, weight, and BMI. Dropping both the neuroticism to heart rate variability, and neuroticism to heart disease paths significantly reduced the model fit (p < .001 in each case). We conclude that neuroticism has independent associations with both autonomic reactivity and cardiovascular disease, over and above its associations with depression and other related variables.

  18. The Association between Neuroticism and Heart Rate Variability Is Not Fully Explained by Cardiovascular Disease and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Čukić, Iva; Bates, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroticism is associated with cardiovascular disease, autonomic reactivity, and depression. Here we address the extent to which neuroticism accounts for the excess heart disease risk associated with depression and test whether cardiac autonomic tone plays a role as mediator. Subjects were derived from a nationally representative sample (n = 1,255: mean age 54.5, SD = 11.5). Higher neuroticism was associated with reduced heart rate variability equally under rest and stress. The baseline structural equation model revealed significant paths from neuroticism to heart rate variability, cardiovascular disease and depression, and between depression and cardiovascular disease, controlling for age, sex, height, weight, and BMI. Dropping both the neuroticism to heart rate variability, and neuroticism to heart disease paths significantly reduced the model fit (p < .001 in each case). We conclude that neuroticism has independent associations with both autonomic reactivity and cardiovascular disease, over and above its associations with depression and other related variables. PMID:25951236

  19. Depression literacy: rates and relation to perceived need and mental health service utilization in a rural American sample.

    PubMed

    Deen, Tisha L; Bridges, Ana J

    2011-01-01

    Mental health literacy assists patients to recognize, manage and prevent emotional disorders such as depression. Depression literacy is a specific type that varies among populations; however, there is a paucity of research on the depression literacy of rural Americans. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the depression literacy of a rural American sample, and to examine the relationship of depression literacy with perceived need for and utilization of different types of services for those with emotional problems. Participants were recruited outside grocery stores in rural towns by consenting to be contacted and providing contact information. They were contacted via telephone to complete a survey of 15 min duration. Depression literacy was measured by assessing participants' ability to correctly label a vignette that depicted depressive symptoms. Demographic data, psychiatric symptoms, perceived need for seeking services (primary care, counselor and religious leader), and lifetime utilization of services (medical, specialty mental health and religious leader) for emotional problems were also assessed in the survey. High depression literacy (i.e., able to correctly label the vignette) was found in 53% of the sample. Men had lower depression literacy than women (35% vs 68%) and this effect remained after controlling for demographic and symptom variables. Multivariable regression analyses revealed that, after including demographic and symptoms variables in the regression equation, depression literacy did not significantly predict perceived need for a doctor, counselor, or religious leader, but depression literacy did significantly predicted utilization of a religious leader (but not a doctor or counselor). The rate of depression literacy in this sample was lower than the rates in other samples, especially among men. The disparity in depression literacy among men in this sample is consistent with the literature. Differences in utilization of a religious leader

  20. Validation of an Arabic translation of the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, Russel; Al Saif, Abdulaziz; el-din Mohamed, Gamal

    2005-01-01

    Depression is a common condition in primary care medicine in all population groups. We wanted to validate an Arabic translation Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale for Arabic speakers as it has been validated in a number of other languages. The hospital translation service translated the English version into Arabic, which was verified by back translation. This version was tested in a pilot study with 40 bilingual Arabic-English clinicians and Arabic linguistic experts. Revised questions were subjected to another translation-back translation and the final version tested in a clinical trial with 240 consenting bilingual English-Arabic speakers. The subjects were randomly assigned to answer either the English or Arabic version of the Zung questionnaire first, ensuring that subjects had no access to previous answers when answering the questionnaire in the other language. The scores obtained were tested for agreement using the kappa statistic. We found substantial agreement between the scores obtained from the two questionnaires. The kappa measurement of agreement was 0.652 (95% confidence interval, 0.571-0.732) We believe the Arabic translation of the English Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale is valid and reliable, and will be useful to practitioners who would like to use this tool in Arabic-speaking patients.

  1. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch for changes in school work, sleep, and behavior. If you wonder whether your child might be depressed, talk with your health care ... families. This may be due to your genes, behaviors you learn at home, or your ... life events, such as job loss, divorce, or death of a spouse or other family ...

  2. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment, the depression will lift Where can I go for help? If you are unsure where to go for help, ask your health provider or check ... one’s health professional. Call 911 for emergency services. Go to the nearest hospital emergency room. Call the ...

  3. Depressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... GHB and Rohypnol ® are also misused to facilitate sexual assault. Affect on mind Depressants used therapeutically do what they are prescribed for to put you to sleep, relieve anxiety and muscle spasms, and prevent seizures. They also: cause amnesia, leaving no memory of events that occur ...

  4. Self-Concept, Social Skills, and Teacher Ratings of Behavior as Predictors of Depression in Learning Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spoto, Philip M.; And Others

    The role of depression as related to symptoms of social behavior, teacher ratings of behavior and intellectual ability was examined for 58 children (7-14 years old) with learning disabilities. Subjects were administered the Children's Depression Inventory, and those (N=16) scoring one standard deviation below the mean were designated nondepressed,…

  5. Atypical reactivity of heart rate variability to stress and depression across development: Systematic review of the literature and directions for future research.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jessica L; Alloy, Lauren B

    2016-12-01

    Heart rate variability has received growing attention in the depression literature, with several recent meta-analyses indicating that lower resting heart rate variability is associated with depression. However, the role of fluctuations in heart rate variability (or reactivity) in response to stress in depression remains less clear. The present review provides a systematic examination of the literature on heart rate variability reactivity to a laboratory-induced stressor task and depression, including 26 studies of reactivity in heart rate variability and clinical depression, remitted (or history of) depression, and subthreshold depression (or symptom-level depression) among adults, adolescents, and children. In addition to reviewing the findings of these studies, methodological considerations and conceptual gaps in the literature are addressed. We conclude by highlighting the importance of investigating the potential transactional relationship between heart rate variability reactivity and depression and possible mechanisms underlying this relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Self-rated health: a predictor for the three year incidence of major depression in individuals with Type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Ghislaine; Pagé, Véronique; Smith, Kimberley J; Gariépy, Geneviève; Malla, Ashok; Wang, Jianli; Boyer, Richard; Strychar, Irene; Lesage, Alain; Schmitz, Norbert

    2013-02-15

    To determine whether self-rated health was a predictor for the three year incidence of major depression in people with Type II diabetes. Data was collected as part a population-based telephone survey of adults with diabetes, in Québec, Canada (2008-2011). Adults with Type II diabetes who did not have major depression at baseline were assessed at three follow-up interviews conducted 12, 24 and 36 months after baseline. Depression was assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Self-rated health status was determined by asking participants to rate their health on a scale from excellent to poor. The sample consisted of 1265 adults with Type II diabetes who did not have major depression at baseline. 36% of individuals who had developed major depression at follow up rated their health as fair or poor at baseline compared to 14.4% of those who had not developed major depression. Logistic regression analyses indicated fair or poor self-rated health at baseline to be predictive of a twofold increased risk for major depression at follow-up, even after adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle-related behaviors, disability and diabetes characteristics (OR=2.05, 95% CI 1.20-3.48). We have focused on current depression (last two weeks) and we have used a questionnaire (PHQ-9) rather than a clinical interview for the assessment of depression. Self-rated health status might be a predictor for developing major depression in people with diabetes in addition to well established risk factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Self-Rated Health and Self-Rated Economic Situation on Depressed Mood Via Life Satisfaction Among Older Adults in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Reyes Fernández, Benjamín; Rosero-Bixby, Luis; Koivumaa-Honkanen, Heli

    2016-03-01

    The study examined the relationship of self-rated health and self-rated economic situation with depressed mood, and life satisfaction as mediator of this relationship among older adults in Costa Rica. A longitudinal study was conducted with a subsample (N = 1,618) from the Costa Rican Longevity and Healthy Aging Study (CRELES). Self-rated health, self-rated economic situation, depressed mood, and life satisfaction were measured at baseline, and depressed mood was reassessed 18 months later. Putative mechanisms for changes in depressed mood were examined by means of conditional process analysis. Self-rated health was negatively associated to depressed mood. This effect took place via life satisfaction. An interaction showed that better economic situation compensated the effect of a low self-rated health on life satisfaction. This study suggests that subjective variables such as self-rated health, economic situation, and life satisfaction should be considered when addressing the onset of depressed mood. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Effects of Self-Rated Health and Self-Rated Economic Situation on Depressed Mood Via Life Satisfaction Among Older Adults in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Reyes Fernández, Benjamín; Rosero-Bixby, Luis; Koivumaa-Honkanen, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The study examined the relationship of self-rated health and self-rated economic situation with depressed mood, and life satisfaction as mediator of this relationship among older adults in Costa Rica. Method: A longitudinal study was conducted with a subsample (N = 1,618) from the Costa Rican Longevity and Healthy Aging Study (CRELES). Self-rated health, self-rated economic situation, depressed mood, and life satisfaction were measured at baseline, and depressed mood was reassessed 18 months later. Putative mechanisms for changes in depressed mood were examined by means of conditional process analysis. Results: Self-rated health was negatively associated to depressed mood. This effect took place via life satisfaction. An interaction showed that better economic situation compensated the effect of a low self-rated health on life satisfaction. Discussion: This study suggests that subjective variables such as self-rated health, economic situation, and life satisfaction should be considered when addressing the onset of depressed mood. PMID:26092651

  9. Prevalence Rates and Demographic Characteristics Associated with Depression in Pregnancy and the Postpartum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotlib, Ian H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined prevalence of depression in 360 women during pregnancy and after delivery. At both assessments, approximately 25 percent reported elevated levels of depressive symptomatology. Ten percent met diagnostic criteria for depression during pregnancy; 6.8 percent were depressed postpartum. One-half of postpartum depression cases were new onset.…

  10. Prevalence Rates and Demographic Characteristics Associated with Depression in Pregnancy and the Postpartum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotlib, Ian H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined prevalence of depression in 360 women during pregnancy and after delivery. At both assessments, approximately 25 percent reported elevated levels of depressive symptomatology. Ten percent met diagnostic criteria for depression during pregnancy; 6.8 percent were depressed postpartum. One-half of postpartum depression cases were new onset.…

  11. Reaction Rate Acceleration and Tg Depression of Polycyanurate Under Nanopore Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Evelyn; Simon, Sindee L.

    2015-03-01

    Material properties such as Tg and the reaction kinetics are known to deviate from the bulk when subjected to nano-sized confinement. Previous work from our laboratory on the trimerization of cyanate esters found that the reaction kinetics were faster for a monofunctional reactant compared to a difunctional monomer, whereas the Tg depression was greater for the crosslinked product of the latter compared to the low molecular weight trimer of the former. The origin of the changes in nanoconfined reaction rates differs from those that govern changes in the Tg. The research objective is to further explore the effect that confinement has on reaction kinetics and Tg using a mixture consisting of mono- and di- cyanate ester monomers. The product is an uncrosslinked polycyanurate with Mn = 5240 g/mol and PDI = 1.78. The confinement mediums are controlled pore glasses with diameters ranging from 8.1 to 111.1 nm. The nanopore-confined material was synthesized in-situ and the reaction kinetics are followed by DSC; after the reaction, the Tg values of the nanoconfined polymer where also measured by DSC. An acceleration factor of 13 and a Tg depression of 38 °C are observed for the material confined in the smallest 8.1 nm-diameter pores. The Tg depression is between those of the trimer and network previously studied, while the acceleration of the reaction rate is lower. Our results are consistent with the reaction acceleration arising from packing effects at the pore wall and the Tg depression arising from intrinsic size effects.

  12. Preoperative depressed mood and perioperative heart rate variability in patients with hepatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Park, Jin-Hyoung; Lee, Sangmin M; Gwak, Mi-Sook; Kim, Gaab-Soo; Kim, Myung-Hee

    2016-12-01

    How perioperative heart rate variability (HRV) indices differ according to the anxiety or depressed mood of patients scheduled to undergo a major surgical procedure for cancer. Prospective observational study. Operating room. Forty-one male patients between 40 and 70 years of age with hepatocellular carcinoma were included in the final analysis. HRV was measured on the day before surgery (T1), impending anesthesia (T2), and after anesthetic induction (T3). Preoperative anxiety and depressed mood of all patients were evaluated using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS). HRV was significantly different among T1, T2, and T3. At T2, high frequency (HF) (normalized units of HF [nuHF]) was decreased and low frequency (LF) (normalized units of LF) and LF/HF were increased compared with those at T1 and T3. In the subgroup analysis between high and low SDS groups, high SDS group showed significantly decreased nuHF (P = .035), increased nuLF (P = .039), and increased LF/HF (P = .020) compared to low SDS group at T1. However, these values at T2 and T3 were not different between 2 groups. In analysis within the groups, low SDS group showed significant differences in nuHF, nuLF, and LF/HF among T1, T2, and T3 (P < .05, respectively), but no changes in these values were observed in high SDS group among the 3 different time points. HRV decreased significantly immediately before anesthesia and recovered to baseline with anesthetic induction. Preoperative, more depressed patients showed increased sympathetic tone at baseline and blunted response to impending anesthesia on the HRV measurements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of organisational system on self-rated depression in a panel of male municipal firefighters.

    PubMed

    An, Se-Jin; Chung, Yun Kyung; Kim, Bong Hyun; Kwak, Kyeong Min; Son, Jun-Seok; Koo, Jung-Wan; Ju, Young-Su; Kwon, Young-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of job stress, including organisational system to self-rated depression through a panel study of male municipal firefighters in the Republic of Korea. A panel of 186 municipal firefighters reported self-rated depressive symptoms according to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The effects of job stress were evaluated using the Korea Occupational Stress Scale, taken one year earlier and classified by the median value. Panel members were classified into Depression or Control groups according to BDI scores, with a cut-off level of 'over mild depression' in a follow-up survey. The Depression group included 17 (9.1%) workers. Firefighters who scored high on occupational system had an 8.3 times greater risk of being assigned to the Depression group than those who had not (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 8.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) = [1.73-37.22]). In contrast, job stress from a 'difficult physical environment' revealed negative risks related to being classified in the Depression group (AOR = 0.20, 95% CI = [0.04-0.92]). Although the healthy worker effect may be involved, job stress based on perceptions of organisational system was a strong risk factor for depression. A comprehensive approach should be considered that encompasses social issues when assessing or mental health in high-risk groups, as well as the practical issue of physiochemical hazards.

  14. To what extent do single symptoms from a depression rating scale predict risk of long-term sickness absence among employees who are free of clinical depression?

    PubMed

    Rugulies, Reiner; Hjarsbech, Pernille U; Aust, Birgit; Christensen, Karl Bang; Andersen, Rikke Voss; Borg, Vilhelm

    2013-10-01

    Depression rating scales have predicted long-term sickness absence (LTSA) in previous studies. With this study, we investigated to what extent single symptoms from a depression rating scale predicted LTSA among employees who were free of clinical depression. We studied 6,670 female employees in the Danish eldercare sector. Frequency of 12 depressive symptoms over the last 2 weeks was assessed with the Major Depression Inventory. A symptom was considered as elevated if it was present at least "slightly more than half of the time." Data were linked to a national register on LTSA (≥3 weeks). We calculated hazard ratios (HR) from Cox's proportional hazard models to analyze whether a symptom predicted time to onset of LTSA during a 1-year follow-up. Analyses were adjusted for age, family status, health behaviors, occupational group, and previous LTSA. Of the 12 symptoms, three predicted LTSA after adjustment for covariates: "felt low in spirits and sad" (HR = 1.41, 95 % CI = 1.05-1.89), "felt lacking in energy and strength" (HR = 1.33, 95 % CI = 1.08-1.64), and "had trouble sleeping at night" (HR = 1.38, 95 % CI = 1.09-1.74). Among female eldercare workers free of clinical depression, feelings of low spirits and sadness, feelings of lack of energy and strength, and sleep disturbances predict risk of LTSA. Interventions that decrease the prevalence of these symptoms might contribute to a reduction in LTSA in this population.

  15. Relapse rates after psychotherapy for depression - stable long-term effects? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Christiane; Hofmann, Mareike; Kruse, Johannes; Leichsenring, Falk

    2014-10-01

    Depression is the most common mental disorder. Effective psychotherapeutic treatments for depression exist; however, data on their long-term effectiveness beyond a time span of two years is still scarce. Our aim was to perform a meta-analysis, investigating (a) overall rates of relapse more than two years after psychotherapy (meta-analysis 1), and (b) if psychotherapy has more enduring effects than non-psychotherapeutic comparison conditions (e.g. pharmacotherapy, treatment as usual), again beyond a time span of two years post-therapy (meta-analysis 2). We searched electronic databases Medline, PsycINFO and the COCHRANE Library. Main selection criteria were (i) RCT of psychotherapy with follow-up interval of more than 2 years, (ii) primary diagnosis of depression, assessed by observer ratings, (iii) report of relapse at follow-up. We identified 11 studies, 6 of which included a non-psychotherapeutic comparison condition. Together they comprised long-term data of 966 patients. Mean follow-up duration was 4.4 years. The overall relapse rate at long-term follow-up was 0.39 (95% CI 0.29, 0.50). Psychotherapy resulted in significantly less relapses (53.1% vs. 71.1%, OR 0.51; 95% CI 0.32, 0.82, p=0.005) than comparison treatments. This finding corresponded to a number needed to treat (NNT) of 5.55. Results can only be preliminary as data was sparse and studies differed methodologically. Heterogeneity in the first meta-analysis was high (I(2)=82%). Results indicated publication bias. The relapse rate more than two years after psychotherapy is relatively high, but significantly lower compared to non-psychotherapeutic treatments. Multiannual follow-ups should routinely be included in future psychotherapy RCTs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Rates and predictors of depression status among caregivers of patients with COPD hospitalized for acute exacerbations: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Bernabeu-Mora, Roberto; García-Guillamón, Gloria; Montilla-Herrador, Joaquina; Escolar-Reina, Pilar; García-Vidal, José Antonio; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospitalization is common for acute exacerbation of COPD, but little is known about its impact on the mental health of caregivers. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the rates and predictors of depressive symptoms in caregivers at the time of hospitalization for acute exacerbation of COPD and to identify the probability and predictors of subsequent changes in depressive status 3 months after discharge. Materials and methods This was a prospective study. Depression symptoms were measured in 87 caregivers of patients hospitalized for exacerbation at hospitalization and 3 months after discharge. We measured factors from four domains: context of care, caregiving demands, caregiver resources, and patient characteristics. Univariate and multivariate multiple logistic regressions were used to determine the predictors of depression at hospitalization and subsequent changes at 3 months. Results A total of 45 caregivers reported depression at the time of hospitalization. After multiple adjustments, spousal relationship, dyspnea, and severe airflow limitation were the strongest independent predictors of depression at hospitalization. Of these 45 caregivers, 40% had a remission of their depression 3 months after discharge. In contrast, 16.7% of caregivers who were not depressive at hospitalization became depressive at 3 months. Caregivers caring >20 hours per week for patients with dependencies had decreased odds of remission, and patients having dependencies after discharge increased the odds of caregivers becoming depressed. Conclusion Depressive symptoms are common among caregivers when patients are hospitalized for exacerbation of COPD. Although illness factors are determinants of depression at hospitalization, patient dependence determines fluctuations in the depressive status of caregivers. PMID:28008245

  17. Depression of belowground respiration rates at simulated high moose population densities in boreal forests.

    PubMed

    Persson, Inga-Lill; Nilsson, Mats B; Pastor, John; Eriksson, Tobias; Bergström, Roger; Danell, Kjell

    2009-10-01

    Large herbivores can affect the carbon cycle in boreal forests by changing productivity and plant species composition, which in turn could ultimately alter litter production, nutrient cycling, and the partitioning between aboveground and belowground allocation of carbon. Here we experimentally tested how moose (Alces alces) at different simulated population densities affected belowground respiration rates (estimated as CO2 flux) in young boreal forest stands situated along a site productivity gradient. At high simulated population density, moose browsing considerably depressed belowground respiration rates (24-56% below that of no-moose controls) except during June, where the difference only was 10%. Moose browsing depressed belowground respiration the most on low-productivity sites. Soil moisture and temperature did not affect respiration rates. Impact of moose on belowground respiration was closely linked to litter production and followed Michaelis-Menten dynamics. The main mechanism by which moose decrease belowground respiration rates is likely their effect on photosynthetic biomass (especially decreased productivity of deciduous trees) and total litter production. An increased productivity of deciduous trees along the site productivity gradient causes an unequal effect of moose along the same gradient. The rapid growth of deciduous trees may offer higher resilience against negative effects of moose browsing on litter production and photosynthate allocation to roots.

  18. Prevalence and rates of recognition of depressive disorders in internal medicine outpatient departments of 23 general hospitals in Shenyang, China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaoxia; Wang, Wei; Jin, Qiu; Ai, Li; Li, Yueling; Dong, Guanghui; Liu, Li; Phillips, Michael R

    2008-09-01

    One important approach to increasing recognition and treatment rates for depression in urban China is to identify persons with depression who have contact with primary health care services, most of which are provided in the outpatient departments of general hospitals. We aim to assess the prevalence, risk factors and rates of recognition of depressive disorders in internal medicine outpatient departments of general hospitals. Outpatients with depression among 5312 consecutive attendees at outpatient internal medicine departments of 23 randomly selected general hospitals in Shenyang are identified by a two-stage screening process using the General Health Questionnaire and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders. Charts of subjects with DSM-IV depressive disorders are reviewed to determine if treating clinicians made a diagnosis of depression or prescribed anti-depressant medications. The current prevalence of any type of depressive disorder was 11.0% (95% CI: 10.1%-12.1%); and those of major depressive disorder, dysthymia, and depression not otherwise specified were 3.6% (3.1%-4.2%), 2.8% (2.4%-3.4%), and 4.1% (3.5%-4.8%) respectively. Only 4.0% (2.5%-6.1%) of the depressed patients were identified by the treating clinician and only 3.0% (1.6%-4.9%) were provided with antidepressant medication. Older age, female gender, reporting religious beliefs, low educational level, low income level and widowhood were independently associated with the occurrence of depression. The prevalence of depression in primary care settings in urban China is lower than that reported in most western countries but the risk factors for depression are similar. The very low rates of recognition and treatment are related both to the low rates of care seeking for psychological problems and to the high-volume collective model of hospital-based primary care delivery. Increasing the recognition and treatment of depression in Chinese general hospitals will require changing

  19. Depression.

    PubMed

    Choe, Christine J; Emslie, Graham J; Mayes, Taryn L

    2012-10-01

    This article reviews the assessment and treatment for depression in children and adolescents, emphasizing the implementation of evidence-based treatments into clinical care. Past trials of antidepressant medications are reviewed, as well as the clinical use of antidepressants and pharmacologic strategies for refractory illness or in the context of comorbid conditions. Clinicians who treat youth now have a body of empiric research to help guide treatment decisions; however, personalized treatment based on associated symptoms, comorbid conditions, contextual factors, and psychiatric history is essential. Further research is needed in the pharmacologic treatment of depressed youth, including expanding the study of non-SSRI antidepressants, augmentation and adjunctive strategies, and treatment in patients with comorbid conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Depression.

    PubMed

    McCarron, Robert M; Vanderlip, Erik R; Rado, Jeffrey

    2016-10-04

    This issue provides a clinical overview of depression, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  1. Variable SO2 emission rates for Anatahan volcano, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands: Implications for deriving arc-wide volatile fluxes from erupting volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, D. R.; Fischer, T. P.; McGonigle, A. J. S.; de Moor, J. M.

    2007-07-01

    We report new spectroscopic-derived SO2 emission rates for Anatahan volcano, Mariana Islands. Measurements of SO2 fluxes reveal large fluctuations over the 2003-2005 period - from 78 kg s-1 which occurred on the same day as resurgent volcanic activity (March, 2005) to 50 kg s-1 and 25 kg s-1 made days/weeks after the start of eruptive sequences in 2003 and 2004 respectively. Even the lowest values make Anatahan a major global source of SO2 over the past decade. These SO2 emission rates are used to estimate the CO2 flux from the arc as a whole (=3.6 - 40 × 107 mol km-1 yr-1). Such values are significantly higher than estimates derived using other approaches: they are also high compared to other convergent margins (e.g., Central America) where the input flux of CO2 is substantially greater. Our results caution against including volatile fluxes from actively-degassing volcanoes to produce volatile outputs considered representative of entire arc fronts.

  2. Translating effects of inbreeding depression on component vital rates to overall population growth in endangered bighorn sheep.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Heather E; Mills, L Scott; Wehausen, John D; Stephenson, Thomas R; Luikart, Gordon

    2011-12-01

    Evidence of inbreeding depression is commonly detected from the fitness traits of animals, yet its effects on population growth rates of endangered species are rarely assessed. We examined whether inbreeding depression was affecting Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis sierrae), a subspecies listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Our objectives were to characterize genetic variation in this subspecies; test whether inbreeding depression affects bighorn sheep vital rates (adult survival and female fecundity); evaluate whether inbreeding depression may limit subspecies recovery; and examine the potential for genetic management to increase population growth rates. Genetic variation in 4 populations of Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep was among the lowest reported for any wild bighorn sheep population, and our results suggest that inbreeding depression has reduced adult female fecundity. Despite this population sizes and growth rates predicted from matrix-based projection models demonstrated that inbreeding depression would not substantially inhibit the recovery of Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep populations in the next approximately 8 bighorn sheep generations (48 years). Furthermore, simulations of genetic rescue within the subspecies did not suggest that such activities would appreciably increase population sizes or growth rates during the period we modeled (10 bighorn sheep generations, 60 years). Only simulations that augmented the Mono Basin population with genetic variation from other subspecies, which is not currently a management option, predicted significant increases in population size. Although we recommend that recovery activities should minimize future losses of genetic variation, genetic effects within these endangered populations-either negative (inbreeding depression) or positive (within subspecies genetic rescue)-appear unlikely to dramatically compromise or stimulate short-term conservation efforts. The distinction between

  3. Concordance between clinician and patient ratings as predictors of response, remission, and recurrence in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Boadie W.; Li, Thomas; Kornstein, Susan G.; Friedman, Edward S.; Rothschild, Anthony J.; Pedersen, Ron; Ninan, Philip; Keller, Martin; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a secondary analysis of data from the Prevention of Recurrent Episodes of Depression With Venlafaxine Extended Release (ER) for Two Years (PREVENT) trial to evaluate whether discrepancies between clinician and patient ratings of depression severity were predictive of response, remission, and recurrence during treatment for a depressive episode. Patients who self-rated depression severity in concordance with the clinician (“concordant patients”) were defined as having a standardized patient-rated Inventory of Depressive Symptoms-Self Report (IDS-SR30) score minus standardized clinician-rated Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D17) score <1 SD from mean. Non-concordant patients (“underrating patients” [−1 SD], “overrating patients” [+1 SD]) were identified. Cohorts were compared for remission and response on the HAM-D17, Clinician Global Impression–Severity (CGI-S), and IDS-SR30 during acute and continuation therapy and time to recurrence during maintenance therapy. During acute treatment female patients were more likely to overrate their depression severity compared to the clinician; older age predicted overrating during continuation treatment. Overrating patients had a slower onset of response on the HAM-D17 during acute treatment (P = 0.004). There were no differences between cohorts for remission or response on the HAM-D17 or CGI-S. Overrating patients at week 10 had lower remission and response rates on the IDS-SR30 during continuation therapy (32% and 50%, respectively; P ≤ 0.001) compared with underrating patients (76%, 77%) or concordant patients (64%, 78%). Patient concordance at the end of continuation therapy did not predict recurrence during maintenance therapy, indicating that patient rating scales may be useful in tracking recurrence during maintenance therapy. Poor agreement between patient- and clinician-ratings of depression severity is primarily a state phenomenon, although it is trait-like for some patients

  4. Low rates of depressed mood and depression diagnoses in a clinic review of children and adolescents with autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Henry, Charles A; Nowinski, Lisa; Koesterer, Karmen; Ferrone, Christine; Spybrook, Jessaca; Bauman, Margaret

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depression diagnoses and related clinical data in an outpatient sample of youth with autistic disorder. Records of 123 psychiatrically referred children and adolescents with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed., Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) diagnosis of autistic disorder were examined. Mood disorder diagnoses and chief complaints along with family mood disorder history were the primary variables analyzed. Four subjects (3%) presented with depressed mood. Irritability complaints were frequent (n=78, 63%). Six subjects (5%) received a mood disorder diagnosis; all with mood disorder, not otherwise specified. No subjects received a depressive disorder diagnosis. Family history of mood disorders was common. Findings raise questions about the appropriate characterization and potential misdiagnoses of depression in youth with autistic disorder.

  5. Positive attitude toward life, emotional expression, self-rated health, and depressive symptoms among centenarians and near-centenarians.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kaori; Zweig, Richard; Schechter, Clyde B; Barzilai, Nir; Atzmon, Gil

    2016-09-01

    Favorable attitudes, emotions, personality characteristics, and self-rated health have been associated with successful aging in late life. However, less is known regarding these constructs and their relationships to mental health outcomes in the oldest old persons. This study examined cross-sectional relationships of these psychological factors to depressive symptoms in centenarians and near-centenarians. A selected sample of Ashkenazi Jewish older adults aged 98-107 (n = 54, 78% female) without significant cognitive impairment participated. Cognitive function was assessed by Mini-Mental Status Examination, positive attitude toward life and emotional expression by the Personality Outlook Profile Scale (POPS), self-rated health by participants' subjective rating of their present health, and depressive symptoms by the Geriatric Depression Scale. Results demonstrated inverse associations of the positive attitude toward life domain of the POPS and self-rated health with participants' levels of depressive symptoms even after adjusting for the effects of history of medical illnesses, cognitive function, and demographic variables. Additionally, participants with high levels of care showed higher levels of depressive symptoms. Path analysis supported the partially mediating role of positive attitude toward life in the relationship between self-rated health and depressive symptoms. These findings emphasized the important roles of positive attitudes and emotions as well as self-rated health in mental health outcomes in the oldest old. Although, limited by its cross-sectional design, findings suggest these psychological factors may exert protective effects on mental health outcomes in advanced age.

  6. Transcultural adaption and validation of the Spanish version of the Bipolar Depression Rating Scale (BDRS-S).

    PubMed

    Sarró, Salvador; Madre, Mercè; Fernández-Corcuera, Paloma; Valentí, Marc; Goikolea, José M; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; Berk, Michael; Amann, Benedikt L

    2015-02-01

    The Bipolar Depression Rating Scale (BDRS) arguably better captures symptoms in bipolar depression especially depressive mixed states than traditional unipolar depression rating scales. The psychometric properties of the Spanish adapted version, BDRS-S, are reported. The BDRS was translated into Spanish by two independent psychiatrists fluent in English and Spanish. After its back-translation into English, the BDRS-S was administered to 69 DSMI-IV bipolar I and II patients who were recruited from two Spanish psychiatric hospitals. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) were concurrently administered. 42 patients were reviewed via video by four psychiatrists blind to the psychopathological status of those patients. In order to assess the BDRS-S intra-rater or test-retest validity, 22 subjects were assessed by the same investigator performing two evaluations within five days. The BDRS-S had a good internal consistency (Cronbach׳s α=0.870). We observed strong correlations between the BDRS-S and the HDRS (r=0.874) and MADRS (r=0.854) and also between the mixed symptom cluster score of the BDRS-S and the YMRS (r=0.803). Exploratory factor analysis revealed a three factor solution: psychological depressive symptoms cluster, somatic depressive symptoms cluster and mixed symptoms cluster. A relatively small sample size for a 20-item scale. The BDRS-S provides solid psychometric performance and in particular captures depressive or mixed symptoms in Spanish bipolar patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An ergodic approach to eruption hazard scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The complexity and indeterminacy of volcanic processes demand the use of statistical methods to analyze the expectations of the occurrence and size of future eruptions. The probability of a volcano producing potentially destructive eruptions in a given time interval may be estimated analyzing the sequence of past eruptions assuming a physically plausible process. Since the threat posed by eruptions depends on their mass or energy release (magnitude) and on their emission rate (intensity), the Volcanic Explosivity Index is a suitable measure to quantify the eruptive events, particularly considering that the largest available global catalogues use that measure. The definition of volcanic hazard is thus posed here in terms of the expected annual release of energy by eruptions in each VEI category. This concept is based on the ergodic property of a large set of volcanoes to release about the same amount of energy in each VEI category over a sufficiently large time interval. This property is however constrained to the VEI range of eruptions that constitute complete catalogues (VEI >2) in the lower end, and to the extreme eruptions that may destroy or significantly alter a volcanic system, such as the large caldera-forming eruptions (VEI < 7). In such conditions, a simple power law for eruptions at the global level relating the global rate of energy release to the eruption magnitude has been proposed as a statistical basis for eruptive event model development. Following the above mentioned arguments, we assume that a similar scaling law rules the annual rate at which energy is released by eruptions at individual volcanoes as log(EmRm)=bM+a, where Em is the energy released by eruptions in the VEI magnitude class M, and Rm is the occurrence rate of such eruptions over times ranges in which catalogues may be considered complete. The parameters b and a depend on the eruptive history of individual volcanoes, the former determining the preferred mode of the volcano to release

  8. Spatial and temporal variations of soil CO2 degassing rate at El Hierro volcanic system and relation to the 2011 submarine eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melían, G.; Barrancos, J.; Padilla, G.; Dionis, S.; Rodríguez, F.; Nolasco, D.; Padrón, E.; Hernández, P. A.; Calvo, D.; Hernández, I.; Peréz, N. M.; Peraza, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    El Hierro Island (278 km2) is the youngest and the SW-most of the Canary Islands. On July 16, 2011, a seismic-volcanic crisis started with the occurrence of more than 11,900 seismic events. On October 10, 2011, the seismic activity changed behaviour and produced a harmonic tremor due to magma movement suggesting the initial stage of an eruption. The purpose of this study is to investigate the spatial and temporal variations of soil CO2 degassing rates at El Hierro volcanic system and its relation with the 2011 El Hierro volcanic unrest. Since 1998, diffuse CO2 emission has been investigated at El Hierro volcanic system in a yearly basis during the summer periods with approximately 600 observation sites. From 2004 to 2009, a diffuse CO2 emission rate decreasing trend from 1434 to 358 t•d-1 (equivalent to background values) was observed, and this tendency changed from 2009 to 2010 reaching a diffuse CO2 emission rate of 970 t•d-1. Because of this observed tendency change on the diffuse CO2 emission rate is possible to think that the preliminary stages of the 2011 volcanic unrest at El Hierro did start by the middle of 2010 with aseismic magma rising in the upper mantle beneath El Hierro. Since July 2011 and due to the start of the seismic-volcanic crisis at El Hierro, 16 diffuse CO2 emission surveys have been undertaken until January 2012. Diffuse CO2 emission measurements were performed by means of portable NDIR sensors according to the accumulation chamber method. Observed soil CO2 efflux values for all the 2011-12 surveys have ranged from negligible values to 398 g•m-2•d-1. The diffuse CO2 output released to atmosphere for the 2011-12 surveys was estimated between 138 and 2,143 t•d-1. On October 6, 2011, an increase tendency of diffuse CO2 emission rate from 380 to 990 t•d-1 was observed prior the occurrence of the first 4 magnitude type earthquake on October 8, 2011, and El Hierro submarine eruption on October 12, 2011. From October 15, 2011, an

  9. Jupiter Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover

    Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers.

    This visible-light image is from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope taken on May 11, 2007. It shows the turbulent pattern generated by the two plumes on the upper left part of Jupiter.

    Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena.

    According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vi gorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  10. Jupiter Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover

    Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers.

    This visible-light image is from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope taken on May 11, 2007. It shows the turbulent pattern generated by the two plumes on the upper left part of Jupiter.

    Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena.

