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Sample records for dermal burn case

  1. Early dermabrasion of deep dermal burns with sandpaper. Case reports.

    PubMed

    Floccard, B; Tixier, F; Chatot-Henry, D; Lacotte, B; Mehdaoui, H; Drault, J N

    1998-12-01

    Deep dermal burns are initially difficult to evaluate, and they sometimes heal spontaneously. We present our experience of dermabrasion with sandpaper in four patients. It is a useful alternative to early excision of the scar. Skin grafts are not always required and the aesthetic results are excellent. Dermabrasion should be considered routinely for all deep dermal burns and particularly for facial burns and those caused by scalds.

  2. Significant chemical burns associated with dermal exposure to laundry pod detergent.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jason L; Wiles, Devin A; Kenney, Brian; Spiller, Henry A

    2014-09-01

    Concentrated laundry pods have been reported to cause significant clinical effects including oropharyngeal burns and respiratory distress requiring intubation. Dermal burns have been reported, but no incidents of serious isolated dermal injury have been published. We report a case of significant, isolated dermal injury as a result of dermal exposure to a concentrated laundry detergent pod. Total body surface area partial thickness burns in this case were estimated at approximately 2 % with an additional 4-5 % of total body surface area (TBSA) displaying superficial burns/chemical dermatitis. Health-care providers should be aware of this complication and should perform thorough dermal decontamination in the event of an exposure. Parents should be educated regarding the dangers associated with dermal exposure to laundry pod compounds and the need to secure these items away from children as well as proper decontamination techniques should an exposure occur.

  3. Exposed tibial bone after burns: Flap reconstruction versus dermal substitute.

    PubMed

    Verbelen, Jozef; Hoeksema, Henk; Pirayesh, Ali; Van Landuyt, Koenraad; Monstrey, Stan

    2016-03-01

    A 44 years old male patient had suffered extensive 3rd degree burns on both legs, undergoing thorough surgical debridement, resulting in both tibias being exposed. Approximately 5 months after the incident he was referred to the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery of the University Hospital Gent, Belgium, to undergo flap reconstruction. Free flap surgery was performed twice on both lower legs but failed on all four occasions. In between flap surgery, a dermal substitute (Integra(®)) was applied, attempting to cover the exposed tibias with a layer of soft tissue, but also without success. In order to promote the development of granulation tissue over the exposed bone, small holes were drilled in both tibias with removal of the outer layer of the anterior cortex causing the bone to bleed and subsequently negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) was applied. The limited granulation tissue resulting from this procedure was then covered with a dermal substitute (Glyaderm(®)), consisting of acellular human dermis with an average thickness of 0.25mm. This dermal substitute was combined with a NPWT-dressing, and then served as an extracellular matrix (ECM), guiding the distribution of granulation tissue over the remaining areas of exposed tibial bone. Four days after initial application of Glyaderm(®) combined with NPWT both tibias were almost completely covered with a thin coating of soft tissue. In order to increase the thickness of this soft tissue cover two additional layers of Glyaderm(®) were applied at intervals of approximately 1 week. One week after the last Glyaderm(®) application both wounds were autografted. The combination of an acellular dermal substitute (Glyaderm(®)) with negative pressure wound therapy and skin grafting proved to be an efficient technique to cover a wider area of exposed tibial bone in a patient who was not a candidate for free flap surgery. An overview is also provided of newer and simpler techniques for coverage of

  4. A novel dermal matrix generated from burned skin as a promising substitute for deep-degree burns therapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guanying; Ye, Lan; Tan, Wei; Zhu, Xuguo; Li, Yaonan; Jiang, Duyin

    2016-03-01

    The extensive skin defects induced by severe burns are dangerous and can be fatal. Currently, the most common therapy is tangential excision to remove the necrotic or denatured areas of skin, followed by skin grafting. Xenogeneic dermal substitutes, such as porcine acellular dermal matrix (ADM), are typically used to cover the burn wounds, and may accelerate wound healing. It is assumed that burned skin that still maintains partial biological activity may be recycled to construct an autologous acellular dermal matrix, termed 'deep‑degree burned dermal matrix (DDBDM)'. In theory, DDBDM may avoid the histoincompatibility issues associated with foreign or xenogeneic dermal matrices, and reduce therapy costs by making full use of discarded skin. In the present study, the collagens within prepared DDBDM were thickened, disorganized and partially fractured, however, they still maintained their reticular structure and tensile strength (P<0.01). Through microarray analysis of the cytokines present in ADM and DDBDM, it was determined that the DDBDM did not produce excessive levels of harmful burn toxins. Following 4 weeks of subcutaneous implantation, ADM and DDBDM were incompletely degraded and maintained good integrity. No significant inflammatory reaction or rejection were observed, which indicated that ADM and DDBDM have good histocompatibility. Therefore, DDBDM may be a useful material for the treatment of deep‑degree burns.

  5. A novel dermal matrix generated from burned skin as a promising substitute for deep-degree burns therapy

    PubMed Central

    YU, GUANYING; YE, LAN; TAN, WEI; ZHU, XUGUO; LI, YAONAN; JIANG, DUYIN

    2016-01-01

    The extensive skin defects induced by severe burns are dangerous and can be fatal. Currently, the most common therapy is tangential excision to remove the necrotic or denatured areas of skin, followed by skin grafting. Xenogeneic dermal substitutes, such as porcine acellular dermal matrix (ADM), are typically used to cover the burn wounds, and may accelerate wound healing. It is assumed that burned skin that still maintains partial biological activity may be recycled to construct an autologous acellular dermal matrix, termed 'deep-degree burned dermal matrix (DDBDM)'. In theory, DDBDM may avoid the histoincompatibility issues associated with foreign or xenogeneic dermal matrices, and reduce therapy costs by making full use of discarded skin. In the present study, the collagens within prepared DDBDM were thickened, disorganized and partially fractured, however, they still maintained their reticular structure and tensile strength (P<0.01). Through microarray analysis of the cytokines present in ADM and DDBDM, it was determined that the DDBDM did not produce excessive levels of harmful burn toxins. Following 4 weeks of subcutaneous implantation, ADM and DDBDM were incompletely degraded and maintained good integrity. No significant inflammatory reaction or rejection were observed, which indicated that ADM and DDBDM have good histocompatibility. Therefore, DDBDM may be a useful material for the treatment of deep-degree burns. PMID:26846279

  6. A novel device to create consistent deep dermal burns in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Menon, Seema; Chan, Queenie; Bertinetti, Monique; Harvey, John G; Hei, Erik R La; Holland, Andrew Ja

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this study to evaluate a novel device to create a consistent and reproducible deep partial thickness burn in a porcine model. A thermostatically controlled, heated aluminium disc device was fashioned by the Biomedical Department of our institution. Contact burns were made on the flank of two Great White pigs by applying the device heated to 92°C at intervals of 5, 10, 15 and 20 seconds to four separate test areas area of skin. Biopsies for histological analysis of burn depth were taken on day 0 at 10 minutes post burn and on day 8. Biopsies taken at day 0 revealed superficial to mid-dermal burns, with minimal dermal edema and necrosis. Those from day 8 showed mid to deep dermal edema and necrosis in all four test areas following a 20 second contact duration burn. The new contact burn device was able to create a consistent deep dermal burn after 20 seconds of contact. We anticipate that this new device could be used to investigate the development of hypertrophic scarring in a porcine model.

  7. Topical treatments for hydrofluoric acid dermal burns. Further assessment of efficacy using an experimental piq model.

    PubMed

    Dunn, B J; MacKinnon, M A; Knowlden, N F; Billmaier, D J; Derelanko, M J; Rusch, G M; Naas, D J; Dahlgren, R R

    1996-05-01

    Several topical treatments for hydrofluoric acid dermal burns (Zephiran, calcium acetate and magnesium hydroxide antacid soaks, and calcium gluconate gel) were assessed for efficacy in a pig model. Gross appearance and histopathology of treated and untreated burn sites were evaluated. For superficial burns, Zephiran was most effective; calcium acetate, magnesium hydroxide antacid, and calcium gluconate gel were less effective. For deep burns, gross observations showed that calcium acetate and Zephiran were most efficacious, whereas histopathology indicated comparable efficacy of Zephiran, calcium acetate, and calcium gluconate gel for all skin layers. Magnesium hydroxide antacid demonstrated efficacy only for the subdermis. The clinically beneficial effects of both Zephiran and calcium gluconate gel were affirmed. Although results suggest that calcium acetate and magnesium-containing antacids may be beneficial for human hydrofluoric acid dermal burns, these are not established clinical treatments.

  8. Immediate tangential excision accelerates wound closure but does not reduce scarring of mid-dermal porcine burns.

    PubMed

    Macri, L K; Singer, A J; McClain, S A; Crawford, L; Prasad, A; Kohn, J; Clark, R A F

    2016-03-31

    Current evidence supports the use of excision to remove eschar from deep dermal and full-thickness burns. However, the role of excision of mid-dermal burns remains unclear. This study aimed to develop a porcine model that could produce reproducible middermal thermal burns that undergo tangential excision; and investigate the effects of immediate tangential excision (30 minutes postburn) on healing and scarring. An aluminum bar preheated in hot water (70°C) was applied for 20 or 30 s to produce a total of sixteen mid-dermal burns per pig on each of six pigs. Thirty minutes after burn creation, half of the burns were tangentially excised. Four partial- thickness wounds per pig were created as controls. Depth of burn injury (1 and 24 h), reepithelialization (7 and 10 d) and scar depth (28 d) were assessed microscopically. Total scar surface area was grossly evaluated on day 28. Exposure of porcine skin to a preheated aluminum bar at 70 °C for 20 or 30 sec resulted in reproducible mid-dermal burns, where immediate excision enhanced complete wound closure as judged by complete re-epithelialization, but did not reduce initial depth of injury, scar contraction and scar depth. Immediate surgical intervention is sufficient to enhance wound closure, but not to mitigate mid-dermal burn scar formation. This work provides a suitable animal model to evaluate novel therapies that may be used to inhibit burn progression, accelerate wound closure and decrease scarring, especially those therapies unable to penetrate burn eschar.

  9. Collagen-Based Films Containing Liposome-Loaded Usnic Acid as Dressing for Dermal Burn Healing

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Paula S.; Albuquerque-Júnior, Ricardo L. C.; Cavalcante, Danielle R. R.; Dantas, Marx D. M.; Cardoso, Juliana C.; Bezerra, Marília S.; Souza, Jamille C. C.; Serafini, Mairim Russo; Quitans-Jr, Lucindo J.; Bonjardim, Leonardo R.; Araújo, Adriano A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was assess the effect of collagen-based films containing usnic acid as a wound dressing for dermal burn healing. Second-degree burn wounds were performed in forty-five Wistar rats, assigned into nine groups: COL—animals treated with collagen-based films; PHO—animals treated with collagen films containing empty liposomes; UAL—animals treated with collagen-based films containing usnic acid incorporated into liposomes. After 7, 14, and 21 days the animals were euthanized. On 7th day there was a moderate infiltration of neutrophils, in UAL, distributed throughout the burn wounds, whereas in COL and PHO, the severity of the reaction was slighter and still limited to the margins of the burn wounds. On the 14th day, the inflammatory reaction was less intense in UAL, with remarkable plasma cells infiltration. On the 21st day, there was reduction of the inflammation, which was predominantly composed of plasma cells in all groups, particularly in UAL. The use of the usnic acid provided more rapid substitution of type-III for type-I collagen on the 14th day, and improved the collagenization density on the 21st day. It was concluded that the use of reconstituted bovine type-I collagen-based films containing usnic acid improved burn healing process in rats. PMID:21274404

  10. In vivo visualization of dermal collagen fiber in skin burn by collagen-sensitive second-harmonic-generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ryosuke; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Sasaki, Kunihiko; Tanaka, Yuji; Murota, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Araki, Tsutomu; Yasui, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    Optical assessment of skin burns is possible with second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy due to its high sensitivity to thermal denaturation of collagen molecules. In contrast to previous studies that were performed using excised tissue specimens ex vivo, in vivo observation of dermal collagen fibers in living rat burn models with SHG microscopy is demonstrated. Changes in signal vanishing patterns in the SHG images are confirmed to be dependent on the burn degree. Comparison of the SHG images with Masson's trichrome-stained images indicated that the observed patterns were caused by the coexistence of molten and fibrous structures of dermal collagen fibers. Furthermore, a quantitative parameter for burn assessment based on the depth profile of the mean SHG intensity across the entire SHG image is proposed. These results and discussions imply a potential of SHG microscopy as a minimally invasive, highly quantitative tool for skin burn assessment.

  11. Hydrofluoric acid dermal burns. An assessment of treatment efficacy using an experimental pig model.

    PubMed

    Dunn, B J; MacKinnon, M A; Knowlden, N F; Billmaier, D J; Derelanko, M J; Rusch, G M; Naas, D J; Dahlgren, R R

    1992-09-01

    There currently exist various opinions concerning the best therapy for managing hydrogen fluoride (HF) dermal burns. Previously reported animal studies designed to evaluate the efficacy of certain therapies are not completely convincing. Studies initially were conducted to develop a reliable animal model for assessing efficacy of treatment. Evaluation of several animal species, dosing regimens (HF concentrations, exposure periods), and application techniques showed that the most consistent and reproducible dermal lesions were produced with 38% HF applied to the skin of anesthetized pigs for exposures of 9, 12, or 15 minutes using Hill Top Chamber patches. Using this model, the efficacy of six clinically applicable treatments was assessed by subjectively scoring and statistically analyzing photographic and histopathological data obtained from treated and untreated control lesions. Photographic data analysis ranked treatments with respect to effectiveness as follows: iced Zephiran and 10% calcium acetate soaks--highly effective; 2.5% calcium gluconate gel, 5.0% calcium gluconate injection and iced Hyamine soaks--effective; 10% calcium gluconate injection--ineffective. Histopathological data analysis showed the topical treatments (2.5% calcium gluconate gel, iced Hyamine, or iced Zephiran soaks) to be most effective in reducing superficial epidermal damage, and the 5% calcium gluconate injection or 10% calcium acetate soaks to be beneficial to deeper tissues of the dermis and subdermis. Injection of 10% calcium gluconate was ineffective. This study suggests that the anesthetized pig model has good applicability for assessing efficacy of HF dermal burn therapies. In addition, it indicates that further experimentation with 10% calcium acetate soaks is warranted.

  12. Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Dermal Repair in Burns and Diabetic Wounds.

    PubMed

    Maranda, Eric L; Rodriguez-Menocal, Luis; Badiavas, Evangelos V

    2017-01-01

    In this review we explore stem cell function in wounds that are resistant to healing, such as burn injuries and diabetic wounds. Diabetic ulcers are of interest due to their remarkable resistance to heal; severe thermal burns are addressed due to critical need for effective therapies for the prevention shock and improvement in scarring. Cell-based therapy utilizing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), also known as mesenchymal stromal cells, are currently being investigated as a therapeutic avenue for both chronic diabetic ulcers and severe thermal burns. The clinical utility of stem cells, in particular MSCs, in caring for these types of injuries is primarily based on repairing and replacing cellular substrates, attenuation of inflammation, increasing angiogenesis, and enhancing migration of reparative cells. MSCs are sought after due to their unique ability to initiate different wound-healing programs, depending on the environmental milieu. Thus, this review aims to highlight the properties of MSCs, including their characterization, immunogenicity, and function in the context of dermal repair and regeneration in severe burns and diabetic wounds. Additionally, relevant clinical and pre-clinical studies illustrating the impact of allogeneic and autologous sources of MSCs on therapeutic efficacy are reviewed. Insight into the properties of MSCs and the dramatic host-to-MSC interactions within these pathological states may lead to the development of effective strategies for improving outcomes in impaired wounds.

  13. In vivo imaging of dermal collagen in skin burn by collagen-sensitive second-harmonic-generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Hase, Eiji; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2013-02-01

    Optical assessment of skin burns is possible with second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy due to its high sensitivity to thermal denaturation of collagen molecules. In contrast to previous studies that were performed using excised tissue specimens ex vivo, in this study, we demonstrated in vivo observation of dermal collagen fibers in living rat burn models with SHG microscopy. We confirmed that changes in SHG vanishing patterns in the SHG images depended on the burn degree. The results imply that SHG microscopy can be used as a low-invasiveness, highly quantitative tool for skin burn assessment.

  14. [Occipital dermal sinus associated to a cerebellar abscess. Case].

    PubMed

    Costa, J M; de Reina, L; Guillén, A; Claramunt, E

    2004-10-01

    Congenital dermal sinuses are tubular tracts which communicate the skin with deeper structures. It is a manifestation of defective separation of the ectoderm and neuroderm. The incidence is 1/2500-3000 births alive. Almost 10 % of congenital dermal sinuses are localized in the occipitocervical region. They are usually asymptomatic, unless an infectious process is concurrent (meningitis, abscess). We are presenting the case of a 12 months girl with unnoticed cutaneous stigmata in the occipital region, who was admitted with a meningeal syndrome and secondary neurological impairment. She had a cerebellar abscess and was treated with decompression by puncture of the abscess and antibiotics. When infection was resolved, congenital dermal sinus was excised. Process solves without morbidity. We reviewed the clinical and therapeutic features in cases reported previously in the literature.

  15. Co-Graft of Acellular Dermal Matrix and Autogenous Microskin in a Child with Extensive Burns

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X.L.; Xia, Z.F.; Fang, L.S.; Wang, Y.J.; Wang, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary A 6-yr-old boy was the victim of a burns accident in a public bathhouse. The burns involved the face, neck, upper and lower extremities, anterior and posterior trunk, and both buttocks, covering 72% of the total body surface area (TBSA). The lesions in the lower extremities and parts of the right upper extremity were deep partial-thickness, comprising 40% TBSA. On day 5 post-burn, the lesions in both lower extremities were excised to the extent of the fascia under general anaesthesia. Meshed J1 Jayya Acellular Dermis®, a kind of acellular allodermal (ADM) matrix, was then placed on the left knee joint. The right knee joint served as control. The wounds in both lower extremities were then overlaid with microskin autografting. At 19 days post-application, the lesions in both lower extremities had almost completely resurfaced. Follow-up at six months revealed well-healed and stable skin of acellular ADM and microskin autografts on the left knee. However, the skin of the right knee was unstable and there was a chronic residual ulcer. Both legs showed some significant hypertrophic scars. The left knee joint (acellular ADM grafted site) showed mild contractures, while the right knee joint developed a significant contracture. The "skin" of the co-graft covered site appeared thicker and more elastic. The movement range of the left knee joint was much larger than that of the right knee joint. These results suggest that co-graft of acellular dermal matrix and autogenous microskin may be an effective way to repair this functional site in children with extensive burns and to improve the functional and cosmetic results. PMID:21991120

  16. Focal dermal hypoplasia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Christiana; de Oliveira Lira Ortega, Adriana; Guimarães, Antônio Sérgio; Gonçalves-Bittar, Daniela; Bönecker, Marcelo; Ciamponi, Ana Lídia

    2011-08-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH), also known as Goltz-Gorlin syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disease affecting tissues derived from the ectoderm and mesoderm. Knowledge and early diagnosis of the craniofacial alterations commonly found in patients with FDH provide oral health care professionals with effective preventive and therapeutic tools. This article aims to review the craniofacial characteristics present in FDH and the main systemic manifestations that have implications for dental management, while presenting a new case of the syndrome with novel oral findings.

  17. Bubble bath burns: an unusual case

    PubMed Central

    Nizamoglu, Metin; Tan, Alethea; El-Muttardi, Naguib

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We present an unusual case of flash burn injury in an adolescent following accidental combination of foaming bath bubbles and tea light candle flame. There has not been any reported similar case described before. This serves as a learning point for public prevention and clinicians managing burn injuries. PMID:27583271

  18. Deficiency of CX3CR1 delays burn wound healing and is associated with reduced myeloid cell recruitment and decreased sub-dermal angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Clover, Anthony J P; Kumar, Arun H S; Caplice, Noel M

    2011-12-01

    The development of a good blood supply is a key step in burn wound healing and appears to be regulated in part by myeloid cells. CX3CR1 positive cells have recently been identified as myeloid cells with a potential role in angiogenesis. The role of functional CX3CR1 system in burn wound healing is not previously investigated. A 2% contact burn was induced in CX3CR1(+/gfp) and CX3CR1(gfp/gfp) mice. These transgenic mice facilitate the tracking of CX3CR1 cells (CX3CR1(+/gfp)) and allow evaluation of the consequence of CX3CR1 functional knockout (CX3CR1(gfp/gfp)) on burn wound healing. The progression of wound healing was monitored before tissue was harvested and analyzed at day 6 and day 12 for migration of CX3CR1 cells into burn wound. Deficiency of a functional CX3CR1 system resulted in decreased recruitment of CX3CR1 positive cells into the burn wound associated with decreased myeloid cell recruitment (p<0.001) and reduced maintenance of new vessels (p<0.001). Burn wound healing was prolonged (p<0.05). Our study is the first to establish a role for CX3CR1 in burn wound healing which is associated with sub-dermal angiogenesis. This chemokine receptor pathway may be attractive for therapeutic manipulation as it could increase sub dermal angiogenesis and thereby improve time to healing.

  19. Case of extreme growth deceleration after burns.

    PubMed

    Bline, Cheryl; Dylewski, Maggie L; Driscoll, Daniel N; Fuzaylov, Gennadiy

    2014-05-01

    Studies have demonstrated deceleration in both weight and height following burns in children. It is expected patients will display catch up growth and return to normal weight within three years but continued height deficiency may remain in cases of severe burns. We describe a case of severe growth retardation of 8 years old orphan child from Ukraine who suffered of burn less than 40% of total body surface area when he was a 3 years of life. His case was complicated by domestic abuse, neglect and limited medical care. He initially presented to the United States for surgical care of his contractures but his treatment quickly focused on his profound growth retardation. Despite aggressive nutritional supplementation and evaluation he did not demonstrate any weight gain.

  20. The pig as an experimental model for mid-dermal burns research.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Shi-Yuan; Wang, Wen-Ling; Fu, Yuan-Tsung; Lin, Sheng-Chuan; Lei, Yi-Chih; Liao, Jeng-Hao; Tang, Nou-Ying; Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Yao, Chun-Hsu

    2014-12-01

    This was a novel, prospective and interventional animal study designed to develop and evaluate a new infliction device for the experimental burn model. Four paired sets of contact burns measuring 36mm diameter were inflicted on the dorsum of an anesthetized pig using a stainless steel round bar heated up to 80-110°C. The bar was applied using a push-pull force gauge designed to control 1kgf mechanical force applied to the skin for a period of 20s. The left dorsum was used for macroscopic observation and the right dorsum was used for histopathological evaluation. A total of eight burns were covered with moist saline dressings and given daily treatments of xylocaine (lidocaine HCl) gel. This procedure was followed for a period of 24 days. Full-thickness biopsies were obtained for histologic analysis to determine the extent of injury. Statistical analysis showed a high correlation between the exposure temperature and histopathological assessment. The results found the depth of injury to the collagen (Seg1) correlated with the temperature (Ti) at which the burns was inflicted, Seg1=0.038Ti-2.57 (r=0.973, P<0.05). Also, the histological studies show a high correlation between the depth of collagen denaturation in wounds and the exposure temperature, Seg1=0.0268Ti-0.165 (r=0.991, P<0.05). This model is useful to assess more closely the therapeutic agents used for wound healing in experimental burn wounds.

  1. A method for assessing the potential for a dermal burn hazard from malfunctioning consumer electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Mikolajczak, Celina J; Taylor, Paul M

    2008-01-01

    We developed an approach to adapt the ASTM C1055-03 Standard to assess the potential for contact burn injury from portable consumer electronic devices. The approach involves measuring the maximum temperature profile during the fault and devising a way to reproduce these temperatures in an exemplar device in a controlled manner for thermesthesiometer measurements. By comparing the results of the thermesthesiometer measurements to the contact burn injury threshold data published in ASTM C1055-03 and various guidelines for unintentional contact times, we were able to predict whether a potential hazard exists and verify result with "finger tests." We applied this method on a number of occasions to assess the likelihood of a contact burn injury resulting from a fault arising inside portable consumer electronic devices.

  2. Filigree burn of lightning: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virendra

    2007-04-01

    Lightning is a powerful natural electrostatic discharge produced during a thunderstorm. The electric current passing through the discharge channels is direct with a potential of 1000 million volts or more. Lightning can kill or injure a person by a direct strike, a side-flash, or conduction through another object. Lightning can cause a variety of injuries in the skin and the cardiovascular, neurological and ophthalmic systems. Filigree burn of lightning is a superficial burn and very rare. Two cases of death from lightning which have this rare finding are reported and discussed.

  3. Differential response of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts, and keratinocytes to burn wound exudates: potential role of skin-specific chemokine CCL27.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Lenie J; Kroeze, Kim L; Waaijman, Taco; Breetveld, Melanie; Sampat-Sardjoepersad, Shakun C; Niessen, Frank B; Middelkoop, Esther; Scheper, Rik J; Gibbs, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Many cell-based regenerative medicine strategies toward tissue-engineered constructs are currently being explored. Cell-cell interactions and interactions with different biomaterials are extensively investigated, whereas very few studies address how cultured cells will interact with soluble wound-healing mediators that are present within the wound bed after transplantation. The aim of this study was to determine how adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC), dermal fibroblasts, and keratinocytes will react when they come in contact with the deep cutaneous burn wound bed. Burn wound exudates isolated from deep burn wounds were found to contain many cytokines, including chemokines and growth factors related to inflammation and wound healing. Seventeen mediators were identified by ELISA (concentration range 0.0006-9 ng/mg total protein), including the skin-specific chemokine CCL27. Burn wound exudates activated both ASC and dermal fibroblasts, but not keratinocytes, to increase secretion of CXCL1, CXCL8, CCL2, and CCL20. Notably, ASC but not fibroblasts or keratinocytes showed significant increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (5-fold) and interleukin-6 (253-fold), although when the cells were incorporated in bi-layered skin substitute (SS) these differences were less pronounced. A similar discrepancy between ASC and dermal fibroblast mono-cultures was observed when recombinant human-CCL27 was used instead of burn wound exudates. Although CCL27 did not stimulate the secretion of any of the wound-healing mediators by keratinocytes, these cells, in contrast to ASC or dermal fibroblasts, showed increased proliferation and migration. Taken together, these results indicate that on transplantation, keratinocytes are primarily activated to promote wound closure. In contrast, dermal fibroblasts and, in particular, ASC respond vigorously to factors present in the wound bed, leading to increased secretion of angiogenesis/granulation tissue formation

  4. Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause swelling, blistering, scarring and, in serious cases, shock, and even death. They also can lead to infections because they damage your skin's protective barrier. Treatment for burns depends on the cause of the ...

  5. Burns from illegal drug manufacture: case series and management.

    PubMed

    Porter, C J W; Armstrong, J R

    2004-01-01

    This case series presents our experience with burns sustained while manufacturing illegal drugs. All adult burn admissions in an 18-month period were retrospectively reviewed. All patients suspected of sustaining burns from illegal drug manufacture were contacted. Information regarding the burn mechanism was sought. Nine of the 64 adult burn admissions were caused by explosions during the manufacture of cannabis oil. Young males with hand and face burns were heavily represented. First-aid treatment was often ignored in favor of hiding incriminating evidence. Only two patients gave honest admission histories. Illegal drug manufacture is becoming more common as synthetic drugs become more consumer desirable. Burns sustained may be thermal and/or chemical. Dishonest patient histories negatively influence burn management. A high level of suspicion is required for diagnosing and treating burns from illegal drug manufacture. Public education is unlikely to be effective as the financial rewards outweigh the perceived risks.

  6. "Burn catatonia": a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Davin Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Thermal injuries have been recognized to cause significant neuropsychiatric symptoms and disability in their sufferers since the middle of the 20th century, when Drs. Stanley Cobb and Erich Lindemann of the Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA) studied survivors of the Cocoanut Grove nightclub fire in Boston. Although "burn encephalopathy" or burn-induced delirium is a common occurrence in the acute phase, catatonia in burn patients is not often reported. This report describes a case of malignant catatonia occurring in a 51-year-old male patient acutely suffering from burns acquired in a chemical explosion, effectively treated with reinstitution of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. The literature on burn encephalopathy and catatonia in burns is reviewed. Few examples of burn catatonia exist. Burn encephalopathy is common, and may occur in patients with low TBSA burns such as described in the case above. Descriptions of burn encephalopathy are numerous, but have not included catatonia as a possible etiology. Catatonia in burn patients as an etiology of burn encephalopathy is likely underrecognized. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of catatonia when a patient's confusional state after a burn does not respond to usual care.

  7. Human acellular dermal matrix allograft: A randomized, controlled human trial for the long-term evaluation of patients with extensive burns.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueyong; Meng, Xianghai; Wang, Xiaolin; Li, Yuejun; Li, Wangzhou; Lv, Xiaoxing; Xu, Xiaoli; Lei, Zhanjun; Li, Jinqing

    2015-06-01

    The potential of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) to improve cosmetic and functional outcomes has been demonstrated; however, there have been few clinical comparative studies assessing the long-term morphological, histological and functional changes after ADM placement. This study was designed to retrospectively evaluate the long-term outcomes of the cograft acellular dermal matrix with autologous thin split-thickness skin for the coverage of wounds in extensively burned patients. Thirty burn patients treated with a composite graft of ADM with autologous split-thickness skin from January 2007 to December 2009 were enrolled in this study. Another group of thirty patients who received only an autogenous split-thickness skin implant served as the control. Our study revealed that the collagen in the dermis treated with ADM were ordered, and the proportion of collagen III/I was much higher in the control group than in the ADM group. The basement membrane was prominent and continuous. Meanwhile, the VBSS (Vancouver Burn Skin Score) was used to evaluate skin quality, which shows a significant differences between the two group (P<0.001). Then the functional level was evaluated by the BI (Barthel Index), and the ADM group was much better than the control group (P=0.005). Based on these results, we concluded that the composite graft of ADM with autologous thin split-thickness skin was suitable for repairing the defects in functional areas after a burn. This technique might facilitate wound management with acceptable esthetic outcomes, good functional recovery and less scar hyperplasia at the donor site.

  8. Car radiator burns: a report on 72 cases.

    PubMed

    al-Baker, A A; Attalla, M F; el-Ekiabi, S A; al Ghoul, A

    1989-08-01

    Seventy-two cases of car radiator burns (CRB) were treated in the Burns Unit, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar, over a 6-year period (1982-87). All the patients were males and most were between 20 and 40 years old. Chest wall, face and right upper limb were the commonest sites involved. Most of the patients suffered from relatively minor scalds. The scenario of the accidents as well as the topography of the burned areas were characteristic to this particular type of injury. The exceptionally high temperatures in the summer months were significantly related to the incidence of this type of burn.

  9. Focal Dermal Hypoplasia with Uterus Bicornis and Renal Ectopia: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Porras, Rocío F.; Arroyo, Carlos; Soto-Vega, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) is a rare inherited genodermatosis with an X-linked dominant trait. FDH is associated with skin defects and other abnormalities of bone, nails, hair, limbs, teeth and eyes. We present the case of a 26-year-old female in the 27th pregnancy week and a previous history of miscarriage. After careful physical examination and dermal biopsy, histopathology revealed that the patient was a carrier of FDH. This is the first report in the literature describing that FDH is associated with uterus bicornis and renal ectopia. Our association could be attributable to early embryonic abnormalities related with FDH because both the uterus bicornis and the renal ectopia originate around the 3th-6th week of embryonic development. We are unable to confirm that the miscarriages were caused by inherited FDH or that uterus bicornis was the cause. We conducted a literature review using the following terms: FDH, Goltz syndrome, uterus bicornis, and renal ectopia. PMID:21941481

  10. In situ visualization of dermal collagen dynamics during skin burn healing using second-harmonic-generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Hase, Eiji; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2015-06-01

    Burn healing is a process to repair thermally damaged tissues. Although burn healing has many aspects, it is common for dynamics of collagen fiber, such as decomposition, production, or growth, to be closely related with burn healing. If such healing process can be visualized from the viewpoint of the collagen dynamics, one may obtain new findings regarding biological repairing mechanisms in the healing process. To this end, second-harmonic-generation (SHG) light will be an effective optical probe because of high selectivity and good image contrast to collagen molecules as well as high spatial resolution, optical three-dimensional (3D) sectioning, minimal invasiveness, deep penetration, the absence of interference from background light, and in situ measurement without additional staining. Furthermore, since SHG light arises from a non-centrosymmetric triple helix of three polypeptide chains in the collagen molecule, its intensity decreases and finally disappears when thermal denaturation caused by the skin burn changes the structure of this molecule to a centrosymmetric random coil. Therefore, optical assessment of skin burn has been investigated by SHG microscopy. In this paper, we applied SHG microscopy for in situ imaging of the healing process in animal skin burn and successfully visualized the decomposition, production, and growth of renewal collagen fibers as a series of time-lapse images in the same subject.

  11. Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... if signs of infection develop. These signs include: Drainage or pus from the burned skin Fever Increased pain Red streaks spreading from the burn Swollen lymph nodes Also call a provider right away if ...

  12. A Case of Superwarfarin Poisoning Due to Repetitive Occupational Dermal Rodenticide Exposure in a Worker

    PubMed Central

    Narlı Özdemir, Zehra; Şahin, Uğur; Merter, Mustafa; Gündüz, Mehmet; Ateşağaoğlu, Berna; Beksaç, Meral

    2016-01-01

    Superwarfarin poisoning is usually due to chronic occult small-dose exposures and can easily be misdiagnosed and may lead to serious complications. The diagnosis can be confirmed by a concordant history and analyses of blood and urine specimens with the liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technique. Several months of continuous treatment with high doses of daily oral vitamin K, as well as other supportive measures, are warranted, especially when repeated laboratory measurements to help predict the treatment period are not available. In this paper, a case of superwarfarin poisoning due to chronic repetitive occupational dermal exposure to commercial rodenticides is presented. PMID:27093901

  13. An unusual case of extensive self-inflicted cement burn.

    PubMed

    Catalano, F; Mariano, F; Maina, G; Bianco, C; Nuzzo, J; Stella, M

    2013-03-31

    Cement is a fine powder used to bind sand and stones into a matrix of concrete, making up the world's most frequently used building material in the construction industry. First described by Ramazzini in his book "De Morbis Artificia Diatriba" in 1700, the effect of cement on the skin was presumed to be due to contact dermatitis. The first cement burns case was published by Rowe and Williams in 1963. Cement handling has been found to be responsible for many cases of occupational burns (generally full-thickness) usually affecting a limited TBSA, rarely greater than 5%, with localization especially in the lower limbs. We describe an unusual case of a self-inflicted cement burn involving 75% TBSA. A 28-yr-old building worker attempted suicide by jumping into a cement mixer in a truck. Upon arrival at our burn centre, clinical examination revealed extensive burn (75% TBSA - 40% full-thickness) involving face, back, abdomen, upper limbs and circumferentially lower limbs, sparing the hands and feet. The patient was sedated, mechanically ventilated, and subjected to escharotomy of the lower limbs in the emergency room. The following day, the deep burns in the lower limbs were excised down to the fascia and covered with meshed allografts. Owing to probable intestinal and skin absorption of cement, metal toxicity was suspected and dialysis and forced diuresis were therefore initiated on day 3. The patient's clinical conditions gradually worsened and he died on day 13 from the multi-organ failure syndrome.

  14. Blaschko Linear Enamel Defects – A Marker for Focal Dermal Hypoplasia: Case Report of Focal Dermal Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gysin, Stefan; Itin, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) is a rare genetic skin disorder. The inheritance of FDH or Goltz-Gorlin syndrome is X-linked dominant and the disease is associated with a PORCN gene mutation. This gene plays a key role in the Wnt pathway, which has an impact on embryonic development. Every tissue derived from meso- and ectoderm can be affected. Patients suffer from cutaneous, ocular, osseous, oral and dental defects. The skin and dental alterations manifest along the Blaschko lines. We present a woman (born in 1962) suffering from FDH with congenital skin changes and Blaschko linear enamel defects. Typical symptoms (e.g. fat herniations, scoliosis, syndactyly, microphthalmia, caries and alopecia) plus vertical grooving of all teeth gave a first indication. Molecular genetic testing confirmed the definitive diagnosis of FDH. We hypothesize that, in the context of typical skin changes, visible Blaschko lines on the teeth in the form of vertical grooves are almost pathognomonic for FDH. PMID:26078738

  15. A case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers

    PubMed Central

    Basora, Jose F.; Fernandez, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Modesto; Adorno, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage Symptoms: Cough dry • short of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: — Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Hyaluronic acid is a substance that is naturally present in the human body, especially in joints and eyes. Hyaluronic acid injectable gels have been available for the general market since 2003 as cosmetic dermal fillers and skin boosters. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is an acute event that threatens the life of the patient and can lead to pulmonary fibrosis. Alveolar hemorrhage associated with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers is an entity that to the best of our knowledge has never been described in the medical literature. Case Report: We describe a patient who presented with dyspnea and cough after a subcutaneous injection of hyaluronic acid, with radiographic abnormalities including ground glass opacities and consolidation. The patient underwent flexible bronchoscopy and was diagnosed with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Conclusions: This case emphasizes that this life threatening condition may occur with the use of this medication and physicians must be aware of this disorder, as early recognition and management can reduce morbidity. PMID:24826208

  16. Alkali-related ocular burns: a case series and review.

    PubMed

    Bunker, Daniel J L; George, Robert J; Kleinschmidt, Andrew; Kumar, Rohit J; Maitz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alkali burns are known to possess high pathological potential because of their inherent ability to lyse cell membranes and penetrate intraocular structures with devastating results. The authors aimed to evaluate the most common cause of this presentation, the current treatment approaches to injury, and eventual outcome as related to severity. The authors performed a retrospective review of all patients who sustained chemical-related ocular injuries seen at the Concord Hospital Burns Unit, Australia between January 2005 and March 2012. Management was based on cooperation between ophthalmic staff and the burns unit, with emphasis on early aggressive intervention and rigorous follow-up. The records of 39 patients who presented with chemical-related injury were assessed, 12 of whom had confirmed alkali burns involving the cornea. The most commonly implicated agent was sodium hydroxide, usually in the context of otherwise trivial domestic accidents. Acute medical management included copious irrigation and the use of analgesics, cycloplegics, and topical antibiotics. In half the cases, steroid drops and oral vitamin C were also used. Ten of the 12 patients (83%) had return to premorbid visual acuity. Complications included cicatrical ectropion (n = 1), pseudoexfoliative syndrome (n = 1), and symblepharon (n = 1). Surgical correction was needed in the one patient with cicatrical ectropion. This case series shows that appropriate acute management minimizes the potentially devastating sequelae of ocular alkali burns. Emphasis should be placed on prevention of domestic and workplace injuries when using alkaline products.

  17. Gelatin-based membrane containing usnic acid-loaded liposome improves dermal burn healing in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paula Santos; Rabelo, Alessandra Silva; Souza, Jamille Cristina Campos de; Santana, Bruno Vasconcelos; da Silva, Thailson Monteiro Menezes; Serafini, Mairim Russo; Dos Passos Menezes, Paula; Dos Santos Lima, Bruno; Cardoso, Juliana Cordeiro; Alves, Júlio César Santana; Frank, Luiza Abrahão; Guterres, Sílvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; Pinheiro, Malone Santos; de Albuquerque, Ricardo Luiz Cavalcanti; Araújo, Adriano Antunes de Souza

    2016-11-20

    There are a range of products available which claim to accelerate the healing of burns; these include topical agents, interactive dressings and biomembranes. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a gelatin-based membrane containing usnic acid/liposomes on the healing of burns in comparison to silver sulfadiazine ointment and duoDerme(®) dressing, as well as examining its quantification by high performance liquid chromatography. The quantification of the usnic acid/liposomes was examined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) by performing separate in vitro studies of the efficiency of the biomembranes in terms of encapsulation, drug release and transdermal absorption. Then, second-degree 5cm(2) burn wounds were created on the dorsum of nine male pigs, assigned into three groups (n=3): SDZ - animals treated with silver sulfadiazine ointment; GDU - animals treated with duoDerme(®); UAL - animals treated with a gelatin-based membrane containing usnic acid/liposomes. These groups were treated for 8, 18 and 30days. In the average rate of contraction, there was no difference among the groups (p>0.05). The results of the quantification showed that biomembranes containing usnic acid/liposomes were controlled released systems capable of transdermal absorption by skin layers. A macroscopic assay did not observe any clinical signs of secondary infections. Microscopy after 8days showed hydropic degeneration of the epithelium, with intense neutrophilic infiltration in all three groups. At 18days, although epidermal neo-formation was only partial in all three groups, it was most incipient in the SDZ group. Granulation tissue was more exuberant and cellularized in the UAL and GDU groups. At 30days, observed restricted granulation tissue in the region below the epithelium in the GDU and UAL groups was observed. In the analysis of collagen though picrosirius, the UAL group showed greater collagen density. Therefore, the UAL group displayed development and

  18. Comparative study of smoke condensates from 1R4F cigarettes that burn tobacco versus ECLIPSE cigarettes that primarily heat tobacco in the SENCAR mouse dermal tumor promotion assay.

    PubMed

    Meckley, Daniel R; Hayes, Johnnie R; Van Kampen, K R; Ayres, Paul H; Mosberg, Arnold T; Swauger, James E

    2004-05-01

    Numerous chemical and toxicological studies indicate that smoke from ECLIPSE, a cigarette that primarily heats rather than burns tobacco, is simplified and reduced in specific chemicals believed to be associated with smoking-related diseases, and demonstrates reduced smoke toxicity and biological activity in vitro when compared to conventional tobacco burning cigarettes. These data led to the hypothesis that cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) from ECLIPSE should have lower tumorigenicity than 1R4F condensate in the SENCAR mouse dermal tumor promotion assay. Female SENCAR mice were initiated with a single topical application of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) followed by promotion with ECLIPSE or 1R4F CSC. Dermal application of 10, 20, or 40 mg ECLIPSE or 1R4F CSC three times/week for 29 weeks did not alter body weights, survival or other indicators of subchronic toxicity. In DMBA-initiated mice, there were significant increases in both the number of microscopically confirmed tumor-bearing animals and total number of microscopically confirmed dermal tumors at all 1R4F CSC doses and the high-dose ECLIPSE CSC. However, the number of ECLIPSE tumor-bearing animals were reduced 83%, 93% and 67% at the low-, mid- and high-doses, respectively, compared to the 1R4F. Similarly, the total number of dermal tumors was reduced 91%, 94% and 87% at the low-, mid- and high-dose, respectively, compared to the 1R4F CSC. ECLIPSE CSC demonstrated dramatic reductions in dermal tumor promotion potential compared to 1R4F CSC.

  19. Infrared dermal thermography on diabetic feet soles to predict ulcerations: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Klein, Marvin E.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Bus, Sicco A.; van Netten, Jaap J.

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication for patients with diabetes mellitus. If not adequately treated, these ulcers may lead to foot infection, and ultimately to lower extremity amputation, which imposes a major burden to society and great loss in health-related quality of life for patients. Early identification and subsequent preventive treatment have proven useful to limit the incidence of foot ulcers and lower extremity amputation. Thus, the development of new diagnosis tools has become an attractive option. The ultimate objective of our project is to develop an intelligent telemedicine monitoring system for frequent examination on patients' feet, to timely detect pre-signs of ulceration. Inflammation in diabetic feet can be an early and predictive warning sign for ulceration, and temperature has been proven to be a vicarious marker for inflammation. Studies have indicated that infrared dermal thermography of foot soles can be one of the important parameters for assessing the risk of diabetic foot ulceration. This paper covers the feasibility study of using an infrared camera, FLIR SC305, in our setup, to acquire the spatial thermal distribution on the feet soles. With the obtained thermal images, automated detection through image analysis was performed to identify the abnormal increased/decreased temperature and assess the risk for ulceration. The thermography for feet soles of patients with diagnosed diabetic foot complications were acquired before the ordinary foot examinations. Assessment from clinicians and thermography were compared and follow-up measurements were performed to investigate the prediction. A preliminary case study will be presented, indicating that dermal thermography in our proposed setup can be a screening modality to timely detect pre-signs of ulceration.

  20. DNA adduct formation in mice following dermal application of smoke condensates from cigarettes that burn or heat tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.K.; Brown, B.G.; Reed, E.A.; Mosberg, A.T.; Doolittle, D.J.; Hayes, A.W. ); Hejtmancik, M. )

    1992-01-01

    A prototype cigarette that heats tobacco (test cigarette), developed by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, has yielded consistently negative results in several in vivo and in vitro genetic toxicology tests. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) from the test cigarette to induce DNA adducts in mouse tissues and compare the results with those obtained with CSC from a reference tobacco-burning cigarette (1R4F). CD-1 mice were skin-painted with CSF from reference and test cigarettes three times a week for 4 weeks. The highest mass of CSC applied was 180 mg tar per week per animal for both reference and test cigarette. DNA adducts were analyzed in skin and lung tissues using the [sup 32]P-postlabeling method with the P[sub 1] nuclease modification. Distinct diagonal radioactive zones (DRZ) were observed in the DNA from both skin and lung tissues of animals dosed with reference CSC, whereas no corresponding DRZ were observed from the DNA of animals dosed with either test CSC or acetone (solvent control). The relative adduct labeling (RAL) values of skin and lung DNA from reference CSC-treated animals were significantly greater than those of the test CSC-treated animals. The RAL values of the test CSC-treated animals were no greater than those of solvent controls. The negative results in DNA adduct assays with test CSC are consistent with all previous results of in vivo and in vitro genetic toxicology testing on this cigarette and provide additional evidence that smoke condensate from the test cigarette is not genotoxic. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Ophthalmologic manifestations of focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome): A case series of 18 patients.

    PubMed

    Gisseman, Jordan D; Herce, Honey H

    2016-03-01

    Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH) or Goltz syndrome is a rare multi-system disorder with cutaneous, ocular, dental, and skeletal anomalies due to dysplasia of mesoectodermal derived tissues. It is an X-linked inheritance syndrome caused by mutations in the PORCN gene. This study is aimed to investigate the ocular findings in patients with Goltz syndrome. To date, there have been a limited number of case reports on the ocular manifestations of FDH. This is a prospective, non-consecutive, observational case series. Prospective ophthalmologic evaluation was performed on 18 patients with confirmed genetic testing for FDH, Goltz Syndrome, as a component of a larger multi-subspecialty study to better characterize the findings of this condition. Special attention was placed on evaluating the incidence of anophthalmia, microphthalmia, colobomas (iris, optic nerve, and/or retinal), cataracts, nystagmus, and strabismus. A complete ophthalmologic exam was done on all the patients. The mean patient age was 12.8 years (1-55 years). Eighty-nine percent were female and 77% (14/18) of patients had some form of an ophthalmologic manifestation of the condition. Ophthalmological findings included chorioretinal colobomas (61%), iris colobomas (50%), microphthalmia (44%), anophthalmia (11%), cataracts (11%), and conjunctival and eyelid papillomas (5%). Nystagmus was present in 33% and strabismus in 22% of the patients. Visual acuity ranged from 20/20 to no light perception. This study demonstrates a higher incidence of ophthalmologic manifestations as previously reported (77% vs. 40%). To our knowledge, this is the largest case series reported in the literature with 18 patients.

  2. Focal dermal hypoplasia: report of a case with myelomeningocele, Arnold-Chiari malformation and hydrocephalus with a review of neurologic manifestations of Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peters, Tess; Perrier, Renee; Haber, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [OMIM] 305600) is a rare X-linked dominant congenital disorder involving defects of mesodermal- and ectodermal-derived structures. It is associated with mutations in the PORCN gene, a regulator of Wnt signaling proteins. The phenotype is highly variable, although all describe characteristic skin findings as a primary diagnostic feature. To date there are few case reports of focal dermal hypoplasia associated with central nervous system abnormalities. We report the second case of focal dermal hypoplasia associated with myelomenigocele, Arnold-Chiari malformation and hydrocephalus and the first in a male. Genetic testing identified a novel mosaic three base pair deletion within the PORCN gene (c.853_855delACG). This case highlights the importance of neurological evaluation in focal dermal hypoplasia and consideration of other syndromes more commonly associated with central nervous system abnormalities. In this report we summarize the literature on neurological manifestations in Goltz syndrome.

  3. Micronized, particulate dermal matrix to manage a non-healing pressure ulcer with undermined wound edges: a case report.

    PubMed

    Allam, Reynald C

    2007-04-01

    Pressure ulcers with undermined edges are generally hard to treat and may require surgical debridement and flap coverage. A woman with a 5-month history of a non-healing, undermined, sacro-coccygeal pressure ulcer presented for care at the author's wound care center. Because traditional wound care had failed and surgical debridement and repair was contraindicated due to her overall poor general health and malnutrition, an injectable dermal filler was applied inside the wound. The matrix filler was covered with secondary and tertiary dressings and the wound healed after 8 weeks with no adverse effects or infection. The results of this and previously published case studies suggest that injectable dermal matrix may be a viable option for non-surgical treatment of difficult-to-heal pressure ulcers with undermining. Additional safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness studies seem warranted.

  4. Plaque-like CD34-positive dermal fibroma ("medallion-like dermal dendrocyte hamartoma"): clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular analysis of 5 cases emphasizing its distinction from superficial, plaque-like dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans.

    PubMed

    Kutzner, Heinz; Mentzel, Thomas; Palmedo, Gabriele; Hantschke, Markus; Rütten, Arno; Paredes, Bruno E; Schärer, Leo; Guillen, Carlos Serra; Requena, Luis

    2010-02-01

    Medallion-like dermal dendrocyte hamartoma (DH) and superficial (plaque-like) dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) are CD34-positive dermal neoplasms with overlapping clinicopathologic features. We analyzed the clinical, histomorphologic, and molecular criteria of 5 DH and 7 DFSP to delineate diagnostically relevant differences between incipient dermal DFSP and its benign look-alike, DH. We expand the clinical and histologic spectrum of DH. As medallion-like dermal DH is neither of dermal dendrocyte lineage nor a genuine hamartoma, we propose instead the descriptive term of plaque-like CD34-positive dermal fibroma (PDF). Both PDF/DH and DFSP presented as slightly pigmented and indurated plaques on neck, trunk, and extremities. Histologically, DFSP was characterized either by horizontally oriented spindle cell fascicles or by diffusely arranged fibroblasts within a slightly myxoid stroma in the upper two-thirds of the dermis, whereas PDF/DH presented with a cellular band-like fibroblastic proliferation mostly in the papillary and adjacent upper reticular dermis. Only one congenital PDF/DH in a 9-year-old boy extended into the septa of the subcutaneous fat. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tissue was used for detection of the COL1A1-PDGFB gene rearrangement by multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and by dual color fusion fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). Archival blocs older than 4 years did not yield amplifiable RNA because of RNA degradation, whereas FISH analysis was feasible in all investigated cases. FISH analysis revealed COL1A1-PDGFB gene rearrangement in all DFSP cases (n=7), whereas RT-PCR could detect the COL1A1-PDGFB fusion transcript only in 1 DFSP. Two cases were negative. In 4 archival cases with storage between 4.5 and 12 years, RNA had been degraded making these cases unsuitable for RT-PCR. In PDF/DH, both RT-PCR and FISH analysis did not reveal any evidence of COL1A1-PDGFB gene rearrangement. We show

  5. Thermal burns on lower limb resulting from laptop use: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Nebu C; Zarugh, Adel; Suraliwala, Khushroo H

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 29-year-old man with a background history of incomplete quadriplegia, who sustained a second degree thermal burn of the lower limb from prolonged proximity to the extractor fan of his laptop. We have also reviewed all other reported cases of thermal burns associated with laptop use. This literature review highlights the variability in the extent of injury and the subsequent management of laptop induced burns.

  6. Thermal burns on lower limb resulting from laptop use: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Nebu C.; Zarugh, Adel; Suraliwala, Khushroo H.

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 29-year-old man with a background history of incomplete quadriplegia, who sustained a second degree thermal burn of the lower limb from prolonged proximity to the extractor fan of his laptop. We have also reviewed all other reported cases of thermal burns associated with laptop use. This literature review highlights the variability in the extent of injury and the subsequent management of laptop induced burns. PMID:25593437

  7. [Whole esophagus deep burns with a metal foreign body in the stomach: a case report].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Xiao, Nengkan; Xie, Hanqiu; Tang, Zhongming

    2014-04-01

    Whole esophagus deep burn is an extremely rare upper gastrointestinal tract disease. We report a case of severe burns of involving extensive body skin, eyes, throat, and esophagus. Endoscopic examination revealed acute necrotizing esophagitis and detected a metal foreign body in the stomach. The patient underwent burn wound debridement with analgesia, anti-shock rehydration, anti-infection, and symptomatic treatments, which failed to improve the conditions. The patient died of respiratory and circulatory failure secondary to serious sepsis.

  8. [Hydrofluoric acid burns].

    PubMed

    Holla, Robin; Gorter, Ramon R; Tenhagen, Mark; Vloemans, A F P M Jos; Breederveld, Roelf S

    2016-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid is increasingly used as a rust remover and detergent. Dermal contact with hydrofluoric acid results in a chemical burn characterized by severe pain and deep tissue necrosis. It may cause electrolyte imbalances with lethal consequences. It is important to identify high-risk patients. 'High risk' is defined as a total affected body area > 3% or exposure to hydrofluoric acid in a concentration > 50%. We present the cases of three male patients (26, 31, and 39 years old) with hydrofluoric acid burns of varying severity and describe the subsequent treatments. The application of calcium gluconate 2.5% gel to the skin is the cornerstone of the treatment, reducing pain as well as improving wound healing. Nails should be thoroughly inspected and possibly removed if the nail is involved, to ensure proper healing. In high-risk patients, plasma calcium levels should be evaluated and cardiac monitoring is indicated.

  9. Outcomes related to burn-related child abuse: a case series.

    PubMed

    Ruth, G D; Smith, S; Bronson, M; Davis, A T; Wilcox, R M

    2003-01-01

    Nationally, approximately 10% of child abuse cases involve burning, and up to 20% of pediatric burn admissions involve abuse or neglect. Historically, these cases have been more difficult to prosecute than nonburn cases for multiple reasons. Between 1995 and 1999, there were 285 pediatric (under 18) patients admitted to the Spectrum Health Regional Burn Center. Of these cases, 18 of the alleged perpetrators were legally investigated for suspicion of child abuse, and 7 received punitive sentences. We found that men tended to be prosecuted and convicted more often than women and that cases involving multiple instances of injury tended to be prosecuted more frequently. Similarly, we found that cases involving more severe injuries tended to be prosecuted more successfully. There are many psychological and social factors involved in handling burn abuse cases. However, by successful prosecution of these crimes, victims tend to fare better both socially and psychologically.

  10. Skin analysis following dermal exposure to kerosene in rats: the effects of postmortem exposure and fire.

    PubMed

    Hieda, Yoko; Tsujino, Yoshio; Xue, Yuying; Takayama, Koji; Fujihara, Junko; Kimura, Kojiro; Dekio, Satoshi

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of skin analysis for the forensic examination of cases involving postmortem dermal exposure to kerosene and/or fire, an experimental study using rats was performed. Rats received dermal exposure to kerosene before or after death, and the effect of fire was determined by burning an area of exposed skin after death. Kerosene concentrations in skin and blood were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and microscopic observation was performed for skin samples. No differences were observed in skin kerosene levels between antemortem and postmortem exposure. Kerosene concentrations in mildly burned skin where the stratum corneum (SC) was retained were approximately 84% compared to those in non-burned exposed skin, whereas concentrations in severely burned skin where the SC was almost completely burned off were 28% of non-burned skin. Even in non-exposed control skin 14% of the original kerosene concentrations could be detected, which was considered to be caused by contamination during the experimental protocol combined with kerosene's property of a high affinity for the SC. These results suggest that (1) skin analysis is useful in estimating the type of petroleum product involved in crimes or accidents even for postmortem exposure, (2) whether the SC is retained or not primarily determined the kerosene levels in burned skin, and (3) attention must be paid to evaluate the results obtained from skin samples in the light of the circumstances surrounding the case.

  11. Variations in burn perfusion over time as measured by portable ICG fluorescence: A case series.

    PubMed

    Dissanaike, Sharmila; Abdul-Hamed, Senan; Griswold, John A

    2014-01-01

    The early determination of healing potential in indeterminate thickness burns may be difficult to establish by visual inspection alone, even for experienced burn practitioners. This case series explores the use of indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence using portable bedside assessment as a potential tool for early determination of burn depth. Three subjects with indeterminate thickness burns had daily perfusion assessment using ICG fluorescence assessment using the SPY machine (SPY®, Lifecell Corp., NJ, USA) in addition to standard burn care. The fluorescence was quantified as a percentage of the perfusion of intact skin, and areas of hypo- and hyper-perfusion were indicated. The study was concluded when the burn surgeon, blinded to the ICG results, made a clinical determination of the need for skin grafting or discharge. The perfusion in areas of differing depth of burn were compared over the entire study period to determine both the magnitude of difference, and the point in the time course of healing when these changes became evident. Significant differences in perfusion were noted between burned areas of varying depth. These differences were evident as early as the first post-burn day, and persisted till the completion of the study. ICG fluorescence represents a potential adjunct in burn assessment in this first longitudinal study of its use; however much more systematic research will be required to judge the feasibility of clinical implementation.

  12. Atypical disseminated leishmaniasis similar to post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis in a Brazilian AIDS patient infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum chagasi: a case report.

    PubMed

    Carnaúba, Dimas; Konishi, Cassiana Tami; Petri, Valéria; Martinez, Isabel Cristina Pedro; Shimizu, Laura; Pereira-Chioccola, Vera Lucia

    2009-11-01

    We report the case of an atypical disseminated leishmaniasis with similar clinical characteristics to post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis, an uncommon disease in South America. This occurred in a Brazilian patient with AIDS, 3 years after the first episode of American visceral leishmaniasis.

  13. Iatrogenic surgical microscope skin burns: A systematic review of the literature and case report.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Joseph; Soni, Ashwin; Calva, Daniel; Susarla, Srinivas M; Jallo, George I; Redett, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Cutaneous burns associated with microscope-use are perceived to be uncommon adverse events in microsurgery. Currently, it is unknown what factors are associated with these iatrogenic events. In this report, we describe the case of a 1-year-old patient who suffered a full thickness skin burn from a surgical microscope after a L4-S1 laminectomy. Additionally, we present a systematic review of the literature that assessed the preoperative risk, outcome, and management of iatrogenic microscope skin burns. Lastly, a summary of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database of voluntary adverse events was reviewed and analyzed for clinical cases of microscope thermal injuries. The systematic literature review identified only seven articles related to microsurgery-related cutaneous burns. From these seven studies, 15 clinical cases of iatrogenic skin burns were extracted for analysis. The systematic review of the FDA MAUDE database revealed only 60 cases of cutaneous burns associated with surgical microscopes since 2004. Few cases of microscope burns have been described in the literature; this report is, to our knowledge, one of the first comprehensive reports of this iatrogenic event in the literature.

  14. Clinical management of electrical burns in the developing world: a case of electrical burn injury left untreated leading to amputation.

    PubMed

    Choong, Marcus; Chy, Delia; Guevarra, Jerric R; Ross, Allen

    2017-02-15

    We discuss the case of a 26-year-old male patient from Northern Samar, the Philippines who was left without essential health services after the amputation of all four limbs following a high voltage (20 000 volts) injury in Metro Manila in 2011. Local health services in the developing world are faced with enormous challenges in providing first-line care for burn patients. The cost of maintaining a burn unit, finding suitable qualified staff, and appropriate referral mechanisms are only some of the challenges faced. Once a patient is discharged from hospital they face more obstacles in obtaining artificial limbs, physiotherapy and access to mental health services. Disability pensions are non-existent thus patients place a considerable lifelong burden on their families.

  15. Two cases of burns caused by misuse of coagulation unit and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rolly, G

    1978-01-01

    Two cases of severe burns with monitoring apparatus are described. In a female patient of 45 years, a severe third degree burn occurred by misuse of coagulation apparatus (inversion of the poles of an older Bovie apparatus), in the presence of a non-floating ECG monitoring device. A high intensity current was established from the coagulation unit, via the earth plate under the buttocks, to the indifferent electrode placed on the chest, where burns occurred. In an 8 month female baby, having laparotomy for a neuroblastoma, a third degree burn of 5 cm diameter occurred with a non-floating ECG monitor. A twin-wired disposable earth plate was placed just beneath the indifferent ECG electrode on the leg. A burning current was established between the Bovie coagulation unit and the monitor.

