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  1. Depression and Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Marie A.

    Mentally retarded people may be particularly vulnerable to depression and related emotional disturbances due to limited social skills, lack of friends, and negative self-esteem. A therapy group for depressed retarded clients provided an opportunity to collect information about depression in retarded individuals and to evaluate various treatment…

  2. Mental depression and kundalini yoga.

    PubMed

    Devi, S K; Chansauria, J P; Udupa, K N

    1986-10-01

    In cases of mental depression, the plasma serotonin, melatonin and glutamate levels are increased along with the lowering of urinary - 5 - hydroxyindole acetic acid, plasma monoamine oxidase and cortisol levels following three and six months Practice of Kundalini Yoga. The pulse rate and blood pressure in these patients are also lowered after Kundalini Yoga practice. Thus, the practice of Kundalini Yoga helps to maintain a perfect homeostasis by bringing an equilibrium between the sympathetic and parasympathetic activities and it can be used as a non - medical measure in treating patients with mental depression.

  3. Identifying Depression in Students with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stough, Laura M.; Baker, Lynn

    1999-01-01

    Offers guidelines to teachers for identifying depression in students with mental retardation. Discusses prevalence and symptoms of depression, causes of depression, difficulty of diagnosis in students with mental retardation, detecting symptoms in the classroom, treatment of depression, and psychological services. Inserts list ideas for helping…

  4. Identifying Depression in Students with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stough, Laura M.; Baker, Lynn

    1999-01-01

    Offers guidelines to teachers for identifying depression in students with mental retardation. Discusses prevalence and symptoms of depression, causes of depression, difficulty of diagnosis in students with mental retardation, detecting symptoms in the classroom, treatment of depression, and psychological services. Inserts list ideas for helping…

  5. Chronic pain and comorbid mental health conditions: independent associations of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression with pain, disability, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Outcalt, Samantha D; Kroenke, Kurt; Krebs, Erin E; Chumbler, Neale R; Wu, Jingwei; Yu, Zhangsheng; Bair, Matthew J

    2015-06-01

    Both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression are highly comorbid with chronic pain and have deleterious effects on pain and treatment outcomes, but the nature of the relationships among chronic pain, PTSD, and depression has not been fully elucidated. This study examined 250 Veterans Affairs primary care patients with moderate to severe chronic musculoskeletal pain who participated in a randomized controlled pain treatment trial. Baseline data were analyzed to examine the independent associations of PTSD and major depression with multiple domains of pain, psychological status, quality of life, and disability. PTSD was strongly associated with these variables and in multivariate models, PTSD and major depression each had strong independent associations with these domains. PTSD demonstrated similar relationships as major depression with psychological, quality of life, and disability outcomes and significant but somewhat smaller associations with pain. Because PTSD and major depression have independent negative associations with pain, psychological status, quality of life, and disability, it is important for clinicians to recognize and treat both mental disorders in patients with chronic pain.

  6. Perinatal depression: implications for child mental health

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Perinatal depression is common and primary care holds a crucial role for detecting, treating or, if necessary, providing referrals to mental health care for affected women. Family doctors should be aware of risk factors for peripartum depression, including previous history of depression, life events and interpersonal conflict. Perinatal depression has been associated with many poor outcomes, including maternal, child and family unit challenges. Infants and young children of perinatally depressed mothers are more likely to have a difficult temperament, as well as cognitive and emotional delays. The primary care setting is uniquely poised to be the screening and treatment site for perinatal depression; however, several obstacles, both at patient and systems level, have been identified that interfere with women's treatment engagement. Current published treatment guidelines favour psychotherapy above medicines as first line treatment for mild to moderate perinatal depression, while pharmacotherapy is first choice for severe depression, often in combination with psychosocial or integrative approaches. Among mothers who decide to stop taking their antidepressants despite ongoing depression during the perinatal period, the majority suffer from relapsing symptoms. If depression continues post‐partum, there is an increased risk of poor mother–infant attachment, delayed cognitive and linguistic skills in the infant, impaired emotional development and risk for behavioural problems in later life. Complex, comprehensive and multilevel algorithms are warranted to treat perinatal depression. Primary care doctors are best suited to initiate, carry out and evaluate the effectiveness of such interventions designed to prevent adverse outcomes of maternal perinatal depression on mother and child wellbeing. PMID:22477948

  7. A systematic review of evidence for fitness-to-drive among people with the mental health conditions of schizophrenia, stress/anxiety disorder, depression, personality disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Unsworth, Carolyn A; Baker, Anne M; So, Man H; Harries, Priscilla; O'Neill, Desmond

    2017-08-31

    Limited evidence exists regarding fitness-to-drive for people with the mental health conditions of schizophrenia, stress/anxiety disorder, depression, personality disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder (herein simply referred to as 'mental health conditions'). The aim of this paper was to systematically search and classify all published studies regarding driving for this population, and then critically appraise papers addressing assessment of fitness-to-drive where the focus was not on the impact of medication on driving. A systematic search of three databases (CINAHL, PSYCHINFO, EMBASE) was completed from inception to May 2016 to identify all articles on driving and mental health conditions. Papers meeting the eligibility criteria of including data relating to assessment of fitness-to-drive were critically appraised using the American Academy of Neurology and Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine protocols. A total of 58 articles met the inclusion criteria of driving among people with mental health conditions studied, and of these, 16 contained data and an explicit focus on assessment of fitness-to-drive. Assessment of fitness-to-drive was reported in three ways: 1) factors impacting on the ability to drive safely among people with mental health conditions, 2) capability and perception of health professionals assessing fitness-to-drive of people with mental health conditions, and 3) crash rates. The level of evidence of the published studies was low due to the absence of controls, and the inability to pool data from different diagnostic groups. Evidence supporting fitness-to-drive is conflicting. There is a relatively small literature in the area of driving with mental health conditions, and the overall quality of studies examining fitness-to-drive is low. Large-scale longitudinal studies with age-matched controls are urgently needed in order to determine the effects of different conditions on fitness-to-drive.

  8. Expanded mental health benefits and outpatient depression treatment intensity.

    PubMed

    Lo Sasso, Anthony T; Lindrooth, Richard C; Lurie, Ithai Z; Lyons, John S

    2006-04-01

    The justification for higher cost-sharing for behavioral health treatment is its greater price sensitivity relative to general healthcare treatment. Despite this, recent policy efforts have focused on improving access to behavioral health treatment. We measured the effects on outpatient treatment of depression of a change in mental health benefits for employees of a large U.S.-based corporation. The benefit change involved 3 major elements: reduced copayments for mental health treatment, the implementation of a selective contracting network, and an effort to destigmatize mental illness. Claims data and a difference-in-differences methodology were used to examine how the benefit change affected outpatient treatment of depression. Subjects consisted of 214,517 employee-years of data for individuals who were continuously enrolled for at least 1 full year at the intervention company and 96,365 employee-years in the control group. We measured initiation into treatment of depression and the number of outpatient therapy visits. The benefit change was associated with a 26% increase in the probability of initiating depression treatment. Conditional on initiating treatment, patients in the intervention company received 1.2 additional (P < 0.001) outpatient mental health treatment visits relative to the control group. Our results suggest that the overall effect of the company's benefit change was to significantly increase the number of outpatient visits per episode of treatment conditional on treatment initiation.

  9. Induced optimism as mental rehearsal to decrease depressive predictive certainty.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Regina; Weierich, Mariann; Khait, Valerie; Jurska, Justyna; Andersen, Susan M

    2017-03-01

    The present study examined whether practice in making optimistic future-event predictions would result in change in the hopelessness-related cognitions that characterize depression. Individuals (N = 170) with low, mild, and moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms were randomly assigned to a condition in which they practiced making optimistic future-event predictions or to a control condition in which they viewed the same stimuli but practiced determining whether a given phrase contained an adjective. Overall, individuals in the induced optimism condition showed increases in optimistic predictions, relative to the control condition, as a result of practice, but only individuals with moderate-to-severe symptoms of depression who practiced making optimistic future-event predictions showed decreases in depressive predictive certainty, relative to the control condition. In addition, they showed gains in efficiency in making optimistic predictions over the practice blocks, as assessed by response time. There was no difference in depressed mood by practice condition. Mental rehearsal might be one way of changing the hopelessness-related cognitions that characterize depression.

  10. Measuring depression and stigma towards depression and mental health treatment among adolescents in an Arab-American community

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, R.M.; Farroukh, M.; Ismail, M.; Najda, J.; Sobh, H.; Hammad, A.; Dalack, G.W.

    2014-01-01

    There has been limited research that has examined the prevalence of depression and attitudes towards depression and mental health treatment in Arab-American adolescents; we sought to assess these in a predominantly Arab-American community in metro Detroit. A health survey of adolescents aged 12–17 years was conducted (n=98). Participants were recruited from two local community organizations in Dearborn, MI. Depression was assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) Depression Scale, and attitude towards depression and willingness to seek help for mental health conditions were assessed by the Self-Stigma of Depression Scale (SSDS). To assess whether attitudes might be affected by information about mental health treatment, adolescents were randomized to view either an educational video about mental health, or a control video before responding to questions about their willingness to seek help for mental health conditions. Overall, 14% of Arab-American adolescents in this study endorsed moderate or moderately severe depression (PHQ-9 ≥ 11), suggesting a need to increase awareness of and access to mental health services and screening for Arab-American youth. PMID:26257824

  11. Mental health in senior housing: racial/ethnic patterns and correlates of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Robison, Julie; Schensul, Jean J; Coman, Emil; Diefenbach, Gretchen J; Radda, Kim E; Gaztambide, Sonia; Disch, William B

    2009-09-01

    Mental health problems are associated with disability, overuse of medical care, higher rates of mortality and suicide as well as personal suffering for older adults. Residents of urban, low-income senior housing may face increased risk of a variety of mental health problems, including depression. This study identified the prevalence of multiple mental health problems in older residents of low-income senior housing and explored correlates of major depressive disorder for the two largest ethnic groups: black and Latino. In-person diagnostic interviews identified rates of mental illness in a sample of 635 residents of 13 low-income senior housing buildings in a medium-sized northeastern city. Applying George's Social Antecedent Model of Depression, logistic regression analyses identified shared and unique correlates of depression for Latino and black participants. This population had high rates of major depressive disorder (26%), generalized anxiety disorder (12%) and other mental health problems that varied significantly by ethnic and racial group. Separate multivariate models for Latino and black people showed that younger age, more chronic conditions and social distress were related to major depressive disorder for both ethnic groups. Perceived environmental stress, shorter tenure in the building, poorer perceived health, higher life stress and fewer leisure activities were associated with depression for Latinos only. Mental health screening and treatment services are needed in senior housing to address these high rates of mental illness. Unique constellations of correlates of depression for different ethnic groups underscore a need for culturally competent approaches to identification and treatment.

  12. Depressive Symptoms Displayed by Persons with Mental Retardation: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawlarcyzk, Douglas; Beckwith, Bill E.

    1987-01-01

    The applicability of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders III" diagnostic criteria for "Major Depressive Episode" within a population of persons with mild and moderate mental retardation was validated by reviewing reports of severe depression among these individuals. (Author/DB)

  13. [Depressive symptoms and motor condition in Parkinson's disease patients].

    PubMed

    Stella, F; Bucken-Gobbi, L T; Gobbi, S; Sant'Ana-Simões, C

    Complex relations between brain and psychopathology have attracted the interest of researchers, aiming to clarify the neurobiological mechanisms of depression in Parkinson's disease, obviously in addiction to mental features. The association of motor impairment and decline of personal autonomy with severity of depressive symptoms was the hypothesis of the present study. Aiming to check this hypothesis, the objective of this study consisted in investigating relationships between the severity of depressive symptoms and motor characteristics of Parkinson's disease. Thirty patients (53 to 80 year-old) with medical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease in initial clinic stages were studied. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, Hoehn-Yahr Scale, and Schwab & England Scale were used to assess the clinic signs and symptoms. The depressive symptoms were identified by complete anamnesis, examination of mental condition, and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the Anxiety and Depression Scale. Statistical analysis was performed by Pearson's correlation and multiple regression analysis. A significant correlation of severity of depression symptoms with disease stage (p < 0.02), with motor signs (p < 0.008), and with functional performance (p < 0.007) was found. There was significant association between motor impairment and severity of depressive symptoms, and between depression and early disease onset or prolonged duration of Parkinson's disease.

  14. A "Mental-Health-at-the-Workplace" Educational Workshop Reduces Managers' Stigma Toward Depression.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Johannes; Mendel, Rosmarie; Reichhart, Tatjana; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Kissling, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Stigma and discrimination are important factors hindering people with mental health conditions to stay employed or successfully make their careers. We surveyed 580 German managers before and after visiting a "mental-health-at-the-workplace" educational workshop using the Depression Stigma Scale. The workshop significantly reduced stigma toward depression. Managers at baseline already exhibited lower stigma toward depression compared with the general population. In addition, female gender and higher education predicted lower stigma, which is in line with findings from other studies. We conclude that an educational workshop giving practical guidance regarding "mental-health-at-the-workplace" reduces managers' stigma toward depression and improves knowledge regarding depression, its course, and its treatment.

  15. Mental Imagery in Depression: Phenomenology, Potential Mechanisms, and Treatment Implications.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Emily A; Blackwell, Simon E; Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Renner, Fritz; Raes, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Mental imagery is an experience like perception in the absence of a percept. It is a ubiquitous feature of human cognition, yet it has been relatively neglected in the etiology, maintenance, and treatment of depression. Imagery abnormalities in depression include an excess of intrusive negative mental imagery; impoverished positive imagery; bias for observer perspective imagery; and overgeneral memory, in which specific imagery is lacking. We consider the contribution of imagery dysfunctions to depressive psychopathology and implications for cognitive behavioral interventions. Treatment advances capitalizing on the representational format of imagery (as opposed to its content) are reviewed, including imagery rescripting, positive imagery generation, and memory specificity training. Consideration of mental imagery can contribute to clinical assessment and imagery-focused psychological therapeutic techniques and promote investigation of underlying mechanisms for treatment innovation. Research into mental imagery in depression is at an early stage. Work that bridges clinical psychology and neuroscience in the investigation of imagery-related mechanisms is recommended.

  16. Processes of mental health service use by adolescents with depression.

    PubMed

    Draucker, Claire Burke

    2005-01-01

    To begin development of a substantive theory of the processes of mental health service use by adolescents who are depressed and by their families. Grounded theory. Open-ended interviews were conducted with 52 young adults who were depressed as adolescents, four of their parents, and eight professionals who work with adolescents who are depressed. The constant comparison method was used to analyze the data. Adolescents who are depressed and their families perceived several "treatment pitfalls" associated with formal mental health services: (a) "They'll (mental health clinicians) think I'm crazy," (b) "They'll tell my business," and (c) "They won't have a clue." The adolescents and their families interacted with the mental health care providers by engaging in the psychosocial process of "venturing through the system," that is, proceeding despite possible dangers and risks by steering clear, holding back, and letting it take hold. Mental health service use by adolescents with depression involved complex and fluid interactional processes among the depressed adolescents, their parents or caretakers, and mental health care providers. Strategies are needed to avoid creating the pitfalls that concern adolescents and their families.

  17. Depressive symptoms are associated with mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingkai; Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit J; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J Douglas; Nye, Jonathon A; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Murrah, Nancy; Shallenberger, Lucy; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Depression is an adverse prognostic factor after an acute myocardial infarction (MI), and an increased propensity toward emotionally-driven myocardial ischemia may play a role. We aimed to examine the association between depressive symptoms and mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia in young survivors of an MI. We studied 98 patients (49 women and 49 men) age 38-60 years who were hospitalized for acute MI in the previous 6 months. Patients underwent myocardial perfusion imaging at rest, after mental stress (speech task), and after exercise or pharmacological stress. A summed difference score (SDS), obtained with observer-independent software, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used to measure depressive symptoms, which were analyzed as overall score, and as separate somatic and cognitive depressive symptom scores. There was a significant positive association between depressive symptoms and SDS with mental stress, denoting more ischemia. After adjustment for demographic and lifestyle factors, disease severity and medications, each incremental depressive symptom was associated with 0.14 points higher SDS. When somatic and cognitive depressive symptoms were examined separately, both somatic [β = 0.17, 95% CI: (0.04, 0.30), p = 0.01] and cognitive symptoms [β = 0.31, 95% CI: (0.07, 0.56), p = 0.01] were significantly associated with mental stress-induced ischemia. Depressive symptoms were not associated with ischemia induced by exercise or pharmacological stress. Among young post-MI patients, higher levels of both cognitive and somatic depressive symptoms are associated with a higher propensity to develop myocardial ischemia with mental stress, but not with physical (exercise or pharmacological) stress.

  18. Depressive Symptoms Are Associated with Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia after Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jingkai; Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit J.; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J. Douglas; Nye, Jonathon A.; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Murrah, Nancy; Shallenberger, Lucy; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Depression is an adverse prognostic factor after an acute myocardial infarction (MI), and an increased propensity toward emotionally-driven myocardial ischemia may play a role. We aimed to examine the association between depressive symptoms and mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia in young survivors of an MI. Methods We studied 98 patients (49 women and 49 men) age 38–60 years who were hospitalized for acute MI in the previous 6 months. Patients underwent myocardial perfusion imaging at rest, after mental stress (speech task), and after exercise or pharmacological stress. A summed difference score (SDS), obtained with observer-independent software, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used to measure depressive symptoms, which were analyzed as overall score, and as separate somatic and cognitive depressive symptom scores. Results There was a significant positive association between depressive symptoms and SDS with mental stress, denoting more ischemia. After adjustment for demographic and lifestyle factors, disease severity and medications, each incremental depressive symptom was associated with 0.14 points higher SDS. When somatic and cognitive depressive symptoms were examined separately, both somatic [β = 0.17, 95% CI: (0.04, 0.30), p = 0.01] and cognitive symptoms [β = 0.31, 95% CI: (0.07, 0.56), p = 0.01] were significantly associated with mental stress-induced ischemia. Depressive symptoms were not associated with ischemia induced by exercise or pharmacological stress. Conclusion Among young post-MI patients, higher levels of both cognitive and somatic depressive symptoms are associated with a higher propensity to develop myocardial ischemia with mental stress, but not with physical (exercise or pharmacological) stress. PMID:25061993

  19. The Relationship of Reported Neighborhood Conditions with Child Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Ashley M.; Kowalkowski, Marc; Jones, Heather A.; Raphael, Jean L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective While multiple studies have documented the relationship between neighborhood socioeconomic status and child mental health, few have examined the association between neighborhood conditions and mental health disorders. The objective of this study was to determine whether parent-reported neighborhood conditions are associated with common child mental health disorders. Methods We analyzed data on children ages 6–17 (N = 64,076) collected through the 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health. Primary outcome variables were a child being reported to have a diagnosis of (a) anxiety and/or depression and (b) attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and/or disruptive behavior. Main independent variables were parent-reported neighborhood amenities (e.g., recreation center), poor physical characteristics (e.g., dilapidated housing), social support/trust, neighborhood safety, and school safety. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine associations between neighborhood conditions and (a) anxiety/depression and (b) ADHD/disruptive behavior. Results Children living in a neighborhood with three poor physical characteristics had higher odds of anxiety/depression (AOR 1.58, 95% CI [1.01–2.46]) and ADHD/disruptive behavior (AOR 1.44, 95% CI [1.04–1.99]) compared to children living in a neighborhood with no poor physical characteristics. Children of parents who reported living in a neighborhood with low social support/trust had higher odds of depression/anxiety (AOR 1.71, 95% CI [1.28–2.30]) and ADHD/disruptive behavior (AOR 1.47, 95% CI [1.19–1.81]) than children living in a neighborhood with greater social support/trust. Conclusions Parent perception of neighborhood social support/trust and physical characteristics may be important to assess in clinical settings and should be examined in future study of child mental health burden. PMID:23009865

  20. Mental health professionals’ attitudes toward patients with PTSD and depression

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Thomas; Moergeli, Hanspeter; Kohler, Michaela; Carraro, Giovanni E.; Schnyder, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, mental health professionals’ attitudes toward posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), compared to other psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia or depression, have rarely been studied. Objective We assessed mental health professionals’ attitudes toward patients with PTSD compared to patients suffering from depression. Method Case vignettes of a patient with either PTSD or depression were presented to two samples of mental health professionals: attendees of a conference on posttraumatic stress (N=226) or of a lecture for psychiatry residents (N=112). Participants subsequently completed a questionnaire that assessed their attitude reactions to the presented case. Results Participants showed similarly positive attitudes toward depression and PTSD. PTSD elicited a more favorable attitude with regard to prosocial reactions, estimated dependency, attributed responsibility, and interest in the case, particularly in mental health professionals specializing in psychotraumatology. Across diagnoses, higher age and longer professional experience were associated with more positive attitudes toward patients. Conclusions Mental health professionals’ positive attitudes toward patients with depression and PTSD correlate with their specific knowledge about the disorder, their level of professional training, and their years of professional experience. Limitations The instruments used, although based on established theoretical concepts in attitude research, were not validated in their present versions. PMID:26507340

  1. Immigrant and refugee health: mental health conditions.

    PubMed

    Rew, Karl T; Clarke, S Lindsey; Gossa, Weyinshet; Savin, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Immigrants leave their homes for unfamiliar destinations in search of better lives for themselves and their families. Many immigrants experience profound loss and emotional distress as they adjust to life in different societies. Despite these challenges, the prevalence of mental health conditions among immigrants is low, whereas children of immigrants have rates equal to those of native populations. The prevalence of mental health conditions is high among refugees, who comprise a specific subgroup of immigrants who have been displaced forcibly and often have experienced severe trauma. Cultural factors, such as stigma and somatization of emotional symptoms, make it less likely that immigrants and refugees from certain groups will ever present to mental health subspecialists. Strong therapeutic relationships, cultural sensitivity, involvement of family members, judicious use of medications, and knowledge of available community resources are important tools that can aid clinicians who treat immigrants and refugees with mental health conditions.

  2. Have Mental Health Education Programs Influenced the Mental Health Literacy of Those with Major Depression and Suicidal Ideation? A Comparison between 1998 and 2008 in South Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, Peter N.; Goldney, Robert D.; Taylor, Anne W.; Eckert, Kerena A.

    2012-01-01

    Mental health literacy is the knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders that aid their recognition, management, or prevention and is considered to be an important determinant of help-seeking. This has relevance in suicide prevention, as depression, the clinical condition most frequently associated with suicidality, has been the target of…

  3. Have Mental Health Education Programs Influenced the Mental Health Literacy of Those with Major Depression and Suicidal Ideation? A Comparison between 1998 and 2008 in South Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, Peter N.; Goldney, Robert D.; Taylor, Anne W.; Eckert, Kerena A.

    2012-01-01

    Mental health literacy is the knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders that aid their recognition, management, or prevention and is considered to be an important determinant of help-seeking. This has relevance in suicide prevention, as depression, the clinical condition most frequently associated with suicidality, has been the target of…

  4. Mental Health Comorbidity in MS: Depression, Anxiety, and Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Turner, Aaron P; Alschuler, Kevin N; Hughes, Abbey J; Beier, Meghan; Haselkorn, Jodie K; Sloan, Alicia P; Ehde, Dawn M

    2016-12-01

    Among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), mental health comorbidities play a significant role in contributing to secondary disability and detracting from quality of life. This review examines current evidence surrounding three mental health issues of particular relevance to MS: depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder. We review what is known of the prevalence, correlates, screening mechanisms, and current treatment of each issue and provide recommendations for future areas of research.

  5. Does family history of depression predict major depression in midlife women? Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Mental Health Study (SWAN MHS).

    PubMed

    Colvin, Alicia; Richardson, Gale A; Cyranowski, Jill M; Youk, Ada; Bromberger, Joyce T

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to determine whether family history of depression predicts major depression in midlife women independent of psychosocial and health profiles at midlife. Participants were 303 African American and Caucasian women (42-52 years at baseline) recruited into the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) and the Women's Mental Health Study (MHS) in Pittsburgh. Major depression was assessed annually with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Family mental health history was collected at the ninth or tenth follow-up. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine whether family history of depression predicted major depression in midlife, adjusting for covariates. The odds of experiencing major depression during the study were three times greater for those with a family history than for those without a family history (OR = 3.22, 95% CI = 1.95-5.31). Family history predicted depression (OR = 2.67, 95% CI = 1.50-4.78) after adjusting for lifetime history of depression, age, trait anxiety, chronic medical conditions, and stressful life events. In analyses stratified by lifetime history of depression, family history significantly predicted depression only among women with a lifetime history of depression. Family history of depression predicts major depression in midlife women generally, but particularly in those with a lifetime history of depression prior to midlife.

  6. Comorbid Chronic General Health Conditions and Depression Care: A Population-Based Analysis.

    PubMed

    Puyat, Joseph H; Kazanjian, Arminee; Wong, Hubert; Goldner, Elliot

    2017-09-01

    Untreated depression among persons with chronic general health conditions (chronic health conditions) affects mortality, functional disability, quality of life, and health care costs. Currently, studies of the association between depression care and chronic health conditions report inconsistent results, and studies of depression care among persons with specific health conditions are rare. This study investigated the association between chronic health conditions and the likelihood of receiving depression care among individuals with depression. Retrospective data from physician claims, hospital separations, vital statistics, and insurance plan registries were used to identify a cohort of individuals with depression and track 12-month use of health services among those with and without a chronic health condition. Disparities were analyzed by using generalized linear models. Individuals with depression and a chronic health condition had higher use of psychological therapy, higher use of any depression care, greater continuity of care, and better adherence to antidepressant therapy compared with individuals with depression only. However, they were less likely, in general, to be on antidepressant therapy, and individuals with diabetes had fewer visits to general practitioners for a mental health-related reason compared with individuals without diabetes. A trend toward lower use of any depression care was observed among patients with cerebrovascular disease. Use of depression care was generally higher among individuals with chronic health conditions, although there were differences in patterns of use by type of health condition. Some patients with specific health conditions could be at risk of being inappropriately treated for depression.

  7. The level of depression and its related factors among the mothers with mentally retarded girl children in exceptional primary schools

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Newsha; Taebi, Mahboubeh; Kazemi, Ashraf; Khalafian, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, depression is one of the most prevalent mental diseases to which some individuals like mothers of mentally retarded children are more vulnerable due to their (children’s) special condition. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the level of depression and its related factors in these mothers. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 120 qualified mothers with mentally retarded children who were from exceptional children girls’ schools in Isfahan. The subjects filled personal characteristics and Beck depression inventory assessment, and their level of depression and its association with some baseline factors were analyzed through descriptive statistics in SPSS. Results: Results showed that 75% of the mothers experienced various levels of depression, of whom 25.8% suffered from minor depression, 24.2% from moderate depression, and 25% suffered from major depression. The results obtained showed that there was a significant direct association between the intensity of depression and students’ age, mothers’ age, fathers’ age, the number of children, and the length of parents’ marriage and a reverse association between the intensity of depression and subjects’, fathers’, and mothers’ education (P = 0.004). No association was observed between mothers’ occupation and the intensity of depression. Meanwhile, there was a negative significant association between fathers’ occupation and mothers’ depression (P = 0.02). About 33.3% of the mothers did not believe that their spouses’ and families’ psychological and mental support was adequate. Conclusions: The present study showed that mothers of mentally retarded children are predisposed to depression. With regard to the important role of mothers in the family and, consequently, the risk of impaired health of the family members, especially these children's health, prevention and diagnosis of depression and treatment of these mothers seem to be

  8. Manic Depressive Disorder in Mental Handicap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, T. P.; Jones, P. M.

    1988-01-01

    Eight cases of early onset bipolar affective disorder in adolescents with mental impairment are described, focusing on age of onset; common characteristics such as rapid cycling, mixed affective states, and lithium resistance; and the likelihood that cerebral dysfunction might cause a secondary form of bipolar disorder. (JDD)

  9. Manic Depressive Disorder in Mental Handicap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, T. P.; Jones, P. M.

    1988-01-01

    Eight cases of early onset bipolar affective disorder in adolescents with mental impairment are described, focusing on age of onset; common characteristics such as rapid cycling, mixed affective states, and lithium resistance; and the likelihood that cerebral dysfunction might cause a secondary form of bipolar disorder. (JDD)

  10. [Depression status of the family member and its influencing factors in the patient with mental disorder caused by cerebral trauma: 245 cases analysis].

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Long; Pang, Yan-Xia; Xie, Yan-Ping; Xu, Hai-Feng

    2013-06-01

    To determine the family member's depression status and its influencing factors in the patient with mental disorder caused by cerebral trauma. The self-designed information questionnaire and self-rating depression scale (SDS) were used to investigate 245 family members' depression conditions. On the basis of SDS score index, all cases were divided into depression group and non-depression group. The data were analyzed by the univariate analysis and multiple factors regression analysis. In the 245 family members, 117 family members had different degrees of depressive symptoms including 68 with mild depression, 42 with moderate depression, and 7 with severe depression. In the multiple factors regression analysis, genetic relationship, personality characteristics and payment method were the main influencing factors of the depression status. Much attention should be paid to the family member's depression condition of the patient with mental disorder caused by cerebral trauma through specific psychological intervention.

  11. Mental health literacy about depression: a survey of portuguese youth.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Luís M; Jorm, Anthony F; Mendes, Aida C; Santos, José C; Ferreira, Ricardo O; Pedreiro, Ana T

    2013-05-07

    Depression is a common disorder in adolescents and young adults, but help seeking is low. Mental health literacy about depression is a key concept to plan interventions for improving help seeking. This study aimed to evaluate youth mental literacy about depression in order to design school-based interventions. During 2012, a survey was conducted with a stratified cluster sample of 4938 Portuguese young people between 14 and 24 years of age. Following the presentation of a vignette describing depression, a series of questions was asked concerning: recognition of the disorder; knowledge of professional help and treatments available; knowledge of effective self-help strategies; knowledge and skills to give first aid and support to others; and knowledge of how to prevent this disorder. In response to an open-ended question, around a quarter of the participants failed to recognize depression in the vignette. When asked about the potential helpfulness of various people, most of the participants considered mental health professionals, family and friends to be helpful. However, teachers, social workers and a helpline were less likely to be considered as helpful. With regard to medications, vitamins received more positive views than psychotropics. Some interventions were frequently rated as likely to be helpful, whereas for others there was a lack of knowledge about their effectiveness. A positive finding is that alcohol and tobacco consumption were seen as harmful. When asked about mental health first aid strategies, participants supported the value of listening to the person in the vignette and advising professional help, but some unhelpful strategies were commonly endorsed as well. Deficits were found in some aspects of depression literacy in Portuguese youth. Therefore intervention in this area is needed.

  12. [Comparison of mental rotation ability for depressive disorder and schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiu; Yang, Lai-qi; Jia, Ting; Tuo, Ran; Deng, Zi-he; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Wen-tao; Wu, Xing-qu; Liu, Guang-xiong

    2012-04-03

    To compare the mechanism of depressive disorder and schizophrenia' mental rotation ability so as to provide specific objective clinical indicators for identifying mental illness. Thirty depressive disorder (15 males, 15 females), 30 schizophrenia (15 males, 15 females) and 28 healthy participants (14 males, 14 females) were tested to perform mental rotation tasks with the letter F and R graphics. The subjects were required to decide whether the stimulus was a normal or a mirror version of an alphabet letter presented in different views and angular orientations. The mouse left key was pressed for a normal and the mouse right button for a mirror. (1) Error rate: As compared with the normal control group (normal: 29% ± 10%, mirror: 32% ± 3%), the normal error rate was significantly higher while the mirror error rate significantly lower in depressive disorder (normal: 31% ± 13%, mirror: 22% ± 4%, P < 0.01); the normal error rate was significantly lower while the mirror error rate significantly higher in schizophrenia (normal: 27% ± 9%, mirror: 42% ± 2%, P < 0.01). (2) Normal reaction rate: As compared with the normal control group (50% ± 9%), the normal reaction rate was significantly lower in depressive disorder (38% ± 12%, P < 0.01) and significantly higher in schizophrenia (60% ± 9%, P < 0.01). (3) Response time: As compared with the normal control group (normal (602 ± 25) ms, mirror (606 ± 14) ms), the normal and mirror response durations were both significantly longer in depressive disorder(normal (653 ± 23) ms, mirror (714 ± 13) ms, P < 0.01) while significantly shorter in schizophrenia (normal (571 ± 18) ms, mirror (587 ± 11) ms, P < 0.01). Normal mental rotation ability is severely impaired in depressive disorder, but its mirror counterpart becomes compensated. In schizophrenia, mirror mental rotation ability is severely impaired, but its normal counterpart becomes compensated. It hints that normal and mirror rotation ability may be

  13. [Mental disorders related to persistent negative working conditions].

    PubMed

    Perbellini, L; Tisato, Silvia; Quintarelli, E; Dal, Ponte Silvia; Pelizza, Luisa; Riolfi, A; Zonzin, Cristina; Romeo, L

    2012-01-01

    Mental disorders are common in our industrialised society and inevitably affect the working population. Over the last few years greater attention has been focussed on work-related psychopathologies due to an increasing number of studies regarding workplace bullying. This study reports our observations on patients with mental disorders who came to our Occupational Health Centre because they perceived themselves to be victims of negative working conditions. An indepth analysis of their working conditions led us to the conclusion that many of these disorders were to be attributed to the workplace. Between 2004 and 2010, 449 workers attended our Occupational Health Centre, most suffering from mental disorders which they ascribed to negative working conditions. All patients had an initial consultation session with an occupational physician which focused on the environmental and relational characteristics of their place of work. Thereafter, patients underwent a second clinical evaluation with a psychologist including several psychological tests. At the end of diagnostic process, the occupational physician and the clinical psychologist drew their clinical conclusions and defined the possible relationship with the working condition. For 379 out of 449 patients/workers, a positive and causal relationship between medical disorders and working conditions was established. The mental disorders observed in these groups of workers were: mixed anxiety and depressive disorder (53.6%), depressive disorder (16.2%), adaptation disorder (15.9%), anxiety disorder (13%) and only 1.3% post-traumatic stress disorder. The working conditions favouring the mental disorders were: workplace bullying, such as person-related bullying (30.1%) and task-related bullying (14.8%), adverse situations causing work distress (38.2%) or non-specific work discomfort (16,9%). Our experience showed that not only workplace bullying can cause different psychiatric disorders but also adverse situations that

  14. Contextual fear conditioning depresses infralimbic excitability.

    PubMed

    Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Cruz, Emmanuel; Criado-Marrero, Marangelie; Porter, James T

    2016-04-01

    Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) show hypo-active ventromedial prefrontal cortices (vmPFC) that correlate with their impaired ability to discriminate between safe and dangerous contexts and cues. Previously, we found that auditory fear conditioning depresses the excitability of neurons populating the homologous structure in rodents, the infralimbic cortex (IL). However, it is undetermined if IL depression was mediated by the cued or contextual information. The objective of this study was to examine whether contextual information was sufficient to depress IL neuronal excitability. After exposing rats to context-alone, pseudoconditioning, or contextual fear conditioning, we used whole-cell current-clamp recordings to examine the excitability of IL neurons in prefrontal brain slices. We found that contextual fear conditioning reduced IL neuronal firing in response to depolarizing current steps. In addition, neurons from contextual fear conditioned animals showed increased slow afterhyperpolarization potentials (sAHPs). Moreover, the observed changes in IL excitability correlated with contextual fear expression, suggesting that IL depression may contribute to the encoding of contextual fear.

  15. Association Between Cardiovascular Risk and Depressive Symptoms Among People With Serious Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Naslund, John A; Aschbrenner, Kelly A; Pratt, Sarah I; Lohman, Matthew C; Scherer, Emily A; McHugo, Gregory J; Marsch, Lisa A; Unützer, Jürgen; Bartels, Stephen J

    2017-08-01

    Depressive symptoms have debilitating effects on the physical health and functioning of people with serious mental illness. We examined change in depressive symptoms among overweight and obese adults with serious mental illness (n = 343) using data combined from two randomized trials comparing the 12-month In SHAPE program to a gym membership control condition. In SHAPE consists of a gym membership, weekly individual meetings with a fitness trainer, and instruction on healthy eating and nutrition. Depressive symptoms were measured at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Change in depressive symptoms did not differ between groups, but depressive symptoms decreased over time across the entire sample (p = 0.045). At 12 months, reduced depressive symptoms were associated with clinically significant improved cardiorespiratory fitness (p = 0.030), 10% or more weight loss (p = 0.044), and cardiovascular risk reduction (p = 0.028) across both groups. Our findings suggest that participation in health promotion programs resulting in cardiovascular risk reduction may be associated with reduced depressive symptoms.

  16. Overeducation and depressive symptoms: diminishing mental health returns to education.

    PubMed

    Bracke, Piet; Pattyn, Elise; von dem Knesebeck, Olaf

    2013-11-01

    In general, well-educated people enjoy better mental health than those with less education. As a result, some wonder whether there are limits to the mental health benefits of education. Inspired by the literature on the expansion of tertiary education, this article explores marginal mental health returns to education and studies the mental health status of overeducated people. To enhance the validity of the findings we use two indicators of educational attainment - years of education and ISCED97 categories - and two objective indicators of overeducation (the realised matches method and the job analyst method) in a sample of the working population of 25 European countries (unweighted sample N = 19,089). Depression is measured using an eight-item version of the CES-D scale. We find diminishing mental health returns to education. In addition, overeducated people report more depression symptoms. Both findings hold irrespective of the indicators used. The results must be interpreted in the light of the enduring expansion of education, as our findings show that the discussion of the relevance of the human capital perspective, and the diploma disease view on the relationship between education and modern society, is not obsolete.

  17. Willingness to use mental health counseling and antidepressants in older Korean Americans: the role of beliefs and stigma about depression.

    PubMed

    Park, Nan Sook; Jang, Yuri; Chiriboga, David A

    2016-10-21

    Despite a high prevalence of mental health problems, racial/ethnic minorities are often reluctant to seek mental health services. Their reluctance may be shaped by cultural beliefs and stigma about mental health. The present study examined how beliefs and stigma about depression (e.g. disbelief in depression as a health-related condition, perception of depression as a normal part of aging, and/or depression as a sign of personal weakness/family shame) pose barriers to older Korean Americans' willingness to use mental health counseling and antidepressants. Data were drawn from surveys with 420 Korean American older adults (Mage= 71.6, SD = 7.6) living in the New York City metropolitan area in 2010. Using a separate logistic regression model, the role of beliefs and stigma about depression in predicting participants' willingness to receive mental health counseling and to take antidepressants was tested. Based on Andersen's behavioral health service use model, the analysis was conducted in consideration of predisposing characteristics (age, gender, marital status, education, and acculturation), mental health needs (anxiety, depressive symptoms, and self-rated mental health), and enabling/hindering factors (beliefs and stigma). Similar proportions of the sample (69-70%) indicated their willingness to use mental health counseling or antidepressants. Willingness was more likely among participants who had beliefs about depression as a health-related concern (OR = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.15-3.27 for mental health counseling; OR = 4.47, 95% CI = 2.59-7.70 for antidepressants) and less likely among those who associated depression with family shame (OR = .55, 95% CI = 0.33-0.91 for mental health counseling; OR = .56, 95% CI = 0.33-0.95 for antidepressants). In addressing mental health problems and promoting the use of mental health services, cultural beliefs and stigma shared within an ethnic community should be considered. Given that disbelief

  18. Definitions and factors associated with subthreshold depressive conditions: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Subthreshold depressive disorders (minor and subthrehold depression) have been defined in a wide range of forms, varying on the number of symptoms and duration required. Disability associated with these conditions has also been reported. Our aim was to review the different definitions and to determine factors associated with these conditions in order to clarify the nosological implications of these disorders. Methods A Medline search was conducted of the published literature between January 2001 and September 2011. Bibliographies of the retrieved papers were also analysed. Results There is a wide heterogeneity in the definition and diagnostic criteria of minor and subthreshold depression. Minor depression was defined according to DSM-IV criteria. Regarding subthreshold depression, also called subclinical depression or subsyndromal symptomatic depression, between 2 and 5 depressive symptoms were required for the diagnosis, and a minimum duration of 2 weeks. Significant impairment associated with subthreshold depressive conditions, as well as comorbidity with other mental disorders, has been described. Conclusions Depression as a disorder is better explained as a spectrum rather than as a collection of discrete categories. Minor and subthreshold depression are common conditions and patients falling below the diagnostic threshold experience significant difficulties in functioning and a negative impact on their quality of life. Current diagnostic systems need to reexamine the thresholds for depressive disorders and distinguish them from ordinary feelings of sadness. PMID:23110575

  19. Depression Research at the National Institute of Mental Health. Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is committed to reducing the burden of mental illness through research on mind, brain, and behavior. This report presents the latest information on what is known about depression. The symptoms and types of depression are considered. Research on the treatments of depression is described, including the…

  20. Portrayal of Depression and Other Mental Illnesses in Australian Nonfiction Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Catherine; Pirkis, Jane; Blood, R. Warwick; Dunt, David; Burgess, Philip; Morley, Belinda; Stewart, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    This study describes Australian media portrayal of mental illnesses, focusing on depression. A random sample of 1,123 items was selected for analysis from a pool of 13,389 nonfictional media items about mental illness collected between March 2000 and February 2001. Depression was portrayed more frequently than other mental illnesses. Items about…

  1. Portrayal of Depression and Other Mental Illnesses in Australian Nonfiction Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Catherine; Pirkis, Jane; Blood, R. Warwick; Dunt, David; Burgess, Philip; Morley, Belinda; Stewart, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    This study describes Australian media portrayal of mental illnesses, focusing on depression. A random sample of 1,123 items was selected for analysis from a pool of 13,389 nonfictional media items about mental illness collected between March 2000 and February 2001. Depression was portrayed more frequently than other mental illnesses. Items about…

  2. Relationship between mental states in depression: the assimilation model perspective.

    PubMed

    Osatuke, Katerine; Stiles, William B; Barkham, Michael; Hardy, Gillian E; Shapiro, David A

    2011-11-30

    Metacognitive theories describe relationships between mental-affective self-states, including the capacity of one self-state to reflect upon another self-state. The assimilation model is a metacognitive approach that understands self-states as made of traces of experiences at different levels of integration. Psychological problems are understood as impaired accessibility of certain self-states to the person's normal awareness. These states are distressing or otherwise subjectively problematic when they emerge. This exploratory study used the assimilation framework to describe mental states in 17 clients who participated in a clinical trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression. Three clinically sophisticated raters examined transcripts of 1h-long psychotherapy session per client to construct qualitative descriptions of self-states and their relationship patterns in these depressed individuals. We then systematically compared and integrated these raters' descriptions of the clients' self-states. In each case, we found a conflict between two internally incompatible states: an interpersonally submissive state and an interpersonally dominant one, a pattern consistent with the model's theoretical description of depression.

  3. Mechanisms of change in cognitive therapy for major depressive disorder in the community mental health setting.

    PubMed

    Crits-Christoph, Paul; Gallop, Robert; Diehl, Caroline K; Yin, Seohyun; Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly

    2017-06-01

    This study examined the relation of change in theory-relevant cognitive variables to depressive symptom change over the course of cognitive therapy, as well as the specificity of change mechanisms to cognitive therapy as compared with dynamic therapy. There were 237 adult outpatients who were randomized to either cognitive (n = 119) or dynamic (n = 118) therapy for major depressive disorder in a community mental health setting. Assessments of compensatory skills (Ways of Responding Community Version and Self-Report Version), dysfunctional attitudes (Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale), and depressogenic schemas (Psychological Distance Scaling Task) were obtained at baseline and months 1, 2, and 5 following baseline. Primary outcome was measured using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. Across both therapy conditions, change in all 3 cognitive domains was associated with concurrent change in depressive symptoms. After controlling for other cognitive variables, increased interconnectedness of the positive achievement-related schema was significantly associated with concurrent symptom change in cognitive (rp = .26, p < .001) but not dynamic therapy (rp = .08, p = .29). Increases in positive compensatory skills were associated with subsequent change in depressive symptoms in cognitive therapy (rp = -.36, p = .003), but not in dynamic therapy (rp = .11, p = .386). Results provide support for the compensatory skills model of cognitive therapy (CT) within a community mental health setting. Additional research is necessary to understand other possible mechanisms of change in CT in the community setting. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. A Framework for Classifying Online Mental Health-Related Communities With an Interest in Depression.

    PubMed

    Saha, Budhaditya; Nguyen, Thin; Phung, Dinh; Venkatesh, Svetha

    2016-07-01

    Mental illness has a deep impact on individuals, families, and by extension, society as a whole. Social networks allow individuals with mental disorders to communicate with others sufferers via online communities, providing an invaluable resource for studies on textual signs of psychological health problems. Mental disorders often occur in combinations, e.g., a patient with an anxiety disorder may also develop depression. This co-occurring mental health condition provides the focus for our work on classifying online communities with an interest in depression. For this, we have crawled a large body of 620 000 posts made by 80 000 users in 247 online communities. We have extracted the topics and psycholinguistic features expressed in the posts, using these as inputs to our model. Following a machine learning technique, we have formulated a joint modeling framework in order to classify mental health-related co-occurring online communities from these features. Finally, we performed empirical validation of the model on the crawled dataset where our model outperforms recent state-of-the-art baselines.

  5. A Framework for Classifying Online Mental Health Related Communities with an Interest in Depression.

    PubMed

    Saha, Budhaditya; Nguyen, Thin; Phung, Dinh; Venkatesh, Svetha

    2016-03-18

    Mental illness has a deep impact on individuals, families, and by extension, society as a whole. Social networks allow individuals with mental disorders to communicate with others sufferers via online communities, providing an invaluable resource for studies on textual signs of psychological health problems. Mental disorders often occur in combinations, e.g., a patient with an anxiety disorder may also develop depression. This co-occurring mental health condition provides the focus for our work on classifying online communities with an interest in depression. For this, we have crawled a large body of 620,000 posts made by 80,000 users in 247 online communities. We have extracted the topics and psycho-linguistic features expressed in the posts, using these as inputs to our model. Following a machine learning technique, we have formulated a joint modelling framework in order to classify mental health-related co-occurring online communities from these features. Finally, we performed empirical validation of the model on the crawled dataset where our model outperforms recent state-of-the-art baselines.

  6. Diathesis-Stress and Depressed Mood among Adults with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esbensen, Anna J.; Benson, Betsey A.

    2006-01-01

    The impact of diatheses, stress, and their interaction on depressed mood was evaluated to determine the appropriateness of cognitive diathesis-stress models of depression for adults with mental retardation. We also tested hopelessness as a mediator in the prediction of depressed mood to evaluate the hopelessness theory of depression. Seventy-three…

  7. Depression and mental health among older Mexican American spouses.

    PubMed

    Stimpson, J P; Peek, M K; Markides, K S

    2006-07-01

    Although the association between marriage and well-being is well established, few studies have focused on learning more about the context of marriage and mental health. Recent research studying the mechanisms of marriage and health has focused on contagion of well-being among spouses. This study examined the association of depression with self-esteem, social support, life satisfaction, concern for independence, and cognitive function using baseline data for 553 older, Mexican American couples. Overall, we found evidence to suggest an interdependent relationship between husbands' and wives' emotional states, but the association was not equal for couples. Husbands' depression was significantly associated with the well-being of their wife, but the wife's depression was rarely associated with the husband's well-being. The findings from this study add to the increasing literature on spousal contagion by focusing on an under studied minority group, examining how depression affects well-being, and highlighting unequal effects of marriage on spousal well-being.

  8. Public Stigma Toward Mental Illness in Jordan: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Family Members of Individuals With Schizophrenia, Depression, and Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Abd Al-Hadi; Musleh, Mahmoud

    2017-06-01

    Stigma affects family members of individuals with mental illness. A survey of 640 family members of individuals with mental illness was conducted. Three factors were found to influence stigma regarding schizophrenia, depression, and anxiety: (a) preconceived stereotypes, (b) a sense of personal responsibility or blame for the condition, and (c) perceptions of the patient's inability to recover from the condition. A stronger association between negative stereotypes and inability to recover was found with schizophrenia than depression or anxiety. Conversely, depression and anxiety were found to be correlated with personal responsibility or blame for the condition. The public perception of mental health conditions (e.g., depression, anxiety, schizophrenia) has a crucial role in deriving programs for reducing stigma and raising awareness. Personalized and efficacious treatment regimens may be facilitated by understanding these perceptions and the underlying explanations for why they exist. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(6), 36-43.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Depressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... judgment and mental functioning nausea and vomiting memory loss (depressants can cause users to have no memory of events that happened while they were under the influence) Long-Term Effects When people misuse depressants over a long ...

  10. Factors associated with depression detection in a New Hampshire mental health outreach program.

    PubMed

    Ghesquiere, Angela R; Pepin, Renee; Kinsey, Jennifer; Bartels, Stephen J; Bruce, Martha L

    2017-08-16

    For mental health outreach programs for older adults, accurately detecting depression is key to quality service provision. Multiple factors, including gender, cognitive impairment, or recent bereavement may affect depression detection, but this is under-studied. Therefore, we sought to both establish rates of depressive symptom detection and to examine factors associated with inaccuracies of detecting depression among participants in a mental health outreach program serving older adults. We conducted a chart review of 1126 cases in an older adult-focused mental health outreach program in New Hampshire, the Referral Education Assistance & Prevention (REAP) program. Accuracy of depression detection was identified by comparing screen-positive scores for depressive symptoms on the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) to depression identification by counselors on a 'presenting concerns' list. Inaccurate depression detection (positive on the GDS but depression not identified by counselors) occurred in 27.6% of cases. Multivariate regression analyses indicated that anxiety, cognitive concerns, and rurality were all associated with detection innaccuracy. This study appears to be the first to examine factors influencing depression detection in a mental health outreach program. Future efforts should help ensure that all older mental health outreach clients have depression detected at optimal rates.

  11. Evaluating Mental Health Literacy and Adolescent Depression: What Do Teenagers "Know?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, John; Bruno, Michelle; Fernandes, Teresa E.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of depression increases markedly during adolescence, yet many youth are not receiving the support that they need. One factor that has been speculated as contributing to low rates of care is a lack of mental health literacy about depression and viable sources of support. This pilot study focused on mental health literacy as it…

  12. School Psychologists' Perceptions and Experiences regarding Students with Mental Retardation and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Paula J.

    2010-01-01

    An exploration of use and believed effectiveness of interventions as well as personal interest and perceived effectiveness in working with (1) students with average IQs and depression, (2) students with mental retardation, and (3) students with both mental retardation and depression was conducted via a nationwide survey of 131 school…

  13. Conditional shared confidentiality in mental health care.

    PubMed

    Liégeois, Axel; Eneman, Marc

    2015-05-01

    Because of the development towards community care, care providers not only exchange information in a team, but increasingly also in networks. This is a challenge to confidentiality. The ethical question is how care providers can keep information about the care receiver confidential, whilst at the same time exchanging information about that care receiver in a team or network? Can shared confidentiality be extended from a team to a network? To clarify this question, the article refers to the advice of an expert ethics committee in mental health care. The advice regards exchange of information in a network as a further step in enhancing collaboration among care providers. Therefore, the good and evident practice of shared confidentiality in a team can be extended to a network if the same conditions are met. First, the care providers participate in a clearly defined and identifiable team or network. Secondly, they have a shared care responsibility. Thirdly, they have a duty of confidentiality. Fourth, they dialogue with the care receiver and obtain his or her consent. Finally, they apply the filter of relevance. Hence, conditional shared confidentiality is an ethical justification for the exchange of information in a team or network.

  14. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for depressed individuals improves suppression of irrelevant mental-sets.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Jonathan; Shapero, Benjamin G; Mischoulon, David; Lazar, Sara W

    2017-04-01

    An impaired ability to suppress currently irrelevant mental-sets is a key cognitive deficit in depression. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) was specifically designed to help depressed individuals avoid getting caught in such irrelevant mental-sets. In the current study, a group assigned to MBCT plus treatment-as-usual (n = 22) exhibited significantly lower depression scores and greater improvements in irrelevant mental-set suppression compared to a wait-list plus treatment-as-usual (n = 18) group. Improvements in mental-set-suppression were associated with improvements in depression scores. Results provide the first evidence that MBCT can improve suppression of irrelevant mental-sets and that such improvements are associated with depressive alleviation.

  15. Exploring the relation between visual mental imagery and affect in the daily life of previously depressed and never depressed individuals.

    PubMed

    Slofstra, Christien; Nauta, Maaike H; Holmes, Emily A; Bos, Elisabeth H; Wichers, Marieke; Batalas, Nikolaos; Klein, Nicola S; Bockting, Claudi L H

    2017-08-17

    Previously depressed individuals experience disturbances in affect. Affective disturbances may be related to visual mental imagery, given that imagery-based processing of emotional stimuli causes stronger affective responses than verbal processing in experimental laboratory studies. However, the role of imagery-based processing in everyday life is unknown. This study assessed mental imagery in the daily life of previously and never depressed individuals. Higher levels of visual mental imagery was hypothesised to be associated with more affective reactivity to both negatively and positively valenced mental representations. This study was the first to explore mental imagery in daily life using experience sampling methodology. Previously depressed (n = 10) and matched never depressed (n = 11) individuals participated in this study. Momentary affect and imagery-based processing were assessed using the "Imagine your mood" smartphone application. Participants recorded on average 136 momentary reports over a period of 8 weeks. The expected association between visual mental imagery and affective reactivity was not found. Unexpectedly, in both previously and never depressed individuals, higher levels of imagery-based processing of mental representations in daily life were significantly associated with better momentary mood and more positive affect, regardless of valence. The causality of effects remains to be examined in future studies.

  16. Mental Health and Functional Outcomes of Maternal and Adolescent Reports of Adolescent Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Frances; Lifford, Kate J.; Thomas, Hollie V.; Thapar, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of maternal and self-ratings of adolescent depression by investigating the extent to which these reports predicted a range of mental health and functional outcomes 4 years later. The potential influence of mother's own depressed mood on her ratings of adolescent depression and suicidal ideation on adolescent outcome…

  17. Mental Health Literacy of Those with Major Depression and Suicidal Ideation: An Impediment To Help Seeking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldney, Robert D.; Fisher, Laura J.; Wilson, David H.; Cheok, Frida

    2002-01-01

    A vignette depicting classical features of major depression was presented to subjects along with questions related to mental health literacy. Responses of those with major depression were compared to those of a control group. Results demonstrated that despite increased professional contact by those with major depression and suicidal ideation,…

  18. Cognitive Bias Modification Using Mental Imagery for Depression: Developing a Novel Computerized Intervention to Change Negative Thinking Styles

    PubMed Central

    LANG, TAMARA J; BLACKWELL, SIMON E; HARMER, CATHERINE J; DAVISON, PHIL; HOLMES, EMILY A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Why do some people see their glass as half-empty rather than half-full or even imagine that the glass will be filled in the future? Experimental methods can illuminate how individual differences in information processing style can profoundly impact mood or even result in disorders such as depression. A computerized cognitive bias modification intervention targeting interpretation bias in depression via positive mental imagery (CBM-I) was evaluated by investigating its impact on mental health and cognitive bias compared with a control condition. Twenty-six depressed individuals completed either positive imagery-focussed CBM-I or a control condition daily at home over one week. Outcome measures were collected pre-treatment and post-treatment and at two-week follow-up. Individuals in the positive condition demonstrated significant improvements from pre-treatment to post-treatment in depressive symptoms, cognitive bias and intrusive symptoms compared with the control condition. Improvements in depressive symptoms at two-week follow-up were at trend level. The results of this first controlled comparison of positive imagery-focussed CBM-I for depression further support the clinical potential of CBM-I and the development of a novel computerized treatment that could help patients imagine a more positive future. Broader implications concern the modification of individual differences in personality variables via their interaction with key information processing targets. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23316101

  19. A Ten-Year Look Back at the Association between the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) and Costly Mental Health Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    occupational dysfunction. Significant mood disorder, such as depression or manic symptoms, general medical conditions or substance abuse that might lead to...rate is considered low compared to other mental illness , such as depression and borderline personality disorder (Mueser et al., 1998). Resnick...TREATMENT Bipolar disorder, otherwise known as manic - depressive disorder, is characterized by dramatic mood swings. Bipolar disorder can be mainly

  20. Depression and Social Functioning Among Preschool Children with Chronic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Carmen E.; Luby, Joan L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relations between depressive symptoms, social behavior, and chronic medical illness in preschool children. Study design Caregivers of 273 preschool children (3.0 to 5.2 years of age) completed questionnaires regarding preschoolers’ physical health, depressive symptoms, and social behavior. Interviewers determined ratings for preschoolers’ impairment in social and behavioral functioning. Analyses examined the relationships between chronic medical conditions, depressive symptoms, peer acceptance/rejection, and social behavior. Results Chronic illness was significantly associated with early-onset depressive symptoms and impairment in several social functioning domains, even after accounting for socioeconomic status. Regression analyses demonstrated that the number of health conditions predicted higher depression scores, frequency of asocial behaviors, and impairment in daycare role cooperation and behavior towards others. Preschoolers with at least one medical condition experienced a greater frequency of peer rejection and bullying compared with healthy peers. Depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between illness and asocial behavior. Conclusions There is a need for greater attention to depression and difficulties in social functioning in preschool children with chronic illness. Given the potential impact on later developmental and mental health outcomes, primary care physicians should now be attentive to depressive symptoms in chronically ill preschoolers. PMID:18534206

  1. Depression and social functioning in preschool children with chronic medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Carmen E; Luby, Joan L

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the relations among depressive symptoms, social behavior, and chronic medical illness in preschool children. Caregivers of 273 preschool children (3.0-5.2 years of age) completed questionnaires about preschoolers' physical health, depressive symptoms, and social behavior. Interviewers determined ratings for preschoolers' impairment in social and behavioral functioning. Analyses examined the relationships among chronic medical conditions, depressive symptoms, peer acceptance/rejection, and social behavior. Chronic illness was significantly associated with early-onset depressive symptoms and impairment in several social functioning domains, even after accounting for socioeconomic status. Regression analyses demonstrated that the number of health conditions predicted higher depression scores, frequency of asocial behaviors, and impairment in daycare role cooperation and behavior toward others. Preschoolers with at least 1 medical condition experienced a greater frequency of peer rejection and bullying compared with healthy peers. Depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between illness and asocial behavior. There is a need for greater attention to depression and difficulties in social functioning in preschool children with chronic illness. Because of the potential impact on later developmental and mental health outcomes, primary care physicians should be attentive now to depressive symptoms in chronically ill preschoolers.

  2. Distressing visual mental images in depressed patients and healthy controls - Are they one and the same?

    PubMed

    Weßlau, Charlotte; Lieberz, Klara; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola; Steil, Regina

    2016-12-30

    Negative mental images are common in a range of mental disorders. So far, only inconclusive evidence has been obtained for depression specificity. We assessed the disparities and similarities of a variety of imagery characteristics in 17 patients suffering from depressive disorders and 17 healthy matched controls who all reported negative mental images. The number of intrusive images, their frequency, and the associated distress were significantly greater for the depressed individuals. Compared with non-depressed controls, negative images during depression were more frequently triggered by internal factors and led to depression-related emotions. Approximately 30% of the images in the depressed group did not consist of actual memories of real-life events. No significant differences in vividness or perceived controllability were observed, but the depressed patients experienced significantly more bodily symptoms during the intrusions than the healthy controls. The results indicate that the central characteristics of the negative mental images of depressed and non-depressed individuals are distinguishable, despite some similarities, and may contribute to depressive symptoms.

  3. The correlates of stigma toward mental illness among Jordanian patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Rayan, Ahmad; Mahroum, Maryam Husnee; Khasawneh, Aws

    2017-05-23

    This study aims to assess the correlates of stigma toward mental illness among patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD). One hundred and sixty one Jordanian outpatients suffering from MDD completed the study. Participants completed the demographic questionnaire, the Center for Epidemiological Studies for the intensity of depression, and the Devaluation-Discrimination Scale to assess stigma. Participants reported a moderate level of perceived stigma toward mental illness. Age, perceived pain, the number of relapses, and severity of depressive symptoms were significantly correlated with stigma toward mental illness among the study sample. The severity of depressive symptoms was the strongest correlate of stigma toward mental illness. Factors associated with stigma toward mental illness should be carefully considered when implementing anti-stigma programs for patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Depression and Barriers to Mental Health Care in Older Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Mark I.; Bruce, Martha L.; Roth, Andrew J.; Breitbart, William; Nelson, Christian J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on depression in cancer patients with a particular focus on depression assessment and barriers to mental health treatment in older cancer patients. Design We conducted a review of the literature on depression and barriers to mental health treatment in older cancer patients. Results Depression is prevalent in cancer patients. However, little is known about prevalence rates of depression in older adults with cancer, assessing depression in older cancer patients and barriers that impede proper mental health treatment in this sample. Conclusion Improved diagnostic clarity and a better understanding of barriers to mental health treatment can help clarify and facilitate mental health referrals and ultimately improve access to care among older cancer patients in need. Continuing to consider the complexities associated with diagnosing depression in older cancer patients is necessary. Further work may be needed to develop new diagnostic measures for such detection, determine the prevalence of depression among older cancer and ways in which to overcome barriers to mental health care. PMID:21157847

  5. Shared decision making interventions for people with mental health conditions.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Edward; Best, Catherine; Hagen, Suzanne

    2010-01-20

    synthesis. We included two separate German studies involving a total of 518 participants. One study was undertaken in the inpatient treatment of schizophrenia and the other in the treatment of people newly diagnosed with depression in primary care. Regarding the primary outcomes, one study reported statistically significant increases in patient satisfaction, the other study did not. There was no evidence of effect on clinical outcomes or hospital readmission rates in either study. Regarding secondary outcomes, there was an indication that interventions to increase shared decision making increased doctor facilitation of patient involvement in decision making, and did not increase consultation times. Nor did the interventions increase patient compliance with treatment plans. Neither study reported any harms of the intervention. Definite conclusions cannot be drawn, however, on the basis of these two studies. No firm conclusions can be drawn at present about the effects of shared decision making interventions for people with mental health conditions. There is no evidence of harm, but there is an urgent need for further research in this area.

  6. Mental health care use in relation to depressive symptoms among pregnant women in the USA.

    PubMed

    Byatt, Nancy; Xiao, Rui S; Dinh, Kate H; Waring, Molly E

    2016-02-01

    We examined mental health care use in relation to depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) ≥ 10) among a nationally representative sample of pregnant women using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2012. Logistic regression models estimated crude and adjusted odds ratios for mental health care use in the past year in relation to depressive symptoms. While 8.2 % (95 % CI 4.6-11.8) of pregnant women were depressed, only 12 % (95 % CI 1.8-22.1) of these women reported mental health care use in the past year.

