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Sample records for dermatology

  1. Dermatology Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive Published Members Online Dermatology Journals Edit This Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes ... 2/2017 2017 AOCD Spring Current Concepts in Dermatology Meeting more Latest News ... About AOCD The AOCD was recognized in ...

  2. Triads in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Prachi G; Khopkar, Uday S; Mahajan, Sunanda A; Mishra, Sunil N

    2013-01-01

    It is imperative for any dermatology resident to have a good knowledge of the various triads in dermatology. For an easy grasp over this topic, we have grouped the various triads on the basis of their etiologies. PMID:24082177

  3. Dermatology on instagram.

    PubMed

    Karimkhani, Chante; Connett, Jessica; Boyers, Lindsay; Quest, Tyler; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-07-01

    The novel photo-sharing social networking platform, Instagram, has an impressive following of 75 million daily users, with a predominantly younger and female demographic. This study investigated the presence of dermatology-related content on Instagram. The most popular professional dermatological organizations, dermatology journals, and dermatology related patient advocate groups on Facebook and Twitter, determined from a prior study, were searched for established profiles on Instagram. In addition, dermatology-related terms (i.e. dermatology, dermatologist, alopecia, eczema, melanoma, psoriasis, and skin cancer) and dermatology-related hashtags (i.e. #dermatology, #dermatologist, #melanoma, #acne, #psoriasis, and #alopecia) were searched. None of the top ten dermatological journals or professional dermatological organizations were found on Instagram. Although only one of the top ten patient advocate groups related to dermatology conditions, Melanoma Research Foundation, had an Instagram presence, there were many private offices, cosmetic products, and some patient advocacy groups. This novel social networking platform could grant dermatology journals and other professional organizations a unique opportunity to reach younger demographic populations, particularly women, with the potential for true educational and life-changing impact.

  4. Dermatology on instagram.

    PubMed

    Karimkhani, Chante; Connett, Jessica; Boyers, Lindsay; Quest, Tyler; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-07-01

    The novel photo-sharing social networking platform, Instagram, has an impressive following of 75 million daily users, with a predominantly younger and female demographic. This study investigated the presence of dermatology-related content on Instagram. The most popular professional dermatological organizations, dermatology journals, and dermatology related patient advocate groups on Facebook and Twitter, determined from a prior study, were searched for established profiles on Instagram. In addition, dermatology-related terms (i.e. dermatology, dermatologist, alopecia, eczema, melanoma, psoriasis, and skin cancer) and dermatology-related hashtags (i.e. #dermatology, #dermatologist, #melanoma, #acne, #psoriasis, and #alopecia) were searched. None of the top ten dermatological journals or professional dermatological organizations were found on Instagram. Although only one of the top ten patient advocate groups related to dermatology conditions, Melanoma Research Foundation, had an Instagram presence, there were many private offices, cosmetic products, and some patient advocacy groups. This novel social networking platform could grant dermatology journals and other professional organizations a unique opportunity to reach younger demographic populations, particularly women, with the potential for true educational and life-changing impact. PMID:25046455

  5. The dermatology acting internship.

    PubMed

    Stephens, John B; Raimer, Sharon S; Wagner, Richard F

    2011-07-15

    Acting internships are an important component of modern day medical school curriculum. Several specialties outside of internal medicine now offer acting internship experiences to fourth year medical students. We have found that a dermatology acting internship is a valuable experience for fourth year medical students who are interested in pursuing a residency in dermatology. Our experience with the dermatology acting internship over the 2010-2011 academic year is described.

  6. Eponymous signs in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Madke, Bhushan; Nayak, Chitra

    2012-01-01

    Clinical signs reflect the sheer and close observatory quality of an astute physician. Many new dermatological signs both in clinical and diagnostic aspects of various dermatoses are being reported and no single book on dermatology literature gives a comprehensive list of these “signs” and postgraduate students in dermatology finds it difficult to have access to the description, as most of these resident doctor do not have access to the said journal articles. “Signs” commonly found in dermatologic literature with a brief discussion and explanation is reviewed in this paper. PMID:23189246

  7. Men's aesthetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Anthony M

    2014-12-01

    Cosmetic dermatology is continuing to see a dramatic increase in both procedures performed and technological advancements. Men's aesthetic dermatology is burgeoning with more men seeking cosmetic consultations and intervention. Whether it is targeted cosmeceuticals for men or male-specific procedures, dermatologists must be aware of this evolving demographic and understand the biological, anatomical, and psychological aspects that separate this cohort from their female counterparts. Cosmetic dermatology has moved beyond just applying the same techniques used for females onto males. The use of our cosmetic toolbox can differ for men in terms of technique and dosage. This article will review the state of men's aesthetic dermatology with. PMID:25830252

  8. Thalidomide in dermatology: revisited.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Iffat; Dorjay, Konchok; Anwar, Parvaiz

    2015-01-01

    The use of thalidomide in relation to dermatology is well- known and enough data is available in the literature about various aspects of thalidomide. Despite being an interesting and useful drug for many dermatoses, it is associated with many health hazards including the birth defects, phocomelia. We hereby present a comprehensive review about thalidomide and its application in dermatology.

  9. Thalidomide in Dermatology: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Iffat; Dorjay, Konchok; Anwar, Parvaiz

    2015-01-01

    The use of thalidomide in relation to dermatology is well- known and enough data is available in the literature about various aspects of thalidomide. Despite being an interesting and useful drug for many dermatoses, it is associated with many health hazards including the birth defects, phocomelia. We hereby present a comprehensive review about thalidomide and its application in dermatology. PMID:25814738

  10. Vitamin E in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Keen, Mohammad Abid; Hassan, Iffat

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin E is an important fat-soluble antioxidant and has been in use for more than 50 years in dermatology. It is an important ingredient in many cosmetic products. It protects the skin from various deleterious effects due to solar radiation by acting as a free-radical scavenger. Experimental studies suggest that vitamin E has antitumorigenic and photoprotective properties. There is a paucity of controlled clinical studies providing a rationale for well-defined dosages and clinical indications of vitamin E usage in dermatological practice. The aim of this article is to review the cosmetic as well as clinical implications of vitamin E in dermatology. PMID:27559512

  11. Physician Assistants in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Although physician assistants have played a key role in the delivery of medical care since the mid-1960s, their utilization in the dermatology specialty has been a more recent occurrence. Dermatology physician assistants have experienced tremendous growth over the last 10 years, largely due to the imbalance between patient demand for skin care services and a lack of supply in residency-trained dermatologists. Working under the supervision of dermatologists, physician assistants have been able to extend the reach of the physician and improve patient access to quality dermatologic care. PMID:21103320

  12. Yoga for dermatologic conditions.

    PubMed

    Jalalat, Sheila

    2015-04-01

    As both a dermatology resident and yoga instructor, I find the potential correlation between the 2 disciplines to be interesting and a growing topic of attention in the media today. With the rising trend of practicing yoga, which encompasses physical postures, breathing exercises, and meditation or mindfulness, it is inevitable that patients will inquire about the benefits of yoga in managing dermatologic problems. In this column, I will discuss the dermatologic manifestations of stress as well as the known health benefits of yoga as described in the literature so that residents may offer an objective opinion about yoga in response to patient inquiries. PMID:25942035

  13. [Ultrasound in pediatric dermatology].

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, F J; Muñoz-Garza, F Z; Hernández-Martín, A

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous ultrasound is particularly useful in pediatric dermatology to diagnose numerous diseases without the need to use invasive tests. The present articles reviews some frequent dermatological entities in children whose study can be simplified through cutaneous ultrasound. This article also provides practical recommendations reported in the literature that may facilitate ultrasound examination, with special mention of benign tumoural disease, both congenital and acquired, and vascular anomalies.

  14. Aspirin in dermatology: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Bubna, Aditya Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been one of the oldest drugs in the field of medicine, with a wide range of applications. In dermatology, aspirin has shown benefit in a variety of disorders. Recently, reduction of melanoma risk with aspirin has been demonstrated. Although an analgesic to begin with, aspirin has come a long way; after cardiology, it is now found to be useful even in dermatology. PMID:26753146

  15. Surgical lasers in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanczyk, Jacek; Nowakowski, Wlodzimierz; Golebiowska, Aleksandra; Michalska, I.; Mindak, Marek K.

    1997-10-01

    Almost every laser for medical applications was first tried in dermatology. The efficiency of YAG, CO2, and Argon lasers on this area and their potential advantages over conventional methods were mostly evaluated by cosmetic effect of laser therapy. The indications for different laser treatment in such dermatological cases as: angiomas, telangiectasias, pigmented lesions, nevus flammeus congenitus, deep cavernous angiomas, skin neoplasms and condylomata acuminata are discussed in this paper and the results of the laser therapy are also presented.

  16. Sonographic diagnostics in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Jens; Schwürzer-Voit, Markus; Jenderka, Klaus-Vitold; Voit, Christiane

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasonography non-invasively visualizes changes within the skin, skin appendages, subcutaneous tissue, subcutaneous (regional) lymph nodes and peripheral vessels. Thus it is an established diagnostic tool in dermatology. Compared to X-ray, MRI and PET, ultrasonography has some advantages; however, it is more dependent on the individual experience of the investigator. Therefore a structured education and continuous training are necessary. This review describes the physical and technical basics, the administrative requirements and the main indications in dermatology.

  17. Dermatology in Doximity.

    PubMed

    Ashack, Kurt A; Burton, Kyle A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Doximity, currently the largest online social networking service for United States (US) health care professionals and medical students, provides a wide variety of content to a large audience. In fact, its database includes 1,078,305 physicians in the US. It is therefore important to evaluate this content from time to time. Our objective is to analyze both the residency rankings and news content presented in Doximity, with respect to dermatology. The study compared the residency rankings created by Doximity to another dermatology residency ranking system that used a different algorithm. In terms of dermatology content, seven dermatology-related search terms were entered into the Doximity search query and data was collected on the first 20 "relevant" articles. Our study evaluated a total of 140 articles. The search term "skin cancer" yielded the most articles totaling 6,001. Informative articles were the most common type of article for each content item searched except for "dermatology", yielding research articles as the most common content type (70%). The search term "melanoma awareness" had the largest number of shares (19,032). In comparing dermatology residency rankings on Doximity with another ranking system that accounted for scholarly achievement, there was 50% overlap. In conclusion, it is vital to evaluate content on social media websites that are utilized by US medical students and health care professionals. We hope this information presented provides an up-to-date analysis on the quality of one particular social media platform. PMID:27267188

  18. Diet and Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Samir P.

    2014-01-01

    For decades, it was thought that many common dermatological conditions had no relationship to diet. Studies from recent years, however, have made it clear that diet may influence outcome. In this review, the authors focus on conditions for which the role of diet has traditionally been an underappreciated aspect of therapy. In some cases, dietary interventions may influence the course of the skin disease, as in acne. In others, dietary change may serve as one aspect of prevention, such as in skin cancer and aging of the skin. In others, dermatological disease may be linked to systemic disease, and dietary changes may affect health outcomes, as in psoriasis. Lastly, systemic medications prescribed for dermatological disease, such as steroids, are known to raise the risk of other diseases, and dietary change may reduce this risk. PMID:25053983

  19. Hippocrates on Pediatric Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Sgantzos, Markos; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Giatsiou, Styliani; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Androutsos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hippocrates of Kos is well known in medicine, but his contributions to pediatric dermatology have not previously been examined. A systematic study of Corpus Hippocraticum was undertaken to document references of clinical and historical importance of pediatric dermatology. In Corpus Hippocraticum, a variety of skin diseases are described, along with proposed treatments. Hippocrates rejected the theory of the punishment of the Greek gods and supported the concept that dermatologic diseases resulted from a loss of balance in the body humors. Many of the terms that Hippocrates and his pupils used are still being used today. Moreover, he probably provided one of the first descriptions of skin findings in smallpox, Henoch-Schönlein purpura (also known as anaphylactoid purpura, purpura rheumatica, allergic purpura), and meningococcal septicemia. PMID:26058689

  20. Procedural pediatric dermatology.

    PubMed

    Metz, Brandie J

    2013-04-01

    Due to many factors, including parental anxiety, a child's inability to understand the necessity of a procedure and a child's unwillingness to cooperate, it can be much more challenging to perform dermatologic procedures in children. This article reviews pre-procedural preparation of patients and parents, techniques for minimizing injection-related pain and optimal timing of surgical intervention. The risks and benefits of general anesthesia in the setting of pediatric dermatologic procedures are discussed. Additionally, the surgical approach to a few specific types of birthmarks is addressed.

  1. Autologous Therapies in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sumir; Mahajan, Bharat Bhushan; Singh, Amarbir

    2014-01-01

    Autologous therapy is a therapeutic intervention that uses an individual’s cells or tissues, which are processed outside the body, and reintroduced into the donor. This emerging field presently represents a mere tip of the iceberg with much knowledge and applications yet to be discovered. It, being free from risks of hypersensitivity reactions and transmission of infectious agents, has been explored in various fields, such as plastic surgery, orthopedics, and dermatology. This review article focuses on various forms of autologous therapies used in dermatology along with their applications and mechanisms of action. PMID:25584137

  2. [What's new in paediatric dermatology?].

    PubMed

    Plantin, P

    2014-12-01

    Regular analysis of the major journals in dermatology and paediatrics has been used to select forty articles which are representative of the past year in paediatric dermatology. This selection is not exhaustive but rather reflects the interests of the author and also the dominant topics in paediatric dermatology in 2013-2014. PMID:25539754

  3. Dyslipidemia in Dermatological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Chetana; Shenoy, Manjunath Mala; Rao, Gururaja K.

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidemias are one of the common metabolic disorders. A link between dermatological disorders like psoriasis and dyslipidemia has been established in the recent past. Many dermatological disorders could have a systemic inflammatory component which explains such association. Chronic inflammatory dermatological disorders could also have other metabolic imbalances that may contribute to dyslipidemia. Presence of such abnormal metabolism may justify routine screening of these disorders for associated dyslipidemia and other metabolic abnormalities and early treatment of such comorbidities to improve quality of life. Some of the drugs used by dermatologists such as retinoids are also likely to be a cause of dyslipidemia. Hence, it is imperative that the dermatologists obtain scientific knowledge on the underlying mechanisms involved in dyslipidemia and understand when to intervene with therapies. A systematic review of the English language literature was done by using Google Scholar and PubMed. In this review, attempts are made to list the dermatological disorders associated with dyslipidemia; to simplify the understanding of underlying mechanisms; and to give a brief idea about the interventions. PMID:26713286

  4. Paradoxes in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Adya, Keshavmurthy A.; Inamadar, Arun C.; Palit, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    Many paradoxical phenomena related to clinical, immunological, and therapeutic dermatology have been described. While some of them can be explained logically, the cause for others can only be speculated. Whenever encountered in clinical practice, background knowledge of such paradoxes may be useful to the clinician. PMID:23741675

  5. Stem cells in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ogliari, Karolyn Sassi; Marinowic, Daniel; Brum, Dario Eduardo; Loth, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical research have shown that stem cell therapy could be a promising therapeutic option for many diseases in which current medical treatments do not achieve satisfying results or cure. This article describes stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications in dermatology today.

  6. Elastography in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Alfageme Roldán, F

    2016-10-01

    Elastography is a recently developed ultrasound technique applicable to various medical specialties. It provides information on the physical properties of tissues in the context of physiologic and pathologic alterations. In this review we explain the physical principles of the method, the information provided by the different elastography techniques, and its new applications in clinical dermatology.

  7. Vaccines in dermatological diseases.

    PubMed

    Magel, G D; Mendoza, N; Digiorgio, C M; Haitz, K A; Lapolla, W J; Tyring, S K

    2011-06-01

    Vaccines have been a cornerstone in medicine and public health since their inception in the 18th century by Edward Jenner. Today, greater than 20 vaccines are used worldwide for the prevention of both viral and bacterial diseases. This article will review the vaccines used for the following dermatological diseases: smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, shingles, and human papillomavirus.

  8. Vaccines in dermatological diseases.

    PubMed

    Magel, G D; Mendoza, N; Digiorgio, C M; Haitz, K A; Lapolla, W J; Tyring, S K

    2011-06-01

    Vaccines have been a cornerstone in medicine and public health since their inception in the 18th century by Edward Jenner. Today, greater than 20 vaccines are used worldwide for the prevention of both viral and bacterial diseases. This article will review the vaccines used for the following dermatological diseases: smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, shingles, and human papillomavirus. PMID:21566552

  9. [Dermatology and skin color].

    PubMed

    Petit, Antoine

    2010-09-01

    Melanin is the pigment that is responsible for skin, hair and eye colours. Genetics and sun exposure are the two key factors that determine skin pigmentation. In dermatology, skin colours is significant, not only for semiology and diagnosis, but also for epidemiology and wounds healing.

  10. Antioxidants in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Varadraj V.; Shukla, Pankaj; Kikkeri, Naveen Narayanshetty

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidants neutralize free radicals produced by various environmental insults such as ultraviolet radiation, cigarette smoke and air pollutants, thereby preventing cellular damage. The role of oxidative stress and antioxidants is known in diseases like obesity, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. Herein we discuss the effects of oxidative stress on the skin and role of antioxidants in dermatology. PMID:24860765

  11. Dermatology for the Allergist

    PubMed Central

    Lockey, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Allergists/immunologists see patients with a variety of skin disorders. Some, such as atopic and allergic contact dermatitis, are caused by abnormal immunologic reactions, whereas others, such as seborrheic dermatitis or rosacea, lack an immunologic basis. This review summarizes a select group of dermatologic problems commonly encountered by an allergist/immunologist. PMID:23268431

  12. [What's new in dermatology?].

    PubMed

    Ingber, Arieh

    2012-10-01

    Skin diseases have been the focus of many innovations in the last decade. These innovations are mainly in the classification of skin diseases (primarily due to the dramatic development of research into the genetics of skin diseases, but not only because of this element), a new understanding of the processes underlying various diseases, improvements in diagnosis and innovations in drug treatment. In the current issue of "Harefuah", we review some advances in the field of skin diseases discovered in recent years. We review psoriasis as a multi-system disease, describe new insights into polyarteritis nodosa, parapsoriasis, autoinflammatory syndromes, and pustular psoriasis of pregnancy (impetigo herpetiformis). We also describe the new immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma. Dermatology aLso has new technological developments, especially the in vivo reflected mode confocal laser microscopy. We describe in detail the use of this technique in dermatology. PMID:23316658

  13. Countertransference in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Consoli, Sylvie G; Consoli, Silla M

    2016-08-23

    The doctor-patient relationship in dermatology, as in all the fields of medicine, is not a neutral relationship, removed from affects. These affects take root in the sociocultural, professional, family and personal history of both persons in the relationship. They underpin the psychic reality of the patients, along with a variety of representations, preconceived ideas, and fantasies concerning dermatology, the dermatologists or the psychiatrists. Practitioners call these "countertransference feelings", with reference to the psychoanalytical concept of "countertransference". These feelings come forward in a more or less conscious way and are active during the follow-up of any patient: in fact they can facilitate or hinder such a follow-up. Our purpose in focusing on this issue is to sensitize the dermatologists to recognizing these countertransference feelings in themselves (and the attitudes generated by them), in order to allow the patients and doctors to build a dynamic, creative, trustful and effective relationship. PMID:27282987

  14. Green tea in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Pazyar, Nader; Feily, Amir; Kazerouni, Afshin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this brief review is to summarize all in vitro, in vivo, and controlled clinical trials on green tea preparations and their uses in dermatology. An extensive literature search was carried out to identify in vivo and in vitro studies as well as clinical trials. Twenty studies were assessed and the results suggest that oral administration of green tea can be effective in the scavenging of free radicals, cancer prevention, hair loss, and skin aging plus protection against the adverse effects associated with psoralen-UV-A therapy. Topical application of green tea extract should be potentially effective for atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris, rosacea, androgenetic alopecia, hirsutism, keloids, genital warts, cutaneous leishmaniasis, and candidiosis. There are promising results with the use of green tea for several dermatologic conditions; however, the efficacy of oral and topical green tea has not always been confirmed. PMID:23346663

  15. Cell Therapy in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Petrof, Gabriela; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; McGrath, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing the regenerative capacity of keratinocytes and fibroblasts from human skin has created new opportunities to develop cell-based therapies for patients. Cultured cells and bioengineered skin products are being used to treat patients with inherited and acquired skin disorders associated with defective skin, and further clinical trials of new products are in progress. The capacity of extracutaneous sources of cells such as bone marrow is also being investigated for its plasticity in regenerating skin, and new strategies, such as the derivation of inducible pluripotent stem cells, also hold great promise for future cell therapies in dermatology. This article reviews some of the preclinical and clinical studies and future directions relating to cell therapy in dermatology, particularly for inherited skin diseases associated with fragile skin and poor wound healing. PMID:24890834

  16. Green tea in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Pazyar, Nader; Feily, Amir; Kazerouni, Afshin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this brief review is to summarize all in vitro, in vivo, and controlled clinical trials on green tea preparations and their uses in dermatology. An extensive literature search was carried out to identify in vivo and in vitro studies as well as clinical trials. Twenty studies were assessed and the results suggest that oral administration of green tea can be effective in the scavenging of free radicals, cancer prevention, hair loss, and skin aging plus protection against the adverse effects associated with psoralen-UV-A therapy. Topical application of green tea extract should be potentially effective for atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris, rosacea, androgenetic alopecia, hirsutism, keloids, genital warts, cutaneous leishmaniasis, and candidiosis. There are promising results with the use of green tea for several dermatologic conditions; however, the efficacy of oral and topical green tea has not always been confirmed.

  17. [Lasers and aesthetic dermatology].

    PubMed

    Stratigos, A J; Dover, J S; Arndt, K A

    2003-07-01

    The improved understanding of laser-tissue interaction along with the latest advances of laser technology have led to the development of sophisticated, safe, and user-friendly laser systems that provide effective treatment for a variety of aesthetic skin conditions. The use of lasers and their tissue-specific capabilities in the treatment of pigmented and vascular lesions has been greatly expanded to include rhytides, photoaged skin, atrophic scars, and unwanted hair. In addition, laser techniques have been employed in traditional "rejuvenating" procedures of aged skin, e.g., face-lifting, blepharoplasty, and hair transplantation, decreasing the intra-operative time and limiting the recovery period. These advances have led to a wide acceptance of cutaneous laser surgery by the dermatologic community and have created an increasing popularity among the public. The purpose of this article is to review the applications of lasers in aesthetic dermatology and discuss their limitations and potential side effects. PMID:12835862

  18. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY: RELEVANCE IN DERMATOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Palit, Aparna; Inamadar, Arun C

    2011-01-01

    Use of immunohistochemical technique is increasing in diagnosing various diseases. In many situations it may not be possible to differentiate entities with overlapping clinical and histopathological features. Immunostaining of cellular antigens is immensely helpful in such cases. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) has also been in use for targeted cancer therapy. In this article, the discussion will be restricted to use of IHC in dermatological disorders and use of classical antigens with brief updating of some important newly discovered antigens. PMID:22345760

  19. Advancement of women in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Murrell, Dedee F; Ryan, Terence J; Bergfeld, Wilma F

    2011-05-01

    This article reviews the special role that women dermatologists have played in the improvement of skin care for women and children, as well as the role of the Women's Dermatological Society (WDS) in providing networking, mentoring and leadership opportunities for female dermatologists. Women leaders within the International League of Dermatology Societies (ILDS) have influenced WHO directives to assign higher priorities to areas of women's health. Maria Duran and her legacy at the International Society for Dermatology (ISD) has recognized leaders in the area of dermatology education and mentorship. Volunteerism and the promotion of equal access to health care by women and children are other key activities by women dermatologists. PMID:21506978

  20. OCT in Dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, John; Welzel, Julia

    OCT is increasingly interesting for non-invasive skin imaging in Dermatology. Due to its resolution and imaging depth, OCT is already routinely established for diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer, whereas for pigmented lesions, the resolution is still not high enough. OCT has also a high value for monitoring of treatment effects, for example to control healing after non-surgical topical treatment of basal cell carcinomas. In summary, there are several indications for applications of OCT to image skin diseases, and its importance will grow in the future due to further technical developments like speckle variance OCT.

  1. American Osteopathic College of Dermatology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive Published Members Online Dermatology Journals ').appendTo($slider); var $navRight = $(' ').appendTo($slider); var ... programs that are currently training 163 residents in dermatology. Learn more ... Management Software Powered by YourMembership :: Legal

  2. Cantharidin in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Al-Dawsari, Najla A; Masterpol, Kasia Szyfelbein

    2016-01-01

    Cantharidin is natural toxin produced by the blistering beetle. It has both vesicant and keratolytic features by inducing acanthloysis through targeting the desmosomal dense plaque, leading to detachment of the desmosomes from the tonofilaments. There are two available liquid preparations for dermatologic use, Canthacur (0.7% cantharidin) and Canthacur PS (1% cantharidin 30%/salicylic acid/2% podophylotoxin). The former preparation is indicated for the treatment of common warts, periungual warts, and molluscum contagiosum, while the more potent latter preparation is indicated only for plantar warts. Both preparations provide painless applications with outcomes similar to other treatment modalities for warts and molluscum contagiosum; however, neither is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The lack of FDA approval could be related to its toxic effects following oral ingestion, which include ulceration of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts, along with electrolyte and renal function disturbance in humans and animals. The mechanism of action, dermatologic indications, application techniques, and complications of cantharidin preparations are discussed. PMID:27319954

  3. Rituximab: Uses in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, K; Wilson, J; Wilkerson, M

    2016-09-01

    Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody with considerable potential in dermatology due to an increase in off-label indications. Chronic graft-versus-host disease and pemphigus vulgaris are two of the most promising indications for off-label use of rituximab. It is a generally safe alternative that should be considered when traditional therapy with corticosteroids or immunosuppressants has failed or caused significant intolerance. Currently, rituximab is only FDA-approved for treatment of follicular and diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Wegener's granulomatosis) and microscopic polyangiitis. Herein, off-label uses of rituximab and its efficacy in the treatment of cutaneous diseases are reviewed. PMID:27603326

  4. Morgellons in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Harth, Wolfgang; Hermes, Barbara; Freudenmann, Roland W

    2010-04-01

    Delusional parasitosis (DP) is the most frequent delusional disorder in dermatology. In DP there is a fixed belief of a usually skin-related invasion or infestation by a number of alleged infectious species (usually parasites and bacteria), whose identity has varied over the decades. Since 2002 worldwide an increasing number of patients have complained of unverifiable fibers and filaments in or on the skin, associated with numerous nonspecific complaints (arthralgias, altered cognitive function and extreme fatigue). This entity has been named "Morgellons disease" by the patients themselves, although medical evidence for its existence is lacking. As an example, we discuss a 55-year-old woman who complained of Morgellons disease and was treated as if she had DP. Currently the delusional assumption of infestation with Morgellons should be considered as a new type of DP with some kind of inanimate material. We therefore recommend in case of DP including Morgellons the use of the broader term "delusional infestation". PMID:19878403

  5. New described dermatological disorders.

    PubMed

    Gönül, Müzeyyen; Cevirgen Cemil, Bengu; Keseroglu, Havva Ozge; Kaya Akis, Havva

    2014-01-01

    Many advances in dermatology have been made in recent years. In the present review article, newly described disorders from the last six years are presented in detail. We divided these reports into different sections, including syndromes, autoinflammatory diseases, tumors, and unclassified disease. Syndromes included are "circumferential skin creases Kunze type" and "unusual type of pachyonychia congenita or a new syndrome"; autoinflammatory diseases include "chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) syndrome," "pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH) syndrome," and "pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PAPASH) syndrome"; tumors include "acquired reactive digital fibroma," "onychocytic matricoma and onychocytic carcinoma," "infundibulocystic nail bed squamous cell carcinoma," and "acral histiocytic nodules"; unclassified disorders include "saurian papulosis," "symmetrical acrokeratoderma," "confetti-like macular atrophy," and "skin spicules," "erythema papulosa semicircularis recidivans." PMID:25243162

  6. Perspectives in Occupational Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, C. G. Toby; Maibach, Howard I.

    1982-01-01

    Because large surface areas of the skin are exposed directly to the environment, skin is an organ particularly vulnerable to occupationally induced disease. Statistics show that, excluding accidental injury, nearly half of all occupational illnesses occur in this organ; a fourth of all workers suffering from occupational skin disease lose an average of 10 to 12 workdays. The constant evolution of new industrial chemicals and methods of manufacture continue to bring new skin hazards and disease into the workplace. Occupational health physicians and practitioners, who usually have minimal training in dermatology, must diagnose and treat unfamiliar diseases in a setting of even less familiar, often overwhelming, technology. A thorough understanding of cutaneous defense mechanisms, clinical patterns of occupational skin disease and methods for establishing accurate diagnoses is essential. PMID:6219498

  7. Garlic in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Pazyar, Nader; Feily, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L. fam. Alliaceae) is one of the best-researched, best-selling herbal remedies and is also commonly used for treating various health problems. Garlic is widely known for its biological properties and plays an important role as an antioxidant. The purpose of this review is to gather and summarize all dermatologic-oriented in vitro and in-vivo experiments and clinical trials on garlic preparations. Extensive literatures search was carried out and twenty three studies were included. The results suggest that oral administration of garlic is effective on immunologic properties, cutaneous microcirculation, protection against UVB and cancer treatment. Additionally, topical application of garlic extract can potentially be effective on psoriasis, alopecia areata, keloid scar, wound healing, cutaneous corn, viral and fungal infection, leishmaniasis, skin aging and rejuvenation. Clinical effectiveness of oral and topical garlic extract is not sufficiently and meticulously explored as so far. PMID:25386259

  8. Morgellons in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Harth, Wolfgang; Hermes, Barbara; Freudenmann, Roland W

    2010-04-01

    Delusional parasitosis (DP) is the most frequent delusional disorder in dermatology. In DP there is a fixed belief of a usually skin-related invasion or infestation by a number of alleged infectious species (usually parasites and bacteria), whose identity has varied over the decades. Since 2002 worldwide an increasing number of patients have complained of unverifiable fibers and filaments in or on the skin, associated with numerous nonspecific complaints (arthralgias, altered cognitive function and extreme fatigue). This entity has been named "Morgellons disease" by the patients themselves, although medical evidence for its existence is lacking. As an example, we discuss a 55-year-old woman who complained of Morgellons disease and was treated as if she had DP. Currently the delusional assumption of infestation with Morgellons should be considered as a new type of DP with some kind of inanimate material. We therefore recommend in case of DP including Morgellons the use of the broader term "delusional infestation".

  9. Nanotechnology in Dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, João Roberto; Antônio, Carlos Roberto; Cardeal, Izabela Lídia Soares; Ballavenuto, Julia Maria Avelino; Oliveira, João Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The scientific community and general public have been exposed to a series of achievements attributed to a new area of knowledge: Nanotechnology. Both abroad and in Brazil, funding agencies have launched programs aimed at encouraging this type of research. Indeed, for many who come into contact with this subject it will be clear the key role that chemical knowledge will play in the evolution of this subject. And even more, will see that it is a science in which the basic structure is formed by distilling different areas of inter-and multidisciplinary knowledge along the lines of new paradigms. In this article, we attempt to clarify the foundations of nanotechnology, and demonstrate their contribution to new advances in dermatology as well as medicine in general. Nanotechnology is clearly the future. PMID:24626657

  10. [New lasers in dermatologic surgery].

    PubMed

    Morvay, M

    1995-04-30

    Developments in the fields of laser technology and application have significantly broadened its clinical use over the past two decades. As lasers became more smaller, more reliable and less expensive, dermatology will benefit new laser-based therapeutic and diagnostic methods. Relevant laser systems and their clinical applications are presented, as are investigational laser systems, which may be of importance for the future in dermatology. We review advances in the use of pulsed lasers for treating vascular and non-vascular, pigmented epidermal and dermal lesions, for precise cutting of tissue, for photodynamic therapy and the future role of diode lasers in dermatological laser surgery is also discussed.

  11. US dermatology residency program rankings.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Lisa L; Wen, Ge; Wu, Jashin J

    2014-10-01

    Unlike many other adult specialties, US News & World Report does not rank dermatology residency programs annually. We conducted a study to rank individual US dermatology residency programs based on set criteria. For each residency program, data from 2008 related to a number of factors were collected, including annual amount of National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Dermatology Foundation (DF) funding received; number of publications from full-time faculty members; number of faculty lectures given at 5 annual society meetings; and number of full-time faculty members who were on the editorial boards of 6 dermatology journals with the highest impact factors. Most of the data were obtained through extensive Internet searches, and missing data were obtained by contacting individual residency programs. The programs were ranked based on the prior factors according to a weighted ranking algorithm. A list of overall rankings also was created.

  12. Nanoparticles in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Papakostas, Dimitrios; Rancan, Fiorenza; Sterry, Wolfram; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in the field of nanotechnology have allowed the manufacturing of elaborated nanometer-sized particles for various biomedical applications. A broad spectrum of particles, extending from various lipid nanostructures such as liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles, to metal, nanocrystalline and polymer particles have already been tested as drug delivery systems in different animal models with remarkable results, promising an extensive commercialization in the coming years. Controlled drug release to skin and skin appendages, targeting of hair follicle-specific cell populations, transcutaneous vaccination and transdermal gene therapy are only a few of these new applications. Carrier systems of the new generation take advantage of improved skin penetration properties, depot effect with sustained drug release and of surface functionalization (e.g., the binding to specific ligands) allowing specific cellular and subcellular targeting. Drug delivery to skin by means of microparticles and nanocarriers could revolutionize the treatment of several skin disorders. However, the toxicological and environmental safety of micro- and nanoparticles has to be evaluated using specific toxicological studies prior to a wider implementation of the new technology. This review aims to give an overview of the most investigated applications of transcutaneously applied particle-based formulations in the fields of cosmetics and dermatology. PMID:21837474

  13. New Described Dermatological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cevirgen Cemil, Bengu; Keseroglu, Havva Ozge; Kaya Akis, Havva

    2014-01-01

    Many advances in dermatology have been made in recent years. In the present review article, newly described disorders from the last six years are presented in detail. We divided these reports into different sections, including syndromes, autoinflammatory diseases, tumors, and unclassified disease. Syndromes included are “circumferential skin creases Kunze type” and “unusual type of pachyonychia congenita or a new syndrome”; autoinflammatory diseases include “chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) syndrome,” “pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH) syndrome,” and “pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PAPASH) syndrome”; tumors include “acquired reactive digital fibroma,” “onychocytic matricoma and onychocytic carcinoma,” “infundibulocystic nail bed squamous cell carcinoma,” and “acral histiocytic nodules”; unclassified disorders include “saurian papulosis,” “symmetrical acrokeratoderma,” “confetti-like macular atrophy,” and “skin spicules,” “erythema papulosa semicircularis recidivans.” PMID:25243162

  14. Newer drug treatment in dermatology.

    PubMed

    REES, R B; BENNETT, J H; GREENLEE, M R

    1959-07-01

    This article deals with a number of newer drugs now being employed in dermatology. The great beneficial role of corticoids both topically and systematically for various inflammatory dermatoses is now amply proved. The addition of a corticoid to a conventional acne lotion renders it much more effective. Nystatin for monilial infections is especially effective in a powder form. For systemic use Griseovulvin, now becoming available, is the most interesting current development in dermatology. Presumably, it is highly effective against ringworm of the hair, nails and skin. The role of synthetic antimalarials in treating chronic discoid lupus erythematosus and light sensitivity eruptions also is firmly established.

  15. Nose: Applied Aspects in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Dammaningala Venkataramaiah; Shilpa, Kanathur; Nataraja, Holavanahally Veerabhadrappa; Divya, Kallapa Gorur

    2016-01-01

    Nose is the most prominent part of the mid-face and has important physiological, aesthetic and psychological functions. Skin diseases on the nose are commonly seen by dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, and plastic surgeons. Because of its exposed, highly visible localization, lesions on the skin of the nose are often noticed by patients themselves, typically very early in the course of the disease. Similarly, the dermatological lexicon is well known with descriptive terminologies, synonyms, acronyms, eponyms, toponyms, misnomers. We have tried to compile the anatomical applications of nose in cosmetology and dermatosurgery subspecialities with nasal eponyms and signs encountered in clinical dermatology that would be helpful for residents. PMID:27057038

  16. Nose: Applied Aspects in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Dammaningala Venkataramaiah; Shilpa, Kanathur; Nataraja, Holavanahally Veerabhadrappa; Divya, Kallapa Gorur

    2016-01-01

    Nose is the most prominent part of the mid-face and has important physiological, aesthetic and psychological functions. Skin diseases on the nose are commonly seen by dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, and plastic surgeons. Because of its exposed, highly visible localization, lesions on the skin of the nose are often noticed by patients themselves, typically very early in the course of the disease. Similarly, the dermatological lexicon is well known with descriptive terminologies, synonyms, acronyms, eponyms, toponyms, misnomers. We have tried to compile the anatomical applications of nose in cosmetology and dermatosurgery subspecialities with nasal eponyms and signs encountered in clinical dermatology that would be helpful for residents. PMID:27057038

  17. Fellowships after dermatology residency: the traditional and beyond.

    PubMed

    Park, Kelly K

    2015-03-01

    Postresidency fellowship training options exist for graduating dermatology residents. Formal subspecialty fellowship programs are offered in dermatopathology, pediatric dermatology, micrographic surgery and dermatologic oncology (procedural dermatology), and cosmetic dermatologic surgery. There also are a number of fellowships offered at certain institutions for those interested in more specific subspecialties or academia. This guide serves to assist dermatology residents in learning more about fellowship opportunities.

  18. Dermatology on YouTube.

    PubMed

    Boyers, Lindsay N; Quest, Tyler; Karimkhani, Chante; Connett, Jessica; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-06-01

    YouTube, reaches upwards of six billion users on a monthly basis and is a unique source of information distribution and communication. Although the influence of YouTube on personal health decision-making is well established, this study assessed the type of content and viewership on a broad scope of dermatology related content on YouTube. Select terms (i.e. dermatology, sun protection, skin cancer, skin cancer awareness, and skin conditions) were searched on YouTube. Overall, the results included 100 videos with over 47 million viewers. Advocacy was the most prevalent content type at 24% of the total search results. These 100 videos were "shared" a total of 101,173 times and have driven 6,325 subscriptions to distinct YouTube user pages. Of the total videos, 35% were uploaded by or featured an MD/DO/PhD in dermatology or other specialty/field, 2% FNP/PA, 1% RN, and 62% other. As one of the most trafficked global sites on the Internet, YouTube is a valuable resource for dermatologists, physicians in other specialties, and the general public to share their dermatology-related content and gain subscribers. However, challenges of accessing and determining evidence-based data remain an issue.

  19. Misnomers in Dermatology: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Savitha, Somaiah A; Sacchidanand, Sarvajnamurthy A; Gowda, Shilpa K

    2013-01-01

    The name of a condition in dermatology, gives a clue regarding the clinical feature, etiology, or histopathology of the disease. A disease might have been termed wrongly due to its resemblance to another known condition. Misnomers often mislead a physician regarding the etiology or histopathology of the condition. Here is a list of misnomers, with explanation, and the appropriate name in parentheses. PMID:24249901

  20. Novel Antiangiogenic Agents in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Berrios, Ricardo L.; Arbiser, Jack L.

    2011-01-01

    Because angiogenesis underlies the pathogenesis of numerous conditions (cancer, psoriasis, macular degeneration), there is a pressing need for continued investigations into angiogenic signaling and potential drug targets. Antiangiogenic agents can be classified as either direct or indirect. Direct antiangiogenics act on untransformed endothelial cells to prevent differentiation and proliferation; indirect antiangiogenics act to inhibit factors involved in proangiogenic signaling. Agents currently available with dermatologic indications are few, while several established and novel biologics targeting various proangiogenic factors are currently being investigated for potential dermatologic uses, but the jury is still out on their efficacy and safety. In this review, we highlight our experience with a group of existing and novel, small molecules that combine several modes of action against angiogenesis in addition to other properties – triarylmethane dyes and fulvene derivatives. PMID:21172300

  1. [What's new in pediatric dermatology].

    PubMed

    Czernielewski, Justine; Hohl, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Progress in paediatric dermatology is achieved in both research and therapeutic fields. In infectiology, scabies and bed bugs are a scourge for dermatologists, with an important recent outbreak. This article describes the fundamental clinical signs to look for, when suspecting such diagnosis. Hair dermatoscopy seems to be also very precious as a new tool for the diagnosis of ringworm. Regarding eczemas, atopic dermatitis is supported by S. Aureus's skin colonization, the target of eradication of new products in ongoing studies. We will also explain the role of Hemangiol, recently marketed in Switzerland for the treatment of haemangiomas. Alternative beta blockers have also a large number of ongoing projects in the dermatological vascular diseases field. Other various news is to be discovered.... PMID:26021137

  2. Current status of surgery in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Hanke, C William; Moy, Ronald L; Roenigk, Randall K; Roenigk, Henry H; Spencer, James M; Tierney, Emily P; Bartus, Cynthia L; Bernstein, Robert M; Brown, Marc D; Busso, Mariano; Carruthers, Alastair; Carruthers, Jean; Ibrahimi, Omar A; Kauvar, Arielle N B; Kent, Kathryn M; Krueger, Nils; Landau, Marina; Leonard, Aimee L; Mandy, Stephen H; Rohrer, Thomas E; Sadick, Neil S; Wiest, Luitgard G

    2013-12-01

    An article titled "Current issues in dermatologic office-based surgery" was published in the JAAD in October 1999 (volume 41, issue 4, pp. 624-634). The article was developed by the Joint American Academy of Dermatology/American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Liaison Committee. A number of subjects were addressed in the article including surgical training program requirements for dermatology residents and selected advances in dermatologic surgery that had been pioneered by dermatologists. The article concluded with sections on credentialing, privileging, and accreditation of office-based surgical facilities. Much has changed since 1999, including more stringent requirements for surgical training during dermatology residency, and the establishment of 57 accredited Procedural Dermatology Fellowship Training Programs. All of these changes have been overseen and approved by the Residency Review Committee for Dermatology and the Accreditation Committee for Graduate Medical Education. The fertile academic environment of academic training programs with interaction between established dermatologic surgeons and fellows, as well as the inquisitive nature of many of our colleagues, has led to the numerous major advances in dermatologic surgery, which are described herein.

  3. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  4. Dermatology resources on the internet.

    PubMed

    George, Dean D; Wainwright, Brent D

    2012-09-01

    Both patients and medical professionals are increasingly accessing the Internet for health information. Today's Web enables features that facilitate information sharing in a social and collaborative manner, thus transforming the way we access data and communicate with our patients and colleagues. The visual nature of the field of dermatology lends itself to the use of the Internet for reference and educational purposes. To generate a list of Web sites commonly used by academic dermatologists, the authors polled the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Dermatology Program Directors for their top 3 Web resources. The purpose of this article is to identify resources used by dermatologists as well as patients and examine factors that can influence Internet search results. Concerns regarding professionalism in the era of social media are also explored. As the volume of health information on the Internet continues to increase, it is essential for physicians to be aware of what is available in cyberspace. Reference and learning tools for the physician, learning and support tools for the patient, and physician Internet presence are key aspects of modern dermatology practice. PMID:22929356

  5. Ethics education for dermatology residents.

    PubMed

    Bercovitch, Lionel; Long, Thomas P

    2009-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada both require the teaching and demonstration of general competencies, which include professionalism and ethics as a condition of training program accreditation and specialty certification, respectively. Residents in dermatology and other specialties perceive their training in ethics is inadequate in numerous areas. Residents and specialists in dermatology encounter numerous ethical and professional issues throughout their workday. A dermatoethics curriculum was developed at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in 2001 to address the need for training in bioethics and professionalism. The subject matter of the curriculum and didactic methods are reviewed. Guidelines for effective teaching of ethics and professionalism to dermatology residents are presented. It is important to make the teaching sessions relevant to the residents' day-to-day work experiences and personal needs. Honesty and openness on the part of faculty and trainees is important. Although informality fosters such exchanges, the sessions should be a learning experience. Resources outside the residency program should be used as necessary. Evaluation of ethics and professionalism in trainees is addressed. PMID:19539170

  6. Dermatology resources on the internet.

    PubMed

    George, Dean D; Wainwright, Brent D

    2012-09-01

    Both patients and medical professionals are increasingly accessing the Internet for health information. Today's Web enables features that facilitate information sharing in a social and collaborative manner, thus transforming the way we access data and communicate with our patients and colleagues. The visual nature of the field of dermatology lends itself to the use of the Internet for reference and educational purposes. To generate a list of Web sites commonly used by academic dermatologists, the authors polled the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Dermatology Program Directors for their top 3 Web resources. The purpose of this article is to identify resources used by dermatologists as well as patients and examine factors that can influence Internet search results. Concerns regarding professionalism in the era of social media are also explored. As the volume of health information on the Internet continues to increase, it is essential for physicians to be aware of what is available in cyberspace. Reference and learning tools for the physician, learning and support tools for the patient, and physician Internet presence are key aspects of modern dermatology practice.

  7. Nonhuman primate dermatology: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Joseph A.; Didier, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    In general, veterinary dermatologists do not have extensive clinical experience of nonhuman primate (NHP) dermatoses. The bulk of the published literature does not provide an organized evidence-based approach to the NHP dermatologic case. The veterinary dermatologist is left to extract information from both human and veterinary dermatology, an approach that can be problematic as it forces the clinician to make diagnostic and therapeutic decisions based on two very disparate bodies of literature. A more cohesive approach to NHP dermatology – without relying on assumptions that NHP pathology most commonly behaves similarly to other veterinary and human disease – is required. This review of the dermatology of NHP species includes discussions of primary dermatoses, as well as diseases where dermatologic signs represent a significant secondary component, provides a first step towards encouraging the veterinary community to study and report the dermatologic diseases of nonhuman primates. PMID:19490576

  8. Distinction between forensic evidence and dermatological findings.

    PubMed

    Hammer, U; Boy, D; Rothaupt, D; Büttner, A

    2015-07-01

    The external examination after death requires knowledge in forensics/pathology, dermatology, as well as associated diseases and age-related alterations of the skin. This article highlights some findings with forensic evidence versus dermatological findings. The lectures in forensic medicine should be structured interdisciplinarily, especially to dermatology, internal medicine, surgery, pathology, and toxicology in order to train the overlapping skills required for external and internal postmortem examinations. PMID:26048487

  9. Distinction between forensic evidence and dermatological findings.

    PubMed

    Hammer, U; Boy, D; Rothaupt, D; Büttner, A

    2015-07-01

    The external examination after death requires knowledge in forensics/pathology, dermatology, as well as associated diseases and age-related alterations of the skin. This article highlights some findings with forensic evidence versus dermatological findings. The lectures in forensic medicine should be structured interdisciplinarily, especially to dermatology, internal medicine, surgery, pathology, and toxicology in order to train the overlapping skills required for external and internal postmortem examinations.

  10. Probiotics and prebiotics in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Baquerizo Nole, Katherine L; Yim, Elizabeth; Keri, Jonette E

    2014-10-01

    The rapid increase in the medical use of probiotics and prebiotics in recent years has confirmed their excellent safety profile. As immune modulators, they have been used in inflammatory skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis. We review the literature regarding the use of probiotics and prebiotics in dermatology. Probiotics and prebiotics appear to be effective in reducing the incidence of atopic dermatitis in infants, but their role in atopic dermatitis treatment is controversial. Their role in acne, wound healing, and photoprotection is promising, but larger trials are needed before a final recommendation can be made.

  11. [Laser treatments in pediatric dermatology].

    PubMed

    Lévy, J L; Almebayadh, M; Christen-Zaech, S

    2014-04-01

    Lasers in pediatric dermatology were developed as a result of the treatment of port-wine stains. Infantile hemangiomas may benefit, in some cases, from laser treatment as well as venous and lymphatic malformations. For certain pigmented lesions, as well as some hamartomas, laser treatments are a credible alternative to surgical resection. Bum scars are improved by lasers which stimulate collagen remodeling. Furthermore, hair removal of congenital and acquired hypertrichosis can relieve psychosocial discomfort and improve quality of life. The management of pain and fear of children undergoing laser treatment, using either topical or general anesthesia, remains of central importance. PMID:24772810

  12. [Current therapeutics in infectious dermatology].

    PubMed

    Lascaux, A S; Chosidow, O

    NEW AGENTS: Among new treatments used for infectious dermatology diseases, new agents for genital herpes, valaciclovir and famciclovir, have greatly simplified therapeutic schemes. Cidofovir has also been shown to be effective against aciclovir-resistant cutaneous and mucosal herpetic lesions and for the treatment of molluscum contagiosum. NEW ADMINISTRATION ROUTES: For genital papillomavirus infections, trials using systemic or intralesional administered interferon have not provided conclusive evidence but imiquimode appears to be quite promising. Itaconazole and fluconazole are effective for onchomycoses. NEW POSSIBILITIES: Ivermectine is effective against scabies, but must be reserved for particularly severe forms. Finally, the emergence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains resistant to fluoroquinolones is disquieting. PMID:10874915

  13. Elementary lesions in dermatological semiology: literature review*

    PubMed Central

    Cardili, Renata Nahas; Roselino, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Discrepancies in the terminology of elementary lesions persist when texts from Dermatology and Semiology books are compared, which can cause some confusion in both the teaching of undergraduate medical students and the learning acquired by professionals in the field. This review aims to compare and clarify the differences in the description of elementary lesions by many authors, used as references for specialists in dermatology.

  14. Nonsteroidal Topical Immunomodulators in Allergology and Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Jovanović, Marina; Golušin, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review currently available literature data concerning pathomechanisms of action, indications, treatment efficacy, as well as side effects of nonsteroidal immunomodulators used in dermatology, primarily for the treatment of allergic dermatoses. MEDLINE search was undertaken using the key words “Topical Immunomodulators, Dermatology and Allergy”. Full articles, and nothing but full articles, were used. PMID:27144167

  15. Ethical considerations in dermatologic photography.

    PubMed

    Lakdawala, Nikita; Fontanella, Demian; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2012-01-01

    In dermatology, clinical photographs are an essential component of patient care, enabling clinicians to document changes in skin pathology over time. Recent advances in digital technology and the electronic medical record have revolutionized clinical photography; however, these advances bring with them new ethical, legal, and social concerns. Photographs, more than other forms of documentation, have the potential to make patients uncomfortable. The act of photography, especially for those images requiring exposure of the genital area or the entire body, can be an uncomfortable experience for patients, necessitating the clinician and photographer to take an empathic stance in this setting. The Internet has elicited an increasing, and a very real, concern for patients about possible distribution and use of images outside of their individual care. The clinician and staff can allay these fears by professionally and empathetically addressing their concerns. In addition, it is important that patients receive appropriate informed consent about clinical photographs and the potential use of the images in their care, education, and research. Given the multitude of methods for recording clinical photographs, combined with the increasing complexity of image storage, standardization becomes a critical tool in providing consistency among images and achieving more equitable and efficacious care. To achieve this goal and improve the baseline standard of continuity of care for dermatological practices, we review the role of photographs, develop a model for patient consent, and establish standards for photography so as to provide the most ethical care for the patient.

  16. Medical student Dermatology Interest Groups.

    PubMed

    Jalalat, Sheila Z; Hunter-Ellul, Lindsey; Wagner, Richard F

    2013-01-01

    The Dermatology Interest Group (DIG) at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) blog (digutmb.blogspot.com) was created in 2004 with the aims of increasing communication and collaboration among students, faculty, residents, and alumni, promoting educational opportunities, and fostering the missions for which DIG was created. This blog is unique, because its frequent activity is directed toward the educational and professional needs of medical students and residents. We assessed the use of this blog by evaluating the number of blog views and audience members with relationship to the number of posts and post content over time via a tracking system. We found that there has been an increase in blog posts, views, and subscribers, as well as in areas of post content including dermatology resources/news/articles, residency applications, and resident-related information. Usefulness of such posts expands beyond UTMB students, which increases blog views and widens viewer audience. An international viewer population also was evaluated. Recorded blog viewing time was 1 minute, 57 seconds, which is more time than needed to read a post, suggesting use of additional blog information. This review of the DIG at the UTMB blog demonstrates how the use of web-based tools, in addition to the inherent benefits of medical student interests groups, are valuable resources for students, residents, and faculty.

  17. Applications of Nanotechnology in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    What are nanoparticles and why are they important in dermatology? These questions are addressed by highlighting recent developments in the nanotechnology field that have increased the potential for intentional and unintended nanoparticle skin exposure. The role of environmental factors in the interaction of nanoparticles with skin and the potential mechanisms by which nanoparticles may influence skin response to environmental factors are discussed. Trends emerging from recent literature suggest that the positive benefit of engineered nanoparticles for use in cosmetics and as tools for understanding skin biology and curing skin disease, out weigh potential toxicity concerns. Discoveries reported in this journal are highlighted. This review begins with a general introduction to the field of nanotechnology and nanomedicine. This is followed by a discussion of the current state of understanding of nanoparticle skin penetration and their use in three different therapeutic applications. Challenges that must be overcome to derive clinical benefit from the application of nanotechnology to skin are discussed last, providing perspective on the significant opportunity that exists for future studies in investigative dermatology. PMID:22217738

  18. Medical student Dermatology Interest Groups.

    PubMed

    Jalalat, Sheila Z; Hunter-Ellul, Lindsey; Wagner, Richard F

    2013-01-01

    The Dermatology Interest Group (DIG) at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) blog (digutmb.blogspot.com) was created in 2004 with the aims of increasing communication and collaboration among students, faculty, residents, and alumni, promoting educational opportunities, and fostering the missions for which DIG was created. This blog is unique, because its frequent activity is directed toward the educational and professional needs of medical students and residents. We assessed the use of this blog by evaluating the number of blog views and audience members with relationship to the number of posts and post content over time via a tracking system. We found that there has been an increase in blog posts, views, and subscribers, as well as in areas of post content including dermatology resources/news/articles, residency applications, and resident-related information. Usefulness of such posts expands beyond UTMB students, which increases blog views and widens viewer audience. An international viewer population also was evaluated. Recorded blog viewing time was 1 minute, 57 seconds, which is more time than needed to read a post, suggesting use of additional blog information. This review of the DIG at the UTMB blog demonstrates how the use of web-based tools, in addition to the inherent benefits of medical student interests groups, are valuable resources for students, residents, and faculty. PMID:24079594

  19. Nicotinamide in dermatology and photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Surjana, Devita; Damian, Diona L

    2011-01-01

    Nicotinamide (the amide form of vitamin B3) has been used in dermatology for more than 40 years for a diverse range of conditions including acne, rosacea, autoimmune bullous dermatoses, and now the treatment and prevention of photoaging and photoimmunosuppression. The broad clinical effects of nicotinamide may be explained by its role as a cellular energy precursor, a modulator of inflammatory cytokines, and an inhibitor of the nuclear enzyme poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1, which plays a significant role in DNA repair, maintenance ofgenomic stability, and cellular response to injury including inflammation and apoptosis. This review outlines the use of nicotinamide for inflammatory dermatoses and photoaging and focuses on its emerging role in photoprotection.

  20. [Modern psychosomatic aspects of dermatology].

    PubMed

    Jovanović, M; Duran, V; Poljacki, M; Misić-Pavkov, G; Matović, L; Subotić, M; Golub, R

    1994-01-01

    Concerning their origin most diseases are multifactorial and that goes for skin diseases too. Emphasizing just one must not exclude further research and other aspects of etiopathogenetic mechanisms. It has been known for along time that psychological factors have a certain influence on the start, aggravation and maintenance on skin changes and that cosmetic defects of this kind disturb the psychological peace of the sick person and his capacity of establishing satisfactory social relations. Psychosomatic approach in dermatology cannot be reduced to investigation of specific etiology in the field of psyche without physical or social spheres. It unites all of them and in that way the old question what cause and what the consequence is has no importance, because there is no time or distance limit among them. They act simultaneously, holistically. PMID:7739438

  1. [Telemedicine in dermatological practice: teledermatology].

    PubMed

    Danis, Judit; Forczek, Erzsébet; Bari, Ferenc

    2016-03-01

    Technological advances in the fields of information and telecommunication technologies have affected the health care system in the last decades, and lead to the emergence of a new discipline: telemedicine. The appearance and rise of internet and smart phones induced a rapid progression in telemedicine. Several new applications and mobile devices are published every hour even for medical purposes. Parallel to these changes in the technical fields, medical literature about telemedicine has grown rapidly. Due to its visual nature, dermatology is ideally suited to benefit from this new technology and teledermatology became one of the most dynamically evolving fields of telemedicine by now. Teledermatology is not routinely practiced in Hungary yet, however, it promises the health care system to become better, cheaper and faster, but we have to take notice on the experience and problems faced in teledermatologic applications so far, summarized in this review. PMID:26920326

  2. [Telemedicine in dermatological practice: teledermatology].

    PubMed

    Danis, Judit; Forczek, Erzsébet; Bari, Ferenc

    2016-03-01

    Technological advances in the fields of information and telecommunication technologies have affected the health care system in the last decades, and lead to the emergence of a new discipline: telemedicine. The appearance and rise of internet and smart phones induced a rapid progression in telemedicine. Several new applications and mobile devices are published every hour even for medical purposes. Parallel to these changes in the technical fields, medical literature about telemedicine has grown rapidly. Due to its visual nature, dermatology is ideally suited to benefit from this new technology and teledermatology became one of the most dynamically evolving fields of telemedicine by now. Teledermatology is not routinely practiced in Hungary yet, however, it promises the health care system to become better, cheaper and faster, but we have to take notice on the experience and problems faced in teledermatologic applications so far, summarized in this review.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of dermatological antiseptics.

    PubMed

    Leitch, C S; Leitch, A E; Tidman, M J

    2015-12-01

    Topical antiseptics are frequently used in dermatological management, yet evidence for the efficacy of traditional generic formulations is often largely anecdotal. We tested the in vitro bactericidal activity of four commonly used topical antiseptics against Staphylococcus aureus, using a modified version of the European Standard EN 1276, a quantitative suspension test for evaluation of the bactericidal activity of chemical disinfectants and antiseptics. To meet the standard for antiseptic effectiveness of EN 1276, at least a 5 log10 reduction in bacterial count within 5 minutes of exposure is required. While 1% benzalkonium chloride and 6% hydrogen peroxide both achieved a 5 log10 reduction in S. aureus count, neither 2% aqueous eosin nor 1 : 10 000 potassium permanganate showed significant bactericidal activity compared with control at exposure periods of up to 1 h. Aqueous eosin and potassium permanganate may have desirable astringent properties, but these results suggest they lack effective antiseptic activity, at least against S. aureus.

  4. Antibiotic overuse and resistance in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Chon, Susan Y; Doan, Hung Q; Mays, Rana Majd; Singh, Selina M; Gordon, Rachel A; Tyring, Stephen K

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics have a significant role in dermatology, treating a wide range of diseases, including acne, rosacea, inflammatory skin conditions and skin structure infections, such as cellulitis, folliculitis, carbuncles, and furuncles. Because of their consistent use, utility, and availability, antibiotics are susceptible to overuse within the medical practice, and, specific to this discussion, in the dermatologic setting. The issue of continuously increasing risk of antibiotic resistance remains an important concern to the dermatologist. The scope of this review will be to provide an overview of the common antibiotics used in the dermatologic setting with an emphasis on identifying areas of overuse, reported bacterial resistance, and discussion of clinical management aimed at decreasing antibiotic resistance.

