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Sample records for dermatology

  1. Behavioral dermatology.

    PubMed

    Virga, Vint

    2003-03-01

    The practice of behavioral dermatology encompasses the management of any dermatologic condition for which there is a substantial behavioral or emotional component. Commonly recognized behavioral dermatoses such as acral lick dermatitis, psychogenic alopecia, and hyperesthesia are syndromes rather than discrete diagnoses. Successful patient management is dependent upon integrating physiological, social, and environmental factors which contribute to the clinical manifestation of behavioral dermatoses.

  2. Dermatologic nondisease.

    PubMed

    Cotterill, J A

    1996-07-01

    Dermatologic nondisease is a relatively common problem presenting to dermatologists with rich symptomatology in important body image areas such as the face, scalp, and genital area. There is no objective dermatologic change present on examination. The most common psychiatric disease present is depression. Suicide is common, especially in women with perceived facial problems.

  3. Teaching dermatology.

    PubMed

    Burge, S M

    2004-03-01

    How might teachers optimize the learning of dermatology? Learning outcomes derived from the curriculum will clarify the requirements of dermatology courses for teachers as well as learners. Clinical teachers must learn to exploit opportunities for teaching, use time effectively, target teaching at the right level and evaluate what the students have learnt. Students should have opportunities to participate actively in clinics, under appropriate supervision, as well as to observe clinicians working with patients. Although new technologies may complement clinical teaching, these are no substitute for clinical experience.

  4. Dermatologic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Sica, P A

    1986-03-01

    Being able to recognize and treat a dermatologic emergency is extremely important to the primary care physician. This ability is very rewarding for the patient and gratifying to the physician. In this article, some of the more commonly encountered emergencies are discussed.

  5. Donkey dermatology.

    PubMed

    White, Stephen D

    2013-12-01

    Donkeys (Equus asinus) are a species used throughout the world primarily as beasts of burden, but occasionally for other functions, as a meat source or as pets. Although closely related to other equids, they have some unique features of their own with regard to dermatologic disease. This article highlights some of the various dermatoses seen or reported in donkeys, as well as some comparisons with horses when prevalence, presentation, or treatment may differ.

  6. Hospital Dermatology, Introduction.

    PubMed

    Fox, Lindy P

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology is emerging as a distinct dermatology subspecialty where dermatologists specialize in caring for patients hospitalized with skin disease. While the main focus of inpatient dermatology is the delivery of top-quality and timely dermatologic care to patients in the hospital setting, the practice of hospital-based dermatology has many additional components that are critical to its success.

  7. Inpatient Consultative Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Biesbroeck, Lauren K; Shinohara, Michi M

    2015-11-01

    Dermatology consultation can improve diagnostic accuracy in the hospitalized patient with cutaneous disease. Dermatology consultation can streamline and improve treatment plans, and potentially lead to cost savings. Dermatology consultants can be a valuable resource for education for trainees, patients, and families. Inpatient consultative dermatology spans a breadth of conditions, including inflammatory dermatoses,infectious processes, adverse medication reactions, and neoplastic disorders, many of which can be diagnosed based on dermatologic examination alone, but when necessary, bedside skin biopsies can contribute important diagnostic information.

  8. Aerospace Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionarily, man is a terrestrial mammal, adapted to land. Aviation and now space/microgravity environment, hence, pose new challenges to our physiology. Exposure to these changes affects the human body in acute and chronic settings. Since skin reflects our mental and physical well-being, any change/side effects of this environment shall be detected on the skin. Aerospace industry offers a unique environment with a blend of all possible occupational disorders, encompassing all systems of the body, particularly the skin. Aerospace dermatologists in the near future shall be called upon for their expertise as we continue to push human physiological boundaries with faster and more powerful military aircraft and look to colonize space stations and other planets. Microgravity living shall push dermatology into its next big leap-space, the final frontier. This article discusses the physiological effects of this environment on skin, effect of common dermatoses in aerospace environment, effect of microgravity on skin, and occupational hazards of this industry. PMID:28216729

  9. Aerospace Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Arora, Gp Capt Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionarily, man is a terrestrial mammal, adapted to land. Aviation and now space/microgravity environment, hence, pose new challenges to our physiology. Exposure to these changes affects the human body in acute and chronic settings. Since skin reflects our mental and physical well-being, any change/side effects of this environment shall be detected on the skin. Aerospace industry offers a unique environment with a blend of all possible occupational disorders, encompassing all systems of the body, particularly the skin. Aerospace dermatologists in the near future shall be called upon for their expertise as we continue to push human physiological boundaries with faster and more powerful military aircraft and look to colonize space stations and other planets. Microgravity living shall push dermatology into its next big leap-space, the final frontier. This article discusses the physiological effects of this environment on skin, effect of common dermatoses in aerospace environment, effect of microgravity on skin, and occupational hazards of this industry.

  10. Dermatologic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Usatine, Richard P; Sandy, Natasha

    2010-10-01

    Life-threatening dermatologic conditions include Rocky Mountain spotted fever; necrotizing fasciitis; toxic epidermal necrolysis; and Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is the most common rickettsial disease in the United States, with an overall mortality rate of 5 to 10 percent. Classic symptoms include fever, headache, and rash in a patient with a history of tick bite or exposure. Doxycycline is the first-line treatment. Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive infection of the deep fascia, with necrosis of the subcutaneous tissues. It usually occurs after surgery or trauma. Patients have erythema and pain out of proportion to the physical findings. Immediate surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy should be initiated. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are acute hypersensitivity cutaneous reactions. Stevens-Johnson syndrome is characterized by target lesions with central dusky purpura or a central bulla. Toxic epidermal necrolysis is a more severe reaction with full-thickness epidermal necrosis and exfoliation. Most cases of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are drug induced. The causative drug should be discontinued immediately, and the patient should be hospitalized for supportive care.

  11. Triads in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Prachi G; Khopkar, Uday S; Mahajan, Sunanda A; Mishra, Sunil N

    2013-01-01

    It is imperative for any dermatology resident to have a good knowledge of the various triads in dermatology. For an easy grasp over this topic, we have grouped the various triads on the basis of their etiologies. PMID:24082177

  12. Consumer Empowerment in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Heather E.; Busse, Kristine L.; Dellavalle, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Health care consumers increasingly confront and collaborate with their medical providers. We describe consumer success in other medical fields and in dermatology, especially dermatologic disease advocacy and improving dermatologist-patient interactions. PMID:19254661

  13. Dermatology on instagram.

    PubMed

    Karimkhani, Chante; Connett, Jessica; Boyers, Lindsay; Quest, Tyler; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-07-15

    The novel photo-sharing social networking platform, Instagram, has an impressive following of 75 million daily users, with a predominantly younger and female demographic. This study investigated the presence of dermatology-related content on Instagram. The most popular professional dermatological organizations, dermatology journals, and dermatology related patient advocate groups on Facebook and Twitter, determined from a prior study, were searched for established profiles on Instagram. In addition, dermatology-related terms (i.e. dermatology, dermatologist, alopecia, eczema, melanoma, psoriasis, and skin cancer) and dermatology-related hashtags (i.e. #dermatology, #dermatologist, #melanoma, #acne, #psoriasis, and #alopecia) were searched. None of the top ten dermatological journals or professional dermatological organizations were found on Instagram. Although only one of the top ten patient advocate groups related to dermatology conditions, Melanoma Research Foundation, had an Instagram presence, there were many private offices, cosmetic products, and some patient advocacy groups. This novel social networking platform could grant dermatology journals and other professional organizations a unique opportunity to reach younger demographic populations, particularly women, with the potential for true educational and life-changing impact.

  14. Dermatologic therapy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Kelly H

    2015-03-01

    Patients present during pregnancy with a variety of dermatologic conditions, most of which can be treated conservatively with topical medication by a primary obstetrician if he or she is familiar with common treatment options. Patients with moderate to severe forms of dermatologic disease or those requiring systemic therapy should be treated in consultation with a dermatologist. Dermatologic surgery can be performed safely in the second trimester using local anesthesia if needed.

  15. Psychosomatic factors in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Urpe, Mauro; Pallanti, Stefano; Lotti, Torello

    2005-10-01

    Psychosomatics describes any aspect of dermatology with psychologic or psychiatric elements. Dermatologists know that a significant proportion of their practice involves patients for whom psychologic elements either partially or sometimes entirely dominate their presenting chief complaints. This article explores the role of psychosomatic factors in dermatologic disorders. The authors discuss the clinical interface between psychiatry, psychology and dermatology and the interpretation of possible relationships between cutaneous diseases, the role of the mind, and psychotherapeutic interventions.

  16. The dermatology acting internship.

    PubMed

    Stephens, John B; Raimer, Sharon S; Wagner, Richard F

    2011-07-15

    Acting internships are an important component of modern day medical school curriculum. Several specialties outside of internal medicine now offer acting internship experiences to fourth year medical students. We have found that a dermatology acting internship is a valuable experience for fourth year medical students who are interested in pursuing a residency in dermatology. Our experience with the dermatology acting internship over the 2010-2011 academic year is described.

  17. Animals Eponyms in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Nidhi; Jindal, Pooja; Kumar, Jeevan; Gupta, Sanjeev; Jain, VK

    2014-01-01

    The world of Dermatology is flooded with inflexions among clinical conditions and signs and syndromes; making it interesting, but a tougher subject to remember. Signs and syndromes have always fascinated residents, but simultaneously burdened their minds, as these attractive names are difficult to remember. This work was undertaken to review dermatological conditions and signs based on commonly encountered daily words and objects like animals, etc. Fifty dermatological conditions were found to be based on animal eponyms. For example, the usage of animal terminology in dermatology like leonine facies is present in leprosy, sarcoidosis, mycosis fungoides (MF), and airborne contact dermatitis (ABCD). PMID:25484417

  18. Eponymous signs in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Madke, Bhushan; Nayak, Chitra

    2012-01-01

    Clinical signs reflect the sheer and close observatory quality of an astute physician. Many new dermatological signs both in clinical and diagnostic aspects of various dermatoses are being reported and no single book on dermatology literature gives a comprehensive list of these “signs” and postgraduate students in dermatology finds it difficult to have access to the description, as most of these resident doctor do not have access to the said journal articles. “Signs” commonly found in dermatologic literature with a brief discussion and explanation is reviewed in this paper. PMID:23189246

  19. Thalidomide in Dermatology: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Iffat; Dorjay, Konchok; Anwar, Parvaiz

    2015-01-01

    The use of thalidomide in relation to dermatology is well- known and enough data is available in the literature about various aspects of thalidomide. Despite being an interesting and useful drug for many dermatoses, it is associated with many health hazards including the birth defects, phocomelia. We hereby present a comprehensive review about thalidomide and its application in dermatology. PMID:25814738

  20. Korean Dermatological Association.

    PubMed

    Ro, B I

    1998-12-01

    The Korean Dermatological Association (KDA) was founded on October 27, 1945. The first annual meeting was held on November 15, 1947, and meetings have been held twice a year since 1975. The KDA 50th Annual Spring Meeting was on April 15-16, 1998. Korean Journal of Dermatology, the official journal of the KDA, was first published in 1960 and has been published bimonthly since 1978. Annals of Dermatology (Seoul), the English journal, was first published in 1989 and has been published quarterly since 1995. The American residency and specialty board system was introduced in 1954. Board specialty examination of dermatology candidates by the KDA requires four years of residency. Three hundred and twenty residents are now in the training course in the fifty-nine resident training approved hospitals this year. KDA has seven regional dermatological societies; Seoul, Pusan, Taegu, Honam, Chungchong, Jeonbuk, and Kangwon. KDA has had eleven research subcommittees since 1981. There are two associated societies of the KDA; the Korean Society for Investigative Dermatology was founded in 1991, and the Korean Society for Medical Mycology was founded in 1994. The Korea-Japan Joint Meeting of Dermatology has been held every two years since 1979 and the Korea-China Joint Meeting of Dermatology and Mycology has been held since 1996. About three hundred papers were presented at the 49th Annual Autumn Meeting on October 21-23, 1997. These included special lectures, invited lectures, educational lectures, oral presentations, and posters. About five hundred dermatologists participated in that meeting. KDA joined the International League of Dermatological Societies in 1973 with forty-seven members. There are around 1200 members of the KDA including 320 residents in 1998.

  1. [Ultrasound in pediatric dermatology].

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, F J; Muñoz-Garza, F Z; Hernández-Martín, A

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous ultrasound is particularly useful in pediatric dermatology to diagnose numerous diseases without the need to use invasive tests. The present articles reviews some frequent dermatological entities in children whose study can be simplified through cutaneous ultrasound. This article also provides practical recommendations reported in the literature that may facilitate ultrasound examination, with special mention of benign tumoural disease, both congenital and acquired, and vascular anomalies. Copyright © 2015 Academia Española de Dermatología y Venereología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Vitamin E in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Keen, Mohammad Abid; Hassan, Iffat

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin E is an important fat-soluble antioxidant and has been in use for more than 50 years in dermatology. It is an important ingredient in many cosmetic products. It protects the skin from various deleterious effects due to solar radiation by acting as a free-radical scavenger. Experimental studies suggest that vitamin E has antitumorigenic and photoprotective properties. There is a paucity of controlled clinical studies providing a rationale for well-defined dosages and clinical indications of vitamin E usage in dermatological practice. The aim of this article is to review the cosmetic as well as clinical implications of vitamin E in dermatology. PMID:27559512

  3. Yoga for dermatologic conditions.

    PubMed

    Jalalat, Sheila

    2015-04-01

    As both a dermatology resident and yoga instructor, I find the potential correlation between the 2 disciplines to be interesting and a growing topic of attention in the media today. With the rising trend of practicing yoga, which encompasses physical postures, breathing exercises, and meditation or mindfulness, it is inevitable that patients will inquire about the benefits of yoga in managing dermatologic problems. In this column, I will discuss the dermatologic manifestations of stress as well as the known health benefits of yoga as described in the literature so that residents may offer an objective opinion about yoga in response to patient inquiries.

  4. American Academy of Dermatology

    MedlinePlus

    ... World Dialogues in Dermatology JAAD Mohs AUC MyDermPath+ Psoriasis Patient education resources Practice Management Center Coding and ... Annual Meeting AAD Meeting News Sulzberger lecturer links psoriasis, CV disease Quality teledermatology is part of the ...

  5. Aspirin in dermatology: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Bubna, Aditya Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been one of the oldest drugs in the field of medicine, with a wide range of applications. In dermatology, aspirin has shown benefit in a variety of disorders. Recently, reduction of melanoma risk with aspirin has been demonstrated. Although an analgesic to begin with, aspirin has come a long way; after cardiology, it is now found to be useful even in dermatology. PMID:26753146

  6. Surgical lasers in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanczyk, Jacek; Nowakowski, Wlodzimierz; Golebiowska, Aleksandra; Michalska, I.; Mindak, Marek K.

    1997-10-01

    Almost every laser for medical applications was first tried in dermatology. The efficiency of YAG, CO2, and Argon lasers on this area and their potential advantages over conventional methods were mostly evaluated by cosmetic effect of laser therapy. The indications for different laser treatment in such dermatological cases as: angiomas, telangiectasias, pigmented lesions, nevus flammeus congenitus, deep cavernous angiomas, skin neoplasms and condylomata acuminata are discussed in this paper and the results of the laser therapy are also presented.

  7. Cyclosporine in veterinary dermatology.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Brian S

    2013-01-01

    Cyclosporine is an immunomodulatory medication that is efficacious and approved for atopic dermatitis in dogs and allergic dermatitis in cats; it has also been used to successfully manage a variety of immune-mediated dermatoses in dogs and cats. This article reviews the use of cyclosporine in veterinary dermatology including its mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, side effects, and relevant clinical updates. Dermatologic indications including atopic/allergic dermatitis, perianal fistulas, sebaceous adenitis, and other immune-mediated skin diseases are discussed.

  8. Sonography of Dermatologic Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Wortsman, Ximena

    2017-09-01

    Dermatologic conditions may be the subjects of potential emergency consultations, and the knowledge of their sonographic appearance can facilitate an early diagnosis and management. In this pictorial essay, the sonographic dermatologic anatomy, technique, and conditions that can be supported by a prompt sonographic diagnosis are reviewed. The sonographic signs that may help diagnose these entities are discussed with a practical approach. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  9. Dermatology in Doximity.

    PubMed

    Ashack, Kurt A; Burton, Kyle A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-02-17

    Doximity, currently the largest online social networking service for United States (US) health care professionals and medical students, provides a wide variety of content to a large audience. In fact, its database includes 1,078,305 physicians in the US. It is therefore important to evaluate this content from time to time. Our objective is to analyze both the residency rankings and news content presented in Doximity, with respect to dermatology. The study compared the residency rankings created by Doximity to another dermatology residency ranking system that used a different algorithm. In terms of dermatology content, seven dermatology-related search terms were entered into the Doximity search query and data was collected on the first 20 "relevant" articles. Our study evaluated a total of 140 articles. The search term "skin cancer" yielded the most articles totaling 6,001. Informative articles were the most common type of article for each content item searched except for "dermatology", yielding research articles as the most common content type (70%). The search term "melanoma awareness" had the largest number of shares (19,032). In comparing dermatology residency rankings on Doximity with another ranking system that accounted for scholarly achievement, there was 50% overlap. In conclusion, it is vital to evaluate content on social media websites that are utilized by US medical students and health care professionals. We hope this information presented provides an up-to-date analysis on the quality of one particular social media platform.

  10. Mobile applications in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Ann Chang; Endly, Dawnielle C; Henley, Jill; Amir, Mahsa; Sampson, Blake P; Moreau, Jacqueline F; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2013-11-01

    With advancements in mobile technology, cellular phone-based mobile applications (apps) may be used in the practice and delivery of dermatologic care. To identify and categorize the variety of current mobile apps available in dermatology for patients and providers. Dermatology-related search terms were queried in the online app stores of the most commonly used mobile platforms developed by Apple, Android, Blackberry, Nokia, and Windows. Applications were assigned to categories based on description. Popularity, price, and reviews were recorded and target audiences were determined through websites offering online mobile apps. Number, type, and price of mobile apps in dermatology. A total of 229 dermatology-related apps were identified in the following categories: general dermatology reference (61 [26.6%]), self-surveillance/diagnosis (41 [17.9%]), disease guide (39 [17.0%]), educational aid (20 [8.7%]), sunscreen/UV recommendation (19 [8.3%]), calculator (12 [5.2%]), teledermatology (8 [3.5%]), conference (6 [2.6%]), journal (6 [2.6%]), photograph storage/sharing (5 [2.2%]), dermoscopy (2 [0.9%]), pathology (2 [0.9%]), and other (8 [3.5%]). The most reviewed apps included Ultraviolet ~ UV Index (355 reviews), VisualDx (306), SPF (128), iSore (61), and SpotMole (50). There were 209 unique apps, with 17 apps existing on more than 1 operating system. More than half of the apps were offered free of charge (117 [51.1%]). Paid apps (112 [48.9%]) ranged from $0.99 to $139.99 (median, $2.99). Target audiences included patient (117 [51.1%]), health care provider (94 [41.0%]), and both (18 [7.9%]). The widespread variety and popularity of mobile apps demonstrate a great potential to expand the practice and delivery of dermatologic care.

  11. Probiotics in dermatologic practice.

    PubMed

    Fuchs-Tarlovsky, Vanessa; Marquez-Barba, María Fernanda; Sriram, Krishnan

    2016-03-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that beneficially affect the host when administered in adequate amounts. They have an excellent safety profile. Probiotics have been used as immunomodulators in inflammatory skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis. The aim of this study was to summarize the available evidence concerning the use of different strains of probiotics in dermatology practice. We conducted a literature review of English and Spanish publications listed in standard databases (PubMed, Ovid, Google Scholar, Medline, and EBSCO), between 1994 and 2015 using the words "probiotics" and "dermatology." We found ∼70 studies containing these criteria and selected 42 in which probiotics were used for dermatologic purposes. We found enough evidence to recommend the use of probiotics in specific conditions in dermatology practice, especially in children with atopic dermatitis. Further well-designed, large population based trials are needed to validate the use of probiotics in dermatology practice, including innovative therapies to rebuild skin barrier defects, protection against microbial colonization, and restoration of immunologic balance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hippocrates on Pediatric Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Sgantzos, Markos; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Giatsiou, Styliani; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Androutsos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hippocrates of Kos is well known in medicine, but his contributions to pediatric dermatology have not previously been examined. A systematic study of Corpus Hippocraticum was undertaken to document references of clinical and historical importance of pediatric dermatology. In Corpus Hippocraticum, a variety of skin diseases are described, along with proposed treatments. Hippocrates rejected the theory of the punishment of the Greek gods and supported the concept that dermatologic diseases resulted from a loss of balance in the body humors. Many of the terms that Hippocrates and his pupils used are still being used today. Moreover, he probably provided one of the first descriptions of skin findings in smallpox, Henoch-Schönlein purpura (also known as anaphylactoid purpura, purpura rheumatica, allergic purpura), and meningococcal septicemia.

  13. Update in adolescent dermatology.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Arthur N; Shwayder, Tor A

    2013-04-01

    This dermatology article serves as a quick reference for the physician treating adolescents. We first review the diagnostic approach to a dermatologic problem: configuration, color, pattern, and distribution. The next section discusses diagnosis and management of the most common clinical situations encountered in everyday practice, including skin infections, infestations, dermatitis, hypersensitivity reactions, and papulosquamous disorders. The following section covers conditions that should be managed with the help of a dermatologist, including difficult acute situations such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and necrotizing fasciitis; other chronic situations, including refractory common conditions such as acne and psoriasis, are also considered. We then discuss conditions that should be managed exclusively by a dermatologist, including malignancies, bullous disorders, and less common types of ichthyosis. The final section alerts the physician to dermatologic conditions that may be manifestations of other disorders, necessitating appropriate referral to a different specialist. Examples are immunologic and endocrine disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, collagen vascular disease, and malignancies.

  14. Diet and Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Samir P.

    2014-01-01

    For decades, it was thought that many common dermatological conditions had no relationship to diet. Studies from recent years, however, have made it clear that diet may influence outcome. In this review, the authors focus on conditions for which the role of diet has traditionally been an underappreciated aspect of therapy. In some cases, dietary interventions may influence the course of the skin disease, as in acne. In others, dietary change may serve as one aspect of prevention, such as in skin cancer and aging of the skin. In others, dermatological disease may be linked to systemic disease, and dietary changes may affect health outcomes, as in psoriasis. Lastly, systemic medications prescribed for dermatological disease, such as steroids, are known to raise the risk of other diseases, and dietary change may reduce this risk. PMID:25053983

  15. Procedural pediatric dermatology.

    PubMed

    Metz, Brandie J

    2013-04-01

    Due to many factors, including parental anxiety, a child's inability to understand the necessity of a procedure and a child's unwillingness to cooperate, it can be much more challenging to perform dermatologic procedures in children. This article reviews pre-procedural preparation of patients and parents, techniques for minimizing injection-related pain and optimal timing of surgical intervention. The risks and benefits of general anesthesia in the setting of pediatric dermatologic procedures are discussed. Additionally, the surgical approach to a few specific types of birthmarks is addressed.

  16. Autologous Therapies in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sumir; Mahajan, Bharat Bhushan; Singh, Amarbir

    2014-01-01

    Autologous therapy is a therapeutic intervention that uses an individual’s cells or tissues, which are processed outside the body, and reintroduced into the donor. This emerging field presently represents a mere tip of the iceberg with much knowledge and applications yet to be discovered. It, being free from risks of hypersensitivity reactions and transmission of infectious agents, has been explored in various fields, such as plastic surgery, orthopedics, and dermatology. This review article focuses on various forms of autologous therapies used in dermatology along with their applications and mechanisms of action. PMID:25584137

  17. Magnification for the dermatologic surgeon.

    PubMed

    Chodkiewicz, Hubert M; Joseph, Aaron K

    2017-06-01

    Ergonomic practice increases the productivity, quality, and longevity of the dermatologic surgeon. When used properly, magnification devices can be ergonomic and beneficial additions to the dermatologic surgeon's practice. Herein, we review the available magnification options for the dermatologic surgeon and evaluate the options based on cost, design, and functional advantages and disadvantages. Magnification for the dermatologic surgeon may be a useful tool for a healthier, more efficient, and higher-quality practice.

  18. [What's new in paediatric dermatology?].

    PubMed

    Plantin, P

    2014-12-01

    Regular analysis of the major journals in dermatology and paediatrics has been used to select forty articles which are representative of the past year in paediatric dermatology. This selection is not exhaustive but rather reflects the interests of the author and also the dominant topics in paediatric dermatology in 2013-2014.

  19. Paradoxes in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Adya, Keshavmurthy A.; Inamadar, Arun C.; Palit, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    Many paradoxical phenomena related to clinical, immunological, and therapeutic dermatology have been described. While some of them can be explained logically, the cause for others can only be speculated. Whenever encountered in clinical practice, background knowledge of such paradoxes may be useful to the clinician. PMID:23741675

  20. Neoprene splinting: dermatological issues.

    PubMed

    Stern, E B; Callinan, N; Hank, M; Lewis, E J; Schousboe, J T; Ytterberg, S R

    1998-01-01

    Occupational therapists are expanding their use of custom and commercial soft splints fabricated from neoprene (polychloroprene), but little has been written regarding dermatological issues associated with this material. Skin contact with neoprene poses two dermatological risks: allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and miliaria rubra (i.e., prickly heat). Allergic reaction to neoprene is generally ascribed to the accelerants used to manufacture the man-made rubber, specifically thiourea compounds and mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT). Symptoms of neoprene-related ACD include itching, skin eruptions, swelling, and hemorrhages into the skin. Miliaria rubra creates small, red, elevated, inflammatory papules and a tingling, burning sensation. Although neoprene hypersensitivity is rare, its incidence may grow as neoprene becomes a more commonly used material. It is recommended that therapists screen patients for a history of dermatological reactions to neoprene or other materials containing thiourea compounds or MBT and educate patients to discontinue splint use if dermatological symptoms develop. Therapists are also encouraged to notify splint manufacturers regarding all ACD reactions.

  1. Dyslipidemia in Dermatological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Chetana; Shenoy, Manjunath Mala; Rao, Gururaja K.

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidemias are one of the common metabolic disorders. A link between dermatological disorders like psoriasis and dyslipidemia has been established in the recent past. Many dermatological disorders could have a systemic inflammatory component which explains such association. Chronic inflammatory dermatological disorders could also have other metabolic imbalances that may contribute to dyslipidemia. Presence of such abnormal metabolism may justify routine screening of these disorders for associated dyslipidemia and other metabolic abnormalities and early treatment of such comorbidities to improve quality of life. Some of the drugs used by dermatologists such as retinoids are also likely to be a cause of dyslipidemia. Hence, it is imperative that the dermatologists obtain scientific knowledge on the underlying mechanisms involved in dyslipidemia and understand when to intervene with therapies. A systematic review of the English language literature was done by using Google Scholar and PubMed. In this review, attempts are made to list the dermatological disorders associated with dyslipidemia; to simplify the understanding of underlying mechanisms; and to give a brief idea about the interventions. PMID:26713286

  2. Dermatology for the Allergist

    PubMed Central

    Lockey, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Allergists/immunologists see patients with a variety of skin disorders. Some, such as atopic and allergic contact dermatitis, are caused by abnormal immunologic reactions, whereas others, such as seborrheic dermatitis or rosacea, lack an immunologic basis. This review summarizes a select group of dermatologic problems commonly encountered by an allergist/immunologist. PMID:23268431

  3. Dermatologic manifestations of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Laniosz, Valerie; Wetter, David A; Godar, Desiree A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the common dermatologic diagnoses and skin-related symptoms in a cohort of patients with fibromyalgia seen in a tertiary referral center. A retrospective chart review was performed of all patients with a fibromyalgia diagnosis from January 1 to December 31, 2008, whose diagnosis was confirmed in the Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Charts were reviewed for dermatologic conditions and cutaneous symptoms. Demographic and clinical data were collected to assess the frequency of skin-related issues in patients with fibromyalgia. Of 2,233 patients screened, 845 patients met the inclusion criteria of having a confirmed diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Among these fibromyalgia patients, various dermatologic conditions and cutaneous problems were identified, including hyperhidrosis in 270 (32.0 %), burning sensation of the skin or mucous membranes in 29 (3.4 %), and various unusual cutaneous sensations in 14 (1.7 %). Pruritus without identified cause was noted by 28 patients (3.3 %), with another 16 patients (1.9 %) reporting neurotic excoriations, prurigo nodules, or lichen simplex chronicus. Some form of dermatitis other than neurodermatitis was found in 77 patients (9.1 %). Patients with fibromyalgia may have skin-related symptoms associated with their fibromyalgia. No single dermatologic diagnosis appears to be overrepresented in this population, with the exception of a subjective increase in sweating.

  4. Vaccines in dermatological diseases.

    PubMed

    Magel, G D; Mendoza, N; Digiorgio, C M; Haitz, K A; Lapolla, W J; Tyring, S K

    2011-06-01

    Vaccines have been a cornerstone in medicine and public health since their inception in the 18th century by Edward Jenner. Today, greater than 20 vaccines are used worldwide for the prevention of both viral and bacterial diseases. This article will review the vaccines used for the following dermatological diseases: smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, shingles, and human papillomavirus.

  5. Pediatric dermatology training survey of United States dermatology residency programs.

    PubMed

    Nijhawan, Rajiv I; Mazza, Joni M; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    Variability exists in pediatric dermatology education for dermatology residents. We sought to formally assess the pediatric dermatology curriculum and experience in a dermatology residency program. Three unique surveys were developed for dermatology residents, residency program directors, and pediatric dermatology fellowship program directors. The surveys consisted of questions pertaining to residency program characteristics. Sixty-three graduating third-year residents, 51 residency program directors, and 18 pediatric dermatology fellowship program directors responded. Residents in programs with one or more full-time pediatric dermatologist were more likely to feel very competent treating children and were more likely to be somewhat or extremely satisfied with their pediatric curriculums than residents in programs with no full-time pediatric dermatologist (50.0% vs 5.9%, p = 0.002, and 85.3% vs 52.9%, p < 0.001, respectively). Residents in programs with no full-time pediatric dermatologist were the only residents who were somewhat or extremely dissatisfied with their pediatric training. Residency program directors were more satisfied with their curriculums when there was one or more pediatric dermatologist on staff (p < 0.01). Residents in programs with pediatric dermatology fellowships were much more likely to report being extremely satisfied than residents in programs without a pediatric dermatology fellowship (83.3% vs 21.2%; p < 0.001). The results of this survey support the need for dermatology residency programs to continue to strengthen their pediatric dermatology curriculums, especially through the recruitment of full-time pediatric dermatologists.

  6. Dermatologic Manifestations of Systemic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Maryn Anne; Isamah, Nwamaka; Northway, Rebecca M

    2015-12-01

    Dermatologic complaints are encountered frequently by the primary care provider. Patients often are required as well as want to see their primary care provider before referral to a specialist. Therefore, primary care providers must be skilled in a variety of topics including dermatology. Certain dermatologic manifestations are associated with, or indicative of, systemic diseases. Primary care providers must be knowledgeable in diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of dermatologic conditions, as well as when to appropriately refer. This article reviews common dermatologic manifestations of systemic diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cell Therapy in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Petrof, Gabriela; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; McGrath, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing the regenerative capacity of keratinocytes and fibroblasts from human skin has created new opportunities to develop cell-based therapies for patients. Cultured cells and bioengineered skin products are being used to treat patients with inherited and acquired skin disorders associated with defective skin, and further clinical trials of new products are in progress. The capacity of extracutaneous sources of cells such as bone marrow is also being investigated for its plasticity in regenerating skin, and new strategies, such as the derivation of inducible pluripotent stem cells, also hold great promise for future cell therapies in dermatology. This article reviews some of the preclinical and clinical studies and future directions relating to cell therapy in dermatology, particularly for inherited skin diseases associated with fragile skin and poor wound healing. PMID:24890834

  8. [LED lights in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Noé, C; Pelletier-Aouizerate, M; Cartier, H

    2017-04-01

    The use in dermatology of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) continues to be surrounded by controversy. This is due mainly to poor knowledge of the physicochemical phases of a wide range of devices that are difficult to compare to one another, and also to divergences between irrefutable published evidence either at the level of in vitro studies or at the cellular level, and discordant clinical results in a variety of different indications: rejuvenation, acne, wound healing, leg ulcers, and cutaneous inflammatory or autoimmune processes. Therapeutic LEDs can emit wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet, through visible light, to the near infrared (247-1300 nm), but only certain bands have so far demonstrated any real value. We feel certain that if this article remains factual, then readers will have a different, or at least more nuanced, opinion concerning the use of such LED devices in dermatology.

  9. Image compression for dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cookson, John P.; Sneiderman, Charles; Colaianni, Joseph; Hood, Antoinette F.

    1990-07-01

    Color 35mm photographic slides are commonly used in dermatology for education, and patient records. An electronic storage and retrieval system for digitized slide images may offer some advantages such as preservation and random access. We have integrated a system based on a personal computer (PC) for digital imaging of 35mm slides that depict dermatologic conditions. Such systems require significant resources to accommodate the large image files involved. Methods to reduce storage requirements and access time through image compression are therefore of interest. This paper contains an evaluation of one such compression method that uses the Hadamard transform implemented on a PC-resident graphics processor. Image quality is assessed by determining the effect of compression on the performance of an image feature recognition task.

  10. Green tea in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Pazyar, Nader; Feily, Amir; Kazerouni, Afshin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this brief review is to summarize all in vitro, in vivo, and controlled clinical trials on green tea preparations and their uses in dermatology. An extensive literature search was carried out to identify in vivo and in vitro studies as well as clinical trials. Twenty studies were assessed and the results suggest that oral administration of green tea can be effective in the scavenging of free radicals, cancer prevention, hair loss, and skin aging plus protection against the adverse effects associated with psoralen-UV-A therapy. Topical application of green tea extract should be potentially effective for atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris, rosacea, androgenetic alopecia, hirsutism, keloids, genital warts, cutaneous leishmaniasis, and candidiosis. There are promising results with the use of green tea for several dermatologic conditions; however, the efficacy of oral and topical green tea has not always been confirmed.

  11. Cyclophosphamide in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Janet; Chan, Jonathan J

    2017-02-01

    Cyclophosphamide is a chemotherapeutic agent which was first discovered in experimental tumours in rats, and it has since been widely used to treat malignancies and severe manifestations of various auto-immune diseases. High-dose chemotherapy and continuous daily oral regimens are associated with significant toxicity profiles, but i.v. pulsed regimens have lowered the rates of adverse effects in rheumatological studies. Cyclophosphamide has been shown to be useful in the treatment of severe autoimmune conditions due to its powerful immunosuppressive ability; however, it remains a relatively underused modality in dermatology. This article reviews the current literature on cyclophosphamide and its clinical applications in dermatology. © 2016 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  12. Esthetic and cosmetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto; Berger, Uwe; Abdel-Naser, Mohammed Badawy

    2008-01-01

    The field of esthetic and cosmetic dermatology has gained remarkable interest all over the world. The major advantage of recent years is the high scientific levels of the most significant new developments in techniques and pharmacotherapy and other nonsurgical approaches. The present paper reviews selected fields of interest under this view. Sexual hormones are involved in the aging process of men and women. Skin function, in particular the epidermal barrier, is affected by a loss of endocrine activity. Hormone replacement therapy has only recently been introduced in treatment of aging males. This is an area of gender-medicine in dermatology with a strong well-aging attempt. Botulinum toxin therapy for hyperfunctional lines has become not only well-established but evidence-based medicine on its highest level. Recent advantages were gained in objective evaluation and monitoring the effect. Digital imaging techniques with various facets have been introduced to assess the achievements of treatment in the most objective way. This may become an example for other techniques as peeling, laser therapy, or radiofrequency in esthetic and cosmetic dermatology. Botulinum toxin has become a valuable tool for brow lifts. Details of the technique are discussed. Cellulite is a strongly female gender-related condition. During the past decades numerous treatments had been recommended but only recently a more critical scientific approach led to improvements in therapy of this common and disfiguring condition. Three major approaches are developed: (a) skin loosing with techniques such as subcision, (b) skin tightening with radiofrequency and other approaches, and (c) improving circulation in blood and lymphatic microvasculature using both physical treatments and pharmacotherapy. The last two chapters are devoted to body sculpturing by lipotransfer and lipolysis. Lipotransfer for facial or body sculpturing has a history of about 100 years. Nevertheless, recently the role of adult stem

  13. Diversity in the dermatology workforce.

    PubMed

    Hinojosa, Jorge A; Pandya, Amit G

    2016-12-01

    The United States is becoming increasingly diverse, and minorities are projected to represent the majority of our population in the near future. Unfortunately, health disparities still exist for these groups, and inequalities have also become evident in the field of dermatology. There is currently a lack of diversity within the dermatology workforce. Potential solutions to these health care disparities include increasing cultural competence for all physicians and improving diversity in the dermatology workforce. ©2016 Frontline Medical Communications.

  14. OCT in Dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, John; Welzel, Julia

    OCT is increasingly interesting for non-invasive skin imaging in Dermatology. Due to its resolution and imaging depth, OCT is already routinely established for diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer, whereas for pigmented lesions, the resolution is still not high enough. OCT has also a high value for monitoring of treatment effects, for example to control healing after non-surgical topical treatment of basal cell carcinomas. In summary, there are several indications for applications of OCT to image skin diseases, and its importance will grow in the future due to further technical developments like speckle variance OCT.

  15. Dermatology internet resources.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Rachel N; Ellis, Jeffrey I; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2009-04-01

    Many Internet resources for dermatologists benefit public health by providing education and information on the diagnosis and treatment of skin conditions. A variety of dermatology resources exist on the Web, but finding quality resources can be time-consuming. The authors provide a collection of high-quality, freely accessible, English-language Web sites that they have categorized as clinical, educational, or evidence-based medicine resources. They hope that this list of sources helps to meet the informational needs of dermatologists and promotes skin disease awareness and education.

  16. [Dermatology in Nazi Germany].

    PubMed

    Cuerda, E; González-López, E; López-Estebaranz, J L

    2011-01-01

    During the Nazi period experimentation on human subjects and the elimination of individuals considered to be unproductive members of society were carried out in a systematic fashion. Involved in these practices were many physicians, including dermatologists whose names are linked in one way or another to their specialty. Some, such as Reiter, are very well known. This review attempts to bring to light the identities behind the names we have given to diseases, clinical and histological signs, and syndromes in dermatology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  17. Lasers used in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Lim, J T; Goh, C L

    1994-01-01

    This review introduces the various lasers available for the treatment of dermatological conditions. The applications of various lasers used in dermatology, including the carbon dioxide, argon, Q-switch Nd:YAG, ruby, dye and metal vapour lasers are discussed. We present our experience with the use of the carbon dioxide laser, flashlamp pulse-dye laser and Q-switch Nd:YAG laser in the National Skin Centre, Singapore. Our experience indicated that the lasers if used selectively are useful tools in the management of numerous skin disorders. The carbon dioxide laser is a versatile tool, useful for vaporizing or destroying skin lesions. The treatment of vascular or pigmented (melanin) lesions requires lasers that emit wavelengths corresponding to the absorption spectrum of haemoglobin or melanin respectively. Choosing the right laser gives optimal cosmetic result whereas the wrong lasers can lead to a less satisfactory result and even severe scarring. It is important to note that there is no single laser system that is versatile enough to be used to treat all skin disorders. To provide full coverage in the treatment of skin disorders, a laser centre has to be equipped with many different laser systems. This makes using lasers in the treatment of skin disorders very expensive.

  18. Balneotherapy in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Matz, Hagit; Orion, Edith; Wolf, Ronni

    2003-01-01

    Balneotherapy and spa therapy emerged as an important treatment modality in the 1800s, first in Europe and then in the United States. Balneotherapy involves immersion of the patient in mineral water baths or pools. Today, water therapy is being practiced in many countries. Examples of unique and special places for balneotherapy are the Dead Sea in Israel, the Kangal hot spring in Turkey, and the Blue Lagoon in Iceland. Bathing in water with a high salt concentration is safe, effective, and pleasant for healing and recovery. This approach needs no chemicals or potentially harmful drugs. There are almost no side effects during and after treatment, and there is a very low risk to the patient's general health and well-being. Mineral waters and muds are commonly used for the treatment of various dermatologic conditions. The major dermatologic diseases that are frequently treated by balneotherapy with a high rate of success are psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. The mechanisms by which broad spectrums of diseases are alleviated by spa therapy have not been fully elucidated. They probably incorporate chemical, thermal, mechanical, and immunomodulatory effects. The major importance of balneotherapy and spa therapy both individually and as complements to other therapies lies in their potential effectiveness after standard medical treatments have failed to give comfort to these patients.