  7. Onset aging conditions of adults with an intellectual disability associated with primary caregiver depression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Kuo, Meng-Ting; Wu, Jia-Lin; Chu, Cordia; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2014-03-01

    Caregivers of adults with an intellectual disability experience depressive symptoms, but the aging factors of the care recipients associated with the depressive symptoms are unknown. The objective of this study was to analyze the onset aging conditions of adults with an intellectual disability that associated with the depression scores of their primary caregivers. A cross-sectional survey was administered to gather information from 455 caregivers of adults with an intellectual disability about their symptoms of depression which assessed by a 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). The 12 aging conditions of adults with an intellectual disability include physical and mental health. The results indicate that 78% of adults with an intellectual disability demonstrate aging conditions. Physical conditions associated with aging include hearing decline (66.3%), vision decline (63.6%), incontinence (44%), articulation and bone degeneration (57.9%), teeth loss (80.4), physical strength decline (81.2%), sense of taste and smell decline (52.8%), and accompanied chronic illnesses (74.6%). Mental conditions associated with aging include memory loss (77%), language ability deterioration (74.4%), poor sleep quality (74.2%), and easy onset of depression and sadness (50.3%). Aging conditions of adults with an intellectual disability (p<0.001) was one factor that significantly affected the presence of depressive symptom among caregivers after controlling demographic characteristics. Particularly, poor sleep quality of adults with an intellectual disability (yes vs. no, OR=3.807, p=0.002) was statistically correlated to the occurrence of significant depressive symptoms among their caregivers. This study suggests that the authorities should reorient community services and future policies toward the needs of family caregivers to decrease the burdens associated with caregiving.

  8. New Perspectives in Mental Health: Addressing Cognitive Deficits in Remitted Depression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jason I; Hergert, Danielle C

    2017-02-08

    The purpose of this essay is to explore the long-term impact of depression on cognitive functioning and to discuss possible treatment strategies that mental health and psychiatric nurses may employ in practice or pursue in research to improve patient outcomes. As psychiatric and mental health nurses play a valuable role in promoting recovery from depression, addressing cognitive difficulties associated with depression may be an important area for nursing practice. This essay will first introduce the rationale for evaluating cognitive deficits in remitted depression in regards to the impact on quality of life (QOL). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. HIV, multidrug-resistant TB and depressive symptoms: when three conditions collide.

    PubMed

    Das, Mrinalini; Isaakidis, Petros; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Kumar, Ajay M V; Nagaraja, Sharath Burugina; Valikayath, Asmaa; Jha, Santosh; Jadhav, Bindoo; Ladomirska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Management of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is highly challenging. Such patients are subject to long and potentially toxic treatments and may develop a number of different psychiatric illnesses such as anxiety and depressive disorders. A mental health assessment before MDR-TB treatment initiation may assist in early diagnosis and better management of psychiatric illnesses in patients already having two stigmatising and debilitating diseases. To address limited evidence on the baseline psychiatric conditions of HIV-infected MDR-TB patients, we aimed to document the levels of depressive symptoms at baseline, and any alteration following individualized clinical and psychological support during MDR-TB therapy, using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) tool, among HIV-infected patients. This was a retrospective review of the medical records of an adult (aged >15 years) HIV/MDR-TB cohort registered for care during the period of August 2012 through to March 2014. A total of 45 HIV/MDR-TB patients underwent baseline assessment using the PHQ-9 tool, and seven (16%) were found to have depressive symptoms. Of these, four patients had moderate to severe depressive symptoms. Individualized psychological and clinical support was administered to these patients. Reassessments were carried out for all patients after 3 months of follow-up, except one, who died during the period. Among these 44 patients, three with baseline depressive symptoms still had depressive symptoms. However, improvements were observed in all but one after 3 months of follow-up. Psychiatric illnesses, including depressive symptoms, during MDR-TB treatment demand attention. Routine administration of baseline mental health assessments by trained staff has the potential to assist in determining appropriate measures for the management of depressive symptoms during MDR-TB treatment, and help in improving overall treatment outcomes. We recommend

  10. [Mediating effect of mental elasticity on occupational stress and depression in female nurses].

    PubMed

    Wang, Y W; Liu, G Z; Zhou, X T; Sheng, P J; Cui, F F; Shi, T

    2017-06-20

    Objective: To investigate the interaction between mental elasticityand occupational stress and depressionin female nurses and the mediating effect of mental elasticity, as well as the functioning way of mental elasticity in occupational stress-depression. Methods: From August to October, 2015, cluster sampling was used to select 122 female nurses in a county-level medical institution as study subjects. The Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) , Occupational Stress Inventory-Revised Edition (OSI-R) , and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) were used to collect the data on mental elasticity, occupational stress, and depression and analyze their correlation and mediating effect. Results: The 122 female nurses had a mean mental elasticity score of 62.4±15.1, which was significantly lower than the Chinese norm (65.4±13.9) (P<0.05) ; the mean depression score was 41.0±7.7, which was significantly higher than the Chinese norm (33.5±8.6) (P<0.01) , and the incidence rate of depression of 52.5%. Mental elasticity was negatively correlated with occupational stress and depression (r=-0.559 and -0.559, both P<0.01) . Occupational stress and the two subscales mental stress reaction and physical stress reaction were positively correlated with depression (r=0.774, 0.734, and 0.725, all P<0.01) . After adjustment for confounding factors, occupational stress had a positive predictive effect on depression (β=0.744, P<0.01) , and mental elasticity had a negative predictive effect on depression (β=-0.221, P<0.01) . The analysis of mediating effect showed a significant direct effect of occupational stress on depression and a significant mediating effect of mental elasticity (a=-0.527, b=-0.227, c=0.744, c'=0.627; all P<0.01) , and the mediating effect of mental elasticity accounted for 16.08% of the total effect. Conclusion: As a partial mediating variable, mental elasticity has an indirect effect on the relationship between occupational stress and depression and can

  11. Mental State Decoding in Adolescent Boys with Major Depressive Disorder versus Sex-Matched Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Mellick, William; Sharp, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Several adult depression studies have investigated mental state decoding, the basis for theory of mind, using the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test. Findings have been mixed, but a comprehensive study found a greater severity of depression to be associated with poorer mental state decoding. Importantly, there has yet to be a similar study of adolescent depression. Converging evidence suggests that atypical mental state decoding may have particularly profound effects for psychosocial functioning among depressed adolescent boys. Adolescent boys with major depressive disorder (MDD, n = 33) and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs, n = 84) completed structured clinical interviews, self-report measures of psychopathology and the Child Eyes Test (CET). The MDD group performed significantly better than HCs on the CET overall (p = 0.002), underscored by greater accuracy for negatively valenced items (p = 0.003). Group differences on items depicting positive (p = 0.129) and neutral mental states (p = 0.081) were nonsignificant. Enhanced mental state decoding among depressed adolescent boys may play a role in the maintenance of and vulnerability to adolescent depression. Findings and implications are discussed. Limitations of this study include a reliance on self-report data for HC boys, as well as a lack of 'pure' depression among the boys with MDD. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Consensus Bundle on Maternal Mental Health: Perinatal Depression and Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Susan; Keats, John P; Hoffman, M Camille; Kay, Lisa B; Miller, Emily S; Moore Simas, Tiffany A; Frieder, Ariela; Hackley, Barbara; Indman, Pec; Raines, Christena; Semenuk, Kisha; Wisner, Katherine L; Lemieux, Lauren A

    Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health conditions encountered by women of reproductive age. When left untreated, perinatal mood and anxiety disorders can have profound adverse effects on women and their children, ranging from increased risk of poor adherence to medical care, exacerbation of medical conditions, loss of interpersonal and financial resources, smoking and substance use, suicide, and infanticide. Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are associated with increased risks of maternal and infant mortality and morbidity and are recognized as a significant patient safety issue. In 2015, the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care convened an interdisciplinary workgroup to develop an evidence-based patient safety bundle to address maternal mental health. The focus of this bundle is perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. The bundle is modeled after other bundles released by the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care and provides broad direction for incorporating perinatal mood and anxiety disorder screening, intervention, referral, and follow-up into maternity care practice across health care settings. This commentary provides information to assist with bundle implementation.

  13. Consensus Bundle on Maternal Mental Health: Perinatal Depression and Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Susan; Keats, John P; Hoffman, M Camille; Kay, Lisa B; Miller, Emily S; Moore Simas, Tiffany A; Frieder, Ariela; Hackley, Barbara; Indman, Pec; Raines, Christena; Semenuk, Kisha; Wisner, Katherine L; Lemieux, Lauren A

    2017-03-01

    Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health conditions encountered by women of reproductive age. When left untreated, perinatal mood and anxiety disorders can have profound adverse effects on women and their children, ranging from increased risk of poor adherence to medical care, exacerbation of medical conditions, loss of interpersonal and financial resources, smoking and substance use, suicide, and infanticide. Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are associated with increased risks of maternal and infant mortality and morbidity and are recognized as a significant patient safety issue. In 2015, the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care convened an interdisciplinary workgroup to develop an evidence-based patient safety bundle to address maternal mental health. The focus of this bundle is perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. The bundle is modeled after other bundles released by the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care and provides broad direction for incorporating perinatal mood and anxiety disorder screening, intervention, referral, and follow-up into maternity care practice across health care settings. This commentary provides information to assist with bundle implementation.

  14. Consensus Bundle on Maternal Mental Health: Perinatal Depression and Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Susan; Keats, John P; Hoffman, M Camille; Kay, Lisa B; Miller, Emily S; Simas, Tiffany A Moore; Frieder, Ariela; Hackley, Barbara; Indman, Pec; Raines, Christena; Semenuk, Kisha; Wisner, Katherine L; Lemieux, Lauren A

    2017-03-01

    Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health conditions encountered by women of reproductive age. When left untreated, perinatal mood and anxiety disorders can have profound adverse effects on women and their children, ranging from increased risk of poor adherence to medical care, exacerbation of medical conditions, loss of interpersonal and financial resources, smoking and substance use, suicide, and infanticide. Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are associated with increased risks of maternal and infant mortality and morbidity and are recognized as a significant patient safety issue. In 2015, the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care convened an interdisciplinary work group to develop an evidence-based patient safety bundle to address maternal mental health. The focus of this bundle is perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. The bundle is modeled after other bundles released by the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care and provides broad direction for incorporating perinatal mood and anxiety disorder screening, intervention, referral, and follow-up into maternity care practice across health care settings. This commentary provides information to assist with bundle implementation. © 2017 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  15. Mental Health Literacy of Depression: Gender Differences and Attitudinal Antecedents in a Representative British Sample

    PubMed Central

    Swami, Viren

    2012-01-01

    Background Poor mental health literacy and negative attitudes toward individuals with mental health disorders may impede optimal help-seeking for symptoms of mental ill-health. The present study examined the ability to recognize cases of depression as a function of respondent and target gender, as well as individual psychological differences in attitudes toward persons with depression. Methods In a representative British general population survey, the ability to correctly recognize vignettes of depression was assessed among 1,218 adults. Respondents also rated the vignettes along a number of attitudinal dimensions and completed measures of attitudes toward seeking psychological help, psychiatric skepticism, and anti-scientific attitudes. Results There were significant differences in the ability to correctly identify cases of depression as a function of respondent and target gender. Respondents were more likely to indicate that a male vignette did not suffer from a mental health disorder compared to a female vignette, and women were more likely than men to indicate that the male vignette suffered from a mental health disorder. Attitudes toward persons with depression were associated with attitudes toward seeking psychological help, psychiatric skepticism, and anti-scientific attitudes. Conclusion Initiatives that consider the impact of gender stereotypes as well as individual differences may enhance mental health literacy, which in turn is associated with improved help-seeking behaviors for symptoms of mental ill-health. PMID:23166769

  16. Deletion of PTEN produces deficits in conditioned fear and increases fragile X mental retardation protein.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Joaquin N; Smith, Gregory D; Morrison, Jessica B; White, Jessika

    2013-11-15

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog detected on chromosome 10 (PTEN) gene product modulates activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. The PI3K pathway has been found to be involved in the regulation of the fragile X mental retardation protein, which is important for long-term depression and in the formation of new memories. We used delayed fear conditioning and trace fear conditioning to determine learning and memory deficits in neuron subset-specific Pten (NS-Pten) conditional knockout (KO) mice. We found that NS-Pten KO mice had deficits in contextual learning and trace conditioning, but did not have deficits in the ability to learn a conditioned stimulus. Furthermore, we found increased levels in the total and phosphorylated forms of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) in the hippocampus of NS-Pten KO mice.

  17. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Mental Health Service Use among Adolescents with Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Janet R.; Druss, Benjamin G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about racial/ethnic differences in the receipt of treatment for major depression in adolescents. This study examined differences in mental health service use in non-Hispanic white, black, Hispanic, and Asian adolescents who experienced an episode of major depression. Method: Five years of data (2004-2008) were pooled…

  18. Women's Use of Multi sector Mental Health Services in a Community-Based Perinatal Depression Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Sarah Kye

    2010-01-01

    Low-income and ethnic minority women have been described as at risk for experiencing depression during and around the time of pregnancy, a finding complicated by low levels of mental health service use within this population. This study retrospectively examined data from a community-based perinatal depression project targeting low-income women in…

  19. Engaging Women Who Are Depressed and Economically Disadvantaged in Mental Health Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grote, Nancy K.; Zuckoff, Allan; Swartz, Holly; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Geibel, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Women disadvantaged by poverty, as well as racial or ethnic minority status, are more likely to experience depression than the rest of the U.S. population. At the same time, they are less likely to seek or remain in treatment for depression in traditional mental health settings. This article explores a therapeutic, psychosocial engagement strategy…

  20. Women's Use of Multi sector Mental Health Services in a Community-Based Perinatal Depression Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Sarah Kye

    2010-01-01

    Low-income and ethnic minority women have been described as at risk for experiencing depression during and around the time of pregnancy, a finding complicated by low levels of mental health service use within this population. This study retrospectively examined data from a community-based perinatal depression project targeting low-income women in…

  1. Migration and Mental Health: An Empirical Test of Depression Risk Factors Among Immigrant Mexican Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, William A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Critical issues and methodological problems concerning migration and mental health are examined. A model for determining predictor variables of depression in immigrant Mexican women is tested. Demographic, economic, and interpersonal factors are isolated as a subset of depression predictors within the model. (VM)

  2. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Mental Health Service Use among Adolescents with Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Janet R.; Druss, Benjamin G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about racial/ethnic differences in the receipt of treatment for major depression in adolescents. This study examined differences in mental health service use in non-Hispanic white, black, Hispanic, and Asian adolescents who experienced an episode of major depression. Method: Five years of data (2004-2008) were pooled…

  3. International perspectives on psychosocial working conditions, mental health, and stress of dairy farm operators.

    PubMed

    Lunner Kolstrup, Christina; Kallioniemi, Marja; Lundqvist, Peter; Kymäläinen, Hanna-Riitta; Stallones, Lorann; Brumby, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Dairy farm operators-farmers, workers, and family members-are faced with many demands and stressors in their daily work and these appear to be shared across countries and cultures. Dairy operators experience high psychosocial demands with respect to a hard work and production ethos, economic influences, and social and environmental responsibility. Furthermore, both traditional and industrial farms are highly dependent on external conditions, such as weather, fluctuating markets, and regulations from government authorities. Possible external stressors include disease outbreaks, taxes related to dairy production, and recent negative societal attitudes to farming in general. Dairy farm operators may have very few or no opportunities to influence and control these external conditions, demands, and expectations. High work demands and expectations coupled with low control and lack of social support can lead to a poor psychosocial work environment, with increased stress levels, ill mental health, depression, and, in the worst cases, suicide. Internationally, farmers with ill mental health have different health service options depending on their location. Regardless of location, it is initially the responsibility of the individual farmer and farm family to handle mental health and stress, which can be of short- or long-term duration. This paper reviews the literature on the topics of psychosocial working conditions, mental health, stress, depression, and suicide among dairy farm operators, farm workers, and farm family members in an international perspective.

  4. Adverse childhood experiences, depression and mental health barriers to work among low-income women.

    PubMed

    Cambron, Christopher; Gringeri, Christina; Vogel-Ferguson, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has connected childhood abuse to decreased physical and mental health for low-income women in Utah. Further, mental health has established a link to employment problems. This study conducted a secondary analysis of data collected from individuals accessing public assistance to investigate the relationships among retrospective self-reports of childhood emotional, physical and sexual abuse and prospective indicators of mental health and mental health barriers to work. Logistic regression models found strong relationships between childhood abuse and increased odds of depression and mental health barriers to work. Path models highlight the relative importance of depression for those reporting mental health as the biggest barrier to work. Recommendations for social workers, public health professionals, and program administrators are provided.

  5. Late Life Recurrent Depression: Challenge to Mental Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinrichsen, Gregory A.

    For the vast majority of persons of all ages who suffer from major depression, it is recurrent. A traditional wisdom has been that elderly persons respond more poorly to treatment for serious depression than younger persons. The psychiatric status of 127 elderly persons hospitalized for an episode of major depression was systematically assessed…

  6. The specificity of mental pain in borderline personality disorder compared to depressive disorders and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Fertuck, Eric A; Karan, Esen; Stanley, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) may experience a qualitatively distinct depression which includes "mental pain." Mental pain includes chronic, aversive emotions, negative self-concept, and a sense of pervasive helplessness. The present study investigated whether mental pain is elevated in BPD compared to Depressive Disorders (DD) without BPD. The Orbach and Mikulincer Mental Pain Scale (OMMP) was administered to BPD (N = 57), DD (N = 22), and healthy controls (N = 31). The OMMP assesses total mental pain, comprised of nine subtypes: irreversibility, loss of control, narcissistic wounds, emotional flooding, freezing, self-estrangement, confusion, social distancing, and emptiness. Co-occurring psychiatric diagnoses, depression severity, and other potentially confounding clinical and demographic variables were also assessed. The total Mental Pain score did not differentiate BPD from DD. Moreover, most of the subscales of the OMMP were not significantly different in BPD compared to DD. However, the elevation of mental pain subscale "narcissistic wounds," characterized by feeling rejected and having low self-worth, was a specific predictor of BPD status and the severity of BPD symptoms. On OMMP total score, mental pain was similarly elevated in BPD and DD. However, the narcissistic wounds sub-type of mental pain was a sensitive and specific diagnostic indicator of BPD and, therefore, may be an important aspect of BPD in need of increased focus in assessment and theoretical models.

  7. Treating Tobacco Dependence in Clinically Depressed Smokers: Effect of Smoking Cessation on Mental Health Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Hall, Sharon M.; Tsoh, Janice Y.; Eisendrath, Stuart; Rossi, Joseph S.; Redding, Colleen A.; Rosen, Amy B.; Meisner, Marc; Humfleet, Gary L.; Gorecki, Julie A.

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed data from a randomized trial of 322 actively depressed smokers and examined the effect of smoking cessation on their mental health functioning. Only 1 of 10 measures at 4 follow-up time points was significant: participants who successfully stopped smoking reported less alcohol use than did participants who continued smoking. Depressive symptoms declined significantly over time for participants who stopped smoking and those who continued smoking; there were no group differences. Individuals in treatment for clinical depression can be helped to stop smoking without adversely affecting their mental health functioning. PMID:17600251

  8. Mental Health Outcomes of Psychosocial Intervention Among Traditional Health Practitioner Depressed Patients in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Musyimi, Christine W; Mutiso, Victoria; Ndetei, David M; Henderson, David C; Bunders, Joske

    2017-03-01

    Task-shifting in mental health such as engaging Traditional Health Practitioners (THPs) in appropriate management of mental disorders is crucial in reducing global mental health challenges. This study aims to determine the outcomes of using evidence-based mental health Global Action Programme Intervention guide (mhGAP-IG) to provide psychosocial interventions among depressed patients seeking care from THPs. THPs were trained to deliver psychosocial interventions to their patients screening positive for mild to severe depression on Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). Assessments were conducted at 0, 6 and 12 weeks and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) performed to determine the change in depression scores over the three time period. BDI mean score was 26.52 before intervention and reduced significantly at 6 (13%) and 12 (35%) weeks after intervention. 58 and 78% of patients showed reduction in symptoms of depression at 6 and 12 weeks. It is therefore crucial to engage THPs in the care of patients with depression and the need for inclusion of training packages; and other mental disorders in order to establish and maintain collaboration between THPs and conventional health workers and promote evidence-based care among marginalized populations. Moreover, further research on randomized control trials of mhGAP-IG intervention versus usual care is required.

  9. Visual mental imagery in psychopathology--implications for the maintenance and treatment of depression.

    PubMed

    Weßlau, Charlotte; Steil, Regina

    2014-06-01

    Negative mental images are a common feature in a range of mental disorders as well as in healthy subjects. Intrusive negative mental images have only recently become a focus of attention in clinical research on depression. Research so far indicates that they can be an important factor regarding the onset and chronicity of affective disorders. This article is the first to provide an extensive overview of the current state of research in the field of visual mental images in depression. It aims to investigate disorder-specific characteristics, as well as the role of imagery as a maintaining factor. A detailed definition and description of empirical results about mental images in depressive disorders is followed by a presentation and analysis of treatment studies using imagery techniques in depressed samples. Additionally, methodological issues like small sample sizes and the lack of control groups are pointed out and implications for future research are discussed. Case vignettes are included in the appendix to exemplify the importance of negative mental images in patients suffering from depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Contextual socioeconomic status and mental health counseling use among US adolescents with depression.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Janet R

    2014-07-01

    Most adolescents with depressive disorders do not receive any mental health services, even though effective treatments exist. Although research has examined numerous individual-level factors associated with mental health service use among depressed adolescents, less is known about the role of contextual factors. This study examines the relationship between contextual-level socioeconomic status (SES) and clinic-based mental health counseling use among US adolescents with high depressive symptoms in urban and suburban areas. Data from the first two waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 1,133; 59 % female) were analyzed using multilevel logistic models in which adolescents were nested within counties. After controlling for individual-level predisposing, enabling, and need characteristics, as well as county racial/ethnic composition, county SES was positively associated with clinic-based counseling use among depressed youth. A one standard deviation increase in the county affluence index was associated with 43 % greater odds of receiving any clinical counseling services. Furthermore, the positive relationship between county affluence and clinical counseling use was no longer significant after controlling for the county supply of mental health specialist physicians. The results indicate that county residential context is a key correlate of mental health service use among depressed adolescents, such that those who live in lower SES counties with fewer mental health specialists are less likely to receive treatment.

  11. Contextual Socioeconomic Status and Mental Health Counseling Use Among U.S. Adolescents with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    Most adolescents with depressive disorders do not receive any mental health services, even though effective treatments exist. Although research has examined numerous individual-level factors associated with mental health service use among depressed adolescents, less is known about the role of contextual factors. This study examines the relationship between contextual-level socioeconomic status (SES) and clinic-based mental health counseling use among U.S. adolescents with high depressive symptoms in urban and suburban areas. Data from the first two waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N=1,133; 59% female) were analyzed using multilevel logistic models in which adolescents were nested within counties. After controlling for individual-level predisposing, enabling, and need characteristics, as well as county racial/ethnic composition, county SES was positively associated with clinic-based counseling use among depressed youth. A one standard deviation increase in the county affluence index was associated with 43% greater odds of receiving any clinical counseling services. Furthermore, the positive relationship between county affluence and clinical counseling use was no longer significant after controlling for the county supply of mental health specialist physicians. The results indicate that county residential context is a key correlate of mental health service use among depressed adolescents, such that those who live in lower SES counties with fewer mental health specialists are less likely to receive treatment. PMID:24114588

  12. Seeing light at the end of the tunnel: Positive prospective mental imagery and optimism in depression.

    PubMed

    Ji, Julie L; Holmes, Emily A; Blackwell, Simon E

    2017-01-01

    Optimism is associated with positive outcomes across many health domains, from cardiovascular disease to depression. However, we know little about cognitive processes underlying optimism in psychopathology. The present study tested whether the ability to vividly imagine positive events in one's future was associated with dispositional optimism in a sample of depressed adults. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were conducted, using baseline (all participants, N=150) and follow-up data (participants in the control condition only, N=63) from a clinical trial (Blackwell et al., 2015). Vividness of positive prospective imagery, assessed on a laboratory-administered task at baseline, was significantly associated with both current optimism levels at baseline and future (seven months later) optimism levels, including when controlling for potential confounds. Even when depressed, those individuals able to envision a brighter future were more optimistic, and regained optimism more quickly over time, than those less able to do so at baseline. Strategies to increase the vividness of positive prospective imagery may aid development of mental health interventions to boost optimism. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Recession Depression: Mental Health Effects of the 2008 Stock Market Crash*

    PubMed Central

    McInerney, Melissa; Mellor, Jennifer M.; Nicholas, Lauren Hersch

    2013-01-01

    Do sudden, large wealth losses affect mental health? We use exogenous variation in the interview dates of the 2008 Health and Retirement Study to assess the impact of large wealth losses on mental health among older U.S. adults. We compare cross-wave changes in wealth and mental health for respondents interviewed before and after the October 2008 stock market crash. We find that the crash reduced wealth and increased feelings of depression and use of antidepressant drugs, and that these effects were largest among respondents with high levels of stock holdings prior to the crash. These results suggest that sudden wealth losses cause immediate declines in subjective measures of mental health. However, we find no evidence that wealth losses lead to increases in clinically-validated measures of depressive symptoms or indicators of depression. PMID:24113241

  14. Recession depression: mental health effects of the 2008 stock market crash.

    PubMed

    McInerney, Melissa; Mellor, Jennifer M; Nicholas, Lauren Hersch

    2013-12-01

    Do sudden, large wealth losses affect mental health? We use exogenous variation in the interview dates of the 2008 Health and Retirement Study to assess the impact of large wealth losses on mental health among older U.S. adults. We compare cross-wave changes in wealth and mental health for respondents interviewed before and after the October 2008 stock market crash. We find that the crash reduced wealth and increased feelings of depression and use of antidepressant drugs, and that these effects were largest among respondents with high levels of stock holdings prior to the crash. These results suggest that sudden wealth losses cause immediate declines in subjective measures of mental health. However, we find no evidence that wealth losses lead to increases in clinically-validated measures of depressive symptoms or indicators of depression.

  15. An Internet-Based Intervention to Promote Mental Fitness for Mildly Depressed Adults: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haverman, Merel; Kramer, Jeannet; Westerhof, Gerben J; Riper, Heleen; Walburg, Jan A; Boon, Brigitte; Bohlmeijer, Ernst

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is a worldwide problem warranting global solutions to tackle it. Enhancing well-being has benefits in its own right and could be a good strategy for preventing depression. Providing well-being interventions via the Internet may have synergetic effects. Objective Psyfit (“mental fitness online”) is a fully automated self-help intervention to improve well-being based on positive psychology. This study examines the clinical effects of this intervention. Methods We conducted a 2-armed randomized controlled trial that compared the effects of access to Psyfit for 2 months (n=143) to a waiting-list control condition (n=141). Mild to moderately depressed adults in the general population seeking self-help were recruited. Primary outcome was well-being measured by Mental Health Continuum-Short Form (MHC-SF) and WHO Well-being Index (WHO-5); secondary outcomes were depressive symptoms, anxiety, vitality, and general health measured by Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Anxiety subscale (HADS-A), and Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form (MOS-SF) vitality and general health subscales, respectively. Online measurements were taken at baseline, 2 months, and 6 months after baseline. Results The dropout rate was 37.8% in the Psyfit group and 22.7% in the control group. At 2-month follow-up, Psyfit tended to be more effective in enhancing well-being (nonsignificantly for MHC-SF: Cohen’s d=0.27, P=.06; significantly for WHO-5: Cohen’s d=0.31, P=.01), compared to the waiting-list control group. For the secondary outcomes, small but significant effects were found for general health (Cohen’s d=0.14, P=.01), vitality (d=0.22, P=.02), anxiety symptoms (Cohen’s d=0.32, P=.001), and depressive symptoms (Cohen’s d=0.36, P=.02). At 6-month follow-up, there were no significant effects on well-being (MHC-SF: Cohen’s d=0.01, P=.90; WHO-5: Cohen’s d=0.26, P=.11), whereas depressive symptoms

  16. Mental Health Treatment Seeking Among Older Adults with Depression: The Impact of Stigma and Race

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Kyaien O.; Copeland, Valire Carr; Grote, Nancy K.; Koeske, Gary; Rosen, Daniel; Reynolds, Charles F.; Brown, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Objective Stigma associated with mental illness continues to be a significant barrier to help seeking, leading to negative attitudes about mental health treatment and deterring individuals who need services from seeking care. This study examined the impact of public stigma (negative attitudes held by the public) and internalized stigma (negative attitudes held by stigmatized individuals about themselves) on racial differences in treatment seeking attitudes and behaviors among older adults with depression. Method Random digit dialing was utilized to identify a representative sample of 248 African American and White adults older adults (over the age of 60) with depression (symptoms assessed via the Patient Health Questionnaire-9). Telephone based surveys were conducted to assess their treatment seeking attitudes and behaviors, and the factors that impacted these behaviors. Results Depressed older adult participants endorsed a high level of public stigma and were not likely to be currently engaged in, nor did they intend to seek mental health treatment. Results also suggested that African American older adults were more likely to internalize stigma and endorsed less positive attitudes toward seeking mental health treatment than their White counterparts. Multiple regression analysis indicated that internalized stigma partially mediated the relationship between race and attitudes toward treatment. Conclusion Stigma associated with having a mental illness has a negative influence on attitudes and intentions toward seeking mental health services among older adults with depression, particularly African American elders. Interventions to target internalized stigma are needed to help engage this population in psychosocial mental health treatments. PMID:20220602

  17. Diagnosing Depression in Alzheimer Disease With the National Institute of Mental Health Provisional Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Edmond; Ringman, John M.; Ross, Leslie K.; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Dick, Malcolm B.; Bartzokis, George; Davies, Helen D.; Galasko, Douglas; Hewett, Linda; Mungas, Dan; Reed, Bruce R.; Schneider, Lon S.; Segal-Gidan, Freddi; Yaffe, Kristine; Cummings, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the rates of depression in Alzheimer Disease (AD) determined using National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) provisional criteria for depression in AD (NIMH-dAD) to those determined using other established depression assessment tools. Design Descriptive longitudinal cohort study. Setting The Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers of California. Participants A cohort of 101 patients meeting NINDS-ADRDA criteria for possible/probable AD, intentionally selected to increase the frequency of depression at baseline. Measurements Depression was diagnosed at baseline and after 3 months using NIMH-dAD criteria and the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) Axis I Disorders. Depressive symptoms also were assessed with the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD), the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire. Results The baseline frequency of depression using NIMH-dAD criteria (44%) was higher than that obtained using DSM-IV criteria for major depression (14%; Z = −5.50, df = 101, p <0.001) and major or minor depression (36%; Z = −2.86, df = 101, p = 0.021) or using established cut-offs for the CSDD (30%; Z = −2.86, df = 101, p = 0.004) or GDS (33%; Z = −2.04, df = 101, p = 0.041). The NIMH-dAD criteria correctly identified all patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depression, and correlated well with DSM-IV criteria for major or minor depression (κ = 0.753, p <0.001), exhibiting 94% sensitivity and 85% specificity. The higher rates of depression found with NIMH-dAD criteria derived primarily from its less stringent requirements for the frequency and duration of symptoms. Remission rates at 3 months were similar across instruments. Conclusions The NIMH-dAD criteria identify a greater proportion of AD patients as depressed than several other established tools. PMID:18515691

  18. Mental health conditions among school-aged children: geographic and sociodemographic patterns in prevalence and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ghandour, Reem M; Kogan, Michael D; Blumberg, Stephen J; Jones, Jessica R; Perrin, James M

    2012-01-01

    To explore geographic differences in diagnosed emotional and behavioral mental health conditions and receipt of treatment. Data are from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, a nationally representative, parent-reported, cross-sectional survey. Pediatric mental health conditions were identified using parents' responses to 3 questions regarding whether a health care provider had ever told them that their child had depression, anxiety problems, or behavioral or conduct problems. Parents also reported on past-year treatment or counseling by a mental health professional. State-level differences in condition prevalence were identified using unadjusted and adjusted prevalence estimates. Multivariate logistic regression assessed the odds of not receiving treatment by state and diagnoses. Nearly 8% of children aged 6 to 17 years have ever been diagnosed with depression or anxiety, and 5.4% have ever been diagnosed with behavioral or conduct problems. State-level estimates of parent-reported depression or anxiety varied from 4.8% in Georgia to 14.4% in Vermont, while prevalence of behavioral problems ranged from 3.2% in California to 9.2% in Louisiana. Nearly 10% of all school-aged children and 53.1% of those ever diagnosed with either condition type received past-year treatment. The odds of receiving past-year parent-reported treatment did not differ by state of residence with the exception of Louisiana and Nevada: children ever diagnosed had approximately 2.5 times the odds of not receiving past-year treatment in these states. The prevalence of parent-reported mental health disorders among children varies by geographic and sociodemographic factors, while receipt of treatment is generally dependent on sociodemographic and health-related factors.

  19. The association of childhood adversities and early onset mental disorders with adult onset chronic physical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Kate M.; Von Korff, Michael; Angermeyer, Matthias C.; Benjet, Corina; Bruffaerts, Ronny; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Haro, Josep Maria; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Ormel, Johan; Posada-Villa, José; Tachimori, Hisateru; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Context The physical health consequences of childhood psychosocial adversities may be as substantial as the mental health consequences but whether this is the case remains unclear because much prior research has involved unrepresentative samples and a selective focus on particular adversities or physical outcomes. The association between early onset mental disorders and subsequent poor physical health in adulthood has not been investigated. Objective To investigate whether childhood adversities and early onset mental disorders are independently associated with increased risk of a range of adult onset chronic physical conditions in culturally diverse samples spanning the full adult age range. Design Cross-sectional community surveys of adults in ten countries. Setting General population. Participants Adults (>= 18 years; n = 18,303), with diagnostic assessment and determination of age of onset of DSM-IV mental disorders; assessment of childhood familial adversities; and age of diagnosis/onset of chronic physical conditions. Main Outcome Measures Risk (hazard ratios) of adult onset (> age 20) heart disease, asthma, diabetes, arthritis, chronic spinal pain, and chronic headache as a function of specific childhood adversities and early onset (< age 21) DSM-IV depressive and anxiety disorders, with mutual adjustment. Results A history of three or more childhood adversities was independently associated with onset of all six physical conditions (hazard ratios from 1.44–2.19). Controlling for current mental disorder made little difference to these associations. Early onset mental disorders were independently associated with onset of five physical conditions (hazard ratios from 1.43–1.66). Conclusions These results are consistent with the hypothesis that childhood adversities and early onset mental disorders have independent, broad spectrum effects that increase risks of diverse chronic physical conditions in later life. They require confirmation in a prospective design

  20. Association of Mental Disorders With Subsequent Chronic Physical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Kate M.; Lim, Carmen; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Alonso, Jordi; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, José Miguel; Florescu, Silvia; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Hu, Chiyi; de Jonge, Peter; Kawakami, Norito; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; O’Neill, Siobhan; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, José; Torres, Yolanda; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE It is clear that mental disorders in treatment settings are associated with a higher incidence of chronic physical conditions, but whether this is true of mental disorders in the community, and how generalized (across a range of physical health outcomes) these associations are, is less clear. This information has important implications for mental health care and the primary prevention of chronic physical disease. OBJECTIVE To investigate associations of 16 temporally prior DSM-IV mental disorders with the subsequent onset or diagnosis of 10 chronic physical conditions. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Eighteen face-to-face, cross-sectional household surveys of community-dwelling adults were conducted in 17 countries (47 609 individuals; 2 032 942 person-years) from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2011. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to retrospectively assess the lifetime prevalence and age at onset of DSM-IV–identified mental disorders. Data analysis was performed from January 3, 2012, to September 30, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Lifetime history of physical conditions was ascertained via self-report of physician’s diagnosis and year of onset or diagnosis. Survival analyses estimated the associations of temporally prior first onset of mental disorders with subsequent onset or diagnosis of physical conditions. RESULTS Most associations between 16 mental disorders and subsequent onset or diagnosis of 10 physical conditions were statistically significant, with odds ratios (ORs) (95% CIs) ranging from 1.2 (1.0–1.5) to 3.6 (2.0–6.6). The associations were attenuated after adjustment for mental disorder comorbidity, but mood, anxiety, substance use, and impulse control disorders remained significantly associated with onset of between 7 and all 10 of the physical conditions (ORs [95% CIs] from 1.2 [1.1–1.3] to 2.0 [1.4–2.8]). An increasing number of mental disorders experienced over the life course was significantly

  1. Correlates of Mental Depression Among Female Sex Workers in Southern India.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sangram Kishor; Saggurti, Niranjan; Pachauri, Saroj; Prabhakar, Parimi

    2015-11-01

    Mental health is an integral part of overall health status but has been a largely neglected issue in the developing world especially among female sex workers (FSWs). This study examines the prevalence and correlates of major depression among FSWs in southern India. Major depression was assessed using Patient Health Questionnaire-2 depression scale data from a cross-sectional Behavioral Tracking Survey, 2010-2011 conducted among FSWs (n = 1986) in Andhra Pradesh, a state in southern India. Almost two-fifths of FSWs (39%) reported major depression. Multivariate logistic regression analysis shows a significant association between major depression and the following characteristics for FSWs: low autonomy, alcohol use, experience of violence, police arrest, inconsistent condom use with clients, mobility for sex work, and being HIV positive or not wanting to disclose HIV status. Research and advocacy efforts are needed to ensure that the mental health issues of marginalized groups are appropriately addressed in HIV prevention programs. © 2015 APJPH.

  2. Mental Health for Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... abuse Anxiety disorders and PTSD Body image and eating disorders Depression Sexual health for men Urinary health for ... abuse Anxiety disorders and PTSD Body image and eating disorders Depression Other mental health conditions include bipolar disorder , ...

  3. Attitudes of Mental Health Professionals Toward People With Schizophrenia and Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Nordt, Carlos; Rössler, Wulf; Lauber, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    Several studies reveal poor knowledge about mental illness in the general population and stigmatizing attitudes toward people with mental illness. However, it is unknown whether mental health professionals hold fewer stigmatizing attitudes than the general population. A survey was conducted of the attitudes of mental health professionals (n = 1073) and members of the public (n = 1737) toward mental illness and their specific reaction toward a person with and without psychiatric symptoms (“non-case” as a reference category). Psychiatrists had more negative stereotypes than the general population. Mental health professionals accepted restrictions toward people with mental illness 3 times less often than the public. Most professionals were able to recognize cases of schizophrenia and depression, but 1 in 4 psychiatrists and psychologists also considered the non-case as mentally ill. The social distance toward both major depression and the non-case was lower than toward schizophrenia. However, in this regard, there was no difference between professionals and the public. The study concludes that the better knowledge of mental health professionals and their support of individual rights neither entail fewer stereotypes nor enhance the willingness to closely interact with mentally ill people. PMID:16510695

  4. Associations between DSM-IV mental disorders and diabetes mellitus: a role for impulse control disorders and depression.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Peter; Alonso, Jordi; Stein, Dan J; Kiejna, Andrzej; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Viana, Maria Carmen; Liu, Zhaorui; O'Neill, Siobhan; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Matschinger, Herbert; Levinson, Daphna; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Fukao, Akira; Bunting, Brendan; Haro, Josep Maria; Posada-Villa, Jose A; Al-Hamzawi, Ali Obaid; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Piazza, Marina; Hu, Chiyi; Sasu, Carmen; Lim, Carmen C W; Kessler, Ronald C; Scott, Kate M

    2014-04-01

    No studies have evaluated whether the frequently observed associations between depression and diabetes could reflect the presence of comorbid psychiatric conditions and their associations with diabetes. We therefore examined the associations between a wide range of pre-existing Diagnostic Statistical Manual, 4th edition (DSM-IV) mental disorders with self-reported diagnosis of diabetes. We performed a series of cross-sectional face-to-face household surveys of community-dwelling adults (n = 52,095) in 19 countries. The World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of 16 DSM-IV mental disorders. Diabetes was indicated by self-report of physician's diagnosis together with its timing. We analysed the associations between all mental disorders and diabetes, without and with comorbidity adjustment. We identified 2,580 cases of adult-onset diabetes mellitus (21 years +). Although all 16 DSM-IV disorders were associated with diabetes diagnosis in bivariate models, only depression (OR 1.3; 95% CI 1.1, 1.5), intermittent explosive disorder (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.1, 2.1), binge eating disorder (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.7, 4.0) and bulimia nervosa (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.3, 3.4) remained after comorbidity adjustment. Depression and impulse control disorders (eating disorders in particular) were significantly associated with diabetes diagnosis after comorbidity adjustment. These findings support the focus on depression as having a role in diabetes onset, but suggest that this focus may be extended towards impulse control disorders. Acknowledging the comorbidity of mental disorders is important in determining the associations between mental disorders and subsequent diabetes.

  5. Associations between DSM-IV mental disorders and diabetes mellitus: a role for impulse control disorders and depression

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Jordi; Stein, Dan J.; Kiejna, Andrzej; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Viana, Maria Carmen; Liu, Zhaorui; O’Neill, Siobhan; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Matschinger, Herbert; Levinson, Daphna; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Fukao, Akira; Bunting, Brendan; Haro, Josep Maria; Posada-Villa, Jose A.; Al-Hamzawi, Ali Obaid; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Piazza, Marina; Hu, Chiyi; Sasu, Carmen; Lim, Carmen C. W.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Scott, Kate M.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis No studies have evaluated whether the frequently observed associations between depression and diabetes could reflect the presence of comorbid psychiatric conditions and their associations with diabetes. We therefore examined the associations between a wide range of pre-existing Diagnostic Statistical Manual, 4th edition (DSM-IV) mental disorders with self-reported diagnosis of diabetes. Methods We performed a series of cross-sectional face-to-face household surveys of community-dwelling adults (n=52,095) in 19 countries. The World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of 16 DSM-IV mental disorders. Diabetes was indicated by self-report of physician’s diagnosis together with its timing. We analysed the associations between all mental disorders and diabetes, without and with comorbidity adjustment. Results We identified 2,580 cases of adult-onset diabetes mellitus (21 years +). Although all 16 DSM-IV disorders were associated with diabetes diagnosis in bivariate models, only depression (OR 1.3; 95% CI 1.1, 1.5), intermittent explosive disorder (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.1, 2.1), binge eating disorder (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.7, 4.0) and bulimia nervosa (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.3, 3.4) remained after comorbidity adjustment. Conclusions/interpretation Depression and impulse control disorders (eating disorders in particular) were significantly associated with diabetes diagnosis after comorbidity adjustment. These findings support the focus on depression as having a role in diabetes onset, but suggest that this focus may be extended towards impulse control disorders. Acknowledging the comorbidity of mental disorders is important in determining the associations between mental disorders and subsequent diabetes. PMID:24488082

  6. Reconsidering the role of social disadvantage in physical and mental health: stressful life events, health behaviors, race, and depression.

    PubMed

    Mezuk, Briana; Rafferty, Jane A; Kershaw, Kiarri N; Hudson, Darrell; Abdou, Cleopatra M; Lee, Hedwig; Eaton, William W; Jackson, James S

    2010-12-01

    Prevalence of depression is associated inversely with some indicators of socioeconomic position, and the stress of social disadvantage is hypothesized to mediate this relation. Relative to whites, blacks have a higher burden of most physical health conditions but, unexpectedly, a lower burden of depression. This study evaluated an etiologic model that integrates mental and physical health to account for this counterintuitive patterning. The Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study (Maryland, 1993-2004) was used to evaluate the interaction between stress and poor health behaviors (smoking, alcohol use, poor diet, and obesity) and risk of depression 12 years later for 341 blacks and 601 whites. At baseline, blacks engaged in more poor health behaviors and had a lower prevalence of depression compared with whites (5.9% vs. 9.2%). The interaction between health behaviors and stress was nonsignificant for whites (odds ratio (OR = 1.04, 95% confidence interval: 0.98, 1.11); for blacks, the interaction term was significant and negative (β: -0.18, P < 0.014). For blacks, the association between median stress and depression was stronger for those who engaged in zero (OR = 1.34) relative to 1 (OR = 1.12) and ≥2 (OR = 0.94) poor health behaviors. Findings are consistent with the proposed model of mental and physical health disparities.

  7. Career satisfaction level, mental distress, and gender differences in working conditions among Japanese obstetricians and gynecologists.

    PubMed

    Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi; Suzuki, Sadao; Kitazawa, Masafumi; Kuwae, Chizuko; Sawa, Rintaro; Shimizu, Yukiko; Takeshita, Toshiyuki; Yoshimura, Yasunori

    2012-03-01

    Career satisfaction level, degree of mental distress associated with certain work-related factors, and demographics were examined for the first time in obstetricians and gynecologists in Japan. Associations between the score on Kessler 6 screening scale, or the job satisfaction level, and the scores on the job content questionnaire, Social Support Questionnaire (SSQ), working conditions and demographics were examined in 1301 members of the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 8.4% of respondents were speculated to suffer from depression or anxiety disorder. Multivariate linear regression analysis identified a heavier workload, less personal control, lower satisfaction on the SSQ, and longer working hours as being independent risk factors for mental distress. Careful monitoring of the mental state is necessary for obstetricians and gynecologists with lower incomes, heavier workloads, lower degrees of personal control, and lower satisfaction scores on the SSQ. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. Depression, anxiety, and mental health service experiences of women with a twin-twin transfusion syndrome pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Falletta, Lynn; Fischbein, Rebecca; Bhamidipalli, Surya Sruthi; Nicholas, Lauren

    2017-07-31

    Symptoms of emotional distress during and after pregnancy may be introduced or exacerbated by unexpected medical conditions in the mother or fetus. Twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS), which accounts for 17% of fetal deaths in twins and entails substantial medical uncertainty, may represent a particularly challenging pregnancy experience. Yet, little is known about the impact of TTTS on women's emotional health. We retrospectively surveyed 350 women who experienced a TTTS pregnancy about their experiences at three time points (prior to, during, and after pregnancy) to examine symptoms of anxiety and depression, mental health diagnoses, thoughts of seeking mental healthcare, help received, and preferred mental health services. Women in this study experienced significantly elevated symptoms of depression and anxiety during and after pregnancy, regardless of their pregnancy outcome (double survivor, single survivor, or double loss). Women reported feeling devastated by their experience and indicated they would have accepted mental healthcare had it been offered and had barriers to care been addressed. Prospective studies of women experiencing TTTS pregnancies are needed to examine TTTS effects on maternal mental health and to determine how to best address emotional care needs.

  9. Adverse psychosocial working conditions and risk of severe depressive symptoms. Do effects differ by occupational grade?

    PubMed

    Rugulies, Reiner; Aust, Birgit; Madsen, Ida E H; Burr, Hermann; Siegrist, Johannes; Bültmann, Ute

    2013-06-01

    Depression is a major concern for public health. Both adverse working conditions and low socio-economic position are suspected to increase risk of depression. In a representative sample of the Danish workforce we investigated (i) whether adverse psychosocial working conditions, defined by the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model, predicted onset of severe depressive symptoms after 5-year follow-up and (ii) whether the effect of ERI was differential across occupational grades. A cohort of 2701 Danish employees filled in a questionnaire on work and health in 2000 and 2005. ERI was measured with four effort and seven reward items. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the five-item Mental Health Inventory. Participants scoring ≤ 52 points were defined as cases. We used logistic regression to investigate the association of ERI and occupational grade in 2000 with onset of severe depressive symptoms in 2005. Analyses were adjusted for socio-demographics, health behaviours, survey method, self-rated health, sleep disturbances and non-severe depressive symptoms at baseline. High ERI predicted onset of severe depressive symptoms at follow-up, after adjustment for co-variates and occupational grade (OR = 2.19, 95% CI = 1.12-4.25). Participants with high ERI and low occupational grade showed a considerably higher OR (2.43, 95% CI = 1.07-5.53) compared to participants with low/medium ERI and low grade (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 0.72-2.92), high ERI and high grade (OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 0.59-2.70) and low/medium ERI and high grade (reference group). Adverse psychosocial working conditions predicted onset of severe depressive symptoms. The effect was stronger among employees of lower occupational grades compared to those of higher grades.

  10. Mental health and migration: depression, alcohol abuse, and access to health care among migrants in Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Ismayilova, Leyla; Lee, Hae Nim; Shaw, Stacey; El-Bassel, Nabila; Gilbert, Louisa; Terlikbayeva, Assel; Rozental, Yelena

    2014-12-01

    One-fifth of Kazakhstan's population is labor migrants working in poor conditions with limited legal rights. This paper examines self-rated health, mental health and access to health care among migrant workers. Using geo-mapping, a random sample of internal and external migrant market workers was selected in Almaty (N = 450). We used survey logistic regression adjusted for clustering of workers within stalls. Almost half of participants described their health as fair or poor and reported not seeing a doctor when needed, 6.2% had clinical depression and 8.7% met criteria for alcohol abuse. Female external migrants were at higher risk for poor health and underutilization of health services. High mobility was associated with depression among internal migrants and with alcohol abuse among female migrant workers. This study demonstrates the urgent need to address health and mental health needs and improve access to health care among labor migrants in Central Asia.

  11. Current Use of Depression Rating Scales in Mental Health Setting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Jeong; Kim, Jung Bum; Shin, Im Hee; Lim, Kyung Hee; Lee, Sang Hee; Cho, Gyung Ah; Sung, Hyung Mo; Jung, Sung Won; Zmimmerman, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was to investigate the current use of depression rating scales by psychiatrists and clinical psychologists in Korea. Methods The questionnaires from many psychiatrists and clinical psychologists were included in the analysis. The questionnaire was composed of items about examining the percentage of patients clinically using depression rating scales, reasons for not use of them, the degree of satisfaction, the perceived agreement rate between the result of depression rating scales and doctor's clinical interview in the evaluation of patients with depressive symptoms. Data were analyzed by χ2 and independent t-test. Results The clinical use of depression rating scales was more frequent in the psychologists than in the psychiatrists. The purposes for using depression rating scales were assessed into six areas, there was no significant difference in between two groups, and both groups pointed out their purpose as rating of severity and screening. The reasons for not using scales were that their interview may be sufficient for diagnosis and assessment of depressive patients and they are not familiar with the use of depression rating scales. The psychiatrists usually prefer the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Symptom Checklist 90-Revision (SCL-90-R) in order of frequency, and the clinical psychologists are more likely to use the BDI, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and SCL-90-R. Overall rate of satisfaction in the use of the scales was 67.29±14.45% and overall perceived agreement rate was 70.89±16.45%. Conclusion Currently used depression rating scales at the clinical practice were not various. Therefore, to heighten clinicians' utility of these depression rating scales measures, either educational efforts or advertisements, or both, will be necessary to spread them wildly. PMID:20927305

  12. Possible benefits of singing to the mental and physical condition of the elderly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The evaluation and management of stress are important for the prevention of both depression and cardiovascular disease. In addition, the maintenance of the oral condition of the elderly is essential to enable them to stay healthy, especially to prevent aspiration pneumonia and improve mental health in an aging society. Therefore, we examined the efficacy of singing on the oral condition, mental health status, and immunity of the elderly to determine if singing could contribute to the improvement of their physical condition. Methods Forty-four subjects (10 men, 34 women), aged 60 years or older, participated in this study. The efficacy of singing on mental health status and immunocompetence was examined by swallowing function, oral condition, blood, and saliva tests, as well as through questionnaires taken before and after singing. Results The results showed that the amount of saliva increased and the level of cortisol, a salivary stress marker, decreased after singing. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores for feeling refreshed, comfortable, pleasurable, light-hearted, relieved, and relaxed; the tension and confusion subscale score; and the total mood disturbance (TMD) score of the Profile of Mood States (POMS) all showed improvements. Furthermore, the same tendencies were shown regardless of whether or not the subjects liked singing. Conclusions Our results suggest that singing can be effective in improving the mental health and oral condition of the elderly. PMID:24864162

  13. Depression Screening Using Daily Mental-Health Ratings from a Smartphone Application for Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junetae; Lim, Sanghee; Min, Yul Ha; Shin, Yong-Wook; Lee, Byungtae; Sohn, Guiyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Lee, Jae-Ho; Son, Byung Ho; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Shin, Soo-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background Mobile mental-health trackers are mobile phone apps that gather self-reported mental-health ratings from users. They have received great attention from clinicians as tools to screen for depression in individual patients. While several apps that ask simple questions using face emoticons have been developed, there has been no study examining the validity of their screening performance. Objective In this study, we (1) evaluate the potential of a mobile mental-health tracker that uses three daily mental-health ratings (sleep satisfaction, mood, and anxiety) as indicators for depression, (2) discuss three approaches to data processing (ratio, average, and frequency) for generating indicator variables, and (3) examine the impact of adherence on reporting using a mobile mental-health tracker and accuracy in depression screening. Methods We analyzed 5792 sets of daily mental-health ratings collected from 78 breast cancer patients over a 48-week period. Using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) as the measure of true depression status, we conducted a random-effect logistic panel regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to evaluate the screening performance of the mobile mental-health tracker. In addition, we classified patients into two subgroups based on their adherence level (higher adherence and lower adherence) using a k-means clustering algorithm and compared the screening accuracy between the two groups. Results With the ratio approach, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) is 0.8012, indicating that the performance of depression screening using daily mental-health ratings gathered via mobile mental-health trackers is comparable to the results of PHQ-9 tests. Also, the AUC is significantly higher (P=.002) for the higher adherence group (AUC=0.8524) than for the lower adherence group (AUC=0.7234). This result shows that adherence to self-reporting is associated with a higher accuracy of depression screening. Conclusions Our results

  14. Associations between DSM-IV mental disorders and subsequent heart disease onset: beyond depression

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Kate M.; de Jonge, Peter; Alonso, Jordi; Viana, Maria Carmen; Liu, Zhaorui; O’Neill, Siobhan; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Stein, Dan J.; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Florescu, Silvia E.; Hu, Chiyi; Taib, Nezar Ismet; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Levinson, Daphna; Matschinger, Herbert; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, José A.; Uda, Hidenori; Wojtyniak, Bogdan J.; Lim, Carmen C. W.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior studies on the depression-heart disease association have not usually used diagnostic measures of depression, nor taken other mental disorders into consideration. As a result, it is not clear whether the association between depression and heart disease onset reflects a specific association, or the comorbidity between depression and other mental disorders. Additionally, the relative magnitude of associations of a range of mental disorders with heart disease onset is unknown. Methods Face-to-face household surveys were conducted in 19 countries (n=52,095; person years=2,141,194). The Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of 16 DSM-IV mental disorders. Heart disease was indicated by self-report of physician’s diagnosis, or self-report of heart attack, together with their timing (year). Survival analyses estimated associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent heart disease onset. Results After comorbidity adjustment, depression, panic disorder, specific phobia, post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol use disorders were associated with heart disease onset (ORs 1.3–1.6). Increasing number of mental disorders was associated with heart disease in a dose-response fashion. Mood disorders and alcohol abuse were more strongly associated with earlier onset than later onset heart disease. Associations did not vary by gender. Conclusions Depression, anxiety and alcohol use disorders were significantly associated with heart disease onset; depression was the weakest predictor. If confirmed in future prospective studies, the breadth of psychopathology’s links with heart disease onset has substantial clinical and public health implications. PMID:23993321

  15. Mutuality as background music in women's lived experience of mental health and depression.

    PubMed

    Hedelin, B; Jonsson, I

    2003-06-01

    Mental health problems, especially depression, have turned into an extensive public health problem, affecting women in particular. The aim of this study was to obtain a deeper understanding of mental health phenomena through elderly women's lived experiences of mental health and depression. The phenomenological approach was chosen for collecting experience-based and person-centred descriptions from 21 women, focusing on mental health and depression. The interviews were analysed using Giorgi's phenomenological descriptive method. Mutuality in their relationships with themselves and others emerged as a major element in the women's experience of mental health and depression. When the women's existence and value were confirmed in relation to themselves and others, mental health appeared as an ascending spiral. When the women's value and self-esteem in relation to themselves and others were violated, the result was a descending spiral. Metaphorically speaking, 'mutuality' provided the 'background music' to the women's lives. Being a skilled professional psychiatric nurse means making the best use of mutuality as a creative power in the nurse-patient relationship. This means that the nurse must be aware that her/his attitude, appearance and behaviour are interpreted as a confirmation of the patient's worthiness or worthlessness.

  16. Mental state decoding impairment in major depression and borderline personality disorder: meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Richman, Mara J; Unoka, Zsolt

    2015-12-01

    Patients with major depression and borderline personality disorder are characterised by a distorted perception of other people's intentions. Deficits in mental state decoding are thought to be the underlying cause of this clinical feature. To examine, using meta-analysis, whether mental state decoding abilities in patients with major depression and borderline personality disorder differ from those of healthy controls. A systematic review of 13 cross-sectional studies comparing Reading in the Mind of the Eyes Test (RMET) accuracy performance of patients with major depression or borderline personality disorder and healthy age-matched controls (n = 976). Valence scores, where reported, were also assessed. Large significant deficits were seen for global RMET performance in patients with major depression (d = -0.751). The positive RMET valence scores of patients with depression were significantly worse; patients with borderline personality disorder had worse neutral scores. Both groups were worse than controls. Moderator analysis revealed that individuals with comorbid borderline personality disorder and major depression did better than those with borderline personality disorder alone on accuracy. Those with comorbid borderline personality disorder and any cluster B or C personality disorder did worse than borderline personality disorder alone. Individuals with both borderline personality disorder and major depression performed better then those with borderline personality disorder without major depression for positive valence. These findings highlight the relevance of RMET performance in patients with borderline personality disorder and major depression, and the importance of considering comorbidity in future analysis. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  17. Association of Mental Disorders With Subsequent Chronic Physical Conditions: World Mental Health Surveys From 17 Countries.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kate M; Lim, Carmen; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Alonso, Jordi; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, José Miguel; Florescu, Silvia; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Hu, Chiyi; de Jonge, Peter; Kawakami, Norito; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; O'Neill, Siobhan; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, José; Torres, Yolanda; Kessler, Ronald C

    2016-02-01

    It is clear that mental disorders in treatment settings are associated with a higher incidence of chronic physical conditions, but whether this is true of mental disorders in the community, and how generalized (across a range of physical health outcomes) these associations are, is less clear. This information has important implications for mental health care and the primary prevention of chronic physical disease. To investigate associations of 16 temporally prior DSM-IV mental disorders with the subsequent onset or diagnosis of 10 chronic physical conditions. Eighteen face-to-face, cross-sectional household surveys of community-dwelling adults were conducted in 17 countries (47,609 individuals; 2,032,942 person-years) from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2011. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to retrospectively assess the lifetime prevalence and age at onset of DSM-IV-identified mental disorders. Data analysis was performed from January 3, 2012, to September 30, 2015. Lifetime history of physical conditions was ascertained via self-report of physician's diagnosis and year of onset or diagnosis. Survival analyses estimated the associations of temporally prior first onset of mental disorders with subsequent onset or diagnosis of physical conditions. Most associations between 16 mental disorders and subsequent onset or diagnosis of 10 physical conditions were statistically significant, with odds ratios (ORs) (95% CIs) ranging from 1.2 (1.0-1.5) to 3.6 (2.0-6.6). The associations were attenuated after adjustment for mental disorder comorbidity, but mood, anxiety, substance use, and impulse control disorders remained significantly associated with onset of between 7 and all 10 of the physical conditions (ORs [95% CIs] from 1.2 [1.1-1.3] to 2.0 [1.4-2.8]). An increasing number of mental disorders experienced over the life course was significantly associated with increasing odds of onset or diagnosis of all 10 types of physical conditions, with

  18. Attitudes and beliefs about mental health among African American older adults suffering from depression

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Kyaien O.; Lee, Brenda; Mayers, Vanessa; Robinson, Deborah; Reynolds, Charles F.; Albert, Steve; Brown, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Depression among older adults is a major public health concern leading to increased disability and mortality. Less than 3% of older adults utilize professional mental health services for the treatment of depression, less than any other adult age group. And despite similar rates of depression, African Americans are significantly less likely to seek, engage and be retained in professional mental health services than their white counterparts. Cultural differences in the way depression symptoms are manifested, defined, interpreted and labeled may in part explain some of these racial differences in help-seeking behaviors. Focus group methodology was utilized to identify and explore attitudes and beliefs about depression and mental health treatment utilization among 42 older African Americans who had recently suffered a major depressive episode. Thematic analysis of identified six overarching themes: (a) perceptions of depression, (b) the African American experience, (c) seeking treatment as a last resort, (d) myths about treatment, (e) stigma associated with seeking treatment and (f) culturally appropriate coping strategies. We discuss implications for practice, education and research. PMID:21423819

  19. Non-Listening and Self Centered Leadership – Relationships to Socioeconomic Conditions and Employee Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Theorell, Töres; Nyberg, Anna; Leineweber, Constanze; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.; Oxenstierna, Gabriel; Westerlund, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Background The way in which leadership is experienced in different socioeconomic strata is of interest per se, as well as how it relates to employee mental health. Methods Three waves of SLOSH (Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health, a questionnaire survey on a sample of the Swedish working population) were used, 2006, 2008 and 2010 (n = 5141). The leadership variables were: “Non-listening leadership” (one question: “Does your manager listen to you?” - four response categories), “Self centered leadership” (sum of three five-graded questions – “non-participating”, “asocial” and “loner”). The socioeconomic factors were education and income. Emotional exhaustion and depressive symptoms were used as indicators of mental health. Results Non-listening leadership was associated with low income and low education whereas self-centered leadership showed a weaker relationship with education and no association at all with income. Both leadership variables were significantly associated with emotional exhaustion and depressive symptoms. “Self centered” as well as “non-listening” leadership in 2006 significantly predicted employee depressive symptoms in 2008 after adjustment for demographic variables. These predictions became non-significant when adjustment was made for job conditions (demands and decision latitude) in the “non-listening” leadership analyses, whereas predictions of depressive symptoms remained significant after these adjustments in the “self-centered leadership” analyses. Conclusions Our results show that the leadership variables are associated with socioeconomic status and employee mental health. “Non-listening” scores were more sensitive to societal change and more strongly related to socioeconomic factors and job conditions than “self-centered” scores. PMID:23028491

  20. Non-listening and self centered leadership--relationships to socioeconomic conditions and employee mental health.

    PubMed

    Theorell, Töres; Nyberg, Anna; Leineweber, Constanze; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Oxenstierna, Gabriel; Westerlund, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    The way in which leadership is experienced in different socioeconomic strata is of interest per se, as well as how it relates to employee mental health. Three waves of SLOSH (Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health, a questionnaire survey on a sample of the Swedish working population) were used, 2006, 2008 and 2010 (n = 5141). The leadership variables were: "Non-listening leadership" (one question: "Does your manager listen to you?"--four response categories), "Self centered leadership" (sum of three five-graded questions--"non-participating", "asocial" and "loner"). The socioeconomic factors were education and income. Emotional exhaustion and depressive symptoms were used as indicators of mental health. Non-listening leadership was associated with low income and low education whereas self-centered leadership showed a weaker relationship with education and no association at all with income. Both leadership variables were significantly associated with emotional exhaustion and depressive symptoms. "Self centered" as well as "non-listening" leadership in 2006 significantly predicted employee depressive symptoms in 2008 after adjustment for demographic variables. These predictions became non-significant when adjustment was made for job conditions (demands and decision latitude) in the "non-listening" leadership analyses, whereas predictions of depressive symptoms remained significant after these adjustments in the "self-centered leadership" analyses. Our results show that the leadership variables are associated with socioeconomic status and employee mental health. "Non-listening" scores were more sensitive to societal change and more strongly related to socioeconomic factors and job conditions than "self-centered" scores.