    According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vi gorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  11. Intertriginous eruption.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Ronni; Oumeish, Oumeish Youssef; Parish, Lawrence Charles

    2011-01-01

    Intertrigo is a superficial inflammatory skin disorder involving any area of the body where two opposing skin surfaces can touch and rub or chaff. The word "intertrigo" comes from the Latin inter (between) and terere (to rub) and reflects the rubbing together of skin against skin to create maceration and irritation, hence, friction dermatitis or chaffing. It is a common disorder that can affect any individual from infancy to old age. It is primarily caused by skin-on-skin friction and is facilitated by moisture trapped in deep skin folds where air circulation is limited. The condition is particularly common in obese patients who have diabetes and who are exposed to heat and humidity. The moist, damaged skin associated with intertrigo is a fertile breeding ground for various microorganisms, and secondary cutaneous infections are commonly observed in these areas. The present chapter does not deal with "ordinary" intertrigo, but rather with other skin diseases that have affinity to the intertriginous areas. Diseases mentioned are: acrodermatitis enteropathica, the baboon syndrome or intertriginous drug eruption, Darier disease, Hailey-Hailey, granular parakeratosis, Kawasaki syndrome, necrolytic migratory erythema, streptococcal intertrigo and others. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Physical Exercise for Late-Life Depression: Effects on Heart Rate Variability.

    PubMed

    Toni, Giulio; Belvederi Murri, Martino; Piepoli, Massimo; Zanetidou, Stamatula; Cabassi, Aderville; Squatrito, Salvatore; Bagnoli, Luigi; Piras, Alessandro; Mussi, Chiara; Senaldi, Roberto; Menchetti, Marco; Zocchi, Donato; Ermini, Giuliano; Ceresini, Graziano; Tripi, Ferdinando; Rucci, Paola; Alexopoulos, George S; Amore, Mario

    2016-11-01

    Late-life major depression is associated with increased cardiovascular risk and impaired autonomic control of the heart, as evident from reduced heart rate variability (HRV). Moreover, antidepressant drug therapy also might be associated with further reductions of HRV. In the SEEDS study, we investigated whether sertraline associated with physical exercise protocols led to improvements of HRV, compared with antidepressant drug therapy alone. Single-blind randomized controlled trial. Psychiatric consultation-liaison program for primary care. Patients aged 65-85 years with major depression, recruited from primary care. Sertraline plus structured, tailored group physical exercise (S + EX) versus sertraline alone (S) for 24 weeks. HRV indices (RR, percentage of NN intervals greater than 50 msec [pNN50], square root of the mean squared differences of successive NN intervals [RMSSD], standard deviation of heart rate [SDHR], standard deviation of the NN interval [SDNN], high-frequency band [HF], low-frequency band [LF], and their ratio [LF/HF]) were measured at baseline, week 12, and week 24. Psychiatric and medical assessments. Participants displayed significant improvements of most HRV indices over time, irrespective of the group assignment (pNN50, RMSSD, SDHR, SDNN, HF, LF, and LF/HF). Moreover, patients in the S + EX group displayed greater increases of different HRV indices(RR, pNN50, RMSSD, SDHR, SDNN, HF, and LF) compared with those in the S group. The combination of structured physical exercise and sertraline might exert positive effects on the autonomic control of the heart among older patients with major depression. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Bayesian method for the joint estimation of outcrossing rate and inbreeding depression.

    PubMed

    Koelling, V A; Monnahan, P J; Kelly, J K

    2012-12-01

    The population outcrossing rate (t) and adult inbreeding coefficient (F) are key parameters in mating system evolution. The magnitude of inbreeding depression as expressed in the field can be estimated given t and F via the method of Ritland (1990). For a given total sample size, the optimal design for the joint estimation of t and F requires sampling large numbers of families (100-400) with fewer offspring (1-4) per family. Unfortunately, the standard inference procedure (MLTR) yields significantly biased estimates for t and F when family sizes are small and maternal genotypes are unknown (a common occurrence when sampling natural populations). Here, we present a Bayesian method implemented in the program BORICE (Bayesian Outcrossing Rate and Inbreeding Coefficient Estimation) that effectively estimates t and F when family sizes are small and maternal genotype information is lacking. BORICE should enable wider use of the Ritland approach for field-based estimates of inbreeding depression. As proof of concept, we estimate t and F in a natural population of Mimulus guttatus. In addition, we describe how individual maternal inbreeding histories inferred by BORICE may prove useful in studies of inbreeding and its consequences.

  14. Eruption conditions of spatter deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, Erika; Geist, Dennis

    2015-10-01

    Spatter is an eruptive product that forms within a narrow range of thermal conditions: it must be hot enough to deform and agglutinate, but not so hot that clasts completely re-fuse and remobilize as clastogenic lava. This narrow thermal window of spatter-forming conditions allows for quantitative prediction of cooling rates and accumulation rates. Cooling and accumulation rates then provide information that enables estimates of eruption parameters for inaccessible and prehistoric deposits. High-temperature experiments conducted on basaltic scoria from Devil's Garden, Oregon have revealed the eruption temperature was ~ 1130 °C. The strength welds formed between experimental clasts is shown to depend on cooling rate. Natural samples are compared to the experimental samples by measuring tensile strength and welded area between clasts. The weld strength in natural deposits yields estimates of cooling rates that range between 2.5 °C and 48 °C/min, with the majority of the samples grouping between 7 °C and 14 °C/min. Thermal models based on these cooling rates yield spatter accumulation rates of 0.5-1.8 m/h in the Devil's Garden spatter deposits. We provide a general model for cooling and accumulation rates for spatter cones, ramparts, and hornitos, which allow estimation of the factors that control basaltic eruptive products.

  15. Depression and resting state heart rate variability in children and adolescents - A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Julian; Kemp, Andrew H; Beauchaine, Theodore P; Thayer, Julian F; Kaess, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Among adults, depression is associated with reduced vagal activity, as indexed by high frequency heart rate variability [HF-HRV]), which correlates inversely with depression severity. Available evidence in depressed children and adolescents remains to be reviewed systematically. A search of the literature was performed to identify studies reporting (i) HF-HRV in clinically depressed children/adolescents relative to controls (k=4, n=259) and (ii) the association between HF-HRV and depressive symptoms as measured by standardized psychometric instruments in children and adolescents (k=6, n=2625). Random-effects meta-analysis on group differences revealed significant effects that were associated with a moderate effect size (Hedges' g=-0.59; 95% CI [-1.05; -0.13]), indicating lower resting state HF-HRV among clinically depressed children/adolescents (n=99) compared to healthy controls (n=160), consistent with findings among adults. While no correlation between HF-HRV and depressive symptom severity was observed (r=-.041 [-0.143; 0.062]), these additional correlational findings are limited to non-clinical samples. Findings have important clinical implications including a potentially increased risk for future physical ill health and also the identification of potential new treatment targets in child and adolescent depression.

  16. Variations in eruption style during the 1931A.D. eruption of Aniakchak volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicholson, R.S.; Gardner, J.E.; Neal, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 1931A.D. eruption of Aniakchak volcano, Alaska, progressed from subplinian to effusive eruptive style and from trachydacite to basaltic andesite composition from multiple vent locations. Eyewitness accounts and new studies of deposit stratigraphy provide a combined narrative of eruptive events. Additional field, compositional, grain size, componentry, density, and grain morphology data document the influences on changing eruptive style as the eruption progressed. The eruption began on 1 May 1931A.D. when a large subplinian eruption column produced vesicular juvenile-rich tephra. Subsequent activity was more intermittent, as magma interacted with groundwater and phreatomagmatic ash and lithic-rich tephra was dispersed up to 600km downwind. Final erupted products were more mafic in composition and the eruption became more strombolian in style. Stratigraphic evidence suggests that two trachydacitic lava flows were erupted from separate but adjacent vents before the phreatomagmatic phase concluded and that basaltic andesite lava from a third vent began to effuse near the end of explosive activity. The estimated total bulk volume of the eruption is 0.9km3, which corresponds to approximately 0.3km3 of magma. Eruption style changes are interpreted as follows: (1) a decrease in magma supply rate caused the change from subplinian to phreatomagmatic eruption; (2) a subsequent change in magma composition caused the transition from phreatomagmatic to strombolian eruption style. Additionally, the explosion and effusion of a similar magma composition from three separate vents indicates how the pre-existing caldera structure controlled the pathway of shallow magma ascent, thus influencing eruption style. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V..

  17. Variations in eruption style during the 1931 A.D. eruption of Aniakchak volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicholson, Robert S.; Gardner, James E.; Neal, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    The 1931 A.D. eruption of Aniakchak volcano, Alaska, progressed from subplinian to effusive eruptive style and from trachydacite to basaltic andesite composition from multiple vent locations. Eyewitness accounts and new studies of deposit stratigraphy provide a combined narrative of eruptive events. Additional field, compositional, grain size, componentry, density, and grain morphology data document the influences on changing eruptive style as the eruption progressed. The eruption began on 1 May 1931 A.D. when a large subplinian eruption column produced vesicular juvenile-rich tephra. Subsequent activity was more intermittent, as magma interacted with groundwater and phreatomagmatic ash and lithic-rich tephra was dispersed up to 600 km downwind. Final erupted products were more mafic in composition and the eruption became more strombolian in style. Stratigraphic evidence suggests that two trachydacitic lava flows were erupted from separate but adjacent vents before the phreatomagmatic phase concluded and that basaltic andesite lava from a third vent began to effuse near the end of explosive activity. The estimated total bulk volume of the eruption is 0.9 km3, which corresponds to approximately 0.3 km3 of magma. Eruption style changes are interpreted as follows: (1) a decrease in magma supply rate caused the change from subplinian to phreatomagmatic eruption; (2) a subsequent change in magma composition caused the transition from phreatomagmatic to strombolian eruption style. Additionally, the explosion and effusion of a similar magma composition from three separate vents indicates how the pre-existing caldera structure controlled the pathway of shallow magma ascent, thus influencing eruption style.

  18. A comparison of rates of residual insomnia symptoms following pharmacotherapy or cognitive-behavioral therapy for major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Carney, Colleen E; Segal, Zindel V; Edinger, Jack D; Krystal, Andrew D

    2007-02-01

    A number of pharmacologic studies have documented that insomnia is among the most commonly reported residual symptoms after remission from depression. Residual symptoms after remission are particularly relevant because these symptoms confer greater risk for subsequent depression. This study was the first to date to examine residual insomnia after cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression and to compare CBT with pharmacotherapy for depression on residual insomnia rates. This naturalistic study examined rates of posttreatment insomnia complaints in patients (N = 94) who had been diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD), according to DSM-IV criteria, and who remitted from MDD after completing at least 20 weeks of either CBT or pharmacotherapy at an outpatient clinic specializing in mood disorders. Participants were randomly assigned to the treatment conditions, but only the data from those who completed treatment and remitted were analyzed. Primary outcome measure was the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. Data were collected from October 1, 1999, to September 23, 2003. Groups were compared using a chi(2) for nominal data. The rate of posttreatment insomnia was 22% for sleep-onset insomnia, 26% for sleep-maintenance insomnia, and 17% for early morning awakenings, and the rates did not statistically differ across the 2 treatment groups. Although CBT and pharmacotherapy effectively addressed depression in these patients and addressed insomnia symptoms for many, there were a number of patients with residual insomnia. Whereas there appears to be no difference between CBT and pharmacotherapy with regard to rates of residual insomnia, the rates of such insomnia remaining after these treatments suggest that adjunctive sleep treatment to specifically address insomnia may be necessary for some MDD patients.

  19. Association of rates of household handgun ownership, lifetime major depression, and serious suicidal thoughts with rates of suicide across US census regions

    PubMed Central

    Hemenway, D; Miller, M

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Cross sectional studies in the United States often find a significant positive association between levels of household firearm ownership and suicide rates. This study investigates whether the association can be explained by differences in levels of mental health. Methods: The relationship between household handgun ownership and overall suicide rates across United States regions after accounting for two mental health variables—lifetime prevalence of major depression and serious suicidal thoughts—were examined. Analyses also add another control variable (urbanization, education, unemployment, or alcohol consumption). Data on mental health variables come from the National Comorbidity Study, conducted in the early 1990s. Data on household handgun ownership come from the General Social Surveys. Results: Across the nine regions for the early 1990s (n = 9), household handgun ownership rates are positively correlated with the suicide rate (r = 0.59) and are not correlated with either the lifetime prevalence of major depression or suicidal thoughts. After controlling for major depression and suicidal thoughts (and any of the four additional control variables), handgun ownership rates remain significantly associated with the overall suicide rate. Conclusions: In United States regions with higher levels of household handgun ownership, there are higher suicide rates. This relationship cannot be explained by differences in the prevalence of two mental health indicators—lifetime rates of either major depression or suicidal thoughts. PMID:12460969

  20. Dimensional approach to symptom factors of major depressive disorder in Koreans, using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale: the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea study.

    PubMed

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Jang, Eun Young; Kim, Daeho; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Jung-Bum; Jo, Sun-Jin; Park, Yong Chon

    2015-01-01

    Although major depressive disorder (MDD) has a variety of symptoms beyond the affective dimensions, the factor structure and contents of comprehensive psychiatric symptoms of this disorder have rarely been explored using the 18-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). We aimed to identify the factor structure of the 18-item BPRS in Korean MDD patients. A total of 258 MDD patients were recruited from a multicenter sample of the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea study. Psychometric scales were used to assess overall psychiatric symptoms (BPRS), depression (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale), anxiety (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), global severity (Clinical Global Impression of Severity Scale), suicidal ideation (Scale for Suicide Ideation), functioning (Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale), and quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment-abbreviated version). Common factor analysis with oblique rotation was used to yield factor structure. A four-factor structure was designed and interpreted by the symptom dimensions to reflect mood disturbance, positive symptoms/apathy, bipolarity, and thought distortion/mannerism. These individual factors were also significantly correlated with clinical variables. The findings of this study support the view that the BPRS may be a promising measuring tool for the initial assessment of MDD patients. In addition, the four-factor structure of the BPRS may be useful in understanding the mood and psychotic characteristics of these patients.

  1. Urdu translation of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression: Results of a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Ali M.; Naz, Shahana; Asif, Aftab; Khawaja, Imran S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop a standardized validated version of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) in Urdu. Methods: After translation of the HAM-D into the Urdu language following standard guidelines, the final Urdu version (HAM-D-U) was administered to 160 depressed outpatients. Inter-item correlation was assessed by calculating Cronbach alpha. Correlation between HAM-D-U scores at baseline and after a 2-week interval was evaluated for test-retest reliability. Moreover, scores of two clinicians on HAM-D-U were compared for inter-rater reliability. For establishing concurrent validity, scores of HAM-D-U and BDI-U were compared by using Spearman correlation coefficient. The study was conducted at Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from May to December 2014. Results: The Cronbach alpha for HAM-D-U was 0.71. Composite scores for HAM-D-U at baseline and after a 2-week interval were also highly correlated with each other (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.83, p-value < 0.01) indicating good test-retest reliability. Composite scores for HAM-D-U and BDI-U were positively correlated with each other (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.85, p < 0.01) indicating good concurrent validity. Scores of two clinicians for HAM-D-U were also positively correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.82, p-value < 0.01) indicated good inter-rater reliability. Conclusion: The HAM-D-U is a valid and reliable instrument for the assessment of Depression. It shows good inter-rater and test-retest reliability. The HAM-D-U can be a tool either for clinical management or research. PMID:28083049

  2. Paternal Depression Rates in Prenatal and Postpartum Periods and Affecting Factors.

    PubMed

    Top, Ekin Dila; Cetisli, Nuray Egelioglu; Guclu, Serkan; Zengin, Esma Burcak

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the paternal depression rates and affecting factors in prenatal and postpartum periods. The study, which was descriptive and cross-sectional, was conducted with 92 volunteer couples that suited the criteria for the sample. These participants were selected from couples that applied to the gynecology clinic of a private hospital between September 2014 and April 2015 and who were in their 37th-40th weeks of pregnancy. Data collection was planned in two interviews; the first one was done between the 37th and 40th weeks of the pregnancy, and the second was conducted between the 4th and 6th weeks after the birth. Interviews were completed with 84 couples. In this study, it was determined that there was no relationship between average paternal and maternal scores on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in prenatal and postpartum periods. It was found that the average score of the Family-Work Conflict Scale increased and couples' marriage harmony decreased as the EPDS average score for fathers increased. In addition, it was found that the EPDS average score for fathers that wanted the pregnancy was less compared to fathers that did not want the pregnancy, and the difference between the two groups was statistically meaningful. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of anxiety on heart rate variability, depression, and sleep in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sooyeon; Ellis, Robert J; Sollers, John J; Thayer, Julian F; Yang, Hae-Chung; Emery, Charles F

    2013-05-01

    The current study investigates heart rate variability (HRV) responses to a psychosocial stressor in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, and the potential role of anxiety as a confounding factor in this relationship. Additionally, this study also investigates the influence of anxiety on sleep and depressive symptoms among COPD patients. The study utilized a 2 (disease status)×2 (anxiety group) factorial design examining HRV associated with anxiety symptoms and COPD during a standardized acute social stress task. Participants (mean age 59.1±11.2 years; 50% female) completed pulmonary function testing, HRV monitoring, and self-report questionnaires assessing psychological factors. 30 COPD patients were age- and gender-matched with 30 healthy controls. HRV response to a psychosocial stressor among participants with higher anxiety (both COPD and healthy) reflected autonomic dysregulation in both time and frequency domains that was not evident among non-anxious participants. COPD participants with higher anxiety reported greater symptoms of depression and poorer sleep quality than did COPD participants with low anxiety. Anxiety is associated with dysregulated HRV response to a psychosocial stressor, but the negative influence of anxiety and COPD on autonomic function did not appear to be additive. Comorbid anxiety in patients with COPD is associated with increased behavioral and psychological symptoms of distress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dissociation, cognitive conflict and nonlinear patterns of heart rate dynamics in patients with unipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Bob, Petr; Susta, Marek; Gregusova, Alica; Jasova, Denisa

    2009-02-01

    Recent findings in cognitive neuroscience indicate that activation of anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is related to detecting cognitive conflict. Conflict related ACC activation elicits responses in central autonomic network which can be assessed by psychophysiological measures such as heart rate variability (i.e. beat to beat R-R intervals--RRI). Recent findings in neuroscience also suggest that cognitive conflict is related to specific nonlinear chaotic changes of the signal generated by the neural systems. The present study used Stroop word-colour test as an experimental approach to the study of cognitive conflict in connection with RRI measurement, psychometric measurement of dissociation (DES) and calculation of largest Lyapunov exponents in nonlinear data analysis of RRI time series in 40 patients with unipolar depression and 35 healthy controls. Significant correlation 0.58 (p<0.01) between largest Lyapunov exponents and DES found in depressive patients indicate that cognitive conflict related neural interference during conflicting Stroop task is closely related to dissociative processes. These results present first supportive evidence that degree of chaos could be related to dissociation.

  5. Automated Detection of Eruptive Structures for Solar Eruption Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.

    2012-07-01

    The problem of data processing and assimilation for solar eruption prediction is, for contemporary solar physics, more pressing than the problem of data acquisition. Although critical solar data, such as the coronal magnetic field, are still not routinely available, space-based observatories deliver diverse, high-quality information at such a high rate that a manual or semi-manual processing becomes meaningless. We discuss automated data analysis methods and explain, using basic physics, why some of them are unlikely to advance eruption prediction. From this finding we also understand why solar eruption prediction is likely to remain inherently probabilistic. We discuss some promising eruption prediction measures and report on efforts to adapt them for use with high-resolution, high-cadence photospheric and coronal data delivered by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Concluding, we touch on the problem of physical understanding and synthesis of different results: combining different measures inferred by different data sets is a yet-to-be-done exercise that, however, presents our best opportunity of realizing benefits in solar eruption prediction via a meaningful, targeted assimilation of solar data.

  6. Is the link between depressed mood and heart rate variability explained by disinhibited eating and diet?

    PubMed

    Young, Hayley A; Cousins, Alecia L; Watkins, Heather T; Benton, David

    2017-02-01

    Consistently it has been reported that a depressed mood and low heart rate variability (HRV) are linked. However, studies have not considered that the association might be explained by dietary behaviour. The resting inter-beat interval data of 266 adults (Study 1: 156 (51M), Study 2: 112 (38M)) were recorded for six minutes and quantified using linear (HF power: 0.15-0.4Hz) and nonlinear indices (Sample entropy). Participants also completed the Profile of Mood States and the Three Factor Eating questionnaires. The Alternative Healthy Eating Index was used to quantify diet quality. In study 1 mood was associated with HRV; an effect partially mediated by diet. Study 2 replicated the finding: disinhibited eating (the tendency to lose control over one's eating) and diet sequentially mediated the association between mood and HRV. Diet plays a role in the link between mood and HRV and studies should consider the influence of this factor.

  7. Determination of growth rate depression of some green algae by atrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Hersh, C.M.; Crumpton, W.G.

    1987-12-01

    A common contaminant of surface waters of agricultural regions is the triazine herbicide, atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isoproplyamino-s-triazine). Atrazine effectively inhibits growth and photosynthesis of most plants, including freshwater algae. Both depression of growth rate and reduced yield have been used as parameters in studies of the effects of atrazine on algal growth. Considerable variation exists among algal toxicity methods despite attempts at standardization. Experimental endpoints range from percent inhibitions to EC50s. Algae from two different Iowa springs were the subjects of a study of naturally occurring atrazine tolerance. The authors report here the results of two aspects of that study: development of a quick method of assessing toxin effects on algal growth, and investigation of a ecologically meaningful endpoint for toxin-growth experiments.

  8. Application of Bistatic TanDEM-X Interferometry to Measure Lava Flow Volume and Lava Extrusion Rates During the 2012-13 Tolbachik, Kamchatka Fissure Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubanek, J.; Westerhaus, M.; Heck, B.

    2015-12-01

    Aerial imaging methods are a well approved source for mapping lava flows during eruptions and can serve as a base to assess the eruption dynamics and to determine the affected area. However, clouds and smoke often hinder optical systems like the Earth Observation Advanced Land Imager (EO-1-ALI, operated by NASA) to map lava flows properly, which hence affects its reliability. Furthermore, the amount of lava that is extruded during an eruption cannot be determined from optical images - however, it can significantly contribute to assess the accompanying hazard and risk. One way to monitor active lava flows is to quantify the topographic changes over time while using up-to-date high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs). Whereas photogrammetric methods still fail when clouds and fume obstruct the sight, innovative radar satellite missions have the potential to generate high-resolution DEMs at any time. The innovative bistatic TanDEM-X (TerraSAR-X Add-on for Digital Elevation Measurements) satellite mission enables for the first time generating high-resolution DEMs from synthetic aperture radar satellite data repeatedly with reasonable costs and high resolution. The satellite mission consists of the two nearly identical satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X that build a large synthetic aperture radar interferometer with adaptable across- and along-track baselines aiming to generate topographic information globally. In the present study, we apply the TanDEM-X data to study the lava flows that were emplaced during the 2012-13 Tolbachik, Kamchatka fissure eruption. The eruption was composed of very fluid lava flows that effused along a northeast-southwest trending fissure. We used about fifteen bistatic data pairs to generate DEMs prior to, during, and after the eruption. The differencing of the DEMs enables mapping the lava flow field at different times. This allows measuring the extruded volume and to derive the changes in lava extrusion over time.

  9. Increased rates of depressed mood in mothers of children with ASD associated with the presence of the broader autism phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Brooke; Meyer, Katherine; Becker, Mark W

    2011-04-01

    This study examined the relationship between the broader autism phenotype (BAP) and depressed mood in mothers of children with and without autism spectrum disorders (ASD). One hundred and sixty-five mothers (71 with an ASD child and 94 with a non-ASD child) completed a survey of child autism severity (ASD mothers only), parenting stress, BAP, and depression. Mothers of children with ASD reported greater depressed mood, higher parenting stress, and more characteristics associated with the BAP than mothers of children without ASD. For mothers of children with ASD, the BAP uniquely predicted number of depressive symptoms after controlling for child autism severity and parenting stress. In the full sample, the relationship between group status and depressed mood was no longer significant after controlling for parenting stress and maternal BAP. These findings suggest that the higher rate of depression found in mothers of children with ASD may be attributed both to the increased stress of raising a child with ASD, as well as a greater number of autistic features in the mothers that may place them at higher risk for developing depression.

  10. Multiple coincident eruptive seismic tremor sources during the 2014-2015 eruption at Holuhraun, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Eva P. S.; Bean, Christopher J.; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Höskuldsson, Armann; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Coppola, Diego; Witt, Tanja; Walter, Thomas R.

    2017-04-01

    We analyze eruptive tremor during one of the largest effusive eruptions in historical times in Iceland (2014/2015 Holuhraun eruption). Seismic array recordings are compared with effusion rates deduced from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer recordings and ground video monitoring data and lead to the identification of three coexisting eruptive tremor sources. This contrasts other tremor studies that generally link eruptive tremor to only one source usually associated with the vent. The three sources are (i) a source that is stable in back azimuth and shows bursts with ramp-like decrease in amplitude at the beginning of the eruption: we link it to a process below the open vents where the bursts correlate with the opening of new vents and temporary increases in the lava fountaining height; (ii) a source moving by a few degrees per month while the tremor amplitude suddenly increases and decreases: back azimuth and slowness correlate with the growing margins of the lava flow field, whilst new contact with a river led to fast increases of the tremor amplitude; and (iii) a source moving by up to 25° southward in 4 days that cannot be related to any observed surface activity and might be linked to intrusions. We therefore suggest that eruptive tremor amplitudes/energies are used with caution when estimating eruptive volumes, effusion rates, or the eruption explosivity as multiple sources can coexist during the eruption phase. Our results suggest that arrays can monitor both the growth of a lava flow field and the activity in the vents.

  11. Forecasting eruptions using pre-eruptive seismic patterns at Sinabung Volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCausland, W. A.; White, R. A.; Hendrasto, M.; Gunawan, H.; Indrastuti, N.; Triastuti, H.; Suparman, Y.; Putra, A.

    2015-12-01

    Forecasting the size, timing and style of volcanic eruptions is of primary interest to observatories and civil authorities world-wide, yet most observatories only have access to long-term data at a very limited number of volcanoes under their jurisdiction. When extensive long-term data sets are available to responsible agencies, volcanic eruptive size, timing and style can usually be successfully forecast using current monitoring data and knowledge of precursory eruptive patterns, enabling the communication of timely forecasts to civil authorities. Experienced agencies, such as Indonesia's Center for Volcanology and Geologic Hazards Mitigation and the USAID-USGS Volcano Disaster Assistance Program, utilize extensive collective experiences with multiple monitoring streams over multiple eruption cycles and across volcano types to successfully forecast eruption size, style and onset, as well as changes in eruptive style and size within ongoing eruptions. The longest-term real-time monitoring parameter commonly available at volcanoes worldwide is seismic data. Seismic data is a direct measure of rate-dependent strain changes in the magmatic system from the deep magmatic input to shallow eruptive processes. Patterns of pre-eruptive earthquakes coupled with other available monitoring data and conceptual models of magma ascent enable short-term forecasting of eruption size, style, and onset. First order event locations, characterization of background seismicity, and changes in earthquake types and energy release are most important to successful eruption forecasting. This study demonstrates how this approach has been used to successfully forecast eruption onsets, changes in eruptive style, and to change alert levels and extend or contract evacuation zones during the ongoing eruption of Sinabung Volcano, Indonesia.

  12. Does screening HIV-positive individuals in Uganda for major depressive disorder improve case detection rates and antidepressant prescription?

    PubMed

    Akena, Dickens; Stein, Dan J; Joska, John

    2013-10-01

    Major depressive disorder in HIV-positive persons is often not diagnosed, and poorly treated. The effect of depression screening on case detection, and rates of antidepressant prescription is unknown.We assessed 368 participants for major depressive disorder, and provided clinicians with the results. Four weeks later, we abstracted information from the charts of the depressed patients to ascertain if they received antidepressants. We also randomly sampled the charts of 368 non-screened patients, to ascertain whether clinicians had diagnosed and prescribed antidepressant treatment.Major depressive disorder was identified in 17.9 % of the screened group, and in 2.1 % of the non-screened group [OR = 9.65, CI = (4.54-20.50)]. The screened individuals were 7.8 times more likely to receive antidepressants (95 % CI = 3.04-20.24). Identification of major depressive disorder by clinicians in HIV settings remains poor. However, routine screening can improve case detection rates and the proportion of patients receiving antidepressants.

  13. Rate and correlates of depression among elderly people attending primary health care centres in Al-Dakhiliyah governorate, Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabahi, S M; Al Sinawi, H N; Al-Hinai, S S; Youssef, R M

    2014-04-03

    This study determined the rates and correlates of depression among community-dwelling elderly people, based on data from the comprehensive health assessment conducted in Al-Dakhiliyah governorate in Oman in 2008-2010. Data covered sociodemographic characteristics, medical and nutrition status, functional abilities, depression and dementia. The rate of depression was 16.9%, higher among women than men (19.3% versus 14.3%). Depression was independently predicted by the presence of social risk (OR = 3.44), dementia (OR = 3.17), impairment in activities of daily living (OR = 2.19), joint problems (OR = 1.52) and mobility restriction (OR = 1.43). If dementia was excluded from the model, depression was additionally predicted by poor perception of health (OR = 2.09), impairment in instrumental activities of daily living (OR = 1.47) and older ages of 70-< 80 years (OR = 1.63) and ≥ 80 years (OR = 1.75). Although not presenting as a complaint, depression in not uncommon among elderly people.

  14. Filament Eruption Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    We have been investigating filament eruptions in recent years. Use filament eruptions as markers of the coronal field evolution. Data from SoHO, Yohkoh, TRACE, Hinode, and other sources. We and others have observed: (1)Filaments often show slow rise, followed by fast rise, (2) Brightenings, preflares, microflares during slow rise (3) Magnetic evolution in hours prior to eruption onset. We investigated What do Hinode and SDO show for filament eruptions?

  15. Body downsizing caused by non-consumptive social stress severely depresses population growth rate.

    PubMed

    Edeline, Eric; Haugen, Thrond O; Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Claessen, David; Winfield, Ian J; Stenseth, Nils Chr; Vøllestad, L Asbjørn

    2010-03-22

    Chronic social stress diverts energy away from growth, reproduction and immunity, and is thus a potential driver of population dynamics. However, the effects of social stress on demographic density dependence remain largely overlooked in ecological theory. Here we combine behavioural experiments, physiology and population modelling to show in a top predator (pike Esox lucius) that social stress alone may be a primary driver of demographic density dependence. Doubling pike density in experimental ponds under controlled prey availability did not significantly change prey intake by pike (i.e. did not significantly change interference or exploitative competition), but induced a neuroendocrine stress response reflecting a size-dependent dominance hierarchy, depressed pike energetic status and lowered pike body growth rate by 23 per cent. Assuming fixed size-dependent survival and fecundity functions parameterized for the Windermere (UK) pike population, stress-induced smaller body size shifts age-specific survival rates and lowers age-specific fecundity, which in Leslie matrices projects into reduced population rate of increase (lambda) by 37-56%. Our models also predict that social stress flattens elasticity profiles of lambda to age-specific survival and fecundity, thus making population persistence more dependent on old individuals. Our results suggest that accounting for non-consumptive social stress from competitors and predators is necessary to accurately understand, predict and manage food-web dynamics.

  16. Body downsizing caused by non-consumptive social stress severely depresses population growth rate

    PubMed Central

    Edeline, Eric; Haugen, Thrond O.; Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Claessen, David; Winfield, Ian J.; Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Vøllestad, L. Asbjørn

    2010-01-01

    Chronic social stress diverts energy away from growth, reproduction and immunity, and is thus a potential driver of population dynamics. However, the effects of social stress on demographic density dependence remain largely overlooked in ecological theory. Here we combine behavioural experiments, physiology and population modelling to show in a top predator (pike Esox lucius) that social stress alone may be a primary driver of demographic density dependence. Doubling pike density in experimental ponds under controlled prey availability did not significantly change prey intake by pike (i.e. did not significantly change interference or exploitative competition), but induced a neuroendocrine stress response reflecting a size-dependent dominance hierarchy, depressed pike energetic status and lowered pike body growth rate by 23 per cent. Assuming fixed size-dependent survival and fecundity functions parameterized for the Windermere (UK) pike population, stress-induced smaller body size shifts age-specific survival rates and lowers age-specific fecundity, which in Leslie matrices projects into reduced population rate of increase (λ) by 37–56%. Our models also predict that social stress flattens elasticity profiles of λ to age-specific survival and fecundity, thus making population persistence more dependent on old individuals. Our results suggest that accounting for non-consumptive social stress from competitors and predators is necessary to accurately understand, predict and manage food-web dynamics. PMID:19923130

  17. An erupted compound odontoma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anil; Vij, Hitesh; Vij, Ruchieka; Malhotra, Ritika

    2014-04-12

    Odontomas are familiar entities but their eruption into the oral cavity is an extraordinary occurrence, which may be associated with pain, infection, malocclusion, etc. Not many cases of erupted odontomas have been reported in the literature. This paper puts forth a case of erupting odontoma in an attempt to add to the list of reported cases of this unique pathology.

  18. Breathing exercise combined with cognitive behavioural intervention improves sleep quality and heart rate variability in major depression.