  5. Social Media Use in Pediatric Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Alexander L; Teng, Joyce M C

    2016-01-01

    Social media is predicted to become increasingly important in dermatology because of its potential to serve as a platform for public health campaigns, aid in participant recruitment for clinical trials, increase public engagement in health care, and facilitate scientific discourse. No study of social media use in pediatric dermatology has been performed, so we analyzed the use of the seven leading social media platforms in pediatric dermatology, with a focus on patient advocacy groups, professional societies, research journals, and research institutions. We observed that 89% of patient advocacy groups, 100% of professional societies, 62.5% of research journals, and 0% of academic pediatric dermatology departments maintained one or more social media accounts. Our observations suggest that all stakeholder groups, and in particular members of the research community, have the potential to further their engagement, connections, and communications through social media. PMID:26821563

  6. Antimicrobials in dermatologic surgery: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Shurman, Daniel L; Benedetto, Anthony V

    2010-01-01

    The two main uses of antimicrobials in dermatologic surgery include prophylaxis for bacteremia and prevention of localized surgical skin infection (LSSI). Bacteremia can result in hematogenous surgical infections such as infective endocarditis and prosthetic joint infection. Comprehensive guidelines from the American Heart Society (AHA), American Dental Association (ADA), and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) have significantly reduced the number of patients in which prophylaxis is indicated for hematogenous surgical infection. The use of antimicrobials for localized surgical skin infection in dermatology is controversial. Although the overall trend in the literature supports the decreased use of antimicrobials in dermatologic surgery as a whole, it is important to know which situations still warrant antibiotics. This contribution will address the updated guidelines of the AHA, ADA, and AAOS, evidence-based techniques to decrease localized surgical skin infections, and situations in which antibiotics should be considered during dermatologic surgery. PMID:20797510

  7. Resident guide to advocacy in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Park, Kelly K

    2015-12-01

    Many opportunities exist for residents to get involved in advocacy in dermatology, from national to grassroots levels. Residents also should be aware of opportunities to get involved in patient advocacy and become familiar with the myriad of patient advocacy groups that exist. These groups offer support and education for patients and initiate research efforts for specific dermatologic conditions that provide support for patients beyond what can be offered during a standard office visit. The value of resident involvement in advocacy also is discussed.

  8. Pentoxifylline and its applications in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Iffat; Dorjay, Konchok; Anwar, Parvaiz

    2014-01-01

    Pentoxifylline is a methyl-xanthine derivative with many anti inflammatory effects. Pentoxifylline has been found to be effective for many dermatological as well as non-dermatological conditions. It has been used both as primary drug as well as adjuvant and is a safe and relatively cost-effective alternative drug. In this article, we review the literature and highlight various important aspects of pentoxifylline. PMID:25396144

  9. [What's new in clinical dermatology?].

    PubMed

    Janier, M

    2013-11-01

    2013 has been the year of large genetic studies of the GWAS type (Genome wide association studies) in common diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, aimed at localization of candidate genes. It was also the year of population-based studies from huge public or private registers. Thus, epidemiologic correlations have been put forward: psoriasis and vascular risk, psoriasis and rhinosinusitis, rosacea and migraine, acne and food habits, eczema and basal-cell carcinoma, vitiligo and lower risk of skin cancer, cutaneous Ro/SS-A pos lupus and cancer, chronic eczema and calcium-channel inhlbitors, pemphigoid and loop diuretics. Risk of IBD induced by isotretinoin has not been confirmed but risk of skin cancer under azathioprine is real. New drug reactions have appeared (pigmentation due to interferon, hypodermitis and sarcoidosis to anti-BRAF, vandetanib) and old ones are revisited (patch-testing of Severe Cutaneous adverse cutaneous reactions, pigmentation due to anti-malarial drugs, neutrophilic dermatosis due to azathioprine). Diane35(®) has been transiently withdrawn in January 2013 but tetrazepam has been withdrawn definitively in July 2013. Original aspects of cutaneous infections will be discussed along with new data on STDs (meningococcemia in MSMs, HPV, Herpes, congenital syphilis). Finally, some important papers about dermoscopy, confocal microscopy and aesthetic dermatology will be presented. PMID:24365496

  10. Dermatologic hazards among slaughterhouse workers.

    PubMed

    Gabal, M S; el Geweily, M

    1990-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of skin diseases especially viral warts among Egyptian slaughterhouse workers. 535 subjects working at a manual and semiautomatic slaughterhouses and a meat manufacturing factory (exposed and non-exposed to raw meat & meat products) as well as a control group of 322 persons working at a textile factory at Cairo area were dermatologically examined at the workplace. Results show that the prevalence of all skin diseases among exposed workers (52.17%) is significantly higher than either non-exposed (34.67%) or control (35.71%) groups. Infectious cutaneous papillomas (viral warts) represent the commonest skin disease among occupational exposed workers (27.61%). This prevalence is significantly higher than both figures of non-exposed (13.33%) as well as control (4.66%) groups. Verruca vulgaris represent the commonest type of viral warts among examined workers. The use of protective gloves reduced significantly the prevalence of warts among examined workers meanwhile semi-automation of the processes, type of meat exposure, type of occupation have no significant effect on the prevalence of warts among examined slaughter-housemen.

  11. [What's new in dermatological research?].

    PubMed

    Misery, L

    2012-12-01

    Dermatological research is more and more productive and its level higher and higher. Choosing the most significant articles is difficult. Mast cell plays a role in the initiation of inflammation and therefore in poorer healing. Keratinocytes derive from stem cells and progenitors, which are independent. They can be activated directly by heat through sensory proteins at their surface. The cutaneous nervous system has an organization similar to that of the most complex sensory organs. In psoriasis, denervation induces a significant plaque regression. The cerebral integration of skin appearance modulates the skin reactivity to histamine. Pruritus is linked to specific receptors in the skin, which give specific projections into the brain and are histamine-dependent or not. Atopic dermatitis may be linked to the nonspecific activation of Th2 immune system, particularly to abnormalities of the skin barrier. Skin bacteria, but not intestinal, modulate the formation of skin immunity. Raf kinases are well known in melanoma and play an important role in physiological conditions: they are not essential to the initial development of the melanocyte lineage but to maintain it. In culture, melanocytes can be dedifferentiated in melanoblasts. Sunburns are consecutive to the activation of TLR3 by UVB. ANRIL gene is involved in the polymorphism of neurofibromatosis 1 and gene RAD51B is linked to the risk of male breast cancer. MCV infection is linked to sites with sialic acid. Aging objectified by telomere shortening is accelerated by stress.

  12. Dermatological problems of the puberty

    PubMed Central

    Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia

    2013-01-01

    Puberty is a period of life between childhood and adulthood. It is characterized by many changes in morphology and appearance of the body (biological maturation), in the psyche – development of personality (psychological maturation), and in the attitude towards one's own and the opposite sex (psychosexual maturation), and in the social role (social maturation). Dermatological problems of adolescence are mainly related to fluctuations in hormone levels, mainly androgens. They include acne, hair problems and excessive sweating. Acne vulgaris is the most frequently diagnosed dermatosis in patients aged between 11 and 30 years. It is believed that it affects about 80% of persons in this age group or even, taking into account lesions of low intensity, 100% of young people. Excessive sweating is a condition characterised by excessive production of sweat, resulting from high activity of sweat glands. The sweat glands are localised in almost all areas of the body surface but on the hands, feet, armpits and around the groin they are found at the highest density. Seborrhoeic dermatitis of the scalp is a chronic, relapsing, inflammatory dermatosis, which currently affects about 5% of the population. It affects mostly young people, particularly men. PMID:24278071

  13. [What's new in instrumental dermatology?].

    PubMed

    Amici, J-M

    2014-12-01

    This "What's new in instrumental dermatology" focuses on cutaneous oncologic surgery, base on a review of the 2012-2014 literature. First, the ability of dermatologists to make a good "oncologic reading of tumors" is the key of radical surgical treatment. Advantages and disadvantages of the biopsy are discussed. Then, the second message is the management of anticoagulants, that should not be interrupted for skin surgery. Despite recommendations, this practice is not followed in 40% of cases; this point is critical because bleeding complications are minor compared to potential morbidity of thrombotic events when stopping these medications. Regarding infection, nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is identified as a risk factor for wound infection. A preoperative shower with chlorhexidine and mupirocin topical decolonization of nostril reduces this risk. Surgical techniques are trying to reach minimalism, by reducing undermining and scarring. On the trunk, using deep slow resorbable sutures improve scarring. In addition using adhesive sutures (strip) reduce the wideness of scar. On the face, the lower third of the nose is the most challenging because of the free edges, which are deformable. In this location bilobed or trilobed transposition flap offer the advantage of remaining in the nasal aesthetic unit and not disturbing the free edges of the nasal orifices. Regarding scarring, early hypertrophic scar is now well defined and linked with transposition flaps of the nasal region. An early treatment with intralesional corticosteroid injection appears to be effective. Finally, the biological mechanism of the effectiveness of compression in the prevention and treatment of dystrophic scar is now clear. The mechanotransduction explain how a mechanical stress of the skin activates biological cell pathways, which regulate the quality of collagen synthesis and the arrangement of skin fibrosis.

  14. [What's new in instrumental dermatology?].

    PubMed

    Amici, J-M

    2014-12-01

    This "What's new in instrumental dermatology" focuses on cutaneous oncologic surgery, base on a review of the 2012-2014 literature. First, the ability of dermatologists to make a good "oncologic reading of tumors" is the key of radical surgical treatment. Advantages and disadvantages of the biopsy are discussed. Then, the second message is the management of anticoagulants, that should not be interrupted for skin surgery. Despite recommendations, this practice is not followed in 40% of cases; this point is critical because bleeding complications are minor compared to potential morbidity of thrombotic events when stopping these medications. Regarding infection, nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is identified as a risk factor for wound infection. A preoperative shower with chlorhexidine and mupirocin topical decolonization of nostril reduces this risk. Surgical techniques are trying to reach minimalism, by reducing undermining and scarring. On the trunk, using deep slow resorbable sutures improve scarring. In addition using adhesive sutures (strip) reduce the wideness of scar. On the face, the lower third of the nose is the most challenging because of the free edges, which are deformable. In this location bilobed or trilobed transposition flap offer the advantage of remaining in the nasal aesthetic unit and not disturbing the free edges of the nasal orifices. Regarding scarring, early hypertrophic scar is now well defined and linked with transposition flaps of the nasal region. An early treatment with intralesional corticosteroid injection appears to be effective. Finally, the biological mechanism of the effectiveness of compression in the prevention and treatment of dystrophic scar is now clear. The mechanotransduction explain how a mechanical stress of the skin activates biological cell pathways, which regulate the quality of collagen synthesis and the arrangement of skin fibrosis. PMID:25539752

  15. Pruritus in dermatological hospital in Bamako, Mali.

    PubMed

    Faye, Ousmane; Cisse, Lamissa; Berthe, Siritio; Dicko, Adama; Ndiaye, Hawa Thiam; Traore, Pierre; Coulibaly, Karim; Keita, Somita

    2012-11-01

    Pruritus is a symptom frequently encountered in dermatology consultations. For practitioners working in a tropical environment, particularly in Africa, the diagnosis of pruritus remains a constant problem. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemioclinical aspects and the etiologies of pruritus encountered at the dermatological hospital in Bamako. We conducted a prospective survey on a cohort of patients attending the Department of Dermatology at the Centre National d'Appui (CNAM-Ex Institut Marchoux) in the Fight against Disease over a 1-year period (June 1, 2009-May 31, 2010). Consequently, the study included every patient, whatever their age and gender, that agreed to take part in the survey and whose main reason for attending for a consultation was "pruritus." The clinical and biological data were entered and analyzed using Epi Info software, version 6.04 fr. A total of 232 patients (163 women, 69 men) attended because of pruritus out of 1761 overall patients (i.e., a prevalence of 13.17%). The mean age of the patients was 33 ± 19 years. Dermatological causes represented 95% of the etiologies. This work allowed us to observe the systemic causes of pruritus in the dermatological environment in Mali and greater likelihood of black women to attend because of pruritus.

  16. Review of digital image security in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Nielson, Colton; West, Cameron; Shimizu, Ikue

    2015-10-16

    The inherently visual nature of dermatology naturally lends itself to photography. As technology has evolved, smartphone cameras have become ubiquitous and have the potential to improve education and patient care in dermatology. Although patients and physicians may agree that photography can improve patient care, there are certain risks involved with smartphone photography in the medical field. Perhaps most concerning is the number of dermatologists using smartphones to take unsecured images in their daily practice. A recent study revealed that 22% of surveyed dermatologists used smartphone cameras multiple times per day in their practice. Dermatologists may also overestimate patient comfort with smartphone use in clinical photography. We present a review of the use of smartphones in dermatology and address the potential lack of security and accompanying ethical dilemmas.

  17. Brazilian Society of Dermatology against leprosy*

    PubMed Central

    Lastória, Joel Carlos; de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado

    2016-01-01

    The Brazilian Society of Dermatology promoted a national campaign against leprosy in 2012, involving their State Regional, Accredited Services of Dermatology and Referral Services in Leprosy. Consisted of clarification to the population about the disease and a day of medical voluntary service. Ninety services (57 Accredited Services and 33 Reference Services) participated, distributed in 23 states. The campaign examined 3,223 people and 421 new cases were diagnosed, 54,4% female, 74,3% between 19 and 64 years and 8,3% in children under 15 years. Of the 217 classified cases, 58,5% was paucibacillary and 41,5% was multibacillary. The results were posted on the Brazilian Society of Dermatology website. PMID:27438217

  18. Oatmeal in dermatology: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Pazyar, Nader; Yaghoobi, Reza; Kazerouni, Afshin; Feily, Amir

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to gather and summarize in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials on oatmeal preparations and their uses in dermatology. Literature searches have been carried out to collect in vivo and in vitro studies as well as clinical trials on this subject. The results suggest that oatmeal possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and its administration is effective on a variety of dermatologic inflammatory diseases such as pruritus, atopic dermatitis, acneiform eruptions, and viral infections. Additionally, oatmeal plays a role in cosmetics preparations and skin protection against ultraviolet rays. Although some promising results citing the use of oatmeal to treat numerous dermatologic conditions have been found, the complete efficacy of oatmeal has not been sufficiently explored. This paper proposes accurate and useful information concerning the use of oatmeal in clinical practice to dermatologists. PMID:22421643

  19. Review of digital image security in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Nielson, Colton; West, Cameron; Shimizu, Ikue

    2015-10-01

    The inherently visual nature of dermatology naturally lends itself to photography. As technology has evolved, smartphone cameras have become ubiquitous and have the potential to improve education and patient care in dermatology. Although patients and physicians may agree that photography can improve patient care, there are certain risks involved with smartphone photography in the medical field. Perhaps most concerning is the number of dermatologists using smartphones to take unsecured images in their daily practice. A recent study revealed that 22% of surveyed dermatologists used smartphone cameras multiple times per day in their practice. Dermatologists may also overestimate patient comfort with smartphone use in clinical photography. We present a review of the use of smartphones in dermatology and address the potential lack of security and accompanying ethical dilemmas. PMID:26632792

  20. Serendipity and its role in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Coondoo, Arijit; Sengupta, Sujata

    2015-01-01

    Serendipity is a pleasant surprise of finding a particularly useful information while not looking for it. Significant historic events occurring as a result of serendipity include the discovery of the law of buoyancy (Archimedes principle) by the Greek mathematician Archimedes, of the Americas by Christopher Columbus and of gravity by Sir Isaac Newton. The role of serendipity in science has been immensely beneficial to mankind. A host of important discoveries in medical science owe their origin to serendipity of which perhaps the most famous is the story of Sir Alexander Fleming and his discovery of Penicillin. In the field of dermatology, serendipity has been responsible for major developments in the therapy of psoriasis, hair disorders, aesthetic dermatology and dermatosurgery. Besides these many other therapeutic modalities in dermatology were born as a result of such happy accidents.

  1. Oatmeal in dermatology: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Pazyar, Nader; Yaghoobi, Reza; Kazerouni, Afshin; Feily, Amir

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to gather and summarize in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials on oatmeal preparations and their uses in dermatology. Literature searches have been carried out to collect in vivo and in vitro studies as well as clinical trials on this subject. The results suggest that oatmeal possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and its administration is effective on a variety of dermatologic inflammatory diseases such as pruritus, atopic dermatitis, acneiform eruptions, and viral infections. Additionally, oatmeal plays a role in cosmetics preparations and skin protection against ultraviolet rays. Although some promising results citing the use of oatmeal to treat numerous dermatologic conditions have been found, the complete efficacy of oatmeal has not been sufficiently explored. This paper proposes accurate and useful information concerning the use of oatmeal in clinical practice to dermatologists.

  2. Serendipity and its role in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Coondoo, Arijit; Sengupta, Sujata

    2015-01-01

    Serendipity is a pleasant surprise of finding a particularly useful information while not looking for it. Significant historic events occurring as a result of serendipity include the discovery of the law of buoyancy (Archimedes principle) by the Greek mathematician Archimedes, of the Americas by Christopher Columbus and of gravity by Sir Isaac Newton. The role of serendipity in science has been immensely beneficial to mankind. A host of important discoveries in medical science owe their origin to serendipity of which perhaps the most famous is the story of Sir Alexander Fleming and his discovery of Penicillin. In the field of dermatology, serendipity has been responsible for major developments in the therapy of psoriasis, hair disorders, aesthetic dermatology and dermatosurgery. Besides these many other therapeutic modalities in dermatology were born as a result of such happy accidents. PMID:25814699

  3. Serendipity and its Role in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Coondoo, Arijit; Sengupta, Sujata

    2015-01-01

    Serendipity is a pleasant surprise of finding a particularly useful information while not looking for it. Significant historic events occurring as a result of serendipity include the discovery of the law of buoyancy (Archimedes principle) by the Greek mathematician Archimedes, of the Americas by Christopher Columbus and of gravity by Sir Isaac Newton. The role of serendipity in science has been immensely beneficial to mankind. A host of important discoveries in medical science owe their origin to serendipity of which perhaps the most famous is the story of Sir Alexander Fleming and his discovery of Penicillin. In the field of dermatology, serendipity has been responsible for major developments in the therapy of psoriasis, hair disorders, aesthetic dermatology and dermatosurgery. Besides these many other therapeutic modalities in dermatology were born as a result of such happy accidents. PMID:25814699

  4. Innovative uses for zinc in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Bae, Yoon Soo; Hill, Nikki D; Bibi, Yuval; Dreiher, Jacob; Cohen, Arnon D

    2010-07-01

    Severe zinc deficiency states, such as acrodermatitis enteropathica, are associated with a variety of skin manifestations, such as perioral, acral, and perineal dermatitis. These syndromes can be reversed with systemic zinc repletion. In addition to skin pathologies that are clearly zinc-dependent, many dermatologic conditions (eg, dandruff, acne, and diaper rash) have been associated and treated with zinc. Success rates for treatment with zinc vary greatly depending on the disease, mode of administration, and precise zinc preparation used. With the exception of systemic zinc deficiency states, there is little evidence that convincingly demonstrates the efficacy of zinc as a reliable first-line treatment for most dermatologic conditions. However, zinc may be considered as an adjunctive treatment modality. Further research is needed to establish the indications for zinc treatment in dermatology, optimal mode of zinc delivery, and best type of zinc compound to be used. PMID:20510767

  5. The role of capsaicin in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Katherine; Shea, Sofia M; Patterson, James W

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic pain and pruritus are the common chief complaints at dermatology office visits. Unfortunately, they are also notoriously difficult conditions to treat. Topical capsaicin used as a single therapy or as an adjuvant offers a low-risk option for patients who do not achieve control on other therapies. This chapter presents the evidence behind topical capsaicin use in dermatologic conditions characterized by neurogenic pain or pruritus, including postherpetic neuralgia, notalgia paresthetica, brachioradial pruritus, lichen simplex chronicus, prurigo nodularis, pruritus ani, pruritus of hemodialysis, aquagenic pruritus, apocrine chromhidrosis, lipodermatosclerosis, alopecia areata, and psoriasis. It presents the most common capsaicin formulations, dosages, and durations of treatment for each condition. Additionally, the chapter addresses various adverse effects and limitations in the use of topical capsaicin in dermatology. PMID:24941674

  6. Fruit and Food Eponyms in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Nidhi; Jindal, Pooja; Kumar, Jeevan; Gupta, Sanjeev; Jain, VK

    2015-01-01

    Dermatology world is brimming with myriad of interesting clinical conditions, signs and syndromes. It is infinite, which has systemic clinical connotations too. Complicated pronunciations of diagnosis have always placed residents in an intricate state. Each one is trying his best to make this cumbersome subject comparatively more acceptable and convenient. The present paper is an attempt to further simplify the subject by correlating difficult conditions with commonly used and seen things such as fruit and food. A total of 45 dermatological conditions were found to be based on fruit and food eponyms. For example, strawberries can remind us of strawberry gums of Wegener's granulomatosis and strawberry nevus. PMID:25814737

  7. Safety of Topical Dermatologic Medications in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Viral M; Schwartz, Robert A; Lambert, W Clark

    2016-07-01

    Dermatologic drugs should be employed with caution in women of childbearing age who are pregnant or considering pregnancy. Topical drugs have little systemic absorption. Therefore, they are deemed safer than oral or parenteral agents and less likely to harm the fetus. However, their safety profile must be assessed cautiously, as there is limited available data. In this article, we aggregate human and animal studies and provide recommendations on using topical dermatologic medications in pregnancy.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(7):830-834. PMID:27391632

  8. [The use of lasers in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Lecocq, C; Pirard, D; del Marmol, V; Berlingin, E

    2013-01-01

    Albert Einstein is undoubtedly the father of lasers. But it is not until 1964 that the first dermatological lasers were introduced. The Nd-YAG laser, the CO2 laser were developed by Kumar Patel. In a 40 year period lasers not only were diversified but have also become safer and miniaturized. This article hopes to strengthen general practionners' and specialist's knowledge of the different categories of available lasers. The most frequently used ones are ablative lasers (CO2-Erbium), vascular lasers (Nd-YAG, KTP, pulsed dye laser) and the pigment lasers (Q-Switched Nd-YAG, Alexandrite). A description of these lasers and their indications in dermatology will be discussed.

  9. Dermatology Interest Groups in Medical Schools.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Shannon K; Riemer, Christie; Beers, Paula J; Browning, Richard J; Correa, Mark; Fawaz, Bilal; Lehrer, Michael; Mounessa, Jessica; Lofgreen, Seth; Oetken, Tara; Saley, Taylor P; Tinkey, Katherine; Tracey, Elisabeth H; Dellavalle, Robert; Dunnick, Cory

    2016-01-01

    Involvement in a Dermatology Interest Group (DIG) allows students to learn about dermatology, partake in service projects, get involved in research, and ask questions about the application process for residency programs. In this article, we review the activities and member involvement of DIGs from 11 medical schools. To our knowledge, this is the first descriptive analysis of DIGs across the United States. This comparison of DIGs is not only potentially helpful for medical schools interested in establishing a DIG, but it also offers insight into how previously established DIGs could improve and have a greater impact both in individual medical schools and in the community at-large. PMID:27617719

  10. Dermatologic Practice: Implications for a Primary Care Residency Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, William T., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The problems encountered, diagnostic procedures performed, and treatments prescribed in dermatology were studied in a primary care practice and in a dermatology clinic. It is proposed that the findings of this study be the basis for designing a curriculum in dermatology for residents in primary care medicine. (Author/MLW)

  11. [What's new in dermatological research?].

    PubMed

    Humbert, P

    2008-12-01

    which play a crucial role in the adaptive immunological response. It was shown that activation of the proliferation of the lymphocytes T after the migration of dendritic cells on the level of the lymphatic ganglion depended not on Langerhans cell, but of the dendritic cell. A new way appears to control the autoimmunity in the psoriasis and involves the plasmacytoid dendritic cells which are sensitized with the DNA itself when it is coupled with an antibacterial peptide. Mast cells express cathelicidin, which acts like an antibiotic with broad spectrum and influences the defence system of the epitheliums. We have perhaps found a new therapeutic target for rosacea by disclosing high rates of cathelicidin and a series of associated proteases in skin lesions. The sebocytes express antibacterial functional peptides deriving from cathelicidin which can have a bactericidal effect against P. Acnes. A vast genomic study in the androgenetic alopecia highlighted the existence of new loci localized on the 20p11 chromosome, associated with the risk of androgenetic alopecia. New alleles to determine the color of hair and the cutaneous pigmentation were identified. Two loci (IRF 4 and SLC24A4) are highly associated with the color of hair, like three other areas. The blue color of the eyes could be due to a change of an element located in gene HERC2 preventing of the expression of OCA2. Thus, many fields of dermatology were the object of research which opens new prospects for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19264208

  12. Sources of Observer Variation in Dermatologic Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Geoffrey R.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the effects of similarity to prior examples in predicting errors in dermatologic diagnosis. Two interpretations about the acquisition of expertise are independent cues and instance-based categorization. The subjects (N=16) were first-year family medicine residents from McMaster University (Ontario). (MLW)

  13. Dermatology Residents are Prescribing Tanning Bed Treatment.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kathryn L; Huang, Karen E; Huang, William W; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Although 90% of dermatologists discourage the use of tanning beds, about half of psoriasis patients report using tanning beds and most of these note improvement. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if dermatology residents are advocating the tanning bed use to their patients. PMID:27617718

  14. Zinc Therapy in Dermatology: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Vikram K.; Mehta, Karaninder S.; Chauhan, Pushpinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc, both in elemental or in its salt forms, has been used as a therapeutic modality for centuries. Topical preparations like zinc oxide, calamine, or zinc pyrithione have been in use as photoprotecting, soothing agents or as active ingredient of antidandruff shampoos. Its use has expanded manifold over the years for a number of dermatological conditions including infections (leishmaniasis, warts), inflammatory dermatoses (acne vulgaris, rosacea), pigmentary disorders (melasma), and neoplasias (basal cell carcinoma). Although the role of oral zinc is well-established in human zinc deficiency syndromes including acrodermatitis enteropathica, it is only in recent years that importance of zinc as a micronutrient essential for infant growth and development has been recognized. The paper reviews various dermatological uses of zinc. PMID:25120566

  15. [Digital photograph storage systems in clinical dermatology].

    PubMed

    Taberner, R; Contestí, T

    2010-05-01

    In recent years, digital photography has consolidated its role in clinical dermatology. In view of the quality and low cost of current equipment and the simplicity of digital storage, almost all dermatologists now use digital photography, which is also extremely versatile and readily applicable to teaching. However, to maximize its full potential, image retrieval must be available at any time and with the patient present. This requires a suitable storage system that may vary according to the characteristics of each center. Dermatologists must also find time to maintain and organize the digital archives. The present article describes current options in digital image storage and retrieval, ranging from multidepartmental picture archiving and communication systems at one end to image management freeware at the other, and also including dedicated dermatology software.

  16. Zinc therapy in dermatology: a review.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mrinal; Mahajan, Vikram K; Mehta, Karaninder S; Chauhan, Pushpinder S

    2014-01-01

    Zinc, both in elemental or in its salt forms, has been used as a therapeutic modality for centuries. Topical preparations like zinc oxide, calamine, or zinc pyrithione have been in use as photoprotecting, soothing agents or as active ingredient of antidandruff shampoos. Its use has expanded manifold over the years for a number of dermatological conditions including infections (leishmaniasis, warts), inflammatory dermatoses (acne vulgaris, rosacea), pigmentary disorders (melasma), and neoplasias (basal cell carcinoma). Although the role of oral zinc is well-established in human zinc deficiency syndromes including acrodermatitis enteropathica, it is only in recent years that importance of zinc as a micronutrient essential for infant growth and development has been recognized. The paper reviews various dermatological uses of zinc. PMID:25120566

  17. HIPAA, dermatology images, and the law.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Noah; Rothstein, Brooke

    2013-12-01

    From smart phones to iPads, the world has grown increasingly reliant on new technology. In this ever-expanding digital age, medicine is at the forefront of these new technologies. In the field of dermatology and general medicine, digital images have become an important tool used in patient management. Today, one can even find physicians who use their cellular phone cameras to take patient images and transmit them to other physicians. However, as digital imaging technology has become more prevalent so too have concerns about the impact of this technology on the electronic medical record, quality of patient care, and medicolegal issues. This article will discuss the advent of digital imaging technology in dermatology and the legal ramifications digital images have on medical care, abiding by HIPAA, the use of digital images as evidence, and the possible abuses digital images can pose in a health care setting. PMID:24800426

  18. Current state of imaging in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Hibler, Brian P; Qi, Qiaochu; Rossi, Anthony M

    2016-03-01

    Medical imaging has dramatically transformed the practice of medicine, especially the field of dermatology. Imaging is used to facilitate the transfer of information between providers, document cutaneous disease, assess response to therapy, and plays a crucial role in monitoring and diagnosing skin cancer. Advancements in imaging technology and overall improved quality of imaging have augmented the utility of photography. We provide an overview of current imaging technologies used in dermatology with a focus on their role in skin cancer diagnosis. Future technologies include three-dimensional, total-body photography, mobile smartphone applications, and computerassisted diagnostic devices. With these advancements, we are better equipped to capture and monitor skin conditions longitudinally and achieve improved diagnostic accuracy of skin cancer. PMID:26963110

  19. [The use of lasers in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Lecocq, C; Pirard, D; del Marmol, V; Berlingin, E

    2013-01-01

    Albert Einstein is undoubtedly the father of lasers. But it is not until 1964 that the first dermatological lasers were introduced. The Nd-YAG laser, the CO2 laser were developed by Kumar Patel. In a 40 year period lasers not only were diversified but have also become safer and miniaturized. This article hopes to strengthen general practionners' and specialist's knowledge of the different categories of available lasers. The most frequently used ones are ablative lasers (CO2-Erbium), vascular lasers (Nd-YAG, KTP, pulsed dye laser) and the pigment lasers (Q-Switched Nd-YAG, Alexandrite). A description of these lasers and their indications in dermatology will be discussed. PMID:23534310

  20. Update on TNF Inhibitors in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Sobell, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-01

    Emerging data describe new potential indications for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors in dermatology, including pediatric psoriasis and hidradenitis suppurativa. New biosimilar TNF agents are in late stages of development and may be available in the United States in the near future. Biosimilar agents are similar but not identical to available TNF inhibitors, and approval requires extensive analytic, toxicity, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and clinical testing. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp6):S104-S106. PMID:27537073

  1. Impact on facial rejuvenation with dermatological preparations

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Patrick J

    2009-01-01

    The treatment options for facial rejuvenation using dermatological, nonsurgical techniques have dramatically increased in the past 10 years. This follows the introduction of botulinum toxin and a variety of dermal fillers. The public interest in noninvasive treatments has changed the market beyond recognition with more physicians involved in providing services to satiate the demand. The impact on the public and medical profession is discussed. PMID:19503770

  2. History, dermatology, and medicine: another outlook.

    PubMed

    Goihman-Yahr, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    The History of Medicine and of Dermatology tends to analyze what happened in these disciplines in a given time and place. Contributions of relevant leaders are studied carefully, and their appropriate value to knowledge is determined. This is fundamental to understanding present knowledge and what might be expected in the future. There is, yet, an additional perspective, namely, the relationships between the above and historical phenomena in their wider sense; particularly, the correlation between politics, economy, psychohistory, and medicine. Evolution of medical knowledge does not occur in a vacuum. This contribution provides examples of this viewpoint and how knowledge of history makes clearer the development of medicine and vice versa. Emphasis is also made on the history and development of dermatology, but rather as an illustration of the overall philosophical point of view of the writer than as an analysis of the history of dermatology in itself. One may summarize metaphorically this viewpoint by stating that while the microscope and the dermatoscope are very important, the telescope is vital for integral knowledge.

  3. History, dermatology, and medicine: another outlook.

    PubMed

    Goihman-Yahr, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    The History of Medicine and of Dermatology tends to analyze what happened in these disciplines in a given time and place. Contributions of relevant leaders are studied carefully, and their appropriate value to knowledge is determined. This is fundamental to understanding present knowledge and what might be expected in the future. There is, yet, an additional perspective, namely, the relationships between the above and historical phenomena in their wider sense; particularly, the correlation between politics, economy, psychohistory, and medicine. Evolution of medical knowledge does not occur in a vacuum. This contribution provides examples of this viewpoint and how knowledge of history makes clearer the development of medicine and vice versa. Emphasis is also made on the history and development of dermatology, but rather as an illustration of the overall philosophical point of view of the writer than as an analysis of the history of dermatology in itself. One may summarize metaphorically this viewpoint by stating that while the microscope and the dermatoscope are very important, the telescope is vital for integral knowledge. PMID:24314391

  4. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group: formation of patient-centered outcome measures in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Levin, Adriane A; Armstrong, April W; Abernethy, April; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Bhushan, Reva; Garg, Amit; Merola, Joseph F; Maccarone, Mara; Christensen, Robin

    2015-02-01

    As quality standards are increasingly in demand throughout medicine, dermatology needs to establish outcome measures to quantify the effectiveness of treatments and providers. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group was established to address this need. Beginning with psoriasis, the group aims to create a tool considerate of patients and providers using the input of all relevant stakeholders in assessment of disease severity and response to treatment. Herein, we delineate the procedures through which consensus is being reached and the future directions of the project.

  5. Professional dermatology societies in the USA: an overview.

    PubMed

    Al Aboud, Ahmad; Al Aboud, Khalid

    2015-11-18

    This is a concise overview in a table format for the current membership-based dermatology societies in the USA. The primary objective of these societies is to provide continuous medical education. These societies serve all health care providers in dermatology care, including physician assistants and nurses. There is a clear need for establishing more societies which focus on different aspect of dermatology. There is always a potential for improving the educational activities of these societies.

  6. Historical evolution of the Brazilian Annals of Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Costa, Izelda Maria Carvalho; Vallarelli, Andrelou Fralete Ayres; Bonamigo, Renan Rangel; Reis, Vitor Manoel da Silva

    2012-02-01

    In this special edition in celebration of the centennial of the Brazilian Society of Dermatology, the authors take a retrospective look at printed Brazilian dermatology from the very beginning onward, showing evidence of descriptive dermatology with rich discussions, illustrations and advertisements of medications much used at the time, such as bismuth for the treatment of syphilis, before the discovery of penicillin. This retrospective covers up to the current days, when publications in the Brazilian Annals of Dermatology have reached the modern era in electronics, science and layout as well. PMID:22358212

  7. Personalizing dermatology: the future of genomic expression profiling to individualize dermatologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Amilcar Ezequiel; Maibach, Howard I

    2012-06-01

    At the start of the 21st century, the human genome project provided the scientific community with an enormous array of information as genetic blueprints. A landmark period, yet its potential contribution to medicine at the time was limited and unknown. However, with new technological advances, the benefits of identifying genomic profiles became apparent. This article reviews the historical accomplishments made by the human genome project, future applications of genomic expression profiles with the use of microarray gene chip technology, and the pharmacogenomic translational application of these models to dermatology. A new scientific movement in dermatology has begun with intentions of discovering individual genomic profiles responsible for dermatologic disease and drug metabolism, so that medical management can be personalized towards the genome rather than the disease. This review shows how pharmacogenomics has taken the lead in forming a basic framework of revealing specific drug metabolic pathways in the skin that can consequently be altered to maximize and minimize therapeutic efficacy and side effects, respectively. Dermatology as a model field in medicine has started to take advantage of these discoveries upon which deciphering genetic profiles can be used to enhance medical treatment.

  8. WHY IS THE CENTER OF EVIDENCE-BASED DERMATOLOGY RELEVANT TO INDIAN DERMATOLOGY?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Hywel

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based dermatology is the application of high-quality evidence to the care of individual patients with skin diseases. The Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology in the UK promotes activities in this field through its three interlinking cogs, composed of the international Cochrane Skin Group, the UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network (UKDCTN), and the UK national electronic library for skin disorders. The Cochrane Skin Group summarises what is already known about health care interventions by supporting systematic reviews of relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The UKDCTN then addresses the key research gaps identified in systematic reviews by coordinating and carrying out well-designed RCTs. The Skin Disorders specialist library then plays a key role in disseminating new knowledge from systematic reviews and RCTs to a community of clinical users. The electronic resources at the Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology are all freely available to Indian Dermatologists who can use the resources in a way that could benefit their patients. Such new knoweldge only has value if it is shared and used. PMID:20101305

  9. PSYCHOSOMATIC ASPECTS IN PATIENTS WITH DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Tsintsadze, N; Beridze, L; Tsintsadze, N; Krichun, Y; Tsivadze, N; Tsintsadze, M

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the magnitude of anxiety and depression in our common dermatological patients and its correlation with age, sex. For this purpose, we used Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale HADS. The psychometric validity of HADS has been established by validating the questionnaire against the structured psychiatric interviews. A study of anxiety and depression in patients with dermatologic diseases was conducted on the basis of outpatients department in 211 patients with dermatologic diseases; among them were 107 male and 104 female, aged 16 to 75 years. Among them were patients with Acne, Alopecia Areata, Psoriasis, Vitiligo, Neurodermatitis, Scabies, Eczema and Other diseases (Atopic Dermatitis, Chronic Urticaria, Lichen Planus, Herpes Zoster, Melasma, Warts and Etc.). Based on studies of patients reveals that 65.4% of them are anxiety, depression - 56.2%, both anxiety and depression in 24.7%, there figures higher than the dates of other authorizes. As a result of a direct link research risk disorder depressive spectrum with sex, age; in woman anxiety and depression occurs more frequently than men, and anxiety occurs more frequently in young age. Especially there are hight frequencies of manifestation of abuse in patients with Psoriasis (anxiety - 83.3%, depression - 69.4%, both - 38.8%), Eczema (anxiety - 73.3%, depression - 56.6%, both - 26.7%), Acne (anxiety - 78.4%, depression - 54%, both - 21.6%), Vitiligo (anxiety - 66.7%, depression - 60%, both - 33.3%). Our study noticed higher dates of anxiety and depression than the dates of other outhorizes. PMID:26087735

  10. PSYCHOSOMATIC ASPECTS IN PATIENTS WITH DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Tsintsadze, N; Beridze, L; Tsintsadze, N; Krichun, Y; Tsivadze, N; Tsintsadze, M

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the magnitude of anxiety and depression in our common dermatological patients and its correlation with age, sex. For this purpose, we used Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale HADS. The psychometric validity of HADS has been established by validating the questionnaire against the structured psychiatric interviews. A study of anxiety and depression in patients with dermatologic diseases was conducted on the basis of outpatients department in 211 patients with dermatologic diseases; among them were 107 male and 104 female, aged 16 to 75 years. Among them were patients with Acne, Alopecia Areata, Psoriasis, Vitiligo, Neurodermatitis, Scabies, Eczema and Other diseases (Atopic Dermatitis, Chronic Urticaria, Lichen Planus, Herpes Zoster, Melasma, Warts and Etc.). Based on studies of patients reveals that 65.4% of them are anxiety, depression - 56.2%, both anxiety and depression in 24.7%, there figures higher than the dates of other authorizes. As a result of a direct link research risk disorder depressive spectrum with sex, age; in woman anxiety and depression occurs more frequently than men, and anxiety occurs more frequently in young age. Especially there are hight frequencies of manifestation of abuse in patients with Psoriasis (anxiety - 83.3%, depression - 69.4%, both - 38.8%), Eczema (anxiety - 73.3%, depression - 56.6%, both - 26.7%), Acne (anxiety - 78.4%, depression - 54%, both - 21.6%), Vitiligo (anxiety - 66.7%, depression - 60%, both - 33.3%). Our study noticed higher dates of anxiety and depression than the dates of other outhorizes.

  11. BIOLOGICS IN DERMATOLOGIC THERAPY – AN UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    Coondoo, Arijit

    2009-01-01

    Biologics are protein molecules which are used in various diseases to target the specific points in the immunopathogenesis of the diseases. The molecules are produced by recombinant DNA technology. The molecules bind to the specific targets without interfering wtih rest of the pathogenetic pathways. Therefore the so called ‘immunosuppressives’ have, although, a broader broader spectrum of action on immune system, their side-effects are also equally more. The biologics, because of their spefic action on the immune system, have very little side effects. The biologics which have revolutionized the treatment of various dermatologic diseases have been discussed here. PMID:20161849

  12. Clinical photography in the dermatology practice.

    PubMed

    Witmer, William K; Lebovitz, Peter J

    2012-09-01

    Photography has been accepted for decades as a standard means for documenting dermatologic conditions and as an adjunct to their treatment, in both medical practice and research. The emergence of low-cost easy-to-use digital imaging systems has made good-quality photography more accessible to practitioners, while providing improved functionality in the clinical environment. Primary concerns are controlling lighting and positioning to provide a clear record of the patients skin condition and maintaining consistency over time to assure meaningful comparison of clinical end points.

  13. Poverty, health and development in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Aldo

    2007-10-01

    The WHO Constitution states that "The enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political, economic or social condition." The right to health means that governments must generate conditions in which everyone can be as healthy as possible. Such conditions range from ensuring availability of health services, healthy and safe working conditions, adequate housing and nutritious food. In this report the author analyzes the relationship among health, dermatology and development and tries to find out what the scientific world, including dermatologists, could do for the improvement of health systems.

  14. Home-use devices in aesthetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Keller, Emily C

    2014-12-01

    The world of aesthetic medicine is increasingly a consumer-driven market with a wide variety of home-use devices from which the consumer can choose for treating hair removal, hair loss, acne, facial rejuvenation, and other dermatologic conditions. Where these devices fit in the physician practice and consumer routine can be confusing, as scientific studies may be weak or lacking. The specifications, price, ease-of-use, maintenance, and technology can differ greatly between devices. Thus, the physician and consumer need to define exp. PMID:25830253

  15. Photonics in dermatology and aesthetic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehlmann, C.

    2006-02-01

    This paper provides an overview of the recent developments of photonics in dermatology and aesthetic applications. The range of products covers lasers, continuous Xenon lamps, Intense Pulsed Light systems, and LEDs. We will mention several applications and how different photonics systems are used. We will also discuss methods combining photonics with other technologies. For example, in Photo Dynamic Therapy (PDT) this includes a drugs, or equally the combination of intense light pulses with Radio Frequency (RF) for applications like hair removal. We will also describe some new developments in photonics technology that affect the development of new products, showing the direction of market development. Additionally, some examples of new technology are shown.

  16. Relaxation strategies for patients during dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Shenefelt, Philip D

    2010-07-01

    Patient stress and anxiety are common preoperatively and during dermatologic procedures and surgeries. Stress and anxiety can occasionally interfere with performance of procedures or surgery and can induce hemodynamic instability, such as elevated blood pressure or syncope, as well as producing considerable discomfort for some patients. Detection of excess stress and anxiety in patients can allow the opportunity for corrective or palliative measures. Slower breathing, biofeedback, progressive muscular relaxation, guided imagery, hypnosis, meditation and music can help calm and rebalance the patient's autonomic nervous system and immune functioning. Handheld miniaturized heart rate variability biofeedback devices are now available. The relaxation response can easily be taught. Guided imagery can be recorded or live. Live rapid induction hypnosis followed by deepening and then self-guided imagery requires no experience on the part of the patient but does require training and experience on the part of a provider. Recorded hypnosis inductions may also be used. Meditation generally requires more prior experience and training, but is useful when the patient already is skilled in it. Live, guided meditation or meditation recordings may be used. Relaxing recorded music from speakers or headphones or live performance music may also be employed to ease discomfort and improve the patient's attitude for dermatologic procedures and surgeries.

  17. The use of photodynamic therapy in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Babilas, P; Szeimies, R M

    2010-10-01

    In dermatology, topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a well established treatment modality which has mainly shown to be effective for dermato-oncologic conditions like actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease, in-situ squamous cell carcinoma and superficial basal cell carcinoma. However, a therapeutical benefit of PDT is also evident for inflammatory dermatoses like localized scleroderma, acne vulgaris and granuloma annulare as well as for aesthetic indications like photo aged skin or sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Recent work has been focused on the development and evaluation of topical photosensitizers like the hem precursor 5-aminolevulinic acid or its methyl ester inducing photosensitizing porphyrins. These drugs do not induce strong generalized cutaneous photosensitization like the systemically applied porphyrins or their derivatives. For dermatological purposes incoherent lamps or LED arrays can be used for light activation. Depending on the applied light dose and the concentration of the photosensitizer either cytotoxic effects resulting in tumor destruction or immunomodulatory effects improving the inflammatory conditions occur. Treating superficial oncologic lesions (tumor thickness < 2-3 mm) cure rates achieved by PDT are equal to the cure rates of the respective standard therapeutic procedure. The benefits of PDT are the low level of invasiveness and the excellent cosmetic results after treatment. PMID:20930696

  18. Jojoba in dermatology: a succinct review.

    PubMed

    Pazyar, N; Yaghoobi, R; Ghassemi, M R; Kazerouni, A; Rafeie, E; Jamshydian, N

    2013-12-01

    Phytomedicine has been successfully used in dermatology horizon for thousands of years. Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) is a long-lived, drought resistant, perennial plant with interesting economic value as it is processed for liquid wax production. The jojoba plant produces esters of long-chain alcohols and fatty acids (waxes) as a seed lipid energy reserve. The liquid wax is an important substrate for a variety of industrial applications and is used in skin treatment preparations. The oil from the jojoba plant is the main biological source of wax esters and has a multitude of potential applications. The review of literatures suggest that jojoba has anti-inflammatory effect and it can be used on a variety of skin conditions including skin infections, skin aging, as well as wound healing. Moreover, jojoba has been shown to play a role in cosmetics formulas such as sunscreens and moisturizers and also enhances the absorption of topical drugs. The intention of the review is to summarize the data regarding the uses of jojoba in dermatology for readers and researchers.

  19. Relaxation strategies for patients during dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Shenefelt, Philip D

    2010-07-01

    Patient stress and anxiety are common preoperatively and during dermatologic procedures and surgeries. Stress and anxiety can occasionally interfere with performance of procedures or surgery and can induce hemodynamic instability, such as elevated blood pressure or syncope, as well as producing considerable discomfort for some patients. Detection of excess stress and anxiety in patients can allow the opportunity for corrective or palliative measures. Slower breathing, biofeedback, progressive muscular relaxation, guided imagery, hypnosis, meditation and music can help calm and rebalance the patient's autonomic nervous system and immune functioning. Handheld miniaturized heart rate variability biofeedback devices are now available. The relaxation response can easily be taught. Guided imagery can be recorded or live. Live rapid induction hypnosis followed by deepening and then self-guided imagery requires no experience on the part of the patient but does require training and experience on the part of a provider. Recorded hypnosis inductions may also be used. Meditation generally requires more prior experience and training, but is useful when the patient already is skilled in it. Live, guided meditation or meditation recordings may be used. Relaxing recorded music from speakers or headphones or live performance music may also be employed to ease discomfort and improve the patient's attitude for dermatologic procedures and surgeries. PMID:20677535

  20. Platelet-rich plasma: applications in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Conde Montero, E; Fernández Santos, M E; Suárez Fernández, R

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, the use of platelet-rich plasma has increased notably in a range of diseases and settings. Uses of these products now go beyond skin rejuvenation therapy in patients with facial ageing. Good outcomes for other dermatological indications such as skin ulcers and, more recently, alopecia have been reported in case series and controlled studies. However, these indications are not currently included in the labeling given that stronger scientific evidence is required to support their real benefits. With the increased use of these products, dermatologists need to become familiar with the underlying biological principles and able to critically assess the quality and outcomes of the studies of these products in different skin diseases.

  1. Evaluating clinical dermatology practice in medical undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Casanova, J M; Sanmartín, V; Martí, R M; Morales, J L; Soler, J; Purroy, F; Pujol, R

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of competences (the set of knowledge, skills and attitudes required to perform a job to a professional level) is considered a fundamental part of medical training. Dermatology competences should include, in addition to effective clinical interviewing and detailed descriptions of skin lesions, appropriate management (diagnosis, differentiation, and treatment) of common skin disorders and tumors. Such competences can only be acquired during hospital clerkships. As a way of certifying these competences, we propose evaluating the different components as follows: knowledge, via clinical examinations or critical incident discussions; communication and certain instrumental skills, via structured workplace observation and scoring using a set of indicators; and attitudes, via joint evaluation by staff familiar with the student.

  2. Dermatologic therapeutics: thalidomide. A practical guide.

    PubMed

    Rosenbach, M; Werth, Victoria P

    2007-01-01

    Thalidomide was first introduced in the 1950s, and its widespread use led to thousands of birth defects through the 1960s; it was quickly withdrawn from the market. A fortuitous discovery identified during treatment of patients with erythema nodosum leprosum led to the recognition of the potent anti-inflammatory effects of thalidomide and a resurgence of interest in the drug. In the ensuing decades, thalidomide has been recognized as a potential treatment option in a number of dermatologic conditions. This article reviews the history, pharmacology, mechanisms of action, and off-label uses of thalidomide and serves as a guide for dermatologists to comfortably and safely institute and monitor thalidomide to patients with cutaneous disease.

  3. Instant color print photography in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, C B

    1982-06-01

    The use of instant color print photography in dermatology is explored and evaluated in this article. Recent advances in the technology of instant photography have made it possible for the creation of fast, accurate, clinical photographs by people with little experience or training. The Polaroid SX-70 Sonar camera with the CU-70 close-up kit is evaluated and compared to the Kodak instant close-up camera kit as marketed by the Lester A. Dine Company. The advantages and disadvantages of the two camera systems are presented. Techniques such as lighting, proper distance, and exposure are discussed with mention of the method of converting prints into slides. The many and varied applications of this modality are reviewed. Rapid, sharp, reproducible clinical photographs can now be obtained instantaneously by the busy clinician.

  4. Aloe vera in dermatology: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Feily, A; Namazi, M R

    2009-02-01

    Aloe vera Linne or aloe barbadensis Miller is a succulent from the Aloe family (400 different species), a tropical plant which is easily grown in hot and dry climates and widely distributed in Asia, Africa and other tropical areas. The use of aloe vera is being promoted for a large variety of conditions. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize all dermatology-oriented in vitro and in vivo experiments and clinical trials on aloe vera preparations. Extensive literature search were carried out to identify all in vitro and in vivo studies as well as clinical trials on the subject. Data were extracted from these in a predefined standardized manner. Forty studies were located. The results suggest that oral administration of aloe vera in mice is effective on wound healing, can decrease the number and size of papillomas and reduce the incidence of tumors and leishmania parasitemia by >90% in the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Topical application of aloe vera is not an effective prevention for radiation-induced injuries and has no sunburn or suntan protection. It can be effective for genital herpes, psoriasis, human papilloma virus, seborrheic dermatitis, aphthous stomatitis, xerosis, lichen planus, frostbite, burn, wound healing and inflammation. It can also be used as a biological vehicle and an anti-microbial and antifungal agent and also as a candidate for photodynamic therapy of some kinds of cancer. Even though there are some promising results with the use of aloe vera for diverse dermatologic conditions, clinical effectiveness of oral and topical aloe vera is not sufficiently and meticulously explored as yet.

  5. Dermatology in the North American Indian/Alaska Native population.

    PubMed

    Kryatova, Maria S; Okoye, Ginette A

    2016-02-01

    Dermatology is greatly understudied in the American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) population. This topic deserves attention in light of the changing demographics of the United States and the healthcare disparities faced by AIAN, including access to dermatologic care. In this review, we discuss disorders that are more prevalent or otherwise important in the AIAN population, such as cutaneous malignancies, photodermatoses, acanthosis nigricans, connective tissue disorders, cutaneous infections, hypertrophic scar formation, and Heck's disease. We aim to provide an updated review and increase awareness of the dermatologic needs of the AIAN population.

  6. A Concentrated Teaching Exercise for Introducing Clinical Dermatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binford, Robert T.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    At Cornell University Medical College one 3-hour session in dermatology is required during the second year. A teaching exercise has been developed that combines a lecture, laboratory exercises, and presentations of patients. (Author)

  7. High frequency ultrasound with color Doppler in dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    Barcaui, Elisa de Oliveira; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Lopes, Flavia Paiva Proença Lobo; Piñeiro-Maceira, Juan; Barcaui, Carlos Baptista

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a method of imaging that classically is used in dermatology to study changes in the hypoderma, as nodules and infectious and inflammatory processes. The introduction of high frequency and resolution equipments enabled the observation of superficial structures, allowing differentiation between skin layers and providing details for the analysis of the skin and its appendages. This paper aims to review the basic principles of high frequency ultrasound and its applications in different areas of dermatology. PMID:27438191

  8. Antimalarials in dermatology: mechanism of action, indications, and side effects.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Caruncho, C; Bielsa Marsol, I

    2014-04-01

    Antimalarial drugs have been in common use in dermatology since the 1950s. Their mechanism of action is complex, and it is now known that they act through various pathways. We review the indications for antimalarials in dermatology, their adverse effects, and some less well-known effects, such as their antithrombotic and hypolipidemic action. The most recent recommendations concerning ophthalmological screening in patients on antimalarials are also reviewed.

  9. Dermatologic signs in patients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Strumia, Renata

    2005-01-01

    Eating disorders are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in adolescent females and young women. They are associated with severe medical and psychological consequences, including death, osteoporosis, growth delay and developmental delay. Dermatologic symptoms are almost always detectable in patients with severe anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), and awareness of these may help in the early diagnosis of hidden AN or BN. Cutaneous manifestations are the expression of the medical consequences of starvation, vomiting, abuse of drugs (such as laxatives and diuretics), and of psychiatric morbidity. These manifestations include xerosis, lanugo-like body hair, telogen effluvium, carotenoderma, acne, hyperpigmentation, seborrheic dermatitis, acrocyanosis, perniosis, petechiae, livedo reticularis, interdigital intertrigo, paronychia, generalized pruritus, acquired striae distensae, slower wound healing, prurigo pigmentosa, edema, linear erythema craquele, acral coldness, pellagra, scurvy, and acrodermatitis enteropathica. The most characteristic cutaneous sign of vomiting is Russell's sign (knuckle calluses). Symptoms arising from laxative or diuretic abuse include adverse reactions to drugs. Symptoms arising from psychiatric morbidity (artefacta) include the consequences of self-induced trauma. The role of the dermatologist in the management of eating disorders is to make an early diagnosis of the 'hidden' signs of these disorders in patients who tend to minimize or deny their disorder, and to avoid over-treatment of conditions which are overemphasized by patients' distorted perception of skin appearance. Even though skin signs of eating disorders improve with weight gain, the dermatologist will be asked to treat the dermatological conditions mentioned above. Xerosis improves with moisturizing ointments and humidification of the environment. Acne may be treated with topical benzoyl peroxide, antibacterials or azaleic acid; these agents may be

  10. X-ray microanalysis in dermatology

    SciTech Connect

    Forslind, B.

    1982-01-01

    The current trends in X-ray microanalysis as applied to dermatology are described by reviewing papers which have made a significant contribution to the field. Under separate headings, the analysis of hair, nail and epidermis is reviewed with an emphasis on quantitative results. Our recent work on green hair has revealed a higher than normal copper content derived from copper-containing tap and pool water. In nail the sulfur content was shown to be evenly distributed throughout the nail plate and the calcium content to be too low to influence on the ''hardness'' of the nail. Our study of nails from cystic fibrosis patients showed that the Na, K, and C1 content increased, which is diagnostic for the disease, and that the Ca content could be used to monitor the preparation of nail samples for analysis. With the aid of X-ray microanalysis it has been possible for the first time to study the electrolyte composition of the different strata of epidermis by using freeze-fixed and freeze-dried cryosections. Only the basal stratum maintains a normal Na/K quotient and all cell layers above that one appear to have dysfunctional cell membranes, i.e. inadequate pumping of Na out of the cells. A subsequent study of the effects on normal epidermis by DNCB showed that after 6 hours post-treatment, abnormal Na, K and P levels appeared which differed from those seen in post-mortem changes of normal epidermis.

  11. [Histamine intolerance--possible dermatologic sequences].

    PubMed

    Lugović-Mihić, Liborija; Seserko, Ana; Duvancić, Tomislav; Situm, Mirna; Mihić, Josip

    2012-12-01

    Although histamine intolerance (HIT) is not very frequently encountered, it can have serious consequences. Food intolerance is a non allergic hypersensitivity to food that does not include the immune system even though the symptoms are similar to those of IgE-mediated allergic reactions. HIT apparently develops as a result of an impaired diamine oxidase (DAO) activity due to gastrointestinal disease or through DAO inhibition, as well as through a genetic predisposition which was proven in a number of patients. The intake of histamine-rich foods as well as alcohol or drugs which cause either the release of histamine or the blocking of DAO can lead to various disorders in many organs (gastrointestinal system, skin, lungs, cardiovascular system and brain), depending on the expression of histamine receptors. Dermatologic sequels can be rashes, itch, urticaria, angioedema, dermatitis, eczema and even acne, rosacea, psoriasis, and other. Recognizing the symptoms due to HIT is especially important in treating such patients. The significance of HIT in patients with atopic dermatitis in whom the benefit of a low histamine diet has been proven is becoming increasingly understood recently. Because of the possibility of symptoms affecting numerous organs, a detailed history of symptoms following the intake of histamine-rich foods or drugs that interfere with histamine metabolism is essential for making the diagnosis of HIT. Considering that such symptoms can be the result of multiple factors, the existence of HIT is usually underestimated, but considerable expectations are being made from future studies.

  12. Laboratory tests and compliance of dermatologic outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaehwan

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory tests, including blood tests and urine analysis, are frequently performed in the dermatology outpatient clinic, but doctors often do not consider the cognitive or psychological effect of the examinations. Based on terror management theory, we hypothesized that performing laboratory tests increases the patient’s fear of mortality, and therefore has a positive effect on the patient’s attitude toward the doctor’s recommendations and willingness to accept them. The study employed a single factor between-subjects design, using a questionnaire completed by the patients. One group consisted of patients who had undergone laboratory tests 1 week before the survey, and the other group consisted of patients who had not undergone a laboratory test. Although the differences between two groups were not statistically significant, the patients who had laboratory tests had tendency to show even lower positive attitude toward the doctor’s recommendations and less intention to follow the recommendations. In contrast to our hypothesis, performing laboratory tests does not subliminally increase patients’ fears or anxieties about their disease or their compliance with doctors’ recommendations. PMID:24555101

  13. Use of Polyphenolic Compounds in Dermatologic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Costa, Adilson; Bonner, Michael Yi; Arbiser, Jack L

    2016-08-01

    Polyphenols are a widely used class of compounds in dermatology. While phenol itself, the most basic member of the phenol family, is chemically synthesized, most polyphenolic compounds are found in plants and form part of their defense mechanism against decomposition. Polyphenolic compounds, which include phenolic acids, flavonoids, stilbenes, and lignans, play an integral role in preventing the attack on plants by bacteria and fungi, as well as serving as cross-links in plant polymers. There is also mounting evidence that polyphenolic compounds play an important role in human health as well. One of the most important benefits, which puts them in the spotlight of current studies, is their antitumor profile. Some of these polyphenolic compounds have already presented promising results in either in vitro or in vivo studies for non-melanoma skin cancer and melanoma. These compounds act on several biomolecular pathways including cell division cycle arrest, autophagy, and apoptosis. Indeed, such natural compounds may be of potential for both preventive and therapeutic fields of cancer. This review evaluates the existing scientific literature in order to provide support for new research opportunities using polyphenolic compounds in oncodermatology. PMID:27164914

  14. Biologics in Dermatology: An Integrated Review

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2014-01-01

    The advent of biologics in dermatologic treatment armentarium has added refreshing dimensions, for it is a major breakthrough. Several agents are now available for use. It is therefore imperative to succinctly comprehend their pharmacokinetics for their apt use. A concerted endeavor has been made to delve on this subject. The major groups of biologics have been covered and include: Drugs acting against TNF-α, Alefacept, Ustekinumab, Rituximab, IVIG and Omalizumab. The relevant pharmacokinetic characteristics have been detailed. Their respective label (approved) and off-label (unapproved) indications have been defined, highlighting their dosage protocol, availability and mode of administration. The evidence level of each indication has also been discussed to apprise the clinician of their current and prospective uses. Individual anti-TNF drugs are not identical in their actions and often one is superior to the other in a particular disease. Hence, the section on anti-TNF agents mentions the literature on each drug separately, and not as a group. The limitations for their use have also been clearly brought out. PMID:25284845

  15. Dermatologic Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Dedania, Bhavtosh; Wu, George Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects millions of people worldwide, and an estimated 3.2 million people in the United States. HCV is a hepatotropic and lymphotropic virus that causes not only liver disease, but also a significant number of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs). Up to 74% of patients affected by HCV will have HCV-related EHMs of some severity in their lifetime. The EHMs vary from simple cutaneous palpable purpura to complex lymphoproliferative disorders, including lymphomas and immune-complex deposit diseases causing local and/or systemic complications. Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is manifested by multiple systemic organ involvement, mainly skin, kidney, peripheral nerves, and salivary glands, and less frequently causes widespread vasculitis and malignant lymphoma. MC affects up to 3% of HCV-infected patients with cryoglobulinemia of clinical significance, i.e. >6%. Severe disease requires immunosuppressive or plasma exchange therapy. HCV prevalence in the United States in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) was reported to be 66%, much higher than that in general population. Therefore, all patients with PCT should be screened for HCV. The skin rash of PCT varies from large blisters to small vesicles and/or milia on the hands. Skin manifestations due to PCT usually respond to anti‐HCV treatment together with reducing skin sun exposure, avoiding triggers, having routine phlebotomy (especially for people with chronic iron overload states), and using chloroquine. Lichen planus (LP), which typically affects both the skin and oral mucosa is a chronic inflammatory disease of squamous cell origin affecting about 1% of the worldwide population. The prevalence of HCV in patients with LP varies based on geographic location. We review here the basic pathophysiology, clinical features, and management of dermatologic manifestations of HCV. PMID:26357639

  16. [Dermatological diseases of the external male genitalia : Part 2: Infectious and malignant dermatological].