  16. Treatment of nasal burns: analysis of 150 cases

    PubMed Central

    Prousskaia, E.; El-Muttardi, N.; Philp, B.; Dziewulski, P.; Shelley, O.P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nasal burns present a challenge for the plastic surgeon in terms of immediate management, choice of primary treatment and secondary reconstruction with the goals of good aesthetic and functional outcome. We present a retrospective analysis of the management of 150 patients with nasal burns treated in our center between July 2005 and July 2011. We rationalized our conservative and all surgical treatments of this subset of burns patients and organized them in a simple and structured way. The reconstructive options for most complex full thickness nasal injury is determined by the integrity of adjacent facial tissues which would always be preferred when available. Microsurgical free tissue transfer is dependent upon the fitness of the patient and the availability of unburned skin at the donor site. Secondary nasal reconstruction is based on an assessment of the residual functional and cosmetic problems. Airways narrowing from scar contracture or loss of support are managed using standard plastic surgical and rhinoplasty principles. Cosmetic refinements range from flap debulking to the importation of new tissue on to the nose. Our experience with this challenging group of patients has led us to develop a simple treatment algorithm for the management of nasal burns. PMID:27252610

  17. Treatment of nasal burns: analysis of 150 cases.

    PubMed

    Prousskaia, E; El-Muttardi, N; Philp, B; Dziewulski, P; Shelley, O P

    2015-06-30

    Nasal burns present a challenge for the plastic surgeon in terms of immediate management, choice of primary treatment and secondary reconstruction with the goals of good aesthetic and functional outcome. We present a retrospective analysis of the management of 150 patients with nasal burns treated in our center between July 2005 and July 2011. We rationalized our conservative and all surgical treatments of this subset of burns patients and organized them in a simple and structured way. The reconstructive options for most complex full thickness nasal injury is determined by the integrity of adjacent facial tissues which would always be preferred when available. Microsurgical free tissue transfer is dependent upon the fitness of the patient and the availability of unburned skin at the donor site. Secondary nasal reconstruction is based on an assessment of the residual functional and cosmetic problems. Airways narrowing from scar contracture or loss of support are managed using standard plastic surgical and rhinoplasty principles. Cosmetic refinements range from flap debulking to the importation of new tissue on to the nose. Our experience with this challenging group of patients has led us to develop a simple treatment algorithm for the management of nasal burns.

  18. Feet sunk in molten aluminium: The burn and its prevention.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Peña, David; Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Valero-Gasalla, Javier Luis; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Campillo-Campaña, Ramón; Alonso-Peña, Javier; González-Santos, Jose María; Fernández-Díaz, Alaska Leonor; Arnáiz, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, despite improvements in safety rules and inspections in the metal industry, foundry workers are not free from burn accidents. Injuries caused by molten metals include burns secondary to molten iron, aluminium, zinc, copper, brass, bronze, manganese, lead and steel. Molten aluminium is one of the most common causative agents of burns (60%); however, only a few publications exist concerning injuries from molten aluminium. The main mechanisms of lesion from molten aluminium include direct contact of the molten metal with the skin or through safety apparel, or when the metal splash burns through the pants and rolls downward along the leg. Herein, we report three cases of deep dermal burns after 'soaking' the foot in liquid aluminium and its evolutive features. This paper aims to show our experience in the management of burns due to molten aluminium. We describe the current management principles and the key features of injury prevention.

  19. Almost Unilateral Focal Dermal Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Solam; Choe, Sung Jay

    2017-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia, caused by mutations in PORCN, is an X-linked ectodermal dysplasia, also known as Goltz syndrome. Only seven cases of unilateral or almost unilateral focal dermal hypoplasia have been reported in the English literature and there have been no previously reported cases in the Republic of Korea. A 19-year-old female presented with scalp defects, skin lesions on the right leg and the right trunk, and syndactyly of the right fourth and fifth toes. Cutaneous examination revealed multiple atrophic plaques and a brown and yellow mass with fat herniation and telangiectasia that was mostly located on the lower right leg. She had syndactyly on the right foot and the scalp lesion appeared to be an atrophic, membranous, fibrotic alopecic scar. A biopsy of the calf revealed upper dermal extension of fat cells, dermal atrophy, and loss of dermal collagen. A diagnosis of almost unilateral focal dermal hypoplasia was made on the basis of physical and histologic findings. Henceforth, the patient was referred to a plastic surgeon and an orthopedics department to repair her syndactyly. PMID:28223754

  20. Domestic incense burning and nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a case-control study in Hong Kong Chinese.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shao-Hua; Yu, Ignatius Tak-sun; Tse, Lap Ah; Au, Joseph Siu Kie; Wang, Feng; Lau, June Sze Man; Zhang, Bo

    2014-12-01

    Incense burning is a powerful producer of carcinogens and has been considered as a risk factor for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We conducted a case-control study and case-only analyses to investigate the effect of incense burning and its interaction with genetic background on NPC risk among Hong Kong Chinese. Between June 2010 and December 2012, we recruited 352 incident cases of NPC and 410 controls. We collected information on lifelong practice of domestic incense burning via interviews and genotyped 80 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes. We observed an increased NPC risk associated with daily burning in women [Adjusted OR = 2.49, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.33, 4.66] but not in men. The adjusted OR for daily burning with poor ventilation was 2.08 (95% CI: 1.02, 4.24), while that with good ventilation was 1.35 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.98). Interactions between 2 SNPs (rs2074517 and rs4771436) and incense burning were significantly associated with NPC risk and tended to have a SNP exposure-response effect. Evidence for gene-environment interactions supported the knowledge that NPC is a multi-factorial disease resulting from the joint effects of environmental exposures and inherited susceptibility.

  1. Assessment of dermal hazard from acid burns with fire retardant garments in a full-size simulation of an engulfment flash fire.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Christopher E; Vivanco, Stephanie N; Yeboah, George; Vercellone, Jeff

    2016-09-01

    There have been concerns that fire-derived acid gases could aggravate thermal burns for individuals wearing synthetic flame retardant garments. A comparative risk assessment was performed on three commercial flame retardant materials with regard to relative hazards associated with acidic combustion gases to skin during a full engulfment flash fire event. The tests were performed in accordance with ASTM F1930 and ISO 13506: Standard Test Method for Evaluation of Flame Resistant Clothing for Protection against Fire Simulations Using an Instrumented Manikin. Three fire retardant textiles were tested: an FR treated cotton/nylon blend, a low Protex(®) modacrylic blend, and a medium Protex(®) modacrylic blend. The materials, in the form of whole body coveralls, were subjected to propane-fired flash conditions of 84kW/m(2) in a full sized simulator for a duration of either 3 or 4s. Ion traps consisting of wetted sodium carbonate-impregnated cellulose in Teflon holders were placed on the chest and back both above and under the standard undergarments. The ion traps remained in position from the time of ignition until 5min post ignition. Results indicated that acid deposition did increase with modacrylic content from 0.9μmol/cm(2) for the cotton/nylon, to 12μmol/cm(2) for the medium modacrylic blend. The source of the acidity was dominated by hydrogen chloride. Discoloration was inversely proportional to the amount of acid collected on the traps. A risk assessment was performed on the potential adverse impact of acid gases on both the skin and open wounds. The results indicated that the deposition and dissolution of the acid gases in surficial fluid media (perspiration and blood plasma) resulted in an increase in acidity, but not sufficient to induce irritation/skin corrosion or to cause necrosis in open third degree burns.

  2. Burns from ECG leads in an MRI scanner: Case series and discussion of mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rehim, S.; Bagirathan, S.; Al-Benna, S.; O’Boyle, C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Iatrogenic burns are rare and preventable. The authors present two cases of burns from ECG leads, sustained during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Common features included a long duration spinal MR scan (120 and 60 minutes) and high patient body mass index (BMI >30). Both patients were discharged within 24 hours of admission, but required a period of outpatient burn care. The causation of these injuries remains unclear but there are several possible mechanisms including: electromagnetic induction heating, antenna effects and closed-loop current induction. The authors provide a description of the injuries, discuss possible mechanisms that may lead to burn injury in the MRI environment and suggest ways to reduce the risks of such injuries. PMID:26336370

  3. Burns from ECG leads in an MRI scanner: Case series and discussion of mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rehim, S; Bagirathan, S; Al-Benna, S; O'Boyle, C

    2014-12-31

    Iatrogenic burns are rare and preventable. The authors present two cases of burns from ECG leads, sustained during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Common features included a long duration spinal MR scan (120 and 60 minutes) and high patient body mass index (BMI >30). Both patients were discharged within 24 hours of admission, but required a period of outpatient burn care. The causation of these injuries remains unclear but there are several possible mechanisms including: electromagnetic induction heating, antenna effects and closed-loop current induction. The authors provide a description of the injuries, discuss possible mechanisms that may lead to burn injury in the MRI environment and suggest ways to reduce the risks of such injuries.

  4. A Case Report of the First Nonburn-related Military Trauma Victim Treated with Spray Skin Regenerative Therapy in Combination with a Dermal Regenerate Template

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Daniel A.; Rendon, Juan L.; Latham, Kerry P.; Fleming, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Massive soft tissue and skin loss secondary to war-related traumas are among the most frequently encountered challenges in the care of wounded warriors. This case report outlines the first military nonburn-related trauma patient treated by a combination of regenerative modalities. Our case employs spray skin technology to an established dermal regenerate matrix. Our patient, a 29-year-old active duty male, suffered a combat blast trauma in 2010 while deployed. The patient’s treatment course was complicated by a severe necrotizing fasciitis infection requiring over 100 surgical procedures for disease control and reconstruction. In secondary delayed reconstruction procedures, this triple-limb amputee underwent successful staged ventral hernia repair via a component separation technique with biologic mesh underlay although this resulted in a skin deficit of more than 600 cm2. A dermal regenerate template was applied to the abdominal wound to aid in establishing a “neodermis.” Three weeks after dermal regenerate application, spray skin was applied to the defect in conjunction with a 6:1 meshed split thickness skin graft. The dermal regenerate template allowed for optimization of the wound bed for skin grafting. The use of spray skin allowed for a 6:1 mesh ratio, thus minimizing the donor-site size and morbidity. Together, this approach resulted in complete healing of a large full-thickness wound. The patient is now able to perform activities of daily living, walk without a cane, and engage in various physical activities. Overall, our case highlights the potential that combining regenerative therapies can achieve in treating severe war-related and civilian traumatic injuries. PMID:28293522

  5. A Case Report of the First Nonburn-related Military Trauma Victim Treated with Spray Skin Regenerative Therapy in Combination with a Dermal Regenerate Template.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Ian L; Hammer, Daniel A; Rendon, Juan L; Latham, Kerry P; Fleming, Mark E

    2016-12-01

    Massive soft tissue and skin loss secondary to war-related traumas are among the most frequently encountered challenges in the care of wounded warriors. This case report outlines the first military nonburn-related trauma patient treated by a combination of regenerative modalities. Our case employs spray skin technology to an established dermal regenerate matrix. Our patient, a 29-year-old active duty male, suffered a combat blast trauma in 2010 while deployed. The patient's treatment course was complicated by a severe necrotizing fasciitis infection requiring over 100 surgical procedures for disease control and reconstruction. In secondary delayed reconstruction procedures, this triple-limb amputee underwent successful staged ventral hernia repair via a component separation technique with biologic mesh underlay although this resulted in a skin deficit of more than 600 cm(2). A dermal regenerate template was applied to the abdominal wound to aid in establishing a "neodermis." Three weeks after dermal regenerate application, spray skin was applied to the defect in conjunction with a 6:1 meshed split thickness skin graft. The dermal regenerate template allowed for optimization of the wound bed for skin grafting. The use of spray skin allowed for a 6:1 mesh ratio, thus minimizing the donor-site size and morbidity. Together, this approach resulted in complete healing of a large full-thickness wound. The patient is now able to perform activities of daily living, walk without a cane, and engage in various physical activities. Overall, our case highlights the potential that combining regenerative therapies can achieve in treating severe war-related and civilian traumatic injuries.

  6. A rare chemical burn due to Ranunculus arvensis: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Kocak, Abdullah O; Saritemur, Murat; Atac, Kenan; Guclu, Sibel; Ozlu, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Ranunculus arvensis, a plant that is a member of Ranunculaceae family, generally used for local treatment of joint pain, muscle pain, burns, lacerations, edema, abscess drainage, hemorrhoids, and warts among the population. In this case report, we presented three patients who developed chemical skin burns after using R. arvensis plant locally for knee pain. The destructive effect of the plant has been reported previously to be more in fresh plants and less in dried plants. Although protoanemonin, which is considered as the main toxic substance, was reported to be absent in dried or boiled plants, the plant was boiled, cooled, and wrapped over the region with pain in our cases. Therefore, we thought that protoanemonin may be considered to be heat resistant. Also, the burn management proceeded up to surgery by using the flap technique in one of our patients in contrast to the cases found in published reports who were treated by antibiotics and dressings.

  7. Thrombocytopenia induces multiple intracranial hemorrhages in patients with severe burns: A review of 16 cases

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, JIANDA; LIU, JINYAN; LUO, CHENGQUN; HU, FENG; LIU, RUI; CHEN, ZIZI; CHEN, YAO; XIONG, WU; XIE, JIANFEI; HE, QUANYONG; YIN, CHAOQI; WANG, SHAOHUA; ZHANG, YANWEN; ZENG, SAINAN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the etiology and diagnosis of multiple intracranial hemorrhages (ICHs) following severe burns, with a retrospective review of 16 cases of severe burns further complicated by multiple ICHs. Using cranial CT scans of the brains, we identified that all patients presented with low platelet counts and coagulation abnormalities prior to intracranial hemorrhaging. Following conventional treatment and various supporting treatments, five cases succumbed following a progressive reduction in blood platelet levels and the ICHs were cured in 11 cases following the restoration of normal platelet levels. We conclude that low platelet counts and coagulation abnormalities may cause multiple ICHs following severe burns and early diagnosis and treatment is the key to successful treatment. PMID:23935750

  8. Thigh burns from exploding e-cigarette lithium ion batteries: First case series.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, K J; Rose, A M; Khan, M A A; Quaba, O; Lowrie, A G

    2016-06-01

    E-cigarette (EC) use has risen meteorically over the last decade. The majority of these devices are powered by re-chargeable lithium ion batteries, which can represent a fire hazard if damaged, over-heated, over-charged or stored inappropriately. There are currently no reports in the medical literature of lithium ion battery burns related to EC use and no guidance on the appropriate management of lithium ion battery associated injuries. We report two individual cases of burn resulting from explosion of EC re-chargeable lithium ion batteries. Both patients required in-patient surgical management. We provide evidence that lithium ion battery explosions can be associated with mixed thermal and alkali chemical burns, resulting from the significant discharge of thermal energy and the dispersal of corrosive lithium ion compounds. We would recommend, as with other elemental metal exposures, caution in exposing lithium ion battery burns to water irrigation. Early and thorough cleaning and debridement of such burns, to remove residual lithium contamination, may limit the risk of burn wound extension and potentially improve outcomes.

  9. Chemical burns from assault: a review of seven cases seen in a Nigerian tertiary institution.

    PubMed

    Tahir, C; Ibrahim, B M; Terna-Yawe, E H

    2012-09-30

    Chemical burns represent a major challenge for reconstructive surgeons. They are caused by exposure to acids, alkalis or other corrosive substances which result in various degrees of injury. This report highlights the challenges faced in managing such patients in a Nigerian teaching hospital. The medical records of seven patients (four females and three males) treated for chemical burns injury from January 2001 to December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were younger than 30, with a mean age of 23.3. Most of them (85.7%) had sustained full thickness burns ranging from 8% to 33% of their body surface area. All cases were result of assaults. The male to female ratio was 1:1.3, and the average duration of hospital stay was 7.5 months. The face was affected in all patients. Patients presented with multiple deformities, like ectropion of eyelids, keratopathies, blindness, nasal deformities, microstomia, loss or deformities of the pinna, mentosternal contractures, and severe scarring of the face. Twenty-nine surgical procedures were performed, which included nasal and lip reconstruction, ectropion release, commissuroplasty, contracture release, and wound resurfacing. Management of chemical burns, especially in a developing country lacking specialised burn centres with appropriate facilities, is challenging. Prevention through public awareness campaigns, legislation for control of corrosive substances, and severe punishment for perpetrators of assaults using these substances will go a long way in reducing the incidence of chemical burns.

  10. A case of POEMS syndrome associated with essential thrombocythaemia and dermal mastocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, A.; Burton, I. E.

    1990-01-01

    We describe a case of POEMS syndrome presenting with the recognized features of polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrine abnormalities, monoclonal protein, skin changes and anasarca. The patient was found to have both a solitary sclerotic plasmacytoma of the pelvis and evidence of Castleman's disease of lymph nodes. A number of unusual and unique features are also documented. Histological examination of affected skin demonstrated changes similar to urticaria pigmentosa including local oedema and mast cell infiltration. There was marked thrombocythaemia which has been seen in only one previous case and in addition the patient developed diffuse vascular calcification in the absence of recognized aetiological factors. Radiotherapy of the pelvic lesion and chemotherapy to control the myeloproliferative disorder gave rise to significant improvement in neuropathy. Control of anasarca required steroid therapy in addition to diuretics. The significance of these observations is discussed in relation to previous reports. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2235812

  11. ISSUES IN DERMAL EXPOSURE OF INFANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Infants' dermal exposures to environmental contaminants are expected to be different and, in many cases, much higher than adults. Because of the potential importance of the dermal exposure route, there is currently a significant amount of work being conducted to reduce the uncer...

  12. An acellular dermal matrix allograft (Alloderm®) for increasing keratinized attached gingiva: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Chitra; Kumar, Baron Tarun; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2015-01-01

    Context: Adequate amount of keratinized gingiva is necessary to keep gingiva healthy and free of inflammation. Autografts have been used for years with great success to increase the width of attached gingiva. Autografts, however, have the disadvantage of increasing postoperative morbidity and improper color match with the adjacent tissues. Alloderm® allograft has been introduced as an alternative to autografts to overcome these disadvantages. Aim: In this study, the efficacy of alloderm® in increasing the width of attached gingiva and the stability of gained attached gingiva was evaluated clinically. Materials and Methods: Five patients with sites showing inadequate width of attached gingiva (≤1 mm) were enrolled for the study. The width of keratinized gingiva and other clinical parameters were recorded at baseline and 9th month postoperatively. Result: In all cases, there is the average increase of about 2.5 mm of attached gingiva and was maintained for 9-month. Percentage shrinkage of the graft is about 75% at the end of 3rd month in all cases. Excellent colors match with adjacent tissue has been obtained. Conclusion: The study signifies that Alloderm® results in an adequate increase in the amount of attached gingiva and therefore can be used successfully in place of autografts. PMID:26015676

  13. Burning-Feet Syndrome: Case Due to Malabsorption and Responding to Riboflavine

    PubMed Central

    Lai, C. S.; Ransome, G. A.

    1970-01-01

    A woman with the burning-feet syndrome was found on investigation to have malabsorption. The syndrome responded rapidly to intramuscular injections of 6 mg. of riboflavine daily. It is suggested that deficiency of this substance, due to malabsorption and aggravated by a defective diet and repeated pregnancies, was responsible for the syndrome in this case. PMID:5440597

  14. Caregiver-related predictors of thermal burn injuries among Iranian children: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Mohammadi, Reza; Ayubi, Erfan; Almasi-Hashiani, Amir; Pakzad, Reza; Sullman, Mark J. M.; Safiri, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Burns are a common and preventable cause of injury in children. The aim of this study was to investigate child and caregiver characteristics which may predict childhood burn injuries among Iranian children and to examine whether confounding exists among these predictors. Methods A hospital based case-control study was conducted using 281 burn victims and 273 hospital-based controls, which were matched by age, gender and place of residence (rural/urban). The characteristics of the children and their caregivers were analyzed using crude and adjusted models to test whether these were predictors of childhood burn injuries. Results The age of the caregiver was significantly lower for burn victims than for the controls (P<0.05). Further, the amount of time the caregiver spent outdoors with the child and their economic status had a significant positive association with the odds of a burn injury (P<0.05). A multivariate logistic regression found that Type A behaviour among caregivers was independently associated with the child's odds of suffering a burn injury (OR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.04–1.21). The research also found that children with ADHD (Inattentive subscale: Crude OR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.16–3.95, Adjusted OR = 5.65, 95% CI: 2.53–12.61; Hyperactive subscale: Crude OR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.23–2.41, Adjusted OR = 2.53, 95% CI: 1.65–3.87) also had increased odds of suffering a burn injury. However, several variables were identified as possible negative confounder variables, as the associations were stronger in the multivariate model than in the crude models. Conclusion The caregiver's characteristics which were predictors of burn injuries among Iranian children were: being younger, high socio-economic status, Type A behavioural pattern and spending more time outdoors. In addition, the relationship between a child's ADHD scores and the odds of a burn injury may be negatively confounded by the caregivers predictor variables. PMID:28151942

  15. Chronic Wounds in Burn Injury: A Case Report on Importance of Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Gallardo, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    According to the National Institutes of Health and the Center for Disease and Prevention, it is estimated that 65 to 80 percent of the human infectious are caused by biofilms. Antibiotics and drainage of purulent discharge are the main treatment measures. But in chronic infections sometimes these findings are not easy to recognize. Biofilm is an extracellular polymeric conglomeration generally composed of extracellular DNA, proteins, and polysaccharides, which help bacteria to survive into the host. The following case is the example of chronic wound in burn patient, where biofilm gets involved and special attention is given to the relationship biofilm–chronic wound injury in a burn patient. PMID:27579274

  16. Late costal osteomyelitis with a cutaneous fistula after flame burns: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, S; Bobbio, A; Mansuet-Lupo, A; Hamelin-Canny, E; Hautier, A; Nicolas, C; Alifano, M

    2016-02-01

    Chest wall defects are an unusual complication of burn injury, generally seen after high-voltage electrical burns. Here we report the case of a 57-year-old man who developed costal chondritis and osteomyelitis 23 months after flame injury, which covered 50% of the total body surface area. Management included the resection of two ribs and coverage with an omental flap, overlaid by a split-thickness skin graft during the same surgical procedure. Declaration of interest: The authors have no conflict of interest to declare.

  17. Duloxetine in the treatment of burning mouth syndrome refractory to conventional treatment: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Dong; Lee, Ji-Hye; Shim, Jee-Hoon

    2014-06-01

    Patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS) report burning sensation and pain involving the tongue and oral mucosa without any apparent medical or dental cause. The pathogenesis of this syndrome remains unclear and there is currently no standard treatment. BMS is, therefore, often misdiagnosed and its management is complex. This lack of clinical expertise may result in decreased health-related quality of life and increased psychological distress among patients with BMS. The present case report involves a 77-year-old female patient with BMS refractory to conventional treatment with nerve block and medication, who was successfully treated with duloxetine. Duloxetine may become a new therapeutic option in the management of BMS.

  18. Protrusion of the tongue in bodies burned after death: Two cases of arson to cover homicide.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Slobodan; Živković, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    In the forensic assessment of burned bodies, the question of whether the victim was exposed to fire before or after death is of crucial importance. Many authors consider tongue protrusion in cases of burned bodies to be a post-mortem phenomenon. Deep-heating effects of fire are sufficient to cook muscle. The muscle becomes shortened by dehydration and protein denaturation. Exposure to heat causes flexion of the extremities on the contraction of muscles and tendons - heat rigour. The flexors, being bulkier than the extensors, contract more and force the limbs into the position of general flexion. The genioglossus is the major muscle of the tongue and is responsible for protruding or sticking out the tongue: by means of its inferior fibres, it draws the root of the tongue forward and protrudes the apex from the mouth. Similar to the action of limb flexors exposed to heat and the appearance of post-mortem general flexion of a burned body due to heat rigour, perhaps the geniglossus could be shortened by heat, causing post-mortem tongue protrusion to appear as heat rigour of the tongue. In this paper, we present two such cases of protrusion of the tongue in bodies burned after death - cases of arson to cover homicide.

  19. Rare case-series of electrocautery burn following off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Niazi, Mojtaba; Ahmadi, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: With an increasing number of off-pump coronary artery surgery procedures in high-risk patients with coagulopathy, including renal failure, hepatic failure and anticoagulant drug-using patients, the frequency of related complications such as repeated exploration for bleeding is also increasing. The associated co-morbidity and repeated use of electrocautery in postoperative bleeding leaves patients susceptible to electrocautery ulcers. In this case series, rare cases of cautery burn with unique causative mechanisms are described. PMID:23669602

  20. Fournier's gangrene in a patient after third-degree burns: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Fournier's gangrene is characterized by tissue ischemia leading to rapidly progressing necrotizing fasciitis. Case presentation We present the case of a patient with Fournier's gangrene after third-degree burns. Clinical manifestations, laboratory results and treatment options are discussed. Conclusion Fournier's gangrene is a surgical emergency. Although it can be lethal, it is still a challenging situation in the field of surgical infections. PMID:19830156

  1. Full thickness burns caused by cyanoacrylate nail glue: A case series.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Noemi; Karagergou, Eleni; Jones, Sarah L; Morritt, Andrew N

    2016-06-01

    Artificial (acrylic) nails are popular cosmetic enhancements that provide the user with the appearance of manicured nails, do not chip or crack, and are generally considered very safe to apply. We report three cases where full thickness thermal burns were sustained from nail glue adhesive (cyanoacrylate) during the application of artificial nails. All three cases underwent surgical debridement and split skin graft reconstruction. We carried out an experiment to characterize the exothermic reaction between nail glue and cotton leggings. The average high temperature produced was 68°C which was sustained for 12.2s which is more than sufficient to cause full thickness burns on skin. We report these cases to increase both professional and public awareness of this serious potential complication associated with the application of artificial nails.

  2. [Combination of a universal antidote and temporary skin substitute for chemical burns: Extended case report].

    PubMed

    Liodaki, E; Schopp, B E; Lindert, J; Krämer, R; Kisch, T; Mailänder, P; Stang, F

    2015-09-01

    In this article we describe our experiences in the treatment of chemical burns with Diphoterine(®) solution and Suprathel(®) as a temporary skin substitute material, a treatment which in the past was not commonly used for this pattern of injuries. In the study period from October 2012 to December 2013 we treated five patients (four male and one female including two children and three adults) with chemical burns by decontamination with Diphoterine(®) and wound covering with Suprathel(®). The control group included five patients with similar injury patterns who were treated with Diphoterine(®) and occlusive wound dressings. No wound infections occurred in any of the five cases and no interactions were observed between Suprathel(®) and the chemical substance involved. In four cases the skin areas with IIa-IIb degree damage showed good wound healing and only slight scarring in the follow-up after 3 months and one of the five patients had to be treated surgically. Suprathel(®) can be used as a temporary skin substitute for the treatment of skin burns and is also available for the treatment of chemical burns.

  3. CAD tool for burn diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Acha, Begoña; Serrano, Carmen; Acha, José I; Roa, Laura M

    2003-07-01

    In this paper a new system for burn diagnosis is proposed. The aim of the system is to separate burn wounds from healthy skin, and the different types of burns (burn depths) from each other, identifying each one. The system is based on the colour and texture information, as these are the characteristics observed by physicians in order to give a diagnosis. We use a perceptually uniform colour space (L*u*v*), since Euclidean distances calculated in this space correspond to perceptually colour differences. After the burn is segmented, some colour and texture descriptors are calculated and they are the inputs to a Fuzzy-ARTMAP neural network. The neural network classifies them into three types of bums: superficial dermal, deep dermal and full thickness. Clinical effectiveness of the method was demonstrated on 62 clinical burn wound images obtained from digital colour photographs, yielding an average classification success rate of 82% compared to expert classified images.

  4. Analysis of rugae in burn victims and cadavers to simulate rugae identification in cases of incineration and decomposition.

    PubMed

    Muthusubramanian, M; Limson, K S; Julian, R

    2005-06-01

    The most challenging situations in Forensic Odonto-Stomatology are mass disasters, where the forensic dentist is usually confronted with charred human remains or heavily decomposed or fragmented bodies. This article determines the extent of preservation of palatal rugae for use as an alternative identification tool in such situations, using a study group comprising burn victims and cadavers simulating forensic cases of incineration and decomposition. The thermal effects and the decomposition changes on the palatal rugae of burn victims with panfacial third degree burns and human cadavers in storage were respectively assessed and graded on a new scale. Ninety three percent of burn victims and 77% of human cadavers had Grade 0 changes (normal). When changes were noted, they were less pronounced than the generalized body involvement of burns in burn victims and the generalized body decomposition of human cadavers.

  5. Burning mouth syndrome: a retrospective study of 140 cases in a sample of Catalan population.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Sánchez, Maria F; Jordana-Comín, Xavier; García-Sívoli, Carlos E

    2005-01-01

    The results of analyzing etiologic and clinical factors, and their connection with the burning mouth syndrome (BMS) in a sample of Catalan (Barcelona, Spain) population are presented in this work. The purpose of this study is to establish connections between BMS and the following variables: age, sex, overt depression, masked depression, cancerophobia, dry mouth, foreign body sensation in the mouth, and burning. 140 clinical cases of patients diagnosed with the disease and 140 cases of control patients are studied here. The data were statistically analyzed to study connections as well as the disease and variables frequency. The obtained results will help understanding possible connections of the studied etiologic and clinical factors with the disease, as well as the course of BMS, and its consequences in the Catalan population.

  6. Complications of chlorine inhalation in a pediatric chemical burn patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mangat, Harshdeep Singh; Stewart, Tara Lynn; Dibden, Lionel; Tredget, Edward E

    2012-01-01

    The majority of burn injuries in the pediatric population occur at home, and a significant proportion are the result of exposure to household cleaning products. A common injury-causing agent is bleach, which has the potential to release chlorine gas, a potent respiratory irritant that leads to the added risk of inhalation injury. The survival of pediatric patients with chemical burns is extremely high, and the 3 strongest predictors of mortality are large burn size, age <48 months, and the presence of inhalation injury. The authors present a rare case of a pediatric fatality from a chemical bleach burn that resulted in acute respiratory distress syndrome as well as hemodynamic and pulmonary instability that required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The authors critically appraised the management of this patient to determine the possible effect certain events had on the unexpected and poor outcome of this patient, including fluid resuscitation, the effect of the chemical inhalation injury, sedation, and the need for invasive extracorporeal membrane oxygenation life support.

  7. Forensic diagnosis of ante- and postmortem burn based on aquaporin-3 gene expression in the skin.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Hidemichi; Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Ago, Mihoko; Kanekura, Takuro; Ogata, Mamoru

    2014-05-01

    In order to diagnose death associated with fire, it is essential to show that the person was exposed to heat while still alive. We investigated both AQP1 and AQP3 expression in the skin of an experimental burn model, as well as in forensic autopsy cases, and discuss its role in the differential diagnosis of ante- and postmortem burns. In animal experiments, there was no difference in AQP1 gene expression among four groups (n=4): antemortem burn, postmortem burn, mechanical wound, and control. However, AQP3 expression in the antemortem burn was increased significantly compared with that of the other groups even at 5min after burn. Water content of the skin was decreased significantly by the burn procedure. Consistent with animal experiments, AQP3 gene expression in the skin of antemortem burn cases was increased significantly compared with postmortem burns, mechanical wounds, and controls (n=12 in each group). These observations suggest that dermal AQP3 gene expression was increased to maintain water homeostasis in response to dehydration from burn. Finally, our results suggest that AQP3 gene expression may be useful for forensic molecular diagnosis of antemortem burn.

  8. A 4-month-old baby presenting with dermal necrotizing granulomatous giant cell reaction at the injection site of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adjuvants (for example, aluminum salts) are frequently incorporated in licensed vaccines to enhance the host immune response. Such vaccines include the pneumococcal conjugate, combinations of diphtheria–tetanus/acellular pertussis, tetanus– diphtheria/acellular pertussis, hepatitis B, some Haemophilus influenzae type b, hepatitis A, and human papillomavirus. These preparations have been associated with complicated local adverse events, especially if administered subcutaneously or intradermally in comparison to deep intramuscular injection. We describe a severe inflammatory reaction at the site of an injection of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Case presentation A 4-month-old Arab baby boy developed dermal necrotizing granulomatous giant cell reaction at the injection site (right anterior thigh) of the second dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Ziehl–Neelsen and periodic-acid Schiff were negative. This reaction probably resulted from improper intramuscular administration because the first (at 2 months of age) and third (at 10 months of age) doses were uneventful. Conclusions Dermal necrotizing granulomatous reactions are a serious complication of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Health care providers need to administer this preparation deeply into a muscle mass. Completing the vaccine series is an acceptable option. Physicians are encouraged to report their experience with completing vaccine series following adverse events. PMID:25152179

  9. Beware flammable fingernails. case report: synthetic fingernails result in full thickness burn and terminalisation.

    PubMed

    Arnaout, A; Cubitt, J; Nguyen, D

    2016-06-30

    Having long artificial (acrylic) nails is a current fashion trend, and they are becoming an increasingly popular cosmetic enhancement. We believe that they can be a potential burn hazard to their unknowing users. We present the first reported case in medical literature of a woman whose acrylic nail ignited from a cigarette butt a short distance from the nail while she was taking the final puffs. She sustained a full thickness burn to her dominant left thumb, resulting in terminalisation. Acrylic nails are very flammable and, once ignited, they burn to completion, with the source of flame removed. The temperature at the end of a cigarette can reach 900oC when the smoker takes a puff, which would explain how the artificial nail in our case study ignited. The flammability hazard of artificial fingernails is apparently well known in the beautician community. There are multiple beauty websites and blogs raising awareness of the danger of synthetic nails catching fire. We feel this potential risk should be further highlighted to the public.

  10. A case report of a chemical burn due to the misuse of glacial acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jun-Ho; Roh, Si-Gyun; Lee, Nae-Ho; Yang, Kyung-Moo; Moon, Ji-Hyun

    2010-12-01

    As young and elastic skin is what everyone dreams of, various measures have been implemented including chemical, laser resurfacing and dermabrasion to improve the condition of ageing skin. However, the high cost of these procedures prevents the poor from having access to treatment. Glacial acetic acid is widely used as a substitute for chemical peeling because it is readily easily available and affordable. However, its use can result in a number of serious complications. A 28-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with deep second-degree chemical burns on her face caused by the application of a mixture of glacial acetic acid and flour for chemical peeling. During a 6-month follow-up, hypertrophic scarring developed on the both nasolabial folds despite scar management. Glacial acetic acid is a concentrated form of the organic acid, which gives vinegar its sour taste and pungent smell, and it is also an important reagent during the production of organic compounds. Unfortunately, misleading information regarding the use of glacial acetic acid for chemical peeling is causing serious chemical burns. Furthermore, there is high possibility of a poor prognosis, which includes inflammation, hypertrophic scar formation and pigmentation associated with its misuse. Therefore, we report a case of facial chemical burning, due to the misuse of glacial acetic acid, and hope that this report leads to a better understanding regarding the use of this reagent.

  11. Thoracic Duct Chylous Fistula Following Severe Electric Injury Combined with Sulfuric Acid Burns: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fei; Cheng, Dasheng; Qian, Mingyuan; Lu, Wei; Li, Huatao; Tang, Hongtai; Xia, Zhaofan

    2016-10-11

    BACKGROUND As patients with thoracic duct injuries often suffer from severe local soft tissue defects, integrated surgical treatment is needed to achieve damage repair and wound closure. However, thoracic duct chylous fistula is rare in burn patients, although it typically involves severe soft tissue damage in the neck or chest. CASE REPORT A 32-year-old male patient fell after accidentally contacting an electric current (380 V) and knocked over a barrel of sulfuric acid. The sulfuric acid continuously poured onto his left neck and chest, causing combined electrical and sulfuric acid burn injuries to his anterior and posterior torso, and various parts of his limbs (25% of his total body surface area). During treatment, chylous fistula developed in the left clavicular region, which we diagnosed as thoracic duct chylous fistula. We used diet control, intravenous nutritional support, and continuous somatostatin to reduce the chylous fistula output, and hydrophilic silver ion-containing dressings for wound coverage. A boneless muscle flap was used to seal the left clavicular cavity, and, integrated, these led to resolution of the chylous fistula. CONCLUSIONS Patients with severe electric or chemical burns in the neck or chest may be complicated with thoracic duct injuries. Although conservative treatment can control chylous fistula, wound cavity filling using a muscle flap is an effective approach for wound healing.

  12. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and chemical burns after exposure to chlorine-containing bleach: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hong-Joon; Chang, Jin-Sun; Ahn, Seong; Kim, Tae-Ok; Park, Cheol-Kyu; Lim, Jung-Hwan; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Yu-Il; Lim, Sung-Chul; Kim, Young-Chul; Kwon, Yong-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Chlorine-containing bleach can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and chemical burns. However, simultaneous occurrence of the two conditions caused by this agent is very rare. We describe the case of a 74-year-old female who presented with shortness of breath and hemoptysis following accidental exposure to chlorine-containing bleach. She had second- to third-degree chemical burns on both buttocks and thighs, and received mechanical ventilation because of the development of ARDS. Mechanical ventilation was discontinued on day 6 of hospitalization because of the rapid improvement of hypoxemia, and the patient was transferred to another hospital for further management of the chemical burns on day 18.

  13. Ingestion of white spirit resulting in perineal skin burns: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vanhoucke, Joke; Buylaert, Walter; Colpaert, Kirsten; De Paepe, Peter

    2017-03-02

    In the literature, possible systemic effects on health of inhalation or ingestion of white spirit are well described. Only a few case reports discuss the toxic skin effects that can occur following massive ingestion. Ingestion of large amounts of white spirit produces a watery diarrhoea with a high concentration of white spirit, resulting in perineal skin burns when there is prolonged contact. We describe a patient who developed partial thickness perineal skin burns after ingestion of white spirit and review the literature. The present data indicate that conservative therapy of the skin burns is recommended.

  14. Burning Tongue as Initial Presentation of Celiac Disease in an Elderly Woman: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Andrea; Zamulko, Alla

    2016-06-01

    There are few reports in the literature where celiac disease presents with tongue manifestations, although atypical presentations of celiac disease are not uncommon. This case report highlights an atypical presentation of celiac disease in an elderly female. Our patient presented to clinic with complaints of a burning tongue for the past two years as well as occasional loose stools and fatigue. Work-up revealed iron deficiency anemia, zinc deficiency and an abnormal celiac panel. Complete symptom improvement was noted by 10 weeks into the initiation of a gluten free diet. Celiac disease can present at any age and should be considered as a differential in findings of malabsorption and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  15. Frostbite at the gym: a case report of an ice pack burn.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, G; Rayatt, S

    1999-08-01

    The case is reported of a 59 year old woman who suffered a 1% total body surface area superficial partial thickness burn to her calf following the application of an ice pack. The cause, resulting injury, and subsequent management are discussed. It is possible that such injuries are common, but no similar reports were found in a literature search. Awareness of the risk of this type of injury is important for all those entrusted with advising patients on the treatment of minor soft tissue injuries.

  16. Brain hemorrhage after electrical burn injury: Case report and probable mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Axayacalt, Gutierrez Aceves Guillermo; Alejandro, Ceja Espinosa; Marcos, Rios Alanis; Inocencio, Ruiz Flores Milton; Alfredo, Herrera Gonzalez Jose

    2016-01-01

    Background: High-voltage electric injury may induce lesion in different organs. In addition to the local tissue damage, electrical injuries may lead to neurological deficits, musculoskeletal damage, and cardiovascular injury. Severe vascular damage may occur making the blood vessels involved prone to thrombosis and spontaneous rupture. Case Description: Here, we present the case of a 39-year-old male who suffered an electrical burn with high tension wire causing intracranial bleeding. He presented with an electrical burn in the parietal area (entry zone) and the left forearm (exit zone). The head tomography scan revealed an intraparenchimatous bleeding in the left parietal area. In this case, the electric way was the scalp, cranial bone, blood vessels and brain, upper limb muscle, and skin. The damage was different according to the dielectric property in each tissue. The injury was in the scalp, cerebral blood vessel, skeletal muscle, and upper limb skin. The main damage was in brain’s blood vessels because of the dielectric and geometric features that lead to bleeding, high temperature, and gas delivering. Conclusion: This is a report of a patient with an electric brain injury that can be useful to elucidate the behavior of the high voltage electrical current flow into the nervous system. PMID:27904757

  17. The clinical features of burns resulting from two aerial devices set off in a public fireworks display: 149 case reports.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaosheng; Sun, Dongjie; Zhong, Xiaochun; Liu, Maolin; Ni, Youdi

    2014-12-01

    We report the clinical features of 149 cases with aerial devices burns in a public fireworks display. The characteristic features included sudden onset, masses of terrified burn victims, small and deep wounds, mild disease conditions, and favorable prognosis. Unlike in home or illegal fireworks displays, the body areas most often involved were the extremity, chest, abdomen, and back, and most of the victims were adults in these public fireworks displays.

  18. Third-degree burns caused by ignition of chlorhexidine: A case report and systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Anthony; Bengezi, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Ignition of chlorhexidine by an electrocautery unit is rare but can have devastating consequences for the patient and the surgeon. A case involving a 77-year-old man who underwent removal of an indwelling artificial urethral sphincter is presented. The chlorhexidine was ignited when the urologist activated the electrocautery unit, causing third-degree burns to the patient. A plastic surgeon treated the burns with surgical debridement and split-thickness skin grafting. A systematic review of the literature was performed with best practice recommendations. To the authors’ knowledge, the present case is the ninth such case reported. PMID:25535466

  19. Characterization of aerosols from biomass burning--a case study from Mizoram (Northeast), India.

    PubMed

    Badarinath, K V S; Madhavi Latha, K; Kiran Chand, T R; Gupta, Prabhat K; Ghosh, A B; Jain, S L; Gera, B S; Singh, Risal; Sarkar, A K; Singh, Nahar; Parmar, R S; Koul, S; Kohli, R; Nath, Shambhu; Ojha, V K; Singh, Gurvir

    2004-01-01

    Physical and optical properties of biomass burning aerosols in Northeastern region, India analyzed based on measurements made during February 2002. Large spatial extent of Northeastern Region moist tropical to moist sub-tropical forests in India have high frequency of burning in annual dry seasons. Characterization of resultant trace gases and aerosols from biomass burning is important for the atmospheric radiative process. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) observed to be high during burning period compared to pre- and post-burning days. Peak period of biomass burning is highly correlated with measured AOD and total columnar water vapor. Size distribution of aerosols showed bimodal size distribution during burning day and unimodal size distribution during pre- and post-burning days. Size distribution retrievals from biomass burning aerosols show dominance of accumulation mode particles. Weighted mean radius is high (0.22 microm) during burning period. Columnar content of aerosols observed to be high during burning period in addition to the drastic reduction of visibility. During the burning day Anderson sampler measurements showed dominance of accumulation mode particles. The diurnal averaged values of surface shortwave aerosol radiative forcing af biomass burning aerosols varies from -59 to -87 Wm(-2) on different days. Measured and modeled solar irradiances are also discussed in the paper.

  20. Review of epinephrine solution use in 400 consecutive cases of burn reconstruction. Are infusion pumps safe?

    PubMed

    Maguiña, Pirko; Velez, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Infiltration of diluted epinephrine solutions is often used in reconstructive surgery to produce local vasoconstriction and minimize bleeding. A total of 400 burn reconstruction procedures were performed with the aid of epinephrine solution between July 2008 and July 2011. We used to consider this practice very safe, but after encountering several complications, we decided to perform a retrospective review to look at all complications in detail and identify opportunities to improve safety. We encountered nine complications including one case of flash pulmonary edema and one patient with acute carpal tunnel syndrome. All severe complications were seen when the epinephrine solution was infiltrated with the aid of an electric infusion pump. Infusion pumps do not allow for reliable control of the amount of infiltration of epinephrine solutions. We conclude that infusion pumps may unnecessarily increase the risk for complications. This has resulted in a change in our practice. We now use infusion pumps only in selected cases.

  1. Reconstruction of an Anterior Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Defect Using a Biodegradable Polyurethane Dermal Substitute

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, Marcus JD; Caplash, Yugesh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Although we have previously described the use of a novel polyurethane biodegradable dermal substitute in the reconstruction of 20 free flap donor sites, and extensive cutaneous defects, including a large area of exposed calvarium secondary to burn injury, our experience with this material now extends to 35 free flap donor site reconstructions and 13 major or complex burns. Methods: The polyurethane material (NovoSorb BTM; PolyNovo Biomaterials Pty Ltd, Port Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) was recently employed in another complex wound scenario, implanted into a large anterior cervical cutaneous and soft-tissue defect remaining after serial radical debridement for necrotizing fasciitis. Results: Implantation, integration, delamination, and split-skin graft application proceeded without complication, mirroring our previous experience in other wounds (including major burns). The result was a robust, supple, mobile, and well-contoured reconstruction over the deep tissues of the neck. The functional and cosmetic outcomes exceeded all expectation. Discussion: The wound environment created after necrotizing fasciitis infection and debridement is austere. In this particular case, reconstructive options were limited to large free flap repair, skin graft alone, and skin graft augmented by commercially available collagen/glycosaminoglycan dermal matrix. Each option was discarded for various reasons. Our previous success with NovoSorb BTM, developed at our center, prompted its use following regulatory approval. The patient was physiologically stronger after the temporization afforded by the biodegradable temporizing matrix over 4 weeks of integration. Conclusion: This is the first description of the successful use of an entirely synthetic biodegradable dermal substitute for the reconstruction of both necrotizing fasciitis and an anterior cervical defect. PMID:28197297

  2. Reconstruction of an Anterior Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Defect Using a Biodegradable Polyurethane Dermal Substitute.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Marcus Jd; Caplash, Yugesh; Greenwood, John E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Although we have previously described the use of a novel polyurethane biodegradable dermal substitute in the reconstruction of 20 free flap donor sites, and extensive cutaneous defects, including a large area of exposed calvarium secondary to burn injury, our experience with this material now extends to 35 free flap donor site reconstructions and 13 major or complex burns. Methods: The polyurethane material (NovoSorb BTM; PolyNovo Biomaterials Pty Ltd, Port Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) was recently employed in another complex wound scenario, implanted into a large anterior cervical cutaneous and soft-tissue defect remaining after serial radical debridement for necrotizing fasciitis. Results: Implantation, integration, delamination, and split-skin graft application proceeded without complication, mirroring our previous experience in other wounds (including major burns). The result was a robust, supple, mobile, and well-contoured reconstruction over the deep tissues of the neck. The functional and cosmetic outcomes exceeded all expectation. Discussion: The wound environment created after necrotizing fasciitis infection and debridement is austere. In this particular case, reconstructive options were limited to large free flap repair, skin graft alone, and skin graft augmented by commercially available collagen/glycosaminoglycan dermal matrix. Each option was discarded for various reasons. Our previous success with NovoSorb BTM, developed at our center, prompted its use following regulatory approval. The patient was physiologically stronger after the temporization afforded by the biodegradable temporizing matrix over 4 weeks of integration. Conclusion: This is the first description of the successful use of an entirely synthetic biodegradable dermal substitute for the reconstruction of both necrotizing fasciitis and an anterior cervical defect.

  3. Ability of transplanted cultured epithelium to respond to dermal papillae.

    PubMed

    Xing, L; Kobayashi, K

    2001-10-01

    Cultured epithelium has been used successfully in the treatment of extensive burns. Regenerated epidermis, however, lacks such as hair follicles and sweat glands that are common in mammalian skin. We attempted to determine whether cultured epithelium could be induced to form hair follicles by dermal papillae, which are most important for the morphogenesis and growth of hair follicles. We cultivated adult rat sole keratinocytes, obtained the cultured epithelium, and prepared recombinants consisting of cultured epithelium and fresh dermal papillae with or without the sole dermis. These recombinants were then transplanted underneath the dermis of the dorsal skin of syngeneic rats or athymic mice. Histologic examination revealed that the transplanted cultured epithelium formed the follicular structures with sebaceous gland-like structure following induction of the dermal papillae, especially when supported by the dermis. We concluded that transplanted cultured epithelium of adult rat sole keratinocytes can respond to growth signals from adult dermal papillae.

  4. Cutaneous and post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania infantum in endemic areas of visceral leishmaniasis, northwestern Iran 2002–2011: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Badirzadeh, Alireza; Mohebali, Mehdi; Ghasemian, Mehrdad; Amini, Hassan; Zarei, Zabiholah; Akhoundi, Behnaz; Hajjaran, Homa; Emdadi, Dariush; Molaei, Soheila; Kusha, Ahmad; Alizadeh, Saber

    2013-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is endemic in Northwest and southern Iran. Reports of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Northwest areas are rare, and its etiological agents are unknown. In the current study, we report six CL and two post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) cases caused by Leishmania infantum from endemic areas of VL in the Northwest. Smears were made from skin lesions of 30 suspected patients in 2002–2011, and CL was determined by microscopy or culture. Leishmania spp. were identified by nested-PCR assay. The disease was confirmed in 20 out of 30 (66%) suspected patients by parasitological examinations. L. infantum was identified in eight and Leishmania major in 12 CL cases by nested-PCR. Cutaneous leishmaniasis patients infected with L. major had the history of travel to CL endemic areas. L. infantum antibodies were detected by direct agglutination test (DAT) at titers of 1:3200 in two cases with history of VL. Results of this study indicated that L. infantum is a causative agent of CL as well as PKDL in the VL endemic areas. PMID:23816511

  5. Collagen-chitosan scaffold - Lauric acid plasticizer for skin tissue engineering on burn cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiyanti, Prihartini; Setyadi, Ewing Dian; Rudyardjo, Djony Izak

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence of burns in the world is more than 800 cases per one million people each year and this is the second highest cause of death due to trauma after traffic accident. Many studies are turning to skin substitute methods of tissue engineering. The purpose of this study is to determine the composition of the collagen, chitosan, and lauric acid scaffold, as well as knowing the results of the characterization of the scaffold. The synthesis of chitosan collagen lauric acid scaffold as a skin tissue was engineered using freeze dried method. Results from making of collagen chitosan lauric acid scaffold was characterized physically, biologically and mechanically by SEM, cytotoxicity, biodegradation, and tensile strength. From the morphology test, the result obtained is that pore diameter size ranges from 94.11 to 140.1 µm for samples A,B,C,D, which are in the range of normal pore size 63-150 µm, while sample E has value below the standard which is about 37.87 to 47.36 µm. From cytotoxicity assay, the result obtained is the percentage value of living cells between 20.11 to 21.51%. This value is below 50% the standard value of living cells. Incompatibility is made possible because of human error mainly the replication of washing process over the standard. Degradation testing obtained values of 19.44% - 40% by weight which are degraded during the 7 days of observation. Tensile test results obtained a range of values of 0.192 - 3.53 MPa. Only sample A (3.53 MPa) and B (1.935 MPa) meet the standard values of skin tissue scaffold that is 1-24 MPa. Based on the results of the characteristics of this study, composite chitosan collagen scaffold with lauric acid plasticizer has a potential candidate for skin tissue engineering for skin burns cases.

  6. Somatosensory Rehabilitation for Neuropathic Pain in Burn Survivors: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Calva, Valerie; Chouinard, Annick; Couture, Marie-Andrée; Godbout, Elisabeth; de Oliveira, Ana; LaSalle, Léo

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is an enormous rehabilitation challenge that has a substantial negative effect on patient function and quality of life. Somatosensory rehabilitation is a novel, nonpharmacological intervention described by Spicher based on the neuroplasticity of the somatosensory system. The rationale for somatosensory rehabilitation is that treating hypoesthesia will decrease neuropathic pain. Particularly for those with established neuropathic pain, the hypoesthesia may be masked by mechanical allodynia, which must be treated before treating the underlying hyposensitive zone. This case series describes the outcome of 17 burn survivors treated with somatosensory rehabilitation for their neuropathic pain. Before initiating treatment a modified version of the McGill Pain Questionnaire-short form (Questionnaire de la douleur St. Antoine, QDSA) was completed with the patients. The total score (×/64) was converted to percentage. The mechanical allodynia was assessed with the Rainbow Pain Scale that uses touch with the 15-g Semmes Weinstein Monofilaments (SWMs) and that was rated as painful on the visual analog scale (3/10 or resting pain + 1/10), as the criteria for mechanical allodynia. The severity level was assessed using seven predetermined SWMs to identify the smallest that elicited pain. The treatment consisted of avoiding all touch in the allodynic zone while concurrently providing proximal sensory and vibratory counter stimulation. Once the mechanical allodynia was eliminated, the underlying hypoesthesia was treated. Hypoesthesia was evaluated with the SWMs, and the percent improvement from baseline was calculated. The sensory reeducation treatment for hypoesthesia consisted of touch discrimination, texture perception, and vibratory stimulation. Seventeen patients (71/29% male/female, 21 ± 25% TBSA burned, 486 ± 596 days postburn) were evaluated and treated. Of these 15 initially presented with mechanical allodynia. The SWM scores had improved by 27 ± 21

  7. The use of the artificial dermis (Integra) in combination with vacuum assisted closure for reconstruction of an extensive burn scar--a case report.

    PubMed

    Leffler, M; Horch, R E; Dragu, A; Bach, A D

    2010-01-01

    The artificial dermis Integra (Ethicon, Johnson & Johnson Medical, Norderstedt, Germany) is widely used in the treatment of excessive burn injuries. It is also used in reconstructive surgery when large soft-tissue defects could not be covered with local or free flaps. In this article a 25-year old patient who presented with an early childhood burn of the trunk and lower extremity was treated with Integra in combination with the vacuum assisted closure (V.A.C., KCI, Texas, U.S.A.) and split thickness skin grafting. The combination of the artificial dermal substitute with negative pressure therapy has lead to a complete healing of Integra and the skin graft. During the whole treatment sterile wound conditions were present and time-consuming dressing changes could be prevented. Hospital stay was shortened because the patient could be treated as an outpatient with an ambulant vacuum assisted closure device.

  8. [Cerebellar abscesses secondary to infection of an occipital dermal sinus].

    PubMed

    García Galera, A; Martínez León, M I; Pérez da Rosa, S; Ros López, B

    2013-09-01

    A dermal sinus is a congenital defect arising from a closure failure of the neural tube that results in different degrees of communication between the skin and the central nervous system. A dermal sinus can occur anywhere from the root of the nose to the conus medullaris, and the occipital location is the second most common. Dermal sinuses are often found in association with dermoid or epidermoid cysts and less frequently with teratomas. Patients with an occipital dermoid cyst associated with a dermal sinus can develop meningitis and/or abscesses as the first clinical manifestation of the disease due to the dermoid cyst itself becoming abscessed or to the formation of secondary abscesses; few cases of the formation of secondary abscesses have been reported. We present a case of a dermoid cyst associated with an infected dermal sinus and posterior development of cerebellar abscesses and hydrocephalus.

  9. [Air bags and eye injuries: chemical burns and major traumatic ocular lesions--a case study].

    PubMed

    Bendeddouche, K; Assaf, E; Emadisson, H; Forestier, F; Salvanet-Bouccara, A

    2003-10-01

    The authors report a case of bilateral eye lesions with extended visual sequelae after the inflation of a driver's airbag during a head-on collision. The superficial facial lesions were accompanied by bilateral eye lesions, reaching both the anterior and posterior segments. Bilateral periorbital palpebral hematomas; voluminous bipalpebral edema combined with severe -conjunctival edema, corneal erosions, and edema; bilateral hyphema; pupillary changes with multiple iris sphincter breaks and weak pupillary light reflex only on the right eye; retrocession of the iridocorneal angle; and on fundus examination both retinas had posterior and peripheral hemorrhages and Berlin retinal edema. Five years after the trauma and 4 years after posttraumatic surgery for cataract that had progressively appeared on the left eye, the visual acuity is 25/20 in both eyes notwithstanding a small paracentral scotoma related to a break in the Bruch membrane. A review of the literature shows several types of ophthalmological lesions related to the airbag mechanism, which after combustion of an alkaline powder inflates at a very high speed, resulting in a risk of corneal-conjunctive-palpebral alkaline burns added to an eye contusion, which may be responsible for severe lesions. The American studies distinguish three factors affecting the seriousness of these airbag accidents: (a) wearing glasses, (b) position and size of the driver, and (c) inflation force of the airbag. Wearing a seatbelt is mandatory to minimize the violence of the oculofacial impact. After facial trauma from an airbag, an ophthalmological examination is necessary to assess of the chemical burns of the tissues exposed to the alkaline powder and possible major ocular lesions.

  10. Electric heating pad burns.

    PubMed

    Bill, T J; Edlich, R F; Himel, H N

    1994-01-01

    Patients with sensory deficits are especially prone to heating pad burns. Two cases are reported of patients with anesthetic skin who received partial and full-thickness burns of their feet from an electric heating pad. These burn injuries could have been prevented if the patients understood the potential hazard of heating pads.

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and chemical burns after exposure to chlorine-containing bleach: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hong-Joon; Chang, Jin-Sun; Ahn, Seong; Kim, Tae-Ok; Park, Cheol-Kyu; Lim, Jung-Hwan; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Yu-Il; Lim, Sung-Chul; Kim, Young-Chul

    2017-01-01

    Chlorine-containing bleach can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and chemical burns. However, simultaneous occurrence of the two conditions caused by this agent is very rare. We describe the case of a 74-year-old female who presented with shortness of breath and hemoptysis following accidental exposure to chlorine-containing bleach. She had second- to third-degree chemical burns on both buttocks and thighs, and received mechanical ventilation because of the development of ARDS. Mechanical ventilation was discontinued on day 6 of hospitalization because of the rapid improvement of hypoxemia, and the patient was transferred to another hospital for further management of the chemical burns on day 18. PMID:28203432

  12. Treatment of an acute deep hand burn in a lowincome country with no available microsurgery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Amouzou, K.S.; El Harti, A.; Kouevi-Koko, T.E.; Abalo, A.; Dossim, A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Deep hand burns usually lead to joint and tendon exposure. A simple skin graft is insufficient to achieve healing. Soft tissue reconstruction represents a surgical challenge that ranges from the simplest to the most complex flaps. In some areas, microsurgery is not technically possible. Choice is then limited to pedicled distant flaps such as the abdominal wall flap-graft. We report a case of an acute burned hand with exposure of metacarpophalangeal joints from the second to the fourth radius as well as proximal inter phalangeal joints from the second to the fifth radius and extensor tendons, treated in the burns and wound care unit of the Sylvanus Olympio Teaching Hospital in Lomé. The dorsum hand and fingers were covered with a pedicled abdominal flap-graft that was severed in two stages at 22 and 29 days. We achieved good results (sensitivity S3+, useful aesthetic hand) at two-year follow up. PMID:28149255

  13. A case of chemical scalp burns after hair highlights: experimental evidence of oxidative injuries.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Roberta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Pendolino, Flavio; Facchin, Giangiacomo; Snenghi, Rossella

    2016-12-01

    Hair highlights are quite common procedures carried out in hair salons by using a mixture of a lightening powder containing persulfates with a suspension containing hydrogen peroxide: a representative case of chemical scalp burns is described as a consequence of this treatment. The aim of the paper is to demonstrate the strict relationship between the scalp damage and the commercial products used in a case of hair highlighting. The results of some chemical analyses have been reported, showing, in particular, that the chemical reactivity of the mixture changes in the time, thus strongly suggesting that the procedure for the application of the mixture is critical for the occurrence of possible accidents. The presence in the powder of chemical compounds bearing aliphatic chains as surfactants explains the appearance of dramatic symptoms after days due to a slow dissolution of the oxidant compounds in the stratum corneum of skin with no effect in reducing injury of palliative treatments. Safety suggestions and recommendations for producers and workers are also included.

  14. Dermal exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Schneider, T; Cherrie, J W; Vermeulen, R; Kromhout, H

    2000-10-01

    Assessing dermal exposure is a complex task. Even the most commonly used methods face fundamental problems and there are large gaps in the documentation and validation of sampling methods. Still larger uncertainties exist regarding strategies for measurement. We propose a strategy based on a conceptual model and which draws on the considerable insight gained for airborne contaminants, including EN 689 for assessing exposure by inhalation. The vast amount of air sampling data has provided good insight into the statistical properties of short-term and long-term exposure levels, which is essential for designing cost-effective exposure studies. For surface and skin contaminants an understanding of the distribution types and parameter values is only beginning to emerge. Transport rates away from the skin contaminant layer determine the 'memory' of a dermal sample and measurement principles are proposed depending on these rates. It is argued that uptake is the ultimate dermal exposure metric for risk assessment and should be the basis for devising dermal occupational exposure limits.