  19. Photodynamic therapy in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ceburkov, O; Gollnick, H

    2000-01-01

    Application of non-ionising radiation with or without photosensitizers is rather common in dermatology. Though the method itself was described in ancient times, its routine use in medicine based on scientific research started in the second half of the 20th century. Light can be used in three different patterns: phototherapy (UV-A or UV-B light), photochemotherapy (combination of psoralens with UV-A light) and photodynamic therapy (combination of photosensitizers with UV- and/or visible light). The following article deals with the photodynamic therapy or PDT. Using PDT implies the understanding of light dosimetry and calculation of light dose using different light sources and photosensitizers. The number of PDT sensitisers under investigation is rapidly increasing. The PDT itself, being a relatively new modality, quickly spreads its list of applications covering new indications in different areas of medicine. Though the main part of this list is made up of dermatological conditions, the use of PDT in other disciplines is also discussed to make dermatologists familiar with different aspects of the issue. PDT, like any treatment modality, has its benefits and adverse effects. The future of PDT is closely related to teamwork in physical, biochemical and clinical research which could provide better understanding of underlying mechanisms and help to create protocols for higher therapeutic efficacy.

  20. [Esthetic dermatology for the elderly].

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Goldman, A

    2016-02-01

    Esthetic dermatology discovers older age. Methods and techniques which are useful in younger people need modifications to meet the special needs of the elderly. These aspects are discussed with a focus on the aging face. Esthetic dermatology is most successful when using principles of regenerative medicine.

  1. Nanotechnology in Dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, João Roberto; Antônio, Carlos Roberto; Cardeal, Izabela Lídia Soares; Ballavenuto, Julia Maria Avelino; Oliveira, João Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The scientific community and general public have been exposed to a series of achievements attributed to a new area of knowledge: Nanotechnology. Both abroad and in Brazil, funding agencies have launched programs aimed at encouraging this type of research. Indeed, for many who come into contact with this subject it will be clear the key role that chemical knowledge will play in the evolution of this subject. And even more, will see that it is a science in which the basic structure is formed by distilling different areas of inter-and multidisciplinary knowledge along the lines of new paradigms. In this article, we attempt to clarify the foundations of nanotechnology, and demonstrate their contribution to new advances in dermatology as well as medicine in general. Nanotechnology is clearly the future. PMID:24626657

  2. Perspectives in Occupational Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, C. G. Toby; Maibach, Howard I.

    1982-01-01

    Because large surface areas of the skin are exposed directly to the environment, skin is an organ particularly vulnerable to occupationally induced disease. Statistics show that, excluding accidental injury, nearly half of all occupational illnesses occur in this organ; a fourth of all workers suffering from occupational skin disease lose an average of 10 to 12 workdays. The constant evolution of new industrial chemicals and methods of manufacture continue to bring new skin hazards and disease into the workplace. Occupational health physicians and practitioners, who usually have minimal training in dermatology, must diagnose and treat unfamiliar diseases in a setting of even less familiar, often overwhelming, technology. A thorough understanding of cutaneous defense mechanisms, clinical patterns of occupational skin disease and methods for establishing accurate diagnoses is essential. PMID:6219498

  3. Drug sampling in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Reid, Erika E; Alikhan, Ali; Brodell, Robert T

    2012-01-01

    The use of drug samples in a dermatology clinic is controversial. Drug samples are associated with influencing physician prescribing patterns often toward costlier drugs, increasing health care costs, increasing waste, inducing potential conflicts of interest, and decreasing the quality of patient education. On the other hand, they have the potential to help those in financial need, to improve adherence and convenience, and to expose patients to better drugs. Although some academic centers have banned drug samples altogether, many academic and private practices continue to distribute drug samples. Given the controversy of the topic, physicians who wish to distribute drug samples must do so in an ethical manner. We believe, when handled properly, drug sampling can be used in an ethical manner. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Morgellons in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Harth, Wolfgang; Hermes, Barbara; Freudenmann, Roland W

    2010-04-01

    Delusional parasitosis (DP) is the most frequent delusional disorder in dermatology. In DP there is a fixed belief of a usually skin-related invasion or infestation by a number of alleged infectious species (usually parasites and bacteria), whose identity has varied over the decades. Since 2002 worldwide an increasing number of patients have complained of unverifiable fibers and filaments in or on the skin, associated with numerous nonspecific complaints (arthralgias, altered cognitive function and extreme fatigue). This entity has been named "Morgellons disease" by the patients themselves, although medical evidence for its existence is lacking. As an example, we discuss a 55-year-old woman who complained of Morgellons disease and was treated as if she had DP. Currently the delusional assumption of infestation with Morgellons should be considered as a new type of DP with some kind of inanimate material. We therefore recommend in case of DP including Morgellons the use of the broader term "delusional infestation".

  5. Bibliometrics, dermatology and contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek R

    2008-09-01

    Although the fields of bibliometrics and citation analysis have existed for many years, relatively few studies have specifically focused on the dermatological literature. This article reviews citation-based research in the dermatology journals, with a particular interest in manuscripts that have included Contact Dermatitis as part of their analysis. Overall, it can be seen that the rise of bibliometrics during the mid-20th century and its subsequent application to dermatology has provided an interesting insight into the progression of research within our discipline. Further investigation of citation trends and top-cited papers in skin research periodicals would certainly help complement the current body of knowledge.

  6. Dermatological complications of obesity.

    PubMed

    García Hidalgo, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is a health problem of considerable magnitude in the Western world. Dermatological changes have been reported in patients with obesity, including: acanthosis nigricans and skin tags (due to insulin resistance); hyperandrogenism; striae due to over extension; stasis pigmentation due to peripheral vascular disease; lymphedema; pathologies associated with augmented folds; morphologic changes in the foot anatomy due to excess load; and complications that may arise from hospitalization. Acanthosis nigricans plaques can be managed by improved control of hyperinsulinemia; the vitamin D3 analog calcipitriol has also been shown to be effective. Skin tags can be removed by snipping with curved scissors, by cryotherapy or by electrodesiccation. Hyperandrogenism, a result of increased production of endogenous androgens due to increased volumes of adipose tissue (which synthesizes testosterone) and hyperinsulinemia (which increases the production of ovarian androgens) needs to be carefully assessed to ensure disorders such as virilizing tumors and congenital adrenal hyperplasia are treated appropriately. Treatment of hyperandrogenism should be centred on controlling insulin levels; weight loss, oral contraceptive and antiandrogenic therapies are also possible treatment options. The etiology of striae distensae, also known as stretch marks, is yet to be defined and treatment options are unsatisfactory at present; striae rubra and alba have been treated with a pulsed dye laser with marginal success. The relationship between obesity and varicose veins is controversial; symptoms are best prevented by the use of elastic stockings. Itching and inflammation associated with stasis pigmentation, the result of red blood cells escaping into the tissues, can be treated with corticosteroids. Lymphedema is associated with dilatation of tissue channels, reduced tissue oxygenation and provides a culture medium for bacterial growth. Lymphedema treatment is directed towards reducing the

  7. US dermatology residency program rankings.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Lisa L; Wen, Ge; Wu, Jashin J

    2014-10-01

    Unlike many other adult specialties, US News & World Report does not rank dermatology residency programs annually. We conducted a study to rank individual US dermatology residency programs based on set criteria. For each residency program, data from 2008 related to a number of factors were collected, including annual amount of National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Dermatology Foundation (DF) funding received; number of publications from full-time faculty members; number of faculty lectures given at 5 annual society meetings; and number of full-time faculty members who were on the editorial boards of 6 dermatology journals with the highest impact factors. Most of the data were obtained through extensive Internet searches, and missing data were obtained by contacting individual residency programs. The programs were ranked based on the prior factors according to a weighted ranking algorithm. A list of overall rankings also was created.

  8. Forensics in dermatology: part I.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kalpana; Lowenstein, Eve J

    2011-05-01

    Examination of the skin and adnexae is a critical part of the forensic examination. Little information on forensic sciences has been published in the dermatologic literature. Correct forensic terminology and documentation of dermatologic findings is of critical importance in forensic investigations. The skin may reveal clues to the identity of an individual and the time and method of death or injury. Normal postmortem changes in the skin are described along with pseudopathology and damage from postmortem animal activity. The forensic classification of types of injuries is introduced in this first of a two-part paper on forensics in dermatology. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Forensics in dermatology: part II.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kalpana; Lowenstein, Eve J

    2011-05-01

    The evaluation of skin findings is critical in identifying many types of injury, whether self- inflicted or accidentally or intentionally inflicted. Specific causes of injury include homicide, abuse, neglect, assault, self-inflicted injury, suicide, torture, poisoning, and bioterrorism. Forensic findings in hair and nails are also discussed. This overview of dermatologic findings in forensic pathology highlights the significance of the cutaneous manifestations of injury. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Lasers in dermatologic surgery].

    PubMed

    Takac, S; Stojanović, S; Muhi, B

    1997-01-01

    The authors review their experiences with the use of carbon-dioxide (CO2) lasers in dermatological surgery in a group of 3000 patients, with a total number of 3920 tumorous skin lesions, during a three-year period. The word LASER is an acronym for L-ight A-mplification by S-timulated E-mission of R-adiation. It must be pointed out that it is electromagnetic radiation, not X-irradiation. In regard to the spectrum laser light is between infrared and ultraviolet light, mainly in the visible spectrum, so its application does not produce new generations of iatrogenic malignancies as in the case of ionizing radiation. The laser is a new scalpel which differs from the metal surgical scalpel (also called "optical knife" and "light scalpel"). In the conclusion authors state that using (CO2) complete success was achieved in treatment of the following skin lesions: common viral warts, senile keratosis, seborrhoeic keratosis, plantar viral warts, papillomas, capillary telangiectasias of the face, hemangiomas, juvenile viral warts of the face, ingrown nails, condyloma acuminata, pendular fibromas, xanthelasmas, atheromas, pyogenic granulomas, keratoacanthomas, tattooed skin and basocellular epitheliomas.

  11. New Described Dermatological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cevirgen Cemil, Bengu; Keseroglu, Havva Ozge; Kaya Akis, Havva

    2014-01-01

    Many advances in dermatology have been made in recent years. In the present review article, newly described disorders from the last six years are presented in detail. We divided these reports into different sections, including syndromes, autoinflammatory diseases, tumors, and unclassified disease. Syndromes included are “circumferential skin creases Kunze type” and “unusual type of pachyonychia congenita or a new syndrome”; autoinflammatory diseases include “chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) syndrome,” “pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH) syndrome,” and “pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PAPASH) syndrome”; tumors include “acquired reactive digital fibroma,” “onychocytic matricoma and onychocytic carcinoma,” “infundibulocystic nail bed squamous cell carcinoma,” and “acral histiocytic nodules”; unclassified disorders include “saurian papulosis,” “symmetrical acrokeratoderma,” “confetti-like macular atrophy,” and “skin spicules,” “erythema papulosa semicircularis recidivans.” PMID:25243162

  12. Biosimilars in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Olek-Hrab, Karolina; Karczewski, Jacek; Teresiak-Mikołajczak, Ewa; Adamski, Zygmunt

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade the availability of biological drugs for the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris, psoriatic arthritis and many other inflammatory diseases has revolutionized the treatment of these diseases around the world. Due to the high cost of therapy, the search has started for biosimilars. In dermatology the greatest interest in biosimilar medicines concerns inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-α), for use in the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab). The most important element of the safety of biologicals is their immunogenicity. Therefore, when discussing biosimilars, attention needs to be paid to the dangers of their immune activity. In view of the fact that the drugs contain and aggregates, produced by living organisms or cultures of living cells, they cannot be compared in any way to low molecular weight synthetic generics (called generics). Biosimilars are authorized for use in patients and treated as equivalent to the reference medicine only after passing a number of studies and assessments. As it is well known, the development of medicine and pharmacology is extremely intense, and the market in biological medicine is developing much faster than that of all other drugs, which underlines their important role in modern medicine. Currently, the subject of biosimilars is one of the most important challenges and topics of discussion around the world, including pharmacovigilance and legal and economic regulatory standards. It seems inevitable that biosimilar products will be introduced for the treatment of diseases with indications corresponding to the original product on which they are based. PMID:26759547

  13. [Pioneers of Spanish dermatologic surgery].

    PubMed

    Del Río, E

    2008-06-01

    Even before dermatology was born as a specialty at the beginning of the 19th century, most skin lesions and dermatoses tended to be treated by surgeons rather than physicians. After medicine and surgery were unified into a single discipline and dermatology emerged as a modern specialty, this relationship became blurred and Spanish dermatologists leaned more towards medicine than surgery. Then improvements in surgical techniques, knowledge of antiseptic and aseptic procedures, the development and introduction of anesthesia, and the greater interest in micrographic approaches led to the rediscovery and almost complete rebirth of this old surgical tradition in the second half of the 19th century. In Spain, dermatologic surgery as such did not really exist until the first third of the 20th century, when Enrique Alvarez Sainz de Aja and Vicente Gimeno emerged as the main exponents of this discipline. Of these 2, Alvarez Sainz de Aja drawing on his previous experience as a general surgeon and obstetrician was the better practitioner of the incipient dermatologic surgery. The other, Gimeno, wrote an interesting booklet on dermatologic surgery that was published in 1923 and that formed the basis of his inaugural speech to the Spanish Royal National Academy of Medicine.

  14. Surgical smoke in dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Oganesyan, Gagik; Eimpunth, Sasima; Kim, Silvia Soohyun; Jiang, Shang I Brian

    2014-12-01

    Potential dangers associated with smoke generated during electrosurgery have been described. However, the use of smoke management in dermatology is unknown. There is no objective data showing the amount or the composition of the smoke generated in dermatologic surgeries. To assess the use of smoke management in dermatologic surgery and provide data on the amount and chemical composition of surgical smoke. A total of 997 surveys were sent to dermatologic surgeons across the United States to assess the use of smoke management. Amounts and concentrations of particulates and chemical composition were measured during electrosurgery using a particulate meter and the Environmental Protection Agency-standardized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Thirty-two percent of the surgeons responded to the survey, and 77% of the respondents indicated no use of smoke management at all. Only approximately 10% of surgeons reported consistent use of smoke management. Active electrosurgery produced significant amounts of particulates. In addition, surgical smoke contained high concentrations of known carcinogens, such as benzene, butadiene, and acetonitrile. Surgical smoke contains toxic compounds and particulates. Most dermatologic surgeons do not use smoke management within their practices. Raising the awareness of the potential risks can help increase the use of smoke management.

  15. Dermatologic Surgery and Dermatologic Oncology as an Essential Part of the Modern Dermatology in Bulgaria

    PubMed Central

    Tchernev, Georgi; Lozev, Ilia; Lotti, Torello; Wollina, Uwe; Gianfaldoni, Serena; Guarneri, Claudio; Lotti, Jacopo; França, Katlein; Batashki, Atanas; Chokoeva, Anastasiya

    2017-01-01

    Dermatosurgery and dermatooncology are an integral part of dermatology as a speciality, and this postulate is strictly respected in a high percentage of European dermatological units. Due to the fact that a number of other specialties interweave with the subject of therapy - the surgical treatment of the patient with skin tumors, the positioning of dermatosurgery as part of dermatology is generally controversial (according to some), and at the same time is often the subject of a number of debates and conflicts. These include maxillofacial surgeons, plastic surgeons, regenerative and reconstructive surgeons, surgical and medical oncologist, etc. The advantages of these specialities are mainly based on good medical practice and good surgical techniques that are applied. In contrast, their disadvantages are based on the lack of good awareness of the initial surgical approach as well as the need for time-adjusted and accurately performed additional surgical interventions which should befurthermore careful scheduled with the relevant oncology units. Losing this thread, in practice, it turns out that we are losing the patients themselves or, looking laconically, we are working with reduced efficiency and effectiveness. Although for the last 15 years the positions of these sub-sectors in Bulgaria had been underdeveloped, a certain ascent has been observed nowadays or from a couple of years ago. This advance is undoubtedly due to the influence of the German Dermatological School, presented by Prof. Dr. Uwe Wollina, Head of Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology in Dresden, Germany, as well as due to other respected representative of the Italian Dermatological School - in the face of Prof. Dr. Torello Lotti, Head of the Dermatology Unit at G Marconi University of Rome, Italy. PMID:28785348

  16. Dermatologic Surgery and Dermatologic Oncology as an Essential Part of the Modern Dermatology in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Tchernev, Georgi; Lozev, Ilia; Lotti, Torello; Wollina, Uwe; Gianfaldoni, Serena; Guarneri, Claudio; Lotti, Jacopo; França, Katlein; Batashki, Atanas; Chokoeva, Anastasiya

    2017-07-25

    Dermatosurgery and dermatooncology are an integral part of dermatology as a speciality, and this postulate is strictly respected in a high percentage of European dermatological units. Due to the fact that a number of other specialties interweave with the subject of therapy - the surgical treatment of the patient with skin tumors, the positioning of dermatosurgery as part of dermatology is generally controversial (according to some), and at the same time is often the subject of a number of debates and conflicts. These include maxillofacial surgeons, plastic surgeons, regenerative and reconstructive surgeons, surgical and medical oncologist, etc. The advantages of these specialities are mainly based on good medical practice and good surgical techniques that are applied. In contrast, their disadvantages are based on the lack of good awareness of the initial surgical approach as well as the need for time-adjusted and accurately performed additional surgical interventions which should befurthermore careful scheduled with the relevant oncology units. Losing this thread, in practice, it turns out that we are losing the patients themselves or, looking laconically, we are working with reduced efficiency and effectiveness. Although for the last 15 years the positions of these sub-sectors in Bulgaria had been underdeveloped, a certain ascent has been observed nowadays or from a couple of years ago. This advance is undoubtedly due to the influence of the German Dermatological School, presented by Prof. Dr. Uwe Wollina, Head of Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology in Dresden, Germany, as well as due to other respected representative of the Italian Dermatological School - in the face of Prof. Dr. Torello Lotti, Head of the Dermatology Unit at G Marconi University of Rome, Italy.

  17. Molecular dermatology comes of age.

    PubMed

    Has, Cristina; Sitaru, Cassian

    2013-01-01

    Groundbreaking advances on the molecular and cellular physiological and physiopathological skin processes, including the complete sequencing of the genome of several species and the increased availability of gene-modified organisms, paved the way to firmly establishing molecular approaches and methods in experimental, translational, and clinical dermatology. As a result, newly developed experimental ex vivo assays and animal models prove exquisite tools for addressing fundamental physiological cutaneous processes and pathogenic mechanisms of skin diseases. A plethora of new findings that were generated using these experimental tools serve as a strong basis for intense translational research efforts aiming at developing new, specific, and sensitive diagnostic tests and efficient "personalized" therapies with less side-effects. Consequently, a broad array of molecular diagnostic tests and therapies for a wide spectrum of skin diseases ranging from genodermatoses through skin neoplasms, allergy, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, are already routinely used in the clinical dermatology practice. This article highlights several major developments in molecular experimental and clinical dermatology.

  18. Gelling Your Dermatology Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Sue A.; Chase, Allister Benjamin; Tawa, Marianne C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycosis fungoides is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Stage IA and IB mycosis fungoides cutaneous T-cell lymphoma can be effectively controlled by skin-directed therapies such as the mechlorethamine gel approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Dermatology nurses play a key role in promoting good patient compliance through patient education about mycosis fungoides cutaneous T-cell lymphoma disease, proper administration of mechlorethamine gel, and connecting patients with patient assistance programs or other supportive services. This article provides the dermatology nurse with a background about early-stage mycosis fungoides cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, skin-directed treatment options, questions that a patient may ask about mycosis fungoides cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and mechlorethamine gel, and patient education tools such as questions dermatology nurses may ask of their patients and a patient handout outlining mechlorethamine gel administration.

  19. Practical Topical Therapy in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Enta, Tom

    1982-01-01

    Topical therapy in dermatology is often perplexing to nondermatologists. They have been taught by several clinicians how to treat a dermatologic case and in addition have been besieged by drug company personnel and by colorful journal advertisements on the virtues of preparations which should readily clear any rash. All these approaches usually lead to a hit or miss result. This presentation discusses a simple approach to skin eruptions, basing the treatment on the stage of the disorder rather than on the cause. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:21286146

  20. Nose: Applied Aspects in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Dammaningala Venkataramaiah; Shilpa, Kanathur; Nataraja, Holavanahally Veerabhadrappa; Divya, Kallapa Gorur

    2016-01-01

    Nose is the most prominent part of the mid-face and has important physiological, aesthetic and psychological functions. Skin diseases on the nose are commonly seen by dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, and plastic surgeons. Because of its exposed, highly visible localization, lesions on the skin of the nose are often noticed by patients themselves, typically very early in the course of the disease. Similarly, the dermatological lexicon is well known with descriptive terminologies, synonyms, acronyms, eponyms, toponyms, misnomers. We have tried to compile the anatomical applications of nose in cosmetology and dermatosurgery subspecialities with nasal eponyms and signs encountered in clinical dermatology that would be helpful for residents. PMID:27057038

  1. Probiotics and prebiotics in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Baquerizo Nole, Katherine L; Yim, Elizabeth; Keri, Jonette E

    2014-10-01

    The rapid increase in the medical use of probiotics and prebiotics in recent years has confirmed their excellent safety profile. As immune modulators, they have been used in inflammatory skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis. We review the literature regarding the use of probiotics and prebiotics in dermatology. Probiotics and prebiotics appear to be effective in reducing the incidence of atopic dermatitis in infants, but their role in atopic dermatitis treatment is controversial. Their role in acne, wound healing, and photoprotection is promising, but larger trials are needed before a final recommendation can be made. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Refining the Eye: Dermatology and Visual Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Corinne; Huang, Jennifer T.; Buzney, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    In 2014 the Museum of Fine Arts Boston and Harvard Medical School began a partnership focused on building visual literacy skills for dermatology residents in the Harvard Combined Dermatology Residency Program. "Refining the Eye: Art and Dermatology", a four session workshop, took place in the museum's galleries and utilized the Visual…

  3. Refining the Eye: Dermatology and Visual Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Corinne; Huang, Jennifer T.; Buzney, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    In 2014 the Museum of Fine Arts Boston and Harvard Medical School began a partnership focused on building visual literacy skills for dermatology residents in the Harvard Combined Dermatology Residency Program. "Refining the Eye: Art and Dermatology", a four session workshop, took place in the museum's galleries and utilized the Visual…

  4. Misnomers in Dermatology: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Savitha, Somaiah A; Sacchidanand, Sarvajnamurthy A; Gowda, Shilpa K

    2013-01-01

    The name of a condition in dermatology, gives a clue regarding the clinical feature, etiology, or histopathology of the disease. A disease might have been termed wrongly due to its resemblance to another known condition. Misnomers often mislead a physician regarding the etiology or histopathology of the condition. Here is a list of misnomers, with explanation, and the appropriate name in parentheses. PMID:24249901

  5. The art of learning dermatology.

    PubMed

    Schuster, D S

    2000-03-01

    Complete mastery of dermatology is difficult, if not impossible. However, for the open-minded, inquisitive dermatologist, there are many tangential areas that can be studied. This article presents some of the items that have been of interest to me. I hope it inspires others to search out sidelights that will be equally fascinating.

  6. Dermatology on YouTube.

    PubMed

    Boyers, Lindsay N; Quest, Tyler; Karimkhani, Chante; Connett, Jessica; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-06-15

    YouTube, reaches upwards of six billion users on a monthly basis and is a unique source of information distribution and communication. Although the influence of YouTube on personal health decision-making is well established, this study assessed the type of content and viewership on a broad scope of dermatology related content on YouTube. Select terms (i.e. dermatology, sun protection, skin cancer, skin cancer awareness, and skin conditions) were searched on YouTube. Overall, the results included 100 videos with over 47 million viewers. Advocacy was the most prevalent content type at 24% of the total search results. These 100 videos were "shared" a total of 101,173 times and have driven 6,325 subscriptions to distinct YouTube user pages. Of the total videos, 35% were uploaded by or featured an MD/DO/PhD in dermatology or other specialty/field, 2% FNP/PA, 1% RN, and 62% other. As one of the most trafficked global sites on the Internet, YouTube is a valuable resource for dermatologists, physicians in other specialties, and the general public to share their dermatology-related content and gain subscribers. However, challenges of accessing and determining evidence-based data remain an issue.

  7. Dermatological legal claims in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Sachiko; Isogawa, Naoyuki; Ushiro, Shin; Ayuzawa, Junko; Furue, Masutaka

    2008-07-01

    Health-care safety management has recently been highlighted for patient safety. However, specialist-based risks in clinical settings have hardly been discussed in Japan so far. A review of dermatological legal claims may delineate these risks. This study examined court precedents from the databases "Courts in Japan" and LEX/DB. Thirty-four dermatology-related civil cases were found from 1968-2006. Of the 34 cases, 32 (94%) were judged and two (6%) were retried. Of these 32 cases, 11 (34%) were appealed to higher courts. Among the 34 litigations, the defendants of eight (23%) were dermatology specialists, 20 (59%) were non-dermatologists and six (18%) of unknown specialty. The defendants' negligence was determined at either level in court in 25 of the 34 cases. The negligence in these 25 cases was categorized into five groups: (i) delayed diagnosis (none); (ii) complication during diagnosis procedure (one, 4%); (iii) inappropriate treatment (nine, 36%); (iv) complication during treatment procedure (10, 40%); and (v) insufficient informed consent (five, 20%). The present study may help to improve strategies for health-care safety management in the dermatological field in Japan.

  8. Fellowships after dermatology residency: the traditional and beyond.

    PubMed

    Park, Kelly K

    2015-03-01

    Postresidency fellowship training options exist for graduating dermatology residents. Formal subspecialty fellowship programs are offered in dermatopathology, pediatric dermatology, micrographic surgery and dermatologic oncology (procedural dermatology), and cosmetic dermatologic surgery. There also are a number of fellowships offered at certain institutions for those interested in more specific subspecialties or academia. This guide serves to assist dermatology residents in learning more about fellowship opportunities.

  9. Dermatology hospital fellowships: present and future.

    PubMed

    Sun, Natalie Z; Fox, Lindy P

    2017-03-01

    The question of what makes a successful dermatology hospitalist has risen to the forefront due to the rapidly increasing number of these providers. Inpatient dermatology fellowships have formed as a direct consequence. Though mostly in their infancy, these programs have primary or secondary goals to train providers in the dermatologic care of the hospitalized patient. This article presents a brief synopsis of the history of traditional hospitalist fellowships and extrapolates these findings to existing hospitalist dermatology fellowships. As more of these programs arise, these fellowships are poised to revolutionize dermatologic inpatient care from a systems perspective. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  10. Dermatology teaching in Australian Medical Schools.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aakriti; Chong, Alvin H; Scarff, Catherine E; Huilgol, Shyamala C

    2017-08-01

    Although skin disease and skin cancers cause significant morbidity and mortality in Australia, limited time is dedicated to dermatology teaching in most medical courses. The aim of this study was to define the current state of dermatology teaching in Australian medical schools with a view to developing a national core curriculum for dermatology. An electronic questionnaire was circulated to the dermatology teaching leads and relevant medical program coordinators of the 18 medical schools in Australia. Replies were received from 17 medical schools. Dermatology was included as part of the core curriculum in 15 schools. Time set aside for dermatology teaching varied, as reflected by the number of lectures delivered (0-21, mean 5, median 3) and minimum clinics attended (0-10, mean 1.2, median 0). Only four medical schools had a compulsory clinical attachment in dermatology. Furthermore, satisfying requirements in dermatology was mentioned in the university examination regulations in only six schools. Certain core learning outcomes were addressed in most schools, including the structure and function of the skin, common conditions such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis and cutaneous malignancies. However, there were important omissions, ranging from common problems like dermatophyte infections and drug reactions to the recognition of dermatological emergencies. These results are a compelling impetus to improve current standards of dermatology teaching, learning and assessment. The introduction of a national core curriculum would provide guidelines for dermatology teaching in medical schools, enabling the more effective utilisation of available time for key learning outcomes. © 2016 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  11. Understanding the cost of dermatologic care: A survey study of dermatology providers, residents, and patients.

    PubMed

    Steen, Aaron J; Mann, Julianne A; Carlberg, Valerie M; Kimball, Alexa B; Musty, Michael J; Simpson, Eric L

    2017-04-01

    The American Academy of Dermatology recommends dermatologists understand the costs of dermatologic care. This study sought to measure dermatology providers' understanding of the cost of dermatologic care and how those costs are communicated to patients. We also aimed to understand the perspectives of patients and dermatological trainees on how cost information enters into the care they receive or provide. Surveys were systematically developed and distributed to 3 study populations: dermatology providers, residents, and patients. Response rates were over 95% in all 3 populations. Dermatology providers and residents consistently underestimated the costs of commonly recommended dermatologic medications but accurately predicted the cost of common dermatologic procedures. Dermatology patients preferred to know the cost of procedures and medications, even when covered by insurance. In this population, the costs of dermatologic medications frequently interfered with patients' ability to properly adhere to prescribed regimens. The surveyed population was limited to the northwestern United States and findings may not be generalizable. Cost estimations were based on average reimbursement rates, which vary by insurer. Improving dermatology providers' awareness and communication of the costs of dermatologic care might enhance medical decision-making, improve adherence and outcomes, and potentially reduce overall health care expenditures. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [What's new in instrumental dermatology?].

    PubMed

    Michaud, T

    2015-12-01

    The publications in the field of aesthetic dermatology including those related to laser treatment and related procedures are numerous. Nevertheless, a large number of them lack a serious and well-structured methodological approach or are biased and may lead to false conclusion due to conflict of interest. The selection of the publications used for this review, while subjective, has been based on the strength of the methodology applied as well as their benefit to the dermatological community as a whole. The themes evaluated in this review are the following: injections of botulinum toxin, male ageing skin, complications after aesthetic procedures, innovative therapeutic advanced treatment in aesthetic, laser therapies cryolipolysis and photodynamic therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel Antiangiogenic Agents in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Berrios, Ricardo L.; Arbiser, Jack L.

    2011-01-01

    Because angiogenesis underlies the pathogenesis of numerous conditions (cancer, psoriasis, macular degeneration), there is a pressing need for continued investigations into angiogenic signaling and potential drug targets. Antiangiogenic agents can be classified as either direct or indirect. Direct antiangiogenics act on untransformed endothelial cells to prevent differentiation and proliferation; indirect antiangiogenics act to inhibit factors involved in proangiogenic signaling. Agents currently available with dermatologic indications are few, while several established and novel biologics targeting various proangiogenic factors are currently being investigated for potential dermatologic uses, but the jury is still out on their efficacy and safety. In this review, we highlight our experience with a group of existing and novel, small molecules that combine several modes of action against angiogenesis in addition to other properties – triarylmethane dyes and fulvene derivatives. PMID:21172300

  14. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  15. Dermatology resources on the internet.

    PubMed

    George, Dean D; Wainwright, Brent D

    2012-09-01

    Both patients and medical professionals are increasingly accessing the Internet for health information. Today's Web enables features that facilitate information sharing in a social and collaborative manner, thus transforming the way we access data and communicate with our patients and colleagues. The visual nature of the field of dermatology lends itself to the use of the Internet for reference and educational purposes. To generate a list of Web sites commonly used by academic dermatologists, the authors polled the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Dermatology Program Directors for their top 3 Web resources. The purpose of this article is to identify resources used by dermatologists as well as patients and examine factors that can influence Internet search results. Concerns regarding professionalism in the era of social media are also explored. As the volume of health information on the Internet continues to increase, it is essential for physicians to be aware of what is available in cyberspace. Reference and learning tools for the physician, learning and support tools for the patient, and physician Internet presence are key aspects of modern dermatology practice.

  16. Current status of surgery in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Hanke, C William; Moy, Ronald L; Roenigk, Randall K; Roenigk, Henry H; Spencer, James M; Tierney, Emily P; Bartus, Cynthia L; Bernstein, Robert M; Brown, Marc D; Busso, Mariano; Carruthers, Alastair; Carruthers, Jean; Ibrahimi, Omar A; Kauvar, Arielle N B; Kent, Kathryn M; Krueger, Nils; Landau, Marina; Leonard, Aimee L; Mandy, Stephen H; Rohrer, Thomas E; Sadick, Neil S; Wiest, Luitgard G

    2013-12-01

    An article titled "Current issues in dermatologic office-based surgery" was published in the JAAD in October 1999 (volume 41, issue 4, pp. 624-634). The article was developed by the Joint American Academy of Dermatology/American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Liaison Committee. A number of subjects were addressed in the article including surgical training program requirements for dermatology residents and selected advances in dermatologic surgery that had been pioneered by dermatologists. The article concluded with sections on credentialing, privileging, and accreditation of office-based surgical facilities. Much has changed since 1999, including more stringent requirements for surgical training during dermatology residency, and the establishment of 57 accredited Procedural Dermatology Fellowship Training Programs. All of these changes have been overseen and approved by the Residency Review Committee for Dermatology and the Accreditation Committee for Graduate Medical Education. The fertile academic environment of academic training programs with interaction between established dermatologic surgeons and fellows, as well as the inquisitive nature of many of our colleagues, has led to the numerous major advances in dermatologic surgery, which are described herein.

  17. Nonhuman primate dermatology: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Joseph A.; Didier, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    In general, veterinary dermatologists do not have extensive clinical experience of nonhuman primate (NHP) dermatoses. The bulk of the published literature does not provide an organized evidence-based approach to the NHP dermatologic case. The veterinary dermatologist is left to extract information from both human and veterinary dermatology, an approach that can be problematic as it forces the clinician to make diagnostic and therapeutic decisions based on two very disparate bodies of literature. A more cohesive approach to NHP dermatology – without relying on assumptions that NHP pathology most commonly behaves similarly to other veterinary and human disease – is required. This review of the dermatology of NHP species includes discussions of primary dermatoses, as well as diseases where dermatologic signs represent a significant secondary component, provides a first step towards encouraging the veterinary community to study and report the dermatologic diseases of nonhuman primates. PMID:19490576

  18. Relevance of psychiatry in dermatology: Present concepts

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraj, K. H.; Navya, M. A; Rashmi, R.

    2010-01-01

    Skin is an organ that has a primary function in tactile receptivity and reacts directly upon emotional stimuli. Dermatological practice involves a psychosomatic dimension. A relationship between psychological factors and skin diseases has long been hypothesized. Psychodermatology addresses the interaction between mind and skin. It is divided into three categories according to the relationship between skin diseases and mental disorders. This article reviews different dermatological conditions under each of the three categories namely psychosomatic disorders, dermatological conditions due to primary and secondary psychiatric disorders. Dermatological conditions resulting from psychiatric conditions like stress/depression and those caused by psychiatric disorders are discussed. This review intends to present the relationship between the ‘skin’ and the ‘mind’ specifically from the dermatology point of view. The effects on the quality of life as a result of psychodermatological conditions are highlighted. A multidisciplinary approach for treatment from both dermatologic and psychiatric viewpoints are suggested. PMID:21180416

  19. Distinction between forensic evidence and dermatological findings.

    PubMed

    Hammer, U; Boy, D; Rothaupt, D; Büttner, A

    2015-07-01

    The external examination after death requires knowledge in forensics/pathology, dermatology, as well as associated diseases and age-related alterations of the skin. This article highlights some findings with forensic evidence versus dermatological findings. The lectures in forensic medicine should be structured interdisciplinarily, especially to dermatology, internal medicine, surgery, pathology, and toxicology in order to train the overlapping skills required for external and internal postmortem examinations.

  20. Organizing a dermatology service mission.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Fort, Marigdalia K; Lastra-Vicente, Rosana; Levitt, Jacob O; Sanchez, Jorge L; Reizner, George T

    2013-03-01

    There are few published guidelines that describe the forethought and logistical considerations needed to create a dermatology-specific medical mission. To report the experience of planning and executing a successful medical mission to an underserved community in Puerto Rico. We identified an area of need and projected the volume of patients and diseases to be treated. After recruiting medical staff, pharmaceutical and surgical supplies were collected. Important concerns included establishing the scope of medical and educational services to be rendered, advertising the clinic, arranging for biopsy processing, ensuring follow-up, and selecting a method for medical documentation. We tracked the number of patients seen, diagnoses made, and materials used to prepare for future missions. We recruited 12 physicians and 25 ancillary (i.e. nonlicensed physician) staff members, including: six dermatologists, four internists, one pathologist, one psychiatrist, 23 medical students, and two medical assistants. We secured 12 examination rooms in an existing medical facility. Two pharmaceutical companies and two pathology companies provided the medications and surgical supplies with the remainder coming from the volunteer physicians' offices. Three thousand dollars were raised and used toward purchasing additional supplies. Advertising via public announcements resulted in the attendance of 166 patients during the 1-day clinic. A total of 41 procedures were performed, including 14 biopsies, five excisions, three incisions and drainage, and 19 electrodessications and curettage. Proper planning is critical in creating a successful dermatology mission. Documenting the care given and supplies used helps to identify needs and optimize limited resources for future missions. The goal of a self-sustaining public health service starts with patient education and coordination with the local healthcare providers. © 2012 The International Society of Dermatology.

  1. Dermatologic manifestations of infective endocarditis*

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Rafael Tomaz; Tiberto, Larissa Rezende; Bello, Viviane Nardin Monte; Lima, Margarete Aparecida Jacometo; Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, infective endocarditis still shows considerable morbidity and mortality rates. The dermatological examination in patients with suspected infective endocarditis may prove very useful, as it might reveal suggestive abnormalities of this disease, such as Osler’s nodes and Janeway lesions. Osler’s nodes are painful, purple nodular lesions, usually found on the tips of fingers and toes. Janeway lesions, in turn, are painless erythematous macules that usually affect palms and soles. We report a case of infective endocarditis and highlight the importance of skin examination as a very important element in the presumptive diagnosis of infective endocarditis. PMID:28300907

  2. [What's new in pediatric dermatology?].

    PubMed

    Maruani, A

    2015-12-01

    The years 2014-2015 have been rich in paediatric dermatology news in varied areas. Randomized controlled trials including children have been performed, especially in the fields of vascular anomalies, infectiology and immuno-allergology; new classifications and guidelines have been established; scientific research has made new discoveries, including the molecular basis of pediatric nevi and melanoma; epidemiologic works on risk factors have highlighted the need for dermatologists to be aware of prevention (sun prevention but also obesity); and finally, the many publications have taken into account psychological issues in children, such as quality of life, pain, observance or acceptance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Metformin in dermatology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Badr, D; Kurban, M; Abbas, O

    2013-11-01

    For several decades, metformin has been used as an oral hypoglycaemic agent, where it is the first line of treatment in overweight and obese type 2 diabetic patients. This is because it decreases the hepatic glucose output and acts as an insulin sensitizer by increasing the glucose utilization by muscles and adipocytes. As a result of the improvement in glycaemic control, serum insulin concentrations decline slightly, thus improving hyperinsulinaemia and its signs. In addition, it has been shown that metformin has platelet anti-aggregating and antioxidant effects. These pharmacological properties have allowed metformin to be effective in non-diabetic situations including cutaneous conditions. This is an evidence-based review on the use of metformin in the treatment of skin disorders such as hirsutism, acne, hidradenitis suppurativa, acanthosis nigricans, psoriasis, skin cancer, among others. In addition, cutaneous side-effects such as leukocytoclastic vasculitis, bullous pemphigoid, psoriasiform drug eruption, lichen planus and acute alopecia have been associated with metformin use and are discussed in the article. © 2013 The Authors Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  4. Applications of Nanotechnology in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    What are nanoparticles and why are they important in dermatology? These questions are addressed by highlighting recent developments in the nanotechnology field that have increased the potential for intentional and unintended nanoparticle skin exposure. The role of environmental factors in the interaction of nanoparticles with skin and the potential mechanisms by which nanoparticles may influence skin response to environmental factors are discussed. Trends emerging from recent literature suggest that the positive benefit of engineered nanoparticles for use in cosmetics and as tools for understanding skin biology and curing skin disease, out weigh potential toxicity concerns. Discoveries reported in this journal are highlighted. This review begins with a general introduction to the field of nanotechnology and nanomedicine. This is followed by a discussion of the current state of understanding of nanoparticle skin penetration and their use in three different therapeutic applications. Challenges that must be overcome to derive clinical benefit from the application of nanotechnology to skin are discussed last, providing perspective on the significant opportunity that exists for future studies in investigative dermatology. PMID:22217738

  5. New developments in dermatological oncogenetics.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Manfred

    2013-09-01

    Activated intracellular signaling pathways based on mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes play an important role in a variety of malignant tumors. In dermatology, such mutations have been identified in melanoma, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. These have partly led to the establishment of new, targeted therapies. Treatment successes have been particularly impressive for melanoma with small molecule inhibitors directed against the mutated BRAF oncogene and in basal cell carcinoma with inhibitors directed against the hedgehog signaling pathway. New sequencing technologies, in particular next generation sequencing, have led to a better and more comprehensive understanding of malignant tumors. This approach confirmed the pathogenic role of BRAF, NRAS and MAP kinase pathways for melanoma. At the same time, a series of further interesting target molecules with oncogenic mutations such as ERBB4, GRIN2A, GRM3, PREX2, RAC1 and TP53 were identified. New aspects have recently been shown for squamous cell carcinoma by detection of mutations in the NOTCH signaling pathway. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of these and other tumors should lead to improved and maybe even individualized treatment. The current developments in dermatological oncogenetics based on the new sequencing technologies are reviewed.