    PubMed

    Köhn, F M; Schultheiss, D; Krämer-Schultheiss, K

    2016-07-01

    The urological and andrological examination of male patients should include inspection of the genital skin in order to detect malignant neoplasms, such as erythroplasia of Queyrat and infectious diseases, such as genital warts (condylomata acuminata). Independent of the incidental finding of relevant dermatological alterations in the genital area, sexually transmitted diseases such as syphilis must again be considered more often as the incidence has greatly increased in Germany during the last few years. In addition, urologists should be able to adequately advise patients on all aspects of diseases caused by human papillomavirus. As patients are often alarmed by genital skin lesions and worried that the sex life can be impaired, the initiation of adequate therapy is of great importance. PMID:27364818

  17. Applications of the 308-nm excimer laser in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, A.; Kemeny, L.

    2006-05-01

    Excimer lasers contain a mixture of a noble inert gas and a halogen, which form excited dimers only in the activated state. High-energy current is used to produce these dimers, which have a very short lifetime, and after their fast dissociation they release the excitation energy through ultraviolet photons. The application of these lasers proved to be successful in medicine, including the field of ophthalmology, cardiology, angiology, dentistry, orthopaedics, and, in recent years, dermatology. For medical purposes, the 193-nm argon fluoride, the 248-nm krypton fluoride, the 351-nm xenon fluoride, and the 308-nm xenon chloride lasers are used. Recently, the 308-nm xenon chloride laser has gained much attention as a very effective treatment modality in dermatological disorders. It was successfully utilized in psoriasis; later, it proved to be useful in handling other lightsensitive skin disorders and even in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. This review summarizes the possible applications of this promising tool in dermatology.

  18. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) for cosmetics and dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, Mossum K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-02-01

    Over the last few years, low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to be beneficial to the field of aesthetic medicine, specifically aesthetic dermatology. LLLT encompasses a broad spectrum of procedures, primarily cosmetic, which provide treatment options for a myriad of dermatological conditions. Dermatological disorders involving inflammation, acne, scars, aging and pigmentation have been investigated with the assistance of animal models and clinical trials. The most commercially successful use of LLLT is for managing alopecia (hair loss) in both men and women. LLLT also seems to play an influential role in procedures such as lipoplasty and liposuction, allowing for noninvasive and nonthermal methods of subcutaneous fat reduction. LLLT offers a means to address such conditions with improved efficacy versatility and no known side-effects; however comprehensive literature reports covering the utility of LLLT are scarce and thus the need for coverage arises.

  19. Achieving hemostasis in dermatology-Part II: Topical hemostatic agents

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Jaimie B.; Kaur, Ravneet R.; Siegel, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Bleeding is a common occurrence during any dermatologic surgery that disrupts blood vessels. The complications of excess bleeding can include delayed wound healing, hematoma formation, infection, dehiscence, and necrosis. In part one of this review, we discussed the pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative management of patients undergoing dermatologic surgery. In Part two, we discuss traditional and new topical hemostatic agents used to achieve hemostasis in dermatological procedures and surgery. We will evaluate the caustic and non-caustic hemostatic agents as well as hemostatic dressings. The mechanisms of action, side effect profile, and advantages and disadvantages of the topical hemostatic agents are provided. Sources for this article were found searching the English literature in PubMed for the time period 1940 to March 2012. A thorough bibliography search was also performed and key references examined. PMID:23984226

  20. [MRSA clones identified in outpatient dermatology clinics].

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Shino; Ito, Teruyo; Misawa, Shigeki; Yoshiike, Takashi; Oguri, Toyoko; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To know the characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains disseminating through the Japanese community, we have determined types of Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements, Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST), and carriages of four exotoxin genes (toxic-shock syndrome toxin, Panton-Valentine Leukocidine, and exfoliative toxins a and b) using 54 MRSA strains isolated from outpatients attending dermatology clinics at the four university hospitals of Juntendo University. Ten clonal complexes and 12 SCCmec types have been identified. As a result, more than 15 MRSA clones that were defined by the combination of genotype and SCCmec type, were identified. Among them, Clonal Complex (CC) 5-type IIa SCCmec strains were the most major (16 strains). In contrast to the fact that CC5- type IIa SCCmec strains known as a hospital-associated MRSA clone in Japan carried toxic-shock syndrome toxin gene (tst), only 2 of 16 strains have been shown to carry tst. Thirty-eight (70.4%) of isolates belonged to the clones distinct from the CC5-type IIa SCCmec strains. Among them, CC8 strains were major (12 strains), which contained 9 tst-positive CC8-type IVl SCCmec clones and a CC8-type IVa SCCmec strain carrying the Panton Valentine Leukocidin gene (lukS, F-PV). Clones related to impetigo were also identified: 7 exfoliative toxin b (etb) -positive clones, CC89-type IIa SCCmec and CC89-type V SCCmec strains; and 2 exfoliative toxin a (eta) -positive CC121-type V SCCmec strains. Other clones were as follows: CC1-type IVa SCCmec, CC8-type I SCCmec, CC81-type IVg SCCmec, CC97-type IVc SCCmec, CC91-type IVa SCCmec, CC59-type IVg SCCmec, CC45-type IIn SCCmec, CC89-SCCmec nontypeable, and CC8-type IVm, novel subtype of type IV SCCmec were identified in this study. Our data showed that many novel MRSA clones have emerged in the community. PMID:25764806

  1. The role of dimethylaminoethanol in cosmetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    . Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have been localized to keratinocytes, melanocytes and dermal fibroblasts, whereas nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been found in keratinocytes. The role of acetylcholine and the role of DMAE as a modulator of acetylcholine-mediated functions in the skin remain to be elucidated.Thus, the benefits of DMAE in dermatology include a potential anti-inflammatory effect and a documented increase in skin firmness with possible improvement in underlying facial muscle tone. Studies are needed to evaluate the relative efficacy of DMAE compared with other skin-care regimens (e.g., topical antioxidant creams, alpha-hydroxy acids). PMID:15675889

  2. The role of dimethylaminoethanol in cosmetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    . Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have been localized to keratinocytes, melanocytes and dermal fibroblasts, whereas nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been found in keratinocytes. The role of acetylcholine and the role of DMAE as a modulator of acetylcholine-mediated functions in the skin remain to be elucidated.Thus, the benefits of DMAE in dermatology include a potential anti-inflammatory effect and a documented increase in skin firmness with possible improvement in underlying facial muscle tone. Studies are needed to evaluate the relative efficacy of DMAE compared with other skin-care regimens (e.g., topical antioxidant creams, alpha-hydroxy acids).

  3. Depression, Anxiety and Stress among Saudi Arabian Dermatology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Anwar E.; Al-Dahmash, Abdulaziz M.; Al-Boqami, Qamra T.; Al-Tebainawi, Yazeed F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress among Saudi Arabian dermatology patients and to assess associations with sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 300 consecutive dermatology patients visiting King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in August 2015. The Arabic version of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale was used to screen for symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress. Quality of life (QOL) was assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index. Results: A total of 254 dermatology patients participated in the study (response rate: 84.7%). The prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress was 12.6%, 22.1% and 7.5%, respectively. The presence of at least one of these negative emotional states was noted among 24.4% of the cohort (95% confidence interval: 19.3–30.2%). Depression was significantly higher among subjects who lacked family support (26.5% versus 10.7%; P = 0.006) while anxiety was less common among patients who engaged in physical exercise (14.5% versus 29.4%; P = 0.005). According to the multivariate logistic regression analysis, poor QOL and a lack of family support were significant predictors of a negative emotional state. Conclusion: Almost a quarter of the studied Saudi Arabian dermatology patients were found to suffer from at least one negative emotional state. A lack of family support and poor QOL were the primary factors associated with a negative emotional state. Interventional studies are needed to examine the effects of social and family support on psychological conditions among Saudi Arabian dermatology patients. PMID:27226914

  4. Dimethyl sulfoxide: history, chemistry, and clinical utility in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Kara; Capriotti, Joseph A

    2012-09-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide is a colorless liquid derived as a by-product from wood pulp in the production of paper. This colorless liquid found immediate application as a polar, aprotic solvent miscible with water and able to dissolve an enormous catalog of polar and nonpolar small molecules. It is presently scarcely used in dermatology, but given its useful properties as a penetration-enhancing solvent excipient and active anti-inflammatory pharmaceutical agent, dimethyl sulfoxide has the potential to be used in a much broader capacity. The authors review the history, chemistry, and clinical utility of dimethyl sulfoxide as it pertains to dermatology.

  5. CLEANSERS AND THEIR ROLE IN VARIOUS DERMATOLOGICAL DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha

    2011-01-01

    The art of cleansing has progressed immensely over several thousand years from simply scraping the skin to an exercise in relaxation and improvement in the skin's health and appearance in the present day. Soaps – the basic cleansing agent has also undergone a sea change in its evolution with many variants and newer constituents being incorporated into it. In dermatological disorders like acne, rosacea, atopic dermatitis, photoaging, ‘sensitive skin’, occupational dermatosis cleansers may have a beneficial role along with other therapeutic measures. With the advent of aesthetic dermatology, the act of cleansing and the use of various cleansing agents prior to aesthetic procedures has also assumed significance. PMID:21572782

  6. Manifesto of space medicine: the next dermatologic frontier.

    PubMed

    Toback, A C; Kohn, S R

    1989-03-01

    As the fields of astronomy, cosmology, and space travel move rapidly forward, so must space medicine. The manned space program and medical knowledge and support have developed in tandem. Dermatology will play a fundamental role in survival during space flight. This paper reviews past, present, and future accomplishments of the space program as they relate to medicine and characterizes some of dermatology's multiple roles in the future. It further explores the immunologic alterations noted during space flight and the attendant implications for health and well-being both in flight and on return to Earth, or to an Earthlike environment.

  7. HIV and AIDS in inpatient dermatology. Approach to the consultation.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, M; Berman, B

    2000-07-01

    In the inpatient setting, the dermatologic consultant is called on to address the whole spectrum of cutaneous disease seen in HIV/AIDS patients, with severity varying from severe life-threatening to less serious conditions that dramatically affect quality of life. Rather than reviewing a "laundry list" of conditions associated with HIV/AIDS or the most severe conditions, this article aims to demonstrate a systematic approach to inpatient dermatology consultation in HIV/AIDS patients and to briefly review several common and interesting topics frequently addressed in the inpatient setting (e.g., medications issues, and phototherapy in HIV-infected patients).

  8. Practice and Educational Gaps in Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Abigail; Sobanko, Joseph F; Alam, Murad

    2016-07-01

    This article identifies gaps in the practice of cosmetic dermatology and cosmetics education, and how to overcome these limitations. There is a rapid development of new devices and procedures, with limited data, patient-reported outcomes, and comparative effectiveness research from which to develop best cosmetic practice. There is a need for increased research and funding dedicated to these goals, improved and convenient training for staff to adopt new devices/procedures, and continuous evolution of databases to pool outcome data and develop outcome sets. Resident education can be improved by dedicated resident cosmetic clinics, didactic teaching from visiting professors, attendance of cosmetic dermatology courses and meetings, and encouraging postresidency training.

  9. Application of in vivo laser scanning microscope in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, Juergen; Richter, H.; Otberg, N.; Lawrenz, F.; Blume-Peytavi, U.; Sterry, W.

    2003-10-01

    The state of the art of in-vivo and in-vitro penetration measurements of topically applied substances is described. Only optical techniques represent online measuring methods based on the absorption or scattering properties of the topically applied substances. Laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has become a promising method for investigations in dermatology and skin physiology, after it was possible to analyze the skin surface on any body side in-vivo. In the present paper the application of a dermatological laser scanning microscope for penetration and distribution measurements of topically applied substances is described. The intercellular and follicular penetration pathways were studied.

  10. Women in medicine and dermatology: history and advances*

    PubMed Central

    França, Katlein; Ledon, Jennifer; Savas, Jessica; Nouri, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    The history of women in medicine has been marked by many challenges and achievements. Although the role of women in the "art of healing" can be traced back many centuries, only males are traditionally highlighted in history. Across antiquity, access to medical education was denied to females. Dermatology is a medical specialty in which women displayed particular skill and proficiency. Gradually, determination and competence allowed women to lay claim in an essentially male-dominated world. This article presents a brief review of the performance, progress and achievements of women in the history of medicine and dermatology. PMID:24626675

  11. Practice and Educational Gaps in Radiation Therapy in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Cognetta, Armand B; Wolfe, Christopher M; Goldberg, David J; Hong, Hyokyoung Grace

    2016-07-01

    Guidelines for appropriate use of superficial radiation therapy are based on decades of research; although no formal appropriate use criteria have been developed, they are warranted. Superficial radiation in the outpatient dermatologic setting is the least expensive form of radiation treatment. Although higher cure rates may be possible with Mohs surgery, this should never argue against dermatologists retaining and refining a modality, nor should we limit its use by our successors. Most important, our elderly and infirm patients should continue to benefit from superficial radiation therapy in outpatient dermatologic settings. PMID:27363889

  12. [Tropical medicine/tropical dermatology training in Tanzania and Ghana: Personal experience and selected case reports].

    PubMed

    Völker, K

    2015-05-01

    As a consultant for dermatology with special interested in tropical diseases, I accepted my employers offer (German Armed Forces) to start my training in tropical medicine and tropical dermatology in Africa. The dermatological part of the training was completed at the Regional Dermatology Training Centre (RDTC) in Moshi, Tanzania. This was followed by tropical medicine training at the Presbyterian Hospital in Agogo, Ghana. In this article, I report on my experiences in Africa and present selected case reports.

  13. Dermatologic Toxicities in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Multikinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Eaby-Sandy, Beth; Grande, Carolyn; Viale, Pamela Hallquist

    2012-01-01

    Targeted therapies have produced significant treatment advances for patients diagnosed with a variety of tumor types. These therapies are associated with unique dermatologic toxicities that may hamper treatment efforts and cause significant discomfort for patients. Prevention and management of these toxicities can allow patients to remain on therapy and hence receive maximum clinical benefit from the drug. PMID:25031940

  14. Occurrence of Malassezia species in healthy and dermatologically diseased dogs.

    PubMed

    Nardoni, S; Mancianti, F; Corazza, M; Rum, A

    2004-05-01

    The presence of Malassezia spp. yeasts was investigated in dermatological specimens of 224 dogs, 164 dermatologically diseased and 60 normal dogs. Subjects included in the study were of different breed, age, sex and habitat. Malassezia spp. positive cultures were obtained in 142 (63.4%) specimens: 67.6% from dermatologically diseased subjects and 51.6% from healthy dogs. Malassezia pachydermatis, either as a pure culture or in association with lipid-dependent species, was identified in 138 (97%) specimens. Malassezia furfur was identified in 69 (48.6%) specimens and was associated with other Malassezia species in 68 dogs, as a pure culture in one subject: at the best of our knowledge, this species was identified before as the sole species from canine dermatitis. Malassezia sympodialis was identified in 11 (7.7%) specimens, always in association with other species: it was never isolated from kennel dogs. Statistical analysis of data showed a very significant difference (P < 0.01) in the prevalence of isolation of Malassezia spp. between animals with and without dermatological signs, and in the distribution of cultural burden between diseased and healthy dogs. A statistically significant difference (P<0.05) was also detected in the group of animals between 1- and 5-years of age. No significant difference was found between male and female dogs. PMID:15281400

  15. Reproducible high-resolution multispectral image acquisition in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, Alexandru; Gardiazabal, José; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2015-07-01

    Multispectral image acquisitions are increasingly popular in dermatology, due to their improved spectral resolution which enables better tissue discrimination. Most applications however focus on restricted regions of interest, imaging only small lesions. In this work we present and discuss an imaging framework for high-resolution multispectral imaging on large regions of interest.

  16. Simulation of Skin Diseases for Teaching Dermatological Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, John M.; Hess, Alan C.

    1980-01-01

    A technique for simulating the papulosquamous skin diseases, using a computer, has been developed and tested with medical students and dermatologists to determine whether this type of simulation is suitable for training students in dermatological diagnosis. The results indicate that it appears to be feasible for training students in differential…

  17. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. 878.4630 Section 878.4630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  18. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. 878.4630 Section 878.4630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  19. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. 878.4630 Section 878.4630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  20. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. 878.4630 Section 878.4630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  1. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. 878.4630 Section 878.4630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  2. 75 FR 36101 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... was announced in the Federal Register of May 11, 2010 (75 FR 26264). The meeting was to discuss new... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The meeting of...

  3. Television depictions about dermatology and skin diseases in Seinfeld.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Jennifer L; Uchida, Tatsuo; Wagner, Richard F

    2010-01-01

    The iconic television situation comedy Seinfeld frequently referenced dermatologists and topics involving the integument, using satire for comedic effect. However, selecting satire to portray an already misunderstood and unknown subject matter may perpetuate incorrect public beliefs and stereotypes about those with skin diseases and diminish cultural sensitivity towards people who have dermatologic conditions and their caregivers.

  4. Primary Care of Adult Women: Common Dermatologic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Arlene M; Mhlaba, Julie; Roman, Carly

    2016-06-01

    Dermatologic disease often presents in the primary care setting. Therefore, it is important for the primary care provider to be familiar with the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of common skin conditions. This article provides an overview of acne, rosacea, melasma, vitiligo, alopecia, nonmelanoma, and melanoma skin cancer, dermatitis, and lichen sclerosus. PMID:27212088

  5. The Effect of Work Characteristics on Dermatologic Symptoms in Hairdressers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hairdressers in Korea perform various tasks and are exposed to health risk factors such as chemical substances or prolonged duration of wet work. The objective of this study is to provide descriptive statistics on the demographics and work characteristics of hairdressers in Korea and to identify work-related risk factors for dermatologic symptoms in hairdressers. Methods 1,054 hairdressers were selected and analyzed for this study. Independent variables were exposure to chemical substances, the training status of the hairdressers, and the main tasks required of them, and the dependent variable was the incidence of dermatologic symptoms. The relationships between work characteristics and dermatologic symptoms were evaluated by estimating odds ratios using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results Among the 1,054 study subjects, 212 hairdressers (20.1%) complained of dermatologic symptoms, and the symptoms were more prevalent in younger, unmarried or highly educated hairdressers. The main tasks that comprise the majority of the wet work were strictly determined by training status, since 96.5% of staff hairdressers identified washing as their main task, while only 1.5% and 2.0% of master and designer hairdressers, respectively, identified this as their main task. Multiple logistic regressions was performed to estimate odds ratios. While exposure to hairdressing chemicals showed no significant effect on the odds ratio for the incidence of dermatologic symptoms, higher odds ratios of dermatologic symptoms were shown in staff hairdressers (2.70, 95% CI: 1.32 - 5.51) and in hairdressers who perform washing as their main task (2.03, 95% CI: 1.22 - 3.37), after adjusting for general and work characteristics. Conclusions This study showed that the training status and main tasks of hairdressers are closely related to each other and that the training status and main tasks of hairdressers are related to the incidence of dermatologic symptoms. This suggests that

  6. Dermatological Findings in Turkish Paediatric Haematology-Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Uksal, Umit; Ozturk, Pinar; Colgecen, Emine; Taslidere, Nazan; Patiroglu, Turkan; Ozdemir, Mehmet Akif; Torun, Yasemin Altuner; Borlu, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Diagnoses of skin, mucosae, hair and nail manifestations in malignant diseases are often challenging because of life-threatening drug reactions, opportunistic infections or skin involvement of primary processes. Description of morphology, configuration and distribution of lesions is important in order to differentiate the self-healing eruptions from serious side effects of chemotherapy. There are case reports from Turkey including dermatological manifestations of malignancies and case series in adult patients but there are no published large group studies assessing all manifestations in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological features of dermatological findings in children with haemato-oncological diseases. Materials and Methods: The study was performed at the Erciyes University, Faculty of Medicine Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Clinic, Turkey. Three dermatologists daily consulted all patients admitted to the clinic during a one-year period. Results: The study group comprised of 157 children (79 female/78 male) aged 1–16 years (mean 7.19±4.63). Detailed dermatological examinations were performed, including oral-genital mucosae, hair and nails. Thorough skin examination revealed that 70% of the patients exhibited at least one dermatological finding. Generalized xerosis and hyperpigmentation were the most common findings among patients undergoing chemotherapy (24.19%). Multiple nevi on at least 10 covered areas were very frequent among patients undergoing long-term chemotherapy (18.47%). Three were identified as dysplastic nevus, but malignant transformation was not observed during the one-year study period. Conclusion: Regular dermatological consultation may help resolve the diagnostic and therapeutic problems in paediatric haemato-oncology clinics. PMID:27551173

  7. Assessment of medical students' proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    PubMed

    Ulman, Catherine A; Binder, Stephen Bruce; Borges, Nicole J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students' ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students' confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%). Many students (87.6%) felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training. PMID:25989840

  8. The "away" dermatology elective for visiting medical students: Educational opportunities and barriers.

    PubMed

    Philips, Rebecca C; Dhingra, Navin; Uchida, Tatsuo; Wagner, Richard F

    2009-01-01

    Dermatology electives allow medical students an opportunity to explore the field of dermatology. In order to gain greater exposure to the specialty of dermatology, some medical students have an interest in taking "away" dermatology electives at other U.S. medical schools. A telephone survey was conducted to better understand the opportunities and barriers that exist for visiting medical students to take an elective in dermatology. Areas of focus in the survey included dermatology elective offerings, institutional policies toward visiting students, academic requirements for visiting students, timing of electives, financial costs of electives incurred by the student and institutional and regional preferences of the host medical school. Survey results indicated considerable opportunities for medical students to explore the field of dermatology among U.S. medical schools, but variance among schools regarding the number and types of dermatology electives offered. Medical schools with dermatology residencies were statistically more likely to offer dermatology electives to visiting medical students than those that did not (p<0.0001). Students from schools that do not provide more advanced electives may find it difficult to explore the field beyond a general dermatology elective because of the limited availability of subspecialty elective rotations for visiting students. Other barriers for "away" electives include academic requirements, priority in course registration for a school's own students, differing rotation schedules, and additional financial costs. PMID:19951619

  9. [Tropical dermatology training in the Bundeswehr: Deployment in Manaus, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M

    2015-05-01

    Training in tropical dermatology at the Fundação de Medicina tropical (FMT-AM) in Manaus, Brazil, offers an ideal opportunity to become familiar with the broad spectrum of tropical skin-diseases which are endemic in the tropical rainforest of the Amazon region. Besides frequently observed cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis of the new world, mucocutaneous forms of leishmaniasis and all entities of the different deep mycoses of South America are also regularly diagnosed. Of special importance in the dermatological care of the population is the early diagnosis of all clinical forms of leprosy and the long-term care of HIV patients. Modern diagnostics, including histopathology and molecular biology analytical methods, enable patients at the FMT-AM to be diagnosed without having to solely rely on clinical presentation and epidemiological data.

  10. Allergic contact dermatitis in dermatologic surgery: review of common allergens.

    PubMed

    Butler, Lara; Mowad, Christen

    2013-01-01

    With the growing number of dermatologic surgeries performed each year comes an increased potential for patient exposure and sensitization to allergens. Patients are exposed to many well-documented allergens in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative settings during surgery. Postoperative skin complications of allergic contact dermatitis increase health care costs and cause patient suffering. Early recognition, diagnosis, and treatment by dermatologic surgeons are essential to decrease morbidity related to medically necessary and elective cutaneous surgeries. While a specific standard screening panel for cutaneous surgery-related allergens is not well established, we propose several categories of allergens be strongly considered and tested if a patient is suspected of having allergic contact dermatitis in an attempt to reveal pertinent allergens and prevent future exposures.

  11. Current evidence and applications of photodynamic therapy in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Marilyn T; Lin, Jennifer Y

    2014-01-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT) a photosensitizer – a molecule that is activated by light – is administered and exposed to a light source. This leads both to destruction of cells targeted by the particular type of photosensitizer, and immunomodulation. Given the ease with which photosensitizers and light can be delivered to the skin, it should come as no surprise that PDT is an increasingly utilized therapeutic in dermatology. PDT is used commonly to treat precancerous cells, sun-damaged skin, and acne. It has reportedly also been used to treat other conditions including inflammatory disorders and cutaneous infections. This review discusses the principles behind how PDT is used in dermatology, as well as evidence for current applications of PDT. PMID:24899818

  12. Compact multi-spectral imaging system for dermatology and neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordmans, Herke Jan; de Roode, Rowland; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf

    2007-03-01

    A compact multi-spectral imaging system is presented as diagnostic tool in dermatology and neurosurgery. Using an electronically tunable filter, a sensitive high resolution digital camera, 140 spectral images from 400 nm up to 720 nm are acquired in 40 s. Advanced image processing algorithms are used to enable interactive acquisition, viewing, image registration and image analysis. Experiments in the department of dermatology and neurosurgery show that multispectral imaging reveals much more detail than conventional medical photography or a surgical microscope, as images can be reprocessed to enhance the view on e.g. tumor boundaries. Using a hardware-based interactive registration algorithm, multi-spectral images can be aligned to correct for motion occurred during image acquisition or to compare acquisitions from different moments in time. The system shows to be a powerful diagnostics tool for medical imaging in the visual and near IR range.

  13. [Aesthetic dermatology. Botulinumtoxin A and soft tissue augmentation].

    PubMed

    Rauch, L; Ruzicka, T

    2004-07-01

    Younger and younger patients are undergoing aesthetic procedures to achieve "wrinkle-free" aging. This has had great impact on the field of aesthetic dermatology. The rapid development of new indications and filler materials requires a critical approach to the available substances particularly concerning side effects and long-term effects. The quality of the chosen approach depends on the applied filler substance, clear indication the compliance of the patient and the experience of the physician. The growing expectations of patients require a critical analysis of the available therapy options. Botulinum toxin A is one of the preferred treatments for wrinkles secondary to facial expression. In addition there are a variety of biologically inert and completely resorbable filler materials such as collagen and hyaluronic acid and autologous materials such as fat implants or plasma gel available. This article gives an overview about the most common fillers and their use in aesthetic dermatology.

  14. Osteopathic manipulative treatment: novel application to dermatological disease.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Shannon M; Winkelmann, Richard R; Walkowski, Stevan

    2012-10-01

    Dermatological diseases, such as dysesthesia syndromes, stasis dermatoses, and hyperhidrosis are difficult to treat due to their complex etiologies. Current theories suggest these diseases are caused by physiological imbalances, such as nerve impingement, localized tissue congestion, and impaired autonomic regulation. Osteopathic manipulative therapy targets these physiological dysfunctions and may serve as a beneficial therapeutic option. Osteopathic manipulative therapy techniques include high velocity low amplitude, muscle energy, counterstrain, myofascial release, craniosacral, and lymphatic drainage. An osteopathic manipulative therapy technique is chosen based on its physiological target for a particular disease. Osteopathic manipulative therapy may be useful alone or in combination with standard therapeutic options. However, due to the lack of standardized trials supporting the efficacy of osteopathic manipulative therapy treatment for dermatological disease, randomized, well-controlled studies are necessary to confirm its therapeutic value. PMID:23125887

  15. Early Detection of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    García-Campayo, J; Pérez-Yus, M C; García-Bustinduy, M; Daudén, E

    2016-05-01

    Many skin diseases are associated with mental disorders. When the psychological symptoms are mild, as is often the case in dermatology, it can be difficult to distinguish between normality and the manifestations of a mental disorder. To facilitate the distinction we review the concept of mental disorder in the present article. It is also important to have instruments that can facilitate early detection of psychological disease, i.e. when the symptoms are still mild. Short, simple, self-administered questionnaires have been developed to help dermatologists and other health professionals identify the presence of a mental disorder with a high degree of certainty. In this article, we focus on the questionnaires most often used to detect the 2 most common mental disorders: anxiety and depression. Finally, we describe the circumstances in which it is advisable to refer a dermatological patient to a psychiatrist, who can diagnose and treat the mental disorder in accordance with standard protocols.

  16. Medicolegal aspects of prescribing dermatological medications in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rishu; High, Whitney A; Butler, Daniel; Murase, Jenny E

    2013-12-01

    Medications are commonly used during pregnancy; in fact, female patients take an average of 2.9 medications during pregnancy. Due to this high prevalence, malpractice litigation poses a high legal risk to dermatologists who prescribe medications to female patients who are or may become pregnant. This article introduces the medicolegal risks involved in prescribing dermatological medications to a pregnant patient and discusses ways for a dermatologist to mitigate those risks. International safety classification systems are reviewed, and potential high risk dermatologic medications prescribed in acne, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and connective tissue disease are discussed. In addition, the article summarizes resources available to patients as well as the important elements for dermatologists to include when documenting their discussion with the patient in the medical record. PMID:24800428

  17. Osteopathic manipulative treatment: novel application to dermatological disease.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Shannon M; Winkelmann, Richard R; Walkowski, Stevan

    2012-10-01

    Dermatological diseases, such as dysesthesia syndromes, stasis dermatoses, and hyperhidrosis are difficult to treat due to their complex etiologies. Current theories suggest these diseases are caused by physiological imbalances, such as nerve impingement, localized tissue congestion, and impaired autonomic regulation. Osteopathic manipulative therapy targets these physiological dysfunctions and may serve as a beneficial therapeutic option. Osteopathic manipulative therapy techniques include high velocity low amplitude, muscle energy, counterstrain, myofascial release, craniosacral, and lymphatic drainage. An osteopathic manipulative therapy technique is chosen based on its physiological target for a particular disease. Osteopathic manipulative therapy may be useful alone or in combination with standard therapeutic options. However, due to the lack of standardized trials supporting the efficacy of osteopathic manipulative therapy treatment for dermatological disease, randomized, well-controlled studies are necessary to confirm its therapeutic value.

  18. The approach to the equine dermatology case in practice.

    PubMed

    Knottenbelt, Derek C

    2012-04-01

    A logical and thorough clinical investigation should provide the best basis for the diagnosis of skin diseases. Where no diagnosis can be reached despite a full range of investigations, the clinician can justifiably attempt symptomatic treatment, but it is always better to focus treatment on a specific condition based on properly accumulated and tested clinical evidence. Unfortunately, in equine dermatology there are few text descriptions of the majority of the conditions encountered in practice. While a few diseases are well recognized, there is still little consensus on the best treatments for many of them. Individual veterinarians will have treatments that they rely on, but frequently the same treatment applied by another person inexplicably fails to work in the same way. In dermatology cases, there is no substitute for experience. Referencing to quality textbooks and to colleagues who might have encountered the condition before is often advisable. Unusual presentations are frequently encountered in horses. For example, there are many manifestations of the pemphigus group of diseases, and not all will have a clear diagnostic pathway. It is important to remember that the skin is one of the biggest organs in the body and yet little is known of its function and pathology! While there are many significant primary dermatologic conditions, there are also important systemic diseases that have more or less pathognomonic secondary dermatologic signs; this makes the proper clinical examination even more imperative. One of the biggest problems with equine dermatology is the dearth of scientific reports. Many experienced clinicians have much useful information, but this may never reach the rest of the profession. Also there are few useful reference textbooks dedicated to the equine species. Equine dermatology most likely suffers the most of all disciplines in this respect. As a result, every clinician is expected to reinvent the wheel! There is a need for publications and

  19. The role of nutrition in dermatologic diseases: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Lakdawala, Nikita; Babalola, Olubukola; Fedeles, Flavia; McCusker, Meagen; Ricketts, Janelle; Whitaker-Worth, Diane; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2013-01-01

    Many dermatologic diseases are chronic with no definitive cure. For some diseases, the etiology is not completely understood, with treatment being difficult and associated with side effects. In such cases, patients may try alternative treatments to prevent onset, reduce symptom severity, or prevent reoccurrence of a disease. Dietary modification, through supplementation and exclusion, is an extremely popular treatment modality for patients with dermatologic conditions. It is, therefore, important for dermatologists to be aware of the growing body of literature pertaining to nutrition and skin disease to appropriately inform patients on benefits and harms of specific dietary interventions. We address the role of nutrition in psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, urticaria, and bullous diseases and specific dietary modifications as an adjunct or alternative to conventional therapy.

  20. [Off-label indications of biological drugs in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Cortés, Begonia; Laffitte, Emmanuel

    2016-03-30

    Last years, the development of biological drugs substantially improved the outcome of many inflammatory diseases. In dermatology, this kind of therapy is essentially prescribed for the treatment of psoriasis, and include the anti-TNF, anti-IL-12/IL-23 and anti-IL-17. Despite these treatments have not yet been approved, they seemed to be efficient for the treatment of many other inflammatory dermatosis, like granulomatous diseases, neutrophilic diseases, hydradenitis suppurativa or pityriasis rubra pilaris. PMID:27172693

  1. Mind-body medicine. Practical applications in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Bilkis, M R; Mark, K A

    1998-11-01

    It is only recently that Western physicians are rediscovering the link between thought and health. The spectrum of causative factors in inflammatory dermatoses are often multifactorial. Stress and negative thoughts are major factors in dermatologic conditions. This article begins with some basic information on the ways that thoughts affect health. Practical methods of intervention including meditation, journal writing, affirmations, prayer, biofeedback, and hypnosis are presented.

  2. Clinical photography in dermatology using smartphones: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Ashique, K. T.; Kaliyadan, Feroze; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev J.

    2015-01-01

    The smartphone is one of the biggest revolutions in the era of information technology. Its built in camera offers several advantages. Dermatologists, who handle a specialty that is inherently visual, are most benefited by this handy technology. Here in this article, we attempt to provide an overview of smartphone photography in clinical dermatology in order to help the dermatologist to get the best out of the available camera for clinical imaging and storage PMID:26009708

  3. Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis: two cases with differing dermatologic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ongchi, D R; Fleming, M G; Harris, C A

    1990-10-01

    Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis is a rare rheumatic condition characterized by ossification and erosion of the clavicle and the first rib, that has been shown to be associated with pustular skin lesions. We present 2 cases, one of which had features of pustulosis palmaris et plantaris and the other dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. Although the dermatologic manifestations differ, both cases have rheumatologic and roentgenographic features diagnostic of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis. PMID:2254905

  4. Sirtuins in dermatology: applications for future research and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Serravallo, Melissa; Jagdeo, Jared; Glick, Sharon A; Siegel, Daniel M; Brody, Neil I

    2013-05-01

    Sirtuins are a family of seven proteins in humans (SIRT1-SIRT7) that are involved in multiple cellular processes relevant to dermatology. The role of sirtuins in other organ systems is established. However, the importance of these proteins in dermatology is less defined. Recently, sirtuins gained international attention because of their role as "longevity proteins" that may extend and enhance human life. Sirtuins function in the cell via histone deacetylase and/or adenosine diphosphate ribosyltransferase enzymatic activity that target histone and non-histone substrates, including transcription regulators, tumor suppressors, structural proteins, DNA repair proteins, cell signaling proteins, transport proteins, and enzymes. Sirtuins are involved in cellular pathways related to skin structure and function, including aging, ultraviolet-induced photoaging, inflammation, epigenetics, cancer, and a variety of cellular functions including cell cycle, DNA repair and proliferation. This review highlights sirtuin-related cellular pathways, therapeutics and pharmacological targets in atopic dermatitis, bullous dermatoses, collagen vascular disorders, psoriasis, systemic lupus erythematosus, hypertrophic and keloid scars, cutaneous infections, and non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancer. Also discussed is the role of sirtuins in the following genodermatoses: ataxia telangiectasia, Cowden's syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, Rubenstein-Taybi, Werner syndrome, and xeroderma pigmentosum. The pathophysiology of these inherited diseases is not well understood, and sirtuin-related processes represent potential therapeutic targets for diseases lacking suitable alternative treatments. The goal of this review is to bring attention to the dermatology community, physicians, and scientists, the importance of sirtuins in dermatology and provide a foundation and impetus for future discussion, research and pharmacologic discovery.

  5. Psychological Morbidity Among Dermatological Patients in a Rural Setting

    PubMed Central

    Kosaraju, Sandeep Krishna Murthy; Reddy, Karumuri Siva Rami; Vadlamani, Naresh; Sandhya, Lakkireddy; Kalasapati, Lokesh; Maganti, Sowmya; Mary, Amudha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dermatological conditions have an impact on psychology of the patients. There is a dearth of studies regarding this field in Rural population of India. Aims And Objectives: The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the psychiatric morbidity in patients affected with Dermatological condition in a rural population and secondary objective is to assess the morbidity in dimensions of Depression Severity and the quality of life in the Emotional Sphere, Physical Symptoms, Psychosocial Functioning. Subjects And Methods: Seventy three rural patients were included in the study. PHQ9 and SKINDEX-29 was used to assess the psychiatric morbidity and quality of life. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS V 20. Chi-square test was used as a test of significance. Results: Significance has been found for duration of suffering from a dermatological condition and quality of life (p=0.03). Correlation has also been established between dermatological diagnosis with depression severity (p=0.004) or quality of life (p=0.004). In the sub scales of SKINDEX it was noted that overall dysfunction was notably more marked in Emotional Sphere and Psychosocial Functions than the Physical symptoms. Eczema was the most affected diagnosis in Skindex indicating a poor quality of life followed by psoriasis, Acne vulgaris and Seborrhoeic Dermatitis however, It was found that the majorly affected condition in depression severity was Psoriasis followed by Eczema, Acne Vulgaris and Seborrhoeic Dermatitis. Conclusion: There seems to be an increased morbidity among the rural population in depression severity and that of quality of life in terms of emotional sphere and psychosocial functioning. PMID:26677293

  6. An Elective Course on Dermatological Topics and Cosmeceutical Compounding

    PubMed Central

    Lunney, Phillip T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To implement and assess a pharmacy dermatology and cosmeceutical compounding elective course and its impact on graduates’ careers. Design. A 3-credit elective course that incorporated classroom lectures on ambulatory dermatologic diseases and cosmeceutical products with case studies, weekly quizzes, and a comprehensive business plan project was implemented in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program in 2010. Assessment. Assessment instruments including weekly quizzes, a business plan project, and pre- and post-course tests were used to evaluate course content. Across 3 offerings of the course (2010, 2011, 2012), pre- and post-course test scores improved. Results of a postgraduate survey showed that 54% of respondents worked at a pharmacy offering compounding services, and 57% felt that the course played a significant or very significant role in their counseling on dermatologic conditions. Conclusions. Assessment methods revealed student learning of course content and the course appeared moderately beneficial to graduates’ early careers. A more longitudinal analysis is needed to assess the course’s impact on long-term career choices, particularly those dealing with compounding of cosmeceutical products. PMID:24850940

  7. Dermatological Manifestations of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome Are Common and Diverse

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Anindita; Culbertson, Collin; Morgenshtern, Karen; DePold Hohler, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a syndrome of orthostatic intolerance in the setting of excessive tachycardia with orthostatic challenge, and these symptoms are relieved when recumbent. Apart from symptoms of orthostatic intolerance, there are many other comorbid conditions such as chronic headache, fibromyalgia, gastrointestinal disorders, and sleep disturbances. Dermatological manifestations of POTS are also common and range widely from livedo reticularis to Raynaud's phenomenon. Methods Questionnaires were distributed to 26 patients with POTS who presented to the neurology clinic. They were asked to report on various characteristics of dermatological symptoms, with their answers recorded on a Likert rating scale. Symptoms were considered positive if patients answered with "strongly agree" or "agree", and negative if they answered with "neutral", "strongly disagree", or "disagree". Results The most commonly reported symptom was rash (77%). Raynaud's phenomenon was reported by over half of the patients, and about a quarter of patients reported livedo reticularis. The rash was most commonly found on the arms, legs, and trunk. Some patients reported that the rash could spread, and was likely to be pruritic or painful. Very few reported worsening of symptoms on standing. Conclusions The results suggest that dermatological manifestations in POTS vary but are highly prevalent, and are therefore of important diagnostic and therapeutic significance for physicians and patients alike to gain a better understanding thereof. Further research exploring the underlying pathophysiology, incidence, and treatment strategies is necessary. PMID:26610893

  8. Resident perspectives on a dermatology Quality Improvement curriculum: the University of Colorado experience.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Sammie J; Huff, Laura S; Lott, Jason P; Dellavalle, Robert P; Dunnick, Cory A

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have prioritized the objective of optimizing quality healthcare though quality improvement initiatives, yet research on dermatology-specific QI programs and their perceptions among dermatology residents remains limited. We explore residents' opinions of a dermatology-specific QI scholarly project curriculum implemented at University of Colorado Denver (UCD) in 2010 and also evaluate residents' attitudes regarding the value of this curriculum in aiding them to meet ACGME core competencies. PMID:27617468

  9. In vivo confocal microscopy in dermatology: from research to clinical application.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Martina; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents an emerging technique for the noninvasive histomorphological analysis of skin in vivo and has shown its applicability for dermatological research as well as its value as an adjunct tool in the clinical management of skin cancer patients. Herein, we aim to give an overview on the current clinical indications for CLSM in dermatology and also highlight the diverse applications of CLSM in dermatological research. PMID:23338938

  10. In vivo confocal microscopy in dermatology: from research to clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Martina; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents an emerging technique for the noninvasive histomorphological analysis of skin in vivo and has shown its applicability for dermatological research as well as its value as an adjunct tool in the clinical management of skin cancer patients. Herein, we aim to give an overview on the current clinical indications for CLSM in dermatology and also highlight the diverse applications of CLSM in dermatological research.

  11. Increasing medical student exposure to clinical dermatology through participation in volunteer clinics.

    PubMed

    Beroukhim, Kourosh; Nguyen, Catherine; Danesh, Melissa; Lee, Kristina; Liao, Wilson

    2015-10-01

    Over the previous decade, several innovative teaching methods have been introduced to overcome the decreasing allotment of time dedicated to dermatology in U.S. medical school curricula. We report our experience of increasing medical student exposure to clinical dermatology thorough involvement in an extracurricular, volunteer-driven dermatology clinic. The clinic was well received by students and faculty. Our experience demonstrates that volunteer-driven dermatology clinics may be an effective method of teaching and engendering a culture of community outreach among medical students and faculty.

  12. Trends in types of dermatology books available over the last ten years.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Lisa L; Wu, Jashin J

    2009-06-15

    Shifts in interest toward cosmetic and surgical dermatology and away from medical and academic dermatology have been observed in recent years. We hypothesized that this trend would be evident in the types of books available for purchase from a major medical textbook supplier. Books published from 1998-2008 were categorized by type and statistical testing was performed to determine if this trend has been reflected in books published. The percentage of medical dermatology books decreased over time, whereas the percentage of cosmetic and surgical dermatology books increased over time.

  13. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Zain; Alster, Tina S

    2016-01-01

    The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice. PMID:26893574

  14. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Husain, Zain; Alster, Tina S

    2016-01-01

    The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice. PMID:26893574

  15. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Husain, Zain; Alster, Tina S

    2016-01-01

    The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice.

  16. Trends in types of dermatology books available over the last ten years.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Lisa L; Wu, Jashin J

    2009-01-01

    Shifts in interest toward cosmetic and surgical dermatology and away from medical and academic dermatology have been observed in recent years. We hypothesized that this trend would be evident in the types of books available for purchase from a major medical textbook supplier. Books published from 1998-2008 were categorized by type and statistical testing was performed to determine if this trend has been reflected in books published. The percentage of medical dermatology books decreased over time, whereas the percentage of cosmetic and surgical dermatology books increased over time. PMID:19723488

  17. Dermatological disorders in Tuvalu between 2009 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Lan, Li-Jung; Lien, Ying-Shuang; Wang, Shao-Chuan; Ituaso-Conway, Nese; Tsai, Ming-Che; Tseng, Pao-Ying; Yeh, Yu-Lin; Chen, Chun-Tzu; Lue, Ko-Huang; Chung, Jing-Gung; Hsiao, Yu-Ping

    2015-09-01

    There is a distinct lack of knowledge on the prevalence of skin disorders in Tuvalu. The aim of the current study was to assess the prevalence of cutaneous diseases and to evaluate access dermatological care in Tuvalu. Cutaneous disorders in the people of Tuvalu between 2009 and 2012 were examined. The most common skin conditions were eczema/dermatitis, superficial fungal infections, impetigo, carbuncles, furuncles, folliculitis, acne, scabies, warts and keloids. Infrequent skin conditions included infectious granulomatous disease, albinism, actinic keratosis, skin cancer, cutaneous lupus erythematosus and mammary Paget's disease, which required medical attention. This is the first epidemiological report on skin disorders in the southwest Pacific Island, Tuvalu. PMID:25998560

  18. Optical coherence tomography: its role in daily dermatological practice.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Lutz; Reinhold, Uwe; Bierhoff, Erhard; Dirschka, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, tomographic imaging technique which generates high-resolution in-vivo images up to mid-dermal layers. Due to continuous technological improvements, OCT is moving from research projects into daily dermatological practice. It can complement other imaging methods like high-frequency ultrasound or confocal microscopy. There is a wide variety of indications for OCT. In addition to aiding in the diagnosis and clinical monitoring of inflammatory dermatoses, OCT is a very useful and feasible technique in dermato-oncology.

  19. Overview of Common Sleep Disorders and Intersection with Dermatologic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Walia, Harneet K; Mehra, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders are very common, often under-recognized and therefore undertreated, are associated with a myriad of medical conditions and could lead to significant impairment of quality of life. This review provides an up-to-date synopsis of common sleep disorders encompassing insufficient sleep syndrome, insomnia, circadian rhythm disorders and obstructive sleep apnea with a brief overview of epidemiology, screening, diagnostic testing and treatment. We also emphasize the emerging area of the intersection of sleep disorders and dermatologic conditions and present compelling data regarding underlying mechanisms including sleep dysfunction in relation to disorders of skin inflammation, aging and skin cancer. PMID:27144559

  20. Medical devices in dermatology using DLP technology from Texas Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, M.; Lüllau, F.

    2012-03-01

    The market of medical devices is growing continuously worldwide. With the DLP™ technology from Texas Instruments Lüllau Engineering GmbH in Germany has realized different applications in the medical discipline of dermatology. Especially a new digital phototherapy device named skintrek™ PT5 is revolutionizing the treatment of skin diseases like psoriasis , Vitiligo and other Eczema. The functions of the new phototherapy device can only be realized through DLP™ technology which is not only be used for the selective irradiation process. In combination with other optical systems DLP™ technology undertakes also other functionalities like 3D-topology calculation und patient movement compensation.

  1. Publication bias in dermatology systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Atakpo, Paul; Vassar, Matt

    2016-05-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analyses in dermatology provide high-level evidence for clinicians and policy makers that influence clinical decision making and treatment guidelines. One methodological problem with systematic reviews is the under representation of unpublished studies. This problem is due in part to publication bias. Omission of statistically non-significant data from meta-analyses may result in overestimation of treatment effect sizes which may lead to clinical consequences. Our goal was to assess whether systematic reviewers in dermatology evaluate and report publication bias. Further, we wanted to conduct our own evaluation of publication bias on meta-analyses that failed to do so. Our study considered systematic reviews and meta-analyses from ten dermatology journals from 2006 to 2016. A PubMed search was conducted, and all full-text articles that met our inclusion criteria were retrieved and coded by the primary author. 293 articles were included in our analysis. Additionally, we formally evaluated publication bias in meta-analyses that failed to do so using trim and fill and cumulative meta-analysis by precision methods. Publication bias was mentioned in 107 articles (36.5%) and was formally evaluated in 64 articles (21.8%). Visual inspection of a funnel plot was the most common method of evaluating publication bias. Publication bias was present in 45 articles (15.3%), not present in 57 articles (19.5%) and not determined in 191 articles (65.2%). Using the trim and fill method, 7 meta-analyses (33.33%) showed evidence of publication bias. Although the trim and fill method only found evidence of publication bias in 7 meta-analyses, the cumulative meta-analysis by precision method found evidence of publication bias in 15 meta-analyses (71.4%). Many of the reviews in our study did not mention or evaluate publication bias. Further, of the 42 articles that stated following PRISMA reporting guidelines, 19 (45.2%) evaluated for publication bias. In

  2. Overview of Common Sleep Disorders and Intersection with Dermatologic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Harneet K.; Mehra, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders are very common, often under-recognized and therefore undertreated, are associated with a myriad of medical conditions and could lead to significant impairment of quality of life. This review provides an up-to-date synopsis of common sleep disorders encompassing insufficient sleep syndrome, insomnia, circadian rhythm disorders and obstructive sleep apnea with a brief overview of epidemiology, screening, diagnostic testing and treatment. We also emphasize the emerging area of the intersection of sleep disorders and dermatologic conditions and present compelling data regarding underlying mechanisms including sleep dysfunction in relation to disorders of skin inflammation, aging and skin cancer. PMID:27144559

  3. Introduction: "The Napkin Area and its Dermatoses" symposium proceedings, World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology, September 2013.

    PubMed

    Torrelo, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Dr Antonio Torrelo, President of the 12(th) World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology, introduces the supplement as providing an opportunity for readers to access the lectures and related presentations delivered at the World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology held September 25-27, 2013, in Madrid. PMID:27311777

  4. Dermatoethics: a curriculum in bioethics and professionalism for dermatology residents at Brown Medical School.

    PubMed

    Bercovitch, Lionel; Long, Thomas P

    2007-04-01

    Both American and Canadian residency accreditation bodies have formal requirements in core competencies that include training in ethics and professionalism without prescribing content. A structured seminar series in medical ethics and professionalism relating to dermatology practice was started at Brown Medical School's dermatology residency in 2001. Methods of instruction include discussion groups, review of medical and lay literature, book review, didactic teaching, case presentation, and informal e-mail exchange. Some of the topics that have been covered include basic medical ethics, research ethics, physician-industry relationships, truth telling, privacy and confidentiality, duty to treat, and ethical and legal issues in cosmetic dermatology, dermatologic surgery, dermatologic genetics, occupational dermatology, and pediatric dermatology. The main goals of the curriculum are to fulfill the core competency requirement in professionalism of the specialty certifying boards, introduce trainees to the cross-disciplinary literature of biomedical ethics and current ethical controversies, and encourage dialogue on ethics and professionalism among faculty, colleagues in other specialties, and dermatology trainees.

  5. Application of wound dressings in dermatology laser procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzel, Fred W.; Chen, Qun; Hoskins, Greg

    1995-05-01

    High powered lasers have been used in dermatological procedures such as tattoo removal. This use is associated with a potential, biological hazard of high speed tissue particles from the laser field. It has been proposed that by applying a clear dermatological would dressing directly over the laser treatment site, it may be possible to completely trap the potentially airborne tissue particles from the procedure. Some important questions must be addressed prior to the implementation of such a technique. While the use of a wound dressing may significantly reduce the airborne materials during the laser procedures, new problems may arise: 1 . The wound dressing or some of its components may absorb excessive amount of light energy. This would result in a very localized temperature rise which may be harmful to the patient; 2. The smooth surface of the wound dressing material could induce specular reflection of the incident laser beam, thus introducing a laser hazard to the staff and patient. To address these possible problems, we studied a series of ClearSite Wound Dressings which have been reportedly tested for such laser procedures. The objective of the studies were, to determine if the use of ClearSite in conjunction with laser procedures poses a possible hazard to either the patient or to the Operating Room personnel, and to determine the effect of the ClearSite dressing on the optical characteristics of the light beam. The latter includes light absorption and transmittance for various wavelengths.

  6. The elements of dermatology: the legacy of Covisa and Bejarano.

    PubMed

    Leis-Dosil, V M; Garrido-Gutiérrez, C; Díaz-Díaz, R M

    2014-04-01

    In 1936, Covisa and Bejarano published a treatise entitled Elementos de Dermatología (The Elements of Dermatology). In this surprisingly modern book they abandoned the nosological debates characteristic of the 19th century and instead classified diseases according to their etiology and pathogenesis based on the scientific and technical advances of the time. Moreover, unlike other books available at the time, which were essentially adaptations of foreign texts, this was the first medical work to reflect the reality of Spanish medicine. However, the future of both the book and its authors was to be determined by the start of the Spanish Civil War in the same year. Covisa and Bejarano, who were both extremely active in the public health system and medical education during the Second Republic, were obliged to seek exile in America. Due to the difficulties of the time, very few copies of the book reached the public and no new editions were ever printed. We will never know what would have happened if the war had not started, but we believe that this important work should be remembered.

  7. The science of dermocosmetics and its role in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Dreno, B; Araviiskaia, E; Berardesca, E; Bieber, T; Hawk, J; Sanchez-Viera, M; Wolkenstein, P

    2014-11-01

    Our increased knowledge of normal skin physiology has ushered in a subtle revolution in cosmetic science. Originally designed as preparations to enhance personal appearance by direct application on to the skin, cosmetics have now taken on a new role in dermatology, through the support of the management of many skin disorders. This evolving role of cosmetics in skin care is primarily due to scientific and technological advancements that have changed our understanding of normal skin physiology and how cosmetics modify its appearance both physically and biologically. The vast array of techniques currently available to investigate skin responsivity to multiple stimuli has brought about a new era in cosmetic and dermocosmetic development based on a robust understanding of skin physiology and its varied responses to commonly encountered environmental insults. Most cosmetic research is undertaken on reconstructed skin models crucial in dermatological research, given the strict ban imposed by the European Union on animal testing. In addition, the design and conduct of trials evaluating cosmetics now follow rules comparable to those used in the development and evaluation of pharmaceutical products. Cosmetic research should now aim to ensure all trials adhere to strictly reproducible and scientifically sound methodologies. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the multidisciplinary scientific approach used in formulating dermocosmetics, and to examine the major advances in dermocosmetic development and assessment, the safety and regulatory guidelines governing their production and the exciting future outlook for these dermocosmetic processes following good practice rules. PMID:24684296

  8. Malassezia species in healthy skin and in dermatological conditions.

    PubMed

    Prohic, Asja; Jovovic Sadikovic, Tamara; Krupalija-Fazlic, Mersiha; Kuskunovic-Vlahovljak, Suada

    2016-05-01

    The genus Malassezia comprises lipophilic species, the natural habitat of which is the skin of humans and other warm-blooded animals. However, these species have been associated with a diversity of dermatological disorders and even systemic infections. Pityriasis versicolor is the only cutaneous disease etiologically connected to Malassezia yeasts. In the other dermatoses, such as Malassezia folliculitis, seborrheic dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis, these yeasts have been suggested to play pathogenic roles either as direct agents of infection or as trigger factors because there is no evidence that the organisms invade the skin. Malassezia yeasts have been classified into at least 14 species, of which eight have been isolated from human skin, including Malassezia furfur, Malassezia pachydermatis, Malassezia sympodialis, Malassezia slooffiae, Malassezia globosa, Malassezia obtusa, Malassezia restricta, Malassezia dermatis, Malassezia japonica, and Malassezia yamatoensis. Distributions of Malassezia species in the healthy body and in skin diseases have been investigated using culture-based and molecular techniques, and variable results have been reported from different geographical regions. This article reviews and discusses the latest available data on the pathogenicity of Malassezia spp., their distributions in dermatological conditions and in healthy skin, discrepancies in the two methods of identification, and the susceptibility of Malassezia spp. to antifungals. PMID:26710919

  9. Dermatology in the military field: What physicians should know?

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Wei-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In the civilian dermatological setting, the top 5 skin diseases usually seen are eczema/dermatitis, acne, benign skin tumors, viral infections and pigmentary disorders. In comparison, the top 5 skin conditions encountered in the military sector are usually fungal infections, eczema/dermatitis, insect bite reactions, bacterial infections and acne. This is not surprising as military personnel, due to the special environment and vocations they are in, are prone to getting eczema as heat, sweating and wearing of the military uniform aggravate the condition. Fungal infections are common in those who wear the army boots. Insect bite reactions are not an uncommon sight among those who have to go to the jungle regularly for outfield training. Grass allergy or intolerance, contact dermatitis or acneiform eruption due to the application of military camouflage cream on the face, contact dermatitis to insect repellents, and military uniform allergy and intolerance are amongst the commonest dermatological problems encountered in the military field, and physicians should recognize them, investigate and manage these problems accordingly. Lastly, a diagnosis not to be missed in the military field is cutaneous melioidosis, especially when a military personnel presents with a non-healing ulcer. PMID:24340268

  10. The beginnings of dermatopathology and dermatologic microbiology in Spain.

    PubMed

    del Río, E

    2014-03-01

    Crisóstomo Martínez from Valencia was a pioneering microscopist in 17th-century Europe. The first microscopic representations of skin in Spain appeared in an 18th-century work by Martín Martínez. Microbiology and histopathology progressed considerably in the late 19th century thanks to anatomists like Maestre de San Juan and surgeons like Federico Rubio Galí. The first Spanish pathologist to specialize in dermatology was Antonio Mendoza, a colleague of José Eugenio de Olavide at the Hospital San Juan de Dios in Madrid. Claudio Sala and Juan de Azúa also made significant contributions, including the description of pseudoepithelioma. Several disciples of Santiago Ramón y Cajal and Jorge FranciscoTello, such as Lorenzo Ruiz de Arcaute and Guillermo de la Rosa King, consolidated the dermatology laboratory, but the Civil War sent many into exile or deprived them of their professional status. Juan Rubió in Barcelona and Julio Rodríguez Puchol in Madrid were the immediate predecessors of today's dermatopathologists.

  11. [Dermatology in Cambodia: Sustainable establishment of a medical discipline].

    PubMed

    Bendick, Ch

    2015-05-01

    After almost 25 years of dictatorship and civil war, in the mid 1990s, Cambodia was in dire need of improvement of its medical infrastructure on all levels. Attention had already been focused on establishing primary care services such as emergency surgery, paediatrics and gynaecology/obstetrics; however dermatovenereology services had so far not been addressed. Using a comprehensive approach aiming at sustainable development, German, French and Cambodian institutions worked together to identify four core areas in need of improvement: postgraduate training, development of skin clinics, quality management, and integration of dermatology services into the health insurance scheme. Since 2005, this "Masterplan Dermatology" was financially supported by the Centre for International Migration and Development (CIM) based in Frankfurt am Main and Else Kröner Fresenius-Stiftung (EKFS) based in Bad Homburg auf der Höhe. Significant improvements have been made due to the efforts of the above institutions with the support of the donors; however challenges of this complex endeavor still remain. PMID:25868569

  12. The elements of dermatology: the legacy of Covisa and Bejarano.

    PubMed

    Leis-Dosil, V M; Garrido-Gutiérrez, C; Díaz-Díaz, R M

    2014-04-01

    In 1936, Covisa and Bejarano published a treatise entitled Elementos de Dermatología (The Elements of Dermatology). In this surprisingly modern book they abandoned the nosological debates characteristic of the 19th century and instead classified diseases according to their etiology and pathogenesis based on the scientific and technical advances of the time. Moreover, unlike other books available at the time, which were essentially adaptations of foreign texts, this was the first medical work to reflect the reality of Spanish medicine. However, the future of both the book and its authors was to be determined by the start of the Spanish Civil War in the same year. Covisa and Bejarano, who were both extremely active in the public health system and medical education during the Second Republic, were obliged to seek exile in America. Due to the difficulties of the time, very few copies of the book reached the public and no new editions were ever printed. We will never know what would have happened if the war had not started, but we believe that this important work should be remembered. PMID:24674985

  13. “Pseudo” Nomenclature in Dermatology: What's in a Name?