  15. Dermal schwannoma (neurilemmoma): a peculiar foreign body reaction?

    PubMed

    Kneitz, Hermann; Weyandt, Gerhard; Meissner, Christoph; Gebhart, Edith; Bröcker, Eva B

    2010-06-01

    Schwannoma is usually a subcutaneous benign neoplasm that derives from nerve sheath. Pain and neurologic symptoms are uncommon, and exclusively dermal tumors are very rare. Solitary schwannoma has a traumatic origin in some cases, and rarely occur as a part of neurofibromatosis or schwannomatosis. An association of deeply located schwannoma with foreign material has been reported in very few cases. To our knowledge, we present the first case of a painful dermal schwannoma in association to foreign material.

  16. Morbidity and mortality in respiratory burns--a prospective study of 240 cases.

    PubMed

    Leung, C M; Lee, S T

    1992-09-01

    A prospective study of 240 consecutive admissions with respiratory burns over an eight-year period beginning 1982 was carried out at the National Burns Centre, Singapore General Hospital. Diagnosis of respiratory burns was based on clinical criteria and a clinical score was then computed to grade the severity. Investigations included chest x-rays, blood gases, carboxyhaemoglobin level, lung scan and fibreoptic bronchoscopy. Treatment was carried out according to a standard protocol where a policy of early intervention in the form of endotracheal intubation was emphasised. Other respiratory support measures were chest physiotherapy, tracheobronchial suction, mucolytics and bronchoscopic lavage where indicated. We found that respiratory burns was a significant cause of mortality in burns patients. The influence on mortality was most marked in patients with large body surface area burns of more than 40%. Age was also an important determinant of survival with patients older than 50 years faring significantly worse. The routine steroids and prophylactic antibiotics did not influence the survival rate. Carbon monoxide poisoning was not a significant cause of mortality. We achieved an overall mortality rate of 18.3%, with 44 deaths out of 240 patients. The main causes of deaths at post-mortem were bronchopneumonia, septicaemia and extensive burns.

  17. Retinal burns caused by exposure to MIG-welding arcs: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Brittain, G P

    1988-08-01

    A new generation of arc welder has recently become widely available at a price which is within reach of most amateurs and part-time mechanics, known as the MIG welder (metal-arc inert gas welder). In MIG welding the arc is ensheathed in a stream of inert gas which prevents the molten metal from oxidising. The stream of gas changes the character of the emitted radiation, and it is possible that this type of welder poses a greater threat to sight than previously recognised. Radiation in the ultraviolet range emitted by arc welders is absorbed by the unprotected cornea and lens, giving rise to a keratoconjunctivitis, or 'arc-eye,' which, though intensely painful, is not considered a threat to sight. Radiation in the visible and near infrared spectrum, however, penetrates the eye to be absorbed by the retina and may cause thermal or photochemical damage which may be permanent and sight-threatening. Retinal injuries resulting from exposure to ordinary electric welding arcs have been reported, but such injuries are uncommon. Two cases of retinal burns resulting from exposure to MIG welder emissions which presented on consecutive days to the Leicester Royal Infirmary are presented. This is the first report of such injuries relating specifically to MIG welding.

  18. Epidemiology and outcome analysis of hand burns: A 5-year retrospective review of 378 cases in a burn center in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kang-an; Sun, Yu; Wu, Guo-sheng; Wang, Yi-ru; Xia, Zhao-fan

    2015-11-01

    Hands are frequent sites of burn but few related studies were reported in China. The aim of this study was to examine the impacts of gender, age, seasons, place, etiology, total body surface area (TBSA), depth, infection and comorbidities on prognosis following injury in a cohort of hand burn inpatients. This is a retrospective study of total 378 inpatients admitted to the burn center of Changhai hospital from January 2009 to December 2013. The present research showed the male inpatients were predominant and most of the inpatients aged from 20 to 49. Flame (37.04%) and electricity (25.40%) were the major causes of hand burns. Hand burns happened more commonly in work place (60.85%). The study preliminarily pointed out that male, flame and depth were the most significant factors impacting surgery. The main factors relevant to amputation were identified including the electrical burns and other etiology of burns. In addition, depth of hand burns was proved to have a higher impact on length of hospital stay (LOS) than other factors. The results of this study not only provide the necessary information of hand burns in Eastern China but also give the suggestions for the prevention of hand burns.

  19. A Dermal Piercing Complicated by Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed

    Patel, Trisha; Scroggins-Markle, Leslie; Kelly, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Background. Dermal piercings have recently become a fashion symbol. Common complications include hypertrophic scarring, rejection, local infection, contact allergy, and traumatic tearing. We report a rare case of Mycobacterium fortuitum following a dermal piercing and discuss its medical implications and treatments. Case. A previously healthy 19-year-old woman presented complaining of erythema and edema at the site of a dermal piercing on the right fourth dorsal finger. She was treated with a 10-day course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and one course of cephalexin by her primary care physician with incomplete resolution. The patient stated that she had been swimming at a local water park daily. A punch biopsy around the dermal stud was performed, and cultures with sensitivities revealed Mycobacterium fortuitum. The patient was treated with clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin for two months receiving full resolution. Discussion. Mycobacterium fortuitum is an infrequent human pathogen. This organism is a Runyon group IV, rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria, often found in water,soil, and dust. Treatment options vary due to the size of the lesion. Small lesions are typically excised, while larger lesions require treatment for 2-6 months with antibiotics. We recommend a high level of suspicion for atypical mycobacterial infections in a piercing resistant to other therapies.

  20. Defining dermal adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Driskell, Ryan R; Jahoda, Colin A B; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Watt, Fiona M; Horsley, Valerie

    2014-09-01

    Here, we explore the evolution and development of skin-associated adipose tissue with the goal of establishing nomenclature for this tissue. Underlying the reticular dermis, a thick layer of adipocytes exists that encases mature hair follicles in rodents and humans. The association of lipid-filled cells with the skin is found in many invertebrate and vertebrate species. Historically, this layer of adipocytes has been termed subcutaneous adipose, hypodermis and subcutis. Recent data have revealed a common precursor for dermal fibroblasts and intradermal adipocytes during development. Furthermore, the development of adipocytes in the skin is independent from that of subcutaneous adipose tissue development. Finally, the role of adipocytes has been shown to be relevant for epidermal homoeostasis during hair follicle regeneration and wound healing. Thus, we propose a refined nomenclature for the cells and adipose tissue underlying the reticular dermis as intradermal adipocytes and dermal white adipose tissue, respectively.

  1. Mitral valve repair via right thoracotomy for multidrug resistant pseudomonal endocarditis in a burn patient: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mohebali, Jahan; Ibrahim, Amir E; MacGillivray, Thomas E; Goverman, Jeremy; Fagan, Shawn P

    2015-05-01

    Diagnosis and management of infectious endocarditis are particularly challenging in patients with severe burns. Cases requiring operative intervention are likely to have higher complication rates as a result of poor wound healing, recurrent bacteremia secondary to burn wound manipulation, and sequelae of anticoagulation in patients who require repeated reconstructive and cosmetic procedures. Few case reports exist describing mitral valve replacement for infectious endocarditis in burn patients. In this article, we review the literature to describe and address these challenges, and present what we believe to be the first case of mitral valve repair for infectious endocarditis in a thermally injured patient.

  2. Species Typing in Dermal Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Dujardin, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Leishmania is an infectious protozoan parasite related to African and American trypanosomes. All Leishmania species that are pathogenic to humans can cause dermal disease. When one is confronted with cutaneous leishmaniasis, identification of the causative species is relevant in both clinical and epidemiological studies, case management, and control. This review gives an overview of the currently existing and most used assays for species discrimination, with a critical appraisal of the limitations of each technique. The consensus taxonomy for the genus is outlined, including debatable species designations. Finally, a numerical literature analysis is presented that describes which methods are most used in various countries and regions in the world, and for which purposes. PMID:25672782

  3. Phototherapy on the Treatment of Burning Mouth Syndrome: A Prospective Analysis of 20 Cases.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Lúcia de Fátima C; de Andrade, Samantha C; Nogueira, Gessé E C; Leão, Jair C; de Freitas, Patrícia M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report the effect of laser phototherapy (LPT) on the treatment of burning mouth syndrome (BMS). This prospective clinical study reports on preliminary outcomes of twenty volunteers diagnosed with BMS who have undergone the conventional treatment prior to laser phototherapy. LPT consisted of weekly sessions of LPT (660 nm), for a period of 10 weeks. The laser protocol consisted of the following parameters: 40 mW, 10 J cm(2) and 0.4 J per point, irradiation time of 10 s. In all sessions, the burning intensity was evaluated with a 10 cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The burning intensity evaluation by VAS was performed immediately before and after each LPT session. Nonparametric test of Wilcoxon was used for statistical analysis, considering a significance level of 5%. All volunteers reported reduced burning intensity in all sessions when compared to the previous one and reduction in VAS scores by up to 49% in the last clinical session when compared to the first session. When only the VAS baseline of the first session was compared with the consecutive sessions, there was a statistically significant reduction in VAS scores in almost all sessions. The LPT may be an alternative treatment for the relief of oral burning symptoms in patients with BMS.

  4. Flexible Dermal Armor in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wen; Chen, Irene H.; Mckittrick, Joanna; Meyers, Marc A.

    2012-04-01

    Many animals possess dermal armor, which acts primarily as protection against predators. We illustrate this through examples from both our research and the literature: alligator, fish (alligator gar, arapaima, and Senegal bichir), armadillo, leatherback turtle, and a lizard, the Gila monster. The dermal armor in these animals is flexible and has a hierarchical structure with collagen fibers joining mineralized units (scales, tiles, or plates). This combination significantly increases the strength and flexibility in comparison with a simple monolithic mineral composite or rigid dermal armor. This dermal armor is being studied for future bioinspired armor applications providing increased mobility.

  5. [Previously expanded full-thickness skin grafts. Technical principles. Indications in the repair of sequelae of burns. Apropos of 22 cases].

    PubMed

    Foyatier, J L; Gounot, N; Comparin, J P; Delay, E; Masson, C L; Latarjet, J

    1995-06-01

    Burns raise difficult repair problems. Previously expanded full-thickness skin grafts represent a good solution in many situations. Based on their experience of 22 cases, the authors present a review of the various indications for this technique.

  6. Biomass Burning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-07-27

    Projects:  Biomass Burning Definition/Description:  Biomass Burning: This data set represents the geographical and temporal distribution of total amount of biomass burned. These data may be used in general circulation models (GCMs) and ...

  7. Burn Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Programs - Fire and Burn Prevention - - Fire Safe Kids - - Senior Smoke Alarm Program - - National Scald Campaign - - Community Services - Burn Survivor Support - - Camp Beyond the Scars - - Retreats - - Burn Survivor & Caregiver Support Groups - - Scholarship Program - - Emergency Needs & Special Assistance Fund - - Red ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: focal dermal hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions focal dermal hypoplasia focal dermal hypoplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Focal dermal hypoplasia is a genetic disorder that primarily affects the ...

  9. Burn injuries caused by a hair-dryer--an unusual case of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Darok, M; Reischle, S

    2001-01-01

    About 1.4-26% burn injuries in children appear to be abusive in origin. A 2.5-year-old girl was referred to our institute because of suspected child abuse. Clinical examination and later interrogation of the mother revealed non-recent deep second degree burn injuries on both gluteal regions, caused by the partner of the mother by pressing a hand-held hair-dryer against the skin. The authors present the findings of this unusual method of child abuse.

  10. Too hot to trot (barefoot)… A study of burns in children caused by sun heated surfaces in Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Asquith, Catherine; Kimble, Roy; Stockton, Kellie

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify and describe the characteristics of burns in children caused by sun heated surfaces. Children presenting between January 2013 and February 2014 with a burn due to sun heated surfaces were included in the study. Fifteen children were identified representing 1.7% of new burns. The mean age was 18.3 months. All burns occurred during the warmer months between 11a.m. and 4p.m. and the feet were commonly involved. Most cases occurred in the child's home garden but six cases occurred in public play areas. Metal was the most common surface involved. Most burns were superficial partial thickness with two burns deep dermal partial thickness and one child needed a skin graft. Burns due to sun heated surfaces are relatively frequent. Parents need to be aware that in summer surfaces can become hot enough to cause burns to bare feet in young children. Play areas need to be shaded or covered in surfaces that do not become hot enough to cause burns and metal objects should not be left in the sun in children's play areas.

  11. Health risk assessment related to dermal exposure of chlorpyrifos: a case study of rice growing farmers in Nakhon Nayok Province, Central Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lappharat, Sattamat; Siriwong, Wattasit; Taneepanichskul, Nutta; Borjan, Marija; Maldonado Perez, Héctor; Robson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    To date, pesticides, especially organophosphate pesticide such as chlorpyrifos, have been frequently applied to paddy fields over time to maintain product quality, protect agricultural crops from various pests, and increase yield. This study evaluates dermal exposure to chlorpyrifos in rice farmers along with providing a health risk assessment. Thirty-five rice farmers participated and completed an in-person interview, and patch technique was used to evaluate dermal exposure to chlorpyrifos. The chlorpyrifos residue was extracted from the gauze patches and quantified by gas chromatography equipped with flame photometric detector (GC-FPD). The results showed that chlorpyrifos concentrations were greater in males (526.34 ± 478.84 mg/kg) than females (500.75 ± 595.15 mg/kg). Average daily dose sampled from seven points on male and female farmers were 31.72 × 10(-4), 193.32 × 10(-4), 5.38 × 10(-4), 190.48 × 10(-4), 170.47 × 10(-4), 465.91 × 10(-4), and 43.04 × 10(-4) mg/kg-day. The hazard quotient (HQ) at the mean and 95th percentile level was found to be greater than acceptable (HQ > 1). Rice-growing farmers in this area may be at risk for adverse health effects due to continuous dermal exposure to chlorpyrifos from their improper use of personal protective equipment (PPE).

  12. [The pain from burns].

    PubMed

    Latarjet, J

    2002-03-01

    The painful events associated with the treatment of a severe burn can, because of their long-lasting and repetitive characteristics, be one of the most excruciating experiences in clinical practice. Moreover, burn pain has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Although nociception and peripheral hyperalgesia are considered the major causes of burn pain, the study of more hypothetical mechanisms like central hyperalgesia and neuropathic pain may lead to a better understanding of burn pain symptoms and to new therapeutic approaches. Continuous pain and intermittent pain due to therapeutic procedures are two distinct components of burn pain. They have to be evaluated and managed separately. Although continuous pain is by far less severe than intermittent pain, the treatment is, in both cases, essentially pharmacological relying basically on opioids. Because of wide intra- and inter-individual variations, protocols will have to leave large possibilities of adaptation for each case, systematic pain evaluation being mandatory to achieve the best risk/benefit ratio. Surprisingly, the dose of medication decreases only slowly with time, a burn often remaining painful for long periods after healing. Non pharmacological treatments are often useful and sometimes indispensable adjuncts; but their rationale and their feasibility depends entirely on previous optimal pharmacological control of burn pain. Several recent studies show that burn pain management is inadequate in most burn centres.

  13. Optical characterization of continental and biomass-burning aerosols over Bozeman, Montana: A case study of the aerosol direct effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, Amin R.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Reagan, John A.; Carlsten, John L.

    2011-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosol optical properties were observed from 21 to 27 September 2009 over Bozeman, Montana, during a transitional period in which background polluted rural continental aerosols and well-aged biomass-burning aerosols were the dominant aerosol types of extremely fresh biomass-burning aerosols resulting from forest fires burning in the northwestern United States and Canada. Aerosol optical properties and relative humidity profiles were retrieved using an eye-safe micropulse water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) (MP-DIAL), a single-channel backscatter lidar, a CIMEL solar radiometer as part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), a ground-based integrating nephelometer, and aerosol products from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra and Aqua. Aerosol optical depths (AODs) measured during the case study ranged between 0.03 and 0.17 (0.015 and 0.075) at 532 nm (830 nm) as episodic combinations of fresh and aged biomass-burning aerosols dominated the optical depth of the pristinely clean background air. Here, a pristinely clean background refers to very low AOD conditions, not that the aerosol scattering and absorption properties are necessarily representative of a clean aerosol type. Diurnal variability in the aerosol extinction to backscatter ratio (Sa) of the background atmosphere derived from the two lidars, which ranged between 55 and 95 sr (50 and 90 sr) at 532 nm (830 nm), showed good agreement with retrievals from AERONET sun and sky measurements over the same time period but were consistently higher than some aerosol models had predicted. Sa measured during the episodic smoke events ranged on average from 60 to 80 sr (50 to 70 sr) at 532 nm (830 nm) while the very fresh biomass-burning aerosols were shown to exhibit significantly lower Sa ranging between 20 and 40 sr. The shortwave direct radiative forcing that was due to the intrusion of biomass-burning aerosols was calculated to be on average -10 W/m2 and was

  14. Engineered alternative skin for partial and full-thickness burns

    PubMed Central

    Wessels, Quenton

    2014-01-01

    Engineered alternative skin in all its forms and shapes serve to provide temporary or permanent wound closure such as in the case of partial and full-thickness burns. The need for collagen-based regeneration templates is motivated by the fact that dermal regeneration of full-thickness injuries does not occur spontaneously and is inundated by contraction and scarring. Partial-thickness burns in turn can regress as a result of infection and improper treatment and require appropriate treatment. Nylon-silicone laminates such as Biobrane®, and more recently AWBAT®, address this by serving as a temporary barrier. Enhanced collagen-based scaffolds today, although not perfect, remain invaluable. Our initial approach was to characterize the design considerations and explore the use of collagen in the fabrication of a dermal regeneration matrix and a silicone-nylon bilaminate. Here we expand our initial research on scaffold fabrication and explore possible strategies to improve the outcome of collagen-scaffold medicated wound healing. PMID:24651001

  15. Engineered alternative skin for partial and full-thickness burns.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Quenton

    2014-01-01

    Engineered alternative skin in all its forms and shapes serve to provide temporary or permanent wound closure such as in the case of partial and full-thickness burns. The need for collagen-based regeneration templates is motivated by the fact that dermal regeneration of full-thickness injuries does not occur spontaneously and is inundated by contraction and scarring. Partial-thickness burns in turn can regress as a result of infection and improper treatment and require appropriate treatment. Nylon-silicone laminates such as Biobrane(®), and more recently AWBAT(®), address this by serving as a temporary barrier. Enhanced collagen-based scaffolds today, although not perfect, remain invaluable. Our initial approach was to characterize the design considerations and explore the use of collagen in the fabrication of a dermal regeneration matrix and a silicone-nylon bilaminate. Here we expand our initial research on scaffold fabrication and explore possible strategies to improve the outcome of collagen-scaffold medicated wound healing.

  16. [Burns in an aeronautic environment].

    PubMed

    Rigotti, G

    1979-10-27

    Following an examination of the aetiology of burns in aeronautic environments, the physiopathology, classification and general and local treatment of the burn case is discussed. Special mention is then made of aircraft as an extremely useful means of transport.

  17. A major burn injury in a liver transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Delikonstantinou, I.; Philp, B.; Kamel, D.; Barnes, D.; Dziewulski, P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Immunosuppressive therapy may aggravate the clinical course of a burned patient, primarily affecting wound healing and thus complicating permanent wound coverage. We hereby present the successful management of a 48-year-old female liver transplant recipient with a major burn injury, aiming to elucidate the effects of the patient’s immunosuppression on surgical treatment. After admission to the Burns ITU, the patient underwent serial debridement of the burn and coverage with cryopreserved allografts. Despite immunosuppression, no prolonged survival of the allo-epidermis was documented. Nevertheless, a variable degree of vascularized allo-dermis was clinically identified. She subsequently underwent skin autografting and was discharged home with most of the wounds healed. Although there are isolated reports of survival of skin allografts in immunocompromised patients, in our case the allografted skin did not provide permanent wound coverage. However, it permitted a staged surgical management, allowing the immunosuppressive regime to change, the skin donor sites to heal and it also provided a dermal scaffold for successful skin autografting. PMID:28149251

  18. Herpes simplex virus infection in burned patients: epidemiology of 11 cases.

    PubMed

    Bourdarias, B; Perro, G; Cutillas, M; Castede, J C; Lafon, M E; Sanchez, R

    1996-06-01

    Burned patients suffer significant immunosuppression during the first 3 or 4 weeks after hospitalization. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are commonly seen in immunosuppressed patients and may account for considerable morbidity and some mortality. We studied retrospectively 11 patients with severe burn injury who became infected with HSV. We determined the prevalence of viral infection in this group of patients. Serological testing and viral culture was used to diagnose HSV infection. No general complications appeared in these 11 patients in association with HSV but two patients died of multiorgan failure. Locally, areas of active epidermal regeneration were most commonly affected. Acyclovir therapy was not used and the duration of hospitalization was normal in these 11 patients.

  19. Winter air quality in a wood-burning community: A case study in Waterbury, Vermont

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, Ken; Spengler, John D.; Treitman, Robert D.; Turner, William A.

    The recent upsurge in residential wood combustion has raised questions about potential adverse effects on ambient air quality and public health. Before policymakers can make informed and rational decisions about the need for government intervention, more information is needed concerning the nature and extent of the problem. This paper presents findings from the 1982 Harvard Wood-Burning Study in Waterbury, Vermont. Waterbury, a rural community of about 2000 people, was an ideal location for this investigation because: (1) half of the private residences are heated with wood fuel; (2) frequent winter temperature inversions promote pollution buildup in the valley; (3) there are no major industrial sources and (4) the Vermont Agency of Environmental Conservation has compiled a detailed wood-burning inventory. The ambient air monitoring study, from January to March 1982, emphasized measurements of total, inhalable and respirable particulate matter. Results indicate that 60-70% of the Waterbury aerosol was composed of particles less than 2.5 μm. A combination of indirect evidence suggests that wood burning was the major source of airborne particles in residential sections of the town. Dramatic diurnal variations in particulate concentrations were observed, with peak values at night exceeding afternoon levels by 5- to 10-fold. Both meteorology and emission patterns contributed to observed fluctuations.

  20. Noninvasive determination of burn depth in children by digital infrared thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina-Preciado, Jose David; Kolosovas-Machuca, Eleazar Samuel; Velez-Gomez, Ezequiel; Miranda-Altamirano, Ariel; González, Francisco Javier

    2013-06-01

    Digital infrared thermal imaging is used to assess noninvasively the severity of burn wounds in 13 pediatric patients. A delta-T (ΔT) parameter obtained by subtracting the temperature of a healthy contralateral region from the temperature of the burn wound is compared with the burn depth measured histopathologically. Thermal imaging results show that superficial dermal burns (IIa) show increased temperature compared with their contralateral healthy region, while deep dermal burns (IIb) show a lower temperature than their contralateral healthy region. This difference in temperature is statistically significant (p<0.0001) and provides a way of distinguishing deep dermal from superficial dermal burns. These results show that digital infrared thermal imaging could be used as a noninvasive procedure to assess burn wounds. An additional advantage of using thermal imaging, which can image a large skin surface area, is that it can be used to identify regions with different burn depths and estimate the size of the grafts needed for deep dermal burns.

  1. Effects of low level laser therapy on the prognosis of split-thickness skin graft in type 3 burn of diabetic patients: a case series.

    PubMed

    Dahmardehei, Mostafa; Kazemikhoo, Nooshafarin; Vaghardoost, Reza; Mokmeli, Soheila; Momeni, Mahnoush; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Ansari, Fereshteh; Amirkhani, Amir

    2016-04-01

    Significant populations in burn centers are diabetic burn patients. Healing process in these patients is more difficult due to diabetes complications. The gold standard treatment for patients with grade 3 burn ulcer is split-thickness skin grafting (STSG), but in the diabetic patients, the rate of graft failure and amputation is high due to impaired tissue perfusion. The technique of low level laser therapy (LLLT) improves tissue perfusion and fibroblast proliferation, increases collagen synthesis, and accelerates wound healing. The purpose of this case report is introducing a new therapeutic method for accelerating healing with better prognosis in these patients. The protocols and informed consent were reviewed according to the Medical Ethics, Board of Shahid Beheshti Medical Sciences (IR.SBMU.RAM.REC.13940.363). Diabetic type 2 patients with 13 grade 3 burn ulcers, candidate for amputation, were enrolled in the study. We used a 650-nm red laser light, 2 J/Cm for the bed of the ulcer and an 810-nm infrared laser light 6 J/Cm(2) for the margins along with intravenous laser therapy with a 660-nm red light, before and after STSG for treating grade 3 burn ulcers in 13 diabetic ulcers. The results of this study showed complete healing in the last 8 weeks for all patients who were candidates for amputation. In this case series, we present 13 cases of diabetic ulcer with type 3 burn wound, candidate for amputation, who healed completely using LLLT and STSG. This is the first time that these two techniques are combined for treatment of burn ulcer in diabetic patients. Using LLLT with STSG might be a promising treatment for burn victims especially diabetic patients.

  2. Effect of 3M Coban Self-Adherent Wraps on edema and function of the burned hand: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lowell, M; Pirc, P; Ward, R S; Lundy, C; Wilhelm, D A; Reddy, R; Held, B; Bernard, J

    2003-01-01

    Edema and limited function are common acute problems associated with hand burns. This case study examined the effects of 3M Coban Self-Adherent Wraps on edema and function in a 59-year-old male (46% TBSA flame injury) with newly skin grafted dorsally burned hands. At the time of each dressing change, circumferential measurements were taken of both hands and weekly active range of motion and grip strength measurements were recorded. The nine-hole peg test was used to appraise dexterity. During the 4-week study period, there was less edema, greater active range of motion and grip strength, and greater dexterity in the hand with 3M Coban Self-Adherent Wraps as compared with the control hand. This case study suggests that 3M Coban Self-Adherent Wraps were effective in reducing edema in the skin-grafted hand after skin grafting. It further appeared that the reduced edema may have contributed to improved hand function and that 3M Coban Self-Adherent Wraps as a compressive dressing do not impede hand function

  3. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, G.; Flores, J. M.; Abo Riziq, A.; Borrmann, S.; Rudich, Y.

    2011-02-01

    In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB) event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-RES-TOF-AMS) was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While these types of extensive BB events are not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI) was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS). The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m = 1.53(±0.03) + 0.07i(±0.03), during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m = 1.54(±0.01) + 0.04i(±0.01) compared to m = 1.49(±0.01) + 0.02i(±0.01) of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  4. Validating long-term satellite-derived disturbance products: the case of burned areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschetti, L.; Roy, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    The potential research, policy and management applications of satellite products place a high priority on providing statements about their accuracy. A number of NASA, ESA and EU funded global and continental burned area products have been developed using coarse spatial resolution satellite data, and have the potential to become part of a long-term fire Climate Data Record. These products have usually been validated by comparison with reference burned area maps derived by visual interpretation of Landsat or similar spatial resolution data selected on an ad hoc basis. More optimally, a design-based validation method should be adopted that is characterized by the selection of reference data via a probability sampling that can subsequently be used to compute accuracy metrics, taking into account the sampling probability. Design based techniques have been used for annual land cover and land cover change product validation, but have not been widely used for burned area products, or for the validation of global products that are highly variable in time and space (e.g. snow, floods or other non-permanent phenomena). This has been due to the challenge of designing an appropriate sampling strategy, and to the cost of collecting independent reference data. We propose a tri-dimensional sampling grid that allows for probability sampling of Landsat data in time and in space. To sample the globe in the spatial domain with non-overlapping sampling units, the Thiessen Scene Area (TSA) tessellation of the Landsat WRS path/rows is used. The TSA grid is then combined with the 16-day Landsat acquisition calendar to provide tri-dimensonal elements (voxels). This allows the implementation of a sampling design where not only the location but also the time interval of the reference data is explicitly drawn by probability sampling. The proposed sampling design is a stratified random sampling, with two-level stratification of the voxels based on biomes and fire activity (Figure 1). The novel

  5. Burn Wise

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Burn Wise is a partnership program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood, the right way, in the right appliance to protect your home, health, and the air we breathe.

  6. EVALUATING COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE DERMAL ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As the Human Exposure Program focuses on the exposure of children to pesticides, there are concerns about the effect, or perceived effect, of components of the sampling procedure on the health and well-being of the infant and the ability to collect pesticide residues. One concern involves the materials in wipes used to collect pesticide residues or other contact materials on the skin. In recent studies (e.g., National Human Exposure Assessment Survey; NHEXAS), isopropyl alcohol has been used as a solvent in conjunction with a cloth wipe to obtain samples from the hands of adults and children. Although isopropyl alcohol is generally considered innocuous, the use of commercially available products could eliminate concerns about exposure to alcohol. A few studies have evaluated the potential of commercially available baby wipes to collect personal exposure samples for metals research, but not for the area of pesticide research (Millson et al., 1994; Campbell et al., 1993; Lichtenwalner et al., 1993). Therefore, there is a need to evaluate the potential for using commercially available baby wipes for collecting pesticide samples from skin and other surfaces. Another concern involves establishing a convenient and safe method for assessing overall dermal exposure for children, especially for those in crawling stage. One route that the U .S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would like to investigate is the use of cotton body suits (infant sleepers) as an indicator

  7. Seventy per cent hydrofluoric acid burns: delayed decontamination with hexafluorine® and treatment with calcium gluconate.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Carlos Alberto; Mathieu, Laurence; Hall, Alan H; Monteiro, Mário G Kool; de Almeida, Décio Moreira

    2011-01-01

    This is a case report of decontamination and treatment of a 70% hydrofluoric acid (HF) dermal splash injury. A worker was splashed with 70% HF, sustaining approximately 10% TBSA first- to third-degree chemical skin burns of the face, trunk, and left thigh and leg. Initial decontamination involved water rinsing, removal of contaminated clothing, more water rinsing, topical application of magnesium oxide, and administration of intravenous narcotics for management of severe pain. After a delay of approximately 3 hours, active skin washing with Hexafluorine®, 5 L, was performed, followed by intravenous, intradermal perilesional, and topical inunction administration of calcium gluconate. Pain relief and a cooling sensation were quite prompt after Hexafluorine® decontamination. Surgical debridement and skin grafting of the more severe burns were required. No significant systemic toxicity developed, although this has occurred in previously reported similar concentrated HF dermal splash exposure cases, some of which resulted in fatality. While burns did develop, the patient was released from the intensive care service after 2 days and, after skin grafting, had a good outcome at 90-day follow-up. Even after a long delay, decontamination with Hexafluorine® appeared to be beneficial in this case.

  8. Psychopathology and psychological problems in patients with burn scars: epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    Van Loey, Nancy E E; Van Son, Maarten J M

    2003-01-01

    Burn injury is often a devastating event with long-term physical and psychosocial effects. Burn scars after deep dermal injury are cosmetically disfiguring and force the scarred person to deal with an alteration in body appearance. In addition, the traumatic nature of the burn accident and the painful treatment may induce psychopathological responses. Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which are prevalent in 13-23% and 13-45% of cases, respectively, have been the most common areas of research in burn patients. Risk factors related to depression are pre-burn depression and female gender in combination with facial disfigurement. Risk factors related to PTSD are pre-burn depression, type and severity of baseline symptoms, anxiety related to pain, and visibility of burn injury. Neuropsychological problems are also described, mostly associated with electrical injuries. Social problems include difficulties in sexual life and social interactions. Quality of life initially seems to be lower in burn patients compared with the general population. Problems in the mental area are more troublesome than physical problems. Over a period of many years, quality of life was reported to be rather good. Mediating variables such as low social support, emotion and avoidant coping styles, and personality traits such as neuroticism and low extraversion, negatively affect adjustment after burn injury. Few studies of psychological treatments in burn patients are available. From general trauma literature, it is concluded that cognitive (behavioral) and pharmacological (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) interventions have a positive effect on depression. With respect to PTSD, exposure therapy and eye movement reprocessing and desensitization are successful. Psychological debriefing aiming to prevent chronic post-trauma reactions has not, thus far, shown a positive effect in burn patients. Treatment of problems in the social area includes cognitive-behavioral therapy

  9. Segmentation and classification of burn images by color and texture information.

    PubMed

    Acha, Begoña; Serrano, Carmen; Acha, José I; Roa, Laura M

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a burn color image segmentation and classification system is proposed. The aim of the system is to separate burn wounds from healthy skin, and to distinguish among the different types of burns (burn depths). Digital color photographs are used as inputs to the system. The system is based on color and texture information, since these are the characteristics observed by physicians in order to form a diagnosis. A perceptually uniform color space (L*u*v*) was used, since Euclidean distances calculated in this space correspond to perceptual color differences. After the burn is segmented, a set of color and texture features is calculated that serves as the input to a Fuzzy-ARTMAP neural network. The neural network classifies burns into three types of burn depths: superficial dermal, deep dermal, and full thickness. Clinical effectiveness of the method was demonstrated on 62 clinical burn wound images, yielding an average classification success rate of 82%.

  10. Relation of people-centered public health and person-centered healthcare management: a case study to reduce burn-out

    PubMed Central

    Stoyanov, Drozdstoj S.; Cloninger, C. Robert

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare management is one practical tool for mediation and implementation of public health into clinical healthcare outcomes and is taken in our case study as an exemplar arena to demonstrate the vital importance of the person-centered approach. Healthcare personnel are frequently at risk for the ‘burn-out’ syndrome. However, modern measures of burn-out recognize burn-out only at a late stage when it is fully developed. There are no available methods to assess the risk for vulnerability to burnout in healthcare systems. Our aim was therefore to design a complex person-centered model for detection of high risk for burn-out at an early stage, that has been termed ‘flame-out’. We accept the observation that decreased personal performance is one crucial expression of burn-out. Low personal performance and negative emotions are strongly related to low self-directedness as measured by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). At the same time, burn-out is characterized by decreased interest and positive emotions from work. Decreased positive emotion is directly related to low self-transcendence as measured by the TCI. Burn-out is also frequently associated with feelings of social alienation or inadequacy of support, which is in turn related to low TCI Cooperativeness. However, high Persistence and Harm Avoidance are predisposing traits for burn-out in healthcare professionals who are often overly perfectionistic and compulsive, predisposing them to anxiety, depression, suicide and burn-out. Hence, people at risk for future burn-out are often highly conscientious over-achievers with intense mixtures of positive and negative emotions. The high demand for perfection comes from both intrinsic characteristics and from features of the social milieu in their psychological climate. Letting go of the unfulfillable desire to be perfect by increasing self-transcendence allows acceptance of the imperfection of the human condition, thereby preventing burn-out and

  11. Burn sepsis and burn toxin

    PubMed Central

    Allgöwer, Martin; Städtler, Karl; Schoenenberger, Guido A

    1974-01-01

    The salient steps of a 20-year programme of research into the nature of burn disease are described. By burn disease we mean the late mortality and morbidity following burns. We have isolated a burn toxin which is derived from a thermal polymerization of cell membrane lipoproteins within the dermis and have studied its influence on the effects of sepsis. We have also used it in the development of active and passive immunization therapy of severe burns. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:4429330

  12. Hip Capsular Reconstruction Using Dermal Allograft.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Soares, Eduardo; Mook, William R; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-04-01

    Because hip arthroscopic procedures are increasing in number, complications related to the operation itself are starting to emerge. Whereas the capsule has been recognized as an important static stabilizer for the hip, it has not been until recently that surgeons have realized the importance of its preservation and restoration. Disruption of the capsule during arthroscopic procedures is a potential contributor to postoperative iatrogenic hip instability. In cases of a symptomatic deficient capsule, a capsular reconstruction is mandatory because instability may lead to detrimental chondral and labral changes. The purpose of this report was to describe our technique for arthroscopic hip capsular reconstruction using dermal allograft.

  13. Cement Burns

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Munir; Moynagh, M.; Lawlor, C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Cement burns account for relatively few admissions to a burn unit; however, these burns deserve separate consideration because of special features of diagnosis and management. Cement burns, even though potentially disabling, have rarely been reported in literature. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all patients admitted with cement burns injuries to the national burns unit at the St James's Hospital in Dublin, Ireland, over a 10-year period for the years 1996–2005. Results: A total of 46 patients with cement burns were admitted. The majority of patients were aged 16–74 years (mean age = 32 years). Eighty-seven percent of injuries occurred in an industrial and 13% in a domestic setting. The upper and lower extremities were involved in all the patients, and the mean total body surface area affected was 6.5%. The mean length of hospital stay was 21 days with a range of 1–40 days. Thirty-eight (82%) were surgically managed involving debridement and split-thickness skin graft (SSG) and four (9%) were conservatively managed. A further four did not have data available. Conclusion: Widespread inexperience in dealing with this group of cement burns patients and delays in referral to burns unit highlights the potential for greater levels of general awareness and knowledge in both prevention and treatment of these burns. As well, early debridement and split-thickness skin grafting at diagnosis constitutes the best means of reducing the high socioeconomic costs and allows for early return to work. PMID:18091981

  14. Chemical burns

    PubMed Central

    Cartotto, Robert C.; Peters, Walter J.; Neligan, Peter C.; Douglas, Leith G.; Beeston, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To report a burn unit’s experience with chemical burns and to discuss the fundamental principles in managing chemical burns. Design A chart review. Setting A burn centre at a major university-affiliated hospital. Patients Twenty-four patients with chemical burns, representing 2.6% of all burn admissions over an 8-year period at the Ross Tilley Regional Adult Burn Centre. Seventy-five percent of the burn injuries were work-related accidents. Chemicals involved included hydrofluoric acid, sulfuric acid, black liquor, various lyes, potassium permanganate and phenol. Results Fourteen patients required excision and skin grafting. Complications were frequent and included ocular chemical contacts, wound infections, tendon exposures, toe amputation and systemic reactions from absorption of chemical. One patient died from a chemical scald burn to 98% of the body surface area. Conclusions The key principles in the management of chemical burns include removal of the chemical, copious irrigation, limited use of antidotes, correct estimation of the extent of injury, identification of systemic toxicity, treatment of ocular contacts and management of chemical inhalation injury. Individualized treatment is emphasized. PMID:8640619

  15. Methamphetamine residue dermal transfer efficiencies from household surfaces.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Mike; Martyny, John W; Serrano, Kate A

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine contamination from illegal production operations poses a potential health concern for emergency responders, child protective services, law enforcement, and children living in contaminated structures. The objective of this study was to evaluate dermal transfer efficiencies of methamphetamine from contaminated household surfaces. These transfer efficiencies are lacking for methamphetamine, and would be beneficial for use in exposure models. Surfaces were contaminated using a simulated smoking method in a stainless steel chamber. Household surfaces were carpet, painted drywall, and linoleum. Dermal transfer efficiencies were obtained using cotton gloves for two hand conditions, dry or saliva moistened (wet). In addition, three contact scenarios were evaluated for both hand conditions: one, two, or three contacts with contaminated surfaces. Dermal transfer efficiencies were calculated for both hand conditions and used as inputs in a Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model (SHEDS-Multimedia, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, N.C.). Results of this study showed that average dermal transfer efficiencies of methamphetamine ranged from 11% for dry hands to 26% for wet hands. There was a significantly higher wet transfer as compared to dry transfer for all surfaces. For wet hands, dermal transfer depended on surface type with higher transfer from carpet and linoleum as compared to drywall. Based on our estimates of dermal transfer efficiency, a surface contamination clearance level of 1.5 μg/100 cm(2) may not ensure absorbed doses remain below the level associated with adverse health effects in all cases. Additional dermal transfer studies should be performed using skin surrogates that may better predict actual skin transfer.

  16. Suppression of nucleation mode particles by biomass burning in an urban environment: a case study.

    PubMed

    Agus, Emily L; Lingard, Justin J N; Tomlin, Alison S

    2008-08-01

    Measurements of concentrations and size distributions of particles 4.7 to 160 nm were taken using an SMPS during the bonfire and firework celebrations on Bonfire Night in Leeds, UK, 2006. These celebrations provided an opportunity to study size distributions in a unique atmospheric pollution situation during and following a significant emission event due to open biomass burning. A log-normal fitting program was used to determine the characteristics of the modal groups present within hourly averaged size distributions. Results from the modal fitting showed that on bonfire night the smallest nucleation mode, which was present before and after the bonfire event and on comparison weekends, was not detected within the size distribution. In addition, there was a significant shift in the modal diameters of the remaining modes during the peak of the pollution event. Using the concept of a coagulation sink, the atmospheric lifetimes of smaller particles were significantly reduced during the pollution event, and thus were used to explain the disappearance of the smallest nucleation mode as well as changes in particle count mean diameters. The significance for particle mixing state is discussed.

  17. Burn injuries and soft tissue traumas complicated by mucormycosis infection: a report of six cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kyriopoulos, E.J.; Kyriakopoulos, A.; Karonidis, A.; Gravvanis, A.; Gamatsi, I.; Tsironis, C.; Tsoutsos, D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mucor fungus infection is a rare opportunistic infection, rapidly progressive and often fatal in immunocompromised patients, or in patients with chronic debilitating diseases. We report six cases of trauma patients with mucormycosis. Three had severe thermal burns, one of them with a medical history of diabetes mellitus. The other three patients suffered from severe soft tissue injuries caused by traffic accidents. In all cases there had been spontaneous exposure and contact of the wounds with soil. During hospitalization, fungi cultures and/or biopsies of all wounds were performed and all resulted positive. The patients were treated with Amphotericin B (AmB) and surgical debridement. Two of them died and the other four were fully healed and discharged. Mucormycosis should be considered in any case of aggressive skin tissue necrosis with a history of soiled wounds. We suggest that mucormycosis is treated by intravenous and local administration of AmB, extensive and repeated debridement and cautious coverage of the wound. The plastic surgeon must wait for negative swab cultures and biopsies before covering the defects with skin grafts or flaps. Reconstruction may be challenging, depending on the extent, depth, location and special indications of the affected site and the donor site availability. PMID:27777549

  18. Burn injuries and soft tissue traumas complicated by mucormycosis infection: a report of six cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kyriopoulos, E J; Kyriakopoulos, A; Karonidis, A; Gravvanis, A; Gamatsi, I; Tsironis, C; Tsoutsos, D

    2015-12-31

    Mucor fungus infection is a rare opportunistic infection, rapidly progressive and often fatal in immunocompromised patients, or in patients with chronic debilitating diseases. We report six cases of trauma patients with mucormycosis. Three had severe thermal burns, one of them with a medical history of diabetes mellitus. The other three patients suffered from severe soft tissue injuries caused by traffic accidents. In all cases there had been spontaneous exposure and contact of the wounds with soil. During hospitalization, fungi cultures and/or biopsies of all wounds were performed and all resulted positive. The patients were treated with Amphotericin B (AmB) and surgical debridement. Two of them died and the other four were fully healed and discharged. Mucormycosis should be considered in any case of aggressive skin tissue necrosis with a history of soiled wounds. We suggest that mucormycosis is treated by intravenous and local administration of AmB, extensive and repeated debridement and cautious coverage of the wound. The plastic surgeon must wait for negative swab cultures and biopsies before covering the defects with skin grafts or flaps. Reconstruction may be challenging, depending on the extent, depth, location and special indications of the affected site and the donor site availability.

  19. Spatial analysis in a Markov random field framework: The case of burning oil wells in Kuwait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezzani, Raymond J.; Al-Dousari, Ahmad

    This paper discusses a modeling approach for spatial-temporal prediction of environmental phenomena using classified satellite images. This research was prompted by the analysis of change and landscape redistribution of petroleum residues formed from the residue of the burning oil wells in Kuwait (1991). These surface residues have been termed ``tarcrete'' (El-Baz etal. 1994). The tarcrete forms a thick layer over sand and desert pavement covering a significant portion of south-central Kuwait. The purpose of this study is to develop a method that utilizes satellite images from different time steps to examine the rate-of-change of the oil residue deposits and determine where redistribution is are likely to occur. This problem exhibits general characteristics of environmental diffusion and dispersion phenomena so a theoretical framework for a general solution is sought. The use of a lagged-clique, Markov random field framework and entropy measures is deduced to be an effective solution to satisfy the criteria of determination of time-rate-of-change of the surface deposits and to forecast likely locations of redistribution of dispersed, aggraded residues. The method minimally requires image classification, the determination of time stationarity of classes and the measurement of the level of organization of the state-space information derived from the images. Analysis occurs at levels of both the individual pixels and the system to determine specific states and suites of states in space and time. Convergence of the observed landscape disorder with respect to an analytical maximum provide information on the total dispersion of the residual system.

  20. A 6-Year Case-Control Study of the Presentation and Clinical Sequelae for Noninflicted, Negligent, and Inflicted Pediatric Burns.

    PubMed

    Collier, Zachary J; Ramaiah, Veena; Glick, Jill C; Gottlieb, Lawrence J

    Inflicted burns are one of the leading causes of abuse-related fatalities in children. Between 30 and 60% of children accidentally returned to abusive homes suffer reabuse. Given the high chance for abuse recurrence and the associated morbidity/mortality, it is critical that inflicted burns are promptly identified to guide appropriate medical and child welfare management. Although previous studies proposed historical and mechanistic features using noncomparative or poorly powered data, this study utilized comparative data from a 6-year period (2009-2014) at a certified burn center along with expert analysis from Child Advocacy and Protective Services (CAPS) to provide higher level evidence supporting classical findings while elucidating new features with respect to burn severity and required interventions. A retrospective chart review of 408 pediatric burns was cross-referenced with the respective CAPS consultations to construct a multidisciplinary, deidentified database. The average age was 2.9 years (0.04-17 years) with 232 (57%) males and 330 (81%) African-Americans. CAPS investigations confirmed burn etiologies: noninflicted (346 [85%]), negligent (30 [7%]), and inflicted (32 [8%]). In comparing the three etiologies, statistical significance (P < .05) was observed for numerous variables including historical inconsistency, burn age, child welfare history, burn size and depth, distribution, concomitant injury rates, number of surgical interventions, infectious complications, and hospital length of stay. In addition to reaffirming classical features of abusive burns to fortify etiologic diagnoses, this study elucidated appreciable differences in burn severity, interventional sequelae, and burn-related complications, which will help guide medical and surgical interventions for future pediatric burn patients.

  1. Integra™ in burns reconstruction: Our experience and report of an unusual immunological reaction.

    PubMed

    Lohana, P; Hassan, S; Watson, S B

    2014-03-31

    Limited availability of autologous donor sites poses significant challenges for soft-tissue reconstruction in severe and complex burns. Integra™ is a bi-layered dermal regeneration template (DRT) which has played a significant role in soft tissue reconstruction since its initial use for full-thickness burn defects. The purpose of this study is to report our institutional experience of Integra™ in burns management over a 4-year period and highlight an unusual reaction to its second application. Twenty-four cases underwent Integra™ resurfacing for burn management from September 2007 to August 2011. Data on patient demographics, including co-morbidities, indications, operative data, complications, secondary reconstruction and outcomes were recorded. Integra™ was used in 24 patients on 37 anatomical sites. One patient died 3 weeks after injury and first stage of Integra™ application, and was therefore excluded from the study. Split-thickness skin grafting was performed within an average of 23 days (with a range of 7-55 days) and mean graft take was 87% (with a range of 75-100%). Five cases of local infection at the graft site were recorded. The average length of hospital stay was 47 days (with a range of 1-162 days). The mean follow-up time was 17 months (with a range of 9-34 months). Overall, our experience with DRT was mixed, that is to say we found it satisfactory with acute burns resurfacing but very good with secondary reconstruction. The main advantage of Integra™ is its immediate availability in unlimited quantities for soft-tissue reconstruction in major and complex burns. The main drawbacks are financial implications, twostage procedure, complex wound care and risk of infection. We believe that Integra™ can be considered as a promising modality in burns management.

  2. Assessment of biomass burning emissions and their impacts on urban and regional PM2.5: a Georgia case study.

    PubMed

    Tian, Di; Hu, Yongtao; Wang, Yuhang; Boylan, James W; Zheng, Mei; Russell, Armistead G

    2009-01-15

    Biomass burning is a major and growing contributor to particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5). Such impacts (especially individual impacts from each burning source) are quantified using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model, a chemical transport model (CTM). Given the sensitivity of CTM results to uncertain emission inputs, simulations were conducted using three biomass burning inventories. Shortcomings in the burning emissions were also evaluated by comparing simulations with observations and results from a receptor model. Model performance improved significantly with the updated emissions and speciation profiles based on recent measurements for biomass burning: mean fractional bias is reduced from 22% to 4% for elemental carbon and from 18% to 12% for organic matter; mean fractional error is reduced from 59% to 50% for elemental carbon and from 55% to 49% for organic matter. Quantified impacts of biomass burning on PM2.5 during January, March, May, and July 2002 are 3.0, 5.1, 0.8, and 0.3 microg m(-3) domainwide on average, with more than 80% of such impacts being from primary emissions. Impacts of prescribed burning dominate biomass burning impacts, contributing about 55% and 80% of PM2.5 in January and March, respectively, followed by land clearing and agriculture field burning. Significant impacts of wildfires in May and residential wood combustion in fireplaces and woodstoves in January are also found.

  3. Pesticides re-entry dermal exposure of workers in greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, V; Conte, E; Correnti, A; Gatti, R; Musmeci, F; Morali, G; Spagnoli, G; Tranfo, G; Triolo, L; Vita, M; Zappa, G

    2004-01-01

    This research has the aim to evaluate the risk of pesticide dermal exposure for workers in greenhouses. We considered the following crops: tomato, cucumber and strawberry, largely spread in Bracciano lake district. The pesticides monitored were: tetradifon on strawberry: metalaxyl, azoxystrobin and fenarimol on cucumber; acrinathrin, azoxystrobin and chlorpyrifos ethyl on tomato. The dermal exposure was evaluated by Dislodgeable Foliar Residue (DFR) measurements employing transfer coefficients got from literature. For risk evaluation, we have compared the dermal exposures with Acceptable Operator Exposure Levels (AOEL). The re-entry time were obtained intercepting the dose decay curves with AOEL values. The re-entry times result higher than two days in the cases of chlorpyrifos on tomato (re-entry time: 3 days), azoxystrobin on tomato (4 days), and tetradifon on strawberry (8 days). The need of measuring specific transfer coefficients is pointed out.

  4. DISPOSITION OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE IN HUMANS FOLLOWING ORAL AND DERMAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    DISPOSITION OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE IN HUMANS FOLLOWING ORAL AND DERMAL EXPOSURE. TL Leavens1, MW Case1, RA Pegram1, BC Blount2, DM DeMarini1, MC Madden1, and JL Valentine3. 1NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2CDC, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3RTI, RTP, NC, USA.
    The disinfection byproduct ...

  5. The management of pemphigus vulgaris in a burn intensive care unit: a case report and treatment review.

    PubMed

    Miletta, Nathanial; Miller, Mary E; Lam, Thomas; Chung, Kevin K; Hivnor, Chad

    2014-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a rare, potentially fatal, autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes. Treatment of this disease is problematic because of a lack of high-grade, evidence-based recommendations, the side-effect profiles of the therapies available, and the extensive supportive care that afflicted patients require. The authors present the unfortunate course of a patient with severe pemphigus vulgaris who was admitted to the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research Burn Center, to demonstrate the potential complications of therapy. Given the patient's complex course, the authors reviewed the literature and share in this article the most up-to-date treatment recommendations for patients with pemphigus vulgaris. The authors' review of the literature supports using conventional therapy consisting of high-dose corticosteroids and an adjuvant immunosuppressant for mild to moderate cases of pemphigus vulgaris. The immunosuppresants recommended are mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide, in order of preference, based on their side-effect profiles and steroid-sparing effects. For severe or recalcitrant cases of pemphigus vulgaris, the authors recommend adding rituximab as early as possible. If increased risk of infection is of particular concern, the use of intravenous immunoglobulin in place of rituximab is advised.

  6. Dermal uptake of petroleum substances.

    PubMed

    Jakasa, Ivone; Kezic, Sanja; Boogaard, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    Petroleum products are complex substances comprising varying amounts of linear and branched alkanes, alkenes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics which may penetrate the skin at different rates. For proper interpretation of toxic hazard data, understanding their percutaneous absorption is of paramount importance. The extent and significance of dermal absorption of eight petroleum substances, representing different classes of hydrocarbons, was evaluated. Literature data on the steady-state flux and permeability coefficient of these substances were evaluated and compared to those predicted by mathematical models. Reported results spanned over 5-6 orders of magnitude and were largely dependent on experimental conditions in particular on the type of the vehicle used. In general, aromatic hydrocarbons showed higher dermal absorption than more lipophilic aliphatics with similar molecular weight. The results showed high variation and were largely influenced by experimental conditions emphasizing the need of performing the experiments under "in use" scenario. The predictive models overestimated experimental absorption. The overall conclusion is that, based on the observed percutaneous penetration data, dermal exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons, even of aromatics with highest dermal absorption is limited and highly unlikely to be associated with health risks under real use scenarios.

  7. Interns' Use of Video Cases to Problematize Their Practice: Crash, Burn, and (Maybe) Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosaen, Cheryl; Lundeberg, Mary; Cooper, Marjorie; Fritzen, Anny

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the following question: To what extent and in what ways does constructing a video case of their own discussion-based teaching help interns reflect on their teaching? First, we discuss the notion of learning to learn from experience through reflection and analysis, why we chose classroom discussions as a site for studying…

  8. Cooling of burns: Mechanisms and models.

    PubMed

    Wright, E H; Harris, A L; Furniss, D

    2015-08-01

    The role of cooling in the acute management of burns is widely accepted in clinical practice, and is a cornerstone of basic first aid in burns. This has been underlined in a number of animal models. The mechanism by which it delivers its benefit is poorly understood, but there is a reduction in burns progression over the first 48 h, reduced healing time, and some subjective improvements in scarring when cooling is administered after burning. Intradermal temperature normalises within a matter of seconds to a few minutes, yet the benefits of even delayed cooling persist, implying it is not simply the removal of thermal energy from the damaged tissues. Animal models have used oedema formation, preservation of dermal perfusion, healing time and hair retention as indicators of burns severity, and have shown cooling to improve these indices, but pharmacological or immunological blockade of humoural and cellular mediators of inflammation did not reproduce the benefit of cooling. More recently, some studies of tissue from human and animal burns have shown consistent, reproducible, temporal changes in gene expression in burned tissues. Here, we review the experimental evidence of the role and mechanism of cooling in burns management, and suggest future research directions that may eventually lead to improved treatment outcomes.

  9. [Hyalomatrix PA(®) in skin substitutes. About 10 cases].

    PubMed

    Perrot, P; Dellière, V; Brancati, A; Duteille, F

    2011-04-01

    During the surgical treatment of burns and reconstructive surgery, we can use autografts, allografts, xenografts or dermal substitutes. Acellular dermal substitutes, implantable medical devices of class III are composed mostly of collagen but also, more recently, derivatives of hyaluronic acid (Hyalomatrix PA(®)). Their mechanism of action is based on revascularization and colonization by fibroblasts of the patient. They are then used to screen for delayed epidermal grafting (2-stage procedure for Integra(®), Matriderm(®) 2mm, Renoskin(®), Hyalomatrix PA(®)) or simultaneous (1-time procedure for IntegraSL(®), Matriderm(®) 1mm). We report 10 cases of clinical use of Hyalomatrix PA(®) in the service of burns and plastic surgery of Nantes.

  10. Effect of biomass burning on surface ozone: A case study in 2010 over Northern Sub-Saharan Africa (NSSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damoah, R.; Ichuku, C.; Ellison, L.

    2015-12-01

    One of the major sources of tropospheric ozone (O3) precursors such as nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxides (CO), and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) is biomass burning. The emissions from the burning do not only affect air quality and climate locally, but also on a continental to hemispheric scales through long-range transport. We have used NASA's Global Modeling Initiative Chemistry and Transport Model (GMI-CTM), to quantify the changes in surface ozone over Northern Sub-Saharan Africa (NSSA: 0 - 20N, 20W - 55E), as triggered by biomass burning from different regions. During the winter months (e.g. January), most of the burning is concentrated in the NSSA region while in summer it shifts southward outside the NSSA region. Our analysis reveals that out of the total contribution to surface ozone from biomass burning emissions in the NSSA region, 92 % is due to NSSA biomass burning while the remaining 8 % is from outside the NSSA. In fact, most (~75 %) of the 8 % comes from outside the African continent because little to no biomass burning occurs in Africa outside of the NSSA region during this time of year. However, during the summer months (e.g. July), most of the contribution to NSSA surface ozone (96 %) is due to burning from outside NSSA. Only 10 % of the 96 % comes from outside the African continent because during this time most of the burning is from outside the NSSA but within the African continent. In spring (e.g. April) approximately equal percentages of contributions come from within and outside the NSSA region.

  11. Phytocontact dermatitis due to Ranunculus arvensis mimicking burn injury: report of three cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Sami; Semur, Heybet; Kose, Ozkan; Ozhasenekler, Ayhan; Celiktas, Mustafa; Basbug, Murat; Yagmur, Yusuf

    2011-02-21

    Ranunculus arvensis (corn buttercup) is a plant species of the genus Ranunculus that is frequently used in the Far East to treat rheumatic diseases and several dermatological disorders. In Turkey, the plant is seen in the eastern and southeastern Anatolian highlands, which are underdeveloped areas of the country. Herein, we report three patients who used Ranunculus arvensis for the treatment of arthralgia and osteoarthritis. A distinctive phytodermatitis developed on the right thumb in one patient (48-year-old male), on the anterior aspect of both knees in another patient (70-year-old female) and all around both knees in a third (59-year-old female). The patients were treated with topical antibiotics and daily wound dressing, and none of them experienced any complications. Ranunculus arvensis was confirmed as the cause of the phytodermatitis in the three cases. Poultices of plants applied to the skin demonstrate beneficial effects on many dermatological and rheumatic diseases; however, they have several adverse effects that should not be ignored. In this study, we also present a review of 25 cases reported in the literature.

  12. Phytocontact dermatitis due to Ranunculus arvensis mimicking burn injury: report of three cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Ranunculus arvensis (corn buttercup) is a plant species of the genus Ranunculus that is frequently used in the Far East to treat rheumatic diseases and several dermatological disorders. In Turkey, the plant is seen in the eastern and southeastern Anatolian highlands, which are underdeveloped areas of the country. Herein, we report three patients who used Ranunculus arvensis for the treatment of arthralgia and osteoarthritis. A distinctive phytodermatitis developed on the right thumb in one patient (48-year-old male), on the anterior aspect of both knees in another patient (70-year-old female) and all around both knees in a third (59-year-old female). The patients were treated with topical antibiotics and daily wound dressing, and none of them experienced any complications. Ranunculus arvensis was confirmed as the cause of the phytodermatitis in the three cases. Poultices of plants applied to the skin demonstrate beneficial effects on many dermatological and rheumatic diseases; however, they have several adverse effects that should not be ignored. In this study, we also present a review of 25 cases reported in the literature. PMID:21408003

  13. Dermoscopic insight into skin microcirculation--Burn depth assessment.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Kyomi; Nomiyama, Tomoko; Masuda, Koji; Shindo, Hajime; Yasumi, Maki; Sawada, Takahiro; Nagasaki, Kotaro; Katoh, Norito

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of dermoscopic observation of skin microcirculation, the dermal capillary integrity of burn wounds was evaluated by dermoscopy according to a proposed algorithm that is designed to distinguish burn wounds between superficial dermal burns: SDB, and deep dermal burns: DDB. As the gold standard for comparison, two widely accepted endpoints of primary healing within 21 days (SDB) or over 21 days after injury (DDB) were used. A number of dermatologists conducted diagnostic imaging by dermoscopy. Comparison among polarized noncontact dermoscopy (PNCD), polarized contact dermoscopy (PCD) and nonpolarized contact dermoscopy (NPD) was also conducted. Images from the three modalities were evaluated for color, pattern and qualitative differences among them. The results of dermoscopy measurements according to the proposed algorithm showed accuracy of 96.7%, sensitivity of 100.0% and specificity of 94.4%. Dermoscopy measurements were significantly more accurate than clinical assessment (p<0.05). The recognition of dots increased for NPD, vessels were most clearly observed under PCD and colours tended to be more distinctly recognized under polarized light. Dermoscopy is a useful and simple tool to evaluate not only epidermal and superficial dermal skin components but also the skin microcirculation.