    PubMed

    Chien, Hui-Ching; Chung, Yu-Chu; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Lee, Jia-Fu

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a cognitive behavioural intervention combined with a breathing relaxation exercise on sleep quality and heart rate variability in patients with major depression. Depression is a long-lasting illness with significant effects not only in individuals themselves, but on their family, work and social relationships as well. Cognitive behavioural therapy is considered to be an effective treatment for major depression. Breathing relaxation may improve heart rate variability, but few studies have comprehensively examined the effect of a cognitive behavioural intervention combined with relaxing breathing on patients with major depression. An experimental research design with a repeated measure was used. Eighty-nine participants completed this study and entered data analysed. The experimental group (n = 43) received the cognitive behavioural intervention combined with a breathing relaxation exercise for four weeks, whereas the control group (n = 46) did not. Sleep quality and heart rate variability were measured at baseline, posttest1, posttest2 and follow-up. Data were examined by chi-square tests, t-tests and generalised estimating equations. After adjusting for age, socioeconomic status, severity of disease and psychiatric history, the quality of sleep of the experimental group improved, with the results at posttest achieving significance. Heart rate variability parameters were also significantly improved. This study supported the hypothesis that the cognitive behavioural intervention combined with a breathing relaxation exercise could improve sleep quality and heart rate variability in patients with major depression, and the effectiveness was lasting. The cognitive behavioural intervention combined with a breathing relaxation exercise that included muscle relaxation, deep breathing and sleep hygiene could be provided with major depression during hospitalisation. Through group practice and experience sharing

  19. Positive Attitude Towards Life, Emotional Expression, self-rated health, and depressive symptoms among centenarians and near-centenarians

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kaori; Zweig, Richard; Schechter, Clyde B.; Barzilai, Nir; Atzmon, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Favorable attitudes, emotions, personality characteristics, and self-rated health have been associated with successful aging in late life. However, less is known regarding these constructs and their relationships to mental health outcomes in the oldest old persons. This study examined cross-sectional relationships of these psychological factors to depressive symptoms in centenarians and near-centenarians. Methods A selected sample of Ashkenazi Jewish older adults ages 98 to 107 (n = 54, 78% female) without significant cognitive impairment participated. Cognitive function was assessed by Mini Mental Status Exam (MMSE), Positive Attitude Towards Life and Emotional Expression by the Personality Outlook Profile Scale (POPS), self-rated health by participants’ subjective rating of their present health, and depressive symptoms by the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Results Results demonstrated inverse associations of the Positive Attitude Towards Life domain of the POPS and self-rated health with participants’ levels of depressive symptoms even after adjusting for the effects of history of medical illnesses, cognitive function, and demographic variables. Additionally, participants with high levels of care showed higher levels of depressive symptoms. Path analysis supported the partially mediating role of Positive Attitude Towards Life in the relationship between self-rated health and depressive symptoms. Conclusion These findings emphasized the important roles of positive attitudes and emotions as well as self-rated health in mental health outcomes in the oldest old. Although, limited by its cross-sectional design, findings suggest these psychological factors may exert protective effects on mental health outcomes in advanced age. PMID:26114814

  20. Prefrontal cortex activation is associated with a discrepancy between self- and observer-rated depression severities of major depressive disorder: a multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Hiroyuki; Tsujii, Noa; Mikawa, Wakako; Adachi, Toru; Kirime, Eiji; Shirakawa, Osamu

    2015-03-15

    Studies on major depressive disorder (MDD) show that the degree of correlation between the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) varies widely. We aimed to determine whether this discrepancy reflects specific functional abnormalities in the frontotemporal cortex. Mildly depressed or euthymic patients with MDD (n=52), including 21 patients with MDD with the discrepancy, i.e., those with low HAMD17 scores (≤13) but high BDI-II scores (>28), and 31 patients without the discrepancy, i.e., those with low HAMD17 scores and low BDI-II scores (≤28), participated in the study along with 48 control subjects. Regional changes of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) levels during a verbal fluency task (VFT) were monitored using a 52-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) device. In the frontotemporal regions, mean oxy-Hb changes induced by the VFT were significantly smaller in patients with MDD than in control subjects. In 5 channels within frontal regions, the increase in mean oxy-Hb levels was significantly greater in MDD patients with the BDI-HAMD discrepancy than in those without the discrepancy. In 6 channels within the frontal region of the patients with MDD, significant positive correlations were observed between mean oxy-Hb changes and BDI total scores (ρ=0.38-0.59; P<0.05, false discovery rate corrected). Our findings required replication in severely depressed patients, particularly those with melancholia. The distinct pattern of activation of the prefrontal cortex suggests that MDD with the BDI-HAMD discrepancy is pathophysiologically different from MDD without the discrepancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dissociation in Rating Negative Facial Emotions between Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia and Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Isabelle; Piguet, Olivier; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Riedl, Lina; Beck, Johannes; Leyhe, Thomas; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Berres, Manfred; Monsch, Andreas U; Sollberger, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Features of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) such as executive dysfunction, apathy, and impaired empathic abilities are also observed in major depressive disorder (MDD). This may contribute to the reason why early stage bvFTD is often misdiagnosed as MDD. New assessment tools are thus needed to improve early diagnosis of bvFTD. Although emotion processing is affected in bvFTD and MDD, growing evidence indicates that the pattern of emotion processing deficits varies between the two disorders. As such, emotion processing paradigms have substantial potentials to distinguish bvFTD from MDD. The current study compared 25 patients with bvFTD, 21 patients with MDD, 21 patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia, and 31 healthy participants on a novel facial emotion intensity rating task. Stimuli comprised morphed faces from the Ekman and Friesen stimulus set containing faces of each sex with two different degrees of emotion intensity for each of the six basic emotions. Analyses of covariance uncovered a significant dissociation between bvFTD and MDD patients in rating the intensity of negative emotions overall (i.e., bvFTD patients underrated negative emotions overall, whereas MDD patients overrated negative emotions overall compared with healthy participants). In contrast, AD dementia patients rated negative emotions similarly to healthy participants, suggesting no impact of cognitive deficits on rating facial emotions. By strongly differentiating bvFTD and MDDpatients through negative facial emotions, this sensitive and short rating task might help improve the early diagnosis of bvFTD. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  2. Heart rate variability (HRV) in adolescent females with anxiety disorders and major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Henje Blom, E; Olsson, EM; Serlachius, E; Ericson, M; Ingvar, M

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate heart rate variability (HRV) in a clinical sample of female adolescents with anxiety disorders (AD) and/or major depressive disorder (MDD) compared with healthy controls and to assess the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) on HRV. Methods: Heart rate variability was measured in adolescent female psychiatric patients with AD and/or MDD (n = 69), mean age 16.8 years (range: 14.5–18.4), from 13 out-patient clinics and in healthy controls (n = 65), mean age 16.5 years (range: 15.9–17.7). HRV was registered in the sitting position during 4 min with no interventions. Results: Logarithmically transformed high frequency HRV (HF), low frequency HRV (LF) and standard deviation of inter beat intervals (SDNN) were lower in the clinical sample compared with the controls (Cohen’s d for HF = 0.57, LF = 0.55, SDNN = 0.60). This was not explained by body mass index, blood pressure or physical activity. Medication with SSRI explained 15.5% of the total variance of HF, 3.0% of LF and 6.5% of SDNN. Conclusions: Adolescent female psychiatric patients with AD and/or MDD show reduced HRV compared with healthy controls. Medication with SSRI explained a part of this difference. PMID:20121706

  3. Patterns of mating-system evolution in hermaphroditic animals: correlations among selfing rate, inbreeding depression, and the timing of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Juan S; Auld, Josh R; Correa, Ana C; Alonso, Juan M; Bony, Yves K; Coutellec, Marie-Agnès; Koene, Joris M; Pointier, Jean-Pierre; Jarne, Philippe; David, Patrice

    2011-05-01

    In hermaphrodites, traits that influence the selfing rate can coevolve with inbreeding depression, leading to the emergence of evolutionary syndromes. Theory predicts a negative correlation between inbreeding depression and selfing rate across species. This prediction has only been examined and validated in vascular plants. Furthermore, selfing rates are often influenced by environmental conditions (e.g., lack of mates or pollinators), and species are predicted to evolve mechanisms to buffer this variation. We extend previous studies of mating-system syndromes in two ways. First, we assembled a new dataset on Basommatophoran snails (17 species, including new data on 12 species). Second, we measured how species responded to variation in mate availability. Specifically, we quantified the waiting time before selfing (i.e., how long the onset of reproduction is delayed in the absence of mates). Selfing rates were negatively correlated with both inbreeding depression and the waiting time. Species with stronger inbreeding depression exhibited longer waiting times. These patterns obtained on Basommatophorans still hold when including eight other hermaphroditic animals. Our results support the hypothesis that selection drives the evolution of mating-system syndromes in animals. The reaction norm of selfing rates to mate availability is a key target of natural selection in this context. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  4. Pre-, Syn- and Post Eruptive Seismicity of the 2011 Eruption of Nabro Volcano, Eritrea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goitom, Berhe; Hammond, James; Kendall, Michael; Nowacky, Andy; Keir, Derek; Oppenheimer, Clive; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Ayele, Atalay; Ibrahim, Said; Jacques, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Nabro volcano, located in south-east Eritrea, East Africa, lies at the eastern margin of the Afar Rift and the Danakil Depression. Its tectonic behaviour is controlled by the divergence of the Arabian, Nubian and Somali plates. Nabro volcano was thought to be seismically quiet until it erupted in June 2011 with limited warning. The volcano erupted on June 12, 2011 around 20:32 UTC, following a series of earthquakes on that day that reached a maximum magnitude of 5.8. It is the first recorded eruption of Nabro volcano and only the second in Eritrea, following the Dubbi eruption in 1861. A lava flow emerged from the caldera and travelled about 20 km from the vent and buried settlements in the area. At the time of this eruption there was no seismic network in Eritrea, and hence the volcano was not monitored. In this study we use ten Ethiopian, one Yemeni and one Djibouti stations to investigate the seismicity of the area before, during and after the eruption. Four Eritrean seismic stations deployed in June 2011, four days after the eruption, are also included in the dataset. Travel time picks supplied by colleagues from Djibouti were also incorporated into the dataset. Our analysis covers roughly three months before and after the eruption and shows that Nabro was seismically quiet before the eruption (nine events), with the exception of one major earthquake (4.8 magnitude) that occurred on March 31, 2011. In contrast, the region shows continued seismic activity after the eruption (92 events). During the eruption seismicity levels are high (123 events), with two days particularly active, June 12 and June 17 with 85 and 28 discrete events, respectively. Maximum magnitudes of 5.8 and 5.9 were recorded on these two days. The two days of increased seismicity are consistent with satellite observations of the eruption which show two distinct phases of the eruption. The period between these two phases was dominated by volcanic tremor. The tremor signal lasted for almost one

  5. Self-rated health, multimorbidity and depression in Mexican older adults: Proposal and evaluation of a simple conceptual model.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Vázquez, Eduardo; Fernández-Niño, Julián Alfredo; Astudillo-Garcia, Claudia Iveth

    2017-04-01

    Self-rated health is an individual and subjective conceptualization involving the intersection of biological, social and psychological factors. It provides an invaluable and unique evaluation of a person's general health status. To propose and evaluate a simple conceptual model to understand self-rated health and its relationship to multimorbidity, disability and depressive symptoms in Mexican older adults. We conducted a cross-sectional study based on a national representative sample of 8,874 adults of 60 years of age and older. Self-perception of a positive health status was determined according to a Likert-type scale based on the question: "What do you think is your current health status?" Intermediate variables included multimorbidity, disability and depressive symptoms, as well as dichotomous exogenous variables (sex, having a partner, participation in decision-making and poverty). The proposed conceptual model was validated using a general structural equation model with a logit link function for positive self-rated health. A direct association was found between multimorbidity and positive self-rated health (OR=0.48; 95% CI: 0.42-0.55), disability and positive self-rated health (OR=0.35; 95% CI: 0.30-0.40), depressive symptoms and positive self-rated health (OR=0.38; 95% CI: 0.34-0.43). The model also validated indirect associations between disability and depressive symptoms (OR=2.25; 95% CI: 2.01- 2.52), multimorbidity and depressive symptoms (OR=1.79; 95% CI: 1.61-2.00) and multimorbidity and disability (OR=1.98; 95% CI: 1.78-2.20). A parsimonious theoretical model was empirically evaluated, which enabled identifying direct and indirect associations with positive self-rated health.

  6. The 1991 eruption of Hekla, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Agust; Oskarsson, Niels; Gronvold, Karl; Saemundsson, Kristjan; Sigurdsson, Oddur; Stefansson, Ragnar; Gislason, Sigurdur R.; Einarsson, Pall; Brandsdottir, Bryndis; Larsen, Gudrun; Johannesson, Haukur; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

    1992-02-01

    The eruption that started in the Hekla volcano in South Iceland on 17 January 1991, and came to an end on 11 March, produced mainly andesitic lava. This lava covers 23 km2 and has an estimated volume of 0.15 km3. This is the third eruption in only 20 years, whereas the average repose period since 1104 is 55 years. Earthquakes, as well as a strain pulse recorded by borehole strainmeters, occurred less than half an hour before the start of the eruption. The initial plinian phase was very short-lived, producing a total of only 0.02 km3 of tephra. The eruption cloud attained 11.5 km in height in only 10 min, but it became detached from the volcano a few hours later. Several fissures were active during the first day of the eruption, including a part of the summit fissure. By the second day, however, the activity was already essentially limited to that segment of the principal fissure where the main crater subsequently formed. The average effusion rate during the first two days of the eruption was about 800 m3 s-1. After this peak, the effusion rate declined rapidly to 10 20 m3 s-1, then more slowly to 1 m3 s-1, and remained at 1 12 m3 s-1 until the end of the eruption. Site observations near the main crater suggest that the intensity of the volcanic tremor varied directly with the force of the eruption. A notable rise in the fluorine concentration of riverwater in the vicinity of the eruptive fissures occurred on the 5th day of the eruption, but it levelled off on the 6th day and then remained essentially constant. The volume and initial silica content of the lava and tephra, the explosivity and effusion rate during the earliest stage of the eruption, as well as the magnitude attained by the associated earthquakes, support earlier suggestions that these parameters are positively related to the length of the preceeding repose period. The chemical difference between the eruptive material of Hekla itself and the lavas erupted in its vicinity can be explained in terms of a

  7. Heart-rate variability depression in porcine peritonitis-induced sepsis without organ failure.

    PubMed

    Jarkovska, Dagmar; Valesova, Lenka; Chvojka, Jiri; Benes, Jan; Danihel, Vojtech; Sviglerova, Jitka; Nalos, Lukas; Matejovic, Martin; Stengl, Milan

    2017-05-01

    Depression of heart-rate variability (HRV) in conditions of systemic inflammation has been shown in both patients and experimental animal models and HRV has been suggested as an early indicator of sepsis. The sensitivity of HRV-derived parameters to the severity of sepsis, however, remains unclear. In this study we modified the clinically relevant porcine model of peritonitis-induced sepsis in order to avoid the development of organ failure and to test the sensitivity of HRV to such non-severe conditions. In 11 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated and instrumented domestic pigs of both sexes, sepsis was induced by fecal peritonitis. The dose of feces was adjusted and antibiotic therapy was administered to avoid multiorgan failure. Experimental subjects were screened for 40 h from the induction of sepsis. In all septic animals, sepsis with hyperdynamic circulation and increased plasma levels of inflammatory mediators developed within 12 h from the induction of peritonitis. The sepsis did not progress to multiorgan failure and there was no spontaneous death during the experiment despite a modest requirement for vasopressor therapy in most animals (9/11). A pronounced reduction of HRV and elevation of heart rate developed quickly (within 5 h, time constant of 1.97 ± 0.80 h for HRV parameter TINN) upon the induction of sepsis and were maintained throughout the experiment. The frequency domain analysis revealed a decrease in the high-frequency component. The reduction of HRV parameters and elevation of heart rate preceded sepsis-associated hemodynamic changes by several hours (time constant of 11.28 ± 2.07 h for systemic vascular resistance decline). A pronounced and fast reduction of HRV occurred in the setting of a moderate experimental porcine sepsis without organ failure. Inhibition of parasympathetic cardiac signaling probably represents the main mechanism of HRV reduction in sepsis. The sensitivity of HRV to systemic inflammation may allow

  8. Association between Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety with Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Jennifer L.; Weinstein, Ali A.; Krantz, David S.; Haigney, Mark C.; Stein, Phyllis K.; Stone, Peter H.; Gottdiener, John S.; Kop, Willem J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Depression and anxiety are associated with autonomic nervous system dysfunction, which may promote the risk of malignant cardiac arrhythmias. This study investigates whether depression and anxiety symptoms are associated with measures of autonomic nervous system dysfunction in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators who are at high risk of cardiac rhythm disturbances. Methods Patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) underwent ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring (n=44, mean age 62.1 ± 9.3 yrs). Depression was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory and anxiety using the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed using time (RMSSD, pNN50 and SDNN) and frequency domain measures derived from 24 hour R-R intervals. Multivariate models were adjusted for age, sex, hypertension, diabetes and smoking status. Results Defibrillator patients with elevated depression symptoms (n=12) had significantly lower RMSSD (15.25 ± 1.66 ms, vs. 24.97 ± 2.44, p = 0.002) and pNN50 (1.83 ± 0.77 vs. 5.61 ± 1.04, p = 0.006) than defibrillator patients with low depression symptoms (n=32). These associations remained significant after multivariate adjustment for covariates. ICD patients with high anxiety levels (n=10) displayed lower RMSSD (p = 0.013), which became marginally significant when adjusting for covariates (p = 0.069). Conclusion Depression and anxiety in defibrillator patients are associated with autonomic nervous system dysfunction indices of reduced parasympathetic control. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction may partially explain the association between depression and anxiety with life-threatening cardiac outcomes in vulnerable patients. PMID:19661191

  9. Depression in older people: visual impairment and subjective ratings of health.

    PubMed

    Hayman, Karen J; Kerse, Ngaire M; La Grow, Steven J; Wouldes, Trecia; Robertson, M Clare; Campbell, A John

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of depression in a sample of older adults with impaired vision and investigate associations between physical and visual disability and depression. We analyzed cross-sectional baseline data from 391 participants aged >or=75 years with visual acuity of 6/24 (20/80) or less, recruited for a randomized controlled trial of interventions to prevent falls (the VIP trial). Measures included the geriatric depression scale (GDS-15), the state-trait anxiety index, activities of daily living (Nottingham extended ADL scale), physical activity (human activity profile), an index of visual functioning (VF-14), health-related quality of life (SF-36), objective measures of physical ability, and a measure of visual acuity. Regression models were developed to investigate the association between depression scores and physical, psychological, and visual disability. About 29.4% (115 of 391) of participants were identified as potentially depressed (GDS-15 score >4). Physical function, physical activity, physical ability, visual function, anxiety, and self-reported physical and mental health were significantly worse for those with depressive symptomatology. Physical, visual, and psychological factors collectively explained 41% of the variance in the depression score in a linear regression model (R=0.421, adjusted R=0.410, F (7,382)=39.680, p<0.001). Depression was not related to age, gender, living situation, ethnicity, or number of prescription or antidepressant medications taken. Depression was common in this population of older adults with severe visual impairment. Impaired visual and physical functions were associated with symptoms of depression. The effect of visual disability was independent of the effect of physical disability. The strength of this relationship, and the results of the regression analyses, indicate that a person who is visually or physically disabled is more likely to suffer from depression.

  10. The 1631 eruption of Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolandi, G.; Barrella, A. M.; Borrelli, A.

    1993-11-01

    Contemporary accounts of the violent eruption of Vesuvius in 1631 are reviewed, and recorded events are correlated with resulting volcanic deposits. Field study of the deposits in the proximal area revealed the presence of tephra falls, pyroclastic flows and lava, with subordinate surge deposits. A total volume of 1.1 km 3 (0.55 km 3 DRE) of phono-tephritic to phonolitic magma was ejected during 24 hours. The different magma compositions correspond with a transition from a lower, white, aphyric, highly vesiculated pumice (layer 1) to an upper, gray, crystal-rich, poorly vesiculated pumice (layer 3), showing reverse grading. Isopach and isopleth maps of the tephra-falls have been constructed to determine changes in the eruptive style and temporal evolution of the eruption column which reached a maximum height of 16 to 28 km. The recorded column height variations show a change in the mass discharge rate (8.9 × 10 6 kg/s to 8.2 × 10 7 kg/s) and the occurrence of pyroclastic flows during the deposition of the weakly vesiculated, dense pumice of the upper part of layer 3. Pyroclastic flows are crystal-rich and show St. Vincent-type features. The explosive phase demolished the upper part of the pre-existing cone, and debris flows invaded the southern side of the volcano. In the afternoon of December 17, 1631 an outbreak of lava flow from a southern lateral fracture system occurred, and effusion of lava continued up to midnight of December 18. Intermittent steam blasts continued to the end of December, when the eruption ended and Mount Vesuvius entered a solfataric phase. The earthquakes that had marked both the pre-eruptive and eruptive phases, continued, however, well into March 1632.

  11. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression: The making of a "gold standard" and the unmaking of a chronic illness, 1960-1980.

    PubMed

    Worboys, Michael

    2013-09-01

    To show why and how the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression became the 'Gold Standard' for assessing therapies from the mid-1960s and how it was used to frame depression as a short-term and curable illness rather than a chronic one. My approach is that of the social construction of knowledge, identifying the interests, institutional contexts and practices that produce knowledge claims and then mapping the social processes of their circulation, validation and acceptance. The circulation and validation of Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression was relatively slow and it became a 'Gold Standard' 'from below', from an emerging consensus amongst psychiatrists undertaking clinical trials for depression, which from the 1960s were principally with psychopharmaceuticals for short-term illness. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, drug trials and the construction of depression as non-chronic were mutually constituted. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression framed depression and its sufferers in new ways, leading psychiatrists to understand illness as a treatable episode, rather than a life course condition. As such, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression served the interests of psychiatrists and psychiatry in its new era of drug therapy outside the mental hospital. However, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression was a strange kind of 'standard', being quite non-standard in the widely varying ways it was used and the meanings given to its findings.

  12. Chronic Depressive Symptomatology in Mild Cognitive Impairment Is Associated with Frontal Atrophy Rate which Hastens Conversion to Alzheimer Dementia.

    PubMed

    Sacuiu, Simona; Insel, Philip S; Mueller, Susanne; Tosun, Duygu; Mattsson, Niklas; Jack, Clifford R; DeCarli, Charles; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul S; Weiner, Michael W; Mackin, R Scott

    2016-02-01

    Investigate the association of chronic depressive symptomatology (chrDS) with cortical atrophy rates and conversion to Alzheimer dementia (AD) over 3 years in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In a multicenter, clinic-based study, MCI elderly participants were selected from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative repository, based on availability of both serial structural magnetic resonance imaging and chrDS endorsed on three depression-related items from the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire (chrDS N = 32 or no depressive symptoms N = 62) throughout follow-up. Clinical and laboratory investigations were performed every 6 months during the first 2 years and yearly thereafter (median follow-up: 3 years; interquartile range: 1.5-4.0 years). Cortical atrophy rates in 16 predefined frontotemporoparietal regions affected in major depression and AD and the rate of incident AD at follow-up. ChrDS in a single domain amnestic MCI sample were associated with accelerated cortical atrophy in the frontal lobe and anterior cingulate but not with atrophy rates in temporomedial or other AD-affected regions. During follow-up, 38 participants (42.7%) developed AD. Participants with chrDS had 60% shorter conversion time to AD than those without depressive symptoms. This association remained significant in survival models adjusted for temporomedial atrophy rates and showed the same trend in models adjusted for frontal cortical atrophy rate, which all increased the risk of AD. Our results suggest that chrDS associated with progressive atrophy of frontal regions may represent an additional risk factor for conversion to dementia in MCI as opposite to representing typical prodromal AD symptomatology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Effect of sertraline on the recovery rate of cardiac autonomic function in depressed patients after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, A; Kamath, M V; Fallen, E L; Malcolm, V; Cherian, F; Norman, G

    2001-10-01

    Brain serotonin is known to possess sympathoinhibitory properties. The aim of this clinical physiologic study was to determine whether sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, facilitates the rate of recovery of cardiac autonomic function after an acute myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with depression. Thirty-eight post-MI depressed patients were randomized to receive either sertraline 50 mg per day or placebo for 6 months. Depression was defined as a score >15 on the standardized Inventory to Diagnose Depression questionnaire taken at prehospital discharge and again within 2 weeks of the acute infarct. Eleven stable post-MI nondepressed patients served as a nonrandomized reference group during follow-up. Twenty-seven patients completed the randomization. All 3 groups were followed up closely in a multidisciplinary post-MI clinic where they underwent serial testing for both time and frequency domain heart rate variability (HRV) indices at baseline (1-2 weeks after MI) and at 6, 10, 14, 18, and 22 weeks. The rate of recovery of HRV was determined by use of a growth curve model based on repeated-measures analysis of variance. There was a linear rate of increase in the SD of 24-hour N-N intervals (SDNN) in the sertraline-treated group that paralleled that of the nondepressed reference group. This contrasted with a modest but significant decline in SDNN in the placebo group from 2 to 22 weeks (t = 2.10, P <.05). However, the short-term power spectral indices, while trending toward a more rapid rate of recovery in the treated group, did not reach statistical significance compared with the placebo group. In depressed patients who have survived the acute phase of an MI sertraline facilitates the rate of recovery of SDNN, a recognized predictor of clinical outcome.

  14. The 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Southern Chile: a tectonically controlled eruption?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, L. E.; Pallister, J. S.; Ewert, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    The May, 2008 - present eruption at Chaitén caldera is the only example of a geophysically monitored rhyolite eruption. Geologic and seismic monitoring was conducted by the Chilean Servicio Nacional de Geología y Minería (SERNAGEOMIN) with assistance from the Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP, a joint program of USGS and OFDA). In addition, global remote sensing assets were focused on the eruption and provide extensive data on the eruptive plume and ash cloud. An initial analysis of seismic and observational monitoring and remote sensing data lead us to suggest that the Chaitén eruption was tectonically controlled, as described below. The Chaitén eruption began abruptly with Plinian ash columns (May 2-8), and then transitioned into lava dome effusion accompanied by continuous low-level ash plumes. Heights and durations of the Plinian phase of the eruption initially suggested magmatic volumes of up to as much as 1 km3, ranking this as a large VEI 4 or possibly a small VEI 5 eruption. However, reports of relatively modest thicknesses of downwind tephra indicate a smaller explosivity, probably in the moderate VEI 4 range. Extrusion of the lava dome continues at a high rate as of this time (mid-September, 2008). We estimate a lava volume of >0.3 km3 and eruption rates that have frequently exceeded 20 m3s-1, anomalously high rates for a sustained lava dome eruption. Little detailed on-site study of the proximal deposits of the eruption has been possible because of continued hazards from the eruption and austral winter weather conditions. However, several inferences about the nature of the eruption are evident. The apparent lack of historic eruptions, absence of a hydrothermal system, rapid onset of the eruption, crystal-poor rhyolite composition, lack of decompression reaction rims on amphibole crystals, and relatively high magmatic temperatures (about 860°C, as reported elsewhere in this session) all argue for rapid ascent of magma from depth. The

  15. The relationships of current suicidal ideation with inflammatory markers and heart rate variability in unmedicated patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chuan-Chia; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Kao, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chin-Bin; Chang, Hsin-An

    2017-08-31

    Studies investigating inflammatory status and autonomic functioning simultaneously in depressed patients with current suicidal ideation (SI) are lacking. We recruited 58 unmedicated depressed patients with current SI but without lifetime history of suicidal behavior, as well as 61 equally depressed patients without lifetime history of SI or suicidal behavior. We measured serum cortisol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and autonomic functioning evaluated by frequency-domain measures of heart rate variability (HRV). The intensity of current SI was rated with the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale. Chronic psychological stress was assessed using the Chinese version of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Patients with current SI showed higher hs-CRP and ESR but lower variance (total HRV), low frequency (LF), and high frequency (HF) HRV than those without lifetime history of SI. We found no differences in cortisol levels and PSS scores. The intensity of current SI was negatively correlated with variance, LF, and HF but positively correlated with hs-CRP. Our results help improve the understanding of the relationships among current SI, inflammation, and autonomic functioning in depressed patients. The combined use of inflammatory markers and HRV indices may one day be applied in predicting and monitoring patients' suicide risk. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. The Impact of Maternal Depressive Symptomatology on Ratings of Children with ADHD and Child Confederates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, B. L.; Pelham Jr., W. E.; Lang, A. R.; Jacob, R. G.; Blumenthal, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    Some researchers who have studied children with behavior problems have suggested that depressed mothers distort reports of deviance in their children, perhaps contributing to misdiagnoses; however, investigations studying mothers with current or past depression have not clearly indicated such a bias. Because some of this equivocation may be due to…

  17. The Impact of Maternal Depressive Symptomatology on Ratings of Children with ADHD and Child Confederates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, B. L.; Pelham Jr., W. E.; Lang, A. R.; Jacob, R. G.; Blumenthal, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    Some researchers who have studied children with behavior problems have suggested that depressed mothers distort reports of deviance in their children, perhaps contributing to misdiagnoses; however, investigations studying mothers with current or past depression have not clearly indicated such a bias. Because some of this equivocation may be due to…

  18. Rasch Rating Scale Modeling of the Korean Version of the Beck Depression Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Sehee; Wong, Eunice C.

    2005-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is one of the most frequently used instruments in the study of depression both within and outside of the United States. Though developed primarily with European American clinical populations, the BDI has been applied in nonclinical and non-Western samples. To determine whether such a practice is warranted, the…

  19. Depressive Symptoms Among Heavy Cigarette Smokers: The Influence of Daily Rate, Gender, and Race

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Cigarette smokers experience higher levels of depressive symptoms and are more likely to be diagnosed with depressive disorders than nonsmokers. To date, the nature of the smoking–depression relationship has not been adequately studied among heavy smokers, a group at elevated risk for poor health outcomes. In this study, we examined depressive symptom expression among heavy smokers while considering the moderating roles of smoking status, gender, and race. We also explored whether amount of tobacco usually consumed had an impact. Methods: We extracted data from a large, highly nicotine-dependent, nontreatment cigarette smoking study sample (N = 6,158). Participants who consented were screened for major exclusions, and they completed questionnaires. Results: Smokers reported a higher, clinically meaningful level of depressive symptoms relative to nonsmokers (27.3% of smokers vs. 12.5% of nonsmokers) scored above the clinical cutoff on the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale (p < .001), which differed among race × gender subgroups. Further, amount of daily intake was inversely associated with self-report of depressive symptoms. For every 10-cigarette increment, the likelihood of scoring above the CES-D clinical cutoff decreased by 62% (p < .0001). Conclusions: These findings improve our understanding of tobacco’s influence on depressive symptom expression among heavy smokers, with implications for tailoring evidence-based tobacco treatments. PMID:23569006

  20. Depression during pregnancy: rates, risks and consequences--Motherisk Update 2008.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Sheila M

    2009-01-01

    Affective illness is common in women, and the puerperium is a time of particular vulnerability. Gender differences in the expression of affective disorders have been attributed to the impact of hormonal influence, socialization, and genetics. Dramatic fluctuations in gonadal hormones that occur following childbirth, influences the increased incidence of mood disorders during this time. Numerous tools including the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale can be used to screen for depression during pregnancy and postpartum. While screening tools may assist with appropriately identifying women who should be further assessed, their use alone does not significantly increase treatment seeking in women, even when their providers are notified about risk. Many studies demonstrate that only a small number (18%) of women who meet criteria for major depressive disorder seek treatment during pregnancy and postpartum. Additionally, common symptoms of depression (sleep, energy and appetite change) may be misinterpreted as normative experiences of pregnancy.Treatment engagement is important as untreated depression during pregnancy may have unfavorable outcomes for both women and children. Complications of pregnancy associated with depression include: inadequate weight gain,under utilization of prenatal care, increased substance use, and premature birth. Human studies demonstrate that perceived life-event stress, as well as depression and anxiety predicted lower birth weight, decreased Apgar scores, and smaller head circumference, and small for gestational age babies. Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common clinical disorder occurring in 15% of deliveries,making it one of the most frequent conditions to complicate pregnancy. Risk factors include past personal or family history of depression, sing marital status, poor health functioning, lower SES, and alcohol use. Women who have a prior history of postpartum depression, particularly with features of bipolarity or psychosis may be at

  1. Refugee, asylum seeker, immigrant women and postnatal depression: rates and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Collins, Catherine H; Zimmerman, Cathy; Howard, Louise M

    2011-02-01

    Postnatal depression (PND) is recognised as a common maternal health problem, but little evidence examines PND among refugee, asylum seeker and immigrant women in developed country settings. This review aimed to identify the rates of PND and highlight common risk factors among this group of women. An iterative and dynamic literature search was conducted across ten databases to identify published articles on PND among immigrant, asylum-seeking and refugee women in developed country settings. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and 'free text' search terms, as well as thesaurus terms, acronyms and truncation were used where appropriate. Findings suggest that PND may affect up to 42% of migrant women, compared to around 10-15% of native-born women. Common risk factors for PND among migrant women include history of stressful life events, lack of social support and cultural factors. With a growing number of babies born to immigrant mothers, greater awareness of PND among this group is needed in order to respond to their particular maternal mental health needs. Maternity care providers should regard all recent immigrants as at high risk of PND and give closer observation and support as necessary.

  2. Clinical and non-clinical depression and anxiety in young people: A scoping review on heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Paniccia, Melissa; Paniccia, David; Thomas, Scott; Taha, Tim; Reed, Nick

    2017-08-26

    Heart rate variability (HRV), a measure of cardiac autonomic nervous system functioning, has emerged as a physiological indicator for emotional regulation and psychological well-being. HRV is understudied in the context of depression and anxiety in young people (10-24years old). Main objectives: (1) describe the nature and breadth of reviewed studies; and (2) synthesize main findings in the context of clinical and non-clinical populations of young people with depression and/or anxiety. The Arksey and O'Malley methodology was utilized for this scoping review. CINHAL, EMBASE, Medline, PsychInfo, Scopus, Web of Science, as well as grey literature, were searched. Two reviewers screened titles, abstracts and full papers for inclusion. A total of 20 citations were included in the final review (19 citations peer-reviewed journal articles, 1 journal abstract). Numerical and thematic analysis was used to summarize study findings. In clinical populations of either depression or anxiety, HRV was lower compared to controls. In non-clinical populations of either depression or anxiety, HRV was found to be lower in those who reported more depression or anxiety symptoms. The quality of the reviewed articles was not assessed which limits the ability to generate conclusions regarding study findings. Changes in HRV were found across the spectrum of clinical and non-clinical populations of young people with depression or anxiety. Neurophysiological research on depression and anxiety in young people can act as a first step to understanding how physiological flexibility (i.e. HRV) is related to psychological flexibility (i.e. adaptive or maladaptive responses to life events). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Rate and Predictors of Persistent Major Depressive Disorder in a Nationally Representative Sample.

    PubMed

    Walker, Elizabeth Reisinger; Druss, Benjamin G

    2015-08-01

    This study examined predictors of persistent major depressive disorder over 10 years, focusing on the effects of clinical variables, physical health, and social support. Data from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States in 1995-1996 and 2004-2006 were analyzed. Logistic regression was used to predict non-recovery from major depression among individuals who met clinical-based criteria for major depressive disorder at baseline. Fifteen percent of the total sample was classified as having major depression in 1995-1996; of these individuals, 37 % had major depression in 2004-2006. Baseline variables that were significantly associated with persistent major depression at follow-up were being female, having never married, having two or more chronic medical conditions, experiencing activity limitation, and less contact with family. Therefore, treatment strategies focused on physical health, social support, and mental health needs are necessary to comprehensively address the factors that contribute to persistent major depressive disorder.

  4. Relationship between eruption plume heights and seismic source amplitudes of eruption tremors and explosion events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, A.; Kumagai, H.

    2016-12-01

    It is crucial to analyze and interpret eruption tremors and explosion events for estimating eruption size and understanding eruption phenomena. Kumagai et al. (EPS, 2015) estimated the seismic source amplitudes (As) and cumulative source amplitudes (Is) for eruption tremors and explosion events at Tungurahua, Ecuador, by the amplitude source location (ASL) method based on the assumption of isotropic S-wave radiation in a high-frequency band (5-10 Hz). They found scaling relations between As and Is for eruption tremors and explosion events. However, the universality of these relations is yet to be verified, and the physical meanings of As and Is are not clear. In this study, we analyzed the relations between As and Is for eruption tremors and explosion events at active volcanoes in Japan, and estimated As and Is by the ASL method. We obtained power-law relations between As and Is, in which the powers were different between eruption tremors and explosion events. These relations were consistent with the scaling relations at Tungurahua volcano. Then, we compared As with maximum eruption plume heights (H) during eruption tremors analyzed in this study, and found that H was proportional to 0.21 power of As. This relation is similar to the plume height model based on the physical process of plume rise, which indicates that H is proportional to 0.25 power of volumetric flow rate for plinian eruptions. This suggests that As may correspond to volumetric flow rate. If we assume a seismic source with volume changes and far-field S-wave, As is proportional to the source volume rate. This proportional relation and the plume height model give rise to the relation that H is proportional to 0.25 power of As. These results suggest that we may be able to estimate plume heights in realtime by estimating As during eruptions from seismic observations.

  5. Mt. Spurr's 1992 eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1993-01-01

    On 27 June, 1992, the Crater Peak vent on the south side of Mt. Spurr awoke from 39 years of dormancy and burst into sub-plinian eruption after 10 months of elevated seismicity. Two more eruptions followed in August and September. The volcano lies 125 km west of Anchorage, Alaska's largest city and an important international hub for air travel. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was able to warn communities and the aviation industry well in advance of these eruptions.

  6. Heart rate variability in major depressive disorder and after antidepressant treatment with agomelatine and paroxetine: Findings from the Taiwan Study of Depression and Anxiety (TAISDA).