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sangita; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    In the bewildering array of scientific nomenclature in the medical field, it is important to use correct terminology, know their aberrations and the reason behind a specific terminology. This paper is an attempt towards compiling all the pseudo-nomenclatures coined in dermatology, in order to make it easier to retain and recollect these pseudo names, signs, morphology, diseases, and conditions. It is also imperative to know the true entities that these pseudo names masquerade as, so as to understand the explanation for assigning the term ‘pseudo’ to these conditions. A total of 52 pseudo-terms have been compiled here in reference to dermatology. Most of these pseudo-nomenclatures were coined due to some clinical or histopathological resemblance to the true conditions, while some were premature conclusions drawn from a flawed understanding of the basic nature of the condition. Clear understanding of each of these terms and the explanation behind them being pseudo will enable a dermatologist to avoid misdiagnosis and needless confusion. PMID:24082182

  14. Why don't we use vitamin E in dermatology?

    PubMed Central

    Pehr, K; Forsey, R R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the possible uses of topical and systemic tocopherols as therapy for skin conditions in light of the widespread use of vitamin E by patients. DATA SOURCES: Index Medicus was searched for articles published from 1922 (when vitamin E was discovered) to 1966 (the beginning of MEDLINE). MEDLINE was searched for articles in English and French on vitamin E or tocopherol in relation to dermatology. Additional original articles were identified from the reference lists of the review articles. STUDY SELECTION: Only well-designed controlled studies were accepted; anecdotes and open studies are cited for completeness and as direction for future research. DATA SYNTHESIS: There was some weak or conflicting evidence that vitamin E is of value in yellow nail syndrome, vibration disease, epidermolysis bullosa, cancer prevention, claudication, cutaneous ulcers, and collagen synthesis and wound healing. It was of no use in atopic dermatitis, dermatitis herpetiformis, psoriasis, subcorneal pustular dermatosis, porphyrias and skin damage induced by ultraviolet light. CONCLUSIONS: After 44 years of research there is still scant proof of vitamin E's effectiveness in treating certain dermatologic conditions. Further research in well-designed controlled trials is needed to clarify vitamin E's role. PMID:8221479

  15. Predictive analysis of optical ablation in several dermatological tumoral tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Blanco-Gutiérrez, A.; Salas-García, I.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    Optical techniques for treatment and characterization of biological tissues are revolutionizing several branches of medical praxis, for example in ophthalmology or dermatology. The non-invasive, non-contact and non-ionizing character of optical radiation makes it specially suitable for these applications. Optical radiation can be employed in medical ablation applications, either for tissue resection or surgery. Optical ablation may provide a controlled and clean cut on a biological tissue. This is particularly relevant in tumoral tissue resection, where a small amount of cancerous cells could make the tumor appear again. A very important aspect of tissue optical ablation is then the estimation of the affected volume. In this work we propose a complete predictive model of tissue ablation that provides an estimation of the resected volume. The model is based on a Monte Carlo approach for the optical propagation of radiation inside the tissue, and a blow-off model for tissue ablation. This model is applied to several types of dermatological tumoral tissues, specifically squamous cells, basocellular and infiltrative carcinomas. The parameters of the optical source are varied and the estimated resected volume is calculated. The results for the different tumor types are presented and compared. This model can be used for surgical planning, in order to assure the complete resection of the tumoral tissue.

  16. The science of dermocosmetics and its role in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Dreno, B; Araviiskaia, E; Berardesca, E; Bieber, T; Hawk, J; Sanchez-Viera, M; Wolkenstein, P

    2014-11-01

    Our increased knowledge of normal skin physiology has ushered in a subtle revolution in cosmetic science. Originally designed as preparations to enhance personal appearance by direct application on to the skin, cosmetics have now taken on a new role in dermatology, through the support of the management of many skin disorders. This evolving role of cosmetics in skin care is primarily due to scientific and technological advancements that have changed our understanding of normal skin physiology and how cosmetics modify its appearance both physically and biologically. The vast array of techniques currently available to investigate skin responsivity to multiple stimuli has brought about a new era in cosmetic and dermocosmetic development based on a robust understanding of skin physiology and its varied responses to commonly encountered environmental insults. Most cosmetic research is undertaken on reconstructed skin models crucial in dermatological research, given the strict ban imposed by the European Union on animal testing. In addition, the design and conduct of trials evaluating cosmetics now follow rules comparable to those used in the development and evaluation of pharmaceutical products. Cosmetic research should now aim to ensure all trials adhere to strictly reproducible and scientifically sound methodologies. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the multidisciplinary scientific approach used in formulating dermocosmetics, and to examine the major advances in dermocosmetic development and assessment, the safety and regulatory guidelines governing their production and the exciting future outlook for these dermocosmetic processes following good practice rules.

  17. Synopsis of Diet in Dermatology: A one day CME conducted by the Department of Dermatology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal, March 3, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Smitha S; Nayak, Sudhir UK; Shenoi, Shrutakirthi Damodar; Pai, Sathish Ballambat

    2013-01-01

    Food is intricately related to mind and body and is one of the elements sustaining life, in disease as well as in health. There are many myths and misgivings regarding partake of food and its medicinal properties. The Department of Dermatology, Kasturba Medical College (KMC), Manipal organized a continuing medical education (CME) on Diet in Dermatology on 3rd March 2013 focusing on pertinent issues regarding diet and medicinal use of food. PMID:24350027

  18. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Dermatology in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Erin T.; Davis, Scott A.; Taylor, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has an increasing presence in dermatology. Complementary therapies have been studied in many skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Objectives: This study sought to assess oral CAM use in dermatology relative to medicine as a whole in the United States, using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Design: Variables studied include patient demographic characteristics, diagnoses, and CAM documented at the visits. A brief literature review of the top 5 CAM treatments unique to dermatology visits was performed. Results: Most CAM users in both dermatology and medicine as a whole were female and white and were insured with private insurance or Medicare. Fish oil, glucosamine, glucosamine chondroitin, and omega-3 were the most common complementary supplements used in both samples. Conclusions: CAM use in dermatology appears to be part of a larger trend in medicine. Knowledge of common complementary therapies can help dermatologists navigate this expanding field. PMID:24517329

  19. [Quantitative analysis of drug expenditures variability in dermatology units].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ramírez, David; Ferrándiz, Lara; Ramírez-Soto, Gabriel; Muñoyerro, M Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: La existencia de variabilidad en el gasto farmacéutico ajustado entre unidades asistenciales plantea la posibilidad de dificultades en el acceso a determinadas opciones terapéuticas, así como un posible gasto farmacéutico evitable. Sin embargo, los análisis de variabilidad de la práctica clínica no incorporan en general el gasto farmacéutico como medida de resultado. Objetivo: Identificar y cuantificar la variabilidad en cuanto al gasto farmacéutico de unidades de Dermatología comparables del Servicio Andaluz de Salud. Métodos: Análisis comparativo del gasto farmacéutico de 18 unidades de Dermatología del Servicio Andaluz de Salud, ajustado a población y producción asistencial. Los datos sobre resultados de contabilidad y producción asistencial (unidades de producción homogénea -UPH-) fueron proporcionadas por Inforcoan, sistema de información de contabilidad analítica del Servicio Andaluz de Salud. Resultados: La ratio de gasto farmacéutico observada fue de 0,97 ?/hab-8,90 ?/hab y de 208,45 ?/UPH-1.471,95 ?/UPH. El coeficiente de correlación de Pearson entre el gasto farmacéutico y la población fue de 0,25 y de 0,35 para el gasto farmacéutico y la producción homogénea (p=0,32 y p=0,15) respectivamente, ambos indicando la ausencia de correlación y existencia de variabilidad. Conclusión: El análisis cuantitativo de variabilidad realizado mediante correlación de Pearson ha permitido confirmar y cuantificar la variabilidad existente en cuanto al gasto farmacéutico en unidades de Dermatología comparables.

  20. Tunable solid state laser system for dermatology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azar, Zion; Bank, Alexander; Donskoy, Dmitri M.; Nechitailo, Vladimir S.

    1994-12-01

    The Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is the most recent in a series of pulsed laser systems for plastic surgery. The 532 nm wavelength has been shown to be absorbed by a variety of chromophores. These include tattoo pigments, oxygenated hemoglobin and melanin-containing epidermal cells. A simple multi-line solid state laser module pumped by double-frequency Q- switched YAG laser is presented. This solid state multi-line module enables tuning of the wavelength in the yellow spectral range to 560 nm or to 580 nm for dermatology applications. Conversion efficiency in excess of 70% was achieved at 10 Hz pulse repetition frequency and output energy per pulse of approximately 200 mJ.

  1. An insight into JAK-STAT signalling in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Palanivel, J A; Macbeth, A E; Chetty, N C; Levell, N J

    2014-06-01

    Many emerging studies have implicated the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) cytokine signalling mechanism in disease pathogenesis. This signalling pathway is involved in haematopoiesis and immune development. Mutations in genes regulating JAK-STAT signalling can cause common inflammatory disorders and myeloproliferative disorders. JAK and STAT inhibitors are new management tools for disorders such as myelofibrosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Evidence suggests that the cytokine components of the JAK-STAT pathways play a crucial role in common skin disorders, including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. We present an overview for the clinical dermatologist of the significance of these signalling pathways in various skin disorders, and introduce the potential application of JAK and STAT inhibition as a new therapeutic tool in dermatology. PMID:24825142

  2. [Prominent personalities from the tropical dermatology field in Peru].

    PubMed

    Burstein Alva, Zuño

    2014-01-01

    This article pays tribute to three Peruvian medical personalities: José Neyra Ramirez (1929-2012), Abelardo Tejada (1931-2013) and Oscar Romero Rivas (1929-2011), highlighting their valuable contributions to the field of Tropical Dermatology and Health Medicine that benefited public health and Peruvian medical education. The article mentions the formation of a group of young researchers called “The Anacoretas”, including professors Hugo Pesce, Enrique Encinas, Juan Francisco Valegas in Lima; and Enerst Nausk and Victor Manchego in Germany, who, with the support of the Peruvian and German governments promoted and created the first university research center of Tropical Medicine on the Pacific Coast of Latin America called Daniel A. Carrion Tropical Medicine Institute at Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos in Lima (TMI/UNMSM).

  3. The value of an aide memoire in the dermatology clinic.

    PubMed

    Dutton, E S; Holder, J E; Graham-Brown, R A

    1999-03-01

    A randomized study was undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of a chart as an aid to memory illustrating the topical medication most frequently prescribed both in the dermatology clinic, and in general practice. One hundred subjects, half new referrals and half follow-ups, were recruited and asked to recall all of the topical preparations that had previously been prescribed for this condition. They were then asked to consult the chart, and any additional medication recognized at this time was noted, along with any clarification of formulation and strength where possible. Despite some limitations, our chart proved to be of considerable value. Thirty-eight patients could identify between three and eight additional preparations. Overall, the mean number of additional preparations recalled per patient was two. Clarification of strength and formulation was achieved by 21 patients. Eight charts were used, and provided additional information at consultation in 87% of subjects interviewed.

  4. Photodynamic therapy in dermatology: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Babilas, Philipp; Schreml, Stephan; Landthaler, Michael; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus

    2010-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become an established treatment modality for dermatooncologic conditions like actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease, in situ squamous cell carcinoma and superficial basal cell carcinoma. There is also great promise of PDT for many non-neoplastic dermatological diseases like localized scleroderma, acne vulgaris, granuloma anulare and leishmaniasis. Aesthetic indications like photo-aged skin or sebaceous gland hyperplasia complete the range of applications. Major advantages of PDT are the low level of invasiveness and the excellent cosmetic results. Here, we review the principal mechanism of action, the current developments in the field of photosensitizers and light sources, practical aspects of topical PDT and therapeutical applications in oncologic as well as non-oncologic indications. PMID:20584250

  5. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Dermatology: Potentials, Advances, and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Bilousova, Ganna; Roop, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of methods for reprogramming adult somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has raised the possibility of producing truly personalized treatment options for numerous diseases. Similar to embryonic stem cells (ESCs), iPSCs can give rise to any cell type in the body and they are amenable to genetic correction by homologous recombination. These ESC properties of iPSCs allow for the development of permanent corrective therapies for many currently incurable disorders, including inherited skin diseases, without using embryonic tissues or oocytes. Here, we review recent progress and limitations of iPSC research with a focus on clinical applications of iPSCs, and using iPSCs to model human diseases for drug discovery in the field of dermatology. PMID:25368014

  6. Diagnostic system with database application for laryngological and dermatological disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paczesny, Daniel; Kuls, Michal; Tarapata, Grzegorz

    2006-03-01

    This article describes the design and construction of a diagnostic system for laryngological and dermatological disorders. Searching for both solutions based on a dew point hygrometer with a semiconductor structure introduced. Some constructional solutions like the framework of a computer application for both systems are similar but the measurement approach is different. The major emphasis is put on the database applications dedicated for medical doctors. The database application which is a common part in both systems and also measurement devices together, create a diagnostic system which has been designed and constructed. Both systems have been tested in a hospital with the assistance of doctors specialized in this subjects. In the near future, the system will enable the analysis between achieved data and different disorders.

  7. Thalidomide: dermatological indications, mechanisms of action and side-effects.

    PubMed

    Wu, J J; Huang, D B; Pang, K R; Hsu, S; Tyring, S K

    2005-08-01

    Thalidomide was first introduced in the 1950s as a sedative but was quickly removed from the market after it was linked to cases of severe birth defects. However, it has since made a remarkable comeback for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved use in the treatment of erythema nodosum leprosum. Further, it has shown its effectiveness in unresponsive dermatological conditions such as actinic prurigo, adult Langerhans cell histiocytosis, aphthous stomatitis, Behçet's syndrome, graft-versus-host disease, cutaneous sarcoidosis, erythema multiforme, Jessner-Kanof lymphocytic infiltration of the skin, Kaposi sarcoma, lichen planus, lupus erythematosus, melanoma, prurigo nodularis, pyoderma gangrenosum and uraemic pruritus. This article reviews the history, pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical uses and adverse effects of thalidomide.

  8. Optimized laser application in dermatology using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Roderick A.; Donne, Kelvin E.; Clement, Marc; Kiernan, Michael N.

    2002-03-01

    Infrared thermography can be used to optimize the application of lasers in dermatology with particular reference to the treatment of certain skin disorders such as vascular lesions and depilation. The efficacy of treatment is dependent upon a number of factors including: Optimization and correct selection of laser parameters such as wavelength and spot size. Human factors, such as laser operator skill, patient's skin type and anatomical location. By observing the thermal effects of laser irradiation on the skins surface during treatment results in improved efficacy and minimizes the possible threshold to skin damage, reducing the possibility of burning and scarring. This is of particular significance for example, in the control of purpura for the treatment of vascular lesions. The optimization is validated with reference to a computer model that predicts various skin temperatures based on two different laser spot sizes.

  9. [Prevention and regeneration of barrier disturbances in occupational dermatology].

    PubMed

    Schürer, Nanna Y; Schwanitz, Hans J

    2004-11-01

    Over the past 10 years primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of occupational skin disorders has been shown to be successful, documented with appropriate statistical methods. Interventional strategies are the main features of secondary and tertiary prevention, now well-established in occupational dermatology. Primary prevention is best accomplished by health education measures, both in the form on individual counseling and seminars. This overview reviews the scientific background of hand eczema with respect to barrier damage and repair and then considers the options for individualized and focused prevention. Special anatomical features of the interdigital space and palms, as well as functional disorders, such as palmar hyperhidrosis, are discussed. The importance of barrier regeneration is considered in light of the role of an acid pH, the epidermal calcium gradient and aspects of percutaneous absorption. The effects of anti-oxidants are considered, and new bioengineering methods which rely on physiologic measuring techniques are reviewed. PMID:16281607

  10. Role of dermatology in pharmacogenomics: drug-induced skin injury.

    PubMed

    Borroni, Riccardo G

    2015-01-01

    Different individuals may respond diversely to the same drug, in terms of efficacy and toxicity. Adverse drug reactions cause about 6% of all hospital admissions and account for up to 9% of hospitalization costs. Drug-induced skin injury (DISI) is the most common presentation of adverse drug reactions, ranging from maculopapular eruptions to severe adverse cutaneous drug reactions (SCARs) with mortality of up to 40%. Specific genetic polymorphisms confer susceptibility to different types of DISI. Identifying patients genetically at risk for SCARs is one of the goals of pharmacogenomics. In this article, the aspects of clinical dermatology relevant to the pharmacogenetics of DISI are reviewed. Many SCARs are now preventable, with consequent reduction of morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs.

  11. Photodynamic therapy in dermatology: past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Fluhr, Joachim W.

    2013-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive therapeutic method first introduced in the field of dermatology. It is mainly used for the treatment of precancerous and superficial malignant skin tumors. Today PDT finds new applications not only for nononcologic dermatoses but also in the field of other medical specialties such as otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology, neurology, gastroenterology, and urology. We are witnessing a broadening of the spectrum of skin diseases that are treated by PDT. Since its introduction, PDT protocol has evolved significantly in terms of increasing method efficacy and patient safety. In this era of evidence-based medicine, it is expected that much effort will be put into creating a worldwide accepted consensus on PDT. A review on the current knowledge of PDT is given, and the historical basis of the method's evolution since its introduction in the 1900s is presented. At the end, future challenges of PDT are focused on discussing gaps that exist for research in the field.

  12. Induced pluripotent stem cells in dermatology: potentials, advances, and limitations.

    PubMed

    Bilousova, Ganna; Roop, Dennis R

    2014-11-01

    The discovery of methods for reprogramming adult somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has raised the possibility of producing truly personalized treatment options for numerous diseases. Similar to embryonic stem cells (ESCs), iPSCs can give rise to any cell type in the body and are amenable to genetic correction by homologous recombination. These ESC properties of iPSCs allow for the development of permanent corrective therapies for many currently incurable disorders, including inherited skin diseases, without using embryonic tissues or oocytes. Here, we review recent progress and limitations of iPSC research with a focus on clinical applications of iPSCs and using iPSCs to model human diseases for drug discovery in the field of dermatology.

  13. Towards a decision support system for hand dermatology.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Luca; Cavazzina, Alice; Pinciroli, Francesco; Bonacina, Stefano; Pigatto, Paolo; Ayala, Fabio; De Pità, Ornella; Marceglia, Sara

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the medical diagnosis is faced by practitioners relying mainly on their experiences. This can be acquired during daily practices and on-the-job training. Given the complexity and extensiveness of the subject, supporting tools that include knowledge extracted by highly specialized practitioners can be valuable. In the present work, a Decision Support System (DSS) for hand dermatology was developed based on data coming from a Visit Report Form (VRF). Using a Bayesian approach and factors significance difference over the population average for the case, we demonstrated the potentiality of creating an enhanced VRF that include a diagnoses distribution probability based on the DSS rules applied for the specific patient situation. PMID:25160145

  14. Towards the use of OCT angiography in clinical dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Utku; Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a popular imaging technique used in ophthalmology, and on the way to become clinically viable alternative in dermatology due to its capability of acquiring histopathology level images of in vivo tissue, noninvasively. In this study, we demonstrate the capabilities of OCT-based angiography (OMAG) in detecting high-resolution, volumetric structural and microvascular features of in vivo human skin with various conditions using a swept source OCT system that operates on a central wavelength of 1310 nm with an A-line rate of 100 kHz. OMAG images provide detailed in vivo visualization of microvasculature of abnormal human skin conditions from face, chest and belly. Moreover, the progress of wound healing on human skin from arm is monitored during longitudinal wound healing process. The presented results promise the clinical use of OCT angiography in treatment of prevalent cutaneous diseases within human skin, in vivo.

  15. Dermatological and immunological conditions due to nerve lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Domenico; Lupoli, Amalia; Caccavale, Stefano; Piccolo, Vincenzo; Ruocco, Eleonora

    2013-01-01

    Summary Some syndromes are of interest to both neurologists and dermatologists, because cutaneous involvement may harbinger symptoms of a neurological disease. The aim of this review is to clarify this aspect. The skin, because of its relationships with the peripheral sensory nervous system, autonomic nervous system and central nervous system, constitutes a neuroimmunoendocrine organ. The skin contains numerous neuropeptides released from sensory nerves. Neuropeptides play a precise role in cutaneous physiology and pathophysiology, and in certain skin diseases. A complex dysregulation of neuropeptides is a feature of some diseases of both dermatological and neurological interest (e.g. cutaneous and nerve lesions following herpes zoster infection, cutaneous manifestations of carpal tunnel syndrome, trigeminal trophic syndrome). Dermatologists need to know when a patient should be referred to a neurologist and should consider this option in those presenting with syndromes of unclear etiology. PMID:24125557

  16. Telemedicine framework and applications in dermatology and ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Lamminen, H; Voipio, V; Ruohonen, K

    2001-05-01

    Medicine has to balance between the advantages and costs of new technology. As the significance of technical aids has increased, medicine has become more tightly bound to technology. Telemedicine is one of the fastest developing fields, as its development is connected to the development of telecommunication and information technology. Technology sets the ultimate restrictions to telemedicine. However, most challenges are nontechnical. Fast development makes it difficult to perform generalizable studies on the field, and the lack of practical, applicable standardization hinders telemedical system design. The cost of technology is quickly falling compared with the cost of human labour. Because of these factors the efficient use of telemedicine requires strategic decisions at the level of the organization as well as more research concerning the effects of telemedicine on medical practice. This article describes the telemedical frame of reference by using dermatology and ophthalmology as examples.

  17. Dermatological diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon1, Amy L.; Desai, Tejas

    2013-01-01

    Context: There are a variety of dermatological diseases that are more commonly seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplants than the general population. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science has been searched. Results: Some cutaneous diseases are clearly unique to this population. Of them, Lindsay’s Nails, xerosis cutis, dryness of the skin, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and acquired perforating dermatosis have been described in chronic kidney disease patients. The most common malignancy found in all transplant recipients is non-melanoma skin cancer. Conclusions: It is important for patients and physicians to recognize the manifestations of skin disease in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease to mitigate the morbidity associated with these conditions. PMID:24475435

  18. In Vitro Antifungal Activities against Moulds Isolated from Dermatological Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Nizam, Tzar; Binting, Rabiatul Adawiyah AG.; Mohd Saari, Shafika; Kumar, Thivyananthini Vijaya; Muhammad, Marianayati; Satim, Hartini; Yusoff, Hamidah; Santhanam, Jacinta

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of various antifungal agents against moulds isolated from dermatological specimens. Methods We identified 29 moulds from dermatological specimens between October 2012 and March 2013 by conventional methods. We performed antifungal susceptibility testing on six antifungal agents, amphotericin B, clotrimazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole and terbinafine, according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines contained in the M38-A2 document. Results Most antifungal agents were active against the dermatophytes, except for terbinafine against Trichophyton rubrum (geometric mean MIC, MICGM 3.17 μg/mL). The dematiaceous moulds were relatively susceptible to amphotericin B and azoles (MICGM 0.17–0.34 μg/mL), but not to terbinafine (MICGM 3.62 μg/mL). Septate hyaline moulds showed variable results between the relatively more susceptible Aspergillus spp. (MICGM 0.25–4 μg/mL) and the more resistant Fusarium spp. (MICGM 5.66–32 μg/mL). The zygomycetes were susceptible to amphotericin B (MICGM 0.5 μg/mL) and clotrimazole (MICGM 0.08 μg/mL), but not to other azoles (MICGM 2.52–4 μg/mL). Conclusion Amphotericin B and clotrimazole were the most effective antifungal agents against all moulds excepting Fusarium spp., while terbinafine was useful against dermatophytes (except T. rubrum) and Aspergillus spp. However, a larger study is required to draw more solid conclusions. PMID:27418867

  19. Future prospects in dermatologic applications of lasers, nanotechnology, and other new technologies.

    PubMed

    Boixeda, P; Feltes, F; Santiago, J L; Paoli, J

    2015-04-01

    We review novel technologies with diagnostic and therapeutic applications in dermatology. Among the diagnostic techniques that promise to become part of dermatologic practice in the future are optical coherence tomography, multiphoton laser scanning microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermography, and 7-T magnetic resonance imaging. Advances in therapy include novel light-based treatments, such as those applying lasers to new targets and in new wavelengths. Devices for home therapy are also appearing. We comment on the therapeutic uses of plasma, ultrasound, radiofrequency energy, total reflection amplification of spontaneous emission of radiation, light stimulation, and transepidermal drug delivery. Finally, we mention some basic developments in nanotechnology with prospects for future application in dermatology.

  20. Key moments in the history of dermatologic surgery (1952-2000).

    PubMed

    Hanke, C William

    2012-06-01

    The history of surgery in dermatology ("dermatologic surgery") is rich with significant developments and advances by multiple individuals. Only a few of these pioneers can be highlighted in this report because of space limitations. My apologies to colleagues and friends who have not been included or mentioned in this article. The Timeline: Major milestones in the history of dermatologic surgery in this article tells some of the story. The biographic pieces on 15 outstanding physicians add additional detail and perspective. Many major developments have occurred since 2000, but they are beyond the scope of this article.

  1. American academy of dermatology cardiovascular research technologies 2013 american college of cardiology.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Walter

    2013-05-01

    Dermatology topics include agents for psoriasis, urticaria, and infantile hemangiomas. The pros and cons of antiplatelet drugs prasugrel (Effient) and ticagrelor (Brilinta) are discussed, and an investigational agent, cangrelor, shows promise in reducing ischemic events when compared with clopidogrel (Plavix).

  2. GA-ANFIS Expert System Prototype for Prediction of Dermatological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Begic Fazlic, Lejla; Avdagic, Korana; Omanovic, Samir

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents novel GA-ANFIS expert system prototype for dermatological disease detection by using dermatological features and diagnoses collected in real conditions. Nine dermatological features are used as inputs to classifiers that are based on Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference Systems (ANFIS) for the first level of fuzzy model optimization. After that, they are used as inputs in Genetic Algorithm (GA) for the second level of fuzzy model optimization within GA-ANFIS system. GA-ANFIS system performs optimization in two steps. Modelling and validation of the novel GA-ANFIS system approach is performed in MATLAB environment by using validation set of data. Some conclusions concerning the impacts of features on the detection of dermatological diseases were obtained through analysis of the GA-ANFIS. We compared GA-ANFIS and ANFIS results. The results confirmed that the proposed GA-ANFIS model achieved accuracy rates which are higher than the ones we got by ANFIS model. PMID:25991223

  3. Analysis of Dermatologic Diseases in Neurosurgical In-Patients: A Retrospective Study of 463 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Hei Sung; Yu, Jeesuk

    2016-01-01

    Background Both the skin and the neurologic system are derived from the ectoderm during embryogenesis, and thus patients with neurologic disorders may have accompanying dermatologic diseases. For example, seborrheic dermatitis is more frequently observed in patients with Parkinsonism and other neurologic disorders. To date, however, there has been limited review on dermatologic diseases in neurosurgical in-patients. Objective The purpose of this study was to characterize dermatological problems encountered in a neurosurgery unit and to compare these data to previous reports of in-patient dermatologic consultations. Methods A retrospective review was conducted over all in-patient dermatology consultations from the neurosurgery unit during a 3-year period. Results Of 2,770 dermatology consultations, 463 (16.7%) came from the department of neurosurgery. The most frequent age group was the 6th decade of life, and the ratio of men to women was 1.07. Consults were most frequently placed from patients with intracranial hemorrhage (23.8%). Eczema/dermatitis (36.5%; n=204) and cutaneous infections (27.0%; n=151) accounted for more than half of all dermatological consultations, followed by cutaneous adverse drug reactions (11.8%; n=66). Additionally, seborrheic dermatitis was significantly more frequent (p=0.048, odds ratio=1.96) in patients with intracranial hemorrhage. Conclusion This study characterizes the distribution of skin disorders in patients admitted to the neurosurgery service based on the consultations that have been made for dermatologic evaluation. Collaboration between the neurosurgeons and dermatologists may improve the quality of patient care and help to better predict the occurrence of these conditions. PMID:27274629

  4. The Suitability of Gray-Scale Electronic Readers for Dermatology Journals

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Eun; Kim, Dai Hyun; Seo, Soo Hong; Kye, Young Chul

    2014-01-01

    Background The rapid development of information and communication technology has replaced traditional books by electronic versions. Most print dermatology journals have been replaced with electronic journals (e-journals), which are readily used by clinicians and medical students. Objective The objectives of this study were to determine whether e-readers are appropriate for reading dermatology journals, to conduct an attitude study of both medical personnel and students, and to find a way of improving e-book use in the field of dermatology. Methods All articles in the Korean Journal of Dermatology published from January 2010 to December 2010 were utilized in this study. Dermatology house officers, student trainees in their fourth year of medical school, and interns at Korea University Medical Center participated in the study. After reading the articles with Kindle 2, their impressions and evaluations were recorded using a questionnaire with a 5-point Likert scale. Results The results demonstrated that gray-scale e-readers might not be suitable for reading dermatology journals, especially for case reports compared to the original articles. Only three of the thirty-one respondents preferred e-readers to printed papers. The most common suggestions from respondents to encourage usage of e-books in the field of dermatology were the introduction of a color display, followed by the use of a touch screen system, a cheaper price, and ready-to-print capabilities. Conclusion In conclusion, our study demonstrated that current e-readers might not be suitable for reading dermatology journals. However, they may be utilized in selected situations according to the type and topic of the papers. PMID:25473221

  5. Top-cited psoriasis authors in 4 high-impact dermatology journals: 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Shivani; Vu, Christina; Choi, Young Mike; Wu, Jashin J

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a largely researched topic with abundant potential for publication in dermatologic journals. We used the Thomson Reuters' Web of Science citation database using the search term "psoriasis" in the titles of any literature published in 4 high-impact dermatology journals. We compiled a ranking of the top 25 cited first authors and top 25 cited authors overall on the subject of psoriasis between 2000-2012. We hope our analysis highlights the achievements of our colleagues and predecessors. PMID:27617948

  6. A retrospective analysis of dermatological lesions in kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Castello, Michela; Gregorini, Marilena; Rampino, Teresa; Bosio, Francesca; Bedino, Giulia; Piotti, Giovanni; Soccio, Grazia; Esposito, Pasquale; Klersy, Catherine; Abelli, Massimo; Borroni, Giovanni; Canton, Antonio Dal

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Kidney transplantation is the best option for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) failure. Prolonged use of immunosuppressive drugs often causes opportunistic infections and malignancies of skin and mucosae, but due to lack of a careful dermatological screening in several transplantation centers the diagnosis and the treatment of dermatological lesions in kidney transplant patients are underestimated. In addition after the introduction of interleukin (IL)-2 -receptor antagonists (basiliximab/daclizumab), mTOR inhibitors and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)/mycophenolic acid (MPA) in new immunosuppressive protocols only a few studies have analyzed the skin and mucosal lesions in kidney transplant patients. This study was undertaken to evaluate the cutaneous and mucosal diseases after kidney transplantation, and to investigate the association between these and different immunosuppressive protocols and/or demographic features. Methods: A retrospective analysis was done using medical records of kidney transplantation between 2000 and 2009 at the Transplant Unit of Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. The study included 183 patients (M 57.3%, F 42.7%) aged 51.5±11.8 yr) with transplant age 52.3±34.9 months. Induction therapy was basiliximab and steroids based; maintenance therapy included combination-regimes from cyclosporine, tacrolimus, steroids, mycophenolate mofetil (MM), mycophenolic acid (MPA), rapamycin, everolimus. Anti-rejection therapy was steroid and/or thymoglobulines based. Diagnosis of cutaneous disease was made through examination of skin, mucous membranes, nails and hair evaluation. Skin biopsies, specific cultures and serological tests were done when required. Results: Skin and mucosal diseases were reported in 173 (95.7%) of patients; 88 (50.81%) showed viral lesions; 92 (53.01%) immunosuppression-related lesions; 28 (16.39%) benign tumours; 26 (15.3%) precancers /neoplastic lesions; 24 (14.21%) mycosis

  7. Strengths and limitations of evidence-based dermatology.

    PubMed

    Williams, Hywel C

    2014-03-01

    The need for understanding and reflecting on evidence-based dermatology (EBD) has never been greater given the exponential growth of new external evidence to inform clinical practice. Like any other branch of medicine, dermatologists need to acquire new skills in constructing answerable questions, efficiently searching electronic bibliographic databases, and critically appraising different types of studies. Secondary summaries of evidence in the form of systematic reviews (SR), that is, reviews that are conducted in a systematic, unbiased and explicit manner, reside at the top of the evidence hierarchy, because they are less prone to bias than traditional expert reviews. In addition to providing summaries of the best external evidence, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are also powerful ways of identifying research gaps and ultimately setting the agenda of future clinical research in dermatology. But like any paradigm, EBD can have its limitations. Wrong application, misuse and overuse of EBD can have serious consequences. For example, mindless pooling together of data from dissimilar studies in a meta-analysis may render it a form of reductionism that does not make any sense. Similarly, even highly protocolised study designs such as SRs and RCTs are still susceptible to some degree of dishonesty and bias. Over-reliance on randomized controlled trials (RCT) may be inappropriate, as RCTs are not a good source for picking up rare but important adverse effects such as lupus syndrome with minocycline. A common criticism leveled against SRs is that these frequently conclude that there is lack of sufficient evidence to inform current clinical practice, but arguably, such a perception is grounded more on the interpretation of the SRs than anything else. The apparent absence of evidence should not paralyze the dermatologist to adopt a state of therapeutic nihilism. Poor primary data and an SR based on evidence that is not up-to-date are also

  8. Strengths and Limitations of Evidence-Based Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Hywel C

    2014-01-01

    The need for understanding and reflecting on evidence-based dermatology (EBD) has never been greater given the exponential growth of new external evidence to inform clinical practice. Like any other branch of medicine, dermatologists need to acquire new skills in constructing answerable questions, efficiently searching electronic bibliographic databases, and critically appraising different types of studies. Secondary summaries of evidence in the form of systematic reviews (SR), that is, reviews that are conducted in a systematic, unbiased and explicit manner, reside at the top of the evidence hierarchy, because they are less prone to bias than traditional expert reviews. In addition to providing summaries of the best external evidence, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are also powerful ways of identifying research gaps and ultimately setting the agenda of future clinical research in dermatology. But like any paradigm, EBD can have its limitations. Wrong application, misuse and overuse of EBD can have serious consequences. For example, mindless pooling together of data from dissimilar studies in a meta-analysis may render it a form of reductionism that does not make any sense. Similarly, even highly protocolised study designs such as SRs and RCTs are still susceptible to some degree of dishonesty and bias. Over-reliance on randomized controlled trials (RCT) may be inappropriate, as RCTs are not a good source for picking up rare but important adverse effects such as lupus syndrome with minocycline. A common criticism leveled against SRs is that these frequently conclude that there is lack of sufficient evidence to inform current clinical practice, but arguably, such a perception is grounded more on the interpretation of the SRs than anything else. The apparent absence of evidence should not paralyze the dermatologist to adopt a state of therapeutic nihilism. Poor primary data and an SR based on evidence that is not up-to-date are also

  9. Dermatological manifestations of measles infection in hospitalised paediatric patients observed in the 2009 - 2011 Western Cape epidemic.

    PubMed

    Tod, Bianca; Carrara, Henri; Levin, Michael; Todd, Gail

    2012-05-08

    Introduction. Measles is an acute vaccine-preventable infection common in childhood. In this study, the common dermatological signs of measles were designated the 'classic dermatological measles syndrome'. Methods. We attempted to ascertain the prevalence of 'non-classic' dermatological measles presentation in 69 paediatric patients admitted to New Somerset Hospital, Western Cape, during the recent South African measles outbreak. The patients were examined and photographed, after informed consent had been obtained, and findings were assessed by 1 dermatology consultant and 6 dermatology registrars. Measles infection was confirmed in 38 of the patients by means of IgM testing. The data were analysed using Stata version 11.1 statistical software. Outcomes. Of the group, 17.4% (95% CI 8.2 - 26.6%) displayed a classic measles dermatological picture, although all had been clinically diagnosed and admitted as complicated measles cases. Those serologically confirmed to have measles (N=38), 26.3% (95% CI 11.6 - 40.9%) conformed to the classic dermatological picture. Therefore, a significant majority of these patients presented with what was considered in this study to be a 'non-classic' dermatological picture. Conclusions. Measles infection in a paediatric population requiring admission may frequently present without a full-house classic dermatological picture. Recognised signs in isolation may be of greater value than the classically described syndrome as a whole. 'Non-classic' dermatological forms may occur more frequently than anticipated in complicated cases needing admission. Skin necrosis may be associated with measles.

  10. Photochemical predictive analysis of photodynamic therapy in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Salas-García, I.; López-Escobar, M.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2010-02-01

    Photodynamic Therapy is a recent treatment modality that allows malignant tissue destruction. The technique provides a localized effect and good cosmetic results. The application of Photodynamic Therapy is based on the inoculation of a photosensitizer and the posterior irradiation by an optical source. This radiation chemically activates the drug and provokes reactions that lead to tissue necrosis. Nowadays there are fixed clinical Photodynamic Therapy protocols that make use of a particular optical dose and photosensitizer amount. These parameters are independent of the patient and the lesion. In this work we present a Photodynamic Therapy model that tries to predict the effect of the treatment on the skin. First the results of a clinical study in the Dermatology Department of the Marqués de Valdecilla University Hospital are presented. The most common lesions and some unsuccessful cases are stated. The predictive model proposed is based on a 3D optical propagation of radiation by a Monte Carlo approach. Once the optical energy is obtained, a complex photochemical model is employed. This model takes into account the electronic transitions between molecular levels and particles concentrations. As the process of generation of photosensitizer is not homogeneous, the photosensitizer distribution is also taken into account. The optical power of the source, the exposition time and the optochemical characteristics of the tissue can be varied. This implies that these parameters could be adjusted to the particular pathology we are dealing with, so the unsuccessful cases could be better treated.

  11. Recent advances in X-ray microanalysis in dermatology

    SciTech Connect

    Forslind, B.; Grundin, T.G.; Lindberg, M.; Roomans, G.M.; Werner, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Electron microprobe and proton microprobe X-ray analysis can be used in several areas of dermatological research. With a proton probe, the distribution of trace elements in human hair can be determined. Electron microprobe analysis on freeze-dried cryosections of guinea-pig and human epidermis shows a marked gradient of Na, P and K over the stratum granulosum. In sections of freeze-substituted human skin this gradient is less steep. This difference is likely to be due to a decrease in water content of the epidermis towards the stratum corneum. Electron microprobe analysis of the epidermis can, for analysis of trace elements, be complemented by the proton microprobe. Quantitative agreement between the two techniques can be obtained by the use of a standard. Proton microprobe analysis was used to determine the distribution of Ni or Cr in human epidermis exposed to nickel or chromate ions. Possible differences in water content between the stratum corneum of patients with atopic eczema and normal stratum corneum was investigated in skin freeze-substituted with Br-doped resin. No significant differences were observed.

  12. New lifestyle drugs and somatoform disorders in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Harth, W; Seikowski, K; Hermes, B; Gieler, U

    2008-02-01

    An increasing number of healthy individuals make use of 'lifestyle' drugs, such as nootropics, psychopharmaca, hormones and eco-drugs. In this respect, the fact that many people try to improve their outer appearance, solve their 'cosmetic problems', influence their rate of hair growth and altogether delay, halt or even reverse the natural ageing process has become a relevant matter for the practising dermatologist. Lifestyle drugs in dermatology are taken in an attempt to increase personal life quality by means of attaining a certain, psychosocially defined beauty ideal. They are not taken to manage a medically identifiable, well-defined disease. Often, patients suffering from somatoform disorders, such as hypochondriac disorders, body dysmorphic disorders, somatization disorders or persistent somatoform pain disorders, may spontaneously ask physicians, in particular dermatologists and plastic surgeons, to prescribe them lifestyle drugs. Typically, patients repeatedly present with alleged 'physical symptoms' that turn out to be subjective complaints without any underlying identifiable medical disease. The use of lifestyle drugs without any proper medical indication may lead to a chronification of the emotional disorders that had ultimately been the cause of the patients' request for such drugs. Such disorders may need to be treated promptly with psychotherapy and/or appropriate psychopharmacotherapy, and the choice of the treatment requires an accurate differential diagnostic approach.

  13. [What's new in aesthetic dermatology: filler and laser treatments].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C

    2009-05-01

    In esthetic dermatology, filling and laser treatments are two essential techniques. Several recent studies on calcium hydroxyapatite in filling treatments and facial volumetry, in esthetics, but also in HIV patients, have been published. It was also tested in accentuated melomental folds where it is superior to hyaluronic acid. In aging of the skin of the dorsal aspect of the hands, hyaluronic acid provides slightly better results than collagen. Filler rhinoplasty can correct minor deformations of the nose. Lipofilling is advantageous for linear scleroderma of the face, at least in the forehead region, and adipocyte stem cells may be a future solution for facial aging or lipoatrophy. The risk of local and/or general sarcoid reactions related to interferon in patients having undergone filling injections has been reported. In the field of laser treatment, fractionated photothermolysis has motivated much more research and seem particularly valuable in treating acne scars, aging of the dorsal aspect of the hands, and, more anecdotally, in colloid milium and pearly penile papules. Laser is also useful in preventing surgical scars where a mini-diode can also be used. For axillary hyperhidrosis, subdermic Nd-YAG laser competes with botulinum toxin, with longer-lasting results. Solutions are appearing for treatment of red or white striae cutis distensae. Intense pulsed light is the reference technique for poikiloderma of Civatte, and seems effective, with new devices, for melasma. However, inappropriately used by nonphysicians, IPL can cause serious ocular accidents; one case of uveitis has been reported. PMID:19576483

  14. Determination of glycine and threonine in topical dermatological preparations.

    PubMed

    Marrubini, G; Caccialanza, G; Massolini, G

    2008-08-01

    In the present study, a single HPLC method was developed for the determination of glycine and threonine in cicatrizants. Two different preparations of a cream and an ointment, and the corresponding bandages, onto which the formulations were applied, were studied. The method involved matrix solubilisation with dichloromethane, liquid-liquid isolation of gly and thr with aqueous 1N NaOH, and derivatization with phenylisothiocyanate. Reversed-phase HPLC separation was carried out by gradient elution with 20mM aqueous NaClO4 and acetonitrile (from 90% to 30% aqueous NaClO4 in 10 min) on a LiChrospher 100 RP-18 cartridge (125 mm x 4.6 mm). Analytes were determined with a UV detector set at 245 nm. Quantitation was accomplished by internal standardization with methionine. Linearity was studied in the range 60-120% of the concentrations expected for gly and thr (viz. for gly from 200 to 400 microgml(-1), and for thr from 100 to 200 microgml(-1)). In reference aqueous samples, linear correlation (r) was better than 0.99 for gly and thr, while in spiked matrix samples r ranged from 0.97 to 0.98. Recoveries were in the 95-105% interval, and precision (CV%, N=6) was better than 5% for both analytes either in cream, ointment or bandages. The method was successfully used for the quality control of topical dermatological preparations.

  15. Effective topical delivery systems for corticosteroids: dermatological and histological evaluations.

    PubMed

    Eroğlu, İpek; Azizoğlu, Erkan; Özyazıcı, Mine; Nenni, Merve; Gürer Orhan, Hande; Özbal, Seda; Tekmen, Işıl; Ertam, İlgen; Ünal, İdil; Özer, Özgen

    2016-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic and relapsing skin disease with severe eczematous lesions. Long-term topical corticosteroid treatment can induce skin atrophy, hypopigmentation and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) increase. A new treatment approach was needed to reduce the risk by dermal targeting. For this purpose, Betamethasone valerate (BMV)/Diflucortolone valerate (DFV)-loaded liposomes (220-350 nm) were prepared and incorporated into chitosan gel to obtain adequate viscosity (∼13 000 cps). Drugs were localized in stratum corneum + epidermis of rat skin in ex-vivo permeation studies. The toxicity was assessed on human fibroblast cells. In point of in-vivo studies, pharmacodynamic responses, treatment efficacy and skin irritation were evaluated and compared with previously prepared nanoparticles. Liposome/nanoparticle in gel formulations produced higher paw edema inhibition in rats with respect to the commercial cream. Similar skin blanching effect with commercial creams was obtained via liposome in gels although they contain 10 times less drug. Dermatological scoring results, prognostic histological parameters and suppression of mast cell numbers showed higher treatment efficiency of liposome/nanoparticle in gel formulations in AD-induced rats. TEWL and erythema measurements confirmed these results. Overview of obtained results showed that liposomes might be an effective and safe carrier for corticosteroids in skin disease treatment. PMID:25259424

  16. [What's new in aesthetic dermatology: filler and laser treatments].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C

    2009-05-01

    In esthetic dermatology, filling and laser treatments are two essential techniques. Several recent studies on calcium hydroxyapatite in filling treatments and facial volumetry, in esthetics, but also in HIV patients, have been published. It was also tested in accentuated melomental folds where it is superior to hyaluronic acid. In aging of the skin of the dorsal aspect of the hands, hyaluronic acid provides slightly better results than collagen. Filler rhinoplasty can correct minor deformations of the nose. Lipofilling is advantageous for linear scleroderma of the face, at least in the forehead region, and adipocyte stem cells may be a future solution for facial aging or lipoatrophy. The risk of local and/or general sarcoid reactions related to interferon in patients having undergone filling injections has been reported. In the field of laser treatment, fractionated photothermolysis has motivated much more research and seem particularly valuable in treating acne scars, aging of the dorsal aspect of the hands, and, more anecdotally, in colloid milium and pearly penile papules. Laser is also useful in preventing surgical scars where a mini-diode can also be used. For axillary hyperhidrosis, subdermic Nd-YAG laser competes with botulinum toxin, with longer-lasting results. Solutions are appearing for treatment of red or white striae cutis distensae. Intense pulsed light is the reference technique for poikiloderma of Civatte, and seems effective, with new devices, for melasma. However, inappropriately used by nonphysicians, IPL can cause serious ocular accidents; one case of uveitis has been reported.

  17. Complement system in dermatological diseases - fire under the skin.

    PubMed

    Panelius, Jaana; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The complement system plays a key role in several dermatological diseases. Overactivation, deficiency, or abnormality of the control proteins are often related to a skin disease. Autoimmune mechanisms with autoantibodies and a cytotoxic effect of the complement membrane attack complex on epidermal or vascular cells can cause direct tissue damage and inflammation, e.g., in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), phospholipid antibody syndrome, and bullous skin diseases like pemphigoid. By evading complement attack, some microbes like Borrelia spirochetes and staphylococci can persist in the skin and cause prolonged symptoms. In this review, we present the most important skin diseases connected to abnormalities in the function of the complement system. Drugs having an effect on the complement system are also briefly described. On one hand, drugs with free hydroxyl on amino groups (e.g., hydralazine, procainamide) could interact with C4A, C4B, or C3 and cause an SLE-like disease. On the other hand, progress in studies on complement has led to novel anti-complement drugs (recombinant C1-inhibitor and anti-C5 antibody, eculizumab) that could alleviate symptoms in diseases associated with excessive complement activation. The main theme of the manuscript is to show how relevant the complement system is as an immune effector system in contributing to tissue injury and inflammation in a broad range of skin disorders.

  18. Ocular changes induced by drugs commonly used in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Turno-Kręcicka, Anna; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Misiuk-Hojło, Marta; Patryn, Eliza; Czajor, Karolina; Nita, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The use of many drugs in dermatologic diseases may cause ocular side effects. Some may regress after discontinuation of the therapy, but others persist or progress even after the cessation of treatment. This review presents four groups of commonly prescribed drugs-antimalarial medicines, glucocorticoids, retinoids, and psoralens + ultraviolet A (UVA) therapy-and discusses their possible ocular side effects. The most significant complication of antimalarial drugs is retinopathy with the risk of permanent visual impairment. There are different recommendations for screening for this drug-related retinopathy. The most important ocular manifestations of steroid management are irreversible optic nerve damage in "steroid responders" (steroid glaucoma) and cataract. Some other side effects may disappear after discontinuation of the therapy. Retinoid-induced ocular side effects include ocular surface disease as well as retinal dysfunction. It is recommended to modify the therapy when night blindness occurs or after the decrease of color vision. Protective eyewear is sufficient to avoid ocular surface problems during psoralen + UVA therapy. The knowledge of screening schemes and closer cooperation between physicians may decrease the risk of serious or irreversible ocular side effects. PMID:26903180

  19. Photosensitizer nanocarriers modeling for photodynamic therapy applied to dermatological diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas-García, I.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; López-Escobar, M.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2011-02-01

    Photodynamic Therapy involves the therapeutic use of photosensitizers in combination with visible light. The subsequent photochemical reactions generate reactive oxygen species which are considered the principal cytotoxic agents to induce cell death. This technique has become widely used in medicine to treat tumors and other nonmalignant diseases. However, there are several factors related to illumination or the photosensitizer that limit an optimal treatment outcome. The use of nanoparticles (NP) for PDT has been proposed as a solution to current shortcomings. In this way, there are NPs that act as carriers for photosensitizers, NPs that absorb the light and transfer the energy to the photosensitizer and NPs that are themselves photodynamically active. In dermatology, the use of topical photosensitizers produces a time dependent inhomogeneous distribution within the tumor, where the stratum corneum is the main barrier to the diffusion of the photosensitizer to the deeper layers of skin. This produces an insufficient photosensitizer accumulation in tumor tissues and therefore, a low therapeutic efficiency in the case of deep lesions. This work focuses in the use of NPs as photosensitizer carriers to improve the actual topical drug distribution in malignant skin tissues. We present a mathematical model of PS distribution in tumor tissue using NPs that takes into account parameters related to nanoparticles binding. Once the concentration profile of NPs into tissue is obtained, we use a photochemical model which allows us to calculate the temporal evolution of reactive oxygen species according to PS distribution calculated previously from NPs profile.

  20. Complement System in Dermatological Diseases – Fire Under the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Panelius, Jaana; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The complement system plays a key role in several dermatological diseases. Overactivation, deficiency, or abnormality of the control proteins are often related to a skin disease. Autoimmune mechanisms with autoantibodies and a cytotoxic effect of the complement membrane attack complex on epidermal or vascular cells can cause direct tissue damage and inflammation, e.g., in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), phospholipid antibody syndrome, and bullous skin diseases like pemphigoid. By evading complement attack, some microbes like Borrelia spirochetes and staphylococci can persist in the skin and cause prolonged symptoms. In this review, we present the most important skin diseases connected to abnormalities in the function of the complement system. Drugs having an effect on the complement system are also briefly described. On one hand, drugs with free hydroxyl on amino groups (e.g., hydralazine, procainamide) could interact with C4A, C4B, or C3 and cause an SLE-like disease. On the other hand, progress in studies on complement has led to novel anti-complement drugs (recombinant C1-inhibitor and anti-C5 antibody, eculizumab) that could alleviate symptoms in diseases associated with excessive complement activation. The main theme of the manuscript is to show how relevant the complement system is as an immune effector system in contributing to tissue injury and inflammation in a broad range of skin disorders. PMID:25688346

  1. Green tea in dermatology--myths and facts.

    PubMed

    Zink, Alexander; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia

    2015-08-01

    Green tea consumption has a long tradition in Asian countries--especially China. The epidemiologically and experimentally observed anticarcinogenic and antiinflammatory effects of green tea have led to the implementation of green tea extracts in multiple therapeutic applications - both in dermatological and cosmeceutical preparations. The most abundant evidence exists for the anticarcinogenic and chemopreventive effect of green tea or its major constituent epigallocatechin-3-gallate. Almost equally evident is the effect in infectious diseases such as cutaneous viral infections. For external genital warts, a topical ointment with green tea extracts was licensed in the USA in 2010, and recently also in Europe. Experimental evidence pinpointing the block of central signal transduction factors in inflammatory mechanisms has led to the evaluation of catechins in inflammatory disorders such as atopic dermatitis. The belief of green tea as a "wonder weapon" against diseases dates back thousands of years. According to a Chinese legend, ancient Emperor Shen Nung noted a delightful aroma after some leaves of a nearby tree had fallen into boiling water. He immediately proclaimed the new "drink" as "heaven-sent", starting the belief - persisting until today - of green tea as a medication from nature against many different diseases. This review summarizes biological effects and clinical implications of green tea.

  2. Laser therapy in dermatology: Kids are not just little people.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Mona; Makkar, Hanspaul; Finch, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Advances in laser research and technology have led to expanded laser applications for the treatment of dermatologic disease. Lasers are viable treatment modalities for patients of any age group and offer unique treatment options for both adult and pediatric patients. While many skin diseases can be treated similarly in children and adults, differences in treatment approaches can result from varying anxiety levels, pain tolerance, psychosocial considerations of untreated disease, determination of suitable anesthesia, the use of size-appropriate safety equipment, and differences in the evolution of skin disease over time. Laser therapy can prove effective for the treatment of molluscum contagiosum unresponsive to conventional therapy. Hypertrophied vascular lesions and pigmented lesions, such as the nevus of Ota, respond more effectively to laser therapy earlier in life with fewer treatment sessions and reduced side effects. In the case of port-wine stains, the pulsed dye laser is the agent of choice in the pediatric patient, while the Q-switched alexandrite may be more effective in the adult population. PMID:26686019

  3. Q-switched ruby laser in cosmetic dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopera, Daisy

    1996-12-01

    The q-switched ruby laser has shown promising results in the treatment of blue and black tattoos. The red light of the ruby laser, 694 nm wavelength, selectively absorbed by dark pigments, is converted into heat and pigments are immediately vaporized. Energy levels range between 4, 5 and 12 J/cm2. Short exposure time does not exceed the thermal relaxation time of the target structures. Thus, thermal damage of the surrounding tissue is minimal. Not only exogenous pigment as tattoo ink but also physiological pigmented structures as melanocytes, melanosome loaden keratinocytes, and melanophages are affected by this type of laser application. Therefore the ruby laser represents a new option in the treatment of a variety of benign pigmented lesions in cosmetic dermatology. The benefit of this source can be seen in efficient clearing of the lesions without scarring. As a side effect transient hypopigmentation may occur. Ruby laser treatment of melanocytic lesions cannot be recommended because unpigmented nevus cells do not absorb red light and persist unaltered. They still bear the potency of further transformation, as into malignancy.

  4. Honey in dermatology and skin care: a review.

    PubMed

    Burlando, Bruno; Cornara, Laura

    2013-12-01

    Honey is a bee-derived, supersaturated solution composed mainly of fructose and glucose, and containing proteins and amino acids, vitamins, enzymes, minerals, and other minor components. Historical records of honey skin uses date back to the earliest civilizations, showing that honey has been frequently used as a binder or vehicle, but also for its therapeutic virtues. Antimicrobial properties are pivotal in dermatological applications, owing to enzymatic H2 O2 release or the presence of active components, like methylglyoxal in manuka, while medical-grade honey is also available. Honey is particularly suitable as a dressing for wounds and burns and has also been included in treatments against pityriasis, tinea, seborrhea, dandruff, diaper dermatitis, psoriasis, hemorrhoids, and anal fissure. In cosmetic formulations, it exerts emollient, humectant, soothing, and hair conditioning effects, keeps the skin juvenile and retards wrinkle formation, regulates pH and prevents pathogen infections. Honey-based cosmetic products include lip ointments, cleansing milks, hydrating creams, after sun, tonic lotions, shampoos, and conditioners. The used amounts range between 1 and 10%, but concentrations up to 70% can be reached by mixing with oils, gel, and emulsifiers, or polymer entrapment. Intermediate-moisture, dried, and chemically modified honeys are also used. Mechanisms of action on skin cells are deeply conditioned by the botanical sources and include antioxidant activity, the induction of cytokines and matrix metalloproteinase expression, as well as epithelial-mesenchymal transition in wounded epidermis. Future achievements, throwing light on honey chemistry and pharmacological traits, will open the way to new therapeutic approaches and add considerable market value to the product. PMID:24305429

  5. Utilization of biodegradable polymeric materials as delivery agents in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable polymeric materials are ideal carrier systems for biomedical applications. Features like controlled and sustained delivery, improved drug pharmacokinetics, reduced side effects and safe degradation make the use of these materials very attractive in a lot of medical fields, with dermatology included. A number of studies have shown that particle-based formulations can improve the skin penetration of topically applied drugs. However, for a successful translation of these promising results into a clinical application, a more rational approach is needed to take into account the different properties of diseased skin and the fate of these polymeric materials after topical application. In fact, each pathological skin condition poses different challenges and the way diseased skin interacts with polymeric carriers might be markedly different to that of healthy skin. In most inflammatory skin conditions, the skin's barrier is impaired and the local immune system is activated. A better understanding of such mechanisms has the potential to improve the efficacy of carrier-based dermatotherapy. Such knowledge would allow the informed choice of the type of polymeric carrier depending on the skin condition to be treated, the type of drug to be loaded, and the desired release kinetics. Furthermore, a better control of polymer degradation and release properties in accordance with the skin environment would improve the safety and the selectivity of drug release. This review aims at summarizing the current knowledge on how polymeric delivery systems interact with healthy and diseased skin, giving an overview of the challenges that different pathological skin conditions pose to the development of safer and more specific dermatotherapies.

  6. Honey in dermatology and skin care: a review.

    PubMed

    Burlando, Bruno; Cornara, Laura

    2013-12-01

    Honey is a bee-derived, supersaturated solution composed mainly of fructose and glucose, and containing proteins and amino acids, vitamins, enzymes, minerals, and other minor components. Historical records of honey skin uses date back to the earliest civilizations, showing that honey has been frequently used as a binder or vehicle, but also for its therapeutic virtues. Antimicrobial properties are pivotal in dermatological applications, owing to enzymatic H2 O2 release or the presence of active components, like methylglyoxal in manuka, while medical-grade honey is also available. Honey is particularly suitable as a dressing for wounds and burns and has also been included in treatments against pityriasis, tinea, seborrhea, dandruff, diaper dermatitis, psoriasis, hemorrhoids, and anal fissure. In cosmetic formulations, it exerts emollient, humectant, soothing, and hair conditioning effects, keeps the skin juvenile and retards wrinkle formation, regulates pH and prevents pathogen infections. Honey-based cosmetic products include lip ointments, cleansing milks, hydrating creams, after sun, tonic lotions, shampoos, and conditioners. The used amounts range between 1 and 10%, but concentrations up to 70% can be reached by mixing with oils, gel, and emulsifiers, or polymer entrapment. Intermediate-moisture, dried, and chemically modified honeys are also used. Mechanisms of action on skin cells are deeply conditioned by the botanical sources and include antioxidant activity, the induction of cytokines and matrix metalloproteinase expression, as well as epithelial-mesenchymal transition in wounded epidermis. Future achievements, throwing light on honey chemistry and pharmacological traits, will open the way to new therapeutic approaches and add considerable market value to the product.