  1. Long term life dissatisfaction and subsequent major depressive disorder and poor mental health.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, Teemu; Viinamäki, Heimo; Honkalampi, Kirsi; Lehto, Soili M; Hintikka, Jukka; Saharinen, Tarja; Koivumaa-Honkanen, Heli

    2011-08-23

    Poor mental health, especially due to depression, is one of the main public health problems. Early indicators of poor mental health in general population are needed. This study examined the relationship between long-term life dissatisfaction and subsequent mental health, including major depressive disorder. Health questionnaires were sent to a randomly selected population-based sample in 1998 and repeated in 1999 and 2001. In 2005, a clinically studied sub-sample (n = 330) was composed of subjects with (n = 161) or without (n = 169) repeatedly reported adverse mental symptoms at all three previous data collection times. Clinical symptom assessments were performed with several psychometric scales: life satisfaction (LS), depression (HDRS, BDI), hopelessness (HS), mental distress (GHQ), dissociative experiences (DES), and alexithymia (TAS). The long-term life dissatisfaction burden was calculated by summing these life satisfaction scores in 1998, 1999, 2001 and dividing the sum into tertiles. Psychiatric diagnoses were confirmed by SCID-I for DSM-IV in 2005. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the studied relationship. The previous life dissatisfaction burden associated with adverse socio-demographic, life style and clinical factors. In adjusted logistic regression analyses, it was independently and strongly associated with subsequent major depressive disorder in 2005, even when the concurrent LS score in 2005 was included in the model. Excluding those with reported major depressive disorder in 1999 did not alter this finding. MDD in 1999 was based on self-reports and not on structured interview and LS data in 2001-2005 was not available. The life satisfaction burden is significantly related to major depressive disorder and poor mental health, both in cross-sectional and longitudinal settings.

  2. Long term life dissatisfaction and subsequent major depressive disorder and poor mental health

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Poor mental health, especially due to depression, is one of the main public health problems. Early indicators of poor mental health in general population are needed. This study examined the relationship between long-term life dissatisfaction and subsequent mental health, including major depressive disorder. Method Health questionnaires were sent to a randomly selected population-based sample in 1998 and repeated in 1999 and 2001. In 2005, a clinically studied sub-sample (n = 330) was composed of subjects with (n = 161) or without (n = 169) repeatedly reported adverse mental symptoms at all three previous data collection times. Clinical symptom assessments were performed with several psychometric scales: life satisfaction (LS), depression (HDRS, BDI), hopelessness (HS), mental distress (GHQ), dissociative experiences (DES), and alexithymia (TAS). The long-term life dissatisfaction burden was calculated by summing these life satisfaction scores in 1998, 1999, 2001 and dividing the sum into tertiles. Psychiatric diagnoses were confirmed by SCID-I for DSM-IV in 2005. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the studied relationship. Results The previous life dissatisfaction burden associated with adverse socio-demographic, life style and clinical factors. In adjusted logistic regression analyses, it was independently and strongly associated with subsequent major depressive disorder in 2005, even when the concurrent LS score in 2005 was included in the model. Excluding those with reported major depressive disorder in 1999 did not alter this finding. Limitations MDD in 1999 was based on self-reports and not on structured interview and LS data in 2001-2005 was not available. Conclusions The life satisfaction burden is significantly related to major depressive disorder and poor mental health, both in cross-sectional and longitudinal settings. PMID:21861908

  3. Environmental and individual characteristics associated with depressive disorders and mental health care use.

    PubMed

    Annequin, Margot; Weill, Alain; Thomas, Frédérique; Chaix, Basile

    2015-08-01

    Few studies examined the relationship between neighborhood characteristics and both depressive disorders and the corresponding mental health care use. The aim of our study was to investigate neighborhood effects on depressive symptomatology, antidepressant consumption, and the consultation of psychiatrists. Data from the French Residential Environment and Coronary heart Disease Study (n = 7290, 2007-2008, 30-79 years of age) were analyzed. Depressive symptomatology was cross-sectionally assessed. Health care reimbursement data allowed us to assess antidepressant consumption and psychiatric consultation prospectively more than 18 months. Multilevel logistic regression models were estimated. The risk of depressive symptoms increased with decreasing personal educational level and unemployment and slightly with decreasing neighborhood income. In a sample comprising participants with and without depressive symptoms, high individual and parental educational levels were both associated with the consultation of psychiatrists. In this sample, a low personal educational level increased the odds of consumption of antidepressants. No heterogeneity between neighborhoods was found for antidepressant consumption. However, the odds of consulting psychiatrists increased with median neighborhood income and with the density of psychiatrists, after adjustment for individual characteristics. Among depressive participants only, a particularly strong gradient in the consultation of psychiatrists was documented according to individual socioeconomic status. Future research on the relationships between the environments and depression should take into account health care use related to depression and consider the spatial accessibility to mental health services among other environmental factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Do unfavourable working conditions explain mental health inequalities between ethnic groups? Cross-sectional data of the HELIUS study.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Schene, Aart H; Stronks, Karien; Snijder, Marieke B; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Sluiter, Judith K

    2015-08-20

    Ethnic inequalities in mental health have been found in many high-income countries. The purpose of this study is to test whether mental health inequalities between ethnic groups are mediated by exposure to unfavourable working conditions. Workers (n = 6278) were selected from baseline data of the multi-ethnic HELIUS study. Measures included two indices of unfavourable working conditions (lack of recovery opportunities, and perceived work stress), and two mental health outcomes (generic mental health: MCS-12 and depressive symptoms: PHQ-9). Mediation of the relationships between ethnicity and mental health by unfavourable working conditions was tested using the bias-corrected bootstrap confidence intervals technique. Linear models with and without the mediators included, and adjusted for gender and age. Attenuation was calculated as the change in B between the models with and without mediators. The sample comprised Dutch (1355), African Surinamese (1290), South-Asian Surinamese (1121), Turkish (1090), Ghanaian (729), and Moroccan (693) workers. After controlling for age and gender, all ethnic minorities had a higher risk of mental health problems as compared to the Dutch host population, with the exception of Ghanaians in the case of depressive symptoms, and African Surinamese workers with regard to both outcomes. The Turkish group stands out with the lowest mental health on both mental health indices, followed by Moroccan and South-Asian Surinamese workers. A lack of recovery opportunities mediated the relationship between ethnic group and a higher risk of mental health problems. Perceived work stress did not contribute to the explanation of ethnic inequalities. The higher risk of mental health problems in ethnic minority groups can be partly accounted for by a lack of recovery opportunities at work, but not by perceived work stress. This may imply that workplace prevention targeting recovery opportunities have the potential to reduce ethnic inequalities, but

  5. Mental health literacy and postpartum depression: a qualitative description of views of lower income women.

    PubMed

    Guy, Sarah; Sterling, Bobbie Sue; Walker, Lorraine O; Harrison, Tracie C

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand mental health literacy (MHL) (Jorm, 2000) in lower income women postpartum and share participant experiences of recognizing and seeking help for depressive symptoms. Focus group textual data were received from 25 participants who completed a weight and psychosocial health longitudinal study. Iterative content data analysis using Jorm's framework provided thematic understandings descriptive of MHL. Women recognized behavioral changes indicating mental distress, but fears prevented them from seeking help, and some resorted to risky behaviors. This framework could guide providers to identify women who may benefit from early intervention for postpartum depressive symptoms.

  6. "Depression is who I am": Mental illness identity, stigma and wellbeing.

    PubMed

    Cruwys, Tegan; Gunaseelan, Sathiavaani

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has found that in the face of discrimination, people tend to identify more strongly with stigmatized groups. Social identification can, in turn, buffer wellbeing against the negative consequences of discrimination. However, this rejection identification model has never been tested in the context of mental illness identity. A survey was conducted with 250 people with diagnosed depression or current symptoms of at least moderate clinical severity. Experiencing mental illness stigma was associated with poorer wellbeing. Furthermore, people who had experienced such stigma were more likely to identify as a depressed person. Social identification as depressed magnified, rather than buffered, the relationship between stigma and reduced wellbeing. This relationship was moderated by perceived social norms of the depressed group for engaging in depressive thoughts and behaviors. These findings suggest that mental illness stigma is a double-edged sword: as well as the direct harms for wellbeing, by increasing identification with other mental illness sufferers, stigma might expose sufferers to harmful social influence processes. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Internalized stigma of mental illness and depressive and psychotic symptoms in homeless veterans over 6 months.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Jennifer E; Hayward, H'Sien; Bassett, Elena D; Hoff, Rani

    2016-06-30

    We investigated the relationship between internalized stigma of mental illness at baseline and depressive and psychotic symptoms 3 and 6 months later, controlling for baseline symptoms. Data on homeless veterans with severe mental illness (SMI) were provided by the Northeast Program Evaluation Center (NEPEC) Special Needs-Chronic Mental Illness (SN-CMI) study (Kasprow and Rosenheck, 2008). The study used the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI) scale to measure internalized stigma at baseline and the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) to measure depressive and psychotic symptoms at baseline and 3 and 6 month follow-ups. Higher levels of internalized stigma were associated with greater levels of depressive and psychotic symptoms 3 and 6 months later, even controlling for symptoms at baseline. Alienation and Discrimination Experience were the subscales most strongly associated with symptoms. Exploratory analyses of individual items yielded further insight into characteristics of potentially successful interventions that could be studied. Overall, our findings show that homeless veterans with SMI experiencing higher levels of internalized stigma are likely to experience more depression and psychosis over time. This quasi-experimental study replicates and extends findings of other studies and has implications for future controlled research into the potential long-term effects of anti-stigma interventions on mental health recovery.

  8. Assessing mental health literacy: What medical sciences students’ know about depression

    PubMed Central

    Sayarifard, Azadeh; Ghadirian, Laleh; Mohit, Ahmad; Eftekhar, Mehrdad; Badpa, Mahnaz; Rajabi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mental health literacy is an individual’s knowledge and belief about mental disorders which aid their recognition, management and prevention. The aim of this study was to investigate mental health literacy among students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, data were collected by the anonymous self-administered questionnaires and finally 324 students participated in the study. Random cluster sampling was used. Questions were in different areas of the mental health literacy for depression include recognition of disorder, intended actions to seek help and perceived barriers, beliefs about interventions, prevention, stigmatization and impact of media. T-test was used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean (±SD) age was 23.5±2.8. The participants were 188 (58.1%) females and 136 (41.9%) males. In response to the recognition of the disorder 115 (35.6%) students mentioned the correct answer. In help-seeking area, 208 (64.3%) gave positive answer. The majority of affected students sought for help from their friends and parents. Stigma was the greatest barrier for seeking help. Television and Internet were the most common sources of information related to mental health. Conclusion: Generally students’ mental health literacy on depression was low in some areas. Appropriate educational programs specifically for reducing mental disorders stigma seems necessary. Organizing networks of co-helper students for mental health could be considered. PMID:26000256

  9. Socioeconomic position and depression in South African adults with long-term health conditions: a longitudinal study of causal pathways.

    PubMed

    Elwell-Sutton, T; Folb, N; Clark, A; Fairall, L R; Lund, C; Bachmann, M O

    2017-08-14

    There is convincing evidence that lower socioeconomic position is associated with increased risk of mental disorders. However, the mechanisms involved are not well understood. This study aims to elucidate the causal pathways between socioeconomic position and depression symptoms in South African adults. Two possible causal theories are examined: social causation, which suggests that poor socioeconomic conditions cause mental ill health; and social drift, which suggests that those with poor mental health are more likely to drift into poor socioeconomic circumstances. The study used longitudinal and cross-sectional observational data on 3904 adults, from a randomised trial carried out in 38 primary health care clinics between 2011 and 2012. Structural equation models and counterfactual mediation analyses were used to examine causal pathways in two directions. First, we examined social causation pathways, with language (a proxy for racial or ethnic category) being treated as an exposure, while education, unemployment, income and depression were treated as sequential mediators and outcomes. Second, social drift was explored with depression treated as a potential influence on health-related quality of life, job loss and, finally, income. The results suggest that the effects of language on depression at baseline, and on changes in depression during follow-up, were mediated through education and income but not through unemployment. Adverse effects of unemployment and job loss on depression appeared to be mostly mediated through income. The effect of depression on decreasing income appeared to be mediated by job loss. These results suggest that both social causation and social selection processes operate concurrently. This raises the possibility that people could get trapped in a vicious cycle in which poor socioeconomic conditions lead to depression, which, in turn, can cause further damage to their economic prospects. This study also suggests that modifiable factors such

  10. Working conditions in mid-life and mental health in older ages.

    PubMed

    Wahrendorf, Morten; Blane, David; Bartley, Mel; Dragano, Nico; Siegrist, Johannes

    2013-03-01

    This article illustrates the importance of previous working conditions during mid-life (between 40 and 55) for mental health among older retired men and women (60 or older) across 13 European countries. We link information on health from the second wave (2006-2007) of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) with information on respondents' working life collected retrospectively in the SHARELIFE interview (2008-2009). To measure working conditions, we rely on core assumptions of existing theoretical models of work stress (the demand-control-support and the effort-reward imbalance model) and distinguish four types of unhealthy working conditions: (1) a stressful psychosocial work environment (as assessed by the two work stress models) (2) a disadvantaged occupational position throughout the whole period of mid-life, (3) experience of involuntary job loss, and (4) exposure to job instability. Health after labour market exit is measured using depressive symptoms, as measured by the EURO-D depression scale. Main results show that men and women who experienced psychosocial stress at work or had low occupational positions during mid-life had significantly higher probabilities of high depressive symptoms during retirement. Additionally, men with unstable working careers and an involuntary job loss were at higher risks to report high depressive symptoms in later life. These associations remain significant after controlling for workers' health and social position prior mid-life. These findings support the assumption that mental health of retirees who experienced poor working conditions during mid-life is impaired.

  11. Depression and anxiety disorder among epileptic people at Amanuel Specialized Mental Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tegegne, Minale Tareke; Mossie, Tilahun Belete; Awoke, Andargie Abate; Assaye, Ashagre Molla; Gebrie, Belete Temitm; Eshetu, Desalegn Asmare

    2015-09-02

    Although depression and anxiety disorders are very common in people with epilepsy; there are no studies that assessed the magnitude and associated factors among epileptic people in Ethiopia. Therefore, this study determined prevalence and associated factors of depression and anxiety disorders in people with epilepsy. An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted from April to May, 2013, among 423 people with epilepsy from the outpatient department of Amanuel Mental Specialized Hospital. Depression and anxiety were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess predictors of depression and anxiety. The prevalence of anxiety and depression among epileptic people were 33.5 and 32.8%, respectively. Monthly income, frequency of seizure and side effects of anti convulsants were found to be significantly associated with both depression and anxiety. Being divorced/widowed was associated with anxiety while using poly-therapy of anti convulsants, perceived stigma, and inability to read or write were associated with depression. The prevalence of co-morbid anxiety and depression was found to be high among people with epilepsy. Early identification of co-morbid depression and anxiety in people with epilepsy and managing epilepsy to become seizure free should be of great concern for health care providers.

  12. Polyunsaturated fatty acid status in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression, and Alzheimer's disease: towards an omega-3 index for mental health?

    PubMed

    Milte, Catherine M; Sinn, Natalie; Howe, Peter R C

    2009-10-01

    Interest in the role of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), particularly long-chain (LC) omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs, in mental health is increasing. This review investigates whether n-3 PUFA levels are abnormal in people with three prevalent mental health problems - attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression, and dementia. Data sources included PubMed, Web of Science, and bibliographies of papers published in English that describe PUFA levels in the circulation of individuals who have these mental health conditions. Although abnormal blood PUFA levels were reported in a number of studies, weighted comparisons of PUFA status showed no significant differences overall between people with mental health problems and controls. Whether those with low n-3 PUFA status are likely to be more responsive to n-3 PUFA supplementation is not yet resolved. Further studies assessing PUFA levels and mental status with greater uniformity are required in order to clarify the relationship between LC n-3 PUFA status and mental health.

  13. How mental health literacy and experience of mental illness relate to stigmatizing attitudes and social distance towards people with depression or psychosis: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Bengt; Hansson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that mental health literacy among the public is low, and stigmatizing attitudes are widespread. So far the effects of anti-stigma campaigns are small, and studies demonstrate that negative attitudes have been quite stable through recent decades. Aims To investigate the relationships between mental health literacy, experience of mental illness and stigmatizing attitudes/social distance towards people with depression or psychosis. Methods A cross-sectional study in which staff members from public services in Sweden (n = 1027) completed questionnaires covering demographic data, self-reported experience of mental illness, identification of a vignette for depression or psychosis, beliefs about helpful interventions for the illness presented in the vignette, and attitudes and social distance towards people with the illness. Results About 50% of participants could identify depression and less than 40% psychosis. A higher degree of mental health literacy was related to less stigma and social distance but mainly towards people with depression. A similar relationship was shown for having personal or family experience of mental illness and attitudes/social distance. Negative attitudes and social distance were significantly higher in all aspects measured towards a person with psychosis than a person with depression. Conclusions A higher degree of mental health literacy relates to more positive attitudes and less desire for social distance towards people with depression. The differences between depression and psychosis should be taken into account in anti-stigma interventions.

  14. Mental-Health Conditions, Barriers to Care, and Productivity Loss Among Officers in An Urban Police Department

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Justin; Desai, Mayur M.; Britten, Karissa; Lucas, Georgina; Luneau, Renee; Rosenthal, Marjorie S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Police officers are frequently exposed to situations that can negatively impact their mental health. Methods We conducted this study of an urban police department to determine 1) the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and alcohol abuse; 2) patterns of and barriers to mental-health services utilization; and 3) the impact these conditions have on productivity loss. Results Among 150 officers, PTSD (24%), depression (9%), and alcohol abuse (19%) were common. Only 46.7% had ever sought mental-health services; the most commonly cited barriers to accessing services were concerns regarding confidentiality and the potential “negative career impact.” Officers with mental-health conditions had higher productivity loss (5.9% vs 3.4%, P <0.001) at an annual cost of $ 4,489 per officer. Conclusion Mental-health conditions among police officers are common, and costly, yet most officers had never accessed mental-health services; many due to modifiable risk factors. PMID:23155671

  15. The association of child mental health conditions and parent mental health status among U.S. Children, 2007.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Amanda C; Brewer, Katherine C; Rankin, Kristin M

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association of child mental health conditions and parent mental health status. This study used data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health on 80,982 children ages 2-17. The presence of a child mental health condition was defined as a parent-reported diagnosis of at least one of seven child mental health conditions. Parent mental health was assessed via a 5-point scale. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of child mental health conditions and parent mental health status, while examining socioeconomic, parent, family, and community factors as potential effect modifiers and confounders of the association. 11.1% of children had a mental health condition (95% CI = 10.5-11.6). The prevalence of child mental health conditions increased as parent mental health status worsened. Race/ethnicity was the only significant effect modifier of the child-parent mental health association. After adjustment for confounders, the stratum-specific adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) of child mental health conditions related to a one-level decline in parent mental health were: 1.44 (1.35-1.55) for non-Hispanic whites, 1.24 (1.06-1.46) for non-Hispanic blacks, 1.04 (0.81-1.32) for Hispanics from non-immigrant families, 1.21 (0.96-1.93) for Hispanics from immigrant families, and 1.43 (1.21-1.70) for non-Hispanic other race children. The effect of parent mental health status on child mental health conditions was significant only among non-Hispanic children. Parent-focused interventions to prevent or improve child mental health conditions may be best targeted to the sub-populations for whom parent and child mental health are most strongly associated.

  16. Mental Models and the Suppositional Account of Conditionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrouillet, Pierre; Gauffroy, Caroline; Lecas, Jean-Francois

    2008-01-01

    The mental model theory of conditional reasoning presented by P. N. Johnson-Laird and R. M. J. Byrne (2002) has recently been the subject of criticisms (e.g., J. St. B. T. Evans, D. E. Over, & S. J. Handley, 2005). The authors argue that the theoretical conflict can be resolved by differentiating 2 kinds of reasoning, reasoning about possibilities…

  17. Detection of Mental Disorders Other Than Depression with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in a Sample of Pregnant Women in Northern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sifuentes-Alvarez, Antonio; Salas-Martinez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the capacity of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in discriminating mental disorders other than depression in pregnant women in northern Mexico. Three hundred pregnant women attending prenatal consultations in a public hospital in Durango City, Mexico submitted a validated EPDS and were examined for mental disorders other than depression using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - 4th Ed. (DSM-IV) criteria. Sensitivity and specificity of cut-off points of the EPDS, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Of the 300 pregnant women studied, 21 had mental disorders other than depression by the DSM-IV criteria. The best EPDS score for screening mental disorders other than depression was 8/9. This threshold showed a sensitivity of 52.4%, a specificity of 67.0%, a positive predictive value of 11.5%, a negative predictive value of 95.4%, and an area under the curve of 0.643 (95% confidence interval: 0.52-0.76). The EPDS can be considered for screening mental disorders other than depression in Mexican pregnant women whenever a cut-off score of 8/9 is used. However, the tool showed small power to separate pregnant women with and without mental disorders other than depression. PMID:27403273

  18. Detection of Mental Disorders Other Than Depression with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in a Sample of Pregnant Women in Northern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sifuentes-Alvarez, Antonio; Salas-Martinez, Carlos

    2016-05-18

    We sought to evaluate the capacity of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in discriminating mental disorders other than depression in pregnant women in northern Mexico. Three hundred pregnant women attending prenatal consultations in a public hospital in Durango City, Mexico submitted a validated EPDS and were examined for mental disorders other than depression using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - 4(th) Ed. (DSM-IV) criteria. Sensitivity and specificity of cut-off points of the EPDS, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Of the 300 pregnant women studied, 21 had mental disorders other than depression by the DSM-IV criteria. The best EPDS score for screening mental disorders other than depression was 8/9. This threshold showed a sensitivity of 52.4%, a specificity of 67.0%, a positive predictive value of 11.5%, a negative predictive value of 95.4%, and an area under the curve of 0.643 (95% confidence interval: 0.52-0.76). The EPDS can be considered for screening mental disorders other than depression in Mexican pregnant women whenever a cut-off score of 8/9 is used. However, the tool showed small power to separate pregnant women with and without mental disorders other than depression.

  19. Portraying mental illness and drug addiction as treatable health conditions: effects of a randomized experiment on stigma and discrimination.

    PubMed

    McGinty, Emma E; Goldman, Howard H; Pescosolido, Bernice; Barry, Colleen L

    2015-02-01

    Despite significant advances in treatment, stigma and discrimination toward persons with mental illness and drug addiction have remained constant in past decades. Prior work suggests that portraying other stigmatized health conditions (i.e., HIV/AIDS) as treatable can improve public attitudes toward those affected. Our study compared the effects of vignettes portraying persons with untreated and symptomatic versus successfully treated and asymptomatic mental illness and drug addiction on several dimensions of public attitudes about these conditions. We conducted a survey-embedded randomized experiment using a national sample (N = 3940) from an online panel. Respondents were randomly assigned to read one of ten vignettes. Vignette one was a control vignette, vignettes 2-5 portrayed individuals with untreated schizophrenia, depression, prescription pain medication addiction and heroin addiction, and vignettes 6-10 portrayed successfully treated individuals with the same conditions. After reading the randomly assigned vignette, respondents answered questions about their attitudes related to mental illness or drug addiction. Portrayals of untreated and symptomatic schizophrenia, depression, and heroin addiction heightened negative public attitudes toward persons with mental illness and drug addiction. In contrast, portrayals of successfully treated schizophrenia, prescription painkiller addiction, and heroin addiction led to less desire for social distance, greater belief in the effectiveness of treatment, and less willingness to discriminate against persons with these conditions. Portrayal of persons with successfully treated mental illness and drug addiction is a promising strategy for reducing stigma and discrimination toward persons with these conditions and improving public perceptions of treatment effectiveness.

  20. Improving Depression Care for Disadvantaged Adults by Partnering With Non—Mental Health Agencies

    PubMed Central

    Dobransky-Fasiska, Deborah; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Pincus, Harold Alan; Castillo, Enrico; Lee, Brenda E.; Walnoha, Adrienne L.; Reynolds, Charles F.; Brown, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Reaching disadvantaged adults who need mental health care is challenging, partly because of mistrust of institutions, cultural insensitivity, and stigma. Researchers from Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic and leaders of 11 non–mental health community organizations formed a partnership to improve depression care, especially for elders and individuals from difficult-to-reach racial and ethnic minority groups. The overarching goal is to reduce disparities by providing and improving care. This column describes challenges overcome in working with a heterogeneous group of agencies to address issues of mental illness, stigma, inadequate staff training, and privacy—challenges that influenced the direction of research and ensuing projects. PMID:20123813

  1. Revisiting the concept of severe mental illness: severity indicators and healthcare spending in psychotic, depressive and dissociative disorders.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Vazquez, Ana Isabel; Seijo Ameneiros, Natalia; Díaz Del Valle, Juan Carlos; Lopez Fernandez, Ester; Santed Germán, Miguel Angel

    2017-08-10

    The concept of severe mental illness (SMI) has been related to bipolar or psychotic diagnosis, or to some cases of depressive disorders. Other mental health problems such as personality disorders or posttraumatic dissociative conditions, which can sometimes lead to relevant functional impairments, remain separate from the SMI construct. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical severity as well as healthcare spending on dissociative disorders (DDs). This diagnostic group was compared with two other groups usually considered as causing severe impairment and high healthcare spending: bipolar and psychotic disorders, and unipolar depression. From a random sample of 200 psychiatric outpatients, 108 with unipolar depression (N = 45), psychotic/bipolar (N = 31) or DDs (N = 32) were selected for this study. The three groups were compared by the severity of their disorder and healthcare indicators. Of the three groups, those with a DD were more prone to and showed higher indices of suicide, self-injury, emergency consultations, as well as psychotropic drug use. This group ranked just below psychotic/bipolar patients in the amount of psychiatric hospitalisations. Despite a certain intra-professional stigma regarding DDs, these data supported the severity of these posttraumatic conditions, and their inclusion in the construct of SMI.

  2. Disparities in adequate mental health care for past-year major depressive episodes among Caucasian and Hispanic youths.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Pierre K; Martins, Silvia S; Richard, Patrick

    2009-10-01

    Following efforts made in recent years to provide effective mental health treatments based on evidence-based guidelines, a working definition was developed in the literature detailing a minimum level of "adequate mental health care" for serious mental illness. However, little is known about racial or ethnic disparities in receipt of adequate mental health care for individuals affected with serious mental illness. The objective of this study was to examine disparities among Caucasian and Hispanic youths in receipt of adequate mental health care for past-year major depressive episodes. Data for this study were drawn from the 2005 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. The study sample was composed of 1,169 Caucasian youths and 316 Hispanic youths aged 12 to 17 with past-year major depressive episodes. The percentages of youths in the sample who received adequate mental health care for past-year major depressive episodes were estimated, and the correlates of receipt of adequate mental health care were examined. Thirty-four percent of the full sample received adequate mental health care for past-year major depressive episodes, but separate analyses indicated that adequate mental health care was received by a significantly higher proportion of Caucasian youths (36%) than Hispanic youths (27%). The odds of receiving adequate mental health care for past-year major depressive episodes for Caucasians were 1.55 times that of Hispanics (p=.01). Having Medicaid or coverage via the State Children's Health Insurance Program significantly increased the odds of receiving adequate mental care for past-year major depressive episodes for both Hispanics and Caucasians. As mental health problems of adolescents from diverse racial or ethnic backgrounds become more easily identified and a larger proportion of these groups is referred to mental health treatment services, it is important to examine the degree to which treatment should be tailored to engage and retain specific racial or

  3. The efficacy of smartphone‐based mental health interventions for depressive symptoms: a meta‐analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Joseph; Torous, John; Nicholas, Jennifer; Carney, Rebekah; Pratap, Abhishek; Rosenbaum, Simon; Sarris, Jerome

    2017-01-01

    The rapid advances and adoption of smartphone technology presents a novel opportunity for delivering mental health interventions on a population scale. Despite multi‐sector investment along with wide‐scale advertising and availability to the general population, the evidence supporting the use of smartphone apps in the treatment of depression has not been empirically evaluated. Thus, we conducted the first meta‐analysis of smartphone apps for depressive symptoms. An electronic database search in May 2017 identified 18 eligible randomized controlled trials of 22 smartphone apps, with outcome data from 3,414 participants. Depressive symptoms were reduced significantly more from smartphone apps than control conditions (g=0.38, 95% CI: 0.24‐0.52, p<0.001), with no evidence of publication bias. Smartphone interventions had a moderate positive effect in comparison to inactive controls (g=0.56, 95% CI: 0.38‐0.74), but only a small effect in comparison to active control conditions (g=0.22, 95% CI: 0.10‐0.33). Effects from smartphone‐only interventions were greater than from interventions which incorporated other human/computerized aspects along the smartphone component, although the difference was not statistically significant. The studies of cognitive training apps had a significantly smaller effect size on depression outcomes (p=0.004) than those of apps focusing on mental health. The use of mood monitoring softwares, or interventions based on cognitive behavioral therapy, or apps incorporating aspects of mindfulness training, did not affect significantly study effect sizes. Overall, these results indicate that smartphone devices are a promising self‐management tool for depression. Future research should aim to distil which aspects of these technologies produce beneficial effects, and for which populations. PMID:28941113

  4. Maternal Depressive Symptoms when Caring for a Child with Mental Health Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerkensmeyer, Janis E.; Perkins, Susan M.; Day, Jennifer; Austin, Joan K.; Scott, Eric L.; Wu, Jingwei

    2011-01-01

    As primary caregivers of children with mental health problems, mothers face challenges that put them at risk for depression, which is rarely identified or addressed. The aims of this paper were to (a) identify mean differences among demographic, stressor, threat, and resource variables specified in a theoretical model and thought to be associated…

  5. National Health Priority Areas Report, 1998--Mental Health: A Report Focusing on Depression, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Dept. of Health and Ageing, Canberra.

    This report presents procedures for national mental health that involve many levels of government and draws advice from a range of professional organizations. Due to the enormous impact of depression on the social, human, economic, and public health costs to Australians and the Australian government, this initiative focuses efforts on dealing with…

  6. Depressive Symptoms and Mental Health Treatment in an Ethnoracially Diverse College Student Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Steve; Archambeau, Olga G.; Deliramich, Aimee N.; Kim, Bryan S. K.; Chiu, Pearl H.; Frueh, B. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To study (a) the prevalence of depressive symptoms and (b) the utilization of mental health treatment in an ethnoracially diverse sample consisting primarily of Asian Americans, European Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. Participants: Five hundred eighty-nine college students. Method: A questionnaire packet that…

  7. The Dexamethasone Suppression Test as an Indication of Depression in Patients with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattes, Jeffrey A.; Amsell, Loren

    1993-01-01

    Administration of the Dexamethasone Suppression Test (DST) for three groups of institutionalized patients with severe/profound mental retardation found that the 12 depressed patients more frequently (though not significantly) had positive DSTs and significantly higher cortisol levels compared with nondepressed patients with and without other…

  8. Gender differences in major depressive disorder: findings from the Singapore Mental Health Study.

    PubMed

    Picco, Louisa; Subramaniam, Mythily; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2016-08-16

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders worldwide, and various sociodemographic risk factors including age, gender and ethnicity have been associated with MDD. The present study aimed to establish whether gender-specific differences relating to the prevalence and correlates of MDD existed in the Singapore adult resident population. The Singapore Mental Health Study was a population-based, cross-sectional, epidemiological study among Singapore citizens and permanent residents aged 18 years and above. Face-to-face interviews were completed with 6,616 respondents between December 2009 and December 2010. Psychiatric conditions were established using version 3.0 of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). In addition, data relating to chronic medical conditions was captured using a modified version of the CIDI checklist for chronic medical conditions. The lifetime prevalence of MDD was higher among women (7.2%) than men (4.3%). MDD was more prevalent among men and women who were divorced/separated and widowed women, as compared to those who were single. Among men, MDD was more prevalent among Indian and 'other' ethnicities as compared to Chinese. Of the 417 respondents with MDD, women had significantly higher odds of having generalised anxiety disorder, but lower odds of having high blood pressure, as compared to men. The study highlighted key gender-specific correlates of MDD. Given the comorbidities associated with MDD and other psychiatric disorders and/or physical illnesses, these correlates pose additional challenges for care providers.

  9. Diagnostic variability for schizophrenia and major depression in a large public mental health care system dataset.

    PubMed

    Folsom, David P; Lindamer, Laurie; Montross, Lori P; Hawthorne, William; Golshan, Shahrokh; Hough, Richard; Shale, John; Jeste, Dilip V

    2006-11-15

    Administrative datasets can provide information about mental health treatment in real world settings; however, an important limitation in using these datasets is the uncertainty regarding psychiatric diagnosis. To better understand the psychiatric diagnoses, we investigated the diagnostic variability of schizophrenia and major depression in a large public mental health system. Using schizophrenia and major depression as the two comparison diagnoses, we compared the variability of diagnoses assigned to patients with one recorded diagnosis of schizophrenia or major depression. In addition, for both of these diagnoses, the diagnostic variability was compared across seven types of treatment settings. Statistical analyses were conducted using t tests for continuous data and chi-square tests for categorical data. We found that schizophrenia had greater diagnostic variability than major depression (31% vs. 43%). For both schizophrenia and major depression, variability was significantly higher in jail and the emergency psychiatric unit than in inpatient or outpatient settings. These findings demonstrate that the variability of psychiatric diagnoses recorded in the administrative dataset of a large public mental health system varies by diagnosis and by treatment setting. Further research is needed to clarify the relationship between psychiatric diagnosis, diagnostic variability and treatment setting.

  10. Social class and mental health: testing exploitation as a relational determinant of depression.

    PubMed

    Muntaner, Carles; Ng, Edwin; Prins, Seth J; Bones-Rocha, Katia; Espelt, Albert; Chung, Haejoo

    2015-01-01

    This study tests whether social class exploitation operates as a relational mechanism that generates mental health inequalities in the nursing home industry. We ask, does social class exploitation (i.e., the acquisition of economic benefits from the labor of those who are dominated) have a systematic and predictable impact on depression among nursing assistants? Using cross-sectional data from 868 nursing assistants employed in 50 nursing homes in three U.S. states, we measure social class exploitation as "ownership type" (private for-profit, private not-for-profit, and public) and "managerial domination" (labor relations violations, perceptions of labor-management conflict). Depression is assessed using the original and revised versions of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D and CESD-R). Using two-level logistic regressions, we find that private for-profit ownership and higher managerial domination are predictive of depression among nursing assistants even after adjustment for potential confounders and mediators. Our findings confirm the theoretical and empirical value of applying a social class approach to understanding how mental health inequalities are generated through exploitative mechanisms. Ownership type and managerial domination appear to affect depression through social relations that generate mental health inequalities through the process of acquiring profits, controlling production, supervising and monitoring labor, and enforcing disciplinary sanctions. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions:]br]sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. Social Class and Mental Health: Testing Exploitation as a Relational Determinant of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Muntaner, Carles; Ng, Edwin; Prins, Seth J.; Bones-Rocha, Katia; Espelt, Albert; Chung, Haejoo

    2016-01-01

    This study tests whether social class exploitation operates as a relational mechanism that generates mental health inequalities in the nursing home industry. We ask, does social class exploitation (i.e., the acquisition of economic benefits from the labor of those who are dominated) have a systematic and predictable impact on depression among nursing assistants? Using cross-sectional data from 868 nursing assistants employed in 50 nursing homes in three U.S. states, we measure social class exploitation as “ownership type” (private for-profit, private not-for-profit, and public) and “managerial domination” (labor relations violations, perceptions of labor-management conflict). Depression is assessed using the original and revised versions of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D and CESD-R). Using two-level logistic regressions, we find that private for-profit ownership and higher managerial domination are predictive of depression among nursing assistants even after adjustment for potential confounders and mediators. Our findings confirm the theoretical and empirical value of applying a social class approach to understanding how mental health inequalities are generated through exploitative mechanisms. Ownership type and managerial domination appear to affect depression through social relations that generate mental health inequalities through the process of acquiring profits, controlling production, supervising and monitoring labor, and enforcing disciplinary sanctions. PMID:25813501

  12. Adolescent Mental Health Literacy: Young People's Knowledge of Depression and Social Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Coles, Meredith E; Ravid, Ariel; Gibb, Brandon; George-Denn, Daniel; Bronstein, Laura R; McLeod, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Understanding why nearly 80% of youth ages 6-18 years with a mental disorder fail to receive treatment represents an important public health priority. International data suggest that underrecognition of mental illness and the need for treatment are barriers to service utilization. This study extends work to a U.S. sample of 1,104 adolescents. High School students were invited to participate in a self-report study assessing knowledge and beliefs regarding mental illness. Participants completed the survey in groups at school and read vignettes portraying peers experiencing major depression, social anxiety disorder, and a situation where the individual has to cope with a common life stressor followed by a series of questions in reference to each vignette. Adolescents had better recognition of depression than social anxiety disorder and were more likely to recommend seeking help for it. However, <50% of youth recognized depression. Family, friends, and counselors were recommended as sources of help. Differences according to the sex of the respondent and person in the vignette were observed. These data are among the first to provide information regarding the mental health literacy of American adolescents and suggest potential points for intervention. Pending replication of the findings herein, efforts to help adolescents recognize mental health problems and to increase the likelihood of recommending professional help will be important. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mental Health Literacy in Hmong and Cambodian Elderly Refugees: A Barrier to Understanding, Recognizing, and Responding to Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hee Yun; Lytle, Kathy; Yang, Pa Nhia; Lum, Terry

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to explore mental health literacy, specifically focusing on depression, among Southeast Asian (SEA) elderly refugees residing in the Twin Cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minnesota. Three focus groups were held with nine mental health professionals who work with SEA elders. Jorm's mental health literacy framework guided the…

  14. Mental Health Literacy in Hmong and Cambodian Elderly Refugees: A Barrier to Understanding, Recognizing, and Responding to Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hee Yun; Lytle, Kathy; Yang, Pa Nhia; Lum, Terry

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to explore mental health literacy, specifically focusing on depression, among Southeast Asian (SEA) elderly refugees residing in the Twin Cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minnesota. Three focus groups were held with nine mental health professionals who work with SEA elders. Jorm's mental health literacy framework guided the…

  15. Understanding mental and physical fatigue complaints in those with depression and insomnia.

    PubMed

    Carney, Colleen E; Moss, Taryn G; Lachowski, Angela M; Atwood, Molly E

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue is a concern for both people with insomnia and with depression, yet it remains poorly understood. Participants (N = 62) included those meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text revision) criteria for insomnia and major depressive disorder (MDD). Multiple regression examined sleep, mood, activity, and cognitive factors as predictors of mental and physical fatigue. Only the cognitive factors (i.e., unhelpful beliefs about sleep and symptom-focused rumination) were predictive of both physical and mental fatigue. Beliefs about not being able to function and needing to avoid activities after a poor night of sleep were related to both types of fatigue. Targeting these beliefs via cognitive therapy and encouraging patients to test maladaptive beliefs about sleep may enhance fatigue response in those with MDD and insomnia.

  16. Desired mental health resources for urban, ethnically diverse, impoverished women struggling with anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Doornbos, Mary Molewyk; Zandee, Gail Landheer; DeGroot, Joleen; Warpinski, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Depression and anxiety are mental health issues that disproportionately affect women-particularly when access to culturally sensitive care is limited. The purpose of this study was to identify mental health concerns in three urban, ethnically diverse, underserved, and impoverished neighborhoods using the ideological perspective of community-based participatory research. In the context of long-term partnerships between a department of nursing and these neighborhoods, we recruited 61 women aged 18 to 69 years and collected data via homogeneous focus groups comprised of Black, Hispanic, and White women, respectively. We conducted five of the focus groups in English and one in Spanish. The women perceived anxiety and depression as significant concerns for themselves, their families, and their communities. They used unique community resources to manage mental health issues and desired new resources, including support groups and education.

  17. Maternal depression as a risk factor for children's inadequate housing conditions.

    PubMed

    Corman, Hope; Curtis, Marah A; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E

    2016-01-01

    Depression among mothers with young children is an important public health issue that not only has implications for their own well-being, but can also potentially affect their children's health and developmental trajectories. This study explored the extent to which maternal depression is a risk factor for inadequate housing conditions related to utilities, a noteworthy risk factor for poor child health. Using data on 2965 mothers and children from a national urban cohort of U.S. births in 1998-2000, we estimated multivariate logistic regression models of associations between maternal depression during the postpartum year and a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) measure of severely inadequate housing due to heating issues, as well as a broader measure of energy insecurity that encompasses various types of utility problems. We also considered outcomes that incorporated housing instability and food insecurity in conjunction with housing inadequacy. Mothers who experienced depression had about 60% higher odds of experiencing severely inadequate housing due to heat (OR: 1.57) and 70% higher odds of experiencing energy insecurity (OR: 1.69) compared to mothers who did not experience depression. Maternal depression was even more strongly associated with multiple hardships in the forms of housing inadequacy plus housing instability and/or food insecurity than it was with housing inadequacy. This study provides robust evidence that maternal depression is a risk factor for inadequate housing and multiple hardships during a critical period of children's development. The findings suggest that policy efforts should not occur in mental health, housing, and food security silos.

  18. Subgroups of US IRAQ and Afghanistan veterans: associations with traumatic brain injury and mental health conditions.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Carlos A; Cooper, Douglas B; Wang, Chen-Pin; Tate, David F; Eapen, Blessen C; York, Gerald E; Pugh, Mary Jo

    2015-09-01

    U. S. veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan are known to have a high prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and depression, which are often comorbid and share many symptoms. Attempts to describe this cohort by single diagnoses have limited our understanding of the complex nature of this population. The objective of this study was to identify subgroups of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans (IAVs) with distinct compositions of symptoms associated with TBI, PTSD, and depression. Our cross-sectional, observational study included 303,716 IAVs who received care in the Veterans Health Administration in 2010-2011. Symptoms and conditions were defined using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes and symptom-clusters were identified using latent class analysis. We identified seven classes with distinct symptom compositions. One class had low probability of any condition and low health care utilization (HCU) (48 %). Other classes were characterized by high probabilities of mental health comorbidities (14 %); chronic pain and sleep disturbance (20 %); headaches and memory problems (6 %); and auditory problems (2.5 %). Another class had mental health comorbidities and chronic pain (7 %), and the last had high probabilities of most symptoms examined (3 %). These last two classes had the highest likelihood of TBI, PTSD, and depression and were identified as high healthcare utilizers. There are subgroups of IAVs with distinct clusters of symptom that are meaningfully associated with TBI, PTSD, depression, and HCU. Additional studies examining these veteran subgroups could improve our understanding of this complex comorbid patient population.

  19. Effects of Group Drumming Interventions on Anxiety, Depression, Social Resilience and Inflammatory Immune Response among Mental Health Service Users

    PubMed Central

    Fancourt, Daisy; Perkins, Rosie; Ascenso, Sara; Carvalho, Livia A.; Steptoe, Andrew; Williamon, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Growing numbers of mental health organizations are developing community music-making interventions for service users; however, to date there has been little research into their efficacy or mechanisms of effect. This study was an exploratory examination of whether 10 weeks of group drumming could improve depression, anxiety and social resilience among service users compared with a non-music control group (with participants allocated to group by geographical location.) Significant improvements were found in the drumming group but not the control group: by week 6 there were decreases in depression (-2.14 SE 0.50 CI -3.16 to -1.11) and increases in social resilience (7.69 SE 2.00 CI 3.60 to 11.78), and by week 10 these had further improved (depression: -3.41 SE 0.62 CI -4.68 to -2.15; social resilience: 10.59 SE 1.78 CI 6.94 to 14.24) alongside significant improvements in anxiety (-2.21 SE 0.50 CI -3.24 to -1.19) and mental wellbeing (6.14 SE 0.92 CI 4.25 to 8.04). All significant changes were maintained at 3 months follow-up. Furthermore, it is now recognised that many mental health conditions are characterised by underlying inflammatory immune responses. Consequently, participants in the drumming group also provided saliva samples to test for cortisol and the cytokines interleukin (IL) 4, IL6, IL17, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP) 1. Across the 10 weeks there was a shift away from a pro-inflammatory towards an anti-inflammatory immune profile. Consequently, this study demonstrates the psychological benefits of group drumming and also suggests underlying biological effects, supporting its therapeutic potential for mental health. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01906892 PMID:26974430

  20. [Social representations and living conditions of the mentally ill and mentally retarded elderly in nursing homes.].

    PubMed

    Dorvil, H; Benoit, M

    1999-01-01

    The aging of the population in Québec as in the rest of the western world, brings to the fore people who until now were greatly marginalized. This is the case of mentally ill and mentally retarded elderly who until recently, lived their aging in the shadow of psychiatric institutions. Have these people now found with deinstitutionalization, the possibility of growing old within society ? This article analyses the conditions of integration and support networks, in sum a collective responsability of these aging people in nursing homes.

  1. Mood disturbance and depression in Arab women following hospitalisation from acute cardiac conditions: a cross-sectional study from Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Tam Truong; Al Suwaidi, Jassim Mohd; Al-Qahtani, Awad; Asaad, Nidal; Fung, Tak; Singh, Rajvir; Qader, Najlaa Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Depression is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates among cardiovascular patients. Depressed patients have three times higher risk of death than those who are not. We sought to determine the presence of depressive symptoms, and whether gender and age are associated with depression among Arab patients hospitalised with cardiac conditions in a Middle Eastern country. Setting Using a non-probability convenient sampling technique, a cross-sectional survey was conducted with 1000 Arab patients ≥20 years who were admitted to cardiology units between 2013 and 2014 at the Heart Hospital in Qatar. Patients were interviewed 3 days after admission following the cardiac event. Surveys included demographic and clinical characteristics, and the Arabic version of the Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II). Depression was assessed by BDI-II clinical classification scale. Results 15% of the patients had mild mood disturbance and 5% had symptoms of clinical depression. Twice as many females than males suffered from mild mood disturbance and clinical depression symptoms, the majority of females were in the age group 50 years and above, whereas males were in the age group 40–49 years. χ2 Tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that gender and age were statistically significantly related to depression (p<0.001 for all). Conclusions Older Arab women are more likely to develop mood disturbance and depression after being hospitalised with acute cardiac condition. Gender and age differences approach, and routine screening for depression should be conducted with all cardiovascular patients, especially for females in the older age groups. Mental health counselling should be available for all cardiovascular patients who exhibit depressive symptoms. PMID:27388362

  2. Shared versus distinct genetic contributions of mental wellbeing with depression and anxiety symptoms in healthy twins.

    PubMed

    Routledge, Kylie M; Burton, Karen L O; Williams, Leanne M; Harris, Anthony; Schofield, Peter R; Clark, C Richard; Gatt, Justine M

    2016-10-30

    Mental wellbeing and mental illness symptoms are typically conceptualized as opposite ends of a continuum, despite only sharing about a quarter in common variance. We investigated the normative variation in measures of wellbeing and of depression and anxiety in 1486 twins who did not meet clinical criteria for an overt diagnosis. We quantified the shared versus distinct genetic and environmental variance between wellbeing and depression and anxiety symptoms. The majority of participants (93%) reported levels of depression and anxiety symptoms within the healthy range, yet only 23% reported a wellbeing score within the "flourishing" range: the remainder were within the ranges of "moderate" (67%) or "languishing" (10%). In twin models, measures of wellbeing and of depression and anxiety shared 50.09% of variance due to genetic factors and 18.27% due to environmental factors; the rest of the variance was due to unique variation impacting wellbeing or depression and anxiety symptoms. These findings suggest that an absence of clinically-significant symptoms of depression and anxiety does not necessarily indicate that an individual is flourishing. Both unique and shared genetic and environmental factors may determine why some individuals flourish in the absence of symptoms while others do not. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nutrition and depression: implications for improving mental health among childbearing-aged women.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Lisa M; Wisner, Katherine L

    2005-11-01

    Adequate nutrition is needed for countless aspects of brain functioning. Poor diet quality, ubiquitous in the United States, may be a modifiable risk factor for depression. The objective was to review and synthesize the current knowledge of the role of nutrition in depression, and address implications for childbearing-aged women. Poor omega-3 fatty acid status increases the risk of depression. Fish oil and folic acid supplements each have been used to treat depression successfully. Folate deficiency reduces the response to antidepressants. Deficiencies of folate, vitamin B12, iron, zinc, and selenium tend to be more common among depressed than nondepressed persons. Dietary antioxidants have not been studied rigorously in relation to depression. Childbearing-aged women are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of poor nutrition on mood because pregnancy and lactation are major nutritional stressors to the body. The depletion of nutrient reserves throughout pregnancy and a lack of recovery postpartum may increase a woman's risk of depression. Prospective research studies are needed to clarify the role of nutrition in the pathophysiology of depression among childbearing-aged women. Greater attention to nutritional factors in mental health is warranted given that nutrition interventions can be inexpensive, safe, easy to administer, and generally acceptable to patients.

  4. Neurohormonal and Inflammatory Hyper-Responsiveness to Acute Mental Stress in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Ali A.; Deuster, Patricia A.; Francis, Jennifer L.; Bonsall, Robert W.; Tracy, Russell P.; Kop, Willem J.

    2010-01-01

    Depression is associated with dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, overactivity of the sympathoadrenal system, and increased levels of inflammation markers. It is not known whether these biological processes are disproportionately elevated in response to acute negative emotional arousal by mental stress (MS). The present study investigates responses of neurohormones and inflammatory markers to MS in 14 clinically depressed (age: 42±10 years; 50% female) and 14 non-depressed control participants (age: 39±6 years; 50% female). Heightened acute MS reactivity was documented in depressed participants (adrenocorticotropic hormone, ρ=0.001; Norepinephrine, ρ=0.042; Epinephrine, ρ=0.039), and a delayed increase in cortisol was observed (ρ=0.002). Inflammation markers increased more strongly in depressed vs. non-depressed participants (IL-6, ρ=0.027; tumor necrosis factor-alpha, ρ=0.050; and recovery C-reactive protein, ρ=0.003). It is concluded that depressed individuals display hyper-reactivity of neuroimmunological markers in response to acute negative emotions. This hyper-reactivity may serve a pathologic role in the elevated morbidity and mortality risk associated with depression. PMID:20117167

  5. Age differences in the prevalence and comorbidity of DSM-IV major depressive episodes: Results from the WHO World Mental Health Survey Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Birnbaum, Howard; Shahly, Victoria; Bromet, Evelyn; Hwang, Irving; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Sampson, Nancy; Andrade, Laura Helena; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Demyttenaere, Koen; Haro, Josep Maria; Karam, Aimee N.; Kostyuchenko, Stanislav; Kovess, Viviane; Lara, Carmen; Levinson, Daphna; Matschinger, Herbert; Nakane, Yoshibumi; Browne, Mark Oakley; Ormel, Johan; Posada-Villa, Jose; Sagar, Rajesh; Stein, Dan J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although depression appears to decrease in late life, this could be due to misattribution of depressive symptoms to physical disorders that increase in late life. Methods We investigated this issue by studying age differences in comorbidity of DSM-IV major depressive episodes (MDE) with chronic physical conditions in the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) surveys, a series of community epidemiological surveys carried out in 10 developed countries (n = 51,771) and 8 developing countries (n = 37,265). MDE and other mental disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Organic exclusion rules were not used to avoid inappropriate exclusion of cases with physical comorbidity. Physical conditions were assessed with a standard chronic conditions checklist. Results Twelve-month DSM-IV/CIDI MDE was significantly less prevalent among respondents ages 65+ than younger respondents in developed but not developing countries. Prevalence of comorbid mental disorders generally either decreased or remained stable with age, while comorbidity of MDE with mental disorders generally increased with age. Prevalence of physical conditions, in comparison, generally increased with age, while comorbidity of MDE with physical conditions generally decreased with age. Depression treatment was lowest among the elderly in developed and developing countries. Conclusions The weakening associations between MDE and physical conditions with increasing age argue against the suggestion that the low estimated prevalence of MDE among the elderly is due to increased confounding with physical disorders. Future study is needed to investigate processes that might lead to a decreasing impact of physical illness on depression among the elderly. PMID:20037917

  6. [Representations of insanity, mental illness and depression in general population in France].

    PubMed

    Roelandt, J-L; Caria, A; Defromont, L; Vandeborre, A; Daumerie, N

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the representations of insane, mentally ill and depressive persons, in a representative sample from the French General Population. Data were derived from the multicentric survey "Mental Health in the General Population: images and realities", carried out in 47 French public sites between 1999 and 2003. A face-to-face questionnaire was used to interview a representative sample of French metropolitan subjects, aged 18 and over, non-institutionalized and homeless. These subjects were recruited using quota sampling for age, sex, socioprofessional and education levels, according to data from the 1999 national French population census. Representations of insane, mentally ill and depressive persons were explored by a specific questionnaire with open and semi-open questions. Psychiatric diagnoses were identified using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). A national database was then constituted by pooling data from all sites, weighted for age, sex, level of education, socioprofessional level and work status to be representative of the French general population. Of the 36,000 individuals included in this study, over 75% associated the words "insane" and "mentally ill" with violent and dangerous behaviours and the term "depressive" with sadness, isolation and suicide. Young people, those with higher education and higher income level more frequently associated dangerous behaviours with mental illness rather than with insanity. The study shows that the general population draws a clear line between the representation of insane and mentally ill on one hand, and depressive on the other hand. Insane and mentally people are described as abnormal, irresponsible, unconscious, socially excluded, far from being curable, and to be cured against their will by psychotropic drugs and psychiatric hospitalisation. Whereas the depressive is perceived as a more familiar character, suffering, curable, who can be cured with psychotropic

  7. The Efficacy of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy as a Public Mental Health Intervention for Adults with Mild to Moderate Depressive Symptomatology: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pots, Wendy T. M.; Meulenbeek, Peter A. M.; Veehof, Martine M.; Klungers, Jorinde; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although there has been growing evidence for the efficacy of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) for different clinical populations, its effectiveness as a public mental health intervention has not been studied. The present study evaluates a community-based MBCT intervention for adults with mild to moderate depressive symptomatology in a large multi-site, pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Method The participants with mild to moderate depressive symptomatology were recruited from the general population and randomized to the MBCT intervention (n = 76) or to a waiting list control group (n = 75). Participants completed measures before and after the intervention. Participants in the experimental condition also completed these measures at a 3-month follow-up. Results In the experimental condition significant reductions in depression, anxiety, and experiential avoidance, and improvements in mindfulness and emotional- and psychological mental health were found, compared to the waiting list (effect sizes Cohen's d = 0.31–0.56). These effects were sustained at the 3-month follow-up. The likelihood of a clinically significant change in depressive symptoms was significantly higher for the MBCT group [odds ratio (OR) 3.026, p<0.01 at post-treatment; NNT = 5.10]. Discussion MBCT as a public mental health intervention for adults with mild to moderate depressive symptoms seems effective and applicable in a natural setting. Trial Registration Nederlands Trial Register NTR2096 PMID:25333885

  8. Stigmatizing attitudes differ across mental health disorders: a comparison of stigma across eating disorders, obesity, and major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Ebneter, Daria S; Latner, Janet D

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the current article was to compare stigmatizing attitudes toward eating disorders (EDs), including anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED), with stigma toward another weight-related condition (obesity) and a non-weight-related mental disorder (major depressive disorder [MDD]). Participants (N = 447) read five vignettes describing a woman with AN, BN, BED, obesity, or MDD and responded to questionnaires examining stigmatizing attitudes. The targets with EDs were blamed more for their condition than the targets with MDD, whereas persons with obesity were held more responsible for their condition than any other target. On the other hand, the target with MDD was perceived as more impaired than any other target. Lack of self-discipline was attributed more to the development of BED and obesity than to any other condition. Stigmatizing attitudes vary across mental health disorders, and future research should aim to specifically target stigmatizing beliefs to reduce and prevent discrimination toward mental health disorders and obesity.

  9. Improving maternal perinatal mental health: integrated care for all women versus screening for depression.

    PubMed

    Laios, Lia; Rio, Ines; Judd, Fiona

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this article is to highlight the debate about universal routine screening and psychosocial assessment in the perinatal period, and suggest an alternative/additional approach to improving maternal perinatal mental illness. Universal routine screening and psychosocial assessment in the perinatal period has been introduced in Australia despite a lack of evidence that this affects perinatal maternal morbidity. Furthermore, this approach is not designed to detect maternal illnesses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder, although it is these women and their infants who have the highest rates of morbidity and mortality. We propose that any approach to improving maternal perinatal mental health should be tailored to particular situations and populations, with mental health care (inclusive of all mental illness, not just depression) integrated into, and thus a routine aspect of, maternity care provided to all women throughout the perinatal period.

  10. Major depressive disorder, suicidal behaviour, bipolar disorder, and generalised anxiety disorder among emerging adults with and without chronic health conditions.

    PubMed

    Ferro, M A

    2016-10-01

    Despite the considerable physical, emotional and social change that occurs during emerging adulthood, there is little research that examines the association between having a chronic health condition and mental disorder during this developmental period. The aims of this study were to examine the sex-specific prevalence of lifetime mental disorder in an epidemiological sample of emerging adults aged 15-30 years with and without chronic health conditions; quantify the association between chronic health conditions and mental disorder, adjusting for sociodemographic and health factors; and, examine potential moderating and mediating effects of sex, level of disability and pain. Data come from the Canadian Community Health Survey-Mental Health. Respondents were 15-30 years of age (n = 5947) and self-reported whether they had a chronic health condition. Chronic health conditions were classified as: respiratory, musculoskeletal/connective tissue, cardiovascular, neurological and endocrine/digestive. The World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview 3.0 was used to assess the presence of mental disorder (major depressive disorder, suicidal behaviour, bipolar disorder and generalised anxiety disorder). Lifetime prevalence of mental disorder was significantly higher for individuals with chronic health conditions compared with healthy controls. Substantial heterogeneity in the prevalence of mental disorder was found in males, but not in females. Logistic regression models adjusting for several sociodemographic and health factors showed that the individuals with chronic health conditions were at elevated risk for mental disorder. There was no evidence that the level of disability or pain moderated the associations between chronic health conditions and mental disorder. Sex was found to moderate the association between musculoskeletal/connective tissue conditions and bipolar disorder (β = 1.71, p = 0.002). Exploratory analyses suggest that the levels of

  11. Depressive Symptoms and Mental Stress Induced Myocardial Ischemia in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Stephen; Samad, Zainab; Becker, Richard C.; Williams, Redford; Kuhn, Cynthia; Ortel, Thomas L.; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Prybol, Kevin; Rogers, Joseph; O’Connor, Christopher; Velazquez, Eric J.; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The primary focus of this study was to examine associations between depressive symptoms and mental stress induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods Adult patients with documented CHD were recruited for baseline mental stress and exercise stress screening testing as a part of the enrollment process of the REMIT trial. Patients were administered the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD). Following a 24-48-hour Beta-blocker withdrawal, consented patients completed three mental stress tests followed by a treadmill exercise test. Ischemia was defined as 1) any development or worsening of any wall motion abnormality (WMA), 2) reduction of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥ 8% by transthoracic echocardiography, and/or ischemic ST-segment change by electrocardiography during stress testing. MSIMI was considered present when ischemia occurred in at least one mental test. Data were analyzed using logistic regression adjusting for age, gender, and resting left ventricular ejection fraction. Results One hundred twenty five (44.2 %) of 283 patients were found to have MSIMI and 93 (32.9%) had ESIMI. Unadjusted analysis showed that BDI-II scores were positively associated with the probability of MSIMI (OR = .1.30: 95% CI 1.06 – 1.60, p = .013) and number of MSIMI positive tasks (all p < .005). These associations were still significant after adjustment for covariates (ps ≤ .05). Conclusions In CHD patients, depressive symptoms were associated with a higher probability of MSIMI. These observations may enhance our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the association of depressive symptoms to future cardiovascular events. PMID:24163385

  12. The Role of an Early Head Start Mental Health Coordinator: Screening for Maternal Depression in a Comprehensive Approach to Mental Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canuso, Regina

    2007-01-01

    Screening for maternal depression was a core component of the P.E.A.C.E., Inc., Early Head Start program's comprehensive approach to supporting the mental health needs of low-income pregnant women and families with infants and toddlers. The addition of a mental health coordinator as a full-time staff member created an opportunity to develop a…

  13. On defining "mental disorder": purposes and conditions of adequacy.

    PubMed

    Brülde, Bengt

    2010-02-01

    All definitions of mental disorder are backed up by arguments that rely on general criteria (e.g., that a definition should be consistent with ordinary language). These desiderata are rarely explicitly stated, and there has been no systematic discussion of how different definitions should be assessed. To arrive at a well-founded list of desiderata, we need to know the purpose of a definition. I argue that this purpose must be practical; it should, for example, help us determine who is entitled to publicly funded health care. I then propose eight conditions of adequacy that can be used to assess competing definitions (e.g., the ordinary language condition, the coherence condition, and the condition of normative adequacy). These conditions pull in different directions, however, and we must decide which are most important. I also suggest that there is no single definition that can help us deal with all the relevant practical issues.

  14. Private prayer associations with depression, anxiety and other health conditions: an analytical review of clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, James W; Nunnelley, Paige A

    2016-09-01

    To critically analyze appropriate clinical studies to assess the relationship between health conditions and the frequency of private prayer. Private prayer is defined as individuals praying for themselves. Using PubMed and other search engines, we identified over 300 articles reporting relationships between prayer and health conditions. We identified 41 observational clinical studies that evaluated the relationship between private prayer and health conditions. Prayer scores of 5 to 1 were assigned to studies, with 5 being private prayer for health and 1 being prayer in combination with meditation or Bible study. Frequency scores ranged from 3 to 1 with 3 being twice daily or more and 0 when frequency was not assessed. Studies were ranked from 8 to 1 based on the sum of Prayer and Frequency Scores. Twenty-one studies had Prayer-Frequency scores of 5 to 8, indicating that they evaluated private prayer (praying for one's own health) of suitable frequency in association with health conditions. Nine of 11 studies indicated that private prayer was associated with a significantly lower prevalence of depression (P value, <0.01). Optimism as well as coping were significantly improved by prayer in four studies (P value, P < 0.01). In 10 studies of mental health conditions-including anxiety and confusion-there was a significant benefit associated with prayer (P < 0.01), In the reviewed studies, prayer did not have a significant effect on physical health or blood pressure. The reported observational studies suggest that frequent private prayer is associated with a significant benefit for depression, optimism, coping, and other mental health conditions such as anxiety. Controlled clinical trials are required to critically assess the associations of private prayer and health conditions.

  15. Mental health literacy towards depression among non-medical students at a Malaysian university.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tahir M; Sulaiman, Syed A; Hassali, Mohamed A

    2010-03-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the knowledge and perception of depression among students of University Sains Malaysia (USM), in Penang, Peninsular Malaysia.Method Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a pre-validated 21-item questionnaire among students at USM.Results A total of 500 respondents participated in the survey comprising 24.6% (n=123) males and 75.4% (n=377) females. Half (50.0%, n=250) were Malays, followed by Chinese (44.0%, n=220) and Indians (6.0%, n=30). Whilst exploring the respondents' knowledge of the symptoms of depression, it was found that Chinese females had a comparatively better knowledge (P=0.058) of the symptoms of depression in comparison with Malays and Indians. Overall, social issues were attributed as the possible cause of depression. A cursory knowledge level was observed regarding medication for depression. Female students were more inclined towards the use of alternative and traditional medicines. However, with regard to seeking professional help, consultation with a psychiatrist was preferred by the majority.Conclusion Overall, a moderate level of knowledge about the symptoms of depression and a cursory knowledge of its therapy were observed. Those with personal experience of depression had better knowledge of the symptoms and therapy. Alternative treatments and traditional medicines were also favoured. There is a risk that this may affect the ability of Malaysian youths to seek evidence-based mental health care.