  6. Ethical considerations in dermatologic photography.

    PubMed

    Lakdawala, Nikita; Fontanella, Demian; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2012-01-01

    In dermatology, clinical photographs are an essential component of patient care, enabling clinicians to document changes in skin pathology over time. Recent advances in digital technology and the electronic medical record have revolutionized clinical photography; however, these advances bring with them new ethical, legal, and social concerns. Photographs, more than other forms of documentation, have the potential to make patients uncomfortable. The act of photography, especially for those images requiring exposure of the genital area or the entire body, can be an uncomfortable experience for patients, necessitating the clinician and photographer to take an empathic stance in this setting. The Internet has elicited an increasing, and a very real, concern for patients about possible distribution and use of images outside of their individual care. The clinician and staff can allay these fears by professionally and empathetically addressing their concerns. In addition, it is important that patients receive appropriate informed consent about clinical photographs and the potential use of the images in their care, education, and research. Given the multitude of methods for recording clinical photographs, combined with the increasing complexity of image storage, standardization becomes a critical tool in providing consistency among images and achieving more equitable and efficacious care. To achieve this goal and improve the baseline standard of continuity of care for dermatological practices, we review the role of photographs, develop a model for patient consent, and establish standards for photography so as to provide the most ethical care for the patient. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Applications of nanotechnology in dermatology.

    PubMed

    DeLouise, Lisa A

    2012-03-01

    What are nanoparticles and why are they important in dermatology? These questions are addressed by highlighting recent developments in the nanotechnology field that have increased the potential for intentional and unintentional nanoparticle skin exposure. The role of environmental factors in the interaction of nanoparticles with skin and the potential mechanisms by which nanoparticles may influence skin response to environmental factors are discussed. Trends emerging from recent literature suggest that the positive benefit of engineered nanoparticles for use in cosmetics and as tools for understanding skin biology and curing skin disease outweigh potential toxicity concerns. Discoveries reported in this journal are highlighted. This review begins with a general introduction to the field of nanotechnology and nanomedicine. This is followed by a discussion of the current state of understanding of nanoparticle skin penetration and their use in three therapeutic applications. Challenges that must be overcome to derive clinical benefit from the application of nanotechnology to skin are discussed last, providing perspective on the significant opportunity that exists for future studies in investigative dermatology.

  8. Nonsteroidal Topical Immunomodulators in Allergology and Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Jovanović, Marina; Golušin, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review currently available literature data concerning pathomechanisms of action, indications, treatment efficacy, as well as side effects of nonsteroidal immunomodulators used in dermatology, primarily for the treatment of allergic dermatoses. MEDLINE search was undertaken using the key words “Topical Immunomodulators, Dermatology and Allergy”. Full articles, and nothing but full articles, were used. PMID:27144167

  9. Academic productivity and affiliation of dermatologic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Emily P; Hanke, C William; Kimball, Alexa Boer

    2009-12-01

    Because Mohs fellowship training typically incorporates a research component, as required by the Mohs College for fellowship certification, we evaluated whether Mohs microscopic surgery fellowship-trained (MMSFT) dermatologic surgeons were more likely to join academic institutions and demonstrate greater activity in teaching, research, and scientific writing than non-fellowship-trained surgeons (NMMSFT). Responses to the 2002 and 2005 American Academy of Dermatology Practice Profile survey comparing practice settings, proportion of time spent in various practice settings, and professional roles were compared between the two groups. MMSFT dermatologic surgeons were 5 times as likely to be in full-time academic practice and 3 times as likely to be in part-time academia as NMMSFT dermatologic surgeons. Consistent with their greater presence in academia, in 2004, 47% of MMSFT dermatologist surgeons participated in teaching, compared with 19% of NMMSFT surgeons (p=.001) and 16% of all dermatologists (p=.001). Twenty-two percent of MMSFT dermatologic surgeons were involved in research, compared with only 4% of NMMSFT dermatologic surgeons (p=.001) and 8% of all dermatologists (p<.05). Academic productivity of dermatologic surgeons appears to be associated with Mohs fellowship training. The level of teaching and research was significant even in MMSFT surgeons who were not in full- or part-time academic faculty positions. This suggests a strong tradition of academic productivity for dermatologic surgeons outside traditional academic institutions.

  10. Elementary lesions in dermatological semiology: literature review.

    PubMed

    Cardili, Renata Nahas; Roselino, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Discrepancies in the terminology of elementary lesions persist when texts from Dermatology and Semiology books are compared, which can cause some confusion in both the teaching of undergraduate medical students and the learning acquired by professionals in the field. This review aims to compare and clarify the differences in the description of elementary lesions by many authors, used as references for specialists in dermatology.

  11. Innovative therapeutics in pediatric dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gelmetti, Carlo; Frasin, Adina; Restano, Lucia

    2010-07-01

    Although clinical trials for new drugs are often limited in children because of safety concerns or restrictions, new therapies or novel strategies with old drugs have recently expanded dermatologic armamentarium for pediatric patients. Oral propranolol is currently the first choice in the treatment of alarming infantile hemangiomas. In atopic dermatitis, proactive strategy with topical calcineurin inhibitors can safely prevent disease exacerbation. Tacrolimus, in particular, is also useful for the treatment of vitiligo occurring in sensitive areas such as the eyelids. Among biologic drugs, use of etanercept is safe and efficient in children and adolescents with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Engineered tissues with special antimicrobial properties (silver-coated fabrics or engineered silk) are now used to treat eczema and fungal diseases in children. In athlete's foot, the use of 5-finger socks can also be helpful.

  12. Nicotinamide in dermatology and photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Surjana, Devita; Damian, Diona L

    2011-01-01

    Nicotinamide (the amide form of vitamin B3) has been used in dermatology for more than 40 years for a diverse range of conditions including acne, rosacea, autoimmune bullous dermatoses, and now the treatment and prevention of photoaging and photoimmunosuppression. The broad clinical effects of nicotinamide may be explained by its role as a cellular energy precursor, a modulator of inflammatory cytokines, and an inhibitor of the nuclear enzyme poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1, which plays a significant role in DNA repair, maintenance ofgenomic stability, and cellular response to injury including inflammation and apoptosis. This review outlines the use of nicotinamide for inflammatory dermatoses and photoaging and focuses on its emerging role in photoprotection.

  13. [Telemedicine in dermatological practice: teledermatology].

    PubMed

    Danis, Judit; Forczek, Erzsébet; Bari, Ferenc

    2016-03-06

    Technological advances in the fields of information and telecommunication technologies have affected the health care system in the last decades, and lead to the emergence of a new discipline: telemedicine. The appearance and rise of internet and smart phones induced a rapid progression in telemedicine. Several new applications and mobile devices are published every hour even for medical purposes. Parallel to these changes in the technical fields, medical literature about telemedicine has grown rapidly. Due to its visual nature, dermatology is ideally suited to benefit from this new technology and teledermatology became one of the most dynamically evolving fields of telemedicine by now. Teledermatology is not routinely practiced in Hungary yet, however, it promises the health care system to become better, cheaper and faster, but we have to take notice on the experience and problems faced in teledermatologic applications so far, summarized in this review.

  14. [What's new in dermatological therapy?].

    PubMed

    Paul, C

    2007-12-01

    A review of the medical literature and of the regulatory agencies website was performed to identify new information about dermatological therapy from October 2006 to October 2007. Care was taken to prioritize results from randomized controlled trials and epidemiological studies of acceptable methodology. In the last year, significant advances have been made in the field of psoriasis, pemphigus, prevention of infection with oncogenic papillomaviruses, leg ulcers, evaluation of lasers and photodynamic therapy. The availability of biological agents for the treatment of psoriasis, auto-immune disease and skin cancer will certainly induce major changes in our therapeutic strategies in the near future. The dermatologist needs to keep-up with new therapies in order to address the therapeutic needs of patients with skin diseases.

  15. [What's new in pediatric dermatology?].

    PubMed

    Vabres, P

    2008-12-01

    The main selected articles in pediatric dermatology covered the following topics: development and maturation of the epidermal barrier in the neonate, iatrogenic events in the neonatal ICU, diagnostic value of minor birthmarks, complications, risk factors and treatment of hemangiomas, coagulopathy in venous malformations, epidemiology and dermoscopy of congenital and acquired melanocytic nevi in childhood, growth of the body surface area, new pathogenic concepts and treatment in atopic dermatitis, the impact of filaggrin deficiency, hereditary factors in Kawasaki disease, severe and drug resistant cases, management of juvenile dermatomyositis, treatment of childhood psoriasis with biologics, the new classification of epidermolysis bullosa and therapeutic approach with cell therapy, neurological impairment in xeroderma pigmentosum, behavioural anomalies in X-linked ichthyosis, guidelines for neurofibromatosis type I, the genetics of an hereditary hypotrichosis, infantile acne, rosacea in childhood, mast cell disease management and, last but not least, treatment of hair lice with silicone.

  16. Dapsone in dermatology and beyond.

    PubMed

    Wozel, Gottfried; Blasum, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Dapsone (4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone) is an aniline derivative belonging to the group of synthetic sulfones. In 1937 against the background of sulfonamide era the microbial activity of dapsone has been discovered. Shortly thereafter, the use of dapsone to treat non-pathogen-caused diseases revealed alternate antiinflammatory mechanisms that initially were elucidated by inflammatory animal models. Thus, dapsone clearly has dual functions of both: antimicrobial/antiprotozoal effects and anti-inflammatory features similarly to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The latter capabilities primarily were used in treating chronic inflammatory disorders. Dapsone has been investigated predominantly by in vitro methods aiming to get more insights into the effect of dapsone to inflammatory effector cells, cytokines, and/or mediators, such as cellular toxic oxygen metabolism, myoloperoxidase-/halogenid system, adhesion molecules, chemotaxis, membrane-associated phospholipids, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, interleukin-8, tumor necrosis factor α, lymphocyte functions, and tumor growth. Moreover, attention has been paid to mechanisms by which dapsone mediates effects in more complex settings like impact of lifespan, stroke, glioblastoma, or as anticonvulsive agent. Additionally, there are some dermatological investigations in human being using dapsone and its metabolites (e.g., leukotriene B4-induced chemotaxis, ultraviolet-induced erythema). It could be established that dapsone metabolites by their own have anti-inflammatory properties. Pharmacology and mechanisms of action are determining factors for clinical use of dapsone chiefly in neutrophilic and/or eosinophilic dermatoses and in chronic disorders outside the field of dermatology. The steroid-sparing effect of dapsone is useful for numerous clinical entities. Future avenues of investigations will provide more information on this fascinating and essential agent.

  17. Interdepartmental Dermatology: Characteristics and Impact of Dermatology Inpatient Referrals at a Teaching Hospital in Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Satyendra Nath; Podder, Indrasish; Saha, Abanti; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dermatology is primarily considered to be an outpatient-centered specialty. However, several inpatient admissions to other specialties require dermatologic consultation for optimum management. Aims: To analyze the causes of inpatient dermatology referrals, departments sending referrals, and impact of dermatology consultation on patient management. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study by analyzing the records of 486 patient referrals over a 4-year period. The demographic details, specialties requesting consultation, cause of referral, and dermatological advice have been recorded and analyzed. Results: Dermatology consultation changed the dermatologic diagnosis and treatment of almost two-thirds of patients. General medicine requested the maximum number of referrals, “skin rash” being the most common cause for referral. Accurate diagnosis on referrals was provided by only 30.2% of nondermatologists. Common dermatological disorders were often misdiagnosed by these physicians, and dermatology referrals had significant impact on the diagnosis and subsequent management of these patients. Conclusion: While dermatologic referral leads to improved patient care, there is a need for better training of nondermatologists enabling them to recognize and treat common dermatoses. PMID:28216722

  18. Measuring impact of JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps section on training in US dermatology residency programs.

    PubMed

    Britton, Kristina M; Stratman, Erik J

    2013-07-01

    JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps commentaries are intended to aid in the interpretation of the literature to make it more practical and applicable to daily patient care. Practice Gaps commentaries have had an impact on physician clinical practice and dermatology residency curricula. To assess the impact of JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps commentaries on dermatology residency training programs in the United States, including journal club discussions and local quality improvement activities. A web-based questionnaire of 17 questions was sent via e-mail to US dermatology residency program directors (PDs) in February 2012. Program director report of incorporating Practice Gaps themes and discussions into resident journal club activities, clinical practice, quality improvement activities, or research projects in the residency programs, as a result of a Practice Gaps commentary. Of the 114 surveys distributed to US dermatology residency PDs, 48 were completed (42% response rate). Sixty percent of PDs reported familiarity with the Practice Gaps section of JAMA Dermatology, and 56% discuss these commentaries during resident journal club activities. Quality improvement and research projects have been initiated as a result of Practice Gaps commentaries. Practice Gaps commentaries are discussed during most dermatology residency journal club activities. Practice Gaps have had an impact on physician practice and dermatology residency curricula and can serve as a tool for enhanced continuing medical education and quality improvement initiatives.

  19. How Clarence S. Livingood and his Manual of Dermatology influenced dermatologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Collison, Daniel W

    2006-06-01

    Clarence S. Livingood and his mentors, Pillsbury and Sulzberger, wrote the Manual of Dermatology, a book that was the dermatologic handbook of choice for thousands of medical officers in World War II. By virtue of its wide distribution among a variety of physicians practicing in the medical boom of the 40s, 50s, and 60s, this book (and its formulary) was one of the most influential dermatologic texts of the 20th century. Livingood would repeat the strategies employed in writing this book over and over in his long career advancing dermatology among American medical specialties.

  20. Factors affecting academic leadership in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Martires, Kathryn J; Aquino, Lisa L; Wu, Jashin J

    2015-02-01

    Although prior studies have examined methods by which to recruit and retain academic dermatologists, few have examined factors that are important for developing academic leaders in dermatology. This study sought to examine characteristics of dermatology residency programs that affect the odds of producing department or division chairs/chiefs and program directors (PDs). Data regarding program size, faculty, grants, alumni residency program attended, lectures, and publications for all accredited US dermatology residency programs were collected. Of the 103 programs examined, 46% had graduated at least 1 chair/chief, and 53% had graduated at least 1 PD. Results emphasize that faculty guidance and research may represent modifiable factors by which a dermatology residency program can increase its graduation of academic leaders.

  1. Social Media Use in Pediatric Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Alexander L; Teng, Joyce M C

    2016-01-01

    Social media is predicted to become increasingly important in dermatology because of its potential to serve as a platform for public health campaigns, aid in participant recruitment for clinical trials, increase public engagement in health care, and facilitate scientific discourse. No study of social media use in pediatric dermatology has been performed, so we analyzed the use of the seven leading social media platforms in pediatric dermatology, with a focus on patient advocacy groups, professional societies, research journals, and research institutions. We observed that 89% of patient advocacy groups, 100% of professional societies, 62.5% of research journals, and 0% of academic pediatric dermatology departments maintained one or more social media accounts. Our observations suggest that all stakeholder groups, and in particular members of the research community, have the potential to further their engagement, connections, and communications through social media.

  2. The logistics of an inpatient dermatology service.

    PubMed

    Rosenbach, Misha

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology represents a unique challenge as caring for hospitalized patients with skin conditions is different from most dermatologists' daily outpatient practice. Declining rates of inpatient dermatology participation are often attributed to a number of factors, including challenges navigating the administrative burdens of hospital credentialing, acclimating to different hospital systems involving potential alternate electronic medical records systems, medical-legal concerns, and reimbursement concerns. This article aims to provide basic guidelines to help dermatologists establish a presence as a consulting physician in the inpatient hospital-based setting. The emphasis is on identifying potential pitfalls, problematic areas, and laying out strategies for tackling some of the challenges of inpatient dermatology including balancing financial concerns and optimizing reimbursements, tracking data and developing a plan for academic productivity, optimizing workflow, and identifying metrics to document the impact of an inpatient dermatology consult service. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  3. Elementary lesions in dermatological semiology: literature review*

    PubMed Central

    Cardili, Renata Nahas; Roselino, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Discrepancies in the terminology of elementary lesions persist when texts from Dermatology and Semiology books are compared, which can cause some confusion in both the teaching of undergraduate medical students and the learning acquired by professionals in the field. This review aims to compare and clarify the differences in the description of elementary lesions by many authors, used as references for specialists in dermatology. PMID:27828637

  4. Pentoxifylline and its applications in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Iffat; Dorjay, Konchok; Anwar, Parvaiz

    2014-01-01

    Pentoxifylline is a methyl-xanthine derivative with many anti inflammatory effects. Pentoxifylline has been found to be effective for many dermatological as well as non-dermatological conditions. It has been used both as primary drug as well as adjuvant and is a safe and relatively cost-effective alternative drug. In this article, we review the literature and highlight various important aspects of pentoxifylline. PMID:25396144

  5. Nutritional clinical studies in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Liakou, Aikaterini I; Theodorakis, Michael J; Melnik, Bodo C; Pappas, Apostolos; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2013-10-01

    Nutrition has long been associated with skin health, beauty, integrity and aging through multiple pathways and cofactors implicated in skin biology. The onset and clinical course of various common skin diseases, especially acne, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and hair loss, have been suggested to be critically affected by nutrition patterns and habits. The relationship between acne and diet, predominantly the role of high glycemic load diets and dairy consumption have recently gained increased interest. Abnormal nutritional conditions such as obesity or malnutrition often manifest themselves by specific cutaneous features and altered skin function. Skin photoprotection, rendered by various nutrients, is well documented and appropriate nutritional supplementation has been shown to exert beneficial effects upon impaired skin integrity, restore its appearance and promote skin health. It is our intention to provide a comprehensive review of the most recent information on the role of nutrition for common skin diseases and regulation of skin biology. Nutritional clinical studies in dermatology have been reviewed using the MedLine literature source and the terms "diet" or "nutrition" and "skin". The data on the relationship between nutrition and skin are until now controversial and much more work is needed to be done to clarify possible etiological correlations.

  6. [What's new in dermatological research?].

    PubMed

    Passeron, Th

    2010-12-01

    Dermatology research has been very rich this year, once again. The physiopathological mechanisms of paradoxical reactions to anti-TNF are better understood and new therapeutic targets for psoriasis have been evidenced. Targeted therapy in oncodermatology have shown their potential usefulness clinically but fundamental data have also clarified their mechanisms of action as well as their limits. The key role played by the immune system in nonsegmental vitiligo has also been clearly demonstrated. Fibroblasts as well as visible light seem to play a key role that has been poorly understood to date within the complex mechanisms of cutaneous pigmentation. Specific receptors of pruritus have been reported and foster hope for the development of more effective antipruriginous treatments in the near future. Other studies report new potential targets for diseases such as fungoid mycosis, atopic dermatitis, or scleroderma. Finally, physiopathological explanations have contributed to a variety of domains such as greying hair, axillary odors, HIV and herpes virus interrelations, and the teratogenicity of thalidomide. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of antimalarials in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ochsendorf, Falk R

    2010-10-01

    The antimalarials chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine have been used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases for more than 60 years. Even today new indications evolve due to the complex mode of action of these compounds. Due to the fear of side effects, especially irreversible retinopathy, their use is often limited. These side-effects, however, are a consequence of excessive daily dosages. An effective, safe therapy needs correct dosing, i. e. adherence to maximal daily dosages of 3.5(-4) mg chloroquine or 6(-6.5) mg hydroxychloroquine per kilogram ideal body weight. If the actual body weight is lower than the ideal body weight, this actual weight is used for the calculation of the dosage. Observing these limits allows a rather safe therapy of the diseases like lupus erythematosus, REM syndrome, porphyria cutanea tarda (2 × 125 mg chloroquine/week), cutaneous sarcoidosis and dermatomyositis. If standard therapies fail, then antimalarials can be tried to treat Sjögren syndrome, granuloma annulare or erosive lichen planus. If therapy fails, either can be combined with quinacrine to increase their effectiveness. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine are indispensable and well-tolerated essential drugs in dermatology and especially suited as part of a combination scheme, for example with corticosteroids, as they act synergistically and reduce side-effects.

  8. Dermatological problems of the puberty

    PubMed Central

    Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia

    2013-01-01

    Puberty is a period of life between childhood and adulthood. It is characterized by many changes in morphology and appearance of the body (biological maturation), in the psyche – development of personality (psychological maturation), and in the attitude towards one's own and the opposite sex (psychosexual maturation), and in the social role (social maturation). Dermatological problems of adolescence are mainly related to fluctuations in hormone levels, mainly androgens. They include acne, hair problems and excessive sweating. Acne vulgaris is the most frequently diagnosed dermatosis in patients aged between 11 and 30 years. It is believed that it affects about 80% of persons in this age group or even, taking into account lesions of low intensity, 100% of young people. Excessive sweating is a condition characterised by excessive production of sweat, resulting from high activity of sweat glands. The sweat glands are localised in almost all areas of the body surface but on the hands, feet, armpits and around the groin they are found at the highest density. Seborrhoeic dermatitis of the scalp is a chronic, relapsing, inflammatory dermatosis, which currently affects about 5% of the population. It affects mostly young people, particularly men. PMID:24278071

  9. [What's new in dermatological research?].

    PubMed

    Misery, L

    2012-12-01

    Dermatological research is more and more productive and its level higher and higher. Choosing the most significant articles is difficult. Mast cell plays a role in the initiation of inflammation and therefore in poorer healing. Keratinocytes derive from stem cells and progenitors, which are independent. They can be activated directly by heat through sensory proteins at their surface. The cutaneous nervous system has an organization similar to that of the most complex sensory organs. In psoriasis, denervation induces a significant plaque regression. The cerebral integration of skin appearance modulates the skin reactivity to histamine. Pruritus is linked to specific receptors in the skin, which give specific projections into the brain and are histamine-dependent or not. Atopic dermatitis may be linked to the nonspecific activation of Th2 immune system, particularly to abnormalities of the skin barrier. Skin bacteria, but not intestinal, modulate the formation of skin immunity. Raf kinases are well known in melanoma and play an important role in physiological conditions: they are not essential to the initial development of the melanocyte lineage but to maintain it. In culture, melanocytes can be dedifferentiated in melanoblasts. Sunburns are consecutive to the activation of TLR3 by UVB. ANRIL gene is involved in the polymorphism of neurofibromatosis 1 and gene RAD51B is linked to the risk of male breast cancer. MCV infection is linked to sites with sialic acid. Aging objectified by telomere shortening is accelerated by stress.

  10. A multimedia database for dermatology.

    PubMed

    Kindler, H; Densow, D; Baranov, A E; Fliedner, T M; Peter, R U

    1998-01-01

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness (REMPAN) centres have built up the International Computer Database for Radiation Accident Case Histories (ICDREC) to document the treatment of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) patients. Radiation induced skin lesions may cause severe late effects in radiation accident patients. Dermatological multimedia documentation is included into the ICDREC. In particular, retrieval and display of digitised skin photographs and medical reports serves to improve patient care, medical education, and scientific analysis concerning the cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS). The database has been built up as a client/server system. A particular focus has been set on using commercial off-the-shelf software components. The medical data including the multimedia data are stored in a relational database system. The database can be accessed by inexpensive personal computers in the dermatologist's workplace. Authorised institutions can access the database via the Internet. Retrieval of one skin photograph via local area network (LAN) requires approximately 3 seconds. The current state of the application is illustrated with the skin lesion treatment of a Chernobyl patient. An example is given on how to access the ICDREC from a dermatologist's desktop personal computer. The discussion focuses on the advantages of storing the textual and pictorial data in one central database to be accessed from different care centres and how the results can be generalised for medical multimedia information systems.

  11. MD-PhDs in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Prystowsky, J H

    1992-05-01

    A national survey was conducted to explore ways in which MD-PhDs in dermatology balance their research and clinical interests and the factors that influenced their career decisions. A questionnaire was mailed to all MD-PhDs who were affiliated with dermatology training programs as determined by a preliminary study. The survey consisted of a questionnaire about research background, career pathway, attitudes about personal and professional issues, and influence of residency training program on career decision making. From 60 MD-PhD dermatologists surveyed, 43 (72%) completed questionnaires. Eighty percent of the respondents (34 of 43) held positions in academic medicine; 76% entered dermatology with the intent to pursue academic medicine. Almost all (93%) held academic positions immediately after residency; 50% held positions with the title of assistant professor or higher as their first postresidency employment. Only 26% of the respondents received funding for their MD-PhD through the federally funded Medical Scientist Training Program. Fifty percent of the respondents completed their training with loans. Despite the long period of training and expense required for the dual career, a high percentage (80%) stayed in academic dermatology suggesting that they are an important source for supplying physician-scientists to the field of dermatology. The ability to limit patient care responsibilities and maintain protected time for research may be a factor responsible for the high percentage of MD-PhDs that stay in academic dermatology.

  12. Review of digital image security in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Nielson, Colton; West, Cameron; Shimizu, Ikue

    2015-10-16

    The inherently visual nature of dermatology naturally lends itself to photography. As technology has evolved, smartphone cameras have become ubiquitous and have the potential to improve education and patient care in dermatology. Although patients and physicians may agree that photography can improve patient care, there are certain risks involved with smartphone photography in the medical field. Perhaps most concerning is the number of dermatologists using smartphones to take unsecured images in their daily practice. A recent study revealed that 22% of surveyed dermatologists used smartphone cameras multiple times per day in their practice. Dermatologists may also overestimate patient comfort with smartphone use in clinical photography. We present a review of the use of smartphones in dermatology and address the potential lack of security and accompanying ethical dilemmas.

  13. Serendipity and its Role in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Coondoo, Arijit; Sengupta, Sujata

    2015-01-01

    Serendipity is a pleasant surprise of finding a particularly useful information while not looking for it. Significant historic events occurring as a result of serendipity include the discovery of the law of buoyancy (Archimedes principle) by the Greek mathematician Archimedes, of the Americas by Christopher Columbus and of gravity by Sir Isaac Newton. The role of serendipity in science has been immensely beneficial to mankind. A host of important discoveries in medical science owe their origin to serendipity of which perhaps the most famous is the story of Sir Alexander Fleming and his discovery of Penicillin. In the field of dermatology, serendipity has been responsible for major developments in the therapy of psoriasis, hair disorders, aesthetic dermatology and dermatosurgery. Besides these many other therapeutic modalities in dermatology were born as a result of such happy accidents. PMID:25814699

  14. The role of capsaicin in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Katherine; Shea, Sofia M; Patterson, James W

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic pain and pruritus are the common chief complaints at dermatology office visits. Unfortunately, they are also notoriously difficult conditions to treat. Topical capsaicin used as a single therapy or as an adjuvant offers a low-risk option for patients who do not achieve control on other therapies. This chapter presents the evidence behind topical capsaicin use in dermatologic conditions characterized by neurogenic pain or pruritus, including postherpetic neuralgia, notalgia paresthetica, brachioradial pruritus, lichen simplex chronicus, prurigo nodularis, pruritus ani, pruritus of hemodialysis, aquagenic pruritus, apocrine chromhidrosis, lipodermatosclerosis, alopecia areata, and psoriasis. It presents the most common capsaicin formulations, dosages, and durations of treatment for each condition. Additionally, the chapter addresses various adverse effects and limitations in the use of topical capsaicin in dermatology.

  15. Serendipity and its role in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Coondoo, Arijit; Sengupta, Sujata

    2015-01-01

    Serendipity is a pleasant surprise of finding a particularly useful information while not looking for it. Significant historic events occurring as a result of serendipity include the discovery of the law of buoyancy (Archimedes principle) by the Greek mathematician Archimedes, of the Americas by Christopher Columbus and of gravity by Sir Isaac Newton. The role of serendipity in science has been immensely beneficial to mankind. A host of important discoveries in medical science owe their origin to serendipity of which perhaps the most famous is the story of Sir Alexander Fleming and his discovery of Penicillin. In the field of dermatology, serendipity has been responsible for major developments in the therapy of psoriasis, hair disorders, aesthetic dermatology and dermatosurgery. Besides these many other therapeutic modalities in dermatology were born as a result of such happy accidents.

  16. Pediatric dermatology: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Prindaville, Brea; Antaya, Richard J; Siegfried, Elaine C

    2015-01-01

    Up to 30% percent of pediatric primary care visits include a skin-related problem, and referrals are hampered by appointment wait times among the longest of any pediatric subspecialty. Despite the clear demand for pediatric dermatologists, there has been a long-standing shortage of providers, leaving dermatology as one of the most underserved pediatric subspecialties. Another consequence of the workforce shortage is the limited opportunity for pediatric dermatology training for residents and postgraduate general pediatricians and dermatologists. This review includes the evolution of the subspecialty from conception through the present, along with obstacles to workforce expansion and potential solutions to improve access to care for children with skin diseases.

  17. Fruit and Food Eponyms in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Nidhi; Jindal, Pooja; Kumar, Jeevan; Gupta, Sanjeev; Jain, VK

    2015-01-01

    Dermatology world is brimming with myriad of interesting clinical conditions, signs and syndromes. It is infinite, which has systemic clinical connotations too. Complicated pronunciations of diagnosis have always placed residents in an intricate state. Each one is trying his best to make this cumbersome subject comparatively more acceptable and convenient. The present paper is an attempt to further simplify the subject by correlating difficult conditions with commonly used and seen things such as fruit and food. A total of 45 dermatological conditions were found to be based on fruit and food eponyms. For example, strawberries can remind us of strawberry gums of Wegener's granulomatosis and strawberry nevus. PMID:25814737

  18. [Measurement of disease severity in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Deckert, S; Apfelbacher, C; Schmitt, J

    2015-09-01

    In order to determine the appropriate therapy for dermatological diseases, numerous measurement instruments are available to measure disease severity. Due to the lack of laboratory parameters for some dermatological diseases to objectify the disease severity (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis), questionnaires are used. Laboratory as well as questionnaire-based measurements should be reliable, valid, and sensitive to change. In addition, measurement instruments should be feasible. Classifications of disease severity which are based on inadequate measurement properties result in incorrect clinical decisions and limit evidence-based healthcare. Therefore, systematically developed and evidence-based recommendations for the use of individual measurement instruments should be taken into consideration.

  19. Safety of Topical Dermatologic Medications in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Viral M; Schwartz, Robert A; Lambert, W Clark

    2016-07-01

    Dermatologic drugs should be employed with caution in women of childbearing age who are pregnant or considering pregnancy. Topical drugs have little systemic absorption. Therefore, they are deemed safer than oral or parenteral agents and less likely to harm the fetus. However, their safety profile must be assessed cautiously, as there is limited available data. In this article, we aggregate human and animal studies and provide recommendations on using topical dermatologic medications in pregnancy.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(7):830-834.

  20. [The use of lasers in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Lecocq, C; Pirard, D; del Marmol, V; Berlingin, E

    2013-01-01

    Albert Einstein is undoubtedly the father of lasers. But it is not until 1964 that the first dermatological lasers were introduced. The Nd-YAG laser, the CO2 laser were developed by Kumar Patel. In a 40 year period lasers not only were diversified but have also become safer and miniaturized. This article hopes to strengthen general practionners' and specialist's knowledge of the different categories of available lasers. The most frequently used ones are ablative lasers (CO2-Erbium), vascular lasers (Nd-YAG, KTP, pulsed dye laser) and the pigment lasers (Q-Switched Nd-YAG, Alexandrite). A description of these lasers and their indications in dermatology will be discussed.

  1. 75 FR 36101 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The meeting of the Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee scheduled for June 28, 2010, is cancelled. This...

  2. [What's new in dermatological research?].

    PubMed

    Humbert, P

    2008-12-01

    which play a crucial role in the adaptive immunological response. It was shown that activation of the proliferation of the lymphocytes T after the migration of dendritic cells on the level of the lymphatic ganglion depended not on Langerhans cell, but of the dendritic cell. A new way appears to control the autoimmunity in the psoriasis and involves the plasmacytoid dendritic cells which are sensitized with the DNA itself when it is coupled with an antibacterial peptide. Mast cells express cathelicidin, which acts like an antibiotic with broad spectrum and influences the defence system of the epitheliums. We have perhaps found a new therapeutic target for rosacea by disclosing high rates of cathelicidin and a series of associated proteases in skin lesions. The sebocytes express antibacterial functional peptides deriving from cathelicidin which can have a bactericidal effect against P. Acnes. A vast genomic study in the androgenetic alopecia highlighted the existence of new loci localized on the 20p11 chromosome, associated with the risk of androgenetic alopecia. New alleles to determine the color of hair and the cutaneous pigmentation were identified. Two loci (IRF 4 and SLC24A4) are highly associated with the color of hair, like three other areas. The blue color of the eyes could be due to a change of an element located in gene HERC2 preventing of the expression of OCA2. Thus, many fields of dermatology were the object of research which opens new prospects for diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Dermatologic Practice: Implications for a Primary Care Residency Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, William T., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The problems encountered, diagnostic procedures performed, and treatments prescribed in dermatology were studied in a primary care practice and in a dermatology clinic. It is proposed that the findings of this study be the basis for designing a curriculum in dermatology for residents in primary care medicine. (Author/MLW)

  4. Dermatologic Practice: Implications for a Primary Care Residency Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, William T., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The problems encountered, diagnostic procedures performed, and treatments prescribed in dermatology were studied in a primary care practice and in a dermatology clinic. It is proposed that the findings of this study be the basis for designing a curriculum in dermatology for residents in primary care medicine. (Author/MLW)

  5. Topical hemostatic agents for dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Larson, P O

    1988-06-01

    Topical hemostatic agents are very helpful in attaining capillary and small vessel hemostasis in dermatologic surgery. The commonly used topical hemostatic agents, including oxidized cellulose, absorbable gelatin, and thrombin are reviewed, along with newer agents such as microfibrillar collagen, fibrin sealants, and acrylates. Agents best suited for certain situations are recommended.

  6. Sources of Observer Variation in Dermatologic Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Geoffrey R.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the effects of similarity to prior examples in predicting errors in dermatologic diagnosis. Two interpretations about the acquisition of expertise are independent cues and instance-based categorization. The subjects (N=16) were first-year family medicine residents from McMaster University (Ontario). (MLW)

  7. Update on mobile applications in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shivani; Eluri, Madhu; Boyers, Lindsay N; Karimkhani, Chante; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-11-09

    As the use of mobile devices surpasses that of personal computers, medical applications increasingly provide easy access to a diverse range of health care resources. To analyze changes in the number of dermatologic mobile applications since 2012. We examined five mobile platforms (Apple, Android, Windows, Nokia, and Blackberry) for dermatology-related diagnoses applications. The apps were categorized by purpose, cost, and target audience. A total of 365 dermatologic mobile applications were analyzed with 225 new mobile applications found since 2012. Since the last query, there was a decrease in market share of reference materials (26.6% in 2012 to 15.9% in 2014) and self-surveillance/diagnosis applications (17.9% in 2012 to 12.9% in 2014) while teledermatology apps increased from 3.5% of total apps in 2012 to 9% in 2014. Dermatology apps continue to proliferate with minimal regulation. As technology continues to advance and physicians have greater access to mobile- health information, novel advancements in diagnosis may lead to more time-and-location-flexible patient care.

  8. Dermatological adverse events with taxane chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sibaud, Vincent; Lebœuf, Nicole R.; Roche, Henri; Belum, Viswanath R.; Gladieff, Laurence; Deslandres, Marion; Montastruc, Marion; Eche, Audrey; Vigarios, Emmanuelle; Dalenc, Florence; Lacouture, Mario E.

    2017-01-01

    Taxanes (docetaxel and paclitaxel) are among the most commonly prescribed anticancer drugs approved for the treatment of metastatic or locally advanced breast, non-small cell lung, prostate, gastric, head and neck, and ovarian cancers, as well as in the adjuvant setting for operable node-positive breast cancers. Although the true incidence of dermatological adverse events (AEs) in patients receiving taxanes is not known, and has never been prospectively analysed, they clearly represent one of the major AEs associated with these agents. With an increase in the occurrence of cutaneous AEs during treatment with novel targeted and immunological therapies when used in combination with taxanes, a thorough understanding of reactions attributable to this class is imperative. Moreover, identification and management of dermatological AEs is critical for maintaining the quality of life in cancer patients and for minimizing dose modifications of their antineoplastic regimen. This analysis represents a systematic review of the dermatological conditions reported with the use of these drugs, complemented by experience at comprehensive cancer centres. The conditions reported herein include skin, hair, and nail toxicities. Lastly, we describe the dermatological data available for the new, recently FDA-and EMA- approved, solvent-free nab-paclitaxel. PMID:27550571

  9. Prison dermatology: experience in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice dermatology clinic.

    PubMed

    Coury, Cameron; Kelly, Brent

    2012-10-01

    In this article, the authors review the skin conditions seen in a dermatology referral clinic for inmates in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice system at the University of Texas Medical Branch. A database search of dermatology visits over a 34-month period yielded 3,326 adult outpatient encounters for analysis. Psoriasis, actinic keratoses, and hair diseases were the most commonly encountered diagnoses. Dermatophytes were the most common infection, keloids the most common benign tumor, and pemphigus the most common autoimmune disease.

  10. [Digital photograph storage systems in clinical dermatology].

    PubMed

    Taberner, R; Contestí, T

    2010-05-01

    In recent years, digital photography has consolidated its role in clinical dermatology. In view of the quality and low cost of current equipment and the simplicity of digital storage, almost all dermatologists now use digital photography, which is also extremely versatile and readily applicable to teaching. However, to maximize its full potential, image retrieval must be available at any time and with the patient present. This requires a suitable storage system that may vary according to the characteristics of each center. Dermatologists must also find time to maintain and organize the digital archives. The present article describes current options in digital image storage and retrieval, ranging from multidepartmental picture archiving and communication systems at one end to image management freeware at the other, and also including dedicated dermatology software.

  11. Lasers in dermatology: a selective historical review.

    PubMed

    Morelli, J G; Parrish, J A

    1985-10-01

    Lasers have been used in dermatology for over 20 years. Multiple lesions including port wine stains, decorative tattoos, malignant tumors, and keloids have been treated with various lasers. Initial therapy exploited the laser property of spatial confinement of an extremely high energy density to create a localized thermal effect. With increased understanding of laser technology, skin optics, and laser-tissue interactions, other laser properties such as monochromaticity and pulsewidth variability have been exploited to even further confine damage to pathologic tissue while maximally sparing surrounding normal tissue. This increased knowledge has led to a vast improvement in the results of dermatologic laser therapy. Despite this, laser therapy still remains a surgical art, with wound healing playing a large part in the final outcome.

  12. Dermatology and HIV/AIDS in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jenny; McKoy, Karen; Papier, Art; Klaus, Sidney; Ryan, Terence; Grossman, Henning; Masenga, Elisante J; Sethi, Aisha; Craft, Noah

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) have greatly complicated dermatologic disease and the required care in most regions of Africa. Opportunistic infections, ectoparasites, Kaposi sarcoma, and skin manifestations of systemic infections are exceedingly common in patients with HIV/AIDS. Dermatologists have contributed significantly to our knowledge base about HIV/AIDS and have played an important educational role regarding the clinical manifestations historically. Because of the increased burden of skin disease in Africa due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic we must redouble our efforts to provide dermatology education to care providers in Africa. We review the burden of skin disease in Africa, how it relates to HIV/AIDS and global infectious disease, current educational strategies in Africa to address this need, and suggest potential solutions to move these efforts forward. PMID:21887061

  13. HIPAA, dermatology images, and the law.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Noah; Rothstein, Brooke

    2013-12-01

    From smart phones to iPads, the world has grown increasingly reliant on new technology. In this ever-expanding digital age, medicine is at the forefront of these new technologies. In the field of dermatology and general medicine, digital images have become an important tool used in patient management. Today, one can even find physicians who use their cellular phone cameras to take patient images and transmit them to other physicians. However, as digital imaging technology has become more prevalent so too have concerns about the impact of this technology on the electronic medical record, quality of patient care, and medicolegal issues. This article will discuss the advent of digital imaging technology in dermatology and the legal ramifications digital images have on medical care, abiding by HIPAA, the use of digital images as evidence, and the possible abuses digital images can pose in a health care setting.

  14. [Contemporary dermatological methods of treating hirsutism].

    PubMed

    Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Sikorska, Patrycja; Szkudłapski, Dawid; Oleszczyk, Paulina; Juśko, Maciej; Kozłowski, Michał; Madej, Paweł; Okopień, Bogusław

    2014-01-01

    Hirsutism is a symptom of excessive androgen secretion in women, which in recent years is becoming more common. It is a problem of physical, mental and social background and patients always require application of an appropriate therapy. In addition to medical therapy, there are also other forms of treatment of hirsutism. These include the dermatological treatment using mechanical methods of removing unwanted hair. The aim of this work is to systematize the existing knowledge about treatment of hirsutism and suggest different patterns of treatment. Dermatological treatment is a very important complement to drug therapy. Its use allows for more rapid achievement of an external effect, and thus to improve the patients compliance. Due to the variety of symptoms in patients population therapy should be adapted to the needs of every patient.

  15. Zinc therapy in dermatology: a review.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mrinal; Mahajan, Vikram K; Mehta, Karaninder S; Chauhan, Pushpinder S

    2014-01-01

    Zinc, both in elemental or in its salt forms, has been used as a therapeutic modality for centuries. Topical preparations like zinc oxide, calamine, or zinc pyrithione have been in use as photoprotecting, soothing agents or as active ingredient of antidandruff shampoos. Its use has expanded manifold over the years for a number of dermatological conditions including infections (leishmaniasis, warts), inflammatory dermatoses (acne vulgaris, rosacea), pigmentary disorders (melasma), and neoplasias (basal cell carcinoma). Although the role of oral zinc is well-established in human zinc deficiency syndromes including acrodermatitis enteropathica, it is only in recent years that importance of zinc as a micronutrient essential for infant growth and development has been recognized. The paper reviews various dermatological uses of zinc.