  7. Minoxidil use in dermatology, side effects and recent patents.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alfredo; Cantisani, Carmen; Melis, Luca; Iorio, Alessandra; Scali, Elisabetta; Calvieri, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    Minoxidil, a vasodilator medication known for its ability to slow or stop hair loss and promote hair regrowth, was first introduced, exclusively as an oral drug, to treat high blood pressure. It was however discovered to have the important side-effect of increasing growth or darkening of fine body hairs; this led to the development of a topical formulation as a 2% concentration solution for the treatment of female androgenic alopecia or 5% for treating male androgenic alopecia. Measurable changes disappear within months after discontinuation of treatment. The mechanism by which it promotes hair growth is not fully understood. Minoxidil is a potassium channel opener, causing hyperpolarization of cell membranes and it is also a vasodilator, it is speculated that, by widening blood vessels and opening potassium channels, it allows more oxygen, blood and nutrients to the follicle. This can also cause follicles in the telogen phase to shed, usually soon to be replaced by new, thicker hairs in a new anagen phase. It needs to be applied regularly, once or twice daily, for hair gained to be maintained, and side effects are common. The most common adverse reactions of the topical formulation are limited to irritant and allergic contact dermatitis on the scalp. There have been cases of allergic reactions to the nonactive ingredient propylene glycol, which is found in some topical solution especially if they are galenic. Increased hair loss which can occur during Minoxidil use, is due to the synchronization of the hair cycle that the treatment induces. In this review, we described its mechanism of action, use in dermatology and some patents related to alternative treatment of allergic reactions due to its use. PMID:22409453

  8. Dermatology Residency Selection Criteria with an Emphasis on Program Characteristics: A National Program Director Survey

    PubMed Central

    Gorouhi, Farzam; Alikhan, Ali; Rezaei, Arash; Fazel, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Background. Dermatology residency programs are relatively diverse in their resident selection process. The authors investigated the importance of 25 dermatology residency selection criteria focusing on differences in program directors' (PDs') perception based on specific program demographics. Methods. This cross-sectional nationwide observational survey utilized a 41-item questionnaire that was developed by literature search, brainstorming sessions, and online expert reviews. The data were analyzed utilizing the reliability test, two-step clustering, and K-means methods as well as other methods. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in PDs' perception regarding the importance of the selection criteria based on program demographics. Results. Ninety-five out of 114 PDs (83.3%) responded to the survey. The top five criteria for dermatology residency selection were interview, letters of recommendation, United States Medical Licensing Examination Step I scores, medical school transcripts, and clinical rotations. The following criteria were preferentially ranked based on different program characteristics: “advanced degrees,” “interest in academics,” “reputation of undergraduate and medical school,” “prior unsuccessful attempts to match,” and “number of publications.” Conclusions. Our survey provides up-to-date factual data on dermatology PDs' perception in this regard. Dermatology residency programs may find the reported data useful in further optimizing their residency selection process. PMID:24772165

  9. Polish dermatology in the 19th and the first half of the 20th centuries.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The beginnings of Polish dermatology date back to the first half of the 19th century in Kraków. The first textbook of dermatology was written by Ludwik Bierkowski. Later the progress in the development of this field of medicine was due to Franciszek Krzyształowicz, Marian Grzybowski, Franciszek Walter, and Jan Alkiewicz. Krzyształowicz's most remarkable achievements were related to his studies of the Treponema pallidum of syphilis. Grzybowski's main contribution to international dermatology was the first description in the medical literature of a specific variant of keratoacanthoma, which has since then been called Grzybowski's eruptive keratoacanthoma or generalized eruptive keratoacanthoma - Grzybowski's variant. Alkiewicz described trachyonychia, or twenty-nail dystrophy, a disease that became well established in the dermatological literature; he also described the so-called transverse net in onychomycosis. Walter identified the syphilitic skin and bone lesions in some figures carved in the Veit Stoss's altar in Kraków, thus presenting the famous thesis of the non-American origin of syphilis in Europe. Considering all these achievements, it is the goal of this paper to review Polish contributions to international dermatology. PMID:18173613

  10. Role of Clinical Images Based Teaching as a Supplement to Conventional Clinical Teaching in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gurumoorthy Rajesh; Madhavi, Sankar; Karthikeyan, Kaliaperumal; Thirunavakarasu, MR

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Clinical Dermatology is a visually oriented specialty, where visually oriented teaching is more important than it is in any other specialty. It is essential that students must have repeated exposure to common dermatological disorders in the limited hours of Dermatology clinical teaching. Aim: This study was conducted to assess the effect of clinical images based teaching as a supplement to the patient based clinical teaching in Dermatology, among final year MBBS students. Methods: A clinical batch comprising of 19 students was chosen for the study. Apart from the routine clinical teaching sessions, clinical images based teaching was conducted. This teaching method was evaluated using a retrospective pre-post questionnaire. Students’ performance was assessed using Photo Quiz and an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Feedback about the addition of images based class was collected from students. Results: A significant improvement was observed in the self-assessment scores following images based teaching. Mean OSCE score was 6.26/10, and that of Photo Quiz was 13.6/20. Conclusion: This Images based Dermatology teaching has proven to be an excellent supplement to routine clinical cases based teaching. PMID:26677267

  11. Applications of platelet-rich plasma in dermatology: A critical appraisal of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lynch, M D; Bashir, S

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous blood-derived product enriched in platelets, growth factors, chemokines and cytokines. Initial applications were predominantly in musculoskeletal and maxillofacial fields, however in recent years, it has been used for a range of dermatological indications including wound healing, fat grafting, alopecia, scar revision and dermal volume augmentation. Here, we critically appraise the literature relating to the usage of PRP within Dermatology. We have evaluated in vitro data, preclinical animal studies and human trials. We conclude that, whilst the literature may be consistent with a modest benefit for specific indications, there is not sufficient evidence supporting the efficacy of PRP to justify a role in routine dermatological practice at the present time. However, since PRP is generally well tolerated with few reported complications, further study may be justified in the context of organized trials.

  12. Constructing a knowledge-based database for dermatological integrative medical information.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeeyoung; Jo, Yunju; Bae, Hyunsu; Hong, Moochang; Shin, Minkyu; Kim, Yangseok

    2013-01-01

    Recently, overuse of steroids and immunosuppressive drugs has produced incurable dermatological health problems. Traditional medical approaches have been studied for alternative solutions. However, accessing relevant information is difficult given the differences in information for western medicine (WM) and traditional medicine (TM). Therefore, an integrated medical information infrastructure must be utilized to bridge western and traditional treatments. In this study, WM and TM information was collected based on literature searches and information from internet databases on dermatological issues. Additionally, definitions for unified terminology and disease categorization based on individual cases were generated. Also a searchable database system was established that may be a possible model system for integrating both WM and TM medical information on dermatological conditions. Such a system will yield benefits for researchers and facilitate the best possible medical solutions for patients. The DIMI is freely available online.

  13. Constructing a Knowledge-Based Database for Dermatological Integrative Medical Information

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yunju; Bae, Hyunsu; Hong, Moochang; Shin, Minkyu; Kim, Yangseok

    2013-01-01

    Recently, overuse of steroids and immunosuppressive drugs has produced incurable dermatological health problems. Traditional medical approaches have been studied for alternative solutions. However, accessing relevant information is difficult given the differences in information for western medicine (WM) and traditional medicine (TM). Therefore, an integrated medical information infrastructure must be utilized to bridge western and traditional treatments. In this study, WM and TM information was collected based on literature searches and information from internet databases on dermatological issues. Additionally, definitions for unified terminology and disease categorization based on individual cases were generated. Also a searchable database system was established that may be a possible model system for integrating both WM and TM medical information on dermatological conditions. Such a system will yield benefits for researchers and facilitate the best possible medical solutions for patients. The DIMI is freely available online. PMID:24386003

  14. [Nursing care management in dermatological patient on phototherapy narrow band UVB].

    PubMed

    de Argila Fernández-Durán, Nuria; Blasco Maldonado, Celeste; Martín Gómez, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Phototherapy with narrow band ultraviolet B is a treatment used in some dermatology units, and is the first choice in some dermatological diseases due to being comfortable and cheap. The aim of this paper is to describe the management and nursing care by grouping more specific diagnoses, following NANDA-NIC/NOC taxonomy, such as the methodology from application, technique, material, and personnel to space-related aspects, with the aim of avoiding the clinical variability and the possible associated risks for the patients, and for the nurses who administer the treatment. The continuity of the same nurse in the follow-up sessions stimulates the relationship between medical personnel and patients, key points for loyalty and therapeutic adherence. This paper examines a consensus procedure with the Dermatology Unit Team and accredited by the Hospital Quality Unit.

  15. 21 CFR 878.4810 - Laser surgical instrument for use in general and plastic surgery and in dermatology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laser surgical instrument for use in general and... Surgical Devices § 878.4810 Laser surgical instrument for use in general and plastic surgery and in dermatology. (a) Identification. (1) A carbon dioxide laser for use in general surgery and in dermatology is...

  16. Dermatological and cosmeceutical benefits of Glycine max (soybean) and its active components.

    PubMed

    Waqas, Muhammad Khurram; Akhtar, Naveed; Mustafa, Rehan; Jamshaid, Muhammad; Khan, Haji Muhammad Shoaib; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    Glycine max, known as the soybean or soya bean, is a species of legume native to East Asia. Soya beans contain many functional components including phenolic acids, flavonoids, isoflavonoids (quercetin, genistein, and daidzein), small proteins (Bowman-Birk inhibitor, soybean trypsin inhibitor) tannins, and proanthocyanidins. Soybean seeds extract and fresh soymilk fractions have been reported to possess the cosmeceutical and dermatological benefits such as anti-inflammatory, collagen stimulating effect, potent anti-oxidant scavenging peroxyl radicals, skin lightening effect and protection against UV radiation. Thus, present review attempts to give a short overview on dermatological and cosmeceutical studies of soybean and its bioactive compounds.

  17. Comparative effectiveness of topical drugs in dermatologic priority diseases: geometry of randomized trial networks.

    PubMed

    Karimkhani, Chante; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    This commentary explores the fundamentals of network theory, a branch of applied mathematics that has numerous applications in many fields. Maruani et al. (2014) used network theory to analyze the geometry of the evidence base for dermatologic treatments. This is a prime example of the innovative nature of network theory: the mapping of a complex system into an abstract geometry for easier analysis. The interpretation rests upon the two concepts of diversity and co-occurrence. The mathematical foundation of these concepts is briefly reviewed. In addition, examples of the application of network geometry in other dermatologic settings as well as in science and technology are presented.

  18. Medical emergencies in the dermatology office: incidence and options for crisis preparedness.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Paul G; Daoud, Shaza; Hazen, Brent P; Engstrom, Conley W; Turgeon, Karen L; Reep, Michael D; Tanphaichitr, Arthapol; Styron, Brandie T

    2014-05-01

    Medical emergencies may occur in any setting, including dermatology offices. We examined the incidence of medical emergencies in a survey of 34 dermatologists northeast Ohio. Fifty-five events occurred over 565 combined years of clinical practice, an incidence of 1 episode every 10.3 years. We also review options for better preparedness for medical emergencies in dermatology practices, ranging from an emergency action plan for emergency personnel, basic life support (BLS) certification, advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) certification, and on-site automatic electronic defibrillators (AEDs).

  19. The American Academy of Dermatology Ethics Committee: how it works and what you need to know.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Robert D

    2009-01-01

    The American Academy of Dermatology Ethics Committee has a key role in assessing members' adherence to the Code of Medical Ethics. It performs no disciplinary action on its own, referring validated complaints for judicial review. The most frequent complaints that the Ethics Committee has received in recent years have been cases involving expert witness testimony, complaints about American Academy of Dermatology members promoting products and services of questionable benefit for patients through false, misleading, and deceptive advertising and self-promotion, and reports of misuse of nonphysician clinicians. The steps by which a complaint is received and processed are detailed. PMID:19539157

  20. Developing more open and equitable relationships with industry to improve advancements in clinical research in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Campa, M; Ryan, C; Menter, A

    2016-06-01

    Relationships between physicians, scientists, and the pharmaceutical industry can be complicated by conflicts of interest. Honest and equitable relationships, however, are essential to the advancement of dermatologic clinical research. Several factors can increase transparency in clinical trials including preregistration of clinical trials, reporting of all data produced from clinical trials, non-industry ownership of clinical trial data, clarity of statistical methods and publication of both positive and negative results. Through collaborative, scientifically rigorous studies, physicians and industry can achieve significant advances in dermatologic care. PMID:27317287

  1. A Study on Oral Mucosal Lesions in 3500 Patients with Dermatological Diseases in South India

    PubMed Central

    Babu, RS Arvind; Chandrashekar, P; Kumar, K Kiran; Reddy, G Sridhar; Chandra, K Lalith Prakash; Rao, V; Reddy, BVR

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral mucosal lesions that are observed in the dermatological diseases are categorized under mucocutaneous conditions. The oral lesions in dermatological diseases may be the early aspects of the disease manifestation or the most significant clinical appearance or the only sign/and or symptom of such dermatological diseases and occasionally lesions occur simultaneously in the skin as well as mucous membrane. Aim: This present study attempts to find out the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in patients with dermatological diseases. Subjects and Methods: The study includes 3500 patients who attended out-patient Department of Dermatology. Patients with oral manifestation were subjected for clinical examination in the Department of Oral Pathology. Diagnostic procedures were performed to confirm the clinical oral diagnosis. The results of the study were analyzed by SPSS software version 19.0 (Armonk, NY) and presented as descriptive statistics. Correlation of oral manifestions with their respective dermatological disease was statistically analysed by Pearson's correlation test.(P < 0.05 were considered as statistically significant) Results: The prevalence rate of oral mucosal lesions in the present study was 1.8% (65/3500). The most frequent lesions observed were psoriasis 32.3% (21/65), lichen planus 18.4% (12/65), Stevens Johnson Syndrome 18.4% (12/65), pemphigus 10.7% (7/65), toxic epidermal necrolysis 4.6% (3/65), systemic lupus erythematosus 3% (2/65), discoid lupus erythematosus 1.5% (1/65), pemphigoid 1.5% (1/65). Gender distribution in the study population was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Employed and unemployed individuals in the study population were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Pearson's correlation analysis of oral manifestations with their respective dermatological disease showed r = 0.466 and signifies a positive correlation and is statistically significant at the 0.01 level (two-tailed). Conclusion: The prevalence rate of

  2. Herpes zoster guideline of the German Dermatology Society (DDG).

    PubMed

    Gross, G; Schöfer, H; Wassilew, S; Friese, K; Timm, A; Guthoff, R; Pau, H W; Malin, J P; Wutzler, P; Doerr, H W

    2003-04-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chickenpox), remains dormant in dorsal root and cranial nerve ganglia and can be reactivated as a consequence of declining VZV-specific cellular immunity leading to herpes zoster (shingles). Patients older than 50 years of age affected by herpes zoster may suffer a significant decrease of quality of life. These patients and immunocompromised individuals are at increased risks for severe complications, involving the eye, the peripheral and the central nervous system (prolonged pain, postherpetic neuralgia). Such complications occur with and without cutaneous symptoms. The German Dermatology Society (DDG) has released guidelines in order to guarantee updated management to anyone affected by herpes zoster. Diagnosis is primarily clinical. The gold standard of laboratory diagnosis comprises PCR and direct identification of VZV in cell cultures. Detection of IgM- and IgA-anti VZV antibodies may be helpful in immunocompromised patients. Therapy has become very effective in the last years. Systemic antiviral therapy is able to shorten the healing process of acute herpes zoster, to prevent or to alleviate pain and other acute and chronic complications, particularly, when given within 48 h to a maximum of 72 h after onset of the rash. Systemic antiviral therapy is urgently indicated in patients beyond the age of 50 years and in patients at any age with herpes zoster in the head and neck area, especially in patients with zoster ophthalmicus. Further urgent indications are severe herpes zoster on the trunk and on the extremities, herpes zoster in immunosuppressed patients and in patients with severe atopic dermatitis and severe ekzema. Only relative indications for antiviral therapy exist in patients younger than 50 years with zoster on the trunk and on the extremities. In Germany acyclovir, valacyclovir, famciclovir and brivudin are approved for the systemic antiviral treatment of herpes zoster. These compounds are all well

  3. Bilateral suborbital rash: a dermatologic manifestation of neuropsychiatric disease in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lana X; Wang, Yen Tun; Beynet, David

    2014-05-01

    A 10-year-old girl presented with a new onset bilateral suborbital rash. Dermatologic examination revealed violaceous, non-tender, well-demarcated patches with an atypical distribution and pigmentation. After further investigation, a diagnosis of Munchausen syndrome was made and the patient was referred to her primary care provider for further management. PMID:24852783

  4. A critical review of personal statements submitted by dermatology residency applicants.

    PubMed

    Olazagasti, Jeannette; Gorouhi, Farzam; Fazel, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Background. A strong personal statement is deemed favorable in the overall application review process. However, research on the role of personal statements in the application process is lacking. Objective. To determine if personal statements from matched applicants differ from unmatched applicants. Methods. All dermatology residency applications (n = 332) submitted to UC Davis Dermatology in the year of 2012 were evaluated. Two investigators identified the characteristics and recurring themes of content present in the personal statements. Then, both investigators individually evaluated the content of these personal statements in order to determine if any of the defined themes was present. Chi-square, Fisher's exact, and reliability tests were used. Results. The following themes were emphasized more often by the matched applicants than the unmatched applicants as their reasons for going into dermatology are to study the cutaneous manifestations of systemic disease (33.8% versus 22.8%), to contribute to the literature gap (8.3% versus 1.1%), and to study the pathophysiology of skin diseases (8.3% versus 2.2%; P ≤ 0.05 for all). Conclusion. The prevalence of certain themes in personal statements of dermatology applicants differs according to match status; nevertheless, whether certain themes impact match outcome needs to be further elucidated. PMID:25342950

  5. Screening for Body Dysmorphic Disorder in a Dermatology Outpatient Setting at a Tertiary Care Centre

    PubMed Central

    Thanveer, Fibin; Khunger, Niti

    2016-01-01

    Context: A distressing pre-occupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance with a marked negative effect on the patient's life is the core symptom of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Aim: To screen the patients attending a dermatology clinic at a tertiary care centre for BDD using the BDD-dermatology version (DV) questionnaire. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study enrolled 245 consecutive patients from the dermatology outpatients clinic. Methods: The demographic details were collected and the DV of BDD screening questionnaire was administered. A 5-point Likert scale was used for objective scoring of the stated concern and patients who scored ≥3 were excluded from the study. Statistical Analysis Used: The results were statistically analysed. Differences between the groups were investigated by Chi-square analysis for categorical variables, and Fisher exact test wherever required. Results: A total of 177 patients completed the study, and of these, eight patients screened positive for BDD. The rate of BDD in patients presenting with cosmetic complaints was 7.5% and in those with general dermatology, complaints were 2.1%, with no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.156). Facial flaws (62.5%) were the most common concern followed by body asymmetry (25%). Conclusion: The rates of BDD found in this study are comparable but at a lower rate than that reported in literature data. PMID:27761090

  6. Identification of Translational Dermatology Research Priorities in the UK; Results of an e-Delphi Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Healy, E.; Reynolds, N.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Translational research is the direct application of basic and applied research to patient care. It is estimated that there are at least 2,000 different skin diseases, thus there are considerable challenges in seeking to undertake research on each of these disorders. Objective This eDelphi exercise was conducted in order to generate a list of translational dermatology research questions which are regarded as a priority for further investigations. Results During the first phase of the eDelphi, 228 research questions were generated by an expert panel which included clinical academic dermatologists, clinical dermatologists, non-clinical scientists, dermatology trainees and representatives from patient support groups. Following completion of the second and third phases, 40 questions on inflammatory skin disease, 20 questions on structural skin disorders / genodermatoses, 37 questions on skin cancer and 8 miscellaneous questions were designated as priority translational dermatology research questions (PRQs). In addition to PRQs on a variety of disease areas (including multiple PRQs on psoriasis, eczema, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and melanoma), there were a number of cross-cutting themes which identified a need to investigate mechanisms / pathogenesis of disease and the necessity to improve treatments for patients with skin disease. Conclusion It is predicted that this list of PRQs will help to provide a strategic direction for translational dermatology research in the UK and that addressing this list of questions will ultimately provide clinical benefit for substantial numbers of subjects with skin disorders. PMID:26149834

  7. Application of a Medical Text Indexer to an online dermatology atlas.

    PubMed

    Kim, G R; Aronson, A R; Mork, J G; Cohen, B A; Lehmann, C U

    2004-01-01

    Clinical dermatology cases are presented as images and semi-structured text describing skin lesions and their relationships to disease. Metadata assignment to such cases is hampered by lack of a standardized dermatology vocabulary and facilitated methods for indexing legacy collections. In this pilot study descriptive clinical text from Dermatlas, a Web-based repository of dermatology cases, was indexed to Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms using the National Library of Medicine's Medical Text Indexer (MTI). The MTI is an automated text processing system that derives ranked lists of MeSH terms to describe the content of medical journal citations using knowledge from the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and from MEDLINE. For a representative, random sample of 50 Dermatlas cases, the MTI frequently derived MeSH indexing terms that matched expert-assigned terms for Diagnoses (88%), Lesion Types (72%), and Patient Characteristics (Gender and Age Groups, 62% and 84% respectively). This pilot demonstrates the potential for extending the MTI to automate indexing of clinical case presentations and for using MeSH to describe aspects of clinical dermatology.

  8. Comparative study of the prevalence of sepsis in patients admitted to dermatology and internal medicine wards*

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Luiz Maurício Costa; Diniz, Michelle dos Santos; Diniz, Lorena dos Santos; Machado-Pinto, Jackson; Silva, Francisco Chagas Lima

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sepsis is a common cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients. The prevalence of this condition has increased significantly in different parts of the world. Patients admitted to dermatology wards often have severe loss of skin barrier and use systemic corticosteroids, which favor the development of sepsis. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the prevalence of sepsis among patients admitted to a dermatology ward compared to that among patients admitted to an internal medicine ward. METHODS It is a cross-sectional, observational, comparative study that was conducted at Hospital Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte. Data were collected from all patients admitted to four hospital beds at the dermatology and internal medicine wards between July 2008 and July 2009. Medical records were analyzed for the occurrence of sepsis, dermatologic diagnoses, comorbidities, types of pathogens and most commonly used antibiotics. RESULTS We analyzed 185 medical records. The prevalence of sepsis was 7.6% among patients admitted to the dermatology ward and 2.2% (p = 0.10) among those admitted to the internal medicine ward. Patients with comorbidities, diabetes mellitus and cancer did not show a higher incidence of sepsis. The main agent found was Staphylococcus aureus, and the most commonly used antibiotics were ciprofloxacin and oxacillin. There was a significant association between sepsis and the use of systemic corticosteroids (p <0.001). CONCLUSION It becomes clear that epidemiological studies on sepsis should be performed more extensively and accurately in Brazil so that efforts to prevent and treat this serious disease can be made more effectively. PMID:24173179

  9. Dermatologic adverse events in pediatric patients receiving targeted anticancer therapies: a pooled analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pratilas, Christine A.; Sibaud, Vincent; Boralevi, Franck; Lacouture, Mario E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The dermatologic adverse events (AEs) of various molecularly targeted therapies are well-described in adult cancer patients. Little has been reported on the incidence and clinical presentation of such AEs in pediatric patients with cancer. To address this gap, we analyzed the dermatologic AEs reported across clinical trials of targeted anticancer therapies in pediatric patients. METHODS We conducted an electronic literature search (PubMed, American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meetings’ abstracts, ClinicalTrials.gov, NCI’s Pediatric Oncology Branch webpage) to identify clinical trials involving targeted anticancer therapies that reported dermatologic AEs in their safety data. Studies were limited to the pediatric population, monotherapy trials (oncology), and English language publications. RESULTS Pooled data from 19 clinical studies investigating 11 targeted anticancer agents (alemtuzumab, rituximab, imatinib, dasatinib, erlotinib, vandetanib, sorafenib, cabozantinib, pazopanib, everolimus, and temsirolimus) were analyzed. The most frequently encountered dermatologic AEs were rash (127/660; 19%), xerosis (18/100; 18%), mucositis (68/402; 17%) and pruritus (12/169; 7%). Other AEs included pigmentary abnormalities of the skin/hair (13%), hair disorders (trichomegaly, hypertrichosis, alopecia and madarosis; 14%), urticaria (7%), palmoplantar erythrodysesthesia (7%), erythema, acne, purpura, skin fissures, other ‘unknown skin changes’, exanthem, infection, flushing, telangiectasia, and photosensitivity. CONCLUSION This study describes the dermatologic manifestations of targeted anticancer therapy-related AEs in the pediatric population. Since these AEs are often associated with significant morbidity, it is imperative that pediatric oncologists be familiar with their recognition and management, to avoid unnecessary dose modifications and/or termination, and to prevent impairments in patients’ quality of life. PMID:25683226

  10. Dermatology relevance to graduates from the Universidade Estadual de Campinas Medical School*

    PubMed Central

    Lugão, Ariel Falbel; de Caldas, Tânia Alencar; de Castro, Eneida Lazzarini; Pereira, Elisabete Monteiro de Aguiar; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Some research indicates that physicians do not dominate the expected dermatological content for the proper exercise of the profession. This fact compromises their diagnostic and therapeutic performance, generating unnecessary costs. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to evaluate the relevance of Dermatology and the knowledge acquired in the specialty during the undergraduate course in clinical practice of graduates at the State University of Campinas Medical School (FCM/UNICAMP). METHOD A questionnaire with 22 closed questions and two open ones was electronically sent to physicians who had graduated more than 10 years ago and others for less than 10 years. In the first group, physicians were trained by the same curriculum and in the second group there were subjects trained by the old and the new curriculum. RESULTS Of the 126 respondents, 83% had completed a specialization course. Among all, 82% did not study dermatology after graduation. The majority considered that Dermatology has high relevance in clinical practice, regardless of the group. There was a statistically significant difference between non-dermatologist doctors graduated for more than 10 years and those graduated for less than 10 years regarding confidence about lesion diagnosis, diagnostic investigation and treatment of skin diseases. Physicians who have graduated for a longer time feel more insecure in relation to patients with dermatoses. Concerning contributions offered by graduation program completion they prioritized outpatient care, ability to diagnose, knowledge of pathology, research and knowledge of lesions. CONCLUSION This study has shown that Dermatology is relevant in medical practice and more recent graduates from the FCM/UNICAMP feel less insecure when treating a patient with dermatoses. PMID:26560207

  11. Prevalence of Dermatological Presentations of Canine Leishmaniasis in a Nonendemic Area: A Retrospective Study of 100 Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Perego, Roberta; Proverbio, Daniela; Bagnagatti De Giorgi, Giada; Spada, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective study determined the prevalence of dermatological lesions associated with canine leishmaniasis (CanL) in a nonendemic area in Italy. The medical records of 131 dogs with CanL were reviewed and, of these, 115/131 dogs (88%) had dermatological manifestations of which 100/131 dogs (76%) met the inclusion criteria. Sixty-two percent of dogs were male and 38% were female and the mean age was 6.4 years. Thirty-two percent of dogs were mixed breeds; the remainder represented a variety of pure breeds. In 79% of dogs dermatological signs occurred in association with systemic signs of CanL, whilst 21% of dogs had only dermatological manifestations. The most common dermatological manifestation was exfoliative dermatitis (74%), followed by ulcerative (18%) and nodular (11%) lesions. In 51% of dogs the lesions were localized mainly on the pinnae, head, and pressure points; in the remaining 49% lesions were generalized. The only statistically significant association was between Retriever breed and animals with only dermatological signs (P = 0.0034, OD 5.97, CI 0.996–37.933). In this study dermatological manifestations of CanL were very commonly reported, and their prevalence is similar to previous studies in endemic areas despite the fact that dogs living in nonendemic areas are not exposed to repeated infectious bites and continuous stimulation of the dermal immune system. PMID:24660088

  12. Diagnostic agreement between a primary care physician and a teledermatologist for common dermatological conditions in North India

    PubMed Central

    Patro, Binod Kumar; Tripathy, Jaya Prasad; De, Dipankar; Sinha, Smita; Singh, Amarjeet; Kanwar, Amrinder Jit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Primary care physicians (PCPs) encounter a large number of patients with dermatological diseases. However, delivering appropriate management is a challenge considering the inadequate dermatology training offered during the undergraduate medical curriculum. Teledermatology is the clinical evaluation of skin lesions by dermatologists and allows patients to be diagnosed and treated from a distant site. It is seen as a potential solution to the shortage of specialists and providing equitable service in remote areas. Aim: The study was aimed at estimating the diagnostic agreement of common dermatological conditions between a PCP and a teledermatologist. Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients with dermatological ailments who attended a primary health care clinic were recruited into the study, examined by the PCP and offered a diagnosis. The clinical images and patients’ history were collected and transferred to a dermatologist at a tertiary center who also made a diagnosis. Agreement between diagnosis made by the PCPs and the teledermatologist was measured using kappa (κ) statistics. Results: Overall agreement between the diagnoses made by a PCP and the dermatologist was found to be 56%. Poor κ agreement (<0.4) was seen in the diagnosis of psoriasis and eczema. Conclusion: Teledermatology can supplement specialist dermatology service in remote areas. There was poor agreement in the diagnosis of psoriasis, classifying various types of eczematous conditions and fungal infections. Scarce manpower in dermatology at the primary health care level compounded by the burden of skin ailments necessitates training of PCPs in common dermatological conditions. PMID:25657912

  13. [Dermatology in the tropics and in medical missions: Consequences for the training of dermatologists and for continuing medical education].

    PubMed

    Elsner, P

    2015-05-01

    Dermatologists from Germany are increasingly involved in international missions under tropical conditions. While civilian operations take place primarily in the context of international development cooperation, non-governmental organizations and private initiatives, dermatologists of the German Armed Forces have been engaged in numerous military missions and international disaster relief missions abroad. The specific requirements of these missions require a specialist qualification; however, the specialist training in "Skin and Venereal Diseases" under the conditions for medical care in Germany is frequently not sufficient. For an optimal preparation for dermatological missions in tropical regions, an additional qualification in tropical medicine is to be recommended. Since this additional training is time-consuming and can often not be put into practice, especially in the civilian sector, the acquisition of the certificate "Tropical and Travel Dermatology (DDA)" of the International Society for Dermatology in the Tropics in cooperation with the German Dermatological Academy (DDA) can be recommended. In the future, training in tropical dermatology should be incorporated into the main curriculum of dermatology for those specialists planning to work on dermatological missions in the tropics.

  14. A Cross-Sectional Survey of Population-Wide Wait Times for Patients Seeking Medical vs. Cosmetic Dermatologic Care

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Geeta; Goldberg, Hanna R.; Barense, Morgan D.; Bell, Chaim M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Though previous work has examined some aspects of the dermatology workforce shortage and access to dermatologic care, little research has addressed the effect of rising interest in cosmetic procedures on access to medical dermatologic care. Our objective was to determine the wait times for Urgent and Non-Urgent medical dermatologic care and Cosmetic dermatology services at a population level and to examine whether wait times for medical care are affected by offering cosmetic services. Methods A population-wide survey of dermatology practices using simulated calls asking for the earliest appointment for a Non-Urgent, Urgent and Cosmetic service. Results Response rates were greater than 89% for all types of care. Wait times across all types of care were significantly different from each other (all P < 0.05). Cosmetic care was associated with the shortest wait times (3.0 weeks; Interquartile Range (IQR) = 0.4–3.4), followed by Urgent care (9.0 weeks; IQR = 2.1–12.9), then Non-Urgent Care (12.7 weeks; IQR = 4.4–16.4). Wait times for practices offering only Urgent care were not different from practices offering both Urgent and Cosmetic care (10.3 vs. 7.0 weeks). Interpretation Longer wait times and greater variation for Urgent and Non-Urgent dermatologic care and shorter wait times and less variation for Cosmetic care. Wait times were significantly longer in regions with lower dermatologist density. Provision of Cosmetic services did not increase wait times for Urgent care. These findings suggest an overall dermatology workforce shortage and a need for a more streamlined referral system for dermatologic care. PMID:27632206

  15. [Clinical dermatology at the Central Hospital Sankt-Jürgen-Strasse in Bremen.. A 110-year history].

    PubMed

    Bahmer, F A

    2001-08-01

    The history of clinical dermatology in Bremen began in 1891 with a dermatology unit founded in the main building of the then so-called "Big Hospital", nowadays Central Hospital Sankt-Juergen-Street. Friedrich B. Hahn became the first director and served in this position for more than four decades. In 1913, the dermatology wards moved to a new building, still home to the Dermatologic Clinic today. In 1933, the son of F.B. Hahn, Carl F. Hahn, became director until 1938, when the state officials named Konrad Burchardi as head of the department. Immediately after World War II, Friedrich Fölsch replaced K. Burchardi. He served as director until his retirement in 1964, when Joachim J. Herzberg became his successor until 1979. Wolfgang P. Herrmann then directed the clinic until 1994, when the author of this article was elected.

  16. Status Report from the Scientific Panel on Antibiotic Use in Dermatology of the American Acne and Rosacea Society

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Richard L.; Thiboutot, Diane; Webster, Guy F.; Rosen, Ted; Leyden, James J.; Walker, Clay; Zhanel, George; Eichenfield, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    In this second part of a three-part series addressing several issues related to antibiotic use in dermatology, potential effects of antibiotic use on the human microbiota and microbiome are reviewed. Data from available literature on the microbiologic effects of specific therapeutic agents commonly used in dermatology, including oral isotretinoin, tetracycline agents, and sub-antimicrobial (sub-antibiotic) dose doxycycline, are also discussed.

  17. Antoni Rosner, the first associate professor of dermatology and venereology in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Staszek, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    The article presents an outline of the development of world and Polish dermatology. The author points out to the first descriptions of skin diseases by ancient and medieval medical luminaries. The outline of the Polish dermatology is based on examples of doctors living in the 16th and 17th centuries. The first clinics of skin and venereal diseases in Poland appeared, like in other European countries, in the second half of the 19th century. Antoni Rosner, the first associate professor of clinical studies, greatly contributed to the development of this medical field. The description of his life and work is the background for the presentation of opening and developing the clinic of skin and venereal diseases in Krakow as well as the presentation of university curriculum at the Faculty of Medicine of the Jagiellonian University. PMID:25097475

  18. CAM use in dermatology. Is there a potential role for honey, green tea, and vitamin C?

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Naiara S; Kalaaji, Amer N

    2014-02-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a group of non-traditional medical practices that includes natural products, manipulations, and mind and body medicine. CAM use has grown and become popular among patients. In dermatology, honey, green tea, and vitamin C have been used as topical treatments for a variety of diseases. We performed a systematic review to explore the cutaneous effects of each of these three products. Honey's unique antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties were shown to contribute to wound healing, especially in ulcers and burns. Green tea, among many health benefits, demonstrated protection from ultraviolet-induced events, such as photoimmunosuppression and skin cancer growth. Vitamin C, known for its antioxidant properties and key role in collagen production, has been shown to produce positive effects on skin hyperpigmentation and aging. Future large well-designed clinical trials are needed in order to further investigate the potential of these agents as dermatological therapies.

  19. Future perspective of probiotics in dermatology: an old wine in new bottle.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumir; Mahajan, Bharat Bhushan; Kamra, Nidhi

    2014-09-16

    Probiotics are live microbial food supplements that are beneficial to the host health when administered in adequate amounts. Probiotics do have an exciting concept in digestive functions, but these live microbes have wider applicability as evidenced by gut-brain-skin axis theory given 80years back. However, the details regarding use of probiotics for dermatological indications ranging from atopic dermatitis to acne and sexually transmitted infections is dispersed in the literature, herein we have tried to focus all under one heading. Overall, probiotics seem to be promising and safe therapeutic modality, but the evidence as of now, from the available published data is low. This review will stimulate readers to carry out well designed, larger population based trials, so as to validate its use in dermatology practice.

  20. Laser surgery in dermatology with application of superthin optical fiber by contact and noncontact method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garipova, A.; Denissov, I. A.; Solodovnikov, Vladimir; Digilova, I.

    1999-06-01

    At present nobody doubts the advantages of minor laser surgery over the conventional one.Bloodless manipulations, ablation, minor injury to the tissues while using laser equipment ensures its wide application in such fields as dermatology and cosmetology, especially since the semiconductor lasers because available at the technological market. No doubt CO2 and solid laser are still playing an important role, however, their imperfect fiber optic qualities limit their use in these field,s where advantages of diode lasers with flexible and fine quartz-polymeric optical fiber are obvious. The elaboration of new diode surgical lasers made it possible to invent new surgical equipment for solving many medical problems in the optimal way. Application of contact and noncontact laser methods in dermatology, gynecological plastic surgery and otolaryngology is discussed. A combined use of these methods demonstrates a positive effect on therapy results and healing time.

  1. Reflections on relationships between national and world events and development of dermatology. Venezuela as a model.

    PubMed

    Goihman-Yahr, Mauricio

    2013-11-01

    From a personal vantage, the author tries to understand evolution of medicine and dermatology as relating to political, ideological,and economic factors.He analyzes the evolution of Venezuelan Dermatology research and practice from 1936 to present, relating it to the events that have taken place in that country during this period and integrating the latter to events in the world. There is a close relationship between Venezuelan and US history particularly since the late nineteen-thirties.Physicians in general and dermatologists in particular should not dismiss or just bear the events that take place in the society as a whole. They should try to influence them by acting in harmony with forces that propitiate freedom, rule of law, free inquiry, and meritocracy.

  2. [Dermatological diseases of the external male genitalia : Part 1].

    PubMed

    Köhn, F M; Schultheiss, D; Krämer-Schultheiss, K

    2016-06-01

    The urological examination of male patients includes an inspection of the external genitalia whereby a variety of dermatological alterations can be found. Not all dermatological findings are of clinical relevance. Pearly penile papules and heterotopic sebaceous glands are examples of normal physiological variations. Most penile melanotic macules, angiokeratomas, fibromas and angiomas do not have to be treated; however, penile skin lesions may also be symptoms of other diseases, such as circinate balanitis in Reiter's syndrome and multiple angiokeratomas in Fabry's disease. A typical manifestation of reactions to various drugs is the fixed drug eruption of penile skin. The differential diagnosis of various forms of balanoposthitis may be difficult and requires histological investigations (e.g. plasma cell balanitis or Zoon's disease). In contrast, the clinical manifestation of lichen sclerosus et atrophicus is easy to recognize. The clinical relevance of this disease is due to phimosis and problems during sexual intercourse. PMID:27250104

  3. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and PPAR agonists: the 'future' in dermatology therapeutics?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mrinal; Mahajan, Vikram K; Mehta, Karaninder S; Chauhan, Pushpinder S; Rawat, Ritu

    2015-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors and comprise three different isoforms namely PPARα, PPARγ, and PPARβ/δ with PPARβ/δ being the predominant subtype in human keratinocytes. After binding with specific ligands, PPARs regulate gene expression, cell growth and differentiation, apoptosis, inflammatory responses, and tumorogenesis. PPARs also modulate a wide variety of skin functions including keratinocyte proliferation, epidermal barrier formation, wound healing, melanocyte proliferation, and sebum production. Recent studies have shown the importance of PPARs in the pathogenesis of many dermatological disorders. Clinical trials have suggested possible role of PPAR agonists in the management of various dermatoses ranging from acne vulgaris, psoriasis, hirsutism, and lipodystrophy to cutaneous malignancies including melanoma. This article is intended to be a primer for dermatologists in their understanding of clinical relevance of PPARs and PPAR agonists in dermatology therapeutics.

  4. [Dermatological experience at the Moroccan mobile field hospital in Brazzaville, Congo].

    PubMed

    Boui, M; Lemnaouer, A

    2009-02-01

    As part of a humanitarian relief mission, Morocco set up a mobile field hospital in Brazzaville Congo from February 22, 2006 to March 23, 2006. Analysis of data collected at a cost-free outpatient dermatology clinic demonstrated local characteristics in comparison with conventional dermatologic practice. A total of 1217 patients including 473 women, 451 men, and 293 children were examined. The five most frequent disorders affecting children were infectious disease, atopic eczema, keloids, toxidermias, and genodermatosis. In addition to these diseases, adults presented sexually transmitted infections, benign and malignant tumors, lichen, leg ulcers, elephantiasis of the external genitalia and lower extremities, and complications related to the use of skin lighteners. Historical pathology was found in 1% of the general population. PMID:19499724

  5. Psoriasis, a model of dermatologic psychosomatic disease: psychiatric implications and treatments.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Evan; Tausk, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common dermatologic disorder with psychiatric comorbidity that often goes undetected and untreated. Psoriasis has higher associations with psychiatric illness than do other dermatologic conditions. We conducted a comprehensive qualitative review of all published medical literature on psoriasis and psychiatric comorbidities since 2005. We found that psoriasis patients suffer psychiatric and psychosocial morbidity that is not commensurate with the extent of cutaneous lesions. Biologic therapies and nonpharmacologic psychosocial interventions show promise in treating comorbid psychiatric illness. The main limitations of this review are the low quality of published studies and the infrequent use of basic science endpoints in reporting treatment outcomes. The literature examining the psychiatric comorbidity of psoriasis is expanding but remains of variable quality. Stronger studies will be necessary to more accurately estimate comorbidities and help identify and comprehensively treat suffering patients.

  6. Anti-inflammatory and Immunomodulatory Effects of Antibiotics and Their Use in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Swetalina; Madke, Bhushan; Kabra, Poonam; Singh, Adarsh Lata

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics (antibacterial, antiviral, and antiparasitic) are class of drugs which result in either killing or inhibiting growth and multiplication of infectious organisms. Antibiotics are commonly prescribed by all specialties for treatment of infections. However, antibiotics have hitherto immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties and can be exploited for various noninfectious dermatoses. Dermatologists routinely prescribe antibiotics in treatment of various noninfectious disorders. This study will review anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of antibiotics and their use in dermatology.

  7. Inpatient Dermatology: Characteristics of Patients and Admissions in a Tertiary Level Hospital in Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Arpita; Chowdhury, Satyendranath; Poddar, Indrasish; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dermatology is primarily a non-acute, outpatient-centered clinical specialty, but substantial number of patients need indoor admission for adequate management. Over the years, the need for inpatient facilities in Dermatology has grown manifold; however, these facilities are available only in some tertiary centers. Aims and Objectives: To analyze the characteristics of the diseases and outcomes of patients admitted in the dermatology inpatient Department of a tertiary care facility in eastern India. Materials and Methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of the admission and discharge records of all patients, collected from the medical records department, admitted to our indoor facility from 2011 to 2014. The data thus obtained was statistically analyzed with special emphasis on the patient's demographic profile, clinical diagnosis, final outcome, and duration of stay. Results and Analysis: A total of 375 patients were admitted to our indoor facility during the period. Males outnumbered females, with the median age in the 5th decade. Immunobullous disorders (91 patients, 24.27%) were the most frequent reason for admissions, followed by various causes of erythroderma (80 patients, 21.33%) and infective disorders (73 patients, 19.47%). Other notable causes included cutaneous adverse drug reactions, psoriasis, vasculitis, and connective tissue diseases. The mean duration of hospital stay was 22.2±15.7 days; ranging from 1 to 164 days. Majority of patients (312, 83.2%) improved after hospitalization; while 29 (7.73%) patients died from their illness. About 133 patients (35.64%) required referral services during their stay, while 8 patients (2.13%) were transferred to other departments for suitable management. Conclusion: Many dermatoses require inpatient care for their optimum management. Dermatology inpatient services should be expanded in India to cater for the large number of cases with potentially highly severe dermatoses.

  8. Anti-inflammatory and Immunomodulatory Effects of Antibiotics and Their Use in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Swetalina; Madke, Bhushan; Kabra, Poonam; Singh, Adarsh Lata

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics (antibacterial, antiviral, and antiparasitic) are class of drugs which result in either killing or inhibiting growth and multiplication of infectious organisms. Antibiotics are commonly prescribed by all specialties for treatment of infections. However, antibiotics have hitherto immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties and can be exploited for various noninfectious dermatoses. Dermatologists routinely prescribe antibiotics in treatment of various noninfectious disorders. This study will review anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of antibiotics and their use in dermatology. PMID:27688434

  9. Maria Goeppert-Mayer (1906–1972): two-photon effect on dermatology.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Pietrzak, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Maria Goeppert-Mayer (1906–1972) created the theoretic basis for investigations using the double-photon effect. She was also involved in work on the Manhattan Project for the development of the atomic bomb. In 1963, she received the Nobel Prize in physics for her discoveries concerning nuclear shell structure. Her theoretic results on double-photon absorption are directly used today in dermatology in nonlinear microscopy, multiphoton tomography, and photodynamic therapy. PMID:23570069

  10. Robert Koch (1843-1910) and dermatology on his 171st birthday.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Pietrzak, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Robert Koch (1843-1910) received the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1905 for his studies of tuberculosis. He contributed significantly to microbiology, isolating also cholera and anthrax pathogens, and introducing several postulates in this field. In addition, he developed staining methods, as well as culturing and microscopic techniques. Many of his achievements have also influenced dermatology. This contribution reviews his life and major achievements on the occasion of the 171st anniversary of his birth.

  11. Anti-inflammatory and Immunomodulatory Effects of Antibiotics and Their Use in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Swetalina; Madke, Bhushan; Kabra, Poonam; Singh, Adarsh Lata

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics (antibacterial, antiviral, and antiparasitic) are class of drugs which result in either killing or inhibiting growth and multiplication of infectious organisms. Antibiotics are commonly prescribed by all specialties for treatment of infections. However, antibiotics have hitherto immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties and can be exploited for various noninfectious dermatoses. Dermatologists routinely prescribe antibiotics in treatment of various noninfectious disorders. This study will review anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of antibiotics and their use in dermatology. PMID:27688434

  12. Inpatient Dermatology: Characteristics of Patients and Admissions in a Tertiary Level Hospital in Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Arpita; Chowdhury, Satyendranath; Poddar, Indrasish; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dermatology is primarily a non-acute, outpatient-centered clinical specialty, but substantial number of patients need indoor admission for adequate management. Over the years, the need for inpatient facilities in Dermatology has grown manifold; however, these facilities are available only in some tertiary centers. Aims and Objectives: To analyze the characteristics of the diseases and outcomes of patients admitted in the dermatology inpatient Department of a tertiary care facility in eastern India. Materials and Methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of the admission and discharge records of all patients, collected from the medical records department, admitted to our indoor facility from 2011 to 2014. The data thus obtained was statistically analyzed with special emphasis on the patient's demographic profile, clinical diagnosis, final outcome, and duration of stay. Results and Analysis: A total of 375 patients were admitted to our indoor facility during the period. Males outnumbered females, with the median age in the 5th decade. Immunobullous disorders (91 patients, 24.27%) were the most frequent reason for admissions, followed by various causes of erythroderma (80 patients, 21.33%) and infective disorders (73 patients, 19.47%). Other notable causes included cutaneous adverse drug reactions, psoriasis, vasculitis, and connective tissue diseases. The mean duration of hospital stay was 22.2±15.7 days; ranging from 1 to 164 days. Majority of patients (312, 83.2%) improved after hospitalization; while 29 (7.73%) patients died from their illness. About 133 patients (35.64%) required referral services during their stay, while 8 patients (2.13%) were transferred to other departments for suitable management. Conclusion: Many dermatoses require inpatient care for their optimum management. Dermatology inpatient services should be expanded in India to cater for the large number of cases with potentially highly severe dermatoses. PMID:27688450

  13. Maria Goeppert-Mayer (1906–1972): two-photon effect on dermatology.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Pietrzak, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Maria Goeppert-Mayer (1906–1972) created the theoretic basis for investigations using the double-photon effect. She was also involved in work on the Manhattan Project for the development of the atomic bomb. In 1963, she received the Nobel Prize in physics for her discoveries concerning nuclear shell structure. Her theoretic results on double-photon absorption are directly used today in dermatology in nonlinear microscopy, multiphoton tomography, and photodynamic therapy.

  14. The Role of the CO2 Laser and Fractional CO2 Laser in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Omi, Tokuya; Numano, Kayoko

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tremendous advances have been made in the medical application of the laser in the past few decades. Many diseases in the dermatological field are now indications for laser treatment that qualify for reimbursement by many national health insurance systems. Among laser types, the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser remains an important system for the dermatologist. Rationale: The lasers used in photosurgery have wavelengths that differ according to their intended use and are of various types, but the CO2 laser is one of the most widely used lasers in the dermatology field. With its wavelength in the mid-infrared at 10,600 nm, CO2 laser energy is wellabsorbed in water. As skin contains a very high water percentage, this makes the CO2 laser ideal for precise, safe ablation with good hemostasis. In addition to its efficacy in ablating benign raised lesions, the CO2 laser has been reported to be effective in the field of esthetic dermatology in the revision of acne scars as well as in photorejuvenation. With the addition of fractionation of the beam of energy into myriad microbeams, the fractional CO2 laser has offered a bridge between the frankly full ablative indications and the nonablative skin rejuvenation systems of the 2000s in the rejuvenation of photoaged skin on and off the face. Conclusions: The CO2 laser remains an efficient, precise and safe system for the dermatologist. Technological advances in CO2 laser construction have meant smaller spot sizes and greater precision for laser surgery, and more flexibility in tip sizes and protocols for fractional CO2 laser treatment. The range of dermatological applications of the CO2 laser is expected to continue to increase in the future. PMID:24771971

  15. Optical coherence tomography based microangiography: A tool good for dermatology applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruikang K.; Baran, Utku; Choi, Woo J.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) based microangiography (OMAG) is a new imaging technique enabling the visualization of blood flow within microcirculatory tissue beds in vivo with high resolution. In this talk, the concept and advantages of OMAG will be discussed and its potential clinical applications in the dermatology will be shown, demonstrating its usefulness in the clinical monitoring and therapeutic treatment of various skin pathologies, e.g. acne, port wine stain and wound healing.

  16. Nonconventional Use of Flash-Lamp Pulsed-Dye Laser in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Nisticò, Steven; Campolmi, Piero; Moretti, Silvia; Del Duca, Ester; Bruscino, Nicola; Conti, Rossana; Bassi, Andrea; Cannarozzo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Flash-lamp pulsed-dye laser (FPDL) is a nonablative technology, typically used in vascular malformation therapy due to its specificity for hemoglobin. FPDL treatments were performed in a large group of patients with persistent and/or recalcitrant different dermatological lesions with cutaneous microvessel involvement. In particular, 149 patients (73 males and 76 females) were treated. They were affected by the following dermatological disorders: angiokeratoma circumscriptum, genital and extragenital viral warts, striae rubrae, basal cell carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, angiolymphoid hyperplasia, and Jessner-Kanof disease. They all underwent various laser sessions. 89 patients (59.7%) achieved excellent clearance, 32 patients (21.4%) achieved good-moderate clearance, 19 patients (12.7%) obtained slight clearance, and 9 subjects (6.1%) had low or no removal of their lesion. In all cases, FPDL was found to be a safe and effective treatment for the abovementioned dermatological lesions in which skin microvessels play a role in pathogenesis or development. Further and single-indication studies, however, are required to assess a standardized and reproducible method for applying this technology to "off-label" indications. PMID:27631010

  17. The use of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Michałek, Karolina; Lechowicz, Marta; Pastuszczak, Maciej; Wojas-Pelc, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed publications and articles in the PubMed database about the use of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) in dermatology. Literature published in the English language, at least in the past two decades, was reviewed. Specific dermatologic indications for TMP-SMX are few but it is often used as the second- or third- line agent. TMP-SMX is used to treat cutaneous nocardiosis and Aeromonas infections. TMP-SMX is a treatment option for cat - scratch disease, granuloma inguinale, melioidosis and Mycobacterium marinum/fortuitum cutaneous infections. TMP-SMX is an alternate choice for treatment of pyodermas and lymphogranuloma venereum. TMP-SMX has been used to treat acne vulgaris in tetracycline and erythromycin - resistant patients. TMP-SMX is still the preferred empiric antibiotic for methicillin - resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infection in HIV positive population. TMP-SMX is used in dermatology to treat various skin conditions and is one of the most commonly prescribed sulfonamide drugs. TMP-SMX as monotherapy is an effective treatment option in many diseases but due to drug resistance, a combination therapy-usually of two drugs-may be considered. PMID:26774630

  18. Chronic hand eczema: perception and knowledge in non-affected individuals from general and dermatological practice.

    PubMed

    Letulé, Valerie; Herzinger, Thomas; Schirner, Astrid; Hertrich, Frank; Lange, Dirk; Ruzicka, Thomas; Molin, Sonja

    2014-11-01

    Misunderstanding and stigmatisation are common problems encountered by patients with hand eczema. Various misconceptions about the disease circulate in the general population. Although hand eczema has gained more attention in dermatology during the past years, information on public perception of the disease is still lacking. The aim of our study was to investigate perception of and level of knowledge on the subject hand eczema. There were 624 patients included from 2 general medicine practices and 2 dermatological practices. A self-administered questionnaire was filled out by the participants, covering issues on history of hand eczema, level of knowledge and attitude towards a clinical photograph of hand eczema. We found that a larger proportion of individuals from dermatological practice were more familiar with hand eczema as a disease than those from general medical practice. Women knew significantly more about and had a more positive perception of the disease than men. Our results imply that the level of knowledge on hand eczema in the general public is rather low and influenced by prejudice.

  19. Performance of a rapid dermatology referral system during the anthrax outbreak.

    PubMed

    Redd, John T; Van Beneden, Chris; Soter, Nicholas A; Hatzimemos, Eric; Cohen, David E

    2005-06-01

    The bioterrorism-related anthrax outbreak generated unanticipated demand for dermatologic services. In this study we sought to perform rapid, efficient, cost-effective evaluation of patients suspected of having cutaneous anthrax. During the outbreak, we developed an anthrax evaluation system featuring clinical field examination by nondermatologist physicians, followed by rapid referral of selected high-risk patients to a centralized dermatology center. We excluded anthrax in 29 previously screened high-risk patients. All were examined within 24 hours, costing $272.07 per patient. Diagnoses were established quickly (median, same day; range, 0-15 days). Among 2259 at-risk postal workers, 144 (6.4%) self-identified new (< or =14 days) skin lesions and were examined in the field; 8 (5.6%) were referred to our system. Our system was not the only local dermatologic resource available during the outbreak. A system featuring initial nondermatologist examination with minimal laboratory evaluation, followed by rapid centralized referral of high-risk patients, functioned efficiently in this outbreak.

  20. Cumulative life course impairment in other chronic or recurrent dermatologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Ibler, Kristina S; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2013-01-01

    Skin diseases are visible, and identifying abnormal skin generally does not require specialist knowledge. Dermatology is therefore a ripe field for studies of cumulative life course impairment, because of the many diseases that affect not only the patients, but also their psychosocial interaction with others. Dermatological patients are visibly sick. The stigma associated with visible as well as hidden skin diseases is considerable and may have a major negative impact on the life course of patients. Stigma and psychosocial relations are however not the only sources of impairment for patients with dermatological diseases. Hand eczema is a prototypical example of a skin disease that causes life course impairment not only due to stigmatization, but also to a major loss of function. The impairment therefore occurs through several mechanisms increasing the potential impact of hand eczema on patients. The list of skin diseases where an assessment of cumulative life course impairment is relevant can be enlarged considerably. Diseases with functional impairment such as, e.g. scleroderma, diseases with prominent subjective symptoms such as acne or hidradenitis, and diseases with limited physical impairment but massive psychosocial impairment in specific communities such as vitiligo, are all suitable for further studies. Life course studies are particularly suitable for skin diseases due to their often chronic recurrent course, low mortality and their psychosocial aspects. The development of a stronger empirical framework is welcomed, and may lead to considerable benefits for patients.

  1. Systematic review of the use of platelet-rich plasma in aesthetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Leo, Michael S; Kumar, Alur S; Kirit, Raj; Konathan, Rajyalaxmi; Sivamani, Raja K

    2015-12-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a highly concentrated autologous solution of plasma prepared from a patient's own blood. PRP contains platelets that are purported to release numerous growth factors that may be valuable in numerous dermatologic applications. Here, we review systematically the clinical cosmetic applications of PRP including: androgenetic alopecia, scar revision, acne scars, skin rejuvenation, dermal augmentation, and striae distensae to understand the potential and best practices for PRP use. A systematic search was conducted on three databases: Pubmed, Embase, and Web of Science. Publications were included if they were in English, investigated the clinical applications of PRP in aesthetic dermatology and reported clinical results either as case reports or clinical studies. There were a total of 22 manuscripts that fulfilled these criteria. Four evaluated hair-related applications, eight evaluated the treatment of scars and postprocedure recovery, eight evaluated skin rejuvenation and dermal augmentation, and two evaluated treatment of striae distensae. PRP is a relatively new treatment modality with studies suggesting its utility in aesthetic dermatology. The combination of PRP with other therapies is particularly interesting. Future studies should include controls, including incorporation of split-face comparisons, to reduce intersubject variability. PMID:26205133

  2. Incorporation of Electronic Brachytherapy for Skin Cancer into a Community Dermatology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Mark; Willoughby, Cole; Mafong, Erick; Han, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The introduction of an electronic brachytherapy delivery system into an existing general dermatology practice is described. Radiobiologic rational for the dose fractionation schedule is detailed. Design: A miniaturized 50keV x-ray tube and delivery system are United States Food and Drug Administration cleared for nonmelanoma skin cancer. The device is introduced into an existing multi-physician dermatology practice in a standard unshielded treatment room. Setting: A multi-site, multi-physician dermatology practice Results: Fifteen months following introduction of the system, a total of 524 nonmelanoma skin cancer patients have been treated. At 12.5 months follow-up, there have been four recurrences and cosmesis has been excellent. Conclusions: Advances in radiobiology and radiotechnology permit the treatment course to be given in eight fractions over four weeks. Radiation therapy for nonmelanoma skin cancer can now be given in an office setting as an alternative to Mohs surgery for appropriately selected patients. Results are comparable or better than those of surgery. Advances in radiobiology and radiotechnology permit the treatment course to be given in as few as eight fractions over four weeks. Patients are pleased with the convenience of the short course of therapy given in the office. PMID:26705437

  3. Dermatological and respiratory problems in migrant construction workers of Udupi, Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Mayuri; Kamath, Ramachandra; Tiwari, Rajnarayan R.; Nair, Narayana Pillai Sreekumaran

    2015-01-01

    Background: India being a developing country has tremendous demand of physical infrastructure and construction work as a result there is a raising demand of construction workers. Workers in construction industry are mainly migratory and employed on contract or subcontract basis. These workers face temporary relationship between employer and employee, uncertainty in working hours, contracting and subcontracting system, lack of basic continuous employment, lack basic amenities, and inadequacy in welfare schemes. Objective: To estimate the prevalence of respiratory and dermatological symptoms among migratory construction workers. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Manipal, Karnataka, among 340 male migratory construction workers. A standard modified questionnaire was used as a tool by the interviewer and the physical examination of the workers was done by a physician. The statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15.0. Result: Eighty percent of the workers belong to the age group of 18–30 years. The mean age of the workers was 26 ± 8.2 years. Most (43.8%) of the workers are from West Bengal followed by those from Bihar and Jharkhand. The rates of prevalence of respiratory and dermatological symptoms were 33.2% and 36.2%, respectively. Conclusion: The migrant construction workers suffer from a high proportion of respiratory and dermatological problems. PMID:26957808

  4. Application of Multiphoton Microscopy in Dermatological Studies: a Mini-Review

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Elijah; Rowlands, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the historical and more recent developments of multiphoton microscopy, as applied to dermatology. Multiphoton microscopy offers several advantages over competing microscopy techniques: there is an inherent axial sectioning, penetration depths that compete well with confocal microscopy on account of the use of near-infrared light, and many two-photon contrast mechanisms, such as second-harmonic generation, have no analogue in one-photon microscopy. While the penetration depths of photons into tissue are typically limited on the order of hundreds of microns, this is of less concern in dermatology, as the skin is thin and readily accessible. As a result, multiphoton microscopy in dermatology has generated a great deal of interest, much of which is summarized here. The review covers the interaction of light and tissue, as well as the various considerations that must be made when designing an instrument. The state of multiphoton microscopy in imaging skin cancer and various other diseases is also discussed, along with the investigation of aging and regeneration phenomena, and finally, the use of multiphoton microscopy to analyze the transdermal transport of drugs, cosmetics and other agents is summarized. The review concludes with a look at potential future research directions, especially those that are necessary to push these techniques into widespread clinical acceptance. PMID:25075226

  5. Limited role of marital status in the impact of dermatological diseases on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Tabolli, Stefano; Pagliarello, Calogero; Di Pietro, Cristina; Abeni, Damiano

    2012-01-01

    Health status, health services utilization and mortality differ by marital status for both sexes in most conditions, but little is known about dermatological diseases. We evaluated whether marital status is associated with the impact that dermatological diseases have on quality of life (QoL). Data from two surveys on dermatological outpatients were pooled. Marital status, sex, age, and educational level were analysed in relation to QoL (using the scales of the Skindex-29 questionnaire: emotions, symptoms, and functioning) and psychological well-being (using the GHQ-12 questionnaire). Data on 5,471 patients (59% females, 46% married) were obtained. Married patients in univariate analysis had lower mean values on the emotions scale and higher mean values in the symptoms scale of the Skindex-29 compared to singles. Statistically significant differences were identified only in men, for the emotions scale and for the GHQ-12. Females had significantly higher mean scores than males on each of the Skindex-29 scales and on the GHQ-12. Married patients had a lower disease impact on the emotions scale even if they suffered a higher impact on the symptoms scale. However, after multiple adjustment, gender seems to be more relevant than marital status in the evaluation of health status.