  16. Mental health literacy towards depression among non‐medical students at a Malaysian university

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the knowledge and perception of depression among students of University Sains Malaysia (USM), in Penang, Peninsular Malaysia. Method Face‐to‐face interviews were conducted using a pre‐validated 21‐item questionnaire among students at USM. Results A total of 500 respondents participated in the survey comprising 24.6% (n=123) males and 75.4% (n=377) females. Half (50.0%, n=250) were Malays, followed by Chinese (44.0%, n=220) and Indians (6.0%, n=30). Whilst exploring the respondents' knowledge of the symptoms of depression, it was found that Chinese females had a comparatively better knowledge (P=0.058) of the symptoms of depression in comparison with Malays and Indians. Overall, social issues were attributed as the possible cause of depression. A cursory knowledge level was observed regarding medication for depression. Female students were more inclined towards the use of alternative and traditional medicines. However, with regard to seeking professional help, consultation with a psychiatrist was preferred by the majority. Conclusion Overall, a moderate level of knowledge about the symptoms of depression and a cursory knowledge of its therapy were observed. Those with personal experience of depression had better knowledge of the symptoms and therapy. Alternative treatments and traditional medicines were also favoured. There is a risk that this may affect the ability of Malaysian youths to seek evidence‐based mental health care. PMID:22477920

  17. Depressive disorders among adolescents managed in a child and adolescent mental health service.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Aaron; Oakley Browne, Mark; Bearsley-Smith, Cate; Villanueva, Elmer

    2010-04-01

    The aims were to describe the prevalence and treatment of depressive disorders among case-managed adolescents attending a regional Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS). An observational study was conducted in a regional CAMHS over a 3-month period. Clinicians recorded treatment of their case-managed adolescents aged 12-18 years at the end of each calendar month. The Health of the Nation Outcome Scale for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA) and Children's Global Assessment Scale (CGAS) were collected at the beginning of the study period or at entry into the service, and repeated at discharge from the service or at the conclusion of the study period. Adolescents also completed the Reynold's Adolescent Depression Scale, 2nd edition. Depressive disorders were the most common clinician diagnosis reported (22%). There was no statistically significant difference in treatment for depressed compared to non-depressed adolescents. There was a statistically significant improvement in both the HoNOSCA scores (p <0.001) and CGAS scores (p <0.001) for the whole sample. Treatment appeared to be the same in type for depressed compared to non-depressed adolescents case managed within CAMHS.

  18. Association between mental health conditions and rehospitalization, mortality, and functional outcomes in patients with stroke following inpatient rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Limited evidence exists regarding the association of pre-existing mental health conditions in patients with stroke and stroke outcomes such as rehospitalization, mortality, and function. We examined the association between mental health conditions and rehospitalization, mortality, and functional outcomes in patients with stroke following inpatient rehabilitation. Methods Our observational study used the 2001 VA Integrated Stroke Outcomes database of 2162 patients with stroke who underwent rehabilitation at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Separate models were fit to our outcome measures that included 6-month rehospitalization or death, 6-month mortality post-discharge, and functional outcomes post inpatient rehabilitation as a function of number and type of mental health conditions. The models controlled for patient socio-demographics, length of stay, functional status, and rehabilitation setting. Results Patients had an average age of 68 years. Patients with stroke and two or more mental health conditions were more likely to be readmitted or die compared to patients with no conditions (OR: 1.44, p = 0.04). Depression and anxiety were associated with a greater likelihood of rehospitalization or death (OR: 1.33, p = 0.04; OR:1.47, p = 0.03). Patients with anxiety were more likely to die at six months (OR: 2.49, p = 0.001). Conclusions Patients with stroke with pre-existing mental health conditions may need additional psychotherapy interventions, which may potentially improve stroke outcomes post-hospitalization. PMID:22085779

  19. [Physical exercise and mental health: cognition, anxiety, depression and self-concept].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan-Lin; Wang, John; Yao, Jia-Xin; Ji, Cheng-Shu; Dai, Qun; Jin, Ya-Hong

    2014-10-01

    This review focuses on the benefits of regular physical activity participation have mainly focused on cognitive functioning, anxiety and depression, and self-concept. It is well documented that ex- ercise can enhance cognitive functioning, improve executive function at old age, and improve mental abil- ity of children labeled as educational subnormal or disability. Regular exercise has been used to reduce stress and ward off anxiety and feelings of depression. In addition, exercise can improve self-esteem and positive outlook in life. Studies in these three main areas were reviewed and issues and future directions were highlighted.

  20. Longitudinal associations between mental health conditions and overactive bladder in women veterans.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Catherine S; Nygaard, Ingrid E; Hillis, Stephen L; Torner, James C; Sadler, Anne G

    2017-10-01

    One in 5 recently deployed US women veterans report overactive bladder symptoms. Mental health conditions such as depression and anxiety commonly co-occur in women with overactive bladder, but temporal relationships between these outcomes have not been well studied, and the mechanism behind this association is unknown. The Women Veterans Urinary Health Study, a nationwide longitudinal study in recently deployed women veterans, was designed to better understand relationships between overactive bladder and mental health conditions. We sought to estimate the 1-year incidence and remission of overactive bladder and to identify the impact of depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, and prior sexual assault on 1-year overactive bladder incidence and remission rates. Participants of this 1-year prospective cohort study were female veterans separated from military service who had returned from Iraq or Afghanistan deployment within the previous 2 years. Eligible women were identified through the Defense Manpower Data Center and recruited by mail and telephone. Telephone screening confirmed participants were ambulatory, community-dwelling veterans and excluded those with urinary tract fistula, congenital abnormality, or cancer; pelvic radiation; spinal cord injury; multiple sclerosis; Parkinson disease; stroke; or current/recent pregnancy. Data collection included computer-assisted telephone interviews performed at enrollment and 1 year later. The interview assessed demographic and military service characteristics; urinary symptoms and treatment; depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and treatment; and a lifetime history of sexual assault. Overactive bladder was identified if at least moderately bothersome urgency urinary incontinence and/or urinary frequency symptoms were reported on Urogenital Distress Inventory items. Exposures included depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, and lifetime sexual assault, assessed at

  1. Does Mother-Child Interaction Mediate the Relation Between Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Children's Mental Health Problems?

    PubMed

    van Doorn, Marleen M E M; Kuijpers, Rowella C W M; Lichtwarck-Aschoff, Anna; Bodden, Denise; Jansen, Mélou; Granic, Isabela

    The relation between maternal depressive symptoms and children's mental health problems has been well established. However, prior studies have predominantly focused on maternal reports of children's mental health problems and on parenting behavior, as a broad and unilateral concept. This cross-sectional study examined specific observed mother-child interaction behaviors through which maternal depressive symptoms are assumed to affect children's mental health problems. We expected higher rates of maternal depressive symptoms to predict higher rates of children's mental health problems, and we expected this relation to be mediated by low maternal warmth and high maternal psychological control. The sample consisted of 111 mother-child dyads referred for treatment. The mother-child interaction behaviors were coded according to the observed mother-child interaction tasks. Children's mental health problems were assessed using both maternal reports and children's self-reports. As expected, the results showed that maternal depressive symptoms were strongly related to maternal reports of children's internalizing and externalizing mental health problems. Surprisingly, maternal depressive symptoms were unrelated to children's self-reported depressive symptoms. Furthermore, mother-child interactions did not mediate the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and child mental health problems. Maternal depressive symptoms were associated with high maternal warmth, and high psychological control was associated with high levels of mother-reported externalizing mental health problems in children. These results partially replicate previous findings but add to these by using observational methods and multi-informant data. The importance of using a multi-informant and multi-method approach in assessing children's mental health problems in clinical practice and research are discussed.

  2. Race and Ethnic Group Differences in Comorbid Major Depressive Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Chronic Medical Conditions.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Daphne C; Assari, Shervin; Johnson-Lawrence, Vicki

    2015-09-01

    This study tested whether race and ethnic group differences exist for lifetime major depressive disorder and/or general anxiety disorder with one or more chronic medical conditions. Data from the National Survey of American Life, which included 3570 African American, 1438 Caribbean Black, and 891 non-Hispanic White adults were analyzed. Outcomes included at least one and multiple chronic medical conditions, from a list of 14 medical conditions (e.g., arthritis, cancer, diabetes, kidney disease, stroke, heart disease, etc.). Logistic regressions were fitted to data to determine how the association between major depressive disorder, general anxiety disorder, and one or more chronic medical conditions vary across race and ethnicity. Lifetime major depressive disorder (but not lifetime general anxiety disorder) was associated with at least one chronic medical condition among African Americans and Caribbean Blacks, but not non-Hispanic Whites. Lifetime major depressive disorder was similarly associated with multiple chronic medical conditions among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks, and non-Hispanic Whites. For Caribbean Blacks, stronger associations were found between major depressive disorder and general anxiety disorder with one or more chronic medical conditions compared to African Americans and non-Hispanic Whites. Findings suggest that race and ethnicity may shape the links between comorbid psychiatric disorders and chronic medical conditions. Mental health screening of individuals with chronic medical conditions in primary health-care settings may benefit from tailoring based on race and ethnicity. More research is needed to understand why associations between physical and mental health vary among race and ethnic groups.

  3. Barriers to Mental Health Service Use Among Workers With Depression and Work Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This article estimates the decrease in workplace productivity losses associated with removal of three types of barriers to mental health service use among workers with depression. Methods: A model of productivity losses based on the results of a population-based survey of Canadian workers was used to estimate the impact of three types of barriers to mental health service use among workers with depression. Results: Removing the service need recognition barrier is associated with a 33% decrease in work productivity losses. There is a 49% decrease when all three barriers are removed. Conclusions: Our results suggest recognizing the need for treatment is only one barrier to service use; attitudinal and structural barriers should also be considered. The greatest decrease in productivity losses is observed with the removal of all three barriers. PMID:26147540

  4. The contribution of working conditions and social support to the onset of depressive and anxiety disorders among male and female employees.

    PubMed

    Plaisier, Inger; de Bruijn, Jeanne G M; de Graaf, Ron; ten Have, Margreet; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2007-01-01

    Poor working conditions may be an important source of stress and may therefore contribute to the development of depressive and anxiety disorders. Social support may act as a buffer and protect against the development of depression or anxiety in the face of poor working conditions. With longitudinal data from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS), the effect of working conditions and social support on the incidence of depressive and anxiety disorders was examined among 2646 working men and women, aged 18 through 65 years. Three dimensions of self reported working conditions were assessed: psychological demands, decision latitude and job security. Social support was assessed through validated scales for daily emotional support. About 10.5% of working women and 4.6% among working men developed an incident depressive and/or anxiety disorder over 2 years. Psychological demands predicted the incidence of depressive and anxiety disorders in both men and women (RR per score increase=2.29, 95% CI: 1.44-3.63), whereas decision latitude and job security did not. Social support protected against the incidence of depressive and anxiety disorders. This effect was stronger for men compared to women. Social support did not buffer the unfavorable mental effect of working conditions. Women were more likely to report low levels of decision latitude, whereas men reported higher psychological demands. Working conditions did not explain sex differences in the incidence of depressive and anxiety disorders.

  5. Mental health treatment associated with community-based depression screening: considerations for planning multidisciplinary collaborative care.

    PubMed

    Winchester, Bruce R; Watkins, Sarah C; Brahm, Nancy C; Harrison, Donald L; Miller, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Depression places a large economic burden on the US health care system. Routine screening has been recognized as a fundamental step in the effective treatment of depression, but should be undertaken only when support systems are available to ensure proper diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. To estimate differences in prescribing new antidepressants and referral to stress management, psychotherapy, and other mental health (OMH) counseling at physician visits when documented depression screening was and was not performed. Cross-sectional physician visit data for adults from the 2005-2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were used. The final analytical sample included 55,143 visits, representing a national population estimate of 1,741,080,686 physician visits. Four dependent variables were considered: (1) order for new antidepressant(s), and referral to (2) stress management, (3) psycho therapy, or (4) OMH counseling. Bivariable and multivariable associations between depression screening and each measure of depression follow-up care were evaluated using the design-based F statistic and multivariable logistic regression models. New antidepressant prescribing increased significantly (2.12% of visits without depression screening vs 10.61% with depression screening resulted in a new prescription of an antidepressant). Referral to stress management was the behavioral treatment with the greatest absolute change (3.31% of visits without depression screening vs 33.10% of visits with depression screening resulted in a referral to stress management). After controlling for background sociodemographic characteristics, the adjusted odds ratio of a new antidepressant order remained significantly higher at visits involving depression screening (AOR 5.36; 99.9% CI 2.92-9.82), as did referrals for all behavioral health care services (ie, stress management, psychotherapy, and OMH counseling). At the national level, depression screening was associated with increased new

  6. Community mental health provider reluctance to provide pharmacotherapy may be a barrier to addressing perinatal depression: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Byatt, Nancy; Biebel, Kathleen; Debordes-Jackson, Gifty; Lundquist, Rebecca S; Moore Simas, Tiffany A; Weinreb, Linda; Ziedonis, Douglas

    2013-06-01

    This is the first study evaluating obstetrics and gynecology (OB/Gyn) provider and staff perceptions of barriers to accessing pharmacotherapy for perinatal depression outside the obstetric setting. Four, 90 min focus groups were conducted with OB/Gyn physicians, advance practice nurses, and support and nursing staff (n = 28). Data were analyzed with a grounded theory approach. Participants perceived that community mental health providers and pharmacists often do not want to participate in pharmacotherapy for perinatal women. Participants believed the solution is training for community mental health providers in the risks and benefits of pharmacotherapy for perinatal depression and improved communication between OB/Gyn's and community mental health providers. Community mental health provider and pharmacist reluctance to provide pharmacotherapy hinders OB/Gyn's perceived ability to address perinatal depression. Community mental health provider and pharmacist training are needed to mitigate precipitous discontinuation of treatment and to improve access to pharmacotherapy for perinatal women.

  7. Adequacy of Mental Health Services for HIV-Positive Patients with Depression: Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Stephanie K. Y.; Boyle, Eleanor; Cairney, John; Gardner, Sandra; Collins, Evan J.; Bacon, Jean; Rourke, Sean B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Major depression can profoundly impact clinical and quality-of-life outcomes of people living with HIV, and this disease is underdiagnosed and undertreated in many HIV-positive individuals. Here, we describe the prevalence of publicly funded primary and secondary mental health service use and antidepressant use, as well as mental health care for depression in accordance with existing Canadian guidelines for HIV-positive patients with depression in Ontario, Canada. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study linking data from the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study with administrative health databases in the province of Ontario, Canada. Current depression was assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Depression Scale or the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. Multivariable regressions were used to characterize prevalence outcomes. Results Of 990 HIV-positive patients with depression, 493 (50%) patients used mental health services; 182 (18%) used primary services (general practitioners); 176 (18%) used secondary services (psychiatrists); and 135 (14%) used both. Antidepressants were used by 407 (39%) patients. Patients who identified as gay, lesbian, or bisexual, as having low income or educational attainment, or as non-native English speakers or immigrants to Canada were less likely to obtain care. Of 493 patients using mental health services, 250 (51%) received mental health care for depression in accordance with existing Canadian guidelines. Conclusions Our results showed gaps in delivering publicly funded mental health services to depressed HIV-positive patients and identified unequal access to these services, particularly among vulnerable groups. More effective mental health policies and better access to mental health services are required to address HIV-positive patient needs and reduce depression’s impact on their lives. PMID:27280751

  8. Nervous Facilitation in Cardiodynamic Response of Exercising Athletes to Superimposed Mental Tasks: Implications in Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tocco, Filippo; Crisafulli, Antonio; Milia, Raffaele; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Mura, Roberto; Roberto, Silvana; Todde, Francesco; Concu, Daniele; Melis, Salvatore; Velluzzi, Fernanda; Loviselli, Andrea; Concu, Alberto; Melis, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Motor commands to perform exercise tasks may also induce activation of cardiovascular centres to supply the energy needs of the contracting muscles. Mental stressors per se may also influence cardiovascular homeostasis. We investigated the cardiovascular response of trained runners simultaneously engaged in mental and physical tasks to establish if aerobically trained subjects could develop, differently from untrained ones, nervous facilitation in the brain cardiovascular centre. Methods : Cardiovascular responses of 8 male middle-distance runners (MDR), simultaneously engaged in mental (colour-word interference test) and physical (cycle ergometer exercise) tasks, were compared with those of 8 untrained subjects. Heart rate, cardiac (CI) and stroke indexes were assessed by impedance cardiography while arterial blood pressures were assessed with a brachial sphygmomanometer. Results : Only in MDR simultaneous engagement in mental and physical tasks induced a significant CI increase which was higher (p<0.05) than that obtained on summing CI values from each task separately performed. Conclusion : Aerobic training, when performed together with a mental effort, induced a CI oversupply which allowed a redundant oxygen delivery to satisfy a sudden fuel demand from exercising muscles by utilizing aerobic sources of ATP, thus shifting the anaerobic threshold towards a higher work load. From data of this study it may also be indirectly stated that, in patients with major depressive disorder, the promotion of regular low-intensity exercise together with mental engagement could ameliorate the perceived physical quality of life, thus reducing their heart risk associated with physical stress. PMID:26535050

  9. Primary care, depression, and anxiety: exploring somatic and emotional predictors of mental health status in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Ian P; Olson, Ardis L

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of research points to regular, comprehensive mental health screening in primary care practices as an effective tool, but a thorough and efficient approach is not yet widely used. The purpose of this report is to describe the pattern of mental health-related concerns, protective and social risk factors reported by adolescents during routine well-child visits in primary care settings, and their occurrence among teens that screen positive for either depression or anxiety with brief validated measures. A personal digital assistant-based questionnaire was administered as part of clinical care to adolescents 11 to 18 years old (N = 2184) attending preventive well-child visits in 13 pediatric and family medicine primary care practices in a northern New England practice-based research network over 18 months (2008 to 2009). Depressive and anxiety-related symptoms were assessed using the 2-question versions of the Patient Health Questionnaire and Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale, respectively. Analyses determined the role that the protective and social risk factors played in determining who screens positive for depression and anxiety. In the fully adjusted model, risk factors that were significant (P < .05) predictors for a positive screen of depression included substance use (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.05); stress (AOR, 3.59); anger (AOR, 1.94); and worries about family alcohol and drug use (AOR, 2.69). Among protective factors, that is, those that reduce the risk of depression, age (AOR, 0.87 for younger patients); having parents who listen (AOR, 0.34); and having more assets (AOR, 0.65) were significant. Significant predictors of screening positive for anxiety included substance use (AOR, 1.97); stress (AOR, 6.10); anger (AOR, 2.31); trouble sleeping (AOR, 1.75), and the sex of the adolescent (AOR, 1.87 for girls). Although having parents who listen was still a significant protective factor for anxiety (AOR, 2.26), other assets were not significant

  10. Cannabis use and mental health-related quality of life among individuals with depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Aspis, Itay; Feingold, Daniel; Weiser, Mark; Rehm, Jurgen; Shoval, Gal; Lev-Ran, Shaul

    2015-12-15

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit substance among individuals with depressive disorders. This study aimed to evaluate whether among individuals with depressive disorders, higher frequency of cannabis use would be associated with poorer Quality of Life (QoL), based on a large nationally representative US sample. Individuals with depressive disorders (N=3416) were divided into categories according to no use (N=3096), occasional use (less than weekly, N=176) and regular (at least weekly, N=144) use of cannabis in the past 12 months. QoL was assessed using the Short-Form 12 (SF-12) questionnaire. Women who used cannabis regularly had a significantly lower SF-12 Mental Component Summary score (MCS) compared to non-users, with a mean difference of 0.4 Standard Deviations (SDs). Comparison of subscale scores showed no significant differences. No significant difference was noted when comparing women who used cannabis occasionally to non-users. No differences were found among men when comparing MCS and mental subscale scores of both regular and occasional users to non-users. Our findings highlight the importance of taking gender and the frequency of cannabis use into account, when assessing functional and emotional aspects of cannabis use among individuals with depressive disorders.

  11. Depression, a Hidden Mental Health Disparity in an Asian Indian Immigrant Community

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Lisa R.; Mann, Semran K.; Montgomery, Susanne B.

    2015-01-01

    Cultural influences are deeply rooted, and continue to affect the lives of Asian-Indian (AI) immigrants living in Western culture. Emerging literature suggests the powerful nature of traditions and culture on the lives, mental and physical health of AI immigrants, particularly women. The purpose of this study was to explore depression among AI women in Central California (CC). This mixed-methods research was conducted in collaboration with the CC Punjabi community and the support of local religious leaders. All interviews were conducted in Punjabi and English. Whenever possible we utilized validated scales aligned with emerging themes from the qualitative data, which also provided contextualization to survey responses. In all we conducted 11 key informant interviews, four focus groups (n = 47) and a rigorously developed anonymous survey (n = 350). Social dynamics and traditional expectations including gendered roles significantly affected mental health among women participants. Subgroups along the lines of language choice (Punjabi vs. English) experience and report depression differently in part due to the highly stigmatized nature of mental health issues in this model minority community. The findings of this study highlight the importance of utilizing mixed methods to access hard to reach populations regarding sensitive topics such as mental health. PMID:26703654

  12. Depression, a Hidden Mental Health Disparity in an Asian Indian Immigrant Community.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lisa R; Mann, Semran K; Montgomery, Susanne B

    2015-12-23

    Cultural influences are deeply rooted, and continue to affect the lives of Asian-Indian (AI) immigrants living in Western culture. Emerging literature suggests the powerful nature of traditions and culture on the lives, mental and physical health of AI immigrants, particularly women. The purpose of this study was to explore depression among AI women in Central California (CC). This mixed-methods research was conducted in collaboration with the CC Punjabi community and the support of local religious leaders. All interviews were conducted in Punjabi and English. Whenever possible we utilized validated scales aligned with emerging themes from the qualitative data, which also provided contextualization to survey responses. In all we conducted 11 key informant interviews, four focus groups (n = 47) and a rigorously developed anonymous survey (n = 350). Social dynamics and traditional expectations including gendered roles significantly affected mental health among women participants. Subgroups along the lines of language choice (Punjabi vs. English) experience and report depression differently in part due to the highly stigmatized nature of mental health issues in this model minority community. The findings of this study highlight the importance of utilizing mixed methods to access hard to reach populations regarding sensitive topics such as mental health.

  13. Success/failure condition influences attribution of control, negative affect, and shame among patients with depression in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Si-Ning; Zainal, Hani; Tang, Catherine S; Tong, Eddie M; Ho, Cyrus S; Ho, Roger C

    2017-08-02

    There remains a paucity of research on control attribution and depression within Asian populations. This study examines: (1) Success/Failure condition as a moderator between depression and negative affect or shame, and (2) differences in control attribution between patients with depression and healthy controls in Singapore. Seventy one patients with depression and 71 healthy controls went through a digit-span memory task where they were randomized into either the Success or Failure condition. Participants in the Success condition had to memorize and recall 5-digit strings, while participants in the Failure condition did the same for 12-digit strings. They then completed self-report measures of negative affect, shame, and attribution of control. One-way ANCOVA was performed to examine task condition as a moderator of association between mental health status and post-task negative affect or shame. Test of simple effects was carried out on significant interactions. Sign test and Mann-Whitney U test were employed to investigate differences in attribution of control. Mental health status and Success/Failure condition had significant effects on reported negative affect and shame. Healthy controls reported less post-task negative affect and shame in the Success than in the Failure condition while patients with depression reported similar levels of post-task negative affect and shame in both conditions. However, these differences were not significant in the test of simple effects. In addition, healthy controls felt a stronger sense of personal control in success than in failure and were more likely to blame external factors in failure than in success. Conversely, patients with depression were more inclined to credit external factors in success than in failure and ascribed greater personal control in failure than in success. The results suggest that successful conditions may not necessitate the reduction of negative affect in Asians with depression, indicating possible

  14. The Burden of Mental Illness Among Veterans: Use of VHA Health Care Services by Those With Service-connected Conditions.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Charles; Batten, Adam; Liu, Chuan-Fen; Nelson, Karin; Fihn, Stephan D

    2017-09-19

    Little is known about how Veterans with service-connected conditions use health care provided by the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). To ascertain what proportion of Veterans with service-connected conditions used VHA health care and whether it varied according to type of condition, combined disability rating, age, sex, military rank, or other characteristics and whether there were differences in receipt of inpatient and outpatient care. Cross-sectional analysis of administrative benefits and claims data for 2015 and 2016. In total, 4,029,672 Veterans who had an active award status for service-connected conditions in October 2016. Independent variables included age, sex, military rank, service branch, combined disability rating, Agent Orange exposure, and type of service-connected condition. The key-dependent variable was VHA health care use including specific types of health care utilization such as inpatient and outpatient services. In total, 52% of those with service-connected conditions used VHA health care. Type of condition and disability rating were associated with use. Over 65% of those with major depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), Agent Orange exposure, or diabetes used VHA health care, as did 76% of those with a 100% rating. Almost one third of users of VHA health care were compensated for PTSD. In general, both inpatient and outpatient mental health services were frequently used by Veterans with service-connected mental health conditions. Veterans with service-connected conditions, particularly those with diabetes or mental illness such as depression or PTSD, depend heavily upon VHA for health care, including mental health services.

  15. The Impact of Group-as-a-Whole Work on Anxiety and Depression in a Severely Mentally Ill Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semmelhack, Diana J.; Hazell, Clive; Hoffman, William

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the impact of a group-as-a-whole processing group on 11 severely mentally ill adult clients residing in a long term care facility over 30 weeks. Participants were evaluated for the effect of the group on anxiety and depression, using the Beck Depression Index (BDI-II) and the Beck Anxiety Index (BAI). This longitudinal study…

  16. Mental Health and Migration: Depression, Alcohol Abuse, and Access to Health Care among Migrants in Central Asia

    PubMed Central

    Ismayilova, Leyla; Lee, Hae Nim; Shaw, Stacey; El-Bassel, Nabila; Gilbert, Louisa; Terlikbayeva, Assel; Rozental, Yelena

    2014-01-01

    Background One fifth of Kazakhstan’s population is labor migrants working in poor conditions with limited legal rights. This paper examines self-rated health, mental health and access to health care among migrant workers. Methods Using geo-mapping, a random sample of internal and external migrant market workers was selected in Almaty (N=450). We used survey logistic regression adjusted for clustering of workers within stalls. Results Almost half of participants described their health as fair or poor and reported not seeing a doctor when needed, 6.2% had clinical depression and 8.7% met criteria for alcohol abuse. Female external migrants were at higher risk for poor health and underutilization of health services. High mobility was associated with depression among internal migrants and with alcohol abuse among female migrant workers. Conclusions This study demonstrates the urgent need to address health and mental health needs and improve access to health care among labor migrants in Central Asia. PMID:24186359

  17. Primary Care Patients with Depression Are Less Accepting of Treatment Than Those Seen by Mental Health Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Van Voorhees, Benjamin W; Cooper, Lisa A; Rost, Kathryn M; Nutting, Paul; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Meredith, Lisa; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Ford, Daniel E

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study examined whether depressed patients treated exclusively in primary care report less need for care and less acceptability of treatment options than those depressed patients treated in the specialty mental health setting after up to 6 months of treatment. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING Forty-five community primary care practices. PARTICIPANTS A total of 881 persons with major depression who had received mental health services in the previous 6 months and who enrolled in 3 of the 4 Quality Improvement for Depression Collaboration Studies. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS Patients were categorized into 1 of 2 groups: 1) having received mental health services exclusively from a primary care provider (45%), or 2) having received any services from a mental health specialist (55%) in the previous 6 months. Compared with patients who received care from mental health specialists, patients who received mental health services exclusively from primary care providers had 2.7-fold the odds (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6 to 4.4) of reporting that no treatment was definitely acceptable and had 2.4-fold the odds (95% CI, 1.5 to 3.9) of reporting that evidence-based treatment options (antidepressant medication) were definitely not acceptable. These results were adjusted for demographic, social/behavioral, depression severity, and economic factors using multiple logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS Patients with depression treated exclusively by primary care providers have attitudes and beliefs more averse to care than those seen by mental health specialists. These differences in attitudes and beliefs may contribute to lower quality depression care observed in comparisons of primary care and specialty mental health providers. PMID:14687257

  18. Factors influencing the underutilization of mental health services among Asian American women with a history of depression and suicide.

    PubMed

    Augsberger, Astraea; Yeung, Albert; Dougher, Meaghan; Hahm, Hyeouk Chris

    2015-12-08

    Despite the substantially high prevalence of depression, suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among Asian American women who are children of immigrants, little is known about the prevalence of mental health utilization and the perceived barriers to accessing care. The data were from the Asian American Women's Sexual Health Initiative Project (AWSHIP), a 5-year mixed methods study at Boston University. The quantitative analysis examined the differential proportion of mental health utilization among 701 survey participants based on their mental health risk profile determined by current moderate to severe depression symptoms and lifetime history of suicidality. Mental health risk groups were created based on participants' current depression symptoms and history of suicide behaviors: Group 1-low-risk; Group 2-medium-risk; Group 3-high-risk. Mental health care utilization outcomes were measured by any mental health care, minimally adequate mental health care, and intensive mental health care. The qualitative analysis explored the perceived barriers to mental health care among 17 participants from the medium and high-risk groups. Among 701 participants, 43% of women (n = 299) reported that they either suffered from current moderate to severe depression symptoms or a lifetime history of suicidal ideation or suicide attempt. Although the high-risk group demonstrated statistically significant higher mental health utilization compared to the low and medium-risk groups, more than 60% of the high-risk group did not access any mental health care, and more than 80% did not receive minimally adequate care. The qualitative analysis identified three underutilization factors: Asian family contributions to mental health stigma, Asian community contributions to mental health stigma, and a mismatch between cultural needs and available services. Despite the high prevalence of depression and suicidal behaviors among young Asian American women in the sample, the proportion of mental

  19. Cognitive behaviour therapy for older adults experiencing insomnia and depression in a community mental health setting: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Paul; McLaren, Suzanne; Klein, Britt; Jenkins, Megan; Harvey, Jack

    2015-11-27

    Cognitive behaviour therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is a well-established treatment; however, the evidence is largely limited to homogenous samples. Although emerging research has indicated that CBT-I is also effective for comorbid insomnia, CBT-I has not been tested among a complex sample of older adults with comorbid insomnia and depression. Furthermore, no study has explored whether modifying CBT-I to target associated depressive symptoms could potentially enhance sleep and mood outcomes. Therefore, this study aims to report a protocol designed to test whether an advanced form of CBT for insomnia and depression (CBT-I-D) is more effective at reducing insomnia and depressive symptoms compared to a standard CBT-I and psychoeducation control group (PCG) for older adults in a community mental health setting. We aim to recruit 150 older adults with comorbid insomnia who have presented to community mental health services for depression. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated via block/cluster randomisation to one of three group therapy conditions: CBT-I, CBT-I-D, or PCG. Participants who receive CBT-I will only practice strategies designed to improve their sleep, whereas participants who receive CBT-I-D will practice additional strategies designed to also improve their mood. This trial will implement a mixed-methods design involving quantitative outcome measures and qualitative focus groups. The primary outcome measures are insomnia and depression severity, and secondary outcomes are anxiety, hopelessness, beliefs about sleep, comorbid sleep conditions, and health. Outcomes will be assessed at pre-intervention (week 0), post-intervention (week 8), and 3-month follow-up (week 20). This CBT study protocol has been designed to address comorbid insomnia and depression for older adults receiving community mental health services. The proposed trial will determine whether CBT-I is more effective for older adults with comorbid insomnia and depression compared to a PCG

  20. Perceptions of the impact of depression and anxiety and the medication for these conditions on safety in the workplace

    PubMed Central

    Haslam, C; Atkinson, S; Brown, S; Haslam, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: The number of people taking prescribed medication for anxiety and depression has increased greatly, but little is known of how this medication impacts on safety at work. Aims: To examine the relation between anxiety and depression, prescribed medication, performance, and safety in the workplace. Methods: The research involved nine focus groups with sufferers of anxiety and depression to investigate experiences of mental health problems and the impact of psychotropic drugs. A further three focus groups were conducted with staff in human resources, personnel, occupational health, and health and safety departments, to explore organisational perspectives. The sample comprised 74 individuals drawn from a wide range of occupational sectors. Finally, the results were presented to a panel of experts from occupational medicine, general practice, psychology, health and safety, and psychiatry, to consider the implications for practice. Results: Workers reported that both the symptoms and the medication impaired work performance. Participants described accidents which they attributed to their condition or to the medication. Workers with responsibilities for others, such as teachers, healthcare workers, and managers appeared to present a particular safety risk. Healthcare workers believed that they placed themselves and their patients at risk when carrying out medical procedures. Conclusions: Respondents in this study felt that their symptoms of anxiety and depression and the medication they took to treat these conditions placed them at risk with respect to safety in the workplace. Drawing on the results, the authors outline areas for improvement in the management of mental health problems at work. PMID:16046606

  1. Psychosocial conditions on and off the job and psychological ill health: depressive symptoms, impaired psychological wellbeing, heavy consumption of alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Michelsen, H; Bildt, C

    2003-01-01

    Background: Psychiatric epidemiology has revealed a number of associations between gender, socioeconomic status, and psychiatric disorders. Aims: To examine psychosocial conditions on and off the job in relation to psychological ill health. Methods: Longitudinal design with 24 year follow up of employed persons (190 women, 177 men). Interview and questionnaire data on work and leisure conditions were collected in 1969 and 1993. Risk analyses were performed in relation to three outcomes in 1993: depression within the preceding 12 months, impaired psychological wellbeing, and heavy alcohol use. Results: Thirteen per cent of the women and 11% of the men showed symptoms of depression, 21% and 22% had impaired psychological wellbeing, and 7% and 15% respectively were heavy alcohol users. Dissatisfaction with the quality (women) or quantity (men) of social contacts 24 years earlier was a significant risk factor for depression. Dissatisfaction with the quality of social contacts was also associated with impaired psychological wellbeing (among women), and dissatisfaction with leisure time activities was associated with heavy alcohol use (among men). Frequent overtime work 24 years earlier was associated with heavy alcohol use among women. Cross sectional analyses also showed associations between psychological ill health and some work related factors (mentally demanding work and lack of job pride). Conclusions: Perceived inadequacies in social contacts, and practical obstacles to social relationships are viewed as risk factors for depression. In this longitudinal study, work related factors, including mental demands and time pressure, do not appear sufficiently associated with psychological ill health. PMID:12819282

  2. Prevalence of depression and its associated factors among primary caregivers of patients with severe mental illness in southwest, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Derajew, Habtamu; Tolessa, Daniel; Feyissa, Garumma Tolu; Addisu, Fikir; Soboka, Matiwos

    2017-03-09

    Depression is a serious mental illness that affects patients' treatment outcome and caregiver's day to day life. The prevalence of depression among caregivers of patients with severe mental illness is greater than the general population. Little is known about depression among primary caregivers of patients with severe mental illness in Ethiopia. This study is aimed at assessing prevalence of depression and associated factors among primary caregivers of patients with mental illness. A cross-sectional study was conducted among primary caregivers of patients with severe mental illness in Jimma University Teaching Hospital. Patient health questionnaire (PHQ-9) was used to assess depression. A multidimensional scale of perceived social support (MSPSS) was used to assess perceived social support; Cut down, Annoyed, Guilty, Eye opener (CAGE) scale was used to assess alcohol use disorder. After conducting descriptive analyses, logistic regression analysis was finally used for bivariate and multivariable analysis. The overall prevalence of depression among primary caregivers of patients with mental illness was 12 (19%). Out of those caregivers with depressions, 11.3, 3.5 and 4.2% had moderate, moderately severe and severe types of depression respectively. The prevalence of depression among female primary caregivers was 25% (n = 40). Being single (aOR 2.62, 95% CI = 1.07, 6.41), giving care more than six hours per day (aOR 3.75, 95% CI = 1.51, 9.33) and caring for a patient who had more than once episodes of suicidal attempts (aOR 1.48, 95% CI = 1.07, 3.42) were positively associated with depression among caregivers of patients with mental illness. We found that the prevalence of depression among primary caregivers was high. Depression among caregivers was associated with giving care more than six hours per day and caring for a patient who had two or more episodes of suicidal attempts. The prevalence of depression among female caregivers was higher than that

  3. Comparison of depression, anxiety, quality of life, vitality and mental health between premenopausal and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Jafari, F; Hadizadeh, M H; Zabihi, R; Ganji, K

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate and compare the rates of depression, anxiety, quality of life, vitality and mental health between premenopausal and postmenopausal women. The sample included 218 women selected randomly from the cultural center of Tehran in November and December 2013 and was divided into two groups. The first group included 110 postmenopausal women (45-55 years old). One year had passed since their last monthly period and they had not used any hormones. The second group included 108 premenopausal women (35-45 years old) who had not yet experienced menopause. In order to assess data, three tests were used: the Zung Anxiety Self-Report scale, the Beck Depression Inventory and the Quality of Life questionnaire (SF-36). The gathered data were analyzed with the T-test for independent groups. The results indicated that all five hypotheses were confirmed. There were significant differences between the scores of anxiety, depression, quality of life, vitality and mental health between the two groups. Since menopausal women spend almost one-third of their long life in this situation, it can be useful to recognize the causes of these disorders in women and their influences on their families. We can also increase their motivation and self-efficacy in order to improve their quality of life.

  4. Neurocognitive impairment of mental rotation in major depressive disorder: evidence from event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiu; Ma, Wentao; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Lai-Qi; Zhang, Zhijun; Wu, Xingqu; Deng, Zihe

    2014-08-01

    Mental rotation performance may be used as an index of mental slowing or bradyphrenia and may reflect speed of motor preparation. Previous studies suggest that major depressive disorder (MDD) presents correlates of impaired behavioral performance for mental rotation and psychomotor disturbance. Very little is known about the electrophysiological mechanism underlying this deficit. The present study was the first to investigate the event-related brain potential (ERP) correlates of mental rotation and their mental slowing or bradyphrenia in MDD. ERPs were recorded while we tested 25 MDD patients and 26 healthy controls by evaluating the performance of MDD patients on hand and letter rotation tasks at different orientations, and their 400-to-600-msec time window was measured and analyzed for latencies and peak amplitudes over the electrodes. First, individuals with MDD were slower and made more errors in mentally rotating hands and letters than healthy controls did, and individuals with MDD exhibited a greater difference in response times and errors than controls did between hands and letters. Second, the mean peak amplitude was significantly lower and the mean latency was significantly longer in the 400-to-600-msec time window at the parietal site in the hand tasks in MDD patients than in controls, but this was not seen in the letter task, with only lower mean peak amplitude. MDD patients present the absence of a typical mental rotation function for the amplitude of the rotation-related negativity in the hand and letter tasks. Third, the scalp activity maps in MDD patients exhibited the absence of activation in the left parietal site for the mental rotation of hands, as shown in healthy participants. In contrast, their brain activation for the letter task was similar to those of healthy participants. These data suggest that mental imagery of hands and letters relies on different cognitive and neural mechanisms and indicate that the left posterior parietal lobe is a

  5. Depression in Taiwanese patients with Alzheimer's disease determined by the National Institutes of Mental Health Provisional Criteria.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Pai-Yi; Steffens, David; Chen, Ping-Kun; Hsu, Ya-Chen; Huang, Hsiu-Tzu; Lai, Te-Jen

    2012-08-01

    Depression is a common behavioral and psychological symptom of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aims of the present study were to determine the rate of depression in Taiwanese patients with AD using the National Institutes of Mental Health Provisional Criteria for Depression in AD (NIMH-dAD criteria) and to investigate the association of depression with other behavioral and psychological symptoms. A consecutive series of 302 AD patients registered in a dementia clinic were investigated in this study. All patients met the criteria of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke-Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association for probable AD. The rates of depression were determined according to the criteria of the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders for major depression (DSM-IV), the International Classification of Diseases-9-Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) for neurotic depression, the depression subscale of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), and the NIMH-dAD criteria. Depression severity was assessed using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. The rates of depression determined by the NIMH-dAD criteria were compared with the rates derived from each of the other instruments. Other behavioral and psychological symptoms were assessed using NPI. A behavioral neurologist or a geriatric psychiatrist interviewed all the patients. Using the NIMH-dAD criteria, it was found that 90 (29.8%) of the AD patients had depression, and all depressive symptoms in NIMH-dAD were significantly higher among depressed patients. Among other depression instruments, the frequency of depression was lowest using the DSM-IV major depression criteria (9.3%) and highest with the NPI depression subscale (54%). Behavioral and psychological symptoms determined with NPI were significantly higher among depressed patients in all domains except euphoria. This is the first study of depression in Taiwanese patients with AD using the NIMH

  6. An Innovative Model of Depression Care Delivery: Peer Mentors in Collaboration with a Mental Health Professional to Relieve Depression in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Jin Hui; Hwang, Seungyoung; Abu, Hawa; Gallo, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Traditional mental health services are not used by a majority of older adults with depression, suggesting a need for new methods of health service delivery. We conducted a pilot study using peer mentors to deliver depression care to older adults in collaboration with a mental health professional. We evaluated the acceptability of peer mentors to older adults and examined patient experiences of the intervention. Methods Six peer mentors met 30 patients for 1 hour weekly for 8 weeks. A mental health professional provided an initial clinical evaluation as well as supervision and guidance to peer mentors concurrent with patient meetings. We measured depressive symptoms at baseline and after study completion, and depressive symptoms and working alliance at weekly peer-patient meetings. We also interviewed participants and peer mentors to assess their experiences of the intervention. Results Ninety-six percent of patients attended all eight meetings with the peer mentor and PHQ-9 scores decreased for 85% of patients. Patients formed strong, trusting relationships with peer mentors. Patients emphasized the importance of trust, of developing a strong relationship, and of the credibility and communication skills of the peer mentor. Participants described benefits such as feeling hopeful, and reported changes in attitude, behavior, and insight. Conclusions Use of peer mentors working in collaboration with a mental health professional is promising as a model of depression care delivery for older adults. Testing of effectiveness is needed and processes of recruitment, role definition, and supervision should be further developed. PMID:27066731

  7. [Regular physical activity and mental health. The role of exercise in the prevention of, and intervention in depressive disorders].

    PubMed

    Takács, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    In our review we examine the relationship between physical activity and mental health; especially we determine the effectiveness of exercise in the prevention and treatment of depression. Over the past two decades the literature in the area of physical activity and mental health has been growing. However it seems that the findings and evidences not being utilized by mental health agencies and health practitioners. Depression is the most common disorder in the world, generally has a higher prevalence among women. In our study we overview and demonstrate that the exercise is a powerful intervention for prevention and treatment not only in non-clinical but also in clinical levels of depression. In sub-clinical levels of depression the meta-analytic findings and population surveys suggest that the exercise is associated with a significant moderate reduction of depression in different groups by gender and age; as well as a physically active lifestyle associates with lower levels of depression. In clinical levels of depression the physical activity is an effective tool in the prevention, studies support an association between higher levels of physical activity and lower levels of depression. In the treatment of clinical depression the randomized-controlled trials suggest the clear positive effects of exercise. This effect is similar to psychotherapeutic interventions and it was appeared under relatively short time (4-8 weeks). The exercise is one of the most important preventive health-related behaviors. Our review suggests a protective effect from activity on the development of clinical levels of depression and depressive symptoms. In addition the randomized controlled trials support a causal connection between exercise and reduction of depression. In sum the reviewed studies clearly support the antidepressant effect of exercise.

  8. Association Between Chronic Physical Conditions and the Effectiveness of Collaborative Care for Depression: An Individual Participant Data Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Panagioti, Maria; Bower, Peter; Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Lovell, Karina; Gilbody, Simon; Waheed, Waquas; Dickens, Chris; Archer, Janine; Simon, Gregory; Ell, Kathleen; Huffman, Jeff C; Richards, David A; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina; Adler, David A; Bruce, Martha; Buszewicz, Marta; Cole, Martin G; Davidson, Karina W; de Jonge, Peter; Gensichen, Jochen; Huijbregts, Klaas; Menchetti, Marco; Patel, Vikram; Rollman, Bruce; Shaffer, Jonathan; Zijlstra-Vlasveld, Moniek C; Coventry, Peter A

    2016-09-01

    Collaborative care is an intensive care model involving several health care professionals working together, typically a physician, a case manager, and a mental health professional. Meta-analyses of aggregate data have shown that collaborative care is particularly effective in people with depression and comorbid chronic physical conditions. However, only participant-level analyses can rigorously test whether the treatment effect is influenced by participant characteristics, such as chronic physical conditions. To assess whether the effectiveness of collaborative care for depression is moderated by the presence, type, and number of chronic physical conditions. Data were obtained from MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL Complete, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and references from relevant systematic reviews. The search and collection of eligible studies was ongoing until May 22, 2015. This was an update to a previous meta-analysis. Two independent reviewers were involved in the study selection process. Randomized clinical trials that compared the effectiveness of collaborative care with usual care in adults with depression and reported measured changes in depression severity symptoms at 4 to 6 months after randomization were included in the analysis. Key search terms included depression, dysthymia, anxiety, panic, phobia, obsession, compulsion, posttraumatic, care management, case management, collaborative care, enhanced care, and managed care. Individual participant data on baseline demographics and chronic physical conditions as well as baseline and follow-up depression severity symptoms were requested from authors of the eligible studies. One-step meta-analysis of individual participant data using appropriate mixed-effects models was performed. Continuous outcomes of depression severity symptoms measured using self-reported or observer-rated measures. Data sets from 31 randomized clinical trials including 36 independent comparisons (N

  9. Racial/ethnic disparities, social support, and depression: examining a social determinant of mental health.

    PubMed

    Shim, Ruth S; Ye, Jiali; Baltrus, Peter; Fry-Johnson, Yvonne; Daniels, Elvan; Rust, George

    2012-01-01

    We examined the risk of depression as it relates to social support among individuals from African American, Caribbean black, and non-Hispanic White backgrounds. 6,082 individuals participated in the national survey of American life (NSAL), a nationally representative, psychiatric epidemiological, cross-sectional survey of household populations. The survey is designed to explore racial and ethnic differences in mental disorders. NSAL survey questions were used as a proxy for social support. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the correlates between having a DSM-IV diagnosis of major depressive disorder in the past year, demographic variables, and social support. African American race/ethnicity was associated with decreased odds of depression when compared to non-Hispanic whites, even when controlling for social support variables and demographics (OR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.43-0.60). We found a three-fold increase in risk of depression among individuals who reported feeling "not very close at all" with family members compared to those who reported feeling "very close" to family (OR = 3.35, 95% CI = 1.81-6.19). These findings reinforce previous research documenting the important relationship between social support and depression, and perhaps should lead us to reexamine the individualistic models of treatment that are most evaluated in United States. The lack of evidence-based data on support groups, peer counseling, family therapy, or other social support interventions may reflect a majority-culture bias toward individualism, which belies the extensive body of research on social support deficits as a major risk factor for depression.

  10. Methods for Incorporating Patient Preferences for Treatments of Depression in Community Mental Health Settings.

    PubMed

    Crits-Christoph, Paul; Gallop, Robert; Diehl, Caroline K; Yin, Seohyun; Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly

    2016-06-22

    We developed three methods (rating, ranking, and discrete choice) for identifying patients' preferred depression treatments based on their prioritization of specific treatment attributes (e.g., medication side effects, psychotherapy characteristics) at treatment intake. Community mental health patients with depressive symptoms participated in separate studies of predictive validity (N = 193) and short-term (1-week) stability (N = 40). Patients who received non-preferred initial treatments (based on the choice method) switched treatments significantly more often than those who received preferred initial treatments. Receiving a non-preferred treatment at any point (based on rating and choice methods) was a significant predictor of longer treatment duration. All three methods demonstrated good short-term stability.

  11. Volume and social context of physical activity in association with mental health, anxiety and depression among youth.

    PubMed

    Doré, Isabelle; O'Loughlin, Jennifer L; Beauchamp, Guy; Martineau, Marc; Fournier, Louise

    2016-10-01

    There is growing interest in physical activity (PA) to prevent mental disorders in youth. However, few studies examine the association between PA and mental health. Further, how PA volume and context relate to mental health and mental disorders remains unclear, especially among youth in transition to adulthood. This study examined the cross-sectional associations among PA volume and context, mental health, and symptoms of anxiety and depression in post-secondary students. A total of 1527 post-secondary students (97.4% were age 16-24years) recruited in a CEGEP in Quebec, Canada completed a self-report questionnaire during class-time in October 2013. Multivariate linear regression was used to model the associations between PA volume and context and mental health, anxiety and depression controlling for sex, age and perceived socioeconomic status. Volume of moderate-to-vigorous leisure time PA (MVPA) was positively associated with mental health (β (95% CI)=0.072 (0.045, 0.099)) and inversely associated with symptoms of anxiety (-0.011 (-0.020, -0.001)) and depression (-0.010 (-0.017, -0.003)). Volume including all PA intensities was associated with mental health (0.052 (0.028, 0.076)). After controlling for PA volume, active youth involved in team sports had better mental health than those who engaged in PA individually. PA volume and the social context of PA are independently associated with mental health among youth. MVPA is inversely associated with anxiety and depressive symptoms.

  12. A Review of Energy Drinks and Mental Health, with a Focus on Stress, Anxiety, and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Concerns have been expressed regarding the potential for caffeinated energy drinks to negatively affect mental health, and particularly so in young consumers at whom they are often targeted. The products are frequently marketed with declarations of increasing mental and physical energy, providing a short-term boost to mood and performance. Although a certain amount of evidence has accumulated to substantiate some of these claims, the chronic effects of energy drinks on mental health also need to be addressed. Methods: To review the relevant literature, PubMed and PsycINFO were searched for all peer-reviewed articles published in English that addressed associations between energy drink use and mental health outcomes. Case reports were also considered, though empirical studies investigating acute mood effects were excluded as a review of such articles had recently been published. Fifty-six articles were retrieved: 20 of these (along with eight more identified through other means) were included in the current review, and, because the majority addressed aspects of stress, anxiety, and depression, particular focus was placed on these outcomes. Results: Though a number of null findings (and one negative relationship) were observed, the majority of studies examined reported positive associations between energy drink consumption and symptoms of mental health problems. Conclusions: Though the findings imply that energy drink use may increase the risk of undesirable mental health outcomes, the majority of research examined utilized cross-sectional designs. In most cases, it was therefore not possible to determine causation or direction of effect. For this reason, longitudinal and intervention studies are required to increase our understanding of the nature of the relationships observed. PMID:27274415

  13. A Review of Energy Drinks and Mental Health, with a Focus on Stress, Anxiety, and Depression.

    PubMed

    Richards, Gareth; Smith, Andrew P

    2016-06-01

    Background: Concerns have been expressed regarding the potential for caffeinated energy drinks to negatively affect mental health, and particularly so in young consumers at whom they are often targeted. The products are frequently marketed with declarations of increasing mental and physical energy, providing a short-term boost to mood and performance. Although a certain amount of evidence has accumulated to substantiate some of these claims, the chronic effects of energy drinks on mental health also need to be addressed. Methods: To review the relevant literature, PubMed and PsycINFO were searched for all peer-reviewed articles published in English that addressed associations between energy drink use and mental health outcomes. Case reports were also considered, though empirical studies investigating acute mood effects were excluded as a review of such articles had recently been published. Fifty-six articles were retrieved: 20 of these (along with eight more identified through other means) were included in the current review, and, because the majority addressed aspects of stress, anxiety, and depression, particular focus was placed on these outcomes. Results: Though a number of null findings (and one negative relationship) were observed, the majority of studies examined reported positive associations between energy drink consumption and symptoms of mental health problems. Conclusions: Though the findings imply that energy drink use may increase the risk of undesirable mental health outcomes, the majority of research examined utilized cross-sectional designs. In most cases, it was therefore not possible to determine causation or direction of effect. For this reason, longitudinal and intervention studies are required to increase our understanding of the nature of the relationships observed.

  14. Predicting depression outcome in mental health treatment: a recursive partitioning analysis.

    PubMed

    Berman, Margit I; Hegel, Mark T

    2014-01-01

    Recursive partitioning was applied to a longitudinal dataset of outpatient mental health clinic patients to identify empirically factors and interactions among factors that best predicted clinical improvement and deterioration in symptoms of depression across treatment. Sixty-two variables drawn from an initial patient survey and from chart review were included as covariates in the analysis, representing nearly all of the demographic, treatment, symptom, diagnostic, and social history information obtained from patients at their initial evaluations. Trees estimated the probability of participants' having depression at their last assessment, improving to a clinically significant degree during treatment, or developing a new onset of significant depressive symptoms during treatment. Initial pain, the presence of anxiety, and a history of multiple types of abuse were risk factors for poorer outcome, even among patients who did not initially have significant depressive symptoms. By examining multiple-related outcomes, we were able to create a series of overlapping models that revealed important predictors across trees. Limitations of the study included the lack of cross-validation of the trees and the exploratory nature of the analysis.

  15. Examining Burnout, Depression, and Self-Compassion in Veterans Affairs Mental Health Staff.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, David M; Rodman, John L; Thuras, Paul D; Shiroma, Paulo R; Lim, Kelvin O

    2017-07-01

    Burnout, a state of emotional exhaustion associated with negative personal and occupational outcomes, is prevalent among healthcare providers. A better understanding of the psychological factors that may be associated with resilience to burnout is essential to develop effective interventions. Self-compassion, which includes kindness toward oneself, recognition of suffering as part of shared human experience, mindfulness, and nonjudgment toward inadequacies and failures, may be one such factor. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between burnout, depression, and self-compassion in Veterans Affairs (VA) mental health staff. Cross-sectional study. VA medical center and affiliated community-based clinics. VA mental health staff. The 19-item Copenhagen Burnout Inventory, the 26-item Self-Compassion Scale, and the Patient Health Questionnaire 2-item depression screen. Demographic information included age, sex, years worked in current position, and number of staff supervised. One hundred and twenty-eight of a potential 379 individuals (33.8%) responded. Clerical support, nursing, social work, psychology, and psychiatry were the major professions represented. Self-compassion was inversely correlated with burnout (r = -0.41, p < 0.001), and inversely correlated with depression (rpb = -0.39, p < 0.001). The inverse relationship between self-compassion and burnout remained significant even after accounting for depressive symptoms and demographic variables in a multiple linear regression model. Of all the variables examined, self-compassion was the strongest predictor of burnout. The results of this study support the hypothesis that self-compassion may be associated with resilience to burnout. Alternatively, decreased self-compassion may be a downstream effect of increased burnout. Prospective, longitudinal studies are needed to determine the directional relationship between these factors, and whether interventions that cultivate self

  16. [Probable Mental Health Disorders Prevalence in Children With Chronic Conditions. Results From the National Mental Health Survey of Colombia 2015].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Ramirez, Sandra; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie; Rodriguez, Maria Nelcy; Rodríguez, Andrea; Rengifo, Henrey

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of chronic conditions is increasing globally and this phenomenon covers pediatric populations. There is a relationship between chronic conditions and mental health problems, which has been insufficiently studied in the case of children. To measure the frequency of problems and mental disorders in the Colombian population between 7 and 11 years, depending on the presence or absence of chronic conditions. The information pertains to the National Survey of Mental Health of Colombia 2015, an observational cross-sectional nationally representative for the group between 7 and 11 years old. Mental problems where measure with the Reporting Questionnaire for Children (RQC), the 12 month prevalence of seven mental disorders were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version parents (DISC-P) and a list of chronic conditions. Univariate and stratification analysis of the data were performed. 41.6% of the children with no chronic conditions, 56.7% of the children with 1 chronic condition and 70.8% in those with 2 or more have at least one RQC symptom; the highest prevalence of mental health symptoms are those with chronic inflammatory lung disease, followed by diabetes mellitus and allergies. The prevalence of one or more mental disorders in children without chronic conditions is 3.1% while those with at least 1 is 13.8%. A higher prevalence of mental disorders in children and its association with chronic conditions justifies further studies that address this issue and develop strategies with multidisciplinary interventions. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. The Depression Screener for Teenagers (DesTeen): a valid instrument for early detection of adolescent depression in mental health care.

    PubMed

    Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin; Krick, Kathrin; Saravo, Barbara; Schulte-Körne, Gerd

    2014-07-01

    Diagnosis of comorbid depressive disorder is challenging, even in mental health care. Screening instruments could be economic tools in indicating depression. For the first time, the current study investigates the validity of the newly developed Depression Screener for Teenagers (DesTeen) and its abbreviated five-item form DesTeen-a in a mental health setting. A total of 88 patients aged 13-16 years were recruited in institutions specialized in child and adolescent psychiatry, psychotherapy or psychosomatic medicine. DSM-IV-TR diagnoses of major depression or dysthymia based on a structured diagnostic interview served as the gold standard for validation. For assessing the criterion validity of the DesTeen and the DesTeen-a, areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were calculated. Specificity and sensitivity were computed for optimal cut-off scores according to the Youden Index. Point prevalence of depression was 27.3%. Diagnostic accuracy of the DesTeen was high (AUC=.94). Using a cut-off score of ≥ 18, sensitivity was .96 and specificity was .86. The DesTeen-a showed no loss in validity (AUC=.94). At a cut-off point of ≥ 6, sensitivity remained excellent (.96), while specificity was slightly lower (.80). The limited representativeness and the small sample size restrict the generalizability of the findings. The DesTeen and its abbreviated version are valid instruments to screen for adolescent depression in mental health care. Since structured interviews to diagnose comorbid mental disorders are rarely applied, the DesTeen and the DesTeen-a can support mental health specialists in making the diagnostic process more efficient, thus facilitating effective treatment planning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mental health service use among those with depression: an exploration using Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Service Use.

    PubMed

    Graham, Annette; Hasking, Penelope; Brooker, Joanne; Clarke, David; Meadows, Graham

    2017-01-15

    Despite positive effects on prognosis, less than half of the people diagnosed with depression access mental health services. Knowledge of what promotes such service use is limited. There is dispute about whether the receipt of mental illness related information encourages or discourages service use among those with depression. Accurate service use models are needed to inform programs designed to facilitate service use by those who would benefit most. We examine the appropriateness of Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Service Use in this context. Data from 451 adults identified through the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing as meeting International Classification of Diseases Ten (ICD-10) criteria for depression were used. Confirmatory factor analysis failed to verify Andersen's model. Thus, an empirically derived service use model was developed using exploratory factor analysis and then structural equation modelling. Mental health need was the strongest predictor of service use and the model suggested the importance of social connectedness in promoting service use. Participants who had received helpful mental illness information were significantly more likely to have accessed mental health services than those who had not. The cross-sectional design and lack of replication preclude definitive conclusions CONCLUSION: Andersen's model is a useful starting point for the exploration of service use among people with depression. It is necessary, however, to develop specific models for this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of Health Literacy on Depressive Symptoms and Mental Health-related: Quality of Life Among Adults with Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lincoln, Alisa; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Cheng, Debbie M; Lloyd-Travaglini, Christine; Caruso, Christine; Saitz, Richard; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Health literacy has been linked to health status in a variety of chronic diseases. However, evidence for a relationship between health literacy and mental health outcomes is sparse. OBJECTIVE We hypothesized that low literacy would be associated with higher addiction severity, higher levels of depressive symptoms, and worse mental health functioning compared with those with higher literacy in adults with alcohol and drug dependence. METHODS The association of literacy with multiple mental health outcomes was assessed using multivariable analyses. Measurement instruments included the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale, the Mental Component Summary scale of the Short Form Health Survey, and the Addiction Severity Index for drug and alcohol addiction. Subjects included 380 adults recruited during detoxification treatment and followed prospectively at 6-month intervals for 2 years. Based on the REALM, subjects were classified as having either low (≤8th grade) or higher (≥9th grade) literacy levels. RESULTS In longitudinal analyses, low literacy was associated with more depressive symptoms. The adjusted mean difference in CES-D scores between low and high literacy levels was 4 (P<.01). Literacy was not significantly associated with mental health-related quality of life or addiction severity. CONCLUSIONS In people with alcohol and drug dependence, low literacy is associated with worse depressive symptoms. The mechanisms underlying the relationship between literacy and mental health outcomes should be explored to inform future intervention efforts. PMID:16881940

  20. Predicting mental conditions based on "history of present illness" in psychiatric notes with deep neural networks.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tung; Kavuluru, Ramakanth

    2017-06-10

    Applications of natural language processing to mental health notes are not common given the sensitive nature of the associated narratives. The CEGS N-GRID 2016 Shared Task in Clinical Natural Language Processing (NLP) changed this scenario by providing the first set of neuropsychiatric notes to participants. This study summarizes our efforts and results in proposing a novel data use case for this dataset as part of the third track in this shared task. We explore the feasibility and effectiveness of predicting a set of common mental conditions a patient has based on the short textual description of patient's history of present illness typically occurring in the beginning of a psychiatric initial evaluation note. We clean and process the 1000 records made available through the N-GRID clinical NLP task into a key-value dictionary and build a dataset of 986 examples for which there is a narrative for history of present illness as well as Yes/No responses with regards to presence of specific mental conditions. We propose two independent deep neural network models: one based on convolutional neural networks (CNN) and another based on recurrent neural networks with hierarchical attention (ReHAN), the latter of which allows for interpretation of model decisions. We conduct experiments to compare these methods to each other and to baselines based on linear models and named entity recognition (NER). Our CNN model with optimized thresholding of output probability estimates achieves best overall mean micro-F score of 63.144% for 11 common mental conditions with statistically significant gains (p<0.05) over all other models. The ReHAN model with interpretable attention mechanism scored 61.904% mean micro-F1 score. Both models' improvements over baseline models (support vector machines and NER) are statistically significant. The ReHAN model additionally aids in interpretation of the results by surfacing important words and sentences that lead to a particular prediction for each

  1. Continuity of Depressive Disorders From Childhood and Adolescence to Adulthood: A Naturalistic Study in Community Mental Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Carballo, Juan J.; Muñoz-Lorenzo, Laura; Blasco-Fontecilla, Hilario; Lopez-Castroman, Jorge; García-Nieto, Rebeca; Dervic, Kanita; Oquendo, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare rates of homotypic continuity of childhood- and adolescent-onset depression into adulthood. Method: This was a naturalistic, prospective cohort study of children and adolescents receiving psychiatric care at all community mental health centers in Madrid, Spain, from January 1986 to December 2007. Data were obtained from a regional registry wherein all psychiatric visits to public mental health centers are recorded. Patients received their first diagnosis of an ICD-10 F32 or F33 depressive disorder between 6 and 17 years of age and were at least 20 years old at the time of their last visit. Subjects whose first diagnosis was in childhood (aged 6–12 years: depressed-child group) and subjects whose first diagnosis was in adolescence (aged 13–17 years: depressed-adolescent group) were compared in terms of demographic characteristics, psychiatric comorbidity, and rates of homotypic continuity in adulthood. Results: Five hundred twenty-eight patients with depressive disorders met inclusion criteria. The depressed-adolescent group had a higher proportion of girls (60.3%) compared to the depressed-child group, but did not differ on other demographic or clinical variables. Most subjects who later received treatment in adult mental health facilities (n = 243; 57.2%; 95% CI, 50.9–57.2) continued to be diagnosed with a depressive disorder. High rates of anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, personality disorders, and psychotic disorders in adulthood were observed among subjects from both groups. The absence of psychiatric comorbidity prior to age 18 years was associated with homotypic continuity of depressive disorder into adulthood. Conclusions: Subjects with adolescent-onset depression and subjects without comorbid psychiatric disorders in youth appear to have a higher level of homotypic continuity into adulthood. Both children and adolescents with depressive disorders are at risk for other psychiatric disorders in adulthood. PMID

  2. Psychological treatments for common mental health problems experienced by informal carers of adults with chronic physical health conditions (Protocol).