  16. Photodynamic therapy in dermatology: history and horizons.

    PubMed

    Taub, Amy Forman

    2004-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a photosensitizer, light, and molecular oxygen to selectively kill cells. When localized in the target tissue, the photosensitizer is activated by light to produce oxygen intermediates that destroy target tissue cells. The easy access of skin to light-based therapy has led dermatologists to apply PDT to cutaneous disorders. In dermatology, PDT has been most successful in treating actinic keratoses, basal cell carcinoma, and Bowen's disease. The introduction of aminolevulinic acid, which does not make patients susceptible to phototoxicity for extended periods, has reduced morbidity associated with PDT. This has led to new interest in PDT not only for nonmelanoma skin cancer and premalignant lesions but also in the treatment of acne and as an adjuvant to photorejuvenation procedures. This review examines the historical roots of PDT and the research evaluating different light and laser sources as well as reports on new horizons for PDT in dermatology.

  17. 308nm Excimer Laser in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Mehraban, Shadi

    2014-01-01

    308nm xenon-chloride excimer laser, a novel mode of phototherapy, is an ultraviolet B radiation system consisting of a noble gas and halide. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the literature and summarize all the experiments, clinical trials and case reports on 308-nm excimer laser in dermatological disorders. 308-nm excimer laser has currently a verified efficacy in treating skin conditions such as vitiligo, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, alopecia areata, allergic rhinitis, folliculitis, granuloma annulare, lichen planus, mycosis fungoides, palmoplantar pustulosis, pityriasis alba, CD30+ lympho proliferative disorder, leukoderma, prurigo nodularis, localized scleroderma and genital lichen sclerosus. Although the 308-nm excimer laser appears to act as a promising treatment modality in dermatology, further large-scale studies should be undertaken in order to fully affirm its safety profile considering the potential risk, however minimal, of malignancy, it may impose. PMID:25606333

  18. A visual literacy course for dermatology trainees.

    PubMed

    Griffin, L L; Chiang, N Y Z; Tomlin, H; Young, H S; Griffiths, C E M

    2016-09-17

    First described by John Debes(1) in 1968, visual literacy (VL) refers to the ability of an observer to derive meaning from images.(2) In addition to understanding the image itself, the wider meaning is considered and deeper critical thinking encouraged.(1,3) In contrast with other medical specialties, the interpretation of visual signs and gross pathology remains key to dermatological practice.(4) Diagnostic accuracy may be increased by careful observation without preconceptions.(4) Thus, description of lesions in dermatological practice may be considered as "the expression of pathological art".(5) On this basis we believe dermatologists should have fluent VL skills, which could be developed throughout their training. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Laser-induced tissue reactions and dermatology.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rebecca J; Taylor, Brent R; Engelman, Dendy E

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of laser tissue reactions and tissue properties allows the practitioner to tailor a treatment to an individual patient's need and goals. A laser's power, spot size and pulse duration may be manipulated to yield different tissue reactions. Five tissue reactions, each the result of varying laser pulse durations and energy densities, may be achieved. They are photochemical, photothermal, photoablation, plasma-induced ablation and photomechanical. Of these, photothermal reactions are most utilized in dermatology. When higher powered pulses are applied, tissue often undergoes multiple reactions simultaneously. An understanding of these reactions allows their effects to be predicted. In this chapter, the various reactions are reviewed, and the reactions caused by many of the most commonly used lasers in dermatology are discussed.

  20. Zinc Therapy in Dermatology: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Vikram K.; Mehta, Karaninder S.; Chauhan, Pushpinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc, both in elemental or in its salt forms, has been used as a therapeutic modality for centuries. Topical preparations like zinc oxide, calamine, or zinc pyrithione have been in use as photoprotecting, soothing agents or as active ingredient of antidandruff shampoos. Its use has expanded manifold over the years for a number of dermatological conditions including infections (leishmaniasis, warts), inflammatory dermatoses (acne vulgaris, rosacea), pigmentary disorders (melasma), and neoplasias (basal cell carcinoma). Although the role of oral zinc is well-established in human zinc deficiency syndromes including acrodermatitis enteropathica, it is only in recent years that importance of zinc as a micronutrient essential for infant growth and development has been recognized. The paper reviews various dermatological uses of zinc. PMID:25120566

  1. Novel applications of Rituximab in dermatological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Prasan R.; Pai, Varadraj V.

    2014-01-01

    Rituximab is a monoclonal therapeutic anti-CD20 antibody that has been approved for use in lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis. Over the past decade several reports based on case series and observational studies have recorded the benefits of rituximab in particular groups of dermatological patients. Off-label use of rituximab in many dermatological indications is not uncommon in many countries in the world. This article reviews the available data that may be of use to the practicing dermatologist. Because of its potential complications, paucity of clinical data, and cost considerations, rituximab is favoured only when standard systemic therapies fail or corticosteroids are absolutely contraindicated. Further research is required in this field. PMID:25165639

  2. [Paediatric dermatology emergencies in a tertiary hospital].

    PubMed

    Baquero-Sánchez, E; Bernabéu-Wittel, J; Dominguez-Cruz, J J; Conejo-Mir, J

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the increasing demand for dermatological consultations in the Emergency department has resulted in the publication of a variety of studies on this subject. However, most of them deal with the general population, without taking into account the changes in frequencies found in young children (ages 0-14). To determine the frequency of various dermatological diagnoses made by the on-call paediatrician in the Emergency Department, and after referral to Paediatric Dermatology. Firstly, a descriptive retrospective study was performed that included all patients aged between 0 and 14 years old who were seen after being referred to the emergency paediatric dermatologist by the on-call paediatrician from June 2010 to December 2013. Secondly, an analytical study was carried by calculating the kappa index calculus, in order to establish the diagnostic concordance between the emergency paediatrician and the paediatric dermatologist. A total of 861 patients, with a mean age of 4.5 years were included. More than half of the skin disorders analysed were eczema (27%) and infections (26%). The 5 main diagnoses were: atopic dermatitis (16%), acute prurigo simplex (5%), tinea (5%), pyogenic granuloma (4%), and molluscum contagiosum (4%). Additional tests were only required in 16% of the cases. The kappa index obtained was 0.206 (95% CI: 0.170-0.241). The dermatology consultations in the Emergency Department were shown to be frequent and mostly involved minor diseases. Collaboration between paediatricians and dermatologists resulted in a high treatment success rate, leading to a low percentage of additional tests required and a high rate of discharges. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact on facial rejuvenation with dermatological preparations

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Patrick J

    2009-01-01

    The treatment options for facial rejuvenation using dermatological, nonsurgical techniques have dramatically increased in the past 10 years. This follows the introduction of botulinum toxin and a variety of dermal fillers. The public interest in noninvasive treatments has changed the market beyond recognition with more physicians involved in providing services to satiate the demand. The impact on the public and medical profession is discussed. PMID:19503770

  4. Application of Protease Technology in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews background on proteases and their functions, their physiological significance in skin, and the potential implications of incorporating specific proteases and protease blends into dermatological products, including skin care formulations. The history of protease blend formulations used in wound model studies and for other disorders is reviewed. In vitro data with use of a specific 3-protease blend with evaluation of the impact on various skin proteins and peptides is also discussed in this article. PMID:23882305

  5. Digital image compression in dermatology: format comparison.

    PubMed

    Guarneri, F; Vaccaro, M; Guarneri, C

    2008-09-01

    Digital image compression (reduction of the amount of numeric data needed to represent a picture) is widely used in electronic storage and transmission devices. Few studies have compared the suitability of the different compression algorithms for dermatologic images. We aimed at comparing the performance of four popular compression formats, Tagged Image File (TIF), Portable Network Graphics (PNG), Joint Photographic Expert Group (JPEG), and JPEG2000 on clinical and videomicroscopic dermatologic images. Nineteen (19) clinical and 15 videomicroscopic digital images were compressed using JPEG and JPEG2000 at various compression factors and TIF and PNG. TIF and PNG are "lossless" formats (i.e., without alteration of the image), JPEG is "lossy" (the compressed image has a lower quality than the original), JPEG2000 has a lossless and a lossy mode. The quality of the compressed images was assessed subjectively (by three expert reviewers) and quantitatively (by measuring, point by point, the color differences from the original). Lossless JPEG2000 (49% compression) outperformed the other lossless algorithms, PNG and TIF (42% and 31% compression, respectively). Lossy JPEG2000 compression was slightly less efficient than JPEG, but preserved image quality much better, particularly at higher compression factors. For its good quality and compression ratio, JPEG2000 appears to be a good choice for clinical/videomicroscopic dermatologic image compression. Additionally, its diffusion and other features, such as the possibility of embedding metadata in the image file and to encode various parts of an image at different compression levels, make it perfectly suitable for the current needs of dermatology and teledermatology.

  6. American Society for Dermatologic Surgery dermatologic surgery drug and device nomenclature recommendations.

    PubMed

    Alam, Murad; Dover, Jeffrey S

    2013-08-01

    There is a lack of consensus regarding appropriate nomenclature for drugs and devices used in surgical and cosmetic dermatology. To develop a rules-based system for naming drugs and devices commonly used in dermatologic surgery that generates identifiers and modifiers that are clear, complete, and brief. Using an iterative modified consensus process, five subject-area work groups of the ASDS Lexicon Task Force were charged with developing standard terminology for the drugs and devices subsumed under their topic. A subcommittee comprising the chairs of the workgroups initially developed the general rules that guided the consensus process; subsequently, this subcommittee merged the 5 resulting documents into a single work product. Two external reviewers with expertise in dermatologic drugs and devices reviewed the final document for errors and omissions. General characteristics sought in systematic names included: brevity, clarity, non-overlapping (mutually exclusive) nature, within-class similarity, preservation of current usage when possible, and potential for inclusion of future refinements. Naming of drugs and devices in dermatologic surgery can be improved to increase comprehensibility and utility in both clinical and research contexts. Particularly for devices, the use of systematic names can reduce repeated mention of proprietary names in scientific discourse. Any naming system should be amenable to modification, correction, and the continual incorporation of novel agents. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Safety of cosmetic dermatologic procedures during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kachiu C; Korgavkar, Kaveri; Dufresne, Raymond G; Higgins, H William

    2013-11-01

    Safety of cosmetic procedures in pregnant women has not been extensively studied. Maternal and fetal health risks are important to consider in any procedure performed. With the increasing popularity of cosmetic procedures, dermatologic surgeons will be faced with scenarios necessitating knowledge regarding the safety of such procedures during pregnancy. Furthermore, dermatologic surgeons may inadvertently perform cosmetic procedures during the first trimester, before the patient is aware of the pregnancy. To investigate the safety of cosmetic procedures during pregnancy and the postpartum period. A literature search of PubMed and Google Scholar was conducted of all English-language articles published from 1960 through 2012. Definitive recommendations on the safety of procedures such as chemical peels, injectables, fillers, and most laser therapies during pregnancy cannot be made. The safety of onabotulinum toxin usage is well documented in the neurology literature, although isolated events of miscarriage have been reported with high doses of toxin in women with a previous history of miscarriage. Carbon dioxide laser therapy for genital condylomas has considerable evidence supporting its safety during pregnancy. There is a lack of controlled trials addressing the safety of cosmetic procedures during pregnancy and postpartum periods. It is advisable to delay elective cosmetic procedures until after the baby is born. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A new alternative therapy in dermatology: tocilizumab.

    PubMed

    Koryürek, Özgül Muştu; Kalkan, Göknur

    2016-01-01

    Tocilizumab (TCZ) is a recombinant-humanized anti-human interleukin 6 receptor monoclonal antibody of the immunoglobulin (Ig) IgG1 subclass with a H2L2 polypeptide structure. Even if it was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, satisfying results have also been reported with TCZ in various refractory dermatological diseases such as psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, Behçet's disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, relapsing polychondritis, vasculitis and atopic dermatitis. TCZ treatment in dermatology and adverse effects of the drug were reviewed here after the pharmacological properties, mechanism of action, dosage and administration of the drug were summarized. We estimate that by the help of newly well-designed studies with wider spectrum of subjects to comprehensively investigate the efficacy and safety will be able to contribute to the clinical management of the diseases especially refractory to the other treatments. Therefore, during the next decade, TCZ will be promising drugs in the treatment of refractory dermatological diseases.

  9. Patient perspectives on medical photography in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Leger, Marie C; Wu, Timothy; Haimovic, Adele; Kaplan, Rachel; Sanchez, Miguel; Cohen, David; Leger, Elizabeth A; Stein, Jennifer A

    2014-09-01

    Clinical photography enhances medical care, research, and teaching. Empirical data are needed to guide best practices regarding dermatologic photography. To investigate patient opinion about clinical photography and identify demographic factors that influence these opinions. Four hundred patients representing a broad range of ages, self-identified ethnic/racial groups, and socioeconomic levels were recruited from 4 dermatology settings in New York City. Patients were administered a survey about perceptions of photography, willingness to allow photographs to be used in a variety of settings, preferences for photographer and photographic equipment, and methods of consent. Eighty-eight percent of patients agreed that photography enhanced their quality of care. Most patients would allow their photographs to be used for medical, teaching, and research purposes with significantly more acceptance when patients were not identifiable. Patients preferred photographs taken by a physician rather than a nurse or student, photographers of the same gender, clinic-owned cameras to personal cameras or cell phones, and written consent to verbal consent. There were significant racial/ethnicity and age-related variations in responses, with white and older patients being more permissive than other groups. We use the results of this study to recommend best practices for photography in dermatology.

  10. The changing face of Canadian dermatology.

    PubMed

    Marcoux, Danielle; Gratton, David

    2002-01-01

    In 1986, Cosmair Canada, agent of the L'Oréal Group, sponsored a survey among Canadian dermatologists to measure the perceptions, attitudes, expectations, and needs of dermatologists regarding cosmetology. Fifteen years later, a new survey among Canadian dermatologists, again sponsored by L'Oréal, tries to capture the evolution and new trends. This survey tries to capture the perceptions, attitudes, and expectations of Canadian dermatologists regarding cosmetology. A questionnaire was sent to 394 members of the Canadian Dermatology Association; 99 responded (25%). The questionnaire, had 21 questions regarding cosmetology, future trends in Canadian dermatology, and how dermatologists acquire the information required for their practice. More than ever, dermatologists are asked to deal with maintaining healthy, youthful skin. Cosmetology is a greater part of everyday practice. Laser and cosmetic dermatology will become more important in the future. Dermatologists are asked to provide information on the maintenance of healthy, young-looking skin and feel they need more information relating to cosmetology

  11. Dermatologic Surgical Instruments: A History and Review.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sumul A; Kampp, Jeremy T

    2017-01-01

    Dermatologic surgery requires precision and accuracy given the delicate nature of procedures performed. The use of the most appropriate instrument for each action helps optimize both functionality and cosmetic outcome. To review the history of surgical instruments used in dermatology, with a focus on mechanism and evolution to the instruments that are used in current practice. A comprehensive literature search was conducted via textbook and journal research for historic references while review of current references was conducted online using multiple search engines and PubMed. There are a number of articles that review instruments in dermatology, but this article adds a unique perspective in classifying their evolution, while also presenting them as levers that serve to increase human dexterity during the course of surgery. Surgical instruments allow fine manipulation of tissue, which in turn produces optimal outcomes. Surgical tools have been around since the dawn of man, and their evolution parallels the extent to which human civilization has specialized over time. This article describes the evolution of instruments from the general surgical armamentaria to the specialized tools that are used today.

  12. Generic drugs in dermatology: part I.

    PubMed

    Payette, Michael; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2012-03-01

    The cost of health care in the United States is increasing. In order to help control these rising costs, all parties involved in the delivery of health care, including dermatologists, need to be part of the solution of ethically reducing the cost of delivery of care. One potential means of meeting this goal is to increase the use of generic medications in daily practice. Generic medications can offer equally efficacious therapy at significantly lower prices, which can translate into large scale savings for the individual patient, the payer, and the overall health care system. Herein we provide an overview of new drug development, review the history of the generic drug industry, describe how generic drugs are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, and define the concepts of bioequivalence and therapeutic equivalence. In part II, we explore various factors impacting generic drug use, provide cost analyses of dermatologic brand name and generic drugs, and review data addressing potential differences in the effectiveness of brand name versus generic drugs in dermatology. The cost of brand name and generic medications is highly variable by pharmacy, state, and payer. We used one source (www.drugstore.com) as an example and for consistency across all medications discussed herein. Prices included here may not reflect actual retail prices across the United States. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Generic drugs in dermatology: part II.

    PubMed

    Payette, Michael; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2012-03-01

    In part I, we discussed new drug development, reviewed the history of the generic drug industry, described how generic drugs are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, and defined the concepts of bioequivalence and therapeutic equivalence. Herein, we explore various factors impacting generic drug use across the different parties involved: the prescriber, the pharmacist, the patient, and the payer. We also include original cost analysis of dermatologic brand name and generic drugs and show the potential cost savings that can be achieved through generic substitution. We conclude with a review of the data addressing potential differences in the effectiveness of brand name versus generic drugs in dermatology. The cost of brand name and generic medications is highly variable by pharmacy, state, and payer. We used one source (www.drugstore.com) as an example and for consistency across all medications discussed herein. Prices included here may not reflect actual retail prices across the United States. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. ASDS Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery Fellowship Milestones.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Abigail; Arndt, Kenneth A; Avram, Mathew M; Brown, Mariah R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Fabi, Sabrina G; Friedmann, Daniel P; Geronemus, Roy G; Goldberg, David J; Goldman, Mitchel P; Green, Jeremy B; Ibrahimi, Omar A; Jones, Derek H; Kilmer, Suzanne L; McDaniel, David H; Obagi, Suzan; Ortiz, Arisa E; Rohrer, Thomas E; Taylor, Mark B; Torres, Abel; Weinkle, Susan H; Weiss, Margaret A; Weiss, Eduardo T; Weiss, Robert A; Poon, Emily; Alam, Murad

    2016-10-01

    The American Council of Graduate Medical Education, which oversees much of postgraduate medical education in the United States, has championed the concept of "milestones," standard levels of achievement keyed to particular time points, to assess trainee performance during residency. To develop a milestones document for the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS) Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery (CDS) fellowship program. An ad hoc milestone drafting committee was convened that included members of the ASDS Accreditation Work Group and program directors of ASDS-approved Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery (CDC) fellowship training programs. Draft milestones were circulated through email in multiple rounds until consensus was achieved. Thirteen milestones were developed in the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competency areas, with 8 of these being patient-care milestones. Additional instructions for milestone administration more specific to the CDS fellowship than general ACGME instructions were also approved. Implementation of semiannual milestones was scheduled for the fellowship class entering in July 2018. Milestones are now available for CDS fellowship directors to implement in combination with other tools for fellow evaluation.

  15. Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cells in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Moioli, Eduardo K; Bolotin, Diana; Alam, Murad

    2017-05-01

    Clinically relevant regenerative medicine is still in its early stages of development. Difficulties in regenerating large-scale and complex structures, the lack of safety data, and the paucity of clinical trials have slowed the process of technological advance. To familiarize the clinician with techniques available in the laboratory and experimental approaches being tested clinically. In addition, a layout is discussed for how dermatologists can lead the way in bringing regenerative medicine to clinical reality. This article reviews the relevant literature on regenerative medicine for dermatological applications and discusses findings and techniques in a clinically relevant context. Multiple cell-free and cell-based approaches for regenerating dermatologic tissues have been reported in the basic science and clinical literature. These are reviewed in the order of complexity. Incremental steps are needed to apply the principles of regenerative medicine to simple medical problems first. Such a stepwise approach would commence, for example, with creation of single-function tissues that could fill soft-tissue defects and proceed to the development of fully functional skin grafts. Likewise, cell-free approaches can build the foundation for the more technically demanding cell-based strategies that are likely necessary for achieving the ultimate goal of regenerative dermatology.

  16. Dermatologic manifestations of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Amy T; Zane, Lee T

    2007-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 5-10% of reproductive-aged women and is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women. The disorder is commonly characterized by elevated levels of androgen and insulin. Women with PCOS may present with a range of signs and symptoms, and face increased risks of reproductive, metabolic, cardiovascular, psychologic, and neoplastic sequelae, particularly if the condition is left unrecognized or untreated. The clinical definition of PCOS has changed in recent years and includes as one of its cardinal criteria the dermatologic manifestations of hyperandrogenism, chiefly hirsutism, acne vulgaris, and androgenetic alopecia. Acanthosis nigricans, a cutaneous sign of hyperinsulinemia, may also be present. These dermatologic features may provide early clinical clues to recognition of PCOS, and treatment of these cutaneous conditions may improve the patient's quality of life and psychologic well-being. The effects of androgen on pilosebaceous units in the skin can vary by anatomic location, producing pathophysiologic effects on hair growth and differentiation, sebaceous gland size and activity, and follicular keratinization. Treatment modalities may include hormonal therapy intended to modulate androgen production and action as well as non-hormonal therapies directed toward specific dermatologic conditions.

  17. Phenotypic and dermatological manifestations in Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sureshbabu, Rengasamy; Kumari, Rashmi; Ranugha, Subramaniam; Sathyamoorthy, Ramanathan; Udayashankar, Carounanidy; Oudeacoumar, Paquirissamy

    2011-02-15

    Down syndrome (DS) is associated with various uncommon dermatological disorders and increased frequency of some common dermatoses. This study was conducted over a 2-year period to evaluate the frequency of phenotypic and dermatologic manifestations in patients with Down syndrome in south India. The most common phenotypic manifestations that characterize DS include the epicanthic fold (93.7%), brachicephaly (90.6%), flat nasal bridge (84.2%), upward angle of eyes (83.2%), wide gap between first and second toe (81.1%), clinodactyly (77.9%), small nose (74.7%), short broad neck (72.6%), single palmar crease (61.1%), increased nuchal skin fold (61.1%), and fissured tongue (52.6%). The most common dermatological manifestation seen in patients with DS were lichenification, xerosis, dental anomaly, fine, sparse hair, and delayed dentition. Alopecia areata was seen in 9.4 percent of patients and tended to be severe. Infections were relatively less common in our study. Our study has highlighted many phenotypic features and dermatoses, which may help provide better care for patients and counseling to the families.

  18. [The Dermatological University Hospital during National Socialism. A Contribution to the History of Dermatology].

    PubMed

    Kapp, T; Bondio, M G

    2011-03-01

    During the period of National Socialism, many politically motivated changes occurred in Germany in all areas of medicine and consequently in the field of dermatology as well. Most of the Jewish dermatologists were removed from their positions; many of the chair reshuffles were executed for political causes. These changes caused decline of dermatology in the time of National Socialism. This report gives an overview of the developments and changes in the Dermatological University Hospital (DUH) at Greifswald between 1933 and 1945. 3000 medical records were evaluated and archival data and literature reviewed. With these data we were able to reconstruct historical, medical and political aspects. We found a rapid increase in the number of patients suffering from venereal diseases during World War II and an increase in compulsory treatment as well as in forced sterilization. In six cases, the DUH was involved in the practice of compulsory sterilization. Research was performed with mustard gas in patients at the DUH.

  19. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group: formation of patient-centered outcome measures in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Levin, Adriane A; Armstrong, April W; Abernethy, April; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Bhushan, Reva; Garg, Amit; Merola, Joseph F; Maccarone, Mara; Christensen, Robin

    2015-02-01

    As quality standards are increasingly in demand throughout medicine, dermatology needs to establish outcome measures to quantify the effectiveness of treatments and providers. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group was established to address this need. Beginning with psoriasis, the group aims to create a tool considerate of patients and providers using the input of all relevant stakeholders in assessment of disease severity and response to treatment. Herein, we delineate the procedures through which consensus is being reached and the future directions of the project.

  20. Electronic collaboration in dermatology resident training through social networking.

    PubMed

    Meeks, Natalie M; McGuire, April L; Carroll, Bryan T

    2017-04-01

    The use of online educational resources and professional social networking sites is increasing. The field of dermatology is currently under-utilizing online social networking as a means of professional collaboration and sharing of training materials. In this study, we sought to assess the current structure of and satisfaction with dermatology resident education and gauge interest for a professional social networking site for educational collaboration. Two surveys-one for residents and one for faculty-were electronically distributed via the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery and Association of Professors of Dermatology (APD) listserves. The surveys confirmed that there is interest among dermatology residents and faculty in a dermatology professional networking site with the goal to enhance educational collaboration.

  1. Optimizing education on the inpatient dermatology consultative service.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ladan; Shinkai, Kanade

    2017-03-01

    A consultative dermatology service plays an important role in patient care and education in the hospital setting. Optimizing education in balance with high-quality dermatology consultative services is both a challenge and an opportunity for dermatology consultation teams. There is an emergence of new information about how dermatology can best be taught in the hospital, much of which relies on principles of workplace learning as well as the science of how learning and teaching best happen in work settings. These best practices are summarized in this narrative review with integrated discussion of concepts from outpatient dermatology education and lessons learned from other inpatient teaching models. In addition, consultative dermatology curricula should utilize a blended curriculum model comprised of patient care and active learning and self-study modalities. Specific educational methods will discuss 2 strategies: (1) direct patient-care activities (ie, bedside teaching rounds) and (2) nonpatient care activities (ie, case presentations, didactic sessions, online modules, and reading lists).

  2. Professional dermatology societies in the USA: an overview.

    PubMed

    Al Aboud, Ahmad; Al Aboud, Khalid

    2015-11-18

    This is a concise overview in a table format for the current membership-based dermatology societies in the USA. The primary objective of these societies is to provide continuous medical education. These societies serve all health care providers in dermatology care, including physician assistants and nurses. There is a clear need for establishing more societies which focus on different aspect of dermatology. There is always a potential for improving the educational activities of these societies.

  3. Dermatology - a compulsory part of the UK medical school curriculum?

    PubMed

    Shah, Hemal; Pozo-Garcia, Lucia; Koulouroudias, Marinos

    2015-01-01

    Dermatological conditions form a significant number of consultations seen by general practitioners on a daily basis. There is a lack of training and formal assessment of dermatology during medical school and we propose that there should be a mandatory component in OSCEs for dermatology during medical school to enhance one's diagnostic and clinical reasoning skills which will ultimately lead to better care for the patient and efficacious use of NHS resources.

  4. Employing an aesthetician in a dermatology practice: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Slade, Karren; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2013-01-01

    Employment of aestheticians in dermatology offices is becoming an everyday occurrence, as the dermatology patients' demand for cosmetic services taxes the availability of limited resources. Proponents of the practice state that aestheticians can help meet patients' expectations, while allowing dermatologists to focus their practice on the medical needs of patients. Opponents believe employment of fee-for-service aesthetic technicians compromises our ethical duties to our patients and diminishes the stature of dermatology as a profession.

  5. The impact of dermatology in premier medicine journals.

    PubMed

    Kheterpal, Meenal K; Ellis, Charles N

    2011-01-01

    In the past 15 years, research in dermatology has significantly increased. Dermatology-related contributions in premier medical journals such as The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) and The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) are the representation of our field in the medical world. To analyze this representation, incidence of dermatology-related contributions in NEJM and JAMA during 3 separate years (during a 15-year period) was calculated.

  6. Superficial Head and Neck Anatomy for Dermatologic Surgery: Critical Concepts.

    PubMed

    Chow, Steven; Bennett, Richard G

    2015-10-01

    Thorough understanding of head and neck anatomy is useful and necessary for dermatologic surgery. To highlight pertinent head and neck anatomic structures that are encountered during dermatologic surgery and correlate these with common surgical problems. Important anatomic structures and regional cutaneous anatomy are discussed and illustrated. Several important anatomic structures exist within the head and neck that can influence surgical outcomes. Anatomic knowledge is helpful to the dermatologic surgeon to optimize reconstructive outcomes.

  7. Usefulness of Cochrane intervention reviews for the practicing dermatologic surgeon.

    PubMed

    Alam, Murad

    2013-09-01

    The Cochrane Collaboration produces systematic, evidence-based reviews of clinically relevant topics in medicine, including those relevant to dermatologic surgery. To assess the utility of Cochrane reviews for practicing dermatologic surgeons. Search of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews on February 20, 2012 for topics relevant to dermatologic surgery. Assessment of clinical recommendations with regard to their likelihood to affect medical decision-making in clinical dermatologic surgery. Fifteen Cochrane reviews met the search criteria; three offered positive conclusions regarding the comparative effectiveness of different therapies for the same indications. Cochrane reviews offer outstandingly complete evidence-based summaries of their topics. As such, the methodology of Cochrane reviews is a model for reviews in dermatologic surgery. Because of the dearth of high-level evidence in dermatologic surgery, the ability of Cochrane reviews to provide specific recommendations remains limited. Furthermore, dermatologic surgery may be inherently difficult to study because of the rapid evolution of procedures, intraprocedure complexity and variation, difficulties inherent in randomizing patients to interventions, and intersurgeon skill variation. That being said, the dermatologic surgery literature continues to improve and grow, and investigators are now broaching the special challenges associated with research in this area. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Historical evolution of the Brazilian Annals of Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Costa, Izelda Maria Carvalho; Vallarelli, Andrelou Fralete Ayres; Bonamigo, Renan Rangel; Reis, Vitor Manoel da Silva

    2012-02-01

    In this special edition in celebration of the centennial of the Brazilian Society of Dermatology, the authors take a retrospective look at printed Brazilian dermatology from the very beginning onward, showing evidence of descriptive dermatology with rich discussions, illustrations and advertisements of medications much used at the time, such as bismuth for the treatment of syphilis, before the discovery of penicillin. This retrospective covers up to the current days, when publications in the Brazilian Annals of Dermatology have reached the modern era in electronics, science and layout as well.

  9. PSYCHOSOMATIC ASPECTS IN PATIENTS WITH DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Tsintsadze, N; Beridze, L; Tsintsadze, N; Krichun, Y; Tsivadze, N; Tsintsadze, M

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the magnitude of anxiety and depression in our common dermatological patients and its correlation with age, sex. For this purpose, we used Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale HADS. The psychometric validity of HADS has been established by validating the questionnaire against the structured psychiatric interviews. A study of anxiety and depression in patients with dermatologic diseases was conducted on the basis of outpatients department in 211 patients with dermatologic diseases; among them were 107 male and 104 female, aged 16 to 75 years. Among them were patients with Acne, Alopecia Areata, Psoriasis, Vitiligo, Neurodermatitis, Scabies, Eczema and Other diseases (Atopic Dermatitis, Chronic Urticaria, Lichen Planus, Herpes Zoster, Melasma, Warts and Etc.). Based on studies of patients reveals that 65.4% of them are anxiety, depression - 56.2%, both anxiety and depression in 24.7%, there figures higher than the dates of other authorizes. As a result of a direct link research risk disorder depressive spectrum with sex, age; in woman anxiety and depression occurs more frequently than men, and anxiety occurs more frequently in young age. Especially there are hight frequencies of manifestation of abuse in patients with Psoriasis (anxiety - 83.3%, depression - 69.4%, both - 38.8%), Eczema (anxiety - 73.3%, depression - 56.6%, both - 26.7%), Acne (anxiety - 78.4%, depression - 54%, both - 21.6%), Vitiligo (anxiety - 66.7%, depression - 60%, both - 33.3%). Our study noticed higher dates of anxiety and depression than the dates of other outhorizes.

  10. Google searches help with diagnosis in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Amri, Montassar; Feroz, Kaliyadan

    2014-01-01

    Several previous studies have tried to assess the usefulness of Google search as a diagnostic aid. The results were discordant and have led to controversies. To investigate how often Google search is helpful to reach correct diagnoses in dermatology. Two fifth-year students (A and B) and one demonstrator (C) have participated as investigators in this paper. Twenty-five diagnostic dermatological cases were selected from all the clinical cases published in the Web only images in clinical medicine from March 2005 to November 2009. The main outcome measure of our paper was to compare the number of correct diagnoses provided by the investigators without, and with Google search. Investigator A gave correct diagnoses in 9/25 (36%) cases without Google search, his diagnostic success after Google search was 18/25 (72%). Investigator B results were 11/25 (44%) correct diagnoses without Google search, and 19/25 (76%) after this search. For investigator C, the results were 12/25 (48%) without Google search, and 18/25 (72%) after the use of this tool. Thus, the total correct diagnoses provided by the three investigators were 32 (42.6%) without Google search, and 55 (73.3%) when using this facility. The difference was statistically significant between the total number of correct diagnoses given by the three investigators without, and with Google search (p = 0.0002). In the light of our paper, Google search appears to be an interesting diagnostic aid in dermatology. However, we emphasize that diagnosis is primarily an art based on clinical skills and experience.

  11. Ethinylestradiol/Chlormadinone acetate: dermatological benefits.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Tapia, Aurora; Sancho Pérez, Blanca

    2011-09-06

    Acne vulgaris, hirsutism, seborrhea and female pattern hair loss (FPHL) are common disorders of the pilosebaceous unit (PSU). In some women with hyperandrogenemia, an excess of androgens at the PSU can lead to the development of these dermatological manifestations. These manifestations can cause many psychiatric and psychological implications, such as social fears and anxiety, and can adversely affect quality of life. High androgen levels at the PSU as a possible underlying cause of acne vulgaris, hirsutism, seborrhea and FPHL supports the rationale for using combined oral contraceptives for the management of these conditions in women. The purpose of this review is to describe these dermatological manifestations of the PSU and the management of these conditions through the use of the oral contraceptive ethinylestradiol/chlormadinone acetate (EE/CMA). EE/CMA 0.03/2 mg is a combined monophasic contraceptive pill with anti-androgenic properties. It is approved in Europe for contraception and has been investigated in phase III trials for the treatment of acne. EE/CMA was better than placebo and similar to another low-dose oral contraceptive (ethinylestradiol/levonorgestrel) in improving symptoms of acne in two phase III randomized controlled trials in patients with mild to moderate papulopustular acne. In addition, in trials investigating the contraceptive efficacy of EE/CMA, limited data suggest that there were also improvements in hirsutism, FPHL and seborrhea in small subgroups of patients. EE/CMA has a good safety profile. The most commonly reported adverse events are breast tenderness/pain, headache/migraine and nausea. Evidence in the literature indicates that the use of EE/CMA for the treatment of dermatological disorders under the control of androgens may be a valid treatment option. Further investigation is warranted.

  12. Dermoscopy in General Dermatology: A Practical Overview.

    PubMed

    Errichetti, Enzo; Stinco, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    Over the last few years, dermoscopy has been shown to be a useful tool in assisting the noninvasive diagnosis of various general dermatological disorders. In this article, we sought to provide an up-to-date practical overview on the use of dermoscopy in general dermatology by analysing the dermoscopic differential diagnosis of relatively common dermatological disorders grouped according to their clinical presentation, i.e. dermatoses presenting with erythematous-desquamative patches/plaques (plaque psoriasis, eczematous dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, mycosis fungoides and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus), papulosquamous/papulokeratotic dermatoses (lichen planus, pityriasis rosea, papulosquamous sarcoidosis, guttate psoriasis, pityriasis lichenoides chronica, classical pityriasis rubra pilaris, porokeratosis, lymphomatoid papulosis, papulosquamous chronic GVHD, parakeratosis variegata, Grover disease, Darier disease and BRAF-inhibitor-induced acantholytic dyskeratosis), facial inflammatory skin diseases (rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis, discoid lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, cutaneous leishmaniasis, lupus vulgaris, granuloma faciale and demodicidosis), acquired keratodermas (chronic hand eczema, palmar psoriasis, keratoderma due to mycosis fungoides, keratoderma resulting from pityriasis rubra pilaris, tinea manuum, palmar lichen planus and aquagenic palmar keratoderma), sclero-atrophic dermatoses (necrobiosis lipoidica, morphea and cutaneous lichen sclerosus), hypopigmented macular diseases (extragenital guttate lichen sclerosus, achromic pityriasis versicolor, guttate vitiligo, idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis, progressive macular hypomelanosis and postinflammatory hypopigmentations), hyperpigmented maculopapular diseases (pityriasis versicolor, lichen planus pigmentosus, Gougerot-Carteaud syndrome, Dowling-Degos disease, erythema ab igne, macular amyloidosis, lichen amyloidosus, friction melanosis, terra firma-forme dermatosis, urticaria pigmentosa and

  13. Opioid pain medication use after dermatologic surgery: a prospective observational study of 212 dermatologic surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Harris, KaLynne; Curtis, Julia; Larsen, Brooke; Calder, Scott; Duffy, Keith; Bowen, Glen; Hadley, Michael; Tristani-Firouzi, Payam

    2013-03-01

    To better understand postoperative opioid use after dermatologic surgery. Prospective observational study. Academic dermatology department. The study included 212 adults (1) who were undergoing a single skin excision (including Mohs micrographic surgery), (2) who consented to participate,and (3) who were able to be reached by telephone on postoperative day 3 or 4. Patients who did not meet these criteria and those referred to another physician for further surgical treatment or repair were excluded. The study examined(1) the incidence of opioid prescription after dermatologic surgery, (2) the percentage of prescribed opioid pain medications used in the postoperative period, and (3) patient and surgical characteristics associated with opioid pain medication prescription and use. Opioids were prescribed to 72 of the 212 patients(34%). Twenty-five of the 72 patients (35%) who were prescribed opioids did not use them. Forty-nine of 57 patients (86%) who filled an opioid prescription had leftover pills, and 26 of the 49 patients (53%) planned to keep them. Only maximum pain score was significantly associated with opioid use. Opioids were over prescribed after dermatologic surgery. Patients who had left over opioids did not dispose of them properly, which could lead to potential misuse and abuse.

  14. WHY IS THE CENTER OF EVIDENCE-BASED DERMATOLOGY RELEVANT TO INDIAN DERMATOLOGY?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Hywel

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based dermatology is the application of high-quality evidence to the care of individual patients with skin diseases. The Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology in the UK promotes activities in this field through its three interlinking cogs, composed of the international Cochrane Skin Group, the UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network (UKDCTN), and the UK national electronic library for skin disorders. The Cochrane Skin Group summarises what is already known about health care interventions by supporting systematic reviews of relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The UKDCTN then addresses the key research gaps identified in systematic reviews by coordinating and carrying out well-designed RCTs. The Skin Disorders specialist library then plays a key role in disseminating new knowledge from systematic reviews and RCTs to a community of clinical users. The electronic resources at the Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology are all freely available to Indian Dermatologists who can use the resources in a way that could benefit their patients. Such new knoweldge only has value if it is shared and used. PMID:20101305

  15. Combat dermatology: the prevalence of skin disease in a deployed dermatology clinic in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Henning, J Scott; Firoz, Bahar F

    2010-03-01

    Since July 2004, the United States (U.S.) Army has operated a forward-deployed dermatology clinic in Baghdad, Iraq. This paper outlines the prevalence of skin disease among deployed service men and women in Operation Iraqi Freedom. A cross-sectional study was performed for all dermatology visits presenting to the Combat Dermatology Clinic, Ibn Sina, Iraq, between January 15, 2008 and July 15, 2008. In the six-month period reviewed, 2,696 total patients were evaluated. The most prevalent diagnoses included eczematous dermatitis [17%, n=462] and benign neoplasms [14%, n=375]. Eight percent (n=205) of the total visits were for skin cancer. This included: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma both in-situ and invasive, mycosis fungoides and melanoma. Actinic keratosis comprised 5% of the total visits (n=129). Bacterial infections comprised 6% (n=158) of the total visits and 31 of these cases were community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Cross-sectional study with referral bias. This is the largest publication of the prevalence of skin disease in an exclusively dermatologic clinic in a combat setting. For the first time the presence of skin cancer is noted in a combat setting. The prevalence of MRSA is noted and was exclusively seen in U.S. soldiers. There was a statistically significant rise in the prevalence of eczematous dermatitides when compared with previous conflicts. Dermatologists can have a significant and strategic impact on deployed military medicine.

  16. The history of women in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Kural, Esra; Roccia, Maria Grazia; França, Katlein; Lotti, Torello; Tirant, Michael; Fioranelli, Massimo

    2017-02-20

    In the past and present, the status of men is often superior to women in most developing countries and it has a negative effect on the social development of these countries. If women are educated as men in a society, then this society can advance rapidly since the effect of educated women influence the quality of life and health in a positive way and not only for those women, but younger generations who follow them as well. This article reviews the history of some remarkable women in dermatology.

  17. Sulfones and sulfonamides in dermatology today.

    PubMed

    Lang, P G

    1979-12-01

    Although dapsone and sulfapyridine have been used for years in dermatology, there has not always been a clear understanding of how these agents work. Recent investigation, however, has shed new light on thes agents which now allows a more rational approach to their use. This review is an attempt to familiarize the clinician with how these agents work, in what disease states they are effective, how to administer them, what adverse effects may occur, and how to monitor the patient to detect these adverse effects.

  18. Cyclosporin: applications in small animal dermatology.

    PubMed

    Robson, David C; Burton, Gregory G

    2003-02-01

    Cyclosporin has been increasingly used for the treatment of skin diseases in small animals. Reported uses include the treatment of atopy, cutaneous lupus erythematosus, feline acquired alopecia resembling pseudopelade of humans, pemphigus erythematosus, pemphigus foliaceus, perianal fistulae and sebaceous adenitis. In addition, cyclosporin has been used anecdotally for several other skin diseases. Few side effects have been noted at doses therapeutic for dermatologic diseases. Current suggestions for monitoring, and the value of trough cyclosporin serum concentrations for prediction of toxicity and efficacy are discussed.