  14. Burn Center Treatment of Patients With Severe Anhydrous Ammonia Injury: Case Reports and Literature Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Dérobert L , Proteau J, Caroff J. Étude anatomique de quatre cas d’intoxication aiguë par inhalation de gaz ammoniac . Amm Méd Lég 1964;44:362. 33...M. S., Renz E. M., Kim S. H., Ritenour A. E., Wolf S. E., Cancio L . C., 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...function test results Case FEV1 ( L ) FEV1/ FVC % Posttreatment FEV1/FVC % Interval After Exposure 1 1.87 55 42 8 mo 2 2.46 67 67 7 mo 3 1.86 69 70 6 mo 5 2.22

  15. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 cream improves burn-wound healing and attenuates burn-gastric lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Mikus, D; Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Petricevic, A; Aralica, G; Druzijancic, N; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Pigac, B; Perovic, D; Kolombo, M; Kokic, N; Mikus, S; Duplancic, B; Fattorini, I; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Prkacin, I; Konjevoda, P; Stambuk, N; Anic, T

    2001-12-01

    The effects of the gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 were investigated when administered topically or systemically in burned mice. This agent is known to have a beneficial effect in a variety of models of gastrointestinal lesions, as well as on wound or fracture healing. Deep partial skin thickness burns (1.5x1.5 cm) covering 20% of total body area, were induced under anesthesia on the back of mice by controlled burning and gastric lesions were assessed 1, 2, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days following injury. The first application of BPC 157 was immediately following burning, and thereafter, once daily, until 24 h before sacrifice. In the initial experiments, exposure to direct flame for 5 s, the BPC 157 was applied at 10 microg or 10 ng/kg b.w. intraperitoneally (i.p.) by injection or alternatively, topically, at the burn, as a thin layer of cream (50 microg of BPC 157 dissolved in 2 ml of distilled water was mixed with 50 g of commercial neutral cream (also used as local vehicle-control)), while silver sulfadiazine 1% cream was a standard agent acting locally. Others received no local medication: they were treated i.p. by injection of distilled water (distilled water-control) or left without any medication (control). In subsequent experiments involving deeper burns (direct flame for 7 s), BPC 157 creams (50 microg, 5 microg, 500 ng, 50 ng or 5 ng of BPC 157 dissolved in 2 ml of distilled water was mixed with 50 g of commercial neutral cream), or vehicle as a thin layer of cream, were applied topically, at the burn. Compared with untreated controls, in both experiments, in the BPC 157 cream-treated mice all parameters of burn healing were improved throughout the experiment: less edema was observed and inflammatory cell numbers decreased. Less necrosis was seen with an increased number of capillaries along with an advanced formation of dermal reticulin and collagen fibers. An increased number of preserved follicles were observed. Two weeks after injury, BPC 157 cream

  16. Burn Pits

    MedlinePlus

    ... unexploded ordnance, petroleum and lubricant products, plastics, rubber, wood, and discarded food. Burning waste in open air ... Regulations Web Policies No FEAR Act Whistleblower Rights & Protections Site Index USA.gov White House Inspector General ...

  17. Prediction & Assessment of Dermal Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    cutaneous exposure requires the transdermal penetration of the chemical. The unique permeation barrier properties of skin ensure that the kinetics of...following dermal exposure, therefore, requires that the rate of skin penetration in man be predictable. The specific aims of the project were: (1) to...derive, from a compre- hensive database of the percutaneous absorption/ penetration literature predictive ("structure-activity") algorithms to calculate a

  18. Chemical and physical properties of biomass burning aerosols and their CCN activity: A case study in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhijun; Zheng, Jing; Wang, Yu; Shang, Dongjie; Du, Zhoufei; Zhang, Yuanhang; Hu, Min

    2017-02-01

    Biomass burning emits large amounts of both trace gases and particles into the atmosphere. It plays a profound role in regional air quality and climate change. In the present study, an intensive campaign was carried out at an urban site in Beijing, China, in June 2014, which covered the winter wheat harvest season over the North China Plain (NCP). Meanwhile, two evident biomass-burning events were observed. A clear burst in ultrafine particles (below 100nm in diameter, PM1) and subsequent particle growth took place during the events. With the growth of the ultrafine particles, the organic fraction of PM1 increased significantly. The ratio of oxygen to carbon (O:C), which had an average value of 0.23±0.04, did not show an obvious enhancement, indicating that a significant chemical aging process of the biomass-burning aerosols was not observed during the course of events. This finding might have been due to the fact that the biomass-burning events occurred in the late afternoon and grew during the nighttime, which is associated with a low atmospheric oxidation capacity. On average, organics and black carbon (BC) were dominant in the biomass-burning aerosols, accounting for 60±10% and 18±3% of PM1. The high organic and BC fractions led to a significant suppression of particle hygroscopicity. Comparisons among hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA)-derived, cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNc)-derived, and aerosol mass spectrometer-based hygroscopicity parameter (κ) values were consistent. The mean κ values of biomass-burning aerosols derived from both HTDMA and CCNc measurements were approximately 0.1, regardless of the particle size, indicating that the biomass-burning aerosols were less active. The burst in particle count during the biomass-burning events resulted in an increased number of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) at supersaturation (SS)=0.2-0.8%.

  19. The contributions of biomass burning to primary and secondary organics: A case study in Pearl River Delta (PRD), China.

    PubMed

    Wang, BaoLin; Liu, Ying; Shao, Min; Lu, SiHua; Wang, Ming; Yuan, Bin; Gong, ZhaoHeng; He, LingYan; Zeng, LiMin; Hu, Min; Zhang, YuanHang

    2016-11-01

    Synchronized online measurements of gas- and particle- phase organics including non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) and submicron organic matters (OM) were conducted in November 2010 at Heshan, Guangdong provincial supersite, China. Several biomass burning events were identified by using acetonitrile as a tracer, and enhancement ratios (EnRs) of organics to carbon monoxide (CO) obtained from this work generally agree with those from rice straw burning in previous studies. The influences of biomass burning on NMHCs, OVOCs and OM were explored by comparing biomass burning impacted plumes (BB plumes) and non-biomass burning plumes (non-BB plumes). A photochemical age-based parameterization method was used to characterize primary emission and chemical behavior of those three organic groups. The emission ratios (EmRs) of NMHCs, OVOCs and OM to CO increased by 27-71%, 34-55% and 67% in BB plumes, respectively, in comparison with non-BB plumes. The estimated formation rate of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in BB plumes was found to be 24% faster than non-BB plumes. By applying the above emission ratios to the whole PRD, the annual emissions of VOCs and OM from open burning of crop residues would be 56.4 and 3.8Gg in 2010 in PRD, respectively.

  20. Epidermal exfoliation of over 95% after a burn in an 18-month-old boy: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Horna Strand, A; Rubertsson, S; Huss, F; Mani, M

    2016-03-01

    This report concerns an 18-month-old boy who presented with a 6% total body surface area scald. The subject of this report is unique in that he developed the largest exfoliation described in literature. After 3 days an epidermal exfoliation with the appearance of a deliberately inflicted scald developed. As the exfoliation progressed to over 95% total body surface area the suspicion of child abuse or neglect could be abandoned. The diagnosis Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome was set, due to the finding of Staphylococcus aureus on swabs, the lack of mucosal engagement, and the patient's age. The boy's skin healed within 3 weeks. The few reports published are all case reports and most frequently described visually infected burns with smaller epidermal exfoliations, and clinically based exfoliation diagnosis. S. aureus often cause burn wound infections that can lead to complications caused by cross-infection. It is important for burn surgeons and intensive care specialists to be aware of the increased possibility of Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome occurring in patients who have a reduced barrier to infection such as burn patients and also, that the diagnosis can be difficult to make.

  1. Use of a pediatric oxygenator integrated in a veno-venous hemofiltration circuit to remove CO2: a case report in a severe burn patient with refractory hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Anne-Françoise; Damas, Pierre; Renwart, Ludovic; Amand, Théo; Erpicum, Marie; Morimont, Philippe; Dubois, Bernard; Massion, Paul B

    2014-11-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome management is currently based on lung protective ventilation. Such strategy may lead to hypercapnic acidosis. We report a case of refractory hypercapnia in a severe burn adult, treated with simplified veno-venous extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal technique. We integrated a pediatric oxygenator in a continuous veno-venous hemofiltration circuit. This technique, used during at least 96h, was feasible, sure and efficient with carbon dioxide removal rate up to 32%.

  2. [Burns caused by paint thinner].

    PubMed

    Benbrahim, A; Jerrah, H; Diouri, M; Bahechar, N; Boukind, E H

    2009-12-31

    Flame deriving from paint thinner is not a rare cause of burns in Morocco and we thus considered it useful to conduct an epidemiological survey of paint thinner flame burns (PTFB) in the National Burns Centre (NBC) in the Ibn-Rochd University Hospital Centre in Casablanca, Morocco. The research covered the 10-month period from September 2007 to June 2008.The aim of our work was to present the characteristic features of such burns in order to prevent them by increasing public knowledge regarding the risks involved in using paint thinner, i.e. burns in particular. During the period in question, we colligated 17 cases of PTFB out of a total number of 356 patients admitted to the NBC for acute burns of all aetiologies. The patients' average was 32 yr and they were nearly all male (16 men/1 woman), with past histories of drug addiction and/or delinquency. They were all of low-level socioeconomic class and lived mainly in shanty towns. The burn was often secondary to street violence (92% of the cases).The mean burn surface area was 23% and the burns were often deep and located mainly in the upper limbs and the trunk.

  3. Human acellular dermal matrix grafts for rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sherris, David A; Oriel, Brad S

    2011-09-01

    Rhinoplasty often relies on graft material for structural support in the form of cartilage, bone grafts, or fascia. In addition, pliable grafts are often helpful for contouring and can function as a barrier. Unfortunately, grafts carry the disadvantage of requiring an additional donor site, with associated complications. Human acellular dermal matrix (ADM) biological implants offer an exciting alternative for structural support and nonstructural implantation in rhinoplasty procedures. To examine the efficacy of ADM placement in rhinoplasty and septoplasty, the authors report the results from a series of 51 patients. In this series, there were no cases of infection, skin discoloration, seroma formation, septal perforation, significant resorption, extrusion, or other complications related to ADM placement. Therefore, the authors believe that ADM offers a safe and effective alternative to traditional grafting methods for functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty.

  4. Dermal and Ophthalmic Findings in Pseudohypoaldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Korkut, Sabriye; Gökalp, Emir; Özdemir, Ahmet; Kurtoğlu, Selim; Demirtaş, Şafak; Gül, Ülkü; Baştuğ, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism (PHA) is defined as a state of resistance to aldosterone, a hormone crucial for electrolyte equilibrium. The genetically transmitted type of PHA is primary hypoaldosteronism. Secondary hypoaldosteronism develops as a result of hydronephrosis or hydroureter. PHA patients suffer from severe hyponatremia and a severe clinical condition due to severe loss of salt can be encountered in the neonatal period. Dermal findings in the form of miliaria rubra can also develop in these patients. With the loss of salt, abnormal accumulation of sebum in the eye due to a defect in the sodium channels can also occur. In this paper, a case of PHA in a newborn showing typical dermatological and ophthalmological findings is presented. PMID:26316441

  5. Molecular pathology of brain edema after severe burns in forensic autopsy cases with special regard to the importance of reference gene selection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Zhu, Bao-Li; Guan, Da-Wei; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2013-09-01

    Brain edema is believed to be linked to high mortality incidence after severe burns. The present study investigated the molecular pathology of brain damage and responses involving brain edema in forensic autopsy cases of fire fatality (n = 55) compared with sudden cardiac death (n = 11), mechanical asphyxia (n = 13), and non-brain injury cases (n = 22). Postmortem mRNA and immunohistochemical expressions of aquaporins (AQPs), claudin5 (CLDN5), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were examined. Prolonged deaths due to severe burns showed an increase in brain water content, but relative mRNA quantification, using different normalization methods, showed inconsistent results: in prolonged deaths due to severe burns, higher expression levels were detected for all markers when three previously validated reference genes, PES1, POLR2A, and IPO8, were used for normalization, higher for AQP1 and MMP9 when GAPDH alone was used for normalization and higher for MMP9, but lower for MMP2 when B2M alone was used for normalization. Additionally, when B2M alone was used for normalization, higher expression of AQP4 was detected in acute fire deaths. Furthermore, the expression stability values of these five reference genes calculated by geNorm demonstrated that B2M was the least stable one, followed by GAPDH. In immunostaining, only AQP1 and MMP9 showed differences among the causes of death: they were evident in most prolonged deaths due to severe burns. These findings suggest that systematic analysis of gene expressions using real-time PCR might be a useful procedure in forensic death investigation, and validation of reference genes is crucial.

  6. A review of hydrofluoric acid burn management

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Daniel; Thoma, Achilleas; Bailey, Kristy; Fish, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid (HF) causes a unique chemical burn. Much of the current treatment knowledge of HF burns is derived from case reports, small case series, animal studies and anecdotal evidence. The management can be challenging because clinical presentation and severity of these burns vary widely. Plastic surgeons managing burn patients must have a basic understanding of the pathophysiology, the range of severity in presentation and the current treatment options available for HF burns. The present article reviews the current understanding of the pathophysiology and systemic effects associated with severe HF burns. Furthermore, it distinguishes between minor and life-threatening HF burns and describes several of the basic techniques that are available to treat patients with HF burns. PMID:25114621

  7. Burning Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2006-01-01

    Former Baltimore cop and teacher Ed Burns isn't a masochist. The writer-producer for "The Wire," a critically applauded HBO series about life and death on the streets of Baltimore, is just feverishly trying to save public schools. He thinks American education is hopelessly screwed up, but that it's also the country's only hope. So it…

  8. Dupuytren’s contracture following burn injury of the hand: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Chenicheri; Sugg, Kristoffer B; Huettner, William; Jarrahnejad, Payam

    2008-01-01

    In burn patients, scar contractures adjacent to or across the joints lead to disabling deformities. In Dupuytren’s disease, the proliferative process involves the fascia of the palm and fingers, resulting in disabling flexion contractures of the fingers and the palm. A single insult involving the hand or even a more proximal injury may lead to Dupuytren’s disease. PMID:19554166

  9. Burn Wise - Outreach Materials

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Burn Wise outreach material. Burn Wise is a partnership program of that emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood, the right way, in the right wood-burning appliance to protect your home, health, and the air we breathe.

  10. Bioactives from probiotics for dermal health: functions and benefits.

    PubMed

    Lew, L-C; Liong, M-T

    2013-05-01

    Probiotics have been extensively reviewed for decades, emphasizing on improving general gut health. Recently, more studies showed that probiotics may exert other health-promoting effects beyond gut well-being, attributed to the rise of the gut-brain axis correlations. Some of these new benefits include skin health such as improving atopic eczema, atopic dermatitis, healing of burn and scars, skin-rejuvenating properties and improving skin innate immunity. Increasing evidence has also showed that bacterial compounds such as cell wall fragments, their metabolites and dead bacteria can elicit certain immune responses on the skin and improve skin barrier functions. This review aimed to underline the mechanisms or the exact compounds underlying the benefits of bacterial extract on the skin based on evidences from in vivo and in vitro studies. This review could be of help in screening of probiotic strains with potential dermal enhancing properties for topical applications.

  11. Civilian blast-related burn injuries

    PubMed Central

    Patel, J.N.; Tan, A.; Dziewulski, P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary There is limited English literature describing the experience of a civilian hospital managing blast-related burn injuries. As the largest regional burn unit, we reviewed our cases with the aim of identifying means to improve current management. A 6-year retrospective analysis of all patients coded as sustaining blast-related burns was conducted through the unit’s burns database. Medical case notes were reviewed for information on burn demographics, management and outcomes. 42 patients were identified. Male to female ratio was 37:5. Age range was 12-84 years, (mean=33 years). Total body surface area (%TBSA) burn ranged from 0.25% to 60%, (median=1%). The most common burn injury was flame (31/42, 73.8%). Gas explosions were the most common mechanism of injury (19 cases; 45.2%). 7/42 cases (16.7%) had full ATLS management pre-transfer to the burns unit. The Injury Severity Score (ISS) ranged from 0-43 (median=2). 17/42 (40.4%) patients required admission. 37/36 (88.1%) patients were managed conservatively of which 1 patient later required surgery due to deeper burns. 5/42 (11.9%) patients required surgical management at presentation and these were noted to be burns with >15% TBSA requiring resuscitation. One case required emergency escharotomies and finger amputations. All patients survived their burn injuries. Blast-related burn injuries are generally uncommon in the civilian setting. Following proper assessment, most of these cases can be deemed as minor injuries and managed conservatively. Improvement in burns management education and training at local emergency departments would provide efficient patient care and avoid unnecessary referrals to a burns unit. PMID:27857651

  12. Successful treatment of complex traumatic and surgical wounds with a foetal bovine dermal matrix.

    PubMed

    Hayn, Ernesto

    2014-12-01

    A foetal bovine dermal repair scaffold (PriMatrix, TEI Biosciences) was used to treat complex surgical or traumatic wounds where the clinical need was to avoid skin flaps and to build new tissue in the wound that could be reepithelialised from the wound margins or closed with a subsequent application of a split-thickness skin graft (STSG). Forty-three consecutive cases were reviewed having an average size of 79·3 cm(2) , 50% of which had exposed tendon and/or bone. In a subset of wounds (44·7%), the implantation of the foetal dermal collagen scaffold was also augmented with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Complete wound healing was documented in over 80% of the wounds treated, whether the wound was treated with the foetal bovine dermal scaffold alone (95·2%) or when supplemented with NPWT (82·4%). The scaffold successfully incorporated into wounds with exposed tendon and/or bone to build vascularised, dermal-like tissue. The new tissue in the wound supported STSGs however, in the majority of the cases (88·3%); wound closure was achieved through reepithelialisation of the incorporated dermal scaffold by endogenous wound keratinocytes. The foetal bovine dermal repair scaffold was found to offer an effective alternative treatment strategy for definitive closure of challenging traumatic or surgical wounds on patients who were not suitable candidates for tissue flaps.

  13. Burn Resuscitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    areas involving large areas of skin the patient is exposed to death first from shock . . .’’ [10]. In describing the pathophysiology leading to the shock...state seen in burns he postulated that various irritants , mental and physical, caused vasomotor paresis leading to accumulation of blood in the...resuscitation volumes. Subsequent studies suggested a decrease in abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Oda et al., in 2006, published their experience

  14. A case report of cor pulmonale in a woman without exposure to tobacco smoke: an example of the risks of indoor wood burning.

    PubMed

    Opotowsky, Alexander R; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Mamlin, Joseph J

    2008-01-29

    We present the case of a 67-year-old woman with chronic cor pulmonale. She never smoked tobacco and had no other risk factors for pulmonary disease. In developed nations, chronic obstructive lung disease and cor pulmonale are overwhelmingly associated with tobacco use. However, indoor air pollution, most commonly due to burning of solid biomass fuel such as wood, can cause similar clinical syndromes. At our teaching hospital, there is an epidemic of chronic cor pulmonale among nonsmoking women. We attribute this sex predilection to women's greater exposure to wood smoke. Physicians must be cognizant of its risks and counsel patients on prevention strategies such as improved ventilation.

  15. Joint Use of Sentinel-1 and Landsat-8 data for Burned Areas Mapping: the Case of the Sardinia Island, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, Antonio; Azar, Ramin; Calò, Fabiana; Stroppiana, Daniela; Brivio, Pietro Alessandro; Imperatore, Pasquale

    2016-04-01

    Fires widely affect Mediterranean regions, causing severe threats to human lives and damages to natural environments. The socio-economic impacts of fires on the affected local communities are significant, indeed, the activation of prevention measures and the extinguishment of fires and reclamation of the pre-fire conditions are very expensive. Moreover, fires have also global impacts: they affect global warming and climate changes due to gas and aerosol emissions to atmosphere. In such a context, fire scars mapping and monitoring are fundamental tasks for a sustainable management of natural resources and for the prevention/mitigation of fire risk. With this respect, remotely sensed data offer the opportunity for a regional-up-to-global scale monitoring of areas prone to fires, on a cost-effective and regular basis. In this work, the potential of a joint use of Sentinel-1A (C-band) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) data for detecting burned areas is investigated. The experimental analyses are conducted by focusing on Sardinia Island, which is one of the Italian regions most affected by fire events during summer. Our analysis shows that the capability of monitoring burned areas in the Mediterranean environment can be improved by exploiting information embedded in OLI multispectral bands in conjunction with multi-temporal dual-polarized SAR data. Indeed, limitations experienced in analyses based on the use of only optical data (e.g., cloud cover, spectral overlap/confusion of burned areas with dark soils, water surfaces and shaded regions) may be overcome by using SAR data, owing to the insensitiveness to sunlight-illumination conditions and the cloud-penetrating capability of microwave radiation. Results prove the effectiveness of an integrated approach based on the combination of optical and microwave imagery for the monitoring and mapping of burned areas in vegetated regions.

  16. Analyzing small data sets using Bayesian estimation: the case of posttraumatic stress symptoms following mechanical ventilation in burn survivors

    PubMed Central

    van de Schoot, Rens; Broere, Joris J.; Perryck, Koen H.; Zondervan-Zwijnenburg, Mariëlle; van Loey, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The analysis of small data sets in longitudinal studies can lead to power issues and often suffers from biased parameter values. These issues can be solved by using Bayesian estimation in conjunction with informative prior distributions. By means of a simulation study and an empirical example concerning posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) following mechanical ventilation in burn survivors, we demonstrate the advantages and potential pitfalls of using Bayesian estimation. Methods First, we show how to specify prior distributions and by means of a sensitivity analysis we demonstrate how to check the exact influence of the prior (mis-) specification. Thereafter, we show by means of a simulation the situations in which the Bayesian approach outperforms the default, maximum likelihood and approach. Finally, we re-analyze empirical data on burn survivors which provided preliminary evidence of an aversive influence of a period of mechanical ventilation on the course of PTSS following burns. Results Not suprisingly, maximum likelihood estimation showed insufficient coverage as well as power with very small samples. Only when Bayesian analysis, in conjunction with informative priors, was used power increased to acceptable levels. As expected, we showed that the smaller the sample size the more the results rely on the prior specification. Conclusion We show that two issues often encountered during analysis of small samples, power and biased parameters, can be solved by including prior information into Bayesian analysis. We argue that the use of informative priors should always be reported together with a sensitivity analysis. PMID:25765534

  17. Micronucleus frequency in children exposed to biomass burning in the Brazilian Legal Amazon region: a control case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Amazon represents an area of 61% of Brazilian territory and is undergoing major changes resulting from disorderly economic development, especially the advance of agribusiness. Composition of the atmosphere is controlled by several natural and anthropogenic processes, and emission from biomass burning is one with the major impact on human health. The aim of this study was to evaluate genotoxic potential of air pollutants generated by biomass burning through micronucleus assay in exfoliated buccal cells of schoolchildren in the Brazilian Amazon region. Methods The study was conducted during the dry seasons in two regions of the Brazilian Amazon. The assay was carried out on buccal epithelial cells of 574 schoolchildren between 6-16 years old. Results The results show a significant difference between micronucleus frequencies in children exposed to biomass burning compared to those in a control area. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that in situ biomonitoring using a sensitive and low cost assay (buccal micronucleus assay) may be an important tool for monitoring air quality in remote regions. It is difficult to attribute the increase in micronuclei frequency observed in our study to any specific toxic element integrated in the particulate matters. However, the contribution of the present study lies in the evidence that increased exposure to fine particulate matter generates an increased micronuclei frequency in oral epithelial cells of schoolchildren. PMID:22400801

  18. Trace gas constraints on vertical transport in models: a case study of Indonesian biomass burning emissions in 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. D.; Luo, M.; Worden, J.; Kim, D.; Del Genio, A. D.; Voulgarakis, A.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the use of joint Aura TES and MLS CO retrievals in constraining vertical transport in the NASA GISS ModelE2 composition-climate model. We examine September to November 2006 over the tropics. El Nino-induced dry conditions over western Indonesia led to extensive biomass burning and persistent CO greater than 200 ppb in the upper troposphere. This was one of the highest CO episodes over the MLS period since 2004. We show how improvements in the vertical resolution of trace gas retrievals can help to distinguish between errors in parameterized vertical transport and biases in bottom-up emissions estimates. We simulate the episode using the NASA GISS ModelE2 coupled composition-climate model with different subgrid physics for small ensembles of experiments with perturbed initial conditions. The starting point is the CMIP5 version of the model, in which there was a pronounced vertical CO dipole over the Maritime Continent, but with a CO peak 100 ppb higher than Aura CO in the upper troposphere. With modified cumulus and boundary layer parameterizations, but the same prescribed biomass burning emissions estimates, the upper tropospheric CO bias is significantly reduced. Concurrently, precipitation over the emissions source region is reduced relative to observational estimates, leading to better consistency with the dry conditions under which the burning occurred. We discuss the effects of the physics changes on the roles of convective frequency and depth in reducing the bias.

  19. Clinical, pathological, and etiologic aspects of acquired dermal melanocytosis.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, M; Murakami, F; Ito, M; Asano, M; Baba, T; Kawa, Y; Kubota, Y

    1997-06-01

    To study the pathogenesis of acquired dermal melanocytosis (ADM), we reviewed the clinical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural features of 34 cases (female, 33, and male, 1) of ADM. The patients' ages at onset ranged from 8 to 51 years and averaged 26.8 +/- 12.7 years. There was a positive family history. Gray-brown macules were mostly recognized on the face. Not only active dermal melanocytes but also non-pigmented c-KIT- and TRP-2-positive immature melanocytes were detected in the dermis. Taken together those clinical and histological findings, activation of pre-existing immature melanocytes by sunlight, estrogen, and/or progesterone, and some other factors, may be the most likely mode of the development of ADM. Moreover, using cultured murine neural crest cells as a model of c-KIT-positive immature melanocytes, we confirmed that endothelin-1, which is produced and secreted by keratinocytes after UV-irradiation, affects melanocytes and accelerated melanogenesis.

  20. Cell therapy for full-thickness wounds: are fetal dermal cells a potential source?

    PubMed

    Akershoek, J J; Vlig, M; Talhout, W; Boekema, B K H L; Richters, C D; Beelen, R H J; Brouwer, K M; Middelkoop, E; Ulrich, M M W

    2016-04-01

    The application of autologous dermal fibroblasts has been shown to improve burn wound healing. However, a major hurdle is the availability of sufficient healthy skin as a cell source. We investigated fetal dermal cells as an alternative source for cell-based therapy for skin regeneration. Human (hFF), porcine fetal (pFF) or autologous dermal fibroblasts (AF) were seeded in a collagen-elastin substitute (Novomaix, NVM), which was applied in combination with an autologous split thickness skin graft (STSG) to evaluate the effects of these cells on wound healing in a porcine excisional wound model. Transplantation of wounds with NVM+hFF showed an increased influx of inflammatory cells (e.g., neutrophils, macrophages, CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes) compared to STSG, acellular NVM (Acell-NVM) and NVM+AF at post-surgery days 7 and/or 14. Wounds treated with NVM+pFF presented only an increase in CD8(+) lymphocyte influx. Furthermore, reduced alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) expression in wound areas and reduced contraction of the wounds was observed with NVM+AF compared to Acell-NVM. Xenogeneic transplantation of NVM+hFF increased αSMA expression in wounds compared to NVM+AF. An improved scar quality was observed for wounds treated with NVM+AF compared to Acell-NVM, NVM+hFF and NVM+pFF at day 56. In conclusion, application of autologous fibroblasts improved the overall outcome of wound healing in comparison to fetal dermal cells and Acell-NVM, whereas application of fetal dermal fibroblasts in NVM did not improve wound healing of full-thickness wounds in a porcine model. Although human fetal dermal cells demonstrated an increased immune response, this did not seem to affect scar quality.

  1. The use of physical hydrogels of chitosan for skin regeneration following third-degree burns.

    PubMed

    Boucard, Nadège; Viton, Christophe; Agay, Diane; Mari, Eliane; Roger, Thierry; Chancerelle, Yves; Domard, Alain

    2007-08-01

    Skin repair is an important field of the tissue engineering, especially in the case of extended third-degree burns, where the current treatments are still insufficient in promoting satisfying skin regeneration. Bio-inspired bi-layered physical hydrogels only constituted of chitosan and water were processed and applied to the treatment of full-thickness burn injuries. The aim of the study was at assessing whether this material was totally accepted by the host organism and allowed in vivo skin reconstruction of limited area third-degree burns. A first layer constituted of a rigid protective gel ensured good mechanical properties and gas exchanges. A second soft and flexible layer allowed the material to follow the geometry of the wound and ensured a good superficial contact. To compare, highly viscous solutions of chitosan were also considered. Veterinary experiments were performed on pig's skins and biopsies at days 9, 17, 22, 100 and 293, were analysed by histology and immuno-histochemistry. Only one chitosan material was used for each time. All the results showed that chitosan materials were well tolerated and promoted a good tissue regeneration. They induced inflammatory cells migration and angiogenetic activity favouring a high vascularisation of the neo-tissue. At day 22, type I and IV collagens were synthesised under the granulation tissue and the formation of the dermal-epidermal junction was observed. After 100 days, the new tissue was quite similar to a native skin, especially by its aesthetic aspect and its great flexibility.

  2. Assault by burning in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Haddadin, W

    2012-12-31

    Criminal attacks by burns on women in Jordan are highlighted in this retrospective study carried out of all proved cases of criminal burns in female patients treated at the burn unit of the Royal Rehabilitation Center in Jordan between January 2005 and June 2012. Thirteen patients were included in our study, out of a total of 550 patients admitted, all in the age range of 16-45 yr. Of these 13 women, six were burned by acid throwing, five by hot water, and two by direct flames from fuel thrown over them. Burn percentage ranged from 15 to 75% of the total body surface area, with involvement in most cases of the face and upper trunk. The mean hospital stay was 33 days and the mortality rate was 3/13, i.e. 23%. Violence against women exists in Jordanian society, yet burning assaults are rare. Of these, burning by throwing acid is the most common and most disfiguring act, with a higher mortality rate in domestic environments.

  3. Ultrasonic technique for characterizing skin burns

    DOEpatents

    Goans, Ronald E.; Cantrell, Jr., John H.; Meyers, F. Bradford; Stambaugh, Harry D.

    1978-01-01

    This invention, a method for ultrasonically determining the depth of a skin burn, is based on the finding that the acoustical impedance of burned tissue differs sufficiently from that of live tissue to permit ultrasonic detection of the interface between the burn and the underlying unburned tissue. The method is simple, rapid, and accurate. As compared with conventional practice, it provides the important advantage of permitting much earlier determination of whether a burn is of the first, second, or third degree. In the case of severe burns, the usual two - to three-week delay before surgery may be reduced to about 3 days or less.

  4. Telemedicine utilization to support the management of the burns treatment involving patient pathways in both developed and developing countries: a case study.

    PubMed

    Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Scholl, Jeremiah; Chen, Chiehfeng Cliff; Santos, Martinho D P S; Jian, Wen-Shan; Liou, Der-Ming; Li, Yu-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    This case study reports on the utilization of telemedicine to support the management of the burns treatment in the islands of Sao Tome and Principe by Taipei Medical University-affiliated hospital in Taiwan. The authors share experiences about usage of telemedicine to support treatment of the burn victims in a low-income country that receive reconstructive surgery in a developed country. Throughout the entire care process, telemedicine has been used not only to provide an expert advice from distance but also to help establish and maintain the doctor-patient relationship, to keep patients in contact with their families, and to help educate and consult the medical personal physically present in Sao Tome and Principe. This case study presents the details of how this process has been conducted to date, on what were learned from this process, and on issues that should be considered to improve this process in the future. The authors plan to create instructional videos and post them on YouTube to aid clinical workers providing similar treatment during the acute care and rehabilitation process and also to support eLearning in many situations where it otherwise is not possible to use videoconferencing to establish real-time contact between doctors at the local site and remote specialists.

  5. Antioxidant Nanoplatforms for Dermal Delivery: Melatonin.

    PubMed

    Milán, Aroha Belen Sánchez; Campmany, Ana C Calpena; Naveros, Beatriz Clares

    2017-02-22

    Melatonin (MLT) is emerging as a promising therapeutic agent, mainly due to its role as antioxidant. Substantial evidences show that melatonin is potentially effective on a variety of diseases as cancer, inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. The excellent antioxidant capacity with pharmacokinetics characteristics and the emerging search for new pharmaceutical nanotechnology based systems, make it particularly attractive to elaborate nanoplatforms based on MLT for biomedical or cosmetic dermal applications. Different nanosystems for dermal delivery have been investigated. These nanosystems are expected to play a significant role in the protection of therapeutic functions of MLT, enhanced transdermal permeability and dermal delivery profiles. These nanocarriers not only transport MLT, but also increase the solubility, bioavailability, half-life and antioxidant activity. In the current review, we will focus on nanocarrier production strategies, dermal MLT application and delivery advances in vivo and in vitro. Equally, future perspectives of this assisted MLT delivery will be also discussed.

  6. First Aid: Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Burns KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Burns A A A Scald burns from hot water and other liquids are the most common burns in early childhood. Because burns range from mild ...

  7. Histopathological analysis of the progression pattern of subungual melanoma: late tendency of dermal invasion in the nail matrix area.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun-Tae; Jang, Kee-Taek; Mun, Goo-Hyun; Lee, Dong-Youn; Lee, Jason B

    2014-11-01

    Subungual melanoma is a rare subtype of melanoma that usually originates and spreads from the nail matrix. Because of its poor prognosis and short matrix-to-bone distance, amputation has been traditionally performed. Recently, conservative surgery has been attempted for early subungual melanoma, but the evidence supporting this practice is sparse. As little is known about the progression pattern of subungual melanoma, further advances on the subject may provide better guidance on the optimal surgical approach. Histopathology slides, clinical records, and photographs of 23 cases of subungual melanoma were reviewed. For all cases, each area of the nail unit-proximal nail fold, nail matrix, nail bed, and/or hyponychium-in longitudinal sections was available for histological examination. Growth pattern, dermal invasion, and thickness were assessed in each area of the nail unit. There were five cases of melanoma in situ. Eighteen cases showed dermal invasion in at least one area of the nail unit. There were no cases showing dermal invasion in the nail matrix area only. In four cases, dermal invasion involved areas of the nail unit other than the nail matrix. In 14 cases, dermal invasion involved the nail matrix area as well as other areas of the nail unit. Except for one case, the nail matrix area showed thinner dermal invasion compared with dermal invasion in other areas of the nail unit. In conclusion, dermal invasion of subungual melanoma in the nail matrix area tends to occur later than other areas of the nail unit. Longitudinal incisional biopsy is necessary to accurately evaluate melanoma invasion. The findings of this study suggest that conservative surgical treatment for early subungual melanoma may be justified as the nail matrix area, an area of thin dermis and close proximity to the underlying bone, appears to be more resistant to invasion.

  8. Chronic dermal sinuses as a manifestation of histiocytosis X.

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, S H; Hall, I; Ragge, N; Pritchard, J

    1986-01-01

    Two young patients presented with generalised lymphadenopathy, otorrhoea, otitis, and rash. Over the next few years chronically discharging sinuses began to form over enlarged nodes and histological appearances were typical of histiocytosis X. In neither case were micro-organisms isolated from the lesions, and in both patients healing occurred with immunosuppressive agents. Chronic dermal sinus formation secondary to lymph node disease has never before been recorded as a manifestation of histiocytosis X. Histiocytosis X should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of "suppurative" lymphadenopathy so that appropriate treatment may be given without delay. Images Case 1 PMID:3084014

  9. Frostbite burns caused by liquid oxygen.

    PubMed

    Uygur, Fatih; Sever, Celalettin; Noyan, Nurettin

    2009-01-01

    Frostbite burns are uncommon and they have various etiologies. We will present a case of rapid frostbite burn caused by liquid oxygen. The patient injured both hands from contact with liquid oxygen. The circumstances of this injury and preventive measures are discussed in this case report.

  10. When are burns not accidental?

    PubMed

    Hobbs, C J

    1986-04-01

    One hundred and ninety five children aged up to 6 years with burns and scalds (30 non-accidental and 165 accidental) were studied retrospectively. The history, presentation, and other typical injuries assisted the diagnosis of abuse. Scalds accounted for 81% of accidents and 25% of the cases of abuse, and burns for 17% and 44%, respectively. Scalds usually followed spillage from kitchen containers in accidents and forced tap water immersion in cases of abuse. Burns in cases of both accidents and abuse resulted from contact with a wide range of household appliances, including room heaters. Attention is drawn to the back of the hand as an important site in cases of abuse, as well as the legs, buttocks, and feet. It is speculated that the low level of reporting of this form of child abuse reflects failure of diagnosis.

  11. The conduct of a two-generation reproductive toxicity study via dermal exposure in the Sprague-Dawley rat--a case study with KBR 3023 (a prospective insect repellent).

    PubMed

    Astroff, A B; Freshwater, K J; Young, A D; Stuart, B P; Sangha, G K; Thyssen, J H

    1999-01-01

    KBR 3023, 1-(1-methyl-propoxycarbonyl)-2-(2-hydroxyethyl)-piperidine, a prospective insect repellent being developed by the Bayer Corporation, was evaluated for reproductive toxicity in the Sprague-Dawley rat. As the intended human use of the test compound is topical, the test system was also exposed to the compound via the dermal route. Specifically, the adult rats (P generation) were fitted with Elizabethan collars, to reduce the likelihood of oral ingestion, and dermally administered either 0, 50, 100, or 200 mg KBR 3023/kg body weight throughout the study (5 d/week) beginning at the onset of the 10-week premating period and continuing through the mating, gestation, and lactation phases. Clinical signs and changes in body weight and food consumption were assessed throughout the study. All adults and neonates underwent a gross necropsy examination. Tissues retained for microscopic examination from all adult animals included the kidney, liver, pituitary, reproductive organs, and samples of skin from the shaved dose site. In addition to the parameters noted above, the animals were evaluated for the effect of the test compound on estrous cycling, mating, fertility, gestation length, litter size, pup sex ratio, and pup viability. There were no test compound-related clinical signs or effects on body weight or food consumption observed in either the adults or the pups during any phase of the study. There were no compound-related effects on any reproductive or litter parameters. Dermal findings at the dose site (acanthosis and hyperkeratosis) were noted in both generations. Other than the dermal findings, no compound-related necropsy findings were seen in either the adults or the pups. No compound-related histopathologic findings were noted in the reproductive tissues of either the males or females. Based on these results, KBR 3023, administered as described in this study at dose levels as high as 200 mg/kg body weight (the physical limit of dermal application for this

  12. Ram Burn Observations (RAMBO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Ram Burn Observations (RAMBO) is a Department of Defense experiment that observes shuttle Orbital Maneuvering System engine burns for the purpose of improving plume models. On STS-107 the appropriate sensors will observe selected rendezvous and orbit adjust burns.

  13. Biomass burning influences on atmospheric composition: A case study to assess the impact of aerosol data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keslake, Tim; Chipperfield, Martyn; Mann, Graham; Flemming, Johannes; Remy, Sam; Dhomse, Sandip; Morgan, Will

    2016-04-01

    The C-IFS (Composition Integrated Forecast System) developed under the MACC series of projects and to be continued under the Copernicus Atmospheric Monitoring System, provides global operational forecasts and re-analyses of atmospheric composition at high spatial resolution (T255, ~80km). Currently there are 2 aerosol schemes implemented within C-IFS, a mass-based scheme with externally mixed particle types and an aerosol microphysics scheme (GLOMAP-mode). The simpler mass-based scheme is the current operational system, also used in the existing system to assimilate satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) for improved forecast capability. The microphysical GLOMAP scheme has now been implemented and evaluated in the latest C-IFS cycle alongside the mass-based scheme. The upgrade to the microphysical scheme provides for higher fidelity aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions, accounting for global variations in size distribution and mixing state, and additional aerosol properties such as cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. The new scheme will also provide increased aerosol information when used as lateral boundary conditions for regional air quality models. Here we present a series of experiments highlighting the influence and accuracy of the two different aerosol schemes and the impact of MODIS AOD assimilation. In particular, we focus on the influence of biomass burning emissions on aerosol properties in the Amazon, comparing to ground-based and aircraft observations from the 2012 SAMBBA campaign. Biomass burning can affect regional air quality, human health, regional weather and the local energy budget. Tropical biomass burning generates particles primarily composed of particulate organic matter (POM) and black carbon (BC), the local ratio of these two different constituents often determining the properties and subsequent impacts of the aerosol particles. Therefore, the model's ability to capture the concentrations of these two

  14. Superthin Abdominal Wall Glove-Like Flap Combined With Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy for Soft Tissue Reconstruction in Severely Burned Hands or With Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Sheng; Qiu, Le; Ma, Ben; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong-Jie; Peszel, April; Chen, Xu-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Severe burn and infection to hands always involves the deep structures, such as tendons, joints, and bones. These wounds cannot be closed immediately and therefore creates a high risk for complication. We presented 9 cases with deep dermal burns to the dorsal of the hand (6 electrical burns and 3 thermal crush injuries) with wound infections in 2 cases. The vacuum-assisted closure system was used continuously until the flap reconstruction was performed. A random pattern and superthin abdominal wall skin flap-like glove was designed. The flap was transferred to the defected portion of the dorsum of the hand and resected from the abdominal wall about 3 weeks later. The flaps in 8 of the patients treated by this technique survived completely and partial necrosis of the distal flap occurred in 1 patient. The defect resolved after operative treatment and the function of the hands and fingers were successfully salvaged. All patients resulted in having a satisfactory aesthetic outcome with no or minor discomfort at the abdominal donor area. Integration of the vacuum-assisted closure system and the superthin abdominal wall glove-like flap reconstruction appeared to be successful and should be considered in patients with severely burned hands.

  15. Anaesthetic management of post-burn contractures, a recurrent challenge from oil pipeline vandalization in Nigeria: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Abiodun Oyinpreye

    2009-12-03

    A 13 year- old girl presented to the department with sternomental contractures as a result of facial burns from kerosene explosion. Difficult airway was envisaged. Over the period of time she developed sub-mental contracture with keloids; and was scheduled for release of contractures and flap closure.Anaesthesia was induced with halothane and 100% oxygen. A size 3 laryngeal mask airway (LMA) was inserted and anaesthesia maintained with oxygen/nitrous oxide/halothane/muscle relaxant technique. The successful placement of LMA at 2(nd )attempt was aided by a surgical incision on the submental contracture. Blood loss was 600 mls and a unit of packed red blood cells was transfused. She made full recovery and was discharged home after 1 month.

  16. The wound/burn guidelines - 6: Guidelines for the management of burns.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Yuichiro; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Sakai, Keisuke; Hashimoto, Akira; Hayashi, Masahiro; Madokoro, Naoki; Asano, Yoshihide; Abe, Masatoshi; Ishii, Takayuki; Isei, Taiki; Ito, Takaaki; Inoue, Yuji; Imafuku, Shinichi; Irisawa, Ryokichi; Ohtsuka, Masaki; Ogawa, Fumihide; Kadono, Takafumi; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Kukino, Ryuichi; Kono, Takeshi; Kodera, Masanari; Takahara, Masakazu; Tanioka, Miki; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Hasegawa, Minoru; Fujimoto, Manabu; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Maekawa, Takeo; Matsuo, Koma; Yamasaki, Osamu; Le Pavoux, Andres; Tachibana, Takao; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-09-01

    Burns are a common type of skin injury encountered at all levels of medical facilities from private clinics to core hospitals. Minor burns heal by topical treatment alone, but moderate to severe burns require systemic management, and skin grafting is often necessary also for topical treatment. Inappropriate initial treatment or delay of initial treatment may exert adverse effects on the subsequent treatment and course. Therefore, accurate evaluation of the severity and initiation of appropriate treatment are necessary. The Guidelines for the Management of Burn Injuries were issued in March 2009 from the Japanese Society for Burn Injuries as guidelines concerning burns, but they were focused on the treatment for extensive and severe burns in the acute period. Therefore, we prepared guidelines intended to support the appropriate diagnosis and initial treatment for patients with burns that are commonly encountered including minor as well as moderate and severe cases. Because of this intention of the present guidelines, there is no recommendation of individual surgical procedures.

  17. Spatio-Temporal Trends of Fire in Slash and Burn Agriculture Landscape: A Case Study from Nagaland, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padalia, H.; Mondal, P. P.

    2014-11-01

    Increasing incidences of fire from land conversion and residue burning in tropics is the major concern in global warming. Spatial and temporal monitoring of trends of fire incidences is, therefore, significant in order to determine contribution of carbon emissions from slash and burn agriculture. In this study, we analyzed time-series Terra / Aqua MODIS satellite hotspot products from 2001 to 2013 to derive intra- and inter-annual trends in fire incidences in Nagaland state, located in the Indo-Burma biodiversity hotspot. Time-series regression was applied to MODIS fire products at variable spatial scales in GIS. Significance of change in fire frequency at each grid level was tested using t statistic. Spatial clustering of higher or lower fire incidences across study area was determined using Getis-OrdGi statistic. Maximum fire incidences were encountered in moist mixed deciduous forests (46%) followed by secondary moist bamboo brakes (30%). In most parts of the study area fire incidences peaked during March while in warmer parts (e.g. Mon district dominated by indigenous people) fire activity starts as early as during November and peaks in January. Regression trend analysis captured noticeable areas with statistically significant positive (e.g. Mokokchung, Wokha, Mon, Tuensang and Kiphire districts) and negative (e.g. Kohima and north-western part of Mokokchung district) inter-annual fire frequency trends based on area-based aggregation of fire occurrences at different grid sizes. Localization of spatial clusters of high fire incidences was observed in Mokokchung, Wokha, Mon,Tuensang and Kiphire districts.

  18. Aeromonas hydrophila in a burn patient.

    PubMed

    Yasti, Ahmet Cinar; Otan, Emrah; Doganay, Mutlu; Kama, Nuri A

    2009-01-01

    Infectious consequences are still a major problem and leading cause of mortality in burn patients. Among others, aeromonads need special concern because they mimic pseudomonal infections; however, they have a more rapid progression with considerable mortality if undiagnosed promptly. Here, we present a major burn case extinguished with tap water pooled in a tank. With the possibility of aeromonal infection in mind, the patient underwent aggressive debridement with proper antibiotic medication, which resulted in a successful patient management. Aeromonads should always be kept in mind in burn cases that contacted with tanked water or soil after the burn.

  19. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    PubMed

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome.

  20. MicroRNA 181b regulates decorin production by dermal fibroblasts and may be a potential therapy for hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Peter; Ding, Jie; Tredget, Edward E

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is a frequent fibroproliferative complication following deep dermal burns leading to impaired function and lifelong disfigurement. Decorin reduces fibrosis and induces regeneration in many tissues, and is significantly downregulated in hypertrophic scar and normal deep dermal fibroblasts. It was hypothesized that microRNAs in these fibroblasts downregulate decorin and blocking them would increase decorin and may prevent hypertrophic scarring. Lower decorin levels were found in hypertrophic scar as compared to normal skin, and in deep as compared to superficial dermis. A decorin 3' un-translated region reporter assay demonstrated microRNA decreased decorin in deep dermal fibroblasts, and microRNA screening predicted miR- 24, 181b, 421, 526b, or 543 as candidates. After finding increased levels of mir-181b in deep dermal fibroblasts, it was demonstrated that TGF-β1 stimulation decreased miR-24 but increased miR-181b and that hypertrophic scar and deep dermis contained increased levels of miR-181b. By blocking miR-181b with an antagomiR, it was possible to increase decorin protein expression in dermal fibroblasts. This suggests miR-181b is involved in the differential expression of decorin in skin and wound healing. Furthermore, blocking miR-181b reversed TGF-β1 induced decorin downregulation and myofibroblast differentiation in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts, suggesting a potential therapy for hypertrophic scar.

  1. Thigh burn associated with laptop computer use.

    PubMed

    Paulius, Karina; Napoles, Phyllis; Maguina, Pirko

    2008-01-01

    Laptop computers are an uncommon source of burns to the thighs and perineum. Burns can result from the prolonged contact of hot surfaces at the base of the computer with the user's lap. The authors report a case of second-degree burns to the thigh of an otherwise healthy patient that resulted from prolonged use of the laptop. We measured the temperatures of the patient's computer and the temperatures of other popular laptop computers. Laptops can develop temperatures that can pose a risk for burns if the skin is exposed for prolonged periods of time. Patients with impaired lower extremity sensation, altered consciousness, or decreased mobility are at higher risk for laptop burns. To their knowledge, this is the first case report of such a burn injury in the American literature.

  2. Assault by burning in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Das, Kishore Kumar; Khondokar, M Sazzad; Quamruzzaman, M; Ahmed, Syed Shamsuddin; Peck, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Assault by burning in Dhaka, Bangladesh, occurs in a variety of forms, resulting from various causes and motives. A total of 311 cases of intentional burns from the Burn Unit of Dhaka Medical College Hospital from April 2004 to May 2011 (6 years) were studied by retrospective and prospective observational review. The majority of victims (68%) were female. Concentrated sulphuric acid was the most commonly used chemical for attack. Disfigurement was the principal complication (mortality, 4%). Dowry-related issues, divorce and other marital quarrels were frequent backgrounds for assault by burning. Kerosene oil was used to ignite 78 girls or young women, most often related to conflicts over dowry (mortality 97%). A total of 102 victims (32%) in all burn groups were attacked because of dowry-related issues. Intentional contact burns were often inflicted on domestic servants. Although physical morbidity and mortality were not reported in contact and other types of burns, psychological disturbances were reported in all victims. A few victims had been assaulted prior to receiving burns, and fractures and deformities were also present on examination at the time of presentation for burn treatment. Ophthalmic injury, with frequent visual impairment, was very common in cases of chemical attack. Legal and social support for victims and their families are frequently inadequate to compensate for losses. Clearly, more attention in our community should be focussed on the prevention of burn assaults, adequate compensation and medical care for victims, as well as speedy retribution for perpetrators.

  3. Chemical Debridement of Burns

    PubMed Central

    Levenson, Stanley M.; Kan, Dorinne; Gruber, Charles; Crowley, Leo V.; Lent, Richard; Watford, Alvin; Seifter, Eli

    1974-01-01

    The development of effective, non-toxic (local and systemic) methods for the rapid chemical (enzymatic and non-enzymatic) debridement of third degree burns would dramatically reduce the morbidity and mortality of severely burned patients. Sepsis is still the major cause of death of patients with extensive deep burns. The removal of the devitalized tissue, without damage to unburned skin or skin only partially injured by burning, and in ways which would permit immediate (or very prompt) skin grafting, would lessen substantially the problems of sepsis, speed convalescence and the return of these individuals to society as effective human beings, and would decrease deaths. The usefulness and limitations of surgical excision for patients with extensive third degree burns are discussed. Chemical debridement lends itself to complementary use with surgical excision and has the potential advantage over surgical excision in not requiring anesthesia or a formal surgical operation. The authors' work with the chemical debridement of burns, in particular the use of Bromelain, indicates that this approach will likely achieve clinical usefulness. The experimental studies indicate that rapid controlled debridement, with minimal local and systemic toxicity, is possible, and that effective chemotherapeutic agents may be combined with the Bromelain without either interfering with the actions of the other. The authors believe that rapid (hours) debridement accomplished by the combined use of chemical debriding and chemotherapeutic agents will obviate the possibility of any increase in infection, caused by the use of chemical agents for debridement, as reported for Paraenzyme21 and Travase.39,48 It is possible that the short term use of systemic antibiotics begun just before and continued during, and for a short time after, the rapid chemical debridement may prove useful for the prevention of infection, as appears to be the case for abdominal operations of the clean-contaminated and

  4. Case Study: Videogame Distraction Reduces Behavioral Distress in a Preschool-Aged Child Undergoing Repeated Burn Dressing Changes: A Single-Subject Design

    PubMed Central

    Sil, Soumitri; Burns, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This single-subject design study evaluated the feasibility and efficacy of passive and interactive videogame distraction on behavioral distress for a preschool-aged child receiving repeated burn dressing changes. Method A 4-year-old girl underwent 3 baseline and 10 videogame distraction sessions (5 passive and 5 interactive) using a restricted alternating treatments design. Observed behavioral distress was coded, and parents and nurses rated the child’s distress and cooperative behavior. Results Relative to baseline, behavioral distress decreased and cooperative behavior increased immediately after the onset of videogame distraction. Single Case Randomization Tests revealed significantly lower behavioral distress and greater cooperation during interactive videogame distraction relative to passive videogame distraction. Conclusions Interactive videogame distraction appears to be a feasible and effective pain management strategy for a preschool-aged child undergoing repeated painful medical procedures. PMID:23248343

  5. Early burn wound excision and skin grafting postburn trauma restores in vivo neutrophil delivery to inflammatory lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Tchervenkov, J.I.; Epstein, M.D.; Silberstein, E.B.; Alexander, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    This study assessed the effect of early vs delayed postburn wound excision and skin grafting on the in vivo neutrophil delivery to a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction and a bacterial skin lesion (BSL). Male Lewis rats were presensitized to keyhole-limpet hemocyanin. Group 1 comprised sham controls. Groups 2 through 4 were given a 30% 3 degrees scald burn, but the burn wounds were excised, and skin was grafted on days 1, 3, and 7, respectively, after the burn. Group 5 comprised burn controls. Twelve days after burn trauma, all rats were injected at different intervals (during a 24-hour period) with a trio of intradermal injections of keyhole-limpet hemocyanin, Staphylococcus aureus 502A, and saline at different sites. In vivo neutrophil delivery to these dermal lesions was determined by injecting indium in 111 oxyquinoline-labeled neutrophils isolated from similarly treated groups of rats. Neutrophil delivery to DTH and BSL lesions was restored to normal by excision and skin grafting of the burn wound one day after burn trauma. Waiting three days after burn trauma to excise and skin graft the wound partially, but not completely, restored the in vivo neutrophil delivery to DTH and BSL lesions. Waiting one week to excise and skin graft a burn wound resulted in no improvement in neutrophil delivery to DTH and BSL dermal lesions. It was concluded that burn wound excision and skin grafting immediately after burn trauma restored in vivo neutrophil delivery to a BSL and DTH dermal lesion. This may, in part, explain the beneficial effect of early aggressive burn wound debridement in patients with burn injuries.

  6. Orion Burn Management, Nominal and Response to Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Ryan; Goodman, John L.; Barrett, Charles P.; Pohlkamp, Kara; Robinson, Shane

    2016-01-01

    An approach for managing Orion on-orbit burn execution is described for nominal and failure response scenarios. The burn management strategy for Orion takes into account per-burn variations in targeting, timing, and execution; crew and ground operator intervention and overrides; defined burn failure triggers and responses; and corresponding on-board software sequencing functionality. Burn-to- burn variations are managed through the identification of specific parameters that may be updated for each progressive burn. Failure triggers and automatic responses during the burn timeframe are defined to provide safety for the crew in the case of vehicle failures, along with override capabilities to ensure operational control of the vehicle. On-board sequencing software provides the timeline coordination for performing the required activities related to targeting, burn execution, and responding to burn failures.

  7. Heating pad burns in anesthetic skin.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, T R; Hammond, D C; Keip, D; Argenta, L C

    1985-07-01

    Patients requiring reconstruction by muscle or musculocutaneous flaps often have an associated area of skin anesthesia. This skin is susceptible to trauma because of its insensibility. This study reports 3 cases in which patients sustained deep partial-thickness burns of anesthetic skin following flap reconstruction. All burns healed by reepithelialization. Following flap reconstruction, patients should be warned regarding the use of heating pads. Burns of this type represent a preventable complication of flap reconstruction.

  8. Site-specific rectocele repair with dermal graft augmentation: comparison of porcine dermal xenograft (Pelvicol) and human dermal allograft.

    PubMed

    Biehl, Roger C; Moore, Robert D; Miklos, John R; Kohli, Neeraj; Anand, Indu S; Mattox, T Fleming

    2008-01-01

    This study is a retrospective chart review comparing 195 women who underwent rectocele repair with either a porcine dermal xenograft or human allogenic cadaveric dermal graft augmentation over a two year period. A site-specific defect repair was completed prior to augmentation with the graft. Examinations were performed preoperatively and postoperatively using the pelvic organ prolapse quantification system. Questionnaires were used to assess constipation and dyspareunia. De novo dyspareunia and cure rates for constipation and dyspareunia were not statistically different between the two groups. Site-specific fascial rectocele repairs with xenograft or allograft augmentation were found to have similar complication rates as well as objective and subjective cure rates.

  9. Pediatric burns in Mosul: an epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Al-Zacko, S M; Zubeer, H G; Mohammad, A S

    2014-06-30

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the characteristics and case fatality rate of pediatric burns in Mosul, Iraq. The study group was burn patients aged 14 years and under who were admitted to the Burns Unit in Al-Jamhoori Teaching Hospital from the 1(st) of March 2011 to the 1(st) of March 2012. Of the 459 emergency burn admissions, 209 (45.53%) were pediatric patients up to 14 years of age, with a mean age of 4.73±3.61 years. Scald was the most common type of burn and occurred mainly in domestic settings. The mean total body surface area (TBSA) burned was 19.73±17.15%. Thirty-five patients died during the study period, giving a case fatality rate of 16.75%. The maximum number of deaths occurred in the 2-4 years age group. The case fatality rate was high in patients having more than 40% TBSA involvement. Flame burns were significantly more fatal than scalds, with a fatality rate of 35.35% and 12.05% respectively; (p=0.0001). In conclusion, given that most pediatric burn accidents occur at home, burn prevention should be focused on improving living conditions and on providing an educational program for parents.

  10. Estimating terrestrial amphibian pesticide body burden through dermal exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal exposure presents a potentially significant but understudied route for pesticide uptake in terrestrial amphibians. Our study measured dermal uptake of pesticides of varying hydrophobicity (logKow) in frogs. Amphibians were indirectly exposed to one of five pesticide active...

  11. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crow, Heidi C; Gonzalez, Yoly

    2013-02-01

    Pain in the tongue or oral tissues described as "burning" has been referred to by many terms including burning mouth syndrome. When a burning sensation in the mouth is caused by local or systemic factors, it is called secondary burning mouth syndrome and when these factors are treated the pain will resolve. When burning mouth syndrome occurs in the absence of identified risk indicators, the term primary burning mouth syndrome is utilized. This article focuses on descriptions, etiologic theories, and management of primary burning mouth syndrome, a condition for which underlying causative agents have been ruled out.

  12. Dermal injection of immunocytes induces psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Wrone-Smith, T; Nickoloff, B J

    1996-10-15

    Establishing direct and causal relationships among the confederacy of activated cell types present in psoriasis has been hampered by lack of an animal model. Within psoriatic plaques there are hyperplastic keratinocytes, infiltrating immunocytes, and activated endothelial cells. The purpose of this study was to determine if psoriasis is primarily a disorder of keratinocytes or the immune system. Using a newly developed experimental system in which full-thickness human skin is orthotopically transferred onto severe combined immunodeficient mice, autologous immunocytes were injected into dermis, and the resultant phenotype characterized by clinical, histologic, and immunophenotypic analyses. Engraftment of samples included both uninvolved/ symptomless (PN) skin removed from patients with psoriasis elsewhere, or from healthy individuals with no skin disease (NN skin). In 10 different experiments involving 6 different psoriasis patients, every PN skin was converted to a full-fledged psoriatic plaque skin by injection of autologous blood-derived immunocytes. In all but one psoriatic patient, the immunocytes required preactivation with IL-2 and superantigens to convert PN skin into psoriatic plaque skin. In every case, resultant plaques were characterized by visible presence of flaking and thickened skin, loss of the granular cell layer, prominent elongation of rete pegs with a dermal angiogenic tissue reaction, and infiltration within the epidermis by T cells. Lesional skin displayed 20 different antigenic determinants of the psoriatic phenotype. None of the four NN skin samples injected with autologous immunocytes converted to psoriatic plaques. We conclude that psoriasis is caused primarily by the ability of pathogenetic blood-derived immunocytes to induce secondary activation and disordered growth of endogenous cutaneous cells including keratinocytes and vascular endothelium.