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ta-Chuan; Kao, Lien-Cheng; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Kuo, Terry B J; Huang, San-Yuan; Chang, Chuan-Chia; Chang, Hsin-An

    2016-01-04

    Evidence from previous studies suggests that heart rate variability (HRV) is reduced in major depressive disorder (MDD). However, whether this reduction is attributable to the disorder per se or to medication, since antidepressants may also affect HRV, is still debated. There is a dearth of information regarding the effects of agomelatine, a novel antidepressant, on HRV. Here, we investigated whether HRV is reduced in MDD and compared the effects of agomelatine and paroxetine on HRV. We recruited 618 physically healthy unmedicated patients with MDD and 506 healthy volunteers aged 20-65 years. Frequency-domain measures of resting HRV were obtained at the time of enrollment for all participants. For patients with MDD, these measures were obtained again after 6 weeks of either agomelatine or paroxetine monotherapy. Compared with healthy subjects, unmedicated patients with MDD exhibited significantly lower variance (total HRV), low frequency (LF), and high frequency (HF) HRV, and a higher LF/HF ratio. Depression severity independently contributed to decreased HRV and vagal tone. Fifty-six patients completed the open-label trial (n=29 for agomelatine, n=27 for paroxetine). Between-group analyses showed a significant group-by-time interaction for LF-HRV and HF-HRV, driven by increases in LF-HRV and HF-HRV only after agomelatine treatment. Within the paroxetine-treated group, there were no significant changes in mean R-R intervals or any HRV indices. We therefore concluded that MDD is associated with reduced HRV, which is inversely related to depression severity. Compared with paroxetine, agomelatine has a more vagotonic effect, suggesting greater cardiovascular safety. Clinicians should consider HRV effects while selecting antidepressants especially for depressed patients who already have decreased cardiac vagal tone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Magma transfer at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) before the 1538 AD eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vito, Mauro A.; Acocella, Valerio; Aiello, Giuseppe; Barra, Diana; Battaglia, Maurizio; Carandente, Antonio; Del Gaudio, Carlo; de Vita, Sandro; Ricciardi, Giovanni; Rico, Ciro; Scandone, Roberto; Terrasi, Filippo

    2017-04-01

    Defining and understanding the shallow transfer of magma at volcanoes is crucial to forecast eruptions, possibly the ultimate goal of volcanology. This is particularly challenging at felsic calderas experiencing unrest, which typically includes significant changes in seismicity, deformation and degassing rates. Caldera unrest is particularly frequent, affects wide areas and often does not culminate in an eruption. Moreover its evidence is usually complicated by the presence of a hydrothermal system. As a result, forecasting any eruption and vent-opening sites within a caldera is very difficult. The Campi Flegrei caldera (CFc), in the densely inhabited area of Naples (Italy), is commonly considered one of the most dangerous active volcanic systems. CFc is a 12 km wide depression hosting two nested calderas formed during the eruptions of the Campanian Ignimbrite ( 39 ka) and the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff ( 15 ka). In the last 5 ka, resurgence, with uplift >60 m close to the central part of the caldera, was accompanied by volcanism between 4.8 and 3.8 ka. After 3 ka of quiescence, increasing seismicity and uplift preceded the last eruption at Monte Nuovo in 1538 for several decades. The most recent activity culminated in four unrest episodes between 1950-1952, 1969-1972, 1982-1984 and 2005-Present, with a cumulative uplift at Pozzuoli of 4.5 m; the present unrest episode has been interpreted as being magma-driven. These unrest episodes are considered the most evident expression of a longer-term (centuries or more) restless activity. The post-1980 deformation largely results from a magmatic oblate or sill-like source at 4 km depth below Pozzuoli. Despite the restless activity of CFc, the recent unrest episodes did not culminate in eruption, so that any possibility to define the pre-eruptive shallow transfer of magma remains elusive. Indeed, this definition is a crucial step in order to identify and understand pre-eruptive processes, and thus to make any forecast. To fill

  8. Eruptive viscosity and volcano morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posin, Seth B.; Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    Terrestrial central volcanoes formed predominantly from lava flows were classified as shields, stratovolcanoes, and domes. Shield volcanoes tend to be large in areal extent, have convex slopes, and are characterized by their resemblance to inverted hellenic war shields. Stratovolcanoes have concave slopes, whereas domes are smaller and have gentle convex slopes near the vent that increase near the perimeter. In addition to these differences in morphology, several other variations were observed. The most important is composition: shield volcanoes tend to be basaltic, stratovolcanoes tend to be andesitic, and domes tend to be dacitic. However, important exceptions include Fuji, Pico, Mayon, Izalco, and Fuego which have stratovolcano morphologies but are composed of basaltic lavas. Similarly, Ribkwo is a Kenyan shield volcano composed of trachyte and Suswa and Kilombe are shields composed of phonolite. These exceptions indicate that eruptive conditions, rather than composition, may be the primary factors that determine volcano morphology. The objective of this study is to determine the relationships, if any, between eruptive conditions (viscosity, erupted volume, and effusion rate) and effusive volcano morphology. Moreover, it is the goal of this study to incorporate these relationships into a model to predict the eruptive conditions of extraterrestrial (Martian) volcanoes based on their morphology.

  9. Self-Rated Mental Health: Screening for Depression and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Women Exposed to Perinatal Intimate Partner Violence.

    PubMed

    Kastello, Jennifer C; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Gaffney, Kathleen F; Kodadek, Marie P; Bullock, Linda C; Sharps, Phyllis W

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the validity of a single-item, self-rated mental health (SRMH) measure in the identification of women at risk for depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Baseline data of 239 low-income women participating in an intimate partner violence (IPV) intervention study were analyzed. PTSD was measured with the Davidson Trauma Scale. Risk for depression was determined using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. SRMH was assessed with a single item asking participants to rate their mental health at the time of the baseline interview. Single-item measures can be an efficient way to increase the proportion of patients screened for mental health disorders. Although SRMH is not a strong indicator of PTSD, it may be useful in identifying pregnant women who are at increased risk for depression and need further comprehensive assessment in the clinical setting. Future research examining the use of SRMH among high-risk populations is needed. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Short-term venlafaxine v. lithium monotherapy for bipolar type II major depressive episodes: effectiveness and mood conversion rate.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, Jay D; Lorenzo-Luaces, Lorenzo; Soeller, Irene; Li, Susan Qing; Mao, Jun J; DeRubeis, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Controversy exists over antidepressant use in bipolar II depression. To compare the safety and effectiveness of antidepressantv.mood stabiliser monotherapy for bipolar type II major depressive episodes. Randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, 12-week comparison of venlafaxine (n= 65)v.lithium (n= 64) monotherapy in adult out-patients (trial registration numberNCT00602537). Primary outcome - venlafaxine produced a greater response rate (67.7%)v lithium (34.4%,P<0.001). Secondary outcomes - venlafaxine produced a greater remission rate (58.5%v 28.1%,P<0.001); greater decline in depression symptom scores over time (β = -5.32, s.e. = 1.16, χ(2)= 21.19,P<0.001); greater reduction in global severity scores over time (β = -1.05, s.e. = 0.22, w(2)= 22.33,P<0.001); and greater improvement in global change scores (β = -1.31, s.e. = 0.32, χ(2)= 16.95,P<0.001) relative to lithium. No statistically significant or clinically meaningful differences in hypomanic symptoms were observed between treatments. These findings suggest that short-term venlafaxine monotherapy may provide effective antidepressant treatment for bipolar II depression without a statistically significant increase in hypomanic symptoms relative to lithium. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  11. Short-term venlafaxine v. lithium monotherapy for bipolar type II major depressive episodes: effectiveness and mood conversion rate

    PubMed Central

    Amsterdam, Jay D.; Lorenzo-Luaces, Lorenzo; Soeller, Irene; Li, Susan Qing; Mao, Jun J.; DeRubeis, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Controversy exists over antidepressant use in bipolar II depression. Aims To compare the safety and effectiveness of antidepressant v. mood stabiliser monotherapy for bipolar type II major depressive episodes. Method Randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, 12-week comparison of venlafaxine (n = 65) v. lithium (n = 64) monotherapy in adult out-patients (trial registration number NCT00602537). Results Primary outcome – venlafaxine produced a greater response rate (67.7%) v. lithium (34.4%, P<0.001). Secondary outcomes – venlafaxine produced a greater remission rate (58.5% v. 28.1%, P<0.001); greater decline in depression symptom scores over time (β = −5.32, s.e. = 1.16, χ2 = 21.19, P<0.001); greater reduction in global severity scores over time (β = −1.05, s.e. = 0.22, w2 = 22.33, P<0.001); and greater improvement in global change scores (β = −1.31, s.e. = 0.32, χ2 = 16.95, P<0.001) relative to lithium. No statistically significant or clinically meaningful differences in hypomanic symptoms were observed between treatments. Conclusions These findings suggest that short-term venlafaxine monotherapy may provide effective antidepressant treatment for bipolar II depression without a statistically significant increase in hypomanic symptoms relative to lithium. PMID:26892848

  12. Empirical and analytical determination of eruptive parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonadonna, C.; Costa, A.; Connor, C.; Volentik, A.; Connor, L.

    2009-04-01

    The determination of eruptive parameters (e.g. plume height, erupted volume, mass discharge rate, duration, grainsize distribution) is crucial to the interpretation of the activity and therefore the hazard assessment of any given volcano. Characterization of tephra deposits allows for most eruptive parameters to be constrained, even though some parameters of recent eruptions can be more accurately derived from direct observations and satellite retrievals (e.g. plume height). In particular, the distribution of tephra thickness and mass per unit area around the volcano (isopach and isomass maps) is necessary for the estimate of erupted volume, whereas the distribution of the largest clasts (isopleth maps) is typically used for the estimate of column height and wind speed at the time of the eruption. Both isopach/isomass maps and isopleth maps can also be used for the determination of the eruptive vent location and the classification of the eruptive style. The mass eruption rate and the duration of the sustained phase can be calculated from a combination of these parameters. Indications on fragmentation mechanisms can also be inferred from the study of particle size. Eruptive parameters can be inferred by applying empirical, analytical and numerical models and through the inversion solutions of analytical models. These empirical and analytical models need to be thoroughly analyzed and the associated assumptions and limitations need to be investigated in order to assess the variability of resulting eruptive parameters. This is crucial not only because these eruptive parameters are used to characterize volcanic eruptions but also because they are used as input to numerical models and to construct potential activity scenarios for hazard assessment. In addition, tephra deposits cannot be uniquely characterized especially when associated with old eruptions and were affected by erosion and reworking. Here we apply different models to different eruptions, both recent and

  13. Dome forming eruptions: a global hazards database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogburn, S. E.; Loughlin, S.; Calder, E. S.; Ortiz, N.

    2009-12-01

    The analysis of global datasets of historical eruptions is a powerful tool for decision-making as well as for scientific discovery. Lava dome forming eruptions are common throughout the world, can extend for significant periods of time and have many associated hazards, thus providing a rich source of data to mine. A database on dome forming eruptions is under development with the view to aiding comparative studies, providing scientists with valuable data for analysis, and enabling advances in modeling of associated hazards. For new eruptive episodes in particular, and in the absence of monitoring data or a knowledge of a volcano’s eruptive history, global analysis can provide a method of understanding what might be expected based on similar eruptions in the past. Important scientific information has already been gleaned from disparate collections of dome-forming eruption hazard information, such as variation in the mobility of different types of pyroclastic flows, magma ascent and extrusion dynamics, and mechanisms of lava dome collapse. Further, modeling (both empirically-based and geophysically-based) of volcanic phenomena requires extensive data for development, calibration and validation. This study investigates the relationship between large explosive eruptions (VEI ≥ 4) and lava dome-growth from 1000 CE to present by development of a world-wide database of all relevant information, including dome growth duration, pauses between episodes of dome growth, and extrusion rates. Data sources include the database of volcanic activity maintained by the Smithsonian Institute (Global Volcanism Program) and all relevant published review papers, research papers and reports. For example, nearly all dome-forming eruptions have been associated with some level of explosive activity. Most explosions are vulcanian with eruption plumes reaching less than 15 km, and with a Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) <3. However large Plinian explosions with a VEI ≥ 4 can also occur

  14. Population prevalence of edentulism and its association with depression and self-rated health

    PubMed Central

    Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Koyanagi, Ai; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.; Haro, Josep Maria; Kassebaum, Nicholas J.; Chrepa, Vanessa; Kotsakis, Georgios A.

    2016-01-01

    Edentulism is associated with various adverse health outcomes but treatment options in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are limited. Data on its prevalence and its effect on mental health and overall-health is lacking, especially from LMICs. Self-reported data on complete edentulism obtained by standardized questionnaires on 201,953 adults aged ≥18 years from 50 countries which participated in the World Health Survey (WHS) 2002–2004 were analyzed. Age and sex-standarized edentulism prevalence ranged from 0.1% (95% CI = 0.0–0.3) (Myanmar) to 14.5% (95% CI = 13.1–15.9) (Zimbabwe), and 2.1% (95% CI = 1.5–3.0) (Ghana) to 32.3% (95% CI = 29.0–35.8) (Brazil) in the younger and older age groups respectively. Edentulism was significantly associated with depression (OR 1.57, 95% CI = 1.23–2.00) and poor self-rated health (OR 1.38, 95% CI = 1.03–1.83) in the younger group with no significant associations in the older age group. Our findings highlight the edentulism-related health loss in younger persons from LMICs. The relative burden of edentulism is likely to grow as populations age and live longer. Given its life-long nature and common risk factors with other NCDs, edentulism surveillance and prevention should be an integral part of the global agenda of NCD control. PMID:27853193

  15. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Depression, and Heart-Rate Variability among North Korean Defectors

    PubMed Central

    Song, Byoung-A; Yoo, So-Young; Kang, Hee-Young; Byeon, Seong-Hye; Shin, Sang-Ho; Hwang, Eun-Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among North Korean defectors and their level of suicidal ideation and the correlation between these and heart-rate variability (HRV) to explore the possibility of using HRV as an objective neurobiological index of signs of autonomic nervous system disorder. Methods A total of 32 North Korean defectors (nine men, 23 women) were selected as subjects, and their HRV was measured after they completed the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-PTSD (MMPI-PTSD) scale and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results 1) Low-frequency (LF)/high-frequency (HF) ratios in the HRV index and MMPI-PTSD scores were correlated (r=0.419, p<0.05), as were BDI item 9 (suicidal ideation) and MMPI-PTSD scores (r=0.600, p<0.01). 2) A regression analysis of LF/HF ratios and MMPI-PTSD scores revealed an R-value of 13.8% (Adj. R2=0.138, F=4.695, p=0.041), and a regression analysis of BDI item 9 and MMPI-PTSD scores showed an R-value of 32.8% (Adj. R2=0.328, F=11.234, p=0.003). In other words, the LF/HF ratio (β=0.419) and BDI item 9 (β=0.600) appear to be risk factors in predicting MMPI-PTSD scores. Conclusion The LF/HF ratio, a standard index of autonomic nervous system activity, can be used as an objective neurobiological index to analyze PTSD among North Korean defectors presenting with various mental and physical symptoms, and the approximate level of suicide -ideation can act as a predicting factor for PTSD. PMID:22216038

  16. Population prevalence of edentulism and its association with depression and self-rated health.

    PubMed

    Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Koyanagi, Ai; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Haro, Josep Maria; Kassebaum, Nicholas J; Chrepa, Vanessa; Kotsakis, Georgios A

    2016-11-17

    Edentulism is associated with various adverse health outcomes but treatment options in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are limited. Data on its prevalence and its effect on mental health and overall-health is lacking, especially from LMICs. Self-reported data on complete edentulism obtained by standardized questionnaires on 201,953 adults aged ≥18 years from 50 countries which participated in the World Health Survey (WHS) 2002-2004 were analyzed. Age and sex-standarized edentulism prevalence ranged from 0.1% (95% CI = 0.0-0.3) (Myanmar) to 14.5% (95% CI = 13.1-15.9) (Zimbabwe), and 2.1% (95% CI = 1.5-3.0) (Ghana) to 32.3% (95% CI = 29.0-35.8) (Brazil) in the younger and older age groups respectively. Edentulism was significantly associated with depression (OR 1.57, 95% CI = 1.23-2.00) and poor self-rated health (OR 1.38, 95% CI = 1.03-1.83) in the younger group with no significant associations in the older age group. Our findings highlight the edentulism-related health loss in younger persons from LMICs. The relative burden of edentulism is likely to grow as populations age and live longer. Given its life-long nature and common risk factors with other NCDs, edentulism surveillance and prevention should be an integral part of the global agenda of NCD control.

  17. Phreatomagmatic and water-influenced Strombolian eruptions of a small-volume parasitic cone complex on the southern ringplain of Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand: Facies architecture and eruption mechanisms of the Ohakune Volcanic Complex controlled by an unstable fissure eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kósik, S.; Németh, K.; Kereszturi, G.; Procter, J. N.; Zellmer, G. F.; Geshi, N.

    2016-11-01

    The Ohakune Volcanic Complex is a late Pleistocene tuff ring - scoria/spatter cone complex located south of Ruapehu volcano. This small-volume volcano consists of an outer E-W elongated compound tuff ring edifice, three inner scoria-spatter cones and further volcanic depressions, located on the Ohakune Fault. We quantified accurately the variations of the eruptive styles and processes through time by systematic sampling of key stratigraphic marker beds at proximal and distal locations, and the determination of grain size distribution, componentry, density and vesicularity. Using a Digital Terrain Model coupled with stratigraphic data, we also determined the spatial distribution and volume of each identified unit and individual edifices within the Ohakune Volcanic Complex. Activity began with a shallow phreatomagmatic phase characterized by an almost continuous generation of a low eruptive column, accompanied by wet pyroclastic density currents, together with the ejection of juvenile fragments and accidental lithics from the surrounding country rocks. Subsequent activity was dominated by a variety of Strombolian eruptions exhibiting differing intensities that were at times disrupted by phreatic blasts or phreatomagmatic explosions due to the interaction with external water and/or sudden changes in magma discharge rate. At least three major vent-shifting events occurred during the eruption, which is demonstrated by the truncation of the initial tuff ring and the infilling of the truncated area by several coarse grained surge units. Our study indicates that approx. 12 × 106 m3 DRE magma erupted within maximum 2.5 to 5 months through multiple vents. The erupted magma ascended from a depth of 16-18 km, and reached the surface within approximately 50 h. Alternating eruption styles, frequent vent-shifting and a variety of emplacement mechanisms inferred from the deposits of the Ohakune Volcanic Complex demonstrate the unpredictable nature of small-volume volcanism

  18. Relations between Concurrent Longitudinal Changes in Cognition, Depressive Symptoms, Self-Rated Health and Everyday Function in Normally Aging Octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ability to predict and prevent incipient functional decline in older adults may help prolong independence. Cognition is related to everyday function and easily administered, sensitive cognitive tests may help identify at-risk individuals. Factors like depressive symptoms and self-rated health are also associated with functional ability and may be as important as cognition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between concurrent longitudinal changes in cognition, depression, self-rated health and everyday function in a well-defined cohort of healthy 85 year olds that were followed-up at the age of 90 in the Elderly in Linköping Screening Assessment 85 study. Regression analyses were used to determine if cognitive decline as assessed by global (the Mini-Mental State Examination) and domain specific (the Cognitive Assessment Battery, CAB) cognitive tests predicted functional decline in the context of changes in depressive symptoms and self-rated health. Results showed deterioration in most variables and as many as 83% of these community-dwelling elders experienced functional difficulties at the age of 90. Slowing-down of processing speed as assessed by the Symbol Digits Modality Test (included in the CAB) accounted for 14% of the variance in functional decline. Worsening self-rated health accounted for an additional 6%, but no other variables reached significance. These results are discussed with an eye to possible preventive interventions that may prolong independence for the steadily growing number of normally aging old-old citizens. PMID:27551749

  19. ST/HR hysteresis: exercise and recovery phase ST depression/heart rate analysis of the exercise ECG.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, R

    1999-01-01

    ST segment depression/heart rate (ST/HR) hysteresis is a recently introduced novel computer method for integrating the exercise and recovery phase ST/HR analysis for improved detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). It is a continuous diagnostic variable that extracts the prevailing direction and average magnitude of the hysteresis in ST depression against HR during the first 3 consecutive minutes of postexercise recovery. This article reviews the development and evaluation of this new method in a clinical population of 347 patients referred for a routine bicycle exercise electrocardiographic (ECG) test at Tampere University Hospital, Finland. Of these patients, 127 had angiographically proven CAD, whereas 13 had no CAD according to angiography, 18 had no perfusion defect according to Tc-99m-sestamibi myocardial imaging and single photon emission computed tomography, and 189 were clinically normal with respect to cardiac diseases. For each patient, the values for ST/HR hysteresis, ST/HR index, end-exercise ST depression, and recovery ST depression were determined for each lead of the Mason-Likar modification of the standard 12-lead exercise ECG and maximum value from the lead system (aVL, aVR, and V1 excluded). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (ie, the discriminative capacity) of the ST/HR hysteresis was 89%, which was significantly larger than that of the end-exercise ST depression (76%, P < .0001), recovery ST depression (84%, P = .0063) or ST/HR index (83%, P = .0023), indicating the best diagnostic performance of the ST/HR hysteresis in detection of CAD regardless of the partition value selection. Furthermore, the superior diagnostic performance of the method was relatively insensitive to the ST segment measurement point or to the ECG lead selection. These results suggest that the ST/HR hysteresis improves the clinical utility of the exercise ECG test in detection of CAD.

  20. Efficacy and Mood Conversion Rate of Short-Term Fluoxetine Monotherapy of Bipolar II Major Depressive Episode

    PubMed Central

    Amsterdam, Jay D.; Shults, Justine

    2010-01-01

    Objective As part of a long-term, relapse-prevention study of anti-depressant versus mood stabilizer monotherapy of bipolar II major depressive episode, we prospectively examined the efficacy and mood conversion rate of initial fluoxetine monotherapy. We hypothesized that there would be a statistically significant reduction in depressive symptoms without a clinically meaningful increase in mood conversion symptoms. Methods Patients received open-label fluoxetine monotherapy 10 to 80 mg daily for up to 14 weeks. Primary outcome was change over time in Hamilton Depression Rating score, with secondary outcomes including the proportion of treatment responders and remitters, change over time in Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) score, and frequency of mood conversion episodes. Results One hundred forty-eight patients had at least 1 post-baseline measurement. Mean Hamilton Depression Rating score decreased by 9.0 points (P < 0.0005). There were 88 responder patients (59.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 51.1%–67.4%) (P < 0.0005) and 86 remitter patients (58.1%; 95% CI, 49.7%–66.2%) (P < 0.0005). Mean time to remission was 64.4 days (95% CI, 59.1–69.7 days). Six patients (4.1%; 95% CI, 1.5%–8.6%) (P < 0.0005) had hypomania, and 29 patients (19.6%; 95% CI, 13.5%–26.9%) (P < 0.0005) had subsyndromal hypomania, which did not result in treatment discontinuation. Six patients (4.1%; 95% CI, 1.5%–8.6%) had a YMRS score of 8 or greater (P < 0.0005), and 4 patients (2.7%; 95% CI, 0.7%–6.8%) (P < 0.0005) had a YMRS score of 12 or greater at any study visit. Conclusions Although design limitations constrain the interpretation of the current findings, fluoxetine monotherapy may be an effective short-term treatment of bipolar II major depressive episode with a relatively low rate of syndromal hypomanic episodes. PMID:20473068

  1. Generalized Eruptive Syringoma

    PubMed Central

    Avhad, Ganesh; Ghuge, Priyanka; Jerajani, HR

    2015-01-01

    Eruptive syringoma is a very rare variant of syringoma. It is a benign adnexal tumor of the intraepidermal portion of eccrine sweat ducts. Here we report a 32-year-old female presented with classical asymptomatic eruptive syringomas involving her face and extremities. PMID:25814740

  2. Can Tongue Acupuncture Enhance Body Acupuncture? First Results from Heart Rate Variability and Clinical Scores in Patients with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xian; Wang, Huan; Zhao, Zengkai; Tao, Jingqiao; Sheng, Zemin

    2014-01-01

    Tongue acupuncture (TA) is a method which is not used in western medicine and even in China it is applied very rarely in clinical practice. This study aimed at investigating whether additional TA can improve the efficacy of body acupuncture (BA) in patients with depression. Twenty patients with a mean age of ± SD of 42.9 ± 11.2 years were randomly divided into two groups (n = 10 patients each), one group receiving BA (Zusanli, Sanyinjiao, Neiguan, Shenting, Yintang, and Baihui) and the other receiving BA and TA (Liver, Heart, and Brain). The quantitative and qualitative outcome measures were heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), and different clinical scores. We found that in both groups all scores and HR improved significantly, whereas HRV increased partly significantly. It seems that TA can enhance acute and treatment effects of BA in patients with depression. The investigation of de qi sensation in TA needs further attention. PMID:24782907

  3. Increased rates of body dissatisfaction, depressive symptoms, and suicide attempts in Jamaican teens with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Bhatt-Poulose, Komal; James, Kenneth; Reid, Marvin; Harrison, Abigail; Asnani, Monika

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to examine the association of body image and weight perceptions with risk of depression and suicidal attempts in Jamaican adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD). Adolescents with SCD and a national sample of Jamaican adolescents completed a questionnaire examining body image, weight perceptions, and risk for depression. Perceived and desired body images were similar for both groups. Adolescents with SCD had higher levels of "negative body satisfaction" (43.9% vs. 33.9%; P = 0.03), risk for depression (28.7% vs. 19.3%; P = 0.01), and attempted suicide (12.4% vs. 6.6%; P = 0.02) than national sample. Risk of depression was higher in those who perceived themselves to be over or underweight, and lower in those with more friends and attending school. Females and those with body image dissatisfaction were more likely to have attempted suicide. Within the SCD adolescents, girls were at greater odds of having mental health issues. Jamaican adolescents with SCD have significantly higher rates of negative body satisfaction and depressive symptoms, and nearly twice the rate of attempted suicide, compared with their healthy peers. This underscores the need for healthcare professionals to better explore and discuss healthy weight, body satisfaction, and coping with the demands and uncertainties of having a chronic illness with Jamaican adolescents with SCD, even while promoting body acceptance and good self-esteem. Screening for mood disorders is strongly recommended and gender-specific interventions should be developed. Healthcare professionals need to encourage positive social interactions that improve adolescents' mental health. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Initiation of Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    We consider processes occurring just prior to and at the start of the onset of flare- and CME-producing solar eruptions. Our recent work uses observations of filament motions around the time of eruption onset as a proxy for the evolution of the fields involved in the eruption. Frequently the filaments show a slow rise prior to fast eruption, indicative of a slow expansion of the field that is about co explode. Work by us and others suggests that reconnection involving emerging or canceling flux results in a lengthening of fields restraining the filament-carrying field, and the consequent upward expansion of the field in and around the filament produces the filament's slow rise: that is, the reconnection weakens the magnetic "tethers" ("tether-weakening" reconnection), and results in the slow rise of the filament. It is still inconclusive, however, what mechanism is responsible for the switch from the slow rise to the fast eruption.

  5. Rates of depression and participation in senior centre activities in community-dwelling older persons.

    PubMed

    Fulbright, S A

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role that senior citizen centres play in decreasing depression in community-dwelling older persons. A quantitative cross-sectional design was utilized. A questionnaire was used to determine demographic and lifestyle data. The dependent variable, depression symptoms, was measured using the 15-point Geriatric Depression Scale. Eighty-eight per cent stated that they attend for the friends and social support. Second, the study demonstrated that community-dwelling older persons can have those needs fulfilled at the senior centres. Ninety-four per cent of them have made close friends at their centres. Ninety-four per cent stated that their lives had improved since attending the senior centre. Eighty-six per cent felt they had made friends on whom they could rely when needed.

  6. Mafic Plinian eruptions: Is fast ascent required?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szramek, Lindsay Ann

    2016-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that for a Plinian eruption of mafic magma to occur, that magma must ascend rapidly from the chamber to cause it to fragment into a jet containing juvenile and nonjuvenile tephra. To determine how fast mafic Plinian magmas need to travel to the level of fragmentation, a number of decompression experiments were carried out on two hydrous mafic magmas, and the results are compared to the products of two well-documented mafic Plinian eruptions: the basaltic andesite Fontana eruption of Masaya (Nicaragua) and the hawaiite 122 B.C. eruption of Etna (Italy). Comparison of natural and experimental textures shows that the Fontana eruption can be replicated in the lab at decompression rates between 0.1 MPa s-1 and 0.2 MPa s-1. This decompression rate is faster than any previously determined experimentally rate for more silicic eruptions. The hawaiite was unable to be reproduced in the lab. The natural groundmass is highly crystalline, which would have raised the viscosity of the initial melt by 1-2 orders of magnitude, which may not be enough to cause fragmentation.

  7. An Experimental Investigation of Ice-melting and heat transfer rates from submerged warm water jets upward impinging into ice-blocks as analogous for water-filled cavities formed during subglacial eruptions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidnia, Hamidreza; Gudmundsson, Magnus Tumi

    2016-11-01

    Rates of energy transfer in water-filled cavities formed under glaciers by geothermal and volcanic activity are investigated by conducting experiments in which hot water jets (10°- 90°C) impinging into an ice block for jet Reynolds numbers in turbulent regime of 10000 -70000. It is found that heat flux is linearly dependent on jet flow temperature. Water jet melts a cavity into an ice block. Cavities had steep to vertical sides with a doming roof. Some of ice blocks used had trapped air bubbles. In these cases that melting of the ice could have led to trapping of air at the top of cavity, partially insulating the roof from hot water jet. The overall heat transfer rate in cavity formation varied with jet temperature from <100 kW m-2 to 900 kW m-2 while melting rates in the vertical direction yield heat transfer rates of 200-1200 kW m-2. Experimental heat transfer rates can be compared to data on subglacial melting observed for ice cauldrons in Iceland. For lowest temperatures the numbers are comparable to those for geothermal water in cool, subglacial water bodies and above subglacial flowpaths of jökulhlaups. Highest experimental rates for 80-90°C jets are 3-10 times less than inferred from observations of recent subglacial eruptions (2000-4000 kW m-2) . This can indicate that single phase liquid water convection alone may not be sufficient to explain the rates seen in recent subglacial eruptions, suggesting that forced 2 or 3 phase convection can be common.

  8. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, A.

    2012-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of these aerosol clouds produce responses in the climate system. Observations and numerical models of the climate system show that volcanic eruptions produce global cooling and were the dominant natural cause of climate change for the past millennium, on timescales from annual to century. Major tropical eruptions produce winter warming of Northern Hemisphere continents for one or two years, while high latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere weaken the Asian and African summer monsoon. The Toba supereruption 74,000 years ago caused very large climate changes, affecting human evolution. However, the effects did not last long enough to produce widespread glaciation. An episode of four large decadally-spaced eruptions at the end of the 13th century C.E. started the Little Ice Age. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade had a small effect on global temperature trends. The June 13, 2011 Nabro eruption in Eritrea produced the largest stratospheric aerosol cloud since Pinatubo, and the most of the sulfur entered the stratosphere not by direct injection, but by slow lofting in the Asian summer monsoon circulation. Volcanic eruptions warn us that while stratospheric geoengineering could cool the surface, reducing ice melt and sea level rise, producing pretty sunsets, and increasing the CO2 sink, it could also reduce summer monsoon precipitation, destroy ozone, allowing more harmful UV at the surface, produce rapid warming when stopped, make the sky white, reduce solar power, perturb the ecology with more diffuse radiation, damage airplanes flying in the stratosphere, degrade astronomical observations, affect remote sensing, and affect

  9. Depression and Self-Rated Health Among Rural Women Who Experienced Adolescent Dating Abuse: A Mixed Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Burton, Candace W; Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie; Rehm, Roberta S; Rankin, Sally H; Humphreys, Janice C

    2016-03-01

    This study used mixed methods to examine the experiences and health of rural, young adult women (N = 100) who self-reported past experience of physical, emotional and verbal, sexual, and relational abuse in adolescent dating relationships. Few studies have examined the lasting health ramifications of adolescent dating abuse adolescent dating abuse in rural populations, and almost no mixed methods studies have explored adolescent dating abuse. Participants completed questionnaires on demographics, relationship behaviors, and mental health symptoms. A subsample (n = 10) of participants also completed semi-structured, in-depth interviews with the primary investigator. Results suggest that depressive symptoms and self-rating of health in these women are associated with particular kinds and severity of abusive experiences, and that adolescent dating abuse has ramifications for health and development beyond the duration of the original relationship. Self-rated health (SRH) was inversely associated with abusive behaviors in the relationship, whereas depressive symptoms were positively correlated with such behaviors. Self-rated health was also negatively correlated with depressive symptoms. The results of this study represent an important step toward establishing lifetime health risks posed by adolescent dating abuse. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. The influence of stress, depression, and anxiety on PSA screening rates in a nationally-representative sample

    PubMed Central

    Kotwal, Ashwin A.; Schumm, Phil; Mohile, Supriya G.; Dale, William

    2012-01-01

    Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing for prostate cancer (PCa) is controversial, with concerning rates of both over- and under-screening. The reasons for the observed rates of screening are unknown, and few studies have examined the relationship of psychological health to PSA screening rates. Understanding this relationship can help guide interventions to improve informed-decision making (IDM) for screening. Methods A nationally-representative sample of men 57–85 years old without PCa (N=1,169) from the National Social life, Health and Aging Project (NSHAP) was analyzed. The independent relationship of validated psychological health scales measuring stress, anxiety, and depression to PSA testing rates was assessed using multvariable logistic regression analyses. Results PSA screening rates were significantly lower for men with higher perceived stress (OR=0.76, p=0.006), but not for higher depressive symptoms (OR=0.89, p=0.22) when accounting for stress. Anxiety influences PSA screening through an interaction with number of doctor visits (p=0.02). Among the men who visited the doctor 1 time, those with higher anxiety were less likely to be screened (OR=0.65, p=0.04). Conversely, among those who visited the doctor 10+ times with higher anxiety were more likely to be screened (OR=1.71, p=0.04). Conclusions Perceived stress significantly lowers PSA screening likelihood, and it appears to partly mediate the negative relationship of depression with screening likelihood. Anxiety affects PSA screening rates differently for men with different numbers of doctor visits. Interventions to influence PSA screening rates should recognize the role of the patients’ psychological state to improve their likelihood of making informed decisions and improve screening appropriateness. PMID:22955835

  11. Heart rate variability is a trait marker of major depressive disorder: evidence from the sertraline vs. electric current therapy to treat depression clinical study.

    PubMed

    Brunoni, Andre Russowsky; Kemp, Andrew H; Dantas, Eduardo M; Goulart, Alessandra C; Nunes, Maria Angélica; Boggio, Paulo S; Mill, José Geraldo; Lotufo, Paulo A; Fregni, Felipe; Benseñor, Isabela M

    2013-10-01

    Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) is a cardiovascular predictor of mortality. Recent debate has focused on whether reductions in HRV in major depressive disorder (MDD) are a consequence of the disorder or a consequence of pharmacotherapy. Here we report on the impact of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a non-pharmacological intervention, vs. sertraline to further investigate this issue. The employed design was a double-blind, randomized, factorial, placebo-controlled trial. One hundred and eighteen moderate-to-severe, medication-free, low-cardiovascular risk depressed patients were recruited for this study and allocated to either active/sham tDCS (10 consecutive sessions plus two extra sessions every other week) or placebo/sertraline (50 mg/d) for 6 wk. Patients were age and gender-matched to healthy controls from a concurrent cohort study [the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)]. The impact of disorder, treatment and clinical response on HRV (root mean square of successive differences and high frequency) was examined. Our findings confirmed that patients displayed decreased HRV relative to controls. Furthermore, HRV scores did not change following treatment with either a non-pharmacological (tDCS) or pharmacological (sertraline) intervention, nor did HRV increase with clinical response to treatment. Based on these findings, we discuss whether reduced HRV is a trait-marker for MDD, which may predispose patients to a host of conditions and disease even after response to treatment. Our findings have important implications for our understanding of depression pathophysiology and the relationship between MDD, cardiovascular disorders and mortality.

  12. Associations between Physical Activity and Reduced Rates of Hopelessness, Depression, and Suicidal Behavior among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Pigg, R. Morgan; Miller, M. David; Dodd, Virginia J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors explored associations among types of physical activity and hopelessness, depression, and suicidal behavior among college students. Participants: Participants included 43,499 college students aged 18 to 25 who completed the 2005 National College Health Assessment conducted by the American College Health Association. Methods:…

  13. Depression among Alumni of Foster Care: Decreasing Rates through Improvement of Experiences in Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Catherine Roller; O'Brien, Kirk; Pecora, Peter J.; English, Diana; Williams, Jason R.; Phillips, Chereese M.

    2009-01-01

    The Northwest Foster Care Alumni Study examined the relation between experiences in foster care and depression among young adults who spent at least a year in foster care as adolescents. Results indicate that preparation for leaving foster care, nurturing supports from the foster family, school stability, access to tutoring, access to therapeutic…

  14. Depression among Alumni of Foster Care: Decreasing Rates through Improvement of Experiences in Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Catherine Roller; O'Brien, Kirk; Pecora, Peter J.; English, Diana; Williams, Jason R.; Phillips, Chereese M.