  19. Psychologic trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder, and dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhulika A; Lanius, Ruth A; Van der Kolk, Bessel A

    2005-10-01

    Psychologic trauma refers to events (such as sexual assault, major earthquake, or plane crashes) that overwhelm an individual's capacity to cope. Psychologic trauma can result in chronic and recurring dermatologic symptoms that persist after the trauma subsides. Examples are cutaneous sensory flashbacks (which may be fragments of the sensory component of the traumatic experience), autonomic hyperarousal (with symptoms such as profuse sweating or flare-up of an underlying stress-reactive dermatosis), conversion symptoms (such as numbness, pain, or other medically unexplained cutaneous symptoms), and cutaneous self-injury (manifesting in many forms, including trichotillomania, dermatitis artefacta, and neurotic excoriations--tension-reducing behaviors in patients who have posttraumatic stress disorder).

  20. Photonics in dermatology and aesthetic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehlmann, C.

    2006-02-01

    This paper provides an overview of the recent developments of photonics in dermatology and aesthetic applications. The range of products covers lasers, continuous Xenon lamps, Intense Pulsed Light systems, and LEDs. We will mention several applications and how different photonics systems are used. We will also discuss methods combining photonics with other technologies. For example, in Photo Dynamic Therapy (PDT) this includes a drugs, or equally the combination of intense light pulses with Radio Frequency (RF) for applications like hair removal. We will also describe some new developments in photonics technology that affect the development of new products, showing the direction of market development. Additionally, some examples of new technology are shown.

  1. Infectious Disease Practice Gaps in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Shelby; Quest, Tyler L; Wanat, Karolyn A

    2016-07-01

    The article highlights different educational and practice gaps in infectious diseases as they pertain to dermatology. These gaps include the use of antibiotics in relation to atopic dermatitis and acne vulgaris, treatment of skin and soft tissue infection, and diagnosis and treatment of onychomycosis. In addition, practice gaps related to use of imiquimod for molluscum contagiosum, risk of infections related to immunosuppressive medications and rates of vaccination, and the use of bedside diagnostics for diagnosing common infections were discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Dermatological diseases and their importance for psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Mavrogiorgou, P; Juckel, G

    2017-03-01

    The relationship between skin and psychiatric disorders is not an uncommon occurrence in the clinical practice; however, there are only a few systematic studies and in addition knowledge about the neurobiological and immunological mechanisms is lacking. Impairments and disorders of the skin are often an (early) sign of a psychiatric disorder. In the sense of true psychosomatics, psychiatrists should also be aware of this relationship as far as possible. This review article focuses on the most important dermatological diagnoses in relation to the respective psychiatric comorbidities and presents the most important aspects of epidemiology, symptomatology, pathophysiology and treatment options.

  3. CPT coding and reimbursement issues in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Zalla, James A

    2005-09-01

    In the past 6 years, significant changes have been made in Current Procedural Terminology codes, descriptors, and guidelines affecting dermatologists. These changes involved excision, repair, measuring excised diameter, measuring flap defects, skin biopsy and Mohs surgery guidelines, KOH examination, and fungus cultures. New codes were introduced for photodynamic therapy, laser treatment, and whole-body photography. Reimbursement issues affecting dermatologists are also discussed, including inappropriate bundling of separate services, failure to recognize modifiers, and unfair multiple procedure reduction. The successes of the American Academy of Dermatology Association advocacy efforts with insurance carriers are summarized, with an update on the current status of these issues. Physician responsibilities, documentation requirements, and expectations are also outlined.

  4. Current status of photodynamic therapy in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, R; Lui, H

    1997-07-01

    The accessibility of skin to light treatment, as well as the expertise developed by dermatologists in laser surgery and phototherapy, creates an exciting opportunity for dermatologic PDT to become part of our standard therapeutic armamentarium. PDT appears to be viable alternative to conventional therapy for superficial BCC and Bowen's disease, although definitive controlled studies are lacking. The introduction of ongoing research developments, new photosensitizers, and better light sources into clinical PDT trials in the coming years will undoubtedly expand the range of indications for this novel form of therapy, particularly for nononcologic conditions.

  5. Tyrosine kinases in inflammatory dermatologic disease

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Ricardo T.; Fiorentino, David; Chung, Lorinda; Robinson, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases are enzymes that catalyze the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues on protein substrates. They are key components of signaling pathways that drive an array of cellular responses including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. Specific tyrosine kinases have recently been identified as critical to the pathogenesis of several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors of tyrosine kinases are emerging as a novel class of therapy that may provide benefit in certain patient subsets. In this review, we highlight tyrosine kinase signaling implicated in inflammatory dermatologic diseases, evaluate strategies aimed at inhibiting these aberrant signaling pathways, and discuss prospects for future drug development. PMID:20584561

  6. Home-use devices in aesthetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Keller, Emily C

    2014-12-01

    The world of aesthetic medicine is increasingly a consumer-driven market with a wide variety of home-use devices from which the consumer can choose for treating hair removal, hair loss, acne, facial rejuvenation, and other dermatologic conditions. Where these devices fit in the physician practice and consumer routine can be confusing, as scientific studies may be weak or lacking. The specifications, price, ease-of-use, maintenance, and technology can differ greatly between devices. Thus, the physician and consumer need to define exp.

  7. [Dermatological and rheumatic symptoms in neoplasmas].

    PubMed

    Krajewska-Włodarczyk, Magdalena; Owczarczyk-Saczonek, Agnieszka; Placek, Waldemar

    2017-01-01

    Some of the symptoms that occur in neoplasmas are not directly related to tumor mass or metastasis. These may be an expression of paraneopastic syndromes and occur simultaneously or during neoplastic disease, but it is extremely important that they can precede the first symptoms of malignancy by several months or years. The clinical picture of paraneopastic syndromes often includes symptoms of defined disease or symptoms which resemble them. The association of neoplasmas and certain dermatological or rheumatic diseases is complex. Most of them are more likely to occur as primary diseases, therefore it is important for dermatologist and rheumatologist have an oncological awareness, especially in cases which are not routinely treated.

  8. [Dermatologic aspects of SAPHO-syndrome].

    PubMed

    Károlyi, Z; Harhai, I; Erós, N

    2001-08-19

    SAPHO syndrome (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis) as a new disease entity was first described in 1987. The syndrome is characterized by the presence of pustular dermatoses together with aseptic osteoarticular lesions. The bone involvement includes hyperostosis, aseptic osteomyelitis or arthritis of the anterior chest wall, sacroiliac joints or long bones. Skin diseases include acne conglobata or acne fulminans, palmoplantar pustulosis and hidradenitis suppurativa. Authors describe the dermatological relationship of SAPHO syndrome reporting their 7 cases (3 acne fulminans, 4 palmoplantar pustulosis). Authors draw attention to the isotretinoin therapy as a possible provoking factor of the articular symptoms, and they emphasize the diagnostic role of bone scintigraphy.

  9. BIOLOGICS IN DERMATOLOGIC THERAPY – AN UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    Coondoo, Arijit

    2009-01-01

    Biologics are protein molecules which are used in various diseases to target the specific points in the immunopathogenesis of the diseases. The molecules are produced by recombinant DNA technology. The molecules bind to the specific targets without interfering wtih rest of the pathogenetic pathways. Therefore the so called ‘immunosuppressives’ have, although, a broader broader spectrum of action on immune system, their side-effects are also equally more. The biologics, because of their spefic action on the immune system, have very little side effects. The biologics which have revolutionized the treatment of various dermatologic diseases have been discussed here. PMID:20161849

  10. Clinical photography in the dermatology practice.

    PubMed

    Witmer, William K; Lebovitz, Peter J

    2012-09-01

    Photography has been accepted for decades as a standard means for documenting dermatologic conditions and as an adjunct to their treatment, in both medical practice and research. The emergence of low-cost easy-to-use digital imaging systems has made good-quality photography more accessible to practitioners, while providing improved functionality in the clinical environment. Primary concerns are controlling lighting and positioning to provide a clear record of the patients skin condition and maintaining consistency over time to assure meaningful comparison of clinical end points. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Nitrous oxide - oxygen analgesia in aesthetic dermatology].

    PubMed

    Drosner, M

    2013-06-01

    Local anaesthesia often is insufficient for more extensive procedures. Instead of general anaesthesia or sedation, pediatricians, gynaecologists and dentists increasingly use nitrous oxide (N2O). This study evaluates the suitability of this form of anesthesia in dermatology. In 24 patients (18 w, 6 m, mean age 49 y.) N2O/O2 inhalation (Livopan®) was used during 46 procedures with indications including fractional RF/wrinkle reduction, IPL/rosacea, q-sw. laser/tattoos and hemosiderosis as well as fractional Er:Glass laser for scars and hypopigmentation. In 26 procedures subjective pain intensity was measured (visual analogue scale 0-10). With N2O the treatment pain was lowered from 6.6 ± 1.6 to 2.9 ± 1.7 (median, p = 0.000). 23/24 patients chose N2O for their next treatment. Beside euphoria, fatigue, slight drowsiness, dizziness, nausea or change in auditory perception, no other side effects occurred. The pronounced analgesia, the easy self-administration, the fast onset and complete recovery after a few minutes and the low ratio of side effects make the N2O/O2 inhalation to an ideal addendum in the management of larger painful procedures in dermatology as long as contraindications and safety precautions are respected.

  12. Anesthesia for liposuction in dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Klein, J A

    1988-10-01

    Liposuction is now a well-established procedure in dermatologic surgery. The relative advantages and risks of the various forms of primary anesthesia and supplemental analgesia used for liposuction surgery in the office by dermatologic surgeons is described. Effective anesthetic techniques include infiltration of local anesthesia (LA) with or without intramuscular (IM), intravenous (IV), or nitrous oxide sedation, cryoanesthesia, and IV or inhalation general anesthesia (GA). Local anesthesia, using large volumes of dilute anesthetic solution containing lidocaine (0.05%), epinephrine (1:1,000,000), and sodium bicarbonate (12.5 meq/L), is a safe and effective modality for liposuction by dermatologists. In a study of 12 liposuction patients treated with this technique, the average lidocaine dose was 1181 mg (9.4 mg/kg/hr). The highest peak lidocaine blood level among all patients was 0.484 microgram/ml. Dermatologists should not assume the dual responsibility of surgeon and of monitoring patients given IV sedation. Any form of anesthesia has the potential for serious complications. The surgeon and office staff must be well trained and equipped to perform emergency resuscitation.

  13. Discriminative power of visual attributes in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Giotis, Ioannis; Visser, Margaretha; Jonkman, Marcel; Petkov, Nicolai

    2013-02-01

    Visual characteristics such as color and shape of skin lesions play an important role in the diagnostic process. In this contribution, we quantify the discriminative power of such attributes using an information theoretical approach. We estimate the probability of occurrence of each attribute as a function of the skin diseases. We use the distribution of this probability across the studied diseases and its entropy to define the discriminative power of the attribute. The discriminative power has a maximum value for attributes that occur (or do not occur) for only one disease and a minimum value for those which are equally likely to be observed among all diseases. Verrucous surface, red and brown colors, and the presence of more than 10 lesions are among the most informative attributes. A ranking of attributes is also carried out and used together with a naive Bayesian classifier, yielding results that confirm the soundness of the proposed method. proposed measure is proven to be a reliable way of assessing the discriminative power of dermatological attributes, and it also helps generate a condensed dermatological lexicon. Therefore, it can be of added value to the manual or computer-aided diagnostic process. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Relaxation strategies for patients during dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Shenefelt, Philip D

    2010-07-01

    Patient stress and anxiety are common preoperatively and during dermatologic procedures and surgeries. Stress and anxiety can occasionally interfere with performance of procedures or surgery and can induce hemodynamic instability, such as elevated blood pressure or syncope, as well as producing considerable discomfort for some patients. Detection of excess stress and anxiety in patients can allow the opportunity for corrective or palliative measures. Slower breathing, biofeedback, progressive muscular relaxation, guided imagery, hypnosis, meditation and music can help calm and rebalance the patient's autonomic nervous system and immune functioning. Handheld miniaturized heart rate variability biofeedback devices are now available. The relaxation response can easily be taught. Guided imagery can be recorded or live. Live rapid induction hypnosis followed by deepening and then self-guided imagery requires no experience on the part of the patient but does require training and experience on the part of a provider. Recorded hypnosis inductions may also be used. Meditation generally requires more prior experience and training, but is useful when the patient already is skilled in it. Live, guided meditation or meditation recordings may be used. Relaxing recorded music from speakers or headphones or live performance music may also be employed to ease discomfort and improve the patient's attitude for dermatologic procedures and surgeries.

  15. Dermatological hazards in the electronics industry.

    PubMed

    Koh, D; Foulds, I S; Aw, T C

    1990-01-01

    The advent of the electronics age has resulted in the rapid growth and increasing importance of the electronics industry on a global scale. The main industrial processes are fabrication of semiconductor wafers, printed circuit boards, the assembly of semiconductor devices, printed circuit boards and the final electronic products. The process carry the risk of various work hazards, among them dermatological hazards. These include exposure to irritants and allergens during common operations such as soldering, cleaning operations, materials handling, procedures for control of static electricity and low humidity in the work environment. Even the use of protective clothing may be associated with the risk of dermatitis. In spite of the numerous dermatological hazards, the risk for work-related skin disorders among electronics workers appears to be low when compared to other industries. However, the vast size of the electronics workforce will contribute to large numbers of workers with occupational dermatoses. Occupational health personnel responsible for factories in the electronics industry should therefore be aware of the cutaneous hazards present, and how these may lead to work-related dermatoses.

  16. Distance transform for automatic dermatologic images composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grana, C.; Pellacani, G.; Seidenari, S.; Cucchiara, R.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper we focus on the problem of automatically registering dermatological images, because even if different products are available, most of them share the problem of a limited field of view on the skin. A possible solution is then the composition of multiple takes of the same lesion with digital software, such as that for panorama images creation. In this work, to perform an automatic selection of matching points the Harris Corner Detector is used, and to cope with outlier couples we employed the RANSAC method. Projective mapping is then used to match the two images. Given a set of correspondence points, Singular Value Decomposition was used to compute the transform parameters. At this point the two images need to be blended together. One initial assumption is often implicitly made: the aim is to merge two rectangular images. But when merging occurs between more than two images iteratively, this assumption will fail. To cope with differently shaped images, we employed the Distance Transform and provided a weighted merging of images. Different tests were conducted with dermatological images, both with standard rectangular frame and with not typical shapes, as for example a ring due to the objective and lens selection. The successive composition of different circular images with other blending functions, such as the Hat function, doesn't correctly get rid of the border and residuals of the circular mask are still visible. By applying Distance Transform blending, the result produced is insensitive of the outer shape of the image.

  17. The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database.

    PubMed

    Lamberg, Anna Lei; Sølvsten, Henrik; Lei, Ulrikke; Vinding, Gabrielle Randskov; Stender, Ida Marie; Jemec, Gregor Borut Ernst; Vestergaard, Tine; Thormann, Henrik; Hædersdal, Merete; Dam, Tomas Norman; Olesen, Anne Braae

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database was established in 2008. The aim of this database was to collect data on nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) treatment and improve its treatment in Denmark. NMSC is the most common malignancy in the western countries and represents a significant challenge in terms of public health management and health care costs. However, high-quality epidemiological and treatment data on NMSC are sparse. The NMSC database includes patients with the following skin tumors: basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma, Bowen's disease, and keratoacanthoma diagnosed by the participating office-based dermatologists in Denmark. Clinical and histological diagnoses, BCC subtype, localization, size, skin cancer history, skin phototype, and evidence of metastases and treatment modality are the main variables in the NMSC database. Information on recurrence, cosmetic results, and complications are registered at two follow-up visits at 3 months (between 0 and 6 months) and 12 months (between 6 and 15 months) after treatment. In 2014, 11,522 patients with 17,575 tumors were registered in the database. Of tumors with a histological diagnosis, 13,571 were BCCs, 840 squamous cell carcinomas, 504 Bowen's disease, and 173 keratoakanthomas. The NMSC database encompasses detailed information on the type of tumor, a variety of prognostic factors, treatment modalities, and outcomes after treatment. The database has revealed that overall, the quality of care of NMSC in Danish dermatological clinics is high, and the database provides the necessary data for continuous quality assurance.

  18. Quantifying and characterizing adverse events in dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Jenna L; Lee, Yun Sun; Solomon, James A; Patel, Nikita; Shutty, Brandon; Davis, Scott A; Robins, Douglas N; Williford, Philip M; Feldman, Steven R; Pearce, Daniel J

    2013-06-01

    Although office-based dermatologic procedures are generally considered safe, there is a lack of prospective data on the rate of adverse events (AEs) associated with these procedures. To determine the frequency of AEs after dermatologic surgery and to characterize the most commonly encountered AEs. A web-based interface was designed to track AEs with the input of four dermatologic surgeons. Patient demographic and operative data were collected at the time of the dermatologic surgery procedure. AEs occurring at any time during the data collection period were logged according to an a priori categorization scheme. The AE rate was 2.0% in this series of 2,418 subjects undergoing dermatologic surgery from February 1 through December 14, 2010. The most commonly reported AEs were suspicion of infection (64%), postoperative hemorrhage (20%), and wound dehiscence (8%). Suspicion of infection was slightly less frequent in subjects who received prophylactic preoperative antibiotics (0.4%) than in those who did not (1.5%, p = .07). There were no serious AEs and no deaths. AEs are uncommon after office-based dermatologic surgery procedures. Preoperative antibiotics may further decrease the infection rate after dermatologic surgery, but the risks and benefits must be weighed given the already low AE rate. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Practice models and roles of physician extenders in dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Emily P; Hanke, C William; Kimball, Alexa Boer

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of physician extenders (PEs) has increased significantly in dermatologic surgery over the last decade. An analysis was performed of the staff in dermatologic surgery practices, roles of PEs, and level of supervision. Mohs fellowship-trained (MMSFT) dermatologic surgeons were more likely to employ registered nurses (n=85, 73.9%) than non-fellowship-trained (NMMSFT) surgeons (n=65, 50.0%, p<.05) (dermatologists who reported performing Mohs without having completed a Mohs College fellowship). NMMSFT surgeons (n=46, 35.4%) were 33% more likely to employ physician assistants than MMSFT surgeons (n=30, 26.1%, p=.05). Both surgeon types reported that their physician assistants and nurse practitioners spent the majority of their time treating medical dermatology patients, but NMMSFT surgeons were twice as likely as MMSFT surgeons to have their PEs involved in performing or assisting with cosmetic procedures. MMSFT surgeons (38.5%) were twice as likely to have direct supervision of their PEs as NMMSFT surgeons (16.1%, p=.01). PEs are highly prevalent in dermatologic surgery practices and are playing direct roles in the delivery of dermatologic care. Promoting patient safety through appropriate extender supervision and reporting of patient outcomes are highly needed as this sector of the dermatologic surgery workforce continues to expand. © 2011 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc.

  20. Introduction of Basic Dermatologic Ultrasound in Undergraduate Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Alfageme, F; Cerezo, E; Fernandez, I S; Aguilo, R; Vilas-Sueiro, A; Roustan, G

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: Teaching ultrasound procedures to undergraduates has recently been proposed to improve the quality of medical education. We address the impact of applying standardized dermatologic ultrasound teaching to our undergraduates. Materials and Methods: Medical students were offered an additional theoretical and practical seminar involving hands-on ultrasound dermatologic ultrasound during their mandatory dermatology practical training. The students' theoretical knowledge and dermatologic ultrasoud skills were tested with a multiple choice questionnaire extracted from Level 1 Spanish Society of Ultrasound Dermatologic Ultrasound accreditation exam before and after the course. After the course, the students were asked to answer a course evaluation questionnaire Results: The multiple-choice question scores after the course showed statistically significant improvement (5.82 vs. 8.71%; P<0.001). The questionnaire revealed that students were satisfied with the course, felt that it increased both their dermatologic and ultrasound knowledge, and indicated that they wanted more sonographic hands-on training in both dermatologic ultrasound and other medical fields. Conclusion: Using both objective and subjective methods, we showed that the introduction of standardized ultrasound training programs in undergraduate medical education can improve both students' understanding of the technique and the quality of medical education in dermatology.

  1. Introduction of Basic Dermatologic Ultrasound in Undergraduate Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Alfageme, F.; Cerezo, E.; Fernandez, I. S.; Aguilo, R.; Vilas-Sueiro, A.; Roustan, G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching ultrasound procedures to undergraduates has recently been proposed to improve the quality of medical education. We address the impact of applying standardized dermatologic ultrasound teaching to our undergraduates. Materials and Methods: Medical students were offered an additional theoretical and practical seminar involving hands-on ultrasound dermatologic ultrasound during their mandatory dermatology practical training. The students’ theoretical knowledge and dermatologic ultrasoud skills were tested with a multiple choice questionnaire extracted from Level 1 Spanish Society of Ultrasound Dermatologic Ultrasound accreditation exam before and after the course. After the course, the students were asked to answer a course evaluation questionnaire Results: The multiple-choice question scores after the course showed statistically significant improvement (5.82 vs. 8.71%; P<0.001). The questionnaire revealed that students were satisfied with the course, felt that it increased both their dermatologic and ultrasound knowledge, and indicated that they wanted more sonographic hands-on training in both dermatologic ultrasound and other medical fields. Conclusion: Using both objective and subjective methods, we showed that the introduction of standardized ultrasound training programs in undergraduate medical education can improve both students’ understanding of the technique and the quality of medical education in dermatology. PMID:27933321

  2. Body dysmorphic disorder among dermatologic patients: Prevalence and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Conrado, Luciana Archetti; Hounie, Ana Gabriela; Diniz, Juliana Belo; Fossaluza, Victor; Torres, Albina Rodrigues; Miguel, Euripedes Constantino; Rivitti, Evandro Ararigboia

    2010-08-01

    An impairing preoccupation with a nonexistent or slight defect in appearance is the core symptom of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), a psychiatric condition common in dermatology settings. We sought to determine the prevalence of BDD in dermatologic patients, comparing general and cosmetic settings, and describing some demographic and clinical characteristics. In all, 300 patients were consecutively assessed. Screening and diagnoses were performed with validated instruments plus a best estimate diagnosis procedure. The final sample comprised 150 patients in the cosmetic group, 150 patients in the general dermatology group, and 50 control subjects. Standard statistical analyses were performed (chi(2), nonparametric tests, logistic regression). The current prevalence was higher in the cosmetic group (14.0%) compared with general (6.7%) and control (2.0%) groups. No patient had a previous diagnosis. Frequently the reason for seeking dermatologic treatment was not the main BDD preoccupation. Patients with BDD from the cosmetic group were in general unsatisfied with the results of dermatologic treatments. Cross-sectional study conducted in a university hospital is a limitation. It is uncertain if the findings can be generalized. Retrospective data regarding previous treatments are not free from bias. BDD is relatively common in a dermatologic setting, especially among patients seeking cosmetic treatments. These patients have some different features compared with general dermatology patients. Dermatologists should be aware of the clinical characteristics of BDD to identify and refer these patients to mental health professionals. Copyright 2009 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 10 Year Publication Trends in Dermatology in Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Shujun; Mauro, Jacqueline A; Mauro, Theodora M; Elias, Peter M; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Background China has been experiencing huge changes in all aspects including dermatologic research since its reform in 1978. However, how the economic and intellectual development has influenced the publication trends in the field of dermatology, which could mirror the scientific development in other medical disciplines, is unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the publication trends from departments of dermatology in mainland China from 2002 to 2011. Materials and Methods All publication data were obtained from www.pubmed.com. Only papers published from dermatology departments of mainland China were used for analysis. Results The number of publications increased 10-fold over this 10 year period. A total 1,231 of articles were published in English in 251 journals between 2002 and 2011. A total of 129 journals published only one paper from dermatology departments of mainland China. Over 60% of articles were original research and 21.7% were case reports. Among these 251 journals, foremost was the Journal of Clinical Experimental Dermatology, which published 5.9% of all papers from mainland China. 2.7% papers were published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. The number of publications positively correlated with the changes in gross domestic product per capita during the study period. Conclusions These results suggest that the number of publications in the dermatology field has increased markedly in mainland China over the last 10 years. This dramatic increase in publications could be, at least partially, attributed to the significant improvement in economic conditions in mainland China. PMID:23968296

  4. [Counseling in dermatology and cosmetology at pharmacies in Ouagadougou].

    PubMed

    Niamba, Pascal; Sieba, Ibrahim; Faye, Ousmane; Traoré-Barro, Fatou; Traoré, Adama

    2007-01-01

    In Burkina Faso as in other underdeveloped countries, access to health care in general and dermatology care in particular remains difficult. This situation puts pharmacies on the front line for providing counselling. We undertook a cross-sectional descriptive study of the pharmacies of Ouagadougou from October 1, 2002, through April 1, 2003. Our objective was to evaluate the prevalence of dermatological and cosmetic counselling. The study included 75.5% of all pharmacies and 150 service providers. Prevalence of dermatology counseling was considered moderate, as was the availability and use of dermatology products. Service providers did not know most of the common dermatology disorders and offered inappropriate advice and products. This study shows the gap between the need for counselling from pharmacies and its satisfaction. It also underlines the necessity of reorganization in this domain.

  5. [Antibiotic prophylaxis in dermatologic and soft tissue surgery].

    PubMed

    Schulze, T; Napp, M; Maier, S

    2014-01-01

    In Germany, over half a million operations are done in dermatologic surgery in a hospital setting every year, as well as a less well quantified number of procedures in private offices. In spite of this large number, specific guidelines concerning the use of perioperative antibiotics in dermatologic surgery are sparse. In contrast to procedures in general, visceral or gynecological surgery, general guidelines on perioperative antibiotics issued by the Paul-Ehrlich Institutes and the AWMF do not specifically consider dermatologic operations. Several surveys indicate that familiarity with current recommendations on perioperative antibiotics is suboptimal and resulted in a considerable overuse of perioperative antibiotics in dermatologic surgery. Given the increasing antimicrobial resistance among important pathogens and the inherent risks of antibiotic administration, the decision for the use of prophylactic antibiotics should be based on the individual risk profile of the patient and of the surgical procedure. In the following, we will critically discuss the evidence for perioperative antibiotics in dermatologic surgery.

  6. Lasers in dermatology--a critical update.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R R

    2000-11-01

    Lasers are accepted for treating nevus of Ota, other pigmented lesions, hair removal, vascular lesions, leg veins, tattoos, and for skin resurfacing. These are photothermal treatments, in which certain skin "targets" are heated, followed by selective wound healing. Small pigmented targets such as the dermal melanocytes in nevus of Ota, are best treated with short (< 1 microsecond) laser pulses. Large targets, such as hair follicles, have long thermal relaxation times and are best treated with longer pulses. In general, the ideal pulse duration is about equal to the thermal relaxation time for pigmented targets. However, sometimes the actual target is not pigmented and is at some distance from a pigmented structure. For example the follicular stem cells, which are not pigmented, line the outer root sheath far away from the pigmented hair shaft. These cells appear to be an important target for permanent hair destruction. Pulses longer than the thermal relaxation time of the hair shaft allow heat conduction and better damage of follicular stem cells. Epidermal cooling works far better with pulses longer than about 10 ms, delivered through a cold medium (e.g., cold sapphire in contact with the skin). Thus, the combination of cooling and long near-infrared laser pulses allows safe and effective pigmented hair removal in all skin types. In contrast, epidermal protection from short pulses is best with dynamic pre-cooling (e.g., cryogen spray), for example during portwine stain treatment. A major challenge for the future of photothermal laser treatments is to develop ways of treating non-pigmented skin "targets". New uses for lasers are emerging. Diagnostic laser imaging and spectroscopy will soon emerge in dermatology. A near-infrared laser confocal microscope provides histology-like images of human skin. Imaging is painless and takes only a few minutes. Lesions including melanoma, basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma, microvascular and inflammatory lesions

  7. SYSTEMIC USE OF CORTICOSTEROIDS IN DERMATOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Robert G.; Farber, Eugene M.

    1961-01-01

    The use of corticosteroids systemically in dermatology has benefited patients with pemphigus and systemic lupus erythematosus in that they now have a better chance to carry on a productive life. These hormones, used cautiously, can alleviate some of the tremendous suffering during the explosive exacerbations and acute crises of atopic and neurodermatitis. Corticosteroids are useful in the widespread and acute contact dermatitis and drug eruptions; they are contraindicated in the treatment of ordinary psoriasis. Every attempt should be made by history-taking, clinical examination and necessary laboratory studies to reach an accurate diagnosis before corticosteroids are used. If use of them is indicated, then total patient care is required to avoid complications, and a very careful follow-up is mandatory. PMID:13783009

  8. Platelet-rich plasma: applications in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Conde Montero, E; Fernández Santos, M E; Suárez Fernández, R

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, the use of platelet-rich plasma has increased notably in a range of diseases and settings. Uses of these products now go beyond skin rejuvenation therapy in patients with facial ageing. Good outcomes for other dermatological indications such as skin ulcers and, more recently, alopecia have been reported in case series and controlled studies. However, these indications are not currently included in the labeling given that stronger scientific evidence is required to support their real benefits. With the increased use of these products, dermatologists need to become familiar with the underlying biological principles and able to critically assess the quality and outcomes of the studies of these products in different skin diseases.

  9. Arthropathy in Dermatology: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Jagadeesan, Soumya; Shenoy, Padmanabha

    2017-01-01

    Dermatology and rheumatology are two specialties that deal with significant overlap. In this context, it is important that the dermatologists acquaint themselves with conditions presenting with arthropathy. As the first step, it is essential to know whether the origin of musculoskeletal symptom is articular or extra-articular; inflammatory or noninflammatory; acute or chronic; oligo- or poly-articular. This will help in narrowing down the differential diagnoses as well as in better correlation with the cutaneous symptoms. In this review, we discuss the skin and articular manifestations of common inflammatory and noninflammatory arthropathies including rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthropathies, connective tissue disorders, vasculitis, crystal arthropathies, infective arthritis, arthritis associated with degenerative, endocrine and metabolic conditions, etc. We have also added a section on the common cutaneous features associated with the treatment of rheumatologic diseases. A basic understanding of the joint pathologies and associated skin changes will help a long way in the better management of these conditions. PMID:28405546

  10. Evaluating clinical dermatology practice in medical undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Casanova, J M; Sanmartín, V; Martí, R M; Morales, J L; Soler, J; Purroy, F; Pujol, R

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of competences (the set of knowledge, skills and attitudes required to perform a job to a professional level) is considered a fundamental part of medical training. Dermatology competences should include, in addition to effective clinical interviewing and detailed descriptions of skin lesions, appropriate management (diagnosis, differentiation, and treatment) of common skin disorders and tumors. Such competences can only be acquired during hospital clerkships. As a way of certifying these competences, we propose evaluating the different components as follows: knowledge, via clinical examinations or critical incident discussions; communication and certain instrumental skills, via structured workplace observation and scoring using a set of indicators; and attitudes, via joint evaluation by staff familiar with the student. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  11. Fullerene nanoparticle in dermatological and cosmetic applications.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, S Zeinab; Nafisi, Shohreh; Maibach, Howard I

    2017-04-01

    Nanoparticles are equipped with exceptional properties which make them well suitable for diverse and novel applications. Fullerene is one of the nanomaterials that has valuable applications in the field of biomedicine. It possesses exceptional antioxidant capacity which has made it a promising core ingredient in many dermatological and skin care products. However, fullerene has the potentials to display a range of activities resulting in cell death or dysfunction. This review outlines the achievements made so far by reporting studies that have focused on incorporating fullerene in skin care products and cosmetics and assessed their beneficial effects. We have also documented reports that have assessed toxicity of this novel carbon allotrope toward skin cells and discussed its possible dermal reactions. Aside from pointing out the recent developments, areas that can benefit from further researches are identified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. On the History of Classification in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Amiya Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Since the early days of cutaneous medicine, naming of the entities had remained a confusing subject. Earlier texts of all ancient civilisations are almost similar in this topic The Biblical controversy regarding the actual translational meaning of the original Hebrew term Zara ‘at has become a centre of controversy amongst many research scholars of the medical history. Similar debate exists about the Ayurvedic term Kustha---- whether it meant leprosy or stood for a number of skin affliction is a matter of controversy. A scientific and rational classification system was, therefore needed. The process started with Galen and traversed a long path and ultimately with the eight orders classification system proposed by Robert Willan in the early part of the nineteenth century resolved the issue. This whole journey was eventful….almost all the great doyens of dermatology directly or indirectly contributed to this process. This overview will focus on the main such events of the medical history in nutshell. PMID:27904174

  13. Dermatologic Manifestations of Chronic Hepatitis C Infection.

    PubMed

    Sayiner, Mehmet; Golabi, Pegah; Farhat, Freba; Younossi, Zobair M

    2017-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with various extrahepatic manifestations, including dermatologic involvement mostly caused by immune complexes. Mixed cryoglobulinemia has a strong relationship with HCV with 95% of these patients being infected with HCV. Lichen planus is a disease of the squamous epithelium and may affect any part of the skin, with 4% to 24% of patients with lichen planus reported to have chronic HCV infection. Porphyria cutanea tarda is the most common form of porphyria, and it is thought that HCV interferes with iron stores, which can promote porphyria cutanea tarda. Finally, necrolytic acral erythema is a rare, psoriasis-like disease closely associated with HCV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nanotechnology and dermatology: benefits and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Collins, A; Nasir, A

    2011-04-01

    Nanotechnology is the study of purposeful design in the size range of 100 nm and smaller. Discoveries stemming from nanotechnology have led to improvements in materials and devices for industrial and consumer use. The unique properties of nanoscale matter, and the ability to engineer precisely targeted function have led to a great deal of interest in medical research in nanotechnology. Recently, the skin care industry has emerged as the leader in patents issued for nanotechnology. A range of products have been developed or are being developed for the maintenance of skin health, and the diagnosis and management of skin disease. Matter also acquires a greater potential for volatility and unfavorable reactivity on the nanoscale. The skin is the first point of contact for most nanotechnologies and thus may be an early and prime target for nanotoxicity. This review discusses some of the important benefits and risks of nanotechnology within a dermatologic context.

  15. [What’s new in pediatric dermatology?].

    PubMed

    Lacour, J-Ph

    2013-11-01

    This article is a selection of the most significant developments in the field of pediatric dermatology through an analysis of the articles published between October 2012 and October 2013. In the field of vascular anomalies, propranolol remains a topic of interest for infantile hemangiomas. New clinical concepts appear in the field of vascular malformations in parallel to genetic progress in this area. New epidemiological data or new pathophysiological concepts apply to atopic dermatitis. Congenital or atypical nevi of the child benefit from genetic progress or improvement of clinical knowledge. Although rare, melanoma of the child concerns by its increasing incidence and its misleadingclinical characteristics. Other data reported here relate to infectious skin of the child, morpheas, neurofibromatosis type 1, psoriasis and other commonly seen dermatoses in children.

  16. The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database

    PubMed Central

    Lamberg, Anna Lei; Sølvsten, Henrik; Lei, Ulrikke; Vinding, Gabrielle Randskov; Stender, Ida Marie; Jemec, Gregor Borut Ernst; Vestergaard, Tine; Thormann, Henrik; Hædersdal, Merete; Dam, Tomas Norman; Olesen, Anne Braae

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database was established in 2008. The aim of this database was to collect data on nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) treatment and improve its treatment in Denmark. NMSC is the most common malignancy in the western countries and represents a significant challenge in terms of public health management and health care costs. However, high-quality epidemiological and treatment data on NMSC are sparse. Study population The NMSC database includes patients with the following skin tumors: basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma, Bowen’s disease, and keratoacanthoma diagnosed by the participating office-based dermatologists in Denmark. Main variables Clinical and histological diagnoses, BCC subtype, localization, size, skin cancer history, skin phototype, and evidence of metastases and treatment modality are the main variables in the NMSC database. Information on recurrence, cosmetic results, and complications are registered at two follow-up visits at 3 months (between 0 and 6 months) and 12 months (between 6 and 15 months) after treatment. Descriptive data In 2014, 11,522 patients with 17,575 tumors were registered in the database. Of tumors with a histological diagnosis, 13,571 were BCCs, 840 squamous cell carcinomas, 504 Bowen’s disease, and 173 keratoakanthomas. Conclusion The NMSC database encompasses detailed information on the type of tumor, a variety of prognostic factors, treatment modalities, and outcomes after treatment. The database has revealed that overall, the quality of care of NMSC in Danish dermatological clinics is high, and the database provides the necessary data for continuous quality assurance. PMID:27822110

  17. [Feminine acne: dermatologic disease or endocrine disease?].

    PubMed

    Vexiau, P; Chivot, M

    2002-01-01

    Acne is a problem of the pilo-sebaceous follicle caused by the conjunction of three factors: seborrhea, follicle obstruction, and follicle inflammation. The key element, seborrhea, is under androgenic control. Acne in women is also influenced by developments and modifications in genital life, as well as by hormonal contraceptive and replacement therapies. Acne is rare prior to puberty, when it may indicate endocrine disease. At puberty, acne is quasi-physiological, because of the relative hyperandrogenism induced by the andrenarche preceding pubarche, as well as by the relative shortage of estrogens and progesterone during the first menstrual cycles. Other signs of hyperandrogenism, such as menstrual cycle difficulties and excess weight, which favor a hormonal origin, must be sought in cases of persistent or late-onset acne in adults. There is a mirror image of puberty during the peri-menopausal period, but with decreased seborrhea, so acne is rare. Finally, a tumoral origin must be sought in the rare cases of acne occurring after menopause. Hormonal investigation of acne should not be systematic, but is justified during prepuberty when other symptoms are associated with acne that resists well-conducted dermatological treatment. The therapeutic approach should be primarily dermatological, but hormone-oriented treatment should be considered when such therapy fails, or in the presence of other signs of hyperandrogenism. Sometimes the association of isotretinoin and an anti-androgen treatment are necessary to effectively treat such acne. Finally, particular attention must be paid to contraceptive therapies and hormone treatments, which can induce or aggravate acne, especially during the peri-menopausal period.

  18. Use of topical antibiotics as prophylaxis in clean dermatologic procedures.

    PubMed

    Levender, Michelle M; Davis, Scott A; Kwatra, Shawn G; Williford, Phillip M; Feldman, Steven R

    2012-03-01

    Topical antibiotics are not indicated for routine postoperative care in clean dermatologic procedures, but may be widely used. We sought to describe topical antibiotic use in clean dermatologic surgical procedures in the United States. The 1993 to 2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey database was queried for visits in which clean dermatologic surgery was performed. We analyzed provider specialty, use of topical antibiotics, and associated diagnoses. Use of topical antibiotic over time was analyzed by linear regression. An estimated 212 million clean dermatologic procedures were performed between 1993 and 2007; topical antibiotics were reported in approximately 10.6 million (5.0%) procedures. Dermatologists were responsible for 63.3% of dermatologic surgery procedures and reported use of topical antibiotic prophylaxis in 8.0 million (6.0%). Dermatologists were more likely to use topical antibiotic prophylaxis than nondermatologists (6.0% vs 3.5%). Use of topical antibiotic prophylaxis decreased over time. Data were limited to outpatient procedures. The assumption was made that when topical antibiotics were documented at procedure visits they were being used as prophylaxis. Topical antibiotics continue to be used as prophylaxis in clean dermatologic procedures, despite being ineffective for this purpose and posing a risk to patients. Although topical antibiotic use is decreasing, prophylactic use should be eliminated. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Understanding the pediatric dermatology workforce shortage: mentoring matters.

    PubMed

    Admani, Shehla; Caufield, Maura; Kim, Silvia S; Siegfried, Elaine C; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2014-02-01

    To target pediatric dermatologists directly in order to evaluate their current demographics and the most important motivating factors that influenced their career choice. Pediatric dermatology is one of the pediatric subspecialties with an inadequate supply to meet current patient needs. A survey was designed to evaluate the training pathway, employment status, participation in teaching, and clinical practice characteristics of pediatric dermatologists. The survey was administered to attendants of the 2010 Society for Pediatric Dermatology annual meeting. Any remaining board certified pediatric dermatologists who had not previously responded were queried via Survey Monkey. There was a 71% response rate. The majority chose a career in pediatric dermatology early, often prior to starting a dermatology residency. The vast majority of respondents noted mentorship as the most important influence on their decision to pursue a career in pediatric dermatology. The most common obstacles cited by respondents were financial hardship and resistance of some dermatology programs to accept applicants previously trained in pediatrics. Our survey provides evidence to support the importance of early exposure to the field and, most importantly, to committed pediatric dermatologists who can serve as mentors. This information may be helpful in approaching solutions to the workforce shortage in the field of pediatric dermatology. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Dermatologic climate therapy--definition, indications and public health necessity].