    PubMed

    Woodford, Joanne; Farrand, Paul; Richards, David; Llewellyn, David J

    2013-01-31

    Improved life expectancy is resulting in increased outpatient treatment of people with chronic physical health conditions and reliance on the provision of informal care in the community. However, informal care is also associated with increased risk of experiencing common mental health difficulties such as depression and anxiety. Currently there is a lack of evidence-based treatments for such difficulties, resulting in poor health outcomes for both the informal carer and care recipient. Electronic databases will be systemically searched for randomised controlled trials examining the effectiveness of psychological interventions targeted at treating depression or anxiety experienced by informal carers of patients with chronic physical health conditions. Database searches will be supplemented by contact with experts, reference and citation checking and grey literature. Both published and unpublished research in English language will be reviewed with no limitations on year or source. Individual, group and patient-carer dyad focused interventions will be eligible. Primary outcomes of interest will be validated self-report or clinician administered measures of depression or anxiety. If data allows a meta-analysis will examine: (1) the overall effectiveness of psychological interventions in relation to outcomes of depression or anxiety; (2) intervention components associated with effectiveness. This review will provide evidence on the effectiveness of psychological interventions for depression and anxiety experienced by informal carers of patients with chronic physical health conditions. In addition, it will examine intervention components associated with effectiveness. Results will inform the design and development of a psychological intervention for carers of people with chronic physical health conditions experiencing depression and anxiety. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42012003114.

  3. Psychological treatments for common mental health problems experienced by informal carers of adults with chronic physical health conditions (Protocol)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Improved life expectancy is resulting in increased outpatient treatment of people with chronic physical health conditions and reliance on the provision of informal care in the community. However, informal care is also associated with increased risk of experiencing common mental health difficulties such as depression and anxiety. Currently there is a lack of evidence-based treatments for such difficulties, resulting in poor health outcomes for both the informal carer and care recipient. Methods/Design Electronic databases will be systemically searched for randomised controlled trials examining the effectiveness of psychological interventions targeted at treating depression or anxiety experienced by informal carers of patients with chronic physical health conditions. Database searches will be supplemented by contact with experts, reference and citation checking and grey literature. Both published and unpublished research in English language will be reviewed with no limitations on year or source. Individual, group and patient-carer dyad focused interventions will be eligible. Primary outcomes of interest will be validated self-report or clinician administered measures of depression or anxiety. If data allows a meta-analysis will examine: (1) the overall effectiveness of psychological interventions in relation to outcomes of depression or anxiety; (2) intervention components associated with effectiveness. Discussion This review will provide evidence on the effectiveness of psychological interventions for depression and anxiety experienced by informal carers of patients with chronic physical health conditions. In addition, it will examine intervention components associated with effectiveness. Results will inform the design and development of a psychological intervention for carers of people with chronic physical health conditions experiencing depression and anxiety. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42012003114 PMID:23369319

  4. [Economic evaluation of the demand of medical care for mental health in Mexico: schizophrenia and depression, 1996-2000].

    PubMed

    Arredondo, Armando; Ramos, René; Zúñiga, Alexis

    2003-01-01

    Financing protection for both, users and providers of health care services is one of the main objectives of National Program of Health in Mexico, 2001-2006. In fact one of the elements of the present health care reform initiatives is need for the efficient allocation of financial resources, using resource allocation schemes by specific health care demands that combine both the economic, clinical and the epidemiological perspectives. The evaluation of such schemes has been approached in several ways; however, in the case of mental health services, there is dearth of studies that use economic assessment methods. Moreover, such studies are of limited scope, often a response to unmated health needs, disregarding the economic implication for health services production and financing and ensuing medical care market imbalances. This paper presents the results of an evaluative research work aimed to assess the average cost of depression and schizophrenia case management, the financial resources required to meet the health care demands by type of institution, period 1996-2000, in Mexico by type of health care provider. The case management average cost for schizophrenia was $211.00 US, and that for depression was $221.00 US. The demand of services for both conditions in each type of institution showed that the greatest relative demands (96% of the national total for depression and 94% of the national total for schizophrenia) occur in three institutions: IMSS, SSA and ISSSTE. The greatest demand of the health services for the two study condition corresponded to those insured by the IMSS, followed by those uninsured who use the SSA services, and those insured by the ISSSTE. The case management costs for mental conditions are in the middle range between hypertension and diabetes in the upper end, pneumonia and diarrhea in the lower end. The case managment costs of health care demands for the selected tracer conditions differ considerably among institutions for insure populations

  5. Prevalence of war-related mental health conditions and association with displacement status in postwar Jaffna District, Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Husain, Farah; Anderson, Mark; Lopes Cardozo, Barbara; Becknell, Kristin; Blanton, Curtis; Araki, Diane; Vithana, Eeshara Kottegoda

    2011-08-03

    Nearly 2.7 million individuals worldwide are internally displaced (seeking refuge in secure areas of their own country) annually by armed conflict. Although the psychological impact of war has been well documented, less is known about the mental health symptoms of forced displacement among internally displaced persons. To estimate the prevalence of the most common war-related mental health conditions, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, and depression, and to assess the association between displacement status and these conditions in postwar Jaffna District, Sri Lanka. Between July and September 2009, a cross-sectional multistage cluster sample survey was conducted among 1517 Jaffna District households including 2 internally displaced persons camps. The response rate was 92% (1448 respondents, 1409 eligible respondents). Two percent of participants (n = 80) were currently displaced, 29.5% (n = 539) were recently resettled, and 68.5% (n = 790) were long-term residents. Bivariable analyses followed by multivariable logistic regression models were performed to determine the association between displacement status and mental health. Symptom criteria of PTSD, anxiety, and depression as measured by the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25. The overall prevalences of symptoms of PTSD, anxiety, and depression were 7.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.1%-9.7%), 32.6% (95% CI, 28.5%-36.9%), and 22.2% (95% CI, 18.2%-26.5%), respectively. Currently displaced participants were more likely to report symptoms of PTSD (odds ratio [OR], 2.71; 95% CI, 1.28-5.73), anxiety (OR, 2.91; 95% CI, 1.89-4.48), and depression (OR, 4.55; 95% CI, 2.47-8.39) compared with long-term residents. Recently resettled residents were more likely to report symptoms of PTSD (OR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.11-3.47) compared with long-term residents. However, displacement was no longer associated with mental health symptoms after controlling for trauma exposure

  6. Low depressive symptom and mental distress scores in adult long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Harila, Marika J; Niinivirta, Tomi I T; Winqvist, Satu; Harila-Saari, Arja H

    2011-04-01

    Childhood cancer survivors are thought to be at risk of psychological difficulties. We examined the prevalence of depressive symptoms and mental well-being in adult long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at a mean age of 20 years after the cessation of therapy. Depressive symptoms were assessed with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-21) and mental distress with General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) among 73 ALL survivors and 146 healthy controls. The ALL survivors obtained significantly lower BDI scores (P=0.046) compared with the controls, indicating less depressive symptoms among the ALL survivors. BDI scores indicated a significantly less frequent moderate or severe depression in the ALL survivors compared with the controls (P=0.039). BDI scores indicated no depression in 80.8% of the ALL survivors and 73.3% of the control group. The female ALL survivors obtained lower BDI scores than did the female controls (P=0.005). No difference was found in GHQ-12 scores between the survivors and the controls. Survivors of ALL reported fewer depressive symptoms and equal mental well-being compared with healthy controls. Our findings support the idea that childhood leukemia survivors' subjective experience of well-being is possibly affected by repressive adaptive style.

  7. Patterns of Psychopathology in the Families of Children with Conduct Problems, Depression, and both Psychiatric Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Lisa M.; Beauchaine, Theodore P.

    2009-01-01

    Comorbid conduct problems (CPs) and depression are observed far more often than expected by chance, which is perplexing given minimal symptom overlap. In this study, relations between parental psychopathology and children’s diagnostic status were evaluated to test competing theories of comorbidity. Participants included 180 families with an 8–12-year-old child diagnosed with CPs, depression, both conditions, or neither condition. Although no single theory of comorbidity was supported fully, evidence suggested that CPs and depression may be inherited separately. Paternal antisocial characteristics and maternal depression provided independent prediction of both child depression and CPs. However, paternal antisocial behavior moderated the effect of maternal depression on CPs. For children with antisocial fathers, CPs were observed regardless of maternal depression levels. In contrast, a strong relation was observed between CPs and maternal depression for children without antisocial fathers. PMID:17216344

  8. [Primary care and mental health care collaboration in patients with depression: Evaluation of a pilot experience].

    PubMed

    Calderón, Carlos; Balagué, Laura; Iruin, Álvaro; Retolaza, Ander; Belaunzaran, Jon; Basterrechea, Javier; Mosquera, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    To implement and assess a collaborative experience between Primary Care (PC) and Mental Health (MH) in order to improve the care of patients with depression. Pilot collaborative project from a participatory action research approach during 2013. Basque Country. Osakidetza (Basque Health Service). Bizkaia and Gipuzkoa. The study included 207 professionals from general practice, nursing, psychiatry, psychiatric nursing, psychology and social work of 9 health centres and 6 mental health centres of Osakidetza. Shared design and development of four axes of intervention: 1) Communication and knowledge between PC and MH professionals, 2) Improvement of diagnostic coding and referral of patients, 3) Training programmes with meetings and common Clinical Practice Guidelines, and 4) Evaluation. Intervention and control questionnaires to professionals of the centres on the knowledge and satisfaction in the PC-MH relationship, joint training activities, and assessment of the experience. Osakidetza registers of prevalences, referrals and treatments. Follow-up meetings. Improvement in the 4 axes of intervention in the participant centres compared with the controls. Identification of factors to be considered in the development and sustainability of PC-MH collaborative care. The pilot experience confirms that collaborative projects promoted by PC and MH can improve depression care and the satisfaction of professionals. They are complex projects that need simultaneous interventions adjusted to the particularities of the health services. Multidisciplinary and continuous participation and management and information system support are necessary for their implementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Depression and mental health in neoliberal times: a critical analysis of policy and discourse.

    PubMed

    Teghtsoonian, Katherine

    2009-07-01

    Depression has received increasing attention as a significant public health issue over the past ten years, both in Canada and elsewhere in the industrialized west. During the same period, many of the social and economic policies adopted by governments in these jurisdictions have reflected neoliberal goals and orientations. The purpose of this article is to explore the points of contact between these two features of contemporary social and political life in the industrialized west, using the Canadian province of British Columbia as an empirical site. My analysis draws on the Foucauldian literature on governmentality in presenting a close reading of provincial government documents concerned with depression and mental health literacy that have been produced since the election of the Liberal Party to office in British Columbia in 2001. This analysis identifies discourses of "responsibilization" circulating in these documents, within which individuals, families, communities and workplaces - rather than publicly-funded services - appear as key resources in responding to experiences of mental distress. It also points to a number of strategies visible in the documents that work to align the interests of individuals and their practitioners in pursuing particular approaches to treatment with a governing interest in reducing public spending on services and supports. The article concludes by identifying a number of resistive discourses and proposing further research in a range of empirical contexts within which they may be evident.

  10. Health conditions, physical disabilities, perceived burdensomeness, and depressive symptoms influence suicidal ideation.

    PubMed

    Khazem, Lauren R; Jahn, Danielle R; Cukrowicz, Kelly C; Anestis, Michael D

    2017-04-01

    The roles of perceived burdensomeness and depressive symptoms in the relationship between physical disabilities or health conditions and suicidal ideation warrant examination. The authors examined indirect effects using cross-sectional data from adults who answered questions online. The serial indirect effect of the number of physical disabilities on suicidal ideation through perceived burdensomeness and depressive symptoms was not significant, but the serial indirect effects of the combined number of physical disabilities and health conditions and number of health conditions on suicidal ideation through perceived burdensomeness and depression were each significant. For those with disabilities or health conditions, perceived burdensomeness may precede depressive symptoms in the development of suicidal ideation.

  11. Depression and chronic health conditions in parents of children with and without developmental disabilities: the growing up in Ireland cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Stephen; Hannigan, Ailish

    2014-02-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that poor physical health and depression are highly co-morbid. To date, however, no study has considered whether depression in parents caring for children with developmental disabilities is partly driven by poor physical health. Using data from the Growing Up in Ireland national cohort study (2006 to date), 627 parents of children with developmental disabilities were compared with 7941 parents of typically developing children on scores from the Centre for Epidemiological Depression Scale, chronic health conditions, socio-demographic and child behavioural characteristics. Having a child with disabilities was associated with a higher risk of depression (odds ratio (OR)=1.83, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.43, 2.35) compared to parents of typically developing children. Adjusting for the presence of chronic health conditions accounted for some of this excess risk (OR=1.77, 95% CI: 1.38, 2.27). The association between having a child with disabilities and increased risk of depression was explained, however, by adjusting for the child problem behaviours (OR=1.07, 95% CI: 0.81, 1.43). This study has confirmed, in a population-based sample, the high risk of depression in parents caring for children with developmental disabilities after adjusting for the presence of a chronic health condition. Importantly, given that poor mental health in these parents is associated with a battery of negative health and social family outcomes, it is imperative that health professionals pay attention to the mental health needs of these parents.

  12. Toward the Design of Evidence-Based Mental Health Information Systems for People With Depression: A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fleisch, Elgar

    2017-01-01

    Background Existing research postulates a variety of components that show an impact on utilization of technology-mediated mental health information systems (MHIS) and treatment outcome. Although researchers assessed the effect of isolated design elements on the results of Web-based interventions and the associations between symptom reduction and use of components across computer and mobile phone platforms, there remains uncertainty with regard to which components of technology-mediated interventions for mental health exert the greatest therapeutic gain. Until now, no studies have presented results on the therapeutic benefit associated with specific service components of technology-mediated MHIS for depression. Objective This systematic review aims at identifying components of technology-mediated MHIS for patients with depression. Consequently, all randomized controlled trials comparing technology-mediated treatments for depression to either waiting-list control, treatment as usual, or any other form of treatment for depression were reviewed. Updating prior reviews, this study aims to (1) assess the effectiveness of technology-supported interventions for the treatment of depression and (2) add to the debate on what components in technology-mediated MHIS for the treatment of depression should be standard of care. Methods Systematic searches in MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library were conducted. Effect sizes for each comparison between a technology-enabled intervention and a control condition were computed using the standard mean difference (SMD). Chi-square tests were used to test for heterogeneity. Using subgroup analysis, potential sources of heterogeneity were analyzed. Publication bias was examined using visual inspection of funnel plots and Begg’s test. Qualitative data analysis was also used. In an explorative approach, a list of relevant components was extracted from the body of literature by consensus between two researchers. Results Of 6387 studies

  13. Toward the Design of Evidence-Based Mental Health Information Systems for People With Depression: A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wahle, Fabian; Bollhalder, Lea; Kowatsch, Tobias; Fleisch, Elgar

    2017-05-31

    Existing research postulates a variety of components that show an impact on utilization of technology-mediated mental health information systems (MHIS) and treatment outcome. Although researchers assessed the effect of isolated design elements on the results of Web-based interventions and the associations between symptom reduction and use of components across computer and mobile phone platforms, there remains uncertainty with regard to which components of technology-mediated interventions for mental health exert the greatest therapeutic gain. Until now, no studies have presented results on the therapeutic benefit associated with specific service components of technology-mediated MHIS for depression. This systematic review aims at identifying components of technology-mediated MHIS for patients with depression. Consequently, all randomized controlled trials comparing technology-mediated treatments for depression to either waiting-list control, treatment as usual, or any other form of treatment for depression were reviewed. Updating prior reviews, this study aims to (1) assess the effectiveness of technology-supported interventions for the treatment of depression and (2) add to the debate on what components in technology-mediated MHIS for the treatment of depression should be standard of care. Systematic searches in MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library were conducted. Effect sizes for each comparison between a technology-enabled intervention and a control condition were computed using the standard mean difference (SMD). Chi-square tests were used to test for heterogeneity. Using subgroup analysis, potential sources of heterogeneity were analyzed. Publication bias was examined using visual inspection of funnel plots and Begg's test. Qualitative data analysis was also used. In an explorative approach, a list of relevant components was extracted from the body of literature by consensus between two researchers. Of 6387 studies initially identified, 45 met all

  14. Causal beliefs of the public and social acceptance of persons with mental illness: a comparative analysis of schizophrenia, depression and alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Schomerus, G; Matschinger, H; Angermeyer, M C

    2014-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate whether biological illness explanations improve tolerance towards persons with mental illness or not. Several theoretical models have been proposed to predict the relationship between causal beliefs and social acceptance. This study uses path models to compare different theoretical predictions regarding attitudes towards persons with schizophrenia, depression and alcohol dependence. In a representative population survey in Germany (n = 3642), we elicited agreement with belief in biogenetic causes, current stress and childhood adversities as causes of either disorder as described in an unlabelled case vignette. We further elicited potentially mediating attitudes related to different theories about the consequences of biogenetic causal beliefs (attribution theory: onset responsibility, offset responsibility; genetic essentialism: differentness, dangerousness; genetic optimism: treatability) and social acceptance. For each vignette condition, we calculated a multiple mediator path model containing all variables. Biogenetic beliefs were associated with lower social acceptance in schizophrenia and depression, and with higher acceptance in alcohol dependence. In schizophrenia and depression, perceived differentness and dangerousness mediated the largest indirect effects, the consequences of biogenetic causal explanations thus being in accordance with the predictions of genetic essentialism. Psychosocial causal beliefs had differential effects: belief in current stress as a cause was associated with higher acceptance in schizophrenia, while belief in childhood adversities resulted in lower acceptance of a person with depression. Biological causal explanations seem beneficial in alcohol dependence, but harmful in schizophrenia and depression. The negative correlates of believing in childhood adversities as a cause of depression merit further exploration.

  15. Anti-sleepiness sensor systems for sober mental condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Won Heum; Jung, Hyung Sik; Lee, Hyo Gun

    2011-05-01

    The anti-sleepiness sensor systems have been devised for soldier's sober mental condition. These systems judge whether the soldier is sleepy or not, on one hand by monitoring open or closed eyes, on the other hand by measuring the heart blood beat and rate on the carotid of human's neck. They reasonably adopt one of the following methods such as optical, mechanical, magnetic impedance and piezoelectric sensor and so on. In this paper, the characteristics of those sensors are compared to one another and subsequently the suitable ones are proposed from the viewpoint of measurement and judgment reliability.; as a sensor to directly monitor the soldier's open/closed eyes the IR (Infrared) sensor is recommended, which is equipped on glasses (so called the anti-sleepiness glasses), and as a sensor to measure the heart beat and rate of blood vein, the piezoelectric PMN-PT crystal sensor mounted on a necklace turns out to be the most suitable owing to its high sensitivity (i.e. the anti-sleepiness necklace). These systems and relevant ideas are also applicable to the civilian usage, namely to the student preparing an examination as well as to the car-driver for safety.

  16. Depression literacy: rates and relation to perceived need and mental health service utilization in a rural American sample.

    PubMed

    Deen, Tisha L; Bridges, Ana J

    2011-01-01

    Mental health literacy assists patients to recognize, manage and prevent emotional disorders such as depression. Depression literacy is a specific type that varies among populations; however, there is a paucity of research on the depression literacy of rural Americans. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the depression literacy of a rural American sample, and to examine the relationship of depression literacy with perceived need for and utilization of different types of services for those with emotional problems. Participants were recruited outside grocery stores in rural towns by consenting to be contacted and providing contact information. They were contacted via telephone to complete a survey of 15 min duration. Depression literacy was measured by assessing participants' ability to correctly label a vignette that depicted depressive symptoms. Demographic data, psychiatric symptoms, perceived need for seeking services (primary care, counselor and religious leader), and lifetime utilization of services (medical, specialty mental health and religious leader) for emotional problems were also assessed in the survey. High depression literacy (i.e., able to correctly label the vignette) was found in 53% of the sample. Men had lower depression literacy than women (35% vs 68%) and this effect remained after controlling for demographic and symptom variables. Multivariable regression analyses revealed that, after including demographic and symptoms variables in the regression equation, depression literacy did not significantly predict perceived need for a doctor, counselor, or religious leader, but depression literacy did significantly predicted utilization of a religious leader (but not a doctor or counselor). The rate of depression literacy in this sample was lower than the rates in other samples, especially among men. The disparity in depression literacy among men in this sample is consistent with the literature. Differences in utilization of a religious leader

  17. Improving responses to depression and related disorders: evaluation of a innovative, general, mental health care workers training program

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Australian General Practitioners have been beneficiaries of extensive training in mental health care delivery over the last few years but less so other workers who support those with mental illness. Training is needed as it is widely recognised that the most effective interventions to prevent and treat mental disorders are often not readily available. The Mental Health Aptitudes into Practice (MAP) training package is a broad, innovative, interdisciplinary, general mental health training aimed at improving responses to individuals with depression and related disorders. The modular structure of this training program meant that such training could be targeted at those with varied backgrounds. Two hundred and seventy one days of free MAP training was delivered across Victoria in 2004/2005. The evaluation reported here assessed whether changes occurred in the trainees' confidence, mental health literacy, attitudes towards effective treatments, mental health knowledge and skills and community mental health ideology following training. Methods These elements were assessed using pen and paper tests prior, immediately following, 6 months after and then 12 months after the training. Trainees' confidence, mental health literacy and social distance were measured using scales that have been used in evaluations of Mental Health First Aid Training. Community mental health ideology was measured using a sub-scale of the Community Attitudes to the Mentally Ill (CAMI) scale. The trainees' knowledge and skills were accessed using instrumentation specifically designed for this evaluation. Results Following training, participants had more confidence in their ability to work with those who have mental health issues and less desire for social distance from them. Participants' knowledge and skills in relation to the treatment of mental disorders increased. These changes were observed immediately after training. The limited existing evidence suggests these changes were sustained

  18. Treatment for Cigarette Smoking Among Depressed Mental Health Outpatients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sharon M.; Tsoh, Janice Y.; Prochaska, Judith J.; Eisendrath, Stuart; Rossi, Joseph S.; Redding, Colleen A.; Rosen, Amy B.; Meisner, Marc; Humfleet, Gary L.; Gorecki, Julie A.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. Using a brief contact control, we tested the efficacy of a staged care intervention to reduce cigarette smoking among psychiatric patients in outpatient treatment for depression. Methods. We conducted a randomized clinical trial that included assessments at baseline and at months 3, 6, 12, and 18. Three hundred twenty-two patients in mental health outpatient treatment who were diagnosed with depression and smoked ≥1 cigarette per day participated. The desire to quit smoking was not a prerequisite for participation. Staged care intervention participants received computerized motivational feedback at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months and were offered a 6-session psychological counseling and pharmacological cessation treatment program. Brief contact control participants received a self-help guide and referral list of local smoking-treatment providers. Results. As we hypothesized, abstinence rates among staged care intervention participants exceeded those of brief contact control participants at months 12 and 18. Significant differences favoring staged care intervention also were found in occurrence of a quit attempt and stringency of abstinence goal. Conclusion. The data suggest that individuals in psychiatric treatment for depression can be aided in quitting smoking through use of staged care interventions and that smoking cessation interventions used in the general population can be implemented in psychiatric outpatient settings. PMID:17008577

  19. There is more to perinatal mental health care than depression: public health nurses' reported engagement and competence in perinatal mental health care.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Agnes; Downes, Carmel; Carroll, Margaret; Gill, Ailish; Monahan, Mark

    2017-08-03

    To explore public health nurses' engagement, competence and education needs in relation to perinatal mental health care in Ireland. It is estimated that 15-25% of women will experience a mental health problem during or post pregnancy, either as a new problem or a reoccurrence of a pre-existing problem. Public Health Nurses, or their equivalent, are ideally positioned to support women's mental health and improve health outcomes for the woman and baby, yet little is known about their role and engagement with mental health issues, other than with postnatal depression. The objectives of the study were to identify public health nurses' knowledge, skills and current practices in perinatal mental health and establish their education needs. The research used a descriptive design. 186 public health nurses completed an anonymous, online-survey, designed by the research team. While public health nurses are positive about their role in supporting women's mental health, they lack the knowledge and skills to address all aspects of mental health, including opening a discussion with women on more sensitive or complex issues, such as trauma and psychosis and providing information to women. Those who received education reported statistically significant higher knowledge and confidence scores than those without. Public health nurses lack the knowledge and skills required to provide comprehensive perinatal mental health care to women. Future education programmes needs to move beyond postnatal depression and address the range of mental health problems that may impact on women in the perinatal period. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. The Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS): detecting anxiety disorder and depression in employees absent from work because of mental health problems

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuijsen, K; de Boer, A G E M; Verbeek, J; Blonk, R; van Dijk, F J H

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To (1) evaluate the psychometric properties and (2) examine the ability to detect cases with anxiety disorder and depression in a population of employees absent from work because of mental health problems. Methods: Internal consistency, construct validity, and criterion validity of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) were assessed. Furthermore, the ability to identify anxiety disorders or depression was evaluated by calculating posterior probabilities of these disorders following positive and negative test results for different cut off scores of the DASS-Depression and DASS-Anxiety subscales. Results: Internal consistency of the DASS subscales was high, with Cronbach's alphas of 0.94, 0.88, and 0.93 for depression, anxiety, and stress respectively. Factor analysis revealed a three factor solution, which corresponded well with the three subscales of the DASS. Construct validity was further supported by moderately high correlations of the DASS with indices of convergent validity (0.65 and 0.75), and lower correlations of the DASS with indices of divergent validity (range -0.22 to 0.07). Support for criterion validity was provided by a statistically significant difference in DASS scores between two diagnostic groups. A cut off score of 5 for anxiety and 12 for depression is recommended. The DASS showed probabilities of anxiety and depression after a negative test result of 0.05 and 0.06 respectively. Probabilities of 0.29 for anxiety disorder and 0.33 for depression after a positive test result reflect relatively low specificity of the DASS. Conclusion: The psychometric properties of the DASS are suitable for use in an occupational health care setting. The DASS can be helpful in ruling out anxiety disorder and depression in employees with mental health problems. PMID:12782751

  1. Deletion of PTEN Produces Deficits in Conditioned Fear and Increases Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugo, Joaquin N.; Smith, Gregory D.; Morrison, Jessica B.; White, Jessika

    2013-01-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog detected on chromosome 10 (PTEN) gene product modulates activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. The PI3K pathway has been found to be involved in the regulation of the fragile X mental retardation protein, which is important for long-term depression and in the formation of new…

  2. Deletion of PTEN Produces Deficits in Conditioned Fear and Increases Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugo, Joaquin N.; Smith, Gregory D.; Morrison, Jessica B.; White, Jessika

    2013-01-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog detected on chromosome 10 (PTEN) gene product modulates activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. The PI3K pathway has been found to be involved in the regulation of the fragile X mental retardation protein, which is important for long-term depression and in the formation of new…

  3. Gender Differences in the Relationships Among Major Depressive Disorder, Heavy Alcohol Use, and Mental Health Treatment Engagement Among College Students.

    PubMed

    Pedrelli, Paola; Borsari, Brian; Lipson, Sarah Ketchen; Heinze, Justin E; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Although major depressive disorder (MDD) and heavy episodic drinking (HED, 4+/5+ drinks in a single sitting for women/men) are common among young adults in college, the relationship between the two remains unclear. This study examined the association between MDD and HED in this population, the effect of gender on this association, and whether comorbid MDD and heavy alcohol use are associated with higher rates of mental health treatment engagement. The study comprised 61,561 (65.3% female) undergraduate students who answered an online survey on depression, alcohol use, and treatment engagement in the past year. Hierarchical linear regressions examined the association between MDD and alcohol use (HED and peak blood alcohol concentration [pBAC]) and whether gender moderated these associations. Logistic regressions were then conducted to examine the influence of MDD, heavy alcohol use, and gender on treatment engagement. Students with MDD reported more frequent HED and higher pBAC than did students without MDD; this was especially true for female students. Rates of treatment engagement were higher among women than men, among students with MDD than students without MDD, and among female students with HED than women without HED. The presence of an association between MDD and heavy alcohol use suggests the need for systematic screenings of both conditions. Low rates of treatment engagement in college students with MDD and heavy alcohol use calls for the development of strategies to engage this high-risk group in treatment.

  4. Gender Differences in the Relationships Among Major Depressive Disorder, Heavy Alcohol Use, and Mental Health Treatment Engagement Among College Students

    PubMed Central

    Pedrelli, Paola; Borsari, Brian; Lipson, Sarah Ketchen; Heinze, Justin E.; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Although major depressive disorder (MDD) and heavy episodic drinking (HED, 4+/5+ drinks in a single sitting for women/men) are common among young adults in college, the relationship between the two remains unclear. This study examined the association between MDD and HED in this population, the effect of gender on this association, and whether comorbid MDD and heavy alcohol use are associated with higher rates of mental health treatment engagement. Method: The study comprised 61,561 (65.3% female) undergraduate students who answered an online survey on depression, alcohol use, and treatment engagement in the past year. Hierarchical linear regressions examined the association between MDD and alcohol use (HED and peak blood alcohol concentration [pBAC]) and whether gender moderated these associations. Logistic regressions were then conducted to examine the influence of MDD, heavy alcohol use, and gender on treatment engagement. Results: Students with MDD reported more frequent HED and higher pBAC than did students without MDD; this was especially true for female students. Rates of treatment engagement were higher among women than men, among students with MDD than students without MDD, and among female students with HED than women without HED. Conclusions: The presence of an association between MDD and heavy alcohol use suggests the need for systematic screenings of both conditions. Low rates of treatment engagement in college students with MDD and heavy alcohol use calls for the development of strategies to engage this high-risk group in treatment. PMID:27340967

  5. Trauma, time and mental health: a study of temporal reintegration and Depressive Disorder among Southeast Asian refugees.

    PubMed

    Beiser, M; Wickrama, K A S

    2004-07-01

    Prior research suggested that time splitting--suppressing the past and dissociating it from present and future--protected refugee mental health in the aftermath of catastrophe. The current study investigates temporal reintegration, defined as cognitive recapture of the past and reconnecting it with present and future, the mental health effects of temporal reintegration, and factors moderating the associated risk for Depressive Disorder. A community sample of 608 Southeast Asian refugees, resettled in Vancouver British Columbia between 1979 and 1981, were interviewed on three separate occasions over a 10-year period. Participants performed a temporal orientation task and responded to questions about employment, social relations and mental health. Depressive Disorder, measured by a typology derived from Grade of Membership analysis of symptoms, constituted the dependent variable. Latent Growth Curve Analysis was used to examine both levels and rates of change in the probability of Depressive Disorder as predicted by changes in temporal reintegration, as well as the contribution of putative social and psychological moderators to explaining variations in growth parameters. Time relatedness increased over the duration of the study. Temporal reintegration jeopardized mental health. Employment and relational stability each moderated the mental health effects of temporal reintegration. Although time splitting may be effective in coping with adversity over the short-term, eventual temporal reintegration is probably ineluctable. Stability in love and work are protective factors, mitigating the mental health vicissitudes of temporal reintegration. Implications for optimal timing of clinical interventions are discussed.

  6. Family Matters: The Role of Mental Health Stigma and Social Support on Depressive Symptoms and Subsequent Help Seeking among African American Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Michael A.; Joe, Sean; Nebbitt, Von

    2010-01-01

    African American adolescent boys underutilize mental health service due to stigma associated with depression. Gaining an increased understanding of how depressed, African American adolescent boys perceive their mental health needs and engage in help-seeking behaviors might play an essential role in efforts to improve their symptoms and access to…

  7. IRRITABLE MOOD IN ADULT MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER: RESULTS FROM THE WORLD MENTAL HEALTH SURVEYS

    PubMed Central

    Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Alonso, Jordi; Angermeyer, Matthias; Bromet, Evelyn; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Jonge, Peter; Demyttenaere, Koen; Florescu, Silvia E.; Gruber, Michael J.; Gureje, Oye; Hu, Chiyi; Huang, Yueqin; Karam, Elie G.; Jin, Robert; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Levinson, Daphna; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Medina-Mora, María E.; O’Neill, Siobhan; Ono, Yutaka; Posada-Villa, José A.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Scott, Kate M.; Shahly, Victoria; Stein, Dan J.; Viana, Maria C.; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although irritability is a core symptom of DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD) for youth but not adults, clinical studies find comparable rates of irritability between nonbipolar depressed adults and youth. Including irritability as a core symptom of adult MDD would allow detection of depression-equivalent syndromes with primary irritability hypothesized to be more common among males than females. We carried out a preliminary examination of this issue using cross-national community-based survey data from 21 countries in the World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys (n = 110,729). Methods The assessment of MDD in the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview includes one question about persistent irritability. We examined two expansions of the definition of MDD involving this question: (1) cases with dysphoria and/or anhedonia and exactly four of nine Criterion A symptoms plus irritability; and (2) cases with two or more weeks of irritability plus four or more other Criterion A MDD symptoms in the absence of dysphoria or anhedonia. Results Adding irritability as a tenth Criterion A symptom increased lifetime prevalence by 0.4% (from 11.2 to 11.6%). Adding episodes of persistent irritability increased prevalence by an additional 0.2%. Proportional prevalence increases were significantly higher, but nonetheless small, among males compared to females. Rates of severe role impairment were significantly lower among respondents with this irritable depression who did not meet conventional DSM-IV criteria than those with DSM-IV MDD. Conclusion Although limited by the superficial assessment in this single question on irritability, results do not support expanding adult MDD criteria to include irritable mood. PMID:23364997

  8. Mental healthcare in Kenya: Exploring optimal conditions for capacity building

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Natisha; Rolley, John; Ndetei, David; Mansouri, Fethi

    2014-01-01

    The global burden of disease related to mental disorders is on the increase, with the World Health Organization (WHO) estimating that over 450 million people are affected worldwide. The Mental Health Global Action Program (mhGAP) was launched by the WHO in 2002 in order to address the widening gap in access to mental healthcare in low-income countries. Despite these efforts, access to mental healthcare in low-income countries remains poor and is often described as inadequate, inefficient and inequitable, with an 85% estimated treatment gap in low-income countries, as compared with 35% to 50% in high-income countries.In this article, the authors argue that integrating mental health services into primary healthcare settings through capacity building is vital with regard to achieving mhGAP goals. The article explores the challenges to and potential enablers for the improvement of the delivery of broad-based mental healthcare services in Kenya. The authors propose the integration of the conceptual dimensions of both the cosmopolitanism and capabilities approaches as a combined strategy for dealing with capacity building in heterogeneous settings such as Kenya. PMID:26245443

  9. A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Impact of a Family-Based Adolescent Depression Intervention on both Youth and Parent Mental Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Poole, Lucinda A; Knight, Tess; Toumbourou, John W; Lubman, Dan I; Bertino, Melanie D; Lewis, Andrew J

    2017-04-04

    This paper presents findings from a multi-centre, double-blind, randomized controlled trial that tested the hypothesis that parent and youth mental health improvements would be superior in a family-based intervention for adolescent depression (BEST MOOD) compared to a treatment-as-usual supportive parenting program (PAST). Eligible participants were families with a young person aged between 12 and 18 years who met diagnostic criteria for a depressive disorder (major, minor or dysthymic). Participating families (N = 64; 73.4% of youth were female) were recruited in Victoria, Australia and allocated to treatment condition using a block randomization procedure (parallel design) with two levels of blinding. This paper reports on the trial's secondary outcomes on youth and parent mental health. General linear mixed models were used to examine the longitudinal effect of treatment group on outcome. Data were analyzed according to intention-to-treat; 31 families were analyzed in BEST MOOD, and 33 families in PAST. Parents in the BEST MOOD group experienced significantly greater reductions in stress and depressive symptoms than parents in the PAST group at 3-month follow-up. A greater reduction in parental anxiety was observed in the BEST MOOD group (d = 0.35) compared with PAST (d = 0.02), although the between-group difference was not significant. Both groups of youth showed similar levels of improvement in depressive symptoms at post-treatment (d = 0.83 and 0.80 respectively), which were largely sustained at a 3-month follow-up. The family-based BEST MOOD intervention appeared superior to treatment-as-usual (PAST) in demonstrating greater reductions in parental stress and depression. Both interventions produced large reductions in youth depressive symptoms.

  10. Family Matters: The Role of Mental Health Stigma and Social Support on Depressive Symptoms and Subsequent Help Seeking Among African American Boys

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Michael A.; Joe, Sean; Nebbitt, Von

    2010-01-01

    African American adolescent boys underutilize mental health service due to stigma associated with depression. Gaining an increased understanding of how depressed, African American adolescent boys perceive their mental health needs and engage in help-seeking behaviors might play an essential role in efforts to improve their symptoms and access to care. Using a mixed-methods design, this study examined the influence of mental health stigma and social support on depressive symptoms among African American adolescent boys. Findings indicated the protective effects of social support in decreasing depressive symptoms, especially when participants experienced mental health stigma. Results also revealed the pivotal role of family social support over both professional and peer support for participants who struggled with depressive symptoms. The primacy of family support among the sample, combined with the frequent distrust of professionals and peer networks, would indicate that working with families may improve initial identification of depression among African American adolescent boys and decrease their barriers to care. PMID:20953336

  11. Labor market conditions and employment of the mentally ill.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Ralph; Drake, Robert E.; Becker, Deborah R.; Clark, Robin E.

    1999-06-01

    BACKGROUND: The mental health services literature includes assertions that workers with mental illness are at earlier risk of unemployment than other workers when the economy contracts. This possibility is important for several reasons. One is that such a phenomenon would support the argument that the lives of mentally ill persons are made unnecessarily stressful by the stigma of mental illness. Another is that the phenomenon could distort comparisons of the effectiveness of programs designed to prepare persons with severe mental illness for work. Despite its importance, the assertion that severely mentally ill workers are at early risk of unemployment has never been empirically tested. AIMS OF THE STUDY: We aim to test the hypothesis that unemployment among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) increases before job loss among other workers. METHODS: We test the hypothesis by applying Granger causality methods to time-series data collected in two communities in the United States (i.e., Concord and Manchester, NH) over 131 weeks beginning on 12 May 1991. RESULTS: We find no relationship between job loss in the labor market and the likelihood that persons with SMI will be unemployed. DISCUSSION: We speculate that persons with SMI participate in the secondary labor market and that their employment status is unlikely to be well described by data gathered in the primary labor market. This implies that widely available measures of labor market status, which are designed to describe the primary labor market, cannot be used to improve the evaluation of programs intended to prepare the mentally ill for work. We also discuss the possibility that persons with SMI may have needs that are better met by the secondary than by the primary labor market. CONCLUSIONS: The intuition that workers with severe mental illness are affected earlier than other workers by labor market contraction may not be correct. We infer that persons with severe mental illness may participate in the

  12. Real-time Continuous Assessment Method for Mental and Physiological Condition using Heart Rate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Kiyoko; Ishii, Naohiro

    It is necessary to monitor the daily health condition for preventing stress syndrome. In this study, it was proposed the method assessing the mental and physiological condition, such as the work stress or the relaxation, using heart rate variability at real time and continuously. The instantanuous heart rate (HR), and the ratio of the number of extreme points (NEP) and the number of heart beats were calculated for assessing mental and physiological condition. In this method, 20 beats heart rate were used to calculate these indexes. These were calculated in one beat interval. Three conditions, which are sitting rest, performing mental arithmetic and watching relaxation movie, were assessed using our proposed algorithm. The assessment accuracies were 71.9% and 55.8%, when performing mental arithmetic and watching relaxation movie respectively. In this method, the mental and physiological condition was assessed using only 20 regressive heart beats, so this method is considered as the real time assessment method.

  13. Policy for Promotion of Women's Mental Health: Insight from Analysis of Policy on Postnatal Depression in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Place, Jean Marie S; Billings, Deborah L; Frongillo, Edward A; Blake, Christine E; Mann, Joshua R; deCastro, Filipa

    2016-03-01

    This article critically examines federal, state and facility-level policies, as well as clinical practice guidelines regarding postnatal depression in Mexico. Thirteen documents including national health plans, national action plans, federal and state laws and regulations, clinical practice guidelines, and public-sector healthcare facility policies were collected and evaluated according to whether they included a statement of intent and/or actions related to the care of women at risk for or experiencing postnatal depression. While postnatal depression is included in several policies in Mexico, it is not addressed in ways that guide actions to manage postnatal depression. Specific direction on postnatal depression in policies would bridge a gap in maternal mental healthcare given that medication, treatment, and timing of interventions is unique in the postpartum context.

  14. Impaired mental simulation of specific past and future personal events in non-depressed multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Alexandra; Blanc, Frédéric; de Seze, Jérôme; Sellal, François; Chauvin, Bruno; Manning, Liliann

    2014-10-15

    The aims of the present study were (i) to explore autobiographical memory and episodic future thought in multiple sclerosis (MS), using Levine's Autobiographical Interview; (ii) to investigate the influence of the Interview's high retrieval support condition (the specific probe phase) on MS patients' past and future simulations and (iii) to obtain the patients' estimations of their own difficulties, during the test, and in everyday life. To that end, we examined 39 non-depressed relapsing-remitting MS patients and 34 healthy subjects matched for gender, age and education level. The 73 participants underwent an adapted version of the Autobiographical Interview in two conditions: remembering and imagining personal events. The group of patients also underwent an extended neuropsychological baseline, including particularly, anterograde memory and executive functions. The results showed that the MS patients' scores on the baseline were mildly or not impaired. On the contrary, the Autobiographical Interview measure, i.e., the mean number of internal details, for each of the two phases of the test - free recall and specific probe - was significantly lower in simulated past and future events in comparison with the healthy controls. Within each group, autobiographical memory performance was superior to episodic future thought performance. A strong positive correlation was observed between past and future mental simulation scores in both groups. In conclusion, our results showed, for the first time, the co-occurrence of deficit of remembering the past and imagining the future in MS patients. They also showed more difficulty in imagining future events than remembering past events for both patients and normal controls. MS being a neurological condition very frequent in the young adult population, the clinical considerations of our study might be of interest. Indeed, they give rise to new insights on MS patients' daily life difficulties related to impaired mental simulation of

  15. Depression.

    PubMed

    Choe, Christine J; Emslie, Graham J; Mayes, Taryn L

    2012-10-01

    This article reviews the assessment and treatment for depression in children and adolescents, emphasizing the implementation of evidence-based treatments into clinical care. Past trials of antidepressant medications are reviewed, as well as the clinical use of antidepressants and pharmacologic strategies for refractory illness or in the context of comorbid conditions. Clinicians who treat youth now have a body of empiric research to help guide treatment decisions; however, personalized treatment based on associated symptoms, comorbid conditions, contextual factors, and psychiatric history is essential. Further research is needed in the pharmacologic treatment of depressed youth, including expanding the study of non-SSRI antidepressants, augmentation and adjunctive strategies, and treatment in patients with comorbid conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Limitations of the Patient Health Questionnaire in Identifying Anxiety and Depression in Community Mental Health: Many Cases Are Undetected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Greeno, Catherine G.; Lee, Bong-Jae

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the concordance between the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in diagnosing anxiety and depressive disorders. Method: Fifty women seeking psychiatric services for their children at two mental health centers in western Pennsylvania were assessed for anxiety and…

  17. Limitations of the Patient Health Questionnaire in Identifying Anxiety and Depression in Community Mental Health: Many Cases Are Undetected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Greeno, Catherine G.; Lee, Bong-Jae

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the concordance between the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in diagnosing anxiety and depressive disorders. Method: Fifty women seeking psychiatric services for their children at two mental health centers in western Pennsylvania were assessed for anxiety and…

  18. Cardiovascular Reactivity in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder With High- or Low-Level Depressive Symptoms: A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Cardiovascular Reactivity to Laboratory-Induced Mental Stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei-Yeh; Chiu, Chen-Huan; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Su, Chien-Tien; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2016-03-01

    Depression increases the risk of adverse cardiac events. Cardiovascular reactivity is defined as the pattern of cardiovascular responses to mental stress. An altered pattern of cardiovascular reactivity is an indicator of subsequent cardiovascular disease. Because depression and adverse cardiac events may have a dose-dependent association, this study examined the differences in cardiovascular reactivity to mental stress between patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) with high depression levels and those with low depression levels. Moreover, autonomic nervous system regulation is a highly plausible biological mechanism for the pattern of cardiovascular reactivity to mental stress. The association between cardiovascular reactivity and parameters of heart rate variability (HRV), an index for quantifying autonomic nervous system activity modulation, was thus examined. This study included 88 patients with MDD. HRV was measured before stress induction. The Stroop Color and Word Test and mirror star-tracing task were used to induce mental stress. We observed no significant association between depressive symptom level and any of the cardiovascular reactivity parameters. Cardiovascular reactivity to mental stress was comparable between patients with MDD with high-level depressive symptoms and those with low-level depressive symptoms. After adjusting for confounding variables, the high-frequency domain of HRV was found to be an independent predictor of the magnitude of heart rate reactivity (β = -.33, p = .002). In conclusion, the magnitude of cardiovascular reactivity may be independent of depression severity in patients with MDD. The autonomic regulation of cardiovascular responses to mental stress primarily influences heart rate reactivity in patients with MDD.

  19. Depressive Symptoms in a Sample of Social Work Students and Reasons Preventing Students from Using Mental Health Services: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ting, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Limited research exists on social work students' level of depression and help-seeking beliefs. This study empirically examined the rates of depression among 215 BSW students and explored students' reasons for not using mental health services. Approximately 50% scored at or above the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale cutoff;…

  20. Reducing depression in older home care clients: design of a prospective study of a nurse-led interprofessional mental health promotion intervention

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Very little research has been conducted in the area of depression among older home care clients using personal support services. These older adults are particularly vulnerable to depression because of decreased cognition, comorbid chronic conditions, functional limitations, lack of social support, and reduced access to health services. To date, research has focused on collaborative, nurse-led depression care programs among older adults in primary care settings. Optimal management of depression among older home care clients is not currently known. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of a 6-month nurse-led, interprofessional mental health promotion intervention aimed at older home care clients with depressive symptoms using personal support services. Methods/Design This one-group pre-test post-test study aims to recruit a total of 250 long-stay (> 60 days) home care clients, 70 years or older, with depressive symptoms who are receiving personal support services through a home care program in Ontario, Canada. The nurse-led intervention is a multi-faceted 6-month program led by a Registered Nurse that involves regular home visits, monthly case conferences, and evidence-based assessment and management of depression using an interprofessional approach. The primary outcome is the change in severity of depressive symptoms from baseline to 6 months using the Centre for Epidemiological Studies in Depression Scale. Secondary outcomes include changes in the prevalence of depressive symptoms and anxiety, health-related quality of life, cognitive function, and the rate and appropriateness of depression treatment from baseline to 12 months. Changes in the costs of use of health services will be assessed from a societal perspective. Descriptive and qualitative data will be collected to examine the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention and identify barriers and facilitators to implementation. Discussion

  1. Lesbian, gay, & bisexual older adults: linking internal minority stressors, chronic health conditions, and depression

    PubMed Central

    Hoy-Ellis, Charles P.; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen I.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to: (1) test whether the minority stressors disclosure of sexual orientation; and (2) internalized heterosexism are predictive of chronic physical health conditions; and (3) depression; (4) to test direct and indirect relationships between these variables; and (5) whether chronic physical health conditions are further predictive of depression, net of disclosure of sexual orientation and internalized heterosexism. Methods Secondary analysis of national, community-based surveys of 2349 lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults aged 50 and older residing in the US utilizing structural equation modeling. Results Congruent with minority stress theory, disclosure of sexual orientation is indirectly associated with chronic physical health conditions and depression, mediated by internalized heterosexism with a suppressor effect. Internalized heterosexism is directly associated with chronic physical health conditions and depression, and further indirectly associated with depression mediated by chronic physical health conditions. Finally, chronic physical health conditions have an additional direct relationship with depression, net of other predictor variables. Conclusion Minority stressors and chronic physical health conditions independently and collectively predict depression, possibly a synergistic effect. Implications for depression among older sexual minority adults are discussed. PMID:27050776

  2. Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Public Mental Health: Comparison to Treatment as Usual for Treatment -Resistant Depression

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Molly A.; Basco, Monica A.

    2014-01-01

    State mental health systems have been leaders in the implementation of evidence-based approaches to care for individuals with severe mental illness. Numerous case studies of the wide-scale implementation of research-supported models such as Integrated Dual Diagnosis Treatment and Assertive Community Treatment are documented. However, relatively few dissemination efforts have focused on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for individuals with major depression despite evidence indicating its efficacy with this population. A multi-site effectiveness trial of CBT was conducted within the Texas public mental health system. Eighty-three adults with major depression received CBT from community clinicians trained through a workshop and regular consultation with a master clinician. Outcomes were compared to a matched sample of individuals receiving pharmacotherapy. Outcome measures used included the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology and Beck Depression Inventory. Individuals receiving CBT showed greater improvements in depression symptoms than those in the comparison group. Greater pre-treatment symptom severity predicted better treatment response, while the presence of comorbid personality disorders was associated with poorer outcomes. PMID:24692026

  3. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in public mental health: comparison to treatment as usual for treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Molly A; Basco, Monica A

    2015-01-01

    State mental health systems have been leaders in the implementation of evidence-based approaches to care for individuals with severe mental illness. Numerous case studies of the wide-scale implementation of research-supported models such as integrated dual diagnosis treatment and assertive community treatment are documented. However, relatively few dissemination efforts have focused on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for individuals with major depression despite evidence indicating its efficacy with this population. A multi-site effectiveness trial of CBT was conducted within the Texas public mental health system. Eighty-three adults with major depression received CBT from community clinicians trained through a workshop and regular consultation with a master clinician. Outcomes were compared to a matched sample of individuals receiving pharmacotherapy. Outcome measures used included the quick inventory of depressive symptomatology and beck depression inventory. Individuals receiving CBT showed greater improvements in depression symptoms than those in the comparison group. Greater pre-treatment symptom severity predicted better treatment response, while the presence of comorbid personality disorders was associated with poorer outcomes.

  4. Prevalence, correlates of major depression: A mental health survey among undergraduates at a mainland Chinese university.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjun; Meng, Xiangfei; Xu, Ziqi; Yu, Qiong; Shi, Jieping; Yu, Yaqin; D'Arcy, Carl; Huang, Yueqin; Kou, Changgui

    2016-09-01

    This cross-sectional survey among Chinese university students aimed to estimate the prevalence and risk factors of major depressive disorder (MDD) among undergraduates, in order to provide basic information for the prevention and treatment of depression among the college-aged population. A total of 2,046 undergraduates were interviewed face to face using the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 (WHO-CIDI, version 3.0). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV) criteria were used to diagnose MDD. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations between MDD and selected correlates. The survey response rate was 90.1% (N = 1,843). The prevalence rates of MDD were 3.9% (lifetime), 2.4% (12 months) and 0.4% (30 days). No significant gender or age differences were found in prevalence rates. No sociodemographic characteristics were related to the lifetime prevalence of MDD. In contrast, family structure and environment factors specifically being from a single-parent family (odds ratio [OR] = 2.513, confidence interval [CI] = 1.404-2.500), parents having mental problems (OR = 1.809, CI = 1.104-2.964), and physical punishment (OR = 1.789, CI = 1.077-3.001) were associated with higher lifetime prevalence of MDD. These findings showed a relatively lower prevalence of DSM-IV/CIDI MDD in this sample of Chinese undergraduates than that reported for students in other countries. However, the prevalence rate for university students was higher than that reported for general Chinese population. Family structure and socio-environmental factors in the student's family of origin significantly correlated with the lifetime prevalence of MDD. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Does income inequality get under the skin? A multilevel analysis of depression, anxiety and mental disorders in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chiavegatto Filho, Alexandre Dias Porto; Kawachi, Ichiro; Wang, Yuan Pang; Viana, Maria Carmen; Andrade, Laura Helena Silveira Guerra

    2013-11-01

    Test the original income inequality theory, by analysing its association with depression, anxiety and any mental disorders. We analysed a sample of 3542 individuals aged 18 years and older selected through a stratified, multistage area probability sample of households from the São Paulo Metropolitan Area. Mental disorder symptoms were assessed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria. Bayesian multilevel logistic models were performed. Living in areas with medium and high-income inequality was statistically associated with increased risk of depression, relative to low-inequality areas (OR 1.76; 95% CI 1.21 to 2.55, and 1.53; 95% CI 1.07 to 2.19, respectively). The same was not true for anxiety (OR 1.25; 95% CI 0.90 to 1.73, and OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.79 to 1.46). In the case of any mental disorder, results were mixed. In general, our findings were consistent with the income inequality theory, that is, people living in places with higher income inequality had an overall higher odd of mental disorders, albeit not always statistically significant. The fact that depression, but not anxiety, was statistically significant could indicate a pathway by which inequality influences health.

  6. The impact of persistent poor housing conditions on mental health: A longitudinal population-based study.

    PubMed

    Pevalin, David J; Reeves, Aaron; Baker, Emma; Bentley, Rebecca

    2017-09-26

    Living with housing problems increases the risk of mental ill health. Housing problems tend to persist over time but little is known about the mental health consequences of living with persistent housing problems. We investigated if persistence of poor housing affects mental health over and above the effect of current housing conditions. We used data from 13 annual waves of the British Household Panel Survey (1996 to 2008) (81,745 person/year observations from 16,234 individuals) and measured the persistence of housing problems by the number of years in the previous four that a household experienced housing problems. OLS regression models and lagged-change regression models were used to estimate the effects of past and current housing conditions on mental health, as measured by the General Health Questionnaire. Interaction terms tested if tenure type modified the impact of persistent poor housing on mental health. In fully adjusted models, mental health worsened as the persistence of housing problems increased. Adjustment for current housing conditions attenuated, but did not explain, the findings. Tenure type moderated the effects of persistent poor housing on mental health, suggesting that those who own their homes outright and those who live in social housing are most negatively affected. Persistence of poor housing was predictive of worse mental health, irrespective of current housing conditions, which added to the weight of evidence that demonstrates that living in poor quality housing for extended periods of time has negative consequences for mental health. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Measurement of Common Mental Health Conditions in VHA Co-located, Collaborative Care.

    PubMed

    Beehler, Gregory P; King, Paul R; Vair, Christina L; Gass, Julie; Funderburk, Jennifer S

    2016-12-01

    The VA has integrated psychologists and other licensed mental health providers, known collectively as co-located collaborative care (CCC) providers, into patients' primary care medical homes to improve mental health services for veterans. However, it is unclear if CCC providers are routinely using mental health measures as part of evidence-based, coordinated care. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of CCC provider utilization of brief, validated measures. A retrospective review of VA electronic medical records from 8403 veterans diagnosed with depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, or anxiety disorder was conducted. Results indicated that 23 % of the sample had a screening or brief symptom measure documented by a CCC provider. Likelihood of measurement was predicted by primary diagnosis, length of care episode, CCC provider credential, and clinic setting. Future research should address factors impacting measurement practices of CCC providers in order to develop implementation strategies for advancing measurement-based mental health care.

  8. Supportive-Expressive Dynamic Psychotherapy in the Community Mental Health System: A Pilot Effectiveness Trial for the Treatment of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Connolly Gibbons, Mary Beth; Thompson, Sarah M.; Scott, Kelli; Schauble, Lindsay A.; Mooney, Tessa; Thompson, Donald; Green, Patricia; MacArthur, Mary Jo; Crits-Christoph, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the current article is to present the results of a randomized pilot investigation of a brief dynamic psychotherapy compared with treatment-as-usual (TAU) in the treatment of moderate-to-severe depression in the community mental health system. Forty patients seeking services for moderate-to-severe depression in the community mental health system were randomized to 12 weeks of psychotherapy, with either a community therapist trained in brief dynamic psychotherapy or a TAU therapist. Results indicated that blind judges could discriminate the dynamic sessions from the TAU sessions on adherence to dynamic interventions. The results indicate moderate-to-large effect sizes in favor of the dynamic psychotherapy over the TAU therapy in the treatment of depression. The Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale-24 showed that 50% of patients treated with dynamic therapy moved into a normative range compared with only 29% of patients treated with TAU. PMID:22962971

  9. Brightening the Day With Flashes of Positive Mental Imagery: A Case Study of an Individual With Depression.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, Simon E; Holmes, Emily A

    2017-02-02

    This article presents a case example of an individual with current major depression engaging in a positive mental imagery intervention, specifically a computerized cognitive training paradigm involving repeated practice in generating positive imagery in response to ambiguous scenarios. The patient's reported experience of the intervention suggests the potential of the positive imagery intervention to "brighten" everyday life via promoting involuntary "flashes" of positive mental imagery in situations related to the scenarios, with associated beneficial effects on positive affect, future expectations, and behavior. Enhancing this aspect of the training-i.e., involuntary positive imagery in contexts where it is adaptive-may hold particular promise for reducing anhedonic symptoms of depression. Developing simple computerized interventions to increase the experience of positive mental imagery in everyday life could therefore provide a useful addition to the drive to improve treatment outcomes.

  10. Mental imagery in bipolar affective disorder versus unipolar depression: investigating cognitions at times of 'positive' mood.

    PubMed

    Ivins, Annabel; Di Simplicio, Martina; Close, Helen; Goodwin, Guy M; Holmes, Emily

    2014-09-01

    Compared to unipolar depression (UD), depressed mood in bipolar disorder (BD) has been associated with amplified negative mental imagery of the future ('flashforwards'). However, imagery characteristics during positive mood remain poorly explored. We hypothesise first, that unlike UD patients, the most significant positive images of BD patients will be 'flashforwards' (rather than past memories). Second, that BD patients will experience more frequent (and more 'powerful') positive imagery as compared to verbal thoughts and third, that behavioural activation scores will be predicted by imagery variables in the BD group. BD (n=26) and UD (n=26) patients completed clinical and trait imagery measures followed by an Imagery Interview and a measure of behavioural activation. Compared to UD, BD patients reported more 'flashforwards' compared to past memories and rated their 'flashforwards' as more vivid, exciting and pleasurable. Only the BD group found positive imagery more 'powerful', (preoccupying, 'real' and compelling) as compared to verbal thoughts. Imagery-associated pleasure predicted levels of drive and reward responsiveness in the BD group. A limitation in the study was the retrospective design. Moreover pathological and non-pathological periods of "positive" mood were not distinguished in the BD sample. This study reveals BD patients experience positive 'flashforward' imagery in positive mood, with more intense qualities than UD patients. This could contribute to the amplification of emotional states and goal directed behaviour leading into mania, and differentiate BD from UD. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Deployment Related Risk of Incident Mental Health Conditions Among Aeromedical Evacuation Crewmembers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Alliance on Mental Illness estimates that up to 33% of qualified individuals are turned down for a job due to a psychiatric label (Williamson & Mulhall...RISK OF INCIDENT MENTAL HEALTH CONDITIONS AMONG AEROMEDICAL EVACUATION CREWMEMBERS by Jennifer P. Howland September 2015 Thesis Advisor...DATE September 2015 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DEPLOYMENT RELATED RISK OF INCIDENT MENTAL HEALTH

  12. Symmetrical treatment of "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition", for major depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Sawamura, Jitsuki; Morishita, Shigeru; Ishigooka, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We previously presented a group theoretical model that describes psychiatric patient states or clinical data in a graded vector-like format based on modulo groups. Meanwhile, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5, the current version), is frequently used for diagnosis in daily psychiatric treatments and biological research. The diagnostic criteria of DSM-5 contain simple binominal items relating to the presence or absence of specific symptoms. In spite of its simple form, the practical structure of the DSM-5 system is not sufficiently systemized for data to be treated in a more rationally sophisticated way. To view the disease states in terms of symmetry in the manner of abstract algebra is considered important for the future systematization of clinical medicine. We provide a simple idea for the practical treatment of the psychiatric diagnosis/score of DSM-5 using depressive symptoms in line with our previously proposed method. An expression is given employing modulo-2 and -7 arithmetic (in particular, additive group theory) for Criterion A of a 'major depressive episode' that must be met for the diagnosis of 'major depressive disorder' in DSM-5. For this purpose, the novel concept of an imaginary value 0 that can be recognized as an explicit 0 or implicit 0 was introduced to compose the model. The zeros allow the incorporation or deletion of an item between any other symptoms if they are ordered appropriately. Optionally, a vector-like expression can be used to rate/select only specific items when modifying the criterion/scale. Simple examples are illustrated concretely. Further development of the proposed method for the criteria/scale of a disease is expected to raise the level of formalism of clinical medicine to that of other fields of natural science.

  13. Depression and Chronic Health Conditions Among Latinos: The Role of Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Soto, Sandra; Arredondo, Elva M; Villodas, Miguel T; Elder, John P; Quintanar, Elena; Madanat, Hala

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the "buffering hypothesis" of social network characteristics in the association between chronic conditions and depression among Latinos. Cross-sectional self-report data from the San Diego Prevention Research Center's community survey of Latinos were used (n = 393). Separate multiple logistic regression models tested the role of chronic conditions and social network characteristics in the likelihood of moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms. Having a greater proportion of the network comprised of friends increased the likelihood of depression among those with high cholesterol. Having a greater proportion of women in the social network was directly related to the increased likelihood of depression, regardless of the presence of chronic health conditions. Findings suggest that network characteristics may play a role in the link between chronic conditions and depression among Latinos. Future research should explore strategies targeting the social networks of Latinos to improve health outcomes.

  14. The relationship between social support networks and depression in the 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Well-being.

    PubMed

    Werner-Seidler, Aliza; Afzali, Mohammad H; Chapman, Cath; Sunderland, Matthew; Slade, Tim

    2017-09-09

    Social isolation and low levels of social support are associated with depression. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationship between depression and social connectivity factors (frequency of contact and quality of social connections) in the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-being. A national survey of 8841 participants aged 16-85 years was conducted. Logistic regression was used to investigate the relationship between social connectivity factors and 12-month prevalence of Major Depressive Disorder in the whole sample, as well as across three age groups: younger adults (16-34 years), middle-aged adults (35-54 years), and older adults (55+ years). Respondents indicated how often they were in contact with family members and friends (frequency of contact), and how many family and friends they could rely on and confide in (quality of support), and were assessed for Major Depressive Disorder using the World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostics Interview. Overall, higher social connection quality was more closely and consistently associated with lower odds of the past year depression, relative to frequency of social interaction. The exception to this was for the older group in which fewer than a single friendship interaction each month was associated with a two-fold increased likelihood of the past year depression (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.14-4.25). Friendship networks were important throughout life, although in middle adulthood, family support was also critically important-those who did not have any family support had more than a three-fold increased odds of the past year depression (OR 3.47, 95% CI 2.07-5.85). High-quality social connection with friends and family members is associated with reduced likelihood of the past year depression. Intervention studies that target the quality of social support for depression, particularly support from friends, are warranted.