  13. Dermal injection of immunocytes induces psoriasis.

    PubMed Central

    Wrone-Smith, T; Nickoloff, B J

    1996-01-01

    Establishing direct and causal relationships among the confederacy of activated cell types present in psoriasis has been hampered by lack of an animal model. Within psoriatic plaques there are hyperplastic keratinocytes, infiltrating immunocytes, and activated endothelial cells. The purpose of this study was to determine if psoriasis is primarily a disorder of keratinocytes or the immune system. Using a newly developed experimental system in which full-thickness human skin is orthotopically transferred onto severe combined immunodeficient mice, autologous immunocytes were injected into dermis, and the resultant phenotype characterized by clinical, histologic, and immunophenotypic analyses. Engraftment of samples included both uninvolved/ symptomless (PN) skin removed from patients with psoriasis elsewhere, or from healthy individuals with no skin disease (NN skin). In 10 different experiments involving 6 different psoriasis patients, every PN skin was converted to a full-fledged psoriatic plaque skin by injection of autologous blood-derived immunocytes. In all but one psoriatic patient, the immunocytes required preactivation with IL-2 and superantigens to convert PN skin into psoriatic plaque skin. In every case, resultant plaques were characterized by visible presence of flaking and thickened skin, loss of the granular cell layer, prominent elongation of rete pegs with a dermal angiogenic tissue reaction, and infiltration within the epidermis by T cells. Lesional skin displayed 20 different antigenic determinants of the psoriatic phenotype. None of the four NN skin samples injected with autologous immunocytes converted to psoriatic plaques. We conclude that psoriasis is caused primarily by the ability of pathogenetic blood-derived immunocytes to induce secondary activation and disordered growth of endogenous cutaneous cells including keratinocytes and vascular endothelium. PMID:8878440

  14. High-temperature rapid pyrometamorphism induced by a charcoal pit burning: The case of Ricetto, central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, Flavio; Larocca, Francesco; Improta, Salvatore

    Bulk chemistry and mineralogy of the peculiar rock of Ricetto (Carseolani Mts., Central Apennines, Italy) was studied to resolve its controversial origin: igneous dyke or anthropic product. This hybrid rock consists of a colorless, felsic component made up of glass plus quartz, and a brown, femic component made up of fans and spherulites of diopside, calcic plagioclase, wollastonite, and melilite. Textural relationships indicate very rapid cooling and immiscibility phenomena. The bulk chemistry of the rock is the same as that of the surrounding siliciclastic sandstone. The 14C analysis of a coal fragment from bottom of the body yields the conventional age of 227(+/-50) years. The Ricetto occurrence is an example of pyrometamorphism of a siliceous limestone induced by a charcoal pit burning. The small size of the heat source at Ricetto caused an intense but short-lived melting of the country rock. Prograde metamorphism caused a temperature increase up to 1,000-1,100 °C when melilite crystallization conditions were reached at appreciable P(CO2) and high f(O2). Melting occurred in a close system represented by the simplified equation: 3Cal+16.5Qtz+Ms+Bt-->Mel+Melt+2H2O+3CO2+0.5O2. Diopside+calcic plagioclase+wollastonite formed by melilite breakdown during rapid cooling, through the reaction: 6Mel+6Qtz+0.5O2-->3Di+2An+7Wo. Liquid immiscibility caused the separation between the felsic melt component and the femic melilite-bearing component. Immiscibility was characterized by different fractionation of alumina and alkalies between these two phases. Differences in bulk, glass, and mineral chemistry between the Ricetto and other melilite-bearing pyrometamorphic rocks can be attributed mainly to different protoliths.

  15. Leukoencephalopathy associated with extensive burns.

    PubMed Central

    Gregorios, J B

    1982-01-01

    Unusual neuropathological changes were observed in two cases following extensive burns. These consisted of perivascular areas of demyelination distributed symmetrically in the brain and affecting the white matter predominantly. One case in addition had widespread petecchial and ring haemorrhages characteristic of brain purpura. Both patients sustained second and third degree burns in greater than 50% of the body surface area, developed metabolic acidosis, sepsis, disturbance in consciousness and multiple episodes of cardiorespiratory arrest prior to death. A toxic metabolic state related to a burn toxin released from the damaged tissue or from bacterial action to the tissue in addition to low platelet level is proposed as the major pathogenetic factor in the development of the neurological symptoms and the patients' demise. Images PMID:6754873

  16. Management of gingival recession with acellular dermal matrix graft: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, V. R.; Ramakrishnan, T.; Manikandan, D.; Lambodharan, R.; Karthikeyan, B.; Niazi, Thanvir Mohammed; Ulaganathan, G.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Obtaining root coverage has become an important part of periodontal therapy. The aims of this studyare to evaluate the clinical efficacy of acellular dermal matrix graft in the coverage of denuded roots and also to examine the change in the width of keratinized gingiva. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 sites with more than or equal to 2 mm of recession depth were taken into the study, for treatment with acellular dermal matrix graft. The clinical parameters such as recession depth, recession width, width of keratinized gingiva, probing pocket depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL) were measured at the baseline, 8th week, and at the end of the study (16th week). The defects were treated with a coronally positioned pedicle graft combined with acellular dermal matrix graft. Results: Out of 20 sites treated with acellular dermal matrix graft, seven sites showed complete root coverage (100%), and the mean root coverage obtained was 73.39%. There was a statistically significant reduction in recession depth, recession width, and probing PD. There was also a statistically significant increase in width of keratinized gingiva and also gain in CAL. The postoperative results were both clinically and statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: The results of this study were esthetically acceptable to the patients and clinically acceptable in all cases. From this study, it may be concluded that acellular dermal matrix graft is an excellent substitute for autogenous graft in coverage of denuded roots. PMID:27829749

  17. Pattern of burns in child abuse.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Peter; Palmer, John; Garvey, Richard; Atweh, Nabil; Fidler, Philip

    2007-03-01

    Cases of burns from child abuse are low because of under-reporting, low index of suspicion, or lack of verity proof. Although the reported incidence of child abuse by burns is 4 to 39 per cent, less than one-half are substantiated. We retrospectively reviewed all burns in children less than 6 years old admitted to our burn center within an 8-year period (1997-2003). Of the 155 children less than 6 years old admitted with burns within the study period, only six cases (3.8%) were confirmed as occurring from abuse. Scald injury was the most common cause of accidental and abuse burns. Burns by child abuse occur mostly from tap water (50%) and usually in children less than 2 years old. Whenever the extremities were involved, the left side was always included. In extreme cases, however, multiple areas of the body were involved with intervening spared sites. The perpetrator was the mother's boyfriend in all cases. Burns in children less than 2 years old left in the care of the mother's boyfriend, involving the left extremity (or extremities), and caused by tap water should prompt the clinician to more actively confirm or exclude abuse.

  18. Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease

    PubMed Central

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Mayne, Peter J; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process. PMID:23326202

  19. Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease.

    PubMed

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Mayne, Peter J; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process.

  20. Propolis and amnion reepithelialise second-degree burns in rats.

    PubMed

    Pessolato, Alicia Greyce Turatti; Martins, Daniele dos Santos; Ambrósio, Carlos Eduardo; Mançanares, Celina Almeida Furlanetto; de Carvalho, Ana Flávia

    2011-11-01

    Burns are serious consequences of trauma in terms of both imminent mortality and prolonged periods of morbidity. They are often accompanied by unsatisfactory cosmetic as well as functional and psychological outcomes. These complications emphasise the need for stronger efforts in achieving greater diversity and effectiveness in the treatment of skin burns. This study aimed to verify the effectiveness of gross and microscopic epidermal and dermal responses in the process of regenerative repair or healing of burns in rats that were treated either daily with 5% propolis ointment or by autologous amnion graft. Second-degree burns were inflicted in the neck region of female rats by contact with a hot metal (at 130 °C) for 5 s. Propolis treatment accelerated the process of tissue repair and led to decreased local inflammation, which indicates that treatment with propolis was successful in the initial period (7 days) and stimulated the production of collagen fibre (assessed by morphometry) in all the periods evaluated (14 and 21 days). Amnion treatment inhibited local inflammation (assessed macroscopically), stimulated local epithelial regeneration (assessed microscopically) and stimulated the production of collagen fibre (assessed by morphometry) in the days following burn. These treatments offer new therapeutic strategies for treating severe skin burns; these strategies may allow the minimisation of scar formation, a more rapid return of function and, ultimately, a better quality of life for burn patients.

  1. LINKING DERMAL MODELING AND LOADING DATA TO PREDICT LONG-TERM DOSES FROM INTERMITTENT DERMAL CONTACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we assess dermal exposure and dose resulting from intermittent contact with residue-contaminated surfaces. These estimates require an understanding of (1) the quantitative relationship between exposure and absorbed dose; (2) the impact of intermittent exposure on ...

  2. 40 CFR 798.2250 - Dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... clinical abnormalities, gross lesions, identified target organs, body weight changes, effect on mortality... (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Subchronic Exposure § 798.2250 Dermal toxicity. (a) Purpose. In...-observed-effect level and toxic effects associated with continuous or repeated exposure to a test...

  3. 40 CFR 798.2250 - Dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... clinical abnormalities, gross lesions, identified target organs, body weight changes, effect on mortality... (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Subchronic Exposure § 798.2250 Dermal toxicity. (a) Purpose. In...-observed-effect level and toxic effects associated with continuous or repeated exposure to a test...

  4. Dermal exudate macrophages. Induction in dermal chambers and response to lymphokines.

    PubMed Central

    Goihman-Yahr, M; Ulrich, M; Noya-León, A; Rojas, A; Convit, J

    1975-01-01

    Chambers were implanted in the dorsum of guinea-pigs at the dermal-subcutaneous junction. Exudates were induced and harvested. Macrophages obtained were able to migrate in vitro. If procured from sensitized donors, macrophage migration was inhibited by the corresponding antigen. Dermal exudate macrophages are therefore subject to the effect of lymphokines. The chamber model may be useful for in vivo studies of cell to cell and cell-parasite interactions. PMID:1212821

  5. Burn-related peripheral neuropathy: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yiji; Lineaweaver, William C; Zheng, Xianyou; Chen, Zenggan; Mullins, Fred; Zhang, Feng

    2017-03-24

    Peripheral neuropathy is the most frequent disabling neuromuscular complication of burns. However, the insidious and progressive onset of burn neuropathy makes it often undiagnosed or overlooked. In our study, we reviewed the current studies on the burn-related peripheral neuropathy to summarize the morbidity, mechanism, detecting method and management of peripheral neuropathy in burn patients. Of the 1533 burn patients included in our study, 98 cases (6.39%) were presented with peripheral neuropathy. Thermal and electrical burns were the most common etiologies. Surgical procedures, especially nerve decompression, showed good effect on functional recovery of both acute and delayed peripheral neuropathy in burn patients. It is noteworthy that, for early detection and prevention of peripheral neuropathy, electrodiagnostic examinations should be performed on burn patients independent of symptoms. Still, the underlying mechanisms of burn-related peripheral neuropathy remain to be clarified.

  6. MUCORMYCOSIS IN SEVERELY BURNED PATIENTS. REPORT OF TWO CASES PRESENTING EXTENSIVE DESTRUCTION OF THE FACE AND NASAL CAVITY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Two cases of fatal mucormycosis presenting rapid widespread destruction of the face and nasal cavity are reported as a complication of extensive...recognition of mucormycosis infection depends upon its distinctive dry, black, ischemic necrosis of the face and nasal cavity with early spread to the orbit

  7. A clinico-epidemiological study of rescuer burns.

    PubMed

    Basra, Baljeet Kumar; Suri, Manav P; Patil, Nilesh; Atha, Ravish; Patel, Natvar; Sachde, Jayesh P; Shaikh, M F

    2014-08-01

    Rescuer burn is a relatively newer terminology introduced to define the burns sustained by a person attempting to rescue a primary burn victim. Few studies have been published thus far on this peculiar type of burns. Due to the general neglect of the rescuer burns victim and discontinuation of treatment in most cases, once the primary victim dies, the rescuer often ends up in badly infected wounds and has a delayed return to work. A prospective study was conducted at the B J Medical College and Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad from January 2009 to December 2012 on the rescuer burns patients treated in its burns and plastic surgery department. 3074 patients of burns received treatment during the period of study. Of these, 48 patients gave the history of sustaining burns while trying to rescue a burns victim. Male to female ratio of rescuers was approximately 7:1. It was significantly higher as compared to the ratio of 1:0.8 of females to male burn victims observed at our centre (p≤0.01). Average age of the rescuers was higher in males as compared to females but the difference was not significant (p≥0.05). Of the 45 cases of female primary burns victims, male rescuer was husband of the primary victim in 41/45 cases (91.1%), mother was rescuer in three cases (6.6% cases) and sister was rescuer in one case. Though multiple people came to rescue a burns victim, in all cases, it was seen that it was the first rescuer who sustained burns himself or herself. None of the rescuers had any knowledge of the techniques and precautions to be taken while performing a rescue operation irrespective of their education status, indirectly pointing to the lack of any teaching on burns rescue in the school education curriculum.

  8. Exploring social and infrastructural factors affecting open burning of municipal solid waste (MSW) in Indian cities: A comparative case study of three neighborhoods of Delhi.

    PubMed

    Ramaswami, Anu; Baidwan, Navneet Kaur; Nagpure, Ajay Singh

    2016-11-01

    Open municipal solid waste (MSW)-burning is a major source of particulate matter emissions in developing world cities. Despite a legal ban, MSW-burning is observed ubiquitously in Indian cities with little being known about the factors shaping it. This study seeks to uncover social and infrastructural factors that affect MSW-burning at the neighborhood level. We couple physical assessments of the infrastructure provision and the MSW-burning incidences in three different neighborhoods of varying socio-economic status in Delhi, with an accompanying study of the social actors (interviews of waste handlers and households) to explore the extent to which, and potential reasons why, MSW-burning occurs. The observed differences in MSW-burning incidences range from 130 km(-2) day(-1) in low-income to 30 km(-2) day(-1) in the high-income areas. However, two high-income areas neighborhoods with functional infrastructure service also showed statistical differences in MSW-burning incidences. Our interviews revealed that, while the waste handlers were aware of the health risks associated with MSW-burning, it was not a high priority in the context of the other difficulties they faced. The awareness of the legal ban on MSW-burning was low among both waste handlers and households. In addition to providing infrastructure for waste pickup, informal restrictions from residents and neighborhood associations can play a significant role in restricting MSW-burning at the neighborhood scale. A more efficient management of MSW requires a combined effort that involves interplay of both social and infrastructural systems.

  9. Isolation of fungi belonging to the genera Geotrichum and Trichosporum from human dermal lesions.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, A; De Uribe, L

    1976-08-30

    Isolates of Geotrichum and Trichosporum spp. obtained from patients with a variety of dermal lesions were studied. Among 2,202 cases examined, microorganisms of these genera were recovered from 100 (4,5%); there were 38 isolated of Geotrichum- and 62 of Trichosporum- spp. Most isolations were obtained from nails: 52 cases. The species most frequently found were T. beigelii (25 cases) and G. candidum (30 cases). In 50 of the patients, these fungi were isolated in pure culture, in an additional 40 Trichosporum spp. were found. Mixed cultures with C. albicans were observed in 28 patients, with other Candida spp. in 16 and with dermatophytes in 6. Among the patients whose isolations occurred in pure cultures, the number of colonies recovered was large in 20 cases, 1 with Geotrichum candidum - 19 with Trichosporum (16 T. beigelii, 3 T. capitatum). The relationship between the isolated yeast-like fungi and the dermal lesion was considered to be direct in these 20 patients.

  10. American Burn Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the Journal's website MONTHLY HEADLINES from MSKTC (Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center) The American Burn Association Web site contains general information for burn care professionals. The ABA Web site is not intended ...

  11. First Aid: Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Kitchen: Household Safety Checklist Fireworks Safety First Aid: Sunburn Firesetting Fire Safety Burns ... Being Safe in the Kitchen Finding Out About Fireworks Safety Playing With Fire? Dealing With Burns Fireworks ...

  12. Burning Rate Emulator

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Burning Rate Emulator is a gas fuel investigation attempting to emulate the burning of solids to improve our understanding of materials''flammability over a wide range of conditions. The approa...

  13. Profile of pediatric burns Indian experience in a tertiary care burn unit.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, K Mathangi; Sankar, Janani; Venkatraman, Jayaraman

    2005-05-01

    Pediatric burns admitted to the tertiary care burn facility of Kanchi Kamakoti CHILDS Trust Hospital in Chennai (India) were retrospectively analysed between 1992 and 2003. Five hundred and thirty-five burn cases were admitted during these years. These children belonged to the age group of 0-18 years (as WHO has increased the pediatric age group range to 0 to 18 years). The etiology of these burns was looked into and the outcome of these patients in respect to etiology and complications were studied. After analysis, they were classified according to age, sex, TBSA and the occurrence of infection during the course of treatment. The complications that really affected the outcome were looked into and infection ranked first in fatal cases. Inhalation burns were not very common in our group and were associated only with large flame burns, which occur when a child is burnt while the mother commits suicide, or in cases of abuse of female children in a closed room with lots of inflammable upholstery. Scalds were the most common type of burn among children under 4 years of age. Flame burns predominated the older age group. Although there were 13 deaths among the entire group, the majority occurred within the 2-4 years age group. There was no significant gender difference with respect to mortality. Large burn size and infection were the strongest predictors of mortality.

  14. Dermal Titanium Dioxide Deposition Associated With Intralesional Triamcinolone Injection.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Brandon E; Bashey, Sameer; Cole, Christine; Abraham, Jerrold L; Ragsdale, Bruce; Ngo, Binh

    2016-12-01

    Cutaneous discoloration secondary to dermal deposition of titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles is recognized but seldom reported in the literature. In this report, the authors describe the case of a 61-year-old gentleman, with a long history of alopecia areata, who presented with numerous, discrete dark blue macules on the scalp. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis ultimately identified the macules as deposits of TiO2. The patient had a history of intralesional triamcinolone injections for management of alopecia areata. A sample of generic 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide paste was analyzed and found to contain many TiO2 particles analogous to those seen in the patient's biopsy sample. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of TiO2 deposition in the dermis likely resulting from topical combined with intralesional triamcinolone injection.

  15. Minor burns - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... the burn: Use cool water, not ice. The extreme cold from ice can injure the tissue even more. If possible, especially if the burn is caused by chemicals, hold the burned skin under cool running water for 10 to 15 minutes until it ...

  16. Ciguatera neurotoxin poisoning mimicking burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heir, Gary M

    2005-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a condition in which the patient perceives a sensation of intraoral burning, typically of the anterior tongue. This article presents a case report of a patient presenting for orofacial pain evaluation in whom ciguatera neurotoxin poisoning is diagnosed. The clinician should be aware of neurotoxin poisoning as a possible cause of symptoms of burning mouth, especially among patients who have recently traveled to a tropical area. Recognition of this condition in this case highlights the need for a detailed and accurate patient history.

  17. Preparation of fucoidan-chitosan hydrogel and its application as burn healing accelerator on rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sezer, Ali Demir; Cevher, Erdal; Hatipoğlu, Fatih; Oğurtan, Zeki; Baş, Ahmet Levent; Akbuğa, Jülide

    2008-12-01

    Treatment of dermal wounds with macromolecular agents such as natural polymers is one of the research areas of the biomaterial science. Fucoidan is a sulphated polysaccharide which is commonly obtained from seaweeds. The great number of studies on the different pharmacological properties of fucoidan is present, but there is limited information about using of fucoidan in the treatment of dermal burns. The aim of this study was to prepare fucoidan-chitosan hydrogels and to investigate their treatment efficiency on dermal burns. Hydrogels were prepared by swelling the polymers in acidic solution and their swelling, mechanical (hardness, cohesiveness and adhesiveness) and bioadhesive properties were investigated. The viscosity and water absorption capacity of formulations increased with increase in the polymer concentration. In contrast to the cohesiveness results, the adhesiveness of hydrogels increased with the polymer concentration. The bioadhesion was changed between 0.012-0.142 mJ x cm(-2) and enhanced with addition of fucoidan into gel formulations. It was formed dermal burns on seven adult male New Zealand white rabbits and the optimum gel formulation applied on the wounds. Control and treatment group biopsy samples were taken on days 7, 14 and 21 and each burn wound site was evaluated histopathologically. No edema was seen in tested groups except control after 3 d treatment. After 7 d treatment, fibroplasia and scar were fixed on wounds treated with fucoidan-chitosan gel and fucoidan solution. The best regeneration on dermal papillary formation and the fastest closure of the wounds were observed in fucoidan-chitosan hydrogels after 14 d treatment.

  18. Stress Ulcer Disease in the Burned Patient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    association of acute upper gastrointestinal tract disease with burn injury was noted as early as 1823 by both Cumin |l| and Swan [2|. but was largely...recommend intragastric irrigation with warm saline [42] and/or selective arterial injec- tion of vasoactive agents such as posterior pituitary extract [43... Cumin , W.: Cases of severe burn, with dissections and remarks. Edinburgh Medical Journal 7^:337, 1823 2. Swan. J.: Practical observations: case of a

  19. DERMAL ADIPOCYTES: FROM IRRELEVANCE TO METABOLIC TARGETS?

    PubMed Central

    Kruglikov, Ilja L.; Scherer, Philipp E.

    2015-01-01

    Dermal white adipose tissue (dWAT) has found little appreciation in the past as a distinct entity from the better recognized subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT). However, recent work has established dWAT as an important contributor to a multitude of processes, including immune response, wound healing and scarring, hair follicle growth and thermoregulation. Unique metabolic contributions are attributed to dWAT as well, at least in part due to thermic insulation properties and its response to cold exposure. Dermal adipocytes can also undergo adipocyte-myofibroblast transition (AMT), a process that is suspected to play an important role in a number of pathophysiological processes within the skin. Here, we discuss emerging concepts regarding dWAT physiology and its significance to a variety of cellular processes. PMID:26643658

  20. Nanoemulsion Therapy for Burn Wounds is Effective as a Topical Antimicrobial Against Gram Negative and Gram Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dolgachev, Vladislav A.; Ciotti, Susan M.; Eisma, Rone; Gracon, Stephen; Wilkinson, J. Erby; Baker, James R.; Hemmila, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of two different nanoemulsion formulations against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria in an in vivo rodent scald burn model. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and received a partial-thickness scald burn. Eight hours following burn injury the wound was inoculated with 1x108 colony forming units of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment groups consisted of two different nanoemulsion formulations (NB-201, NB-402), nanoemulsion vehicle (NE vehicle), or saline. Topical application of the treatment was performed at 16 and 24 hours after burn injury. Animals were euthanized 32 hours after burn injury and skin samples obtained for quantitative wound culture and determination of dermal inflammation markers. In a separate set of experiments, burn wound progression was measured histologically after 72 hours of treatment. Results Both nanoemulsion formulations (NB-201, NB 402) significantly reduced burn wound infections with either Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus, and decreased median bacterial counts at least 3 logs as compared to animals with saline applications (p<0.0001). NB-201 and NB-402 also decreased dermal neutrophil recruitment and sequestration into the wound as measured by myeloperoxidase assay and histopathology (p<0.05). In addition, there was a reduction in the pro-inflammatory dermal cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) and the neutrophil chemoattractants CXCL1 and CXCL2. By histology examination, both NB-201 and NB-402 appeared to suppress burn wound progression 72 hours after injury. Conclusions Topically applied NB-201 and NB-402 are effective in decreasing Gram positive and negative bacteria growth in burn wounds, reducing inflammation and abrogating burn wound progression. PMID:26182074

  1. Nanoemulsion Therapy for Burn Wounds Is Effective as a Topical Antimicrobial Against Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dolgachev, Vladislav A; Ciotti, Susan M; Eisma, Rone; Gracon, Stephen; Wilkinson, J Erby; Baker, James R; Hemmila, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of two different nanoemulsion (NE) formulations against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in an in vivo rodent scald burn model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and received a partial-thickness scald burn. Eight hours after burn injury, the wound was inoculated with 1 × 10(8) colony-forming units of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment groups consisted of two different NE formulations (NB-201 and NB-402), NE vehicle, or saline. Topical application of the treatment was performed at 16 and 24 hours after burn injury. Animals were killed 32 hours after burn injury, and skin samples were obtained for quantitative wound culture and determination of dermal inflammation markers. In a separate set of experiments, burn wound progression was measured histologically after 72 hours of treatment. Both NE formulations (NB-201 and NB-402) significantly reduced burn wound infections with either P. aeruginosa or S. aureus and decreased median bacterial counts at least three logs when compared with animals with saline applications (p < .0001). NB-201 and NB-402 also decreased dermal neutrophil recruitment and sequestration into the wound as measured by myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay and histopathology (p < .05). In addition, there was a decrease in the proinflammatory dermal cytokines (interleukin 1-beta [IL-1β], IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and the neutrophil chemoattractants CXCL1 and CXCL2. Using histologic examination, it was found that both NB-201 and NB-402 appeared to suppress burn wound progression 72 hours after injury. Topically applied NB-201 and NB-402 are effective in decreasing Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria growth in burn wounds, reducing inflammation, and abrogating burn wound progression.

  2. Dermal mass aspirate from a Persian cat.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Kurt; Feldman, Bernard; Robertson, John; Herring, Erin S; Manning, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    A 1-year-old spayed female Persian cat with alopecia and weight loss had numerous variably ulcerated dermal nodules. Cytologic examination of an aspirate of one of the nodules revealed pyogranulomatous inflammation along with septate hyphae and basophilic round bodies, 0.5-1.0 microm in diameter, surrounded by a thin clear halo (arthrospores). The cytologic diagnosis was dermatophytic pseudomycetoma. Histologically, there were dermal granulomas containing poorly staining, septate hyphae with bulbous spores embedded within abundant amorphous eosinophilic material (Splendore-Hoeppli reaction), and the histologic diagnosis was pseudomycetoma-associated chronic multifocal severe granulomatous dermatitis with lymphocytic perifolliculitis and furunculosis. Microsporum canis was cultured from the lesion. Pseudomycetomas are distinguished from fungal mycetomas, or eumycotic mycetomas, by the findings of multiple lesions, lack of a history of skin trauma, an association with dermatophytes, most commonly Microsporum canis, and, histologically, lack of true cement material and a more abundant Splendore-Hoeppli reaction in pseudomycetomas. Additionally, pseudomycetomas differ from dermatophytosis, in which lesions are restricted to epidermal structures. Persian cats have a high incidence of pseudomycetoma formation, suggesting a heritable predisposition. The prognosis is fair with systemic antifungal therapy. When examining cytologic specimens from Persian cats with single or multiple dermal nodules, especially if pyogranulomatous inflammation is present, a diagnosis of pseudomycetoma should be suspected and is warranted if arthrospores and refractile septate hyphae are present.

  3. Incidence and cost of non-fatal burns in Iran: a nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Abouie, Abolfazl; Salamati, Payman; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Rahimi-Movaghar, Afarin; Saadat, Soheil; Amin-Esmaeili, Masoumeh; Sharifi, Vandad; Hajebi, Ahmad; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2017-04-07

    To determine the incidence and cost of non-fatal burns in Iran; this cross-sectional household survey of a nationally representative sample of 15-64 years old was conducted. Through face-to-face interviews and telephone calls, the data on the demographics, history and cost of burns were collected. The annual incidence rate of burns was estimated 129.85 per 1000 population. Burns occurred higher in younger age, female gender and urban residency. The most common burn description was as follows: unpaid work (activity during burn), home (place of burn), heat and hot substances (mechanism of burn) and upper limb (site of burn). The average total cost of burn includes victims seeking medical care was US$124 per case. The main findings of this study suggest that burns are a major public health concern in Iran. To stop this important health issue, a national program for burn prevention and education must be developed.

  4. Epidemiology of hospitalized burns patients in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chien, Wu-Chien; Pai, Lu; Lin, Chao-Cheng; Chen, Heng-Chang

    2003-09-01

    Previous studies based on either single hospital data or sampling of specific groups of hospitalized burns victims in Taiwan have provided only minimal epidemiological information. The study is designed to provide additional data on the epidemiology of hospitalized burns patients in Taiwan. Data were obtained from the Burn Injury Information System (BIIS), which brings together information supplied by 34 contracted hospitals. The study time course spanned a 2-year period from July 1997 to June 1999. Patient characteristics (age, sex, education level, etc.), causes and severity of injuries, and medical care measures were explored. A total of 4741 patients were registered with BIIS over the study period. The majority of hospitalized patients (67%) were male. The age distribution of burns patients showed peaks occurring at the age groups of 0-5 and 35-44 years. Over the time course of a day, burn injuries occurred more frequently from 10:00 to 12:00 h and 16:00 to 18:00 h. Injuries suspected as the result of suicide, homicide or child abuse accounted for 4.8% of hospitalized cases. More than 48% of the burns occurred in the home. The leading type of burn injury was scalding, followed by naked flame, explosion, electrical burns, and chemical burns due to caustic or corrosive substances. The mean percent total body surface area (%TBSA) for adults was 19%, and for young children was 12%. The average length of hospital stay was 18 days. In conclusion, children under 5 years and adults between 35 and 44 years of age are two high-risk groups for burn injuries. Corresponding to meal preparation time, hot substances such as boiling water, hot soup, etc. are the most common agents responsible for scalds. Prevention programs for reducing the risk of burn injuries during cooking and eating are required, especially for parents with young children.

  5. Evaluation of electric arc furnace-processed steel slag for dermal corrosion, irritation, and sensitization from dermal contact.

    PubMed

    Suh, Mina; Troese, Matthew J; Hall, Debra A; Yasso, Blair; Yzenas, John J; Proctor, Debora M

    2014-12-01

    Electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag is alkaline (pH of ~11-12) and contains metals, most notably chromium and nickel, and thus has potential to cause dermal irritation and sensitization at sufficient dose. Dermal contact with EAF slag occurs in many occupational and environmental settings because it is used widely in construction and other industrial sectors for various applications including asphaltic paving, road bases, construction fill, and as feed for cement kilns construction. However, no published study has characterized the potential for dermal effects associated with EAF slag. To assess dermal irritation, corrosion and sensitizing potential of EAF slag, in vitro and in vivo dermal toxicity assays were conducted based on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. In vitro dermal corrosion and irritation testing (OECD 431 and 439) of EAF slag was conducted using the reconstructed human epidermal (RHE) tissue model. In vivo dermal toxicity and delayed contact sensitization testing (OECD 404 and 406) were conducted in rabbits and guinea pigs, respectively. EAF slag was not corrosive and not irritating in any tests. The results of the delayed contact dermal sensitization test indicate that EAF slag is not a dermal sensitizer. These findings are supported by the observation that metals in EAF slag occur as oxides of low solubility with leachates that are well below toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) limits. Based on these results and in accordance to the OECD guidelines, EAF slag is not considered a dermal sensitizer, corrosive or irritant.

  6. Comparative study of 1,064-nm laser-induced skin burn and thermal skin burn.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Ming; Ruan, Jing; Xiao, Rong; Zhang, Qiong; Huang, Yue-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Infrared lasers are widely used in medicine, industry, and other fields. While science, medicine, and the society in general have benefited from the many practical uses of lasers, they also have inherent safety issues. Although several procedures have been put forward to protect the skin from non-specific laser-induced damage, individuals receiving laser therapy or researchers who use laser are still at risk for skin damage. This study aims to understand the interaction between laser and the skin, and to investigate the differences between the skin damage caused by 1,064-nm laser and common thermal burns. Skin lesions on Wistar rats were induced by a 1,064-nm CW laser at a maximum output of 40 W and by a copper brass bar attached to an HQ soldering iron. Histological sections of the lesions and the process of wound healing were evaluated. The widths of the epidermal necrosis and dermal denaturalization of each lesion were measured. To observe wound healing, the epithelial gap and wound gap were measured. Masson's trichrome and picrosirius red staining were also used to assess lesions and wound healing. The thermal damage induced by laser intensified significantly in both horizontal dimension and in vertical depth with increased duration of irradiation. Ten days after wounding, the dermal injuries induced by laser were more severe. Compared with the laser-induced skin damage, the skin burn induced by an HQ soldering iron did not show a similar development or increased in severity with the passage of time. The results of this study showed the pattern of skin damage induced by laser irradiation and a heated brass bar. This study also highlighted the difference between laser irradiation and thermal burn in terms of skin damage and wound healing, and offers insight for further treatment.

  7. Aesthetic septorhinoplasty in the burned nose.

    PubMed

    Hafezi, Farhad; Karimi, Hamid; Nouhi, Amirhosein

    2005-03-01

    Patients who have survived thermal injuries to the face suffer severe disfigurement from the devastating deformities of full-thickness facial burns. The nose is the prominent central organ of the face, which has crucial effect on Aesthetic appearance. The plastic surgeon's role to deal with such cases is to undertake procedures to produce a more pleasant look although the target organ could be the non-burned areas of the face. It is a common belief that surgical intervention under the scarred or grafted nose is risky and may result in skin or covering graft necrosis. For this reason, plastic surgeons are cautious and hesitate to perform Aesthetic surgery on burn scarred tissue. We present 13 cases, 10 women and three men with complete or subtotal nasal burn. Classic Aesthetic Rhinoplasty operations were performed to create a better appearance and correct any internal or external deviations. These procedures are carried out under severely burned skins, or previously grafted and reconstructed noses. Cases were followed for about a one-year period. There was no necrosis in any part of skin after surgery. We believe that Aesthetic rhinoplasty can be done safely in these victims with pleasing outcome. The problems that we encountered in these cases were irregularities of burned alar margins, multiple operations and intractable nasal deviation in severe cases.

  8. Burning mouth syndrome and secondary oral burning.

    PubMed

    Minor, Jacob S; Epstein, Joel B

    2011-02-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a complex disorder of unclear etiology that is most prevalent in perimenopausal women. It is often accompanied by dysguesia and subjective xerostomia. Recent evidence implicates both central and peripheral neuropathies, possibly representing a phantom pain syndrome in some patients. Ensuring that the patient's oral burning is not secondary to some other local or systemic factor is central to appropriate management. Current standard therapies include clonazepam, paroxetine, and cognitive behavioral therapy, and several promising new alternatives are described.

  9. Widespread dermal ulcerations and bullae.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Jay; Patel, Mahir; Readinger, Allison; Menter, Alan

    2012-04-01

    Bullous pemphigoid is an autoimmune disease of the skin characterized by large, tense bullae resulting in significant morbidity in affected individuals. The diagnosis of bullous pemphigoid may present challenges due to clinical similarities with various other bullous eruptions. Frequently, epidemiological features can provide clues to the diagnosis of bullous pemphigoid, with histologic analysis commonly required for definitive diagnosis. This case study illustrates the typical clinical and histologic findings seen in bullous pemphigoid patients and briefly discusses the differential diagnosis. An in-depth understanding of the intricate pathophysiology is essential in order to educate patients. After diagnosis and appropriate workup, an array of treatment approaches, including topical and systemic corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents, antibiotics, chemotherapeutic agents, and even monoclonal antibodies, may be utilized individually or in combination to achieve an optimal therapeutic response.

  10. Widespread dermal ulcerations and bullae

    PubMed Central

    Wofford, Jay; Patel, Mahir; Readinger, Allison

    2012-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid is an autoimmune disease of the skin characterized by large, tense bullae resulting in significant morbidity in affected individuals. The diagnosis of bullous pemphigoid may present challenges due to clinical similarities with various other bullous eruptions. Frequently, epidemiological features can provide clues to the diagnosis of bullous pemphigoid, with histologic analysis commonly required for definitive diagnosis. This case study illustrates the typical clinical and histologic findings seen in bullous pemphigoid patients and briefly discusses the differential diagnosis. An in-depth understanding of the intricate pathophysiology is essential in order to educate patients. After diagnosis and appropriate workup, an array of treatment approaches, including topical and systemic corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents, antibiotics, chemotherapeutic agents, and even monoclonal antibodies, may be utilized individually or in combination to achieve an optimal therapeutic response. PMID:22481847

  11. Bizarre paediatric facial burns.

    PubMed

    Ho, W S; Ying, S Y; Wong, T W

    2000-08-01

    Child abuse and neglect account for a significant number of paediatric burn injuries. It is of great importance because of the high mortality, high frequency of repeated abuse, as well as the physical, psychological and social sequelae that it causes. Burn abuse is often under-recognized and under-reported because it is difficult to define non-accidental injury. On the other hand, false accusation of burn abuse is extremely damaging to the family. Bizarre and unusual burn injuries can be caused by accident and should not automatically be assumed to be deliberate injury. Three boys of age 1-7 years with bizarre facial burns were admitted to the Burns Unit at the Prince of Wales Hospital between February 1995 and July 1999. One was burned by his baby-sitter with hot water steam and the other two were burned by their mothers with hot boiled eggs. The unusual causes of their burns raised the suspicion of child abuse and formal investigations were carried out by the Social Services Department. Detail assessment including a developmental history of the child and the psychosocial assessment of the family revealed that these three boys were burned because of poor medical advice and innocent cultural belief.

  12. A COMPARATIVE INVESTIGATION OF THE INFLUENCE OF DERMAL APPENDAGES (HAIR FOLLICLES) ON THE PERCUTANEOUS ABSORPTION OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS (OP) INSECTICIDES USING QSAR AND PBPK/PD MODELS FOR HUMAN RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The successful use of the Exposure Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) for assessment of dermal exposure of humans to OP pesticides requires the input of representative and comparable input parameters. In the specific case of dermal exposure, regional anatomical variation in...

  13. Topical Pain Relievers May Cause Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reported Cases According to FDA chemist Reynold Tan, Ph.D., there have been 43 reported cases of burns associated with the use of OTC topical muscle and joint pain relievers containing the active ingredients menthol, methyl salicylate and capsaicin. These cases ...

  14. Paraganglioma-like dermal melanocytic tumor: a unique entity distinct from cellular blue nevus, clear cell sarcoma, and cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Deyrup, Andrea T; Althof, Pamela; Zhou, Ming; Morgan, Michael; Solomon, Alvin R; Bridge, Julia A; Weiss, Sharon W

    2004-12-01

    We are reporting a previously undescribed primary dermal melanocytic tumor identified by reviewing all dermal melanocytic tumors referred in consultation that did not qualify histologically as a previously described entity. From these cases, 8 were remarkably similar. We termed them "paraganglioma-like dermal melanocytic tumor" (PDMT) based on their nested growth pattern. This term is used descriptively and does not imply any histogenetic or biologic similarity to true paraganglioma. PDMT is primarily a tumor of the extremities of adult females (18-53 years, mean 35 years; males 2; females 6) which present as a dermal nodule (range, 0.5-4.2 cm; mean, 1.4 cm) composed of nests of clear to amphophilic oval cells separated by delicate fibrous strands. Nuclear atypia was mild and mitotic activity low (1-4 mitoses/10 HPF). Melanin was not obvious on light microscopy. Tumors expressed S-100 protein (8 of 8), Melan-A (4 of 8), HMB-45 (8 of 8), and microphthalmia transcription factor (8 of 8) and lacked pancytokeratin (8 of 8) and smooth muscle actin (8 of 8). FISH analysis of 5 cases revealed an intact EWS gene locus, supporting absence of the clear cell sarcoma 12;22 translocation. Follow-up information in 8 patients (range, 35-92 months; mean, 54 months) indicated that all were alive without disease. PDMT comprises a clinically and pathologically unique subtype of dermal melanocytic tumors. Our study suggests a benign course, although a lesion of low malignant potential cannot be excluded.

  15. Burn injury caused by laptop computers.

    PubMed

    Sharma, G

    2013-11-01

    Laptop burn is a real condition and medical reports indicate that using a laptop across the legs can indeed cause it. in very rare cases, the condition can cause damage leading to skin cancer. A 24-year-old man presented with an asymptomatic reddish brown pigmentation on the thighs. After an extensive work-up, burning caused by use of a laptop was observed. Burning was induced in 3 days by using laptop for 4 h daily. Laptop should be used in properly ventilated and air-conditioned rooms. The most effective way of preventing erythema is to use the laptop on the table or desk.

  16. One Burn, One Standard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    for supporting burn treatment has induced a rethinking of current medical documentation processes of burns, especially with respect to the Lund...Browder burn diagram. In the past, the lack of comparability, scientific evalu- ation possibilities, and as a consequence, missing medical evidence in...to interested parties after registration. To that end, a protected (everyone is able to read the content, one has to register to edit) wiki (www

  17. A case series of thermal scald injuries in dogs exposed to hot water from garden hoses (garden hose scalding syndrome).

    PubMed

    Quist, Erin M; Tanabe, Mika; Mansell, Joanne E K L; Edwards, Jeffrey L

    2012-04-01

    In this report, we present a series of cases of thermal burns (scalds) in dogs resulting from exposure to hot water from a garden hose that had been lying in the sun. These dogs typically inhabited the southern and western regions of the USA, where the recorded high temperatures often exceed 32°C (90°F) during the warm summer months. Dogs with thermal scald injury in these cases presented with linear thermal burns along the dorsum, in addition to a variety of other macroscopic lesions that were dependent upon the degree of burn exposure and ranged from local erythema to ulcerated, necrotic and sloughing skin. Chronic, healed wounds were often alopecic, with markedly thickened skin and characteristically smooth and glassy scar tissue formation. Histologically, the lesions of thermal scald injury in these dogs were indistinguishable from any other second or third degree burn, and consisted of full-thickness dermal and epidermal necrosis with occasional fibrinoid necrosis of vessel walls, vasculitis and intravascular thrombosis. Here, we closely examine 10 cases of dogs with dorsal thermal burns collected from Texas, Arizona, California, Utah, Nevada, Indiana, Michigan and North Carolina and propose the term 'garden hose scalding syndrome (GHS)' to describe this unique type of scald injury.

  18. Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices. PMID:16614255

  19. Choosing Wood Burning Appliances

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information to assist consumers in choosing a wood burning appliance, including types of appliances, the differences between certified and non-certified appliances, and alternative wood heating options.

  20. Burn Wound Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    wound invasion was identified only Nine of 97 patients (9%) with histologic burn wound after septic or cardiogenic shock had been present in invasion...051= ADA12589 Th JouRHAL oP TRAUMA Vol. 21, No. 9 Copyright 0 1981 by The Williams & Wilkins Co. ,r, Prin U.S.A. . Burn Wound Infection WILLIAM F...admitted to a burn center during a 3-year period C had histologically confirmed bacterial or tungal burn wound invasion. Nine of t X Q these 97

  1. Evaluation of lymphangiogenesis in acellular dermal matrix

    PubMed Central

    Cherubino, Mario; Pellegatta, Igor; Tamborini, Federico; Cerati, Michele; Sessa, Fausto; Valdatta, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Much attention has been directed towards understanding the phenomena of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in wound healing. Thanks to the manifold dermal substitute available nowadays, wound treatment has improved greatly. Many studies have been published about angiogenesis and cell invasion in INTEGRA®. On the other hand, the development of the lymphatic network in acellular dermal matrix (ADM) is a more obscure matter. In this article, we aim to characterize the different phases of host cell invasion in ADM. Special attention was given to lymphangiogenic aspects. Materials and Methods: Among 57 rats selected to analyse the role of ADM in lymphangiogenesis, we created four groups. We performed an excision procedure on both thighs of these rats: On the left one we did not perform any action except repairing the borders of the wound; while on the right one we used INTEGRA® implant. The excision biopsy was performed at four different times: First group after 7 days, second after 14 days, third after 21 days and fourth after 28 days. For our microscopic evaluation, we used the classical staining technique of haematoxylin and eosin and a semi-quantitative method in order to evaluate cellularity counts. To assess angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis development we employed PROX-1 Ab and CD31/PECAM for immunohistochemical analysis. Results: We found remarkable wound contraction in defects that healed by secondary intention while minor wound contraction was observed in defects treated with ADM. At day 7, optical microscopy revealed a more plentiful cellularity in the granulation tissue compared with the dermal regeneration matrix. The immunohistochemical process highlighted vascular and lymphatic cells in both groups. After 14 days a high grade of fibrosis was noticeable in the non-treated group. At day 21, both lymphatic and vascular endothelial cells were better developed in the group with a dermal matrix application. At day 28, lymphatic endothelial

  2. Burns and military clothing.

    PubMed

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells induce dermal fibroblast responses to injury

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Andria N.; Willis, Elise; Chan, Vincent T.; Muffley, Lara A.; Isik, F. Frank; Gibran, Nicole S.; Hocking, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    Although bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote repair when applied to cutaneous wounds, the mechanism for this response remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of paracrine signaling from mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast responses to injury including proliferation, migration and expression of genes important in wound repair. Dermal fibroblasts were co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells grown in inserts, which allowed for paracrine interactions without direct cell contact. In this co-culture model, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells regulate dermal fibroblast proliferation, migration and gene expression. When co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts show increased proliferation and accelerated migration in a scratch assay. A chemotaxis assay also demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts migrate towards bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A PCR array was used to analyze the effect of mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast gene expression. In response to mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts up-regulate integrin alpha 7 expression and down-regulate expression of ICAM1, VCAM1 and MMP11. These observations suggest that mesenchymal stem cells may provide an important early signal for dermal fibroblast responses to cutaneous injury.

  4. CARD14 expression in dermal endothelial cells in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Harden, Jamie L; Lewis, Steven M; Pierson, Katherine C; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Lentini, Tim; Ortenzio, Francesca S; Zaba, Lisa C; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Bowcock, Anne M; Lowes, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the caspase recruitment domain, family member 14 (CARD14) gene have recently been described in psoriasis patients, and explain the psoriasis susceptibility locus 2 (PSORS2). CARD14 is a scaffolding protein that regulates NF-κB activation, and psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations lead to enhanced NF-κB signaling. CARD14 is expressed mainly in epidermal keratinocytes, but also in unidentified dermal cells. In this manuscript, the identity of the dermal cell types expressing CARD14, as well the potential functional consequence of overactive CARD14 in these dermal cell types, was determined. Using two-color immunofluorescence, dermal CARD14 did not co-localize with T-cells, dendritic cells, or macrophages. However, dermal CARD14 did highly co-localize with CD31(+) endothelial cells (ECs). CARD14 was also expressed non-dermal endothelial cells, such as aortic endothelial cells, which may indicate a role of CARD14(+)ECs in the systemic inflammation and cardiovascular comorbidities associated with psoriasis. Additionally, phosphorylated NF-κB was found in psoriatic CARD14(+) CD31(+) ECs, demonstrating this pathway is active in dermal ECs in psoriasis. Transfection of dermal ECs with psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations resulted in increased expression of several chemokines, including CXCL10, IL-8, and CCL2. These results provide preliminary evidence that CARD14 expression in ECs may contribute to psoriasis through increased expression of chemokines and facilitating recruitment of immune cells into skin.

  5. IN VITRO DERMAL ABSORPTION OF FLAME RETARDANT CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    The use of flame retardant chemicals in furniture fabric could pose a potential health risk to consumers from dermal absorption of these compounds. The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro dermal absorption of two flame retardant chemicals, [14C]-d...

  6. Spectrum of PORCN mutations in Focal Dermal Hypoplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH), also known as Goltz syndrome (OMIM 305600), is a genetic disorder that affects multiple organ systems early in development. Features of FDH include skin abnormalities, (hypoplasia, atrophy, linear pigmentation, and herniation of fat through dermal defects); papillomas...

  7. MHD control in burning plasmas MHD control in burning plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donné, Tony; Liang, Yunfeng

    2012-07-01

    Fusion physics focuses on the complex behaviour of hot plasmas confined by magnetic fields with the ultimate aim to develop a fusion power plant. In the future generation of tokamaks like ITER, the power generated by the fusion reactions substantially exceeds the external input power (Pfusion}/Pin >= 10). When this occurs one speaks of a burning plasma. Twenty per cent of the generated fusion power in a burning plasma is carried by the charged alpha particles, which transfer their energy to the ambient plasma in collisions, a process called thermalization. A new phenomenon in burning plasmas is that the alpha particles, which form a minority but carry a large fraction of the plasma kinetic energy, can collectively drive certain types of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) modes, while they can suppress other MHD modes. Both types of MHD modes can have desirable effects on the plasma, as well as be detrimental to the plasma. For example, the so-called sawtooth instability, on the one hand, is largely responsible for the transport of the thermalized alpha particles out of the core, but, on the other hand, may result in the loss of the energetic alphas before they have fully thermalized. A further undesirable effect of the sawtooth instability is that it may trigger other MHD modes such as neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs). These NTMs, in turn, are detrimental to the plasma confinement and in some cases may even lead to disruptive termination of the plasma. At the edge of the plasma, finally, so-called edge localized modes or ELMs occur, which result in extremely high transient heat and particle loads on the plasma-facing components of a reactor. In order to balance the desired and detrimental effects of these modes, active feedback control is required. An additional complication occurs in a burning plasma as the external heating power, which is nowadays generally used for plasma control, is small compared to the heating power of the alpha particles. The scientific challenge

  8. Clinical Performance of a Dermal Filler Containing Natural Glycolic Acid and a Polylactic Acid Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Macchetto, Pedro Cervantes; Durán Páramo, Rosa Margarita

    2010-01-01

    Lipoatrophy is a condition that affects certain individuals, most commonly those who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.1–3 Injectable fillers are used for the treatment of these dermal contour deformities to smooth dermal depressions formed by the loss of volume. These dermal fillers (also known as soft tissue augmentation devices) can correct contour deformities caused by lipoatrophy in patients who are human immunodeficiency virus positive or negative. The product used in this study is a patented, second-generation, injectable, dermal collagen stimulator that combines glycolic acid and polylactic acid. The glycolic acid used is not a polymer, but rather an acid derived from sugar cane. Its chemical structure corresponds to that of an alpha-hydroxy acid. Glycolic acid is a well-characterized agent that is present in a number of cosmetic products. Polylactic acid is a synthetic, biocompatible, biodegradable, inert, synthetic polymer from the poly a-hydroxy-acid family that is believed to stimulate fibroblasts to produce more collagen, thus increasing facial volume. Together, polylactic acid and glycolic acid act in concert to 1) stimulate collagen production and 2) hydrate the outer layers of the skin. A multicenter, clinical investigation authorized by the Mexican Secretariat of Health was conducted between September 20, 2002, and September 19, 2004. This clinical study was conducted in male patients between 32 and 60 years of age with lipoatrophy as a result of highly active antiretroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infection. The study objective was to measure the improvement of contour deformities after the injection of a dermal collagen stimulator containing glycolic acid and polylactic acid. In addition to safety, this dermal filler was assessed when used to correct volume deformities caused by lipoatrophy in subjects who are human immunodeficiency virus positive. Thirty male subjects participated and were treated as follows

  9. Burn injuries caused by air bag deployment.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, D; Noah, E M; Fuchs, P; Pallua, N

    2001-03-01

    Automobile air bags have gained acceptance as an effective measure to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with motor vehicle accidents. As more cars have become equipped with them, new problems have been encountered that are directly attributable to the deployment of the bag itself. An increasing variety of associated injuries has been reported, including minor burns. We present two automobile drivers who were involved in front-impact crashes with air bag inflation. They sustained superficial and partial-thickness burns related to the deployment. The evaluation of these cases shows mechanisms involved in burn injuries caused by the air bag system. Most of the burns are chemical and usually attributed to sodium hydroxide in the aerosol created during deployment. Also direct thermal burns from high-temperature gases or indirect injuries due to the melting of clothing, as well as friction burns from physical contact are possible. However, the inherent risks of air bag-related burns are still outweighed by the benefits of preventing potentially life-threatening injuries.

  10. RGTA OTR4120, a heparan sulfate mimetic, is a possible long-term active agent to heal burned skin.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Filipe, S; Barbier-Chassefiere, V; Alexakis, C; Huet, E; Ledoux, D; Kerros, M E; Petit, E; Barritault, D; Caruelle, J P; Kern, P

    2007-01-01

    Burn-related skin fibrosis leads to loss of tissue function and hypertrophic scar formation with damaging consequences for the patient. There is therefore a great need for an efficient agent to treat burned skin. We report that ReGeneraTing Agent (RGTA) reduces burn-induced skin alteration. The tissue-regenerating effect of RGTA OTR4120 was evaluated after 1-6 days and after 10 months in a rat skin burn model. This effect was also examined in vitro using fibroblasts isolated from control and 6-day-old burned skins. We measured production of dermal collagen I, III, and V and activities of metalloproteinases 2 and 9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9). Ratio of collagen III over collagen I production increased 6 days after the burn, because of a decrease in collagen I production. After 10 months, ratio of collagen III over collagen I in burn sites was still increased compared with control skin, because of an increase in collagen III production. Both abnormalities were corrected by OTR4120. OTR4120 increased pro- and active MMP-2 and MMP-9, compared with healthy and burned controls and therefore accelerated remodeling. Similar data were obtained with cultured fibroblasts from healthy and burned skins. OTR4120 enhanced healing in short- and long-term after burns, reducing the formation of fibrotic tissue, and then represents a potential agent to improve burned skin healing.

  11. Burns Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... for fluid resuscitation, wound cleaning, skin replacement, infection control and nutritional support. What is on the horizon for burn research? Improving methods for wound healing and tissue repair offer tremendous opportunities to enhance the quality of life for burn patients and may also ...

  12. Pain in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Latarjet, J; Choinère, M

    1995-08-01

    While severe pain is a constant component of the burn injury, inadequate pain management has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Pain-generating mechanisms in burns include nociception, primary and secondary hyperalgesia and neuropathy. The clinical studies of burn pain characteristics reveal very clear-cut differences between continuous pain and pain due to therapeutic procedures which have to be treated separately. Some of the main features of burn pain are: (1) its long-lasting course, often exceeding healing time, (2) the repetition of highly nociceptive procedures which can lead to severe psychological disturbances if pain control is inappropriate. Pharmaco-therapy with opioids is the mainstay for analgesia in burned patients, but non-pharmacological techniques may be useful adjuncts. Routine pain evaluation is mandatory for efficient and safe analgesia. Special attention must be given to pain in burned children which remains too often underestimated and undertreated. More educational efforts from physicians and nursing staff are necessary to improve pain management in burned patients.

  13. Application of physiologically-based toxicokinetic modelling in oral-to-dermal extrapolation of threshold doses of cosmetic ingredients.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, M; Worth, A; Urani, C; Briesen, H; Schramm, K-W

    2014-06-16

    The application of physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) modelling in route-to-route (RtR) extrapolation of three cosmetic ingredients: coumarin, hydroquinone and caffeine is shown in this study. In particular, the oral no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) doses of these chemicals are extrapolated to their corresponding dermal values by comparing the internal concentrations resulting from oral and dermal exposure scenarios. The PBTK model structure has been constructed to give a good simulation performance of biochemical processes within the human body. The model parameters are calibrated based on oral and dermal experimental data for the Caucasian population available in the literature. Particular attention is given to modelling the absorption stage (skin and gastrointestinal tract) in the form of several sub-compartments. This gives better model prediction results when compared to those of a PBTK model with a simpler structure of the absorption barrier. In addition, the role of quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPRs) in predicting skin penetration is evaluated for the three substances with a view to incorporating QSPR-predicted penetration parameters in the PBTK model when experimental values are lacking. Finally, PBTK modelling is used, first to extrapolate oral NOAEL doses derived from rat studies to humans, and then to simulate internal systemic/liver concentrations - Area Under Curve (AUC) and peak concentration - resulting from specified dermal and oral exposure conditions. Based on these simulations, AUC-based dermal thresholds for the three case study compounds are derived and compared with the experimentally obtained oral threshold (NOAEL) values.

  14. Coverage of Deep Cutaneous Wounds Using Dermal Template in Combination with Negative-pressure Therapy and Subsequent Skin Graft

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alexandre A.; Lobato, Rodolfo C.; Nakamoto, Hugo A.; Tuma, Paulo; Ferreira, Marcus C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: We consider the use of dermal matrix associated with a skin graft to cover deep wounds in the extremities when tendon and bone are exposed. The objective of this article was to evaluate the efficacy of covering acute deep wounds through the use of a dermal regeneration template (Integra) associated with vacuum therapy and subsequent skin grafting. Methods: Twenty patients were evaluated prospectively. All of them had acute (up to 3 weeks) deep wounds in the limbs. We consider a deep wound to be that with exposure of bone, tendon, or joint. Results: The average area of integration of the dermal regeneration template was 86.5%. There was complete integration of the skin graft over the dermal matrix in 14 patients (70%), partial integration in 5 patients (25%), and total loss in 1 case (5%). The wound has completely closed in 95% of patients. Conclusions: The use of Integra dermal template associated with negative-pressure therapy and skin grafting showed an adequate rate of resolution of deep wounds with low morbidity. PMID:25289363

  15. Evaluation of burn injuries related to liquefied petroleum gas.

    PubMed

    Tarim, Mehmet Akin

    2014-01-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is a fuel that is widely used for domestic, agricultural, and industrial purposes. LPG is also commonly used in restaurants, industries, and cars; however, the home continues to be the main site for accidents. In Turkey, the increased usage of LPG as a cooking or heating fuel has resulted in many burn injuries from LPG mishaps. Between January 2000 and June 2011, 56 LPG-burned patients were compared with 112 flame-burned patients. There were no significant differences with respect to the mean age, sex, hospitalization time, and mortality in both groups. In the LPG-caused burn cases, 41 burns (73.2%) occurred at home, seven (12.5) were work-related mishaps, and eight (14.3) were associated with car accidents. The majority of the LPG burns (82%, 46 patients) resulted from a gas leak, and 18% of them were related to the failure to close LPG tubes in the patients' kitchens (10 patients). Burns to the face and neck (82 vs 67%, P = .039) and upper (62 vs 23%, P = .000) and lower (70 vs 45%, P = .002) extremities were significantly higher in LPG-caused burn cases than flame-burned cases. General awareness regarding the risk of LPG and first aid for burns appears to be lacking. The LPG delivery system should be standardized throughout countries that widely use LPG.

  16. [Burns in children: child abuse or another cause?].

    PubMed

    van Ewijk, Roelof; op de Coul, Moniek E; Teeuw, A H Rian; Wolf, Bart H M

    2012-01-01

    Burns are common in children but it is not always clear whether the burn is accidental or not. Child abuse should always be considered. We present two children in which the diagnosis only became clear after admission and further investigation. Patient A, a 15-month-old boy, had a burn on his left shoulder. The burn was assumed suspect in view of the unclear history given by the parents and a possible delay in their seeking help. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with impetigo bullosa and successfully treated with antibiotics. Patient B, a 24-month-old girl, had burns on both feet and her right hand, which were infected as a result of the delay in seeking help. The burns were identified as abuse-related. The child was removed from her mother's care and sent to a foster home. A well-defined work-up should be followed in case of burns in children.

  17. Burning Mouth Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kamala, K A; Sankethguddad, S; Sujith, S G; Tantradi, Praveena

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is multifactorial in origin which is typically characterized by burning and painful sensation in an oral cavity demonstrating clinically normal mucosa. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to differentiate between symptom of oral burning and BMS. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this study was to provide the practitioner with an understanding of the local, systemic, and psychosocial factors which may be responsible for oral burning associated with BMS, and review of treatment modalities, therefore providing a foundation for diagnosis and treatment of BMS.

  18. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele

    2012-01-01

    According to the International Association for the Study of Pain, burning mouth Syndrome (BMS) is defined as a burning pain in the tongue or other oral mucous membrane in the absence of clinical signs or laboratory findings. The etiology is unknown and presents a challenge for both researchers and clinicians. The management of BMS is still not satisfactory. The prognosis is poor and the burning sensation can last for many years causing a dramatic impact on the patient's quality of life. It is important to distinguish between true BMS and symptomatic burning sensation which occurs when the burning sensation is secondary to a local or systemic pathologic condition. Currently, there are no defined diagnostic criteria for BMS. A diagnosis is usually reached by exclusion of other diseases. This may lead to misdiagnoses, presenting an obstacle to successful treatment.

  19. Morphological study of burn wound healing with the use of collagen-chitosan wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Kirichenko, A K; Bolshakov, I N; Ali-Riza, A E; Vlasov, A A

    2013-03-01

    Experiments on the model of thermal skin burn in rats showed that the use of wound dressing based on collagen-chitosan complex Kollakhit-Bol in local treatment of grade IIIb skin burns increased healing rate by accelerating the formation of granulation and fibrous connective tissues and reducing crust thickness in comparison with Kollakhit coating. Kollakhit-Bol provided targeted stimulation of reparative processes in the treatment of grade IIIb burns by creating favorable conditions for grafting full thickness skin transplant or dermal-epidermal skin equivalent. In the topical treatment of thermal burn, Kollakhit-Bol application shortened the phases of alteration and exudation and accelerated transition to the productive phase of the inflammatory process with phagocytosis and neoangiogenesis activation.