    PubMed

    Vocks, E; Engst, R; Karl, S

    1995-08-01

    Dermatological climatotherapy is used in the treatment of chronic and chronically relapsing long-term dermatoses, such as, especially, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, complementing the dermatological therapies applied at the patient's place of living. It is a classical dermatological in-clinic therapy carried through in specific rough and stimulating climate areas of proven therapeutic benefit, primarily the North Sea climate and certain alpine locations over 1 500 m above sea-level, like especially in the high mountain valley of Davos, Switzerland. Dermatological climatotherapy is a well-tried therapeutic agent which, in comparison to the dermatological therapies applied at home, as a rule has fewer side effects as well as, above all, an additional long-lasting time effect. The latter is of particular importance regarding chronical diseases and cannot be achieved by other therapies. Dermatological climatotherapy, hence, represents an all-entailing therapy form and moreover is the most comprehensive therapy anyway. Dermatological climatotherapy can only be performed in rough and stimulating climate zones with additional special insolation, thermichygric and defined aerosol conditions. On the one hand, the organism is stabilized general by those climatic conditions, and, on the other, the constitutionally damaged skin is affected positively by the direct influence of climate factors. As every climate has its specific overall effect, the therapeutical immediate and long-term effects of a climate have to be proven scientifically by follow-up studies.

  1. Which Dermatological Conditions Present to an Emergency Department in Australia?

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, Tracey J.; Chong, Alvin H.; Jelinek, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives. There is minimal data available on the types of dermatological conditions which present to tertiary emergency departments (ED). We analysed demographic and clinical features of dermatological presentations to an Australian adult ED. Methods. The St. Vincent's Hospital Melbourne (SVHM) ED database was searched for dermatological presentations between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2011 by keywords and ICD-10 diagnosis codes. The lists were merged, and the ICD-10 codes were grouped into 55 categories for analysis. Demographic and clinical data for these presentations were then analysed. Results. 123 345 people presented to SVHM ED during the 3-year period. 4817 (3.9%) presented for a primarily dermatological complaint. The most common conditions by ICD-10 diagnosis code were cellulitis (n = 1741, 36.1%), allergy with skin involvement (n = 939, 19.5%), boils/furuncles/pilonidal sinuses (n = 526, 11.1%), eczema/dermatitis (n = 274, 5.7%), and varicella zoster infection (n = 161, 3.3%). Conclusion. The burden of dermatological disease presenting to ED is small but not insignificant. This information may assist in designing dermatological curricula for hospital clinicians and specialty training organisations as well as informing the allocation of dermatological resources to ED. PMID:24800080

  2. Dermatologic Features of Classic Movie Villains: The Face of Evil.

    PubMed

    Croley, Julie Amthor; Reese, Vail; Wagner, Richard F

    2017-06-01

    Dichotomous dermatologic depictions of heroes and villains in movies have been used since the silent film age. To evaluate the hero-villain skin dichotomy in film by (1) identifying dermatologic findings of the all-time top 10 American film villains, (2) comparing these dermatologic findings to the all-time top 10 American film heroes quantitatively and qualitatively, and (3) analyzing dermatologic portrayals of film villains in depth. In this cross-sectional study, dermatologic findings for film heroes and villains in mainstream media were identified and compared quantitatively using a χ2 test with α < .05, as well as qualitatively. The all-time top 10 American film villains and heroes were obtained from the American Film Institute 100 Greatest Heroes and Villains List. Primary outcomes include identification and frequencies of dermatologic findings of the top 10 film villains and of the top 10 film heroes. Six (60%) of the all-time top 10 American film villains have dermatologic findings, including cosmetically significant alopecia (30%), periorbital hyperpigmentation (30%), deep rhytides on the face (20%), multiple facial scars (20%), verruca vulgaris on the face (20%), and rhinophyma (10%). The top 10 villains have a higher incidence of significant dermatologic findings than the top 10 heroes (60% vs 0%; P = .03). Dermatologic findings of the all-time top 10 American villains are used in film to highlight the dichotomy of good and evil, which may foster a tendency toward prejudice in our society directed at those with skin disease.

  3. Access to inpatient dermatology care in Pennsylvania hospitals.

    PubMed

    Messenger, Elizabeth; Kovarik, Carrie L; Lipoff, Jules B

    2016-01-01

    Access to care is a known issue in dermatology, and many patients may experience long waiting periods to see a physician. In this study, an anonymous online survey was sent to all 274 Pennsylvania hospitals licensed by the US Department of Health in order to evaluate current levels of access to inpatient dermatology services. Although the response rate to this survey was limited, the data suggest that access to inpatient dermatology services is limited and may be problematic in hospitals across the United States. Innovation efforts and further studies are needed to address this gap in access to care.

  4. Autoinflammatory diseases in dermatology: CAPS, TRAPS, HIDS, FMF, Blau, CANDLE.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Shivani V; Leslie, Kieron S

    2013-07-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases, including CAPS, TRAPS, HIDS, FMF, Blau, and CANDLE, have unique dermatologic presentations that can be a clue to diagnosis. Although these conditions are rare, the morbidity and mortality can be severe, and well-informed physicians can place these conditions in their differential diagnosis when familiar with the dermatologic manifestations. This review article presents a brief overview of each condition, clues to diagnosis that focus of dermatologic manifestations and clinical images, basic laboratory tests and follow-up, a brief review of treatments, and concludes with an overview for these autoinflammatory conditions and their differential diagnoses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dermatology in the North American Indian/Alaska Native population.

    PubMed

    Kryatova, Maria S; Okoye, Ginette A

    2016-02-01

    Dermatology is greatly understudied in the American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) population. This topic deserves attention in light of the changing demographics of the United States and the healthcare disparities faced by AIAN, including access to dermatologic care. In this review, we discuss disorders that are more prevalent or otherwise important in the AIAN population, such as cutaneous malignancies, photodermatoses, acanthosis nigricans, connective tissue disorders, cutaneous infections, hypertrophic scar formation, and Heck's disease. We aim to provide an updated review and increase awareness of the dermatologic needs of the AIAN population.

  6. Therapies and nursing care of women with vulvar dermatologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Lipkin, Deborah; Kwon, Yanghee

    2014-01-01

    Vulvar dermatologic disorders are common among women, and prevalence increases with age. Treatment can provide women with symptomatic relief and can halt further progression of disease. Numerous therapies are available, and nurses who work with women across the life span should have an understanding of vulvar dermatologic disorders and therapeutic modalities. We provide an overview of general vulvar care, four vulvar dermatologic disorders, and common treatment modalities including topical and systemic pharmacologic management. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  7. Dermatologic surgery emergencies: Complications caused by occlusion and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Minkis, Kira; Whittington, Adam; Alam, Murad

    2016-08-01

    While the overall incidence of emergencies in dermatologic surgery is low, emergent situations can occasionally pose a risk to patients undergoing such procedures. The clinical importance of several types of emergences related to vascular occlusion, hypertension, and hypotension are reviewed, and relevant epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, work-up, management, and prevention are discussed. Early detection of these emergencies can mitigate or forestall associated adverse outcomes, thereby allowing the outstanding record of safety of dermatologic surgery to continue. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Patient expectations and performance measures in dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Erica H

    2016-01-01

    Patient satisfaction has increasingly played an important role in quality-of-care reforms and health care delivery. In dermatologic surgery, patient expectations of procedures and the outcomes are important determinants of satisfaction. Identification of the patient's met and unmet expectations through patient-reported outcome measures may enable a better understanding of the patient's perspective and improve communication and the delivery of care. Performance measures report on the quality of care being delivered. Performance measures currently being implemented into dermatologic practices may have a role in demonstrating the "quality" of dermatologic surgery procedures in the near future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dermatologic signs in patients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Strumia, Renata

    2005-01-01

    Eating disorders are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in adolescent females and young women. They are associated with severe medical and psychological consequences, including death, osteoporosis, growth delay and developmental delay. Dermatologic symptoms are almost always detectable in patients with severe anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), and awareness of these may help in the early diagnosis of hidden AN or BN. Cutaneous manifestations are the expression of the medical consequences of starvation, vomiting, abuse of drugs (such as laxatives and diuretics), and of psychiatric morbidity. These manifestations include xerosis, lanugo-like body hair, telogen effluvium, carotenoderma, acne, hyperpigmentation, seborrheic dermatitis, acrocyanosis, perniosis, petechiae, livedo reticularis, interdigital intertrigo, paronychia, generalized pruritus, acquired striae distensae, slower wound healing, prurigo pigmentosa, edema, linear erythema craquele, acral coldness, pellagra, scurvy, and acrodermatitis enteropathica. The most characteristic cutaneous sign of vomiting is Russell's sign (knuckle calluses). Symptoms arising from laxative or diuretic abuse include adverse reactions to drugs. Symptoms arising from psychiatric morbidity (artefacta) include the consequences of self-induced trauma. The role of the dermatologist in the management of eating disorders is to make an early diagnosis of the 'hidden' signs of these disorders in patients who tend to minimize or deny their disorder, and to avoid over-treatment of conditions which are overemphasized by patients' distorted perception of skin appearance. Even though skin signs of eating disorders improve with weight gain, the dermatologist will be asked to treat the dermatological conditions mentioned above. Xerosis improves with moisturizing ointments and humidification of the environment. Acne may be treated with topical benzoyl peroxide, antibacterials or azaleic acid; these agents may be

  10. A Concentrated Teaching Exercise for Introducing Clinical Dermatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binford, Robert T.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    At Cornell University Medical College one 3-hour session in dermatology is required during the second year. A teaching exercise has been developed that combines a lecture, laboratory exercises, and presentations of patients. (Author)

  11. Parental anxiety and concern for children undergoing dermatological surgery.

    PubMed

    Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Guenova, Emmanuella; Krug, Markus; Goetz, Angelika; Amarov, Boyko; Haefner, Hans-Martin; Breuninger, Helmut

    2014-10-01

    Parents experience anxiety and concern about their children's anesthesia and surgeries, which can adversely affect the children's outcomes. Therefore, it is important to identify the factors that influence parental fear. Because dermatological surgery is often performed in young children, we examined how a child's age and the size of the dermatological surgical area affected the levels of parental anxiety and concern. The parents' levels of anxiety and concern were accessed by parental self-reports in a prospective observational study of 106 children undergoing dermatological surgery. Correlation analysis showed that the level of parental anxiety decreased with the child's age. In contrast, the level of parental anxiety increased with the size of the surgical area. Our findings thus indicate that parents whose children undergo large-sized surgeries at a young age are at high risk. This result should be considered when performing dermatological surgery in children.

  12. Textiles in dermatology: our experience and literature review.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Lucia; Brena, Michela; Tourlaki, Athanasia

    2016-06-01

    Skin protects its host from its environment and allows their interactions by providing a physical permeability barrier, protection from infectious agents, thermoregulation, and ultraviolet protection. Textiles, in particular clothing, interact with skin functions in a dynamic pattern. For years cotton has been considered as the only comfortable tissue suitable for patients with dermatologic disorders. Nowadays new synthetic fibers with important functions, for example breathability and waterproofing have leaned out and new tissues can be used as a complementary tool in dermatologic treatments. Our purpose is to report the main fibers used for dermatological problems and to review the literature on their use in dermatological field; finally, we also report our personal experience on this topic.

  13. A Concentrated Teaching Exercise for Introducing Clinical Dermatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binford, Robert T.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    At Cornell University Medical College one 3-hour session in dermatology is required during the second year. A teaching exercise has been developed that combines a lecture, laboratory exercises, and presentations of patients. (Author)

  14. Biomechanics in dermatology: Recent advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Ryan T; Haber, Richard M

    2017-02-01

    Biomechanics is increasingly being recognized as an important research area in dermatology. To highlight only a few examples, biomechanics has contributed to the development of novel topical therapies for aesthetic and medical purposes, enhanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of plantar melanoma, and provided insight into the epidemiology of psoriatic disease. This article summarizes the findings from recent studies to demonstrate the important role that biomechanics may have in dermatologic disease and therapy and places these biomechanical findings in a clinical context for the practicing physician. In addition, areas for future biomechanics research and development in dermatology are discussed. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of the educational climate for specialty trainees in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Goulding, J M R; Passi, V

    2016-06-01

    Dermatology specialty trainees (STs) in the United Kingdom (UK) are few in number and will join a thinly spread national consultant body. It is of paramount importance to deliver training programmes of the highest quality for these doctors, central to which is the establishment and maintenance of an educational climate conducive to learning. To conduct a pilot study to evaluate the educational climate for dermatology STs in one UK deanery (West Midlands). Secondary analysis of published data was performed, from the UK's General Medical Council (GMC) national training survey, and the Job Evaluation Survey Tool (JEST) administered by the West Midlands deanery. A modified online version of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) was circulated among dermatology STs. The GMC's survey data show that UK dermatology STs rated their training highly in comparison with undifferentiated UK postgraduate trainees. West Midlands dermatology STs (n = 22) scored very similarly to UK dermatology STs. The JEST gave broadly encouraging results, with 21/22 (95%) happy to recommend their posts to colleagues. The modified PHEEM yielded a global mean score of 96.5/152, attracting the descriptor 'more positive than negative but room for improvement'. Despite inherent methodological limitations, the GMC, JEST and modified PHEEM surveys have revealed useful comparative triangulated data which allows the conclusion that West Midlands dermatology STs seem to be training in a favourable educational climate. This represents an important facet of the quality assurance process for medical education, and allows insight into areas which may require improvement. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  16. High frequency ultrasound with color Doppler in dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    Barcaui, Elisa de Oliveira; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Lopes, Flavia Paiva Proença Lobo; Piñeiro-Maceira, Juan; Barcaui, Carlos Baptista

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a method of imaging that classically is used in dermatology to study changes in the hypoderma, as nodules and infectious and inflammatory processes. The introduction of high frequency and resolution equipments enabled the observation of superficial structures, allowing differentiation between skin layers and providing details for the analysis of the skin and its appendages. This paper aims to review the basic principles of high frequency ultrasound and its applications in different areas of dermatology. PMID:27438191

  17. Cutaneous malignancies identified on an inpatient Dermatology consult service.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S; Scott, J F; Keller, J J; Gerstenblith, M R

    2017-02-23

    The role of inpatient Dermatology consultation and biopsy in evaluating suspicious cutaneous lesions is unknown.(1-3) Previous studies analyzed the diagnostic accuracy and utility of consultations for common rashes and infectious diseases, without considering suspicious lesions.(4-6) We sought to describe the frequency, clinicopathologic characteristics, and outcomes of suspicious lesions biopsied on an inpatient Dermatology consult service This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. "Pseudo" conditions in dermatology: need to know both real and unreal.

    PubMed

    Kudur, Mohan H; Hulmani, Manjunath

    2012-01-01

    There are 'n' number of names and terminologies in dermatology. The real and unreal names lead to lot of confusion to the residents and practitioners of dermatology. The word 'pseudo' means 'unreal', 'false' or 'fake', and it has deep roots in dermatology providing herculean task to differentiate and understand the real conditions/diseases/signs in dermatology. We have made an attempt to list and describe the pseudo and associated real conditions in dermatology.

  19. [Medical emergencies following dermatological injections and infusions].

    PubMed

    Dill-Müller, D

    2006-03-01

    Emergency situations following appropriately administered injections and infusions are an uncommon dermatologic problem. Embolia cutis medicamentosa is an uncommon complication following intramuscular injection which leads to infarct-like cutaneous necrosis. It may develop after gluteal injection of corticosteroids, anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics and has rarely been described following venous sclerotherapy with polidocanol. Hoigné syndrome is a pseudoanaphylactic or pseudoallergic reaction following intramuscular injection of procaine penicillin, with neuropsychiatric problems developing immediately after the injection. Subacute forms following intramuscular or oral administration of structurally-related antibiotics. The intraoperative use of patent blue dye has a 1-2% risk of allergic reactions. The patient must be monitored carefully following injection for the onset the life-threatening immediate reaction. Extravasation of cytostatic agents is a critical iatrogenic problem in oncology with an incidence of up to 6.5%. Every oncologic department should have an understanding of necrotic risk of the various agents and an emergency kit with instructions for immediate steps, also including agent-specific antidotes as available.

  20. [Dermatologic indications for anti-androgenic treatment].

    PubMed

    Zaun, H; Ludwig, E

    1978-11-01

    In spite of remarkable therapeutic results obtained by gestagens with antiandrogenic activity, usually combined with estrogen, in oily seborrhea, acne, Fox-Fordyce disease, androgenetic alopecia and hirsutism many dermatologist still hesitate to treat the named disorders by hormones. The reason for their hesitation appears to be the erroneous belief, that the named disturbances represent hormonal disorders the treatment of which does not belong to dermatology. After a survey on the mechanism of action of antiandrogens the basic difference between androgen dependent skin disorders and endocrinopathies with manifestation on the skin and its appendages is explained. Androgen dependent skin disorders, like oily seborrhea and most cases of acne are not the result of endocrine disturbances in the sense of an pathologically increased or decreased production of sexual hormons. Administering sexual hormons the physician takes advantage of the sebosuppressive effect of female sexual hormons as he does of the antiallergic activity of the hormon cortisol (and related compounds) in the treatment of eczemas. The antiandrogenic treatment of androgenetic alopecia, hirsutism and androgenetic acne--with their underlying hormonal disturbance, consisting in an increased production of androgens, represents an quasi etiological therapy. As in these cases the hormonal disturbances finds its expression mainly or exclusively in disorders of the skin or hair growth, the dermatologist, preferentially in cooperation with endocrinogists and/or gynacologists remains entitled to take over the treatment. The available drugs are discussed and suggestions are made for their appropriate use.

  1. Acupuncture in dermatology: an historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Tan, Eunice K; Millington, George W M; Levell, Nick J

    2009-06-01

    Classical acupuncture focuses primarily on treating the person, and secondarily treating the illness. The "symptoms" are regarded as "branch" expressions of a "root" (constitutional) imbalance. Different root imbalances can produce the same symptoms. Five patients with eczema, for example, may reveal five distinct root imbalances and would all be treated very differently. Because acupuncture treats the whole person, it has something to offer almost every condition. In many cases, acupuncture aims to bring about a complete cure; in others, it aims to manage the problem. Acupuncture remains a substantial part of the traditional Chinese medicine, which is used to treat many conditions including acne, alopecia, dermatitis, pruritus, psoriasis, rosacea, systemic lupus erythematosus, urticaria, herpes zoster, chicken pox, impetigo, leprosy, vitiligo, and tinea. This review introduces the historical context of acupuncture within Chinese medicine and how it relates to skin disease. Specifically, a key question is, what can we learn from the ancients with regard to their use of acupuncture as part of a holistic system of medicine, and how does this relate to the practice of modern dermatology?

  2. Laboratory tests and compliance of dermatologic outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaehwan

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory tests, including blood tests and urine analysis, are frequently performed in the dermatology outpatient clinic, but doctors often do not consider the cognitive or psychological effect of the examinations. Based on terror management theory, we hypothesized that performing laboratory tests increases the patient’s fear of mortality, and therefore has a positive effect on the patient’s attitude toward the doctor’s recommendations and willingness to accept them. The study employed a single factor between-subjects design, using a questionnaire completed by the patients. One group consisted of patients who had undergone laboratory tests 1 week before the survey, and the other group consisted of patients who had not undergone a laboratory test. Although the differences between two groups were not statistically significant, the patients who had laboratory tests had tendency to show even lower positive attitude toward the doctor’s recommendations and less intention to follow the recommendations. In contrast to our hypothesis, performing laboratory tests does not subliminally increase patients’ fears or anxieties about their disease or their compliance with doctors’ recommendations. PMID:24555101

  3. Body dysmorphic disorder in the dermatology patient.

    PubMed

    Koblenzer, Caroline S

    Body dysmorphic disorder is primarily a psychiatric disorder, in which the patient believes that some normal or very near normal aspect of his or her physical appearance is distorted or ugly. Should there be a minor abnormality, it is grossly exaggerated in the mind of the patient, causing feelings of shame and embarrassment and leading daily to spending hours at the mirror, or any reflecting surface, as the patient tries to conceal or remove the perceived abnormality through the development of ritualistic behavior. Although other organs can be involved-for example, the shape of the nose or a portion of an ear- the skin, hair, and nails are most commonly involved, while the patient constantly seeks reassurance about appearance from friends and family. There is a broad spectrum of severity in body dysmorphic disorder, ranging from obsessional worry to frank delusion, and the psychiatric comorbidities-anxiety, depression, and personality disorder-are prominent parts of the picture. Unfortunately, the psychiatric comorbidities and the negative impact on every aspect of the patient's life may not be recognized by dermatologists and other non-psychiatric physicians, so that effective treatment is often not instituted or appropriate referrals made. This paper describes the incidence, possible etiologies, and clinical picture of body dysmorphic disorder in dermatology patients and discusses interpersonal approaches that may permit appropriate treatment or referral to take place. Specific treatments and prognosis are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sjögren's syndrome in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Fox, Robert I; Liu, Alice Y

    2006-01-01

    Sjogren's Syndrome (SS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by dry eyes (keratoconjunctivis sicca) and dry mouth (xerostomia). To fulfill diagnostic criteria, patients must have objective signs of dryness on examination and laboratory confirmation of an autoimmune process as evidenced by a positive autoantibody to SS-A antigen or a characteristic lip biopsy. SS may exist as a primary condition or in association with other systemic autoimmune disorders (termed secondary SS) such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematous (SLE), progressive systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), or dermatomyositis. Exclusions to the diagnosis include pre-existing lymphoma, hepatitis C or HIV infection. Pathogenesis involves both genetic (especially HLA-DR) and environmental factors. Both T-cells and B-cells are involved in the generation of cytokines and chemokines within the glands. The epithelial cells of the glands also play a role in pathogenesis. The dermatologic manifestations range from drynessness (sicca) and its complications to vasculitis. There is a significant overlap in the clinical manifestations, as well as treatment, of SS and SLE. However, SS patients require special attention to the complications of ocular dryness (keratocojunctivitis sicca and blepharitis) and oral dryness (rapid tooth loss and oral candidiasis) SS patients have a markedly increased risk of lymphoma and enlarged lymph nodes or persistently enlarged parotid/submandibular glands that require further evaluation.

  5. Biologics in Dermatology: An Integrated Review

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2014-01-01

    The advent of biologics in dermatologic treatment armentarium has added refreshing dimensions, for it is a major breakthrough. Several agents are now available for use. It is therefore imperative to succinctly comprehend their pharmacokinetics for their apt use. A concerted endeavor has been made to delve on this subject. The major groups of biologics have been covered and include: Drugs acting against TNF-α, Alefacept, Ustekinumab, Rituximab, IVIG and Omalizumab. The relevant pharmacokinetic characteristics have been detailed. Their respective label (approved) and off-label (unapproved) indications have been defined, highlighting their dosage protocol, availability and mode of administration. The evidence level of each indication has also been discussed to apprise the clinician of their current and prospective uses. Individual anti-TNF drugs are not identical in their actions and often one is superior to the other in a particular disease. Hence, the section on anti-TNF agents mentions the literature on each drug separately, and not as a group. The limitations for their use have also been clearly brought out. PMID:25284845

  6. [Personality of patients with dermatologic artefacts].

    PubMed

    Rauchfleisch, U; Schuppli, R; Haenel, T

    1983-01-01

    35 female patients with dermatological artefacts being treated in the University Skin Clinic Basel have been investigated by a dermatologist, a psychiatrist, and a psychologist. The testpsychological examination with the Color Pyramid Test and the Rosenzweig Picture-Frustration Test yielded a striking uniform picture: The patients showed strong intrapsychic tension, severe depressivity, inhibition of aggression, affective inhibition, low frustration tolerance, weak ego-integration (with tendencies to break outs of impulses) and autoaggressive tendencies. These results point to a depressive and schizoid-narcissistic personality-structure. The manipulations at the skin have different functions: by causing pain to themselves the patients try to feel their body-boundaries and to avoid fragmentations in the body-self; on the tactile level emotional experiences of early childhood should be (re)-activated; the artefact should draw the attention of the surroundings to the emotional suffering of the patient. Concerning therapy, it is important that the doctor to whom the patients come first is ready to offer therapeutic talks. In these discussions the situation in which the artefact was done, with its psychodynamic background, should be explored and the therapist should help the patient to find other ways than artefacts to articulate his needs.

  7. Simulation in dermatologic surgery: a new paradigm in training.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Luke; Toren, Kristen; Bingham, Jonathan; Marquart, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Simulation-based training has become popular in many surgical residencies for acquiring procedural skills, but simulator use is rare in dermatologic training. To evaluate the perceived efficacy of obtaining dermatologic procedural skills using simulators. Opinions of dermatology residents and staff regarding simulator use were assessed using questionnaires completed after a 2-day surgical symposium in which participants were instructed on and practiced with simulators and cadavers. Overall, 93.9% strongly agreed that simulators are helpful in acquiring procedural skills. More than three-quarters of participants agreed that simulators are useful in acquiring, refining, assessing, and learning these skills. Many participants further thought that simulator use would be beneficial in learning anatomy and trouble-shooting techniques. An overwhelming majority of those surveyed believed that training on simulators would be helpful in learning various dermatologic procedures; 90.9% of participants thought that training using simulators should be, at least in part, a mandatory component of residency. It was felt that this training should be conducted at the beginning of residency, with additional with sessions held throughout training. Simulation offers an excellent model for the acquisition and assessment of dermatologic procedural skills. Cost and availability of instructors remain obstacles. Further studies are required to evaluate the implementation and effectiveness of these models. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The incidence of skin cancer in dermatology.

    PubMed

    van der Geer, S; Siemerink, M; Reijers, H A; Verhaegh, M E J M; Ostertag, J U; Neumann, H A M; Krekels, G A M

    2013-10-01

    It is known that the incidence of skin cancer is rising rapidly worldwide, but no reliable figures on multiple nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) are available. To determine the actual incidence of skin cancer in dermatology practice and to estimate how this relates to the first primary tumours (registered at the Eindhoven Cancer Registry). We examined 1001 randomly selected patient records at Catharina Hospital Eindhoven for mention of skin cancer. For each patient, skin cancers were recorded in a database, starting from 1 January 2004 until 1 March 2010. The time interval between tumours and any history of skin cancer were also recorded. Of this group, 876 patients were treated for skin cancer during the study period. We recorded a total of 2106 tumours with a mean of 2.4 skin cancers per patient. Nearly half (46%) of patients developed multiple tumours, and the second tumour developed within a median period of 5 months. Over a quarter (28%) of patients were known to have had skin cancer before 2004, the start of the study period. The number of NMSCs in practice differs substantially from the number of first primary histologically confirmed NMSCs, as usually reported by the Eindhoven Cancer Registry. To obtain the optimum benefit from registration of NMSC, it is recommended to register all NMSCs, because only this complete number will give an insight into the incidence of the rising skin-cancer numbers. Because subsequent tumours occur frequently, NMSC should be regarded as a chronic disease, and innovations in disease management are required for cost-effective control. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  9. Quantification of wound oedema after dermatological surgery.

    PubMed

    McGrath, E J; Kersey, P

    2009-12-01

    Postoperative wound oedema causing increased suture tension is thought to be a possible cause of scars known as suture marks. Quantification of such oedema has not previously been reported in the literature. Measures to accommodate wound oedema may include the adoption of alternative suture techniques and the use of more elastic suture materials. To quantify wound expansion after skin surgery and to identify any contributory factors, and to determine the ability of eight commonly used skin suture materials to stretch under increasing tension. Forty consecutive adult patients attending a dermatology department for routine skin surgery in December 2002 were recruited. Details including body site, nature of the lesion excised and dimensions of the open wound were recorded. The distance between entry and exit points of an untied suture at the time of skin surgery was measured and then repeated 24 h postoperatively. The ability of eight different suture materials to stretch when an increasing force was applied was measured by hanging standard weights from the sutures and measuring the suture length for each force applied. Thirty-nine patients completed the study. All wounds expanded postoperatively, with a mean lateral expansion of 1.0 mm. There was a strong association between the width of the unsutured wound after excision and the subsequent wound expansion. Commonly used sutures in skin surgery were found to be relatively inelastic at forces under 0.2 kg. The monofilament Novofil (Davis & Geck, Danbury, CT, U.S.A.) exhibited the greatest degree of stretch of those tested. There is considerable oedema in the first 24 h after skin surgery, particularly with wider excisions. This needs to be considered when choosing suturing materials and techniques to avoid excessive suture tension.

  10. Stem cell therapy in veterinary dermatology.

    PubMed

    Harman, Robert J

    2013-02-01

    Adult stem cells come from many sources and have the capacity to differentiate into many cell types, including those of the skin. The most commonly studied stem cells are those termed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are easily isolated from bone marrow and adipose tissue. Mesenchymal stem cells are known to produce a wide array of cytokines that modulate the regeneration process. The ease of collection, propagation and use of these MSCs in therapy of traumatic, ischaemic and immune-mediated skin conditions is emerging. In traumatic and ischaemic skin damage, MSCs are used in tissue-engineered skin and by direct injection into damaged tissue. For immune-mediated diseases, systemic administration of stem cells can modulate the immune system. The earliest clinical work has been with autologous stem cell sources, such as adipose tissue and bone marrow. In immune-mediated diseases, the MSCs are used to downregulate production of inflammatory cytokines and to block T-cell activation. Cells are generally given intravenously. Multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus have been successfully treated in human clinical trials. Mesenchymal stem cells can also stimulate resident local cells, such as keratinocytes and progenitor cells, to proliferate, migrate and repair skin injury and disease. The discovery of the MSC in adipose tissue has spawned a global effort to utilize these cells in therapy of a wide range of diseases of the skin. Reconstructive surgery, scar blocking and resolution and skin regeneration have all been shown to be possible in human and animal studies. © 2013 The Author. Veterinary Dermatology © 2013 ESVD and ACVD.

  11. Dermatologic Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Dedania, Bhavtosh; Wu, George Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects millions of people worldwide, and an estimated 3.2 million people in the United States. HCV is a hepatotropic and lymphotropic virus that causes not only liver disease, but also a significant number of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs). Up to 74% of patients affected by HCV will have HCV-related EHMs of some severity in their lifetime. The EHMs vary from simple cutaneous palpable purpura to complex lymphoproliferative disorders, including lymphomas and immune-complex deposit diseases causing local and/or systemic complications. Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is manifested by multiple systemic organ involvement, mainly skin, kidney, peripheral nerves, and salivary glands, and less frequently causes widespread vasculitis and malignant lymphoma. MC affects up to 3% of HCV-infected patients with cryoglobulinemia of clinical significance, i.e. >6%. Severe disease requires immunosuppressive or plasma exchange therapy. HCV prevalence in the United States in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) was reported to be 66%, much higher than that in general population. Therefore, all patients with PCT should be screened for HCV. The skin rash of PCT varies from large blisters to small vesicles and/or milia on the hands. Skin manifestations due to PCT usually respond to anti‐HCV treatment together with reducing skin sun exposure, avoiding triggers, having routine phlebotomy (especially for people with chronic iron overload states), and using chloroquine. Lichen planus (LP), which typically affects both the skin and oral mucosa is a chronic inflammatory disease of squamous cell origin affecting about 1% of the worldwide population. The prevalence of HCV in patients with LP varies based on geographic location. We review here the basic pathophysiology, clinical features, and management of dermatologic manifestations of HCV. PMID:26357639

  12. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Richard F; Raimer, Sharon S; Kelly, Brent C

    2013-01-01

    Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by residents is outlined. It is recommended that additional residency programs should consider adopting similar research programs to enrich resident education. PMID:23901305

  13. The effect of work characteristics on dermatologic symptoms in hairdressers.

    PubMed

    Jung, Pil Kyun; Lee, June-Hee; Baek, Ji Hye; Hwang, Jungho; Won, Jong-Uk; Kim, Inah; Roh, Jaehoon

    2014-01-01

    Hairdressers in Korea perform various tasks and are exposed to health risk factors such as chemical substances or prolonged duration of wet work. The objective of this study is to provide descriptive statistics on the demographics and work characteristics of hairdressers in Korea and to identify work-related risk factors for dermatologic symptoms in hairdressers. 1,054 hairdressers were selected and analyzed for this study. Independent variables were exposure to chemical substances, the training status of the hairdressers, and the main tasks required of them, and the dependent variable was the incidence of dermatologic symptoms. The relationships between work characteristics and dermatologic symptoms were evaluated by estimating odds ratios using multiple logistic regression analysis. Among the 1,054 study subjects, 212 hairdressers (20.1%) complained of dermatologic symptoms, and the symptoms were more prevalent in younger, unmarried or highly educated hairdressers. The main tasks that comprise the majority of the wet work were strictly determined by training status, since 96.5% of staff hairdressers identified washing as their main task, while only 1.5% and 2.0% of master and designer hairdressers, respectively, identified this as their main task. Multiple logistic regressions was performed to estimate odds ratios. While exposure to hairdressing chemicals showed no significant effect on the odds ratio for the incidence of dermatologic symptoms, higher odds ratios of dermatologic symptoms were shown in staff hairdressers (2.70, 95% CI: 1.32 - 5.51) and in hairdressers who perform washing as their main task (2.03, 95% CI: 1.22 - 3.37), after adjusting for general and work characteristics. This study showed that the training status and main tasks of hairdressers are closely related to each other and that the training status and main tasks of hairdressers are related to the incidence of dermatologic symptoms. This suggests that in the future, regulations on working

  14. Body dysmorphic disorder in female Swedish dermatology patients.

    PubMed

    Brohede, Sabina; Wyon, Yvonne; Wingren, Gun; Wijma, Barbro; Wijma, Klaas

    2017-09-27

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are highly distressed and impaired owing to perceived defects in their physical appearance that are not noticeable to others. They are frequently concerned about their skin and often present to dermatologists rather than psychiatrists. However, BDD patients attending dermatology clinics may be at risk of not receiving an appropriate assessment and beneficial treatment. The aims of this study were to estimate the BDD prevalence rate among Swedish female dermatology patients and to assess the psychological condition of BDD patients compared to that of other dermatology patients. The occurrence of BDD was estimated using the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ), a validated self-report measure for BDD. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and quality of life was assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). The prevalence rate of BDD among female Swedish dermatology patients was 4.9% (95% CI 3.2-7.4). Anxiety (HADS A ≥ 11) was 4-fold more commonly reported by patients with positive BDD screening (48% vs. 11%), and depression (HADS D ≥ 11) was over 10-fold more common in patients with positive BDD screening (19% vs. 1.8%) (P < 0.001). The median DLQI score was 18 in the BDD group, compared to a score of 4 in the non-BDD group (P < 0.001). Our results indicate that BDD is fairly common among female Swedish dermatology patients (4.9%) and that BDD patients have high levels of depression and anxiety and severely impaired quality of life. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  15. Comorbidity of depressive and dermatologic disorders - therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Filaković, Pavo; Petek, Anamarija; Koić, Oliver; Radanović-Grgurić, Ljiljana; Degmecić, Dunja

    2009-09-01

    Depressive disorders are more common in the population affected with dermatologic disorders. Comorbidity of depression and dermatologic disorders is around 30%. The correlation between depressive and dermatologic disorders still remains unclear. In psychodermatology three disorders are described: a) psychophysiological disorders (both disorders induced and maintained by stressors), b) secondary psychiatric disorders (mental disorder as a result of skin leasions and treatment) and c) primary psychiatric disorders (skin alterations as a result of mental disorders and treatment). In depression and dermatology disorders in which certain precipitating factors are required thereby causing alteration of the patient's immunological identity causing a combination of hereditary features and ones acquired through adaptation occur to cause the disorder to develop. The cytokines are vital in the regulation of the immunology response and are also mediators of non-infective inflammatory processes leading to recurrent hormonal secretion affecting the function of the vegetative and central nervous system leading to so called "sickness behaviour", marked by loss of appetite, anhedonia, anxiety, decrease of concentration and interest along with other changes which generate a picture of depressive disorder. Treatment of depressive and dermatologic disorders is complex and requires an integral therapeutic approach encompassing all aspects of both disorders and their comorbidity. Therefore therapeutic success lies in a team approach to the patient under the auspice of consultative-liason psychiatry by setting the frame for efficient collaboration and bridging the gap between the mental and the physical in everyday clinical practice.

  16. E-learning program for medical students in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Cristiana Silveira; Souza, Murilo Barreto; Filho, Roberto Silveira Silva; de Medeiros, Luciana Molina; Criado, Paulo Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dermatological disorders are common in medical practice. In medical school, however, the time devoted to teaching dermatology is usually very limited. Therefore, online educational systems have increasingly been used in medical education settings to enhance exposure to dermatology. OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to develop an e-learning program for medical students in dermatology and evaluate the impact of this program on learning. METHODS: This prospective study included second year medical students at the University of Technology and Science, Salvador, Brazil. All students attended discussion seminars and practical activities, and half of the students had adjunct online seminars (blended learning). Tests were given to all students before and after the courses, and test scores were evaluated. RESULTS: Students who participated in online discussions associated with face-to-face activities (blended learning) had significantly higher posttest scores (9.0±0.8) than those who only participated in classes (7.75±1.8, p <0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that an associated online course might improve the learning of medical students in dermatology. PMID:21655756

  17. Pharmacogenomics in dermatology: Taking patient treatment to the next level.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Jessica; Maibach, Howard

    2015-02-01

    The notion of treating the patient, and not the particular disease, has been emphasized by physicians for some time. In the past decade, this idea advanced with the human genome project, and has been taken further with the advent of personalized dermatology, or using genetics to drive pharmacological treatment. For example, recent melanoma treatment trials focus entirely on the genetic makeup of the individual. Although some dermatological conditions such as melanoma are being targeted with gene-specific therapy, the idea of choosing a drug based on the genetic makeup to treat other dermatologic conditions might be relevant, since it may increase drug efficacy or decrease adverse drug events. This concept of pharmacogenomics could be applied throughout the field of dermatology. Online libraries have been developed to guide drug efficacy, dose prediction and adverse events. We provide a list of current systemic dermatologic drugs in which the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have been studied. It would be beneficial to guide patient treatment with these drugs, if we can better understand their pharmacogenomics.

  18. The role of dimethylaminoethanol in cosmetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    . Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have been localized to keratinocytes, melanocytes and dermal fibroblasts, whereas nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been found in keratinocytes. The role of acetylcholine and the role of DMAE as a modulator of acetylcholine-mediated functions in the skin remain to be elucidated.Thus, the benefits of DMAE in dermatology include a potential anti-inflammatory effect and a documented increase in skin firmness with possible improvement in underlying facial muscle tone. Studies are needed to evaluate the relative efficacy of DMAE compared with other skin-care regimens (e.g., topical antioxidant creams, alpha-hydroxy acids).

  19. Applications of the 308-nm excimer laser in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, A.; Kemeny, L.

    2006-05-01

    Excimer lasers contain a mixture of a noble inert gas and a halogen, which form excited dimers only in the activated state. High-energy current is used to produce these dimers, which have a very short lifetime, and after their fast dissociation they release the excitation energy through ultraviolet photons. The application of these lasers proved to be successful in medicine, including the field of ophthalmology, cardiology, angiology, dentistry, orthopaedics, and, in recent years, dermatology. For medical purposes, the 193-nm argon fluoride, the 248-nm krypton fluoride, the 351-nm xenon fluoride, and the 308-nm xenon chloride lasers are used. Recently, the 308-nm xenon chloride laser has gained much attention as a very effective treatment modality in dermatological disorders. It was successfully utilized in psoriasis; later, it proved to be useful in handling other lightsensitive skin disorders and even in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. This review summarizes the possible applications of this promising tool in dermatology.

  20. What's new in pediatric dermatology?: part II. Treatment.

    PubMed

    Pride, Howard B; Tollefson, Megha; Silverman, Robert

    2013-06-01

    The field of pediatric dermatology has been rich in new developments. Part II of this continuing medical education article will focus on new therapeutic modalities for several entities encountered in pediatric dermatology. The treatment of atopic dermatitis, exciting advances in the use of propranolol and other beta-blockers for the use of infantile hemangiomas, the use of rapamycin for vascular anomalies, the use of biologics in children, the central nervous system risks of general anesthesia in young children, side effects in the use of isotretinoin, the treatment of tinea capitis, treatment of herpes simplex infections, and the use of technologies such as texting and social media in medicine will be discussed. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Synergy of understanding dermatologic disease and epidermal biology.

    PubMed

    Stanley, John R

    2012-02-01

    Dermatologic disease, although seldom life threatening, can be extremely disfiguring and interfere with the quality of life. In addition, as opposed to other organs, just the aging of skin and its adnexal structure the hair follicle can result in cosmetic concerns that affect most of us. The articles in this dermatology Review Series demonstrate recent progress in understanding the cell biology and molecular pathophysiology of the epidermis and hair follicles, which harbor keratinocyte and melanocyte stem cells. They reveal a dynamic relationship between research and clinical care: knowledge of dermatologic disease has facilitated the understanding of the biology of the epidermis and, in turn, progress in basic science has informed our understanding of disease. This type of synergy is a profound strength of clinical research of the type that the JCI is dedicated to publishing.

  2. Achieving hemostasis in dermatology-Part II: Topical hemostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Glick, Jaimie B; Kaur, Ravneet R; Siegel, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Bleeding is a common occurrence during any dermatologic surgery that disrupts blood vessels. The complications of excess bleeding can include delayed wound healing, hematoma formation, infection, dehiscence, and necrosis. In part one of this review, we discussed the pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative management of patients undergoing dermatologic surgery. In Part two, we discuss traditional and new topical hemostatic agents used to achieve hemostasis in dermatological procedures and surgery. We will evaluate the caustic and non-caustic hemostatic agents as well as hemostatic dressings. The mechanisms of action, side effect profile, and advantages and disadvantages of the topical hemostatic agents are provided. Sources for this article were found searching the English literature in PubMed for the time period 1940 to March 2012. A thorough bibliography search was also performed and key references examined.