  15. Park availability and major depression in individuals with chronic conditions: Is there an association in urban India?

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debarati; Safraj, S; Tayyab, Mohammad; Shivashankar, Roopa; Patel, Shivani A; Narayanan, Gitanjali; Ajay, Vamadevan S; Ali, Mohammed K; Narayan, Km Venkat; Tandon, Nikhil; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

    2017-09-01

    Green space exposure has been positively correlated with better mental-health indicators in several high income countries, but has not been examined in low- and middle-income countries undergoing rapid urbanization. Building on a study of mental health in adults with a pre-existing chronic condition, we examined the association between park availability and major depression among 1208 adults surveyed in Delhi, India. Major depression was measured using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The ArcGIS platform was used to quantify park availability indexed as (i) park distance from households, (ii) area of the nearest park; and within one km buffer area around households - the (iii) number and (iv) total area of all parks. Mixed-effects logistic regression models adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics indicated that relative to residents exposed to the largest nearest park areas (tertile 3), the odds [95% confidence interval] of major depression was 3.1 [1.4-7.0] times higher among residents exposed to the smallest nearest park areas (tertile 1) and 2.1 [0.9-4.8] times higher in residents with mid-level exposure (tertile 2). There was no statistically significant association between other park variables tested and major depression. We hypothesized that physical activity in the form of walking, perceived stress levels and satisfaction with the neighborhood environment may have mediating effects on the association between nearest park area and major depression. We found no significant mediation effects for any of our hypothesized variables. In conclusion, our results provide preliminary and novel evidence from India that availability of large parks in the immediate neighborhood positively impacts mental well-being of individuals with pre-existing chronic conditions, at the opportune time when India is embarking on the development of sustainable cities that aim to promote health through smart urban design - one of the key elements of which is the

  16. The psychosocial impact of cancer: exploring relationships between conditional goal setting and depression.

    PubMed

    Street, Helen

    2003-09-01

    This study explores depression in cancer patients with reference to conditional goal setting (CGS) theory. CGS theory proposes that depressed individuals believe that personal happiness is conditional upon attainment of specific goals (personal CGS). Other individuals may set important goals believing that goal achievement is a necessary prerequisite of social acceptance and approval (social CGS). CGS has been found to contribute to depression in normal populations. 15.2% of the 67 newly diagnosed cancer patients in this study showed clinical levels of depression. A significant relationship was identified between personal CGS, rumination and depression, as predicted in CGS theory. Two months later, 46.7% of patients demonstrated clinical levels of depression. This later experience of depression was significantly related to social CGS. The results suggest CGS involving a misdirected pursuit of happiness is initially associated with depression whereas subsequent experiences of depression are related to a misdirected pursuit of social acceptance. Implications are discussed in terms of understanding the cancer patients' motivations controlling goal setting. It is suggested that successful psychotherapy for depression in cancer patients needs to examine the motivations controlling goal setting in addition to the process of goal pursuit. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Training and testing ERP-BCIs under different mental workload conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yufeng; Wang, Peiyuan; Chen, Yuqian; Gu, Bin; Qi, Hongzhi; Zhou, Peng; Ming, Dong

    2016-02-01

    Objective. As one of the most popular and extensively studied paradigms of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), event-related potential-based BCIs (ERP-BCIs) are usually built and tested in ideal laboratory settings in most existing studies, with subjects concentrating on stimuli and intentionally avoiding possible distractors. This study is aimed at examining the effect of simultaneous mental activities on ERP-BCIs by manipulating various levels of mental workload during the training and/or testing of an ERP-BCI. Approach. Mental workload was manipulated during the training or testing of a row-column P300-speller to investigate how and to what extent the spelling performance and the ERPs evoked by the oddball stimuli are affected by simultaneous mental workload. Main results. Responses of certain ERP components, temporal-occipital N200 and the late reorienting negativity evoked by the oddball stimuli and the classifiability of ERP features between targets and non-targets decreased with the increase of mental workload encountered by the subject. However, the effect of mental workload on the performance of ERP-BCI was not always negative but depended on the conditions where the ERP-BCI was built and applied. The performance of ERP-BCI built under an ideal lab setting without any irrelevant mental activities declined with the increasing mental workload of the testing data. However, the performance was significantly improved when an ERP-BCI was built under an appropriate mental workload level, compared to that built under speller-only conditions. Significance. The adverse effect of concurrent mental activities may present a challenge for ERP-BCIs trained in ideal lab settings but which are to be used in daily work, especially when users are performing demanding mental processing. On the other hand, the positive effects of the mental workload of the training data suggest that introducing appropriate mental workload during training ERP-BCIs is of potential benefit to the

  18. Training and testing ERP-BCIs under different mental workload conditions.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yufeng; Wang, Peiyuan; Chen, Yuqian; Gu, Bin; Qi, Hongzhi; Zhou, Peng; Ming, Dong

    2016-02-01

    As one of the most popular and extensively studied paradigms of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), event-related potential-based BCIs (ERP-BCIs) are usually built and tested in ideal laboratory settings in most existing studies, with subjects concentrating on stimuli and intentionally avoiding possible distractors. This study is aimed at examining the effect of simultaneous mental activities on ERP-BCIs by manipulating various levels of mental workload during the training and/or testing of an ERP-BCI. Mental workload was manipulated during the training or testing of a row-column P300-speller to investigate how and to what extent the spelling performance and the ERPs evoked by the oddball stimuli are affected by simultaneous mental workload. Responses of certain ERP components, temporal-occipital N200 and the late reorienting negativity evoked by the oddball stimuli and the classifiability of ERP features between targets and non-targets decreased with the increase of mental workload encountered by the subject. However, the effect of mental workload on the performance of ERP-BCI was not always negative but depended on the conditions where the ERP-BCI was built and applied. The performance of ERP-BCI built under an ideal lab setting without any irrelevant mental activities declined with the increasing mental workload of the testing data. However, the performance was significantly improved when an ERP-BCI was built under an appropriate mental workload level, compared to that built under speller-only conditions. The adverse effect of concurrent mental activities may present a challenge for ERP-BCIs trained in ideal lab settings but which are to be used in daily work, especially when users are performing demanding mental processing. On the other hand, the positive effects of the mental workload of the training data suggest that introducing appropriate mental workload during training ERP-BCIs is of potential benefit to the performance in practical applications.

  19. Days Out of Role Due to Mental and Physical Conditions: Results from the Singapore Mental Health Study.

    PubMed

    Abdin, Edimansyah; Ong, Clarissa; Chong, Siow Ann; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the relative contributions of mental and physical conditions to days out of role among adults aged 18 years and above in Singapore. The Singapore Mental Health Study was a cross-sectional epidemiological survey of a nationally representative sample of residents aged 18 years or older. Diagnosis of mental disorders was established using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview; while chronic physical conditions were established using a checklist. Days out of role were assessed using a WHO Disability Assessment Schedule item. Multivariate regression analyses were used to estimate individual-level and societal-level effects of disorders. Overall, 8.7% of respondents reported at least one day out of role, with a mean of 5.8 days. The most disabling conditions at the individual level were cancer (118.9 additional days), cardiovascular diseases (93.5), and bipolar disorder (71.0). At the societal level, cardiovascular diseases contributed the highest population attributable risk proportion (45%), followed by cancer (39.3%), and hypertension (13.5%). Mental and physical conditions are linked to significant losses in productivity for society as well as role disability for individuals, underscoring the need to enhance prevention and intervention efforts to increase overall productivity and improve individual functioning.

  20. Days Out of Role Due to Mental and Physical Conditions: Results from the Singapore Mental Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Abdin, Edimansyah; Ong, Clarissa; Chong, Siow Ann; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the current study was to evaluate the relative contributions of mental and physical conditions to days out of role among adults aged 18 years and above in Singapore. Methods The Singapore Mental Health Study was a cross-sectional epidemiological survey of a nationally representative sample of residents aged 18 years or older. Diagnosis of mental disorders was established using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview; while chronic physical conditions were established using a checklist. Days out of role were assessed using a WHO Disability Assessment Schedule item. Multivariate regression analyses were used to estimate individual-level and societal-level effects of disorders. Results Overall, 8.7% of respondents reported at least one day out of role, with a mean of 5.8 days. The most disabling conditions at the individual level were cancer (118.9 additional days), cardiovascular diseases (93.5), and bipolar disorder (71.0). At the societal level, cardiovascular diseases contributed the highest population attributable risk proportion (45%), followed by cancer (39.3%), and hypertension (13.5%). Conclusions Mental and physical conditions are linked to significant losses in productivity for society as well as role disability for individuals, underscoring the need to enhance prevention and intervention efforts to increase overall productivity and improve individual functioning. PMID:26840741

  1. Multifamily psychoeducation for improvement of mental health among relatives of patients with major depressive disorder lasting more than one year: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Katsuki, Fujika; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Norio; Shiraishi, Nao; Maeda, Tohru; Kubota, Yosuke; Suzuki, Masako; Yamada, Atsurou; Akechi, Tatsuo

    2014-08-12

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a long-lasting disorder with frequent relapses that have significant effects on the patient's family. Family psychoeducation is recognized as part of the optimal treatment for patients with psychotic disorder. A previous randomized controlled trial has found that family psychoeducation is effective in enhancing the treatment of MDD. Although MDD can easily become a chronic illness, there has been no intervention study on the families of patients with chronic depression. In the present study, we design a randomized controlled trial to examine the effectiveness of family psychoeducation in improving the mental health of relatives of patients with MDD lasting more than one year. Participants are patients with MDD lasting more than one year and their relatives. Individually randomized, parallel-group trial design will be employed. Participants will be allocated to one of two treatment conditions: relatives will receive (a) family psychoeducation (four, two-hour biweekly multifamily psychoeducation sessions) plus treatment-as-usual for the patient (consultation by physicians), or (b) counseling for the family (one counseling session from a nurse) plus treatment-as-usual for the patient. The primary outcome measure will be relatives' mental health as measured by K6 that was developed to screen for DSM-IV depressive and anxiety disorder. Additionally, the severity of depressive symptoms in patients measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) scale will be assessed. Data from the intention-to-treat sample will be analyzed 16 weeks after randomization. This is the first study to evaluate the effectiveness of family psychoeducation for relatives of patients with MDD lasting more than one year. If this type of intervention is effective, it could be a new method of rehabilitation for patients with MDD lasting more than one year. Clinical Trials.gov NCT01734291 (registration date: 18 October 2012).

  2. Longitudinal Trajectory of Adolescent Exposure to Community Violence and Depressive Symptoms Among Adolescents and Young Adults: Understanding the Effect of Mental Health Service Usage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Yi; Corvo, Kenneth; Lee, Yookyong; Hahm, Hyeouk Chris

    2017-01-01

    Research on the impact of exposure to community violence tends to define victimization as a single construct. This study differentiates between direct and indirect violence victimization in their association with mental health problems and mental health service use. This study includes 8947 individuals from four waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health and examines (1) whether sub-types of adolescent victimization are linked to depressive symptoms; (2) whether adolescent victimization is linked with mental health service use; and (3) the role of mental health service use in attenuating symptoms arising from victimizations. Adolescents witnessing community violence were more likely to experience depressive symptoms during adolescence but not during their young adulthood; direct exposure to violence during adolescence does not predict depressive symptoms in adolescence but does in adulthood. Use of mental health service mediates report of depressive symptoms for adolescent witnessing community violence.

  3. Chronic physical conditions in older adults with mental illness and/ or substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Chieh; Zhang, Jianying; Leung, Gary Y; Clark, Robin E

    2011-10-01

    To examine the association between mental illness and chronic physical conditions in older adults and investigate whether co-occurring substance use disorders (SUDs) are associated with greater risk of chronic physical conditions beyond mental illness alone. A retrospective cross-sectional study. Medicare and Medicaid programs in Massachusetts. Massachusetts Medicare and Medicaid members aged 65 and older as of January 1, 2005 (N = 679,182). Diagnoses recorded on Medicare and Medicaid claims were used to identify mental illness, SUDs, and 15 selected chronic physical conditions. Community-dwelling older adults with mental illness or SUDs had higher adjusted risk for 14 of the 15 selected chronic physical conditions than those without these disorders; the only exception was eye diseases. Moreover, those with co-occurring SUDs and mental illness had the highest adjusted risk for 11 of these chronic conditions. For residents of long-term care facilities, mental illness and SUDs were only moderately associated with the risk of chronic physical conditions. Community-dwelling older adults with mental illness or SUDs, particularly when they co-occurred, had substantially greater medical comorbidity than those without these disorders. For residents of long-term care facilities, the generally uniformly high medical comorbidity may have moderated this relationship, although their high prevalence of mental illness and SUDs signified greater healthcare needs. These findings strongly suggest the imminent need for integrating general medical care, mental health services, and addiction health services for older adults with mental illness or SUDs. © 2011, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  4. Working conditions and mental health: Results from the CARESUN study.

    PubMed

    Feola, Daniela; Pedata, Paola; D'Ancicco, Francesco; Santalucia, Laura; Sannolo, Nicola; Ascione, Eduardo; Nienhaus, Albert; Magliano, Lorenza; Lamberti, Monica

    2016-05-03

    The authors conducted a work-related stress surveillance study in 2013 on 6,558 public-sector employees in Italy, examining how they perceived their jobs, via the Job Content Questionnaire, and their mental health status, via the General Health Questionnaire 12 (GHQ-12). Of the 2,094 employees completing the questionnaires, 60% were male, 52% had a medium-level education, and 76% had a medium-level job. Three hundred and eighty-five employees (18%) had a GHQ-12 score >3 and were classified as GHQ-12 cases: these were more often female (54%), medium-to-highly educated (54%), and had more often reported health problems over the previous year (51%). Thus, GHQ-12 cases represented a significant percentage of the examined population, indicating that work-related stress surveillance programs are needed for the planning of psychosocial interventions aimed at the reintegration of individuals with mental health problems.

  5. Visual grouping under isoluminant condition: impact of mental fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pladere, Tatjana; Bete, Diana; Skilters, Jurgis; Krumina, Gunta

    2016-09-01

    Instead of selecting arbitrary elements our visual perception prefers only certain grouping of information. There is ample evidence that the visual attention and perception is substantially impaired in the presence of mental fatigue. The question is how visual grouping, which can be considered a bottom-up controlled neuronal gain mechanism, is influenced. The main purpose of our study is to determine the influence of mental fatigue on visual grouping of definite information - color and configuration of stimuli in the psychophysical experiment. Individuals provided subjective data by filling in the questionnaire about their health and general feeling. The objective evidence was obtained in the specially designed visual search task were achromatic and chromatic isoluminant stimuli were used in order to avoid so called pop-out effect due to differences in light intensity. Each individual was instructed to define the symbols with aperture in the same direction in four tasks. The color component differed in the visual search tasks according to the goals of study. The results reveal that visual grouping is completed faster when visual stimuli have the same color and aperture direction. The shortest reaction time is in the evening. What is more, the results of reaction time suggest that the analysis of two grouping processes compete for selective attention in the visual system when similarity in color conflicts with similarity in configuration of stimuli. The described effect increases significantly in the presence of mental fatigue. But it does not have strong influence on the accuracy of task accomplishment.

  6. Self-Rated Mental Health: Screening for Depression and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Women Exposed to Perinatal Intimate Partner Violence.

    PubMed

    Kastello, Jennifer C; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Gaffney, Kathleen F; Kodadek, Marie P; Bullock, Linda C; Sharps, Phyllis W

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the validity of a single-item, self-rated mental health (SRMH) measure in the identification of women at risk for depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Baseline data of 239 low-income women participating in an intimate partner violence (IPV) intervention study were analyzed. PTSD was measured with the Davidson Trauma Scale. Risk for depression was determined using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. SRMH was assessed with a single item asking participants to rate their mental health at the time of the baseline interview. Single-item measures can be an efficient way to increase the proportion of patients screened for mental health disorders. Although SRMH is not a strong indicator of PTSD, it may be useful in identifying pregnant women who are at increased risk for depression and need further comprehensive assessment in the clinical setting. Future research examining the use of SRMH among high-risk populations is needed. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Explaining heterogeneity in disability associated with current major depressive disorder: effects of illness characteristics and comorbid mental disorders.

    PubMed

    van der Werff, E; Verboom, C E; Penninx, B W J H; Nolen, W A; Ormel, J

    2010-12-01

    Although major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with disability, some persons do function well despite their illness. Aim of the present study was to examine the effect of illness characteristics and comorbid mental disorders on various aspects of disability among persons with a current MDD episode. Data were derived from 607 participants with a current MDD based on the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Severity was assessed via the Inventory of Depressive Symptoms self-report (IDS-SR). For disability three outcome measures were used: World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHODAS) disability and its 7 dimensions, days out of role, and work absence. Using multiple regression analysis the effects of MDD characteristics and comorbid mental disorders were estimated. The IDS-SR score was the best predictor of all disability outcomes. Of the comorbid mental disorders, agoraphobia was significantly associated with overall disability. Collectively, all illness characteristics accounted for 43% of variance in WHODAS disability, 13% in days out of role and 10% in work absence, suggesting substantial unexplained variance. Only self-report measures of disability were used. There were no assessments of other diagnoses than depressive, anxiety and alcohol use disorders. Although heterogeneity in disability of persons with current MDD is partially explained by illness characteristics of MDD (especially symptom severity) and comorbid mental disorders, most of the variance is not accounted for. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Besides Depression, Number of Physiological Diseases is More Important than Physical Function on Mental Health of Elderly Adults in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, Ren-Hau; Wu, Yi-Ying; Tsang, Hin-Yeung

    2017-02-01

    This study contrasted the relative importance between the number of physiological diseases and activities of daily living (ADLs) to the mental health of elderly adults after controlling for mini-mental state exam (MMSE) scores and depression. Participants were 1342 elderly people with a mean age of 73.22 years and living in three communities in southern Taiwan. Age, gender, years of education duration, marital status, and MMSE and hamilton depression rating scale (HAMD) scores were control variables. The ability of the ADLs scale scores and number of physiological diseases to predict mental health, as measured by the 12-item Chinese health questionnaire, was compared using hierarchical regression analyses. The final hierarchical model indicated that only HAMD and the number of physiological diseases scores were significant and that the former was much more predictive than the latter. The results imply that the number of physiological diseases is more predictive of mental health than ADLs scores and that depression is a dangerous risk factor for elderly people.

  9. Effects of comorbid health conditions on healthcare expenditures among people with severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungkyu; Rothbard, Aileen; Choi, Sunha

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about the incremental cost burden associated with treating comorbid health conditions among people with severe mental illness (SMI). This study compares the extent to which each individual medical condition increases healthcare expenditures between people with SMI and people without mental illness. Data were obtained from the 2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS; N = 17 764). Mental illness and physical health conditions were identified through ICD-9 codes. Guided by the Andersen's behavioral model of health services utilization, generalized linear models were conducted. Total healthcare expenditures among individuals with SMI were approximately 3.3 times greater than expenditures by individuals without mental illness ($11 399 vs. $3449, respectively). Each additional physical health condition increased the total healthcare expenditure by 17.4% for individuals with SMI compared to the 44.8% increase for individuals without mental illness. The cost effect of having additional health conditions on the total healthcare expenditures among individuals with SMI is smaller than those individuals without mental illness. Whether this is due to limited access to healthcare for the medical problems or better coordination between medical and mental health providers, which reduces duplicated medical procedures or visits, requires future investigation.

  10. Days out of role due to common physical and mental conditions: results from the WHO World Mental Health surveys

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, J; Petukhova, M; Vilagut, G; Chatterji, S; Heeringa, S; Üstün, T B; Alhamzawi, A O; Viana, M C; Angermeyer, M; Bromet, E; Bruffaerts, R; de Girolamo, G; Florescu, S; Gureje, O; Haro, J M; Hinkov, H; Hu, C-y; Karam, E G; Kovess, V; Levinson, D; Medina-Mora, M E; Nakamura, Y; Ormel, J; Posada-Villa, J; Sagar, R; Scott, K M; Tsang, A; Williams, D R; Kessler, R C

    2011-01-01

    Days out of role because of health problems are a major source of lost human capital. We examined the relative importance of commonly occurring physical and mental disorders in accounting for days out of role in 24 countries that participated in the World Health Organization (WHO) World Mental Health (WMH) surveys. Face-to-face interviews were carried out with 62 971 respondents (72.0% pooled response rate). Presence of ten chronic physical disorders and nine mental disorders was assessed for each respondent along with information about the number of days in the past month each respondent reported being totally unable to work or carry out their other normal daily activities because of problems with either physical or mental health. Multiple regression analysis was used to estimate associations of specific conditions and comorbidities with days out of role, controlling by basic socio-demographics (age, gender, employment status and country). Overall, 12.8% of respondents had some day totally out of role, with a median of 51.1 a year. The strongest individual-level effects (days out of role per year) were associated with neurological disorders (17.4), bipolar disorder (17.3) and post-traumatic stress disorder (15.2). The strongest population-level effect was associated with pain conditions, which accounted for 21.5% of all days out of role (population attributable risk proportion). The 19 conditions accounted for 62.2% of all days out of role. Common health conditions, including mental disorders, make up a large proportion of the number of days out of role across a wide range of countries and should be addressed to substantially increase overall productivity. PMID:20938433

  11. Effects of a mental task on splanchnic blood flow in fasting and postprandial conditions.

    PubMed

    Someya, Nami; Endo, Masako Yamaoka; Fukuba, Yoshiyuki; Hirooka, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Naoyuki

    2010-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a mental task attenuates the meal-induced vasodilation in the splanchnic vasculature. Ten subjects performed a 5-min colour-word conflict test (CWT) under fasting and postprandial conditions. Subjects in the postprandial condition had ingested solid food with an energy content of 300 kcal (1,255 kJ) before either performing the CWT (mental task trial) or resting (resting control trial). The mean blood velocities (MBV) in the coeliac artery (CA) and superior mesenteric artery (SMA), and the mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured. The MBV in the CA and SMA were divided by the MAP to assess the vascular conductance (VC). The MBV in the CA and SMA were significantly increased by the CWT under fasting conditions. In the postprandial condition, the MBV in the CA and SMA significantly increased immediately after the meal in both the mental task and resting control trials. The VC in the SMA, but not in the CA, was significantly decreased by the CWT under fasting conditions. In the postprandial conditions, there was no significant difference in the VC in both arteries between mental task and resting control trials. These results suggest that a mental task exerts different effects on the CA and SMA under fasting but not postprandial condition. The vasoconstrictive effect of a mental task on the SMA does not counter the vasodilatory effect of meal ingestion.

  12. Mental health status, including depression and quality of life among members of an elderly club in suburban Bangkok.

    PubMed

    Kosulwit, Lampu

    2012-01-01

    Evolution of medical technologies extent human life expectancy. The United Nations found Thai elderly population were increased rapidly compared with other developing countries. Global estimations of the burden of disease show that mental illness plays a prominent role. Elderly club is one of the several ways to promote social interaction, gain self esteem, slow progression of physical and mental disabilities in old age people. However, the activities which certainly proper for each elderly group remains unclear because various demographic data background of elderly in each area. To determine the mental health status, including depression and quality of life among members of the Thammasat hospital elderly club which covers elderly members in northen Bangkok, Pathumthani and Ayutthaya province. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Seventy members were sampled for interview from 207 members. The assessment tools were Thai Mental Health Indicator (TMHI-54), Thai Geriatric Depression Scale (TGDS), Stress self assessment questionnaire, and World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief-Thai Version (WHOQOL-BREF-THAI). The majority of the sample was females (78.6%). The age ranged from 60 to 84 years old (mean 70.24). The prevalences of psychological problems were; poor mental health (12.90%), depression (5.7%) and stress (15.2%). The sample reported poorer quality of life on 3 sub-domains of WHOQOL; physical (2.9%), psychological (1.4%) and social relationship (4.30%) domains. The level of depression, reported by those who had not enough income, was significantly higher than those who had enough income (p = 0.022). Quality of life (physical and social relationship domain) among those aged younger than 70 years, was better than that among those aged 70 or older (p = 0.024 and p = 0.023 respectively). Quality of life (psychological domain) among those who had not enough income, was significantly poorer than those with enough income (p = 0.020). Quality of

  13. An Evaluation of IMPACT for the Treatment of Late-Life Depression in a Public Mental Health System.

    PubMed

    Penkunas, Michael J; Hahn-Smith, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    IMPACT (Improving Mood--Promoting Access to Collaborative Treatment) has a large body of evidence demonstrating its effectiveness for treating late-life depression in clients enrolled in a clinical research study, but little is known about how well the collaborative care model translates into treatment provided in a public mental health setting. This evaluation examines the influence of clinical and demographic characteristics in 112 older adults treated for late-life depression through publicly funded IMPACT in a large San Francisco Bay Area county. Depression severity decreased for 85% of clients between enrollment and treatments' end and 46% of clients realized a 50% reduction in symptom severity. Depression severity at enrollment, number of treatment sessions attended, ethnicity, and gender reliably predicted depression severity at the end of treatment. Men, clients attending more therapy sessions, and clients without substance abuse diagnoses had an increased likelihood of realizing a 50% reduction in symptoms. Results highlight the success of this evidence-based treatment program offered through the public mental health system but suggest that the demographic and clinical characteristics of the population being treated must be considered when adopting evidence-based practices.

  14. Women's experiences of participating in a prospective, longitudinal postpartum depression study: insights for perinatal mental health researchers.

    PubMed

    Andrighetti, Heather J; Semaka, Alicia; Austin, Jehannine C

    2017-08-01

    Barriers to recruitment for research on mental illness include participant distrust of researchers and social stigma. Though these issues may be acutely important in perinatal mental health research, they remain unexplored in this context. In order to inform strategies to more fully engage women in perinatal mental health research, we explored the motivations and experiences of women with a history of major depressive disorder who participated in a prospective longitudinal research study on postpartum depression (PPD). Sixteen women with a history of depression who had either completed or recently made a decision about participation in a longitudinal research study about PPD were interviewed by telephone. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews explored participants' decision-making about, and experiences of, participation. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and qualitatively analyzed using elements of grounded theory methodology. Follow-up interviews were conducted with four participants to refine and clarify preliminary results. Foundational elements necessary for women to consider participating in PPD research included personal acceptance of illness and trust in the research team/institution. Other main motivators included perceived personal relevance, anticipated benefits (including access to support/resources, learning opportunities, and improved self-worth), altruism, and accessible study procedures. Our data suggest that participating in perinatal mental health research may help women make meaning of their mental illness experience and is perceived as providing support. The findings-particularly around the importance of participant-researcher rapport and accessibility of study design-may inform strategies that improve participation rates, decrease attrition, and maximize participant benefits in perinatal mental health research.

  15. The devil's in the detail: Accessibility of specific personal memories supports rose-tinted self-generalizations in mental health and toxic self-generalizations in clinical depression.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, Caitlin; Rees, Catrin; Dalgleish, Tim

    2017-09-01

    Models of memory propose that separate systems underpin the storage and recollection of specific events from our past (e.g., the first day at school), and of the generic structure of our experiences (e.g., how lonely I am), and that interplay between these systems serves to optimize everyday cognition. Specifically, it is proposed that memories of discrete events help define the circumstances (boundary conditions) in which our generalized knowledge applies, thereby enhancing accuracy of memory-dependent cognitive processes. However, in the domain of self-judgment, cognition is systematically biased, with a robust self-enhancement bias characterizing healthy individuals and a negativity bias characterizing the clinically depressed. We hypothesized that self-enhancement effects in the mentally healthy may partly rest on an impaired ability for specific memories to set appropriate boundary conditions on positive self-generalizations, while the opposite may be true for self-referred negative traits in the depressed. To assess this, we asked healthy and depressed individuals to think about the applicability of a trait to themselves, then to recall a specific memory that was inconsistent with that trait which would therefore index a boundary condition for its applicability. Healthy individuals showed faster recall only for specific positive memories following negative trait evaluations, while depressed individuals demonstrated faster recall only of specific negative memories following positive trait evaluations-the pattern expected given the respective self-enhancement and negativity biases. Results suggest that specific memories may serve to delimit self-generalizations in biased ways, and thus support systemic biases in trait judgments characteristic of healthy and depressed individuals. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Predictors of depressive mood, occupational stress, and propensity to leave in older and younger mental health case managers.

    PubMed

    Gellis, Zvi D; Kim, Jong Chun

    2004-10-01

    Age differences and relationships between occupational stressors, work environment, depressed mood, and propensity to leave were examined among 263 case managers (CMs) in community-based mental health agencies. For younger CMs, satisfaction with the supervisor, perceived job pressure and lack of organizational support were significant predictors of propensity to leave the job. Older CMs who reported lower satisfaction with financial rewards, the type of work they did, and greater use of avoidance/resignation and help seeking coping strategies, were more likely to rate themselves higher on the depressed mood scale.

  17. Talking about depression: a qualitative study of barriers to managing depression in people with long term conditions in primary care.

    PubMed

    Coventry, Peter A; Hays, Rebecca; Dickens, Chris; Bundy, Christine; Garrett, Charlotte; Cherrington, Andrea; Chew-Graham, Carolyn

    2011-03-22

    The risk of depression is increased in people with long term conditions (LTCs) and is associated with poorer patient outcomes for both the depressive illness and the LTC, but often remains undetected and poorly managed. The aim of this study was to identify and explore barriers to detecting and managing depression in primary care in people with two exemplar LTCs: diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD). Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 19 healthcare professionals drawn predominately from primary care, along with 7 service users and 3 carers (n = 29). One focus group was then held with a set of 6 healthcare professionals and a set of 7 service users and 1 carer (n = 14). Interviews and the focus group were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed independently. The two data sets were then inspected for commonalities using a constant comparative method, leading to a final thematic framework used in this paper. Barriers to detecting and managing depression in people with LTCs in primary care exist: i) when practitioners in partnership with patients conceptualise depression as a common and understandable response to the losses associated with LTCs - depression in the presence of LTCs is normalised, militating against its recognition and treatment; ii) where highly performanced managed consultations under the terms of the Quality and Outcomes Framework encourage reductionist approaches to case-finding in people with CHD and diabetes, and iii) where there is uncertainty among practitioners about how to negotiate labels for depression in people with LTCs in ways that might facilitate shared understanding and future management. Depression was often normalised in the presence of LTCs, obviating rather than facilitating further assessment and management. Furthermore, structural constraints imposed by the QOF encouraged reductionist approaches to case-finding for depression in consultations for CHD and diabetes. Future work might focus on

  18. Smartphone ownership and interest in mobile applications to monitor symptoms of mental health conditions.

    PubMed

    Torous, John; Friedman, Rohn; Keshavan, Matcheri

    2014-01-21

    Patient retrospective recollection is a mainstay of assessing symptoms in mental health and psychiatry. However, evidence suggests that these retrospective recollections may not be as accurate as data collection though the experience sampling method (ESM), which captures patient data in "real time" and "real life." However, the difficulties in practical implementation of ESM data collection have limited its impact in psychiatry and mental health. Smartphones with the capability to run mobile applications may offer a novel method of collecting ESM data that may represent a practical and feasible tool for mental health and psychiatry. This paper aims to provide data on psychiatric patients' prevalence of smartphone ownership, patterns of use, and interest in utilizing mobile applications to monitor their mental health conditions. One hundred psychiatric outpatients at a large urban teaching hospital completed a paper-and-pencil survey regarding smartphone ownership, use, and interest in utilizing mobile applications to monitor their mental health condition. Ninety-seven percent of patients reported owning a phone and 72% reported that their phone was a smartphone. Patients in all age groups indicated greater than 50% interest in using a mobile application on a daily basis to monitor their mental health condition. Smartphone and mobile applications represent a practical opportunity to explore new modalities of monitoring, treatment, and research of psychiatric and mental health conditions.

  19. Guided self-help interventions for mental health disorders in children with neurological conditions: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Sophie; Heyman, Isobel; Coughtrey, Anna; Simmonds, Jess; Varadkar, Sophia; Stephenson, Terence; DeJong, Margaret; Shafran, Roz

    2016-11-04

    Rates of mental health disorders are significantly greater in children with physical illnesses than in physically well children. Children with neurological conditions, such as epilepsy, are known to have particularly high rates of mental health disorders. Despite this, mental health problems in children with neurological conditions have remained under-recognised and under-treated in clinical settings. Evidence-based guided self-help interventions are efficacious in reducing symptoms of mental health disorders in children, but their efficacy in reducing symptoms of common mental health disorders in children with neurological conditions has not been investigated. We aim to pilot a guided self-help intervention for the treatment of mental health disorders in children with neurological conditions. A pilot randomised controlled trial with 18 patients with neurological conditions and mental health disorders will be conducted. Participants attending specialist neurology clinics at a National UK Children's Hospital will be randomised to receive guided self-help for common mental health disorders or to a 12-week waiting list control. Participants in the treatment group will receive 10 sessions of guided self-help delivered over the telephone. The waiting list control group will receive the intervention after a waiting period of 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure is reduction in symptoms of mental health disorders. Exclusion criteria are limited to those at significant risk of harm to self or others, the presence of primary mental health disorder other than anxiety, depression or disruptive behaviour (e.g. psychosis, eating disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder) or intellectual disability at a level meaning potential participants would be unable to access the intervention. The study has ethical approval from the Camden and Islington NHS Research Ethics Committee, registration number 14.LO.1353. Results will be disseminated to patients, the wider public, clinicians and

  20. Chronic medical conditions mediate the association between depression and cardiovascular disease mortality.

    PubMed

    Atlantis, Evan; Shi, Zumin; Penninx, Brenda J W H; Wittert, Gary A; Taylor, Anne; Almeida, Osvaldo P

    2012-04-01

    To determine whether chronic medical conditions mediate the association between depression and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. Data analyzed were from 6,394 subjects aged 25-74 years who participated in extensive health examinations in the NHEFS conducted between 1971 and 1975 and follow-up studies to 1992. CVD mortality was the endpoint. Depression predictors were clinically significant depressive symptoms at baseline by the GWB-D, and/or at 1982-1984 by the CES-D ('baseline', 'new', or 'twice' depression). Chronic conditions were prevalent/incident high blood pressure, diabetes, and non-fatal CVD by examination and/or self-report. Mediation effects were assessed by stepwise adjustments of covariates and additive interactions in competing risks regression models (accounting for other mortality causes) and logit models. Baseline, new, and twice depression were significant predictors of CVD mortality in competing-risks models adjusted for demographics (HRs 1.3, 1.4, and 2.0), but effects were progressively weakened and became non-significant after adjustment for lifestyle factors, prevalent and incident medical conditions, respectively. CVD mortality risk was 80% higher for depression plus incident non-fatal CVD than without (HR 4.0 vs. 3.2, additive interaction), and mediation effects of depression via chronic medical conditions (particularly via incident non-fatal CVD) increased the risk by 2-11% in logit models, independent of all covariates. Several levels of evidence suggest that the association between depression and CVD mortality is partially mediated by prevalent/incident chronic medical conditions, as well as unhealthy lifestyle behaviors. Patients presenting with clinically significant depressive symptoms, particularly if persistent, should be assessed for both chronic conditions and lifestyle risk factors.

  1. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... The depression generally lifts during spring and summer. Bipolar disorder is different from depression but is included in this list is because someone with bipolar disorder experiences episodes of extreme low moods (depression). But ...

  2. Implicit Mentalizing Persists beyond Early Childhood and Is Profoundly Impaired in Children with Autism Spectrum Condition

    PubMed Central

    Schuwerk, Tobias; Jarvers, Irina; Vuori, Maria; Sodian, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Implicit mentalizing, a fast, unconscious and rigid way of processing other’s mental states has recently received much interest in typical social cognitive development in early childhood and in adults with autism spectrum condition (ASC). This research suggests that already infants implicitly mentalize, and that adults with ASC have a sustained implicit mentalizing deficit. Yet, we have only sparse empirical evidence on implicit mentalizing beyond early childhood, and deviations thereof in children with ASC. Here, we administered an implicit mentalizing eye tracking task to assess the sensitivity to false beliefs to a group of 8-year-old children with and without ASC, matched for chronological age, verbal and non-verbal IQ. As previous research suggested that presenting outcomes of belief-based actions leads to fast learning from experience and false belief-congruent looking behavior in adults with ASC, we were also interested in whether already children with ASC learn from such information. Our results provide support for a persistent implicit mentalizing ability in neurotypical development beyond early childhood. Further, they confirmed an implicit mentalizing deficit in children with ASC, even when they are closely matched to controls for explicit mentalizing skills. In contrast to previous findings with adults, no experience-based modulation of anticipatory looking was observed. It seems that children with ASC have not yet developed compensatory general purpose learning mechanisms. The observed intact explicit, but impaired implicit mentalizing in ASC, and correlation patterns between mentalizing tasks and executive function tasks, are in line with theories on two dissociable mentalizing systems. PMID:27840620

  3. Keep calm and carry on: Mental disorder is not more "organic" than any other medical condition.

    PubMed

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J A; Quiles, C; Masson, M

    2017-03-24

    Psychiatry as a discipline should no longer be grounded in the dualistic opposition between organic and mental disorders. This non-dualistic position refusing the partition along functional versus organic lines is in line with Jean Delay, and with Robert Spitzer who wanted to include in the definition of mental disorder discussed by the DSM-III task force the statement that "mental disorders are a subset of medical disorders". However, it is interesting to note that Spitzer and colleagues ingeniously introduced the definition of "mental disorder" in the DSM-III in the following statement: "there is no satisfactory definition that specifies precise boundaries for the concept "mental disorder" (also true for such concepts as physical disorder and mental and physical health)". Indeed, as for "mental disorders", it is as difficult to define what they are as it is to define what constitutes a "physical disorder". The problem is not the words "mental" or "organic" but the word "disorder". In this line, Wakefield has proposed a useful "harmful dysfunction" analysis of mental disorder. They raise the issue of the dualistic opposition between organic and mental disorders, and situate the debate rather between the biological/physiological and the social. The paper provides a brief analysis of this shift on the question of what is a mental disorder, and demonstrates that a mental disorder is not more "organic" than any other medical condition. While establishing a dichotomy between organic and psychiatry is no longer intellectually tenable, the solution is not to reduce psychiatric and non-psychiatric disorders to the level of "organic disorders" but rather to continue to adopt both a critical and clinically pertinent approach to what constitutes a "disorder" in medicine. Copyright © 2017 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Predicting the Impact of the 2011 Conflict in Libya on Population Mental Health: PTSD and Depression Prevalence and Mental Health Service Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Charlson, Fiona J.; Steel, Zachary; Degenhardt, Louisa; Chey, Tien; Silove, Derrick; Marnane, Claire; Whiteford, Harvey A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Mental disorders are likely to be elevated in the Libyan population during the post-conflict period. We estimated cases of severe PTSD and depression and related health service requirements using modelling from existing epidemiological data and current recommended mental health service targets in low and middle income countries (LMIC’s). Methods Post-conflict prevalence estimates were derived from models based on a previously conducted systematic review and meta-regression analysis of mental health among populations living in conflict. Political terror ratings and intensity of exposure to traumatic events were used in predictive models. Prevalence of severe cases was applied to chosen populations along with uncertainty ranges. Six populations deemed to be affected by the conflict were chosen for modelling: Misrata (population of 444,812), Benghazi (pop. 674,094), Zintan (pop. 40,000), displaced people within Tripoli/Zlitan (pop. 49,000), displaced people within Misrata (pop. 25,000) and Ras Jdir camps (pop. 3,700). Proposed targets for service coverage, resource utilisation and full-time equivalent staffing for management of severe cases of major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are based on a published model for LMIC’s. Findings Severe PTSD prevalence in populations exposed to a high level of political terror and traumatic events was estimated at 12.4% (95%CI 8.5–16.7) and was 19.8% (95%CI 14.0–26.3) for severe depression. Across all six populations (total population 1,236,600), the conflict could be associated with 123,200 (71,600–182,400) cases of severe PTSD and 228,100 (134,000–344,200) cases of severe depression; 50% of PTSD cases were estimated to co-occur with severe depression. Based upon service coverage targets, approximately 154 full-time equivalent staff would be required to respond to these cases sufficiently which is substantially below the current level of resource estimates for these regions. Discussion

  5. Depressive symptoms and access to mental health care in women screened for postpartum depression who lose health insurance coverage after delivery: findings from the Translating Research into Practice for Postpartum Depression (TRIPPD) effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Bobo, William V; Wollan, Peter; Lewis, Greg; Bertram, Susan; Kurland, Margary J; Vore, Kimberle; Yawn, Barbara P

    2014-09-01

    To determine the impact of losing health insurance coverage on perceived need for and access to mental health care in women screened for postpartum depression (PPD) in primary care settings. The study sample included 2343 women enrolled in a 12-month, multisite, randomized trial that compared clinical outcomes of a comprehensive PPD screening and management program with usual care (March 1, 2006, through August 31, 2010). Screening for PPD occurred at the first postpartum visit (5-12 weeks) using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale followed by the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Insurance status during the prenatal period, at delivery, and during the first postpartum year and perceived need for and access to mental health care during the first postpartum year were assessed via questionnaires completed by individual patients and participating practices. Rates of uninsured increased from 3.8% during pregnancy and delivery (n=87 of 2317) to 10.8% at the first postpartum visit (n=253 of 2343) and 13.7% at any subsequent visit to the practice after 2 months post partum (n=226 of 1646) (P<.001, both comparisons vs baseline). For patients with data on insurance type during follow-up, insurance loss occurred primarily in Medicaid beneficiaries. Nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire scores and self-reported need for mental health care did not differ significantly between patients who remained insured and those who lost insurance during the first postpartum year. However, of patients who reported the need for mental health care, 61.1% of the uninsured (n=66 of 108) vs 27.1% of the insured (n=49 of 181) reported an inability to obtain mental health care (P<.001). Loss of insurance during the first postpartum year did not significantly affect depressive symptoms or perceived need for mental health care but did adversely affect self-reported ability to obtain mental health care. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by

  6. Depression - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - depression ... Depression is a medical condition. If you think you may be depressed, see a health care provider. ... following organizations are good sources of information on depression : American Psychological Association -- www.apa.org/topics/depress/ ...

  7. Effects of common mental disorders and physical conditions on role functioning in Spain.

    PubMed

    Barbaglia, Gabriela; Duran, Núria; Vilagut, Gemma; Forero, Carlos García; Haro, Josep Maria; Alonso, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effects of common mental disorders and physical conditions on role functioning in Spain. Cross-sectional study of the general adult population of Spain (n = 2,121). Non-psychotic mental disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 3.0) and physical conditions with a checklist. The role functioning dimension of the WHO-Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS) was used to asses the number of days in the past month in which respondents were fully or partially limited to perform daily activities. Generalized linear models were used to estimate individual-level associations of specific conditions and role functioning, controlling for co-morbidity. Societal level estimates were calculated using population attributable risk proportions (PARP). Mental disorders and physical conditions showed similar number of days with full role limitation (about 20 days per year); in contrast mental disorders were responsible for twice as many days with partial role limitation than physical conditions (42 vs 21 days, respectively). If the population were entirely unexposed to mental and physical conditions, days with full limitation would be reduced by 73% and days with partial limitation by 41%. Common health conditions in Spain are associated with considerably more days with role limitation than other Western countries. There is need of mainstreaming disability in the Spanish public health agenda in order to reduce role limitation among individuals with common conditions. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Fear conditioning and extinction in anxiety- and depression-prone persons.

    PubMed

    Dibbets, Pauline; van den Broek, Anne; Evers, Elisabeth A T

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety and depression frequently co-occur and may share similar deficits in the processing of emotional stimuli. High anxiety is associated with a failure in the acquisition and extinction of fear conditioning. Despite the supposed common deficits, no research has been conducted on fear acquisition and extinction in depression. The main aim of the present study was to investigate and compare fear acquisition and extinction in anxiety- and depression-prone participants. Non-clinical anxious, depressive, anxious-depressive and control participants performed a fear discrimination task. During acquisition, the CS+ predicted an aversive event (unconditioned stimulus, US) and the CS- safety (no US). During extinction, the CS+ was no longer followed by the US, rendering it (temporarily) into a safety signal. On each CS participants rated their US expectancy; skin conductance responses (SCRs) were measured throughout. The expectancy scores indicated that high anxiety resulted in less safety learning during acquisition and extinction; no effect of depression was observed. SCRs showed that high-anxiety persons displayed less discrimination learning (CS+ minus CS-) during acquisition than low-anxiety persons. During extinction, high-depression persons demonstrated more discriminative SCR than low-depression persons. The observed discrepancies in response patterns of high-anxiety and -depression persons seem to indicate distinctive information processing of emotional stimuli.

  9. Relapse prevention in major depressive disorder: Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy versus an active control condition.

    PubMed

    Shallcross, Amanda J; Gross, James J; Visvanathan, Pallavi D; Kumar, Niketa; Palfrey, Amy; Ford, Brett Q; Dimidjian, Sona; Shirk, Stephen; Holm-Denoma, Jill; Goode, Kari M; Cox, Erica; Chaplin, William; Mauss, Iris B

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the comparative effectiveness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) versus an active control condition (ACC) for depression relapse prevention, depressive symptom reduction, and improvement in life satisfaction. Ninety-two participants in remission from major depressive disorder with residual depressive symptoms were randomized to either an 8-week MBCT or a validated ACC that is structurally equivalent to MBCT and controls for nonspecific effects (e.g., interaction with a facilitator, perceived social support, treatment outcome expectations). Both interventions were delivered according to their published manuals. Intention-to-treat analyses indicated no differences between MBCT and ACC in depression relapse rates or time to relapse over a 60-week follow-up. Both groups experienced significant and equal reductions in depressive symptoms and improvements in life satisfaction. A significant quadratic interaction (Group × Time) indicated that the pattern of depressive symptom reduction differed between groups. The ACC experienced immediate symptom reduction postintervention and then a gradual increase over the 60-week follow-up. The MBCT group experienced a gradual linear symptom reduction. The pattern for life satisfaction was identical but only marginally significant. MBCT did not differ from an ACC on rates of depression relapse, symptom reduction, or life satisfaction, suggesting that MBCT is no more effective for preventing depression relapse and reducing depressive symptoms than the active components of the ACC. Differences in trajectory of depressive symptom improvement suggest that the intervention-specific skills acquired may be associated with differential rates of therapeutic benefit. This study demonstrates the importance of comparing psychotherapeutic interventions to active control conditions. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Relapse Prevention in Major Depressive Disorder: Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Versus an Active Control Condition

    PubMed Central

    Shallcross, Amanda J.; Gross, James J.; Visvanathan, Pallavi D.; Kumar, Niketa; Palfrey, Amy; Ford, Brett Q.; Dimidjian, Sona; Shirk, Stephen; Holm-Denoma, Jill; Goode, Kari M.; Cox, Erica; Chaplin, William; Mauss, Iris B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the comparative effectiveness of Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) versus an active control condition (ACC) for depression relapse prevention, depressive symptom reduction, and improvement in life satisfaction. Method Ninety-two participants in remission from Major Depressive Disorder with residual depressive symptoms were randomized to either an 8-week MBCT or a validated ACC that is structurally equivalent to MBCT and controls for non-specific effects (e.g., interaction with a facilitator, perceived social support, treatment outcome expectations). Both interventions were delivered according to their published manuals. Results Intention-to-treat analyses indicated no differences between MBCT and ACC in depression relapse rates or time to relapse over a 60-week follow-up. Both groups experienced significant and equal reductions in depressive symptoms and improvements in life satisfaction. A significant quadratic interaction (group x time) indicated that the pattern of depressive symptom reduction differed between groups. The ACC experienced immediate symptom reduction post-intervention and then a gradual increase over the 60-week follow-up. The MBCT group experienced a gradual linear symptom reduction. The pattern for life satisfaction was identical but only marginally significant. Conclusions MBCT did not differ from an ACC on rates of depression relapse, symptom reduction, or life satisfaction, suggesting that MBCT is no more effective for preventing depression relapse and reducing depressive symptoms than the active components of the ACC. Differences in trajectory of depressive symptom improvement suggest that the intervention-specific skills acquired may be associated with differential rates of therapeutic benefit. This study demonstrates the importance of comparing psychotherapeutic interventions to active control conditions. PMID:26371618

  11. [Depression and Anxiety Disorders and Associated Factors in the Adult Colombian Population, 2015 National Mental Health Survey].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie; Bohórquez, Adriana; Rondón, Martín; Medina Rico, Mauricio; Rengifo, Hernet; Bautisa, Nubia

    2016-12-01

    Mental disorders are the first causes of disability adjusted life years (DALY), contributing with the 7.4%. This value increases as the DALYs of the transmittable diseases decrease. To determine the prevalence and associated factors of the major depressive and anxious disorders. Data obtained from the IV Mental Health Survey with representation from 5 regions. A computerised interview was conducted, focusing on the most frequent anxiety and depressive disorders, using the CIDI CAPI 3.0. A sample of 10,870 adults over 18 years old was obtained. The lifetime prevalence of any of these disorders is 10.1% (95% CI: 8.8-11.5) in the population between 18 and 44 years, and of 7.7% (95% CI: 6.5-9.1) in those older than 45 years. The prevalence in the last 12 months was 5.1% (95% CI: 4.3-6.0) in the younger group, and 2.3% (95% CI: 1.8-3.0) in the older group. Of the people with evaluated mental disorders, 17.6% (95% CI: 13.1-23.4) had 2 or more disorders, a comorbidity that is more common in the female population (20.4%, 95% CI: 14.2-28.3) than in males (13.5%, 95% CI: 7.9-22.0). Major depressive disorder is the most prevalent of the disorders, with a lifetime prevalence of 4.3% (95% CI: 3.7-5.0). After adjusting in a multivariate model, being divorced or widowed (OR=1.3), previous suicide attempt (OR=3.3), and having 6 or more features of border-line personality, were associated with an increased risk of presenting with any of the studied disorders. Anxiety and depressive mental disorders are an important health burden in Colombia. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España.

  12. Depression and anxiety among mothers who bring their children to a pediatric mental health clinic.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Holly A; Shear, M Katherine; Wren, Frances J; Greeno, Catherine G; Sales, Esther; Sullivan, Beverly K; Ludewig, Diane P

    2005-09-01

    Maternal psychiatric illness is a potent risk factor for child psychiatric disorders, but little is known about rates of psychiatric diagnoses among mothers who bring their children to pediatric mental health clinics. This study investigated rates of psychiatric disorders among mothers of children presenting for psychiatric evaluation and examined the relationship between maternal diagnosis and child psychopathology. Interviewers conducted structured diagnostic interviews with nonpsychotic, school-age children and their mothers (N=222) and collected self-report measures of symptoms, functioning, and social support. One-hundred-thirty-five participating mothers (61 percent) met DSM-IV criteria for a current axis I disorder, most commonly depression (35 percent) and anxiety (42 percent). Children of mothers with a diagnosis met criteria for significantly more diagnoses on the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Age Children, Present and Lifetime version and had significantly higher scores on measures of internalizing and externalizing symptoms than children of mothers without a diagnosis. Two-thirds of mothers with a diagnosis were not receiving psychiatric treatment. More than half the mothers who brought their children for psychiatric treatment were themselves suffering from a psychiatric disorder. Maternal psychiatric illness was, in turn, associated with greater occurrence of psychopathology among offspring, underscoring the importance of developing interventions that address the needs of both children with psychiatric disorders and their at-risk mothers.

  13. Reducing the impact of physical inactivity: evidence to support the case for targeting people with chronic mental and physical conditions.

    PubMed

    Everson-Hock, Emma S; Green, Mark A; Goyder, Elizabeth C; Copeland, Robert J; Till, Simon H; Heller, Ben; Hart, Ollie

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that small increases in the physical activity of those considered least active can have a bigger health impact than raising levels of those already achieving or close to achieving recommendations. Profiling the characteristics of those who are least active allows for appropriate targeting of interventions. This study therefore examined the characteristics of people in the lowest physical activity bracket. Data were taken from the Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) funded 'South Yorkshire Cohort', a longitudinal observational dataset of residents of South Yorkshire, England. Five separate outcomes based on a shortened version of the GPPAQ were used to represent the lowest levels of physical activity. Potential predictors examined were age, sex, body mass index, ethnicity, chronic conditions, current employment and deprivation. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were conducted. Individuals with chronic mental and physical conditions (fatigue, insomnia, anxiety, depression, diabetes, breathing problems, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke and cancer) were more likely to report the lowest levels of physical activity across all five outcomes. Demographic variations were also observed. Targeting people with chronic mental and physical conditions has the potential to reduce the impact of physical inactivity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Effort Deficits and Depression: The Influence of Anhedonic Depressive Symptoms on Cardiac Autonomic Activity During a Mental Challenge.

    PubMed

    Silvia, Paul J; Nusbaum, Emily C; Eddington, Kari M; Beaty, Roger E; Kwapil, Thomas R

    2014-12-01

    Motivational approaches to depression emphasize the role of dysfunctional motivational dynamics, particularly diminished reward and incentive processes associated with anhedonia. A study examined how anhedonic depressive symptoms, measured continuously across a wide range of severity, influenced the physiological mobilization of effort during a cognitive task. Using motivational intensity theory as a guide, we expected that the diminished incentive value associated with anhedonic depressive symptoms would reduce effort during a "do your best" challenge (also known as an unfixed or self-paced challenge), in which effort is a function of the value of achieving the task's goal. Using impedance cardiography, two cardiac autonomic responses were assessed: pre-ejection period (PEP), a measure of sympathetic activity and our primary measure of interest, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a measure of parasympathetic activity. As expected, PEP slowed from baseline to task as anhedonic depressive symptoms increased (as measured with the DASS Depression scale), indicating diminished effort-related sympathetic activity. No significant effects appeared for RSA. The findings support motivational intensity theory as a translational model of effort processes in depression and clarify some inconsistent effects of depressive symptoms on effort-related physiology found in past work.

  15. Effort Deficits and Depression: The Influence of Anhedonic Depressive Symptoms on Cardiac Autonomic Activity During a Mental Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Silvia, Paul J.; Nusbaum, Emily C.; Eddington, Kari M.; Beaty, Roger E.; Kwapil, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Motivational approaches to depression emphasize the role of dysfunctional motivational dynamics, particularly diminished reward and incentive processes associated with anhedonia. A study examined how anhedonic depressive symptoms, measured continuously across a wide range of severity, influenced the physiological mobilization of effort during a cognitive task. Using motivational intensity theory as a guide, we expected that the diminished incentive value associated with anhedonic depressive symptoms would reduce effort during a “do your best” challenge (also known as an unfixed or self-paced challenge), in which effort is a function of the value of achieving the task’s goal. Using impedance cardiography, two cardiac autonomic responses were assessed: pre-ejection period (PEP), a measure of sympathetic activity and our primary measure of interest, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a measure of parasympathetic activity. As expected, PEP slowed from baseline to task as anhedonic depressive symptoms increased (as measured with the DASS Depression scale), indicating diminished effort-related sympathetic activity. No significant effects appeared for RSA. The findings support motivational intensity theory as a translational model of effort processes in depression and clarify some inconsistent effects of depressive symptoms on effort-related physiology found in past work. PMID:25431505

  16. Criticism and Depression among the Caregivers of At-Risk Mental State and First-Episode Psychosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Hamaie, Yumiko; Ohmuro, Noriyuki; Katsura, Masahiro; Obara, Chika; Kikuchi, Tatsuo; Ito, Fumiaki; Miyakoshi, Tetsuo; Matsuoka, Hiroo; Matsumoto, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Expressed emotion (EE), especially criticism, is an important predictor of outcomes for the patient for a wide range of mental health problems. To understand complex links between EE and various relevant variables in early phase psychosis, this study examined criticism, distress of caregivers, other patients', and caregivers' variables, and links between criticism and these variables in those with at-risk mental state (ARMS) for psychosis and first-episode psychosis (FEP). The participants were 56 patients (mean age 18.8 ± 4.2 years) with ARMS and their caregivers (49.4 ± 5.8 years) and 43 patients (21.7 ± 5.2 years) with FEP and their caregivers (49.3 ± 7.4 years). We investigated criticisms made by caregivers using the Japanese version of the Family Attitude Scale and caregiver depressive symptoms via the self-report Beck Depression Inventory. We also assessed psychiatric symptoms and functioning of the patients. Approximately one-third of caregivers of patients with ARMS or FEP had depressive symptoms, predominately with mild-to-moderate symptom levels, whereas only a small portion exhibited high criticism. The level of criticism and depression were comparable between ARMS and FEP caregivers. The link between criticism, caregivers' depression, and patients' symptoms were observed in FEP but not in ARMS caregivers. These findings imply that the interaction between criticism and caregivers' and patients' mental states may develop during or after the onset of established psychosis and interventions for the caregivers should be tailored to the patient's specific stage of illness. Interventions for FEP caregivers should target their emotional distress and include education about patient's general symptoms.

  17. LGBT Identity, Untreated Depression, and Unmet Need for Mental Health Services by Sexual Minority Women and Trans-Identified People.

    PubMed

    Steele, Leah S; Daley, Andrea; Curling, Deone; Gibson, Margaret F; Green, Datejie C; Williams, Charmaine C; Ross, Lori E

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have found that transgender, lesbian, and bisexual people report poorer mental health relative to heterosexuals. However, available research provides little information about mental health service access among the highest need groups within these communities: bisexual women and transgender people. This study compared past year unmet need for mental health care and untreated depression between four groups: heterosexual cisgender (i.e., not transgender) women, cisgender lesbians, cisgender bisexual women, and transgender people. This was a cross-sectional Internet survey. We used targeted sampling to recruit 704 sexual and gender minority people and heterosexual cisgendered adult women across Ontario, Canada. To ensure adequate representation of vulnerable groups, we oversampled racialized and low socioeconomic status (SES) women. Trans participants were 2.4 times (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.6-3.8, p < 0.01) and bisexual people 1.8 times (95% CI = 1.1-2.9, p = 0.02) as likely to report an unmet need for mental healthcare as cisgender heterosexual women. Trans participants were also 1.6 times (95% CI = 1.0-27, p = 0.04) more likely to report untreated depression. These differences were not seen after adjustment for social context factors such as discrimination and social support. We conclude that there are higher rates of unmet need and untreated depression in trans and bisexual participants that are partly explained by differences in social factors, including experiences of discrimination, lower levels of social support, and systemic exclusion from healthcare. Our findings suggest that the mental health system in Ontario is not currently meeting the needs of many sexual and gender minority people.

  18. Mental Health Utilization Patterns During a Stepped, Collaborative Care Effectiveness Trial for PTSD and Depression in the Military Health System.

    PubMed

    Belsher, Bradley E; Jaycox, Lisa H; Freed, Michael C; Evatt, Daniel P; Liu, Xian; Novak, Laura A; Zatzick, Douglas; Bray, Robert M; Engel, Charles C

    2016-07-01

    Integrated health care models aim to improve access and continuity of mental health services in general medical settings. STEPS-UP is a stepped, centrally assisted collaborative care model designed to improve posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression care by providing the appropriate intensity and type of care based on patient characteristics and clinical complexity. STEPS-UP demonstrated improved PTSD and depression outcomes in a large effectiveness trial conducted in the Military Health System. The objective of this study was to examine differences in mental health utilization patterns between patients in the stepped, centrally assisted collaborative care model relative to patients in the collaborative care as usual-treatment arm. Patients with probable PTSD and/or depression were recruited at 6 large military treatment facilities, and 666 patients were enrolled and randomized to STEPS-UP or usual collaborative care. Utilization data acquired from Military Health System administrative datasets were analyzed to determine mental health service use and patterns. Clinical complexity and patient characteristics were based on self-report questionnaires collected at baseline. Compared with the treatment as usual arm, STEPS-UP participants received significantly more mental health services and psychiatric medications across primary and specialty care settings during the year of their participation. Patterns of service use indicated that greater clinical complexity was associated with increased service use in the STEPS-UP group, but not in the usual-care group. Results suggest that stepped, centrally assisted collaborative care models may increase the quantity of mental health services patients receive, while efficiently matching care on the basis of the clinical complexity of patients.

  19. Perceived mental health related stigma, gender, and depressive symptom severity in a psychiatric facility in South India.

    PubMed

    Kulesza, Magdalena; Raguram, R; Rao, Deepa

    2014-06-01

    Few studies exist on the topic of gender associated with depression and mental health-related stigma coming out of non-Western countries such as India. We aimed to add to the literature by assessing these relationships among adults seeking psychiatric services in India. Participants were 60 individuals seeking care at a psychiatric clinic in Bangalore, India. The majority of participants were female with a mean age of 36 years (SD=9.75). Contrary to our prediction, there were no significant differences between men (M=28.96; SD=9.85) and women (M=33.03; SD=12.08) on depression severity, t(58)=1.42, p=.16. Yet, women (M=10.09, SD=8.23) reported significantly more perceived stigma than men (M=5.79, SD=5.86), t(58)=2.30, p=.02. While men and women seeking psychiatric services at the psychiatric clinic in India report similar levels of depression severity, women reported more perceived mental illness stigma. Having experienced regular forms of discrimination associated with female status in India, it may be the case that women are more attuned to other forms of stigma, such as mental health stigma investigated in the present study. Given the detrimental impact of stigma on treatment adherence and engagement in care, additional research is needed support this work, including research on interventions to reduce stigma and improve engagement in care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Working Conditions and Mental Health of Nursing Staff in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Mawn, Barbara; Gore, Rebecca

    2016-07-01

    Nursing staff in nursing homes suffer from poor mental health, probably associated with stressful working conditions. Working conditions may distribute differently among nursing assistants, licensed practical nurses, and registered nurses due to their different levels in the organizational hierarchy. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the association between working conditions and mental health among different nursing groups, and examine the potential moderating effect of job group on this association. Self-administered questionnaires were collected with 1,129 nursing staff in 15 for-profit non-unionized nursing homes. Working conditions included both physical and psychosocial domains. Multivariate linear regression modeling found that mental health was associated with different working conditions in different nursing groups: physical safety (β = 2.37, p < 0.05) and work-family conflict (β = -2.44, p < 0.01) in NAs; work-family conflict (β = -4.17, p < 0.01) in LPNs; and physical demands (β = 10.54, p < 0.05) in RNs. Job group did not moderate the association between working conditions and mental health. Future workplace interventions to improve mental health should reach to nursing staff at different levels and consider tailored working condition interventions in different nursing groups.