  20. Wound healing properties of ethyl acetate fraction of Moringa oleifera in normal human dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gothai, Sivapragasam; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Tan, Woan Sean; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Wounds are the outcome of injuries to the skin that interrupt the soft tissue. Healing of a wound is a complex and long-drawn-out process of tissue repair and remodeling in response to injury. A large number of plants are used by folklore traditions for the treatment of cuts, wounds and burns. Moringa oleifera (MO) is an herb used as a traditional folk medicine for the treatment of various skin wounds and associated diseases. The underlying mechanisms of wound healing activity of ethyl acetate fraction of MO leaves extract are completely unknown. Materials and Methods: In the current study, ethyl acetate fraction of MO leaves was investigated for its efficacy on cell viability, proliferation and migration (wound closure rate) in human normal dermal fibroblast cells. Results: Results revealed that lower concentration (12.5 µg/ml, 25 µg/ml, and 50 µg/ml) of ethyl acetate fraction of MO leaves showed remarkable proliferative and migratory effect on normal human dermal fibroblasts. Conclusion: This study suggested that ethyl acetate fraction of MO leaves might be a potential therapeutic agent for skin wound healing by promoting fibroblast proliferation and migration through increasing the wound closure rate corroborating its traditional use. PMID:27069722

  1. Up-regulation of cutaneous α1-adrenoceptors after a burn.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Peter D; Dawson, Linda F; Finch, Philip M; Drummond, Eleanor S; Wood, Fiona M; Fear, Mark W

    2015-09-01

    Stimulation of α1-adrenoceptors evokes inflammatory cytokine production, boosts neurogenic inflammation and pain, and influences cellular migration and proliferation. As expression of α1-adrenoceptors increases on dermal nerves and keratinocytes after peripheral nerve injury, the aim of this study was to determine whether another form of tissue injury (a cutaneous burn) triggered a similar response. In particular, changes in expression of α1-adrenoceptors were investigated on dermal nerve fibres, keratinocytes and fibroblast-like cells using immunohistochemistry 2-12 weeks after a full thickness burn in Wistar rats. Within two weeks of the burn, local increases in α1-adrenoceptor expression were seen in the re-forming epidermis, in dense bands of spindle-shaped cells in the upper dermis (putatively infiltrating immune cells and fibroblasts), and on nerve fibres in the deep dermis. In addition, nerve fibre density increased approximately three-fold in the deep dermis, and this response persisted for several more weeks. In contrast, α1-adrenoceptor labelled cells and staining intensity in the upper dermis decreased contralateral to the burn, as did nerve fibre density in the deep dermis. These findings suggest that inflammatory mediators and/or growth factors at the site of a burn trigger the synthesis of α1-adrenoceptors on resident epidermal cells and nerve fibres, and an influx of α1-adrenoceptor labelled cells. The heightened expression of α1-adrenoceptors in injured tissue could shape inflammatory and wound healing responses.

  2. Melanoma arising in a nevus of Ito: novel genetic mutations and a review of the literature on cutaneous malignant transformation of dermal melanocytosis.

    PubMed

    Tse, Julie Y; Walls, Brooke E; Pomerantz, Hyemin; Yoon, Charles H; Buchbinder, Elizabeth I; Werchniak, Andrew E; Dong, Fei; Lian, Christine G; Granter, Scott R

    2016-01-01

    Dermal melanocytosis refers to a spectrum of benign melanocytic proliferations that includes Mongolian spot, nevus of Ota and nevus of Ito. These lesions most commonly occur in persons of Asian or African descent and are often present at birth or develop during childhood. Very rarely, dermal melanocytoses undergo malignant transformation. There have been only 13 reports in the literature of primary cutaneous melanoma arising in dermal melanocytoses. We report a case of a Chinese woman with melanoma arising in a congenital nevus of Ito. We performed targeted next-generation sequencing of the tumor which revealed mutations of GNAQ and BAP1, suggesting that alterations in these two genes led to malignant transformation of the nevus of Ito. We also provide a summary of reports in the literature regarding primary cutaneous melanoma arising in the context of dermal melanocytosis.

  3. Burned area, active fires and biomass burning - approaches to account for emissions from fires in Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruecker, Gernot; Hoffmann, Anja; Leimbach, David; Tiemann, Joachim; Ng'atigwa, Charles

    2013-04-01

    Eleven years of data from the globally available MODIS burned area and the MODS Active Fire Product have been analysed for Tanzania in conjunction with GIS data on land use and cover to provide a baseline for fire activity in this East African country. The total radiated energy (FRE) emitted by fires that were picked up by the burned area and active fire product is estimated based on a spatio-temporal clustering algorithm over the burned areas, and integration of the fire radiative power from the MODIS Active Fires product over the time of burning and the area of each burned area cluster. Resulting biomass combusted by unit area based on Woosteŕs scaling factor for FRE to biomass combusted is compared to values found in the literature, and to values found in the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED). Pyrogenic emissions are then estimated using emission factors. According to our analysis, an average of 11 million ha burn annually (ranging between 8.5 and 12.9 million ha) in Tanzania corresponding to between 10 and 14 % of Tanzaniás land area. Most burned area is recorded in the months from May to October. The land cover types most affected are woodland and shrubland cover types: they comprise almost 70 % of Tanzania's average annual burned area or 6.8 million ha. Most burning occurs in gazetted land, with an annual average of 3.7 million ha in forest reserves, 3.3 million ha in game reserves and 1.46 million ha in national parks, totalling close to 8.5 million ha or 77 % of the annual average burned area of Tanzania. Annual variability of burned area is moderate for most of the analysed classes, and in most cases there is no clear trend to be detected in burned area, except for the Lindi region were annual burned area appears to be increasing. Preliminary results regarding emissions from fires show that for larger fires that burn over a longer time, biomass burned derived through the FRP method compares well to literature values, while the integration over

  4. Allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells, but not culture modified monocytes, improve burn wound healing.

    PubMed

    Clover, Anthony J P; Kumar, Arun H S; Isakson, Matthew; Whelan, Derek; Stocca, Alecia; Gleeson, Birgitta M; Caplice, Noel M

    2015-05-01

    The use of cell therapy to improve burn wound healing is limited as a validated cell source is not rapidly available after injury. Progenitor cells have shown potential to drive the intrinsic wound regeneration. Two sources of cells, allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and autologous culture modified monocytes (CMM), were assessed for their ability to influence burn wound healing. Both could be widely available shortly after injury. Cells were delivered in a fibrin matrix following contact burns in a porcine burns model. Application of MSC significantly decreased the area of unhealed burn compared to CMM or delivery matrix alone (6% MSC, 27% CMM, 24% Matrix, p<0.001). MSC treated wounds showed histological evidence of improved wound healing with increased collagen content (MSC 49%, CMM 42%, p<0.01), increased epidermal area (MSC 8.8%, CMM 6.1%, p<0.01) and dermal thickness (MSC 1108 μm, CMM 1007 μm, p<0.01) compared to CMM treated wounds. Labelled MSC and CMM were identified in the wounds after 2 weeks by immunohistochemistry and FACS. A single application of allogeneic MSC improves the rate of burn wound healing and improves the histological appearance of the burn wound. These cells show potential as a cell therapy that is rapidly available following burn.

  5. Epidemiology and outcome analysis of 6325 burn patients: a five-year retrospective study in a major burn center in Southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haisheng; Yao, Zhihui; Tan, Jianglin; Zhou, Junyi; Li, Yi; Wu, Jun; Luo, Gaoxing

    2017-01-01

    Burns are a major cause of injury worldwide. We investigated the epidemiology and outcomes of burn patients in a major burn center in southwest China between 2011 and 2015 to provide guidance for burn prevention. Of the 6,325 included burn patients, 66.8% were male and 34.7% were 0 ~ 6 years old. The incidence of burns peaked in autumn. Scald was the most common cause of burns, which was predominant in patients aged 0 ~ 6 years. The mean total body surface area (TBSA) of burns was 13.4%, and patients with burns ≤10% TBSA comprised 64.1% of all cases. Patients with full-thickness burns accounted for 40.1% of all patients and 81.0% of operated patients; these burns were primarily caused by flame (34.8%), scald (21.0%), and electricity (20.4%). Fifty-six deaths occurred (mortality 0.9%), and risk factors included full-thickness burns, larger TBSA and older age. The median length of stay was 17 days, and major risk factors included more operations, better outcomes and larger TBSA. Our data showed that closer attention should be paid to children under 6 years old, males, incidents in autumn and scald burns to prevent burn injuries. Furthermore, individualized burn prevention and treatment measures based on related risk factors should be adopted. PMID:28383066

  6. Dermal/transdermal delivery of small interfering RNA and antisense oligonucleotides- advances and hurdles.

    PubMed

    Ita, Kevin

    2017-03-01

    A diverse array of nucleic acids has been studied by several researchers for the management of several diseases. Among these compounds, small interfering RNA and antisense oligonucleotides have attracted considerable attention. Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA while siRNAs, on the other hand, are double-stranded RNA molecules which can hybridize with a specific mRNA sequence and block the translation of numerous genes. One of the main obstacles in the dermal or transdermal delivery of these compounds is their low skin permeability. In this review, various techniques used to enhance the delivery of these molecules into or across the skin are described and in some cases, the correlation between enhanced dermal/transdermal delivery and therapeutic efficacy is highlighted.

  7. Recovery after tetraplegia caused by dermal sinus infection: intramedullary abscess and tetraparesis.

    PubMed

    Houx, Laetitia; Brochard, Sylvain; Peudenier, Sylviane; Dam Hieu, Phong; Rémy-Néris, Olivier

    2011-03-01

    Congenital dermal sinuses result from abnormal neurulation, and are uncommon. A spinal intramedullary abscess secondary to an infected dermoid cyst is very rare, and the functional prognosis is usually quite poor. We report on a 16-month-old child with tetraplegia secondary to intramedullary abscesses because of a dermoid cyst infection associated with a dermal sinus. The abscesses were drained, and the dermoid cyst was removed. Antibiotics were administered for 6 weeks after neurosurgery. The child was followed at a pediatric rehabilitation department. After 1 year, he was able to walk quickly and had regained appropriate upper limb motor function for his age. However, bladder sphincter dyssynergia persisted, requiring intermittent catheterization. This case highlights the importance of early diagnosis for surgical intervention and prolonged antibiotic therapy. Long-term follow-up by a multidisciplinary team allowed for the effective management of related neurologic, orthopedic, and bladder disorders.

  8. Burn encephalopathy in children.

    PubMed

    Mohnot, D; Snead, O C; Benton, J W

    1982-07-01

    Among 287 children with burns treated over a recent two-year period, 13 (5%) showed evidence of encephalopathy. The major clinical symptoms were an altered sensorium and seizures. The majority of symptoms began later than 48 hours after the burn and were accompanied by multiple metabolic aberrations including hypocalcemia. Three children had a relapsing course, and 1 had temporarily enlarged cerebral ventricles. Eleven children improved to normal. In the majority of instances, burn encephalopathy probably reflects central nervous system dysfunction resulting from complex metabolic, hematological, and hemodynamic abnormalities rather than from a single metabolic abnormality.

  9. DREAM: a method for semi-quantitative dermal exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Van-Wendel-de-Joode, Berna; Brouwer, Derk H; Vermeulen, Roel; Van Hemmen, Joop J; Heederik, Dick; Kromhout, Hans

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a new method (DREAM) for structured, semi-quantitative dermal exposure assessment for chemical or biological agents that can be used in occupational hygiene or epidemiology. It is anticipated that DREAM could serve as an initial assessment of dermal exposure, amongst others, resulting in a ranking of tasks and subsequently jobs. DREAM consists of an inventory and evaluation part. Two examples of dermal exposure of workers of a car-construction company show that DREAM characterizes tasks and gives insight into exposure mechanisms, forming a basis for systematic exposure reduction. DREAM supplies estimates for exposure levels on the outside clothing layer as well as on skin, and provides insight into the distribution of dermal exposure over the body. Together with the ranking of tasks and people, this provides information for measurement strategies and helps to determine who, where and what to measure. In addition to dermal exposure assessment, the systematic description of dermal exposure pathways helps to prioritize and determine most adequate measurement strategies and methods. DREAM could be a promising approach for structured, semi-quantitative, dermal exposure assessment.

  10. Dermal Exposure Assessment to Pesticides in Farming Systems in Developing Countries: Comparison of Models

    PubMed Central

    Lesmes Fabian, Camilo; Binder, Claudia R.

    2015-01-01

    In the field of occupational hygiene, researchers have been working on developing appropriate methods to estimate human exposure to pesticides in order to assess the risk and therefore to take the due decisions to improve the pesticide management process and reduce the health risks. This paper evaluates dermal exposure models to find the most appropriate. Eight models (i.e., COSHH, DERM, DREAM, EASE, PHED, RISKOFDERM, STOFFENMANAGER and PFAM) were evaluated according to a multi-criteria analysis and from these results five models (i.e., DERM, DREAM, PHED, RISKOFDERM and PFAM) were selected for the assessment of dermal exposure in the case study of the potato farming system in the Andean highlands of Vereda La Hoya, Colombia. The results show that the models provide different dermal exposure estimations which are not comparable. However, because of the simplicity of the algorithm and the specificity of the determinants, the DERM, DREAM and PFAM models were found to be the most appropriate although their estimations might be more accurate if specific determinants are included for the case studies in developing countries. PMID:25938911

  11. Dermal exposure assessment to pesticides in farming systems in developing countries: comparison of models.

    PubMed

    Lesmes-Fabian, Camilo; Fabian, Camilo Lesmes; Binder, Claudia R

    2015-04-29

    In the field of occupational hygiene, researchers have been working on developing appropriate methods to estimate human exposure to pesticides in order to assess the risk and therefore to take the due decisions to improve the pesticide management process and reduce the health risks. This paper evaluates dermal exposure models to find the most appropriate. Eight models (i.e., COSHH, DERM, DREAM, EASE, PHED, RISKOFDERM, STOFFENMANAGER and PFAM) were evaluated according to a multi-criteria analysis and from these results five models (i.e., DERM, DREAM, PHED, RISKOFDERM and PFAM) were selected for the assessment of dermal exposure in the case study of the potato farming system in the Andean highlands of Vereda La Hoya, Colombia. The results show that the models provide different dermal exposure estimations which are not comparable. However, because of the simplicity of the algorithm and the specificity of the determinants, the DERM, DREAM and PFAM models were found to be the most appropriate although their estimations might be more accurate if specific determinants are included for the case studies in developing countries.

  12. Malignant Melanoma on a Thermal Burn Scar with an Interval of More Than 70 Years

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Shusuke; Oiso, Naoki; Shiga, Kuriko; Narita, Tomohiko; Kawada, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Cases of malignant melanoma on thermal burn scars have occasionally been reported. We report a 78-year-old Japanese female with malignant melanoma on a thermal burn scar with an interval of more than 70 years. Our case reemphasizes the importance of regular examinations in persons with thermal burn scars. PMID:27721752

  13. Burning mouth syndrome due to herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Maria A; Choe, Alexander; Traktinskiy, Igor; Gilden, Don

    2015-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterised by chronic orofacial burning pain. No dental or medical cause has been found. We present a case of burning mouth syndrome of 6 months duration in a healthy 65-year-old woman, which was associated with high copy numbers of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA in the saliva. Her pain resolved completely after antiviral treatment with a corresponding absence of salivary HSV-1 DNA 4 weeks and 6 months later.

  14. Aerodigestive tract burn from ingestion of microwaved food.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Michael; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Aerodigestive tract burns represent a rare but potentially devastating injury pattern throughout the world. Although the majority of these injuries do not require intervention, these burns have the potential for poor outcomes. Traditionally this disease has been caused by superheated gases found in explosions or fire-related injury. However, as technology advances, it brings novel methods for injury that require physician awareness of potential hazards. We describe a case of laryngeal and esophageal thermal burn caused by a microwave heated food bolus.

  15. [Treatment of burns in infants].

    PubMed

    Foyatier, J L; Latarjet, J; Comparin, J P; Zaragori, M; Robert, A; Braye, F; Weill, E; Masson, C L

    1995-10-01

    Because of the potential severity of their residual deformities, burn injuries in infants justify an early management in specialized centres when they cover more than 5% of body surface and in every case when hands, face, or external genitalia are concerned. Cooling with cold water is the first aid treatment to be performed as early as possible after the injury. The treatment in specialized centres must be both general and surgical. General treatment includes fluid and electrolyte therapy, temperature control, appropriate nutrition and pain suppression. Pain suppression is a major part of the treatment and morphine must be largely used. Surgical treatment starts as soon as the patient arrives in the centre and is eventually performed under general anesthesia: all the burned areas are covered with occlusive dressings. Infections are prevented by systematic cultures and adjusted antibiotic therapy. A vigorous rehabilitation program must be instituted as soon as possible: massages, compressive clothes, splints, physical therapy, plastic surgery. Primary prevention by sustained parental education is important in order to reduce the frequency of burn injuries in infants.

  16. Does pyrogenicity protect burning plants?

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Paul R; Passmore, Heather A; Platt, William J; Myers, Jonathan A; Paine, C E Timothy; Harms, Kyle E

    2010-12-01

    Pyrogenic plants dominate many fire-prone ecosystems. Their prevalence suggests some advantage to their enhanced flammability, but researchers have had difficulty tying pyrogenicity to individual-level advantages. Based on our review, we propose that enhanced flammability in fire-prone ecosystems should protect the belowground organs and nearby propagules of certain individual plants during fires. We base this hypothesis on five points: (1) organs and propagules by which many fire-adapted plants survive fires are vulnerable to elevated soil temperatures during fires; (2) the degree to which burning plant fuels heat the soil depends mainly on residence times of fires and on fuel location relative to the soil; (3) fires and fire effects are locally heterogeneous, meaning that individual plants can affect local soil heating via their fuels; (4) how a plant burns can thus affect its fitness; and (5) in many cases, natural selection in fire-prone habitats should therefore favor plants that burn rapidly and retain fuels off the ground. We predict an advantage of enhanced flammability for plants whose fuels influence local fire characteristics and whose regenerative tissues or propagules are affected by local variation in fires. Our "pyrogenicity as protection" hypothesis has the potential to apply to a range of life histories. We discuss implications for ecological and evolutionary theory and suggest considerations for testing the hypothesis.

  17. The influence of vapor pressure of chemicals on dermal penetration.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Dermal exposure is an important route of entry for chemicals in occupational and consumer settings. Key to this exposure is the penetration of the skin's barrier, and key to this penetration is a chemical's vapor pressure. Until now, vapor pressure and its effects on the skin have yet to be widely studied. This review aims to provide some historical background on early work on dermal penetration for volatile materials, which has helped form later research into the effects of vapor pressure on chemical risk assessment for dermal exposures. This review should be the start of an investigation into more in-depth coverage of vapor pressure and current prediction models.

  18. Burns and Fire Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mickalide A. Hot tap water legislation in the United States. J Burn Care Res . 2010; 31(6): 918-925. 13 Safe Kids Worldwide, Public Policy Department, 2005. 14 AntiScald, Inc. Available from: http:// ...

  19. Burns (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... arrives. previous continue What to Do (continued) For Flame Burns: Extinguish the flames by having your child roll on the ground. ... a hot-steam one. Choose sleepwear that's labeled flame retardant (either polyester or treated cotton). Cotton sweatshirts ...

  20. New Fashioned Book Burning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Reports on results of a teacher's experiment in book burning as a lesson accompanying the teaching of Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451." Discusses student reactions and the purpose of or justification for the experimental lesson. (TB)

  1. Burns (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... you drowsy, or in bed. Don't use fireworks or sparklers. Bathroom Set the thermostat on your ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Fireworks Safety First Aid: Burns First Aid: Sunburn Sun ...

  2. Burn Wise Awareness Kit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Health and safety outreach materials in the form of an awareness kit. Designed specifically for state, local, and tribal air agencies working to reduce wood smoke pollution, it includes best burn tips, social media m

  3. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the company used technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications

  4. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the companyused technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications.

  5. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the company used technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications.

  6. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thoppay, Jaisri R; De Rossi, Scott S; Ciarrocca, Katharine N

    2013-07-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic condition that is characterized by burning symptoms of the oral mucosa without obvious clinical examination findings. This syndrome has complex characteristics, but its cause remains largely enigmatic, making treatment and management of patients with BMS difficult. Despite not being accompanied by evident organic changes, BMS can significantly reduce the quality of life for such patients. Therefore, it is incumbent on dental professionals to diagnose and manage patients with BMS as a part of comprehensive care.

  7. Exploratory breath analyses for assessing toxic dermal exposure of firefighters during suppression of structural burns

    EPA Science Inventory

    Firefighters wear fireproof clothing and self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) during rescue and fire suppression activities to protect against acute effects from heat and toxic chemicals. Fire services are also concerned about long-term health outcomes from chemical exposure...

  8. Congenital spinal dermal tract: how accurate is clinical and radiological evaluation?

    PubMed

    Tisdall, Martin M; Hayward, Richard D; Thompson, Dominic N P

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT A dermal sinus tract is a common form of occult spinal dysraphism. The presumed etiology relates to a focal failure of disjunction resulting in a persistent adhesion between the neural and cutaneous ectoderm. Clinical and radiological features can appear innocuous, leading to delayed diagnosis and failure to appreciate the implications or extent of the abnormality. If it is left untreated, complications can include meningitis, spinal abscess, and inclusion cyst formation. The authors present their experience in 74 pediatric cases of spinal dermal tract in an attempt to identify which clinical and radiological factors are associated with an infective presentation and to assess the reliability of MRI in evaluating this entity. METHODS Consecutive cases of spinal dermal tract treated with resection between 1998 and 2010 were identified from the departmental surgical database. Demographics, clinical history, and radiological and operative findings were collected from the patient records. The presence or absence of active infection (abscess, meningitis) at the time of neurosurgical presentation and any history of local sinus discharge or infection was assessed. Magnetic resonance images were reviewed to evaluate the extent of the sinus tract and determine the presence of an inclusion cyst. Radiological and operative findings were compared. RESULTS The surgical course was uncomplicated in 90% of 74 cases eligible for analysis. Magnetic resonance imaging underreported the presence of both an intradural tract (MRI 46%, operative finding 86%) and an intraspinal inclusion cyst (MRI 15%, operative finding 24%). A history of sinus discharge (OR 12.8, p = 0.0003) and the intraoperative identification of intraspinal inclusion cysts (OR 5.6, p = 0.023) were associated with an infective presentation. There was no significant association between the presence of an intradural tract discovered at surgery and an infective presentation. CONCLUSIONS Surgery for the treatment of

  9. PBXN-110 Burn Rate Estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E

    2008-08-11

    It is estimated that PBXN-110 will burn laminarly with a burn function of B = (0.6-1.3)*P{sup 1.0} (B is the burn rate in mm/s and P is pressure in MPa). This paper provides a brief discussion of how this burn behavior was estimated.

  10. Dermal reflectivity determined by optical coherence tomography is an indicator of epidermal hyperplasia and dermal edema within inflamed skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Wang, Yun; Levitz, David; Choudhury, Niloy; Swanzey, Emily; Lagowski, James; Kulesz-Martin, Molly; Jacques, Steven L.

    2011-04-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease resulting from genetic and environmental alterations of cutaneous immune responses. While numerous therapeutic targets involved in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis have been identified, the in vivo dynamics of inflammation in psoriasis remain unclear. We undertook in vivo time course focus-tracked optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to noninvasively document cutaneous alterations in mouse skin treated topically with Imiquimod (IMQ), an established model of a psoriasis-like disease. Quantitative appraisal of dermal architectural changes was achieved through a two parameter fit of OCT axial scans in the dermis of the form A(x, y, z) = ρ(x, y)exp [ - μ(x, y)z]. Ensemble averaging over 2000 axial scans per mouse in each treatment arm revealed no significant changes in the average dermal attenuation rate, <μ>, however the average local dermal reflectivity <ρ>, decreased significantly following 1, 3, and 6 days of IMQ treatment (p < 0.001) in comparison to vehicle-treated control mice. In contrast, epidermal and dermal thickness changes were only significant when comparing controls and 6-day IMQ treated mice. This suggests that dermal alterations, attributed to collagen fiber bundle enlargement, occur prior to epidermal thickness changes due to hyperplasia and dermal thickness changes due to edema. Dermal reflectivity positively correlated with epidermal hyperplasia (repi2 = 0.78) and dermal edema (rderm2 = 0.86). Our results suggest that dermal reflectivity as measured by OCT can be utilized to quantify a psoriasis-like disease in mice, and thus has the potential to aid in the quantitative assessment of psoriasis in humans.

  11. The media glorifying burns: a hindrance to burn prevention.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2003-01-01

    The media have a profound influence on the actions of children and adults. Burns and burn prevention tend to be ignored or even mocked. The purpose of this presentation is to reveal the callousness of the media in its dealings with burns and burn prevention. Printed materials with a relationship to burns, risk of burning, or disrespect for the consequences of burns were collected. The materials were tabulated into four categories: comics, advertisements (ads), articles that made light of burns, and television shows that portrayed behavior that would risk burn injury. Most burn-related materials were found in comics or advertisements. Several comics made light of high-risk behavior with flames, scald injury, contact injury, or burns. In addition, several advertisements showed people on fire or actions that could easily lead to burns. Several articles and televisions shows portrayed high-risk behavior that, in some instances, led to copycat injuries. Flames are frequently used to sell items that target adolescent boys or young men. The high incidence injuries that frequent this population parallel the high-risk behaviors portrayed by the media. The media portrays flames and high-risk behavior for burn injury as being cool, funny, and without consequence. The use of flames on clothing and recreational equipment (skateboards, hot rods) particularly targets the high-risk adolescent male. The burn community should make the media aware of the harm it causes with its callous depiction and glorification of burns.

  12. Burns from acetylene gas: more than skin deep.

    PubMed

    Al-Hassani, Fawaz; Amin, Kavit; Lo, Steven

    2014-05-19

    Oxyacetylene welding torches are commonly used in industry, yet serious burns are fortunately rare. When dealing with the sequelae of these burn injuries, one must be aware of the high pressure component of these flame burns, which can penetrate and dissect the subcutaneous tissue. Appropriate initial assessment and preoperative planning are, therefore, essential to exclude and identify problems such as, compartment syndrome, subcutaneous emphysema and acute carpal tunnel syndrome. We present a case in which an innocuous palmar burn revealed a penetrating flame injury into the carpal tunnel.

  13. Heating-pad burn as a complication of abdominoplasty.

    PubMed

    Ozgenel Ege, G Y; Ozcan, M

    2003-01-01

    As the sensory nerves supplying the abdominal wall are divided during abdominoplasty, sensory changes occur in the abdominal skin after surgery, which are troublesome for some patients. These sensory changes can lead to burn injury in uninformed patients. We report the case of a patient who sustained a second-degree burn to the anterior abdominal skin following the application of a heating pad after an abdominoplasty. This burn healed with conservative treatment. Burn injuries due to sensory loss in the abdominal skin following abdominoplasty must be kept in mind, and patients must be informed about this complication.

  14. Management of chemical burns of the canine cornea

    PubMed Central

    Christmas, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Significant clinical signs and general principles of treatment for chemical burns of the canine cornea are presented using three typical case studies for illustration. Alkali burns are more common in dogs than acid burns. The sources of alkali in this study were soap, cement, and mortar dust. Common signs of chemical burns are ocular pain, corneal ulceration, tear film inadequacy, corneal edema, and marked corneal neovascularity. Successful treatment requires thorough ocular lavage, treatment for corneal ulceration, and adequate anti-inflammatory therapy when the corneal epithelium becomes intact. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:17423874

  15. Burns from acetylene gas: more than skin deep

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hassani, Fawaz; Amin, Kavit; Lo, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Oxyacetylene welding torches are commonly used in industry, yet serious burns are fortunately rare. When dealing with the sequelae of these burn injuries, one must be aware of the high pressure component of these flame burns, which can penetrate and dissect the subcutaneous tissue. Appropriate initial assessment and preoperative planning are, therefore, essential to exclude and identify problems such as, compartment syndrome, subcutaneous emphysema and acute carpal tunnel syndrome. We present a case in which an innocuous palmar burn revealed a penetrating flame injury into the carpal tunnel. PMID:24842344

  16. Pattern of burn injury in hang-glider pilots.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D C; Nano, T; Pegg, S P

    1996-06-01

    High-voltage electrical injury has been well documented in a number of situations, such as the occupational hazard of linesmen and construction workers, and in the context of overhead railway power lines. Two cases of hang-glider pilots contacting 11,000-volt power lines have recently been treated in the Royal Brisbane Hospital Burns Unit. They demonstrate an interesting pattern of injury, not described in current burns literature, involving both hand and lower abdominal burns. Both patients sustained full-thickness patches of burn injury, with underlying muscle damage and peripheral neurological injury. This distribution of injury seems to be closely related to the design of the hang glider.

  17. Dextran hydrogel scaffolds enhance angiogenic responses and promote complete skin regeneration during burn wound healing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guoming; Zhang, Xianjie; Shen, Yu-I; Sebastian, Raul; Dickinson, Laura E; Fox-Talbot, Karen; Reinblatt, Maura; Steenbergen, Charles; Harmon, John W; Gerecht, Sharon

    2011-12-27

    Neovascularization is a critical determinant of wound-healing outcomes for deep burn injuries. We hypothesize that dextran-based hydrogels can serve as instructive scaffolds to promote neovascularization and skin regeneration in third-degree burn wounds. Dextran hydrogels are soft and pliable, offering opportunities to improve the management of burn wound treatment. We first developed a procedure to treat burn wounds on mice with dextran hydrogels. In this procedure, we followed clinical practice of wound excision to remove full-thickness burned skin, and then covered the wound with the dextran hydrogel and a dressing layer. Our procedure allows the hydrogel to remain intact and securely in place during the entire healing period, thus offering opportunities to simplify the management of burn wound treatment. A 3-week comparative study indicated that dextran hydrogel promoted dermal regeneration with complete skin appendages. The hydrogel scaffold facilitated early inflammatory cell infiltration that led to its rapid degradation, promoting the infiltration of angiogenic cells into the healing wounds. Endothelial cells homed into the hydrogel scaffolds to enable neovascularization by day 7, resulting in an increased blood flow significantly greater than treated and untreated controls. By day 21, burn wounds treated with hydrogel developed a mature epithelial structure with hair follicles and sebaceous glands. After 5 weeks of treatment, the hydrogel scaffolds promoted new hair growth and epidermal morphology and thickness similar to normal mouse skin. Collectively, our evidence shows that customized dextran-based hydrogel alone, with no additional growth factors, cytokines, or cells, promoted remarkable neovascularization and skin regeneration and may lead to novel treatments for dermal wounds.

  18. Harborview Burns – 1974 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Engrav, Loren H.; Heimbach, David M.; Rivara, Frederick P.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Osler, Turner; Pham, Tam N.; Sharar, Sam R.; Esselman, Peter C.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Carrougher, Gretchen J.; Honari, Shari; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Burn demographics, prevention and care have changed considerably since the 1970s. The objectives were to 1) identify new and confirm previously described changes, 2) make comparisons to the American Burn Association National Burn Repository, 3) determine when the administration of fluids in excess of the Baxter formula began and to identify potential causes, and 4) model mortality over time, during a 36-year period (1974–2009) at the Harborview Burn Center in Seattle, WA, USA. Methods and Findings 14,266 consecutive admissions were analyzed in five-year periods and many parameters compared to the National Burn Repository. Fluid resuscitation was compared in five-year periods from 1974 to 2009. Mortality was modeled with the rBaux model. Many changes are highlighted at the end of the manuscript including 1) the large increase in numbers of total and short-stay admissions, 2) the decline in numbers of large burn injuries, 3) that unadjusted case fatality declined to the mid-1980s but has changed little during the past two decades, 4) that race/ethnicity and payer status disparity exists, and 5) that the trajectory to death changed with fewer deaths occurring after seven days post-injury. Administration of fluids in excess of the Baxter formula during resuscitation of uncomplicated injuries was evident at least by the early 1990s and has continued to the present; the cause is likely multifactorial but pre-hospital fluids, prophylactic tracheal intubation and opioids may be involved. Conclusions 1) The dramatic changes include the rise in short-stay admissions; as a result, the model of burn care practiced since the 1970s is still required but is no longer sufficient. 2) Fluid administration in excess of the Baxter formula with uncomplicated injuries began at least two decades ago. 3) Unadjusted case fatality declined to ∼6% in the mid-1980s and changed little since then. The rBaux mortality model is quite accurate. PMID:22792216

  19. Acquired ichthyosis and impaired dermal lipogenesis in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M F; Wilson, P D; Hartop, P J; Shuster, S

    1980-06-01

    Epidermal lipid biosynthesis was normal in patients with mild ichthyosis due to Hodgkin's disease, but greatly reduced in one patient with severe ichthyosis. Dermal (sebaceous) lipid synthesis was decreased in all patients with Hodgkin's disease, whether or not they had ichthyosis, and was greatly reduced in the patient with severe ichthyosis. Neither the mechanism nor the possible relationship between the dermal and epidermal changes is understood.

  20. Dermal exposure and urinary 1-hydroxypyrene among asphalt roofing workers

    SciTech Connect

    McClean, M.D.; Rinehart, R.D.; Sapkota, A.; Cavallari, J.M.; Herrick, R.F.

    2007-07-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify significant determinants of dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) among asphalt roofing workers and use urinary 1-hydroxyprene (1-OHP) measurements to evaluate the effect of dermal exposure on total absorbed dose. The study population included 26 asphalt roofing workers who performed three primary tasks: tearing off old roofs, putting down new roofs, and operating the kettle at ground level. During multiple consecutive work shifts, dermal patch samples were collected from the underside of each worker's wrists and were analyzed for PACs, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene (BAP). During the same work week, urine samples were collected at pre-shift, post-shift, and bedtime each day and were analyzed for 1-OHP (205 urine samples). Linear mixed effects models were used to evaluate the dermal measurements for the purpose of identifying important determinants of exposure, and to evaluate urinary 1-OHP measurements for the purpose of identifying important determinants of total absorbed dose. Dermal exposures to PAC, pyrene, and BAP were found to vary significantly by roofing task and by the presence of an old coal tar pitch roof. For each of the three analytes, the adjusted mean dermal exposures associated with tear-off were approximately four times higher than exposures associated with operating the kettle. Exposure to coal tar pitch was associated with a 6-fold increase in PAC exposure, an 8-fold increase in pyrene exposure and a 35-fold increase in BAP exposure. The presence of coal tar pitch was the primary determinant of dermal exposure, particularly for exposure to BAP. However, the task-based differences that were observed while controlling for pitch suggest that exposure to asphalt also contributes to dermal exposures.

  1. Characterization of burns using hyperspectral imaging technique - a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Calin, Mihaela Antonina; Parasca, Sorin Viorel; Savastru, Roxana; Manea, Dragos

    2015-02-01

    Surgical burn treatment depends on accurate estimation of burn depth. Many methods have been used to asses burns, but none has gained wide acceptance. Hyperspectral imaging technique has recently entered the medical research field with encouraging results. In this paper we present a preliminary study (case presentation) that aims to point out the value of this optical method in burn wound characterization and to set up future lines of investigation. A hyperspectral image of a leg and foot with partial thickness burns was obtained in the fifth postburn day. The image was analyzed using linear spectral unmixing model as a tool for mapping the investigated areas. The article gives details on the mathematical bases of the interpretation model and correlations with clinical examination pointing out the advantages of hyperspectral imaging technique. While the results were encouraging, further more extended and better founded studies are being prepared before recognizing hyperspectral imaging technique as an applicable method of burn wound assessment.

  2. Management of severe rheumatological disease in the burn center.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Preetham; Ahrenholz, David H; Mohr, William J; Gertner, Elie

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, Burn Center has evolved to become a "wound intensive care unit" treating disease processes other than those due to thermal injury. Recent data have shown that more than 16% of admissions to Burn Centers are for nonburn injuries, particularly severe dermatologic diseases. The role of the Burn Center has been expanded to include treatment of patients with severe cutaneous manifestations of rheumatologic diseases. This approach has not been described before. All collagen vascular disease admissions to the Burn Center from 2005 to 2010 have been reviewed. There were 16 admissions where intensive wound management was a major component of the disease management. Disease processes included systemic lupus erythematosus, progressive systemic sclerosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, antiphospholipid syndrome, and dermatomyositis, among others. The authors describe five of these cases in detail. Comanagement of these patients by the Rheumatology and Burn services led to outstanding, successful outcomes. Collagen vascular diseases represent another area where the Burn Center may be the appropriate site for therapy.

  3. Lymphedema of the upper extremity following circumferential burns.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Chenicheri; Bradt, Lisa M; Khalil, Abdullah J; Trupiano, John M

    2004-01-01

    Lymphedema is characterized by edema of the extremity due to the inability of the lymphatic system to remove lymph into the circulation. This condition can result from destruction of the superficial lymphatics from burn injury and recurrent infection of the extremity. Due to its rare occurrence, two cases of upper extremity lymphedema following burns are reported.

  4. Dermal mast cell responses in Paragonimus westermani-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, M H

    1997-12-01

    This study was carried out to determine whether dermal mast cell responses to Paragonimus westermani in an abnormal host, the mouse, were dependent on the site of metacercarial inoculation. In mice during subcutaneous infection, the number of dermal mast cells were increased significantly (p < 0.05) at the first week (38.3/mm2) and then persisted at a high level until the sixth week (45.2/mm2) of infection compared with PBS-injected (control) mice (range: 19.4-25.1/mm2). In mice during oral infection, the number of dermal mast cells were increased significantly (p < 0.05) at two weeks (33.5/mm2) after infection and remained at these levels thereafter compared with non-infected (control) mice (range: 17.4-22.3/mm2). In mice both during subcutaneous and oral infection, the recruited dermal mast cells showed extensive degranulation at the second week (68.4% and 60.7%, respectively), reached a peak at the third week (81.4%, and 92.1%, respectively) and then declined slightly thereafter. By contrast, in both control mice, about 10% of dermal mast cells were degranulated. In conclusion, this study suggests that dermal mast cell responses to P. westermani in mice are dependent on cutaneous sensitization by larval excretory-secretory antigens, irrespective of infection route.

  5. Chemical composition and sources of ambient aerosol in an urban environment over Athens, Greece: Case study on the role of wintertime biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodosi, Christina

    2016-04-01

    This study examines the chemical composition of aerosols over the Greater Athens Area (GAA). To achieve this, particulate matter sampling has been conducted on a 6h-24h basis and more than 700 aerosol samples were collected at downtown Athens, in Thissio from January 2013 to December 2015. All samples, after mass quantification, were analyzed for major anions (Cl^-, Br^-, NO{_3^-}, SO{_4-2}, PO{_4-3}, C_2O{_4-2}), cations (NH{_4^+}, K^+, Na^+, Mg+2, Ca+2), trace elements (Al, As, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, V, Zn, Mn, Ni, Pb, P, S, Sb), organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC). Aerosol chemical mass closure calculations indicated that carbonaceous aerosol constitutes a major component, along with nitrate and sulfate anions, dust, cations and EC. Moreover, during the winter periods of December 2012-January 2013 and December 2013-January 2014, air pollution due to excessive use of biomass for domestic heating has been reported as a major environmental problem in the area. To assess the importance of biomass burning as a source of air pollution over the GAA three main sugars specific biomass burning tracers (levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan) and Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also analyzed during the winter period. Acknowledgments This work was supported by the State Scholarship Foundation ("IKY Fellowships of Excellence for Postgraduate Studies in Greece - Siemens Programme") in the framework of the Hellenic Republic-Siemens Settlement Agreement.

  6. Pre-clinical evaluation of liposomal gene transfer to improve dermal and epidermal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Branski, L K; Masters, O E; Herndon, D N; Mittermayr, R; Redl, H; Traber, D L; Cox, R A; Kita, K; Jeschke, M G

    2010-06-01

    Liposomal gene transfer effectively enhances dermal and epidermal regeneration in burned rodents. To advance this treatment to clinical studies, we investigated the efficacy of liposomal gene transfer in a clinically relevant porcine wound model. Mimicking the clinical scenario, six female Yorkshire pigs (40-50 kg) received up to 12 burns of 50 cm(2) area that were fully excised and covered with skin autograft meshed at 4:1 ratio 24 h post-burn. Animals received control injections (empty liposomes), liposomes (DMRIE-C) containing 1 mg LacZ-cDNA, or liposomes (DMRIE-C) with 1 mg of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-cDNA, or the naked PDGF gene. Serial biopsies were taken from different wound sites at multiple time points up to 12 days post-wounding. Transfection efficacy and transfection rate of LacZ and localization of beta-gal were determined by immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent techniques. RT-PCR and multiplex protein analysis (ELISA) were used to measure levels of growth factor mRNA transcribed and growth factor protein translated. Wound re-epithelialization and graft adhesion was evaluated using planimetric analysis and clinical scores. We found that peak transfection of liposomal beta-galactosidase occurred on day 2, with a fluorescence increase of 154% to baseline (P<0.001). Transfection intensity dropped to 115% above baseline on day 4 (P<0.001) and 109% on day 7. Immunohistochemistry showed a maximum transfection rate of 34% of cells in wound tissue. Gene transfer of liposomal PDGF-cDNA resulted in increased PDGF-mRNA and protein expression on days 2 and 4, and accelerated wound re-epithlialization as well as graft adhesion on day 9 (P<0.05). In this study, we showed that liposomal cDNA gene transfer is possible in a porcine wound model, and by using PDGF-cDNA we further showed that dermal and epidermal regeneration can be improved. These data indicate that liposomal gene transfer can be a new therapeutic approach to improve wound healing in

  7. ABCB5 identifies immunoregulatory dermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Schatton, Tobias; Yang, Jun; Kleffel, Sonja; Uehara, Mayuko; Barthel, Steven R.; Schlapbach, Christoph; Zhan, Qian; Dudeney, Stephen; Mueller, Hansgeorg; Lee, Nayoung; de Vries, Juliane C.; Meier, Barbara; Vander Beken, Seppe; Kluth, Mark A.; Ganss, Christoph; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Sayegh, Mohamed H.; Abdi, Reza; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Murphy, George F.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Frank, Natasha Y.; Frank, Markus H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell-based strategies represent a new frontier in the treatment of immune-mediated disorders. However, the paucity of markers for isolation of molecularly-defined immunomodulatory cell populations poses a barrier to this field. Here we show that ATP-binding cassette member B5 (ABCB5) identifies dermal immunoregulatory cells (DIRCs) capable of exerting therapeutic immunoregulatory functions through engagement of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1). Purified Abcb5+ DIRCs suppressed T-cell proliferation, evaded immune rejection, homed to recipient immune tissues and induced Tregs in vivo. In fully MHC-mismatched cardiac allotransplantation models, allogeneic DIRCs significantly prolonged allograft survival. Blockade of DIRC-expressed PD-1 reversed the inhibitory effects of DIRCs on T-cell activation, inhibited DIRC-dependent Treg induction, and attenuated DIRC-induced prolongation of cardiac allograft survival, indicating that DIRC immunoregulatory function is mediated, at least in part, through PD-1. Our results identify ABCB5+ DIRCs as a distinct immunoregulatory cell population and suggest promising roles of this expandable cell subset in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:26321644

  8. Vesicular carriers for dermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinico, Chiara; Fadda, Anna Maria

    2009-08-01

    The skin can offer several advantages as a route of drug administration although its barrier nature makes it difficult for most drugs to penetrate into and permeate through it. During the past decades there has been a lot of interest in lipid vesicles as a tool to improve drug topical delivery. Vesicular systems such as liposomes, niosomes, ethosomes and elastic, deformable vesicles provide an alternative for improved skin drug delivery. The function of vesicles as topical delivery systems is controversial with variable effects being reported in relation to the type of vesicles and their composition. In fact, vesicles can act as drug carriers controlling active release; they can provide a localized depot in the skin for dermally active compounds and enhance transdermal drug delivery. A wide variety of lipids and surfactants can be used to prepare vesicles, which are commonly composed of phospholipids (liposomes) or non-ionic surfactants (niosomes). Vesicle composition and preparation method influence their physicochemical properties (size, charge, lamellarity, thermodynamic state, deformability) and therefore their efficacy as drug delivery systems. A review of vesicle value in localizing drugs within the skin at the site of action will be provided with emphasis on their potential mechanism of action.

  9. Human dermal fibroblasts in psychiatry research.

    PubMed

    Kálmán, S; Garbett, K A; Janka, Z; Mirnics, K

    2016-04-21

    In order to decipher the disease etiology, progression and treatment of multifactorial human brain diseases we utilize a host of different experimental models. Recently, patient-derived human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cultures have re-emerged as promising in vitro functional system for examining various cellular, molecular, metabolic and (patho)physiological states and traits of psychiatric disorders. HDF studies serve as a powerful complement to postmortem and animal studies, and often appear to be informative about the altered homeostasis in neural tissue. Studies of HDFs from patients with schizophrenia (SZ), depression, bipolar disorder (BD), autism, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder and other psychiatric disorders have significantly advanced our understanding of these devastating diseases. These reports unequivocally prove that signal transduction, redox homeostasis, circadian rhythms and gene*environment (G*E) interactions are all amenable for assessment by the HDF model. Furthermore, the reported findings suggest that this underutilized patient biomaterial, combined with modern molecular biology techniques, may have both diagnostic and prognostic value, including prediction of response to therapeutic agents.

  10. Dermal absorption of inorganic germanium in rats.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Katsuhiko; Kawaai, Takae; Konomi, Aki; Uchida, Yuka

    2008-11-01

    So-called germanium 'health' products including dietary supplements, cosmetics, accessories, and warm bath service containing germanium compounds and metalloid are popular in Japan. Subchronic and chronic oral exposure of germanium dioxide (GeO(2)), popular chemical form of inorganic germanium causes severe germanium toxicosis including death and kidney dysfunction in humans and experimental animals. Intestinal absorption of neutralized GeO(2) or germanate is almost complete in humans and animals. However, it is not known whether germanium is cutaneously absorbed. We tested dermal absorption of neutralized GeO(2) or germanate using male F344/N rats. Three groups of rats were treated with a 3-h topical application of hydrophilic ointment containing graded level of neutralized GeO(2) (pH 7.4): 0, 0.21 and 0.42 mg GeO(2)/g. Germanium concentration in blood and tissues sampled from rats after topical application of inorganic germanium was measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Animals topically applied 0.42 mg GeO(2)/g ointment had significantly higher germanium concentrations in plasma, liver, and kidney than those of rats that received no topical germanium. The results indicate that skin is permeable to inorganic germanium ion or germanate and recurrent exposure of germanium compounds may pose a potential health hazard.

  11. Emotional intelligence and electro-dermal activity.

    PubMed

    Zysberg, Leehu

    2012-09-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is a promising concept in our understanding of emotional regulation, related behaviors and pathologies. However, research linking EI to underlying physiological and biological structure and responses is meager. This study explored potential associations of EI with electro-dermal activity (EDA) responses to emotionally arousing visual stimuli. It was hypothesized that higher levels of EI will associate with more efficient emotional regulation as reflected by EDA. Eighty-four healthy participants were exposed to stimuli consisting of a series of 12 images designed to evoke positive or negative emotional responses, presented in a counterbalanced order. A self-report questionnaire and a computer based test of EI were administered along with a demographic questionnaire. EDA measures were taken during the exposure to the above stimuli using BIOPACK MP150. EI test scores (Beta = .35, .32; p < .001) and age (Beta = -.24, -.31; p < .03) associated with EDA delta (stimulus response-baseline) scores, while the self-report measure of EI and other demographics (e.g., gender. ethnicity) did not show any associations with the outcome measures. The results support the relevance of the concept to our understanding of emotional responses and regulation. The findings are briefly discussed within the context of underlying mechanisms of EI as well as measure validity and relevance.

  12. Acellular dermal graft reinforcement at the hiatus.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Bruce

    2012-11-01

    The ideal technique to repair large hiatal and diaphragmatic defects remains controversial. Due to high recurrence rates with primary repair alone, attempts at crural reinforcement with various products has been investigated. Initial evaluation of synthetic mesh at the hiatus in retrospective studies led to the conclusion that there were too many serious complications with these products. The next step was to see how biologic grafts fared in this location. Beginning with porcine intestine submucosa in a laminated array and progressing through human and porcine acellular dermal matrices, multiple, retrospective studies looked at the efficacy and safety of these products. Unfortunately, most of these studies evaluated a small sample size with a relatively short follow-up period. The one study followed out to 5 years failed to show any benefit using the biologic (porcine intestinal submucosa) compared with the primary repair alone. Additional, prospective, randomized studies with ample numbers carried out for years will be necessary to see which biologic graft is not only safe but also successful in preventing recurrent herniations.

  13. Toxic epidermal necrolysis from a cigarette burn.

    PubMed

    Parker, Joshua R; Berkeley, Ross P

    2010-05-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis is a rare disease that is most often drug-induced but can be of idiopathic origin. We present a case that originated at the site of a cigarette burn to the forearm and review the key elements of physical exam findings and management of this life-threatening dermatological condition, which needs to be promptly recognized to decrease patient mortality.

  14. Burning trees and bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1990-01-01

    Most burning of biomass is the result of human activity, and on a global scale it is increasing. Tropospheric concentrations of CO2, CO, CH4, non-methane hydrocarbons, and ozone are all increasing with time; global biomass burning may make an important contribution to this increase and thus to potential global climate change. The nitrogen cycle also can have important climatic effects. Nitrous oxide put into the atmosphere by biomass burning is a greenhouse gas 250 times more powerful (molecule for molecule) than carbon dioxide. Nitric oxide, as well as being a photochemical precursor of ozone, a major pollutant in the troposphere, produces nitric acid, the fastest-growing component of acid rain. Hence, the new bridge in the nitrogen cycle is of more than mere technical interest.

  15. Tar burns in the southwest.

    PubMed

    Schiller, W R

    1983-07-01

    The burns which result from contact of human skin with hot tar may be quite serious in proportion to the body surface area involved. Although tending toward partial thickness burns, patchy areas of full thickness skin loss are commonly observed. The use of petrolatum-based ointments on the burn initially to dissolve the tar into the dressings seems like the most efficient and humane method of tar removal. Subsequently, care of the wound is like that of any other burn. Tar burns involving greater than 10 per cent of the body surface area are likely to be the most serious and require intravenous fluid resuscitation. Many tar burns appear to be preventable.

  16. Rocket plume burn hazard.

    PubMed

    Stoll, A M; Piergallini, J R; Chianta, M A

    1980-05-01

    By use of miniature rocket engines, the burn hazard posed by exposure to ejection seat rocket plume flames was determined in the anaesthetized rat. A reference chart is provided for predicting equivalent effects in human skin based on extrapolation of earlier direct measurements of heat input for rat and human burns. The chart is intended to be used in conjunction with thermocouple temperature measurements of the plume environment for design and modification of escape seat system to avoid thermal injury on ejection from multiplace aircraft.

  17. Burning mouth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jimson, Sudha; Rajesh, E.; Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Kasthuri, M.

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a complex disorder that is characterized by warm or burning sensation in the oral mucosa without changes on physical examination. It occurs more commonly in middle-aged and elderly women and often affects the tip of the tongue, lateral borders, lips, hard and soft palate. This condition is probably of multi-factorial origin, often idiopathic, and its etiopathogensis is unknown. BMS can be classified into two clinical forms namely primary and secondary BMS. As a result, a multidisciplinary approach is required for better control of the symptoms. In addition, psychotherapy and behavioral feedback may also help eliminate the BMS symptoms. PMID:26015707

  18. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Torgerson, Rochelle R

    2010-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic condition characterized by burning of the oral mucosa, with or without dysgeusia and xerostomia, in the setting of no underlying systemic disease or identifiable abnormalities on physical examination or laboratory testing. BMS disproportionately affects postmenopausal women. The pathophysiology of the disease is unknown; no single treatment has proven universally successful. In light of these shortcomings, having a practical approach to the evaluation and management of patients with BMS can improve both patient quality of life and physician satisfaction.

  19. Burn Safety Awareness on Playgrounds: Thermal Burns from Playground Equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Awareness on Playgrounds Thermal Burns from Playground Equipment The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission CPSC wants ... of the risk of thermal burns from playground equipment. You may remember the metal slides of your ...

  20. Methamphetamine-related burns in the cornbelt.

    PubMed

    Burke, Bridget A; Lewis, Robert W; Latenser, Barbara A; Chung, Joseph Y; Willoughby, Clark; Kealey, G Patrick; Wibbenmeyer, Lucy A

    2008-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a highly addictive drug that is easily manufactured from everyday household products and chemicals found at local farm stores. The proliferation of small MA labs has led to a dramatic increase in patients sustaining thermal injury while making and/or using MA. We hypothesized that these patients have larger injuries with longer hospital stays, and larger, nonreimbursed hospital bills compared with burn patients not manufacturing or using MA. In a retrospective case-control study, all burn patients >or=16 years of age admitted to our burn center from January 2002 to December 2005 were stratified into two groups based on urine MA status. Of the 660 burn patients >or=16 years of age admitted during this 4 year period, urine drug screens were obtained at admission on 410 patients (62%); 10% of urine drug screens were MA (+). MA (+) patients have larger burns compared with MA (-) patients (9.3 vs 8.6% body surface area burns), have higher rates of inhalation injuries (20.4 vs 9.3%, P = .015), and more nonthermal trauma (13.0 vs 3.1%, P = .001). When compared with MA (-) patients, MA (+) patients require longer hospital stays (median 9.5 vs 7.0 days, P = .036), accrue greater hospital bills per day (dollars 4292 vs dollars 2797, P = .01), and lack medical insurance (66.7 vs 17.7%, P < .0001). The epidemic of MA use and its manufacture mandates that burn centers monitor patients for MA use and develop and institute protocols to ensure proper care of this increasingly costly population.

  1. Fluzone® intra-dermal (Intanza®/Istivac® Intra-dermal): An updated overview.

    PubMed

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Orsi, Andrea; Ansaldi, Filippo; Gasparini, Roberto; Icardi, Giancarlo

    2016-10-02

    Influenza is a highly contagious respiratory acute viral disease which imposes a very heavy burden both in terms of epidemiology and costs, in the developed countries as well as in the developing ones. It represents a serious public health concern and vaccination constitutes an important tool to reduce or at least mitigate its burden. Despite the existence of a broad armamentarium against influenza and despite all the efforts and recommendations of international organisms to broaden immunization, influenza vaccination coverage is still far from being optimal. This, taken together with logistic and technical difficulties that can result into vaccine shortage, makes intra-dermal (ID) vaccines, such as Fluzone® ID and Intanza®, particularly attractive. ID vaccines are comparable and, in some cases, superior to intra-muscular/sub-cutaneous vaccines in terms of immunogenicity, safety, reactogenicity, tolerability and cross-protection profiles, as well as in terms of patient preference, acceptance and vaccine selection. Further advances, such as Fluzone® ID with alternative B strains and Quadrivalent Fluzone® ID or the possibility of self-administering the vaccines, make influenza ID vaccines even more valuable.

  2. Asphalt fume dermal carcinogenicity potential: I. dermal carcinogenicity evaluation of asphalt (bitumen) fume condensates.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles R; Burnett, Donald M; Parker, Craig M; Arp, Earl W; Swanson, Mark S; Minsavage, Gary D; Kriech, Anthony J; Osborn, Linda V; Freeman, James J; Barter, Robert A; Newton, Paul E; Beazley, Shelley L; Stewart, Christopher W

    2011-10-01

    Asphalt (bitumen) fume condensates collected from the headspace above paving and Type III built up roofing asphalt (BURA) tanks were evaluated in two-year dermal carcinogenicity assays in male C3H/HeNCrl mice. A third sample was generated from the BURA using a NIOSH laboratory generation method. Similar to earlier NIOSH studies, the BURA fume condensates were applied dermally in mineral oil twice per week; the paving sample was applied 7 days/week for a total weekly dose of 50 mg/wk in both studies. A single benign papilloma was observed in a group of 80 mice exposed to paving fume condensate at the end of the two-year study and only mild skin irritation was observed. The lab generated BURA fume condensate resulted in statistically significant (P<0.0001) increases in squamous cell carcinomas (35 animals or 55% of animals at risk). The field-matched BURA condensate showed a weaker but significant (P=0.0063) increase (8 carcinomas or 13% of animals) and a longer average latency (90 weeks vs. 76 for the lab fume). Significant irritation was observed in both BURA condensates. It is concluded that the paving fume condensate was not carcinogenic under the test conditions and that the field-matched BURA fume condensate produced a weak tumor response compared to the lab generated sample.

  3. Diaper burn: accident, abuse, or neglect.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C F; Oral, R; Gullberg, L

    2000-06-01

    A 7-year-old, female with mental retardation and seizure disorder was admitted with burns. Reportedly, her brother who was 12 years old was cooking dinner for himself. A towel caught fire. He threw the towel over his head, and the patient's diaper ignited. She had partial thickness second-degree burns over her right elbow, upper abdomen, both inner thighs, and buttocks with multiple blistering, which was estimated to be 7% of the total body surface. The child abuse team took a diaper similar to the one the child was wearing at the time of injury and found that it easily ignited and melted in several seconds. This is the first medically reported burn case due to a disposable diaper.

  4. Burns of children caused by electric stoves.

    PubMed

    Still, J; Craft-Coffman, B; Law, E; Colon-Santini, J; Grant, J

    1998-01-01

    During a 2-year period, eight patients sustained burns caused by the tipping over of electric stoves. In seven of these cases, children aged 2 to 4 years stood up on the open oven door of a stove. The stove then tipped forward, and a pot of boiling liquid on the stove spilled onto the child, who fell forward across the oven door. The general area of involvement was back and buttocks, with spattered areas elsewhere on the body. In one other case, an older child, aged 8, sat on the open oven door and was burned when a pot fell on him. The weight of the children ranged from 12.7 to 20 kilograms, with a mean of 15.2 kilograms. The 8-year old weighed 14.9 kilos. Burn size ranged from 3% to 30%, with a mean of 16.75%. All burns were second-degree and were treated by debridement and coverage with either porcine grafts or Biobrane (Dow Hickman Pharmaceuticals, Inc.). Healing was satisfactory in all cases. Hospital stay ranged from 2 to 20 days. The increase in the use of electric stove has led to a situation in which children, usually toddlers, can overbalance the stove and bring down the pots sitting on the heating elements. This represents another mechanism by which young children can be injured in the kitchen; the awareness of this should be disseminated.

  5. A pilot study of workplace dermal exposures to cypermethrin at a chemical manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Timothy J; Geer, Laura A; Connor, Thomas H; Robertson, Shirley; Sammons, Deborah; Smith, Jerome; Snawder, John; Boeniger, Mark

    2011-10-01

    Exposure during the manufacture of pesticides is of particular concern due to their toxicity and because little is known about worker exposure, since most studies have focused on end-use application within agriculture or buildings. Even though dermal exposure can be expected to dominate for pesticides, little is known about workplace dermal exposures or even appropriate methods for their assessment. The current study begins to address this gap by evaluating alternative methods for assessing dermal exposure at a chemical manufacturing plant. For this pilot study, eight workers were recruited from a U.S. plant that produced the pesticide cypermethrin. Exposure was evaluated using three approaches: (1) survey assessment (questionnaire), (2) biological monitoring, and (3) workplace environmental sampling including ancillary measurements of glove contamination (interior and exterior). In each case, cypermethrin was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Environmental measurements identified two potential pathways of cypermethrin exposure: glove and surface contamination. Workplace exposure was also indicated by urine levels (specific gravity adjusted) of the parent compound, which ranged from 35 to 253 μg/L (median of 121 μg/L) with no clear trend in levels from pre- to post-shift. An exploratory analysis intended to guide future studies revealed a positive predictive association (Spearman correlation, p ≤ 0.10) between post-shift urine concentrations and a subset of survey questions evaluating worker knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions (KAP) of workplace dermal hazards, i.e., personal protective equipment self-efficacy, and inverse associations with behavior belief and information belief scales. These findings are valuable in demonstrating a variety of dermal exposure methods (i.e., behavioral attributes, external contamination, and biomarker) showing feasibility and providing measurement ranges and preliminary associations to support future and

  6. Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Professionals Phoenix Society is the leader in connecting the burn recovery community and creating resources for survivors. Since 1977, we have partnered with survivors, families, health care professionals, burn centers, and the fire ...

  7. Discovery Performs Terminal Initiation Burn

    NASA Video Gallery

    The terminal initiation burn, a left Orbital Maneuvering System engine firing that gave Discovery one last big push toward the space station, took place Feb. 26, 2011 at 10:33 a.m. The burn lasted ...