  3. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) for cosmetics and dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, Mossum K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-02-01

    Over the last few years, low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to be beneficial to the field of aesthetic medicine, specifically aesthetic dermatology. LLLT encompasses a broad spectrum of procedures, primarily cosmetic, which provide treatment options for a myriad of dermatological conditions. Dermatological disorders involving inflammation, acne, scars, aging and pigmentation have been investigated with the assistance of animal models and clinical trials. The most commercially successful use of LLLT is for managing alopecia (hair loss) in both men and women. LLLT also seems to play an influential role in procedures such as lipoplasty and liposuction, allowing for noninvasive and nonthermal methods of subcutaneous fat reduction. LLLT offers a means to address such conditions with improved efficacy versatility and no known side-effects; however comprehensive literature reports covering the utility of LLLT are scarce and thus the need for coverage arises.

  4. Integration of moisturizers and cleansers into a busy dermatology practice.

    PubMed

    Higham, Robert

    2005-12-01

    Patients with chronic dermatologic conditions desire more information from their dermatologist about their disease and treatment options, including which moisturizers and cleansers to use. The challenge for the dermatologist is how to deliver this information in a time-limited office visit. Several ideas from an office-based practice on how to optimize communication on moisturizers and cleansers are shared. The suggestions include product placement within the office, readily available educational materials that make it easy for office staff to address commonly asked questions, and staff training regarding products that are frequently recommended and educational messages that are to be communicated to the patient to reinforce the dermatologist's instructions. Incorporating these tips into a dermatology practice may provide patients with the desired information and may improve the clinical outcomes of patients with these often challenging dermatologic conditions.

  5. Management of egfr tki–induced dermatologic adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, B.; Leighl, N.B.; Rothenstein, J.; Sangha, R.; Stewart, D.; Papp, K.

    2015-01-01

    Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (egfr) pathway has become standard practice for the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Compared with chemotherapy, egfr tyrosine kinase inhibitors (tkis) have been associated with improved efficacy in patients with an EGFR mutation. Together with the increase in efficacy comes an adverse event (ae) profile different from that of chemotherapy. That profile includes three of the most commonly occurring dermatologic aes: acneiform rash, stomatitis, and paronychia. Currently, no randomized clinical trials have evaluated the treatments for the dermatologic aes that patients experience when taking egfr tkis. Based on the expert opinion of the authors, some basic strategies have been developed to manage those key dermatologic aes. Those strategies have the potential to improve patient quality of life and compliance and to prevent inappropriate dose reductions. PMID:25908911

  6. Identifying and Managing Local Anesthetic Allergy in Dermatologic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Ramin; Serota, Marc; Brown, Mariah

    2016-02-01

    Local anesthetic (LA) allergy is a concern for dermatologic surgeons given the large number of procedures performed yearly with LAs. Many patients also have anxiety about past or potential anesthesia allergy. This article will review the symptoms of IgE-mediated allergic reactions, the prevalence of IgE-mediated LA allergy, discuss common mimics of LA, and propose a practical approach for diagnostic and therapeutic options for LA allergy for the dermatologic surgeon in practice. A literature search of Pubmed using keywords "lidocaine," "local anesthetic," "hypersensitivity," and "allergy" was performed. Amide anesthetics result in the most reports of true local anesthetic immediate hypersensitivity. True IgE-mediated anaphylaxis to local anesthesia is very rare. Dermatologic surgeons should be aware of the symptoms of anesthetic allergy and its mimickers, as well as how to manage allergic reactions in their clinical practice.

  7. Non-acne dermatologic indications for systemic isotretinoin.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Melih; Ozçelik, Sedat

    2005-01-01

    Systemic isotretinoin has been used to treat severe acne vulgaris for 20 years. However, isotretinoin also represents a potentially useful choice of drugs in many dermatologic diseases other than acne vulgaris. Diseases such as psoriasis, pityriasis rubra pilaris, condylomata acuminata, skin cancers, rosacea, hidradenitis suppurativa, granuloma annulare, lupus erythematosus and lichen planus have been shown to respond to the immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities of the drug. Isotretinoin also helps prevent skin cancers such as basal cell carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma. A combination of systemic isotretinoin and interferon-alpha-2a may provide a more potent effect than isotretinoin alone in the prevention and treatment of skin cancers.Systemic isotretinoin may be considered as an alternative drug in some dermatologic diseases unresponsive to conventional treatment modalities. However, randomized clinical trials aimed at determining the role of systemic isotretinoin therapy in dermatologic diseases other than acne vulgaris are required.

  8. New dermatological biomedical microscopes for early clinical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Leon

    1993-09-01

    With the current developments in optics, including laser optics, there should be more progress on the development of instrumentation for dermatological diagnostics, even clinical diagnostics. This report introduces new microscopy, much still under development, and research. A frank appeal for this program is made for multi-discipline help from optical physicists, biophysicists, biomedical engineers, even laser biomedical engineers, investigative dermatologists, and pathologists. If one is allowed to say, the most current advanced clinical diagnostic microscope is the polarizing microscope under the stimulus of Rox Anderson, Lynn Drake, Steven Jacques, and Peter Dorogi. The other microscopes for clinical dermatological research to be developed include the confocal scanning microscopy with the emphasis for living tissue, the ultrasonic biomedical microscope (UBM) for dermatology, and the holographic microscope, related to our studies on the biomedical aspects of optical phase conjugation. All these are introduced briefly for our studies and for definite pleas to help us.

  9. Videoconferencing journal club for dermatology residency training: an attitude study.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyo Hyun; Kim, Jeong Eun; Ko, Na Young; Seo, Soo Hong; Kim, Soo Nam; Kye, Young Chul

    2007-01-01

    The use of videoconferencing as a teaching modality in dermatology is not widespread. The objectives of this study were to introduce the videoconferencing format to dermatology journal clubs and to determine its effects on the training and satisfaction of house officers (residents). Ten dermatology house officers participated in this study. They were being trained at three university hospitals in rotation. A videoconferencing facility maintained by the hospitals for remote conferencing was used. After completing a 1-year journal club programme, house officers were asked about their satisfaction levels on a 5-point Likert scale using a questionnaire. Videoconferencing meant that the house officers and attending physicians from sister hospitals remained at their own hospitals, thus saving much time. Using videoconferencing the journal club could be held more frequently and more articles could be studied. In general the participants' satisfaction with the videoconferencing journal club was high. The adoption of videoconferencing produced promising results, increasing the efficiency of house officer training.

  10. Social networking sites: emerging and essential tools for communication in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Amir, Mahsa; Sampson, Blake P; Endly, Dawnielle; Tamai, Jennifer M; Henley, Jill; Brewer, Ann Chang; Dunn, Jeffrey H; Dunnick, Cory A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    The use of social media by dermatology journals and professional and patient-centered dermatology organizations remains largely unknown and, to our knowledge, has yet to be fully evaluated. To evaluate and quantify the extent of involvement of dermatology journals, professional dermatology organizations, and dermatology-related patient advocate groups on social networking sites. We obtained an archived list of 102 current dermatology journals from SCImago on the World Wide Web and used the list to investigate Facebook, Twitter, and individual journal websites for the presence of social media accounts. We identified professional and patient-centered dermatology organization activity on social networks through queries of predetermined search terms on Google, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. The activity of each entity was documented by recording the following metrics of popularity: the numbers of Facebook "likes," Twitter "followers," and LinkedIn "members." The numbers of Facebook likes, Twitter followers, and LinkedIn members corresponding to each dermatology journal and each professional and patient-related dermatology organization. On July 17, 2012, of the 102 dermatology journals ranked by SCImago, 12.7% were present on Facebook and 13.7% on Twitter. We identified popular dermatology journals based on Facebook likes and Twitter followers, led by the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology and Dermatology Times, respectively. Popular professional dermatology organizations included dermRounds Dermatology Network (11 251 likes on Facebook and 2900 followers on Twitter). The most popular dermatology patient-centered organizations were the Skin Cancer Foundation (20 119 likes on Facebook), DermaTalk (21 542 followers on Twitter), and the National Psoriasis Foundation (200 members on LinkedIn). Patient-centered and professional dermatology organizations use social networking sites; however, academic journals tend to lag behind significantly. Although some

  11. Guidelines for Performing Dermatologic Ultrasound Examinations by the DERMUS Group.

    PubMed

    Wortsman, Ximena; Alfageme, Fernando; Roustan, Gaston; Arias-Santiago, Salvador; Martorell, Antonio; Catalano, Orlando; Scotto di Santolo, Maria; Zarchi, Kian; Bouer, Marcio; Gonzalez, Claudia; Bard, Robert; Mandava, Anitha; Gaitini, Diana

    2016-03-01

    To support standardization for performing dermatologic ultrasound examinations. An international working group, called DERMUS (Dermatologic Ultrasound), was formed, composed of physicians who have been working on a regular basis and publishing in peer-reviewed articles on dermatologic ultrasound. A questionnaire on 5 critical issues about performance of the examinations was prepared and distributed by e-mail. The areas of discussion included technical aspects, main areas of application, minimum number of examinations per year required for assessing competence, qualifications of the personnel in charge of the examination, and organization of courses. Final recommendations were approved on the basis of the agreement of more than 50% of the members. The minimum frequency recommended for performing dermatologic examinations was 15 MHz. Routine use of color Doppler ultrasound and the performance of spectral curve analysis for assessing the main vascularity of lesions were suggested. Three-dimensional reconstructions were considered optional. The main dermatologic applications were benign tumors, skin cancer, vascular anomalies, cosmetic field, nail disorders, and inflammatory diseases. The minimum number of examinations per year suggested by the group for assessing competence was 300. A physician and not a sonographer was recommended to be the person in charge of performing the examination. On course organization, a minimum of 2 levels of complexity (basic and advanced) was suggested. There is a need to standardize the performance and quality of dermatologic ultrasound examinations. The present guidelines written by an international group of specialists in the field may support this objective. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. Application of in vivo laser scanning microscope in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, Juergen; Richter, H.; Otberg, N.; Lawrenz, F.; Blume-Peytavi, U.; Sterry, W.

    2003-10-01

    The state of the art of in-vivo and in-vitro penetration measurements of topically applied substances is described. Only optical techniques represent online measuring methods based on the absorption or scattering properties of the topically applied substances. Laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has become a promising method for investigations in dermatology and skin physiology, after it was possible to analyze the skin surface on any body side in-vivo. In the present paper the application of a dermatological laser scanning microscope for penetration and distribution measurements of topically applied substances is described. The intercellular and follicular penetration pathways were studied.

  13. Factors affecting the pursuit of academic careers among dermatology residents.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Lisa L; Wen, Ge; Wu, Jashin J

    2015-04-01

    There is a shortage of academic dermatologists in the United States. This study aimed to examine characteristics of US dermatology residency programs that affect the odds of producing academic dermatologists. Data regarding program size, faculty, grants, alumni residency program attended, lectures, and publications for all accredited US dermatology residency programs were collected; these data were correlated with the ratio of graduating full-time faculty members to estimated total number of graduates for each respective program. Results emphasize that the ratio of faculty to residents and the number of full-time faculty publications may represent key factors by which residency programs can increase their graduation of academic dermatologists.

  14. CLEANSERS AND THEIR ROLE IN VARIOUS DERMATOLOGICAL DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha

    2011-01-01

    The art of cleansing has progressed immensely over several thousand years from simply scraping the skin to an exercise in relaxation and improvement in the skin's health and appearance in the present day. Soaps – the basic cleansing agent has also undergone a sea change in its evolution with many variants and newer constituents being incorporated into it. In dermatological disorders like acne, rosacea, atopic dermatitis, photoaging, ‘sensitive skin’, occupational dermatosis cleansers may have a beneficial role along with other therapeutic measures. With the advent of aesthetic dermatology, the act of cleansing and the use of various cleansing agents prior to aesthetic procedures has also assumed significance. PMID:21572782

  15. [Hannover synthetic moulages. A singular collection of dermatologic teaching models].

    PubMed

    Schnalke, T

    1987-12-01

    Dermatological moulages rapidly lost their importance during the 1950s. The disadvantages of the classical moulage materials, plaster of Paris and wax, are pointed out. In the 1960s and 1970s modern plastics were introduced to moulage technology at the Linden Dermatological Clinic in Hannover. Silicon-caoutchouc and Vestolit-PVC were the substances used. This paper describes how the Hannover collection of plastic models was assembled and presents its current status. Wax and plastic models are set against each other in the illustrations.

  16. Focus on: information technology. Online drug information for dermatology patients.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    Information about medications appropriate for dermatologists and patients with skin diseases is readily available on the Internet. Authoritative educational material is supplied by academic dermatologic associations and institutions and distributed by independent websites, large health portals, and search directories. Although it is easy to find excellent dermatological drug information, the World Wide Web is dynamic and unmoderated, and patients can be misled or exploited by inaccurate or fraudulent websites. Health on the Net and other organizations have developed ethical principles to aid consumers and evaluate the quality of health-related information.

  17. Women in medicine and dermatology: history and advances*

    PubMed Central

    França, Katlein; Ledon, Jennifer; Savas, Jessica; Nouri, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    The history of women in medicine has been marked by many challenges and achievements. Although the role of women in the "art of healing" can be traced back many centuries, only males are traditionally highlighted in history. Across antiquity, access to medical education was denied to females. Dermatology is a medical specialty in which women displayed particular skill and proficiency. Gradually, determination and competence allowed women to lay claim in an essentially male-dominated world. This article presents a brief review of the performance, progress and achievements of women in the history of medicine and dermatology. PMID:24626675

  18. Manifesto of space medicine: the next dermatologic frontier.

    PubMed

    Toback, A C; Kohn, S R

    1989-03-01

    As the fields of astronomy, cosmology, and space travel move rapidly forward, so must space medicine. The manned space program and medical knowledge and support have developed in tandem. Dermatology will play a fundamental role in survival during space flight. This paper reviews past, present, and future accomplishments of the space program as they relate to medicine and characterizes some of dermatology's multiple roles in the future. It further explores the immunologic alterations noted during space flight and the attendant implications for health and well-being both in flight and on return to Earth, or to an Earthlike environment.

  19. Practice and Educational Gaps in Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Abigail; Sobanko, Joseph F; Alam, Murad

    2016-07-01

    This article identifies gaps in the practice of cosmetic dermatology and cosmetics education, and how to overcome these limitations. There is a rapid development of new devices and procedures, with limited data, patient-reported outcomes, and comparative effectiveness research from which to develop best cosmetic practice. There is a need for increased research and funding dedicated to these goals, improved and convenient training for staff to adopt new devices/procedures, and continuous evolution of databases to pool outcome data and develop outcome sets. Resident education can be improved by dedicated resident cosmetic clinics, didactic teaching from visiting professors, attendance of cosmetic dermatology courses and meetings, and encouraging postresidency training.

  20. Cumulative dermatologic toxicity with ipilimumab and vemurafenib responsive to corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Steven P; Pasikhova, Yanina

    2013-12-01

    Dermatologic toxicity is a known reaction of ipilimumab and vemurafenib. Because of the lack of effective treatments and aggressive nature of melanoma, treatments are often discontinued and new treatments are initiated in rapid succession. We report what we believe to be the first case of cumulative dermatologic toxicity secondary to rapid-sequential treatment with ipilimumab and vemurafenib for metastatic melanoma that responded to high-dose steroids. This case highlights the combined toxicity of these two drugs that can occur as a result of overlapping toxicity. It also illustrates the need for a substantial wash out period between rapid cycling of these two drugs secondary to ipilimumab's long half-life.

  1. Dermatologic emergencies in a tertiary hospital: A descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Bancalari-Díaz, D; Gimeno-Mateos, L I; Cañueto, J; Andrés-Ramos, I; Fernández-López, E; Román-Curto, C

    2016-10-01

    Dermatology in-house call is uncommon in the Spanish national health system. The objective of the present study was to define the groups of dermatologic diseases and conditions most frequently seen in the emergency department and to evaluate the need for dermatology in-house call in the training of medical residents. We performed a descriptive study of all patients who attended the emergency department with a skin complaint during a 1-year period (June 2013 to May 2014) and were assessed by 9 dermatology residents. The study variables were date/day, sex, age, diagnosis, special surgical procedures, additional laboratory tests, and need for hospitalization and/or follow-up. We also evaluated patients attending their first scheduled visit to the dermatologist between January and June 2014 in order to compare the most frequent conditions in both groups. A total of 3084 patients attended the emergency room with a skin complaint (5.6% of all visits to the emergency department), and 152 different diagnoses were made. The most frequent groups of diseases were infectious diseases (23%) and eczema (15.1%). The specific conditions seen were acute urticaria (7.6%), contact dermatitis (6.1%), and drug-induced reactions (4.6%). By contrast, the most frequent conditions seen in the 1288 patients who attended a scheduled dermatology appointment were seborrheic keratosis (11.9%), melanocytic nevus (11.5%), and actinic keratosis (8%). A follow-up visit was required in 42% of patients seen in the emergency department. Fourth-year residents generated the lowest number of follow-up visits. We found that infectious diseases and eczema accounted for almost 40% of all emergency dermatology visits. Our results seem to indicate that the system of in-house call for dermatology residents is very useful for the hospital system and an essential component of the dermatology resident's training program. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Women in medicine and dermatology: history and advances.

    PubMed

    França, Katlein; Ledon, Jennifer; Savas, Jessica; Nouri, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    The history of women in medicine has been marked by many challenges and achievements. Although the role of women in the "art of healing" can be traced back many centuries, only males are traditionally highlighted in history. Across antiquity, access to medical education was denied to females. Dermatology is a medical specialty in which women displayed particular skill and proficiency. Gradually, determination and competence allowed women to lay claim in an essentially male-dominated world. This article presents a brief review of the performance, progress and achievements of women in the history of medicine and dermatology.

  3. Dimethyl sulfoxide: history, chemistry, and clinical utility in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Kara; Capriotti, Joseph A

    2012-09-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide is a colorless liquid derived as a by-product from wood pulp in the production of paper. This colorless liquid found immediate application as a polar, aprotic solvent miscible with water and able to dissolve an enormous catalog of polar and nonpolar small molecules. It is presently scarcely used in dermatology, but given its useful properties as a penetration-enhancing solvent excipient and active anti-inflammatory pharmaceutical agent, dimethyl sulfoxide has the potential to be used in a much broader capacity. The authors review the history, chemistry, and clinical utility of dimethyl sulfoxide as it pertains to dermatology.

  4. [Tropical medicine/tropical dermatology training in Tanzania and Ghana: Personal experience and selected case reports].

    PubMed

    Völker, K

    2015-05-01

    As a consultant for dermatology with special interested in tropical diseases, I accepted my employers offer (German Armed Forces) to start my training in tropical medicine and tropical dermatology in Africa. The dermatological part of the training was completed at the Regional Dermatology Training Centre (RDTC) in Moshi, Tanzania. This was followed by tropical medicine training at the Presbyterian Hospital in Agogo, Ghana. In this article, I report on my experiences in Africa and present selected case reports.

  5. Dermatologic Toxicities in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Multikinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Eaby-Sandy, Beth; Grande, Carolyn; Viale, Pamela Hallquist

    2012-01-01

    Targeted therapies have produced significant treatment advances for patients diagnosed with a variety of tumor types. These therapies are associated with unique dermatologic toxicities that may hamper treatment efforts and cause significant discomfort for patients. Prevention and management of these toxicities can allow patients to remain on therapy and hence receive maximum clinical benefit from the drug. PMID:25031940

  6. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. 878.4630 Section 878.4630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  7. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. 878.4630 Section 878.4630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  8. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. 878.4630 Section 878.4630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  9. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. 878.4630 Section 878.4630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  10. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. 878.4630 Section 878.4630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  11. Disability insurance: what dermatology residents need to know.

    PubMed

    Brown, Megan

    2016-02-01

    Disability insurance is an important purchase that dermatology residents will make prior to the completion of residency. This article elucidates commonly used disability insurance terms, common policy pitfalls to avoid, and tips on what type of policy is most advantageous to purchase.

  12. Reproducible high-resolution multispectral image acquisition in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, Alexandru; Gardiazabal, José; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2015-07-01

    Multispectral image acquisitions are increasingly popular in dermatology, due to their improved spectral resolution which enables better tissue discrimination. Most applications however focus on restricted regions of interest, imaging only small lesions. In this work we present and discuss an imaging framework for high-resolution multispectral imaging on large regions of interest.

  13. Emergency department utilization of pediatric dermatology (PD) consultations.

    PubMed

    Moon, Amanda T; Castelo-Soccio, Leslie; Yan, Albert C

    2016-06-01

    There are few published data about pediatric dermatology (PD) consultations in the pediatric emergency department (PED). We profiled PD consultations to determine patterns of dermatology utilization by the PED. We reviewed electronic medical records of 347 PD consultations from the PED over a 36-month period from January 2011 to December 2013. We recorded patient age and gender; PED diagnosis; PD diagnosis; skin biopsy, if needed, with histopathology report; and outpatient PD follow-up. Patient age ranged from 3 days to 18 years with the majority (54.8%) of consultations for patients aged 0 days to 5 years. The most common diagnostic categories were infections and inflammatory skin disorders. Atopic dermatitis was the most common individual diagnosis. In all, 48.1% of patients had PD outpatient clinic follow-up. The rate of diagnostic agreement between the pediatric emergency medicine and PD provider was 58%. Use of electronic medical records, retrospective study design, and population based at a tertiary-care children's hospital represent potential limitations. PD providers contribute to patient care in the PED. Dermatology education in the PED should include the more commonly encountered disorders identified in this study, including infectious diseases and atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Psoriasis news at the Paris Dermatology Days 2007].

    PubMed

    Boulinguez, S

    2008-07-01

    Clinical research works on Psoriasis presented at 2007 annual dermatological meeting in Paris are synthesized in this paper. Efficacy of new treatment, quality of life, extracutaneous lesions of psoriasis and relations between psoriasis and other inflammatory diseases were the main topics.

  15. Review of applications of fluorescence excitation spectroscopy to dermatology.

    PubMed

    Franco, W; Gutierrez-Herrera, E; Kollias, N; Doukas, A

    2016-03-01

    Endogenous molecules that exhibit fluorescence hold the potential to serve as reporters of tissue structure, activity and physiology. Fluorescence excitation spectroscopy is one means to measure and express tissue's innate fluorescence. This review focuses on the application of endogenous fluorescence ultraviolet excitation spectroscopy to dermatology.

  16. The Stegman Papers: biography of a leader in dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Redbord, Kelley P; Hanke, C William

    2012-06-01

    The Stegman Papers is a biography of Dr. Samuel J. Stegman. The papers were collected by Dr. Stegman during his lifetime as a dermatologic surgeon and leader. The manuscript includes a time line of Dr. Stegman's life and listing of his accomplishments, including significant publications.

  17. [Dry skin as a dermatological and cosmetic problem].

    PubMed

    Kacalak-Rzepka, Anna; Bielecka-Grzela, Stanisława; Klimowicz, Adam; Wesołowska, Jolanta; Maleszka, Romuald

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents current opinions on aetiopathogenesis of dry skin including its occurrence in the course of certain dermatological disorders. A meaning of natural moisturizing factor, lipid barrier as well as epidermal differentiation processes in the maintenance of the proper skin moisturization is described. The importance of topical treatment is emphasized. Moreover, a survey of moisturizing factors applied in dry skin care is included.

  18. Trends in dermatology practices and the implications for the workforce.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Alison; Kostecki, James; Olkaba, Helen

    2017-10-01

    The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) practice profile surveys have been conducted for more than a decade to gauge trends in our workforce supply and demand. To update the trends and current workforce issues for the field of dermatology. The AAD Practice Profile Survey is sent by both e-mail and postal mail to a random sample of practicing dermatologists who are AAD members. Shifts are noted in the primary practice setting; fewer dermatologists are in solo practice and more are in group practices than in previous years. Teledermatology use trended upward from 7% to 11% between 2012 and 2014. The implementation of electronic health records increased from 51% in 2011 to 70% in 2014. There is potential for response bias and inaccurate self-reporting. Survey responses collected may not be representative of all geographic areas. The demand for dermatology services remains strong. Shifts in the practice setting may be related to increases in overhead costs that are partially associated with the implementation of technology-based medical records. Integration of electronic health records and utilization of telemedicine are increasing. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dermatology and the Brazilian Portuguese language orthographic reform.

    PubMed

    Miot, Hélio Amante; Ramos, Paulo Müller

    2011-01-01

    The Brazilian Portuguese language orthographic reform has promoted changes in writing in less than 2% of its lexis. However, these changes have affected medical practice. The authors present in this article the main changes in the orthographic rules and gather a group of words that have had their spelling altered by this new language reform emphasizing the dermatological terms.

  20. The Effect of Work Characteristics on Dermatologic Symptoms in Hairdressers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hairdressers in Korea perform various tasks and are exposed to health risk factors such as chemical substances or prolonged duration of wet work. The objective of this study is to provide descriptive statistics on the demographics and work characteristics of hairdressers in Korea and to identify work-related risk factors for dermatologic symptoms in hairdressers. Methods 1,054 hairdressers were selected and analyzed for this study. Independent variables were exposure to chemical substances, the training status of the hairdressers, and the main tasks required of them, and the dependent variable was the incidence of dermatologic symptoms. The relationships between work characteristics and dermatologic symptoms were evaluated by estimating odds ratios using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results Among the 1,054 study subjects, 212 hairdressers (20.1%) complained of dermatologic symptoms, and the symptoms were more prevalent in younger, unmarried or highly educated hairdressers. The main tasks that comprise the majority of the wet work were strictly determined by training status, since 96.5% of staff hairdressers identified washing as their main task, while only 1.5% and 2.0% of master and designer hairdressers, respectively, identified this as their main task. Multiple logistic regressions was performed to estimate odds ratios. While exposure to hairdressing chemicals showed no significant effect on the odds ratio for the incidence of dermatologic symptoms, higher odds ratios of dermatologic symptoms were shown in staff hairdressers (2.70, 95% CI: 1.32 - 5.51) and in hairdressers who perform washing as their main task (2.03, 95% CI: 1.22 - 3.37), after adjusting for general and work characteristics. Conclusions This study showed that the training status and main tasks of hairdressers are closely related to each other and that the training status and main tasks of hairdressers are related to the incidence of dermatologic symptoms. This suggests that

  1. Dermatological Findings in Turkish Paediatric Haematology-Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Uksal, Umit; Ozturk, Pinar; Colgecen, Emine; Taslidere, Nazan; Patiroglu, Turkan; Ozdemir, Mehmet Akif; Torun, Yasemin Altuner; Borlu, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Diagnoses of skin, mucosae, hair and nail manifestations in malignant diseases are often challenging because of life-threatening drug reactions, opportunistic infections or skin involvement of primary processes. Description of morphology, configuration and distribution of lesions is important in order to differentiate the self-healing eruptions from serious side effects of chemotherapy. There are case reports from Turkey including dermatological manifestations of malignancies and case series in adult patients but there are no published large group studies assessing all manifestations in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological features of dermatological findings in children with haemato-oncological diseases. Materials and Methods: The study was performed at the Erciyes University, Faculty of Medicine Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Clinic, Turkey. Three dermatologists daily consulted all patients admitted to the clinic during a one-year period. Results: The study group comprised of 157 children (79 female/78 male) aged 1–16 years (mean 7.19±4.63). Detailed dermatological examinations were performed, including oral-genital mucosae, hair and nails. Thorough skin examination revealed that 70% of the patients exhibited at least one dermatological finding. Generalized xerosis and hyperpigmentation were the most common findings among patients undergoing chemotherapy (24.19%). Multiple nevi on at least 10 covered areas were very frequent among patients undergoing long-term chemotherapy (18.47%). Three were identified as dysplastic nevus, but malignant transformation was not observed during the one-year study period. Conclusion: Regular dermatological consultation may help resolve the diagnostic and therapeutic problems in paediatric haemato-oncology clinics. PMID:27551173

  2. Identification and management of mental health issues by dermatologic surgeons: a survey of American Society for Dermatologic Surgery members.

    PubMed

    Sarwer, David B; Spitzer, Jacqueline C; Sobanko, Joseph F; Beer, Kenneth R

    2015-03-01

    Dermatologists have long been interested in mental health issues of their patients. Some psychosocial distress likely motivates the pursuit of cosmetic dermatologic treatments. However, a percentage of patients seeking treatment suffer from significant psychopathology, such as body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), which may contraindicate treatment. To assess dermatologic surgeons' strategies for identification and management of mental health issues among patients seeking cosmetic procedures. A survey was sent to 2,855 practicing members of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery by e-mail. Two hundred sixty members completed the survey (9.1%). Approximately, 60% of respondents indicated that they ask new patients about psychiatric treatment history, and 92% reported that they have declined to provide a cosmetic treatment because of concerns about mental health status. Most (94%) indicated that they were aware of BDD, and 62% indicated that they refused to treat a patient believed to have BDD. Respondents estimated that 13% of new patients had BDD and 63% considered BDD to be a contraindication to treatment. Approximately 60% of dermatologic surgeons inquire about the mental health issues of their cosmetic patients. Most are aware of BDD, but less than two-thirds consider it a contraindication to treatment.

  3. Assessment of medical students' proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    PubMed

    Ulman, Catherine A; Binder, Stephen Bruce; Borges, Nicole J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students' ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students' confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%). Many students (87.6%) felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training.

  4. US dermatology residents' satisfaction with training and mentoring: survey results from the 2005 and 2006 Las Vegas Dermatology Seminars.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Scott R; Greene, Riley E; Kimball, Alexa B; Freiman, Anatoli; Barzilai, David A; Muller, Sigfrid; Duke, Jodi K; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate residents' satisfaction with dermatology training and mentorship. Written survey. The Las Vegas Dermatology Seminar in 2005 and 2006. Graduating dermatology residents in the United States. Satisfaction with and importance of 26 training components, overall training satisfaction, satisfaction with availability and quality of mentors, and time spent outside the clinics and classroom with mentors. Of dermatology residents attending the 2005 and 2006 seminars, 57 (50%) and 49 (54%), respectively, completed the survey. In 2006, 38 more surveys were received by mail, for a combined total of 144 respondents. In 2005 and 2006, respectively, 44 (77%) and 66 (76%) residents scored training at or above 7 on a 10-point rating scale. Residents were most satisfied with peer teaching, medical dermatology training, pathology slide sessions, and live patient conferences and least satisfied with business management and dermoscopy training. Discrepancies between perceived importance and satisfaction were greatest for business management, time for independent study, and responsiveness to resident input. Residents spending 30 minutes (the median) or more per month outside of clinics and the classroom with someone they defined as a mentor reported higher training satisfaction (8.0 vs 7.2; P = .02). Resident-perceived program mentor availability (P = .001 in 2005, P=.002 in 2006) and quality (P =.002 in 2005, P < or = .001 in 2006) were also associated with increased overall training satisfaction. Of 26 training components, residents were most dissatisfied with business management training. Resident training satisfaction was associated with program mentor availability and quality, as well as time spent with mentors.

  5. The "away" dermatology elective for visiting medical students: Educational opportunities and barriers.

    PubMed

    Philips, Rebecca C; Dhingra, Navin; Uchida, Tatsuo; Wagner, Richard F

    2009-10-15

    Dermatology electives allow medical students an opportunity to explore the field of dermatology. In order to gain greater exposure to the specialty of dermatology, some medical students have an interest in taking "away" dermatology electives at other U.S. medical schools. A telephone survey was conducted to better understand the opportunities and barriers that exist for visiting medical students to take an elective in dermatology. Areas of focus in the survey included dermatology elective offerings, institutional policies toward visiting students, academic requirements for visiting students, timing of electives, financial costs of electives incurred by the student and institutional and regional preferences of the host medical school. Survey results indicated considerable opportunities for medical students to explore the field of dermatology among U.S. medical schools, but variance among schools regarding the number and types of dermatology electives offered. Medical schools with dermatology residencies were statistically more likely to offer dermatology electives to visiting medical students than those that did not (p<0.0001). Students from schools that do not provide more advanced electives may find it difficult to explore the field beyond a general dermatology elective because of the limited availability of subspecialty elective rotations for visiting students. Other barriers for "away" electives include academic requirements, priority in course registration for a school's own students, differing rotation schedules, and additional financial costs.

  6. Specialists are not qualified enough to recognize and define dermatologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Sibel; Artuz, Ferda

    2014-01-01

    Dermatology is a specific branch of medicine which includes dermatologic manifestations of systemic underlying diseases as well as primary cutaneous diseases. In this study, specialists' abilities of defining and diagnosing dermatologic diseases were assessed. 381 hospitalized patients who were referred to the Dermatology Clinic were reviewed via electronic medical charts. 121 of the clinicians (31.2%) made a dermatologic definition when referring their patients to dermatology. 136 of the the clinicians (35.1%) made a pre-diagnosis for their patients' dermatologic condition of which 90 (66,2%) were correct and 46 (33,8%) were non-relevant. Internists wrote a definitive dermatologic examination note significantly more often than surgeons (P=0.03). However, there was not a significant difference between internists and surgeons when we compared the ratio of correct and complete dermatologic definitions of patient condition (P=0.503). There was also no difference between surgeons and internists in terms of making a pre-diagnosis, making a correct diagnosis, and making a wrong diagnosis (P>0.05 for each comparison). In conclusion, dermatologic consultations are crucial and necessary for the improvement of patient care and treatment. Specialists lack basic skills to recognize and define dermatologic conditions they are confronted with.

  7. Public perception of dermatologic surgery in Saudi Arabia: an online survey.

    PubMed

    AlHargan, Abdullah H; Al-Hejin, Nujud R; AlSufyani, Mohammed A

    2017-05-15

    Dermatologic surgery is a well established subspecialty in dermatology, but observations suggest that the public may not be aware of this field. To explore the public perception of the nature and scope of dermatologic surgery Methods: A cross-sectional online-based survey consisting of two parts was used. The first part recorded demographic data. The second part presented a series of clinical scenarios in common surgical and cosmetic procedures performed by dermatologic surgeons to determine respondents' choice among three specialties: general surgery, plastic surgery, and dermatologic surgery. A total of 1,248 responses were recorded. Seventy-four percent of respondents were female, with 80.29% between the ages of 18 and 34 years. Forty-nine percent considered dermatologic surgeons to be specialized skin surgeons and 71.63% said they would consult dermatologic surgeons for skin tumor excisions. However, plastic surgeons emerged more favorably for cosmetic procedures. For office-based procedures, 80.85% and 87.18% of respondents chose plastic surgeons for fillers and Botox® injections, respectively, compared to 15.79% and 12.02% of respondents who chose dermatologic surgeons. Although the majority of participants showed no doubt about the surgical skills of dermatologic surgeons, the responses demonstrate that the public is not aware of the full scope and practice of dermatologic surgery, especially as it pertains to cosmetic procedures. Therefore, we must educate the public about the field and branches of dermatologic surgery.

  8. Dermatologic manifestations of HPV in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Rachel H; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2009-08-01

    Dermatologic human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in HIV patients manifests as both anogenital and nongenital skin disease. Anogenital HPV-related disease includes benign condyloma acuminata, the most common cutaneous manifestation of genital HPV infection; intermediate malignancy or premalignant conditions including giant condyloma acuminata (also called Buschke-Loewenstein tumor), anal intraepithelial neoplasia, penile intraepithelial neoplasia, and vaginal or vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia; and frankly malignant disease including Bowen's disease and invasive anal, penile, or vulvar carcinoma. Cutaneous HPV-related disease in nongenital skin is also increased in HIV-positive patients, in the form of benign common warts, epidermodysplasia verruciformis-like skin lesions, and nonmelanoma skin cancers. This review and update addresses the above listed dermatologic manifestations of HPV disease in HIV-infected individuals, with an emphasis on new findings and published data from 2006 to 2008.

  9. Current evidence and applications of photodynamic therapy in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Marilyn T; Lin, Jennifer Y

    2014-01-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT) a photosensitizer – a molecule that is activated by light – is administered and exposed to a light source. This leads both to destruction of cells targeted by the particular type of photosensitizer, and immunomodulation. Given the ease with which photosensitizers and light can be delivered to the skin, it should come as no surprise that PDT is an increasingly utilized therapeutic in dermatology. PDT is used commonly to treat precancerous cells, sun-damaged skin, and acne. It has reportedly also been used to treat other conditions including inflammatory disorders and cutaneous infections. This review discusses the principles behind how PDT is used in dermatology, as well as evidence for current applications of PDT. PMID:24899818

  10. A review of vitamin B12 in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Brescoll, Jennifer; Daveluy, Steven

    2015-02-01

    Vitamin B12, also known as cobalamin, is a water-soluble vitamin that is important in the hematological and nervous systems, and it has a complex relationship with the skin. Altered cobalamin levels can lead to dermatological manifestations, which may indicate a deficiency or excess of this vitamin. The biochemistry and metabolism of cobalamin is complex, and diseases can be associated with alterations of this metabolic pathway. The cutaneous manifestations of cobalamin deficiency include hyperpigmentation (most commonly); hair and nail changes; and oral changes, including glossitis. Additionally, several dermatologic conditions, including vitiligo, aphthous stomatitis, atopic dermatitis, and acne are related to cobalamin excess or deficiency. The cutaneous complications of cobalamin therapy include acne, rosacea, and allergic site reactions, or anaphylaxis with cobalamin injections. As cobalt is a component of cobalamin, patients with cobalt sensitivity have been reported to have cutaneous manifestations when receiving cobalamin replacement therapy.

  11. [Tropical dermatology training in the Bundeswehr: Deployment in Manaus, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M

    2015-05-01

    Training in tropical dermatology at the Fundação de Medicina tropical (FMT-AM) in Manaus, Brazil, offers an ideal opportunity to become familiar with the broad spectrum of tropical skin-diseases which are endemic in the tropical rainforest of the Amazon region. Besides frequently observed cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis of the new world, mucocutaneous forms of leishmaniasis and all entities of the different deep mycoses of South America are also regularly diagnosed. Of special importance in the dermatological care of the population is the early diagnosis of all clinical forms of leprosy and the long-term care of HIV patients. Modern diagnostics, including histopathology and molecular biology analytical methods, enable patients at the FMT-AM to be diagnosed without having to solely rely on clinical presentation and epidemiological data.

  12. Dermatological conditions in international pediatric travelers: epidemiology, prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Kamimura-Nishimura, Kelly; Rudikoff, Donald; Purswani, Murli; Hagmann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    With an increasing number of children traveling internationally, there has been growing interest in studying the burden of travel-associated illnesses in children. We reviewed recently published (2007-2012) studies on travel-associated illness in children, and extracted the reported spectrum of dermatological conditions in children. Dermatologic problems are among the leading health concerns affecting children during and after return from international travel. Most are mild and self-limited, but an extended spectrum of conditions has been reported from a large retrospective multicenter study. Children may be especially at risk for infections related to environmental exposures, arthropod-related problems, and animal bites. Of note are also tropical and cosmopolitan systemic infections with potential for transmission in the receiving communities. Implications for pre- and post-travel care of children are emphasized.

  13. Angiogenesis in Dermatology - Insights of Molecular Mechanisms and Latest Developments.

    PubMed

    Richarz, N A; Boada, A; Carrascosa, J M

    2017-02-02

    Angiogenesis is the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels. It is a biological process essential in physiological wound healing or pathological inflammation and tumor growth, which underlies a complex interplay of stimulating and inhibiting signals. Extracellular matrix, cells of innate and adaptive immunity and endothelial cells itself are a major source of angiogenic factors that activate or inhibit specific receptors and consequently influence intracellular signaling pathways. Most inflammatory and neoplastic diseases in dermatology are characterized by excessive angiogenesis, such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, as well as melanoma, non-melanoma skin cancer, but also benign vascular neoplasia. In this article we describe current knowledge of angiogenesis and its most relevant mechanisms in different dermatological disorders with particular emphasis on the angiogenic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor) and angiopoietins as a target of current and future directions of anti-angiogenic therapy.

  14. Osteopathic manipulative treatment: novel application to dermatological disease.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Shannon M; Winkelmann, Richard R; Walkowski, Stevan

    2012-10-01

    Dermatological diseases, such as dysesthesia syndromes, stasis dermatoses, and hyperhidrosis are difficult to treat due to their complex etiologies. Current theories suggest these diseases are caused by physiological imbalances, such as nerve impingement, localized tissue congestion, and impaired autonomic regulation. Osteopathic manipulative therapy targets these physiological dysfunctions and may serve as a beneficial therapeutic option. Osteopathic manipulative therapy techniques include high velocity low amplitude, muscle energy, counterstrain, myofascial release, craniosacral, and lymphatic drainage. An osteopathic manipulative therapy technique is chosen based on its physiological target for a particular disease. Osteopathic manipulative therapy may be useful alone or in combination with standard therapeutic options. However, due to the lack of standardized trials supporting the efficacy of osteopathic manipulative therapy treatment for dermatological disease, randomized, well-controlled studies are necessary to confirm its therapeutic value.