  6. Nonconventional Use of Flash-Lamp Pulsed-Dye Laser in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Del Duca, Ester; Bruscino, Nicola; Conti, Rossana; Cannarozzo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Flash-lamp pulsed-dye laser (FPDL) is a nonablative technology, typically used in vascular malformation therapy due to its specificity for hemoglobin. FPDL treatments were performed in a large group of patients with persistent and/or recalcitrant different dermatological lesions with cutaneous microvessel involvement. In particular, 149 patients (73 males and 76 females) were treated. They were affected by the following dermatological disorders: angiokeratoma circumscriptum, genital and extragenital viral warts, striae rubrae, basal cell carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, angiolymphoid hyperplasia, and Jessner-Kanof disease. They all underwent various laser sessions. 89 patients (59.7%) achieved excellent clearance, 32 patients (21.4%) achieved good-moderate clearance, 19 patients (12.7%) obtained slight clearance, and 9 subjects (6.1%) had low or no removal of their lesion. In all cases, FPDL was found to be a safe and effective treatment for the abovementioned dermatological lesions in which skin microvessels play a role in pathogenesis or development. Further and single-indication studies, however, are required to assess a standardized and reproducible method for applying this technology to “off-label” indications. PMID:27631010

  7. Nonconventional Use of Flash-Lamp Pulsed-Dye Laser in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Del Duca, Ester; Bruscino, Nicola; Conti, Rossana; Cannarozzo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Flash-lamp pulsed-dye laser (FPDL) is a nonablative technology, typically used in vascular malformation therapy due to its specificity for hemoglobin. FPDL treatments were performed in a large group of patients with persistent and/or recalcitrant different dermatological lesions with cutaneous microvessel involvement. In particular, 149 patients (73 males and 76 females) were treated. They were affected by the following dermatological disorders: angiokeratoma circumscriptum, genital and extragenital viral warts, striae rubrae, basal cell carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, angiolymphoid hyperplasia, and Jessner-Kanof disease. They all underwent various laser sessions. 89 patients (59.7%) achieved excellent clearance, 32 patients (21.4%) achieved good-moderate clearance, 19 patients (12.7%) obtained slight clearance, and 9 subjects (6.1%) had low or no removal of their lesion. In all cases, FPDL was found to be a safe and effective treatment for the abovementioned dermatological lesions in which skin microvessels play a role in pathogenesis or development. Further and single-indication studies, however, are required to assess a standardized and reproducible method for applying this technology to “off-label” indications.

  8. Dermatological remedies in the traditional pharmacopoeia of Vulture-Alto Bradano, inland southern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Quave, Cassandra L; Pieroni, Andrea; Bennett, Bradley C

    2008-01-01

    Background Dermatological remedies make up at least one-third of the traditional pharmacopoeia in southern Italy. The identification of folk remedies for the skin is important both for the preservation of traditional medical knowledge and in the search for novel antimicrobial agents in the treatment of skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI). Our goal is to document traditional remedies from botanical, animal, mineral and industrial sources for the topical treatment of skin ailments. In addition to SSTI remedies for humans, we also discuss certain ethnoveterinary applications. Methods Field research was conducted in ten communities in the Vulture-Alto Bradano area of the Basilicata province, southern Italy. We randomly sampled 112 interviewees, stratified by age and gender. After obtaining prior informed consent, we collected data through semi-structured interviews, participant-observation, and small focus groups techniques. Voucher specimens of all cited botanic species were deposited at FTG and HLUC herbaria located in the US and Italy. Results We report the preparation and topical application of 116 remedies derived from 38 plant species. Remedies are used to treat laceration, burn wound, wart, inflammation, rash, dental abscess, furuncle, dermatitis, and other conditions. The pharmacopoeia also includes 49 animal remedies derived from sources such as pigs, slugs, and humans. Ethnoveterinary medicine, which incorporates both animal and plant derived remedies, is addressed. We also examine the recent decline in knowledge regarding the dermatological pharmacopoeia. Conclusion The traditional dermatological pharmacopoeia of Vulture-Alto Bradano is based on a dynamic folk medical construct of natural and spiritual illness and healing. Remedies are used to treat more than 45 skin and soft tissue conditions of both humans and animals. Of the total 165 remedies reported, 110 have never before been published in the mainland southern Italian ethnomedical literature. PMID

  9. Comparative Efficacy and Patient Preference of Topical Anaesthetics in Dermatological Laser Treatments and Skin Microneedling

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Yi Zhen; Al-Niaimi, Firas; Madan, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Topical anaesthetics are effective for patients undergoing superficial dermatological and laser procedures. Our objective was to compare the efficacy and patient preference of three commonly used topical anaesthetics: (2.5% lidocaine/2.5% prilocaine cream (EMLA®), 4% tetracaine gel (Ametop™) and 4% liposomal lidocaine gel (LMX4®)) in patients undergoing laser procedures and skin microneedling. Settings and Design: This was a prospective, double-blind study of patients undergoing laser and skin microneedling procedures at a laser unit in a tertiary referral dermatology centre. Materials and Methods: All 29 patients had three topical anaesthetics applied under occlusion for 1 hour prior to the procedure, at different treatment sites within the same anatomical zone. A self-assessment numerical pain rating scale was given to each patient to rate the pain during the procedure and each patient was asked to specify their preferred choice of topical anaesthetic at the end of the procedure. Statistical Analysis: Parametric data (mean pain scores and frequency of topical anaesthetic agent of choice) were compared using the paired samples t-test. A P-value of ≤0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results and Conclusions: Patients reported a mean (±SD; 95% confidence interval) pain score of 5 (±2.58; 3.66-6.46) with Ametop™, 4.38 (±2.53; 2.64-4.89) with EMLA® and 3.91 (±1.95; 2.65-4.76) with LMX4®. There was no statistically significant difference in pain scores between the different topical anaesthetics. The majority of patients preferred LMX4® as their choice of topical anaesthetic for dermatological laser and skin microneedling procedures. PMID:26644737

  10. Dermatological Manifestations of Individuals Infected with Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus type 1

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Lorena; Netto, Eduardo; Glesby, Marshall; Carvalho, Edgar; Machado, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Background Human T-cell lymphotropic virus - type 1 (HTLV-1) is associated with specific manifestations such as adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia (ATLL), HTLV-1-associated myelopathy / tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), HTLV-1-associated uveitis and infective dermatitis associated with HTLV-1 (IDH). Although ATLL and IDH are considered specific manifestations of HTLV-1 infection, several dermatological manifestations have been described in HTLV-1-infected patients. Methods A prevalence study was conducted between 2008 and 2010 with two groups of individuals, 179 HTLV-1 seropositive (positive ELISA and positive Western Blot) and 193 seronegative individuals (ELISA negative). The subjects were selected at a random basis and evaluated using a questionnaire to obtain epidemiological and clinical data. A physical examination was performed to verify the presence of skin lesions. Results Superficial mycoses were found in 54 HTLV-1-positive subjects (30.2%) and in 26 (13.5%) of the seronegative group (p<0.001). Xerosis was found in 39.1% of HTLV-1 infected subjects and in 9.3% of seronegative controls (p<0.001). Ichthyosis was diagnosed in 9 HTLV-1 positive cases (5%) whereas absent in the control group (p=0.001). A seborrheic dermatitis diagnosis was made in 43 HTLV-1 infected subjects (24%) and in 24 seronegative controls (12.4%) (p=0.004). Furthermore, the dermatological manifestations were more intense in the HTLV-1 group. Conclusions Several dermatological manifestations are more common and more severe in HTLV-1 subjects. The presence of these manifestations in an endemic area for HTLV- 1 infection may be a clue for the investigation of this infection. PMID:24111739

  11. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome: a dermatologic perspective and successful treatment with losartan.

    PubMed

    Landero, James

    2014-08-01

    The postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome is a disease characterized by excessively increased heart rate during orthostatic challenge associated with symptoms of orthostatic intolerance including dizziness, exercise intolerance, headache, fatigue, memory problems, nausea, blurred vision, pallor, and sweating, which improve with recumbence. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome patients may present with a multitude of additional symptoms that are attributable to vascular vasoconstriction. Observed signs and symptoms in a patient with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome include tachycardia at rest, exaggerated heart rate increase with upright position and exercise, crushing chest pain, tremor, syncope, loss of vision, confusion, migraines, fatigue, heat intolerance, parasthesia, dysesthesia, allodynia, altered traditional senses, and thermoregulatory abnormalities. There are a number of possible dermatological manifestations of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome easily explained by its recently discovered pathophysiology. The author reports the case of a 22-year-old woman with moderate-to-severe postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome with numerous dermatological manifestations attributable to the disease process. The cutaneous manifestations observed in this patient are diverse and most noticeable during postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome flares. The most distinct are evanescent, hyperemic, sharply demarcated, irregular patches on the chest and neck area that resolve upon diascopy. This distinct "evanescent hyperemia" disappears spontaneously after seconds to minutes and reappears unexpectedly. Other observed dermatological manifestations of this systemic disease include Raynaud's phenomenon, koilonychia, onychodystrophy, madarosis, dysesthesia, allodynia, telogen effluvium, increased capillary refill time, and livedo reticularis. The treatment of this disease poses a great challenge. The author reports the unprecedented use of an oral

  12. Common dermatologic disorders in skin of color: a comparative practice survey.

    PubMed

    Alexis, Andrew F; Sergay, Amanda B; Taylor, Susan C

    2007-11-01

    There is a paucity of data on the epidemiology of dermatologic disease in populations with skin of color. Our objective was to compare the most common diagnoses for which patients of various racial and ethnic groups were treated at a hospital-based dermatology faculty practice. We reviewed the diagnosis codes of 1412 patient visits from August 2004 through July 2005 at the Skin of Color Center at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, in New York. New York, in whom race and ethnicity were recorded. The most common diagnoses observed during dermatologic visits by black and white patients were compared. The leading diagnoses observed during the study period differed between black and white patients. During visits by black patients, the 5 most common diagnoses observed at our center were acne (ICD-9 [International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision] 706.1); dyschromia (ICD-9 709.09); contact dermatitis and other eczema, unspecified cause (ICD-9 692.9); alopecia (ICD-9 704.0); and seborrheic dermatitis (ICD-9 690.1). During visits by white patients, the 5 most common diagnoses recorded were acne (ICD-9 706.1); lesion of unspecified behavior (ICD-9 238.2); benign neoplasm of skin of trunk (ICD-9 216.5); contact dermatitis and other eczema, unspecified cause (ICD-9 692.9); and psoriasis (ICD-9 696. 1). Although similarities were seen in the frequency of acne and eczema, conditions such as dyschromia and alopecia were commonly seen during black patient visits but were not among the leading 10 diagnoses made during white patient visits.

  13. An international perspective on fillers in dermatology-from an American perspective.

    PubMed

    Gold, Michael H

    2012-09-01

    This manuscript is intended to give one an international perspective on the use of fillers around the world-what makes some of them special and what is the need and what is the purpose of having so many fillers in this global dermatologic community we live in. In the US, we have a finite number of fillers and only a handful more currently going through FDA testing. We demand much from our fillers in terms of safety and efficacy, and for all of us in the US, this is a very good reason to keep the numbers of fillers available to a reasonable number.

  14. [Dermatologic preparations with erythromycin--the correlation of the pharmaceutical form-therapeutic effect].

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, I; Irimia, O; Constantin, T

    1997-01-01

    Erythromycin associated with progesterone and A vitamin has been included in three dermatological pharmaceutical forms: a lotion, a L/H emulsion and a L/H nonionogenic ointment. Aspect of these preparations has been noticed for a 90 days period. pH and electrical conductance were also determined during this interval. All the formulations mentioned above revealed insignificant variations of these parameters proving an appreciable physico-chemical stability. Clinical investigative studies in juvenile acne, showed efficiency, particularly for the emulsion form.

  15. Environmental dermatology: skin manifestations of injuries caused by invertebrate aquatic animals.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Vidal

    2013-01-01

    Contact between humans and coastal areas has increased in recent decades, which has led to an increase in injuries from aquatic animals. The majority of these present dermatological manifestations, and some of them show typical lesions. The highest percentages of injuries that occur in marine environments are associated with invertebrates such as sea urchins, jellyfish and Portuguese men-of-war (echinoderms and cnidarians). In this review, we discuss the clinical, therapeutic and preventive aspects of injuries caused by marine and freshwater invertebrates, focusing on first aid measures and diagnosis for dermatologists and professionals in coastal areas.

  16. [New populations at increased cardiovascular risk: Cardiovascular disease in dermatological diseases].

    PubMed

    Godoy-Gijón, Elena; Meseguer-Yebra, Carmen; Palacio-Aller, Lucía; Godoy-Rocati, Diego Vicente; Lahoz-Rallo, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The increased cardiovascular risk in some dermatological diseases has been demonstrated in recent decades. Diseases such as psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus are currently included in the guidelines for prevention of cardiovascular disease. Other diseases such as androgenic alopecia, polycystic ovary syndrome, hidradenitis suppurativa or lichen planus have numerous studies that point to an increased risk, however, they have not been included in these guidelines. In this article we review the evidence supporting this association, in order to alert the clinician to the need for greater control in cardiovascular risk factors in these patients.

  17. [New populations at increased cardiovascular risk: Cardiovascular disease in dermatological diseases].

    PubMed

    Godoy-Gijón, Elena; Meseguer-Yebra, Carmen; Palacio-Aller, Lucía; Godoy-Rocati, Diego Vicente; Lahoz-Rallo, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The increased cardiovascular risk in some dermatological diseases has been demonstrated in recent decades. Diseases such as psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus are currently included in the guidelines for prevention of cardiovascular disease. Other diseases such as androgenic alopecia, polycystic ovary syndrome, hidradenitis suppurativa or lichen planus have numerous studies that point to an increased risk, however, they have not been included in these guidelines. In this article we review the evidence supporting this association, in order to alert the clinician to the need for greater control in cardiovascular risk factors in these patients. PMID:26383179

  18. Minimally invasive eyelid care in dermatology: medical, laser, and cosmetic therapies.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Ramin; Pfeiffer, Margaret L; Tsoukas, Maria

    2015-01-01

    There is a high demand for facial aesthetic enhancement, and the periorbital region is one of the first areas to show signs of aging. Many nonsurgical therapies exist to tackle these problems. These therapies are becoming more efficacious while reducing postprocedural recovery time. The goal is to restore the natural youthful appearance rather than to create an effect that differs from the patient's appearance earlier in life. Eyelid care, and cosmetic dermatology in general, intends to restore balance and symmetry. We discuss the initial consultation, relevant anatomy for the dermatologist, and medical, laser and cosmetic therapies.

  19. Methodology for diagnosing of skin cancer on images of dermatologic spots by spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Rosas, Esperanza; Álvarez-Borrego, Josué

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a new methodology for the diagnosing of skin cancer on images of dermatologic spots using image processing is presented. Currently skin cancer is one of the most frequent diseases in humans. This methodology is based on Fourier spectral analysis by using filters such as the classic, inverse and k-law nonlinear. The sample images were obtained by a medical specialist and a new spectral technique is developed to obtain a quantitative measurement of the complex pattern found in cancerous skin spots. Finally a spectral index is calculated to obtain a range of spectral indices defined for skin cancer. Our results show a confidence level of 95.4%.

  20. Environmental dermatology: skin manifestations of injuries caused by invertebrate aquatic animals*

    PubMed Central

    Haddad Junior, Vidal

    2013-01-01

    Contact between humans and coastal areas has increased in recent decades, which has led to an increase in injuries from aquatic animals. The majority of these present dermatological manifestations, and some of them show typical lesions. The highest percentages of injuries that occur in marine environments are associated with invertebrates such as sea urchins, jellyfish and Portuguese men-of-war (echinoderms and cnidarians). In this review, we discuss the clinical, therapeutic and preventive aspects of injuries caused by marine and freshwater invertebrates, focusing on first aid measures and diagnosis for dermatologists and professionals in coastal areas. PMID:24068119

  1. Co-morbidities in inflammatory dermatological diseases. Psoriasis, hidradenitis suppurativa, and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Miller, Iben M

    2015-09-01

    In conclusion, this thesis demonstrated an association between inflammatory dermatological diseases, i.e. psoriasis and hidradenitis suppurativa, and the metabolic syndrome putting these two patient groups at cardiovascular risk. Therefore, it is recommended as a minimum to screen hidradenitis and psoriasis patients attending in/outpatient clinics for the metabolic syndrome aimed at prevention of cardiovascular disease. The increased risk of metabolic syndrome adds to the range of well-known disease-related burdens e.g. the physical skin symptoms, the psychological impact thereof, and other co-morbidities, thus highlighting that both hidradenitis and psoriasis patients require general medical attention beyond the skin.

  2. Dermatological disease in the older age group: a cross-sectional study in aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Maneka S; Vandal, Alain C; Jarrett, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of dermatological disease in aged care facilities, and the relationship between cognitive or physical disability and significant disease. Setting 2 large aged care facilities in Auckland, New Zealand, each providing low and high level care. Participants All 161 residents of the facilities were invited to participate. The only exclusion criterion was inability to obtain consent from the individual or designated guardian. 88 participants were recruited—66 females (75%), 22 males (25%) with average age 87.1 years (SD 5.5 years). Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary—presence of significant skin disease (defined as that which in the opinion of the investigators needed treatment or was identified as a patient concern) diagnosed clinically on full dermatological examination by a dermatologist or dermatology trainee. Secondary—functional and cognitive status (Rehabilitation Complexity Scale and Abbreviated Mental Test Score). Results 81.8% were found to have at least one significant condition. The most common disorders were onychomycosis 42 (47.7%), basal cell carcinoma 13 (14.8%), asteototic eczema 11 (12.5%) and squamous cell carcinoma in situ 9 (10.2%). Other findings were invasive squamous cell carcinoma 7 (8%), bullous pemphigoid 2 (2.3%), melanoma 2 (2.3%), lichen sclerosus 2 (2.3%) and carcinoma of the breast 1 (1.1%). Inflammatory disease was more common in those with little physical disability compared with those with serious physical disability (OR 3.69; 95% CI 1.1 to 12.6, p=0.04). No significant association was found between skin disease and cognitive impairment. Conclusions A high rate of dermatological disease was found. Findings ranged from frequent but not life-threatening conditions (eg, onychomycosis), to those associated with a significant morbidity (eg, eczema, lichen sclerosus and bullous pemphigoid), to potentially life-threatening (eg, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma and breast cancer

  3. Management of Pornography-seeking in an Online Dermatology Atlas: Adventures in the Skin Trade1

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Christoph U.; Cohen, Bernard A.; Kim, George R.

    2005-01-01

    The escalating competition between online pornography - seeking and disseminating behaviors and technologies that attempt to reduce them creates technical, semantic and legal barriers to the legitimate discussion of and education about sensitive health issues involving sexuality, anatomy and pathology, especially when image-based knowledge is used. The effects of this competition on the use and management of an online dermatology atlas are described with a discussion on the importance of anticipating, addressing and controlling this problem while developing and maintaining image-based digital libraries and other e-Health applications. PMID:16779077

  4. The path to modernity: a personal testimony to the restructuring of the Department of Dermatology, Vargas Hospital, Caracas, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Kerdel-Vegas, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    In the late 1950s and early1960s, there was a concerted effort to modernize teaching, training, and patient care in the Vargas Hospital of Caracas, Venezuela. The above included the development of research in the frame of postgraduate training. This effort was to be helped by USA funds and institutions but could only be achieved by the work of Venezuelans, sharing a vision of progress. Dermatology spearheaded this initiative, and the fruit of this was the exponential development of Venezuelan Dermatology and the creation of the National Institute of Dermatology on the grounds of the Vargas Hospital. The purpose of this contribution is to review these events that happened more than half a century ago from my own perspective. I sincerely hope that these lines could serve as an inspiration to the younger generations that toil today under less-than-favorable conditions.

  5. Prevalence of dermatoses in dermatologic evaluation requests from patients admitted to a tertiary hospital for 10 years*

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Lia Dias Pinheiro; Bakos, Lucio; Balbinot, Gabriela; Drechsler, Carine Elisabete Rost; Eidt, Letícia Maria

    2015-01-01

    Skin diseases are common in hospitalized patients. However, there is a lack of data concerning their frequency. The objective of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of dermatological diagnoses in hospitalized patients after consultation requested by nondermatologist physicians to the Department of Dermatology, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre period of 10 years. A total of 5685 patients were evaluated, representing an average of 48.2 patients per month. The five most frequent groups were infectious dermatoses(33.25%), eczematous dermatoses (11.49%), drug reactions (11.43%), vascular dermatoses (6.81%) and group of pruritus, prurigo nodularis and urticaria (hives) (4.71%). PMID:26560228

  6. Doctor-patient relations in dermatology: obligations and rights for a mutual satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Poot, F

    2009-11-01

    The author examines different aspects of patient-doctor relationship in dermatological consultations. At first, a definition of patients satisfaction is given, based on available literature. It has been shown that satisfaction depends on diagnosis, but also on the doctor's ability to provide explanations on the probable cause of the illness, information on how long the symptom will probably last, and if she/he demonstrates empathy. Satisfaction also increases if the illness is serious, but decreases if quality of life linked to the symptom is underestimated by the doctor. After providing a philosophical definition of ethics, which emphasizes the importance of mutual satisfaction of patient and doctor, the concepts of empathy and compassion in patient-doctor relations are defined. Their importance in consultations is underlined, reporting, for example, that doctors with good communication skills experience fewer difficult consultations (8% vs. 23%). Afterwards, the dermatological consultation is analysed in its practical aspects, trying to define a good-quality consultation. First of all, the pitfalls that can affect good time management are analysed, suggesting to structure the consultation using the Soap method. Particular situations are analysed, such as announcing bad news and dealing with borderline patients. Finally, the concept of transference is defined, remembering that doctor-patient relationships can replay some difficult relationship coming from the past, and thus doctors need to be aware of this possibility and learn how to manage it.

  7. YouTube and the expanding role of videos in dermatologic surgery education.

    PubMed

    Koya, Komal D; Bhatia, Kyle R; Hsu, Jeffrey T S; Bhatia, Ashish C

    2012-09-01

    Video is an excellent medium for medical education, both for clinicians and for the public. YouTube has emerged as one of the largest sources of freely accessible content. It is our intent to provide a preliminary discussion of the growing role of videos in medical education, sources of this video content, and the format of surgical video content on YouTube. Additionally, we will highlight the limitations and pitfalls that clinicians and the public should be aware of when viewing online video content. Several sources of both patient- and clinician-directed videos are easily accessible from the Internet and DVDs today. Medical professionals, students, and patients now have mobiles and instantaneous access to a growing collection of video content. A brief list of online video sources to view and learn dermatologic surgical techniques is provided. Given the increasing ease of creating and posting high-quality video content, this list will continue to grow, providing dermatologic surgeons with an ever-increasing wealth of visual knowledge. Although YouTube is a dominant source of publicly accessible videos, clinicians and consumers should be aware of the source and intent of the video content before accepting the content. Although it is easy to post content on YouTube, it is difficult to verify sources and the credentials of the people posting the videos. Therefore, the viewer should filter content with a discerning eye, embracing the concept of caveat emptor--or buyer beware. PMID:22929353

  8. Lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster: in minor dermatological and needle puncture procedures.

    PubMed

    Croxtall, Jamie D

    2010-11-12

    The lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster comprises a lidocaine/tetracaine 70 mg/70 mg patch and a controlled heat-assisted drug delivery pod that increases the diffusion of lidocaine and tetracaine into the dermis. Following a 1-hour application period, systemic absorption of lidocaine or tetracaine from the plaster was minimal. The lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster provided effective pain relief for adult (including elderly) patients undergoing minor dermatological procedures and for adult and paediatric patients undergoing vascular access procedures. In randomized, double-blind clinical trials, patient-reported median pain scores were significantly lower with the lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster than with an identical plaster containing placebo in patients undergoing minor dermatological or vascular access procedures. Furthermore, patient-reported median pain scores were significantly lower with the lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster than with a lidocaine/prilocaine cream in patients undergoing vascular access procedures. In a large, randomized, double-blind trial in paediatric patients undergoing venipuncture, the overall incidence of pain was significantly lower with the lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster than with a lidocaine/prilocaine plaster. The lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster was well tolerated, with the most frequent treatment-related adverse events resolving spontaneously.

  9. A toxicologic and dermatologic assessment of cinnamyl phenylpropyl materials when used as fragrance ingredients.

    PubMed

    Belsito, D; Bickers, D; Bruze, M; Calow, P; Dagli, M; Fryer, A D; Greim, H; Miyachi, Y; Saurat, J H; Sipes, I G

    2011-12-01

    The cinnamyl phenylpropyl fragrance ingredients are a diverse group of chemical structures that have similar metabolic and toxicity profiles. A toxicological and dermatological review of these fragrance ingredients is presented. The common characteristic structural element of cinnamyl phenylpropyl materials is an aryl substituted primary alcohol/aldehyde/ester. For high end users, calculated maximum dermal exposures vary from 0.14% to 0.72%; systemic exposures vary from 0.0002 to 0.0280 mg/kg/day. Human dermatological studies show that these materials are not generally irritants or sensitizers at lower exposures from consumer products. Reactions (0.9%) in fragrance sensitive patients were observed with 3-phenyl-1-propanol at 5% in petrolatum. The cinnamyl phenylpropyl materials had low acute toxicity and no significant toxicity in repeat dose oral or dermal toxicity studies. No mutagenic or genotoxic activity in bacteria and mammalian cell line assays was observed. The cinnamyl phenylpropyl alcohol materials participate in the same beta oxidation pathways as their parent cinnamic acid derivatives, including common routes of absorption, distribution, and metabolic detoxification, and exhibit similar toxicological endpoints. Based on the review of available data, it is concluded that these materials would not present a safety concern at current levels of use as fragrance ingredients.

  10. The application of dermal papillary rings in dermatology by in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, W. Z.; Xu, A. E.; Xu, J.; Bi, Z. G.; Shang, Y. B.; Ren, Q. S.

    2010-08-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) allows noninvasive visualization of human skin in vivo, without needing to fix or section the tissue. Melanocytes and pigmented keratinocytes at the level of the basal layer form bright dermal papillary rings which are readily amenable to identify in confocal images. Our purpose was to explore the role of dermal papillary rings in assessment of lesion location, the diagnosis, differential diagnosis of lesions and assessment of therapeutic efficacy by in vivo CLSM. Seventy-one patients were imaged with the VivaScope 1500 reflectance confocal microscope provided by Lucid, Inc. The results indicate that dermal papillary rings can assess the location of lesion; the application of dermal papillary rings can provide diagnostic support and differential diagnosis for vitiligo, nevus depigmentosus, tinea versicolor, halo nevus, common nevi, and assess the therapeutic efficacy of NBUVB phototherapy plus topical 0.1 percent tacrolimus ointment for vitiligo. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the dermal papillary rings play an important role in the assessment the location of lesion, diagnosis, differential diagnosis of lesions and assessment of therapeutic efficacy by in vivo CLSM. CLSM may be a promising tool for noninvasive examination in dermatology. However, larger studies are needed to expand the application of dermal papillary rings in dermatology.

  11. Molecular defects in the mannose binding lectin pathway in dermatological disease: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and the Mannose-binding lectin-associated serine proteases (MASPs) are an essential aspect of innate immune responses that probably play an important but understudied role in cutaneous function. The MBL-MASP pathway appears to exert its primary role by assisting in the clearance of apoptotic skin cells (thus preventing accumulation and a subsequent autoimmune response) and promoting opsonophagocytosis of invading pathogens, limiting their dissemination. Deficiencies of the pathway have been described and are associated with infectious, autoimmune and vascular complications. However, the role of this pathway in dermatological disease is essentially unexplored. We describe 6 patients presenting with recurrent inflammatory and/or infectious skin conditions who also demonstrated severely low MBL levels. One patient also had a defect in the MASP2 gene. Genotype analysis revealed specific point mutations in the MBL2 promoter in all 6 patients and a variant MASP-2 gene in one patient. Five patients presented recurrent pustular skin infections (cellulitis, folliculitis and cutaneous abscess). A case of Grover's disease and one forme fruste of Behcet's syndrome (orogenital ulcers) were also observed. The patients responded to antimicrobial therapy, although in some, recurrence of infection was the rule. It appears that MBL deficiency may contribute to recurrent skin infections and to certain forms of inflammatory skin disease. The mechanisms may relate to the role of this pathway in innate immunity, removal of apoptotic cells and in immune complexes. Further study of MBL pathway defects in dermatological disease is required. PMID:20338057

  12. Radiation stability of resveratrol in immobilization on poly vinyl pyrrolidone hydrogel dressing for dermatological use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momesso, Roberta G. R. A. P.; Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, José R.; Spencer, Patrick J.; Lugão, Ademar B.

    2010-03-01

    The polyphenol trans-resveratrol is a natural phytoalexin, which is found in red wine and in a wide variety of plant species. Resveratrol displays a wide array of biological activities, such as modulation of lipid metabolism, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. This active compound immobilized in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) hydrogel could be very interesting for topical administration, as a dressing form for dermatological use. However, PVP hydrogel obtained by radiation-induced crosslinking can cause undesirable hydrolysis reactions in the active compound. The aim of this work was to verify the resveratrol stability after irradiation at 0.5 and 1 kGy in the presence of ethanol, methanol or tert-butyl alcohol. The integrity of these samples was compared to unirradiated resveratrol by HPLC. The PVP hydrogel matrix was characterized by gel fraction, swelling and in vitro biocompatibility test. The results of gel fraction and swelling degree were approximately 90% and 1600%, respectively. The cytotoxicity assay showed absence of toxicity for this formulation after crosslinking and sterilization, indicating that the PVP hydrogel formulation was appropriate for resveratrol immobilization to produce a dressing for dermatological use.

  13. Health related quality of life assessment in the routine clinical practice of a dermatology unit.

    PubMed

    Tabolli, Stefano; Baliva, Giannandrea; Lombardo, Giuseppe Alfonso; Sampogna, Francesca; Di Pietro, Cristina; Mannooranparampil, T J; Alvetreti, Gabriele; Abeni, Damiano

    2006-01-01

    A descriptive study in a Dermatological Research Institution in Rome, Italy, was conducted to test the feasibility and acceptability of health related quality of life (HRQoL) assessment in the daily routine. Quality of life, and psychosocial distress evaluations were obtained for each patient. Patients were invited to complete the Skindex-29, GHQ-12, and SF-36. Results were returned to the clinical staff using standardised feed-back forms with: a) "categories" of QoL scores to help interpreting Skindex-29 scores; b) "warnings" pointing out problems that patients experienced "all the time"; c) categories of GHQ-12 scores for minor psychiatric problems; d) the classical SF-36 graph depicting the patient's "QoL profile" with normative references. The clinical staff were trained, and then their attitudes and behaviours were surveyed using a standardised questionnaire. For all 170 participants enrolled (63% males, 35% age > 64 years), feed-back forms were provided within three hours from data collection. For patients with repeated hospitalisations time-trends in HRQoL measurements were also provided. The acceptability, both for patients and the clinical staff, was high but the actual impact on clinical activities was limited. The routine assessment of HRQoL in dermatology is feasible and well accepted both by patients and by the clinical staff. The application of these widely used questionnaires should be implemented in a larger scale and evaluated in different settings. PMID:16935800

  14. Safety Assessment and Biological Effects of a New Cold Processed SilEmulsion for Dermatological Purpose

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Ana; Gonçalves, Lídia; Pinto, Pedro C.; Urbano, Manuela; Ribeiro, Helena M.

    2013-01-01

    It is of crucial importance to evaluate the safety profile of the ingredients used in dermatological emulsions. A suitable equilibrium between safety and efficacy is a pivotal concern before the marketing of a dermatological product. The aim was to assess the safety and biological effects of a new cold processed silicone-based emulsion (SilEmulsion). The hazard, exposure, and dose-response assessment were used to characterize the risk for each ingredient. EpiSkin assay and human repeat insult patch tests were performed to compare the theoretical safety assessment to in vitro and in vivo data. The efficacy of the SilEmulsion was studied using biophysical measurements in human volunteers during 21 days. According to the safety assessment of the ingredients, 1,5-pentanediol was an ingredient of special concern since its margin of safety was below the threshold of 100 (36.53). EpiSkin assay showed that the tissue viability after the application of the SilEmulsion was 92 ± 6% and, thus considered nonirritant to the skin. The human studies confirmed that the SilEmulsion was not a skin irritant and did not induce any sensitization on the volunteers, being safe for human use. Moreover, biological effects demonstrated that the SilEmulsion increased both the skin hydration and skin surface lipids. PMID:24294598

  15. Patients with hidradenitis suppurativa carry a higher systemic inflammatory load than other dermatological patients.

    PubMed

    Riis, Peter Theut; Søeby, K; Saunte, D M; Jemec, G B E

    2015-12-01

    Hidradenitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with recurrent nodules, tunnels, scarring and suppuration of intertrigious areas. Hospital-treated HS patients have an increased risk of metabolic syndrome and a wide array of co-morbidities that possibly are related to systemic inflammation. Neutrophile to lymphocyte ratio has been suggested as a marker of systemic inflammation. Studies of psoriasis patients have found their neutrophile to lymphocyte ratio to be increased. In this study, routine blood samples collected during control visits from 50 HS patients are examined, and compared to routine blood samples from 250 age- and sex-matched dermatological outpatients. The neutrophile to lymphocyte ratio does not appear to be increased in HS patients as seen in psoriasis patients, but CRP was found to be higher in HS patients, indicating systemic inflammation. However, N/L ratio was positively correlated to Hurley stage (p < 0.006). The inflammatory biochemical markers for HS patients appear to differ from psoriasis patients and other non-HS dermatological patients; however, a larger study with healthy controls is warranted to further explore the characteristics of inflammatory markers in HS.

  16. Dermatology Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... lines the surfaces and cavities of the body. EROSION - A focal loss of the top surface of ... superficial, the skin heals without scarring. EXCORIATION - An erosion or ulcer caused by scratching. FISSURE - A thin ...

  17. Dermatologic infestations.

    PubMed

    Shmidt, Eugenia; Levitt, Jacob

    2012-02-01

    Head lice are transmitted by head to head contact. Optimal therapy includes malathion lotion 0.5% repeated in one week left on for 30 minutes to 8 hours. Spinosad topical suspension 0.9% repeated in one week left on for 10 minutes is another option. Scabies is transmitted mainly by direct contact but also via heavily infested fomites due to crusted scabies. Permethrin 5% cream to the body repeated in four days is often sufficient; however, scalp treatment with malathion lotion 0.5% is helpful in crusted scabies and in infested children. Oral ivermectin 200 mcg/kg is another option, repeated in four days. For scabies more than lice, fomites should be placed in a drier at 60 °C for 10 minutes to kill the arthropods. Treatment of close contacts in both cases will control outbreaks and repeated infestations. Both have been associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. Bed bugs are a common cause for papular urticaria. Identification of the insect in the mattress or bedding confirms the diagnosis. Prevention involves encasing the mattress in a sealed plastic cover and extermination. Delusions of parasitosis is a diagnosis of exclusion that is best treated with an antipsychotic. PMID:22250620

  18. Dermatologic infestations.

    PubMed

    Shmidt, Eugenia; Levitt, Jacob

    2012-02-01

    Head lice are transmitted by head to head contact. Optimal therapy includes malathion lotion 0.5% repeated in one week left on for 30 minutes to 8 hours. Spinosad topical suspension 0.9% repeated in one week left on for 10 minutes is another option. Scabies is transmitted mainly by direct contact but also via heavily infested fomites due to crusted scabies. Permethrin 5% cream to the body repeated in four days is often sufficient; however, scalp treatment with malathion lotion 0.5% is helpful in crusted scabies and in infested children. Oral ivermectin 200 mcg/kg is another option, repeated in four days. For scabies more than lice, fomites should be placed in a drier at 60 °C for 10 minutes to kill the arthropods. Treatment of close contacts in both cases will control outbreaks and repeated infestations. Both have been associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. Bed bugs are a common cause for papular urticaria. Identification of the insect in the mattress or bedding confirms the diagnosis. Prevention involves encasing the mattress in a sealed plastic cover and extermination. Delusions of parasitosis is a diagnosis of exclusion that is best treated with an antipsychotic.

  19. Cosmetic Dermatology

    MedlinePlus

    ... J, et al. (2002). A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study of the efficacy and safety ... axillary hyperhidrosis: a 52-week multicenter double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study of efficacy and safety. J ...

  20. Dermatological and nutritional/growth effects among children living in arsenic-contaminated communities in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Chiho; Matsui, Tamano; Inaoka, Tsukasa; Kadono, Takefumi; Miyazaki, Kaori; Bae, Mun-Joo; Ono, Tomomichi; Ohtsuka, Ryutaro; Bokul, A T M Mozammel Haque

    2007-10-01

    While many reports have outlined the health risk of chronic arsenic exposure on adult populations, relatively little is known about the effects on children. We have examined the effects of chronic arsenic exposure through consumption of contaminated groundwater among 241 children (age 4-15 yr) living in two rural villages in northern Bangladesh. The arsenic concentrations of the tubewell waters ranged from less than detection limit to 535 ng/mL, and in 72 of 241 (30%) tubewells, the water arsenic concentration exceeded 50 ng/mL, the provisional guideline of Bangladesh. Approximately half of the examined children exhibited dermatological symptoms with relatively obscured dose-response relationship; an observation suggesting that the children were no more susceptible to the dermatological effects of arsenic than the adults living in the same communities. Proportion of the children with lower BMI significantly increased with increasing arsenic exposure level; the dose-response relationship was consistently observed among the subgroups. These results suggested that while mild dermatological manifestations, potentially associated with arsenic exposure, could be found as much as half of the children, nutritional status of the children, evaluated by BMI, might be a sensitive endpoint than the dermatological manifestations among children in this area.

  1. 76 FR 63929 - Joint Meeting of the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee and the Dermatologic and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Joint Meeting of the Drug Safety and Risk Management... public. Name of Committees: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee and Dermatologic and... (Public Law 110-85) requires FDA to bring, at least annually, one or more drugs with Risk Evaluation...

  2. Sports Dermatology: Part 1 of 2 Traumatic or Mechanical Injuries, Inflammatory Conditions, and Exacerbations of Pre-existing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sivek, Rachel; Marciniak, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Competitive athletes endure extreme bodily stress when participating in sports-related activities. An athlete’s skin is particularly susceptible to a wide array of repetitive physical and environmental stressors that challenge the skin’s protective function. Many unique dermatoses are well-known to the serious athlete due to countless hours of intense physical training, but are frequently unrecognized by many healthcare professionals. Sports dermatology is a distinctive, budding field of dermatology that focuses on dermatoses frequently encountered in athletes. Athletic skin problems are notoriously infectious in nature due to the inherent environment of close-contact physical activity. Nonetheless, other skin conditions can manifest or worsen with recurring mechanical or traumatic injury or exposure to environmental hazards. Additionally, sports-related activities may exacerbate other pre-existing dermatological conditions that may possibly be unknown to the athlete or clinician. The objective of this two-part review is to arm the astute physician with the fundamental knowledge of the range of dermatological conditions distinct to the competitive athlete. Knowledge of these cutaneous conditions in the context of specific sporting events will permit the clinician to manage these unique patients most effectively. Part one will focus on traumatic or mechanical injuries, inflammatory conditions, and exacerbations of pre-existing conditions frequently seen in athletes. PMID:26060516

  3. 21 CFR 878.4810 - Laser surgical instrument for use in general and plastic surgery and in dermatology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... plastic surgery and in dermatology. 878.4810 Section 878.4810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4810 Laser surgical instrument for use in general and plastic surgery and...

  4. 21 CFR 878.4810 - Laser surgical instrument for use in general and plastic surgery and in dermatology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... plastic surgery and in dermatology. 878.4810 Section 878.4810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4810 Laser surgical instrument for use in general and plastic surgery and...

  5. 21 CFR 878.4810 - Laser surgical instrument for use in general and plastic surgery and in dermatology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... plastic surgery and in dermatology. 878.4810 Section 878.4810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4810 Laser surgical instrument for use in general and plastic surgery and...

  6. 21 CFR 878.4810 - Laser surgical instrument for use in general and plastic surgery and in dermatology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... plastic surgery and in dermatology. 878.4810 Section 878.4810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4810 Laser surgical instrument for use in general and plastic surgery and...

  7. Identifying the Core Content of a Dermatology Module for Malaysian Medical Undergraduate Curriculum Using a Modified Delphi Method

    PubMed Central

    Jamil, Adawiyah; Muthupalaniappen, Leelavathi; Md Nor, Norazirah; Siraj, Harlina Halizah; Salam, Abdus

    2016-01-01

    Background Dermatology is a minor module in internal medicine undergraduate curriculum. Limited time is allocated for its teaching. Most graduates are inadequately prepared to diagnose and manage skin diseases. We aimed to identify the core content of a more effective dermatology module. Methods A modified Delphi method was used to reach a consensus. A questionnaire was developed by a selected panel and sent to 20 dermatologists, family physicians and general practitioners (GPs), respectively. They were asked to rate diseases according to importance. The participants then answered the questionnaire again with results of the first round made available to them. The final module content was identified based on the panel’s collective opinions. Results Eleven topics had mode and median values of 1 with an agreement level of more than 70%. They were as follows: (1) skin structure and function; (2) infections and infestations; (3) the skin in systemic diseases; (4) dermatology emergencies; (5) drug eruptions; (6) psoriasis; (7) eczema; (8) sexually transmitted infections; (9) leprosy; (10) acne; and (11) clinical skills and diagnostic procedures. A total of 56 diseases were identified as important. Conclusion Results of this study reflect the importance of understanding the influence of regional factors on common and important skin diseases. These topics may be used to develop a more effective dermatology module for the Malaysian undergraduate medical curriculum. PMID:27418873

  8. Howard I. Maibach: extraordinary leadership in integrating key concepts underpinning our understanding of percutaneous absorption and occupational dermatology.

    PubMed

    Surber, C; Elsner, P; Singh, J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present article is to briefly highlight some contributions of Prof. Howard I. Maibach to the field of dermatology. After a few introducing remarks regarding Howard's personal career, the article specifically reviews contributions to the understanding of percutaneous absorption and to occupational dermatology. He and his companions/coworkers established and introduced experimental prerequisites to better study and understand percutaneous absorption - both in vitro and in vivo. Not less influential was his contribution to occupational dermatology acting as a founding member of the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group and coinaugurating the North American Contact Dermatitis Group. These groups have been very active ever since. As an academic teacher, he inspired young colleagues to perform original research work and to establish their own working groups. He has done this most successfully with many fellows who worked with him over the years, and who are now leading departments or companies dedicated to dermatological research all over the world. Probably this is his most important and lasting achievement.

  9. Developing a dermatological photodiagnosis system by optical image analyses and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Hsing; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Li, Cheng-Ru; Chang, Chun-Ming; Hung, Chih-Wei; Chang, Han-Chao

    2016-09-01

    Dermatological photodynamic therapy (DPDT) involves using systematic photosensitizers in combination with light irradiation treatment to eliminate cancer cells. Therefore, a noninvasive fluorescence photodiagnosis system is critical in DPDT for diagnosing target tissues and demarcating the margin of normal tissues. This study proposes a 375-nm ring LED light module in fluorescence imaging for DPDT applications. Image reproducibility (I.R.) and image interference (I.I.) analysis were performed. The results showed that the I.R. value of this fluorescence diagnostic system was higher than 99.0%, and the I.I. from external light sources was lower than 3.0%. In addition, the result of an in vivo study showed that the Chlorin e6 red fluorescence and the scope of distribution of B16-F10 melanoma cells in a mouse ear's vein could be measured clearly using our device; however, the comparison studio with 395-nm LED lights could not focus or capture the red fluorescence effectively.

  10. Methodology for diagnosing of skin cancer on images of dermatologic spots by spectral analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Rosas, Esperanza; Álvarez-Borrego, Josué

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new methodology for the diagnosing of skin cancer on images of dermatologic spots using image processing is presented. Currently skin cancer is one of the most frequent diseases in humans. This methodology is based on Fourier spectral analysis by using filters such as the classic, inverse and k-law nonlinear. The sample images were obtained by a medical specialist and a new spectral technique is developed to obtain a quantitative measurement of the complex pattern found in cancerous skin spots. Finally a spectral index is calculated to obtain a range of spectral indices defined for skin cancer. Our results show a confidence level of 95.4%. PMID:26504638

  11. How to design and write a clinical research protocol in Cosmetic Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Bagatin, Ediléia; Miot, Helio A

    2013-01-01

    Cosmetic Dermatology is a growing subspecialty. High-quality basic science studies have been published; however, few double-blind, randomized controlled clinical trials, which are the major instrument for evidence-based medicine, have been conducted in this area. Clinical research is essential for the discovery of new knowledge, improvement of scientific basis, resolution of challenges, and good clinical practice. Some basic principles for a successful researcher include interest, availability, persistence, and honesty. It is essential to learn how to write a protocol research and to know the international and national regulatory rules. A complete clinical trial protocol should include question, background, objectives, methodology (design, variable description, sample size, randomization, inclusion and exclusion criteria, intervention, efficacy and safety measures, and statistical analysis), consent form, clinical research form, and references. Institutional ethical review board approval and financial support disclosure are necessary. Publication of positive or negative results should be an authors' commitment.

  12. Clinical, epidemiological and therapeutic profile of patients with brachioradial pruritus in a reference service in dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ana Cecília Versiani Duarte; Wachholz, Patrick Alexander; Masuda, Paula Yoshiko; Martelli, Antonio Carlos Ceribelli

    2016-01-01

    This is a cross-sectional study, conducted from May to November/2014, in a dermatology reference unit, through review of medical records and interviews. In a sample of 49 patients with brachioradial pruritus, we observed higher prevalence of Caucasian (81.6%) and women (73.5 %), with a mean age of 56.1 years. Pruritus occurred in the topography of brachioradialis muscle in 87.8% of cases; 59.2% of the sample reported worsening of pruritus with sun exposure; the mean intensity of this symptom before treatment was 8.63. Therapy effectiveness was described as "very good/good" in 79.2% of cases, and for 55.3% relapses were categorized as "uncommon". PMID:27579762

  13. [Development of external medicine and dermatology of TCM in the Republican period].

    PubMed

    He, Zhongjun; Wang, Li

    2015-05-01

    The inheritance of the theory in external medicine in the Republican period was mainly derived from Wai ke zheng zong (Orthodox Manual of External Medicine) and Yi zong jin jian (Golden Mirror of Medicine) and the sorting out of medical plasters, pills, and powders from Wai ke shi san fang (Thirteen Recipes of External Medicine). Zhang Shanlei's Yang ke gang yao (Guidelines for Ulcerations), based on the five-year experience of Zhu's family, offers new experience and ideas for syndrome differentiation; Ding Ganren's diagnosis for external medicine is exquisite with many well known formulae prescribed by himself; Monographs on leprosy and syphilis were published by famous physicians. Departments of external medicine and anal diseases, and classes on external medicine and dermatology and venereal diseases were set up in TCM schools in Guangdong and Zhejiang provinces with teaching materials compiled. All these mark the development of external medicine in modern age.

  14. Miniature spectrometer and multispectral imager as a potential diagnostic aid in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Haishan; MacAulay, Calum E.; McLean, David I.; Lui, Harvey; Palcic, Branko

    1995-04-01

    A miniature spectrometer system has been constructed for both reflectance and autofluorescence spectral measurements of skin. The system is based on PC plug-in spectrometer, therefore, it is miniature and easy to operate. The spectrometer has been used clinically to collect spectral data from various skin lesions including skin cancer. To date, 48 patients with a total of 71 diseased skin sites have been measured. Analysis of these preliminary data suggests that unique spectral characteristics exist for certain types of skin lesions, i.e. seborrheic keratosis, psoriasis, etc.. These spectral characteristics will help the differential diagnosis in Dermatology practice. In conjunction with the spectral point measurements, we are building and testing a multispectral imaging system to measure the spatial distribution of skin reflectance and autofluorescence. Preliminary results indicate that a cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma has a weak autofluorescence signal at the edge of the lesion, but a higher autofluorescence signal in the central area.

  15. [Underestimation of dermatology based on ignorance and its impact on patient's health].

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Suárez, Adán; Domínguez-Soto, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of medical specialties in different areas of medicine, assessment of patients became narrow and specialized. There is also the perception that some specialties are more difficult than others. Dermatology has long been seen by most physicians non dermatologists as a relaxed area, without real emergencies or requirement of great intellectual effort. Some specialists, erroneously think that everything can be cured with topical steroids and/or antifungal creams. Although several skin diseases are common complains seen by the general practitioner, very few time and credits are granted to cover these diseases during the years of undergraduate training. Thus, the primary care physicians and others medical specialists believe that skin diseases are not life threatening and hence irrelevant. Nonetheless, they feel competent enough to prescribe a variety of treatments for skin diseases that may lead to iatrogenesis.

  16. Review of dermatology use of 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy in China from 1997 to 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peiru; Zhang, Guolong; Wang, Xiuli

    2015-07-01

    The prodrug 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and its ester derivatives have been used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) in dermatology worldwide. In China, ALA-PDT was first used to treat urethral condylomata acuminata and non-melanoma skin cancers in 1997. A powder formulation of ALA hydrochloride was approved by the Chinese Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of condylomata acuminata in 2007. Large successful experience of treating condylomatas was accumulated compared with Western countries. Meanwhile, numerous clinical studies as well as off-label use of ALAPDT have been carried out in China. To reflect the progress of ALA-PDT in China, several major Chinese and English databases were searched and published data were reviewed in this article.

  17. [Usefulness of corrective make-up in children with vitiligo coordinated by dermatology nursing].

    PubMed

    Padilla-España, Laura; Ramírez-López, Belén; Fernández-Sánchez, Encarnación

    2014-01-01

    There are certain skin disorders such as vitiligo, acne, vascular malformations and postoperative scars that can affect the quality of life of children and especially adolescents. It can become an obstacle to their psychosocial development. A review was conducted on 4 patients with vitiligo located on face, who took part in a camouflage treatment course from January to December 2012. The impact of the skin disorder on quality of life was assessed before and after the therapeutic make-up sessions. Corrective makeup can be a complementary, reproducible, cost-effective, non-invasive, and useful technique in the management of dermatological diseases that have a physical and emotional impact in childhood. PMID:24731391

  18. Mechanism of action and clinical benefits of colloidal oatmeal for dermatologic practice.

    PubMed

    Cerio, Rino; Dohil, Magdalene; Jeanine, Downie; Magina, Sofia; Mahé, Emmanuel; Stratigos, Alexander J

    2010-09-01

    Colloidal oatmeal has a long history of beneficial use in dermatology. It is a natural product that has an excellent safety record and has demonstrated efficacy for the treatment of atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, drug-induced rash and other conditions. In recent years, in vitro and in vivo studies have begun to elucidate the multiple mechanisms of action of naturally derived colloidal oatmeal. Evidence now describes its molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity. The avenanthramides, a recently described component of whole oat grain, are responsible for many of these effects. Studies have demonstrated that avenanthramides can inhibit the activity of nuclear factor kappaB and the release of proinflammatory cytokines and histamine, well known key mechanisms in the pathophysiology of inflammatory dermatoses. Topical formulations of natural colloidal oatmeal should be considered an important component of therapy for atopic dermatitis and other conditions and may allow for reduced use of corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors.

  19. Clinical, epidemiological and therapeutic profile of patients with brachioradial pruritus in a reference service in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ana Cecília Versiani Duarte; Wachholz, Patrick Alexander; Masuda, Paula Yoshiko; Martelli, Antonio Carlos Ceribelli

    2016-01-01

    This is a cross-sectional study, conducted from May to November/2014, in a dermatology reference unit, through review of medical records and interviews. In a sample of 49 patients with brachioradial pruritus, we observed higher prevalence of Caucasian (81.6%) and women (73.5 %), with a mean age of 56.1 years. Pruritus occurred in the topography of brachioradialis muscle in 87.8% of cases; 59.2% of the sample reported worsening of pruritus with sun exposure; the mean intensity of this symptom before treatment was 8.63. Therapy effectiveness was described as "very good/good" in 79.2% of cases, and for 55.3% relapses were categorized as "uncommon". PMID:27579762

  20. [Miracles in dermatology? An overview of miraculous cures of skin diseases in the Catholic Church].

    PubMed

    Kuner, N

    2003-12-01

    Miracles which can be observed in different religions are often closely connected to medicine. These miraculous cures, considered to be inexplicable by medical science, have been documented in Christian religion and in occidental culture for more than 2000 years. These miraculous healings are also reported in the field of dermatology. The miraculous bulletins documented by the Catholic Church take their beginning in the Old Testament and extend to the miraculous cures of Lourdes in present time. We provide an overview of miraculous healings of skin diseases, whereby accounts documented in the Bible, reports during the Middle Ages, and cases documented throughout the last century are discussed. In view of modern medicine, most of the miraculous healings do not meet modern demands of science, but remain important as milestones in medical and religious history.

  1. How to design and write a clinical research protocol in Cosmetic Dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    Bagatin, Ediléia; Miot, Helio A.

    2013-01-01

    Cosmetic Dermatology is a growing subspecialty. High-quality basic science studies have been published; however, few double-blind, randomized controlled clinical trials, which are the major instrument for evidence-based medicine, have been conducted in this area. Clinical research is essential for the discovery of new knowledge, improvement of scientific basis, resolution of challenges, and good clinical practice. Some basic principles for a successful researcher include interest, availability, persistence, and honesty. It is essential to learn how to write a protocol research and to know the international and national regulatory rules. A complete clinical trial protocol should include question, background, objectives, methodology (design, variable description, sample size, randomization, inclusion and exclusion criteria, intervention, efficacy and safety measures, and statistical analysis), consent form, clinical research form, and references. Institutional ethical review board approval and financial support disclosure are necessary. Publication of positive or negative results should be an authors' commitment. PMID:23539006

  2. Dermatologic adverse events to chemotherapeutic agents, Part 2: BRAF inhibitors, MEK inhibitors, and ipilimumab.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jennifer Nam

    2014-03-01

    The advent of novel targeted chemotherapeutic agents and immunotherapies has dramatically changed the arena of cancer treatment in recent years. BRAF inhibitors, MEK inhibitors, and ipilimumab are among the newer chemotherapy drugs that are being used at an increasing rate. Dermatologic adverse events to these medications are common, and it is important for dermatologists and oncologists alike to learn to recognize and treat such side effects in order to maintain both patients' quality of life and their anticancer treatment. This review describes the cutaneous side effects seen with BRAF inhibitors (eg, maculopapular eruption, photosensitivity, squamoproliferative growths, melanocytic proliferations), MEK inhibitors (eg, papulopustular eruption), and ipilimumab (eg, maculopapular eruption, vitiligo), with a mention of vismodegib and anti-PD-1 agents.

  3. In vivo dual-modality photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography imaging of human dermatological pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Zabihian, Behrooz; Weingast, Jessika; Liu, Mengyang; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul; Pehamberger, Hubert; Drexler, Wolfgang; Hermann, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities serve as a key indicator for many skin diseases. Currently available methods in dermatology such as histopathology and dermatoscopy analyze underlying vasculature in human skin but are either invasive, time-consuming, and laborious or incapable of providing 3D images. In this work, we applied for the first time dual-modality photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography that provides complementary information about tissue morphology and vasculature of patients with different types of dermatitis. Its noninvasiveness and relatively short imaging time and the wide range of diseases that it can detect prove the merits of the dual-modality imaging system and show the great potential of its clinical use in the future. PMID:26417489

  4. The epidemiology of dermatologic and venereologic disease in a deployed operational setting.

    PubMed

    Vidmar, D A; Harford, R R; Beasley, W J; Revels, J; Thornton, S A; Kao, T C

    1996-07-01

    We studied the epidemiology, morbidity, and etiology of dermatologic and non-human immunodeficiency virus venereologic disease (Derm/STD) aboard a deployed aircraft carrier to revise Derm/STD training objectives for shipboard primary care providers. Onboard supplies for treatment of Derm/STD were also evaluated. Over 3 months, 929 Derm/STD patients were treated for 1,320 diagnoses generating 2,011 visits. Derm/STD caused 22% of the total morbidity. Pyoderma alone accounted for nearly one-half of that morbidity and involved many work-center groups. Air wing, aircraft maintenance, and engineering work-center groups had lower burdens of pyoderma. Bacterial cultures were performed on 248 exudative dermatoses. Staphylococcus aureus was the dominant pathogen and was overwhelmingly sensitive in vitro to common, inexpensive antibiotics. Strategies to encourage prevention, earlier diagnosis, and rapid treatment of Derm/STD by deployed primary care providers are discussed.

  5. Cost Analysis of Selected Patient Categories within a Dermatology Department Using an ABC Approach

    PubMed Central

    Papadaki, Šárka; Popesko, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Background: Present trends in hospital management are facilitating the utilization of more accurate costing methods, which potentially results in superior cost-related information and improved managerial decision-making. However, the Activity-Based Costing method (ABC), which was designed for cost allocation purposes in the 1980s, is not widely used by healthcare organizations. This study analyzes costs related to selected categories of patients, those suffering from psoriasis, varicose ulcers, eczema and other conditions, within a dermatology department at a Czech regional hospital. Methods: The study was conducted in a hospital department where both inpatient and outpatient care are offered. Firstly, the diseases treated at the department were identified. Further costs were determined for each activity using ABC. The study utilized data from managerial and financial accounting, as well as data obtained through interviews with departmental staff. Using a defined cost-allocation procedure makes it possible to determine the cost of an individual patient with a given disease more accurately than via traditional costing procedures. Results: The cost analysis focused on the differences between the costs related to individual patients within the selected diagnoses, variations between inpatient and outpatient treatments and the costs of activities performed by the dermatology department. Furthermore, comparing the costs identified through this approach and the revenue stemming from the health insurance system is an option. Conclusions: Activity-Based Costing is more accurate and relevant than the traditional costing method. The outputs of ABC provide an abundance of additional information for managers. The benefits of this research lie in its practically-tested outputs, resulting from calculating the costs of hospitalization, which could prove invaluable to persons involved in hospital management and decision-making. The study also defines the managerial implications of

  6. [Evolution of biologicals in inflammation medicine--biosimilars in gastroenterology, rheumatology and dermatology].