  1. Young adults with mental health conditions and social networking websites: seeking tools to build community.

    PubMed

    Gowen, Kris; Deschaine, Matthew; Gruttadara, Darcy; Markey, Dana

    2012-01-01

    This study examined ways that young adults with mental illnesses (1) currently use social networking; and (2) how they would like to use a social networking site tailored for them. The authors examined differences between those with mental health conditions and those without. An online survey was administered by the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) to 274 participants; of those, 207 reported being between 18 and 24 years old. The survey included questions about current social networking use, the key resources respondents believed young adults living with mental illness need, and the essential components that should be included in a social networking site specifically tailored to young adults living with mental illness. Pearson Chi-square analyses examined the differences between those who reported having a mental illness and those who did not. Results indicate that almost all (94%) participants with mental illnesses currently use social networking sites. Individuals living with a mental illness are more likely than those not living with a mental illness to report engaging in various social networking activities that promote connectivity and making online friends. Individuals living with mental illnesses are also more likely to report wanting resources on independent living skills and overcoming social isolation available on a social networking site. Young adults living with mental illnesses are currently using social networking sites and express high interest in a social networking site specifically tailored to their population with specific tools designed to decrease social isolation and help them live more independently. These results indicate that practitioners should themselves be aware of the different social networking sites frequented by their young adult clients, ask clients about their use of social networking, and encourage safe and responsible online behaviors.

  2. The efficacy of group metacognitive therapy on self-esteem and mental health of patients suffering from major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Farahmand, Vahid; Hassanzadeh, Ramezan; Mirzaian, Bahram; Fayyazi Bordbar, Mohammad Reza; Feizi, Jaleh

    2014-01-01

    The present research aims to analyze the efficacy of group metacognitive therapy (MCT) on self-esteem and mental Health of those who suffer from major depressive disorder. The research was a randomized clinical controlled trial, using pretest and posttest with 2 months of follow-up. Twenty-two patients with major depressive disorder based on DSM-IV-TR criteria were selected through available sampling from patients of two psychiatric hospitals of Mashhad, Iran, in 2011. They were allocated randomly into two groups of trial (n = 11) and control (n = 11). Citalopram and sertraline were prescribed as antidepressant to both groups. The experimental group also attended nine 90-minute sessions of MCT (a 5-week program). Eysenck self-esteem scale (ESES) and Mental Health Checklist (MHC) were used in pretest, posttest, and follow-up as the study instrument. The data were analyzed by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) using SPSS. ANCOVA revealed that the patients receiving group MCT had significantly increased (p < 0.001) self-esteem in posttest, which remained significant in the follow up (p < 0.001). Moreover, mental health scores had increased in the MCT group (posttest, p < 0.001; follow up, p < 0.001). Group MCT has beneficial therapeutic roles in improving the self-steam and recuperation of mental health in MDD patients.

  3. Effect of immigrant status on risk of depressive symptoms associated with spouse's chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Stimpson, Jim P; Eschbach, Karl; Peek, M Kristen

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this prospective cohort study was to assess whether the prevalence of chronic disease of one spouse would be associated with a change in depressive symptoms of the other spouse and whether this relationship varies by immigrant status. Negative binomial regression was used to calculate risk ratios from a matched sample of 553 husbands and 553 wives aged 65 years or older of Mexican Americans. Overall, prevalence of chronic disease of one spouse was associated with change in high depressive symptoms for the other spouse. When the results were stratified by immigrant status, respondents born in the US exhibited higher risk of depressive symptoms associated with the chronic conditions of their spouse, while foreign born respondents did not exhibit higher risk for depressive symptoms. These findings highlight how immigrant status and the marital relationship may be related to chronic disease and depression.

  4. Assessment of self-care and medication adherence in individuals with mental health conditions.

    PubMed

    Bible, Lisa J; Casper, Kristin A; Seifert, Jennifer L; Porter, Kyle A

    This descriptive study explored whether patients with mental health conditions engage in personal medicine (self-care activities) as part of their treatment regimen. Personal medicine is patient-identified and -initiated activities of self-care that can improve mental health through various means, including physical activity, social engagement, and spiritual connectedness. The purpose of this study was to explore patient engagement in personal medicine within an underserved population and to evaluate the impact self-care might have on self-reported medication use and adherence and patient perception of mental health control. Cross-sectional study design with a face-to-face verbally administered survey assessing medication adherence, engagement in self-care activities, perception of self-care, and mental health control. The study site was a nonprofit charitable pharmacy in an urban setting. The pharmacy provides medications and pharmacy services at no charge, including disease state education, point-of-care testing, and medication therapy management. Study participants included those who fill medications for mental health conditions and who are age 18 years and older. Main outcomes included engagement in self-care and self-reported medication adherence. Additional measures included stratification of dimensions of self-care, perception of mental health control, and patient knowledge of community resources. Overall, 81.7% of participants engaged in activities of self-care, with 98.3% recognizing self-care as important to improving and maintaining their mental health. Greater self-reported adherence rates and mental health control were seen with patients who participate in self-care. Participants who identify and engage in personal medicine recognize its value and are willing to incorporate it into their treatment regimen. As accessible and trusted health care providers, pharmacists can encourage patients to identify and use personal medicine to aid in the improvement

  5. Falling monsoon depression frequency: A Gray-Sikka conditions perspective

    PubMed Central

    Prajeesh, A. G.; Ashok, K.; Rao, D. V. Bhaskar

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we show that the annual monsoon depression (MD) frequency making landfall on the east coast of India shows a statistically significant decreasing trend for the period 1979–2010. Importantly, about 80% of this fall is confined to the south of 20°N. To understand the plausible reason(s) for the weakening frequency of MDs in the southern Bay of Bengal in recent decades, we examine some of the seasonal average in-situ atmospheric parameters important for tropical cyclogenesis; we use various observational data from the IMD, and three atmospheric climate reanalysis datasets to account for possible quality constraints in them. Our findings suggest that the observed weakening of MD frequency south of 20°N in the Bay of Bengal since 1950s is likely due to a declining trend in the mid-tropospheric relative humidity over the Indian region. Our numerical sensitivity experiments support this finding. PMID:24141862

  6. The association of an inability to form and maintain close relationships due to a medical condition with anxiety and depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Simning, Adam; Seplaki, Christopher L; Conwell, Yeates

    2016-03-15

    While low social support is a risk factor for mental illness, anxiety and depression's relationship with social impairment specifically resulting from a medical condition is poorly understood. We hypothesize that when a medical illness makes it difficult for people to form and maintain close relationships with others, they will be at increased risk for anxiety and depression. Two nationally representative surveys, the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication and National Latino and Asian American Study, included 6805 adults with at least one medical illness and information on social impairment attributed to a medical condition. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview evaluated a 12-month history of anxiety and depressive disorders. 8.2% of our sample had at least moderate difficulty in forming and maintaining close relationships due to a medical condition. In bivariate analyses, younger age, Latino ethnicity, less education, worse financial status, more chronic illnesses, physical health and discomfort, and problems with mobility, home management, and self-care were associated with this social impairment. In multivariable analyses accounting for possible confounders, there was a dose-dependent relationship between social impairment and the prevalence of anxiety and depression. Data are cross-sectional and our analyses are therefore unable to determine cause-and-effect relationships. Among adults with one or more medical conditions, social impairment attributed to medical illness was associated with a significantly greater odds of anxiety and depression. Further clarification of this relationship could inform more targeted, personalized interventions to prevent and/or alleviate mental illness in those with chronic medical conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Exploring the relevance of autonomy and relatedness for mental health in healthy and depressed women from two different cultures: when does culture matter?

    PubMed

    Balkir, Nazli; Arens, Elisabeth A; Barnow, Sven

    2013-08-01

    It is well known that the absence of both autonomy and social support (relatedness) are two important etiologic pathways to major depressive disorder (MDD). However, cross-cultural researchers state that the implications of autonomy and relatedness for mental health vary across cultures. To test these assumptions, the current study investigated the relevance of autonomy and relatedness for mental health in healthy and depressed women from two different cultures (Germans and Turkish immigrants in Germany). One hundred and eight (108) women were evaluated for their levels of autonomy/relatedness satisfaction, for overall psychopathological complaints including depression, for affectivity and for perceived loneliness through self-report measures. Among healthy groups, relatedness satisfaction predicted better mental health in Turkish women, whereas in German women, autonomy satisfaction was the better mental health predictor. Within depressed groups however, cultural differences in mental health outcomes regarding autonomy were no longer evident. Autonomy was associated with higher levels of mental health in Turkish as well as in German patients. Our findings indicate that the relationship between autonomy and mental health is culture-specific in healthy women, but disappears in depressed women. These findings are discussed with consideration of clinical implications and an outlook regarding further research.

  8. The Mental Representation of Causal Conditional Reasoning: Mental Models or Causal Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Nilufa; Chater, Nick; Oaksford, Mike

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, two experiments are reported investigating the nature of the cognitive representations underlying causal conditional reasoning performance. The predictions of causal and logical interpretations of the conditional diverge sharply when inferences involving "pairs" of conditionals--such as "if P[subscript 1] then Q" and "if P[subscript…

  9. Depression and Psychological Trauma: An Overview Integrating Current Research and Specific Evidence of Studies in the Treatment of Depression in Public Mental Health Services in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Vitriol, Verónica; Cancino, Alfredo; Weil, Kristina; Salgado, Carolina; Asenjo, Maria Andrea; Potthoff, Soledad

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, different research has demonstrated the high prevalence of childhood trauma, including sexual abuse, among depressive women. These findings are associated with a complex, severe, and chronic psychopathology. This can be explained considering the neurobiological changes secondary to early trauma that can provoke a neuroendocrine failure to compensate in response to challenge. It suggests the existence of a distinguishable clinical-neurobiological subtype of depression as a function of childhood trauma that requires specific treatments. Among women with depression and early trauma receiving treatment in a public mental health service in Chile, it was demonstrated that a brief outpatient intervention (that screened for and focused on childhood trauma and helped patients to understand current psychosocial difficulties as a repetition of past trauma) was effective in reducing psychiatric symptoms and improving interpersonal relationships. However, in this population, this intervention did not prevent posttraumatic stress disorder secondary to the extreme earthquake that occurred in February 2010. Therefore in adults with depression and early trauma, it is necessary to evaluate prolonged multimodal treatments that integrate pharmacotherapy, social support, and interpersonal psychotherapies with trauma focused interventions (specific interventions for specific traumas). PMID:24695633

  10. High cardiac vagal control protects against future depressive symptoms under conditions of high social support.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Henrik; Shallcross, Amanda J; Ford, Brett Q; Troy, Allison S; Wilhelm, Frank H; Mauss, Iris B

    2013-04-01

    High cardiac vagal control (as measured by respiratory sinus arrhythmia; RSA) is associated with lower depression. Recent theories argue that people's responsiveness to social resources is a key mechanism in this association. This argument implies two hypotheses: first, high RSA should be related to decreased depressive symptoms only when social resources (social support) are available; second, utilization of available social resources (social engagement) should serve as a mechanism for the positive effects of RSA. To test these hypotheses, we measured RSA in 131 adults. Participants reported their social support, social engagement, and depressive symptoms. Six months later, they again reported their depressive symptoms. Participants with higher RSA reported fewer depressive symptoms six months later, but only under conditions of high social support. The interaction between RSA and social support in predicting depressive symptoms was fully mediated by social engagement. These findings provide crucial support for the idea that cardiac vagal control contributes to decreased depressive symptoms via social processes. Implications for biological sensitivity to context and differential susceptibility theories as well as for the prevention and treatment of depression are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Psychosocial working conditions and mental health status of the German babyboomer generation].

    PubMed

    Tophoven, S; Tisch, A; Rauch, A; Burghardt, A

    2015-04-01

    The baby boomers are the first to be available to the German labour market up to the age of 67. A crucial premise for a long working life is good health. However, there is evidence that psychosocial working conditions are related to health. More and more employees report psychosocial stress at work. In addition, mental illness has become one of the main reasons for the entry into disability pension. Against this background this study considers the relationship between psychosocial work conditions and mental health exemplarily for two birth cohorts of the German baby boomers. For the analysis of the assumed relationships data of the lidA study "lidA - leben in der Arbeit - German Cohort Study on Work, Age and Health" is used (N=6 057). Mental health is assessed by the mental health scale of the SF-12. In addition, the items and the scales quantitative job requirements, work pace and support from colleagues from the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) are used. As further control variables cohort affiliation, level of education, occupational status and partnership are considered. Multivariate analyses of the relations between quantitative job requirements, work pace and the experienced support from colleagues show significant relationship to mental health. The increasing frequency of the requirement to work quickly and increasing quantitative job demands are negatively associated to mental health. However, support of colleagues shows a positive relationship to mental health. These results are similarly observed for women and men. For the regarded group of the German babyboomers, employees at the threshold to higher working age, it is clearly shown that psychosocial working conditions are related to mental health. Since this group still has to work up to 18 years given a statutory retirement age of 67, psychosocial working conditions should rather be in the focus of occupational safety. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Use of e-cigarettes by individuals with mental health conditions.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Sharon E; Zhu, Shu-Hong; Tedeschi, Gary J; Gamst, Anthony C; Myers, Mark G

    2014-07-01

    Individuals with mental health conditions (MHC) have disproportionately high tobacco-related morbidity and mortality due to high smoking prevalence rates. As high consumers of cigarettes, smokers with MHC may consider using e-cigarettes as an alternative form of nicotine delivery. Examination of the susceptibility to use e-cigarettes by individuals with MHC. A U.S. population survey with a national probability sample (n=10,041) was used to assess ever use and current use of regular cigarettes, e-cigarettes, and U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation. Survey respondents provided information about whether they had been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder, depression, or other MHC. Individuals with MHC were more likely to have tried e-cigarettes (14.8%) and to be current users of e-cigarettes (3.1%) than those without MHC (6.6% and 1.1%, respectively; p<0.01). Ever smokers with MHC were also more likely to have tried approved pharmacotherapy (52.2% vs. 31.1%, p<0.01) and to be currently using these products (9.9% vs. 3.5%, p<0.01) than those without MHC. Additionally, current smokers with MHC were more susceptible to future use of e-cigarettes than smokers without MHC (60.5% vs. 45.3%, respectively, p<0.01). Smokers with MHC are differentially affected by the rise in popularity of e-cigarettes. Clinical interventions and policies for tobacco control on e-cigarettes should take into account the possible outcomes and their implications for this priority population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Risk of Mental Health Disorders Following an Initial Diagnosis of Postpartum Depression, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 1998-2010.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kasi M; Emasealu, Oseizame V; Hu, Zheng; O'Donnell, Francis L; Clark, Leslie L

    2015-06-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is one of the most common psychiatric conditions of the postpartum period. Several studies have found an association between PPD and other mental health disorders. The Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS) was used to identify a cohort of primiparous service women with PPD between 1998 and 2010 and match them by month of delivery to a cohort of women without PPD. During the surveillance period, there were 5,203 incident cases of PPD with a crude rate of 44.9 per 1,000 person-years. Individuals in the PPD cohort, when compared to their matched controls, were at higher risk for subsequent depressive disorders (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 7.3 [95% CI: 5.2-10.3]), anxiety disorders (adjusted HR: 3.2 [95% CI: 2.5-4.0]), and bipolar disorders (adjusted HR: 4.7 [95% CI: 1.9-11.9]). There were higher rates of these mental health diagnoses among individuals who eventually left service. Early screening, support, and treatment are essential during this vulnerable postpartum time frame to preserve the female fighting force.

  14. Effectiveness of the Coping With Depression (CWD) course for older adults provided by the community-based mental health care system in the Netherlands: a randomized controlled field trial.

    PubMed

    Haringsma, R; Engels, G I; Cuijpers, P; Spinhoven, P

    2006-06-01

    The Dutch version of the Coping With Depression (CWD) course for older adults has been implemented in the prevention arm of the community-based mental health care system in the Netherlands. The study group included older adults with subclinical depression as well as those with a major depressive disorder; all were enrolled into the course by mental health care professionals. The effectiveness (immediate and long-term) of the course for this heterogeneous population was studied in an effectiveness trial. Participants were self-referred, responding to media announcements. A total of 119 participants aged 55-85 years (69% female), with subclinical depression and major depression, were randomized to either the CWD course (N = 61) or the waiting list (N = 58). Nine participants dropped out of the course. According to a diagnostic interview based on the DSM-IV, 39% had a major depressive disorder (MDD), 69% had had a previous MDD, and 45% had an anxiety disorder. Older adults in the intervention group showed a significant decrease in depression symptoms. Gains were maintained over 14 months. In the intervention condition 83% had a pre-treatment score > or = 16 on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D); at post-treatment 62% still scored > or = 16. The course was beneficial for participants with mild or severe depression, and treatment acceptability was high. It should be fitted into a stepped-care protocol that varies intervention intensity according to clinical needs, using the post-treatment level of functioning as an indication for the next step.

  15. Access to services, quality of care, and family impact for children with autism, other developmental disabilities, and other mental health conditions.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Rini; Madhavan, Suresh; Sambamoorthi, Usha; St Peter, Claire

    2014-10-01

    This cross-sectional study examined perceived access to services, quality of care, and family impact reported by caregivers of children aged 3-17 years with autism spectrum disorders, as compared to caregivers of children with other developmental disabilities and other mental health conditions. The 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs was utilized to examine the association between child's special needs condition and three outcomes (N = 18,136): access to services (difficulty using services, difficulty getting referrals, lack of source of care, and inadequate insurance coverage), quality of care (lack of care coordination, lack of shared decision making, and no routine screening), and family impact (financial, employment, and time-related burden). Multivariate logistic regressions were performed to compare caregivers of children with autism spectrum disorders to caregivers of children with developmental disabilities (cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, developmental delay, or intellectual disability), mental health conditions (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, behavioral/conduct problems, or depression), or both developmental disabilities and mental health conditions. Caregivers of children with autism spectrum disorders were significantly more likely to report difficulty using services, lack of source of care, inadequate insurance coverage, lack of shared decision making and care coordination, and adverse family impact as compared to caregivers of children with developmental disabilities, mental health conditions, or both.

  16. The mental health of young people with disabilities: impact of social conditions.

    PubMed

    Honey, Anne; Emerson, Eric; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth

    2011-01-01

    Young people with disabilities have poorer mental health than their non-disabled peers. However, people with disabilities are more likely than others to experience financial hardship and low social support, both of which have been linked with poor mental health outcomes. This article explores the extent to which the relatively poor mental health of young people with disabilities is related to the social conditions in which they live. Secondary analysis was performed on Wave 6 (2006) of the survey of Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA). This nationally representative sample included 3,392 young Australians, aged 15-29, of whom 475 reported having a long-term health condition, impairment or disability. Young people with disabilities reported poorer mental health than their non-disabled peers. However, this relationship was moderated by both social adversity and social support, with minimal differences in mental health observed between the groups under conditions of high social support and low financial hardship. The results suggest that disability represents a potential adversity that may be exacerbated or ameliorated by the effects of wealth/financial hardship and social support. It may be possible to improve the mental health of disabled people by addressing their social exclusion.

  17. [The association between common mental disorders and subjective health conditions among the elderly].

    PubMed

    Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Nascimento, Jairo Evangelista; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Sá, Maria Aparecida Barbosa de; Feres, Sara de Barros Lima; Soares, Bruno Porto; Ferreira, Efigenia Ferreira E

    2016-11-01

    The scope of this study was to evaluate the association between the presence of common mental disorders and the impairment of subjective health conditions among the elderly. It involved a cross-sectional analytical survey conducted among all the elderly residents in the urban area of a Brazilian municipality with low population density. Mental disorders were evaluated using the short version of the Goldberg General Health questionnaire. Subjective and normative health conditions were evaluated and logistic regression was applied (OR/CI95%) with a 5% significance level. The survey included 419 elderly residents and the prevalence of mental disorders was 44.6%. The presence of mental disorders was greater among seniors who reported dissatisfaction with life, impairment in the mental and physical control of quality of life and with self-perception of the appearance of teeth and gums as negative. The prevalence of disorders was less identified between men and among those for whom oral health did not affect their relationships with other people The common mental disorder was identified in a significant number of the elderly investigated and the presence of this disorder has been mainly associated with oral health conditions.

  18. Review of Randomised Controlled Trials of Internet Interventions for Mental Disorders and Related Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Kathleen M.; Christensen, Helen

    2006-01-01

    Self-help Internet interventions have the potential to enable consumers to play a central role in managing their own health. This paper contains a systematic review of 15 randomised controlled trials of the effectiveness of self-help Internet interventions for mental disorders and related conditions. Conditions addressed by the interventions…

  19. Review of Randomised Controlled Trials of Internet Interventions for Mental Disorders and Related Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Kathleen M.; Christensen, Helen

    2006-01-01

    Self-help Internet interventions have the potential to enable consumers to play a central role in managing their own health. This paper contains a systematic review of 15 randomised controlled trials of the effectiveness of self-help Internet interventions for mental disorders and related conditions. Conditions addressed by the interventions…

  20. Employment status, working conditions and depressive symptoms among German employees born in 1959 and 1965.

    PubMed

    Burr, Hermann; Rauch, Angela; Rose, Uwe; Tisch, Anita; Tophoven, Silke

    2015-08-01

    We investigated whether (1) current employment status (regular full-time, regular part-time and marginal employment) is associated with depressive symptoms and (2) whether these associations are mediated by current working conditions and previous employment history. Two cohorts of German employees aged 46 and 52 years were selected from administrative data of the German Federal Employment Agency and answered questions about depressive symptoms (we use an applied version of BDI-V) and their current working conditions. In addition, the participants gave written consent to link register data regarding their employment histories (n = 4,207). Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted. Men experienced elevated depressive symptoms when working regular part-time; women experienced such symptoms when engaged in marginal employment. These associations decreased when we adjusted for job insecurity and rose slightly when we adjusted for leadership quality. Men and women who reported a low level of influence at work showed a higher risk of depressive symptoms. For women, the association between current employment position and depressive symptoms could be partly explained by low levels of influence at work. For men, the association between depressive symptoms and current regular part-time employment decreased when we adjusted for previous part-time employment. Conversely, for women, the association with depressive symptoms increased in current regular part-time and marginal employment when we adjusted for employment history. In both genders, the observed associations between depressive symptoms and current employment status were mediated by both current psychosocial conditions and employment history. Employees not having a regular full-time job differed from full-time employees with respect to both their current working conditions and their employment history.

  1. [Depression and Anxiety Disorders and Associated Factors in the Adolescent Colombian Population, 2015 National Mental Health Survey].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Bohórquez, Adriana; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie; Rondón, Martín; Bautista, Nubia; Rengifo, Herney; Medina Rico, Mauricio

    2016-12-01

    There was a prevalence of mental disorders of 17% in adolescents in the past year. These tended to be chronic and their appearance at this age is associated with a worse prognosis than those in adulthood. To determine the prevalence and mental factors associated with major depression and anxiety disorders. Data were obtained from the IV National Mental Health Survey representing 5 regions. A structured computerised survey was conducted using the Computer Assisted Personal Interview-Composite International Diagnostic Interview-Adolescent Version (CAPI-CIDI-A), focused on the most common depression and anxiety disorders. It included a sample of 1754 adolescents between 12 and 17 years old. The prevalence of any disorder at some point in life was 7.2% (95%CI, 5.8-8.9). The most common disorder corresponded to social phobia manifested sometime in life in 4.8% (95%CI, 3.7-6.2). Less frequent were panic disorder in girls (0.2%; 95% CI, 0.1-1.0) and other bipolar disorders in boys (0.2%; 95%CI, 0.1-0.7). Among the associated factors of suffering from any disorder were, being female (OR=2.1), having little family support (OR=2.0), having witnessed at least one traumatic event (OR=2.6), and having had a previous suicide attempt (OR=3.4). Participation in at least one group was a protective factor (OR=0.5). Mental disorders of anxiety and depression represent a major burden of disease for Colombia. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic health conditions and depressive symptoms strongly predict persistent food insecurity among rural low-income families.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Karla L; Olson, Christine M

    2012-08-01

    Longitudinal studies of food insecurity have not considered the unique circumstances of rural families. This study identified factors predictive of discontinuous and persistent food insecurity over three years among low-income families with children in rural counties in 13 U.S. states. Respondents reported substantial knowledge of community resources, food and finance skills, and use of formal public food assistance, yet 24% had persistent food insecurity, and another 41% were food insecure for one or two years. Multivariate multinomial regression models tested relationships between human capital, social support, financial resources, expenses, and food insecurity. Enduring chronic health conditions increased the risk of both discontinuous and persistent food insecurity. Lasting risk for depression predicted only persistent food insecurity. Education beyond high school was the only factor found protective against persistent food insecurity. Access to quality physical and mental health care services are essential to ameliorate persistent food insecurity among rural, low-income families.

  3. Workplace effectiveness and psychotherapy for mental, substance abuse, and subsyndromal conditions.

    PubMed

    Sledge, William H; Lazar, Susan G

    2014-09-01

    While it is known that psychiatric illness and subclinical psychiatric illness can be very disabling, their impact on workers' productivity has been little appreciated or appropriately addressed. Complex variables are involved in fashioning an appropriate policy to ameliorate the impact of mental illness on productivity including the identification of effective treatments and potential negative effects of controlling patients' access to them. The cost-effectiveness of such treatments is considered from the differing perspectives and goals of the various stakeholders involved, including employers, insurers, and workers with psychiatric illness. Depression in workers leads to significant absenteeism, "presenteeism" (diminished capacity due to illness while still present at work), and significantly increased medical expenses in addition to the costs of psychiatric care. In addition to the specific usefulness of psychotropic medication, there are a variety of studies on the cost-effectiveness of different psychotherapeutic treatments that improve health and productivity in psychiatrically ill workers. Research indicates the usefulness of approaches including employee assistance programs, specialized cognitive-behavioral treatments, and brief and longer term psychodynamic interventions. It is clear that substance abuse disorders and especially depression and subsyndromal depression have a profound negative effect on work productivity and increases in medical visits and expenses. The current system of mental health care suffers from ignorance of the negative effects of psychiatric illness in workers, from a lack of subtle awareness of which treatments are most appropriate for which diagnoses and from the reluctance by payers to invest in them. Access to evidence-based appropriate treatment can improve the negative impact on productivity as well as workers' health. This article considers these issues and argues for a role of psychotherapy in the treatment of mental

  4. Learned resourcefulness, danger in intimate partner relationships, and mental health symptoms of depression and PTSD in abused women.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kerry

    2013-06-01

    The study investigated the relationships among learned resourcefulness, dangerousness in abusive relationships, and symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample of abused sheltered women. A cross-sectional descriptive research design was utilized and 42 women met criteria for participation. Data were collected over a ten-month period from June 2010 to March 2011 using the following instruments: (1) demographic data collection form, (2) Self-Control Schedule (SCS), (3) Danger Assessment (DA), (4) Index of Spouse Abuse (ISA), (5) Beck Depression Inventory, Second Edition (BDI-II), and (6) Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale (PDS). Results indicated that 74% of the sample reported symptoms of depression and 67% met criteria for PTSD. In addition, there was 62% comorbidity between depression and PTSD. High levels of danger and low levels of resourcefulness were associated with increased symptoms of depression and PTSD. Further research is necessary, but results of the study suggest that resourcefulness may be an important consideration for abused women in reducing the impact of violence and abuse on mental health issues.

  5. Vitamin D Intoxication, with Hypernatraemia, Potassium and Water Depletion, and Mental Depression

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D. C.; Cooper, A. F.; Naylor, G. J.

    1968-01-01

    Two elderly patients suffering from manic-depressive psychosis/depressive reaction had concurrently hypercalcaemia from vitamin D intoxication. They developed hypernatraemia with severe potassium and water depletion. Hypercalcaemia was pronounced, but both patients recovered quickly and their depressive symptoms resolved following water and potassium repletion and corticosteroid therapy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:5723727

  6. Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Healthcare Expenditures for Publicly Insured Children with Chronic Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Beil, Heather; Beeber, Linda S.

    2017-01-01

    This study estimated the prevalence of maternal depressive symptoms and tested associations between maternal depressive symptoms and healthcare utilization and expenditures among United States publicly insured children with chronic health conditions (CCHC). A total of 6,060 publicly insured CCHC from the 2004–2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys were analyzed using negative binomial models to compare healthcare utilization for CCHC of mothers with and without depressive symptoms. Annual healthcare expenditures for both groups were compared using a two-part model with a logistic regression and generalized linear model. The prevalence of depressive symptoms among mothers with CCHC was 19 %. There were no differences in annual healthcare utilization for CCHC of mothers with and without depressive symptoms. Maternal depressive symptoms were associated with greater odds of ED expenditures [odds ratio (OR) 1.26; 95 % CI 1.03–1.54] and lesser odds of dental expenditures (OR 0.81; 95 % CI 0.66–0.98) and total expenditures (OR 0.71; 95 % CI 0.51–0.98). Children of symptomatic mothers had lower predicted outpatient expenditures and higher predicted expenditures for total health, prescription medications, dental care; and office based, inpatient and ED visits. Mothers with CCHC were more likely to report depressive symptoms than were mothers with children without chronic health conditions. There were few differences in annual healthcare utilization and expenditures between CCHC of mothers with and without depressive symptoms. However, having a mother with depressive symptoms was associated with higher ED expenditures and higher predicted healthcare expenditures in a population of children who comprise over three-fourths of the top decile of Medicaid spending. PMID:25047785

  7. Specific medical conditions associated with clinically significant depressive symptoms in men.

    PubMed

    Atlantis, Evan; Lange, Kylie; Goldney, Robert D; Martin, Sean; Haren, Matthew T; Taylor, Anne; O'Loughlin, Peter D; Marshall, Villis; Tilley, Wayne; Wittert, Gary A

    2011-12-01

    To define specific medical conditions associated with clinically significant depressive symptoms in men. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a community-based sample of Australian men (N = 1,195, aged 35-80 years; for 2002-2005). Depression was defined by: (1) symptomatic depression (current symptoms) or (2) current prescription for antidepressant(s) or (3) previously diagnosed depression. Logistic regression was used to determine prevalence odds ratios (OR) for depression independently associated with an extensive range of demographic, lifestyle, and clinical factors. Adjusted population attributable risk (PAR%) estimates were also computed. Depression was significantly (ORs at P < 0.05) associated with previously diagnosed anxiety (12.0) and insomnia (4.4), not married (1.7), current smoker (1.7), low muscle strength tertile (1.7, P = 0.059), high triglycerides (1.6), high storage lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) tertile (1.8), past year general practitioner visits 5-9 (1.9), middle energy density tertile (0.4), and high systolic blood pressure (0.5). Significant PAR% estimates (at P < 0.05) were for previous anxiety (27.0%) and insomnia (16.1%), middle energy density tertile (-17.2%), high SBP (-23.5%), high triglycerides (15.2%), and high storage LUTS tertile (12.6%). Results strengthened when depression-related factors (previous anxiety and insomnia, psycholeptics, and cognition) were omitted, and became significant for CVD (OR 1.6; PAR 13.9%). Medical conditions associated with depression in men include high triglycerides, low muscle strength, CVD, and LUTS. Depressed men are likely to use health services frequently, be current smokers, not be married, eat unhealthily, and report previous diagnosis of anxiety and insomnia; which has important implications for clinicians managing male patients.

  8. How people evaluate others with social anxiety disorder: A comparison to depression and general mental illness stigma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kristin N; Jeon, Andrew B; Blenner, Jordan A; Wiener, Richard L; Hope, Debra A

    2015-03-01

    Despite the availability of effective interventions, most individuals with social anxiety disorder do not seek treatment. Given their fear of negative evaluation, socially anxious individuals might be especially susceptible to stigma concerns, a recognized barrier for mental health treatment. However, very little is known about the stigma specific to social anxiety disorder. In a design similar to Feldman and Crandall (2007), university undergraduate students read vignettes about target individuals with a generic mental illness label, major depressive disorder, and social anxiety disorder. Subjects rated each of 3 people in the vignettes on social distance and 17 dimensions including dangerousness, heritability and prevalence of the disorder, and gender ratio. Results indicated that being male and not having experience with mental health treatment was associated with somewhat greater preferred social distance. Multiple regression analyses revealed that being embarrassed by the disorder and dangerousness predicted social distance across all 3 vignettes. The vignette for social anxiety disorder had the most complex model and included work impairment, more common among women, and more avoidable. These results have implications for understanding the specific aspects of the stigma associated with social anxiety disorder. Public service messages to reduce stigma should focus on more accurate information about dangerousness and mental illness, given this is an established aspect of mental illness stigma. More nuanced messages about social anxiety might be best incorporated into the treatment referral process and as part of treatment.

  9. Health professionals' perspective on the promotion of e-mental health apps in the context of maternal depression

    PubMed Central

    Sprenger, Michaela; Osma, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Objective Our study focuses on exploring (1) the intention of health professionals to use and recommend e-mental health applications, (2) how this intention of health professionals might be influenced, (3) which group of health professionals might be most accessible to promote e-mental health applications for maternal depression, and (4) for which tasks they rate them to be most useful. Materials and methods Based on a questionnaire informed by the theory of planned behavior, we collected 131 responses of U.S., Spanish, and Swiss health professionals in the field of pregnancy and maternal care (including psychologists, psychiatrists, midwives, and doctors) by means of an online survey. We analyzed the gathered data applying a structured equation model. Results Our study reveals that health professionals would in general intend to recommend and use e-mental health applications. However, their attitude towards e-mental health applications varies regarding the respective use cases and also differs among health professions. Conclusion We offer three alternative propositions for private or public organizations, associations, or any other entity whose purpose is service to the community for introducing e-mental health applications into practice. PMID:28704442

  10. Evaluating a mental health assessment for older people with depressive symptoms in general practice: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Antony J; Jagger, Carol; Lindesay, James; Matthews, Ruth J

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a lack of evidence on the most effective primary care management of older people with minor depression. AIM: To evaluate a follow-up assessment by the community mental health team (CMHT) for older people with depressive symptoms identified by practice nurses at a health check for people over the age of 75 years. DESIGN OF STUDY: A pragmatic randomised controlled trial. SETTING: A single large general practice in Leicestershire. METHOD: Patients receiving a health check administered by a practice nurse and scoring 5 or more on the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS15) were randomised to either follow-up by the CMHT or routine general practitioner (GP) care. The GDS15 score was measured at the subsequent health check 18 months later. RESULTS: Forty-seven patients were randomised to CMHT assessment and 46 to routine GP care. Uptake of the intervention was 72% (n = 34). At the follow-up health check a greater proportion of the control group had improved GDS15 scores (P = 0.08). Following assessment, the CMHT recommended their further involvement in the care of 12 patients and this was authorised by patients' GPs in six cases. CONCLUSIONS: A follow-up mental health assessment by a member of the local CMHT was not effective in improving outcomes for mildly depressed older people. Other than random error possible reasons for this include the length of follow-up and a failure to meet raised expectations among the intervention group. If complex referral procedures do not improve outcomes for this group, then specialist community services should play a more prominent part in the training of practice staff to care for their depressed older patients. PMID:12030662

  11. An interprofessional nurse-led mental health promotion intervention for older home care clients with depressive symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms in older home care clients are common but poorly recognized and treated, resulting in adverse health outcomes, premature institutionalization, and costly use of health services. The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility and acceptability of a new six-month interprofessional (IP) nurse-led mental health promotion intervention, and to explore its effects on reducing depressive symptoms in older home care clients (≥ 70 years) using personal support services. Methods A prospective one-group pre-test/post-test study design was used. The intervention was a six-month evidence-based depression care management strategy led by a registered nurse that used an IP approach. Of 142 eligible consenting participants, 98 (69%) completed the six-month and 87 (61%) completed the one-year follow-up. Outcomes included depressive symptoms, anxiety, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and the costs of use of all types of health services at baseline and six-month and one-year follow-up. An interpretive descriptive design was used to explore clients’, nurses’, and personal support workers’ perceptions about the intervention’s appropriateness, benefits, and barriers and facilitators to implementation. Results Of the 142 participants, 56% had clinically significant depressive symptoms, with 38% having moderate to severe symptoms. The intervention was feasible and acceptable to older home care clients with depressive symptoms. It was effective in reducing depressive symptoms and improving HRQoL at six-month follow-up, with small additional improvements six months after the intervention. The intervention also reduced anxiety at one year follow-up. Significant reductions were observed in the use of hospitalization, ambulance services, and emergency room visits over the study period. Conclusions Our findings provide initial evidence for the feasibility, acceptability, and sustained effects of the nurse-led mental health promotion

  12. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... the winter months, when there is less natural sunlight. Return to top What causes depression? There is ... alone. Others with moderate to severe depression might benefit from antidepressants. It may take a few weeks ...

  13. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... the birth of a baby. Some people get seasonal affective disorder in the winter. Depression is one part of bipolar disorder. There are effective treatments for depression, including antidepressants, talk therapy, or ...

  14. Depressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... of depressants, including alcohol and the illegal drugs GHB and Rohypnol , come in liquid or powder form ... by prescription only. Some depressants, including Rohypnol and GHB, are illegal in the United States. Illegal possession ...

  15. Personal and Psychosocial Risk Factors for Physical and Mental Health Outcomes and Course of Depression among Depressed Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherbourne, Cathy Donald; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Data from 604 depressed patients in The Medical Outcomes Study showed improvements in measures of functioning and well-being associated with patients who were employed, drank less alcohol, had active coping styles and higher levels of social support, who had active and less avoidant coping styles, who were physically active, and who had fewer…

  16. The depressive situation

    PubMed Central

    A. Jacobs, Kerrin

    2013-01-01

    From a naturalistic perspective on mental illness, depression is often described in terms of biological dysfunctions, while a normative perspective emphasizes the lived experience of depression as a harmful condition. The paper relates a conceptual analysis of “depressive situation” to an analysis of the lived experience of depression. As such, it predominantly aims to specify depression as a harmful condition in lights of normative perspective on mental disorder, but partially refers to empirical research, i.e., naturalistic perspective on depression, to exemplarily stress on the methodological merits and limits of relating phenomenological considerations closer to empirical research. The depressive situation is further specified with an examination of the evaluative dynamics by which individuals meaningfully relate to themselves, others and the world. These evaluative dynamics emerge out of the interplay of pre-reflective and reflective processes, which are significantly altered in depression. Such alterations of the evaluative structure are inextricably intertwined with significant distortions of practical sense in depression. From a phenomenological perspective, these distortions of practical sense show in characteristic experiences of evaluative incoherence and impairments of agency. Finally, this paper focuses on an examination of “evaluative incapacity,” which has the integrative potential to capture a range of typical changes of meaningful relatedness that determine the depressive situation. PMID:23882238

  17. How life stressors influence modifiable lifestyle factors, depressive symptoms, and physical and mental health among Vietnamese older women?

    PubMed

    Dao-Tran, Tiet-Hanh; Anderson, Debra; Seib, Charrlotte

    2017-06-29

    Research has demonstrated that exposure to life stressors can influence health through a number of pathways. However, knowledge about the patterns of life stressors and their contributions to health in different populations is limited. Vietnamese older women have attracted little research to date in this area. This cross-sectional study used an interview-administered-questionnaire to collect data from 440 Vietnamese older women. Descriptive analysis was used to describe life stressors among Vietnamese older women. Binary analysis and Structural Equation Modelling statistical analysis were used to examine the influences of life stressors on modifiable lifestyle factors, depressive symptoms, physical and mental health among Vietnamese older women. Vietnamese older women in this study commonly reported the experience of losing a close person, including a baby/child, serious health or money problems, violence and disaster. Among the study participants, (1) exposure to more life stressors increased their depressive symptoms, and decreased their physical and mental health; (2) exposure to more life stressors also increased their physical health by increasing their physical activity levels. Life stressors influenced health among Vietnamese older women through different pathways. Interventions to manage stress and depressive symptoms are required for Vietnamese older women in the future.

  18. Persistent reflux symptoms cause anxiety, depression, and mental health and sleep disorders in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoshihide; Kamiya, Takeshi; Senoo, Kyouji; Tsuchida, Kenji; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Kojima, Hisayo; Yamashita, Hiroaki; Yamakawa, Yoshihiro; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Ozeki, Tomonori; Endo, Masatsugu; Nakanishi, Kazuhisa; Sando, Motoki; Inagaki, Yusuke; Shikano, Michiko; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Katsumi, Kohei; Joh, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Some patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease experience persistent reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy. These symptoms reduce their health-related quality of life. Our aims were to evaluate the relationship between proton pump inhibitor efficacy and health-related quality of life and to evaluate predictive factors affecting treatment response in Japanese patients. Using the gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire, 145 gastroesophageal reflux disease patients undergoing proton pump inhibitor therapy were evaluated and classified as responders or partial-responders. Their health-related quality of life was then evaluated using the 8-item Short Form Health Survey, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaires. Sixty-nine patients (47.6%) were partial responders. These patients had significantly lower scores than responders in 5/8 subscales and in the mental health component summary of the 8-item Short Form Health Survey. Partial responders had significantly higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, including anxiety and depression scores, than those of responders. Non-erosive reflux disease and double proton pump inhibitor doses were predictive factors of partial responders. Persistent reflux symptoms, despite proton pump inhibitor therapy, caused mental health disorders, sleep disorders, and psychological distress in Japanese gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

  19. Persistent reflux symptoms cause anxiety, depression, and mental health and sleep disorders in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yoshihide; Kamiya, Takeshi; Senoo, Kyouji; Tsuchida, Kenji; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Kojima, Hisayo; Yamashita, Hiroaki; Yamakawa, Yoshihiro; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Ozeki, Tomonori; Endo, Masatsugu; Nakanishi, Kazuhisa; Sando, Motoki; Inagaki, Yusuke; Shikano, Michiko; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Katsumi, Kohei; Joh, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Some patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease experience persistent reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy. These symptoms reduce their health-related quality of life. Our aims were to evaluate the relationship between proton pump inhibitor efficacy and health-related quality of life and to evaluate predictive factors affecting treatment response in Japanese patients. Using the gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire, 145 gastroesophageal reflux disease patients undergoing proton pump inhibitor therapy were evaluated and classified as responders or partial-responders. Their health-related quality of life was then evaluated using the 8-item Short Form Health Survey, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaires. Sixty-nine patients (47.6%) were partial responders. These patients had significantly lower scores than responders in 5/8 subscales and in the mental health component summary of the 8-item Short Form Health Survey. Partial responders had significantly higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, including anxiety and depression scores, than those of responders. Non-erosive reflux disease and double proton pump inhibitor doses were predictive factors of partial responders. Persistent reflux symptoms, despite proton pump inhibitor therapy, caused mental health disorders, sleep disorders, and psychological distress in Japanese gastroesophageal reflux disease patients. PMID:27499583

  20. Mental Health QUERI Initiative: expert ratings of criteria to assess performance for major depressive disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Owen, Richard R; Cannon, Dale; Thrush, Carol R

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine mental health care experts' opinions about performance measures and associated data elements that could serve as the basis of an information system for monitoring the implementation of clinical practice guidelines for major depressive disorder (MDD) and schizophrenia in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Nineteen mental health care experts rated the meaningfulness and validity of performance measures and automated data elements. For MDD, experts rated the following measures as very meaningful and valid: (a) the results of depression screening, (b) the occurrence and results of diagnostic assessment for MDD, (c) the provision of antidepressant medication or psychotherapy, and (d) whether antidepressant medications were prescribed within the therapeutic dose range recommended by practice guidelines. For schizophrenia, expert reviewers rated therapeutic doses of antipsychotic medication and assessment for antipsychotic medication side effects as being very meaningful and valid. Performance measures that evaluate clinically significant aspects of care using specific, valid data elements are the most meaningful. Translation efforts by the VHA's Mental Health Quality Enhancement Research Initiative program include additional studies of the validity of some of the proposed data elements and the development of national clinical reminders for performance measures judged to be meaningful.

  1. Self-harm in postpartum depression and referrals to a perinatal mental health team: an audit study.

    PubMed

    Healey, Christine; Morriss, Richard; Henshaw, Carol; Wadoo, Ovais; Sajjad, Aamer; Scholefield, Helen; Kinderman, Peter

    2013-06-01

    There is a paucity of research on self-harm during pregnancy and the postpartum period despite suicide being a leading cause of death and high rates of mental disorder during this time. This audit describes a cohort of women referred to a new perinatal mental health team (PMHT) based in a large maternity hospital in the UK over a 12-month period. The audit was conducted in two stages. Stage one describes the clinical and socio-demographic characteristics of 225 pregnant women referred to the team after screening positive for a significant mental health history. Stage two determines the veracity of data on a subgroup of 73 pregnant women referred for previous postpartum depression (PPD), 58 % of whom disclosed an episode of self-harm with the 'intent to kill themselves' to the maternity staff when they first booked in for antenatal care. Previous PPD accounted for the largest majority of referrals (32 %) to the PMHT followed by depression (27 %) and self-harm (10 %). The majority of women (85 %) referred to the PMHT were engaged. Eight percent were so unwell at the point of referral they required an admission to the hospital. Attempted suicide in the subgroup of 73 women with previous PPD ranged from 24-49 %. The findings from this audit suggest that self-harm in PPD warrants further investigation.

  2. The Theory of Planned Behavior as it predicts potential intention to seek mental health services for depression among college students.

    PubMed

    Bohon, Lisa M; Cotter, Kelly A; Kravitz, Richard L; Cello, Philip C; Fernandez Y Garcia, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Between 9.5% and 31.3% of college students suffer from depression (American college health association national college health assessment II: reference group executive summary spring 2013. Amer. Coll. Health Assoc. 2013; Eagan K, Stolzenberg EB, Ramirez JJ, Aragon, MC, Suchard, RS, Hurtado S. The American freshman: national norms fall 2014. Higher Educ. Res. Inst.; 2015). Universities need to understand the factors that relate to care-seeking behavior. Across 3 studies, to relate attitudes, social norms, and perceived behavioral control to intention to seek mental health services, and to investigate barriers to care-seeking. University college students (N = 845, 64% female, 26% male, and 10% unspecified). New measures were created in Studies 1 and 2, and were examined using structural equation modeling in Study 3. Partially consistent with the Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen, I, Fishbein, M. Understanding Attitudes and Predicting Social Behavior. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall; 1980), a model with an excellent fit revealed that more positive attitudes about care and higher perceived behavioral control directly predicted higher intention to seek mental health services. Educating college students about mental health disorders and treatments, enhancing knowledge about available services, and addressing limited access to long-term care might improve treatment rates for students suffering from depression.

  3. Effects of a mutual recovery intervention on mental health in depressed elderly community-dwelling adults: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Hua, Yujie; Fu, Hua; Cheng, Longfeng; Qian, Wen; Liu, Junyang; Crawford, Paul; Dai, Junming

    2017-01-03

    in terms of sleep, well-being, and depression at baseline and before the intervention. Mixed-model repeated measures ANOVAs detected a group × time interaction on depression, sleep, and well-being and showed a favorable intervention effect within groups immediately after the intervention. The mutual recovery program could be a creative and effective approach to improve mental health in older community-dwelling adults with depressive symptom.

  4. Autoimmune conditions and comorbid depression in pregnancy: examining the risk of preterm birth and preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Bandoli, G; Chambers, C D

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether prenatal depression interacts with autoimmune conditions to further increase the risk of preterm birth or preeclampsia. Our sample included 3034 pregnant women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn's disease (CD) or psoriasis, or controls that were prospectively enrolled into MothertoBaby pregnancy studies. We estimated the independent and joint effects of the three autoimmune conditions and depression on the select outcomes. We found an increased risk of preterm birth among women with RA (2.10; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.54, 2.87), CD (1.87; 95% CI 1.25, 2.81) or psoriasis (1.88; 95% CI 1.27, 2.79) independent of depression status. RA was also independently associated with preeclampsia. Prenatal depression was not independently associated with preterm birth or preeclampsia, nor was there any synergism with autoimmune conditions. If these findings are confirmed, the absence of synergism should be encouraging news to the many women with select autoimmune conditions and depression in pregnancy.

  5. Cortisol reaction in success and failure condition in endogenous depressed patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Croes, S; Merz, P; Netter, P

    1993-01-01

    The authors studied differences in cortisol response to controllable and uncontrollable stress and its relationship to Seligman's theory of learned helplessness in hospitalized unipolar depressed patients (11 nontreated, acutely depressed; 11 treated patients) and 11 age and sex matched controls hospitalized for traumatic surgery. Control and lack of control were achieved by induction of success and failure in a simple number addition test and applied in balanced order on 2 consecutive days. Saliva cortisol samples were collected before and after the test. No group differences in baseline cortisol levels were observed. Cortisol increased after uncontrollable and decreased after controllable stress in control patients, whereas cortisol decreased after both conditions in the acutely depressed group and less so in the treated group, although they were as emotionally upset after failure as controls. Thus, the normally observed ability of the neuroendocrine system to discriminate between controllable and uncontrollable stress deteriorates with increasing severity of depression.

  6. The role of family history of depression and the menopausal transition in the development of major depression in midlife women: Study of women's health across the nation mental health study (SWAN MHS).

    PubMed

    Colvin, Alicia; Richardson, Gale A; Cyranowski, Jill M; Youk, Ada; Bromberger, Joyce T

    2017-09-01

    This study evaluated whether family history of depression predicts major depression in midlife women above and beyond static risk factors (such as personal history of depression prior to midlife) and risks that may change dynamically across midlife (such as menopausal, psychosocial, and health profiles). Participants were 303 African American and Caucasian women (42-52 years at baseline) recruited into the Study of Women's Health across the Nation (SWAN) Mental Health Study (MHS) in Pittsburgh. Major depression was assessed annually with Structured Clinical Interviews for DSM-IV. Family mental health history was collected at the ninth or tenth annual follow-up. Random effects logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between family history of depression and midlife depression, controlling for baseline sociodemographic characteristics and time-varying risk factors. Family history of depression was associated with midlife depression after adjusting for participant's history of major depression prior to midlife, trait anxiety and baseline age, and time-varying menopausal status, body mass index, very upsetting life events, and chronic difficulties (OR = 2.24, 95% CI = 1.17-4.29, P = .02). Higher odds of major depression were found when women were late perimenopausal or postmenopausal relative to when they were premenopausal or early perimenopausal (OR = 3.01, 95% CI = 1.76-5.15, P < .0001). However, menopausal status was only associated with major depression among women without a family history. Family history of depression predicts major depression in midlife women independent of the menopausal transition and other time-varying covariates. Notably, the menopausal transition was associated with increased risk only among women without a family history of depression. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Utilization of Professional Mental Health Services Related to Population-Level Screening for Anxiety, Depression, and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Among Public High School Students.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, John D; Le, Vi Donna; Baillargeon, Jacques; Temple, Jeff R

    2016-08-01

    This study examines results from three mental health screening measures in a cohort of adolescent public school students in seven public schools in Southeast Texas affiliated with the Dating it Safe study. We estimated the odds of receiving professional mental health treatment in the previous year given results from different mental health screening batteries: the CES-D 10 battery for depression screening, the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders, and the Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress Disorder screen. Overall, students with higher scores on screening instruments for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and combinations of screening instruments were more likely to have sought past-year professional mental health treatment than non-symptomatic youth. However, the proportion of students screening positive and receiving professional treatment was low, ranging from 11 to 16 %. This study emphasizes the need for broader evaluation of population-based mental health screening among adolescents.

  8. Depression in bipolar disorder versus major depressive disorder: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Carmen; Hasin, Deborah S; Arango, Celso; Oquendo, Maria A; Vieta, Eduard; Liu, Shangmin; Grant, Bridget F; Blanco, Carlos

    2012-05-01

    To compare the clinical features and course of major depressive episodes (MDEs) occurring in subjects with bipolar I disorder (BD-I), bipolar II disorder (BD-II), and major depressive disorder (MDD). Data were drawn from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (2001-2002), a nationally representative face-to-face survey of more than 43000 adults in the USA, including 5695 subjects with lifetime MDD, 935 with BD-I and lifetime MDE, and 494 with BD-II and lifetime MDE. Differences on sociodemographic characteristics and clinical features, course, and treatment patterns of MDE were analyzed. Most depressive symptoms, family psychiatric history, anxiety disorders, alcohol and drug use disorders, and personality disorders were more frequent-and number of depressive symptoms per MDE was higher-among subjects with BD-I, followed by BD-II, and MDD. BD-I individuals experienced a higher number of lifetime MDEs, had a poorer quality of life, and received significantly more treatment for MDE than BD-II and MDD subjects. Individuals with BD-I and BD-II experienced their first mood episode about ten years earlier than those with MDD (21.2, 20.5, and 30.4 years, respectively). Our results support the existence of a spectrum of severity of MDE, with highest severity for BD-I, followed by BD-II and MDD, suggesting the utility of dimensional assessments in current categorical classifications. © 2012 John Wiley and Sons A/S.

  9. Depression in bipolar disorder versus major depressive disorder: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Carmen; Hasin, Deborah S.; Arango, Celso; Oquendo, Maria A.; Vieta, Eduard; Liu, Shangmin; Grant, Bridget F.; Blanco, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To compare the clinical features and course of major depressive episodes (MDE) occurring in subjects with bipolar I disorder (BD-I), bipolar II disorder (BD-II), and major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods Data were drawn from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (2001–2002), a nationally representative face-to-face survey of more than 43,000 adults in the United States, including 5,695 subjects with lifetime MDD, 935 with BD-I and lifetime MDE, and 494 with BD-II and lifetime MDE. Differences on sociodemographic characteristics and clinical features, course, and treatment patterns of MDE were analyzed. Results Most depressive symptoms, family psychiatric history, anxiety disorders, alcohol and drug use disorders, and personality disorders were more frequent—and number of depressive symptoms per MDE were higher—among subjects with BD-I, followed by BD-II, and MDD. BD-I individuals experienced a higher number of lifetime MDE, had the worst quality of life, and received significantly more treatment for MDE than BD-II and MDD subjects. Individuals with BD-I and BD-II experienced their first mood episode about 10 years earlier than those with MDD (21.2, 20.5, and 30.4 years, respectively). Conclusions Our results support the existence of a spectrum of severity of MDE, with highest severity for BD-I, followed by BD-II and MDD, suggesting the utility of dimensional assessments in current categorical classifications. PMID:22548900

  10. Is Health Literacy Associated With Depressive Symptoms Among Korean Adults? Implications for Mental Health Nursing.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Taeho Greg; Lee, Hee Yun; Kim, Nam Keol; Han, Gyounghae; Lee, Jeonghwa; Kim, Kyoungwoo

    2017-10-01

    This study investigated whether health literacy is associated with depressive symptoms among Korean adults, when adjusting for relevant risk factors for depression. Data were collected from a sample of 585 community-dwelling Korean adults living in Seoul and Kwangju, South Korea, using a quota sampling strategy. A cross-sectional, multivariate regression analysis was used to investigate the association between health literacy and depressive symptoms. When controlled for covariates, a lower level of health literacy was significantly associated with a higher level of depressive symptoms. Health literacy may play an important role in preventing and treating depression. Future research is needed to determine if improving health literacy, through health promotion interventions, can enhance community-dwelling Korean adults' understanding of depressive symptoms and relevant treatment options. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Working conditions, visual fatigue, and mental health among systems analysts in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, L; Debert-Ribeiro, M

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the association between working conditions and visual fatigue and mental health among systems analysts living in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out by a multidisciplinary team. It included: ergonomic analysis of work, individual and group interviews, and 553 self applied questionnaires in two enterprises. The comparison population numbered 136 workers in different occupations. Results: The study population mainly comprised young males. Among systems analysts, visual fatigue was associated with mental workload, inadequate equipment and workstation, low level of worker participation, being a woman, and subject's attitude of fascination by the computer. Nervousness and intellectual performance were associated with mental workload, inadequate equipment, work environment, and tools. Continuing education and leisure were protective factors. Work interfering in family life was associated with mental workload, difficulties with clients, strict deadlines, subject's attitude of fascination by the computer, and finding solutions of work problems outside work. Family support, satisfaction in life and work, and adequate work environment and tools were protective factors. Work interfering in personal life was associated with subject's attitude of fascination by the computer, strict deadlines, inadequate equipment, and high level of work participation. Satisfaction in life and work and continuing education were protective factors. The comparison population did not share common working factors with the systems analysts in the regression analysis. Conclusions: The main health effects of systems analysts' work were expressed by machine anthropomorphism, being very demanding, mental acceleration, mental absorption, and difficulty in dealing with emotions. PMID:14691269

  12. Making the business case for enhanced depression care: the National Institute of Mental Health-harvard Work Outcomes Research and Cost-effectiveness Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Philip S; Simon, Gregory E; Kessler, Ronald C

    2008-04-01

    Explore the business case for enhanced depression care and establish a return on investment rationale for increased organizational involvement by employer-purchasers. Literature review, focused on the National Institute of Mental Health-sponsored Work Outcomes Research and Cost-effectiveness Study. This randomized controlled trial compared telephone outreach, care management, and optional psychotherapy to usual care among depressed workers in large national corporations. By 12 months, the intervention significantly improved depression outcomes, work retention, and hours worked among the employed. Results of the Work Outcomes Research and Cost-effectiveness Study trial and other studies suggest that enhanced depression care programs represent a human capital investment opportunity for employers.

  13. Substance Use, Depression and Mental Health Functioning in Patients Seeking Acute Medical Care in an Inner-City ED

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Maureen A.; Barry, Kristin L.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Chermack, Stephen T.; Blow, Frederic C.

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the behavioral health of a consecutive sample of 5,641 adult emergency department (ED) patients aged 19 through 60 presenting for medical care in a large, inner-city hospital emergency department. Twenty-three percent met criteria for major depression; average mental health functioning, as measured by the mental health component of the SF-12, was half of a standard deviation lower than in the general population; 15% met criteria for alcohol or drug abuse/dependence in the past year. Comorbidity was high. These behavioral health disorders may complicate treatment and diagnosis of the chief presenting complaint. These findings, coupled with the high rates of these disorders, suggest the importance of screening and either beginning appropriate treatment or offering appropriate referral for such disorders in ED settings. PMID:21086057

  14. "Si Dios Quiere": Fatalismo and use of mental health services among Latinos with a history of depression.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Robert; Calvo, Rocío

    2017-09-01

    Latinos are less likely to seek professional mental health care than other groups in the United States. While fatalismo has long been hypothesized to be responsible for this behavior, there is little evidence on this assumption. Using an adapted version of the Behavioral Model of Health Service Use (BMHSU), and a nationally representative sample, this study examined the association between fatalismo and mental health service use among Latinos with a history of depression. Participants (n = 703) were drawn from the 2007 Pew Hispanic Healthcare survey. Results showed that fatalismo was significantly associated with the use of psychiatric care, even after controlling for traditional deterrents of health care access and utilization. The findings underscore the importance of fatalismo in predicting Latinos' use of psychiatric care. Implications for practice are discussed.

  15. Sugar intake from sweet food and beverages, common mental disorder and depression: prospective findings from the Whitehall II study.

    PubMed

    Knüppel, Anika; Shipley, Martin J; Llewellyn, Clare H; Brunner, Eric J

    2017-07-27

    Intake of sweet food, beverages and added sugars has been linked with depressive symptoms in several populations. Aim of this study was to investigate systematically cross-sectional and prospective associations between sweet food/beverage intake, common mental disorder (CMD) and depression and to examine the role of reverse causation (influence of mood on intake) as potential explanation for the observed linkage. We analysed repeated measures (23,245 person-observations) from the Whitehall II study using random effects regression. Diet was assessed using food frequency questionnaires, mood using validated questionnaires. Cross-sectional analyses showed positive associations. In prospective analyses, men in the highest tertile of sugar intake from sweet food/beverages had a 23% increased odds of incident CMD after 5 years (95% CI: 1.02, 1.48) independent of health behaviours, socio-demographic and diet-related factors, adiposity and other diseases. The odds of recurrent depression were increased in the highest tertile for both sexes, but not statistically significant when diet-related factors were included in the model (OR 1.47; 95% CI: 0.98, 2.22). Neither CMD nor depression predicted intake changes. Our research confirms an adverse effect of sugar intake from sweet food/beverage on long-term psychological health and suggests that lower intake of sugar may be associated with better psychological health.

  16. Changes in Psychotherapy Utilization Among Consumers of Services for Major Depressive Disorder in the Community Mental Health System

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly; Rothbard, Aileen; Farris, Kimberly D.; Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; Scott, Kelli; Heintz, Laura E.; Gallop, Robert; Crits-Christoph, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to explore changes in psychotherapy utilization for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) treated in community mental health agencies across two cohorts. We used a Medicaid claims database including approximately 300,000 public sector clients. Although the use of psychotherapy alone showed a small decrease, there was a large increase in the use of combined medication and psychotherapy as a treatment for MDD. Race was a significant predictor of both treatment type received and length of treatment. African American consumers were more likely to receive psychotherapy alone than combined treatment and attended significantly fewer psychotherapy sessions. PMID:21298475

  17. Chronic pain in HIV-infected patients: relationship to depression, substance use, and mental health and pain treatment

    PubMed Central

    Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Weisberg, Risa B.; Herman, Debra S.; Bailey, Genie L.; Pinkston, Megan M.; Stein, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Since the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV has become a chronic disease for most individuals in developed countries. Chronic pain is a common occurrence for HIV –infected patients and has an impact on quality of life and antiretroviral adherence. The objective of this study was to examine relationships between chronic pain and depression, substance use, mental health treatment, and pain treatment in HIV-infected patients. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Three primary care sites where HIV+ patients receive treatment. Subjects 238 HIV-infected primary care patients. Methods We collected self-report and chart-review information on demographics, HIV clinical status, chronic pain, depression, substance use, mental health treatment, and pain treatment. We collected data between October 2012 and November 2013. Results Of the patients enrolled in this study, 107 reported no chronic pain, 24 reported mild chronic pain, and 107 reported moderate-severe chronic pain. Participants in the moderate-severe pain group were more likely to have high levels of depressive symptoms than those in the no chronic pain group. Similarly, there was a significant relationship between chronic pain status and interference with life activities due to pain. Participants with moderate-severe chronic pain were more likely to be taking an antidepressant medication than those with mild chronic pain, and more likely to be taking a prescription opioid than the other two groups. We did not find a significant relationship between problematic substance use and chronic pain status. Conclusions Despite pharmacologic treatment, moderate-severe chronic pain and elevated depression symptoms are common among HIV-infected patients and frequently co-occur. PMID:26119642

  18. Postpartum Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... Postpartum depression Postpartum depression is often treated with psychotherapy (also called talk therapy or mental health counseling), medication or both. Psychotherapy. It may help to talk through your concerns ...

  19. Depression in Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... here Home » Depression In Older Adults: More Facts Depression In Older Adults: More Facts Depression affects more ... combination of both. [8] Older Adult Attitudes Toward Depression: According to a Mental Health America survey [9] ...

  20. Mental health care utilization in prepaid and fee-for-service plans among depressed patients in the Medical Outcomes Study.