  8. Characterization of Ovine Dermal Papilla Cell Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Agnes Rosarina Prita; Rufaut, Nicholas Wolfgang; Jones, Leslie Norman; Sinclair, Rodney Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Context: The dermal papilla (DP) is a condensation of mesenchymal cells at the proximal end of the hair follicle, which determines hair shaft size and regulates matrix cell proliferation and differentiation. DP cells have the ability to regenerate new hair follicles. These cells tend to aggregate both in vitro and in vivo. This tendency is associated with the ability of papilla cells to induce hair growth. However, human papilla cells lose their hair-inducing activity in later passage number. Ovine DP cells are different from human DP cells since they do not lose their aggregative behavior or hair-inducing activity in culture. Nonetheless, our understanding of ovine DP cells is still limited. Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the expression of established DP markers in ovine cells and their association with aggregation. Subjects and Methods: Ovine DP cells from three different sheep were compared. Histochemistry, immunoflourescence, and polymerase chain reaction experiments were done to analyze the DP markers. Results: We found that ovine DP aggregates expressed all the 16 markers evaluated, including alkaline phosphatase and versican. Expression of the versican V0 and V3 isoforms, neural cell adhesion molecule, and corin was increased significantly with aggregation, while hey-1 expression was significantly decreased. Conclusions: Overall, the stable expression of numerous markers suggests that aggregating ovine DP cells have a similar phenotype to papillae in vivo. The stability of their molecular phenotype is consistent with their robust aggregative behavior and retained follicle-inducing activity after prolonged culture. Their phenotypic stability in culture contrasts with DP cells from other species, and suggests that a better understanding of ovine DP cells might provide opportunities to improve the hair-inducing activity and therapeutic potential of human cells. PMID:27625564

  9. Burning Your Own CDs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekhaml, Leticia

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the use of CDs (Compact Disks) for backing up data as an alternative to using floppy disks and explains how to burn, or record, a CD. Topics include differences between CD-R (CD-Recordable) and CD-RW (CD-Rewritable); advantages of CD-R and CD-RW; selecting a CD burner; technology trends; and care of CDs. (LRW)

  10. The Burn Wound Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Lloyd F.; Chan, Rodney K.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: While the survival rate of the severely burned patient has improved significantly, relatively little progress has been made in treatment or prevention of burn-induced long-term sequelae, such as contraction and fibrosis. Recent Advances: Our knowledge of the molecular pathways involved in burn wounds has increased dramatically, and technological advances now allow large-scale genomic studies, providing a global view of wound healing processes. Critical Issues: Translating findings from a large number of in vitro and preclinical animal studies into clinical practice represents a gap in our understanding, and the failures of a number of clinical trials suggest that targeting single pathways or cytokines may not be the best approach. Significant opportunities for improvement exist. Future Directions: Study of the underlying molecular influences of burn wound healing progression will undoubtedly continue as an active research focus. Increasing our knowledge of these processes will identify additional therapeutic targets, supporting informed clinical studies that translate into clinical relevance and practice. PMID:26989577

  11. Burn Care in Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    tent configuration and later occupied Ibn Sina Hospital, in the international zone in Baghdad, Iraq. In the tent configura- tion, the 28th CSH provided...at Ibn Sina Hos- pital continuously. In a relatively austere general hospital environment, burn care has been provided with a focus on the

  12. Burn and Scald Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... dry oven mitts or potholders. Hot cookware can heat moisture in a potholder or hot pad, resulting in a scald burn. • Wear short, close-fitting or tightly rolled sleeves when cooking. • Have a “kid-free zone” of at least 3 feet around the stove. ...

  13. Fungal Burn Wound Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    severely limits the may prove to be useful in burn patients. Clotrimazole , applied clinical utility of such a culture. Biopsy and frozen-section and as...useful in wound and permit prompt institution of appropriate the treatment of systemic fungal infections. Clotrimazole is treatment. poorly absorbed

  14. TIRES, OPEN BURNING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter describes available information on the health effects from open burning of rubber tires. It concentrates on the three known sources of detailed measurements: (1) a small-scale emissions characterization study performed by the U.S. EPA in a facility designed to simulat...

  15. The Earth Could Burn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarrow, Ruth

    1982-01-01

    Environmental educators are worried about the ultimate ecological threat--nuclear war, which could burn thousands of square miles, sterilize the soil, destroy 70 percent of the ozone layer letting in lethal ultraviolet rays, and cause severe radiation sickness. Educators must inform themselves, teach others, contact government representatives, and…

  16. Natural and synthetic polymers for wounds and burns dressing.

    PubMed

    Mogoşanu, George Dan; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2014-03-25

    In the last years, health care professionals faced with an increasing number of patients suffering from wounds and burns difficult to treat and heal. During the wound healing process, the dressing protects the injury and contributes to the recovery of dermal and epidermal tissues. Because their biocompatibility, biodegradability and similarity to macromolecules recognized by the human body, some natural polymers such as polysaccharides (alginates, chitin, chitosan, heparin, chondroitin), proteoglycans and proteins (collagen, gelatin, fibrin, keratin, silk fibroin, eggshell membrane) are extensively used in wounds and burns management. Obtained by electrospinning technique, some synthetic polymers like biomimetic extracellular matrix micro/nanoscale fibers based on polyglycolic acid, polylactic acid, polyacrylic acid, poly-ɛ-caprolactone, polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene glycol, exhibit in vivo and in vitro wound healing properties and enhance re-epithelialization. They provide an optimal microenvironment for cell proliferation, migration and differentiation, due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, peculiar structure and good mechanical properties. Thus, synthetic polymers are used also in regenerative medicine for cartilage, bone, vascular, nerve and ligament repair and restoration. Biocompatible with fibroblasts and keratinocytes, tissue engineered skin is indicated for regeneration and remodeling of human epidermis and wound healing improving the treatment of severe skin defects or partial-thickness burn injuries.

  17. Burns in mobile home fires--descriptive study at a regional burn center.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Robert F; Alarm, Badrul; Huq Mian, Mohammad Anwarul; Samples, Jancie M; Friedman, Bruce C; Shaver, Joseph R; Brandigi, Claus; Hassan, Zaheed

    2009-01-01

    Death from fires and burns are the sixth most common cause of unintentional injury death in the United States. More than (3/4) of burn deaths occurring in the United States are in the home. Mobile home fires carry twice the death rate as other dwellings. The aim of the study was to describe the characteristics of deaths and injuries in mobile home fire admitted in a regional Burn Center and to identify possible risk factors. A cross-sectional retrospective study was carried out among all burn patients admitted to a regional Burn Center between January 2002 and December 2004 (3469 patients). The study included patients who suffered a burn injury from a mobile home fire. The demographic characteristics of the patients, location of mobile home, associated inhalation injury, source of fire, comorbidity of the victims, employment status, insurance status, family history of burns, and outcomes of the treatment were incorporated in a data collection record. There were 65 burn patients in mobile home fires admitted to the Burn Center during the studied period. The average age of the patients was 39 years (ranging from 2 to 81 years, SD=16.06), 77% were male, 67% were white, and 79% were the residents in the suburban areas of Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Florida. The average TBSA of burns was about 21% (ranging from 1 to 63%, SD=17.66), 63% of the patients had associated inhalation, three inhalation injury only, and 69% patients required ventilator support. The average length of stay per TBSA percentage of burn was 1.01 days (P=0.00), controlling for age, preexisting medical comorbidities, and inhalation injury. About 88% of the patients had preexisting medical comorbid conditions, 74% were smokers, 64% reported as alcoholic, and 72% had at least some form of health insurance coverage. In 40% of the cases, the cause of the fire was unknown, 31% were caused by accidental explosions, such as electric, gasoline, or kerosene appliances, and 29% were due to other

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Burn-McKeown syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... patent, in babies with PDA. If untreated, this heart defect causes infants to breathe rapidly, feed poorly, and gain weight slowly; in severe cases, it can lead to heart failure. Intelligence is unaffected in Burn-McKeown syndrome . ...

  19. Alteration of Skin Properties with Autologous Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L.; Darling, Thomas N.; Meyerle, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts are mesenchymal cells found between the skin epidermis and subcutaneous tissue. They are primarily responsible for synthesizing collagen and glycosaminoglycans; components of extracellular matrix supporting the structural integrity of the skin. Dermal fibroblasts play a pivotal role in cutaneous wound healing and skin repair. Preclinical studies suggest wider applications of dermal fibroblasts ranging from skin based indications to non-skin tissue regeneration in tendon repair. One clinical application for autologous dermal fibroblasts has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) while others are in preclinical development or various stages of regulatory approval. In this context, we outline the role of fibroblasts in wound healing and discuss recent advances and the current development pipeline for cellular therapies using autologous dermal fibroblasts. The microanatomic and phenotypic differences of fibroblasts occupying particular locations within the skin are reviewed, emphasizing the therapeutic relevance of attributes exhibited by subpopulations of fibroblasts. Special focus is provided to fibroblast characteristics that define regional differences in skin, including the thick and hairless skin of the palms and soles as compared to hair-bearing skin. This regional specificity and functional identity of fibroblasts provides another platform for developing regional skin applications such as the induction of hair follicles in bald scalp or alteration of the phenotype of stump skin in amputees to better support their prosthetic devices. PMID:24828202

  20. Alteration of skin properties with autologous dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L; Darling, Thomas N; Meyerle, Jon

    2014-05-13

    Dermal fibroblasts are mesenchymal cells found between the skin epidermis and subcutaneous tissue. They are primarily responsible for synthesizing collagen and glycosaminoglycans; components of extracellular matrix supporting the structural integrity of the skin. Dermal fibroblasts play a pivotal role in cutaneous wound healing and skin repair. Preclinical studies suggest wider applications of dermal fibroblasts ranging from skin based indications to non-skin tissue regeneration in tendon repair. One clinical application for autologous dermal fibroblasts has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) while others are in preclinical development or various stages of regulatory approval. In this context, we outline the role of fibroblasts in wound healing and discuss recent advances and the current development pipeline for cellular therapies using autologous dermal fibroblasts. The microanatomic and phenotypic differences of fibroblasts occupying particular locations within the skin are reviewed, emphasizing the therapeutic relevance of attributes exhibited by subpopulations of fibroblasts. Special focus is provided to fibroblast characteristics that define regional differences in skin, including the thick and hairless skin of the palms and soles as compared to hair-bearing skin. This regional specificity and functional identity of fibroblasts provides another platform for developing regional skin applications such as the induction of hair follicles in bald scalp or alteration of the phenotype of stump skin in amputees to better support their prosthetic devices.

  1. Contamination of burn wounds by Achromobacter Xylosoxidans followed by severe infection: 10-year analysis of a burn unit population

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, A.; Perbix, W.; Fuchs, P.C.; Seyhan, H.; Schiefer, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Gram-negative infections predominate in burn surgery. Until recently, Achromobacter species were described as sepsis-causing bacteria in immunocompromised patients only. Severe infections associated with Achromobacter species in burn patients have been rarely reported. We retrospectively analyzed all burn patients in our database, who were treated at the Intensive Care Burn Unit (ICBU) of the Cologne Merheim Burn Centre from January 2006 to December 2015, focusing on contamination and infection by Achromobacter species.We identified 20 patients with burns contaminated by Achromobacter species within the 10-year study period. Four of these patients showed signs of infection concomitant with detection of Achromobacter species. Despite receiving complex antibiotic therapy based on antibiogram and resistogram typing, 3 of these patients, who had extensive burns, developed severe sepsis. Two patients ultimately died of multiple organ failure. In 1 case, Achromobacter xylosoxidans was the only isolate detected from the swabs and blood samples taken during the last stage of sepsis. Achromobacter xylosoxidans contamination of wounds of severely burned immunocompromised patients can lead to systemic lethal infection. Close monitoring of burn wounds for contamination by Achromobacter xylosoxidans is essential, and appropriate therapy must be administered as soon as possible. PMID:28149253

  2. Burning Mouth Syndrome: update.

    PubMed

    Spanemberg, Juliana Cassol; Rodríguez de Rivera Campillo, Eugenia; Salas, Enric Jané; López López, José

    2014-06-01

    Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a chronic disorder that predominately affects middle-aged women in the postmenopausal period. The condition is distinguished by burning symptoms of the oral mucosa and the absence of any clinical signs. The etiology of BMS is complex and it includes a variety of factors. Local, systemic and psychological factors such as stress, anxiety and depression are listed among the possible causes of BMS. BMS may sometimes be classified as BMS Type I, II or III. Although this syndrome is not accompanied by evident organic alterations and it does not present health risks, it can significantly reduce the patient's quality of life. This study analyzes the available literature related to BMS, and makes special reference to its therapeutic management. The pages that follow will also discuss the diagnostic criteria that should be respected, etiological factors, and clinical aspects. We used the PubMed database and searched it by using the keywords "burning mouth syndrome", "BMS and review", and "burning mouth and review", in the title or abstract of the publication. BMS treatment usually steers towards the management of the symptoms; however, the specific local factors that could play a significant role in worsening the oral burning sensation should be eradicated. The most widely accepted treatment options that show variable results include tricyclic antidepressants, benzodiazepines and antipsychotic drugs; nevertheless there are other therapies that can also be carried out. Professionals that work in the field of dentistry should formulate standardized symptomatic and diagnostic criteria in order to more easily identify the most effective and reliable strategies in BMS treatment through multidisciplinary research.

  3. Burn Wise Outreach Materials for Retailers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Burn Wise outreach material. Burn Wise is a partnership program of that emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood, the right way, in the right wood-burning appliance to protect your home, health, and the air we breathe.

  4. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411 Section 49.10411 Protection of... for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a) Beginning... obtain approval of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning permits....

  5. Biomass Burning Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-04-21

    Biomass Burning Data and Information This data set represents ... geographical and temporal distribution of total amount of biomass burned. These data may be used in general circulation models (GCMs) and ... models of the atmosphere. Project Title:  Biomass Burning Discipline:  Tropospheric Composition ...

  6. The overall patterns of burns

    PubMed Central

    Almoghrabi, A.; Abu Shaban, N.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Burn patterns differ across the whole world and not only in relation to lack of education, overcrowding, and poverty. Cultures, habits, traditions, psychiatric illness, and epilepsy are strongly correlated to burn patterns. However, burns may also occur because of specific religious beliefs and activities, social events and festivals, traditional medical practices, occupational activities, and war. PMID:22639565

  7. Hypocupremia in a major burn.

    PubMed

    Brian, J E; Caldwell, F T; Woody, R C; Bowser-Wallace, B H

    1987-03-01

    Trace element deficiency in burns is an area which apparently has not been investigated. We recently encountered a severely burned patient with profound copper depletion. Neuropsychiatric symptoms and delayed healing may have been secondary to this deficiency. Further study is needed to clearly delineate the role of acquired copper deficiency in recovering burned patients.

  8. Molecular characterization of free tropospheric aerosol collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory: a case study with long range transported biomass burning plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzepina, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Fialho, P.; China, S.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Hueber, J.; Kumar, S.; Perlinger, J. A.; Kramer, L.; Dziobak, M. P.; Ampadu, M. T.; Olsen, S.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2014-09-01

    Free tropospheric aerosol was sampled at the Pico Mountain Observatory located at 2225 m a.m.s.l. on Pico Island of the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic. The observatory (38°28'15'' N; 28°24'14'' W) is located ∼3900 km east and downwind of North America, which enables studies of free tropospheric air transported over long distances, mainly from North America. Aerosol samples collected on filters from June to October 2012 were analyzed to characterize organic carbon, elemental carbon and inorganic ion species. The average ambient concentration of aerosol was 0.9 μg m-3; on average organic aerosol contributes the majority of mass (57%), followed by sulfate (21%) and nitrate (17%). Filter-collected aerosol measurements were positively correlated (with an r2 ≥ 0.80) with continuous aerosol measurements of black carbon, aerosol light scattering and number concentration. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) species extracted from two aerosol samples (9/24 and 9/25) collected consecutively during a pollution event were analyzed using ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. FLEXPART retroplume analysis shows the sampled air masses were very aged (average plume age > 12 days). Approximately 4000 molecular formulas were assigned to each of the mass spectra in the range of m/z 100-1000. The majority of the assigned molecular formulas have unsaturated structures with CHO and CHNO elemental compositions. These aged WSOC compounds have an average O / C ratio of ∼0.45, which is relatively low compared to O / C ratios of other aged aerosol and might be the result of evaporation and increased fragmentation during long-range transport. The increase in aerosol loading during the measurement period of 9/24 was linked to biomass burning emissions from North America by FLEXPART retroplume analysis and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire counts. This was confirmed with biomass burning markers detected in

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of antibiotic-loaded gelatin microsphere/silk fibroin scaffolds in infected full-thickness burns.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yong; Li, Weichang; Jiao, Yanpeng; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Yuanming

    2014-07-01

    Despite advances in burn treatment, burn infection remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In this study, an antibacterial silk fibroin (SF) scaffold for burn treatment was designed; gelatin microspheres (GMs) were impregnated with the antibiotic gentamycin sulfate (GS), and the GS-impregnated GMs were then embedded in a SF matrix to fabricate GS/GM/SF scaffolds. The developed GS/GM/SF scaffolds could serve as a dermal regeneration template in full-thickness burns. The average pore size and porosity of the GS/GM/SF scaffolds were 40-80 μm and 85%, respectively. Furthermore, the drug release rate of the scaffolds was significantly slower than that of either GS/GM or GS/SF scaffolds. And the composite scaffold exhibited stronger antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Hence, we evaluated the wound-healing effects and antibacterial properties of the GS/GM/SF scaffolds in a rat full-thickness burn infection model. Over 21 days, the GS/GM/SF scaffolds not only significantly reduced burn infection by P. aeruginosa but also accelerated the regeneration of the dermis and exhibited higher epithelialization rates than did GS/SF and SF scaffolds. Thus, GS/GM/SF scaffolds are potentially effective for treatment of full-thickness infected burns, and GS/GM/SF scaffolds are a promising therapeutic tool for severely burned patients.

  10. Burns functional disabilities among burn survivors: a study in Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Agbenorku, Pius

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To determine the types of functional disabilities in adult and paediatric burns survivors, with specific emphasis on potential risk and socio-economic factors of burn disabilities present in Ghana. Patients and Methods: The descriptive study was carried out in Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana from May 2011 to April 2012. Burn survivors who came for follow-up visits after been discharged home and had functional disability were the participants of the study. They were physically examined and interviewed using a pre-tested questionnaire after their informed consent/or that of their parents (in the cases of paediatrics burns survivors) was sought. Results: A total of 70 participants consented for the study. Their ages ranged from 8/12 – 78 years, with a mean age of 12±1.7 years. Majority (60.0%, N=42) of the participants had third degree burns. The nature of disabilities of participants were mostly scar contractures (42.9%, N=30) of which 36.7% (N=11) had impeded arm elevation; 23.3% (N=7) could not fold the palm or move the digits. From the multiple regression analysis risk factors for burn victim to have disability were paediatric age (OR=11.1, P=0.043), third degree of burn (OR=6.2, P=0.001) and anatomical part affected (OR=18.3, P=0.031). Socio-economic factors that affected burn disability victims were nuclear family compensation (OR=4.2, P=0.021), community mockery/stigmatization (OR=0.1, P=0.052) and caretakers time and finance (OR=5.2, P=0.033). Conclusion: The commonest functional disabilities recorded were scar contractions of the axilla region which had impeded the ability of the patients to lift the arm. Risk factors for burns disability included childhood age, third degree of burn incurred and anatomical part affected. Social factors influencing the lives of burn survivors with disability were good family and negative community interactions. Significant economical factors recorded were caretakers’ time and financial constrains. PMID

  11. Neck Contracture Release With Matriderm Collagen/Elastin Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, John E.; Mackie, Ian P.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: To demonstrate success with immediate split-skin graft application over Matriderm dermal matrix in a difficult neck contracture release. Methods: An aggressive neck contracture release, accompanied by complete platysmectomy, was followed by application of Matriderm, split-skin graft, Mepitel, and vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) dressing. Results: At VAC removal (day 7), graft take was almost complete over the dermal matrix and with minor “touch-up” were complete by day 9 postrepair. Results at 4 months show graft contraction and a marked diminution of the release obtained. The results, however, are still good and the patient is very happy. Conclusion: Immediate grafting over a dermal matrix appears to provide a good solution, with a gentle surgical learning curve, in this difficult postburn scenario. Postrelease contraction is, however, as inevitable as with other techniques. PMID:21451729

  12. Complications of acellular dermal matrices in breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Israeli, Ron

    2012-11-01

    Acellular dermal matrices have been used in breast surgery for a decade. They are widely used in implant-based breast reconstruction to provide coverage of the inferolateral aspects of the prosthesis. Numerous benefits have been reported with this approach including improved fold control, better support and control of the implant pocket with concomitant reduced risk of malposition, and improved lower pole expansion. Seroma, infection, mastectomy skin necrosis, and expander/implant loss are the most commonly reported complications with this approach, and the incidences vary widely among studies. Patient selection and adherence to established intraoperative technique principles related to acellular dermal matrix use are both critical to minimizing the risk of complications. Acellular dermal matrices are also being used in aesthetic breast surgery, revision breast surgery, and nipple reconstruction, but clinical experience is limited. This article reviews the complications associated with the use of matrices in breast surgery from the published literature.

  13. Biological effects of glycolic acid on dermal matrix metabolism mediated by dermal fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Okano, Yuri; Abe, Yumiko; Masaki, Hitoshi; Santhanam, Uma; Ichihashi, Masamitsu; Funasaka, Yoko

    2003-01-01

    Glycolic acid (GA), one of the alpha-hydroxy acids, is widely used as an agent for chemical peeling. Although there are several reports about the clinical effects of GA in the literature, its biological mechanism remains mostly unclear, and there are only a few reports about its effects on skin rejuvenation mediated by keratinocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of GA on the dermal matrix metabolism of keratinocytes and fibroblasts using in vitro and ex vivo systems. Our study shows that GA not only directly accelerates collagen synthesis by fibroblasts, but it also modulates matrix degradation and collagen synthesis through keratinocyte-released cytokines. We confirm that IL-1alpha is one of the primary mediators for matrix degradation released from keratinocytes after GA treatment. These results suggest that GA contributes to the recovery of photodamaged skin through various actions, depending on the skin cell type.

  14. Longitudinal burn scar quantification.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; de Oliveira, Ana; LaSalle, Leo; Perrault, Isabelle

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative studies of the clinical recovery of burn scars are currently lacking. Previous reports validate the objective, precise, diagnostic capabilities of high-frequency ultrasound to measure thickness, the Cutometer(®) to measure pliability and the Mexameter(®) to measure erythema and pigmentation of scars. Thus, we prospectively quantified clinical characteristics of patient-matched, after burn hypertrophic scar (HSc), donor site scar (D) and normal skin (N) using these instruments. One investigator measured 3 sites (HSc, D, N) in 46 burn survivors at 3, 6, and 12 months after-burn. A mixed model regression analysis, adjusting p-values for multiplicity of testing, was used to compare means among sites and time points. Participants were 41.2±13.5 years old, 87% males, predominantly Caucasian, with an average of 19.5% body surface area burned. HSc thickness decreased significantly between 3 and 6, 6 and 12, and 3 and 12 months (all p<0.0001), but remained thicker than D and N skin (all p<0.0001). Pliability differed significantly between HSc, D and N sites at all time points (all p<0.0001), with HSc and D increasing between 3 and 12 months (p<0.05) but not reaching normal. HSc and D sites were significantly more erythematous than normal skin (p<0.05) at 3 and 6 months but D sites approached normal by 12 months. The only time points at which pigmentation significantly differed were the HSc and D sites at 6 months. Thickness, pliability, erythema and pigmentation of N skin remained similar over the 12 months. We found that post-burn HSc thickness, pliability and erythema differed significantly from D and N skin at 3, 6, and 12 months and does not return to normal by 12 months after-injury; however, significant improvements towards normal can be expected. Donor sites are redder than normal skin at 3 and 6 months but can be expected to return to normal by 12 months. Although the color of HSc and D sites change markedly with time these color changes are

  15. The year in burns 2011.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Steven E; Arnoldo, Brett D

    2012-12-01

    For 2011, approximately 1746 original research articles in burns were published in English in scientific journals. This article reviews those with the most potential impact on for burn therapeutics and outcomes according to the Editor of one of the major journals (Burns) and his colleague. As done previously, articles were found and divided into these topic areas: epidemiology of injury and burn prevention, wound and scar characterisation, acute care and critical care, inhalation injury, infection, psychological considerations, pain and itching management, rehabilitation and long-term outcomes, and burn reconstruction. Each selected article is mentioned briefly with editorial comment.

  16. Review of Recent Large-Scale Burn Disasters Worldwide in Comparison to Preparedness Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Dai, Andrea; Carrougher, Gretchen J; Mandell, Samuel P; Fudem, Gary; Gibran, Nicole S; Pham, Tam N

    The US National Bioterrorism Hospital Preparedness Program indicates that each care facility must have "a plan to care for at least 50 cases per million people for patients suffering burns or trauma" to receive national funding disaster preparedness. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether this directive is commensurate with the severity recent burn disasters, both nationally and internationally. We conducted a review of medical journal articles, investigative fire reports, and media news sources for major burn disasters dating from 1990 to present day. We defined a major burn disaster as any incident with ≥50 burn injuries and/or ≥ 30 burn-related deaths. We compared existing preparedness guidelines with the magnitude of recent burn disasters using as reference the 2005 U.S. Health and Human Services directive that each locale must "have a plan to care for at least 50 cases per million people for patients suffering burns or trauma." We reported the number of actual casualties for each incident, and estimated the number of burn beds theoretically available if the "50 [burn-injury] cases per million people" directive were to be applied to metropolitan areas outside the United States. Seven hundred fifty-two burn disaster incidents met our inclusion criteria. The majority of burn disasters occurred in Asia/Middle East. The incidence of major burn disasters from structural fires and industrial blasts remains constant in high-income and resource-restricted countries during this study period. The incidence of terrorist attacks increased 20-fold from 2001 to 2015 compared with 1990 to 2000. Recent incidents demonstrate that if current preparedness guidelines were to be adopted internationally, local resources including burn-bed availability would be insufficient to care for the total number of burn casualties. These findings underscore an urgent need to organize better regional, national, and international collaboration in burn disaster response.

  17. Face Allotransplantation and Burns: a Review

    PubMed Central

    A, Arno; JP, Barret; RA, Harrison; MG, Jeschke

    2012-01-01

    Burns may represent one of the main indications for face allotransplantation. Severely disfigured faces featuring a devastating appearance and great functional impairments are not only seen as burn sequelae, but also occur as a result of other traumatic injuries, oncological surgical resections, benign tumors (e.g., neurofibromatosis), and major congenital malformations. To date, sixteen human face composite tissue allotransplantations have been performed with success. Despite the initial scepticism about its applicability, due mainly to ethical and technical reasons, the previous worldwide cases and their associated positive outcomes –including acceptable immunosuppressive regimens, excellent aesthetic and functional results, and good psychological acceptance by the recipient- , enable the conclusion that face composite tissue allotransplantation has become another therapeutic strategy in the reconstructive surgical armamentarium, which bears special consideration when dealing with severely disfigured burned patients. The aim of this review is to describe the basics of face composite tissue allotransplantation and give an overview of some of the cases performed until now, with special attention paid to debating the pros and cons of its applicability in burn patients. PMID:22274632

  18. Carbofuran occupational dermal toxicity, exposure and risk assessment†

    PubMed Central

    Gammon, Derek W; Liu, Zhiwei; Becker, John M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Carbofuran is a carbamate insecticide that inhibits AChE. Although toxic by ingestion in mammals, it has low dermal toxicity, with relatively few confirmed worker illnesses. This risk assessment describes its time of onset, time to peak effect and time to recovery in rats using brain AChE inhibition in acute and 21 day dermal studies; in vitro rat/human relative dermal absorption for granular (5G) and liquid (4F) formulations; occupational exposure estimates using the Pesticide Handlers' Exposure Database and Agricultural Handlers' Exposure Database (PHED/AHED). RESULTS The point of departure for acute risk calculation (BMDL10) was 6.7 mg kg−1 day−1 for brain AChE inhibition after 6 h exposure. In a 21 day study, the BMDL10 was 6.8 mg kg−1 day−1, indicating reversibility. At 75 mg kg−1 day−1, time of onset was ≤30 min and time to peak effect was 6–12 h. Rat skin had ca tenfold greater dermal absorption of carbofuran (Furadan® 5G or 4F) than human skin. Exposure estimates for 5G in rice and 4F in ten crops had adequate margins of exposure (>100). CONCLUSION Rat dermal carbofuran toxicity was assessed in terms of dose and time-related inhibition of AChE. Comparative dermal absorption in rats was greater than in humans. Worker exposure estimates indicated acceptable risk for granular and liquid formulations of carbofuran. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry PMID:21834090

  19. Dermal absorption of mucopolysaccharide polysulfate (heparinoid) in human and minipig.

    PubMed

    Kumokawa, Tadao; Hirata, Kazumasa; Sato, Keiichi; Kano, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Dermal absorption of mucopolysaccharide polysulfate (MPS, the active ingredient of Hirudoid") in human and minipig was investigated by using 14C-labeled MPS. Three types of human and minipig skin samples were used: intact, dried and tape-stripped. At 24 h after application of 14C-MPS to intact human skin on a Franz cell in vitro, the radioactivity was detected in 0.98, 1.34, and 0.08% of the applied dose in stratum corneum, epidermal-dermal skin, and receptor fluid, respectively. In dried human skin, the amount of radioactivity detected was similar to that in intact human skin. By contrast, in tape-stripped human skin, higher radioactivity was detected in epidermal-dermal skin and receptor fluid (2.85 and 0.33% of the applied dose, respectively) than in intact or dried skin. Minipig skin showed 1.5 to 4.5 times greater dermal absorption of 14C-MPS, as compared with human skin. In an in vivo study with minipig, radioactivity was detected at the dosing skin site after dermal administration of 14C-MPS. The stability of 14C-MPS in human skin after dermal application was evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis and ion-exchange chromatography. It was suggested that 14C-MPS absorbed into human skin would be stable because the chromatogram behaviors of the radioactivity on the two types of method were not shifted. Microautoradiography of human and minipig skins after 14C-MPS dosing showed that radioactivity was widely distributed in the epidermis in the area near hair follicles. The present results clearly demonstrate that MPS is stable and that a small fraction of it is percutaneously absorbed by human and minipig skin.

  20. Volume correction in the aging hand: role of dermal fillers

    PubMed Central

    Rivkin, Alexander Z

    2016-01-01

    The hands, just like the face, are highly visible parts of the body. They age at a similar rate and demonstrate comparable changes with time, sun damage, and smoking. Loss of volume in the hands exposes underlying tendons, veins, and bony prominences. Rejuvenation of the hands with dermal fillers is a procedure with high patient satisfaction and relatively low risk for complications. This study will review relevant anatomy, injection technique, clinical safety, and efficacy of dermal filler volumization of the aging hand. PMID:27621659

  1. Microvascular transfer of burned tissue for mandibular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Antonetti, John; Killyon, Garry W; Chang, Peter; McCauley, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of mandibular reconstruction using a free-vascularized fibula osteocutaneous flap after invasive infection of the mandible with mucormycosis. Unique to this case is the skin paddle that previously sustained full-thickness burn injury treated with cultured skin substitute (CSS). A 10-year-old boy sustained a 96% total body surface area burn. CSS was used to obtain wound closure. However, he developed invasive mucormycosis of the mandible requiring resection. The best option for mandibular reconstruction was the use of a free-vascularized fibular osteocutaneous flap with CSS as a skin paddle. The reconstruction was performed without complications. To our knowledge this is the first case describing the use of CSS in free tissue transfer. With the improved prognosis in massively burned patients and the increased use of cultured skin for wound coverage, complex reconstruction using previously burned tissue will be required. Previously burned skin including tissue grafted with skin substitutes attains vascularity and healing properties that allow flap elevation for burn reconstruction. Successful utilization of previously burned skin relies on the ability to provide adequate blood supply to the flap by preservation or regeneration of its angiosome.

  2. Coronary stenting during burn shock: diagnostic and treatment considerations.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Shea C; Fidler, Philip E; Atweh, Nabil A

    2006-01-01

    Myocardial injury is known to occur in victims of both thermal and electrical burns. A variety of mechanisms have been ascribed to the pathogenesis of cardiac damage during burn shock. However, limited evidence exists that coronary artery thrombosis plays a frequent role. Distinguishing between acute coronary syndrome (impending myocardial infarction from coronary artery occlusion) vs global cardiac injury is essential; the care diverges drastically. The following case describes a patient who was angiographically proven to have acute coronary thrombosis amidst burn shock ftera 50% TBSA electrical flash burn. Managing the patient's burn shock, myocardial injury, and multiple surgical procedures while considering antiplatelet medications for a newly placed coronary artery stent presented a number of challenges not previously reported.

  3. Delayed primary closure of contaminated abdominal wall defects with non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix compared with conventional staged repair: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Synthetic mesh has been used traditionally to repair abdominal wall defects, but its use is limited in the case of bacterial contamination. New biological materials are now being used successfully for delayed primary closure of contaminated abdominal wall defects. The costs of biological materials may prevent surgeons from using them. We compared the conventional staged repair of contaminated abdominal wall defects with a single-stage procedure using a non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix. Methods A total of 14 cases with Grade 3 contaminated abdominal wall defects underwent delayed primary closure of the abdomen using a non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™ Reconstructive Tissue Matrix, LifeCell Corp., Branchburg, NJ, USA). The results were compared with a group of 14 patients who had received conventional treatment for the repair of contaminated abdominal wall defects comprising a staged repair during two separate hospital admissions employing synthetic mesh. Treatment modalities, outcomes, and costs were compared. Results In all cases treated with delayed primary closure employing non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix, there were no complications related to its use. Two patients died due to unrelated events. Although treatment costs were estimated to be similar in the two groups, the patients treated with porcine acellular dermal matrix spent less time as an inpatient than those receiving conventional two-stage repair. Conclusions Delayed primary closure of contaminated abdominal wall defects using a non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix may be a suitable alternative to conventional staged repair. In our patients, it resulted in early restoration of abdominal wall function and shorter hospitalization. The costs for treating contaminated abdominal wall defects using porcine acellular dermal matrix during a single hospital admission were not higher than costs for conventional two-stage repair

  4. Fungal infections in burns: Diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Capoor, Malini R.; Sarabahi, Sujata; Tiwari, Vinay Kumar; Narayanan, Ravi Prakash

    2010-01-01

    Burn wound infection (BWI) is a major public health problem and the most devastating form of trauma worldwide. Fungi cause BWI as part of monomicrobial or polymicrobial infection, fungaemia, rare aggressive soft tissue infection and as opportunistic infections. The risk factors for acquiring fungal infection in burns include age of burns, total burn size, body surface area (BSA) (30–60%), full thickness burns, inhalational injury, prolonged hospital stay, late surgical excision, open dressing, artificial dermis, central venous catheters, antibiotics, steroid treatment, long-term artificial ventilation, fungal wound colonisation (FWC), hyperglycaemic episodes and other immunosuppressive disorders. Most of the fungal infections are missed owing to lack of clinical awareness and similar presentation as bacterial infection coupled with paucity of mycology laboratories. Expedient diagnosis and treatment of these mycoses can be life-saving as the mortality is otherwise very high. Emergence of resistance in non-albicans Candida spp., unusual yeasts and moulds in fungal BWI, leaves very few fungi susceptible to antifungal drugs, leaving many patients susceptible. There is a need to speciate fungi as far as the topical and systemic antifungal is concerned. Deep tissue biopsy and other relevant samples are processed by standard mycological procedures using direct microscopy, culture and histopathological examination. Patients with FWC should be treated by aggressive surgical debridement and, in the case of fungal wound infection (FWI), in addition to surgical debridement, an intravenous antifungal drug, most commonly amphotericin B or caspofungin, is prescribed followed by de-escalating with voriconazole or itraconazole, or fluconazole depending upon the species or antifungal susceptibility, if available. The propensity for fungal infection increases, the longer the wound is present. Therefore, the development of products to close the wound more rapidly, improvement in

  5. 'Burns Cliff' Color Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for 'Burns Cliff' Color Panorama (QTVR)

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured this view of 'Burns Cliff' after driving right to the base of this southeastern portion of the inner wall of 'Endurance Crater.' The view combines frames taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera between the rover's 287th and 294th martian days (Nov. 13 to 20, 2004).

    This is a composite of 46 different images, each acquired in seven different Pancam filters. It is an approximately true-color rendering generated from the panoramic camera's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters. The mosaic spans more than 180 degrees side to side. Because of this wide-angle view, the cliff walls appear to bulge out toward the camera. In reality the walls form a gently curving, continuous surface.

  6. [Burning mouth syndrome (glossalgia)].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (glossalgia) is manifested by oral pin and tingling sensations, numbness and even burning and severe pains, more frequently in the tongue. Unpleasant sensations may involve the anterior two thirds of the tongue or be extended to the front part of the hard palate and the mucous membrane of the lower lip. This condition is characterized by "mirror" and "food dominant" symptoms, disordered salivation, dysgeusia, or psychological disorders. The disease shows a chronic course. Its etiology may be multifactorial. There are no universally accepted diagnostic criteria; the diagnosis of glossalgia is made to rule out all other causes. A thorough examination should be conducted to establish a differential diagnosis. Glossalgia occurs primarily in middle-aged and elderly people. Women get sick much more frequently than men of the same age. Glossalgia remains difficult to treat. Continuous symptomatic treatment and follow-up help relieve its symptoms.

  7. Paediatric burn injuries requiring hospitalization in Fars, Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Marashi, S.M.; Sanaei-Zadeh, H.; Taghizadeh Behbahani, A.; Ayaz, M.; Akrami, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to determine the demographic characteristics of burnt children in need of hospitalization, causes of burns and associated complications in Fars province, Iran. This is a retrospective cross-sectional study. Files of all children under 15 years of age who were hospitalized in the only burn referral centre of Fars province were evaluated. Data regarding age, gender, location (urban, rural), burn surface area (BSA), cause of burn, length of hospital stay and complications were extracted from patients’ files. Data were analyzed using SPSS, version 22 and the Chi-square test. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. A total of 122 patients (54.9% males) were studied. Children from rural areas were hospitalized 1.4 times more often than urban children. Overall, 31.2% of admissions occurred in winter. Burning with hot liquids (scalding) was the most common cause of burns (56.6%, n = 69). Mean BSA was 12.29 ± 21.18% and mean length of hospital stay was 7.59 ± 12.78 days. Burn complications were seen in 19 cases (15.6%). One child died due to inhalational thermal injury. This study showed that burns mostly occur in boys, in the winter and in rural areas of Fars province. Furthermore, scald burns are the most common type of burn injury. Since a significant number of children suffer from permanent complications following burn injuries, special planning is needed to prevent this type of injury PMID:28289355

  8. Assessing burn depth in tattooed burn lesions with LASCA Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krezdorn, N.; Limbourg, A.; Paprottka, F.J.; Könneker; Ipaktchi, R.; Vogt, P.M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tattoos are on the rise, and so are patients with tattooed burn lesions. A proper assessment with regard to burn depth is often impeded by the tattoo dye. Laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) is a technique that evaluates burn lesions via relative perfusion analysis. We assessed the effect of tattoo skin pigmentation on LASCA perfusion imaging in a multicolour tattooed patient. Depth of burn lesions in multi-coloured tattooed and untattooed skin was assessed using LASCA. Relative perfusion was measured in perfusion units (PU) and compared to various pigment colours, then correlated with the clinical evaluation of the lesion. Superficial partial thickness burn (SPTB) lesions showed significantly elevated perfusion units (PU) compared to normal skin; deep partial thickness burns showed decreased PU levels. PU of various tattoo pigments to normal skin showed either significantly lower values (blue, red, pink) or significantly increased values (black) whereas orange and yellow pigment showed values comparable to normal skin. In SPTB, black and blue pigment showed reduced perfusion; yellow pigment was similar to normal SPTB burn. Deep partial thickness burn (DPTB) lesions in tattoos did not show significant differences to normal DPTB lesions for black, green and red. Tattoo pigments alter the results of perfusion patterns assessed with LASCA both in normal and burned skin. Yellow pigments do not seem to interfere with LASCA assessment. However proper determination of burn depth both in SPTB and DPTB by LASCA is limited by the heterogenic alterations of the various pigment colours. PMID:28149254

  9. Assessing burn depth in tattooed burn lesions with LASCA Imaging.

    PubMed

    Krezdorn, N; Limbourg, A; Paprottka, F J; Könneker; Ipaktchi, R; Vogt, P M

    2016-09-30

    Tattoos are on the rise, and so are patients with tattooed burn lesions. A proper assessment with regard to burn depth is often impeded by the tattoo dye. Laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) is a technique that evaluates burn lesions via relative perfusion analysis. We assessed the effect of tattoo skin pigmentation on LASCA perfusion imaging in a multicolour tattooed patient. Depth of burn lesions in multi-coloured tattooed and untattooed skin was assessed using LASCA. Relative perfusion was measured in perfusion units (PU) and compared to various pigment colours, then correlated with the clinical evaluation of the lesion. Superficial partial thickness burn (SPTB) lesions showed significantly elevated perfusion units (PU) compared to normal skin; deep partial thickness burns showed decreased PU levels. PU of various tattoo pigments to normal skin showed either significantly lower values (blue, red, pink) or significantly increased values (black) whereas orange and yellow pigment showed values comparable to normal skin. In SPTB, black and blue pigment showed reduced perfusion; yellow pigment was similar to normal SPTB burn. Deep partial thickness burn (DPTB) lesions in tattoos did not show significant differences to normal DPTB lesions for black, green and red. Tattoo pigments alter the results of perfusion patterns assessed with LASCA both in normal and burned skin. Yellow pigments do not seem to interfere with LASCA assessment. However proper determination of burn depth both in SPTB and DPTB by LASCA is limited by the heterogenic alterations of the various pigment colours.

  10. Bushfire disaster burn casualty management: the Australian "Black Saturday" bushfire experience.

    PubMed

    Seifman, Marc; Ek, Edmund W; Menezes, Hana; Rozen, Warren M; Whitaker, Iain S; Cleland, Heather J

    2011-11-01

    Mass burn disasters are among the most difficult disasters to manage, with major burns requiring complex management in a multidisciplinary setting and specialist burns services having limited capacity to deal with large numbers of complex patients. There is a paucity of literature addressing health system responses to mass burn disasters resulting from wildfires, with the events of the "Black Saturday" disaster in the state of Victoria, Australia, able to provide a unique opportunity to draw lessons and increase awareness of key management issues arising in mass burn casualty disasters. The event comprised the worst natural disaster in the state's history and one of the worst wildfire disasters in world history, claiming 173 lives and costing more than AUD 4 billion. This article draws on the national burns disaster plan instituted, Australian Mass Casualty Burn Disaster Plan (AUSBURNPLAN), and details the management of mass burn cases through a systems-based perspective.

  11. Molecular characterization of free tropospheric aerosol collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory: a case study with a long-range transported biomass burning plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzepina, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Fialho, P.; China, S.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Hueber, J.; Kumar, S.; Perlinger, J. A.; Kramer, L. J.; Dziobak, M. P.; Ampadu, M. T.; Olsen, S.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2015-05-01

    Free tropospheric aerosol was sampled at the Pico Mountain Observatory located at 2225 m above mean sea level on Pico Island of the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic. The observatory is located ~ 3900 km east and downwind of North America, which enables studies of free tropospheric air transported over long distances. Aerosol samples collected on filters from June to October 2012 were analyzed to characterize organic carbon, elemental carbon, and inorganic ions. The average ambient concentration of aerosol was 0.9 ± 0.7 μg m-3. On average, organic aerosol components represent the largest mass fraction of the total measured aerosol (60 ± 51%), followed by sulfate (23 ± 28%), nitrate (13 ± 10%), chloride (2 ± 3%), and elemental carbon (2 ± 2%). Water-soluble organic matter (WSOM) extracted from two aerosol samples (9/24 and 9/25) collected consecutively during a pollution event were analyzed using ultrahigh-resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Approximately 4000 molecular formulas were assigned to each of the mass spectra in the range of m/z 100-1000. The majority of the assigned molecular formulas had unsaturated structures with CHO and CHNO elemental compositions. FLEXPART retroplume analyses showed the sampled air masses were very aged (average plume age > 12 days). These aged aerosol WSOM compounds had an average O/C ratio of ~ 0.45, which is relatively low compared to O/C ratios of other aged aerosol. The increase in aerosol loading during the measurement period of 9/24 was linked to biomass burning emissions from North America by FLEXPART retroplume analysis and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire counts. This was confirmed with biomass burning markers detected in the WSOM and with the morphology and mixing state of particles as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The presence of markers characteristic of aqueous-phase reactions of phenolic species suggests

  12. Dermal γδ T-Cells Can Be Activated by Mitochondrial Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Schwacha, Martin G.; Rani, Meenakshi; Nicholson, Susannah E.; Lewis, Aaron M.; Holloway, Travis L.; Sordo, Salvador; Cap, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Gamma delta T-cells have been shown to be important to the early immunoinflammatory response to injury, independent of infection. This unique T-cell population acts to regulate cell trafficking and the release of cytokines and growth factors. We propose this sterile inflammatory response is in part associated with damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) generated by major injury, such as burn, and mediated via toll-like receptors (TLRs). It is unknown whether DAMPs can activate resident γδ T-cells that reside in skin. Methods Gamma delta T-cells were isolated from the skin of male C57BL/6 mice by enzymatic digestion. Mitochondrial DAMPs (MTDs) were generated from mitochondria isolated from mouse livers by sonication and centrifugation. Dermal γδ T-cells were incubated with MTDs (0–500 μg/ml) for 24 hr and cells and supernatants were collected for analysis. Results MTDs activated dermal γδ T-cells, as evidenced by increased TLR2 and TLR4 expression following in vitro exposure. MTDs also induced the production of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6), and growth factors (PDGF and VEGF) by γδ T-cells. Conclusions These findings herein support the concept that MTDs released after tissue/cellular injury are capable of activating dermal γδ T-cells. We propose that the activation of this unique T-cell population is central in the initiation of sterile inflammation and also contributes to the subsequent healing processes. PMID:27403524

  13. Malathion dermal permeability in relation to dermal load: Assessment by physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of in vivo human data.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Kenneth T; Singhal, Ankur

    2017-02-01

    Estimates of dermal permeability (Kp), obtained by fitting an updated human PBPK model for malathion to previously reported data on excreted urinary metabolites after 29 volunteers were dermally exposed to measured values of [(14)C]malathion dermal load (L), were used to examine the empirical relationship between Kp and L. The PBPK model was adapted from previously reported human biokinetic and PBPK models for malathion, fit to previously reported urinary excretion data after oral [(14)C]malathion intake by volunteers, and then augmented to incorporate a standard Kp approach to modeling dermal-uptake kinetics. Good to excellent PBPK-model fits were obtained to all of 29 sets of cumulative urinary metabolite-excretion data (ave. [±1 SD] R(2) = 0.953 [±0.064]). Contrary to the assumption that Kp and L are independent typically applied for dermally administered liquids or solutions, the 29 PBPK-based estimates of Kp obtained for malathion exhibit a strong positive association with the 2/3rds power of L (log-log Pearson correlation = 0.925, p = ∼0). Possible explanations of this observation involving physico-chemical characteristics and/or in vivo cutaneous effects of malathion are discussed. The PBPK model presented, and our observation that Kp estimates obtained by fitting this model to human experimental urinary-excretion data correlate well with L(2/3), allow more realistic assessments of absorbed and metabolized dose during or after a variety of scenarios involving actual or potential dermal or multi-route malathion exposures, including for pesticide workers or farmers who apply malathion to crops.

  14. Murine Dermal Fibroblast Isolation by FACS.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Graham G; Maan, Zeshaan N; Hu, Michael S; Atashroo, David A; Whittam, Alexander J; Duscher, Dominik; Tevlin, Ruth; Marecic, Owen; Lorenz, H Peter; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Longaker, Michael T

    2016-01-07

    Fibroblasts are the principle cell type responsible for secreting extracellular matrix and are a critical component of many organs and tissues. Fibroblast physiology and pathology underlie a spectrum of clinical entities, including fibroses in multiple organs, hypertrophic scarring following burns, loss of cardiac function following ischemia, and the formation of cancer stroma. However, fibroblasts remain a poorly characterized type of cell, largely due to their inherent heterogeneity. Existing methods for the isolation of fibroblasts require time in cell culture that profoundly influences cell phenotype and behavior. Consequently, many studies investigating fibroblast biology rely upon in vitro manipulation and do not accurately capture fibroblast behavior in vivo. To overcome this problem, we developed a FACS-based protocol for the isolation of fibroblasts from the dorsal skin of adult mice that does not require cell culture, thereby preserving the physiologic transcriptional and proteomic profile of each cell. Our strategy allows for exclusion of non-mesenchymal lineages via a lineage negative gate (Lin(-)) rather than a positive selection strategy to avoid pre-selection or enrichment of a subpopulation of fibroblasts expressing specific surface markers and be as inclusive as possible across this heterogeneous cell type.

  15. Dermal Lipogenesis Inhibits Adiponectin Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts while Exogenous Adiponectin Administration Prevents against UVA-Induced Dermal Matrix Degradation in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chien-Liang; Huang, Ling-Hung; Tsai, Hung-Yueh; Chang, Hsin-I

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is one of the most abundant adipokines from the subcutaneous fat, and regulates multiple activities through endocrine, paracrine, or autocrine mechanisms. However, its expression in adipogenic induced fibroblasts, and the potential role in photoaging has not been determined. Here, human dermal fibroblasts, Hs68, were presented as a cell model of dermal lipogenesis through stimulation of adipogenic differentiation medium (ADM). Similar to other studies in murine pre-adipocyte models (i.e., 3T3-L1), Hs68 fibroblasts showed a tendency to lipogenesis based on lipid accumulation, triglyceride formation, and the expressions of PPAR-γ, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and FABP4 mRNA. As expected, ADM-treated fibroblasts displayed a reduction on adiponectin expression. Next, we emphasized the photoprotective effects of adiponectin against UVA-induced damage in Hs68 fibroblasts. UVA radiation can downregulate cell adhesion strength and elastic modulus of Hs68 fibroblasts. Moreover, UVA radiation could induce the mRNA expressions of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1), matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), but downregulate the mRNA expressions of type I and type III collagen. On the other hand, post-treatment of adiponectin can partially overcome UVA-induced reduction in the cell adhesion strength of Hs68 fibroblasts through the activation of AdipoR1 and the suppression of EGF-R. In addition, post-treatment of adiponectin indicated the increase of type III collagen and elastin mRNA expression and the decrease of MMP-1 and MMP-3 mRNA expression, but a limited degree of recovery of elastic modulus on UVA-irradiated Hs68 fibroblasts. Overall, these results suggest that dermal lipogenesis may inhibit the expression of adiponectin while exogenous adiponectin administration prevents against UVA-induced dermal matrix degradation in Hs68 fibroblasts. PMID:27428951

  16. Dermal Lipogenesis Inhibits Adiponectin Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts while Exogenous Adiponectin Administration Prevents against UVA-Induced Dermal Matrix Degradation in Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chien-Liang; Huang, Ling-Hung; Tsai, Hung-Yueh; Chang, Hsin-I

    2016-07-14

    Adiponectin is one of the most abundant adipokines from the subcutaneous fat, and regulates multiple activities through endocrine, paracrine, or autocrine mechanisms. However, its expression in adipogenic induced fibroblasts, and the potential role in photoaging has not been determined. Here, human dermal fibroblasts, Hs68, were presented as a cell model of dermal lipogenesis through stimulation of adipogenic differentiation medium (ADM). Similar to other studies in murine pre-adipocyte models (i.e., 3T3-L1), Hs68 fibroblasts showed a tendency to lipogenesis based on lipid accumulation, triglyceride formation, and the expressions of PPAR-γ, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and FABP4 mRNA. As expected, ADM-treated fibroblasts displayed a reduction on adiponectin expression. Next, we emphasized the photoprotective effects of adiponectin against UVA-induced damage in Hs68 fibroblasts. UVA radiation can downregulate cell adhesion strength and elastic modulus of Hs68 fibroblasts. Moreover, UVA radiation could induce the mRNA expressions of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1), matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), but downregulate the mRNA expressions of type I and type III collagen. On the other hand, post-treatment of adiponectin can partially overcome UVA-induced reduction in the cell adhesion strength of Hs68 fibroblasts through the activation of AdipoR1 and the suppression of EGF-R. In addition, post-treatment of adiponectin indicated the increase of type III collagen and elastin mRNA expression and the decrease of MMP-1 and MMP-3 mRNA expression, but a limited degree of recovery of elastic modulus on UVA-irradiated Hs68 fibroblasts. Overall, these results suggest that dermal lipogenesis may inhibit the expression of adiponectin while exogenous adiponectin administration prevents against UVA-induced dermal matrix degradation in Hs68 fibroblasts.

  17. Symmetrically converging plane thermonuclear burn waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charakhch'yan, A. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2013-10-01

    Five variants of a one-dimensional problem on synchronous bilateral action of two identical drivers on opposite surfaces of a plane layer of DT fuel with the normal or five times greater initial density, where the solution includes two thermonuclear burn waves propagating to meet one another at the symmetry plane, are simulated. A laser pulse with total absorption of energy at the critical density (in two variants) and a proton bunch that provides for a nearly isochoric heating (in three variants) are considered as drivers. A wide-range equation of state for the fuel, electron and ion heat conduction, self-radiation of plasma and plasma heating by α-particles are taken into account. In spite of different ways of ignition, various models of α-particle heat, whether the burn wave remains slow or transforms into the detonation wave, and regardless of way of such a transformation, the final value of the burn-up factor depends essentially on the only parameter Hρ0, where H is the half-thickness of the layer and ρ0 is the initial fuel density. This factor is about 0.35 at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and about 0.7 at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. The expansion stage of the flow (after reflecting the burn or detonation wave from the symmetry plane) gives the main contribution in forming the final values of the burn-up factor and the gain at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and increases them approximately two times at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. In the case of the proton driver, the final value of the gain is about 200 at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and about 2000 at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. In the case of the laser driver, the above values are four times less in conformity with the difference between the driver energies.

  18. An Inexpensive Bismuth-Petrolatum Dressing for Treatment of Burns

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Arhana; Chang, Kathleen; Nguyen, Khoa; Galvez, Michael G.; Legrand, Anais; Davis, Christopher; McGoldrick, Rory; Long, Chao; Pham, Hung

    2016-01-01

    Background: Xeroform remains the current standard for treating superficial partial-thickness burns but can be prohibitively expensive in developing countries with prevalent burn injuries. This study (1) describes the production of an alternative low-cost dressing and (2) compares the alternative dressing and Xeroform using the metrics of cost-effectiveness, antimicrobial activity, and biocompatibility in vitro, and wound healing in vivo. Methods: To produce the alternative dressing, 3% bismuth tribromophenate powder was combined with petroleum jelly by hand and applied to Kerlix gauze. To assess cost-effectiveness, the unit costs of Xeroform and components of the alternative dressing were compared. To assess antimicrobial properties, the dressings were placed on agar plated with Escherichia coli and the Kirby-Bauer assay performed. To assess biocompatibility, the dressings were incubated with human dermal fibroblasts and cells stained with methylene blue. To assess in vivo wound healing, dressings were applied to excisional wounds on rats and the rate of re-epithelialization calculated. Results: The alternative dressing costs 34% of the least expensive brand of Xeroform. Antimicrobial assays showed that both dressings had similar bacteriostatic effects. Biocompatibility assays showed that there was no statistical difference (P < 0.05) in the cytotoxicity of Xeroform, alternative dressing, and Kerlix gauze. Finally, the in vivo healing model showed no statistical difference (P < 0.05) in mean re-epithelialization time between Xeroform (13.0 ± 1.6 days) and alternative dressing (13.5 ± 1.0 days). Conclusions: Xeroform is biocompatible, reduces infection, and enhances healing of burn wounds by preventing desiccation and mechanical trauma. Handmade petrolatum gauze may be a low-cost replacement for Xeroform. Future studies will focus on clinical trials in burn units. PMID:27482485

  19. Butane Hash Oil Burns Associated with Marijuana Liberalization in Colorado.

    PubMed

    Bell, Cameron; Slim, Jessica; Flaten, Hanna K; Lindberg, Gordon; Arek, Wiktor; Monte, Andrew A

    2015-12-01

    Butane hash oil (BHO), also known as "amber," "dab," "glass," "honey," "shatter," or "wax," is a potent marijuana concentrate, containing up to 90 % tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). BHO is easily manufactured using highly volatile butane as a solvent. Our objective was to characterize hydrocarbon burns associated with BHO manufacture in Colorado. This was a cross-sectional study utilizing the National Burn Repository to capture all hydrocarbon burns reported to the local burn center from January 1st, 2008, through August 31st, 2014. We abstracted demographic and clinical variables from medical records for patients admitted for hydrocarbon burns associated with butane hash oil extraction. Twenty-nine cases of BHO burns were admitted to the local burn center during the study period. Zero cases presented prior to medical liberalization, 19 (61.3 %) during medical liberalization (Oct 2009-Dec 2013), and 12 (38.7 %) in 2014 since legalization. The majority of cases were Caucasian (72.4 %) males (89.7 %). Median age was 26 (range 15-58). The median total-body-surface-area (TBSA) burn size was 10 % (TBSA range 1-90 %). Median length of hospital admission was 10 days. Six required intubation for airway protection (21 %). Nineteen required skin grafting, eight wound care only, one required surgical fracture repair, and one required surgical debridement. Hydrocarbon burns associated with hash oil production have increased since the liberalization of marijuana policy in Colorado. A combination of public health messaging, standardization of manufacturing processes, and worker safety regulations are needed to decrease the risks associated with BHO production.

  20. Bilayer hydrogel with autologous stem cells derived from debrided human burn skin for improved skin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Shanmugasundaram; Zamora, David O; Wrice, Nicole L; Baer, David G; Christy, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that stem cells isolated from discarded skin obtained after debridement can be used with collagen and fibrin-based scaffolds to develop a tissue-engineered vascularized dermal equivalent. Discarded tissue samples were collected from severely burned patients undergoing wound debridement. Stem cells were isolated from the adipose tissue layer and their growth and immunophenotype characterized. To develop a skin equivalent, debrided skin adipose stem cells (dsASCs) were added to a collagen-polyethylene glycol (PEG) fibrin-based bilayer hydrogel and analyzed in vitro. The effect of the bilayered hydrogels on wound healing was demonstrated using an excision wound model in athymic rats. The dsASCs isolated from all samples were CD90, CD105, and stromal cell surface protein-1 positive, similar to adipose stem cells isolated from normal human lipoaspirates. Within the bilayer hydrogels, dsASCs proliferated and differentiated, maintained a spindle-shaped morphology in collagen, and developed a tubular microvascular network in the PEGylated fibrin. Rat excision wounds treated with bilayer hydrogels showed less wound contraction and exhibited better dermal matrix deposition and epithelial margin progression than controls. Stem cells can be isolated from the adipose layer of burned skin obtained during debridement. When dsASCs are incorporated within collagen-PEGylated fibrin bilayer hydrogels, they develop stromal and vascular phenotypes through matrix-directed differentiation without use of growth factors. Preliminary in vivo studies indicate that dsASC-bilayer hydrogels contribute significantly to wound healing and provide support for their use as a vascularized dermal substitute for skin regeneration to treat large surface area burns.

  1. IN VIVO DERMAL ABSORPTION OF PYRETHROID PESTICIDES IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for exposure to pyrethroid pesticides has risen recently because of their increased agricultural and residential use. The objective of this study was to examine the in vivo dermal absorption of bifenthrin, deltamethrin and cis-permethrin in the rat. Hair on...

  2. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... radioactivity following oral or dermal administration and total excretion following intravenous administration... repeated dosing study, shall be terminated at 7 days or after at least 90 percent of the radioactivity has... skin surface. Both the covering and the washing shall be assayed to recover residual radioactivity....

  3. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... radioactivity following oral or dermal administration and total excretion following intravenous administration... repeated dosing study, shall be terminated at 7 days or after at least 90 percent of the radioactivity has... skin surface. Both the covering and the washing shall be assayed to recover residual radioactivity....

  4. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... radioactivity following oral or dermal administration and total excretion following intravenous administration... repeated dosing study, shall be terminated at 7 days or after at least 90 percent of the radioactivity has... skin surface. Both the covering and the washing shall be assayed to recover residual radioactivity....