    2009-01-01

    The Northwest Foster Care Alumni Study examined the relation between experiences in foster care and depression among young adults who spent at least a year in foster care as adolescents. Results indicate that preparation for leaving foster care, nurturing supports from the foster family, school stability, access to tutoring, access to therapeutic…

  15. Associations between Physical Activity and Reduced Rates of Hopelessness, Depression, and Suicidal Behavior among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Pigg, R. Morgan; Miller, M. David; Dodd, Virginia J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors explored associations among types of physical activity and hopelessness, depression, and suicidal behavior among college students. Participants: Participants included 43,499 college students aged 18 to 25 who completed the 2005 National College Health Assessment conducted by the American College Health Association. Methods:…

  16. Thermal signature, eruption style, and eruption evolution at Pele and Pillan on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, A.G.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Williams, D.A.; Phillips, C.B.; McEwen, A.S.; Lopes, R.M.C.; Smythe, W.D.; Kamp, L.W.; Soderblom, L.A.; Carlson, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft has been periodically monitoring volcanic activity on Io since June 1996, making it possible to chart the evolution of individual eruptions. We present results of coanalysis of Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) and solid-state imaging (SSI) data of eruptions at Pele and Pillan, especially from a particularly illuminating data set consisting of mutually constraining, near-simultaneous NIMS and SSI observations obtained during orbit C9 in June 1997. The observed thermal signature from each hot spot, and the way in which the thermal signature changes with time, tightly constrains the possible styles of eruption. Pele and Pillan have very different eruption styles. From September 1996 through May 1999, Pele demonstrates an almost constant total thermal output, with thermal emission spectra indicative of a long-lived, active lava lake. The NIMS Pillan data exhibit the thermal signature of a "Pillanian" eruption style, a large, vigorous eruption with associated open channel, or sheet flows, producing an extensive flow field by orbit C10 in September 1997. The high mass eruption rate, high liquidus temperature (at least 1870 K) eruption at Pillan is the best candidate so far for an active ultramafic (magnesium-rich, "komatiitic") flow on Io, a style of eruption never before witnessed. The thermal output per unit area from Pillan is, however, consistent with the emplacement of large, open-channel flows. Magma temperature at Pele is ~1600 K. If the magma temperature is 1600 K, it suggests a komatiitic-basalt composition. The power output from Pele is indicative of a magma volumetric eruption rate of ~250 to 340 m3 s-1. Although the Pele lava lake is considerably larger than its terrestrial counterparts, the power and mass fluxes per unit area are similar to active terrestrial lava lakes. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. The association between relative deprivation and self-rated health, depressive symptoms, and smoking behavior in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chun-Tung; Chiang, Tung-liang

    2013-07-01

    Relative deprivation has been hypothesized as one explanation for the association between income inequality and health. However, few studies have examined the effect of relative deprivation on psychosocial and behavioral outcomes. Using a cross-sectional data from the National Survey on Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Health Promotion in Taiwan, this study examined the relationship between relative deprivation and physical health (self-rated health), psychosocial health (depressive symptoms), and behavioral health (smoking) among working-age Taiwanese men and women. We found that higher relative deprivation (measured by the Yitzhaki Index) is significantly associated with a higher prevalence of poor self-rated health, depressive symptoms, and current smoking in both genders. After controlling for demographic variables and absolute income, the prevalence ratios (PRs) of reporting poor health for each 10,000 NT-dollars higher in the Yitzhaki Index are between 1.25 and 1.57, depending on the reference groups. The PRs were between 1.33 and 1.77 for depressive symptoms, and between 1.04 and 1.46 for smoking. Additionally, the depressive symptoms attenuated the association between relative deprivation and self-rated health. The results were consistent with various definitions of reference groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that the psychosocial process of relative deprivation is a crucial mechanism linking income inequality to health. Narrowing the income gap between rich and poor may protect the physical and mental well-being of the population and reduce the prevalence of smoking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Chronic occupational exposures can influence the rate of PTSD and depressive disorders in first responders and military personnel.

    PubMed

    Walker, Anthony; McKune, Andrew; Ferguson, Sally; Pyne, David B; Rattray, Ben

    2016-01-01

    First responders and military personnel experience rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) far in excess of the general population. Although exposure to acute traumatic events plays a role in the genesis of these disorders, in this review, we present an argument that the occupational and environmental conditions where these workers operate are also likely contributors. First responders and military personnel face occupational exposures that have been associated with altered immune and inflammatory activity. In turn, these physiological responses are linked to altered moods and feelings of well-being which may provide priming conditions that compromise individual resilience, and increase the risk of PTSD and depression when subsequently exposed to acute traumatic events. These exposures include heat, smoke, and sleep restriction, and physical injury often alongside heavy physical exertion. Provided the stimulus is sufficient, these exposures have been linked to inflammatory activity and modification of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA), offering a mechanism for the high rates of PTSD and depressive disorders in these occupations. To test this hypothesis in the future, a case-control approach is suggested that compares individuals with PTSD or depressive disorders with healthy colleagues in a retrospective framework. This approach should characterise the relationships between altered immune and inflammatory activity and health outcomes. Wearable technology, surveys, and formal experimentation in the field will add useful data to these investigations. Inflammatory changes, linked with occupational exposures in first responders and military personnel, would highlight the need for a risk management approach to work places. Risk management strategies could focus on reducing exposure, ensuring recovery, and increasing resilience to these risk contributors to minimise the rates of PTSD and depressive disorders in vulnerable occupations.

  19. Beliefs of people taking antidepressants about causes of depression and reasons for increased prescribing rates.

    PubMed

    Read, John; Cartwright, Claire; Gibson, Kerry; Shiels, Christopher; Haslam, Nicholas

    2014-10-01

    Public beliefs about the causes of mental health problems are related to desire for distance and pessimism about recovery, and are therefore frequently studied. The beliefs of people receiving treatment are researched less often. An online survey on causal beliefs about depression and experiences with antidepressants was completed by 1829 New Zealand adults prescribed anti-depressants in the preceding five years, 97.4% of whom proceeded to take antidepressants. The most frequently endorsed of 17 causal beliefs were family stress, relationship problems, loss of loved one, financial problems, isolation, and abuse or neglect in childhood. Factor analysis produced three factors: 'bio-genetic', 'adulthood stress' and 'childhood adversity'. The most strongly endorsed explanations for increases in antidepressant prescribing invoked improved identification, reduced stigma and drug company marketing. The least strongly endorsed was 'Anti-depressants are the best treatment'. Regression analyses revealed that self-reported efficacy of the antidepressants was positively associated with bio-genetic causal beliefs, negatively associated with childhood adversity beliefs and unrelated to adulthood stress beliefs. The belief that 'People cannot׳ get better by themselves even if they try' was positively associated with bio-genetic beliefs. The convenience sample may have been biased towards a favourable view of bio-genetic explanations, since 83% reported that the medication reduced their depression. Clinicians׳ should consider exploring patients׳ causal beliefs. The public, even when taking antidepressants, continues to hold a multi-factorial causal model of depression with a primary emphasis on psycho-social causes. A three factor model of those beliefs may lead to more sophisticated understandings of relationships with stigma variables. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Lower third molar eruption following orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Salehi, P; Danaie, S Momene

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of extraction and preservation of the 1st premolar on lower 3rd molar eruption. Orthodontic clinic records from 1993 to 1995 were evaluated before and after treatment and 8-9 years after treatment for 3 groups of patients: 32 with extraction of 1st premolars in both jaws, 32 with no extraction but orthodontic treatment and 48 controls with no extraction but orthodontic treatment in the upper jaws only. Successful eruption of 3rd molars was evaluated. There was a significant difference in the rates of successful eruptions in the extraction (42%), non-extraction (12%) and control (20%) groups. The findings indicate that 1st premolar extraction may increase the chance of 3rd molar eruption, leading to a lower incidence of health and economic complications.

  1. Interacting filamentary eruptions in magnetised plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneberg, S. A.; Cowley, S. C.; Wilson, H. R.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between multiple filamentary plasma eruptions is investigated by modelling the non-linear ideal MHD ballooning mode envelope equation with a mixed Eulerian and Lagrangian characterisation of the boundary conditions. The study of multiple plasma filaments is performed in a specific slab equilibrium susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. If the unstable system is initiated with three equal sized filaments, they erupt at the same rate, independently of each other, even in the non-linear regime. However, if one is initiated very slightly larger than the other two it causes a down-draft as it erupts upwards, which suppresses the smaller filaments. This suggests that those filaments which first enter the non-linear regime will dominate the plasma eruption dynamics.

  2. Solar Prominence Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.

    1998-01-01

    The prominence that erupts in a prominence eruption is a magnetic structure in the chromosphere and corona. It is visible in chromospheric images by virtue of chromospheric-temperature plasma suspended in the magnetic field, and belongs to that large class of magnetic structures appropriately called filaments because of their characteristic sinewy sigmoidal form. Hence, the term "filament eruption" is used interchangeably with the term "prominence eruption". The magnetic field holding a filament is prone to undergo explosive changes in configuration. In these upheavals, because the filament material is compelled by its high conductivity to ride with the magnetic field that threads it, this material is a visible tracer of the field motion. The part of the magnetic explosion displayed by the entrained filament material is the phenomenon known as a filament eruption, the topic of this article. This article begins with a description of basic observed characteristics of filament eruptions, with attention to the magnetic fields, flares, and coronal mass ejections in which erupting filaments are embedded. The present understanding of these characteristics in terms of the form and action of the magnetic field is then laid out by means of a rudimentary three-dimensional model of the field. The article ends with basic questions that this picture leaves unresolved and with remarks on the observations needed to probe these questions.

  3. Heart rate variability and cordance in rapid eye movement sleep as biomarkers of depression and treatment response.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Marcel A; Gazea, Mary; Wollweber, Bastian; Dresler, Martin; Holsboer, Florian; Keck, Martin E; Steiger, Axel; Adamczyk, Marek; Mikoteit, Thorsten

    2017-09-01

    The relevance of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in affective disorders originates from its well-known abnormalities in depressed patients, who display disinhibition of REM sleep reflected by increased frequency of rapid eye movements (REM density). In this study we examined whether heart rate variability (HRV) and prefrontal theta cordance, both derived from REM sleep, could represent biomarkers of antidepressant treatment response. In an open-label, case-control design, thirty-three in-patients (21 females) with a depressive episode were treated with various antidepressants for four weeks. Response to treatment was defined as a ≥50% reduction of HAM-D score at the end of the fourth week. Sleep EEG was recorded after the first and the fourth week of medication. HRV was derived from 3-min artifact-free electrocardiogram segments during REM sleep. Cordance was computed for prefrontal EEG channels in the theta frequency band during tonic REM sleep. HRV during REM sleep was decreased in depressed patients at week four as compared to controls (high effect size; Cohen's d > 1), and showed a negative correlation with REM density in both, healthy subjects and patients at week four. Further, the fourteen responders had significantly higher prefrontal theta cordance as compared to the nineteen non-responders after the first week of antidepressant medication; in contrast, HRV at week one did not discriminate between responders and non-responders. Our data suggest that HRV in REM sleep categorizes healthy subjects and depressed patients, whereas REM sleep-derived prefrontal cordance may predict the response to antidepressant treatment in depressed patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mothers' and Fathers' Ratings of Family Relationship Quality: Associations with Preadolescent and Adolescent Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms in a Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queen, Alexander H.; Stewart, Lindsay M.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Pincus, Donna B.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the independent associations among three family relationship quality factors--cohesion, expressiveness, and conflict--with youth self-reported depressive and anxiety symptoms in a clinical sample of anxious and depressed youth. Ratings of family relationship quality were obtained through both mother and father report. The…

  5. Mothers' and Fathers' Ratings of Family Relationship Quality: Associations with Preadolescent and Adolescent Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms in a Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queen, Alexander H.; Stewart, Lindsay M.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Pincus, Donna B.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the independent associations among three family relationship quality factors--cohesion, expressiveness, and conflict--with youth self-reported depressive and anxiety symptoms in a clinical sample of anxious and depressed youth. Ratings of family relationship quality were obtained through both mother and father report. The…

  6. The Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Heart Rate Variability in Depressed Patients With Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Robert M.; Freedland, Kenneth E.; Stein, Phyllis K.; Steinmeyer, Brian C.; Harris, William S.; Rubin, Eugene H.; Krone, Ronald J.; Rich, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Low intake of omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) is associated with depression and with low heart rate variability (HRV), and all three are associated with an increased risk of death in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). The purpose of this study was to determine whether omega-3 FA increases the natural log of Very Low Frequency (lnVLF) power, an index of HRV, and reduces 24 hour heart rate (HR) in depressed patients with CHD. Methods Thirty-six depressed patients with CHD randomized to receive 50 mgs of sertraline and two grams of omega-3/day, and 36 randomized to sertraline and a placebo, had 24 hour HRV measured at baseline and following 10 weeks of treatment. Results There was a significant treatment X time interaction for covariate adjusted lnVLF (p=0.009), for mean 24 hour HR (p = 0.03), and for one minute resting HR (p = 0.02). The interaction was not significant for three other measures of HRV. LnVLF did not change over time in the omega-3 arm, but decreased in the placebo arm (p= 0.002), suggesting that omega-3 may have prevented or slowed deterioration in cardiac autonomic function. Conclusions The effects of omega-3 FAs on lnVLF and HR, although modest, were detected after only ten weeks of treatment with two grams per day of omega-3. Whether a longer course of treatment or a higher dose of omega-3 would further decrease HR, improve other indices of HRV, or reduce mortality in depressed CHD patients, should be investigated. PMID:20716712

  7. Depression and Suicidality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, C. V.

    1974-01-01

    Suicidality ratings for 90 patients in a voluntary psychiatric hospital ward are correlated with five possible indices of depression: self-ratings of depression, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Depression scale scores, depressive diagnosis, and alcohol and drug use. Both depression and suicidality emerges in the factor structure as…

  8. Eruption and degassing dynamics of the major August 2015 Piton de la Fournaise eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Muro, Andrea; Arellano, Santiago; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Bachelery, Patrick; Boudoire, Guillaume; Coppola, Diego; Ferrazzini, Valerie; Galle, Bo; Giudice, Gaetano; Gurioli, Lucia; Harris, Andy; Liuzzo, Marco; Metrich, Nicole; Moune, Severine; Peltier, Aline; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Vlastelic, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) shield volcano is one of the most active basaltic volcanoes in the World with one eruption every nine months, on average. This frequent volcanic activity is broadly bimodal, with frequent small volume, short lived eruptions (< 30 Mm3, most being < 10 Mm3) and less frequent relatively large (50-210 Mm3) and long lasting (months) eruptions. After the major caldera forming event of 2007, the volcano produced several short lived small volume summit to proximal eruptions of relatively evolved cotectic magmas and relatively long repose periods (up to 3.5 years between 2010 and 2014). The August 2015 eruption was the first large (45±15 Mm3) and long lasting (2 months) eruption since 2007 and the only event to be fully monitored by the new gas geochemical network of Piton de la Fournaise volcanological observatory (DOAS, MultiGaS, diffuse CO2 soil emissions). Regular lava and tephra sampling was also performed for geochemical and petrological analysis. The eruption was preceded by a significant increase in CO2 soil emissions at distal soil stations (ca. 15 km from the summit), with CO2 enrichment also being recorded at summit low temperature fumaroles. Eruptive products were spectacularly zoned, with plagioclase and pyroxene being abundant in the early erupted products and olivine being the main phase in the late-erupted lavas. Total gas emissions at the eruptive vent underwent a decrease during the first half of the eruption and then an increase, mirroring the time evolution of magma discharge rate (from 5-10 m3/s in September to 15-30 m3/s in late-October) and the progressive change in magma composition. In spite of significant evolution in magma and gas output, CO2/SO2 ratios in high temperature gases remained quite low (< 0.3) and with little temporal change. Geochemical data indicated that this relatively long-lived eruption corresponded to the progressive drainage of most of the shallow part of PdF plumbing system, triggered by a new

  9. Validation of the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale definition of response for adults with major depressive disorder using equipercentile linking to Clinical Global Impression scale ratings: analysis of Pharmacogenomic Research Network Antidepressant Medication Pharmacogenomic Study (PGRN-AMPS) data.

    PubMed

    Bobo, William V; Angleró, Gabriela C; Jenkins, Gregory; Hall-Flavin, Daniel K; Weinshilboum, Richard; Biernacka, Joanna M

    2016-05-01

    The study aimed to define thresholds of clinically significant change in 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) scores using the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) Scale as a gold standard. We conducted a secondary analysis of individual patient data from the Pharmacogenomic Research Network Antidepressant Medication Pharmacogenomic Study, an 8-week, single-arm clinical trial of citalopram or escitalopram treatment of adults with major depression. We used equipercentile linking to identify levels of absolute and percent change in HDRS-17 scores that equated with scores on the CGI-I at 4 and 8 weeks. Additional analyses equated changes in the HDRS-7 and Bech-6 scale scores with CGI-I scores. A CGI-I score of 2 (much improved) corresponded to an absolute decrease (improvement) in HDRS-17 total score of 11 points and a percent decrease of 50-57%, from baseline values. Similar results were observed for percent change in HDRS-7 and Bech-6 scores. Larger absolute (but not percent) decreases in HDRS-17 scores equated with CGI-I scores of 2 in persons with higher baseline depression severity. Our results support the consensus definition of response based on HDRS-17 scores (>50% decrease from baseline). A similar definition of response may apply to the HDRS-7 and Bech-6. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Dynamics of Lake Eruptions and Possible Ocean Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youxue; Kling, George W.

    2006-05-01

    Dissolved gas in liquid is able to power violent eruptions. Two kinds of such gas-driven eruptions are known in nature: explosive volcanic eruptions driven by dissolved H2O in magma at high temperatures and lake eruptions driven by dissolved CO2 in water at low temperatures. There are two known occurrences of lake eruptions, one in 1984 (Lake Monoun) and one in 1986 (Lake Nyos), both in Cameroon, Africa. The erupted CO2 gas asphyxiated 1700 people in the Lake Nyos eruption and 37 people at Lake Monoun. Here we review experimental simulations of CO2-driven water eruptions and dynamic models of such eruptions, and a bubble plume theory is applied to the dynamics of lake eruptions. Field evidence, experimental results, and theoretical models show that lake eruptions can be violent, and theoretical calculations are consistent with the high exit velocities and eruption columns inferred from observations. Furthermore, the dynamics of lake degassing experiments are consistent with theoretical models. Other kinds of gas-driven eruptions are possible and may have occurred in nature in the past. A concentrated and large release of methane gas or hydrate from marine sediment may result in an ocean eruption. Furthermore, injection of liquid CO2 into oceans might also lead to ocean eruptions if care is not taken. The various kinetic and dynamic processes involved are examined and quantified.

  11. A Subregion of the Parabrachial Nucleus Partially Mediates Respiratory Rate Depression from Intravenous Remifentanil in Young and Adult Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Miller, Justin R; Zuperku, Edward J; Stuth, Eckehard A E; Banerjee, Anjishnu; Hopp, Francis A; Stucke, Astrid G

    2017-09-01

    The efficacy of opioid administration to reduce postoperative pain is limited by respiratory depression. We investigated whether clinically relevant opioid concentrations altered the respiratory pattern in the parabrachial nucleus, a pontine region contributing to respiratory pattern generation, and compared these effects with a medullary respiratory site, the pre-Bötzinger complex. Studies were performed in 40 young and 55 adult artificially ventilated, decerebrate rabbits. We identified an area in the parabrachial nucleus where α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid microinjections elicited tachypnea. Two protocols were performed in separate sets of animals. First, bilateral microinjections of the μ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala, N-MePhe, Gly-ol]-enkephalin (100 μM) into the "tachypneic area" determined the effect of maximal μ-opioid receptor activation. Second, respiratory rate was decreased with continuous IV infusions of remifentanil. The opioid antagonist naloxone (1 mM) was then microinjected bilaterally into the "tachypneic area" of the parabrachial nucleus to determine whether the respiratory rate depression could be locally reversed. Average respiratory rate was 27 ± 10 breaths/min. First, [D-Ala, N-MePhe, Gly-ol]-enkephalin injections decreased respiratory rate by 62 ± 20% in young and 45 ± 26% in adult rabbits (both P < 0.001). Second, during IV remifentanil infusion, bilateral naloxone injections into the "tachypneic area" of the parabrachial nucleus reversed respiratory rate depression from 55 ± 9% to 20 ± 14% in young and from 46 ± 20% to 18 ± 27% in adult rabbits (both P < 0.001). The effects of bilateral [D-Ala, N-MePhe, Gly-ol]-enkephalin injection and IV remifentanil on respiratory phase duration in the "tachypneic area" of the parabrachial nucleus was significantly different from the pre-Bötzinger complex. The "tachypneic area" of the parabrachial nucleus is highly sensitive to

  12. Volcano Monitoring and Eruption Response in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, S.; Morita, Y.

    2010-12-01

    magma storage, shape of conduit, etc) obtained through the results from the previous national project and the usage of the precise data set, for example, with bore-hole type and near-crater seismometers. The variety in the eruption style is controlled by the magma supply or intrusion rate and related degassing efficiency. We do not understand exactly what controls the magma supply/intrusion rate. In several volcanoes monitored densely, nearly steady-state magma ascent and eruption will be able to be simulated based on some substantial models. However, the sudden change in the magma supply/intrusion rate, which may trigger the abnormal event such as the Miyakejima eruption in 2000, cannot be modeled. The important issues of the next decade in the volcanological point of view may include an understanding of the mechanisms controlling the magma supply/intrusion rate.

  13. The influence of effusion rate and rheology on lava flow dynamics and morphology: A case study from the 1971 and 1988-1990 eruptions at Villarrica and Lonquimay volcanoes, Southern Andes of Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castruccio, Angelo; Contreras, María Angélica

    2016-11-01

    We analyzed two historical lava flows from the Southern Andes of Chile: The lava flows from the 1971 Villarrica volcano eruption and the 1988-1990 Lonquimay volcano eruption. The 1971 lava flow has a volume of 2.3 × 107 m3, a maximum length of 16.5 km and was emplaced in two days, with maximum effusion rates of 800 m3/s. The lava has a mean width of 150 m and thicknesses that decrease from 10 to 12 m at 5 km from the vent to 5-8 m at the flow front. The morphology is mainly 'a'ā. The 1988-1990 lava flow has a volume of 2.3 × 108 m3, a maximum length of 10.2 km and was emplaced in 330 days, with peak effusion rates of 80 m3/s. The flow has a mean width of 600 m and thicknesses that increase from 10 to 15 m near the vent to > 50 m at the front. The morphology varies from 'a'ā in proximal sectors to blocky in the rest of the flow. We modelled the advance rate and thickness of these flows assuming two possible dynamical regimes: An internal rheology regime modelled as a Herschel-Bulkley (HB) fluid and a Yield Strength in the Crust (YSC) regime. We compared our results with the widely used Newtonian and Bingham rheologies. Our results indicate that the 1971 flow can be modelled either by the HB, Bingham or Newtonian rheologies using a single temperature, while the 1988-1990 flow was controlled by the YSC regime. Our analysis and comparison of models shows that care should be taken when modelling a lava flow, as different rheologies and assumptions can reach the same results in terms of advance rate and flow thickness. These examples suggest that the crustal strength should be taken into account in any model of lava flow advance.

  14. Snake Filament Eruption

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A very long solar filament that had been snaking around the Sun erupted on Dec. 6, 2010 with a flourish. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) caught the action in dramatic detail in extreme ultr...

  15. Triple Solar Eruption

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Solar activity surged on the morning of Dec 12, 2010 when the sun erupted three times in quick succession, hurling a trio of bright coronal mass ejections (CMEs) into space. Coronagraphs onboard th...

  16. The effect of inbreeding rate on fitness, inbreeding depression and heterosis over a range of inbreeding coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Pekkala, Nina; Knott, K Emily; Kotiaho, Janne S; Nissinen, Kari; Puurtinen, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of inbreeding and genetic drift within populations and hybridization between genetically differentiated populations is important for many basic and applied questions in ecology and evolutionary biology. The magnitudes and even the directions of these effects can be influenced by various factors, especially by the current and historical population size (i.e. inbreeding rate). Using Drosophila littoralis as a model species, we studied the effect of inbreeding rate over a range of inbreeding levels on (i) mean fitness of a population (relative to that of an outbred control population), (ii) within-population inbreeding depression (reduction in fitness of offspring from inbred versus random mating within a population) and (iii) heterosis (increase in fitness of offspring from interpopulation versus within-population random mating). Inbreeding rate was manipulated by using three population sizes (2, 10 and 40), and fitness was measured as offspring survival and fecundity. Fast inbreeding (smaller effective population size) resulted in greater reduction in population mean fitness than slow inbreeding, when populations were compared over similar inbreeding coefficients. Correspondingly, populations with faster inbreeding expressed more heterosis upon interpopulation hybridization. Inbreeding depression within the populations did not have a clear relationship with either the rate or the level of inbreeding. PMID:25553071

  17. An erupted complex odontoma.

    PubMed

    Tozoglu, Sinan; Yildirim, Umran; Buyukkurt, M Cemil

    2010-01-01

    Odontomas are benign tumors of odontogenic origin. The cause of the odontoma is unknown, but it is believed to be hereditary or due to a disturbance in tooth development triggered by trauma or infection. Odontomas may be either compound or complex. Although these tumors are seen frequently, erupted odontomas are rare. The purpose of this study is to present a rare case of complex odontoma that erupted into the oral cavity.

  18. Erupting Volcano Mount Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An Expedition Two crewmember aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

  19. Erupting Volcano Mount Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An Expedition Two crewmember aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

  20. A Nanolite Record of Eruption Style Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujin, M.; Nakamura, M.

    2014-12-01

    Microlites in pyroclasts have been intensively studied to understand magma ascent processes. However, microlites do not record the explosive-effusive transitions in sub-Plinian eruptions when such transitions are governed by the shallow level degassing rather than by the magma ascent rate. To overcome this limitation, we studied the "nanolites" in the quenched products of the 2011 Shinmoedake, Kirishima Volcanic Group, Kyusyu Japan1. Nanolites are the nanometer-scale components of the groundmass minerals and exhibit a steeper slope of crystal size distribution than that of the microlites2. In the 2011 Shinmoedake eruption, the style of activity had undergone transformations from sub-Plinian eruption to Vulcanian explosion and intermittent effusion of lava3. We found that, although the products formed by different eruptive activities have similar microlite characteristics, such products can be distinguished clearly by their mineral assemblage of nanolites. The samples of pumices of sub-Plinian eruptions and Vulcanian explosions and the dense juvenile fragments of lava (in descending order of explosivity) contained, respectively, nanolites of low-Ca pyroxene, low-Ca pyroxene + plagioclase, and low-Ca pyroxene + plagioclase + Fe-Ti oxides. Nanolites are assumed to crystallize when undercooling of the magma due primarily to dehydration increases rapidly near the surface. The water contents of the interstitial glass indicate that the quenched depths did not differ greatly between eruption styles. Hence, the different nanolite assemblages of each eruption style are assumed to have resulted from differences in magma residence time near the surface. Thus, we propose that nanolites in pyroclasts have the potential to indicate the physicochemical conditions of magma at the transition points of eruption styles. References 1) Mujin and Nakamura, 2014, Geology, v.42, p.611-614 2) Sharp et al., 1996, Bull. Volcanol, v.57, p.631-640 3) Miyabuchi et al, 2013, J. Volcanol

  1. Exercise interventions for smokers with a history of alcoholism: exercise adherence rates and effect of depression on adherence.

    PubMed

    Patten, Christi A; Vickers, Kristin S; Martin, John E; Williams, Carl D

    2003-06-01

    This study examined the adherence rates and the effect of depression on adherence in two studies conducted among smokers with a past history of alcoholism. In both studies, subjects participated in a 12-session group-based exercise intervention for smoking cessation. The target quit date (TQD) was Session 8. Participants in Study 1 were 73 smokers (43% female). Exercise instructions began at Session 8 and continued through Session 12. Mean frequency and number of minutes of exercise decreased during the 4 weeks of exercise treatment (P<.001). Study 2, conducted with 18 smokers (50% female), examined the feasibility of commencing exercise at Session 1, well before the TQD. The mean number of minutes exercised increased from Sessions 1 to 12 (P=.013). In both studies, average session attendance was high (82%). Combining subjects from both studies, depressed smokers at baseline reported greater mean frequency of exercise per week than nondepressed smokers (P=.05). The results suggest that depressed smokers can be engaged in an exercise program. Further research is needed to determine if commencing exercise early during treatment, prior to the TQD, improves adherence.

  2. Deformation associated with the 1997 eruption of Okmok volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mann, Dorte; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Lu, Zhiming

    2002-01-01

    Okmok volcano, located on Umnak Island in the Aleutian chain, Alaska, is the most eruptive caldera system in North America in historic time. Its most recent eruption occurred in 1997. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry shows deflation of the caldera center of up to 140 cm during this time, preceded and followed by inflation of smaller magnitude. The main part of the observed deformation can be modeled using a pressure point source model. The inferred source is located between 2.5 and 5.0 km beneath the approximate center of the caldera and ???5 km from the eruptive vent. We interpret it as a central magma reservoir. The preeruptive period features inflation accompanied by shallow localized subsidence between the caldera center and the vent. We hypothesize that this is caused by hydrothermal activity or that magma moved away from the central chamber and toward the later vent. Since all historic eruptions at Okmok have originated from the same cone, this feature may be a precursor that indicates an upcoming eruption. The erupted magma volume is ???9 times the volume that can be accounted for by the observed preeruptive inflation. This indicates a much longer inflation interval than we were able to observe. The observation that reinflation started shortly after the eruption suggests that inflation spans the whole time interval between eruptions. Extrapolation of the average subsurface volume change rate is in good agreement with the long-term eruption frequency and eruption volumes of Okmok.

  3. Syn- and post-eruptive erosion, gully formation, and morphological evolution of a tephra ring in tropical climate erupted in 1913 in West Ambrym, Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane J.

    2007-04-01

    Syn- and post-eruptive erosion of volcanic cones plays an important role in mass redistribution of tephra over short periods. Descriptions of the early stages of erosion of tephra from monogenetic volcanic cones are rare, particularly those with a well-constrained timing of events. In spite of this lack of data, cone morphologies and erosion features are commonly used for long-term erosion-rate calculations and relative age determinations in volcanic fields. This paper offers new observations which suggest differing constraints on the timing of erosion of a tephra ring may be operating than those conventionally cited. In 1913 a tephra ring was formed as part of an eruption in west Ambrym Island, Vanuatu and is now exposed along a continuous 2.5 km long coastal section. The ring surrounds an oval shaped depression filled by water. It is composed of a succession of a phreatomagmatic fall and base-surge beds, interbedded with thin scoriaceous lapilli units. Toward the outer edges of the ring, base-surge beds are gradually replaced in the succession by fine ash-dominated debris flows and hyperconcentrated flow deposits. The inter-fingering of phreatomagmatic deposits with syn-volcanic reworked volcaniclastic sediments indicates that an ongoing remobilisation of freshly deposited tephra was already occurring during the eruption. Gullies cut into the un-weathered tephra are up to 4 m deep and commonly have c. 1 m of debris flow deposit fill in their bases. There is no indication of weathering, vegetation fragments or soil development between the gully bases and the basal debris flow fills. Gully walls are steep and superficial fans of collapsed sediment are common. Most gullies are heavily vegetated although some active (ephemeral) channels occur. These observations suggest that the majority of the erosion of such tephra rings in tropical climates takes place directly during eruption and possibly for only a period of days to weeks afterward. After establishment of the

  4. Rating the raters: assessing the quality of Hamilton rating scale for depression clinical interviews in two industry-sponsored clinical drug trials.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Nina; Feiger, Alan D; Cogger, Kenneth O; Sikich, Dawn; DeBrota, David J; Lipsitz, Joshua D; Kobak, Kenneth A; Evans, Kenneth R; Potter, William Z

    2006-02-01

    The quality of clinical interviews conducted in industry-sponsored clinical drug trials is an important but frequently overlooked variable that may influence the outcome of a study. We evaluated the quality of Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) clinical interviews performed at baseline in 2 similar multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled depression trials sponsored by 2 pharmaceutical companies. A total of 104 audiotaped HAM-D clinical interviews were evaluated by a blinded expert reviewer for interview quality using the Rater Applied Performance Scale (RAPS). The RAPS assesses adherence to a structured interview guide, clarification of and follow-up to patient responses, neutrality, rapport, and adequacy of information obtained. HAM-D interviews were brief and cursory and the quality of interviews was below what would be expected in a clinical drug trial. Thirty-nine percent of the interviews were conducted in 10 minutes or less, and most interviews were rated fair or unsatisfactory on most RAPS dimensions. Results from our small sample illustrate that the clinical interview skills of raters who administered the HAM-D were below what many would consider acceptable. Evaluation and training of clinical interview skills should be considered as part of a rater training program.

  5. Mental Health QUERI Initiative: expert ratings of criteria to assess performance for major depressive disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Owen, Richard R; Cannon, Dale; Thrush, Carol R

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine mental health care experts' opinions about performance measures and associated data elements that could serve as the basis of an information system for monitoring the implementation of clinical practice guidelines for major depressive disorder (MDD) and schizophrenia in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Nineteen mental health care experts rated the meaningfulness and validity of performance measures and automated data elements. For MDD, experts rated the following measures as very meaningful and valid: (a) the results of depression screening, (b) the occurrence and results of diagnostic assessment for MDD, (c) the provision of antidepressant medication or psychotherapy, and (d) whether antidepressant medications were prescribed within the therapeutic dose range recommended by practice guidelines. For schizophrenia, expert reviewers rated therapeutic doses of antipsychotic medication and assessment for antipsychotic medication side effects as being very meaningful and valid. Performance measures that evaluate clinically significant aspects of care using specific, valid data elements are the most meaningful. Translation efforts by the VHA's Mental Health Quality Enhancement Research Initiative program include additional studies of the validity of some of the proposed data elements and the development of national clinical reminders for performance measures judged to be meaningful.

  6. Self-Reported and Interviewer-Rated Oral Health in Patients With Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Tang, Li-Rong; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Hui; Ma, Xin; Chiu, Helen F K; Correll, Christoph U; Ungvari, Gabor S; Xiang, Ying-Qiang; Lai, Kelly Y C; Cao, Xiao-Lan; Li, Yan; Zhong, Bao-Liang; Lok, Ka In; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-01-01

    To compare self-reported (SR) and interviewer-rated (IR) oral health between schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BP), and major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. 356 patients with SZ, BP, or MDD underwent assessments of psychopathology, side effects, SR, and IR oral health status. 118 patients (33.1%) reported poor oral health; the corresponding proportion was 36.4% in BP, 34.8% in SZ, and 25.5% in MD (p = .21). SR and IR oral health correlated only modestly (r = 0.17-0.36) in each group. Psychiatric patients need to be assessed for both SR and IR oral health. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effect of Cognitive Therapy With Antidepressant Medications vs Antidepressants Alone on the Rate of Recovery in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hollon, Steven D.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Fawcett, Jan; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Shelton, Richard C.; Zajecka, John; Young, Paula R.; Gallop, Robert

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Antidepressant medication (ADM) is efficacious in the treatment of depression, but not all patients achieve remission and fewer still achieve recovery with ADM alone. OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of combining cognitive therapy (CT) with ADM vs ADM alone on remission and recovery in major depressive disorder (MDD). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A total of 452 adult outpatients with chronic or recurrent MDD participated in a trial conducted in research clinics at 3 university medical centers in the United States. The patients were randomly assigned to ADM treatment alone or CT combined with ADM treatment. Treatment was continued for up to 42 months until recovery was achieved. INTERVENTIONS Antidepressant medication with or without CT. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Blind evaluations of recovery with a modified version of the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. RESULTS Combined treatment enhanced the rate of recovery vs treatment with ADM alone (72.6% vs 62.5%; t451 = 2.45; P = .01; hazard ratio [HR], 1.33; 95% CI, 1.06–1.68; number needed to treat [NNT], 10; 95% CI, 5–72). This effect was conditioned on interactions with severity (t451 = 1.97; P = .05; NNT, 5) and chronicity (χ2 = 7.46; P = .02; NNT, 6) such that the advantage for combined treatment was limited to patients with severe, nonchronic MDD (81.3% vs 51.7%; n = 146; t145 = 3.96; P = .001; HR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.54–3.57; NNT, 3; 95% CI, 2–5). Fewer patients dropped out of combined treatment vs ADM treatment alone (18.9% vs 26.8%; t451 = −2.04; P = .04; HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.45–0.98). Remission rates did not differ significantly either as a main effect of treatment or as an interaction with severity or chronicity. Patients with comorbid Axis II disorders took longer to recover than did patients without comorbid Axis II disorders regardless of the condition (P = .01). Patients who received combined treatment reported fewer

  8. How do Durkheimian variables impact variation in national suicide rates when proxies for depression and alcoholism are controlled?