    PubMed

    Schreiber, S; Luger, T; Mittendorf, T; Mrowietz, U; Müller-Ladner, U; Schröder, J; Stallmach, A; Bokemeyer, B

    2014-11-01

    Biologicals revolutionized the therapy of chronic inflammatory diseases in gastroenterology, rheumatology and dermatology in the last decade. The first generation biologicals mainly targeted against the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. The evolution of these therapies in the last years led to the development of new antibodies and to the admission of first generation "generic" biologics - the biosimilars. Biosimilars are not a fundamental new pharmacological development for existing substances, however they have the potential to lead to enormous cost savings in healthcare without reducing the level of care for patients. Biosimilars are not identical with the originator, but in an extensive biosimilarity exercise including analytical, preclinical and comparative clinical studies it was shown that the biosimilars could demonstrate comparability in all relevant aspects with the originator.In September 2013, the Infliximab biosimilars (Inflectra(®), Remsina(®)) were the first biosimilars for monoclonal antibodies to be authorized by the EMA for use in the European Union. By demonstrating the therapeutic similarity only in one indication (rheumatoid arthritis) the EMA agreed with an extrapolation also to all approved indications of the originator. This could be a relevant problem in clinical practice. Therefore, comparative studies with the originator are required in all approved indications.After expiration of the national patent protection in beginning of 2015, the infliximab biosimilars will be launched on the market in Germany and will be part of the therapeutic arsenal in gastroenterology, rheumatology and dermatology. Interchangeability (Switching) of biosimilars with the originator will be subject of an important discussion with the health care providers. Regardless of the biosimilars EMA-approval, several potential problems (efficacy, extrapolation, switching, long-term safety) should be the topic of intensive long-term registries in the future. PMID:25390629

  7. Systemic sclerosis: current concepts in pathogenesis and therapeutic aspects of dermatological manifestations.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Vishalakshi; Phiske, Meghana M; Gopalani, Vinay V

    2013-07-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic, multisystem connective tissue disease with protean clinical manifestations. Recent advances in understanding the pathogenic mechanisms have led to development of target-oriented and vasomodulatory drugs which play a pivotal role in treating various dermatological manifestations. An exhaustive literature search was done using Medline, Embase, and Cochrane library to review the recent concepts regarding pathogenesis and evidence-based treatment of salient dermatological manifestations. The concept of shared genetic risk factors for the development of autoimmune diseases is seen in SSc. It is divided into fibroproliferative and inflammatory groups based on genome-wide molecular profiling. Genetic, infectious, and environmental factors play a key role; vascular injury, fibrosis, and immune activation are the chief pathogenic factors. Vitamin D deficiency has been documented in SSc and correlates with the severity of skin involvement. Skin sclerosis, Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) with digital vasculopathies, pigmentation, calcinosis, and leg ulcers affect the patient's quality of life. Immunosuppressives, biologicals, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are efficacious in skin sclerosis. Endothelin A receptor antagonists, calcium-channel blockers, angiotensin receptor inhibitors, prostacyclin analogs, and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors are the mainstay in RP and digital vasculopathies. Pigmentation in SSc has been attributed to melanogenic potential of endothelin-1 (ET-1); the role of ET 1 antagonists and vitamin D analogs needs to be investigated. Sexual dysfunction in both male and female patients has been attributed to vasculopathy and fibrosis, wherein PDE-5 inhibitors are found to be useful. The future concepts of treating SSc may be based on the gene expression signature. PMID:23918994

  8. Status Report from the Scientific Panel on Antibiotic Use in Dermatology of the American Acne and Rosacea Society

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Guy F.; Rosen, Ted; Thiboutot, Diane; Leyden, James J.; Gallo, Richard; Walker, Clay; Zhanel, George; Eichenfield, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Oral and topical antibiotics are commonly prescribed in dermatologie practice, often for noninfectious disorders, such as acne vulgaris and rosacea. Concerns related to antibiotic exposure from both medical and nonmedical sources require that clinicians consider in each case why and how antibiotics are being used and to make appropriate adjustments to limit antibiotic exposure whenever possible. This first article of a three-part series discusses prescribing patterns in dermatology, provides an overview of sources of antibiotic exposure, reviews the relative correlations between the magnitude of antibiotic consumption and emergence of antibiotic resistance patterns, evaluates the impact of alterations in antibiotic prescribing, and discusses the potential relevance and clinical sequelae of antibiotic use, with emphasis on how antibiotics are used in dermatology. PMID:27462384

  9. Hyperhidrosis Prevalence and Demographical Characteristics in Dermatology Outpatients in Shanghai and Vancouver

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Sunil; Huang, Rachel Yuanshen; Phillips, Arlie; Su, Mingwan; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhou, Pingyu; Zhou, Youwen

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a wide variation in the reported prevalence of primary hyperhidrosis in the literature. Further, it is unknown if primary hyperhidrosis is a lifelong condition, or if demographical factors influence hyperhidrosis prevalence. Objectives This study aims to examine the prevalence of hyperhidrosis in multiple ethnic groups from two ethnically diverse cities and to determine if the prevalence of primary hyperhidrosis changes according to age, gender, ethnicity, body mass index, and geographical locations. Methods In total, 1010 consecutive subjects attending dermatology outpatient clinics in Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital and 1018 subjects in Skin Care Center of Vancouver General Hospital were invited to fill out a questionnaire on their presenting concerns, demographical information, and sweating symptoms. The subjects were then classified to have primary hyperhidrosis using the criteria of International Hyperhidrosis Society, late-onset hyperhidrosis, or no-hyperhidrosis. The prevalence of primary HH and late-onset HH was calculated for the entire study population and in subgroups stratified according to age of examination, sex, ethnicity, presenting diagnosis, body mass index, and specific study cities. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the impact of these factors on HH prevalence. Results The prevalence of primary hyperhidrosis is very similar in Shanghai and in Vancouver, at 14.5% and 12.3% respectively. In addition, 4.0% of subjects in Shanghai and 4.4% subjects in Vancouver suffer from late-onset HH. Primary HH has highest prevalence in those younger than 30 years of age, decreasing dramatically in later years. Caucasian subjects are at least 2.5 times more likely to develop axillary hyperhidrosis compared to Chinese subjects. Obesity does not have much influence on primary HH presentation, although it does increase significantly the development of late-onset HH. Finally, there is no major difference of

  10. Automatic method for the dermatological diagnosis of selected hand skin features in hyperspectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hyperspectral imaging has been used in dermatology for many years. The enrichment of hyperspectral imaging with image analysis broadens considerably the possibility of reproducible, quantitative evaluation of, for example, melanin and haemoglobin at any location in the patient's skin. The dedicated image analysis method proposed by the authors enables to automatically perform this type of measurement. Material and method As part of the study, an algorithm for the analysis of hyperspectral images of healthy human skin acquired with the use of the Specim camera was proposed. Images were collected from the dorsal side of the hand. The frequency λ of the data obtained ranged from 397 to 1030 nm. A total of 4'000 2D images were obtained for 5 hyperspectral images. The method proposed in the paper uses dedicated image analysis based on human anthropometric data, mathematical morphology, median filtration, normalization and others. The algorithm was implemented in Matlab and C programs and is used in practice. Results The algorithm of image analysis and processing proposed by the authors enables segmentation of any region of the hand (fingers, wrist) in a reproducible manner. In addition, the method allows to quantify the frequency content in different regions of interest which are determined automatically. Owing to this, it is possible to perform analyses for melanin in the frequency range λ E ∈(450,600) nm and for haemoglobin in the range λ H ∈(397,500) nm extending into the ultraviolet for the type of camera used. In these ranges, there are 189 images for melanin and 126 images for haemoglobin. For six areas of the left and right sides of the little finger (digitus minimus manus), the mean values of melanin and haemoglobin content were 17% and 15% respectively compared to the pattern. Conclusions The obtained results confirmed the usefulness of the proposed new method of image analysis and processing in dermatology of the hand as it enables

  11. Profile of patients admitted to a triage dermatology clinic at a tertiary hospital in São Paulo, Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Bertanha, Fernanda; Nelumba, Erica Judite Pimentel; Freiberg, Alyne Korukian; Samorano, Luciana Paula; Festa Neto, Cyro

    2016-01-01

    Background Knowledge of epidemiological data on skin diseases is important in planning preventive strategies in healthcare services. Objective To assess data from patients admitted to a triage dermatology clinic. Methods A retrospective study was performed of patients admitted over a one-year period to the Triage Dermatology Clinic at the Hospital das Clínicas of the University of São Paulo Medical School. Data were obtained from record books. The variables analyzed were: patient age, gender, dermatologic disease (initial diagnosis), origin (from where the patient was referred) and destination (where the patient was referred to). Results A total of 16,399 patients and 17,454 diseases were identified for analysis. The most frequent skin disorders were eczema (18%), cutaneous infections (13.1%), erythematous squamous diseases (6.8%) and malignant cutaneous neoplasms (6.1%). Atopic dermatitis was the most common disease in children. Acne was more common among children and adults, as were viral warts. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma were more common in the elderly. Contact dermatitis and acne predominated in women. The most frequent origins were: the primary/secondary health system (26.6%), other outpatient specialties (25.5%), emergency care (14.9%); while the destinations were: discharged (27.5%), follow-up in our Dermatology Division (24.1%), return (14.1%) and the primary/secondary health system (20.7%). Conclusion Understanding the incidence of skin diseases is fundamental in making decisions regarding resource allocation for clinical care and research. Thus, we believe our findings can contribute to improving public health policies. PMID:27438199

  12. The utilization of a non-invasive fluorescence imaging system to follow clinical dermatological MAL-PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyrrell, Jessica; Campbell, Sandra; Curnow, Alison

    2009-06-01

    This study employed a commercially available, non-invasive, fluorescence imaging system (Dyaderm, Biocam, Germany), to measure protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) concentration at several different stages during clinical dermatological methyl aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT). We validated the system prior to use to ensure that the PpIX changes witnessed were accurate and not due to environmental or user induced artifacts. The system was then employed to acquire color (morphological) and fluorescent (physiological) images simultaneously during dermatological PDT. Clinical data was collected from a range of licensed dermatological conditions (actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease and superficial basal cell carcinoma) during initial and subsequent PDT treatment cycles. The initial clinical data indicated that each type of licensed lesion considered responded in a similar manner following the application of Metvix (Galderma, U.K.) and the subsequent light irradiation (Aktilite, Galderma, U.K.). Images acquired three hours after Metvix application showed a significant increase in PpIX concentration within the lesion (P < 0.05), whilst PpIX levels in the surrounding normal tissue remained unaltered. After irradiation, the PpIX concentration was significantly decreased and returned to a level similar to the initial concentration originally observed. Lesions that received subsequent treatment cycles accumulated significantly less PpIX (P < 0.05) prior to irradiation.

  13. Physical and Dosimetric Optimization of Laser Equipment in Dermatology: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Soriani, A.; D'Alessio, D.; Cattelan, V.; Cameli, N.; Mariano, M.; Ungania, S.; Guerrisi, M.; Strigari, L.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary study is to investigate the correlation between clinical set-up at present used in the treatment of specific skin conditions and laser beam absorbed power in the tissue. This study focused on the CO2 and Nd-Yag laser equipment used in the daily clinical practice in the Department of Dermatology of San Gallicano Institute in Rome. Different types of tissue-equivalent material with various water and haemoglobin concentrations were tested to evaluate laser beam attenuation power. In particular, thinly sliced pork loin, of uniform consistency and without fat, was selected for its high content of haemoglobin to mimic human tissues. An optical power meter was used to measure the power or energy of a laser beam. During measurements, the tissue equivalent phantoms were positioned on the detector head and the laser beam was orthogonally oriented. The results of two experimental set-ups are reported here. The dependence of residual power (W) as a function of ex vivo tissue thickness (mm) for different laser output powers was studied. Data were fitted by a parametric logistic equation. These preliminary data allow for more accurately determining the energy fraction released from lasers to the tissues in order to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25295246

  14. Screening of plant extracts for antimicrobial activity against bacteria and yeasts with dermatological relevance.

    PubMed

    Weckesser, S; Engel, K; Simon-Haarhaus, B; Wittmer, A; Pelz, K; Schempp, C M

    2007-08-01

    There is cumulative resistance against antibiotics of many bacteria. Therefore, the development of new antiseptics and antimicrobial agents for the treatment of skin infections is of increasing interest. We have screened six plant extracts and isolated compounds for antimicrobial effects on bacteria and yeasts with dermatological relevance. The following plant extracts have been tested: Gentiana lutea, Harpagophytum procumbens, Boswellia serrata (dry extracts), Usnea barbata, Rosmarinus officinalis and Salvia officinalis (supercritical carbon dioxide [CO2] extracts). Additionally, the following characteristic plant substances were tested: usnic acid, carnosol, carnosic acid, ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, harpagoside, boswellic acid and gentiopicroside. The extracts and compounds were tested against 29 aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and yeasts in the agar dilution test. U. barbata-extract and usnic acid were the most active compounds, especially in anaerobic bacteria. Usnea CO2-extract effectively inhibited the growth of several Gram-positive bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant strains - MRSA), Propionibacterium acnes and Corynebacterium species. Growth of the dimorphic yeast Malassezia furfur was also inhibited by Usnea-extract. Besides the Usnea-extract, Rosmarinus-, Salvia-, Boswellia- and Harpagophytum-extracts proved to be effective against a panel of bacteria. It is concluded that due to their antimicrobial effects some of the plant extracts may be used for the topical treatment of skin disorders like acne vulgaris and seborrhoic eczema. PMID:17291738

  15. Polymeric nanoparticles-based topical delivery systems for the treatment of dermatological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Tsai, Pei-Chin; Ramezanli, Tannaz; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena B.

    2013-01-01

    Human skin not only functions as a permeation barrier (mainly due to the stratum corneum layer), but also provides a unique delivery pathway for therapeutic and other active agents. These compounds penetrate via intercellular, intracellular and transappendageal routes, resulting in topical delivery (into skin strata) and transdermal delivery (to subcutaneous tissues and into the systemic circulation). Passive and active permeation enhancement methods have been widely applied to increase the cutaneous penetration. The pathology, pathogenesis and topical treatment approaches of dermatological diseases, such as psoriasis, contact dermatitis, and skin cancer, are then discussed. Recent literature has demonstrated that nanoparticles-based topical delivery systems can be successful in treating these skin conditions. The studies are reviewed starting with the nanoparticles based on natural polymers specially chitosan, followed by those made of synthetic, degradable (aliphatic polyesters) and non-degradable (polyarylates) polymers; emphasis is given to nanospheres made of polymers derived from naturally occurring metabolites, the tyrosine-derived nanospheres (TyroSpheres™). In summary, the nanoparticles-based topical delivery systems combine the advantages of both the nano-sized drug carriers and the topical approach, and are promising for the treatment of skin diseases. For the perspectives, the penetration of ultra-small nanoparticles (size smaller than 40 nm) into skin strata, the targeted delivery of the encapsulated drugs to hair follicle stem cells, and the combination of nanoparticles and microneedle array technologies for special applications such as vaccine delivery are discussed. PMID:23386536

  16. Use of potassium iodide in Dermatology: updates on an old drug*

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Rosane Orofino; de Macedo, Priscila Marques; Carvalhal, Aline; Bernardes-Engemann, Andréa Reis

    2013-01-01

    Potassium iodide, as a saturated solution, is a valuable drug in the dermatologist's therapeutic arsenal and is useful for the treatment of different diseases due to its immunomodulatory features. However, its prescription has become increasingly less frequent in dermatology practice. Little knowledge about its exact mechanism of action, lack of interest from the pharmaceutical industry, the advent of new drugs, and the toxicity caused by the use of high doses of the drug are some possible explanations for that. Consequently, there are few scientific studies on the pharmacological aspects, dosage and efficacy of this drug. Also, there is no conventional standard on how to manipulate and prescribe the saturated solution of potassium iodide, which leads to unawareness of the exact amount of the salt being delivered in grams to patients. Considering that dosage is directly related to toxicity and the immunomodulatory features of this drug, it is essential to define the amount to be prescribed and to reduce it to a minimum effective dose in order to minimize the risks of intolerance and thus improve treatment adherence. This review is relevant due to the fact that the saturated solution of potassium iodide is often the only therapeutic choice available for the treatment of some infectious, inflammatory and immune-mediated dermatoses, no matter whether the reason is specific indication, failure of a previous therapy or cost-effectiveness. PMID:23793210

  17. Arsenic-induced skin conditions identified in southwest dermatology practices: an epidemiologic tool?

    PubMed

    Tollestrup, Kristine; Frost, Floyd J; Cristiani, Michelle; McMillan, Garnett P; Calderon, Rebecca L; Padilla, R Steven

    2005-02-01

    Populations living in the Southwest United States are more likely to be exposed to elevated drinking water arsenic levels compared to other areas of the country. Skin changes, including hyperpigmentation and generalized hyperkeratosis, are the most common signs of chronic arsenic ingestion from drinking water. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using dermatology practices in New Mexico, Arizona, and western Texas as a surveillance system for arsenical skin disorders related to drinking water. Postcard questionnaires were mailed to practicing dermatologists. The number of cases of arsenical hyperpigmentation/keratoses seen by these dermatologists during the past 10 years and the past year were estimated. Of 240 dermatologists who were mailed questionnaires, 37 reported seeing 237 patients with arsenical hyperpigmentation/keratoses in the past 10 years and 35 patients in the past year. Since approximately one-eighth of dermatologists practicing in the Southwest saw at least one patient with arsenical hyperpigmentation/keratoses during one year, it appears feasible to complete a population-based study of these conditions.

  18. Advances in the therapeutic use of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Alexander L; Hill, Sharleen; Teng, Joyce M C

    2015-05-01

    Significant developments in the use of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors (mTORIs) as immunosuppressant and antiproliferative agents have been made. Recent advances in the understanding of the mTOR signaling pathway and its downstream effects on tumorigenesis and vascular proliferation have broadened the clinical applications of mTORIs in many challenging disorders such as tuberous sclerosis complex, pachyonychia congenita, complex vascular anomalies, and inflammatory dermatoses. Systemic mTORI therapy has shown benefits in these areas, but is associated with significant side effects that sometimes necessitate drug holidays. To mitigate the side effects of systemic mTORIs for dermatologic applications, preliminary work to assess the potential of percutaneous therapy has been performed, and the evidence suggests that percutaneous delivery of mTORIs may allow for effective long-term therapy while avoiding systemic toxicities. Additional large placebo-controlled, double-blinded, randomized studies are needed to assess the efficacy, safety, duration, and tolerability of topical treatments. The objective of this review is to provide updated information on the novel use of mTORIs in the management of many cutaneous disorders. PMID:25769191

  19. Diagnosis and Management of Onychomycosis Perspectives from a Joint Podiatric Medicine-Dermatology Roundtable.

    PubMed

    Vlahovic, Tracey C; Joseph, Warren S; Scher, Richard K; Tosti, Antonella; Plasencia, Jesse; Pariser, David M; Markinson, Bryan C

    2016-03-01

    Onychomycosis is a fungal infection, and, as such, one of the goals of treatment should be eradication of the infective agent. Despite this, in contrast to dermatologists, many podiatric physicians do not include antifungals in their onychomycosis treatment plans. Before initiating treatment, confirmation of mycologic status via laboratory testing (eg, microscopy with potassium hydroxide preparation, histopathology with periodic acid-Schiff staining, fungal culture, and polymerase chain reaction) is important; however, more podiatric physicians rely solely on clinical signs than do dermatologists. These dissimilarities may be due, in part, to differences between specialties in training, reimbursement patterns, or practice orientation, and to explore these differences further, a joint podiatric medicine-dermatology roundtable was convened. In addition, treatment options have been limited owing to safety concerns with available oral antifungals and relatively low efficacy with previously available topical treatments. Recently approved topical treatments-efinaconzole and tavaborole-offer additional options for patients with mild-to-moderate disease. Debridement alone has no effect on mycologic status, and it is recommended that it be used in combination with an oral or topical antifungal. There is little to no clinical evidence to support the use of lasers or over-the-counter treatments for onychomycosis. After a patient has achieved cure (absence of clinical signs or absence of fungus with minimal clinical signs), lifestyle and hygiene measures, prophylactic/maintenance treatment, and proactive treatment for tinea pedis, including in family members, may help maintain this status. PMID:27031556

  20. Estimation of dermatological application of creams with St. John's Wort oil extracts.

    PubMed

    Arsić, Ivana; Zugić, Ana; Tadić, Vanja; Tasić-Kostov, Marija; Mišić, Dušan; Primorac, Marija; Runjaić-Antić, Dušanka

    2011-12-28

    Oleum Hyperici, the oil extract of St. John's Wort (SJW), is one of the oldest folk remedies, traditionally used in the topical treatment of wounds, bruises, ulcers, cuts, burns, hemorrhoids and also as an antiseptic. Considering the advantageous characteristics of emulsion applications, in the present study we have formulated three O/W creams containing 15% (w/v) of SJW oil extract as an active ingredient. The aim was to estimate dermatological application of the prepared creams for the abovementioned indications. The extracts were prepared according to the prescriptions from traditional medicine, however with different vegetable oils used as an extractant, namely: Olive, palm and sunflower oil. The investigated O/W creams demonstrated significant antiinflammatory effects in an in vivo double-blind randomized study, using a sodium lauryl sulphate test. Both skin parameters assessed in the study (electrical capacitance and erythema index), were restored to the baseline value after a seven-day treatment with the tested creams. Almost all investigated SJW oil extracts and corresponding creams displayed the same antimicrobial activity against the most of the investigated microorganisms with obtained minimal inhibitory concentrations values of 1,280 µg/mL, 2,560 µg/mL or >2,560 µg/mL.

  1. Stability of mupirocin ointment (Bactroban) admixed with other proprietary dermatological products.

    PubMed

    Jagota, N K; Stewart, J T; Warren, F W; John, P M

    1992-06-01

    This study involved the mixing of 1:1 combinations of Bactroban (mupirocin) Ointment 2% with various cream, lotion, ointment, gel, solution and liquid soap formulations with storage at 37 degrees C for 60 days. The mixtures were assayed for mupirocin content at 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 days using a high-pressure liquid chromatographic (HPLC) assay. At the time of preparation of these admixtures, Bactroban Ointment is chemically and physically compatible with all of the topical dermatological products studied except for Valisone lotion where a physical incompatibility is immediately observed. Admixtures of Hibiclens liquid soap or Lotrimin solution with Bactroban Ointment were stable throughout the entire 60-day study. Combinations of Lotrimin cream, Hytone cream, Valisone ointment or Vytone cream with Bactroban Ointment also retained chemical stability of mupirocin for the entire period even though two layers were observed and mixing was required to restore a physically homogenous mixture. Other Bactroban Ointment admixtures were found to be either chemically stable for mupirocin for periods less than 60 days or physically incompatible mixtures were observed upon storage. No conclusions were drawn from these studies concerning the efficacy or safety of any of these products when used in extemporaneously prepared combinations.

  2. Spectrum of Fusarium infections in tropical dermatology evidenced by multilocus sequencing typing diagnostics.

    PubMed

    van Diepeningen, Anne D; Feng, Peiying; Ahmed, Sarah; Sudhadham, Montarop; Bunyaratavej, Sumanas; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium species are emerging causative agents of superficial, cutaneous and systemic human infections. In a study of the prevalence and genetic diversity of 464 fungal isolates from a dermatological ward in Thailand, 44 strains (9.5%) proved to belong to the genus Fusarium. Species identification was based on sequencing a portion of translation elongation factor 1-alpha (tef1-α), rDNA internal transcribed spacer and RNA-dependent polymerase subunit II (rpb2). Our results revealed that 37 isolates (84%) belonged to the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC), one strain matched with Fusarium oxysporum (FOSC) complex 33, while six others belonged to the Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti species complex. Within the FSSC two predominant clusters represented Fusarium falciforme and recently described F. keratoplasticum. No gender differences in susceptibility to Fusarium were noted, but infections on the right side of the body prevailed. Eighty-nine per cent of the Fusarium isolates were involved in onychomycosis, while the remaining ones caused paronychia or severe tinea pedis. Comparing literature data, superficial infections by FSSC appear to be prevalent in Asia and Latin America, whereas FOSC is more common in Europe. The available data suggest that Fusarium is a common opportunistic human pathogens in tropical areas and has significant genetic variation worldwide.

  3. Unusual Dermatological Manifestations of Gout: Review of Literature and a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Viviana Gómez; Gaona, Jennifer; Motta, Adriana; Medina Barragán, Oskar Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gouty panniculitis is a rare clinical manifestation of gout, characterized by deposits of monosodium urate crystals in the hypodermis. Our aim was to describe atypical and rare clinical presentations of gouty tophi. Methods: We searched relevant English and Spanish literature of unusual gout manifestations using the following keywords: giant, gout, panniculitis, gouty panniculitis, gouty tophi, rare manifestations of gout, gouty, tophi, tophus, monosodium urate, uric acid, and unusual. Well-described case reports, case series, and review articles were evaluated and included in the literature review. Results: International literature has reported fewer than 10 cases of gouty panniculitis worldwide. In this case report, the patient presents a rare manifestation of gouty panniculitis, with typical joint injuries, gouty tophi in both lower and upper extremities, chronic gouty tophi in the nose, for which only 3 cases have been reported in literature, and great hypertrophy of adipose tissue in the lower back. Conclusions: Tophi can be found in atypical locations, which increase morbidities and deformities caused by the disease. We report an interesting case of gouty panniculitis associated with great hypertrophy of the adipose tissue, a rare manifestation of gout, and unusual locations of tophi. These clinical manifestations in our patient have not been recorded before, which leads us to think that we are in the presence of a new dermatological manifestation of gout. PMID:26301134

  4. Screening of plant extracts for antimicrobial activity against bacteria and yeasts with dermatological relevance.

    PubMed

    Weckesser, S; Engel, K; Simon-Haarhaus, B; Wittmer, A; Pelz, K; Schempp, C M

    2007-08-01

    There is cumulative resistance against antibiotics of many bacteria. Therefore, the development of new antiseptics and antimicrobial agents for the treatment of skin infections is of increasing interest. We have screened six plant extracts and isolated compounds for antimicrobial effects on bacteria and yeasts with dermatological relevance. The following plant extracts have been tested: Gentiana lutea, Harpagophytum procumbens, Boswellia serrata (dry extracts), Usnea barbata, Rosmarinus officinalis and Salvia officinalis (supercritical carbon dioxide [CO2] extracts). Additionally, the following characteristic plant substances were tested: usnic acid, carnosol, carnosic acid, ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, harpagoside, boswellic acid and gentiopicroside. The extracts and compounds were tested against 29 aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and yeasts in the agar dilution test. U. barbata-extract and usnic acid were the most active compounds, especially in anaerobic bacteria. Usnea CO2-extract effectively inhibited the growth of several Gram-positive bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant strains - MRSA), Propionibacterium acnes and Corynebacterium species. Growth of the dimorphic yeast Malassezia furfur was also inhibited by Usnea-extract. Besides the Usnea-extract, Rosmarinus-, Salvia-, Boswellia- and Harpagophytum-extracts proved to be effective against a panel of bacteria. It is concluded that due to their antimicrobial effects some of the plant extracts may be used for the topical treatment of skin disorders like acne vulgaris and seborrhoic eczema.

  5. A toxicological and dermatological assessment of macrocyclic lactone and lactide derivatives when used as fragrance ingredients.

    PubMed

    Belsito, D; Bickers, D; Bruze, M; Calow, P; Dagli, M L; Fryer, A D; Greim, H; Miyachi, Y; Saurat, J H; Sipes, I G

    2011-12-01

    The Macrocyclic Lactone and Lactide derivative (ML) group of fragrance ingredients was critically evaluated for safety following a complete literature search. For high end users, calculated maximum dermal exposures vary from 0.47% to 11.15%; systemic exposures vary from 0.0008 to 0.25mg/kg/day. The MLs had low acute toxicity and no significant toxicity in repeat dose oral or dermal toxicity studies. Effects on blood biochemistry were reversible after 2 weeks of no treatment. No mutagenic or genotoxic activity in bacteria and mammalian cell line assays was observed. Reproductive and developmental toxicity was not observed. Human dermatological studies show MLs are generally not irritating after one application. Minor irritation was observed in a few individuals following multiple applications. At rates consistent with reported levels for current human exposure, no phototoxicity or photosensitization was observed. In animal studies, the MLs are not sensitizers at lower exposures from consumer products. Eleven ML materials were evaluated for human sensitization. Of these, only ethylene brassylate showed evidence of sensitization in 2/27 studies (sensitization frequency 4/2059 total). Based on these findings, the Panel is of the opinion that there are no safety concerns for the MLs at reported levels of use and exposure as fragrance ingredients.

  6. Pattern of occupational allergic dermatitis in the Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Rohna, R; Ganesapillai, T; Salbiah, D; Zaiton, I

    1999-03-01

    A two years retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed as contact allergic dermatitis with positive patch test attending the Dermatology clinic was performed. Of the 346 patients with a positive patch test, 14% had occupational dermatitis. This condition affected mainly young and inexperienced workers. An inverse relationship was seen between age and prevalence of occupational allergic dermatitis. Allergic hand dermatitis was the commonest presentation in occupational allergic dermatitis. This was followed by dermatitis of the exposed skin (face, neck, hands and forearms). The common sensitising agents identified were rubber chemicals and nickel. The two main groups at risk were factory workers and medical personnel. The common allergens found in factory workers were epoxy resin, pewter, nickel and rubber chemicals. Exposure dermatitis occurred in patients working in the pewter industry. Two thirds of medical personnel with hand dermatitis were allergic to rubber gloves. One year follow up after patch testing showed that 19% of patients still suffered from chronic dermatitis. Dermatitis improved in 34% of patients. Forty-seven percent were cured and stopped attending the clinic after patch testing and adequate counselling.

  7. Speckle reduction process based on digital filtering and wavelet compounding in optical coherence tomography for dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Valverde, Juan J.; Ortuño, Juan E.; Guerra, Pedro; Hermann, Boris; Zabihian, Behrooz; Rubio-Guivernau, José L.; Santos, Andrés.; Drexler, Wolfgang; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J.

    2015-07-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has shown a great potential as a complementary imaging tool in the diagnosis of skin diseases. Speckle noise is the most prominent artifact present in OCT images and could limit the interpretation and detection capabilities. In this work we propose a new speckle reduction process and compare it with various denoising filters with high edge-preserving potential, using several sets of dermatological OCT B-scans. To validate the performance we used a custom-designed spectral domain OCT and two different data set groups. The first group consisted in five datasets of a single B-scan captured N times (with N<20), the second were five 3D volumes of 25 Bscans. As quality metrics we used signal to noise (SNR), contrast to noise (CNR) and equivalent number of looks (ENL) ratios. Our results show that a process based on a combination of a 2D enhanced sigma digital filter and a wavelet compounding method achieves the best results in terms of the improvement of the quality metrics. In the first group of individual B-scans we achieved improvements in SNR, CNR and ENL of 16.87 dB, 2.19 and 328 respectively; for the 3D volume datasets the improvements were 15.65 dB, 3.44 and 1148. Our results suggest that the proposed enhancement process may significantly reduce speckle, increasing SNR, CNR and ENL and reducing the number of extra acquisitions of the same frame.

  8. Loco-regional immune default: The immunocompromised district in human and comparative dermatology.

    PubMed

    Caccavale, Stefano; Di Mattia, Diana; Ruocco, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    Lately, the innovative concept of an immunocompromised cutaneous district (ICD) has been introduced to explain why a previously injured cutaneous site may become in time a privileged location for the onset of opportunistic infections, tumors, and immune reactions. The injuring events capable of rendering a skin region a potential ICD are various, numerous, and most of the time identifiable by means of a careful clinical history. The reason that only a small minority of injured skin areas actually becomes ICDs, with subsequent opportunistic localization of a second and unrelated skin disorder, is presently unknown. The ICD is a conceptual entity that is not limited to human dermatology. It can also apply to veterinary medicine. Development of sarcomas at the injection site in cats after routine vaccination and, occasionally, administration of pharmaceutical products, as well as insertion of any foreign body, is a repeatedly documented event. Antigen load, persistent inflammation, and fibroblastic proliferation are thought to be important factors predisposing to the onset of fibrosarcoma in cats. Recently, it has been hypothesized that a local immunosuppression caused by inhalant glucocorticoids may have favored the development of regional demodicosis in cats. In our opinion, injection-site sarcomas and feline localized demodicosis can be considered examples of veterinary ICDs. PMID:27638447

  9. Photochemical predictive analysis of photodynamic therapy with non-homogeneous topical photosensitizer distribution in dermatological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas-García, I.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; López-Escobar, M.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2010-04-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a therapeutic technique widely used in dermatology to treat several skin pathologies. It is based in topical or systemic delivery of photosensitizing drugs followed by irradiation with visible light. The subsequent photochemical reactions generate reactive oxygen species which are considered the principal cytotoxic agents to induce cell necrosis. In this work we present a PDT model that tries to predict the photodynamic effect on the skin with a topically administered photosensitizer. The time dependent inhomogeneous distribution of the photoactive compound protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) is calculated after obtaining its precursor distribution (Methyl aminolevulinate, MAL) which depends on the drug permeability, diffusion properties of the skin, incubation time and conversion efficiency of MAL to PpIX. Once the optical energy is obtained by means of the Beer Lambert law, a photochemical model is employed to estimate the concentration of the different molecular compounds taking into account the electronic transitions between molecular levels and particles concentrations. The results obtained allow us to know the evolution of the cytotoxic agent in order to estimate the necrotic area adjusting parameters such as the optical power, the photosensitizer concentration, the incubation and exposition time or the diffusivity and permeability of the tissue.

  10. Maximal Usage Trial: An Overview of the Design of Systemic Bioavailability Trial for Topical Dermatological Products

    PubMed Central

    Bashaw, Edward Dennis; Tran, Doanh C.; Shukla, Chinmay G.; Liu, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    Dermatologic diseases can present in varying forms and severity, ranging from the individual lesion and up to almost total skin involvement. Pharmacokinetic assessment of topical drug products has previously been plagued by bioanalytical assay limitations and the lack of a standardized study design. Since the mid-1990's the US Food and Drug Administration has developed and implemented a pharmacokinetic maximal usage trial (MUsT) design to help address these issues. The MUsT design takes into account the following elements: the enrollment of patients rather than normal volunteers, the frequency of dosing, duration of dosing, use of highest proposed strength, total involved surface area to be treated at one time, amount applied per square centimeter, application method and site preparation, product formulation, and use of a sensitive bioanalytical method that has been properly validated. This paper provides a perspective of pre-MUsT study designs and a discussion of the individual elements that make up a MUsT. PMID:26634191

  11. [Online bedside teaching: multimedia, interactive and case-based teaching scenarios in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Avila, Javier; Kaiser, Gerd; Nguyen-Dobinsky, Trong-Nghia; Zielke, Hendrik; Sterry, Wolfram; Rzany, Berthold

    2004-12-01

    The MeduMobile project or Mobiler Campus Charité was started in the beginning of 2003 to evaluate new, multimedia supported teaching and learning scenarios. The project focuses especially on acute and rare diseases to which students usually have are very limited access. During the teaching sessions the MeduOnCall team and the academic teacher communicate with the students who are equipped with individual notebooks through a wireless net. In dermatology the MeduMobile project focused in summer 2003 and winter 2003/2004 on bedside teaching. Despite some technical difficulties in the beginning the project was well received by teachers and students. The possibility of simultaneous online searches by Internet as well as the possibility to include photographs depicting the course of the skin disease was felt to be one of the main advantages of this project. Based on these positive experiences an attempt will be made to integrate the project further into the regular teaching of the Charite.

  12. MSIM: multistage illumination modeling of dermatological photographs for illumination-corrected skin lesion analysis.

    PubMed

    Glaister, Jeffrey; Amelard, Robert; Wong, Alexander; Clausi, David A

    2013-07-01

    Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer and it is costly for dermatologists to screen every patient for melanoma. There is a need for a system to assess the risk of melanoma based on dermatological photographs of a skin lesion. However, the presence of illumination variation in the photographs can have a negative impact on lesion segmentation and classification performance. A novel multistage illumination modeling algorithm is proposed to correct the underlying illumination variation in skin lesion photographs. The first stage is to compute an initial estimate of the illumination map of the photograph using a Monte Carlo nonparametric modeling strategy. The second stage is to obtain a final estimate of the illumination map via a parametric modeling strategy, where the initial nonparametric estimate is used as a prior. Finally, the corrected photograph is obtained using the final illumination map estimate. The proposed algorithm shows better visual, segmentation, and classification results when compared to three other illumination correction algorithms, one of which is designed specifically for lesion analysis.

  13. Object-oriented query based on belief fusion: application to dermatological databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larabi, Mohamed-Chaker; Richard, Noel; Colot, Olivier; Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine

    2001-12-01

    This paper is dedicated to Computer-Aided Diagnosis CAD for skin cancers in order to help the expert (dermatologist) to diagnose a dermatological lesion as benign or malignant. The need of this kind of tools has largely expressed because of the difficulties that have the expert to distinguish benign lesion from melanoma. One way to help him without a classification is to find and display to the expert the most similar images (lesions) to the query (lesion of the patient). The similarity must be measured using features and their representation inspired from the medical diagnosis rules. In fact, the diagnosis rules known as ABCD mnemonics are very interesting because they describe a lesion using color, texture and shape. In order to approach the system from the reality, we build it as a Content-Based Image Retrieval CBIR scheme. Images are represented as an object model including the features and their representation and a set of belief degrees. The aim is to combine, on one hand, the experts analysis which include their knowledge, experience. but also their subjectivity, inexactness, uncertainty, etc. On the other hand, the ground truth based on biopsy results of all the database lesions. The combination gives to the system the autonomy and let it evolve without needing a relevance feedback.

  14. Skin Parameter Map Retrieval from a Dedicated Multispectral Imaging System Applied to Dermatology/Cosmetology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In vivo quantitative assessment of skin lesions is an important step in the evaluation of skin condition. An objective measurement device can help as a valuable tool for skin analysis. We propose an explorative new multispectral camera specifically developed for dermatology/cosmetology applications. The multispectral imaging system provides images of skin reflectance at different wavebands covering visible and near-infrared domain. It is coupled with a neural network-based algorithm for the reconstruction of reflectance cube of cutaneous data. This cube contains only skin optical reflectance spectrum in each pixel of the bidimensional spatial information. The reflectance cube is analyzed by an algorithm based on a Kubelka-Munk model combined with evolutionary algorithm. The technique allows quantitative measure of cutaneous tissue and retrieves five skin parameter maps: melanin concentration, epidermis/dermis thickness, haemoglobin concentration, and the oxygenated hemoglobin. The results retrieved on healthy participants by the algorithm are in good accordance with the data from the literature. The usefulness of the developed technique was proved during two experiments: a clinical study based on vitiligo and melasma skin lesions and a skin oxygenation experiment (induced ischemia) with healthy participant where normal tissues are recorded at normal state and when temporary ischemia is induced. PMID:24159326

  15. From blacklist to beacon, a case study in reducing dermatology out-patient waiting times.

    PubMed

    Appleby, A; Lawrence, C

    2001-09-01

    At its worst our dermatology department had a waiting list for routine appointments of 57 weeks. As a result we started to lose contract income and consequently were unable to replace a retiring consultant. The service faced fragmentation and loss of the inpatient ward. Using a series of internally planned and driven initiatives it was possible to retrieve the situation. Our efforts were recognized by a national waiting list Beacon award in 1999. This study describes the methods used to increase new patient throughput, reduce demand and hence reduce waiting time for new patient appointments. Change was achieved only when medical, nursing staff, general practitioners, managers and health authorities were involved in the process. The changes needed to be led by a consultant enthusiast and managed effectively. There remains a constantly increasing demand for the service and reducing the waiting list simply invites a further increase in referral. In a resource-limited health care system the provider must be able to limit demand by using agreed referral exclusion criteria in order to balance supply and demand.

  16. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells and dermatological disorders: focus on their role in autoimmunity and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Julie; Chaperot, Laurence; Salameire, Dimitri; Di Domizio, Jérémy; Aspord, Caroline; Gressin, Rémy; Jacob, Marie-Christine; Richard, Marie-Jeanne; Beani, Jean-Claude; Plumas, Joel; Leccia, Marie-Thérèse

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC), considered as immunological sentinels of the organism since they are antigen presenting cells, create the link between innate and adaptive immunity. DC include myeloid dendritic cells (MDC) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC). The presence of PDC, cells capable of producing large quantities of interferon alpha (IFN-α) in response to pathogenic agents or danger signals, seem to be tightly related to pathological conditions. Thereby, PDC have been observed in inflammatory immunoallergic dermatological disorders, in malignant cutaneous tumours and in cutaneous lesions of infectious origin. They seem to play a crucial role in the initiation of the pathological process of autoimmune diseases such as lupus or psoriasis. Their function within a tumour context is not as well known and is controversial. They could have a tolerogenic role towards tumour cells in the absence of activator but they also have the capacity to become activated in response to Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands and could therefore be usefull for therapeutic purposes. PMID:19850548

  17. Pattern of occupational allergic dermatitis in the Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Rohna, R; Ganesapillai, T; Salbiah, D; Zaiton, I

    1999-03-01

    A two years retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed as contact allergic dermatitis with positive patch test attending the Dermatology clinic was performed. Of the 346 patients with a positive patch test, 14% had occupational dermatitis. This condition affected mainly young and inexperienced workers. An inverse relationship was seen between age and prevalence of occupational allergic dermatitis. Allergic hand dermatitis was the commonest presentation in occupational allergic dermatitis. This was followed by dermatitis of the exposed skin (face, neck, hands and forearms). The common sensitising agents identified were rubber chemicals and nickel. The two main groups at risk were factory workers and medical personnel. The common allergens found in factory workers were epoxy resin, pewter, nickel and rubber chemicals. Exposure dermatitis occurred in patients working in the pewter industry. Two thirds of medical personnel with hand dermatitis were allergic to rubber gloves. One year follow up after patch testing showed that 19% of patients still suffered from chronic dermatitis. Dermatitis improved in 34% of patients. Forty-seven percent were cured and stopped attending the clinic after patch testing and adequate counselling. PMID:10972018

  18. Evaluation of dermatological effects of cosmetic formulations containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae extract and vitamins.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, L R; Camargo, F B; Gianeti, M D; Maia Campos, P M B G

    2008-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae extract (SCE) is used in cosmetics since it can act in oxidative stress and improve skin conditions. This study investigated dermatological effects of cosmetic formulations containing SCE and/or vitamins A, C and E. The formulation studied was supplemented or not (F1: vehicle) with vitamins A, C and E esters (F2) or with SCE (F3) or with the combination of vitamins and SCE (F4). Formulations were patch tested on back skin of volunteers. For efficacy studies, formulations were applied on volunteers and transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin moisture (SM), skin microrelief (SMR) and free radicals protection were analysed after 3h, 15 and 30 days of application. Volunteers were also asked about efficacy perception. It was observed that F4 provoked a slight erythema in one volunteer. All formulations enhanced forearm SM. Only F3 and F4 presented long term effects on SMR and showed higher texture values; F3 had the highest brightness values. Our results suggest that vitamins and SCE showed effects in SM and SMR. Only formulations containing SC had long term effects in the improvement of SMR. Thus, these kinds of evaluations are very important in cosmetics development to evaluate the best risk and benefit correlation.

  19. Integration of basic dermatological care into primary health care services in Mali.

    PubMed Central

    Mahé, Antoine; Faye, Ousmane; N'Diaye, Hawa Thiam; Konaré, Habibatou Diawara; Coulibaly, Ibrahima; Kéita, Somita; Traoré, Abdel Kader; Hay, Roderick J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate, in a developing country, the effect of a short training programme for general health care workers on the management of common skin diseases--a neglected component of primary health care in such regions. METHODS: We provided a one-day training programme on the management of the skin diseases to 400 health care workers who worked in primary health care centres in the Bamako area. We evaluated their knowledge and practice before and after training. FINDINGS: Before training, knowledge about skin diseases often was poor and practice inadequate. We found a marked improvement in both parameters after training. We analysed the registers of primary health care centres and found that the proportion of patients who presented with skin diseases who benefited from a clear diagnosis and appropriate treatment increased from 42% before the training to 81% after; this was associated with a 25% reduction in prescription costs. Improved levels of knowledge and practice persisted for up to 18 months after training. CONCLUSIONS: The training programme markedly improved the basic dermatological abilities of the health care workers targeted. Specific training may be a reasonable solution to a neglected component of primary health care in many developing countries. PMID:16462986

  20. Various new applications of fiber optic infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy for dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, Reinhard F.; Afanasyeva, Natalia I.; Sukuta, Sydney; Brooks, Angelique L.; Makhine, Volodymyr; Kolyakov, Sergei F.

    1999-02-01

    Fiberoptical evanescent wave Fourier transform infrared (FEW- FTIR) spectroscopy has been applied in the middle infrared (MIR) wavelength range (3 to 20 micrometer) to the in vivo diagnostics of normal skin tissue, acupuncture points as well as precancerous and cancerous conditions. The FTIR-FEW technique, using nontoxic unclad fibers, is suitable for noninvasive, sensitive investigations of skin tissue for various dermatological studies of skin caner, aging, laser treatment, cosmetics, skin allergies, etc. This method is direct, nondestructive, and fast (seconds). Our optical fibers are nonhygroscopic, flexible, and characterized by extremely low losses. In this study, we have noninvasively investigated more than 300 cases of normal skin, acupuncture points, precancerous and cancerous tissue in the range of 1400 to 1800 cm-1. The results of our analysis of skin and other tissue are discussed in terms of structural and mathematical similarities and differences on a molecular level. In addition, we have also performed cluster analysis, using principal component scores, to confirm pathological classifications and to discriminate between genders. We have found good agreement with prior pathological classifications for normal skin tissue and melanoma tumors and normal females were distinctly separate from males.

  1. Vascular lasers and IPLS: guidelines for care from the European Society for Laser Dermatology (ESLD).

    PubMed

    Adamic, Metka; Troilius, Agneta; Adatto, Maurice; Drosner, Michael; Dahmane, Raja

    2007-06-01

    Dermatology and dermatologic surgery have rapidly evolved during the last two decades thanks to the numerous technological and scientific acquisitions focused on improved precision in the diagnosis and treatment of skin alterations. Given the proliferation of new devices for the treatment of vascular lesions, we have considerably changed our treatment approach. Lasers and non-coherent intense pulse light sources (IPLS) are based on the principle of selective photothermolysis and can be used for the treatment of many vascular skin lesions. A variety of lasers has recently been developed for the treatment of congenital and acquired vascular lesions which incorporate these concepts into their design. The list is a long one and includes pulsed dye (FPDL, APDL) lasers (577 nm, 585 nm and 595 nm), KTP lasers (532 nm), long pulsed alexandrite lasers (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (in the range of 800 to 900 nm), long pulsed 1064 Nd:YAG lasers and intense pulsed light sources (IPLS, also called flash-lights or pulsed light sources). Several vascular lasers (such as argon, tunable dye, copper vapour, krypton lasers) which were used in the past are no longer useful as they pose a higher risk of complications such as dyschromia (hypopigmentation or hyperpigmentation) and scarring. By properly selecting the wavelength which is maximally absorbed by the target--also called the chromophore (haemoglobin in the red blood cells within the vessels)--and a corresponding pulse duration which is shorter than the thermal relaxation time of that target, the target can be preferentially injured without transferring significant amounts of energy to surrounding tissues (epidermis and surrounding dermal tissue). Larger structures require more time for sufficient heat absorption. Therefore, a longer laser-pulse duration has to be used. In addition, more deeply situated vessels require the use of longer laser wavelengths (in the infrared range) which can penetrate deeper into the skin. Although

  2. Evidence-based veterinary dermatology: a systematic review of interventions for Malassezia dermatitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Negre, Amélie; Bensignor, Emmanuel; Guillot, Jacques

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy of antifungal treatments for Malassezia dermatitis in dogs and, when possible, to propose recommendation for or against their use. Electronic searches were carried out using PubMed MEDLINE(R), CABDirect and CONSULTANT database. The volumes of Advances in Veterinary Dermatology, the proceedings of ESVD/ECVD and AAVD/ACVD congresses were hand-searched for studies relevant to this review. All articles and book chapters discussing treatment of Malassezia dermatitis were scanned for additional citations. Lastly, a request was sent to the Vetderm Listserv to share recent clinical trials. The analysis evaluated study design, methodology quality, subject enrolment quality, type of interventions and outcome measures. The searches identified 35 articles, and 14 trials that fulfilled the following selection criteria: (i) in vivo clinical trials, (ii) dogs showing clinical lesions of Malassezia dermatitis and (iii) enrolment of at least five dogs. Among these, only eight studies fulfilled the following additional criterion: (iv) prospective in vivo clinical trials reporting clinical and mycological outcome measures. A total number of 14 different treatment protocols included four blinded, randomized and controlled trials (quality of evidence grade A), four controlled studies lacking blinding and/or randomization (grade B), five open uncontrolled trials (grade C) and one descriptive study (grade D). This systematic review allowed us to recommend, with good evidence, the use of only one topical treatment of Malassezia dermatitis (2% miconazole nitrate +2% chlorhexidine, twice a week for 3 weeks) and with fair evidence the use of two systemic treatments with azole derivatives (ketoconazole, 10 mg kg(-1) day(-1) and itraconazole, 5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) for 3 weeks). PMID:19152584

  3. Focus on the Top Ten Diagnoses Could Reduce Pediatric Dermatology Referrals.

    PubMed

    Kakande, Betty; Gumedze, Freedom; Hlela, Carol; Khumalo, Nonhlanhla P

    2016-01-01

    There is a sense that many patients seen at referral centers could be managed at a primary health care level. The objective of the current study was to examine the range of diagnoses among consultations at the Red Cross Children's Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, to help develop a strategy for targeted education of primary health care personnel. This was a retrospective review of data for children seen at a pediatric dermatology clinic from 2005 to 2010, recorded according to International Classification of Diseases coding and compared with published data from similar clinical settings. There were 13,253 clinic visits, with 4,789 patients seen (median age 4.8 yrs, range 2 days to 18.6 yrs). The top 10 diagnoses accounted for 88.5% of consultations (59.5% atopic eczema [AE], 7.1% seborrheic dermatitis [SD], 4.2% superficial mycoses, 3.1% molluscum contagiosum, 2.8% vitiligo, 2.7% viral warts, 2.4% prurigo or scabies, 2.3% psoriasis, 2.3% hemangioma, 2.1% impetigo). Disease prevalence was somewhat different during the first year of life (AE 43.7%, SD 18.6%, hemangiomas 13.4%). Inflammatory dermatoses (76.6%) were more prevalent than infections and infestations (14.5%). The disease spectrum was similar to that in developed countries, although AE prevalence was higher in this study (followed by London 36%, Greece 35%, and Hong Kong 33%) than in 19 published studies. The top 10 diagnoses accounted for more than 70% of diagnoses in 12 studies. The retrospective nature and setting at a specialist clinic increased bias and limited generalizability. Focused education on the optimal care of common diseases, especially AE, could reduce referrals, improve access, and allow specialists at tertiary centers more time to manage complex and uncommon dermatoses. PMID:26572929

  4. Influence of spraying distance and postcooling on cryogen spray cooling for dermatologic laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Guillermo; Majaron, Boris; Viator, John A.; Basinger, Brooke; Karapetian, Emil; Svaasand, Lars O.; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2001-05-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used to minimize the risk of epidermal damage in various laser dermatological procedures such as treatment of port wine stain birthmarks and hair removal. However, the spray characteristics and combination of CSC and heating (laser) to obtain optimal treatments have not yet been determined. The distance between the nozzle tip and the skin surface for commercial devices was apparently chosen based on the position at which the cryogen spray reached a minimum temperature, presumably with the expectation that such a minimum would correspond to maximal heat flux. We have systematically measured spray characteristics of various nozzles, such as mean droplet diameter, velocity, temperature, and heat transfer coefficient, as a function of distance from the nozzle tip. Among other interesting correlations between these spray characteristics, it is shown that, for nozzle-to-skin distances between 20 to 80 mm, variations in the heat transfer coefficient are larger than those in the spray temperature and, therefore, maximization of the heat flux should be better dictated by the distance at which the heat transfer coefficient is maximized rather than that at which the spray temperature is minimized. Also, the influence of droplet diameter appears to be more influential on the heat transfer coefficient value than that of droplet velocity. Based on spray characteristic correlations, different ranges for positioning the nozzles are recommended, depending on the clinical application. Also, a 2D finite-difference method has been developed to study the spatial and temporal thermal variations within the skin. Our results show that it is possible to decrease significantly the epidermal damage after laser irradiation provided the heat transfer coefficient is significantly increased. The influence of post-cooling has minimal effects for the cases studied.

  5. Misuse of topical corticosteroids on the face: A cross-sectional study among dermatology outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhijeet Kumar; Sinha, Rajesh; Prasad, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Topical corticosteroids (TC) are being misused widely on the face without a prescription from the dermatologist. Aim: To evaluate the misuse of TC-containing preparations on the face and the adverse effects due to its application. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire-based analysis was done among patients attending the dermatology outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital between March 2014 and March 2015. Patients with various facial dermatoses were asked about their current use of topical preparations and on further followup questioning, those who revealed the use of TCs (25g or more) continuously or intermittently for a minimum duration of four weeks were included in the study and observed for local adverse effects. Results: A total of 410 patients were observed, 306 were females (74.6%) and 104 were males (25.3%). One hundred and seventy-eight patients (43.4%) used topical steroids alone, 124 (30.2%) used creams containing TC, hydroquinone, and tretinoin, 108 (26.3%) used creams containing a combination of TC, antibiotic, and/or antifungal. One hundred and seventy-six patients (42.9%) bought TC or TC containing creams over the counter on their own, without the prescription of a dermatologist, 35 (8.5%) were recommended TC by a beautician (beauty parlors), 82 (20%) by their friends, family members, or neighbors, 75 (18.2%) by a non-dermatologist practitioner, and 42 (10.2%) by a dermatologist. Limitations: The sample size was small. Conclusion: Dispensing of TCs must be regulated in India; they should only be issued against a doctor's prescription. PMID:27559498

  6. Interest of corrective makeup in the management of patients in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Seité, S; Deshayes, P; Dréno, B; Misery, L; Reygagne, P; Saiag, P; Stengel, F; Roguedas-Contios, AM; Rougier, A

    2012-01-01

    Background Disfiguring dermatoses may have a significant impact on patients’ quality of life, namely on their relationship with others, self image, and self esteem. Some previous studies have suggested that corrective foundation can improve the quality of life (QOL) of patients with facial dermatoses; in particular, in patients with acne vulgaris or pigmentary disorders. Objective The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the impact of the skin conditions of patients with various skin diseases affecting their face (scars, acne, rosacea, melasma, vitiligo, hypo or hyperpigmentation, lentigines, etc) on their QOL and the improvement afforded by the use of corrective makeup for 1 month after being instructed on how to use it by a medical cosmetician during an initial medical consultation. Methods One hundred and twenty-nine patients with various skin diseases affecting the patients’ face were investigated. The patients were instructed by a cosmetician on how to use corrective makeup (complexion, eyes, and lips) and applied it for 1 month. The safety of the makeup application was evaluated and the QOL was assessed via a questionnaire (DLQI) and using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) completed before the first application and at the final visit. The amelioration of their appearance was documented by standardized photography. Results No side effects occurred during the course of the study. A comparison of the standardized photographs taken at each visit showed the patients’ significant improvement in appearance due to the application of corrective makeup. The mean DLQI score dropped significantly from 9.90 ± 0.73 to 3.49 ± 0.40 (P < 0.0001). Conclusion Our results suggest that dermatologists should encourage patients with disfiguring dermatoses to utilize appropriate and safe makeup to improve their appearance and their QOL. Corrective makeup can also complement the treatment of face dermatological diseases in order to improve patient’s adherence. PMID

  7. Proton-induced X-ray emission analysis - a new tool in quantitative dermatology

    SciTech Connect

    Malmqvist, K.G.; Carlsson, L.E.; Akselsson, K.R.; Forslind, B.

    1983-01-01

    Proton-Induced X-ray Emission analysis (PIXE) constitutes a method for trace element analysis characterized by multielemental capability, detection limits in the low ppm-range and size resolution down towards a micrometre. In applications where the sensitivity of the Electron-Induced X-ray Emission (EIXE) analysis is not sufficient and where a spatial resolution not better than a few micrometres is required, the PIXE technique provides a powerful tool. In this paper properties of the PIXE method are demonstrated by quantitative results from three different samples of dermatological interest. Firstly, mercury results from a longitudinal scan of a single hair strand from a mercury poisoned person are shown. With a spatial resolution of one or a few millimetres very fast scans may be performed on hair strands giving information on time and magnitude of intoxication or other exposures, as well as deficiencies. Secondly, results are given from a radial scan with a beam width of 4 micron on hair from a person exposed to high amounts of iron. The calcium, iron and zinc distributions but not the sulphur and potassium distributions show narrow peaks of concentration (less than 4 micron) about 15 micron from the surface of the hair. Further investigations have to be performed in order to interpret these data. Thirdly, the depth profiles in skin of some elements were measured with a beam width of 10 micron. The results show significant increases in sulphur, calcium and zinc concentrations and significant decreases in phosphorous and potassium concentrations at the skin surface, i.e. in the stratum corneum.

  8. Demographic and clinical characteristics of cutaneous lupus erythematosus at a paediatric dermatology referral centre

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, BZ; Holland, KE; Drolet, BA; Galbraith, SS; Lyon, VB; Siegel, DH; Chiu, YE

    2016-01-01

    Background Paediatric cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE) is uncommon and inadequately described in the literature. Similar to adults, children with cutaneous LE develop LE-specific and/or LE-nonspecific skin findings. Similarities and differences in demographics and clinical course between paediatric and adult cutaneous LE have not been sufficiently described. Objectives The purpose of this study is to detail the demographic and clinical features of paediatric cutaneous LE and then compare these findings to those reported in the adult literature. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed of 53 children seen in a paediatric dermatology clinic with cutaneous manifestations of LE. Results Patients presented with all five major subtypes of cutaneous LE, with some notable differences from adult cutaneous LE and previously published reports of paediatric cutaneous LE. Progression from discoid LE to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) did not occur in our cohort. Patients with subacute cutaneous LE were more likely than adults to have lesions below the waist as well as concomitant SLE. Sex distribution for cutaneous LE in our study was equal prior to puberty and female-predominant in post-pubertal patients. Conclusions Children with cutaneous LE have variable clinical presentations and progression to SLE that may be different from adult disease. Specifically, children with acute and subacute cutaneous LE may be more likely than adults to have systemic disease; therefore, patients with these subtypes should be monitored closely for evidence of SLE. Study limitations included small patient numbers that may limit ability to generalize this data and relatively short follow-up intervals. PMID:23601021

  9. High prevalence of psoriatic arthritis in dermatological patients with psoriasis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Henes, Joerg C; Ziupa, Eva; Eisfelder, Michael; Adamczyk, Annette; Knaudt, Bjoern; Jacobs, Felix; Lux, Juergen; Schanz, Stefan; Fierlbeck, Gerhard; Spira, Daniel; Horger, Marius; Kanz, Lothar; Koetter, Ina

    2014-02-01

    The exact prevalence of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) among patients with psoriasis is still not conclusive. Data in the literature vary between 5.8 and 30 %. Objective of this study was to gain more information on the prevalence of PsA among patients with psoriasis in Germany. Between 09/2010 and 05/2011, consecutive patients from dermatological private practices and a university hospital with psoriasis were asked to fill out the validated German Psoriatic Arthritis Diagnostic (GEPARD) Questionnaire. Patients who answered ≥4 questions with "yes" were invited to come for a rheumatological check up. Those patients who refused a rheumatological examination were counted as "absence of PsA". Laboratory tests for inflammatory markers as well as the severity of skin manifestations were assessed. The diagnosis of PsA was made according to the CASPAR criteria, and imaging was performed in addition. A total of 404 questionnaires were evaluated; 50.5 % answered ≥4 questions positively; 19.3 % had a history of PsA confirmed by a rheumatologist; and in 10.9 %, PsA or spondyloarthritis was newly diagnosed during the present study. This leads to an overall prevalence of PsA in patients with psoriasis of 30.2 %. The frequency of psoriatic arthritis in the present study is higher than expected from previous studies in Germany. The prevalence is consistent with findings of a large observational survey from Scandinavia. Using the CASPAR criteria and imaging in all patients, certainty of the diagnosis is very high. The GEPARD Questionnaire is a helpful tool to identify people at risk for psoriatic arthritis.

  10. [Contact sensitization to pharmaceutic aids in dermatologic cosmetic and external use preparations].

    PubMed

    Dastychová, E; Necas, M; Pĕncíková, K; Cerný, P

    2004-05-01

    From April 2001 to December 2002, a group of 514 patients (178 men, 336 women, average age 42.8 years) suffering from chronic eczema were tested by means of epicutaneous tests for contact hypersensitivity to selected auxiliary substances of dermatological external and cosmetic preparations. In 194 patients, the principal diagnosis was atopic eczema. Of the preservatives, the most frequently sensitizing agents were Thiomersal in 13.6%, phenylmercuric acetate in 7.8%, formaldehyde in 5.6%, Bronopol in 5.1%, chlorohexidine in 3.3%, dibromodicyanobutane/phenoxyethanol in 2.9%, chloroacetamide in 2.1%, Kathon CG and parabenes in 1.9%, imidazolidinyl urea and diazolidinyl urea in 1.4%, glutaraldehyde in 1.2%, DMDM-hydantoin in 1.0%, dichlorophen in 0.8%, sorbic acid, phenoxyethanol and triclosan in 0.6%, benzalkonium chloride, Quaternium-15 and chlorocresol in 0.4% and chloroquinaldol in 0.2% of the group of patients. Of antioxidizing agents, it was dodecyl gallate in 2.3%, butylhydroxyanisol in 1.2%, propyl gallate in 0.6%, butylhydroxytoluen in 0.4% of the group o patients and of emulsifiers, alcohols lanae in 5.1%, triethanolamine in 1.6% and propylene glycol in 0.4% of the group of patients. A complete list of contained substances in drug information sheets of both pharmaceutical and cosmetic preparations seems necessary particularly for patients suffering from eczema. The results of the test can serve as feed-back information for the manufacturers of both pharmaceutical and cosmetic preparations.