  5. Visual phototransduction components in cephalopod chromatophores suggest dermal photoreception.

    PubMed

    Kingston, Alexandra C N; Kuzirian, Alan M; Hanlon, Roger T; Cronin, Thomas W

    2015-05-15

    Cephalopod mollusks are renowned for their colorful and dynamic body patterns, produced by an assemblage of skin components that interact with light. These may include iridophores, leucophores, chromatophores and (in some species) photophores. Here, we present molecular evidence suggesting that cephalopod chromatophores - small dermal pigmentary organs that reflect various colors of light - are photosensitive. RT-PCR revealed the presence of transcripts encoding rhodopsin and retinochrome within the retinas and skin of the squid Doryteuthis pealeii, and the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis and Sepia latimanus. In D. pealeii, Gqα and squid TRP channel transcripts were present in the retina and in all dermal samples. Rhodopsin, retinochrome and Gqα transcripts were also found in RNA extracts from dissociated chromatophores isolated from D. pealeii dermal tissues. Immunohistochemical staining labeled rhodopsin, retinochrome and Gqα proteins in several chromatophore components, including pigment cell membranes, radial muscle fibers, and sheath cells. This is the first evidence that cephalopod dermal tissues, and specifically chromatophores, may possess the requisite combination of molecules required to respond to light.

  6. In vivo dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in the rat.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for exposure to pyrethroid pesticides has risen recently because of their increased use. The objective of this study was to examine the in vivo dermal absorption of bifenthrin, deltamethrin and permethrin in the rat. Hair on the dorsal side of anesthetized adult m...

  7. DERMAL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT: A SUMMARY OF EPA APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This final report presents a concise description and evaluation of the approaches used in the Agency for dermal exposure assessment including a discussion about harmonization and research needs in this area. The report is intended to be used by EPA program offices in their effort...

  8. PULMONARY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO SELECTED DIISOCYANATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    PULMONARY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO SELECTED DIISOCYANATES

    M.J.K. Selgrade, E.H. Boykin, N.H. Coates, D.L. Doerfler, S.H. Gavett
    Experimental Toxicology Div., National Health and Environmental Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Developmen...

  9. CONTROLLED, SHORT-TERM DERMAL AND INHALATION EXPOSURE TO CHLOROFORM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies were conducted to determine the uptake by humans of chloroform as a result of controlled short-term dermal and inhalation exposures. The approach used continuous real-time breath analysis to determine exhaled-breath profiles and evaluate chloroform kinetics in the huma...

  10. Unusual inflicted hot oil burns in a 7-year-old.

    PubMed

    Mukadam, Syana; Gilles, Elizabeth E

    2003-02-01

    Pediatric burn injuries occur not infrequently as the result of abuse. While the majority of these burns are inflicted scald burns, those due to contact or contact/scald mechanisms may present diagnostic challenges. A child with unusual combined contact and scald burns caused by a metal spatula heated in hot cooking oil is described. The odd pattern of healed injury limited the initial diagnosis to inflicted healing burns. Despite the initial lack of disclosure, an inflicted etiology was supported by clearly delineated margins, macular lesions with hyper-pigmented rims and variegated central regions. Additional findings of numerous adult bites and bruises provided adjunctive support for an inflicted etiology. Aspects of this case are atypical for the usual demographics of a burn victim. This case extends the known presentations of inflicted contact/scald burns.

  11. Nanocrystals for dermal penetration enhancement - Effect of concentration and underlying mechanisms using curcumin as model.

    PubMed

    Vidlářová, Lucie; Romero, Gregori B; Hanuš, Jaroslav; Štěpánek, František; Müller, Rainer H

    2016-07-01

    Nanocrystals have received considerable attention in dermal application due to their ability to enhance delivery to the skin and overcome bioavailability issues caused by poor water and oil drug solubility. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of nanocrystals on the mechanism of penetration behavior of curcumin as a model drug. Curcumin nanocrystals were produced by the smartCrystals® process, i.e. bead milling followed by high pressure homogenization. The mean particle size of the curcumin crystals was about 200nm. Stabilization was performed with alkyl polyglycoside surfactants. The distribution of curcumin within the skin was determined in vitro on cross-sections of porcine skin and visualized by fluorescent microscopy. The skin penetration profile was analyzed for the curcumin nanosuspension with decreasing concentrations (2%, 0.2%, 0.02% and 0.002% by weight) and compared to nanocrystals in a viscous hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) gel. This study demonstrated there was minor difference between low viscous nanosuspension and the gel, but low viscosity seemed to favor skin penetration. Localization of curcumin was observed in the hair follicles, also contributing to skin uptake. Looking at the penetration of curcumin from formulations with decreasing nanocrystal concentration, formulations with 2%, 0.2% and 0.02% showed a similar penetration profile, whereas a significantly weaker fluorescence was observed in the case of a formulation containing 0.002% of curcumin nanocrystals. In this study we have shown that curcumin nanocrystals prepared by the smartCrystal® process are promising carriers in dermal application and furthermore, we identified the ideal concentration of 0.02% nanocrystals in dermal formulations. The comprehensive study of decreasing curcumin concentration in formulations revealed that the saturation solubility (Cs) is not the only determining factor for the penetration. A new mechanism based also on the concentration of the

  12. Acoustic emission strand burning technique for motor burning rate prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, W. N.

    1978-01-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) method is being used to measure the burning rate of solid propellant strands. This method has a precision of 0.5% and excellent burning rate correlation with both subscale and large rocket motors. The AE procedure burns the sample under water and measures the burning rate from the acoustic output. The acoustic signal provides a continuous readout during testing, which allows complete data analysis rather than the start-stop clockwires used by the conventional method. The AE method helps eliminate such problems as inhibiting the sample, pressure increase and temperature rise, during testing.

  13. Body protective compound-157 enhances alkali-burn wound healing in vivo and promotes proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tonglie; Zhang, Kuo; Sun, Lijuan; Xue, Xiaochang; Zhang, Cun; Shu, Zhen; Mu, Nan; Gu, Jintao; Zhang, Wangqian; Wang, Yukun; Zhang, Yingqi; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Chemical burns take up a high proportion of burns admissions and can penetrate deep into tissues. Various reagents have been applied in the treatment of skin chemical burns; however, no optimal reagent for skin chemical burns currently exists. The present study investigated the effect of topical body protective compound (BPC)-157 treatment on skin wound healing, using an alkali burn rat model. Topical treatment with BPC-157 was shown to accelerate wound closure following an alkali burn. Histological examination of skin sections with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson staining showed better granulation tissue formation, reepithelialization, dermal remodeling, and a higher extent of collagen deposition when compared to the model control group on the 18th day postwounding. BPC-157 could promote vascular endothelial growth factor expression in wounded skin tissues. Furthermore, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and cell cycle analysis demonstrated that BPC-157 enhanced the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Transwell assay and wound healing assay showed that BPC-157 significantly promoted migration of HUVECs. We also observed that BPC-157 upregulated the expression of VEGF-a and accelerated vascular tube formation in vitro. Moreover, further studies suggested that BPC-157 regulated the phosphorylation level of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) as well as its downstream targets, including c-Fos, c-Jun, and Egr-1, which are key molecules involved in cell growth, migration, and angiogenesis. Altogether, our results indicated that BPC-157 treatment may accelerate wound healing in a model of alkali burn-induced skin injury. The therapeutic mechanism may be associated with accelerated granulation tissue formation, reepithelialization, dermal remodeling, and collagen deposition through ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  14. Body protective compound-157 enhances alkali-burn wound healing in vivo and promotes proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tonglie; Zhang, Kuo; Sun, Lijuan; Xue, Xiaochang; Zhang, Cun; Shu, Zhen; Mu, Nan; Gu, Jintao; Zhang, Wangqian; Wang, Yukun; Zhang, Yingqi; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Chemical burns take up a high proportion of burns admissions and can penetrate deep into tissues. Various reagents have been applied in the treatment of skin chemical burns; however, no optimal reagent for skin chemical burns currently exists. The present study investigated the effect of topical body protective compound (BPC)-157 treatment on skin wound healing, using an alkali burn rat model. Topical treatment with BPC-157 was shown to accelerate wound closure following an alkali burn. Histological examination of skin sections with hematoxylin–eosin and Masson staining showed better granulation tissue formation, reepithelialization, dermal remodeling, and a higher extent of collagen deposition when compared to the model control group on the 18th day postwounding. BPC-157 could promote vascular endothelial growth factor expression in wounded skin tissues. Furthermore, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and cell cycle analysis demonstrated that BPC-157 enhanced the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Transwell assay and wound healing assay showed that BPC-157 significantly promoted migration of HUVECs. We also observed that BPC-157 upregulated the expression of VEGF-a and accelerated vascular tube formation in vitro. Moreover, further studies suggested that BPC-157 regulated the phosphorylation level of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) as well as its downstream targets, including c-Fos, c-Jun, and Egr-1, which are key molecules involved in cell growth, migration, and angiogenesis. Altogether, our results indicated that BPC-157 treatment may accelerate wound healing in a model of alkali burn-induced skin injury. The therapeutic mechanism may be associated with accelerated granulation tissue formation, reepithelialization, dermal remodeling, and collagen deposition through ERK1/2 signaling pathway. PMID:25995620

  15. Selective dermal rejuvenation using intradermal injection of carbon dioxide and hyaluronic acid for facial wrinkles.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sae Hoon; Burm, Jin Sik; Kim, Youn Wha

    2013-06-01

    This study assessed selective dermal rejuvenation using sequential intradermal injections of carbon dioxide and hyaluronic acid as a treatment of facial wrinkles. An injection device was designed. After topical anesthesia, 0.1-mL carbon dioxide was gently injected intradermally so as to spread diffusely. A volume of 0.01- to 0.02-mL diluted hyaluronic acid was sequentially injected until the skin rose slightly. Overlapping injections were performed at 3 to 5 mm intervals. This process was repeated until the wrinkles were smoothened. This study included 36 cases of facial wrinkles in 34 patients. The follow-up period was 3 to 11 months. Temporary adverse effects were injection-site pain, mild edema, and redness. Most cases showed obvious improvement in skin thickness, elasticity, and smoothening. Complications included irregularities and hyperpigmentation in 3 cases, and 91% were highly satisfied with the antiwrinkle treatment. This method was a safe, economical, and clinically effective antiwrinkle treatment.

  16. Pain insensitivity syndrome misinterpreted as inflicted burns.

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, Gerbrich E; Baartmans, Martin G A; Vos, Paul; Dokter, Jan; White, Tonya; Tibboel, Dick

    2014-05-01

    We present a case study of a 10-year-old child with severe burns that were misinterpreted as inflicted burns. Because of multiple injuries since early life, the family was under suspicion of child abuse and therefore under supervision of the Child Care Board for 2 years before the boy was burned. Because the boy incurred the burns without feeling pain, we conducted a thorough medical examination and laboratory testing, evaluated detection and pain thresholds, and used MRI to study brain morphology and brain activation patterns during pain between this patient and 3 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. We found elevated detection and pain thresholds and lower brain activation during pain in the patient compared with the healthy controls and reference values. The patient received the diagnosis of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV on the basis of clinical findings and the laboratory testing, complemented with the altered pain and detection thresholds and MRI findings. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV is a very rare congenital pain insensitivity syndrome characterized by the absence of pain and temperature sensation combined with oral mutilation due to unawareness, fractures, and anhidrosis caused by abnormalities in the peripheral nerves. Health care workers should be aware of the potential presence of this disease to prevent false accusations of child abuse.

  17. Dermal Contributions to Human Interfollicular Epidermal Architecture and Self-Renewal

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Kynan T.; Kaur, Pritinder

    2015-01-01

    The human interfollicular epidermis is renewed throughout life by populations of proliferating basal keratinocytes. Though interfollicular keratinocyte stem cells have been identified, it is not known how self-renewal in this compartment is spatially organized. At the epidermal-dermal junction, keratinocytes sit atop a heterogeneous mix of dermal cells that may regulate keratinocyte self-renewal by influencing local tissue architecture and signalling microenvironments. Focusing on the rete ridges and complementary dermal papillae in human skin, we review the identity and organisation of abundant dermal cells types and present evidence for interactions between the dermal microenvironment and the interfollicular keratinocytes. PMID:26602926

  18. Mafenide acetate solution dressings: an adjunct in burn wound care.

    PubMed

    Shuck, J M; Thorne, L W; Cooper, C G

    1975-07-01

    A continuation of the study of 5% aqueous Sulfamylon solution dressings in burned patients was analyzed in 150 consecutive cases. The rate of invasive infection and mortality was not excessive. Dressings were used as an adjunct to other topical chemotherapeutic agents as well as homo/heterograft skin in the overall burn care program. Sulfamylon soaks were shown to be effective for debridement, granulation tissue protection and preparation, and bacterial control. The dressings were comfortable when in place and the wounds appeared clean. Epithelialization was not hampered so that the dressings could be utilized in partial thickness wounds as well as for mesh autografts on extensive burn surfaces=

  19. Physical rehabilitation of pediatric burns

    PubMed Central

    Atiyeh, B.; Janom, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Significant improvements have been made in the acute treatment of pediatric burn injuries over the past 3 decades which have significantly decreased mortality. Each year, more burned children are necessitating serious medical attention during their convalescence. For children with serious consequences resulting from burns that can persist from childhood through adolescence into adulthood, the value of long-term rehabilitation cannot be over stated. Burn injury management should not focus only on the immediate treatment. Long-term functional outcome and the required rehabilitation that burn victims must go through should be given equal if not more attention. The present is a review of the available modalities utilized for the physical rehabilitation of convalescent pediatric burns in order to overcome the catabolic state, improve muscle power and fitness, reduce disfiguring scars and prevent contractures. PMID:25249846

  20. Physical rehabilitation of pediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, B; Janom, H H

    2014-03-31

    Significant improvements have been made in the acute treatment of pediatric burn injuries over the past 3 decades which have significantly decreased mortality. Each year, more burned children are necessitating serious medical attention during their convalescence. For children with serious consequences resulting from burns that can persist from childhood through adolescence into adulthood, the value of long-term rehabilitation cannot be over stated. Burn injury management should not focus only on the immediate treatment. Long-term functional outcome and the required rehabilitation that burn victims must go through should be given equal if not more attention. The present is a review of the available modalities utilized for the physical rehabilitation of convalescent pediatric burns in order to overcome the catabolic state, improve muscle power and fitness, reduce disfiguring scars and prevent contractures.

  1. [The organization of burn care].

    PubMed

    Latarjet, Jacques

    2002-12-15

    In 2002, the organisation of burn care is confronted to a great deficiency in burn epidemiological datas. The main mechanisms of hospitalized burns are somehow wellknown in industrialized countries: about 60% scalds and 30% flame burns; as well as the place of occurrence (60% at home, and 20% at work), and the risk groups (3 times more important for the age group 0-4 years old). The incidence of burns needing medical care (all levels) (250/100,000 inh/yr) or hospitalization (15-20/100,000 inh/yr) is much more uncertain. The statistics of Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG), for hospitalized patients will allow in France very shortly to know more about the most rational ways of dispatching and treating them. They already show that only 30% of hospitalized burned patients are treated in specialized facilities.

  2. Clothing burns in Canadian children

    PubMed Central

    Stanwick, Richard S.

    1985-01-01

    A Canadian survey of 11 tertiary care pediatric centres with specialized burn facilities revealed that an estimated 37 children up to 9 years of age are admitted annually to such hospitals because of clothing burns. Sleepwear accounts for an estimated 21 such burns per year. Girls were found to suffer the most severe burns and represented eight of the nine children in the series who died. Loose and flowing garments dominated the girls' styles. The results of multiple-regression analysis confirmed that style of clothing (loose and flowing as opposed to snug) was the most significant predictor of burn severity, length of hospital stay, the need for skin grafting and survival. The ignition situation (avoidance of parental supervision at the time of injury) was the only other important predictor. The success of regulatory actions in other countries in reducing the incidence of severe clothing burns is reviewed, and preventive strategies for Canada are explored. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:3995433

  3. Calcium pantothenate modulates gene expression in proliferating human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wiederholt, Tonio; Heise, Ruth; Skazik, Claudia; Marquardt, Yvonne; Joussen, Sylvia; Erdmann, Kati; Schröder, Henning; Merk, Hans F; Baron, Jens Malte

    2009-11-01

    Topical application of pantothenate is widely used in clinical practice for wound healing. Previous studies identified a positive effect of pantothenate on migration and proliferation of cultured fibroblasts. However, these studies were mainly descriptive with no molecular data supporting a possible model of its action. In this study, we first established conditions for an in vitro model of pantothenate wound healing and then analysed the molecular effects of pantothenate. To test the functional effect of pantothenate on dermal fibroblasts, cells were cultured and in vitro proliferation tests were performed using a standardized scratch test procedure. For all three donors analysed, a strong stimulatory effect of pantothenate at a concentration of 20 microg/ml on the proliferation of cultivated dermal fibroblasts was observed. To study the molecular mechanisms resulting in the proliferative effect of pantothenate, gene expression was analysed in dermal fibroblasts cultivated with 20 microg/ml of pantothenate compared with untreated cells using the GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array. A number of significantly regulated genes were identified including genes coding for interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, Id1, HMOX-1, HspB7, CYP1B1 and MARCH-II. Regulation of these genes was subsequently verified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Induction of HMOX-1 expression by pantothenol and pantothenic acid in dermal cells was confirmed on the protein level using immunoblots. Functional studies revealed the enhanced suppression of free radical formation in skin fibroblasts cultured with panthenol. In conclusion, these studies provided new insight in the molecular mechanisms linked to the stimulatory effect of pantothenate and panthenol on the proliferation of dermal fibroblasts.

  4. Muse Cells Derived from Dermal Tissues Can Differentiate into Melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ting; Zhang, Ru-Zhi; Yang, Yu-Hua; Liu, Qi; Li, Di; Pan, Xiao-Ru

    2017-02-07

    The objective of the authors has been to obtain multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring cells (Muse cells) from primary cultures of dermal fibroblasts, identify their pluripotency, and detect their ability to differentiate into melanocytes. The distribution of SSEA-3-positive cells in human scalp skin was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and the distribution of Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, and SSEA-3-positive cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. The expression levels of Sox2, Oct4, hKlf4, and Nanog mRNAs and proteins in Muse cells were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses and Western blots, respectively. These Muse cells differentiated into melanocytes in differentiation medium. The SSEA-3-positive cells were scattered in the basement membrane zone and the dermis, with comparatively more in the sebaceous glands, vascular and sweat glands, as well as the outer root sheath of hair follicles, the dermal papillae, and the hair bulbs. Muse cells, which have the ability to self-renew, were obtained from scalp dermal fibroblasts by flow cytometry sorting with an anti-SSEA-3 antibody. The results of RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence staining showed that the expression levels of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and Klf4 mRNAs and proteins in Muse cells were significantly different from their parental dermal fibroblasts. Muse cells differentiated into melanocytes when cultured in melanocyte differentiation medium, and the Muse cell-derived melanocytes expressed the melanocyte-specific marker HMB45. Muse cells could be obtained by flow cytometry from primary cultures of scalp dermal fibroblasts, which possessed the ability of pluripotency and self-renewal, and could differentiate into melanocytes in vitro.

  5. Enhanced dermal delivery of acyclovir using solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sanyog; Mistry, Meghal A; Swarnakar, Nitin K

    2011-10-01

    The present investigation was enthused by the possibility to develop solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) of hydrophilic drug acyclovir (ACV) and evaluate their potential as the carrier for dermal delivery. ACV-loaded SLNs (ACV-SLNs) were prepared by the optimized double emulsion process using Compritol 888 ATO as solid lipid. The prepared SLNs were smooth and spherical in shape with average diameter, polydispersity index, and entrapment efficiency of 262 ± 13 nm, 0.280 ± 0.01, and 40.08 ± 4.39% at 10% (w/w) theoretical drug loading with respect to Compritol 888 ATO content. Differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction pattern revealed that ACV was present in the amorphous state inside the SLNs. In vitro skin permeation studies on human cadaver and Sprague-Dawley rat skin revealed 17.65 and 15.17 times higher accumulation of ACV-SLNs in the dermal tissues in comparison to commercially available ACV cream after 24 h. Mechanism of topical permeation and dermal distribution was studied qualitatively using confocal laser scanning microscopy. While free dye (calcein) failed to penetrate skin barrier, the same encapsulated in SLNs penetrated deeply into the dermal tissue suggesting that pilosebaceous route was followed by SLNs for skin penetration. Histological examination and transdermal epidermal water loss measurement suggested that no major morphological changes occurred on rat skin surface due to the application of SLNs. Overall, it was concluded that ACV-loaded SLNs might be beneficial in improving dermal delivery of antiviral agent(s) for the treatment of topical herpes simplex infection.

  6. Contact radiator burn subsequent to spinal anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Sever, C; Aysal, B K; Sahin, C; Kulahci, Y

    2012-06-30

    An unusual case is reported in which a patient sustained a third-degree burn of the plantar surface of the right foot as the result of contact with a heating radiator. This occurred when the patient fell asleep in his hospital bed after knee surgery. Spinal anaesthesia is easy to perform, and the risk factors, though present, are not serious. Such accidents are not infrequent and care should be taken to prevent them.

  7. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Takenoshita, Miho; Toyofuku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS) ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder) 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS. PMID:27279742

  8. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Takenoshita, Miho; Toyofuku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS) ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder) 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS.

  9. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021 Section 49.11021 Protection of... burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a) Beginning January 1, 2007, a person must apply for... under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning permits....

  10. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021 Section 49.11021 Protection of... burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a) Beginning January 1, 2007, a person must apply for... under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning permits....

  11. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021 Section 49.11021 Protection of... burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a) Beginning January 1, 2007, a person must apply for... under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning permits....

  12. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021 Section 49.11021 Protection of... burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a) Beginning January 1, 2007, a person must apply for... under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning permits....

  13. [Epidemiology of burns in France].

    PubMed

    Latarjet, Jacques; Ravat, François

    2012-01-01

    As with most traumas, the epidemiology of the "burn" health-event has long been neglected by public health doctors and rarely considered by burns specialists. There were therefore few verified data and many approximations and preconceived ideas. The gathering of information recently undertaken in France enables the reliability of the data to be improved and the diagnostic and demographic elements relating to hospitalised patients with burns to be established.

  14. Exercise following burn injury.

    PubMed

    de Lateur, Barbara J; Shore, Wendy S

    2011-05-01

    Fatigue is a major barrier to recovery for burned individuals. Studies indicate that a slow return to normal or near-normal muscle strength is the natural course of recovery. With no special interventions, other than the "usual care" tailored to the needs of the individual, postburn patients will make gradual improvement in strength and aerobic capacity. Using the principle of initial condition (the worse the initial condition, the greater the response to exercise intervention) the authors outline an augmented exercise program that should result in a robust improvement in aerobic capacity.

  15. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high- inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi- periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  16. Burning Mouth Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klasser, Gary D; Grushka, Miriam; Su, Nan

    2016-08-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is an enigmatic, misunderstood, and under-recognized painful condition. Symptoms associated with BMS can be varied, thereby providing a challenge for practitioners and having a negative impact on oral health-related quality of life for patients. Management also remains a challenge for practitioners because it is currently only targeted for symptom relief without a definitive cure. There is an urgent need for further investigations to determine the efficacy of different therapies because this is the only way viable therapeutic options can be established for patients with this chronic and painful syndrome.

  17. Histology of “placoderm” dermal skeletons: Implications for the nature of the ancestral gnathostome

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Sam; Rücklin, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The vertebrate dermal skeleton has long been interpreted to have evolved from a primitive condition exemplified by chondrichthyans. However, chondrichthyans and osteichthyans evolved from an ancestral gnathostome stem‐lineage in which the dermal skeleton was more extensively developed. To elucidate the histology and skeletal structure of the gnathostome crown‐ancestor we conducted a histological survey of the diversity of the dermal skeleton among the placoderms, a diverse clade or grade of early jawed vertebrates. The dermal skeleton of all placoderms is composed largely of a cancellar architecture of cellular dermal bone, surmounted by dermal tubercles in the most ancestral clades, including antiarchs. Acanthothoracids retain an ancestral condition for the dermal skeleton, and we record its secondary reduction in antiarchs. We also find that mechanisms for remodeling bone and facilitating different growth rates between adjoining plates are widespread throughout the placoderms. J. Morphol., 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23378262

  18. Effects of silver nanoparticles on human dermal fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Galandáková, A; Franková, J; Ambrožová, N; Habartová, K; Pivodová, V; Zálešák, B; Šafářová, K; Smékalová, M; Ulrichová, J

    2016-09-01

    Biomedical application of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) has been rapidly increasing. Owing to their strong antimicrobial activity, AgNPs are used in dermatology in the treatment of wounds and burns. However, recent evidence for their cytotoxicity gives rise to safety concerns. This study was undertaken as a part of an ongoing programme in our laboratory to develop a topical agent for wound healing. Here, we investigated the potential toxicity of AgNPs using normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) and normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) with the aim of comparing the effects of AgNPs and ionic silver (Ag-I). Besides the effect of AgNPs and Ag-I on cell viability, the inflammatory response and DNA damage in AgNPs and Ag-I-treated cells were examined. The results showed that Ag-I were significantly more toxic than AgNPs both on NHDF and NHEK. Non-cytotoxic concentrations of AgNPs and Ag-I did not induce DNA strand breaks and did not affect inflammatory markers, except for a transient increase in interleukin 6 levels in Ag-I-treated NHDF. The results showed that AgNPs are more suitable for the intended application as a topical agent for wound healing up to the concentration 25 µg/mL.

  19. Human keratinocyte growth and differentiation on acellular porcine dermal matrix in relation to wound healing potential.

    PubMed

    Zajicek, Robert; Mandys, Vaclav; Mestak, Ondrej; Sevcik, Jan; Königova, Radana; Matouskova, Eva

    2012-01-01

    A number of implantable biomaterials derived from animal tissues are now used in modern surgery. Xe-Derma is a dry, sterile, acellular porcine dermis. It has a remarkable healing effect on burns and other wounds. Our hypothesis was that the natural biological structure of Xe-Derma plays an important role in keratinocyte proliferation and formation of epidermal architecture in vitro as well as in vivo. The bioactivity of Xe-Derma was studied by a cell culture assay. We analyzed growth and differentiation of human keratinocytes cultured in vitro on Xe-Derma, and we compared the results with formation of neoepidermis in the deep dermal wounds treated with Xe-Derma. Keratinocytes cultured on Xe-Derma submerged in the culture medium achieved confluence in 7-10 days. After lifting the cultures to the air-liquid interface, the keratinocytes were stratified and differentiated within one week, forming an epidermis with basal, spinous, granular, and stratum corneum layers. Immunohistochemical detection of high-molecular weight cytokeratins (HMW CKs), CD29, p63, and involucrin confirmed the similarity of organization and differentiation of the cultured epidermal cells to the normal epidermis. The results suggest that the firm natural structure of Xe-Derma stimulates proliferation and differentiation of human primary keratinocytes and by this way improves wound healing.

  20. Biafine topical emulsion accelerates excisional and burn wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Aimee E; Adler, Brandon L; Landriscina, Angelo; Rosen, Jamie M; Musaev, Tagai; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Friedman, Adam J

    2015-09-01

    Macrophages play a fundamental role in wound healing; therefore, employing a strategy that enhances macrophage recruitment would be ideal. It was previously suggested that the mechanism by which Biafine topical emulsion improves wound healing is via enhanced macrophage infiltration into the wound bed. The purpose of this study was to confirm this observation through gross and histologic assessments of wound healing using murine full-thickness excisional and burn wound models, and compare to common standards, Vaseline and silver sulfadiazine (SSD). Full-thickness excisional and burn wounds were created on two groups of 60 mice. In the excisional arm, mice were divided into untreated control, Biafine, and Vaseline groups. In the burn arm, mice were divided into untreated control, Biafine, and SSD groups. Daily treatments were administered and healing was measured over time. Wound tissue was excised and stained to appropriately visualize morphology, collagen, macrophages, and neutrophils. Collagen deposition was measured and cell counts were performed. Biafine enhanced wound healing in murine full-thickness excisional and burn wounds compared to control, and surpassed Vaseline and SSD in respective wound types. Biafine treatment accelerated wound closure clinically, with greater epidermal/dermal maturity, granulation tissue formation, and collagen quality and arrangement compared to other groups histologically. Biafine application was associated with greater macrophage and lower neutrophil infiltration at earlier stages of healing when compared to other study groups. In conclusion, Biafine can be considered an alternative topical therapy for full-thickness excisional and burn wounds, owing to its advantageous biologically based wound healing properties.

  1. A systematic review on burn scar contracture treatment: searching for evidence.

    PubMed

    Stekelenburg, Carlijn M; Marck, Roos E; Tuinebreijer, Wim E; de Vet, Henrica C W; Ogawa, Rei; van Zuijlen, Paul P M

    2015-01-01

    Treating burn scar contracture remains a challenging problem for reconstructive surgeons. At present, no consensus exists on when to use what kind of technique. Therefore, a systematic review was performed on the effectiveness of the different surgical techniques after burn scar contracture release. Electronic databases were searched using a predefined search strategy. Studies evaluating the outcome of surgical techniques for the treatment of burn scar contractures were included. The methodological quality was tested and the data were summarized. One thousand six hundred fourty-nine papers were identified of which 17 met the inclusion criteria. Three papers reported on a controlled trial, 14 were cohort studies, including 10 of a pre-post operative design and 4 of a comparative design. The papers described outcomes of grafts, flaps with random or defined vascularization, and dermal substitutes. All studies had methodological shortcomings and most used inappropriate statistical methods. The current evidence on the effectiveness of reconstruction techniques for burn scar contractures was summarized. Due to the scarcity and low quality of the included studies, no definitive conclusions could be reached about the effectiveness of different techniques. Therefore, no direct implications for daily practice could be made. However, recommendations could be given for improvement of the quality of further primary research on the effectiveness of surgical treatment strategies for burn scar contracture release.

  2. Age-related disruption of autophagy in dermal fibroblasts modulates extracellular matrix components

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Kanae; Shishido, Mayumi; Fujimoto, Keiko; Hirota, Yuko; Yo, Kazuyuki; Gomi, Takamasa; Tanaka, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Autophagosomes accumulate in aged dermal fibroblasts. •Autophagic degradation is impaired in aged dermal fibroblasts. •Autophagy disruption affects extracellular matrix components in dermal fibroblasts. -- Abstract: Autophagy is an intracellular degradative system that is believed to be involved in the aging process. The contribution of autophagy to age-related changes in the human skin is unclear. In this study, we examined the relationship between autophagy and skin aging. Transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy analyses of skin tissue and cultured dermal fibroblasts derived from women of different ages revealed an increase in the number of nascent double-membrane autophagosomes with age. Western blot analysis showed that the amount of LC3-II, a form associated with autophagic vacuolar membranes, was significantly increased in aged dermal fibroblasts compared with that in young dermal fibroblasts. Aged dermal fibroblasts were minimally affected by inhibition of autophagic activity. Although lipofuscin autofluorescence was elevated in aged dermal fibroblasts, the expression of Beclin-1 and Atg5—genes essential for autophagosome formation—was similar between young and aged dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that the increase of autophagosomes in aged dermal fibroblasts was due to impaired autophagic flux rather than an increase in autophagosome formation. Treatment of young dermal fibroblasts with lysosomal protease inhibitors, which mimic the condition of aged dermal fibroblasts with reduced autophagic activity, altered the fibroblast content of type I procollagen, hyaluronan and elastin, and caused a breakdown of collagen fibrils. Collectively, these findings suggest that the autophagy pathway is impaired in aged dermal fibroblasts, which leads to deterioration of dermal integrity and skin fragility.

  3. Oral Rehydration Therapy in Burn Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-24

    Burn Any Degree Involving 20-29 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 30-39 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 40-49 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 50-59 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 60-65 Percent of Body Surface

  4. Burning Fuel Droplet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Fuel ignites and burns in the Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) on STS-94 on July 4 1997, MET:2/05:40 (approximate). The DCE was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. DCE used various fuels -- in drops ranging from 1 mm (0.04 inches) to 5 mm (0.2 inches) -- and mixtures of oxidizers and inert gases to learn more about the physics of combustion in the simplest burning configuration, a sphere. The experiment elapsed time is shown at the bottom of the composite image. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (121KB JPEG, 654 x 977 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300169.html.

  5. [Burns and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Rochet, J M; Hareb, F

    2002-03-01

    Necessary principles of rehabilitation for burn patient are based on empirical findings recently corroborated by discoveries about healing pathophysiology. Risks are assessable immediately from the extensive, depth and situation of the burns, problems appear only if the dermis is affected: retraction, hypertrophy and losses of substances. To cutaneous problems it is necessary to add those linked to the prolonged immobilization and to complications of the resuscitation. To be effective, re-education has to be precocious, continuously suited to cicatricial processing and to the different therapeutic steps: resuscitation, surgical treatment, processing in a re-education and rehabilitation center, steady at home and processing of the sequelae. The processing rests on the repressive cloth port 23/24 hours during more of a year, the port of orthesis of immobilization and segmental posture (to stretch the dermis permanently) and the mobilization of articulations to avoid their stiffening. The cooperation of the patient is essential, it needs the share of therapies as well as the totality of problems and difficulties met by the patient, that they are physical, psychological, social, family or occupational. The steady has to be insured by a pluridisciplinarity team during at least the two necessary years for the cicatricial maturation.

  6. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Tan, Amy

    2013-02-07

    Burning mouth syndrome is a debilitating medical condition affecting nearly 1.3 million of Americans. Its common features include a burning painful sensation in the mouth, often associated with dysgeusia and xerostomia, despite normal salivation. Classically, symptoms are better in the morning, worsen during the day and typically subside at night. Its etiology is largely multifactorial, and associated medical conditions may include gastrointestinal, urogenital, psychiatric, neurologic and metabolic disorders, as well as drug reactions. BMS has clear predisposition to peri-/post menopausal females. Its pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated and involves peripheral and central neuropathic pathways. Clinical diagnosis relies on careful history taking, physical examination and laboratory analysis. Treatment is often tedious and is aimed at correction of underlying medical conditions, supportive therapy, and behavioral feedback. Drug therapy with alpha lipoic acid, clonazepam, capsaicin, and antidepressants may provide symptom relief. Psychotherapy may be helpful. Short term follow up data is promising, however, long term prognosis with treatment is lacking. BMS remains an important medical condition which often places a recognizable burden on the patient and health care system and requires appropriate recognition and treatment.

  7. Global Burned Area and Biomass Burning Emissions from Small Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; vanderWerf, G. R.; Rogers, B. M.; Morton, D. C.

    2012-01-01

    In several biomes, including croplands, wooded savannas, and tropical forests, many small fires occur each year that are well below the detection limit of the current generation of global burned area products derived from moderate resolution surface reflectance imagery. Although these fires often generate thermal anomalies that can be detected by satellites, their contributions to burned area and carbon fluxes have not been systematically quantified across different regions and continents. Here we developed a preliminary method for combining 1-km thermal anomalies (active fires) and 500 m burned area observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to estimate the influence of these fires. In our approach, we calculated the number of active fires inside and outside of 500 m burn scars derived from reflectance data. We estimated small fire burned area by computing the difference normalized burn ratio (dNBR) for these two sets of active fires and then combining these observations with other information. In a final step, we used the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3) biogeochemical model to estimate the impact of these fires on biomass burning emissions. We found that the spatial distribution of active fires and 500 m burned areas were in close agreement in ecosystems that experience large fires, including savannas across southern Africa and Australia and boreal forests in North America and Eurasia. In other areas, however, we observed many active fires outside of burned area perimeters. Fire radiative power was lower for this class of active fires. Small fires substantially increased burned area in several continental-scale regions, including Equatorial Asia (157%), Central America (143%), and Southeast Asia (90%) during 2001-2010. Globally, accounting for small fires increased total burned area by approximately by 35%, from 345 Mha/yr to 464 Mha/yr. A formal quantification of uncertainties was not possible, but sensitivity

  8. Effects of plant sterols derived from Aloe vera gel on human dermal fibroblasts in vitro and on skin condition in Japanese women

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Miyuki; Misawa, Eriko; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki; Ishizaki, Chiaki

    2015-01-01

    Background Aloe is known for its topical use for treating wounds and burns. Many previous studies reported the healing effects of Aloe vera. However, there are few clinical studies on the effect of orally administered A. vera gel on the skin. Aloe sterols are a type of plant sterols that have the capability to regulate the metabolism of glucose and lipids. In a recent study, we confirmed that ingested Aloe sterols reached the peripheral tissues through the bloodstream. However, their influence on dermal fibroblasts has not been investigated. Methods First, we investigated the capability of Aloe sterols (cycloartenol and lophenol) to stimulate human dermal fibroblasts in vitro. Then, we investigated the effect of intake of Aloe vera gel powder (AVGP) containing 40 μg Aloe sterols on the skin conditions in Japanese women with dry skin in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Results After cocultivation with Aloe sterols, the production of collagen and hyaluronic acid increased by approximately two-fold and 1.5-fold, and gene expression levels of these enzymes responsible for their synthesis were also observed in human dermal fibroblasts. An increase in arm skin hydration was observed at 8 weeks in the AVGP group, whereas a slight decrease in arm skin hydration was noted in the placebo group. However, there was no statistical difference between AVGP and placebo groups in skin moisture. In subgroup analysis, the change in the mean wrinkle depth was significantly lower in the AVGP group than in the control group. In addition, percent body fat after 8 weeks was significantly lower in the AVGP group. No AVGP intake-dependent harmful phenomenon was observed during the intake period. Conclusion The present study confirms that daily oral Aloe sterol-containing AVGP significantly reduced facial wrinkles in women aged ≥40 years, and Aloe sterols stimulate collagen and hyaluronic acid production by human dermal fibroblasts. PMID:25759593

  9. Burn Teams and Burn Centers: The Importance of a Comprehensive Team Approach to Burn Care

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mousawi, Ahmed M.; Mecott-Rivera, Gabriel A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Herndon, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Advances in burn care have been colossal, but while extra work is needed, it is clear that the organized effort of burn teams can continue making improvements in survival rates and quality of life possible for patients. Burn patients are unique, representing the most severe model of trauma,33 and hence this necessitates treatment in the best facilities available for that endeavor. Burn centers have developed to meet these intricate needs but can only function productively and most efficiently through well organized, multifaceted, patient-centered teams in areas of clinical care and research. PMID:19793550

  10. Gas chromatographic method for assessing the dermal exposure of greenhouse applicators to dimethoate and malathion.

    PubMed

    Castro Cano, M L; Martínez Vidal, J L; Egea González, F J; Martínez Galera, M

    2001-08-01

    An analytical method is developed to determine potential and actual dermal exposure to dimethoate and malathion for agricultural workers using whole body dosimetry. The methodology described includes three different aspects: the validation of the analytical method incorporating a matrix effect for establishing performance parameters such as recovery rates (between 92% and 103% for both pesticides), limits of detection and quantitation, and precision of measurements (RSD < 10%); a field sampling strategy developing a procedure for collecting samples and carrying out field spikes and field blanks in order to ensure the stability of samples during transport, storage, and analysis; and finally, a quality control procedure for ensuring that data are under statistical control. The method is applied to evaluate the potential and actual dermal exposure as well as its distribution for a pesticide applicator and the applicator's assistant after a greenhouse application. Operator exposure levels of approximately 68 mL/h, and 25 mL/h in the case of the assistant, are found. The body areas most exposed are the lower body and hands.

  11. Dermal inflammation elicited by synthetic analogs of Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Norgard, M V; Riley, B S; Richardson, J A; Radolf, J D

    1995-04-01

    The membrane lipoproteins of Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi have potent immunostimulatory properties in vitro, implicating them as major inflammatory mediators in syphilis and Lyme disease. Recently, we reported that synthetic lipohexapeptide analogs (lipopeptides) of the lipoproteins could be used as surrogates for native spirochetal lipoproteins in immune cell activation studies in vitro. The present study was designed to evaluate the inflammatory properties of the lipopeptides in vivo and to correlate the cellular responses to these synthetic analogs with the histopathology of syphilis and Lyme disease. Lipopeptides corresponding to the 47-kDa major membrane lipoprotein of T. pallidum and the outer surface protein A of B. burgdorferi injected intradermally induced dose-dependent dermal inflammation in mice; the initial predominantly neutrophilic (mice) or heterophilic (rabbits) cellular infiltrates were followed by infiltrates consisting predominantly of mononuclear cells. The intradermal response of rabbits to the 47-kDa lipopeptide was strikingly similar to that observed for animals infected intradermally with T. pallidum. In all cases, lipopolysaccharide was substantially more potent as an inflammatory mediator than the spirochetal lipopeptides. In contrast to the lipopeptides, nonacylated hexapeptides elicited minimal or no dermal lesions in mice or rabbits, underscoring the importance of acyl modification to the inflammatory properties of the lipopeptides. This study provides the first in vivo evidence that the spirochetal lipoproteins/lipopeptides contribute to the immunopathogenesis of syphilis and Lyme disease.

  12. Influence of the composition of monoacyl phosphatidylcholine based microemulsions on the dermal delivery of flufenamic acid.

    PubMed

    Hoppel, Magdalena; Ettl, Hanna; Holper, Evelyn; Valenta, Claudia

    2014-11-20

    Although microemulsions are one of the most promising dermal carrier systems, their clinical use is limited due to their skin irritation potential. Therefore, microemulsions based on naturally derived monoacyl phosphatidylcholine (MAPL) were developed. The influence of the water, oil and surfactant content on dermal delivery of flufenamic acid was systematically investigated for the first time. A water-rich microemulsion led to significantly higher in vitro skin penetration of flufenamic acid compared to other microemulsions. The superiority of the water-rich microemulsion over a marketed flufenamic acid containing formulation was additionally confirmed. Differences in drug delivery could be explained by alterations of the microemulsions after application. Evaporation of isopropanol led to crystal-like structures of MAPL on the skin surface from the surfactant- or oleic acid-rich microemulsions. In contrast, the formation of this additional barrier was hindered in case of the water-rich microemulsion. The skin penetration of MAPL was additionally analyzed by combined ATR-FTIR and tape stripping experiments, where MAPL itself penetrated only into the initial layers of the stratum corneum, independent of the microemulsion composition. Since a surfactant must penetrate the skin to cause irritation, MAPL can be presumed as a skin-friendly emulsifier with the ability to stabilize pharmaceutically acceptable microemulsions.

  13. The alexander surgical technique for the treatment of severe burns

    PubMed Central

    Gasperoni, M.; Neri, R.; Carboni, A.; Purpura, V.; Morselli, P.G.; Melandri, D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The extensive loss of skin in burned patients is a critical clinical condition, and the choice of an effective technique to cover and protect the damaged area has always been a challenge in the surgical field. Despite its wide clinical use, there is little data in the literature on using the Alexander technique to treat severe burns, while several studies have focused on alternative approaches. The present study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the Alexander surgical technique on 117 patients with severe burns. The characteristics of the burned patients, factors related to etiology of burns as well as adverse prognostic factors and their incidence in discharged versus deceased patients were also taken into account. Finally, a comparison is made with an alternative surgical procedure described in the literature. Our results show a satisfactory level of survival for patients with severe burns surgically treated with the Alexander technique, accounting for 63% of all clinical cases reported here. This treatment is also less expensive and more rapid than the alternative approach we compared it with. The Alexander technique is a lifesaving method for the treatment of severe burns that provides a satisfactory chance of survival at lower cost than the alternative surgical procedure examined. PMID:28289363

  14. 30 CFR 816.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or burned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted...

  15. 30 CFR 816.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or burned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted...

  16. 30 CFR 816.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or burned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted...

  17. 30 CFR 816.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or burned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted...

  18. Changing Children's Conceptions of Burning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabel, Dorothy L.; Stockton, Jamie D.; Monaghan, Diane L.; MaKinster, James G.

    2001-01-01

    Examines children's understanding of burning focusing on questions such as: "What are children's views of burning prior to and after instruction?," and "Do children's views become more scientific?" A significant difference was found in children's understanding before and after instruction. (Author/MM)

  19. Animal Models in Burn Research

    PubMed Central

    Abdullahi, A.; Amini-Nik, S.; Jeschke, M.G

    2014-01-01

    Burn injury is a severe form of trauma affecting more than two million people in North America each year. Burn trauma is not a single pathophysiological event but a devastating injury that causes structural and functional deficits in numerous organ systems. Due to its complexity and the involvement of multiple organs, in vitro experiments cannot capture this complexity nor address the pathophysiology. In the past two decades, a number of burn animal models have been developed to replicate the various aspects of burn injury; to elucidate the pathophysiology and explore potential treatment interventions. Understanding the advantages and limitations of these animal models is essential for the design and development of treatments that are clinically relevant to humans. This review paper aims to highlight the common animal models of burn injury in order to provide investigators with a better understanding of the benefits and limitations of these models for translational applications. While many animal models of burn exist, we limit our discussion to the skin healing of mouse, rat, and pig. Additionally, we briefly explain hypermetabolic characteristics of burn injury and the animal model utilized to study this phenomena. Finally, we discuss the economic costs associated with each of these models in order to guide decisions of choosing the appropriate animal model for burn research. PMID:24714880

  20. Burning crude oil without pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Crude oil can be burned at drilling sites by two-stage combustion process without producing pollution. Process allows easier conformance to strict federal or state clean air standards without installation of costly pollution removal equipment. Secondary oil recovery can be accomplished with injection of steam heating by burning oil.

  1. Aztreonam pharmacokinetics in burn patients.

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, L V; White, R L; Kays, M B; Brundage, D M; Yarbrough, D

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of aztreonam in eight adult patients with severe burn injuries (total body surface area burn, 49% +/- 21% [mean +/- standard deviation]) were studied. The time of initiation of study following burn injury was 7.0 +/- 1.4 days. Four patients at first dose and at steady state were studied. Aztreonam concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and a two-compartment model was used to fit the data. No significant differences in any pharmacokinetic parameters between first dose and steady state were observed. Volume of distribution of the central compartment after first dose (0.14 liters/kg) and volume of distribution at steady state (0.31 liters/kg) were approximately 30% higher than those reported for other patient populations. Total drug clearance and renal drug clearance when normalized to creatinine clearance (CLCR) were similar to those previously reported for other critically ill patients. CLCR was strongly correlated with renal drug clearance (r = 0.94) and total drug clearance (r = 0.95). The extent and degree of burn (percent second or third degree burn) were poorly correlated with all pharmacokinetic parameters with the exception of the volume of distribution at steady state, which was correlated with both total body surface area burn (r = 0.95) and percent second degree burn (r = 0.83). Aztreonam pharmacokinetics are altered as a result of thermal injury; however, CLCR can be used to assess the clearance of aztreonam in burn patients. PMID:2014982

  2. Corneoscleral Laceration and Ocular Burns Caused by Electronic Cigarette Explosions

    PubMed Central

    Paley, Grace L.; Echalier, Elizabeth; Eck, Thomas W.; Hong, Augustine R.; Gregory, Darren G.; Lubniewski, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report cases of acute globe rupture and bilateral corneal burns from electronic cigarette (EC) explosions. Methods: Case series. Results: We describe a series of patients with corneal injury caused by EC explosions. Both patients suffered bilateral corneal burns and decreased visual acuity, and one patient sustained a unilateral corneoscleral laceration with prolapsed iris tissue and hyphema. A review of the scientific literature revealed no prior reported cases of ocular injury secondary to EC explosions; however, multiple media and government agency articles describe fires and explosions involving ECs, including at least 4 with ocular injuries. Conclusions: Given these cases and the number of recent media reports, ECs pose a significant public health risk. Users should be warned regarding the possibility of severe injury, including sight-threatening ocular injuries ranging from corneal burns to full-thickness corneoscleral laceration. PMID:27191672

  3. Burn, thermal - close-up (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... first degree burns cause only reddening of the epidermis (outer layer of the skin), as seen in this photograph. Second degree burns cause blistering and extend into the dermis (lower layer of skin). Third degree burns cause ...

  4. Fires and Burns Involving Home Medical Oxygen

    MedlinePlus

    ... nfpa.org Fires and Burns Involving Home Medical Oxygen The air is normally 21% oxygen. Oxygen is not flammable, but fire needs it to burn. ¾ When more oxygen is present, any fire that starts will burn ...

  5. Minor burn management: potions and lotions

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Ela J; Connolly, Siobhan M; Fox, Jade A; Harvey, John G

    2015-01-01

    Summary The first aid for burns is to run cold water over the burn for 20 minutes. This is effective for up to three hours after the injury. Assess the affected body surface area using the rule of nines. Consult a burn unit if more than 5% of the total body surface area is burnt in a child or if more than 10% in an adult. Extensive or deep burns and burns to special areas, such as the hands, should be referred. Chemical or electrical burns should also be assessed by a burn unit. For minor burns, antimicrobial dressings are recommended, but oral antibiotics should be avoided unless there are signs of infection. As burns are tetanus prone, check the patient’s immunisation status. Burns that become infected or are slow to heal should be discussed with a burn unit. The burn unit can also provide advice if there are uncertainties about how to manage a patient. PMID:26648640

  6. The year in burns 2013.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Steven E; Phelan, Herbert A; Arnoldo, Brett D

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 3415 research articles were published with burns in the title, abstract, and/or keyword in 2013. We have continued to see an increase in this number; the following reviews articles selected from these by the Editor of one of the major journals (Burns) and colleagues that in their opinion are most likely to have effects on burn care treatment and understanding. As we have done before, articles were found and divided into the following topic areas: epidemiology of injury and burn prevention, wound and scar characterization, acute care and critical care, inhalation injury, infection, psychological considerations, pain and itching management, rehabilitation and long-term outcomes, and burn reconstruction. The articles are mentioned briefly with notes from the authors; readers are referred to the full papers for details.

  7. Potential dermal exposure in greenhouses for manual sprayers: analysis of the mix/load, application and re-entry stages.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Laura M; Querejeta, Giselle A; Flores, Andrea P; Hughes, Enrique A; Zalts, Anita; Montserrat, Javier M

    2010-09-01

    An evaluation of the Potential Dermal Exposure for the mix/load, application and re-entry stages, associated with procymidone and deltamethrin usage, was carried out for tomatoes grown in greenhouses of small production units in Argentina. Eight experiments were done with four different operators, under typical field conditions with a lever operated backpack sprayer. The methodology applied was based on the Whole Body Dosimetry technique, evaluating a set of different data for the mix and load, application and re-entry operations. These results indicated that the Potential Dermal Exposure of the application step was (38+/-17)mLh(-1) with the highest proportion on torso, head and arms. When the three stages were compared, re-entry was found to contribute least towards the total Potential Dermal Exposure; meanwhile in all cases, except one, the mix/load operation was the stage with highest exposure. The Margin of Safety for each different operation was also calculated and the proportion of pesticide drift from the greenhouse to the environment is presented. These results emphasize the importance of improving the personal protection measures in the mix and load stage, an operation that is not usually associated with high-risk in small production units.

  8. Wood-burning stove

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, W.

    1983-09-06

    A wood-burning stove includes side walls joined together in an airtight manner to form a firebox and a heat chamber thereabove. The firebox contains upstanding rails to support wood logs for combustion. Streams of heated air are discharged from a manifold that extends from rail-to-rail outwardly from one terminal end of each rail between opposite side walls of the stove. A plate is adjusted to control the flow of air into the manifold. An access door has openings in a spacer side wall for supplying air as desired to the firebox. The spacer walls of the door support a glass panel at an outwardly spaced location from a deflector to prevent deposits of creosote and other materials on the glass.

  9. Walleye Dermal Sarcoma Virus: Molecular Biology and Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rovnak, Joel; Quackenbush, Sandra L.

    2010-01-01

    Retroviruses have been detected in most vertebrate species and are etiologic agents of a variety of neoplastic diseases. The study of retroviruses has been instrumental in uncovering the molecular mechanisms responsible for oncogenesis. Retroviruses have been isolated from three neoplastic diseases in fish, two of which affect the dermis and regress naturally coincident with spawning. This feature provides a unique model to study mechanisms of tumor development and regression. Three complex retroviruses, isolated from walleye (Sander vitreus) with dermal sarcoma and epidermal hyperplasia, are the members of the newest retroviral genus, Epsilonretrovirus. Three accessory proteins, encoded by walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV), function in the regulation of host and viral gene expression and cell cycle, alter cell-signaling pathways to promote cell proliferation and block apoptosis, and, finally, induce apoptosis through dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:21994717

  10. Evaluating dermal myelinated nerve fibers in skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Myers, M. Iliza; Peltier, Amanda C.; Li, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Although there has been extensive research on small, unmyelinated fibers in the skin, little research has investigated dermal myelinated fibers in comparison. Glabrous, non-hairy skin contains mechanoreceptors that afford a vantage point for observation of myelinated fibers that have previously been seen only with invasively obtained nerve biopsies. This review discusses current morphometric and molecular expression data of normative and pathogenic glabrous skin obtained by various processing and analysis methods for cutaneous myelinated fibers. Recent publications have shed light on the role of glabrous skin biopsy in identifying signs of peripheral neuropathy and as a potential biomarker of distal myelin and mechanoreceptor integrity. The clinical relevance of a better understanding of the role of dermal myelinated nerve terminations in peripheral neuropathy will be addressed in light of recent publications in the growing field of skin biopsy. PMID:23192899

  11. Creeping attachment: autogenous graft vs dermal matrix allograft.

    PubMed

    Haeri, A; Parsell, D

    2000-09-01

    For many years, free autogenous grafts have been used as a method of gaining keratinized tissue around teeth with mucogingival problems. Creeping attachment using autogenous graft material has been actively studied. In addition, biocompatible, acellular connective-tissue material has recently been used as an alternative to free gingival grafts to increase the zone of keratinization. This report presents a patient with bilateral mucogingival defects in the canine and premolar areas. The patient received an autogenous graft on one side and a dermal matrix allograft on the contralateral side. Creeping attachments were measured and compared at 3 months and 12 months after surgery. After 12 months of healing, an average of 1.23 mm of creeping attachment was measured on the free gingival graft side and 0.96 mm of creeping attachment was measured with the dermal matrix allograft.

  12. Lipid nanoparticles (SLN, NLC) in cosmetic and pharmaceutical dermal products.

    PubMed

    Pardeike, Jana; Hommoss, Aiman; Müller, Rainer H

    2009-01-21

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) are distinguishable from nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) by the composition of the solid particle matrix. Both are an alternative carrier system to liposomes and emulsions. This review paper focuses on lipid nanoparticles for dermal application. Production of lipid nanoparticles and final products containing lipid nanoparticles is feasible by well-established production methods. SLN and NLC exhibit many features for dermal application of cosmetics and pharmaceutics, i.e. controlled release of actives, drug targeting, occlusion and associated with it penetration enhancement and increase of skin hydration. Due to the production of lipid nanoparticles from physiological and/or biodegradable lipids, this carrier system exhibits an excellent tolerability. The lipid nanoparticles are a "nanosafe" carrier. Furthermore, an overview of the cosmetic products currently on the market is given and the improvement of the benefit/risk ratio of the topical therapy is shown.

  13. Staged excisions of moderate-sized burns compared with total excision with immediate autograft: an evaluation of two strategies

    PubMed Central

    Elmasry, Moustafa; Steinvall, Ingrid; Thorfinn, Johan; Abdelrahman, Islam; Olofsson, Pia; Sjoberg, Folke

    2017-01-01

    Background: Different surgical techniques have evolved since excision and autografting became the treatment of choice for deep burns in the 1970s. The treatment plan at the Burn Center, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden, has shifted from single-stage excision and immediate autografting to staged excisions and temporary cover with xenografts before autografting. The aim of this study was to find out if the change in policy resulted in extended duration of hospital stay/total body surface area burned (LOS/TBSA%). Methods: Retrospective clinical cohort including surgically-managed patients with burns of 15%-60% TBSA% within each treatment group. The first had early full excisions of deep dermal and full thickness burns and immediate autografts (1997-98), excision and immediate autograft group) and the second had staged excisions before final autografts using xenografts for temporary cover (2010-11, staged excision group). Results: The study included 57 patients with deep dermal and full-thickness burns, 28 of whom had excision and immediate autografting, and 29 of whom had staged excisions with xenografting before final autografting. Adjusted (LOS/TBSA%) was close to 1, and did not differ between groups. Mean operating time for the staged excision group was shorter and the excised area/operation was smaller. The total operating time/TBSA% did not differ between groups. Conclusion: Staged excisions with temporary cover did not affect adjusted LOS/TBSA% or total operating time. Staged excisions may be thought to be more expensive because of the cost of covering the wound between stages, but this needs to be further investigated as do the factors that predict long term outcome. PMID:28123862

  14. Assessment and management of patients with burns.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Martyn; Swales, Beverley

    Burns are a common injury in the UK. Most burns are limited in size and depth and are therefore suitable for management in the community. Primary care and non-specialist clinicians need to understand initial assessment of the burn and when referral to a specialist burns unit is indicated. Successful treatment of minor burns and ongoing care of severe burns in the community requires careful selection of dressings to support wound healing and achieve optimal outcomes for patients.

  15. Smartphones and burn size estimation: "Rapid Burn Assessor".

    PubMed

    Kamolz, L P; Lumenta, D B; Parvizi, D; Dirnberger, J; Owen, R; Höller, J; Giretzlehner, M

    2014-06-30

    Estimation of the total body surface area burned (%TBSA) following a burn injury is used in determining whether to transfer the patient to a burn center and the required fluid resuscitation volumes. Unfortunately, the commonly applied methods of estimation have revealed inaccuracies, which are mostly related to human error. To calculate the %TBSA (quotient), it is necessary to divide the burned surface area (Burned BSA) (numerator in cm2) by the total body surface area (Total BSA) (denominator in cm2). By using everyday objects (eg. credit cards, smartphones) with well-defined surface areas as reference for estimations of Burned BSA on the one hand and established formulas for Total BSA calculation on the other (eg. Mosteller), we propose an approximation method to assess %TBSA more accurately than the established methods. To facilitate distribution, and respective user feedback, we have developed a smartphone app integrating all of the above parameters, available on popular mobile device platforms. This method represents a simple and ready-to-use clinical decision support system which addresses common errors associated with estimations of Burned BSA (=numerator). Following validation and respective user feedback, it could be deployed for testing in future clinical trials. This study has a level of evidence of IV and is a brief report based on clinical observation, which points to further study.

  16. Hair follicle signaling networks: a dermal papilla-centric approach.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Raul; Guerrero-Juarez, Christian F; Plikus, Maksim V

    2013-10-01

    Functional testing of dermal papilla (DP) signaling inputs into hair follicle (HF) morphogenesis and regeneration is becoming possible with the advent of new Cre lines. Targeted deletion of the signature genes in early DP precursors has revealed significant signaling redundancy during HF morphogenesis. Furthermore, the DP lineage commitment program can be exploited for generating highly inductive DP cells to be used in HF bioengineering assays.

  17. Dermal tunneling: a proposed treatment for depressed scars.

    PubMed

    Lima, Emerson Vasconcelos de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Depressed facial scars are still a challenge in medical literature, despite the wide range of proposed treatments. Subcision is a technique that is frequently performed to improve this type of lesions. This article proposes a new method to release depressed scars, reported and named by the author as dermal tunneling. This study presents a simple and didactic manner to perform this method. The results in 17 patients with facial scars were considered promising. Thus, the technique was deemed to be safe and reproducible.

  18. Acute Dermal Toxicity of Guanidine Hydrochloride in Rabbits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    with electric clippers (Oster®b Model A5, Size 40 blade, Sunbeam Corp, Milwaukee, WI) 24 hours before applying the test compound. The animals were...1984 2. Animals were close-clipped and examined 24 hours before dosing Justification: The laboratory rabbit is a proven mammalian model for dermal...died were necropsied within 16 hours after death. The remaining animls were killed by exsanguination while under pentobarbital anesthesia after a 14

  19. Esophageal squamous papillomas with focal dermal hypoplasia and eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Pasman, Eric A; Heifert, Theresa A; Nylund, Cade M

    2017-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) is a rare disorder of the mesodermal and ectodermal tissues. Here we present an eight-year-old female known to have FDH who presents with poor weight gain and dysphagia. She was diagnosed with multiple esophageal papillomas and eosinophilic esophagitis. She was successfully treated with argon plasma coagulation and ingested fluticasone propionate, which has not been described previously in a child.

  20. Immune Suppression by Dermal Application of JP-8 Jet Fuel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-13

    release; distribution unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The initial focus of this work was to test the hypothesis that dermal application...regulates the production of PGE2 (Pei et al., 1998) we tested the hypothesis that JP-8-induced PAF activates cytokine production and initiates immune...suppression. To test this hypothesis we pre-treated mice with a series of PAF receptor antagonists and then applied JP-8. The PAF receptor antagonists