    PubMed

    Fernquist, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    Sociological research on Durkheim's theories of egoistic and anomic suicide has given Durkheim continued support more than a century after Durkheim published his work. Recent criticism by Breault (1994), though, argues that Durkheim's theories of suicide actually have not been empirically supported given the lack of psychological variables included in sociological research on suicide rates. Using proxy measures of depression and alcoholism, two known psychological variables to impact suicide, as well as classic Durkheimian variables, suicide rates in eight European countries from 1973-1997 were examined. Results indicate that Durkheim's theories of egoism and anomie, while not completely supported in statistical analysis of suicide rates, received moderate support. Results suggest the continued usefulness of Durkheim's work in aggregate analyses of suicide.

  9. Seismogenic lavas and explosive eruption forecasting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Y; Meredith, P G; Dingwell, D B; Hess, K-U; Wassermann, J; Cordonnier, B; Gerik, A; Kruhl, J H

    2008-05-22

    Volcanic dome-building episodes commonly exhibit acceleration in both effusive discharge rate and seismicity before explosive eruptions. This should enable the application of material failure forecasting methods to eruption forecasting. To date, such methods have been based exclusively on the seismicity of the country rock. It is clear, however, that the rheology and deformation rate of the lava ultimately dictate eruption style. The highly crystalline lavas involved in these eruptions are pseudoplastic fluids that exhibit a strong component of shear thinning as their deformation accelerates across the ductile to brittle transition. Thus, understanding the nature of the ductile-brittle transition in dome lavas may well hold the key to an accurate description of dome growth and stability. Here we present the results of rheological experiments with continuous microseismic monitoring, which reveal that dome lavas are seismogenic and that the character of the seismicity changes markedly across the ductile-brittle transition until complete brittle failure occurs at high strain rates. We conclude that magma seismicity, combined with failure forecasting methods, could potentially be applied successfully to dome-building eruptions for volcanic forecasting.

  10. Thin slice ratings of client characteristics in intake assessments: predicting symptom change and dropout in cognitive therapy for depression.

    PubMed

    Sasso, Katherine E; Strunk, Daniel R

    2013-08-01

    Thin slice ratings of personality have been shown to predict a number of outcomes, but have yet to be examined in the context of psychotherapy. In a sample of 66 clients participating in cognitive therapy for depression, we examined the predictive utility of thin slice rated pre-treatment client traits. On the basis of short video clip excerpts (i.e., thin slices) of intake assessments, trained observers rated clients on personality characteristics and specific personality disorder (PD) traits. Clients' therapy interest and neuroticism predicted lower odds of dropout. Ratings of extraversion predicted greater symptom change across treatment; ratings of clients' Avoidant and Schizoid PD traits predicted less marked symptom improvement. Ratings of agreeableness and likeability also predicted greater symptom change, but these relations were only significant in one of two analytic approaches used. Evidence for the predictive validity of thin slice ratings was generally stronger than that observed for self-reported PD traits and PD status. Moreover, these self-report and diagnostic assessments failed to account for the thin slice-outcome relations identified. Findings support the clinical utility of quick, thin slice impressions of clients, as these ratings could be used to identify clients with a high risk of dropout or poor treatment outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Explosive Volcanic Eruptions from Linear Vents on Earth, Venus and Mars: Comparisons with Circular Vent Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Wimert, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    Conditions required to support buoyant convective plumes are investigated for explosive volcanic eruptions from circular and linear vents on Earth, Venus, and Mars. Vent geometry (linear versus circular) plays a significant role in the ability of an explosive eruption to sustain a buoyant plume. On Earth, linear and circular vent eruptions are both capable of driving buoyant plumes to equivalent maximum rise heights, however, linear vent plumes are more sensitive to vent size. For analogous mass eruption rates, linear vent plumes surpass circular vent plumes in entrainment efficiency approximately when L(sub o) > 3r(sub o) owing to the larger entrainment area relative to the control volume. Relative to circular vents, linear vents on Venus favor column collapse and the formation of pyroclastic flows because the range of conditions required to establish and sustain buoyancy is narrow. When buoyancy can be sustained, however, maximum plume heights exceed those from circular vents. For current atmospheric conditions on Mars, linear vent eruptions are capable of injecting volcanic material slightly higher than analogous circular vent eruptions. However, both geometries are more likely to produce pyroclastic fountains, as opposed to convective plumes, owing to the low density atmosphere. Due to the atmospheric density profile and water content on Earth, explosive eruptions enjoy favorable conditions for producing sustained buoyant columns, while pyroclastic flows would be relatively more prevalent on Venus and Mars. These results have implications for the injection and dispersal of particulates into the planetary atmosphere and the ability to interpret the geologic record of planetary volcanism.

  12. Hydrological Disturbances Caused By Explosive Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, J. J.; Pierson, T. C.; Spicer, K. R.; Mark, L.; Yamakoshi, T.; Suwa, H.

    2014-12-01

    Explosive eruptions can drastically alter hydrogeomorphic regimes of drainage basins. The extent and degree of eruption-induced alteration scale with eruption magnitude, volcanic process, and basin proximity to a volcano. The most important effects of explosive eruptions on basin hydrology are ones that alter production and routing of runoff: (a) vegetation damage, which decreases (or eliminates) interception and evapotranspiration (ET); (b) reduction of surface infiltration owing to tephra deposition, which increases overland flow; (c) alteration of stream-channel hydraulics, which enables efficient transport of water and sediment; and (d) alterations to drainage networks, which accelerate or delay geomorphic response. In combination, these effects alter flood magnitude and frequency and rates of sediment transport. Vegetation loss allows more water to fall directly to the ground surface and reduces ET, which affects soil moisture, water storage and runoff pathways. Tephra fall, which typically paves the landscape with nearly impervious sediment, can reduce infiltration by as much as 2 orders of magnitude compared to pre-eruption rates and can increase direct runoff from near zero to as much as 90%. Even very thin layers (2-5 mm) of extremely fine tephra can increase runoff and decrease lag times between peak rainfall and peak runoff. Volcanic sedimentation in river valleys can increase channel gradient, reduce planform resistance, and smooth channel hydraulics, allowing for more efficient flow routing and producing larger, flashier flows. Hydrological effects of eruptive disturbance can linger for decades, but the most extreme effects typically last but a few years. However, lake formation through tributary blockage by thick deposits can delay response and extend the hydrologic legacy of eruptive disturbances. Failures of lake-impounding dams can produce large floods that renew downstream channel instability and rejuvenate headwater erosion.

  13. Submarine Silicic Explosive Eruptions: what can submarine pyroclasts tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, R.; Allen, S.; McPhie, J.; Fiske, R. S.; Tani, K.

    2014-12-01

    Our understanding of submarine volcanism is in its infancy with respect to subaerial eruption processes. Two fundamental differences between eruptions in seawater compared to those on land are that (1) eruptions occur at higher confining pressures, and (2) in a seawater medium, which has a higher heat capacity, density and viscosity than air. Together with JAMSTEC collaborators we have a sample suite of submarine pumice deposits from modern volcanoes of known eruption depths. This sample suite spans a spectrum of eruption intensities, from 1) powerful explosive caldera-forming (Myojin Knoll caldera); to 2) weakly explosive cone building (pre-caldera Myojin Knoll pumice and Kurose-Nishi pumice); to 3) volatile-driven effusive dome spalling (Sumisu knoll A); to 4) passive dome effusion (Sumisu knoll B and C). This sample suite has exceptional potential, not simply because the samples have been taken from well-constrained, sources but because they have similar high silica contents, are unaltered and their phenocrysts contain melt inclusions. Microtextural quantitative analysis has revealed that (i) clast vesicularities remain high (69-90 vol.%) regardless of confining pressure, mass eruption rate or eruption style , (ii) vesicle number densities scale with inferred eruption rate, and (iii) darcian and inertial permeabilities of submarine effusive and explosive pyroclasts overlap with explosively-erupted subaerial pyroclasts.

  14. Failed magmatic eruptions: Late-stage cessation of magma ascent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Newhall, C.; Roman, D.C.

    2011-01-01

    When a volcano becomes restless, a primary question is whether the unrest will lead to an eruption. Here we recognize four possible outcomes of a magmatic intrusion: "deep intrusion", "shallow intrusion", "sluggish/viscous magmatic eruption", and "rapid, often explosive magmatic eruption". We define "failed eruptions" as instances in which magma reaches but does not pass the "shallow intrusion" stage, i. e., when magma gets close to, but does not reach, the surface. Competing factors act to promote or hinder the eventual eruption of a magma intrusion. Fresh intrusion from depth, high magma gas content, rapid ascent rates that leave little time for enroute degassing, opening of pathways, and sudden decompression near the surface all act to promote eruption, whereas decreased magma supply from depth, slow ascent, significant enroute degassing and associated increases in viscosity, and impingement on structural barriers all act to hinder eruption. All of these factors interact in complex ways with variable results, but often cause magma to stall at some depth before reaching the surface. Although certain precursory phenomena, such as rapidly escalating seismic swarms or rates of degassing or deformation, are good indicators that an eruption is likely, such phenomena have also been observed in association with intrusions that have ultimately failed to erupt. A perpetual difficulty with quantifying the probability of eruption is a lack of data, particularly on instances of failed eruptions. This difficulty is being addressed in part through the WOVOdat database. Papers in this volume will be an additional resource for scientists grappling with the issue of whether or not an episode of unrest will lead to a magmatic eruption.

  15. Eruption column physics

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, G.A.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper the author focuses on the fluid dynamics of large-scale eruption columns. The dynamics of these columns are rooted in multiphase flow phenomena, so a major part of the paper sets up a foundation on that topic that allows one to quickly assess the inherent assumptions made in various theoretical and experimental approaches. The first part is centered on a set of complex differential equations that describe eruption columns, but the focus is on a general understanding of important physical processes rather than on the mathematics. The author discusses briefly the relative merits and weaknesses of different approaches, emphasizing that the largest advances in understanding are made by combining them. He then focuses on dynamics of steady eruption columns and then on transient phenomena. Finally he briefly reviews the effects of varying behavior of the ambient medium through which an eruption column moves. These final sections will emphasize concepts and a qualitative understanding of eruption dynamics. This paper relies on principles of continuum mechanics and transport processes but does not go into detail on the development of those principles. 36 refs., 36 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Eruption Products and Collection Methods for the 2008 Summit Eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, K. M.; Thornber, C. R.; Swanson, D. A.; Ellis, J. F.; Orr, T. R.; Patrick, M. R.; Rausch, J.

    2008-12-01

    After several weeks of elevated sulfur dioxide emissions at Kilauea's summit, a new fumarole appeared low on the southeast wall of Halema'uma'u Crater in mid-March 2008. At 0258 H.s.t. on March 19, an explosive eruption at Halema'uma'u's fumarole created a crater approximately 35 m across. Since that explosive eruption, a gas plume, with variable amounts of ash, has continuously emanated from the vent. Lithic debris was strewn over approximately 50 hectares, but no juvenile material was erupted during the March 19 event. On March 24, however, Pele's hair, Pele's tears, and glass-coated lithics were found on the crater's rim. These samples were the first juvenile material erupted at Kilauea's summit since 1982. After the March 19 explosive eruption, five more significant explosive eruptions have occurred, each of which erupted juvenile and lithic material. Several methods have been used to collect tephra from this eruption. A 10-station network of ash collectors was set up in an array to track changes in fallout from the continuous plume and to calculate a daily accumulation rate. Ash and tephra samples for petrologic and geochemical analysis are collected from wooden boxes placed along the crater's rim. Meter-scale squares on the ground downwind of the vent were cleared of older debris to help recognize new tephra. The samples are classified in 10 categories, based on a variety of characteristics, such as juvenile and lithic component, texture, and appearance. This classification scheme has been devised to help distinguish among the diverse suite of erupted material.

  17. Does refining the phenotype improve replication rates? A review and replication of candidate gene studies on Major Depressive Disorder and Chronic Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaochen; Stavrakakis, Nikolaos; Penninx, Brenda W; Bosker, Fokko J; Nolen, Willem A; Boomsma, Dorret I; de Geus, Eco J; Smit, Johan H; Snieder, Harold; Nolte, Ilja M; Hartman, Catharina A

    2016-03-01

    Replication has been poor for previously reported candidate genes involved in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). One possible reason is phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. The present study replicated genetic associations with MDD as defined in DSM-IV and with a more narrowly defined MDD subtype with a chronic and severe course. We first conducted a systematic review of genetic association studies on MDD published between September 2007 and June 2012 to identify all reported candidate genes. Genetic associations were then tested for all identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the entire genes using data from the GAIN genome-wide association study (MDD: n = 1,352; chronic MDD subsample: n = 225; controls: n =  1,649). The 1,000 Genomes database was used as reference for imputation. From 157 studies identified inthe literature, 81 studies reported significant associations with MDD, involving 245 polymorphisms in 97 candidate genes, from which we were able to investigate 185 SNPs in 89 genes. We replicated nine candidate SNPs in eight genes for MDD and six in five genes for chronic MDD. However, these were not more than expected by chance. At gene level, we replicated 18 genes for MDD and 17 genes for chronic MDD, both significantly more than expected by chance. We showed that replication rates were improved for MDD compared to a previous, highly similar, replication study based on studies published before 2007. Effect sizes of the SNPs and replication rates of the candidate genes were improved in the chronic subsample compared to the full sample. Nonetheless, replication rates were still poor.

  18. A computer program for comprehensive ST-segment depression/heart rate analysis of the exercise ECG test.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, R; Vänttinen, H; Sievänen, H; Malmivuo, J

    1996-06-01

    The ST-segment depression/heart rate (ST/HR) analysis has been found to improve the diagnostic accuracy of the exercise ECG test in detecting myocardial ischemia. Recently, three different continuous diagnostic variables based on the ST/HR analysis have been introduced; the ST/HR slope, the ST/HR index and the ST/HR hysteresis. The latter utilises both the exercise and recovery phases of the exercise ECG test, whereas the two former are based on the exercise phase only. This present article presents a computer program which not only calculates the above three diagnostic variables but also plots the full diagrams of ST-segment depression against heart rate during both exercise and recovery phases for each ECG lead from given ST/HR data. The program can be used in the exercise ECG diagnosis of daily clinical practice provided that the ST/HR data from the ECG measurement system can be linked to the program. At present, the main purpose of the program is to provide clinical and medical researchers with a practical tool for comprehensive clinical evaluation and development of the ST/HR analysis.

  19. Mind and heart: heart rate variability in major depressive disorder and coronary heart disease - a review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Stapelberg, Nicolas J; Hamilton-Craig, Ian; Neumann, David L; Shum, David H K; McConnell, Harry

    2012-10-01

    There is a reciprocal association between major depressive disorder (MDD) and coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are linked by a causal network of mechanisms. This causal network should be quantitatively studied and it is hypothesised that the investigation of vagal function represents a promising starting point. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used to investigate cardiac vagal control in the context of MDD and CHD. This review aims to examine the relationship of HRV to both MDD and CHD in the context of vagal function and to make recommendations for clinical practice and research. The search terms 'heart rate variability', 'depression' and 'heart disease' were entered into an electronic multiple database search engine. Abstracts were screened for their relevance and articles were individually selected and collated. Decreased HRV is found in both MDD and CHD. Both diseases are theorized to disrupt autonomic control feedback loops on the heart and are linked to vagal function. Existing theories link vagal function to both mood and emotion as well as cardiac function. However, several factors can potentially confound HRV measures and would thus impact on a complete understanding of vagal mechanisms in the link between MDD and CHD. The quantitative investigation of vagal function using HRV represents a reasonable starting point in the study of the relationship between MDD and CHD. Many psychotropic and cardiac medications have effects on HRV, which may have clinical importance. Future studies of HRV in MDD and CHD should consider antidepressant medication, as well as anxiety, as potential confounders.

  20. Effects of hyperthermic baths on depression, sleep and heart rate variability in patients with depressive disorder: a randomized clinical pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Johannes; Grebe, Julian; Kaifel, Sonja; Weinert, Tomas; Sadaghiani, Catharina; Huber, Roman

    2017-03-28

    Despite advances in the treatment of depression, one-third of depressed patients fail to respond to conventional antidepressant medication. There is a need for more effective treatments with fewer side effects. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether hyperthermic baths reduce depressive symptoms in adults with depressive disorder. Randomized, two-arm placebo-controlled, 8-week pilot trial. Medically stable outpatients with confirmed depressive disorder (ICD-10: F32/F33) who were moderately depressed as determined by the 17-item Hamilton Scale for Depression (HAM-D) score ≥18 were randomly assigned to 2 hyperthermic baths (40 °C) per week for 4 weeks or a sham intervention with green light and follow-up after 4 weeks. Main outcome measure was the change in HAM-Dtotal score from baseline (T0) to the 2-week time point (T1). A total of 36 patients were randomized (hyperthermic baths, n = 17; sham condition, n = 19). The intention-to-treat analysis showed a significant (P = .037) difference in the change in HAM-Dtotal score with 3.14 points after 4 interventions (T1) in favour of the hyperthermic bath group compared to the placebo group. This pilot study suggests that hyperthermic baths do have generalized efficacy in depressed patients. DRKS00004803 at drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de, German Clinical Trials Register (registration date 2016-02-02), retrospectively registered.

  1. Erupting Volcano Mount Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition Five crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy in October 2002. Triggered by a series of earthquakes on October 27, 2002, this eruption was one of Etna's most vigorous in years. This image shows the ash plume curving out toward the horizon. The lighter-colored plumes down slope and north of the summit seen in this frame are produced by forest fires set by flowing lava. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

  2. Erupting Volcano Mount Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition Five crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy in October 2002. Triggered by a series of earthquakes on October 27, 2002, this eruption was one of Etna's most vigorous in years. This image shows the ash plume curving out toward the horizon. The lighter-colored plumes down slope and north of the summit seen in this frame are produced by forest fires set by flowing lava. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

  3. Depressed pacemaker activity of sinoatrial node myocytes contributes to the age-dependent decline in maximum heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric D.; St. Clair, Joshua R.; Sumner, Whitney A.; Bannister, Roger A.; Proenza, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    An inexorable decline in maximum heart rate (mHR) progressively limits human aerobic capacity with advancing age. This decrease in mHR results from an age-dependent reduction in “intrinsic heart rate” (iHR), which is measured during autonomic blockade. The reduced iHR indicates, by definition, that pacemaker function of the sinoatrial node is compromised during aging. However, little is known about the properties of pacemaker myocytes in the aged sinoatrial node. Here, we show that depressed excitability of individual sinoatrial node myocytes (SAMs) contributes to reductions in heart rate with advancing age. We found that age-dependent declines in mHR and iHR in ECG recordings from mice were paralleled by declines in spontaneous action potential (AP) firing rates (FRs) in patch-clamp recordings from acutely isolated SAMs. The slower FR of aged SAMs resulted from changes in the AP waveform that were limited to hyperpolarization of the maximum diastolic potential and slowing of the early part of the diastolic depolarization. These AP waveform changes were associated with cellular hypertrophy, reduced current densities for L- and T-type Ca2+ currents and the “funny current” (If), and a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of If. The age-dependent reduction in sinoatrial node function was not associated with changes in β-adrenergic responsiveness, which was preserved during aging for heart rate, SAM FR, L- and T-type Ca2+ currents, and If. Our results indicate that depressed excitability of individual SAMs due to altered ion channel activity contributes to the decline in mHR, and thus aerobic capacity, during normal aging. PMID:24128759

  4. Geomorphic Consequences of Volcanic Eruptions in Alaska: A Review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    Eruptions of Alaska volcanoes have significant and sometimes profound geomorphic consequences on surrounding landscapes and ecosystems. The effects of eruptions on the landscape can range from complete burial of surface vegetation and preexisting topography to subtle, short-term perturbations of geomorphic and ecological systems. In some cases, an eruption will allow for new landscapes to form in response to the accumulation and erosion of recently deposited volcaniclastic material. In other cases, the geomorphic response to a major eruptive event may set in motion a series of landscape changes that could take centuries to millennia to be realized. The effects of volcanic eruptions on the landscape and how these effects influence surface processes has not been a specific focus of most studies concerned with the physical volcanology of Alaska volcanoes. Thus, what is needed is a review of eruptive activity in Alaska in the context of how this activity influences the geomorphology of affected areas. To illustrate the relationship between geomorphology and volcanic activity in Alaska, several eruptions and their geomorphic impacts will be reviewed. These eruptions include the 1912 Novarupta–Katmai eruption, the 1989–1990 and 2009 eruptions of Redoubt volcano, the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, and the recent historical eruptions of Pavlof volcano. The geomorphic consequences of eruptive activity associated with these eruptions are described, and where possible, information about surface processes, rates of landscape change, and the temporal and spatial scale of impacts are discussed.A common feature of volcanoes in Alaska is their extensive cover of glacier ice, seasonal snow, or both. As a result, the generation of meltwater and a variety of sediment–water mass flows, including debris-flow lahars, hyperconcentrated-flow lahars, and sediment-laden water floods, are typical outcomes of most types of eruptive activity. Occasionally, such flows can be quite

  5. Geomorphic consequences of volcanic eruptions in Alaska: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.

    2015-10-01

    Eruptions of Alaska volcanoes have significant and sometimes profound geomorphic consequences on surrounding landscapes and ecosystems. The effects of eruptions on the landscape can range from complete burial of surface vegetation and preexisting topography to subtle, short-term perturbations of geomorphic and ecological systems. In some cases, an eruption will allow for new landscapes to form in response to the accumulation and erosion of recently deposited volcaniclastic material. In other cases, the geomorphic response to a major eruptive event may set in motion a series of landscape changes that could take centuries to millennia to be realized. The effects of volcanic eruptions on the landscape and how these effects influence surface processes has not been a specific focus of most studies concerned with the physical volcanology of Alaska volcanoes. Thus, what is needed is a review of eruptive activity in Alaska in the context of how this activity influences the geomorphology of affected areas. To illustrate the relationship between geomorphology and volcanic activity in Alaska, several eruptions and their geomorphic impacts will be reviewed. These eruptions include the 1912 Novarupta-Katmai eruption, the 1989-1990 and 2009 eruptions of Redoubt volcano, the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, and the recent historical eruptions of Pavlof volcano. The geomorphic consequences of eruptive activity associated with these eruptions are described, and where possible, information about surface processes, rates of landscape change, and the temporal and spatial scale of impacts are discussed. A common feature of volcanoes in Alaska is their extensive cover of glacier ice, seasonal snow, or both. As a result, the generation of meltwater and a variety of sediment-water mass flows, including debris-flow lahars, hyperconcentrated-flow lahars, and sediment-laden water floods, are typical outcomes of most types of eruptive activity. Occasionally, such flows can be quite large

  6. Eruption of Kliuchevskoi volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-30

    STS068-150-045 (30 September 1994) --- (Kliuchevskoi Volcano) The major eruption that began September 30, 1994 (launch day) got almost immediate coverage by the astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour. The eruption cloud reached 60,000 feet above sea level, and the winds carried ash as far as 640 miles southeast from the volcano into the North Pacific air routes. This picture was made with a large format Linhof camera. While astronauts used handheld camera's to keep up with the Kamchatka event, instruments in the cargo bay of Endeavour recorded data to support the Space Radar Laboratory (SRL-2) mission.

  7. Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    G. Valentine

    2001-12-20

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR), ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'', presents information about natural volcanic systems and the parameters that can be used to model their behavior. This information is used to develop parameter-value distributions appropriate for analysis of the consequences of volcanic eruptions through a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. Many aspects of this work are aimed at resolution of the Igneous Activity Key Technical Issue (KTI) as identified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC 1998, p. 3), Subissues 1 and 2, which address the probability and consequence of igneous activity at the proposed repository site, respectively. Within the framework of the Disruptive Events Process Model Report (PMR), this AMR provides information for the calculations in two other AMRs ; parameters described herein are directly used in calculations in these reports and will be used in Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). Compilation of this AMR was conducted as defined in the Development Plan, except as noted. The report begins with considerations of the geometry of volcanic feeder systems, which are of primary importance in predicting how much of a potential repository would be affected by an eruption. This discussion is followed by one of the physical and chemical properties of the magmas, which influences both eruptive styles and mechanisms for interaction with radioactive waste packages. Eruptive processes including the ascent velocity of magma at depth, the onset of bubble nucleation and growth in the rising magmas, magma fragmentation, and velocity of the resulting gas-particle mixture are then discussed. The duration of eruptions, their power output, and mass discharge rates are also described. The next section summarizes geologic constraints regarding the interaction between magma and waste packages. Finally, they discuss bulk grain size produced by relevant explosive eruptions and grain shapes.

  8. Magma chamber dynamics and Vesuvius eruption forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobran, F.

    2003-04-01

    Magma is continuously or periodically refilling an active volcano and its eruption depends on the mechanical, fluid, thermal, and chemical aspects of the magma storage region and its surroundings. A cyclically loaded and unloaded system can fail from a weakness in the system or its surroundings, and the fluctuating stresses can produce system failures at stress levels that are considerably below the yield strength of the material. Magma in a fractured rock system within a volcano is unstable and propagates toward the surface with the rate depending on the state of the system defined by the inertia, gravity, friction, and permeability parameters of magma and its source region. Cyclic loading and unloading of magma from a reservoir caused by small- or medium-scale eruptions of Vesuvius can produce catastrophic plinian eruptions because of the structural failure of the system and the quiescent periods between these eruptions increase with time until the next eruption cycle which will be plinian or subplinian and will occur with a very high probability this century. Such a system behavior is predicted by a Global Volcanic Simulator of Vesuvius developed for simulating different eruption scenarios for the purpose of urban planning the territory, reducing the number of people residing too close to the cone of the volcano, and providing safety to those beyond about 5 km radius of the crater. The magma chamber model of the simulator employs a thermomechanical model that includes magma inflow and outflow from the chamber, heat and mass transfer between the chamber and its surroundings, and thermoelastoplastic deformation of the shell surrounding the magma source region. These magma chamber, magma ascent, and pyroclastic dispersion models and Vesuvius eruption forecasting are described in Dobran, F., VOLCANIC PROCESSES, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 2001, 590 pp.

  9. Modelling fluid flow in clastic eruptions: application to the Lusi mud eruption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collignon, Marine; Schmid, Daniel W.; Galerne, Christophe; Lupi, Matteo; Mazzini, Adriano

    2017-04-01

    Clastic eruptions involve the rapid ascension of clasts together with fluids, gas and/or liquid phases that may deform and brecciate the host rocks. These fluids transport the resulting mixture, called mud breccia, to the surface. Such eruptions are often associated with geological structures such as mud volcanoes, hydrothermal vent complexes and more generally piercement structures. They involve various processes, acting over a wide range of scales which makes them a complex and challenging, multi-phase system to model. Although piercement structures have been widely studied and discussed, only few attempts have been made to model the dynamics of such clastic eruptions. The ongoing Lusi mud eruption, in the East Java back-arc basin, which began in May 2006, is probably the most spectacular clastic eruption. Lusi's eruptive behaviour has been extensively studied over the past decade and thus represents a unique opportunity to better understand the dynamics driving clastic eruptions, including fossil clastic systems. We use both analytical formulations and numerical models to simulate Lusi's eruptive dynamics and to investigate simple relationships between the mud breccia properties (density, viscosity, gas and clast content) and the volumetric flow rate. Our results show that the conduit radius of such piercement system cannot exceeds a few meters at depth, and that clasts, if not densely packed, will not affect the flow rate when they are smaller than a fifth of the conduit size. Using published data for the annual gas fluxes at Lusi, we infer a maximal depth at which exsolution starts. This occurs between 1800 m and 3200 m deep for the methane and between 750 m and 1000 m for the carbon dioxide.

  10. The greek translation of the symptoms rating scale for depression and anxiety: preliminary results of the validation study

    PubMed Central

    Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Iacovides, Apostolos; Kleanthous, Soula; Samolis, Stavros; Gougoulias, Kyriakos; St Kaprinis, George; Bech, Per

    2003-01-01

    Background The aim of the current study was to assess the reliability, validity and the psychometric properties of the Greek translation of the Symptoms Rating Scale For Depression and Anxiety. The scale consists of 42 items and permits the calculation of the scores of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-21, the BDI 13, the Melancholia Subscale, the Asthenia Subscale, the Anxiety Subscale and the Mania Subscale Methods 29 depressed patients 30.48 ± 9.83 years old, and 120 normal controls 27.45 ± 10.85 years old entered the study. In 20 of them (8 patients and 12 controls) the instrument was re-applied 1–2 days later. Translation and Back Translation was made. Clinical Diagnosis was reached by consensus of two examiners with the use of the SCAN v.2.0 and the IPDE. CES-D and ZDRS were used for cross-validation purposes. The Statistical Analysis included ANOVA, the Spearman Correlation Coefficient, Principal Components Analysis and the calculation of Cronbach's alpha. Results The optimal cut-off points were: BDI-21: 14/15, BDI-13: 7/8, Melancholia: 8/9, Asthenia: 9/10, Anxiety: 10/11. Chronbach's alpha ranged between 0.86 and 0.92 for individual scales. Only the Mania subscale had very low alpha (0.12). The test-retest reliability was excellent for all scales with Spearman's Rho between 0.79 and 0.91. Conclusions The Greek translation of the SRSDA and the scales that consist it are both reliable and valid and are suitable for clinical and research use with satisfactory properties. Their properties are close to those reported in the international literature. However one should always have in mind the limitations inherent in the use of self-report scales. PMID:14667249

  11. Cause and risk of catastrophic eruptions in the Japanese Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    TATSUMI, Yoshiyuki; SUZUKI-KAMATA, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese Archipelago is characterized by active volcanism with variable eruption styles. The magnitude (M)-frequency relationships of catastrophic caldera-forming eruptions (M ≥ 7) are statistically different from those of smaller eruptions (M ≤ 5.7), suggesting that different mechanisms control these eruptions. We also find that volcanoes prone to catastrophic eruptions are located in regions of low crustal strain rate (<0.5 × 108/y) and propose, as one possible mechanism, that the viscous silicic melts that cause such eruptions can be readily segregated from the partially molten lower crust and form a large magma reservoir in such a tectonic regime. Finally we show that there is a ∼1% probability of a catastrophic eruption in the next 100 years based on the eruption records for the last 120 ky. More than 110 million people live in an area at risk of being covered by tephra >20 cm thick, which would severely disrupt every day life, from such an eruption on Kyushu Island, SW Japan. PMID:25391319

  12. ASTER Images Merapi Continuing Eruption

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-18

    This thermal infrared image from NASA Terra spacecraft of Merapi continuing eruption has been processed to reveal the dominant presence of volcanic ash in the eruption plume and clouds, displayed in dark red. The warm volcanic flow appears bright.

  13. Rates and predictors of postpartum depression by race and ethnicity: results from the 2004 to 2007 New York City PRAMS survey (Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System).

    PubMed

    Liu, Cindy H; Tronick, Ed

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine racial/ethnic disparities in the diagnosis of postpartum depression (PPD) by: (1) identifying predictors that account for prevalence rate differences across groups, and (2) comparing the strength of predictors across groups. 3,732 White, African American, Hispanic, and Asian/Pacific Islander women from the New York City area completed the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System from 2004 to 2007, a population-based survey that assessed sociodemographic risk factors, maternal stressors, psycho-education provided regarding depression, and prenatal and postpartum depression diagnoses. Sociodemographic and maternal stressors accounted for increased rates in PPD among Blacks and Hispanics compared to Whites, whereas Asian/Pacific Islander women were still 3.2 times more likely to receive a diagnosis after controlling for these variables. Asian/Pacific Islanders were more likely to receive a diagnosis after their providers talked to them about depressed mood, but were less likely than other groups to have had this conversation. Prenatal depression diagnoses increased the likelihood for PPD diagnoses for women across groups. Gestational diabetes decreased the likelihood for a PPD diagnosis for African Americans; a trend was observed in the association between having given birth to a female infant and increased rates of PPD diagnosis for Asian/Pacific Islanders and Whites. The risk factors that account for prevalence rate differences in postpartum diagnoses depend on the race/ethnic groups being compared. Prenatal depression is confirmed to be a major predictor for postpartum depression diagnosis for all groups studied; however, the associations between other postpartum depression risk factors and diagnosis vary by race/ethnic group.

  14. Affective forecasting and self-rated symptoms of depression, anxiety, and hypomania: evidence for a dysphoric forecasting bias.

    PubMed

    Hoerger, Michael; Quirk, Stuart W; Chapman, Benjamin P; Duberstein, Paul R

    2012-01-01

    Emerging research has examined individual differences in affective forecasting; however, we are aware of no published study to date linking psychopathology symptoms to affective forecasting problems. Pitting cognitive theory against depressive realism theory, we examined whether dysphoria was associated with negatively biased affective forecasts or greater accuracy. Participants (n=325) supplied predicted and actual emotional reactions for three days surrounding an emotionally evocative relational event, Valentine's Day. Predictions were made a month prior to the holiday. Consistent with cognitive theory, we found evidence for a dysphoric forecasting bias-the tendency of individuals in dysphoric states to overpredict negative emotional reactions to future events. The dysphoric forecasting bias was robust across ratings of positive and negative affect, forecasts for pleasant and unpleasant scenarios, continuous and categorical operationalisations of dysphoria, and three time points of observation. Similar biases were not observed in analyses examining the independent effects of anxiety and hypomania. Findings provide empirical evidence for the long-assumed influence of depressive symptoms on future expectations. The present investigation has implications for affective forecasting studies examining information-processing constructs, decision making, and broader domains of psychopathology.

  15. Affective Forecasting and Self-Rated Symptoms of Depression, Anxiety, and Hypomania: Evidence for a Dysphoric Forecasting Bias

    PubMed Central

    Hoerger, Michael; Quirk, Stuart W.; Chapman, Benjamin P.; Duberstein, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging research has examined individual differences in affective forecasting; however, we are aware of no published study to date linking psychopathology symptoms to affective forecasting problems. Pitting cognitive theory against depressive realism theory, we examined whether dysphoria was associated with negatively biased affective forecasts or greater accuracy. Participants (n = 325) supplied predicted and actual emotional reactions for three days surrounding an emotionally-evocative relational event, Valentine’s Day. Predictions were made a month prior to the holiday. Consistent with cognitive theory, we found evidence for a dysphoric forecasting bias – the tendency of individuals in dysphoric states to overpredict negative emotional reactions to future events. The dysphoric forecasting bias was robust across ratings of positive and negative affect, forecasts for pleasant and unpleasant scenarios, continuous and categorical operationalizations of dysphoria, and three time points of observation. Similar biases were not observed in analyses examining the independent effects of anxiety and hypomania. Findings provide empirical evidence for the long assumed influence of depressive symptoms on future expectations. The present investigation has implications for affective forecasting studies examining information processing constructs, decision making, and broader domains of psychopathology. PMID:22397734

  16. Development and validation of the Dimensional Anhedonia Rating Scale (DARS) in a community sample and individuals with major depression.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Sakina J; Quilty, Lena C; Sproule, Beth A; Cyriac, Anna; Michael Bagby, R; Kennedy, Sidney H

    2015-09-30

    Anhedonia, a core symptom of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), is predictive of antidepressant non-response. In contrast to the definition of anhedonia as a "loss of pleasure", neuropsychological studies provide evidence for multiple facets of hedonic function. The aim of the current study was to develop and validate the Dimensional Anhedonia Rating Scale (DARS), a dynamic scale that measures desire, motivation, effort and consummatory pleasure across hedonic domains. Following item selection procedures and reliability testing using data from community participants (N=229) (Study 1), the 17-item scale was validated in an online study with community participants (N=150) (Study 2). The DARS was also validated in unipolar or bipolar depressed patients (n=52) and controls (n=50) (Study 3). Principal components analysis of the 17-item DARS revealed a 4-component structure mapping onto the domains of anhedonia: hobbies, food/drink, social activities, and sensory experience. Reliability of the DARS subscales was high across studies (Cronbach's α=0.75-0.92). The DARS also demonstrated good convergent and divergent validity. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed the DARS showed additional utility over the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS) in predicting reward function and distinguishing MDD subgroups. These studies provide support for the reliability and validity of the DARS.