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, R; Jackson, C A; Meredith, L S; Yip, W; Manning, W G; Rogers, W H; Wells, K B

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We compare mental health utilization in prepaid and fee-for-service plans and analyze selection biases. DATA SOURCE: Primary data were collected every six months over a two-year interval for a panel of depressed patients participating in the Medical Outcomes Study, an observational study of adults in competing systems of care in three urban areas (Boston, Chicago, and Los Angeles). STUDY DESIGN: Patients visiting a participating clinician at baseline were screened for depression, followed by a telephone interview, which included the depression section of the NIMH Diagnostic Interview Schedule. Patients with current or past lifetime depressive disorder and those with depressed mood and three other lifetime symptoms were eligible for this analysis. We analyze mental health utilization based on periodic patient self-report. ANALYTIC METHODS: We use two-part models because of the presence of both nonuse and skewness of use. Standard errors are corrected nonparametrically for correlations across observations due to clustered sampling within participating physicians and repeated observations on the same individual. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The average number of mental health visits was 35-40 percent lower in the prepaid system, adjusted and unadjusted for observed differences in patient characteristics, including health status. Utilization differences were concentrated among patients of psychiatrists, with only minor differences among patients of general medical providers. Analyzing the effect of switches that patients make between payment systems over time, we found some evidence of adverse selection into fee-for-service plans based on baseline utilization, but not based on utilization at the end of the study. In particular, after adjusting for observed patient characteristics and health status, patients switching out of prepaid plans had higher baseline use than predicted, whereas patients switching out of fee-for-service had lower use than predicted. Switching

  1. Faculty Attitudes toward Addressing Mental Health Conditions and Substance Abuse among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor-Merrigan, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The continued prevalence of mental health conditions and substance abuse among students enrolled in institutions of higher education is a significant and progressing concern, with marked impact on retention, academic success, graduation rate, and alarming personal consequences. Yet, many institutions struggle with successfully addressing these…

  2. Perceived Working Conditions and Personal Resources Predicting Mental Health Counselor Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Isabel A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the influence of counselor perceived working conditions, length of time in field, counselor gender, mindfulness attitudes, compassion satisfaction, emotion-focused coping, problem focused coping, and maladaptive coping on levels of burnout and compassion fatigue in a sample of 213 mental health counselors. Cross-sectional…

  3. Perspectives of Young Emerging Adults with Serious Mental Health Conditions on Vocational Peer Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klodnick, Vanessa V.; Sabella, Kathryn; Brenner, Christopher J.; Krzos, Izabela M.; Ellison, Marsha L.; Kaiser, Susan M.; Davis, Maryann; Fagan, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    For early emerging adults with serious mental health conditions, vocational services with peer mentors are a promising adaptation of adult system evidence-based practices. Peer mentors were added to the Individual Placement and Support model of supported employment for 17- to 20-year-olds receiving residential and psychiatric care. To explore the…

  4. Allocation of Public Resources for Psychological Therapy between Types of Mental Health Condition: Towards Structural Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tustin, Don

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses issues of allocating public resources efficiently between mental health conditions that are associated with different levels of disability, and presents an adaptation of an established framework to help decision-making in this area. The adapted framework refers to psychological interventions that are universal, indicated,…

  5. Allocation of Public Resources for Psychological Therapy between Types of Mental Health Condition: Towards Structural Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tustin, Don

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses issues of allocating public resources efficiently between mental health conditions that are associated with different levels of disability, and presents an adaptation of an established framework to help decision-making in this area. The adapted framework refers to psychological interventions that are universal, indicated,…

  6. Faculty Attitudes toward Addressing Mental Health Conditions and Substance Abuse among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor-Merrigan, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The continued prevalence of mental health conditions and substance abuse among students enrolled in institutions of higher education is a significant and progressing concern, with marked impact on retention, academic success, graduation rate, and alarming personal consequences. Yet, many institutions struggle with successfully addressing these…

  7. Perspectives of Young Emerging Adults with Serious Mental Health Conditions on Vocational Peer Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klodnick, Vanessa V.; Sabella, Kathryn; Brenner, Christopher J.; Krzos, Izabela M.; Ellison, Marsha L.; Kaiser, Susan M.; Davis, Maryann; Fagan, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    For early emerging adults with serious mental health conditions, vocational services with peer mentors are a promising adaptation of adult system evidence-based practices. Peer mentors were added to the Individual Placement and Support model of supported employment for 17- to 20-year-olds receiving residential and psychiatric care. To explore the…

  8. Persons with Mental Retardation and Related Conditions in State Institutions: Trends and Projections. Policy Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Charlie; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This Policy Research Brief summarizes longitudinal national statistics on the number and characteristics of persons with mental retardation and related conditions living in state institutions, their movement into and out of those institutions, the costs of state institutions, and the growing numbers of closures of these institutions. Findings are…

  9. Perceived Working Conditions and Personal Resources Predicting Mental Health Counselor Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Isabel A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the influence of counselor perceived working conditions, length of time in field, counselor gender, mindfulness attitudes, compassion satisfaction, emotion-focused coping, problem focused coping, and maladaptive coping on levels of burnout and compassion fatigue in a sample of 213 mental health counselors. Cross-sectional…

  10. Relationship between sickness presenteeism (WHO-HPQ) with depression and sickness absence due to mental disease in a cohort of Japanese workers.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomoko; Miyaki, Koichi; Song, Yixuan; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Kawakami, Norito; Shimazu, Akihito; Takahashi, Masaya; Inoue, Akiomi; Kurioka, Sumiko

    2015-07-15

    Absence due to mental disease in the workplace has become a global public health problem. We aimed to evaluate the influence of presenteeism on depression and absence due to mental disease. A prospective study of 1831 Japanese employees from all areas of Japan was conducted. Presenteeism and depression were measured by the validated Japanese version of the World Health Organization Health and Work Performance Questionnaire (WHO-HPQ) and the K6 scale, respectively. Absence due to mental disease across a 2-year follow up was surveyed through medical certificates obtained for work absence. After adjusting for age and gender, participants with higher rates of sickness absolute and relative presenteeism (the lowest tertile of the scores) were significantly more likely to be absent due to mental disease (OR=4.40, 95% CI: 1.65-11.73, and OR=3.31, 95% CI: 1.50-7.27). Subsequently, higher rates of sickness absolute or relative presenteeism were significantly associated with higher rates of depression (K6≥13) one year later (OR=3.79, 95% CI: 2.48-5.81, and OR=2.89, 95% CI: 1.98-4.22). The number of females in the sample was relatively small. However, the rates of absence for females with and without mental illness did not significantly differ from those of men. More sickness presenteeism scores were found to be related to higher rates of depression and absence due to mental disease in this large-scale cohort of Japanese workers. Measurement of presenteeism could be used to evaluate the risk for depression and absenteeism. Furthermore, our findings suggest that intervention to improve presenteeism would be effective in preventing depression and absence due to mental illness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Insomnia brings soldiers into mental health treatment, predicts treatment engagement, and outperforms other suicide-related symptoms as a predictor of major depressive episodes.

    PubMed

    Hom, Melanie A; Lim, Ingrid C; Stanley, Ian H; Chiurliza, Bruno; Podlogar, Matthew C; Michaels, Matthew S; Buchman-Schmitt, Jennifer M; Silva, Caroline; Ribeiro, Jessica D; Joiner, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    Given the high rates of suicide among military personnel and the need to characterize suicide risk factors associated with mental health service use, this study aimed to identify suicide-relevant factors that predict: (1) treatment engagement and treatment adherence, and (2) suicide attempts, suicidal ideation, and major depressive episodes in a military sample. Army recruiters (N = 2596) completed a battery of self-report measures upon study enrollment. Eighteen months later, information regarding suicide attempts, suicidal ideation, major depressive episodes, and mental health visits were obtained from participants' military medical records. Suicide attempts and suicidal ideation were very rare in this sample; negative binomial regression analyses with robust estimation were used to assess correlates and predictors of mental health treatment visits and major depressive episodes. More severe insomnia and agitation were significantly associated with mental health visits at baseline and over the 18-month study period. In contrast, suicide-specific hopelessness was significantly associated with fewer mental health visits. Insomnia severity was the only significant predictor of major depressive episodes. Findings suggest that assessment of sleep problems might be useful in identifying at-risk military service members who may engage in mental health treatment. Additional research is warranted to examine the predictive validity of these suicide-related symptom measures in a more representative, higher suicide risk military sample.

  12. Adaptive learning can result in a failure to profit from good conditions: implications for understanding depression

    PubMed Central

    Trimmer, Pete C.; Higginson, Andrew D.; Fawcett, Tim W.; McNamara, John M.; Houston, Alasdair I.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: Depression is a major medical problem diagnosed in an increasing proportion of people and for which commonly prescribed psychoactive drugs are frequently ineffective. Development of treatment options may be facilitated by an evolutionary perspective; several adaptive reasons for proneness to depression have been proposed. A common feature of many explanations is that depressive behaviour is a way to avoid costly effort where benefits are small and/or unlikely. However, this viewpoint fails to explain why low mood persists when the situation improves. We investigate whether a behavioural rule that is adapted to a stochastically changing world can cause inactivity which appears similar to the effect of depression, in that it persists after the situation has improved. Methodology: We develop an adaptive learning model in which an individual has repeated choices of whether to invest costly effort that may result in a net benefit. Investing effort also provides information about the current conditions and rates of change of the conditions. Results: An individual following the optimal behavioural strategy may sometimes remain inactive when conditions are favourable (i.e. when it would be better to invest effort) when it is poorly informed about the current environmental state. Initially benign conditions can predispose an individual to inactivity after a relatively brief period of negative experiences. Conclusions and implications: Our approach suggests that the antecedent factors causing depressed behaviour could go much further back in an individual s history than is currently appreciated. The insights from our approach have implications for the ongoing debate about best treatment options for patients with depressive symptoms. PMID:25916884

  13. Longitudinal Effects of Early Childhood Maltreatment on Co-Occurring Substance Misuse and Mental Health Problems in Adulthood: The Role of Adolescent Alcohol Use and Depression.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Martie L; Hong, Seunghye; Herrenkohl, Todd I; Brown, Eric C; Lee, Jungeun Olivia; Jung, Hyunzee

    2016-05-01

    This study tested a developmental model in which subtypes of childhood maltreatment were hypothesized to have direct and indirect effects on co-occurring depression, anxiety, and substance misuse in adulthood. Indirect effects involved adolescent alcohol use and depression, which were included as mediators in the tested models. This prospective longitudinal study (N = 332; 52.4% male) followed the participants from childhood (18 months to 6 years of age) to adulthood (31-41 years old, M = 36.21). Maltreatment subtypes included parent-reported physical and emotional abuse and child-reported sexual abuse. Adult outcomes included measures of substance misuse and mental health (i.e., depression and anxiety). Latent class analysis and structural equation models were used to identify classes of substance misuse and mental health co-occurrence and to test mediating effects of adolescent alcohol use and depression. Three classes were identified: (a) low risk of substance misuse and low mental health symptoms, (b) moderate substance misuse risk and mild depression and anxiety, and (c) moderate substance misuse risk and moderate to high depression and anxiety. Structural models showed that effects of childhood sexual abuse were fully mediated by adolescent alcohol use and depression. Physical abuse increased adolescent depression but did not have direct or indirect effects on adult outcome classes. Emotional abuse had a direct effect on the adult classes. Children exposed to severe emotional abuse are at higher risk for comorbid substance misuse, depression, and anxiety into their mid-30s, after taking into account evidence of alcohol use and depression during adolescence. Sexual and physical abuse have more proximal effects on adolescent alcohol use and depression, which then influence the risk of adult problems.

  14. Women At Work and At Home: Implications for Depression and Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanefield, Linda

    Researchers in the area of depression, aware that women are more likely than men to be depressed, have examined women's marital and employment status to explain this phenomenon. However, the meanings, perceptions, and situations encountered within marital and work roles also contribute to emotional distress. The traditional sex role explanation of…

  15. Parenting Stress and Depression in Children with Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobe, Frank H.

    1994-01-01

    This study of 29 children with developmental delays found that parent ratings of children's depression were significantly associated with maternal depression, negative self-image, anxiety, and conduct problems. Data suggest that children with developmental delays exhibit a similar pattern of symptoms and associated characteristics to those found…

  16. [Mental health of gas and gas-transport industry workers as an indispensable condition of their efficient occupational activity].

    PubMed

    Polozhiĭ, B S

    2013-01-01

    Mental health workers in industry is a major health and social resource of any developed country. Unfortunately, Russia's level of mental health workers is unfavorable level. We have conducted a survey of employees psychoprophylactic mass of the gas industry, which occupies a leading position in the economy. Found that the prevalence of mental disorders in this professional group is 187 per 1,000 workers. In this case, 99.3% of employees with mental health problems of mentally ill for a long time, they do not receive appropriate treatment. Leading position in the structure occupy disorder with anxious and depressive symptoms, about 75% of all cases. In the treatment of these patients showed the highest efficiency Luvox, which is one of the most appropriate products in a production environment.

  17. Rwanda – lasting imprints of a genocide: trauma, mental health and psychosocial conditions in survivors, former prisoners and their children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    the symptom severity of PTSD, whereas economic status, age and gender were not. Descendants of genocide survivors presented with more symptoms than descendants of former prisoners with regard to all assessed mental disorders. Conclusions Our study demonstrated particular long-term consequences of massive organized violence, such as war and genocide, on mental health and psychosocial conditions. Differences between families of survivors and families of former prisoners accused for participation in the Rwandan genocide are reflected in the mental health of the next generation. PMID:23531331

  18. Theory of mind in social anxiety disorder, depression, and comorbid conditions.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Dustin; Wilson, Gillian; Roes, Meighen; Rnic, Katerina; Harkness, Kate Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder is characterized by marked interpersonal impairment, particularly when presenting with comorbid major depression. However, the foundational social-cognitive skills that underlie interpersonal impairment in comorbid and non-comorbid manifestations of SAD has to date received very little empirical investigation. In a sample of 119 young adults, the current study examined differences in theory of mind (ToM), defined as the ability to decode and reason about others' mental states, across four groups: (a) non-comorbid SAD; (b) non-comorbid Lifetime MDD; (c) comorbid SAD and Lifetime MDD; and (d) healthy control. The non-comorbid SAD group was significantly less accurate at decoding mental states than the non-comorbid MDD and control groups. Further, both the comorbid and non-comorbid SAD groups made significantly more 'excessive' ToM reasoning errors than the non-comorbid MDD group, suggesting a pattern of over-mentalizing. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for understanding the social cognitive foundations of social anxiety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Examination of the Comorbidity of Mental Illness and Somatic Conditions in Hospitalized Children in the United States Using the Kids' Inpatient Database, 2009.

    PubMed

    Sztein, Dina M; Lane, Wendy G

    2016-03-01

    To examine the associations between mental and physical illness in hospitalized children. The data for this analysis came from the 2009 Kids' Inpatient Database (KID). Any child with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code indicative of depressive, anxiety, or bipolar disorders or a diagnosis of sickle cell disease, diabetes mellitus type 1 or 2, asthma, or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were included. Using SAS software, we performed χ(2) tests and multivariable logistic regression to determine degrees of association. Children discharged with sickle cell disease, asthma, diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2, and ADHD were 0.94, 2.76, 3.50, 6.37, and 38.39 times more likely to have a comorbid anxiety, depression, or bipolar disorder diagnosis than other hospitalized children, respectively. Children with several chronic physical illnesses (asthma, diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2) and mental illnesses (ADHD) have higher odds of being discharged from the hospital with a comorbid mood or anxiety disorder compared with other children discharged from the hospital. It is therefore important to screen children hospitalized with chronic medical conditions for comorbid mental illness to ensure optimal clinical care, to improve overall health and long-term outcomes for these children. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Sedentary behavior, depressed affect, and indicators of mental well-being in adolescence: Does the screen only matter for girls?

    PubMed

    Suchert, Vivien; Hanewinkel, Reiner; Isensee, Barbara

    2015-07-01

    The study investigated the effects of sedentary behavior (SB) on mental well-being and examined differences between screen-based (sSB) and non-screen-based sedentary behaviors (nSB) separately by gender. In a total sample of 1296 students (609 girls) aged 12-17 (m = 13.7, SD = 0.67), SB, depressed affect, self-esteem, physical self-concept, general self-efficacy and physical activity were assessed through self-administered questionnaires. Among girls, lower scores in self-esteem, physical self-concept as well as general self-efficacy were associated with higher sSB but not nSB. Among boys higher levels of sSB related to higher self-esteem, nSB but not sSB predicted higher scores in depressed affect, and there was a u-shaped association between sSB and general self-efficacy. Results replicate the inverse association between SB and mental well-being, and suggest a distinction between nSB and sSB especially among girls. Additional studies will be necessary to replicate, and further examine mediating mechanisms.

  1. Case-finding for common mental disorders of anxiety and depression in primary care: an external validation of routinely collected data.

    PubMed

    John, Ann; McGregor, Joanne; Fone, David; Dunstan, Frank; Cornish, Rosie; Lyons, Ronan A; Lloyd, Keith R

    2016-03-15

    The robustness of epidemiological research using routinely collected primary care electronic data to support policy and practice for common mental disorders (CMD) anxiety and depression would be greatly enhanced by appropriate validation of diagnostic codes and algorithms for data extraction. We aimed to create a robust research platform for CMD using population-based, routinely collected primary care electronic data. We developed a set of Read code lists (diagnosis, symptoms, treatments) for the identification of anxiety and depression in the General Practice Database (GPD) within the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage Databank at Swansea University, and assessed 12 algorithms for Read codes to define cases according to various criteria. Annual incidence rates were calculated per 1000 person years at risk (PYAR) to assess recording practice for these CMD between January 1(st) 2000 and December 31(st) 2009. We anonymously linked the 2799 MHI-5 Caerphilly Health and Social Needs Survey (CHSNS) respondents aged 18 to 74 years to their routinely collected GP data in SAIL. We estimated the sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of the various algorithms using the MHI-5 as the gold standard. The incidence of combined depression/anxiety diagnoses remained stable over the ten-year period in a population of over 500,000 but symptoms increased from 6.5 to 20.7 per 1000 PYAR. A 'historical' GP diagnosis for depression/anxiety currently treated plus a current diagnosis (treated or untreated) resulted in a specificity of 0.96, sensitivity 0.29 and PPV 0.76. Adding current symptom codes improved sensitivity (0.32) with a marginal effect on specificity (0.95) and PPV (0.74). We have developed an algorithm with a high specificity and PPV of detecting cases of anxiety and depression from routine GP data that incorporates symptom codes to reflect GP coding behaviour. We have demonstrated that using diagnosis and current treatment alone to identify cases for

  2. Integrated primary care for patients with mental and physical multimorbidity: cluster randomised controlled trial of collaborative care for patients with depression comorbid with diabetes or cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, Karina; Dickens, Chris; Bower, Peter; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; McElvenny, Damien; Hann, Mark; Cherrington, Andrea; Garrett, Charlotte; Gibbons, Chris J; Baguley, Clare; Roughley, Kate; Adeyemi, Isabel; Reeves, David; Waheed, Waquas; Gask, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the effectiveness of an integrated collaborative care model for people with depression and long term physical conditions. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting 36 general practices in the north west of England. Participants 387 patients with a record of diabetes or heart disease, or both, who had depressive symptoms (≥10 on patient health questionaire-9 (PHQ-9)) for at least two weeks. Mean age was 58.5 (SD 11.7). Participants reported a mean of 6.2 (SD 3.0) long term conditions other than diabetes or heart disease; 240 (62%) were men; 360 (90%) completed the trial. Interventions Collaborative care included patient preference for behavioural activation, cognitive restructuring, graded exposure, and/or lifestyle advice, management of drug treatment, and prevention of relapse. Up to eight sessions of psychological treatment were delivered by specially trained psychological wellbeing practitioners employed by Improving Access to Psychological Therapy services in the English National Health Service; integration of care was enhanced by two treatment sessions delivered jointly with the practice nurse. Usual care was standard clinical practice provided by general practitioners and practice nurses. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was reduction in symptoms of depression on the self reported symptom checklist-13 depression scale (SCL-D13) at four months after baseline assessment. Secondary outcomes included anxiety symptoms (generalised anxiety disorder 7), self management (health education impact questionnaire), disability (Sheehan disability scale), and global quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF). Results 19 general practices were randomised to collaborative care and 20 to usual care; three practices withdrew from the trial before patients were recruited. 191 patients were recruited from practices allocated to collaborative care, and 196 from practices allocated to usual care. After adjustment for baseline depression score, mean

  3. Characterisation of mental health conditions in social media using Informed Deep Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkotsis, George; Oellrich, Anika; Velupillai, Sumithra; Liakata, Maria; Hubbard, Tim J. P.; Dobson, Richard J. B.; Dutta, Rina

    2017-03-01

    The number of people affected by mental illness is on the increase and with it the burden on health and social care use, as well as the loss of both productivity and quality-adjusted life-years. Natural language processing of electronic health records is increasingly used to study mental health conditions and risk behaviours on a large scale. However, narrative notes written by clinicians do not capture first-hand the patients’ own experiences, and only record cross-sectional, professional impressions at the point of care. Social media platforms have become a source of ‘in the moment’ daily exchange, with topics including well-being and mental health. In this study, we analysed posts from the social media platform Reddit and developed classifiers to recognise and classify posts related to mental illness according to 11 disorder themes. Using a neural network and deep learning approach, we could automatically recognise mental illness-related posts in our balenced dataset with an accuracy of 91.08% and select the correct theme with a weighted average accuracy of 71.37%. We believe that these results are a first step in developing methods to characterise large amounts of user-generated content that could support content curation and targeted interventions.

  4. Characterisation of mental health conditions in social media using Informed Deep Learning.

    PubMed

    Gkotsis, George; Oellrich, Anika; Velupillai, Sumithra; Liakata, Maria; Hubbard, Tim J P; Dobson, Richard J B; Dutta, Rina

    2017-03-22

    The number of people affected by mental illness is on the increase and with it the burden on health and social care use, as well as the loss of both productivity and quality-adjusted life-years. Natural language processing of electronic health records is increasingly used to study mental health conditions and risk behaviours on a large scale. However, narrative notes written by clinicians do not capture first-hand the patients' own experiences, and only record cross-sectional, professional impressions at the point of care. Social media platforms have become a source of 'in the moment' daily exchange, with topics including well-being and mental health. In this study, we analysed posts from the social media platform Reddit and developed classifiers to recognise and classify posts related to mental illness according to 11 disorder themes. Using a neural network and deep learning approach, we could automatically recognise mental illness-related posts in our balenced dataset with an accuracy of 91.08% and select the correct theme with a weighted average accuracy of 71.37%. We believe that these results are a first step in developing methods to characterise large amounts of user-generated content that could support content curation and targeted interventions.

  5. Characterisation of mental health conditions in social media using Informed Deep Learning

    PubMed Central

    Gkotsis, George; Oellrich, Anika; Velupillai, Sumithra; Liakata, Maria; Hubbard, Tim J. P.; Dobson, Richard J. B.; Dutta, Rina

    2017-01-01

    The number of people affected by mental illness is on the increase and with it the burden on health and social care use, as well as the loss of both productivity and quality-adjusted life-years. Natural language processing of electronic health records is increasingly used to study mental health conditions and risk behaviours on a large scale. However, narrative notes written by clinicians do not capture first-hand the patients’ own experiences, and only record cross-sectional, professional impressions at the point of care. Social media platforms have become a source of ‘in the moment’ daily exchange, with topics including well-being and mental health. In this study, we analysed posts from the social media platform Reddit and developed classifiers to recognise and classify posts related to mental illness according to 11 disorder themes. Using a neural network and deep learning approach, we could automatically recognise mental illness-related posts in our balenced dataset with an accuracy of 91.08% and select the correct theme with a weighted average accuracy of 71.37%. We believe that these results are a first step in developing methods to characterise large amounts of user-generated content that could support content curation and targeted interventions. PMID:28327593

  6. Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  7. Mental health of Japanese psychiatrists: the relationship among level of occupational stress, satisfaction and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Koreki, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Atsuo; Abe, Akiko; Ikeuchi, Hidetsugu; Okubo, Jo; Oguri, Atsushi; Orimo, Keisuke; Katayama, Nariko; Sato, Hiroyo; Shikimoto, Ryo; Nishiyama, Go; Nogami, Waka; Haki, Kazuma; Hayashi, Tetsuro; Fukagawa, Yuko; Funaki, Kei; Matsuzawa, Mia; Matsumoto, Ayako; Mimura, Masaru

    2015-03-26

    Psychiatrists in clinical practice face a number of stressors related to patient care, such as overwork. On the other hand, they gain satisfaction from their work. We quantified and assessed the potential relationship between levels of occupational stress, satisfaction, and depressive symptoms among Japanese clinical psychiatrists. We surveyed 206 psychiatrists with up to 15 years of clinical experience who primarily worked in patient care. Levels of occupational stress and occupational satisfaction were measured using the Visual Analogue Scale and the level of depressive symptoms was measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Workplace stressors and satisfiers were also evaluated. Out of 206 psychiatrists, 154 (74.8%) responded to the survey. The respondents' mean (SD) age was 34.3 (5.2) years. The estimated prevalence of significant depressive symptoms was 34.4% (n = 53), and the experienced frequent violence was 14.9% (n = 23). The level of depressive symptoms was inversely correlated with the level of occupational satisfaction. In respondents who reported a moderate level of occupational stress, having fewer depressive symptoms was associated with higher occupational satisfaction, but this association was not significant in those who reported a high level of stress. In addition, high occupational satisfaction was associated with interest towards work content, ability to work at one's discretion, opportunities for growth and career development, and ease of communication with supervisors and colleagues. Nearly one-third of the psychiatrists screened positive for significant depressive symptoms. Having fewer depressive symptoms was associated with higher occupational satisfaction in those who reported a moderate level of stress. Implications from the present findings may be to enhance occupational satisfaction by discussing work interests with a supervisor, as well as increased opportunities for career development, which may

  8. Associations between Childhood Parental Mental Health Difficulties and Depressive Symptoms in Late Adulthood: The Influence of Life-Course Socioeconomic, Health and Lifestyle Factors

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Viola; Klijs, Bart; Smidt, Nynke; Mierau, Jochen O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression among older adults (i.e., the 50+) is a major health concern. The objective of this study is to investigate whether growing up with a parent suffering from mental health problems is associated with depressive symptoms in late-adulthood and how this association is influenced by life-course socio-economic, health and lifestyle factors in childhood and late adulthood. Methods We used life-history data from the SHARE survey, consisting of 21,127 participants living in 13 European countries. Symptoms of depression were assessed using the EURO-D scale. Parental mental health was assessed by asking respondents to report whether any of their parents had mental health problems during the respondents’ childhood. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association between parental mental health status and depression. Variables on childhood and late-life socio-economic, health and lifestyle factors were sequentially added to the model to assess the extent to which this association is influenced by life-course circumstances. Results Individuals who were exposed during childhood to a parent with mental health problems suffered from depressive symptoms more often in late adulthood than those who were not (OR 1.76, 95% CI: 1.43–2.17). Adjustment for life-course socio-economic, health and lifestyle factors in childhood and late adulthood diminished this association to an OR of 1.54 (95% CI: 1.24–1.90) and OR of 1.45 (95% CI: 1.16–1.82), respectively. Conclusion Our results indicate a substantial association between parental mental health problems in childhood and depression in late adulthood and that this association is partly explained by childhood as well as late adulthood socio-economic, health and lifestyle factors. PMID:27936078

  9. Psychostimulant withdrawal as an inducing condition in animal models of depression.

    PubMed

    Barr, Alasdair M; Markou, Athina

    2005-01-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that the withdrawal from high doses of psychostimulant drugs in humans induces a transient syndrome, with symptoms that appear isomorphic to those of major depressive disorder. Pharmacological treatment strategies for psychostimulant withdrawal in humans have focused mainly on compounds with antidepressant properties. Animal models of psychostimulant withdrawal have been shown to demonstrate a wide range of deficits, including changes in homeostatic, affective and cognitive behaviors, as well as numerous physiological changes. Many of these behavioral and physiological sequelae parallel specific symptoms of major depressive disorder, and have been reversed by treatment with antidepressant drugs. These combined findings provide strong support for the use of psychostimulant withdrawal as an inducing condition in animal models of depression. In the current review we propound that the psychostimulant withdrawal model displays high levels of predictive and construct validity. Recent progress and limitations in the development of this model, as well as future directions for research, are evaluated and discussed.

  10. Choir singing and creative writing enhance emotion regulation in adults with chronic mental health conditions.

    PubMed

    Dingle, Genevieve A; Williams, Elyse; Jetten, Jolanda; Welch, Jonathon

    2017-07-18

    Adults with mental health conditions commonly experience difficulties with emotion regulation which affect their social functioning. Arts-based groups provide opportunities for shared emotional experiences and emotion regulation. This study explores emotion regulation strategies and the emotional effects of arts-based group participation in adults with mental health problems and in controls. The 62 participants included 39 adults with chronic mental health problems who were members of arts-based groups (ABG) and 23 comparison choir (CC) members who were not specifically experiencing mental health problems. The repeated measures design included self-reports of emotion upon waking (T1), the hour before group (T2), end of the group (T3), and evening (T4), as well as participant notes to explain their emotion ratings at each time. They also completed measures of individual and interpersonal emotion regulation. The ABG participants engaged marginally more in affect worsening strategies than CC (p = .057 and .08), but there were no other group differences. All participants reported a significant increase in positive emotions, F (3, 180) = 28.044, p < .001, np2 = .319; and a decrease in negative emotions during the arts-based activity: F (2.637, 155.597) = 21.09, p < .001, np2 = .263. The influence on positive emotions was short-lived, while the effect on negative emotions lasted until evening. Findings show that participation in arts-based groups benefits the emotions of both healthy adults and those experiencing mental health conditions through individual and interpersonal processes. Individuals with chronic mental health conditions often experience difficulties in emotion processing Participation in arts-based groups was associated with significant increases in positive emotions although these were short-lived Negative emotion was significantly decreased during arts-based group activities, and sustained to the evening assessment Adults with chronic mental

  11. How does mental-physical multimorbidity express itself in lived time and space? A phenomenological analysis of encounters with depression and chronic physical illness.

    PubMed

    Coventry, Peter A; Dickens, Chris; Todd, Chris

    2014-10-01

    Mental-physical multimorbidity (the co-existence of mental and physical ill health) is highly prevalent and associated with significant impairments and high healthcare costs. While the sociology of chronic illness has developed a mature discourse on coping with long term physical illness the impact of mental and physical health have remained analytically separated, highlighting the need for a better understanding of the day-to-day complexities encountered by people living with mental-physical multimorbidity. We used the phenomenological paradigm of the lived body to elucidate how the experience of mental-physical multimorbidity shapes people's lifeworlds. Nineteen people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and depression (defined as a score ≥8 on depression scale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) were recruited from secondary NHS care and interviewed at their homes. Data were analysed phenomenologically using van Manen's lifeworld existential framework of the lived body, lived time, lived space, lived relations. Additionally, we re-analysed data (using the same framework) collected from 13 people recruited from secondary NHS care with either COPD, rheumatoid arthritis, heart disease, or type 1 or type 2 diabetes and depression. The phenomenology of mental-physical multimorbidity was articulated through embodied and emotional encounters with day-to-day life in four ways: [a] participants' perception of lived time and lived space contracted; [b] time and [c] space were experienced as liminal categories, enforcing negative mood and temporal and spatial contraction; and [d] time and space could also be customised to reinstate agency and self-determination. Mental-physical multimorbidity negatively impacts on individuals' perceptions of lived time and lived space, leading to a loss of agency, heightened uncertainty, and poor well-being. Harnessing people's capacity to modify their experience of time and space may be a novel way to support people

  12. Equivalent inbreeding depression under laboratory and field conditions in a tree-hole-breeding mosquito.

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, P; Hutchinson, R A; Linvell, T

    2000-01-01

    Understanding the consequences of inbreeding has important implications for a wide variety of topics in population biology. However, most studies quantifying the effects of inbreeding are performed under artificial farm, greenhouse, laboratory or zoo conditions. Although several authors have argued that the deleterious effects of inbreeding (inbreeding depression) are likely to be more severe under natural field conditions than in artificial experimental environments, these arguments are usually speculative or based on indirect comparisons. We quantified the effects of inbreeding on fitness traits in a tree-hole-breeding mosquito Aedes geniculatus) under near-optimal laboratory conditions and in three natural tree holes. Our index of fitness (Ro) was lower in the field than in the laboratory and declined due to inbreeding in both However, environments, we found no significant interactions between inbreeding depression and environmental conditions. In both the field and laboratory a 10% increase in the inbreeding coefflicient (F) led to a 12-15) decline in fitness (Ro) These results suggest that inbreeding depression will not necessarily be more extreme under natural field conditions than in the laboratory. PMID:11075705

  13. The personal and national costs of mental health conditions: impacts on income, taxes, government support payments due to lost labour force participation.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Deborah J; Shrestha, Rupendra N; Percival, Richard; Passey, Megan E; Callander, Emily J; Kelly, Simon J

    2011-04-28

    Mental health conditions have the ability to interrupt an individual's ability to participate in the labour force, and this can have considerable follow on impacts to both the individual and the state. Cross-sectional analysis of the base population of Health&WealthMOD, a microsimulation model built on data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics' Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers and STINMOD, an income and savings microsimulation model was used to quantify the personal cost of lost income and the cost to the state from lost income taxation, increased benefits payments and lost GDP as a result of early retirement due to mental health conditions in Australians aged 45-64 in 2009. Individuals aged 45 to 64 years who have retired early due to depression personally have 73% lower income then their full time employed counterparts and those retired early due to other mental health conditions have 78% lower incomes. The national aggregate cost to government due to early retirement from these conditions equated to $278 million (£152.9 million) in lost income taxation revenue, $407 million (£223.9 million) in additional transfer payments and around $1.7 billion in GDP in 2009 alone. The costs of mental health conditions to the individuals and the state are considerable. While individuals has to bear the economic costs of lost income in addition to the burden of the conditions itself, the impact on the state is loss of productivity from reduced workforce participation, lost income taxation revenue, and increased government support payments--in addition to direct health care costs.

  14. The personal and national costs of mental health conditions: impacts on income, taxes, government support payments due to lost labour force participation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mental health conditions have the ability to interrupt an individual's ability to participate in the labour force, and this can have considerable follow on impacts to both the individual and the state. Method Cross-sectional analysis of the base population of Health&WealthMOD, a microsimulation model built on data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics' Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers and STINMOD, an income and savings microsimulation model was used to quantify the personal cost of lost income and the cost to the state from lost income taxation, increased benefits payments and lost GDP as a result of early retirement due to mental health conditions in Australians aged 45-64 in 2009. Results Individuals aged 45 to 64 years who have retired early due to depression personally have 73% lower income then their full time employed counterparts and those retired early due to other mental health conditions have 78% lower incomes. The national aggregate cost to government due to early retirement from these conditions equated to $278 million (£152.9 million) in lost income taxation revenue, $407 million (£223.9 million) in additional transfer payments and around $1.7 billion in GDP in 2009 alone. Conclusions The costs of mental health conditions to the individuals and the state are considerable. While individuals has to bear the economic costs of lost income in addition to the burden of the conditions itself, the impact on the state is loss of productivity from reduced workforce participation, lost income taxation revenue, and increased government support payments - in addition to direct health care costs. PMID:21526993

  15. Evaluation of a spirituality informed e-mental health tool as an intervention for major depressive disorder in adolescents and young adults - a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Rickhi, Badri; Kania-Richmond, Ania; Moritz, Sabine; Cohen, Jordan; Paccagnan, Patricia; Dennis, Charlotte; Liu, Mingfu; Malhotra, Sonya; Steele, Patricia; Toews, John

    2015-12-24

    Depression in adolescents and young adults is a major mental health condition that requires attention. Research suggests that approaches that include spiritual concepts and are delivered through an online platform are a potentially beneficial approach to treating/managing depression in this population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an 8-week online spirituality informed e-mental health intervention (the LEAP Project) on depression severity, and secondary outcomes of spiritual well-being and self-concept, in adolescents and young adults with major depressive disorder of mild to moderate severity. A parallel group, randomized, waitlist controlled, assessor-blinded clinical pilot trial was conducted in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The sample of 62 participants with major depressive disorder (DSM-IV-TR) was defined by two age subgroups: adolescents (ages 13 to 18 years; n = 31) and young adults (ages 19 to 24 years; n = 31). Participants in each age subgroup were randomized into the study arm (intervention initiated upon enrolment) or the waitlist control arm (intervention initiated after an 8-week wait period). Comparisons were made between the study and waitlist control arms at week 8 (the point where study arm had completed the intervention and the waitlist control arm had not) and within each arm at four time points over 24-week follow-up period. At baseline, there was no statistical difference between study and waitlist participants for both age subgroups for all three outcomes of interest. After the intervention, depression severity was significantly reduced; comparison across arms at week 8 and over time within each arm and both age subgroups. Spiritual well-being changes were not significant, with the exception of an improvement over time for the younger participants in the study arm (p = 0.01 at week 16 and p = 0.0305 at week 24). Self-concept improved significantly for younger participants immediately after the

  16. Temporal Assessment of Mental Disorders, Smoking, and Hazardous Drinking in United States Troops Deployed in Support of the Operations in Iraq and Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-26

    syndrome. Additionally, participants who self-reported having been diagnosed with PTSD, depression , manic - depressive disorder, or schizophrenia or...having one or more of the following conditions: depression , schizophrenia or psychosis, manic - depressive disorder, or PTSD. Mental Disorder Symptoms and...participants approximately 3 years later. Main Outcome Measures Posttraumatic stress disorder was assessed using the PTSD Checklist. Depression , panic, and

  17. Warning Signs of Mental Illnesses

    MedlinePlus

    ... OCD) Postpartum Depression Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) More Climate Change and Mental Health Connections Patients & Families Patients & Families ... OCD) Postpartum Depression Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) More Climate Change and Mental Health Connections Warning Signs of Mental ...

  18. Primary Care-Mental Health Integration in the VA Health System: Associations Between Provider Staffing and Quality of Depression Care.

    PubMed

    Levine, Debra S; McCarthy, John F; Cornwell, Brittany; Brockmann, Laurie; Pfeiffer, Paul N

    2017-05-01

    The study examined whether staffing of Primary Care-Mental Health Integration (PCMHI) services in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health system is related to quality of depression care. Site surveys and administrative data from 349 VA facilities for fiscal year 2013 were used to calculate PCMHI staffing (full-time equivalents) per 10,000 primary care patients and discipline-specific staffing proportions for PCMHI psychologists, social workers, nurses, and psychiatric medication prescribers. Multivariable regression analyses were conducted at the facility level and assessed associations between PCMHI staffing ratios and the following indicators of depression treatment in the three months following a new episode of depression: any antidepressant receipt, adequacy of antidepressant receipt, any psychotherapy receipt, and psychotherapy engagement (three or more visits). Higher facility PCMHI staffing ratios were associated with a greater percentage of patients who received any psychotherapy treatment (B=1.16, p<.01) and who engaged in psychotherapy (B=.39, p<.01). When analyses controlled for total PCMHI staffing, the proportion of social workers as part of PCMHI was positively correlated with the percentage of patients with adequate antidepressant treatment continuation (B=3.16, p=.03). The proportion of nurses in PCMHI was negatively associated with the percentage of patients with engagement in psychotherapy (B=-2.83, p=.02). PCMHI programs with greater overall staffing ratios demonstrated better performance on indicators of psychotherapy for depression but not on indicators of antidepressant treatment. Further investigation is needed to determine whether differences in discipline-specific staffing play a causal role in driving associated differences in receipt of treatment.

  19. 78 FR 64603 - Medicare Program: Conditions of Participation (CoPs) for Community Mental Health Centers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ...This final rule establishes, for the first time, conditions of participation (CoPs) that community mental health centers (CMHCs) must meet in order to participate in the Medicare program. These CoPs focus on the care provided to the client, establish requirements for staff and provider operations, and encourage clients to participate in their care plan and treatment. The new CoPs enable CMS to survey CMHCs for compliance with health and safety requirements.

  20. Major depressive disorder in the perinatal period: using data linkage to inform perinatal mental health policy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fenglian; Austin, Marie-Paule; Reilly, Nicole; Hilder, Lisa; Sullivan, Elizabeth A

    2012-10-01

    This study aims to investigate hospital admission of major depressive disorders (MDD) before and after birth. Population data for all primiparous women admitted to the hospital with depressive disorders before and after birth were used. The comparison group consisted of 10 % of primiparous women not admitted to the hospital with a diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder or substance use. A total of 728 women had a first admission with depressive disorders (501 in the first postpartum year). The rate of first hospital admission for depressive disorders decreased during pregnancy and increased markedly in the first three months after birth (peaking in the second month with a rate of 10.74/1,000 person year and rate ratio of 12.56) compared with the 6 months prior to pregnancy. Admission remained elevated in the second postpartum year. Older maternal age, smoking, elective caesarian section and admission to a neonatal intensive care unit or special care nursery were associated with a higher rate of admission. Women born outside Australia and those most socioeconomically disadvantaged were less likely to be admitted to the hospital in the first postpartum year. Overall risk of hospital admission with depressive disorders rose significantly across the entire first postpartum year. This has significant implications for policy and service planning for women with mood disorders in the perinatal period.

  1. The Onset of Depression During the Great Recession: Foreclosure and Older Adult Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Cagney, Kathleen A.; Browning, Christopher R.; Iveniuk, James; English, Ned

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined neighborhood-level foreclosure rates and their association with onset of depressive symptoms in older adults. Methods. We linked data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (2005–2006 and 2010–2011 waves), a longitudinal, nationally representative survey, to data on zip code–level foreclosure rates, and predicted the onset of depressive symptoms using logit-linked regression. Results. Multiple stages of the foreclosure process predicted the onset of depressive symptoms, with adjustment for demographic characteristics and changes in household assets, neighborhood poverty, and visible neighborhood disorder. A large increase in the number of notices of default (odds ratio [OR] = 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.14, 2.67) and properties returning to ownership by the bank (OR = 1.62; 95% CI = 1.06, 2.47) were associated with depressive symptoms. A large increase in properties going to auction was suggestive of such an association (OR = 1.45; 95% CI = 0.96, 2.19). Age, fewer years of education, and functional limitations also were predictive. Conclusions. Increases in neighborhood-level foreclosure represent an important risk factor for depression in older adults. These results accord with previous studies suggesting that the effects of economic crises are typically first experienced through deficits in emotional well-being. PMID:24446830

  2. The relationship of the perceived impact of the current Greek recession with increased suicide risk is moderated by mental illness in patients with long-term conditions.

    PubMed

    Ntountoulaki, Elisavet; Paika, Vassiliki; Papaioannou, Dimitra; Guthrie, Elspeth; Kotsis, Konstantinos; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Carvalho, Andre F; Hyphantis, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Adverse life events may contribute to the emergence of suicidality. We aimed to test the relationship between the impact of the Greek recession and suicidal risk in people with long-term conditions (LTCs) and to determine whether this relationship is moderated by the presence of a mental disorder. Suicidal risk (RASS) and crisis parameters were assessed in a cross-sectional survey including 376 patients with LTCs (type-II diabetes mellitus, rheumatological disorders and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) attending the Emergency Department or specialty clinics. A diagnosis of mental disorder was confirmed by the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) interview. Hierarchical regression models were used to quantify moderator effects. Suicidal risk was significantly associated with the perceived impact of the recession (p=0.028). However, moderation analysis showed that this relationship was significant only in those diagnosed with either major depressive disorder or generalized anxiety disorder. These findings suggest that the perceived impact of the current Greek recession is not correlated with suicidal risk per se, but the recession may act as precipitator in combination with other risk factors, such as the presence of a mental illness, thus supporting the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders in vulnerable groups. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Major depressive disorder is a risk factor for low bone mass, central obesity, and other medical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cizza, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric illnesses in the adult population. It is often associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Osteoporosis is also a major public health threat. Multiple studies have reported an association between depression and low bone mineral density, but a causal link between these two conditions is disputed. Here the most important findings of the POWER (Premenopausal, Osteoporosis Women, Alendronate, Depression) Study, a large prospective study of bone turnover in premenopausal women with major depression, are summarized. The endocrine and immune alterations secondary to depression that might affect bone mass, and the possible role of poor lifestyle in the etiology of osteoporosis in subjects with depression, are also reviewed, as is the potential effect of antidepressants on bone loss. It is proposed that depression induces bone loss and osteoporotic fractures, primarily via specific immune and endocrine mechanisms, with poor lifestyle habits as potential contributory factors. PMID:21485748

  4. Strategies to improve anxiety and depression in patients with COPD: a mental health perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tselebis, Athanasios; Pachi, Argyro; Ilias, Ioannis; Kosmas, Epaminondas; Bratis, Dionisios; Moussas, Georgios; Tzanakis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic inflammatory lung disease characterized by progressive and only partially reversible symptoms. Worldwide, the incidence of COPD presents a disturbing continuous increase. Anxiety and depression are remarkably common in COPD patients, but the evidence about optimal approaches for managing psychological comorbidities in COPD remains unclear and largely speculative. Pharmacological treatment based on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors has almost replaced tricyclic antidepressants. The main psychological intervention is cognitive behavioral therapy. Of particular interest are pulmonary rehabilitation programs, which can reduce anxiety and depressive symptoms in these patients. Although the literature on treating anxiety and depression in patients with COPD is limited, we believe that it points to the implementation of personalized strategies to address their psychopathological comorbidities. PMID:26929625

  5. Mental health measures of anxiety and depression in patients with retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Mozaffarieh, Maneli; Sacu, Stefan; Benesch, Thomas; Wedrich, Andreas

    2007-07-19

    In this study, the researchers examined anxious and depressive symptoms of patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) prior to and up to year after retinal detachment surgery. One hundred and thirteen (113) patients with RRD took part in this prospective longitudinal study. Anxiety and depression were evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Visual acuity (VA) results and HADS scores of all participants were recorded prior to and 3, 6 and 12 months after retinal detachment surgery. Pearson correlation analysis showed a significant association between the patients' VA and HADS psychological scores both prior to and three months after surgery, regardless of the type of surgery performed. Psychological distress is a significant problem associated with retinal detachments that requires more attention.

  6. Does a Depression Management Program Decrease Mortality in Older Adults with Specific Medical Conditions in Primary Care? An Exploratory Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bogner, Hillary R; Joo, Jin H; Hwang, Seungyoung; Morales, Knashawn H; Bruce, Martha L; Reynolds, Charles F; Gallo, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether treating depression decreases mortality from various chronic medical conditions. Long-term follow-up of multisite-practice randomized controlled trial (Prevention of Suicide in Primary Care Elderly: Collaborative Trial). Twenty primary care practices randomized to intervention or usual care. Individuals aged 60 and older identified through depression screening of random patients (N=1,226). For 2 years, a depression care manager worked with primary care physicians in intervention practices to provide algorithm-based care for depression. Mortality risk based on a median follow-up of 98 months (range 0.8-116.4 months) through 2008; chronic medical conditions ascertained through self-report. For heart disease, persons with major depression were at greater risk of death, whether in usual-care or intervention practices. Older adults with major depression and diabetes mellitus in practices randomized to the intervention condition (hazard ratio=0.47, 95% confidence interval=0.24-0.91) were less likely to die. For other medical conditions, the point estimates for risk of death in persons with major depression were all in the direction of indicating lower risk in intervention practices but did not reach statistical significance. Older adults with depression and medical comorbidity pose a significant clinical and public health challenge. Evidence was found of a statistically significant intervention effect on mortality for diabetes mellitus in persons with major depression. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. Relationships among depression, anxiety, and insomnia symptoms in perinatal women seeking mental health treatment.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Leslie M; Pickett, Scott M; Flynn, Heather; Armitage, Roseanne

    2011-04-01

    Depression and anxiety symptoms are commonly experienced by women during the perinatal period. Changes in sleep and sleep quality are typical throughout pregnancy and early postpartum. However, little is known about relationships between insomnia symptoms and psychiatric symptoms in perinatal women. The objective of the present study is to characterize the burden of insomnia symptoms in perinatal women seeking outpatient psychiatric treatment and to examine relationships between insomnia and symptoms of depression and anxiety. Data from 257 pregnant or postpartum women who sought outpatient psychiatric treatment at a university hospital-affiliated clinic were extracted from an existing clinical management database. Data included validated self-report measures assessing insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]), mood (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale [EPDS]), and generalized anxiety (Penn State Worry Questionnaire [PSWQ]). Fifty-two percent of women reported symptoms of insomnia, 75% reported symptoms of depression, and 61% reported symptoms of generalized anxiety. After controlling for PSWQ, the partial correlation between EPDS and ISI was 0.15 and 0.37 for pregnant and postpartum women, respectively. After controlling for EPDS, the partial correlation between PSWQ and ISI was 0.20 and 0.12 for pregnant and postpartum women, respectively. Women with clinically significant ISI scores had significantly higher odds for reporting symptoms consistent with depression (odds ratio [OR] 7.7) and generalized anxiety (OR 2.55) compared to women with lower ISI scores. Insomnia symptoms affected a significant proportion of the perinatal women in this sample. These symptoms are linked to symptoms of depression and anxiety in treatment-seeking pregnant and postpartum women. Perinatal women seen in psychiatric treatment settings should be routinely screened for sleep problems.

  8. Inverse Effects of Oxytocin on Attributing Mental Activity to Others in Depressed and Healthy Subjects: A Double-Blind Placebo Controlled fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, David; Kose, Samet; Arana, Ashley; Johnson, Kevin; Morgan, Paul S.; Borckardt, Jeffrey; Herbsman, Tal; Hardaway, Fran; George, Mark S.; Panksepp, Jaak; Nahas, Ziad

    2010-01-01

    Background: Oxytocin is a stress-attenuating and pro-social neuropeptide. To date, no study has looked at the effects of oxytocin in modulating brain activity in depressed individuals nor attempted to correlate this activity with attribution of mental activity in others. Method: We enrolled 10 unmedicated depressed adults and 10 matched healthy controls in a crossover, double blind placebo controlled fMRI 40 i.u. intra-nasal oxytocin study (20 i.u. per nostril). Each subject performed reading the mind in the eyes task (RMET) before and after inhalation of oxytocin or placebo control for a total of 80 scans. Results: Before oxytocin administration, RMET engaged the medial and lateral prefrontal cortex, amygdala, insula and associative areas. Depressed subjects showed increased anterior ventral activation for the RMET minus gender identification contrast whereas matched controls showed increased dorsal and frontal activity. Compared to placebo, oxytocin in depressed subjects showed increased activity in the superior middle frontal gyrus and insula, while controls exhibited more activity in ventral regions. Oxytocin also led to inverse effects in reaction times on attribution task between groups, with controls getting faster and depressed individuals slower to respond. Conclusion: Depression is associated with increased paralimbic activity during emotional mental attribution of others, appearing to be distinctly modulated by oxytocin when compared to healthy controls. Further studies are needed to explore long-term exposure to pro-social neuropeptides on mood in depressed populations and assess their clinical relevance. PMID:21423444

  9. [Collaborative and stepped care for depression: Development of a model project within the Hamburg Network for Mental Health (psychenet.de)].

    PubMed

    Härter, Martin; Heddaeus, Daniela; Steinmann, Maya; Schreiber, Robert; Brettschneider, Christian; König, Hans-Helmut; Watzke, Birgit

    2015-04-01

    Depression is one of the most widespread mental disorders in Germany and causes a great suffering and involves high costs. Guidelines recommend stepped and interdisciplinary collaborative care models for the treatment of depression. Stepped and collaborative care models are described regarding their efficacy and cost-effectiveness. A current model project within the Hamburg Network for Mental Health exemplifies how guideline-based stepped diagnostics and treatment incorporating innovative low-intensity interventions are implemented by a large network of health care professionals and clinics. An accompanying evaluation using a cluster randomized controlled design assesses depressive symptom reduction and cost-effectiveness for patients treated within "Health Network Depression" ("Gesundheitsnetz Depression", a subproject of psychenet.de) compared with patients treated in routine care. Over 90 partners from inpatient and outpatient treatment have been successfully involved in recruiting over 600 patients within the stepped care model. Communication in the network was greatly facilitated by the use of an innovative online tool for the supply and reservation of treatment capacities. The participating professionals profit from the improved infrastructure and the implementation of advanced training and quality circle work. New treatment models can greatly improve the treatment of depression owing to their explicit reference to guidelines, the establishment of algorithms for diagnostics and treatment, the integration of practices and clinics, in addition to the implementation of low-intensity treatment alternatives. These models could promote the development of a disease management program for depression.

  10. The effect of mental illness, substance use, and treatment for depression on the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Tegger, Mary K; Crane, Heidi M; Tapia, Kenneth A; Uldall, Karina K; Holte, Sarah E; Kitahata, Mari M

    2008-03-01

    Information regarding the prevalence of mental illness and substance use among HIV-infected patients and the effect of these problems on HIV treatment is needed. We conducted an observational study of patients in the University of Washington (UW) HIV Cohort to determine prevalence rates for mental illness and substance use. Cox regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between mental illness and substance use, pharmacologic treatment for depression/anxiety, and initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) within 9 months of becoming eligible for HAART. Among 1774 patients in the UW HIV cohort during 2004, 63% had a mental illness (including mood, anxiety, psychotic, or personality disorders), 45% had a substance use disorder, and 38% had both. There were 278 patients who met criteria for HAART eligibility. After controlling for other factors, patients with depression and/or anxiety were significantly less likely to initiate HAART compared with patients without a mental illness (hazard ratio [HR] 0.4, p = 0.02). However, patients with depression/anxiety who received antidepressant/antianxiety medications were equally likely to initiate HAART as patients without a mental illness (HR 0.9, p = 0.5). We found that patients with mental illness or substance use disorders receive HAART at lower CD4+ cell counts and higher HIV-1 RNA levels than patients without these disorders. However, HAART initiation among patients who receive treatment for depression/anxiety is associated with no delay. Screening for these disorders in primary care settings and access to appropriate treatment are increasingly important components of providing care to HIV-infected patients.

  11. Depression, Mental Distress, and Domestic Conflict among Louisiana Women Exposed to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the WaTCH Study

    PubMed Central

    Rung, Ariane L.; Gaston, Symielle; Oral, Evrim; Robinson, William T.; Fontham, Elizabeth; Harrington, Daniel J.; Trapido, Edward; Peters, Edward S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Psychological sequelae are among the most pronounced effects in populations following exposure to oil spills. Women in particular represent a vulnerable yet influential population but have remained relatively understudied with respect to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (DHOS). Objective: To describe the relationship between oil spill exposure and mental health among women living in the southern coastal Louisiana parishes affected by the DHOS. Methods: The Women and Their Children’s Health Study administered telephone interviews to a population-based sample of 2,842 women between 2012 and 2014 following the DHOS. Participants were asked about depression, mental distress, domestic conflict, and exposure to the oil spill. Results: Over 28% of the sample reported symptoms of depression, 13% reported severe mental distress, 16% reported an increase in the number of fights with their partners, and 11% reported an increase in the intensity of partner fights. Both economic and physical exposure were significantly associated with depressive symptoms and domestic conflict, whereas only physical exposure was related to mental distress. Conclusions: This large, population-based study of women in southern coastal Louisiana, a particularly disaster-prone area of the country, revealed high rates of poor mental health outcomes. Reported exposure to the DHOS was a significant predictor of these outcomes, suggesting avenues for future disaster mitigation through the provision of mental health services. Citation: Rung AL, Gaston S, Oral E, Robinson WT, Fontham E, Harrington DJ, Trapido E, Peters ES. 2016. Depression, mental distress, and domestic conflict among Louisiana women exposed to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the WaTCH Study. Environ Health Perspect 124:1429–1435; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP167 PMID:27164620

  12. Depression, Mental Distress, and Domestic Conflict among Louisiana Women Exposed to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the WaTCH Study.

    PubMed

    Rung, Ariane L; Gaston, Symielle; Oral, Evrim; Robinson, William T; Fontham, Elizabeth; Harrington, Daniel J; Trapido, Edward; Peters, Edward S

    2016-09-01

    Psychological sequelae are among the most pronounced effects in populations following exposure to oil spills. Women in particular represent a vulnerable yet influential population but have remained relatively understudied with respect to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (DHOS). To describe the relationship between oil spill exposure and mental health among women living in the southern coastal Louisiana parishes affected by the DHOS. The Women and Their Children's Health Study administered telephone interviews to a population-based sample of 2,842 women between 2012 and 2014 following the DHOS. Participants were asked about depression, mental distress, domestic conflict, and exposure to the oil spill. Over 28% of the sample reported symptoms of depression, 13% reported severe mental distress, 16% reported an increase in the number of fights with their partners, and 11% reported an increase in the intensity of partner fights. Both economic and physical exposure were significantly associated with depressive symptoms and domestic conflict, whereas only physical exposure was related to mental distress. This large, population-based study of women in southern coastal Louisiana, a particularly disaster-prone area of the country, revealed high rates of poor mental health outcomes. Reported exposure to the DHOS was a significant predictor of these outcomes, suggesting avenues for future disaster mitigation through the provision of mental health services. Rung AL, Gaston S, Oral E, Robinson WT, Fontham E, Harrington DJ, Trapido E, Peters ES. 2016. Depression, mental distress, and domestic conflict among Louisiana women exposed to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the WaTCH Study. Environ Health Perspect 124:1429-1435; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP167.

  13. Defense Health Care: Better Tracking and Oversight Needed of Servicemember Separations for Non-Disability Mental Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    general, and 8. include an assessment to determine whether the servicemember has symptoms of PTSD or other mental illness co-morbidity. Over time ...prevents DOD from being able to conduct analyses—such as trends in non-disability mental condition separations over time —that are important for...DEFENSE HEALTH CARE Better Tracking and Oversight Needed of Servicemember Separations for Non- Disability Mental

  14. Association of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine headache with mental and sleep disorders among adults with disabilities, Spain, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Alejandro; Dueñas, María; Ojeda, Begoña; Failde, Inmaculada

    2014-02-27

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine headache or any other headache in a sample of Spanish adults with disabilities and their association with anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. This cross-sectional study analyzed data from the Spanish national disability and dependence survey (2007-2008) of 16,932 adults aged 18 or older who have disabilities. The prevalence (95% confidence interval [CI]) of painful musculoskeletal conditions was determined according to a diagnosis of arthritis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, muscular dystrophy, and neck or back pain. The prevalence of migraine or other headache was also calculated. Factors associated with these painful conditions were analyzed separately for men and women by using a logistic regression model. The prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions was 66.9% (95% CI, 66.2%-67.6%) and that of migraine or other headache was 23.4% (95% CI, 22.8%-24.1%), both of which were higher in women than in men. Factors associated with these conditions in both men and women included older age, a sleep disorder, and concomitant chronic anxiety and/or depression. The prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine or other headache is high in people with disability in Spain, especially in women, and these conditions often coexist with depression, anxiety, and/or a sleep disorder. To design programs for rehabilitating and improving the quality of life of adults with disability and painful conditions, treatments for mental and/or sleep disorders should be considered in addition to conventional treatments.

  15. Association of Painful Musculoskeletal Conditions and Migraine Headache With Mental and Sleep Disorders Among Adults With Disabilities, Spain, 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas, María; Ojeda, Begoña; Failde, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine headache or any other headache in a sample of Spanish adults with disabilities and their association with anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. Methods This cross-sectional study analyzed data from the Spanish national disability and dependence survey (2007–2008) of 16,932 adults aged 18 or older who have disabilities. The prevalence (95% confidence interval [CI]) of painful musculoskeletal conditions was determined according to a diagnosis of arthritis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, muscular dystrophy, and neck or back pain. The prevalence of migraine or other headache was also calculated. Factors associated with these painful conditions were analyzed separately for men and women by using a logistic regression model. Results The prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions was 66.9% (95% CI, 66.2%–67.6%) and that of migraine or other headache was 23.4% (95% CI, 22.8%–24.1%), both of which were higher in women than in men. Factors associated with these conditions in both men and women included older age, a sleep disorder, and concomitant chronic anxiety and/or depression. Conclusion The prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine or other headache is high in people with disability in Spain, especially in women, and these conditions often coexist with depression, anxiety, and/or a sleep disorder. To design programs for rehabilitating and improving the quality of life of adults with disability and painful conditions, treatments for mental and/or sleep disorders should be considered in addition to conventional treatments. PMID:24576397

  16. Experience of Primary Care among Homeless Individuals with Mental Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chrystal, Joya G.; Glover, Dawn L.; Young, Alexander S.; Whelan, Fiona; Austin, Erika L.; Johnson, Nancy K.; Pollio, David E.; Holt, Cheryl L.; Stringfellow, Erin; Gordon, Adam J.; Kim, Theresa A.; Daigle, Shanette G.; Steward, Jocelyn L.; Kertesz, Stefan G

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of primary care to homeless individuals with mental health conditions presents unique challenges. To inform healthcare improvement, we studied predictors of favorable primary care experience among homeless persons with mental health conditions treated at sites that varied in degree of homeless-specific service tailoring. This was a multi-site, survey-based comparison of primary care experiences at three mainstream primary care clinics of the Veterans Administration (VA), one homeless-tailored VA clinic, and one tailored non-VA healthcare program. Persons who accessed primary care service two or more times from July 2008 through June 2010 (N = 366) were randomly sampled. Predictor variables included patient and organization characteristics suggested by the patient perception model developed by Sofaer and Firminger (2005), with an emphasis on mental health. The primary care experience was assessed with the Primary Care Quality-Homeless (PCQ-H) questionnaire, a validated survey instrument. Multiple regression identified predictors of positive experiences (i.e. higher PCQ-H total score). Significant predictors of a positive experience included a site offering tailored service design, perceived choice among providers, and currently domiciled status. There was an interaction effect between site and severe psychiatric symptoms. For persons with severe psychiatric symptoms, a homeless-tailored service design was significantly associated with a more favorable primary care experience. For persons without severe psychiatric symptoms, this difference was not significant. This study supports the importance of tailored healthcare delivery designed for homeless persons’ needs, with such services potentially holding special relevance for persons with mental health conditions. To improve patient experience among the homeless, organizations may want to deliver services that are tailored to homelessness and offer a choice of providers. PMID:25659142

  17. Experience of primary care among homeless individuals with mental health conditions.

    PubMed

    Chrystal, Joya G; Glover, Dawn L; Young, Alexander S; Whelan, Fiona; Austin, Erika L; Johnson, Nancy K; Pollio, David E; Holt, Cheryl L; Stringfellow, Erin; Gordon, Adam J; Kim, Theresa A; Daigle, Shanette G; Steward, Jocelyn L; Kertesz, Stefan G

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of primary care to homeless individuals with mental health conditions presents unique challenges. To inform healthcare improvement, we studied predictors of favorable primary care experience among homeless persons with mental health conditions treated at sites that varied in degree of homeless-specific service tailoring. This was a multi-site, survey-based comparison of primary care experiences at three mainstream primary care clinics of the Veterans Administration (VA), one homeless-tailored VA clinic, and one tailored non-VA healthcare program. Persons who accessed primary care service two or more times from July 2008 through June 2010 (N = 366) were randomly sampled. Predictor variables included patient and organization characteristics suggested by the patient perception model developed by Sofaer and Firminger (2005), with an emphasis on mental health. The primary care experience was assessed with the Primary Care Quality-Homeless (PCQ-H) questionnaire, a validated survey instrument. Multiple regression identified predictors of positive experiences (i.e. higher PCQ-H total score). Significant predictors of a positive experience included a site offering tailored service design, perceived choice among providers, and currently domiciled status. There was an interaction effect between site and severe psychiatric symptoms. For persons with severe psychiatric symptoms, a homeless-tailored service design was significantly associated with a more favorable primary care experience. For persons without severe psychiatric symp