  11. Prolactin and the skin: a dermatological perspective on an ancient pleiotropic peptide hormone.

    PubMed

    Foitzik, Kerstin; Langan, Ewan A; Paus, Ralf

    2009-05-01

    The polypeptide hormone prolactin (PRL) is best known as the pituitary modulator of lactation and reproduction. However, based on the almost ubiquitous distribution of PRL receptors (PRLR) and an ever-growing list of extrapituitary PRL-expressing tissues, a vast range of PRL actions "beyond the mammary horizon" has now been documented or claimed. For example, PRL modulates hair growth in domestic animals with seasonal hair growth changes ("PRL-pelage axis"). Given that the mammary gland is an epidermal derivative, it is not surprising that the pilosebaceous unit, another epidermal derivative, has also surfaced as a prominent, PRLR-expressing, nonclassical PRL target organ. Moreover, the fact that murine and human hair follicles even synthesize PRL strongly invites one to explore fully the dermatological dimensions of this multifunctional, cytokine-like neuroendocrine bioregulator, which remain insufficiently charted. After describing the relevant essentials of general PRL/PRLR biology, we summarize clinical observations that provide insights into how PRL may impact on the skin, and define important research frontiers and controversies in the quest to better characterize the complex role of PRL in human skin biology and pathology. Focusing on psoriasis, alopecia, and stress-related dermatoses, we then discuss the possible role of PRL/PRLR in cutaneous pathology, and identify potential therapeutic targets for the management of these skin disorders. We close by delineating major open questions at this emerging frontier of basic and clinical cutaneous neuroendocrinology, and argue that systematic exploration of the "PRL-skin connection" will fertilize the development of previously unreported neuroendocrinological strategies for managing selected skin disorders.

  12. Reptiles with dermatological lesions: a retrospective study of 301 cases at two university veterinary teaching hospitals (1992-2008).

    PubMed

    White, Stephen D; Bourdeau, Patrick; Bruet, Vincent; Kass, Philip H; Tell, Lisa; Hawkins, Michelle G

    2011-04-01

    This retrospective study reviews the medical records of 301 reptiles with dermatological lesions that were examined at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of California at Davis (VMTH-UCD) and the Unité de Dermatologie-Parasitologie-Mycologie, Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire de Nantes (UDPM-ENVN) from 1 January 1992 to 1 July 2008. The most common reptile groups differed between the two hospitals, with lizards being the most common at the VMTH-UCD and chelonians at the UDPM-ENVN. At the VMTH-UCD, boa constrictors (Boa constrictor), ball pythons (Python regius) and other Python species were over-represented, and box turtles (Terrapene carolina) were under-represented in the dermatological lesion caseload. When institutional data were combined, 47% of all reptiles at both institutions with confirmed or suspected cases of sepsis had petechiae, with the highest association seen in chelonians at 82%. Dependent on institution and reptile group, from 29% to 64% of the cases had underlying husbandry issues. Sixty-two per cent of all cases were alive at final status. Veterinarians treating reptiles with skin disease should be aware of the following: (i) that boa constrictors and Python species may be predisposed to dermatological lesions; (ii) that client education is important for proper husbandry; and (iii) that there is a possible association between petechiae and sepsis, especially in chelonians. The conjectural association between certain skin lesions and sepsis remains to be confirmed by systematically derived data that demonstrate a causal relationship between the two.

  13. Behavioral and dermatologic changes and low serum zinc and copper concentrations in two premature infants after parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramanian, K N; Henkin, R I

    1978-11-01

    Two premature infants were observed to develop behavioral and dermatologic changes and low serum zinc and copper concentrations following cessation of prolonged parenteral alimentation, while being fed exclusively with human milk. Following treatment with exogenous oral zinc supplementation, prompt relief of symptoms and increases of serum zinc and copper concentrations were observed in both infants. These patients comprise about 5% of our premature infants who are treated with parenteral alimentation for more than two weeks. We recommend that premature infants on prolonged parenteral alimentation should be monitored for changes in serum zinc and copper concentrations and, if a marked fall is observed, supplementation should be considered.

  14. The Use of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Some Dermatologic Diseases: Part II--Autoimmune Bullous Disorders and Lichen Planus.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Adone; Ruocco, Eleonora; Russo, Teresa; Piccolo, Vincenzo; Geng, Long; Zhou, Hongbo; Chen, Hong-Duo; Gao, Xing-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Over the centuries, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Western medicine have traveled along parallel lines with no opportunity for collaboration. In recent decades, while an interest in TCM has been growing among Western clinicians, progress has been made in the comprehension of pathogenic mechanisms of skin disorders, and the communication between Western and Eastern medicines has become more and more intensive. In this paper, the authors discuss TCM remedies used in the treatment of autoimmune bullous disorders (pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid) and lichen planus. Future studies on the active components of the TCM will certainly shed new light on the still obscure aspects of some dermatologic diseases. PMID:26380506

  15. Dermatological problems of asylum seekers arriving on boats: a case report from Australia and a brief review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hui Mei; Kumarasinghe, Sujith Prasad

    2014-11-01

    Assessing the skin of asylum seekers, immigrants, migrant workers, tourists or even locals who return from abroad, can be a confronting task due to the possibility of such people having non-autochthonous diseases. Primary-care physicians and dermatologists need to have a systematic approach in the assessment of such dermatoses. This article describes an interesting case of possible kerosene-induced and diesel-induced skin injury in an asylum seeker arriving on a boat. Dermatological conditions in asylum seekers and a suggested template for skin assessment are discussed. PMID:25178452

  16. Dermatological problems of asylum seekers arriving on boats: a case report from Australia and a brief review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hui Mei; Kumarasinghe, Sujith Prasad

    2014-11-01

    Assessing the skin of asylum seekers, immigrants, migrant workers, tourists or even locals who return from abroad, can be a confronting task due to the possibility of such people having non-autochthonous diseases. Primary-care physicians and dermatologists need to have a systematic approach in the assessment of such dermatoses. This article describes an interesting case of possible kerosene-induced and diesel-induced skin injury in an asylum seeker arriving on a boat. Dermatological conditions in asylum seekers and a suggested template for skin assessment are discussed.

  17. Grading dermatologic adverse events of cancer treatments: the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alice P; Setser, Ann; Anadkat, Milan J; Cotliar, Jonathan; Olsen, Elise A; Garden, Benjamin C; Lacouture, Mario E

    2012-11-01

    Dermatologic adverse events to cancer therapies have become more prevalent and may to lead to dose modifications or discontinuation of life-saving or prolonging treatments. This has resulted in a new collaboration between oncologists and dermatologists, which requires accurate cataloging and grading of side effects. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0 is a descriptive terminology and grading system that can be used for uniform reporting of adverse events. A proper understanding of this standardized classification system is essential for dermatologists to properly communicate with all physicians caring for patients with cancer. PMID:22502948

  18. [Reactions to infliximab infusions in dermatologic patients: consensus statement and treatment protocol. Working Group of the Grupo Español de Psoriasis de la Academia Española de Dermatología y Venereología ].

    PubMed

    Puig Sanz, Lluís; Sáez, E; Lozano, M J; Bordas, X; Carrascosa, J M; Gallardo, F; Luelmo, J; Sánchez-Regaña, M; Alsina, M; García-Patos, V

    2009-03-01

    Infliximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to and blocks tumor necrosis factor alpha and is the most effective biologic agent approved for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. It is administered by intravenous infusion, usually in day hospitals on an outpatient basis. The main problem with the administration of infliximab is the possibility of infusion reactions, which may be immediate or delayed; these reactions are related to the immunogenicity of this monoclonal antibody, leading to the production of anti-infliximab antibodies. Infusion reactions to infliximab are not usually anaphylactic (ie, they are not mediated by immunoglobulin E), and re-exposure of the patient using specific protocols to prevent and treat these reactions is therefore possible. The extensive experience in the use of infliximab for the treatment of rheumatic conditions and chronic inflammatory bowel disease has made it possible to develop infusion reaction management protocols; these can be applied to dermatologic patients, who constitute a growing proportion of patients treated with intravenous biological agents. The aim of this review is to draw up a consensus protocol for the treatment of infusion reactions in dermatologic patients treated with infliximab.

  19. Evaluation of an interactive case simulation system in dermatology and venereology for medical students

    PubMed Central

    Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik; Edelbring, Samuel; Fors, Uno; Hindbeck, Hans; Ståhle, Mona

    2006-01-01

    Background Most of the many computer resources used in clinical teaching of dermatology and venereology for medical undergraduates are information-oriented and focus mostly on finding a "correct" multiple-choice alternative or free-text answer. We wanted to create an interactive computer program, which facilitates not only factual recall but also clinical reasoning. Methods Through continuous interaction with students, a new computerised interactive case simulation system, NUDOV, was developed. It is based on authentic cases and contains images of real patients, actors and healthcare providers. The student selects a patient and proposes questions for medical history, examines the skin, and suggests investigations, diagnosis, differential diagnoses and further management. Feedback is given by comparing the user's own suggestions with those of a specialist. In addition, a log file of the student's actions is recorded. The program includes a large number of images, video clips and Internet links. It was evaluated with a student questionnaire and by randomising medical students to conventional teaching (n = 85) or conventional teaching plus NUDOV (n = 31) and comparing the results of the two groups in a final written examination. Results The questionnaire showed that 90% of the NUDOV students stated that the program facilitated their learning to a large/very large extent, and 71% reported that extensive working with authentic computerised cases made it easier to understand and learn about diseases and their management. The layout, user-friendliness and feedback concept were judged as good/very good by 87%, 97%, and 100%, respectively. Log files revealed that the students, in general, worked with each case for 60–90 min. However, the intervention group did not score significantly better than the control group in the written examination. Conclusion We created a computerised case simulation program allowing students to manage patients in a non-linear format supporting

  20. Industry-funded dermatologic research within academia in the United States: fiscal and ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Blank, I H

    1992-03-01

    Private-sector funding of biomedical research within academia may come from industry, foundations, the dermatologists themselves, and the public at large. Industry-funding is of benefit to both academia and industry. Industry may fund clinical and basic research and product testing. Industry is more willing to fund product testing and clinical research than basic research. Funds for dermatologic research may be obtained from manufacturers of drugs, medical devices, cosmetics, soaps, and detergents. Questions of academic freedom arise when research is funded by industry. The results of academic research are in the public domain; the results of intramural industry research are often proprietary, i.e., "trade secrets." When there is industry funding within academia, any restraints on publication should be held to a minimum and be temporary. Publication should occur in a timely fashion, although recognizing the need for delayed publication if the results concern patentable material. When there is a consultantship, pre-arranged terms of agreement may restrict communication. Patents usually are held by the investigator's institution. The funding company may be granted world-wide, royalty-bearing licenses. Conflicts of interest may arise during any research endeavor; this warrants close attention when the research is industry funded. Stock ownership, speaker fees, blind contracts, etc., should be avoided. In any communication, funding agreements should be stated. Indirect costs are a "necessary evil." There are non-research expenditures associated with all research projects for which the institution is justified in requesting compensation. Indirect costs must have definite connections to a project. As industrial funding of research within academia increases, various facets of the academia-industry relationship are receiving increasing attention. Several aspects of conflicts of interest and indirect costs must yet be resolved. When faced openly and directly, all of these

  1. Traces of Marion B. Sulzberger in the Museum of Wax Moulages in Zurich and their importance for the history of dermatology.

    PubMed

    Geiges, Michael L

    2009-06-01

    Marion B. Sulzberger was one of the most famous American dermatologists. He had received his training in dermatology in Zurich (Switzerland) from 1926 to 1929. The collection of moulages in Zurich still preserves outstanding wax models of Sulzberger's scientific work. They are impressive examples of the purpose and value of moulages at the beginning of the 20th century being used as teaching aids but also as documents and illustrations in scientific articles and textbooks. Today, the wax models of Sulzberger's work belong to the most important examples of moulages used in medical historical research. They also have value for teaching dermatology to medical students.

  2. Dermatophytosis: fluorostaining enhances speed and sensitivity in direct microscopy of skin, nail and hair specimens from dermatology outpatients.

    PubMed

    Ovrén, Ellen; Berglund, Lars; Nordlind, Klas; Rollman, Ola

    2016-07-01

    Direct microscopy of keratinised specimens is a standard screening procedure that assists clinicians to differentiate true superficial mycoses from non-fungal disorders of the skin, nail and hair. Most clinical dermatologists use bright-field microscopy when searching for dermatophyte fungi in clinical samples while laboratory-based mycologists increasingly favour fluorescence microscopy in order to optimise visualisation of fungal elements. This study compared the validity and speediness of fluorescence microscopy vs. conventional light microscopy when screening for fungi in 206 dermatological samples from dermatology outpatients. Both senior dermatologist and a less experienced investigator (medical student) attained high and comparable levels of specificity (91.7-93.8%), positive predictive value (77.1-81.4%) and negative predictive value (83.7-89.9%) using either method. Fluorostaining with Blankophor prior to fluorescence microscopy increased the sensitivity by 22 ± 1% as compared to light microscopy of unstained samples. For both investigators, the time required to identify fungal elements by the fluorescence-based technique was reduced by at least 50%, thus improving the performance of direct microscopy in the clinical setting. PMID:26931645

  3. [Bacterial colonization of chronic wounds. Studies on outpatients in a university dermatology clinic with special consideration of ORSA].

    PubMed

    Dissemond, J; Schmid, E N; Esser, S; Witthoff, M; Goos, M

    2004-03-01

    In this retrospective investigation, we documented the bacterial colonization of 79 patients with chronic wounds, who had been treated between January 2002 and May 2003 in an outpatient wound healing clinic of a university dermatology program. We isolated 106 facultative pathogenic bacterial strains of which 56 were Staphylococcus aureus, 19 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 11 Escherichia coli, 4 Proteus mirabilis, 4 Enterobacter cloacae, 2 Serratia marcescens, 2 Streptococcus group G und 8 further species. 68 of these bacterial strains were gram-positive and 46 gram-negative. Moreover we identified one patient with Candida parapsilosis. Therefore, 70.8% of all patients showed Staphylococcus aureus in their chronic wounds. Determination of the specific resistances showed 17 patients to be colonized with oxacillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ORSA) strain; this corresponds to 21.5% of all patients. Consequently, 30.4% of all Staphylococcus aureus isolates were ORSA strains. All of the ORSA isolates were sensitive to vancomycin. Sensitivity to tetracycline was documented in 15, to amikacin in 13, to clindamycin in 7, to gentamicin and erythromycin in 6 of the ORSA-positive patients. In the case of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, 10 were sensitive and 3 were intermediate in sensitivity. Beside the obligate resistance to oxacillin, penicillin G, ampicillin, cefuroxime and imipenem, none of the ORSA was sensitive to ofloxacin. The results of our investigations demonstrate the actual spectrum of bacterial colonization in chronic wounds of patients in an university dermatologic wound clinic and underline the growing problem of ORSA.

  4. Dermatologic relationships between the United States and German-speaking countries: part 2--the exodus of Jewish dermatologists.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Walter H C; Bickers, David R

    2013-09-01

    The rise to power of the National Socialist (Nazi) party led by Adolf Hitler and the subsequent tumultuous 12 years of their rule in Germany resulted in catastrophes including World War II, the most destructive war ever, and the premeditated and systematic murder of 5 to 6 million European Jews. Despite their notable contributions to the academic excellence that existed in German-speaking countries at that time, Jewish physicians were particularly vulnerable to persecution and death. Between 1933 and 1938, a series of repressive measures eliminated them from the practice of medicine in Germany and other countries. Although some died in concentration camps and others committed suicide, many were able to emigrate from Europe. Dermatology in the United States particularly benefited from the influx of several stellar Jewish dermatologists who were major contributors to the subsequent flowering of academic dermatology in the United States. A number of representative biographies of these immigrants are briefly recounted to illustrate their lasting influence on our specialty.

  5. Off-label use of TNF-alpha inhibitors in a dermatological university department: retrospective evaluation of 118 patients.

    PubMed

    Sand, Freja Lærke; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF)-alpha inhibitors are licensed for patients with severe refractory psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. However, TNF-alpha inhibitors have also been used off-label for various recalcitrant mucocutaneous diseases. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of TNF-alpha inhibitors used for off-label dermatological indications. We retrospectively evaluated patient records of 118 patients treated off-label with TNF-alpha inhibitors in a dermatological university department. Patients presented with severe aphthous stomatitis/genital aphthous lesions (26), chronic urticaria (25), hidradenitis suppurativa (29), acne conglobata (11), dissecting cellulitis of the scalp (two), orofacial granulomatosis (four), sarcoidosis (four), granuloma annulare (two), granulomatous rosacea (one), granuloma faciale (one), subcorneal pustulosis (one), pyoderma gangrenosum (four), Sweet's syndrome (four), Well's syndrome (one), benign familial pemphigus (one), lichen planus (one), and folliculitis decalvans (one). A significant number of these patients went into remission during therapy with TNF-alpha inhibitors. A total of 11 patients (9%) experienced severe adverse effects during therapy. Off-label therapy with TNF-alpha inhibitors may be considered for selected patients with severe recalcitrant mucocutaneous diseases. The risk of severe adverse effects signals that a thorough benefit-risk assessment should be performed before initiating off-label treatment with TNF-alpha inhibitors for these conditions. PMID:25731720

  6. Dermatologic relationships between the United States and German-speaking countries: part 2--the exodus of Jewish dermatologists.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Walter H C; Bickers, David R

    2013-09-01

    The rise to power of the National Socialist (Nazi) party led by Adolf Hitler and the subsequent tumultuous 12 years of their rule in Germany resulted in catastrophes including World War II, the most destructive war ever, and the premeditated and systematic murder of 5 to 6 million European Jews. Despite their notable contributions to the academic excellence that existed in German-speaking countries at that time, Jewish physicians were particularly vulnerable to persecution and death. Between 1933 and 1938, a series of repressive measures eliminated them from the practice of medicine in Germany and other countries. Although some died in concentration camps and others committed suicide, many were able to emigrate from Europe. Dermatology in the United States particularly benefited from the influx of several stellar Jewish dermatologists who were major contributors to the subsequent flowering of academic dermatology in the United States. A number of representative biographies of these immigrants are briefly recounted to illustrate their lasting influence on our specialty. PMID:23986294

  7. The Infectious and Noninfectious Dermatological Consequences of Flooding: A Field Manual for the Responding Provider.

    PubMed

    Bandino, Justin P; Hang, Anna; Norton, Scott A

    2015-10-01

    Meteorological data show that disastrous floods are increasingly frequent and more severe in recent years, perhaps due to climatic changes such as global warming. During and after a flood disaster, traumatic injuries, communicable diseases, chemical exposures, malnutrition, decreased access to care, and even mental health disorders dramatically increase, and many of these have dermatological manifestations. Numerous case reports document typical and atypical cutaneous infections, percutaneous trauma, immersion injuries, noninfectious contact exposures, exposure to wildlife, and exacerbation of underlying skin diseases after such disasters as the 2004 Asian tsunami, Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and the 2010 Pakistan floods. This review attempts to provide a basic field manual of sorts to providers who are engaged in care after a flooding event, with particular focus on the infectious consequences. Bacterial pathogens such as Staphylococcus and Streptococcus are still common causes of skin infections after floods, with atypical bacteria also greatly increased. Vibrio vulnificus is classically associated with exposure to saltwater or brackish water. It may present as necrotizing fasciitis with hemorrhagic bullae, and treatment consists of doxycycline or a quinolone, plus a third-generation cephalosporin and surgical debridement. Atypical mycobacterial infections typically produce indolent cutaneous infections, possibly showing sporotrichoid spread. A unique nontuberculous infection called spam has recently been identified in Satowan Pacific Islanders; combination antibiotic therapy is recommended. Aeromonas infection is typically associated with freshwater exposure and, like Vibrio infections, immunocompromised or cirrhotic patients are at highest risk for severe disease, such as necrotizing fasciitis and sepsis. Various antibiotics can be used to treat Aeromonas infections. Melioidosis is seen mainly in Southeast Asia and Australia, particularly in rice farmers, and

  8. The Infectious and Noninfectious Dermatological Consequences of Flooding: A Field Manual for the Responding Provider.

    PubMed

    Bandino, Justin P; Hang, Anna; Norton, Scott A

    2015-10-01

    Meteorological data show that disastrous floods are increasingly frequent and more severe in recent years, perhaps due to climatic changes such as global warming. During and after a flood disaster, traumatic injuries, communicable diseases, chemical exposures, malnutrition, decreased access to care, and even mental health disorders dramatically increase, and many of these have dermatological manifestations. Numerous case reports document typical and atypical cutaneous infections, percutaneous trauma, immersion injuries, noninfectious contact exposures, exposure to wildlife, and exacerbation of underlying skin diseases after such disasters as the 2004 Asian tsunami, Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and the 2010 Pakistan floods. This review attempts to provide a basic field manual of sorts to providers who are engaged in care after a flooding event, with particular focus on the infectious consequences. Bacterial pathogens such as Staphylococcus and Streptococcus are still common causes of skin infections after floods, with atypical bacteria also greatly increased. Vibrio vulnificus is classically associated with exposure to saltwater or brackish water. It may present as necrotizing fasciitis with hemorrhagic bullae, and treatment consists of doxycycline or a quinolone, plus a third-generation cephalosporin and surgical debridement. Atypical mycobacterial infections typically produce indolent cutaneous infections, possibly showing sporotrichoid spread. A unique nontuberculous infection called spam has recently been identified in Satowan Pacific Islanders; combination antibiotic therapy is recommended. Aeromonas infection is typically associated with freshwater exposure and, like Vibrio infections, immunocompromised or cirrhotic patients are at highest risk for severe disease, such as necrotizing fasciitis and sepsis. Various antibiotics can be used to treat Aeromonas infections. Melioidosis is seen mainly in Southeast Asia and Australia, particularly in rice farmers, and

  9. [Incidence pityriasis rosea of Gibert in the Dermatology Service of the Hospital do Servidor Público in the state of São Paulo].

    PubMed

    de Souza Sittart, J A; Tayah, M; Soares, Z

    1984-01-01

    The authors present a retrospective study on the incidence of Pitiriase Rosea in the Dermatology Department of the Hospital do Servidor Público do Estado de São Paulo, covering a 17 years span. Figures concerning race, sex, age, mensal and anual incidence as well the distribution in the seasons of the year are analysed. PMID:6392788

  10. Demodectic Mange, Dermatophilosis, and other parasitic and bacterial dermatologic diseases in free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in the United States from 1975-2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is a common and widespread North American game species. To evaluate the incidence, clinical manifestations, demography, and pathology of bacterial and parasitic dermatologic diseases in white-tailed deer in the southeastern United States, we retrospecti...

  11. Measurement of health-related quality of life in dermatological research and practice: outcome of the EADV Taskforce on Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Prinsen, C A C; de Korte, J; Augustin, M; Sampogna, F; Salek, S S; Basra, M K A; Holm, E A; Nijsten, T E C

    2013-10-01

    In the last decade, the importance of the measurement of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has grown significantly. Today, HRQoL measurement is generally considered to be important in clinical trials, in the assessment of disease severity, in patient management and in the field of health economics. Therefore, a good understanding of the concept of HRQoL and its measurement instruments is a prerequisite for both researchers and clinicians. The European Academy for Dermatology and Venereology (EADV) Taskforce on Quality of Life encourages the application of HRQoL instruments in research and clinical practice, and with this manuscript, the Taskforce aims to contribute to the quality of this application. In dermatology, a large number of HRQoL instruments exist and herewith, we summarize the most commonly used generic and dermatology-specific HRQoL instruments. Information is given on the most important psychometric characteristics of these instruments, including: scale structure, reliability, validity and responsiveness. Furthermore, a flow chart is provided to support researchers and clinicians in selecting an existing instrument or, in case an appropriate instrument does not exist, in finding alternative solutions. The present manuscript is the first of a series of manuscripts to be written on behalf of the EADV Taskforce on Quality of Life, aiming to contribute to the scientific knowledge and measurement of patient reported outcomes in dermatological research and practice. PMID:23301583

  12. Uptake of antioxidants by natural nutrition and supplementation: pros and cons from the dermatological point of view.

    PubMed

    Lademann, J; Patzelt, A; Schanzer, S; Richter, H; Meinke, M C; Sterry, W; Zastrow, L; Doucet, O; Vergou, T; Darvin, M E

    2011-01-01

    The pros and cons of the systemic and topical application of antioxidant substances are a subject of intense discussion among experts, with resulting confusion for consumers and producers. The objective of the present article is to clarify the various uncertainties relating to the use of antioxidant substances in dermatology. Whereas inappropriate application of antioxidant substances (concerning their concentration and composition) might induce harmful effects, the consumer will definitively benefit from physiological concentrations and compositions of antioxidants. The most suitable method is the consumption of natural antioxidants in the form of fruit and vegetables, for example. In addition, the skin, which also accumulates antioxidant substances, may profit from a sufficient antioxidative level, as damage induced by sun radiation in addition to skin aging is reduced.

  13. Teaching resources for dermatology on the WWW--quiz system and dynamic lecture scripts using a HTTP-database demon.

    PubMed Central

    Bittorf, A.; Diepgen, T. L.

    1996-01-01

    The World Wide Web (WWW) is becoming the major way of acquiring information in all scientific disciplines as well as in business. It is very well suitable for fast distribution and exchange of up to date teaching resources. However, to date most teaching applications on the Web do not use its full power by integrating interactive components. We have set up a computer based training (CBT) framework for Dermatology, which consists of dynamic lecture scripts, case reports, an atlas and a quiz system. All these components heavily rely on an underlying image database that permits the creation of dynamic documents. We used a demon process that keeps the database open and can be accessed using HTTP to achieve better performance and avoid the overhead involved by starting CGI-processes. The result of our evaluation was very encouraging. Images Figure 3 PMID:8947625

  14. From patient to discoverer--Niels Ryberg Finsen (1860–1904) --the founder of phototherapy in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Pietrzak, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Niels Ryberg Finsen (1860–1904) developed a lamp based on electric carbon arcs (later known as the Finsen light) that was used for skin therapy a century ago. He became director of the Medical Light Institute in Copenhagen, later the Finsen Institute, where he developed this method of treatment. Within a few years, 40 Finsen Institutes were established in Europe and in the United States of America. In 1903, Finsen received the Nobel Prize in Medicine in recognition of his work on the treatment of diseases and, in particular, the treatment of lupus vulgaris by means of concentrated light rays. Finsen's scientific interests were greatly influenced by his health condition. Beginning in 1883, he began to experience symptoms of an illness that would be later diagnosed as Niemann-Pick disease. He spent the last years of his life confined to a wheelchair. Dermatology reaps the benefits of light treatment to this day.

  15. Air quality and seasonal variations in consultations for respiratory, allergic, dermatological and gastrointestinal diseases in Bahrain, 2007.

    PubMed

    Hamadeh, R R; Al-Roomi, K A

    2014-06-09

    Environmental health data in Bahrain are scarce. This study in 4 governorates of Bahrain aimed to establish baseline data on the seasonal prevalence of certain disease groups that are sensitive to climate (respiratory, allergic, dermatological and non-specific gastrointestinal diseases) over a 1-year period and to record local climate and air pollutant data for the same year. A 5% sample of medical records for those who attended primary health-care centres during 2007 was taken. Visit rates for all 4 diseases had peaks, in spring and in autumn, with the lowest rates in the summer season when the average temperatures were highest and average humidity was lower. Respiratory-related visits were highest when the air concentrations of SO2 were highest. An ongoing surveillance system for climate-sensitive diseases should be initiated to monitor and relate health and environmental trends.

  16. Multidisciplinary dermatology-rheumatology management for patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cobo-Ibáñez, Tatiana; Villaverde, Virginia; Seoane-Mato, Daniel; Muñoz-Fernández, Santiago; Guerra, Mercedes; Del Campo, Petra Díaz; Cañete, Juan D

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the efficacy and satisfaction of multidisciplinary dermatology-rheumatology management for patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We conducted a systematic literature search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library up to September 2015. Selection criteria include (1) adult patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis and PsA, (2) assessed in a multidisciplinary consultation, (3) comparison with routine separate consultations, and (4) outcome measures to evaluate efficacy and/or satisfaction. Meta-analyses, systematic reviews, clinical trials, cohort studies, and case series were included. The quality of the studies included was graded according to the Oxford Level of Evidence scale. Of 195 articles, three studies complied with the inclusion criteria: two case series and one descriptive study in which 506 patients were evaluated. Patients were referred to the multidisciplinary consultation from dermatology and rheumatology consultations in all but one study, in which primary care was also involved. The reason for the referral was to confirm the diagnosis and/or treatment. Patients were evaluated on a weekly and monthly basis in two and one study, respectively. The evidence obtained is scarce but suggests the efficacy of multidisciplinary consultations in terms of improved skin and joint symptoms after changing treatment (82-56 %), showing higher scores for this type of consultation compared to the usual [4.91 vs. 2.85 (0-5)] and a high level of satisfaction among patients (94 % "very satisfied"). However, waiting times were higher. With the limited evidence found, multidisciplinary management seems to be more effective and more satisfactory for patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis and PsA than conventional consultations, though this could not be conclusively demonstrated. The results of this review support the benefit of implementing this type of consultation.

  17. The quality of European dermatological guidelines: critical appraisal of the quality of EDF guidelines using the AGREE II instrument.

    PubMed

    Werner, R N; Marinović, B; Rosumeck, S; Strohal, R; Haering, N S; Weberschock, T; Dreher, A C; Nast, A

    2016-03-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are systematically developed tools to assist clinicians and health policy makers in decision making for clearly defined clinical situations. In the light of the demand for evidence-based medicine and quality in health care and the increasing methodological requirements concerning guidelines development, it is important to evaluate existing practice guidelines to systematically identify strengths and weaknesses. Currently, the most accepted tool for the methodological evaluation of guidelines is the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation (AGREE) Instrument. Intention of this assessment is to identify and critically appraise clinical practice guidelines commissioned by the European Dermatology Forum (EDF). A quality assessment of a predefined set of guidelines, including all available clinical practice guidelines published on the EDF guidelines internet site, was performed using the AGREE II instrument. To assure an objective assessment, four independent assessments were performed by evaluators situated in different European countries. Twenty-five EDF guidelines covering different dermatological topics were identified and evaluated. The assessment included seven guidelines developed on the highest methodological standard (systematic literature search and structured consensus conference, S3). Eighteen guidelines were identified that were based on either a structured consensus process (S2k), a systematic literature assessment (S2e) or on informal consensus only (S1). The methodological and reporting quality among the evaluated guidelines was heterogeneous. S3 guidelines generally received the highest scores. The domains 'clarity of presentation' and 'scope and purpose' achieved the highest mean ratings within the different domains of assessment, whereas the domains of 'applicability', 'stakeholder involvement' and 'editorial independence' scored poorly. Considering the large variations in the achieved scores, there is need for

  18. A review of the Journal of Investigative Dermatology's most cited publications over the past 25 years and the use of developing bibliometric methodologies to assess journal quality.

    PubMed

    Bickers, David R; Modlin, Robert L

    2012-03-01

    The JID is a major resource for publishing dermatologic research. Here we document bibliometric systems that permit detailed analysis of JID's relative scientific quality. We provide an overview of metrics employed by ISI Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge and Elsevier's open-access Scopus to measure JID's comparative performance. We list JID's 50 most cited articles between 1986 and 2010 and summarize the six most cited papers published during this period. We conclude by showing how selected cited papers have influenced research in the JID subcategories of immunology/infection and photobiology during this period. JID has thrived as the strength of its editorial leadership and the quality of dermatologic science have grown apace.

  19. The IFRA: working towards the continually-improved safety of fragrance ingredients and the importance of a partnership with the dermatological community.

    PubMed

    Vey, Matthias G

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between the fragrance industry and the dermatological community in the past has not always been perceived as one of partnership. IFRA, the International Fragrance Association, has started a series of initiatives to underline the industry's commitment to market safe products that limit any unavoidable risk to the minimum while at the same time enabling the consumer to choose from a variety of fragranced products. This article describes current projects and future initiatives.

  20. Assessing health-related quality of life in hand eczema patients: how to overcome psychometric faults when using the dermatology life quality index.

    PubMed

    Ofenloch, Robert F; Diepgen, Thomas L; Weisshaar, Elke; Elsner, Peter; Apfelbacher, Christian J

    2014-11-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has become an important patient reported outcome in health service research. The dermatology life quality index (DLQI) is the most commonly used instrument in dermatology. In recent years, the psychometric properties of the DLQI have been a subject of debate as requirements of modern test theory seem not to be fulfilled. The aim of this study was to test whether those violations also occur in patients with hand eczema. We collected data of 602 hand eczema patients who participated in an inpatient dermatology rehabilitation program in Germany. In order to report meaningful scores of the DLQI, data were analysed according to the principles of modern test theory. We calibrated the DLQI using the Rasch model, resulting in a 6 item version with a range between 0-15 points. This version showed no significant misfit to the Rasch model (p>0.14). By using a Rasch analysis the results were evaluated in a second sample of hand eczema patients (n=511). Even if all demographic characteristic of this sample were different, we were able to replicate the results found in this study (p>0.21). In conclusion, we recommend to use an alternative scoring procedure as presented in this article if the DLQI is used in hand eczema patients.

  1. Two configurations of miniature Mirau interferometry for swept-source OCT imaging: applications in dermatology and gastroendoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorecki, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    The early diagnosis of cancer is essential since it can be treated more effectively when detected earlier. Visual inspection followed by histological examination is, still today, the gold standard for clinicians. However, a large number of unnecessary surgical procedures are still performed. New diagnostics aids are emerging including the recent techniques of optical coherence tomography (OCT) which permits non-invasive 3D optical biopsies of biological tissues, improving patient's quality of life. Nevertheless, the existing bulk or fiber optics systems are expensive, only affordable at the hospital and thus, not sufficiently used by physicians or cancer's specialists as an early diagnosis tool. We developed two different microsystems based on Mirau interferometry and applied for swept source OCT imaging: one for dermatology and second for gastroenterology. In both cases the architecture is based tem based on spectrally tuned Mirau interferometry. The first configuration, developed in the frame of the European project VIAMOS, includes an active array of 4x4 Mirau interferometers. The matrix of Mirau reference mirrors is integrated on top of an electrostatic vertical comb-drive actuator. In second configuration, developed in the frame of Labex ACTION, we adapted VIAMOS technology to develop an OCT endomicroscope with a single-channel passive Mirau interferometer.

  2. The effect of air cooling pain relief on protoporphyrin IX photobleaching and clinical efficacy during dermatological photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Tyrrell, J; Campbell, S M; Curnow, A

    2011-04-01

    Methyl aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT) is utilized to successfully treat licensed indications (e.g. actinic keratosis (AK), superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC) and Bowen's disease (BD)) in the UK. Air cooling devices (ACD) are commonly utilized as a method of pain relief, however the effect of this on treatment outcome has never been extensively investigated. This non-randomized, retrospective observational controlled study investigated whether the application of the ACD limited photosensitiser (protoporphyrin IX - PpIX) photobleaching during irradiation and/or subsequent clinical outcome. Patients utilizing the ACD throughout treatment were observed to undergo significantly less PpIX photobleaching than the control group (P<0.001) and complete clinical clearances observed at 3 months were also reduced within the ACD group. Separate analysis of the different lesion types indicated that significantly less photobleaching occurred in AK lesions with ACD and all lesion types failed to fully utilize the accumulated PpIX when ACD was employed. The application of the ACD as pain relief during light irradiation therefore resulted in lower PpIX photobleaching which corresponded to a reduction in the efficacy of PDT treatment. Whilst the ACD is an effective method of dermatological PDT analgesia it should be utilized as sparingly as possible to minimize any deleterious effects on treatment outcome.

  3. Antioxidant and metabolic impairment result in DNA damage in arsenic-exposed individuals with severe dermatological manifestations in Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Smarajit; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Deb, Bimal; Samanta, Tanmoy; Maji, Gurupada; Pan, Bappaditya; Ghosh, Amar; Ghosh, Debidas

    2012-05-01

    Arsenic is an environmental toxicant, free-radical generator, carcinogenic agent, and aging promoter. Recently, blood samples were analyzed from individuals (control- male 12, female 13; arsenic-exposed- male 16, female 14; and exposed to ≥100 μg/L As, ≥10 y) with dermatological symptoms in few affected villages in Eastern India to unravel their hematopoietic, metabolic, and antioxidant profiles. White blood cells recovered from buffy coat were used for DNA fragmentation test. Present observation suggests that significant number of individuals developed pigmentation and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis with black-brownish patch on their body and many of those developed carcinomas. Hematopoietic data show a significant increase in eosinophil and decrease in monocyte count in either sex. Though insignificant, an increase in neutrophil in female and lymphocyte count in male arsenic-exposed individuals are supported by the earlier report on sex dimorphic immune sensitization. Significant increase in serum alanine transaminase in both sexes and bilirubin only in male suggests the eventuality of hepatic disintegration. Arsenic exposure significantly decreased serum amylase in female. A significant decrease in antioxidant components like catalase, soluble thiol, and recently recognized uric acid worsened the situation by generating free radicals as observed in significant rise in malondialdehyde level, which finally increased DNA fragmentation and arsenic-associated mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. This could attribute to lowering in immune competence and related necrotic and/or apoptotic manifestations.

  4. Human phthiriasis. Can dermoscopy really help dermatologists? Entodermoscopy: a new dermatological discipline on the edge of entomology.

    PubMed

    Scanni, G

    2012-02-01

    The diagnosis of human phtiriasis (often referred to as the "crab" or the "pubic louse") can be more difficult than other types of pediculosis (Pediculus corporis and Pediculus capitis) because this insect has a smaller body of 1.2 x 0.8 mm, may be lighter in color, not as mobile and therefore harder to see to the naked eye. Can dermoscopy aid to perform a better analysis of the skin? The clinical experience developed in two patients gives an affirmative answer, moreover adding useful information of insect and its eggs already known to entomologists but never used in dermatological diagnosis. The identification in vivo can distinguish Phthirus pubis from other skin signs while the conical shape of the operculum and the wide fixing sleeve of egg to hair, tells what species of louse is infesting, even if the insect is unavailable or nits are elsewhere from the pubic area. Entodermoscopy, provided that dermatologists have some knowledge of entomology, therefore promises advantages over standard microscopic examination. PMID:22370575

  5. Irritancy testing in occupational dermatology: comparison between two quick tests and the acute irritation induced by sodium lauryl sulphate.

    PubMed

    Bangha, E; Hinnen, U; Elsner, P

    1996-11-01

    To reduce the incidence of irritant contact dermatitis, the development of screening methods to identify subjects with increased susceptibility to irritants is essential. In a pilot study on the comparison between two quick, non-invasive irritancy tests (dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) with the time-consuming patch testing with sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), no correlation between the "quick tests" and SLS patch testing was observed. In the present paper the results of irritancy testing in 181 metal worker trainees are presented. Experimental irritant contact dermatitis reactions were induced on the medial third of the volar forearm using SLS 0.5%, applied for 23 h and as "quick tests" DMSO 90% and 95% and a solution of 0.2% mol/l NaOH applied for 5 min. Assessment of skin irritability was made by visual scoring and measurement of transepidermal water loss. Except for a statistically significant relationship between the irritations by DMSO 90% and 95%, correlations between the different techniques were weak or non-existent. This is most probably due to different pathophysiological pathways for the irritant reactions. We therefore propose to use a spectrum of different tests in occupational dermatology for predicting the individual's risk of irritant contact dermatitis.

  6. Dermatological Adverse Events Associated with Topical Brimonidine Gel 0.33% in Subjects with Erythema of Rosacea

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Anna D.; Waite, Kimberly A.; Chen, Michael C.; Palaniswamy, Kiruthi; Wiser, Thomas H.; Draelos, Zoe D.; Rafal, Elyse S.; Werschler, W. Philip; Harvey, Alison E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The topical α2 adrenergic receptor agonist brimonidine gel 0.33% is an effective and safe pharmacological treatment for the facial erythema of rosacea. However, adverse events of worsened redness have occasionally been reported with its use. Objective: A detailed analysis of adverse events is needed to accurately define worsening erythema and the adverse-events profile associated with brimonidine gel treatment. Methods and measurements: A retrospective review of related dermatological adverse events occurring in subjects enrolled in the two pivotal four-week Phase 3 studies and the 52-week long-term safety study for brimonidine gel was conducted. Measurements included total adverse-event incidences; number of subjects experiencing adverse events; study discontinuation due to adverse events, severity, onset, episodic duration period; and correlation of adverse events to subject disposition, and rosacea profile. Results: Flushing and erythema were the most commonly reported adverse events, occurring in a total of 5.4 percent of subjects in the Phase 3 studies and in 15.4 percent in the long-term study. Most adverse events were mild or moderate in severity, transient, and intermittent. Adverse events occurred early in treatment, and duration was short-lived in the majority of cases. Adverse-event patterns were not remarkably altered with regard to subject disposition in the long-term study. Conclusion: Adverse events of worsening redness are not frequent, are transient in nature, and occur early in the course of treatment with brimonidine gel. PMID:26345379

  7. Highlights of Thirty-Year Experience of CO2 Laser Use at the Florence (Italy) Department of Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Campolmi, Piero; Bonan, Paolo; Cannarozzo, Giovanni; Bassi, Andrea; Bruscino, Nicola; Arunachalam, Meena; Troiano, Michela; Lotti, Torello; Moretti, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The CO2 laser has been used extensively in dermatological surgery over the past 30 years and is now recognised as the gold standard for soft tissue vaporization. Considering that the continuous wave CO2 laser delivery system and the newer “superpulsed” and scanned CO2 systems have progressively changed our practice and patient satisfaction, a long range documentation can be useful. Our experience has demonstrated that the use of CO2 laser involves a reduced healing time, an infrequent need for anaesthesia, reduced thermal damage, less bleeding, less inflammation, the possibility of intra-operative histologic and/or cytologic examination, and easy access to anatomically difficult areas. Immediate side effects have been pain, erythema, edema, typically see with older methods, using higher power. The percentage of after-treatment keloids and hypertrophic scars observed was very low (~1%) especially upon the usage of lower parameters. The recurrence of viral lesions (condylomas and warts) have been not more frequent than those due to other techniques. Tumor recurrence is minor compared with radiotherapy or surgery. This method is a valid alternative to surgery and/or diathermocoagulation for microsurgery of soft tissues. Our results are at times not consistent with those published in the literature, stressing the concept that multicentric studies that harmonization methodology and the patient selection are vital. PMID:22593693

  8. Human phthiriasis. Can dermoscopy really help dermatologists? Entodermoscopy: a new dermatological discipline on the edge of entomology.

    PubMed

    Scanni, G

    2012-02-01

    The diagnosis of human phtiriasis (often referred to as the "crab" or the "pubic louse") can be more difficult than other types of pediculosis (Pediculus corporis and Pediculus capitis) because this insect has a smaller body of 1.2 x 0.8 mm, may be lighter in color, not as mobile and therefore harder to see to the naked eye. Can dermoscopy aid to perform a better analysis of the skin? The clinical experience developed in two patients gives an affirmative answer, moreover adding useful information of insect and its eggs already known to entomologists but never used in dermatological diagnosis. The identification in vivo can distinguish Phthirus pubis from other skin signs while the conical shape of the operculum and the wide fixing sleeve of egg to hair, tells what species of louse is infesting, even if the insect is unavailable or nits are elsewhere from the pubic area. Entodermoscopy, provided that dermatologists have some knowledge of entomology, therefore promises advantages over standard microscopic examination.

  9. Antimicrobial activity against bacteria with dermatological relevance and skin tolerance of the essential oil from Coriandrum sativum L. fruits.

    PubMed

    Casetti, F; Bartelke, S; Biehler, K; Augustin, M; Schempp, C M; Frank, U

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the antibacterial activity of essential coriander oil (ECO) on bacteria with dermatological relevance and to assess the skin tolerance of antimicrobial effective ECO concentrations. Essential coriander oil was tested on clinical isolates of different bacteria species, all of which may cause superficial skin infections. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using a standardized macrodilution test. Essential coriander oil showed good antibacterial activity towards the majority of the bacterial strains tested, including Streptococcus pyogenes (Lancefield group A) and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), with mean minimal inhibitory concentrations of 0.04% v/v and 0.25% v/v, respectively. The skin tolerance of a cream and a lotion containing 0.5% and 1.0% ECO was assessed in 40 healthy volunteers using the occlusive patch test. No skin irritation could be observed by sensitive photometric assessment in any of the volunteers. Because of its activity against Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA combined with excellent skin tolerance, ECO might be useful as an antiseptic for the prevention and treatment of skin infections with Gram-positive bacteria.

  10. Research Techniques Made Simple: The Application of CRISPR-Cas9 and Genome Editing in Investigative Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Guitart, Joan Ramon; Johnson, Jodi L; Chien, Wade W

    2016-09-01

    Designer nucleases have gained widespread attention for their ability to precisely modify genomic DNA in a programmable manner. These genome-editing nucleases make double-stranded breaks at specified loci, and desired changes can be made to modify, ablate, or excise target genes. This technology has been used widely to develop human disease models in laboratory animals and to study gene functions by silencing, activating, or modifying them. Furthermore, the recent discovery of a bacterially derived programmable nuclease termed clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein 9 (Cas9) has revolutionized the field because of its versatility and wide applicability. In this article, we discuss various modalities used to achieve genome editing with an emphasis on CRISPR-Cas9. We discuss genome-editing strategies to either repair or ablate target genes, with emphasis on their applications for investigating dermatological diseases. Additionally, we highlight preclinical studies showing the potential of genome editing as a therapy for congenital blistering diseases and as an antimicrobial agent, and we discuss limitations and future directions of this technology. PMID:27542298

  11. Research Techniques Made Simple: The Application of CRISPR-Cas9 and Genome Editing in Investigative Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Guitart, Joan Ramon; Johnson, Jodi L.; Chien, Wade W.

    2016-01-01

    Designer nucleases have gained widespread attention for their ability to precisely modify genomic DNA in a programmable manner. These genome-editing nucleases make double-stranded breaks at specified loci, and desired changes can be made to modify, ablate, or excise target genes. This technology has been used widely to develop human disease models in laboratory animals and to study gene functions by silencing, activating, or modifying them. Furthermore, the recent discovery of a bacterially derived programmable nuclease termed clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein 9 (Cas9) has revolutionized the field because of its versatility and wide applicability. In this article, we discuss various modalities used to achieve genome editing with an emphasis on CRISPR-Cas9. We discuss genome-editing strategies to either repair or ablate target genes, with emphasis on their applications for investigating dermatological diseases. Additionally, we highlight preclinical studies showing the potential of genome editing as a therapy for congenital blistering diseases and as an antimicrobial agent, and we discuss limitations and future directions of this technology. PMID:27542298

  12. Validation of a 2D multispectral camera: application to dermatology/cosmetology on a population covering five skin phototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivot, Romuald; Nugroho, Hermawan; Vabres, Pierre; Ahmad Fadzil, M. H.; Marzani, Franck

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the validation of a new multispectral camera specifically developed for dermatological application based on healthy participants from five different Skin PhotoTypes (SPT). The multispectral system provides images of the skin reflectance at different spectral bands, coupled with a neural network-based algorithm that reconstructs a hyperspectral cube of cutaneous data from a multispectral image. The flexibility of neural network based algorithm allows reconstruction at different wave ranges. The hyperspectral cube provides both high spectral and spatial information. The study population involves 150 healthy participants. The participants are classified based on their skin phototype according to the Fitzpatrick Scale and population covers five of the six types. The acquisition of a participant is performed at three body locations: two skin areas exposed to the sun (hand, face) and one area non exposed to the sun (lower back) and each is reconstructed at 3 different wave ranges. The validation is performed by comparing data acquired from a commercial spectrophotometer with the reconstructed spectrum obtained from averaging the hyperspectral cube. The comparison is calculated between 430 to 740 nm due to the limit of the spectrophotometer used. The results reveal that the multispectral camera is able to reconstruct hyperspectral cube with a goodness of fit coefficient superior to 0,997 for the average of all SPT for each location. The study reveals that the multispectral camera provides accurate reconstruction of hyperspectral cube which can be used for analysis of skin reflectance spectrum.

  13. An international dermatological image atlas on the WWW: practical use for undergraduate and continuing medical education, patient education and epidemiological research.

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, G; Bauer, J; Sager, A; Bittorf, A; Simon, M; Diepgen, T

    1998-01-01

    We describe the development of an image database DOIA (Dermatological OnlIne Atlas) and present several spin-off projects using images of the atlas, e.g. student education using the atlas including results of an questionnaire evaluating computer-literacy, prerequisites and interests of students for using computers and the World-Wide-Web (WWW), a patient information system and an experiment to collect epidemiological data from patients with dermatological diseases via WWW. The database, available on the WWW at http:@www.derma.med.uni-erlangen.de, contains about 3,000 clinical images covering more than 540 dermatological diagnoses. It is designed for worldwide use; international submissions are encouraged. One aim of the project is to compile an international reference for dermatological images, containing images of high educational quality and also covering conditions on different skin types and rare diagnoses which are not commonly illustrated in ordinary textbooks. All images were originally mapped to the Erlanger Diagnosis Code, which is a proprietary modified ICD-9 key, later also to the UMLS (Unified Medical Language System). In addition, images are described with keys for the location, physical attributes of the location and clinical and histopathological features of the lesion. In order to facilitate the integration of the atlas into other web-based medical resources and to allow easy access to additional information, the Erlanger Diagnosis Code was mapped to the CUIs (unique concept identifiers) of the UMLS Metathesaurus. One purpose of the UMLS is to allow conversion of terms from one controlled medical vocabulary to another, thus, mapping of our diagnosis code to the UMLS CUIs allows simultaneous search for a given diagnosis in a number of other databases and also access to our image database from other databases. Mapping was successful for 619 out of 1383 dermatological diagnosis terms. For images with these diagnoses we are able to provide a hyperlink to

  14. The Use of Quality Benchmarking in Assessing Web Resources for the Dermatology Virtual Branch Library of the National electronic Library for Health (NeLH)

    PubMed Central

    Roudsari, AV; Gordon, C; Gray, JA Muir

    2001-01-01

    Background In 1998, the U.K. National Health Service Information for Health Strategy proposed the implementation of a National electronic Library for Health to provide clinicians, healthcare managers and planners, patients and the public with easy, round the clock access to high quality, up-to-date electronic information on health and healthcare. The Virtual Branch Libraries are among the most important components of the National electronic Library for Health . They aim at creating online knowledge based communities, each concerned with some specific clinical and other health-related topics. Objectives This study is about the envisaged Dermatology Virtual Branch Libraries of the National electronic Library for Health . It aims at selecting suitable dermatology Web resources for inclusion in the forthcoming Virtual Branch Libraries after establishing preliminary quality benchmarking rules for this task. Psoriasis, being a common dermatological condition, has been chosen as a starting point. Methods Because quality is a principal concern of the National electronic Library for Health, the study includes a review of the major quality benchmarking systems available today for assessing health-related Web sites. The methodology of developing a quality benchmarking system has been also reviewed. Aided by metasearch Web tools, candidate resources were hand-selected in light of the reviewed benchmarking systems and specific criteria set by the authors. Results Over 90 professional and patient-oriented Web resources on psoriasis and dermatology in general are suggested for inclusion in the forthcoming Dermatology Virtual Branch Libraries. The idea of an all-in knowledge-hallmarking instrument for the National electronic Library for Health is also proposed based on the reviewed quality benchmarking systems. Conclusions Skilled, methodical, organized human reviewing, selection and filtering based on well-defined quality appraisal criteria seems likely to be the key ingredient

  15. An international dermatological image atlas on the WWW: practical use for undergraduate and continuing medical education, patient education and epidemiological research.

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, G; Bauer, J; Sager, A; Bittorf, A; Simon, M; Diepgen, T

    1998-01-01

    We describe the development of an image database DOIA (Dermatological OnlIne Atlas) and present several spin-off projects using images of the atlas, e.g. student education using the atlas including results of an questionnaire evaluating computer-literacy, prerequisites and interests of students for using computers and the World-Wide-Web (WWW), a patient information system and an experiment to collect epidemiological data from patients with dermatological diseases via WWW. The database, available on the WWW at http:@www.derma.med.uni-erlangen.de, contains about 3,000 clinical images covering more than 540 dermatological diagnoses. It is designed for worldwide use; international submissions are encouraged. One aim of the project is to compile an international reference for dermatological images, containing images of high educational quality and also covering conditions on different skin types and rare diagnoses which are not commonly illustrated in ordinary textbooks. All images were originally mapped to the Erlanger Diagnosis Code, which is a proprietary modified ICD-9 key, later also to the UMLS (Unified Medical Language System). In addition, images are described with keys for the location, physical attributes of the location and clinical and histopathological features of the lesion. In order to facilitate the integration of the atlas into other web-based medical resources and to allow easy access to additional information, the Erlanger Diagnosis Code was mapped to the CUIs (unique concept identifiers) of the UMLS Metathesaurus. One purpose of the UMLS is to allow conversion of terms from one controlled medical vocabulary to another, thus, mapping of our diagnosis code to the UMLS CUIs allows simultaneous search for a given diagnosis in a number of other databases and also access to our image database from other databases. Mapping was successful for 619 out of 1383 dermatological diagnosis terms. For images with these diagnoses we are able to provide a hyperlink to

  16. A novel, short, and simple screening questionnaire can suggest presence of psoriatic arthritis in psoriasis patients in a dermatology clinic.

    PubMed

    Garg, N; Truong, B; Ku, J H; Devere, T S; Ehst, B D; Blauvelt, A; Deodhar, A A

    2015-10-01

    Delaying diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) can lead to poor quality of life and disability. The purpose of this study is to identify simple questions for dermatologists to screen psoriasis patients for psoriatic arthritis. Data regarding psoriasis and arthritis were prospectively collected by a questionnaire from all psoriasis patients. Patients with joint-related symptoms were assessed by a rheumatologist for the presence of PsA. Retrospectively, the sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios, and posttest probabilities of various screening questions were calculated to identify the best combination of parameters. Of 517 patients seen in dermatology clinic, 117 (22.63 %) were found to have PsA. Four screening questions ("Do you have a history of joint pain or swelling?" "Do you have stiffness in the morning?" "Have you had X-rays taken of your joints?" "Do you have PsA?") with psoriatic nail changes demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for predicting PsA. A cutoff of three out of these five parameters correctly classified patients with and without PsA with 86.9 % sensitivity, 71.3 % specificity, 53 % positive predictive value (PPV), 93.6 % negative predictive value (NPV), and area under the curve (AUC) of 0.87. Likelihood ratios for individual parameters varied between1.6 and 3.7, and with a combination of certain parameters, the posttest probability of PsA was 76 %. This is a preliminary data on a potential screening questionnaire which can help dermatologists quickly screen for PsA. All patients not having evaluated by a rheumatologist could have led to underdiagnosis of PsA and potential misclassification. Psoriasis patients seen at a specialty clinic may introduce a referral bias.

  17. Demodectic mange, dermatophilosis, and other parasitic and bacterial dermatologic diseases in free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in the United States from 1975 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, N M; Ruder, M G; Gerhold, R W; Brown, J D; Munk, B A; Oesterle, P T; Kubiski, S V; Keel, M K

    2014-05-01

    The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is a common and widespread North American game species. To evaluate the incidence, clinical manifestations, demography, and pathology of bacterial and parasitic dermatologic diseases in white-tailed deer in the southeastern United States, we retrospectively evaluated white-tailed deer cases submitted to the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study from 1975 to 2012. Among 2569 deer examined, bacterial or parasitic dermatologic disease was diagnosed in 88 (3.4%) individuals, with Demodex spp (n = 37; 42.0%) and Dermatophilus congolensis (n = 19; 21.6%) as the most common causes. Demodicosis was significantly more common in deer older than 2 years and was most often detected in the fall; no statistically significant sex predilection was identified. Affected animals had patchy to generalized alopecia, often distributed over the head, neck, limbs, and trunk; microscopic lesions included epidermal crusts and cutaneous nodules with mild perifollicular, lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. Dermatophilosis was most common in males younger than 1 year that were often found dead. Crusting, erythema, and alopecia occurred on the face, ears, and distal extremities. Less commonly, infectious dermatologic diseases were associated with other bacteria (n = 13; 14.8%), fungi (n = 5; 5.7%), ectoparasites (chiggers, lice, mites, and ticks; n = 11; 12.5%), and larval nematodes (n = 7; 8.0%). Population-level effects of these diseases in white-tailed deer are likely minimal; however, due to their dramatic presentation, demodicosis, dermatophilosis, and other infectious skin diseases can be of concern to hunters and, in some cases, may have zoonotic potential.

  18. Process of Care for Patients With Benign Cysts and Tumors: Consensus Document of the Andalusian Regional Section of the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (AEDV).

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ramírez, D; Ruiz-Villaverde, R; de Troya, M; Reyes-Alcázar, V; Alcalde, M; Galán, M; García-Lora, E; García, E I; Linares, M; Martínez, L; Pulpillo, Á; Suárez, C; Vélez, A; Torres, A

    2016-06-01

    Benign skin lesions are a common reason for visits to primary care physicians and dermatologists. However, access to diagnosis and treatment for these lesions varies considerably between users, primarily because no explicit or standardized criteria for dealing with these patients have been defined. Principally with a view to reducing this variability in the care of patients with benign cysts or tumors, the Andalusian Regional Section of the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (AEDV) has created a Process of Care document that describes a clinical pathway and quality-of-care characteristics for each action. This report also makes recommendations for decision-making with respect to lesions of this type. PMID:26826882

  19. Process of Care for Patients With Benign Cysts and Tumors: Consensus Document of the Andalusian Regional Section of the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (AEDV).

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ramírez, D; Ruiz-Villaverde, R; de Troya, M; Reyes-Alcázar, V; Alcalde, M; Galán, M; García-Lora, E; García, E I; Linares, M; Martínez, L; Pulpillo, Á; Suárez, C; Vélez, A; Torres, A

    2016-06-01

    Benign skin lesions are a common reason for visits to primary care physicians and dermatologists. However, access to diagnosis and treatment for these lesions varies considerably between users, primarily because no explicit or standardized criteria for dealing with these patients have been defined. Principally with a view to reducing this variability in the care of patients with benign cysts or tumors, the Andalusian Regional Section of the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (AEDV) has created a Process of Care document that describes a clinical pathway and quality-of-care characteristics for each action. This report also makes recommendations for decision-making with respect to lesions of this type.

  20. Clinical Pathway for Patients with Acute or Chronic Urticaria: A Consensus Statement of the Andalusian Section of the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (AEDV).

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Villaverde, R; Moreno-Ramírez, D; Galán-Gutierrez, M; de Troya, M; Reyes-Alcázar, V; Alcalde, M; García, E I; Linares, M; Martínez, L; Pulpillo, Á; Suárez, C; Vélez, A; García-Lora, E; Torres, A

    2016-01-01

    Attention has been focused on new ways to understand and manage urticaria ever since the recent addition of novel drugs to the therapeutic arsenal, the updating of clinical practice guidelines, and the publication of pathophysiologic insights. The Andalusian Section of the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (AEDV) has developed a clinical pathway that defines quality-of-care characteristics and makes recommendations on decision-making affecting patients with urticaria. We present a patient-centered approach to care, in which the patient's clinical pathway through the health care system includes links between primary and hospital care to ensure continuity-a key feature of quality.