  17. Eruptive parameters and dynamics of the April 2015 sub-Plinian eruptions of Calbuco volcano (southern Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castruccio, Angelo; Clavero, Jorge; Segura, Andrea; Samaniego, Pablo; Roche, Olivier; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc; Droguett, Bárbara

    2016-09-01

    We conducted geological and petrological analyses of the tephra fallout and pyroclastic density current (PDC) products of the 22-23 April 2015 Calbuco eruptions. The eruptive cycle consisted of two sub-Plinian phases that generated > 15 km height columns and PDCs that travelled up to 6 km from the vent. The erupted volume is estimated at 0.38 km3 (non-DRE), with approximately 90% corresponding to tephra fall deposits and the other 10% to PDC deposits. The erupted products are basaltic-andesite, 54-55 wt.% SiO2, with minor amounts of andesite (58 wt.% SiO2). Despite the uniform composition of the products, there are at least four types of textures in juvenile clasts, with different degrees of vesicularity and types and content of crystals. We propose that the eruption triggering mechanism was either exsolution of volatiles due to crystallization, or a small intrusion into the base of the magma chamber, without significant magma mixing or with a magma compositionally similar to that of the residing magma. In either case the triggering mechanism generated convection and sufficient overpressure to promote the first eruptive phase. The start of the eruption decompressed the chamber, promoting intense vesiculation of the remaining magma and an increase in eruption rate towards the end of the eruption.

  18. Kimberlite ascent and eruption.

    PubMed

    Sparks, R S J; Brown, R J; Field, M; Gilbertson, M

    2007-12-13

    Wilson and Head model kimberlite ascent and eruption by considering the propagation of a volatile-rich dyke. Wilson and Head's model has features in common with Sparks et al., but it is inconsistent with geological observations and constraints on volatile solubility. Here we show that this may be due to erroneous physical assumptions.

  19. Volcanic Eruptions in Kamchatka

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-30

    One of the most volcanically active regions of the world is the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Siberia, Russia. It is not uncommon for several volcanoes to be erupting at the same time. NASA Terra satellite acquired this image on April 26, 2007

  20. Eruption of Pele

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The eruption of Pele on Jupiter's moon Io. The volcanic plume rises 300 kilometers above the surface in an umbrella-like shape. The plume fallout covers an area the size of Alaska. The vent is a dark spot just north of the triangular-shaped plateau (right center). To the left, the surface is covered by colorful lava flows rich in sulfur.

  1. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeGrande, Allegra N.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent some of the most climatically important and societally disruptive short-term events in human history. Large eruptions inject ash, dust, sulfurous gases (e.g. SO2, H2S), halogens (e.g. Hcl and Hbr), and water vapor into the Earth's atmosphere. Sulfurous emissions principally interact with the climate by converting into sulfate aerosols that reduce incoming solar radiation, warming the stratosphere and altering ozone creation, reducing global mean surface temperature, and suppressing the hydrological cycle. In this issue, we focus on the history, processes, and consequences of these large eruptions that inject enough material into the stratosphere to significantly affect the climate system. In terms of the changes wrought on the energy balance of the Earth System, these transient events can temporarily have a radiative forcing magnitude larger than the range of solar, greenhouse gas, and land use variability over the last millennium. In simulations as well as modern and paleoclimate observations, volcanic eruptions cause large inter-annual to decadal-scale changes in climate. Active debates persist concerning their role in longer-term (multi-decadal to centennial) modification of the Earth System, however.

  2. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeGrande, Allegra N.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent some of the most climatically important and societally disruptive short-term events in human history. Large eruptions inject ash, dust, sulfurous gases (e.g. SO2, H2S), halogens (e.g. Hcl and Hbr), and water vapor into the Earth's atmosphere. Sulfurous emissions principally interact with the climate by converting into sulfate aerosols that reduce incoming solar radiation, warming the stratosphere and altering ozone creation, reducing global mean surface temperature, and suppressing the hydrological cycle. In this issue, we focus on the history, processes, and consequences of these large eruptions that inject enough material into the stratosphere to significantly affect the climate system. In terms of the changes wrought on the energy balance of the Earth System, these transient events can temporarily have a radiative forcing magnitude larger than the range of solar, greenhouse gas, and land use variability over the last millennium. In simulations as well as modern and paleoclimate observations, volcanic eruptions cause large inter-annual to decadal-scale changes in climate. Active debates persist concerning their role in longer-term (multi-decadal to centennial) modification of the Earth System, however.

  3. Eruption Conditions During Fissure Eruptions in Tharsis, Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Tyson, S.; Mackown, J.; Garbeil, H.

    2008-12-01

    We focus on six separate, but physically close, vent systems in eastern Tharsis, Mars, just to the east of the volcano Jovis Tholus. The vents are typically linear fissures a few to 20 km in length that have built small shields rising to 50-85 m above the level of the surrounding topography. Typical lengths of individual lava flows from these fissures are 15-20 km, with a maximum of 30 km. Mapping of the vent complexes reveals smooth material, interpreted to be spatter from fire fountaining, located on the rims of some of the fissures. In some places this spatter fed individual short (less than 5 km) lava flows; elsewhere spatter from segments of the fissure coalesced to form longer flows. Temporal evolution of the flow fields is indicated: the oldest parts of the basement at each center are built from a series of compound flows that cannot be subdivided into individual flows. In places activity was locally focussed and formed lava ponds and channelized flows from central vents. MOLA topographic data and photoclinometry topographic profiles made from THEMIS VIS images show that the flows are typically less than 5 m thick, 8-15 times thinner than flows elsewhere on Mars. We used standard models of magma rise through dikes, lava flow emplacement, and fire-fountain behavior to find lava viscosities and yield strengths (100 Pa s and 100 Pa, respectively), eruption rates (5,000 m3/s), flow speeds (1-2 m/s), durations of emplacement of individual flow units (5 hours), and an equivalent magma water content (0.1-0.2 mass percent). These eruption conditions are consistent with a wide range of possible depths of the magma reservoirs feeding the eruptions. Small vents like those studied here have been identified elsewhere in Tharsis (particularly just to the east of Olympus Mons), and the eruption conditions described above may characterize a previously poorly recognized style of volcanism on Mars only identifiable in images with spatial resolutions better than 10 m/pixel.

  4. Variation of selfing rate and inbreeding depression among individuals and across generations within an admixed Cedrus population

    PubMed Central

    Ferriol, M; Pichot, C; Lefèvre, F

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the variation and short-term evolution of the selfing rate and inbreeding depression (ID) across three generations within a cedar forest that was established from admixture ca 1860. The mean selfing rate was 9.5%, ranging from 0 to 48% among 20 seed trees (estimated from paternally inherited chloroplast DNA). We computed the probability of selfing for each seed and we investigated ID by comparing selfed and outcrossed seeds within progenies, thus avoiding maternal effects. In all progenies, the germination rate was high (88–100%) and seedling mortality was low (0–12%). The germination dynamics differed significantly between selfed and outcrossed seeds within progenies in the founder gene pool but not in the following generations. This transient effect of selfing could be attributed to epistatic interactions in the original admixture. Regarding the seedling growth traits, the ID was low but significant: 8 and 6% for height and diameter growth, respectively. These rates did not vary among generations, suggesting minor gene effects. At this early stage, outcrossed seedlings outcompeted their selfed relatives, but not necessarily other selfed seedlings from other progenies. Thus, purging these slightly deleterious genes may only occur through within-family selection. Processes that maintain a high level of genetic diversity for fitness-related traits among progenies also reduce the efficiency of purging this part of the genetic load. PMID:20424643

  5. Assessment of Holocene soil erosion rates on the loess plateau in East Poland using sedimentary archives from closed depressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kołodyńska-Gawrysiak, Renata; Poesen, Jean; Gawrysiak, Leszek

    2016-04-01

    Closed depressions (CDs) are typical geomorphological features of the European loess belt. They are closed sedimentation basins that enable the estimation of long-term soil erosion rates for different land use environments. This study was conducted in eastern Poland (Nałęczów Plateau). In this region CDs are rather small landforms and the area of 70% of all CDs does not exceed 1500 m2. The study objective was to assess Holocene soil erosion rates in the loess plateau based on a quantitative analysis of colluvial sediments deposited in CDs. Two representative CDs were selected for this study: one CD is located in an old (long-term) forest and the other is situated in a long-term agricultural land. The maximum depth of the CD in the forest, the mean slope gradient and area of the corresponding catchment are 4.9 m, 3.410 and 7568 m² respectively. For the CD in agricultural land these values are 3.2 m, 2.760 and 5156 m² respectively. In both CDs several dozen of drillings and two trenches (2 m long, 1m wide, 2 m deep) were made in the deepest point of the CDs. Mean long-term soil erosion rates were calculated based on the stratigraphy of the soil-sediment sequence infilling the CDs. C-14 and OSL datings of soils and colluvial sediments within the CDs were obtained. For the long-term agricultural used catchment of the CD it was calculated that since 6.31 ± 0.35 ka BP the mean annual soil loss due to water and tillage erosion is 0.63-0.7 t/ha/year or 279.3 mm. In the prehistoric period since 6.31 ± 0.35 ka BP until 1026-1162 AD the mean annual soil erosion rate amounted to 0,10-0.11 t/ha/year or 41.5 mm. During the last ca. 1000 years mean soil erosion rates increased to 3.99-4.63 t/ha/year or 249.2 mm. Results of long-term soil erosion rates (calculated using colluvial sediment sequences in CDs) from agricultural catchments in the loess regions of eastern Poland (this study) and Central Belgium (Gillijns et al. 2005) are quite similar. For the forested catchment

  6. The Initial Giant Umbrella Cloud of the May 18, 1980 Explosive Eruption of Mount St. Helens.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-30

    1981). Moore and Rice (1984) interpreted this as the onset of the plinian eruption , discharging predominantly high-temperature juvenile magma, which...1978; Sparks, 1986). Irrespective of whether the cloud is fed from a point source (as in plinian eruptions ) or from a large area (as in the present...calculated that plinian eruption columns with heights greater than 20 km and mass eruption rates greater than 5 x 104 m3/s should show large mushroom

  7. Reunion Island Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On January 16, 2002, lava that had begun flowing on January 5 from the Piton de la Fournaise volcano on the French island of Reunion abruptly decreased, marking the end of the volcano's most recent eruption. These false color MODIS images of Reunion, located off the southeastern coast of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean, were captured on the last day of the eruption (top) and two days later (bottom). The volcano itself is located on the southeast side of the island and is dark brown compared to the surrounding green vegetation. Beneath clouds (light blue) and smoke, MODIS detected the hot lava pouring down the volcano's flanks into the Indian Ocean. The heat, detected by MODIS at 2.1 um, has been colored red in the January 16 image, and is absent from the lower image, taken two days later on January 18, suggesting the lava had cooled considerably even in that short time. Earthquake activity on the northeast flank continued even after the eruption had stopped, but by January 21 had dropped to a sufficiently low enough level that the 24-hour surveillance by the local observatory was suspended. Reunion is essentially all volcano, with the northwest portion of the island built on the remains of an extinct volcano, and the southeast half built on the basaltic shield of 8,630-foot Piton de la Fournaise. A basaltic shield volcano is one with a broad, gentle slope built by the eruption of fluid basalt lava. Basalt lava flows easily across the ground remaining hot and fluid for long distances, and so they often result in enormous, low-angle cones. The Piton de la Fournaise is one of Earth's most active volcanoes, erupting over 150 times in the last few hundred years, and it has been the subject of NASA research because of its likeness to the volcanoes of Mars. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  8. Reunion Island Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On January 16, 2002, lava that had begun flowing on January 5 from the Piton de la Fournaise volcano on the French island of Reunion abruptly decreased, marking the end of the volcano's most recent eruption. These false color MODIS images of Reunion, located off the southeastern coast of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean, were captured on the last day of the eruption (top) and two days later (bottom). The volcano itself is located on the southeast side of the island and is dark brown compared to the surrounding green vegetation. Beneath clouds (light blue) and smoke, MODIS detected the hot lava pouring down the volcano's flanks into the Indian Ocean. The heat, detected by MODIS at 2.1 um, has been colored red in the January 16 image, and is absent from the lower image, taken two days later on January 18, suggesting the lava had cooled considerably even in that short time. Earthquake activity on the northeast flank continued even after the eruption had stopped, but by January 21 had dropped to a sufficiently low enough level that the 24-hour surveillance by the local observatory was suspended. Reunion is essentially all volcano, with the northwest portion of the island built on the remains of an extinct volcano, and the southeast half built on the basaltic shield of 8,630-foot Piton de la Fournaise. A basaltic shield volcano is one with a broad, gentle slope built by the eruption of fluid basalt lava. Basalt lava flows easily across the ground remaining hot and fluid for long distances, and so they often result in enormous, low-angle cones. The Piton de la Fournaise is one of Earth's most active volcanoes, erupting over 150 times in the last few hundred years, and it has been the subject of NASA research because of its likeness to the volcanoes of Mars. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  9. Introduction to the 2012-2013 Tolbachik eruption special issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Benjamin R.; Belousov, Alexander; Belousova, Marina; Volynets, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The Tolbachik volcanic complex in central Kamchatka holds a special place in global volcanological studies. It is one of 4 areas of extensive historic volcanic activity in the northern part of the Central Kamchatka Depression (the others being Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Shiveluch), and is part of the Klyuchevskoy volcanic group, which is one of the most active areas of volcanism on Earth. Tolbachik is especially well-known due largely to the massive 1975-1976 eruption that became known as the Great Tolbachik Fissure eruption (GTFE; Fedotov, 1983; Fedotov et al., 1984). This was one of the first eruptions in Russia to be predicted based on precursory seismic activity, based on M5 earthquakes approximately one week before the eruption started, and was intensively studied during its course by a large number of Russian scientists. A summary of those studies was published, first in Russian and then in English, and it became widely read for many reasons. One in particular is that the eruption was somewhat unusual for a subduction zone setting; although many subduction zone stratovolcanoes have associated basaltic tephra cone-lava fields, this was the first such Hawaiian-style eruption to be widely observed. After the end of the eruption in 1976, the complex showed no signs of activity until 27 November 2012, when increased seismic activity was registered by the Kamchatka Branch of the Russian Geophysical Survey and a red glow from the eruption site was first noticed through the snowstorm haze. This prompted them, and then the Kamchatka Volcanic Emergency Response Team (KVERT) to issue an alert that activity was coming from the south flank of Plosky Tolbachik volcano, the younger of two volcanic edifices (the older is Ostry Tolbachik) that together make up the bulk of the complex along with tephra cone-lava fields that lie along a NE-SW fissure zone that transects Plosky Tolbachik. The new eruption lasted for more than 250 days and, like the 1975-1976 eruption, was

  10. Treatment-Resistant Depressed Youth Show a Higher Response Rate If Treatment Ends during Summer School Break

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamseddeen, Wael; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Emslie, Graham; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Porta, Giovanna; Mayes, Taryn; Keller, Martin B.; Brent, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is little work on the effect of school on response to treatment of depression, with available research suggesting that children and adolescents with school difficulties are less likely to respond to fluoxetine compared with those with no school difficulties. Method: Depressed adolescents in the Treatment of Resistant Depression in…

  11. Treatment-Resistant Depressed Youth Show a Higher Response Rate If Treatment Ends during Summer School Break

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamseddeen, Wael; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Emslie, Graham; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Porta, Giovanna; Mayes, Taryn; Keller, Martin B.; Brent, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is little work on the effect of school on response to treatment of depression, with available research suggesting that children and adolescents with school difficulties are less likely to respond to fluoxetine compared with those with no school difficulties. Method: Depressed adolescents in the Treatment of Resistant Depression in…

  12. Review of eruptive activity at Tianchi volcano, Changbaishan, northeast China: implications for possible future eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Haiquan; Liu, Guoming; Gill, James

    2013-04-01

    One of the largest explosive eruptions in the past several thousand years occurred at Tianchi volcano, also known as Changbaishan, on the China-North Korea border. This historically active polygenetic central volcano consists of three parts: a lower basaltic shield, an upper trachytic composite cone, and young comendite ash flows. The Millennium Eruption occurred between 938 and 946 ad, and was preceded by two smaller and chemically different rhyolitic pumice deposits. There has been at least one additional, small eruption in the last three centuries. From 2002 to 2005, seismicity, deformation, and the helium and hydrogen gas contents of spring waters all increased markedly, causing regional concern. We attribute this event to magma recharge or volatile exhalation or both at depth, followed by two episodes of addition of magmatic fluids into the overlying aquifer without a phreatic eruption. The estimated present magma accumulation rate is too low by itself to account for the 2002-2005 unrest. The most serious volcanic hazards are ash eruption and flows, and lahars. The available geological information and volcano monitoring data provide a baseline for comprehensive assessment of future episodes of unrest and possible eruptive activity.

  13. Small-scale eruptive filaments on the quiet sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermans, Linda M.; Martin, Sara F.

    1986-01-01

    A study of a little known class of eruptive events on the quiet sun was conducted. All of 61 small-scale eruptive filamentary structures were identified in a systematic survey of 32 days of H alpha time-lapse films of the quiet sun acquired at Big Bear Solar Observatory. When fully developed, these structures have an average length of 15 arc seconds before eruption. They appear to be the small-scale analog of large-scale eruptive filaments observed against the disk. At the observed rate of 1.9 small-scale eruptive features per field of view per average 7.0 hour day, the rate of occurence of these events on the sun were estimated to be greater than 600 per 24 hour day.. The average duration of the eruptive phase was 26 minutes while the average lifetime from formation through eruption was 70 minutes. A majority of the small-scale filamentary sturctures were spatially related to cancelling magnetic features in line-of-sight photospheric magnetograms. Similar to large-scale filaments, the small-scale filamentary structures sometimes divided opposite polarity cancelling fragments but often had one or both ends terminating at a cancellation site. Their high numbers appear to reflect the much greater flux on the quiet sun. From their characteristics, evolution, and relationship to photospheric magnetic flux, it was concluded that the structures described are small-scale eruptive filaments and are a subset of all filaments.

  14. Presentation and validation of the multiple sclerosis depression rating scale: a test specifically devised to investigate affective disorders in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Davide; Marra, Camillo; Zinno, Massimiliano; Patanella, Agata Katia; Messina, Maria Josè; Piccininni, Chiara; Batocchi, Anna Paola; Gainotti, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of depression in patients affected by MS is important, as it may be a cause of reduced quality of life and increased suicide risk. We present a new scale, the Multiple Sclerosis Depression Rating Scale (MSDRS), and assess its diagnostic accuracy in comparison to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). A total of 94 MS participants were classified as non-depressed (N = 44) or affected by mood disorder associated to MS with depressive manifestations (MSD-MDDM; N = 37) or with a major depression-like episode (MSD-MDL; N = 13). Each participant underwent a psychiatric interview, MSDRS, and BDI; diagnostic accuracy was evaluated using area under the ROC curve (AROC). The diagnostic accuracy of MSDRS and BDI was comparable when diagnosing both MSD-MDDM and MSD-MDL (AROC respectively 0.8998 and 0.8659); the MSDRS showed higher accuracy for the diagnosis of MSD-MDL (AROC respectively 0.9278 and 0.8314; p = .038). The MSDRS may be a reliable tool for the diagnosis of depression in MS.

  15. Rates and predictors of remission, recurrence and conversion to bipolar disorder after the first lifetime episode of depression--a prospective 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Bukh, J D; Andersen, P K; Kessing, L V

    2016-04-01

    In depression, non-remission, recurrence of depressive episodes after remission and conversion to bipolar disorder are crucial determinants of poor outcome. The present study aimed to determine the cumulative incidences and clinical predictors of these long-term outcomes after the first lifetime episode of depression. A total of 301 in- or out-patients aged 18-70 years with a validated diagnosis of a single depressive episode were assessed from 2005 to 2007. At 5 years of follow-up, 262 patients were reassessed by means of the life chart method and diagnostic interviews from 2011 to 2013. Cumulative incidences and the influence of clinical variables on the rates of remission, recurrence and conversion to bipolar disorder, respectively, were estimated by survival analysis techniques. Within 5 years, 83.3% obtained remission, 31.5% experienced recurrence of depression and 8.6% converted to bipolar disorder (6.3% within the first 2 years). Non-remission increased with younger age, co-morbid anxiety and suicidal ideations. Recurrence increased with severity and treatment resistance of the first depression, and conversion to bipolar disorder with treatment resistance, a family history of affective disorder and co-morbid alcohol or drug abuse. The identified clinical characteristics of the first lifetime episode of depression should guide patients and clinicians for long-term individualized tailored treatment.

  16. Eruption time series statistically examined: Probabilities of future eruptions at Villarrica and Llaima Volcanoes, Southern Volcanic Zone, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Wehrmann, Heidi

    2010-06-01

    Probabilistic forecasting of volcanic eruptions is a central issue of applied volcanology with regard to mitigating consequences of volcanic hazards. Recent years have seen great advances in the techniques of statistical analysis of volcanic eruption time series, which constitutes an essential component of a multi-discipline volcanic hazard assessment. Here, two of the currently most active volcanoes of South America, Villarrica and Llaima, are subjected to an established statistical procedure, with the aim to provide predictions for the likelihood of future eruptions within a given time interval. In the eruptive history of both Villarrica and Llaima Volcanoes, time independence of eruptions provides consistency with Poissonian behaviour. A moving-average test, helping to assess whether the distribution of repose times between eruptions changes in response to the time interval considered, validates stationarity for at least the younger eruption record. For the earlier time period, stationarity is not entirely confirmed, which may artificially result from incompleteness of the eruption record, but can also reveal fluctuations in the eruptive regime. To take both possibilities into account, several different distribution functions are fit to the eruption time series, and the fits are evaluated for their quality and compared. The exponential, Weibull and log-logistic distributions are shown to fit the repose times sufficiently well. The probability of future eruptions within defined time periods is therefore estimated from all three distribution functions, as well as from a mixture of exponential distribution (MOED) for the different eruption regimes and from a Bayesian approach. Both the MOED and Bayesian estimates intrinsically predict lower eruption probabilities than the exponential distribution function, while the Weibull distributions have increasing hazard rates, hence giving the highest eruption probability forecasts. This study provides one of the first

  17. Eruption precursors: Manifestations and strategies for detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, Michael; Pritchard, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    The past several decades have seen a rapid increase in volcano monitoring and modeling capabilities. Diverse arrays of instrument networks can detect a variety of pre-, co-, and post-eruptive phenomena, and remote sensing observations are available across a range of spatial, temporal, and spectral resolutions. A growing class of models, based on the physics of magmatic systems, are making use of these expanding datastreams, providing probabilistic assessments of such parameters as magma supply, volatile content, and eruption duration. To what extent, however, do these developments heighten our ability to identify eruption precursors? The advent of better data and new models provides an opportunity to reexamine our understanding of pre-eruption unrest, as well as our ability to detect and recognize it as such. An idealized model of the buildup to a volcanic eruption might include magma ascent from a deep source region and accumulation in the mid- to upper crust in the preceding months to years. The process might be manifested by surface inflation and deep long-period earthquakes, and accompanied by an increase in CO2 emissions. As magma continues to accumulate, distal volcano-tectonic earthquakes may result as stress builds on nearby faults, H2S emissions may increase as sulfur in a shallow reservoir is hydrolyzed by groundwater, and fumarole and spring temperatures may increase and show changes in chemistry. In the days to hours before an eruption, sudden changes in the rate and style of earthquakes (including repeating earthquakes and tremor) and deformation may occur as the magma reservoir ruptures and magma moves laterally or vertically. Phreatic eruptions might result as ascending magma comes into contact with groundwater, and SO2 emissions might increase as the path between the magma and surface dries out. How often does such a sequence actually occur? Relatively few volcanoes are comprehensively monitored prior to obvious expressions of unrest, so this is not

  18. Inpatient treatment of major depression in Austria between 1989 and 2009: impact of downsizing of psychiatric hospitals on admissions, suicide rates and outpatient psychiatric services.

    PubMed

    Vyssoki, B; Willeit, M; Blüml, V; Höfer, P; Erfurth, A; Psota, G; Lesch, O M; Kapusta, N D

    2011-09-01

    During the last 20 years Austrian psychiatric services underwent fundamental changes, as a focus was set on downsizing psychiatric hospitals. Little is known about how restructuring of mental health services affected patients with major depression and suicide rates. Monthly hospital discharges from all hospitals in Austria with the diagnosis of unipolar major depression as primary reason for inpatient treatment were obtained for the time period between 1989 and 2008. These data were correlated with relevant parameters from the general health system, such as number of hospital beds, suicide rate, density of psychotherapists and sales of antidepressants. While the number of psychiatric beds was reduced by almost 30%, the total annual numbers of inpatient treatment episodes for depression increased by 360%. This increase was stronger for men than for women. Further on this development was accompanied by a decrease in the suicide rate and an improvement in the availability of professional outpatient mental health service providers. Only aggregated patient data and no single case histories were available for this study. The validity of the correct diagnosis of unipolar major depression must be doubted, as most likely not all patients were seen by a clinical expert. Our data show that although inpatient treatment for unipolar major depression dramatically increased, reduction of psychiatric beds did not lead to an increase of suicide rates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The use of the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale to assist in the case management of patients living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Deborah; Mizuno, Lori T; Thornberry, Anya

    2010-01-01

    Depression is a common comorbidity in people with HIV/AIDS, frequently impacting disease status by direct effects on immune fuinction and adherence to antiretroviral treatment. For case managers, who are often the main contacts for patients, quick and simple identification of patients at high risk for depression can be both a challenge and a priority. These patients should be screened at the primary point of care and then referred to mental health providers for further evaluation or diagnosis. Here we report the experiences in three diverse case management settings using the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale for patient self-reporting of depression symptoms. The three clinics--Broward House in Wilton Manors, Florida; BIENESTAR Human Services in Los Angeles, California, and the West Midtown Medical Group in New York City--serve diverse racial and ethnic populations with substantial HIV infection rates in urban and rural communities. Benefits of using this validated tool include increased patient self-awareness and acceptance by mental health providers, thereby facilitating a final diagnosis that leads to improved implementation of treatment for depression. Case management settings provide a unique point of contact to unite clients with mental health care, especially in disease settings where depression or other mental health conditions are prevalent.

  20. Forecasting the Beginning, Middle, and End of Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallister, J. S.; McCausland, W. A.; Ogburn, S. E.; White, R. A.; Wright, H. M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are triggered either by "bottom-up" processes such as magmatic intrusion and recharge or by "top-down" processes such as unloading by flank failure. Eruptions end when conduit pressure drops below lithostatic pressure because of depletion of magmatic gases or cessation of magmatic replenishment, or alternatively, as a consequence of plugging of the conduit by crystallization. Examples from the Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP) show that it is possible to forecast the beginning, changes during, and the end of eruptions using a combination of multi-parametric monitoring, geologic constraints and applicable information from global databases. Beginning: Magmatic intrusions can be detected from patterns of precursory seismicity, CO2 emissions, and inflation. The probability that a particular intrusive episode leads to eruption can be estimated from global data modified by the local history of past eruptions and by characteristic progressions in monitoring parameters. Middle: Increased probability of a more explosive phase during a long-lived dome-forming eruption may be forecast on the basis of high extrusion rates and recurrence of deep or distal VT earthquakes; both indicate more rapid magma ascent and increased gas pressure. Alternatively, increased seismicity coincident with a rapid decrease in gas emission and extrusion rate may signal conduit plugging, which can also lead to an explosive phase. End: The end of long-lived eruptions may be forecast using a combination of: 1) global data on duration of similar eruptions, 2) comparison of eruptive volumes to those of past eruptions, 3) projection of effusion rate trends to zero, 4) reversal of regional deflation to inflation and near-vent inflation to deflation, and 5) change in morphology or composition indicative of more viscous crystalline magma. We find that forecasting using the criteria such as described above is best conducted by multidisciplinary teams using probabilistic event

  1. Time Series of North Pacific Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehn, J.; Worden, A. K.; Webley, P. W.

    2011-12-01

    The record of volcanic eruptions was gathered from the 1986 eruption of Augustine Volcano to present for Alaska, Kamchatka and the Kuriles Islands. In this time over 400 ash producing eruptions were noted, and many more events that produced some other activity, e.g. lava, lahar, small explosion, seismic crisis. This represents a minimum for the volcanic activity in this region. It is thought that the records for Alaska are complete for this time period, but it is possible that activity in the Kuriles and Kamchatka could have been overlooked, particularly smaller events. For the Alaska region, 19 different volcanoes have been active in this time. Mt. Cleveland shows the most activity over the time period (40 % likely to have activity in a 3 month period), followed closely by Pavlof (34% likely)volcano. In Kamchatka only 7 volcanoes have been active, Shiveluch is the most active (83% likely) followed by Bezymianny and Kliuchevskoi volcanoes (tied at 60%). The Kuriles only has had 4 active volcanoes, and only 6 known eruptions. Overall this region is one of the most active in the world, in any 3 month period there is a 77% likelihood of volcano activity. For well instrumented volcanoes, the majority of activity is preceded by significant seismicity. For just over half of the events, explosive activity is preceded by thermal signals in infrared satellite data. Rarely (only about 5% of the time) is a stand alone thermal signal not followed within 3 months by an explosive eruption. For remaining events where an ash plume begins the activity, over 90% of the cases show a thermal signal the eruption. The volcanoes with the most activity are the least likely to produce large ash plumes. Conversely the volcanoes that erupt rarely often begin with larger ash producing events. Though there appears to be a recurrent progression of volcanic activity down the chain from east to west, this may be an artifact of several independent systems, each working at their own rate, that

  2. Stability of volcanic conduits during explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravena, Álvaro; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Cioni, Raffaello; Neri, Augusto

    2017-06-01

    Geological evidences of volcanic conduit widening are common in most pyroclastic deposits (e.g. presence of lithic fragments from different depths), suggesting a continuous modification of the conduit geometry during volcanic eruptions. However, the controlling factors of the mechanisms driving conduit enlargement (e.g. erosion, local collapse) are still partially unclear, as well as the influence of conduit geometry on the eruptive dynamics. Although numerical models have been systematically employed to study volcanic conduits, their mechanical stability and the eruptive dynamics related to non-cylindrical conduits have been poorly addressed. We present here a 1D steady-state model which includes the main processes experimented by ascending magmas (i.e. crystallization, rheological changes, fragmentation, drag forces, outgassing and degassing), and the application of two mechanical stability criteria (Mohr-Coulomb and Mogi-Coulomb), in order to study the collapse conditions of volcanic conduits during a representative explosive rhyolitic eruption. It emerges that mechanical stability of volcanic conduits is mainly controlled by its radial dimension, and a minimum radius for reaching stable conditions can be computed, as a function of water content and inlet overpressure. Additionally, for a set of input parameters thought typical of explosive rhyolitic volcanism, we estimated a minimum magma flux for developing a mechanically stable conduit ( 7 • 107 - 3 • 108 kg/s). Results are consistent with the unsteady character usually observed in sub-Plinian eruptions, opposite to mainly stationary Plinian eruptions, commonly characterized by higher magma discharge rates. We suggest that cylindrical conduits represent a mechanically stable configuration only for large radii. Because the instability conditions are not uniform along the conduit, the widening processes probably lead to conduit geometries with depth-varying width. Consequently, as our model is able to

  3. Spontaneous Eruption of Premolar Associated with a Dentigerous Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Anibal Henrique Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    Dentigerous cyst (DC) is the second most common odontogenic cyst with greater incidence in young patients. It presents as a unilocular, asymptomatic radiolucency involving the crown of an impacted tooth, commonly noticed in X-rays to investigate absence, wrong tooth position, or delay in the chronology of eruption. Decompression/marsupialization (D/M) is the most implemented treatment, especially when preserving the tooth involved is advised. The aim of this study is to discuss the DC characteristics that contribute to spontaneous eruption of premolars, by reporting the case of a conservative treatment of DC. This eruption depends on factors such as age, angulation of inclusion, rate of root formation, depth of inclusion, and eruption space. This paper reports the case of a 10-year-old patient with a radiolucent lesion diagnosed as DC involving element 35, which erupted as a result of treatment. The patient was observed during 1 year and 6 months. PMID:27313912

  4. Magnetic field restructuring associated with two successive solar eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Hu, Huidong

    2014-08-20

    We examine two successive flare eruptions (X5.4 and X1.3) on 2012 March 7 in the NOAA active region 11429 and investigate the magnetic field reconfiguration associated with the two eruptions. Using an advanced non-linear force-free field extrapolation method based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetograms, we obtain a stepwise decrease in the magnetic free energy during the eruptions, which is roughly 20%-30% of the energy of the pre-flare phase. We also calculate the magnetic helicity and suggest that the changes of the sign of the helicity injection rate might be associated with the eruptions. Through the investigation of the magnetic field evolution, we find that the appearance of the 'implosion' phenomenon has a strong relationship with the occurrence of the first X-class flare. Meanwhile, the magnetic field changes of the successive eruptions with implosion and without implosion were well observed.

  5. Vesiculation of basaltic magma during eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, Margaret T.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Newman, Sally

    1993-01-01

    Vesicle size distributions in vent lavas from the Pu'u'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption of Kilauea volcano are used to estimate nucleation and growth rates of H2O-rich gas bubbles in basaltic magma nearing the earth's surface (≤120 m depth). By using well-constrained estimates for the depth of volatile exsolution and magma ascent rate, nucleation rates of 35.9 events ⋅ cm-3 ⋅ s-1 and growth rates of 3.2 x 10-4cm/s are determined directly from size-distribution data. The results are consistent with diffusion-controlled growth as predicted by a parabolic growth law. This empirical approach is not subject to the limitations inherent in classical nucleation and growth theory and provides the first direct measurement of vesiculation kinetics in natural settings. In addition, perturbations in the measured size distributions are used to examine bubble escape, accumulation, and coalescence prior to the eruption of magma.

  6. Neutrophilic Fixed Drug Eruption.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Leah; Reddy, Swathi B; Kassim, Andrea; Dettloff, Jennifer; Reddy, Vijaya B

    2015-07-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a cutaneous reaction to a medication that recurs in the same fairly localized site with each exposure to the offending drug. The classical histopathologic findings in FDE consist of an interface dermatitis with predominantly lymphocytic inflammatory cell infiltrate. An unusual case of FDE in a 27-year-old pregnant woman who presented with widespread lesions and a predominantly neutrophilic infiltrate on histopathologic examination is reported.

  7. Eruption of Kliuchevskoi volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-10-05

    STS068-155-094 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- (Kliuchevskoi Volcano) The crewmembers used a Linhof large format Earth observation camera to photograph this nadir view of the Kamchatka peninsula's week-old volcano. The eruption and the follow-up environmental activity was photographed from 115 nautical miles above Earth. Six NASA astronauts spent a week and a half aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in support of the Space Radar Laboratory 2 (SRL-2) mission.

  8. Mode of Administration Effects in Psychopathology Assessment: Analyses of Gender, Age, and Education Differences in Self-Rated Versus Interview-Based Depression.

    PubMed

    Levin-Aspenson, Holly F; Watson, David

    2017-03-16

    Respondents may answer sensitive questions differently depending on the mode of assessment (e.g., questionnaire, interview). The possibility of differences in these mode effects across groups is an important assessment consideration given the implications for test-score validity and bias. Although differences in mode effects are highly relevant to issues in clinical assessment, research is limited and generally fails to make use of psychometrically sound methods. The present research argues for greater attention to demographic differences in mode effects with regard to the assessment of psychopathology. Analyses of differences in mode effects in depression assessment are presented for gender, age, and education based on data from 440 community adults. Depression symptom ratings from a structured clinical interview were regressed on a self-report state depression composite score; analyses tested for differences of intercept and slope across gender, age, and education. Neither slope nor intercept differences were found for gender, but intercept differences were obtained for both age and level of education. These results indicate that younger and better educated respondents receive somewhat lower than expected ratings of depression in interviews, given their level of self-rated symptoms. These findings suggest that use of a single mode of assessment over- or underpredicts depression in certain participants. More generally, they demonstrate the value of multimethod assessment of psychopathology and justify further inquiry into mode-effect differences in clinical assessment. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Interrater Reliability of mHealth App Rating Measures: Analysis of Top Depression and Smoking Cessation Apps.

    PubMed

    Powell, Adam C; Torous, John; Chan, Steven; Raynor, Geoffrey Stephen; Shwarts, Erik; Shanahan, Meghan; Landman, Adam B

    2016-02-10

    There are over 165,000 mHealth apps currently available to patients, but few have undergone an external quality review. Furthermore, no standardized review method exists, and little has been done to examine the consistency of the evaluation systems themselves. We sought to determine which measures for evaluating the quality of mHealth apps have the greatest interrater reliability. We identified 22 measures for evaluating the quality of apps from the literature. A panel of 6 reviewers reviewed the top 10 depression apps and 10 smoking cessation apps from the Apple iTunes App Store on these measures. Krippendorff's alpha was calculated for each of the measures and reported by app category and in aggregate. The measure for interactiveness and feedback was found to have the greatest overall interrater reliability (alpha=.69). Presence of password protection (alpha=.65), whether the app was uploaded by a health care agency (alpha=.63), the number of consumer ratings (alpha=.59), and several other measures had moderate interrater reliability (alphas>.5). There was the least agreement over whether apps had errors or performance issues (alpha=.15), stated advertising policies (alpha=.16), and were easy to use (alpha=.18). There were substantial differences in the interrater reliabilities of a number of measures when they were applied to depression versus smoking apps. We found wide variation in the interrater reliability of measures used to evaluate apps, and some measures are more robust across categories of apps than others. The measures with the highest degree of interrater reliability tended to be those that involved the least rater discretion. Clinical quality measures such as effectiveness, ease of use, and performance had relatively poor interrater reliability. Subsequent research is needed to determine consistent means for evaluating the performance of apps. Patients and clinicians should consider conducting their own assessments of apps, in conjunction with

  10. Interrater Reliability of mHealth App Rating Measures: Analysis of Top Depression and Smoking Cessation Apps

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Steven; Raynor, Geoffrey Stephen; Shwarts, Erik; Shanahan, Meghan; Landman, Adam B

    2016-01-01

    Background There are over 165,000 mHealth apps currently available to patients, but few have undergone an external quality review. Furthermore, no standardized review method exists, and little has been done to examine the consistency of the evaluation systems themselves. Objective We sought to determine which measures for evaluating the quality of mHealth apps have the greatest interrater reliability. Methods We identified 22 measures for evaluating the quality of apps from the literature. A panel of 6 reviewers reviewed the top 10 depression apps and 10 smoking cessation apps from the Apple iTunes App Store on these measures. Krippendorff’s alpha was calculated for each of the measures and reported by app category and in aggregate. Results The measure for interactiveness and feedback was found to have the greatest overall interrater reliability (alpha=.69). Presence of password protection (alpha=.65), whether the app was uploaded by a health care agency (alpha=.63), the number of consumer ratings (alpha=.59), and several other measures had moderate interrater reliability (alphas>.5). There was the least agreement over whether apps had errors or performance issues (alpha=.15), stated advertising policies (alpha=.16), and were easy to use (alpha=.18). There were substantial differences in the interrater reliabilities of a number of measures when they were applied to depression versus smoking apps. Conclusions We found wide variation in the interrater reliability of measures used to evaluate apps, and some measures are more robust across categories of apps than others. The measures with the highest degree of interrater reliability tended to be those that involved the least rater discretion. Clinical quality measures such as effectiveness, ease of use, and performance had relatively poor interrater reliability. Subsequent research is needed to determine consistent means for evaluating the performance of apps. Patients and clinicians should consider conducting their

  11. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This true-color image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 28, 2002. Nyamuragira is situated roughly in the center of this scene, roughly 100 km south of Lake Edward and just north of Lake Kivu (which is mostly obscured by the haze from the erupting volcano and the numerous fires burning in the surrounding countryside). Due south of Lake Kivu is the long, narrow Lake Tanganyika running south and off the bottom center of this scene.

  12. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This true-color image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 28, 2002. Nyamuragira is situated roughly in the center of this scene, roughly 100 km south of Lake Edward and just north of Lake Kivu (which is mostly obscured by the haze from the erupting volcano and the numerous fires burning in the surrounding countryside). Due south of Lake Kivu is the long, narrow Lake Tanganyika running south and off the bottom center of this scene.

  13. Calorespirometry reveals that goldfish prioritize aerobic metabolism over metabolic rate depression in all but near-anoxic environments.

    PubMed

    Regan, Matthew D; Gill, Ivan S; Richards, Jeffrey G

    2017-02-15

    Metabolic rate depression (MRD) has long been proposed as the key metabolic strategy of hypoxic survival, but surprisingly, the effects of changes in hypoxic O2 tensions (PwO2 ) on MRD are largely unexplored. We simultaneously measured the O2 consumption rate (ṀO2 ) and metabolic heat of goldfish using calorespirometry to test the hypothesis that MRD is employed at hypoxic PwO2  values and initiated just below Pcrit, the PwO2 below which ṀO2  is forced to progressively decline as the fish oxyconforms to decreasing PwO2 Specifically, we used closed-chamber and flow-through calorespirometry together with terminal sampling experiments to examine the effects of PwO2  and time on ṀO2 , metabolic heat and anaerobic metabolism (lactate and ethanol production). The closed-chamber and flow-through experiments yielded slightly different results. Under closed-chamber conditions with a continually decreasing PwO2 , goldfish showed a Pcrit of 3.0±0.3 kPa and metabolic heat production was only depressed at PwO2  between 0 and 0.67 kPa. Under flow-through conditions with PwO2  held at a variety of oxygen tensions for 1 and 4 h, goldfish also initiated MRD between 0 and 0.67 kPa but maintained ṀO2  to 0.67 kPa, indicating that Pcrit is at or below this PwO2 Anaerobic metabolism was strongly activated at PwO2 ≤1.3 kPa, but only used within the first hour at 1.3 and 0.67 kPa, as anaerobic end-products did not accumulate between 1 and 4 h exposure. Taken together, it appears that goldfish reserve MRD for near-anoxia, supporting routine metabolic rate at sub-PcritPwO2  values with the help of anaerobic glycolysis in the closed-chamber experiments, and aerobically after an initial (<1 h) activation of anaerobic metabolism in the flow-through experiments, even at 0.67 kPa PwO2.

  14. The Chaitén 2008 eruption: explosive eruption characteristics and tephra dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, S. F. L.; Pyle, D. M.

    2012-04-01

    of cloud aggregation processes, affecting rates of fine ash fallout. The complexity of the Chaitén fall deposit, resulting from a multi-phase eruption and changing wind patterns, could only be revealed through a combination of rapid field measurements of the distal deposit and modern satellite observations. The long-term preservation of this ash deposit is likely to be extremely sparse; such effects also limit the recognition of previous eruptions. The 2008 eruption was widely cited as the first at Chaitén for ~9000 years, but recent field data shows that much more recent eruptions have occurred. These were of similar magnitude to, and in some cases far larger than, the 2008 eruption. Each of these previous eruptions also sampled a homogeneous rhyolite magma stock, stored at depths of ~10 km beneath the volcano.

  15. Impact of depression mood disorder on the adverse drug reaction incidence rate of anticancer drugs in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhou, T; Duan, J J; Zhou, G P; Cai, J Y; Huang, Z H; Zeng, Y T; Xu, F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of depression mood disorder on the incidence of adverse drug reactions of anticancer drugs in cancer patients. The Hamilton Depression Scale 17 was used to evaluate the depression mood disorder level in 73 cancer patients before chemotherapy. Pharmacists monitored adverse drug reactions during the chemotherapy period. The relationship between depression mood disorder level and the incidence of adverse drug reactions was analysed. The frequency and extent of total adverse drug reactions were not related to depression mood disorder level. The frequency and extent of subjectively experienced adverse drug reactions such as anorexia, nausea and fatigue were related to depression mood disorder level. In conclusion, psychological support and intervention should be provided to cancer patients in order to improve patient adherence and cancer chemotherapy effectiveness, and to decrease the incidence of adverse drug reactions.

  16. Long-Term Effects of a Screening Intervention for Depression on Suicide Rates among Japanese Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Sakashita, Tomoe

    2016-04-01

    To explore the long-term impact of a universal screening intervention for depression on suicide rates among older community-dwelling adults, with gender as an effect modifier. Controlled cohort study reporting long-term follow-up of previous research. Two sets of three municipalities in Japan were assigned as intervention and control regions and compared with the surrounding zone and prefecture. Intervention area residents aged 60 years and older (14,291) were invited to participate in a 2-year intervention (2005-2006). Four population-based dynamic cohorts of residents aged 65 years and older (1999-2010) were included as subjects, 6 years before and after the intervention started. At-risk residents within the intervention region (4,918) were invited for a two-step screening program; 2,552 participated in the program linked with care/support services for 2 years. An education program open to the public was held. Changes in suicide from a 6-year baseline to the 2-year intervention and a 4-year follow-up in the intervention region (11,700 adults ≥65 years) were compared with a matched control and two comparison areas using mixed-effects negative binomial regression models. Suicide rates among older adults exposed to screening were compared with those of the control region. Suicide rates in the intervention region decreased by 48%, which was significantly greater than in the three comparison areas. The program's benefits lasted longer for women than men. Screening exposure may be associated with decreased suicide risk over the 4-year follow-up. Universal screening may decrease suicide rates among older adults, with potential gender differences in treatment response. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The size and frequency of the largest explosive eruptions on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Ben G.; Pyle, David M.; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2004-12-01

    A compilation and analysis of the size and frequency of the largest known explosive eruptions on Earth are presented. The ‘largest’ explosive events are defined to be those eruptions yielding greater than 1015 kg of products (>150 times the mass of the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo). This includes all known eruptions with a volcanic explosivity index (VEI) of 8. A total of 47 such events, ranging in age from Ordovician to Pleistocene, are identified, of which 42 eruptions are known from the past 36 Ma. A logarithmic ‘magnitude’ scale of eruption size is applied, based on erupted mass, to these events. On this scale, 46 eruptions >1015 kg are defined to be of magnitude M8. There is one M9 event known so far, the Fish Canyon Tuff, with an erupted mass of >1016 kg and a magnitude of 9.2. Analysis of this dataset indicates that eruptions of size M8 and larger have occurred with a minimum frequency of ≈1.4 events/Ma in two pulses over the past 36 Ma. On the basis of the activity during the past 13.5 Ma, there is at least a 75% probability of a M8 eruption (>1015 kg) occurring within the next 1 Ma. There is a 1% chance of an eruption of this scale in the next 460 7,200 years. While the effect of any individual M8 or larger eruption is considerable, the time-averaged impact (i.e., erupted mass×frequency) of the very largest eruptions is small, due to their rarity. The long-term, time-averaged erupted mass flux from magnitude 8 and 9 eruptions is ~10 100 times less than for M7 eruptions; the time-averaged mass eruption rate from M7 eruptions is 9,500 kg s-1, whereas for M8 and M9 eruptions it is ~70 1,000 kg s-1. Comparison of the energy release by volcanic eruptions with that due to asteroid impacts suggests that on timescales of <100,000 years, explosive volcanic eruptions are considerably more frequent than impacts of similar energy yield. This has important implications for understanding the risk of extreme events.

  18. Radiative and climate impacts of a large volcanic eruption during stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, A.; Kokkola, H.; Partanen, A.-I.; Niemeier, U.; Timmreck, C.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Hakkarainen, H.; Korhonen, H.

    2016-01-01

    Both explosive volcanic eruptions, which emit sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere, and stratospheric geoengineering via sulfur injections can potentially cool the climate by increasing the amount of scattering particles in the atmosphere. Here we employ a global aerosol-climate model and an Earth system model to study the radiative and climate changes occurring after an erupting volcano during solar radiation management (SRM). According to our simulations the radiative impacts of the eruption and SRM are not additive and the radiative effects and climate changes occurring after the eruption depend strongly on whether SRM is continued or suspended after the eruption. In the former case, the peak burden of the additional stratospheric sulfate as well as changes in global mean precipitation are fairly similar regardless of whether the eruption takes place in a SRM or non-SRM world. However, the maximum increase in the global mean radiative forcing caused by the eruption is approximately 21 % lower compared to a case when the eruption occurs in an unperturbed atmosphere. In addition, the recovery of the stratospheric sulfur burden and radiative forcing is significantly faster after the eruption, because the eruption during the SRM leads to a smaller number and larger sulfate particles compared to the eruption in a non-SRM world. On the other hand, if SRM is suspended immediately after the eruption, the peak increase in global forcing caused by the eruption is about 32 % lower compared to a corresponding eruption into a clean background atmosphere. In this simulation, only about one-third of the global ensemble-mean cooling occurs after the eruption, compared to that occurring after an eruption under unperturbed atmospheric conditions. Furthermore, the global cooling signal is seen only for the 12 months after the eruption in the former scenario compared to over 40 months in the latter. In terms of global precipitation rate, we obtain a 36 % smaller decrease in the

  19. How to compare scores from different depression scales: equating the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) and the ICD-10-Symptom Rating (ISR) using Item Response Theory.

    PubMed

    Fischer, H Felix; Tritt, Karin; Klapp, Burghard F; Fliege, Herbert

    2011-12-01

    A wide range of questionnaires for measuring depression are available. Item Response Theory models can help to evaluate the questionnaires exceeding the boundaries of Classical Test Theory and provide an opportunity to equate the questionnaires. In this study after checking for unidimensionality, a General Partial Credit Model was applied to data from two different depression scales [Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and ICD-10-Symptom Rating (ISR)] obtained in clinical settings from a consecutive sample, including 4517 observations from a total of 2999 inpatients and outpatients of a psychosomatic clinic. The precision of each questionnaire was compared and the model was used to transform scores based on the assumed underlying latent trait. Both instruments were constructed to measure the same construct and their estimates of depression severity are highly correlated. Our analysis showed that the predicted scores provided by the conversion tables are similar to the observed scores in a validation sample. The PHQ-9 and ISR depression scales measure depression severity across a broad range with similar precision. While the PHQ-9 shows advantages in measuring low or high depression severity, the ISR is more parsimonious and also suitable for clinical purposes. Furthermore, the equation tables derived in this study enhance the comparability of studies using either one of the instruments, but due to substantial statistical spread the comparison of individual scores is imprecise. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Explosive dynamics of violent Strombolian eruptions: The eruption of Parícutin Volcano 1943 1952 (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioli, L.; Erlund, E.; Johnson, E.; Cashman, K.; Wallace, P.; Rosi, M.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2008-07-01

    Violent Strombolian is a term that was originally used by MacDonald [Macdonald, G.A., 1972. Volcanoes, Prentice-Hall inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 510 pp.] to describe energetic Strombolian eruptions such as some of the more explosive phases of the 1943-1952 eruption of Parícutin Volcano (Michoacán, central Mexico), eruptions that disperse 'showers of incandescent cinder and bombs…to heights of a few thousand feet' and during which 'a great black ash cloud rises above the volcano'. Here we re-examine accounts of the Parícutin eruption and compare them with new stratigraphic data and physical features of the tephra deposit to improve the definition of violent Strombolian activity and to better elucidate the mechanisms that can cause this distinctive eruptive style. We find characteristic violent Strombolian activity to be strongly pulsatory, with production of moderately high eruption columns (2-6 km) that eject abundant fine ash. Also characteristic is simultaneous lava effusion from lateral vents. At Parícutin, violent Strombolian activity occurred at magma eruption rates of 10 4 to 10 5 kg/s, intermediate between Strombolian and subplinian rates. A progressive decline in magma flux during the eruption led to a decrease in the relative proportion of both erupted tephra and glassy vesicular fragments in the fallout layers. Eruption characteristics can be explained by varying degrees of shallow gas segregation from water-rich basaltic magma that modulate both transitions between two-phase flow regimes in the upper conduit and effusion of degassed lava from the base of the cone.

  1. Late-stage stretching and subsidence rates in the Danakil Depression, evidenced from borehole records and seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Adam; Bastow, Ian; Magee, Craig; Keir, Derek; Corti, Giacomo; Jackson, Chris; Wilkinson, Jason

    2016-04-01

    The Ethiopian and Afar Rift systems provide a globally unique opportunity to study the incipient transition from continental rifting to sea-floor spreading. A consensus has emerged that a considerable proportion of plate extension in Ethiopia is accommodated by dyke intrusion, with smaller contributions from crustal thinning. However, observations of thinned crust and a pulse in Quaternary-Recent basaltic volcanism within Ethiopia's Danakil Depression have been cited (Bastow and Keir, 2011) as evidence that localised plate stretching may mark the final stages of continent-ocean transition. We explore this hypothesis using an archive of five 2-D seismic reflection profiles, each between 7-10 km in length, and ˜120 borehole records distributed over an area of 225 km2. From depth and age relationships of key marker horizons, we also suggest local subsidence and extension rates. The borehole archive reveals extensive evaporite sequences deposited in and around an asymmetric basin, bounded to the west by a network of east-dipping normal faults. West of the basin, the maximum observed thickness of evaporites is 150 m, beneath which are deposits of clastic sediment, but a sequence of evaporites at least 900 m thick is observed at the basin centre. The sedimentary architecture of these sequences suggests deposition in a shallow salt-pan environment, with seasonal - potentially diurnal - freshening of the brine supply (Warren, 2012). Isotopic analysis of reef carbonates in the basin flank dates the last marine incursion into the Danakil Depression at 24-230ka (Lalou et al., 1970; Bonatti et al., 1971; Bannert et al., 1971), therefore the evaporite sequence must be younger than this. A key marker horizon within the evaporites is the potash-bearing Houston Formation, also distinct in borehole records given its high porosity (25-40%) and radioactivity (50-250 API units). The elevation of the Houston Formation is ˜500 m deeper in the centre of the basin than on the flank

  2. Maternal depressive symptoms at three months postpartum and breastfeeding rates at six months postpartum: Implications for primary care in a prospective cohort study of primiparous women in Australia.

    PubMed

    Woolhouse, Hannah; James, Jennifer; Gartland, Deirdre; McDonald, Ellie; Brown, Stephanie J

    2016-08-01

    The World Health Organisation recommends exclusive breastfeeding to six months postpartum, but most women in developed countries do not breastfeed this long. Prior studies exploring the relationship between breastfeeding duration and maternal depression show ambiguous findings. To explore associations between maternal depressive symptoms at three months postpartum, and breastfeeding status over the first six months postpartum. Prospective pregnancy cohort study of nulliparous women. 1507 women were recruited from six public hospitals in early pregnancy, completing baseline data in early pregnancy (mean gestation 15 weeks). Follow-up questionnaires were completed at three and six months postpartum. Women reported how many months they breastfed for (breastfeeding refers to 'any' breastfeeding, including expressed breastmilk). Depressive symptoms were measured at three months postpartum with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (scores ≥13 indicated probable major depression). Of the almost 95% of women who initiated breastfeeding, 76% were still breastfeeding at three months postpartum, and by six months postpartum this dropped to 61%. Women who reported depressive symptoms at three months had significantly lower rates of breastfeeding at six months postpartum compared to women without depressive symptoms (49% vs. 61%; adjusted OR=0.55, 95% CI 0.34-0.90). Maternal social characteristics associated with not breastfeeding at six months postpartum were: young maternal age; lower education; and smoking in pregnancy. Women's decisions around infant-feeding are influenced by a range of psycho-social factors, and early postnatal depressive symptoms appear to be a significant part of this picture, as either a cause or consequence of decisions to cease breastfeeding. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. The comparison of anxiety and depression rate between medical staff of infertility centers and obstetrics and gynecology centers of Yazd, Shiraz, Isfahan and Kerman hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Pourmovahed, Zahra; Yassini Ardekani, Seyed Mojtaba; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Halvaei, Iman; Nabi, Ali; Ghasemi, Mojdeh; Fesahat, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Regarding the close and continuous interaction of infertility staff with hopeless infertile couples and in the contrary the atmosphere of happiness especially in obstetric wards make a sense that considering anxiety and depression it would be a difference between these two wards. Objective: The objective of this study is the comparison of the rate of depression and anxiety between the two wards of infertility and obstetrics and gynecology. Materials and Methods: This study is a descriptive-correlation study based on cross-sectional method. 199 individuals who were the staff of infertility and obstetrics and gynecology wards in four provinces enrolled in this study through stratified sampling. Data collection was done by demographic questionnaire, Spiel Berger and Beck depression inventory tests. Data were analyzed by SPSS software using ANOVA test. Results: The result showed the rate of anxiety in obstetrics and gynecology staff of Isfahan center (54.69±13.58) and depression rate had increased level in infertility staff of Shiraz center (14.94±10.87). Overall, there was significant correlation between anxiety, depression and work place (p=0.047, 0.008 respectively). According to ANOVA test, the mean value of anxiety level was higher in the staff of four obstetrics and gynecology centers and one infertility center Conclusion: As long as we know that infertile couples have little chance for success rate and obstetrics and gynecology wards patients have little risk of failure in treatment, it could be mentioned that the anxiety and depression in the staff are not correlated with the client illness. PMID:24799878

  4. Switch Rates During Acute Treatment for Bipolar II Depression With Lithium, Sertraline, or the Two Combined: A Randomized Double-Blind Comparison.

    PubMed

    Altshuler, Lori L; Sugar, Catherine A; McElroy, Susan L; Calimlim, Brian; Gitlin, Michael; Keck, Paul E; Aquino-Elias, Ana; Martens, Brian E; Fischer, E Grace; English, Teri L; Roach, Janine; Suppes, Trisha

    2017-03-01

    The authors compared medication-induced mood switch risk (primary outcome), as well as treatment response and side effects (secondary outcomes) with three acute-phase treatments for bipolar II depression. In a 16-week, double-blind, multisite comparison study, 142 participants with bipolar II depression were randomly assigned to receive lithium monotherapy (N=49), sertraline monotherapy (N=45), or combination treatment with lithium and sertraline (N=48). At each visit, mood was assessed using standardized rating scales. Rates of switch were compared, as were rates of treatment response and the presence and severity of treatment-emergent side effects. Twenty participants (14%) experienced a switch during the study period (hypomania, N=17; severe hypomania, N=3). Switch rates did not differ among the three treatment groups, even after accounting for dropout. No patient had a manic switch or was hospitalized for a switch. Most switches occurred within the first 5 weeks of treatment. The treatment response rate for the overall sample was 62.7% (N=89), without significant differences between groups after accounting for dropout. The lithium/sertraline combination group had a significantly higher overall dropout rate than the monotherapy groups but did not have an accelerated time to response. Lithium monotherapy, sertraline monotherapy, and lithium/sertraline combination therapy were associated with similar switch and treatment response rates in participants with bipolar II depression. The dropout rate was higher in the lithium/sertraline combination treatment group, without any treatment acceleration advantage.

  5. Novel Interpretation for Shift Between Eruptive Styles in Some Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polacci, Margherita; Rosi, Mauro; Landi, Patrizia; Di Muro, Andrea; Papale, Paolo

    2005-09-01

    The transition from effusive, low mass flow rate to explosive, high mass flow rate eruptive behavior is a common aspect of the activity of calc- alkaline volcanoes. However, the process driving the shift between the two eruptive styles is at present debatable and represents a topical theme in the volcanological literature. The main challenge is to understand the mechanism that allows a high mass flow rate when eruptions of highly porphyritic (>=40 vol % crystals) and viscous magmas (>106 Pas, pascal second) occur. In this article, volcanological, compositional, and textural observations are used to demonstrate that viscous dissipation, a process that develops heating within flowing magma in a boundary layer near the conduit walls due to friction, is responsible for the long-lasting, sustained explosive phases of this eruption type, as well as for the transition from effusive to explosive behavior.

  6. Eruption of magmatic foams on the Moon: Formation in the waning stages of dike emplacement events as an explanation of ;irregular mare patches;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Lionel; Head, James W.

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions on the Moon take place in conditions of low gravity and negligible atmospheric pressure, very different from those on Earth. These differences lead to characteristic lunar versions of hawaiian and strombolian explosive activity, and to the production of unusual eruption products neither predicted nor observed on Earth in the terminal stages of eruptions. These include the unusual mounds and rough (hummocky, blocky) floors of some small-shield summit pit crater floors, elongate depressions and mare flows (similar to those named ;irregular mare patches;, IMPs, by Braden et al., 2014). We examine the ascent and eruption of magma in the waning stages of the eruptive process in small-shield summit pit crater floors and show that many IMP characteristics can be plausibly explained by basaltic magma behavior as the rise rate of the ascending magma slows to zero, volatiles exsolve in the dike and lava lake to form a very vesicular foam, and the dike begins to close. Stresses in the very vesicular and porous lava lake crust produce fractures through which the foam extrudes at a rate determined by its non-Newtonian rheology. Waning-stage extrusion of viscous magmatic foams to the surface produces convex mounds whose physical properties inhibit typical impact crater formation and regolith development, creating an artificially young crater retention age. This mechanism for the production and extrusion of very vesicular magmatic foams is also applicable to waning-stage dike closure associated with pit craters atop dikes, and fissure eruptions in the lunar maria, providing an explanation for many irregular mare patches. This mechanism implies that IMPs and associated mare structures (small shields, pit craters and fissure flows) formed synchronously billions of years ago, in contrast to very young ages (less than 100 million years) proposed for IMPs by some workers.

  7. Increased depressive ratings in patients with hepatitis C receiving interferon-alpha-based immunotherapy are related to interferon-alpha-induced changes in the serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Stefania; Marino, Valentina; Puzella, Antonella; Pasquini, Massimo; Biondi, Massimo; Artini, Marco; Almerighi, Cristiana; Verkerk, Robert; Meltzer, Herbert; Maes, Michael

    2002-02-01

    There is now evidence that repeated administration of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) to patients with chronic active hepatitis and cancers induces depressive symptoms. There is also evidence that induction of the cytokine network modulates the serotonergic system and that major depression is related to activation of the cytokine network and disturbances in the serotonergic metabolism. The aims of this study were to examine the effects of IFN-alpha-based immunotherapy on the development of depressive symptoms in relation to its effects on plasma tryptophan and kynurenine and serum serotonin (5-HT). Eighteen patients affected by chronic active hepatitis C were treated with IFN-alpha (3-6 million units subcutaneously three to six times a week for 6 months) and had measurements of the previous parameters before starting immunotherapy and 2, 4, 16, and 24 weeks later. Severity of depression and anxiety were measured with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A) scale, respectively. Immunochemotherapy with IFN-alpha (1) significantly increased the MADRS and HAM-A scores and serum kynurenine concentrations and (2) significantly reduced plasma tryptophan and serum 5-HT concentrations. IFN-alpha-based immunotherapy significantly increased the kynurenine per tryptophan quotient, which estimates the activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, the major tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme, which is induced by IFNs. There are significant relationships between the IFN-alpha-induced changes in the MADRS score and serum kynurenine (positive) and 5-HT (negative) concentrations. Immunotherapy with IFN-alpha significantly increases the severity of depressive symptoms. The latter is related to changes in the serotonergic system, such as depletion of serum 5-HT and induction of the catabolism of tryptophan to kynurenine. It is suggested that the IFN-alpha-induced changes in the serotonergic turnover could play a role in the

  8. The Campanian Ignimbrite eruption: inferring eruption characteristics from distal submarine deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engwell, S. L.; Sparks, R. S.; Carey, S.; Aspinall, W.

    2011-12-01

    The magnitudes of large explosive eruptions are characterized almost exclusively from tephra deposits in sub-aerial locations. This information is biased because such areas are subject to high rates of erosion: depending upon the climate of the area, eruption deposits can be completely lost within the space of a few decades. In contrast, deposits in deep-sea and lake environments can survive over much longer timescales than those found on land and, on regional scales, they tend to be much better preserved than the equivalent sub-aerial deposits. This study uses grain-size distributions and thicknesses of ash layers in deep-sea cores to determine key parameters for characterizing the Campanian Ignimbrite eruption. Cores from the Trident 171 and 172 cruises were analysed in addition to those from the Marion Dufresne MD81 cruise. These cores come from all across the Eastern Mediterranean and therefore sample a large portion of the overall area affected by pyroclastic products dispersed during the eruption. Variabilities in the thickness of the deposit in the deep-sea environment arise not only from eruption source complexity and dispersion effects but also from syn- and post-depositional processes. Therefore, thickness measurements of tephra layers in cores are assessed in terms of their reliability for estimating the magnitude of eruption. Because the grain-size distribution of a submarine deposit is resistant to such disruption, this information provides a more reliable source of information regarding primary eruption characteristics and can thus be used to weight thickness measurements appropriately for magnitude estimation. In addition, deposits in deep-sea cores tend to be mainly distal; these data can be compared with information from sub-aerial deposits at equivalent distances for further assessment of data reliability.

  9. Models of volcanic eruption hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

  10. Models of volcanic eruption hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.H.

    1992-06-01

    Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

  11. Social capital - a mixed blessing for women? A cross-sectional study of different forms of social relations and self-rated depression in Moscow.

    PubMed

    Ferlander, Sara; Stickley, Andrew; Kislitsyna, Olga; Jukkala, Tanya; Carlson, Per; Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik

    2016-07-22

    Depression is a major health problem worldwide, especially among women. The condition has been related to a number of factors, such as alcohol consumption, economic situation and, more recently, to social capital. However, there have been relatively few studies about the social capital-depression relationship in Eastern Europe. This paper aims to fill this gap by examining the association between different forms of social capital and self-rated depression in Moscow. Differences between men and women will also be examined, with a special focus on women. Data was obtained from the Moscow Health Survey, which was conducted in 2004 with 1190 Muscovites aged 18 years or above. For depression, a single-item self-reported measure was used. Social capital was operationalised through five questions about different forms of social relations. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to estimate the association between social capital and self-rated depression, separately for men and women. More women (48 %) than men (36 %) reported that they had felt depressed during the last year. An association was found between social capital and reported depression only among women. Women who were divorced or widowed or who had little contact with relatives had higher odds of reporting depression than those with more family contact. Women who regularly engaged with people from different age groups outside of their families were also more likely to report depression than those with less regular contact. Social capital can be a mixed blessing for women. Different forms of social relations can lead to different health outcomes, both positive and negative. Although the family is important for women's mental health in Moscow, extra-familial relations across age groups can be mentally distressing. This suggests that even though social capital can be a valuable resource for mental health, some of its forms can be mentally deleterious to maintain, especially for women. More research is

  12. Mass and style of eruptions in experimental geysers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toramaru, Atsushi; Maeda, Kazuki

    2013-05-01

    In the present study, we conducted laboratory experiments of geysers to reproduce the time predictability of natural geysers in Yellowstone and other geothermal areas. We measured pressure and temperature in a hot water chamber, flux from a cold water reservoir, and mass erupted by each eruption (total number of eruptions are up to 100), varying experimental conditions such as the heating rate, water quality, and system geometry. We observed two styles of eruptions, "jet" and "flow" depending on the maximum height reached. Under some conditions, only jet events occurred, while under other conditions, jet and flow events co-occurred. Based on the statistical analysis of the erupted mass, an experiment setup that produces only jet events exhibits a narrower frequency distribution with a relatively large average mass. As the proportion of flow events increases, the frequency distribution of the erupted mass widens with relatively small average mass. The temperature measurements indicated that jet-dominated experimental setups had smaller temperature fluctuations than flow-dominated setup. We proposed a triggering condition involving boiling of water that defined the onset of an eruption. We assumed two thresholds of the efficiency of decompression boiling that defined explosivity and eruption development on the basis of hydrodynamic energetics. Using the triggering condition and the two thresholds, to explain experimental correlations between erupted mass, eruption style, and the magnitude of thermal fluctuation, we conducted a Monte Carlo simulation in a square consisting of 256 × 256 parcels with the superheating temperature as a stochastic variable by a Gaussian probability density function (PDF). The results showed that when the PDF has a larger average and smaller standard deviation, the event tends to be explosive and large fraction of water is evacuated, as in jet events. Decreasing the average temperature or increasing the standard deviation of the PDF shifts

  13. Voltage- and time-dependent depression of maximum rate of depolarization of guinea-pig ventricular action potentials by two steroidal antiarrhythmic drugs, CCI 22277 and ORG 6001.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    1 The voltage- and time-dependence of the depression of the maximum rate of depolarization (Vmax) by two steroidal anti-arrhythmic drugs, CCI22277 and Org 6001 were studied in guinea-pig ventricle. 2 At normal resting potentials CCI22277 (2 microM and 4 microM) produced very little depression of Vmax at very low driving rates (resting block) but trains of stimuli at interstimulus intervals (ISI) of less than 10,000 ms led to an exponential decline in Vmax to a new plateau over 100-200 beats. 3 This 'rate-dependent block' (RDB) increased with rate over the range ISI=4800 to ISI=200 ms. 4 Org 6001 30 microM and 60 microM produced a similar degree of RDB over the same range of frequencies but the new plateau level of Vmax was reached much more rapidly (20-30 beats) and there was a moderate degree of depression of Vmax in the resting tissue. 5 Recovery from RDB in the presence of both drugs was an exponential process with time constants (tau re) of 80.4 +/- 7.4 s for CCI22277 and 4.6 +/- 0.5 s for Org 6001. 6 Both drugs shifted the steady-state inactivation curve, relating Vmax to resting membrane potential, in the hyperpolarizing direction, implying selective depression of depolarized cells. PMID:7139201

  14. The Diagnostic Drawing Series and the Tree Rating Scale: An Isomorphic Representation of Multiple Personality Disorder, Major Depression, and Schizophrenic Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Maureen Batza

    1995-01-01

    The tree drawings of 80 subjects, who were diagnosed with either multiple personality disorder, schizophrenia, or major depression, and a control group, were rated. Patterns were examined and graphs were used to depict results. Certain features were found to distinguish each category. The descriptive statistical findings were both consistent and…

  15. The Diagnostic Drawing Series and the Tree Rating Scale: An Isomorphic Representation of Multiple Personality Disorder, Major Depression, and Schizophrenic Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Maureen Batza

    1995-01-01

    The tree drawings of 80 subjects, who were diagnosed with either multiple personality disorder, schizophrenia, or major depression, and a control group, were rated. Patterns were examined and graphs were used to depict results. Certain features were found to distinguish each category. The descriptive statistical findings were both consistent and…

  16. Utility of patch testing for patients with drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Ohtoshi, S; Kitami, Y; Sueki, H; Nakada, T

    2014-04-01

    Patch testing is less dangerous than oral provocation testing for identification of the causative drug for patients with drug eruption; however, its usefulness for such identification is controversial. To clarify the rates of positive patch testing for patients with drug eruption, classified by causative drugs and clinical features. We analysed results during the period 1990-2010 for 444 patients (151 men, 293 women; mean ± SD age 49.9 ± 18.6 years) who were tested for drug eruption. In the patient group, there were 309 people (69.1%) with maculopapular eruption and 31 (6.9%) with severe drug eruption. The test materials were applied to the back and left for 2 days under occlusion, then results were assessed by the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG) scoring system 3 days after application. Reactions of + to +++ were regarded as positive. Of the 444 patients, 100 (22.4%) had a positive patch test result to a suspected drug. Positive rates were 23.6% and 20.0% for maculopapular eruption and fixed drug eruption, respectively. The class of materials to which most patients reacted positively was contrast medium (n = 53; 41.1%), followed by drugs acting on the central nervous system (n = 18; 28.6%). In the latter group, 16 of the 18 patients were positive to antiepileptics. Positive rates depend on the causative drug rather than the clinical features of the drug eruption. Patch testing is useful when contrast medium or antiepileptics are suspected to be the causative drugs. However, standardization of patch test materials and method of reading is needed, as well as guidelines regarding when testing should be performed. Although patch testing for drug eruption has significant potential, it requires further validation. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Association of Dermatologists.

  17. Self-Rated Pubertal Development, Depressive Symptoms and Delinquency: Measurement Issues and Moderation by Gender and Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Negriff, Sonya; Fung, Michelle T.; Trickett, Penelope K.

    2008-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined relationships between pubertal developm