  15. Allergic contact dermatitis in dermatologic surgery: review of common allergens.

    PubMed

    Butler, Lara; Mowad, Christen

    2013-01-01

    With the growing number of dermatologic surgeries performed each year comes an increased potential for patient exposure and sensitization to allergens. Patients are exposed to many well-documented allergens in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative settings during surgery. Postoperative skin complications of allergic contact dermatitis increase health care costs and cause patient suffering. Early recognition, diagnosis, and treatment by dermatologic surgeons are essential to decrease morbidity related to medically necessary and elective cutaneous surgeries. While a specific standard screening panel for cutaneous surgery-related allergens is not well established, we propose several categories of allergens be strongly considered and tested if a patient is suspected of having allergic contact dermatitis in an attempt to reveal pertinent allergens and prevent future exposures.

  16. Assessment of Online Patient Education Materials from Major Dermatologic Associations.

    PubMed

    John, Ann M; John, Elizabeth S; Hansberry, David R; Lambert, William Clark

    2016-09-01

    Objective: Patients increasingly use the internet to find medical information regarding their conditions and treatments. Physicians often supplement visits with written education materials. Online patient education materials from major dermatologic associations should be written at appropriate reading levels to optimize utility for patients. The purpose of this study is to assess online patient education materials from major dermatologic associations and determine if they are written at the fourth to sixth grade level recommended by the American Medical Association and National Institutes of Health. Design: This is a descriptive and correlational design. Setting: Academic institution. Participants/measurements: Patient education materials from eight major dermatology websites were downloaded and assessed using 10 readability scales. A one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's Honestly Statistically Different post hoc analysis were performed to determine the difference in readability levels between websites. Results: Two hundred and sixty patient education materials were assessed. Collectively, patient education materials were written at a mean grade level of 11.13, with 65.8 percent of articles written above a tenth grade level and no articles written at the American Medical Association/National Institutes of Health recommended grade levels. Analysis of variance demonstrated a significant difference between websites for each reading scale (p<0.001), which was confirmed with Tukey's Honestly Statistically Different post hoc analysis. Conclusion: Online patient education materials from major dermatologic association websites are written well above recommended reading levels. Associations should consider revising patient education materials to allow more effective patient comprehension. (J ClinAesthet Dermatol. 2016;9(9):23-28.).

  17. Dermatological emergencies: evolution from 2008 to 2014 and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Isnard, C; Ingen-Housz-Oro, S; Fardet, L; Matteodo, E; Duval, S; Hemery, F; Khellaf, M; Duong, T-A; Chosidow, O; Wolkenstein, P

    2017-02-01

    Our dermatological department includes a dermatological emergency unit (DEU) whose activity has grown in recent years. An audit to characterize the activity of our DEU and its evolution in terms of medical demographics of the area. We collected the following data from administrative services: number of patients consulting each year in the DEU and in the general emergency unit (GEU) of our hospital between 2008 and 2014; daily and seasonal activity of the DEU; occurrence of a second event in the department and proportion of patients from the DEU who were hospitalized and why. From the medical charts of a random sample of patients consulting in the first 15 days of January and August 2014, we studied the epidemiological profile, time to consultation and diagnoses. Data related to medical demographics (number of general practitioners and dermatologists) between 2007 and 2014 and projections were obtained. The activity in the DEU increased by 67% between 2008 and 2014 but remained stable in the GEU over the same period. The activity was higher on Mondays and in the summer (+30%). More than 15% of the patients were seen a second time in outpatient consultation; 1.2% were hospitalized. Infectious dermatosis was the main reason for consultation; seasonal-disease consultations were more frequent in the summer. Less than 40% of patients consulted in the first week after disease onset. Medical demographics continually decreased since 2007 in Paris and suburbs and will continue to decrease in the next years. The increasing activity of our DEU parallels the decrease in medical demographics in Paris. The proportion of patients hospitalized was low, in part due to specific healthcare networks implemented for some life-threatening dermatoses independent of the DEU. A better coordination between hospital and private practitioners for managing dermatologic emergencies, taking into account the decrease in medical demographics, is warranted. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology

  18. Assessment of Online Patient Education Materials from Major Dermatologic Associations

    PubMed Central

    John, Ann M.; John, Elizabeth S.; Hansberry, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Patients increasingly use the internet to find medical information regarding their conditions and treatments. Physicians often supplement visits with written education materials. Online patient education materials from major dermatologic associations should be written at appropriate reading levels to optimize utility for patients. The purpose of this study is to assess online patient education materials from major dermatologic associations and determine if they are written at the fourth to sixth grade level recommended by the American Medical Association and National Institutes of Health. Design: This is a descriptive and correlational design. Setting: Academic institution. Participants/measurements: Patient education materials from eight major dermatology websites were downloaded and assessed using 10 readability scales. A one-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s Honestly Statistically Different post hoc analysis were performed to determine the difference in readability levels between websites. Results: Two hundred and sixty patient education materials were assessed. Collectively, patient education materials were written at a mean grade level of 11.13, with 65.8 percent of articles written above a tenth grade level and no articles written at the American Medical Association/National Institutes of Health recommended grade levels. Analysis of variance demonstrated a significant difference between websites for each reading scale (p<0.001), which was confirmed with Tukey’s Honestly Statistically Different post hoc analysis. Conclusion: Online patient education materials from major dermatologic association websites are written well above recommended reading levels. Associations should consider revising patient education materials to allow more effective patient comprehension. (J ClinAesthet Dermatol. 2016;9(9):23–28.) PMID:27878059

  19. Feline dermatology at Cornell University: 1407 cases (1988-2003).

    PubMed

    Scott, Danny W; Miller, William H; Erb, Hollis N

    2013-04-01

    Medical records of 1407 cats with dermatologic diagnoses made at Cornell University teaching hospital from 1988 to 2003 were tabulated. We expressed the diagnoses as counts, percentages of the cats with dermatologic disease (1407) and percentages of all cats seen at the university hospital (22,135) during the same period. A total of 1887 diagnoses were made in the 1407 cats. We compared the age, sex and breed group of our cases with all those 22,135 cats in ('1-by-c') χ(2) tests in which the hospital population was considered a standard (rather than a 'sample'). The 10 most common dermatoses, their counts, and the proportions of dermatologic diagnoses and of the total cat population that the cats with these dermatoses represented were: allergy (298; 15.8%; 1.35%), atopic dermatitis (194; 10.3%; 0.88%), bacterial folliculitis/furunculosis (189; 10.0%; 0.85%), otodectic mange (115; 6.1%; 0.52%), flea infestation (99; 5.2%; 0.45%), feline acne (74; 3.9%; 0.33%), flea-bite allergy (70; 3.7%; 0.32%), cutaneous adverse drug reaction (56; 3.0%; 0.25%), idiopathic eosinophilic-granuloma complex (55; 2.9%; 0.25%) and abscess (51; 2.7%; 0.23%). Allergies of all types, combined, accounted for 32.7% of all the feline dermatoses. Relative to the standard of the total hospital population, cats <2 years old and females (both intact and spayed) were significantly under-represented (all P≤0.001) in the dermatologic case series. In contrast, Himalayans (compared with domestic short- or longhair, Persian, Siamese and other breeds) and males (both intact and neutered) were significantly over-represented (all P ≤0.001).

  20. Clinical photography in dermatology using smartphones: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Ashique, K. T.; Kaliyadan, Feroze; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev J.

    2015-01-01

    The smartphone is one of the biggest revolutions in the era of information technology. Its built in camera offers several advantages. Dermatologists, who handle a specialty that is inherently visual, are most benefited by this handy technology. Here in this article, we attempt to provide an overview of smartphone photography in clinical dermatology in order to help the dermatologist to get the best out of the available camera for clinical imaging and storage PMID:26009708

  1. Will a physician assistant improve your dermatology practice?

    PubMed

    Baker, K E

    2000-09-01

    A physician assistant (PA) is a licensed health care professional and dependent practitioner. The profession began in the 1960s and accredited programs now number 110 nationwide. PAs practice in every specialty, including dermatology, and their clinical duties vary tremendously. Research has shown enhanced productivity and increased patient satisfaction in practices using PAs. Most third-party payers cover services provided by PAs, making them ideally suited in this era of increasing managed care.

  2. Mind-body medicine. Practical applications in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Bilkis, M R; Mark, K A

    1998-11-01

    It is only recently that Western physicians are rediscovering the link between thought and health. The spectrum of causative factors in inflammatory dermatoses are often multifactorial. Stress and negative thoughts are major factors in dermatologic conditions. This article begins with some basic information on the ways that thoughts affect health. Practical methods of intervention including meditation, journal writing, affirmations, prayer, biofeedback, and hypnosis are presented.

  3. Sirtuins in dermatology: applications for future research and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Serravallo, Melissa; Jagdeo, Jared; Glick, Sharon A; Siegel, Daniel M; Brody, Neil I

    2013-05-01

    Sirtuins are a family of seven proteins in humans (SIRT1-SIRT7) that are involved in multiple cellular processes relevant to dermatology. The role of sirtuins in other organ systems is established. However, the importance of these proteins in dermatology is less defined. Recently, sirtuins gained international attention because of their role as "longevity proteins" that may extend and enhance human life. Sirtuins function in the cell via histone deacetylase and/or adenosine diphosphate ribosyltransferase enzymatic activity that target histone and non-histone substrates, including transcription regulators, tumor suppressors, structural proteins, DNA repair proteins, cell signaling proteins, transport proteins, and enzymes. Sirtuins are involved in cellular pathways related to skin structure and function, including aging, ultraviolet-induced photoaging, inflammation, epigenetics, cancer, and a variety of cellular functions including cell cycle, DNA repair and proliferation. This review highlights sirtuin-related cellular pathways, therapeutics and pharmacological targets in atopic dermatitis, bullous dermatoses, collagen vascular disorders, psoriasis, systemic lupus erythematosus, hypertrophic and keloid scars, cutaneous infections, and non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancer. Also discussed is the role of sirtuins in the following genodermatoses: ataxia telangiectasia, Cowden's syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, Rubenstein-Taybi, Werner syndrome, and xeroderma pigmentosum. The pathophysiology of these inherited diseases is not well understood, and sirtuin-related processes represent potential therapeutic targets for diseases lacking suitable alternative treatments. The goal of this review is to bring attention to the dermatology community, physicians, and scientists, the importance of sirtuins in dermatology and provide a foundation and impetus for future discussion, research and pharmacologic discovery.

  4. Dermatological and musculoskeletal assessment of diabetic foot: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Arsanjani Shirazi, Azam; Nasiri, Morteza; Yazdanpanah, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic Foot Syndrome (DFS) is the most costly and devastating complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), which early effective assessment can reduce the severity of complications including ulceration and amputations. This study aimed to review dermatological and musculoskeletal assessment of diabetic foot. In this review article, we searched for articles published between March 1, 1980 and July 28, 2015 in PubMed, Science Direct, Embase, Web of Science, and Scopus, for both English and non-English language articles with the following keywords: "Diabetic foot syndrome", "Ulceration", "Amputation", "Foot assessment", "Skin disorders" and "Musculoskeletal deformities". In dermatological dimension, most studies focused on elucidated changes in skin temperature, color, hardiness and turgor as well as common skin disorders such as Diabetic Dermopathy (DD), Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum (NLD) and Diabetic Bullae (DB), which are common in diabetic patients and have high potential for leading to limb-threatening problems such as ulceration and infection. In musculoskeletal dimension, most studies focused on range of motion and muscle strength, gait patterns and as well as foot deformities especially Charcot osteoarthropathy (COA), which is the most destructive musculoskeletal complication of diabetes. DFS as a common condition in DM patients lead to ulceration and lower limb amputation frequently unless a prompt and comprehensive assessment was taken. So that dermatological and musculoskeletal assessments are usually neglected in primary health care, these assessments should be done frequently to reduce the high risk of serious complications. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Knowledge and Behavior Regarding Cosmetics in Koreans Visiting Dermatology Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sohee; Kim, Nack In; Ro, Young Suck; Kim, Joung Soo; Park, Young Min; Park, Chun Wook; Lee, Weon Ju; Kim, Dong Kun; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Sang Jun

    2017-01-01

    Background Cosmetics can affect the skin condition profoundly, and yet no survey has been performed in Koreans visiting dermatology clinics. Objective To assess knowledge and consumer behavior regarding cosmetics in Koreans visiting dermatology clinics. Methods A questionnaire consisting of 43 questions concerning demographics and use/knowledge/selection/purchase of cosmetics was given to patients and accompanying persons who visited dermatologic clinics in university and private clinic settings. Results In total 1,015 subjects (73.2% females, mean age 32.5 years) completed the survey. Education level was college or higher in 72.8%. Thirty-one percent had been diagnosed with a skin disorder, atopic dermatitis and seborrheic dermatitis being the most frequent diagnoses (33.7% and 16.8%, respectively). The frequency of makeup/sunscreen/functional cosmetics use, amount of sunscreen use, recognition of functional cosmetics, and knowledge of shelf life were significantly correlated with level of education. Among “functional cosmetics,” whitening products were used most frequently (29.2%). Regardless of education level, 79.2% purchased cosmetics without checking ingredients, and 85.7% were unaware of the all-ingredient-labelling regulations, and yet subjects considered ingredient the most important factor when purchasing a product. Conclusion Outpatient subjects in their twenties and thirties are the most knowledgeable about cosmetics in Korea. PMID:28392645

  6. Active skin cooling in conjunction with laser dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J S; Majaron, B; Kelly, K M

    2000-12-01

    The clinical objective in the laser treatment of patients with specific dermatoses is to maximize thermal damage to the target chromophore while minimizing injury to the normal skin. Unfortunately, for some lesions, the threshold incident light dosage for epidermal injury can be very close to the threshold for permanent removal of the target chromophore, thus precluding the use of higher light dosages. An important method of overcoming the aforementioned problem is to selectively cool the most superficial layers of the skin. Although melanin absorption will result in heat production during laser exposure, cooling the epidermis can prevent its temperature elevation from exceeding the threshold for thermal injury. Spatially selective cooling can be achieved by active cooling using a cryogen spray or cold sapphire contact handpieces. These devices promote rapid and spatially selective epidermal cooling to low temperatures without affecting the target chromophore temperature before the laser pulse is delivered. Cooling has become an Integral part in the emerging discipline of laser dermatologic surgery. Attend almost any academic dermatology conference and you are likely to find many lectures that relate to cooling during dermatologic laser surgery. Although cooling in conjunction with laser therapy has become the clinical standard for many laser procedures, considerable controversy surrounds this methodology. We present herewith an overview of currently used techniques for active cooling of human skin and explore their advantages and disadvantages in relationship to specific dermatoses amenable to laser therapy.

  7. [Quantitative analysis of drug expenditures variability in dermatology units].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ramírez, David; Ferrándiz, Lara; Ramírez-Soto, Gabriel; Muñoyerro, M Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Variability in adjusted drug expenditures among clinical departments raises the possibility of difficult access to certain therapies at the time that avoidable expenditures may also exist. Nevertheless, drug expenditures are not usually applied to clinical practice variability analysis. To identify and quantify variability in drug expenditures in comparable dermatology department of the Servicio Andaluz de Salud. Comparative economic analysis regarding the drug expenditures adjusted to population and health care production in 18 dermatology departments of the Servicio Andaluz de Salud. The 2012 cost and production data (homogeneous production units -HPU-)were provided by Inforcoan, the cost accounting information system of the Servicio Andaluz de Salud. The observed drug expenditure ratio ranged from 0.97?/inh to 8.90?/inh and from 208.45?/HPU to 1,471.95?/ HPU. The Pearson correlation between drug expenditure and population was 0.25 and 0.35 for the correlation between expenditure and homogeneous production (p=0.32 and p=0,15, respectively), both Pearson coefficients confirming the lack of correlation and arelevant degree of variability in drug expenditures. The quantitative analysis of variability performed through Pearson correlation has confirmed the existence of drug expenditure variability among comparable dermatology departments. Copyright © 2013 SEFH. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  8. JPEG vs. JPEG2000: benchmarking with dermatological images.

    PubMed

    Guarneri, F; Vaccaro, M; Guarneri, C; Cannavò, S P

    2014-02-01

    Despite the importance of images in the discipline and the diffusion of digital imaging devices, the issue of image compression in dermatology was discussed only in few studies, which yielded results often not comparable, and left some unanswered questions. To evaluate and compare the performance of the JPEG and JPEG2000 algorithms for compression of dermatological images. Nineteen macroscopic and fifteen videomicroscopic images of skin lesions were compressed with JPEG and JPEG2000 at 18 different compression rates, from 90% to 99.5%. Compressed images were shown, next to uncompressed versions, to three dermatologists with different experience, who judged quality and suitability for educational/scientific and diagnostic purposes. Moreover, alterations and quality were evaluated by calculation of mean 'distance' of pixel colors between compressed and original images and by peak signal-to-noise ratio, respectively. JPEG2000 was qualitatively better than JPEG at all compression rates, particularly highest ones, as shown by dermatologists' ratings and objective parameters. Agreement between raters was high, but with some differences in specific cases, showing that different professional experience can influence judgement on images. In consideration of its high qualitative performance and wide diffusion, JPEG2000 represents an optimal solution for the compression of digital dermatological images. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. [Fahr syndrome associated to hypoparathyroidy, revealed by dermatologic manifestation].

    PubMed

    Khadir, K; Moussaid, L; El Ouazzani, T; Gam, I; Slassi, I; Azzouzi, S; Lakhdar, H

    2004-11-01

    Fahr syndrome is defined by the presence at the brain base of strio-pallido-notched non-arteriosclerotic bilateral and symmetric calcifications. We report an observation of Fahr syndrome revealed by a growing pyodermitis in direct relation with hypocalcemia. A 17 year-old girl was admitted to the Dermatology Department for a growing pyodermitis of the large folds. The patient was known to be epileptic and had undergone surgery for a left eye cataract a year before. Microbiologic and mycologic examinations of the pus and of the cutaneous fragments were negative. During hospitalization, the patient had an attack of tetany, a laryngeal spasm and a generalized erythema thrust studded with pustules. The phosphocalcic assessment showed severe hypocalcemia and hyperphosphoremia. Parathormone serum rate was decreased. The brain tomodensitometry conveyed bilateral calcifications of the central gray nucleus. The diagnosis of a growing amicrobial pustulosis secondary to an idiopathic hypoparathyroidism and responsible for the Fahr syndrome was maintained. Treatment was composed of calcium (2 g/day) and vitamin D3. The evolution was favorable with a relapse at 2 years. We report an idiopathic hypoparathyroidism associated with Fahr syndrome conveyed by growing amicrobial pustulosis. We discuss the dermatologic manifestations of Fahr syndrome associated with hypoparathyroidism and the physiopathologic mechanisms of the dermatologic lesions during hypocalcemia.

  10. Use of optical skin phantoms for calibration of dermatological lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, M. S.; Sekowska, A.; Marchwiński, M.; Galla, S.; Cenian, A.

    2016-09-01

    A wide range of dermatological diseases can be efficiently treated using laser heating. Nevertheless, before the new laser is introduced into clinical practice, its parameters and ability to interact with human skin have to be carefully examined. In order to do that optical skin phantoms can be used. Such phantoms closely imitate the scattering and absorption properties of real human skin tissue along with its thermal properties, such as capacitance and conductivity specific heat. We have fabricated a range of optical tissue phantoms based on polyvinylchloride-plastisol PVC-P with varying optical properties, including the absorption, scattering and density of the matrix material. We have utilized a pre-clinical dermatological laser system with a 975 nm diode laser module. A range of laser settings were tested, such as laser pulse duration, laser power and number of pulses. We have studied laser irradiation efficiency on fabricated optical tissue phantoms. Measurements of the temporal and spatial temperature distribution on the phantoms' surface were performed using thermographic imaging. The comparison of results between tissues' and phantoms' optical and thermal response prove that they can be used for approximate evaluation of laser heating efficiency. This study presents a viable approach for calibration of dermatological lasers which can be utilized in practice.

  11. Knowledge and Behavior Regarding Cosmetics in Koreans Visiting Dermatology Clinics.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soyun; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Nack In; Ro, Young Suck; Kim, Joung Soo; Park, Young Min; Park, Chun Wook; Lee, Weon Ju; Kim, Dong Kun; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Sang Jun

    2017-04-01

    Cosmetics can affect the skin condition profoundly, and yet no survey has been performed in Koreans visiting dermatology clinics. To assess knowledge and consumer behavior regarding cosmetics in Koreans visiting dermatology clinics. A questionnaire consisting of 43 questions concerning demographics and use/knowledge/selection/purchase of cosmetics was given to patients and accompanying persons who visited dermatologic clinics in university and private clinic settings. In total 1,015 subjects (73.2% females, mean age 32.5 years) completed the survey. Education level was college or higher in 72.8%. Thirty-one percent had been diagnosed with a skin disorder, atopic dermatitis and seborrheic dermatitis being the most frequent diagnoses (33.7% and 16.8%, respectively). The frequency of makeup/sunscreen/functional cosmetics use, amount of sunscreen use, recognition of functional cosmetics, and knowledge of shelf life were significantly correlated with level of education. Among "functional cosmetics," whitening products were used most frequently (29.2%). Regardless of education level, 79.2% purchased cosmetics without checking ingredients, and 85.7% were unaware of the all-ingredient-labelling regulations, and yet subjects considered ingredient the most important factor when purchasing a product. Outpatient subjects in their twenties and thirties are the most knowledgeable about cosmetics in Korea.

  12. Dermatological image search engines on the Internet: do they work?

    PubMed

    Cutrone, M; Grimalt, R

    2007-02-01

    Atlases on CD-ROM first substituted the use of paediatric dermatology atlases printed on paper. This permitted a faster search and a practical comparison of differential diagnoses. The third step in the evolution of clinical atlases was the onset of the online atlas. Many doctors now use the Internet image search engines to obtain clinical images directly. The aim of this study was to test the reliability of the image search engines compared to the online atlases. We tested seven Internet image search engines with three paediatric dermatology diseases. In general, the service offered by the search engines is good, and continues to be free of charge. The coincidence between what we searched for and what we found was generally excellent, and contained no advertisements. Most Internet search engines provided similar results but some were more user friendly than others. It is not necessary to repeat the same research with Picsearch, Lycos and MSN, as the response would be the same; there is a possibility that they might share software. Image search engines are a useful, free and precise method to obtain paediatric dermatology images for teaching purposes. There is still the matter of copyright to be resolved. What are the legal uses of these 'free' images? How do we define 'teaching purposes'? New watermark methods and encrypted electronic signatures might solve these problems and answer these questions.

  13. Neurological and Neuropsychiatric Adverse Effects of Dermatologic Medications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Melinda; Huang, Yuan Yu M; Hsu, Sylvia; Kass, Joseph S

    2016-12-01

    Severe, recalcitrant dermatologic conditions often require systemic treatment. Although efficacious, these medications have been associated with wide-ranging adverse reactions. Some are reversible, predictable, and either dose-dependent or treatment length-dependent, while others are unpredictable, irreversible, and potentially fatal. This review examines the neuropsychiatric adverse effects associated with US FDA-approved medications for treatment of the following dermatologic pathologies that typically require systemic therapy: autoimmune dermatoses, acne, psoriasis, and melanoma. A search of the literature was performed, with adverse effects ranging from mild headaches and neuropathy to severe encephalopathies. The medications associated with the most serious reactions were those used to treat psoriasis, especially the older non-biologic medications such as cyclosporine A and methotrexate. Given the importance of these systemic dermatologic therapies in treating severe, recalcitrant conditions, and the wide variety of potentially serious neuropsychiatric adverse effects of these medications, neurologists, psychiatrists, dermatologists, oncologists, and primary care providers must be aware of the potential for these neuropsychiatric adverse reactions to allow for appropriate counseling, management, and medication withdrawal.

  14. Evaluation of cutaneous body image dissatisfaction in the dermatology patient.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhulika A; Gupta, Aditya K

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous body image (CBI), defined as the individual's mental representation of his or her skin, hair, and nails, is an important clinical factor in dermatologic disorders and often the primary consideration in deciding whether to proceed with cosmetic procedures or institute treatment in some skin disorders such as acne. CBI is a highly subjective construct that can be significantly confounded by cultural, psychosocial, and psychiatric factors. Assessment of CBI in the dermatology patient is best accomplished using a biopsychosocial model that involves (1) evaluation of concerns about the appearance of the skin, hair, and nails, (2) assessment of comorbid body image pathologies, especially body dysmorphic disorder, and (3) assessment of other psychiatric comorbidities such as major depressive disorder that can confound the presentation of the CBI complaint. Depending on the psychiatric comobidities, an assessment of suicide risk may have to be done, and if necessary, a referral made to a mental health professional. The clinician should consider the patient's developmental stage (eg, body image concerns are likely to be much greater in the adolescent patient independent of his or her dermatologic disorder) and sociocultural background (eg, a desire for lighter skin in some ethnic groups), factors that can also have a major effect on CBI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dermatological Manifestations of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome Are Common and Diverse.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao; Deb, Anindita; Culbertson, Collin; Morgenshtern, Karen; DePold Hohler, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a syndrome of orthostatic intolerance in the setting of excessive tachycardia with orthostatic challenge, and these symptoms are relieved when recumbent. Apart from symptoms of orthostatic intolerance, there are many other comorbid conditions such as chronic headache, fibromyalgia, gastrointestinal disorders, and sleep disturbances. Dermatological manifestations of POTS are also common and range widely from livedo reticularis to Raynaud's phenomenon. Questionnaires were distributed to 26 patients with POTS who presented to the neurology clinic. They were asked to report on various characteristics of dermatological symptoms, with their answers recorded on a Likert rating scale. Symptoms were considered positive if patients answered with "strongly agree" or "agree", and negative if they answered with "neutral", "strongly disagree", or "disagree". The most commonly reported symptom was rash (77%). Raynaud's phenomenon was reported by over half of the patients, and about a quarter of patients reported livedo reticularis. The rash was most commonly found on the arms, legs, and trunk. Some patients reported that the rash could spread, and was likely to be pruritic or painful. Very few reported worsening of symptoms on standing. The results suggest that dermatological manifestations in POTS vary but are highly prevalent, and are therefore of important diagnostic and therapeutic significance for physicians and patients alike to gain a better understanding thereof. Further research exploring the underlying pathophysiology, incidence, and treatment strategies is necessary.

  16. Initial experience with CO2 laser in treating dermatological conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, C T; Tham, S N; Tan, T

    1987-10-01

    CO2 laser was first used in the treatment of melanomas in animals. Since then, it has been successfully used in treating many dermatological conditions. A total of 47 patients were treated once as outpatients in Middle Road Hospital by using Model 720 Sharplan CO2 Laser System and Yoshida Opelaser-01 CO2 Laser System to determine the usefulness of CO2 laser in the treatment of various dermatological conditions. The laser was used mainly in the defocused mode at 10 watts. Local anaesthetic with 1% lignocaine HCL was employed in all cases. 3 patients defaulted follow-up. Of the 30 patients with warts, most of which were recalcitrant, 14 were cured and the remaining 16 showed marked improvement. 4 of the 5 patients with lichen simplex chronicus were cured. 1 patient each of the following conditions were also treated; prurigo nodularis, psoriasis, solar keratosis, ingrowing toe nail, Bowen's disease, infected callosity and lichen amyloidosis; cure was achieved in the former 4 conditions. The laser failed to cure 2 patients with pyogenic granuloma. Side effects included hypopigmentation (62%), mild post-operative pain (11%), scarring (11%), excess granulation tissue (11%), and infection (2%). CO2 laser is a potentially useful, effective and safe treatment modality for many dermatological conditions.

  17. Use of hypnosis, meditation, and biofeedback in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Shenefelt, Philip D

    Hypnosis utilizes trance to access otherwise inaccessible repressed or unconscious memories and features of the psyche and control of physiology not attainable in the ordinary conscious waking state. Medical uses of hypnosis in dermatology include reducing discomfort from itching or skin pain, altering ingrained dysfunctional habits such as scratching, promoting healing of skin disorders, searching for psychosomatic aspects of skin disorders and alleviating them, and reframing cognitive and emotional dysfunctional patterns related to skin disorders. Meditation uses trance to center and balance. Medical uses of meditation in dermatology include relaxation to promote healing of skin disorders and refocusing with respect to the meaning and emotional negative valance of skin disorders. Biofeedback in dermatology employs instrumentation with visual or auditory feedback to permit conscious awareness and alteration of physiologic phenomena such as sweating as measured by galvanic skin resistance and skin temperature measured by temperature detecting devices, promoting relaxation and healing. These methods and techniques permit access to and intervention in otherwise inaccessible areas that can influence skin disorders. With proper use, they are very safe, with minimal, if any, side effects and sometimes produce significant results where other methods have failed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Use and potential of nanotechnology in cosmetic dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Morganti, Pierfrancesco

    2010-01-01

    Biotechnology and nanotechnology are the key technologies of the twenty-first century, having enormous potential for innovation and growth. The academic and industrial goals for these technologies are the development of nanoscale biomolecular substances and analytical instruments for investigating cell biology at the cellular and molecular levels. Developments in nanotechnology will provide opportunities for cosmetic dermatology to develop new biocompatible and biodegradable therapeutics, delivery systems and more active compounds. Cosmetics have the primary function of keeping up a good appearance, changing the appearance, or correcting body odors, while maintaining the skin and its surroundings in good conditions. Thus cosmetic dermatology, recognizing the new realities of skin care products, has to emphasize the functional aspects of cosmetics through an understanding of their efficacy and safety in promoting good health. Nanoscience may help the scientific community to find more innovative and efficacious cosmetics. Understanding the physical model of the cell as a machine is essential to understand how all the cell components work together to accomplish a task. The efficacy and safety of new nanomaterials has to be deeply studied by ex vivo tests and innovative laboratory techniques. New delivery systems and natural nanocompounds, such as chitin nanofibrils for wound healing, are being used in cosmetic dermatology with good results, as are nanostructured TiO2 and ZnO sunscreens. The challenge is open. PMID:21437055

  19. [Dermatology day-care: between official rules and reality].

    PubMed

    Ingen-Housz-Oro, S; Durand-Zaleski, I; Cosnes, A; Valeyrie-Allanore, L; Moreno, J-C; Chosidow, O; Wolkenstein, P

    2012-11-01

    Official rules published in 2006 and 2010 concerning ambulatory care rates in France led to artificial redistribution of this activity from day-care hospitalization to consultations. In our dermatological day-care establishment, we compared the financial costs engendered for patients admitted for day-care hospitalization and those seen at consultations. From 2011/01/10 to 2011/02/04, for each patient, we prospectively analyzed the following data: day-care hospitalization or consultation, age, sex, diagnosis, laboratory and radiological examination, non-dermatological consultations, time spent with the patient by doctors (interns, senior doctors) and nurses, with timing by a stop-watch. The hospital cost was the total for medical examinations (official nomenclature), non-dermatological consultations, physicians' and nurses' salaries and establishment overheads (216 €). The hospital revenue regarding the consultation group consisted of the sum of reimbursement for medical examination, dermatological and non-dermatological consultations, and regarding the day-care hospitalization group, the dermatology rate (670 €) or chemotherapy sessions (380 €). Results were compared using a Chi(2) test and a Student's t-test (P ≤ 0.05). One hundred and twenty-seven patients were included: 67 in the day-care hospitalization group and 60 in the consultation group. Patients in the day-care hospitalization group were older and had significantly more radiological examinations and non-dermatological consultations, but the number of laboratory examinations and skin biopsies did not differ between the two groups. The mean time spent by doctors was similar in both groups but the time spent by senior doctors without the help of interns was significantly greater and longer than the time for a standard consultation. Nurses spent a mean 72 minutes with each hospitalized patient and 35 minutes with consultation patients (P = 0.007). Hospital costs were identical in both groups at around

  20. In vivo confocal microscopy in dermatology: from research to clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Martina; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents an emerging technique for the noninvasive histomorphological analysis of skin in vivo and has shown its applicability for dermatological research as well as its value as an adjunct tool in the clinical management of skin cancer patients. Herein, we aim to give an overview on the current clinical indications for CLSM in dermatology and also highlight the diverse applications of CLSM in dermatological research.

  1. Resident perspectives on a dermatology Quality Improvement curriculum: the University of Colorado experience.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Sammie J; Huff, Laura S; Lott, Jason P; Dellavalle, Robert P; Dunnick, Cory A

    2016-04-18

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have prioritized the objective of optimizing quality healthcare though quality improvement initiatives, yet research on dermatology-specific QI programs and their perceptions among dermatology residents remains limited. We explore residents' opinions of a dermatology-specific QI scholarly project curriculum implemented at University of Colorado Denver (UCD) in 2010 and also evaluate residents' attitudes regarding the value of this curriculum in aiding them to meet ACGME core competencies.

  2. Report of the 11th World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pruksachatkun, Chulabhorn

    2010-01-01

    The 11th World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology took place at the Queen Sirikit National Convention Center, Bangkok, Thailand on 17 to 19 November 2009. The theme was "Health and Beauty in Pediatric Dermatology." This report highlights several presentations discussing hemangiomas, infections, and novel and future diagnostic methods and treatment of pediatric dermatologic conditions. This report is not intended as a substitute for reading the conference educational handouts, online updates and related references quoted in this article.

  3. Increasing medical student exposure to clinical dermatology through participation in volunteer clinics.

    PubMed

    Beroukhim, Kourosh; Nguyen, Catherine; Danesh, Melissa; Lee, Kristina; Liao, Wilson

    2015-10-16

    Over the previous decade, several innovative teaching methods have been introduced to overcome the decreasing allotment of time dedicated to dermatology in U.S. medical school curricula. We report our experience of increasing medical student exposure to clinical dermatology thorough involvement in an extracurricular, volunteer-driven dermatology clinic. The clinic was well received by students and faculty. Our experience demonstrates that volunteer-driven dermatology clinics may be an effective method of teaching and engendering a culture of community outreach among medical students and faculty.

  4. Trends in types of dermatology books available over the last ten years.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Lisa L; Wu, Jashin J

    2009-06-15

    Shifts in interest toward cosmetic and surgical dermatology and away from medical and academic dermatology have been observed in recent years. We hypothesized that this trend would be evident in the types of books available for purchase from a major medical textbook supplier. Books published from 1998-2008 were categorized by type and statistical testing was performed to determine if this trend has been reflected in books published. The percentage of medical dermatology books decreased over time, whereas the percentage of cosmetic and surgical dermatology books increased over time.

  5. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Zain; Alster, Tina S

    2016-01-01

    The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice. PMID:26893574

  6. Dermatologic research in the Nordic countries 1989-2008--a bibliometric study.

    PubMed

    Gjersvik, Petter; Nylenna, Magne; Jemec, Gregor B E; Haraldstad, Anne-Marie

    2010-11-01

    Bibliometric methods, based on the count of articles published in scientific journals, are increasingly used to evaluate scientific productivity. Bibliometric studies may identify factors that promote or inhibit research performance. We set out to analyze dermatologic research activity in Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Norway using bibliometric methods. We performed repetitive searches on Medline, using the PubMed interface, for the period 1989-2008. Dermatologic articles were defined as all articles in dermatologic journals plus articles in nondermatologic journals in which the address of first author included an institution of dermatology. Articles were allocated to the country of first author's address. The number of dermatologic articles from Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Norway was 1896 (214 per million inhabitants), 1502 (281), 1017 (196), and 249 (55), respectively. Dermatologic articles represented 1.4%, 2.3%, 1.6%, and 0.6% of each country's total number of Medline articles in English over the same period. Similar patterns were found in relation to gross domestic product, number of dermatologists, and number of medical schools. After 2000, the yearly number of dermatologic articles from Denmark increased and that from Finland decreased, whereas the numbers from Sweden and Norway remained relatively stable. Despite similarities in social and economic conditions in Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Norway, there are great differences in dermatologic research activity in the four countries, with Denmark performing best and Norway poorest. Historical and cultural factors may partly explain these differences. © 2010 The International Society of Dermatology.

  7. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Husain, Zain; Alster, Tina S

    2016-01-01

    The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice.

  8. Identifying randomized clinical trials in Spanish-language dermatology journals.

    PubMed

    Sanclemente, G; Pardo, H; Sánchez, S; Bonfill, X

    2015-06-01

    The necessary foundation for good clinical practice lies in knowledge derived from clinical research. Evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) is the pillar on which decisions about therapy are based. To search exhaustively and rigorously to identify RCTs in dermatology journals published in Spanish. We located dermatology journals through the following search engines and indexes: PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, Periódica, Latindex, Índice Médico Español, C-17, IBECS, EMBASE, and IMBIOMED. We also sought information through dermatology associations and dermatologists in countries where Spanish was the usual language of publication, and we searched the Internet (Google). Afterwards we searched the journals electronically and manually to identify RCTs in all available volumes and issues, checking from the year publication started through 2012. Of 28 journals identified, we included 21 in the search. We found a total of 144 RCTs published since 1969; 78 (54%) were in Latin American journals and 66 (46%) were in Spanish journals. The most frequent disease contexts for RCTs in Spanish journals were psoriasis, mycoses, and acne vulgaris. In Latin American journals, the most frequent disease contexts were common warts, mycoses, acne vulgaris, and skin ulcers on the lower limbs. Manual searches identified more RCTs than electronic searches. Manual searches found a larger number of RCTs. Relatively fewer RCTs are published in Spanish and Latin American journals than in English-language journals. Internet facilitated access to full texts published by many journals; however, free open access to these texts is still unavailable and a large number of journal issues are still not posted online. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence of actinic keratosis among dermatology outpatients in Spain.

    PubMed

    Ferrándiz, C; Plazas, M J; Sabaté, M; Palomino, R

    2016-10-01

    Actinic keratoses (AKs) are common skin lesions associated with an increased risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma. Few studies in Europe have focused on AK prevalence. To determine the point prevalence of AKs in a dermatology outpatient population in Spain, to describe the clinical characteristics of these lesions and to characterise the profile of AK patients. Observational, cross-sectional, multicentre study conducted in 19 hospitals (dermatology outpatient services) around Spain. A total of 204 consecutive patients per hospital who were ≥45 years old were screened for the presence of AKs. 3877 patients were assessed and the overall AKs prevalence was 28.6%. Prevalence was significantly higher in men than women (38.4% vs. 20.8%, p<0.0001) and increased with age for both sexes (45.2% in 71-80 years). Scalp and ear lesion locations were significantly more frequent in men (51.9% vs. 2.7% and 16.9% vs. 2.4%, respectively, p<0.0001 both cases) and the cheek, nose and neckline in women (46.3% vs. 34.0% [p<0.0001], 43.0% vs. 24.8% [p<0.0001] and 5.3% vs. 1.8% [p=0.002]). Men showed a significantly higher frequency of ≥2 affected areas than women (42.7% vs. 20.3%, p<0.0001). Among patients with AK lesions, only 65% confirmed that they were the reason for the visit to the clinic. Approximately a quarter of the dermatology outpatient population in Spain aged ≥45 years old have AKs, with the prevalence rate being highest in men and in older age groups. AK is underdiagnosed and a proactive strategy is needed for the diagnosis and early treatment of these lesions. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. The substitution of digital images for dermatologic physical examination.

    PubMed

    Kvedar, J C; Edwards, R A; Menn, E R; Mofid, M; Gonzalez, E; Dover, J; Parrish, J A

    1997-02-01

    To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of clinicians viewing a patient's history and static digital image set compared with clinicians who conducted office-based physical examinations of the same patients. Observational study. One hundred sixteen adult patients presenting with dermatologic symptoms in a university-based practice who consented to have their skin conditions documented with a still digital camera according to a standardized protocol. Concordance between office-based dermatologists' diagnoses and 2 remote clinicians' diagnoses using still digital images (resolution, 92 dots per inch) and identical medical history data to render diagnoses. When photographic quality was high and office-based clinician certainty was high, remote clinicians were in agreement more than 75% of the time. Office-based and remote clinicians were in agreement 61% to 64% of the time for all cases. No specific disease category appeared to be more or less amenable to diagnosis based on still digital imagery. The diagnostic certainty of the office-based clinician (reported from 0-10) had the most impact on agreement. When cases with office-based clinician certainty of no more than 7 were compared with cases with certainty of at least 9, agreement increased 54% for remote clinician 1 and 111% for remote clinician 2. As an isolated variable, photographic quality had a modest impact on agreement. Still digital images can substitute for the dermatologic physical examination in up to 83% of cases. This study provides validation of the store-and-forward concept of telemedicine as applied to dermatology. These results serve as the foundation for field testing of the concept in primary care settings.

  11. The changing face of dermatological practice: 25 years' experience.

    PubMed

    Benton, E C; Kerr, O A; Fisher, A; Fraser, S J; McCormack, S K A; Tidman, M J

    2008-08-01

    In order to plan appropriate delivery of dermatology services we need periodically to assess the type of work we undertake and to examine changing trends in the numbers and type of referrals and the workload these referrals generate. To quantify outpatient workload in hospital-based and private practice; to assess reasons for referral to secondary care and to examine the changes over 25 years in the diagnostic spectrum of conditions referred. During November 2005, all outpatient dermatological consultations in the south-east of Scotland were recorded. Demographic data, source of and reason for referral, diagnoses, investigations performed, treatment administered and disposal were recorded, and comparisons made with four previous studies. During the 1-month study, attendances were recorded for 2118 new and 2796 review patients (new/review 1 : 1.3, female/male 1.3 : 1, age range 0-106 years). Eighty-nine per cent of new referrals came from primary care and 11% from secondary care. Fifty-seven per cent of referrals were for diagnosis and 38% for management advice. Benign tumours accounted for 33.4%, malignant tumours 11.6%, eczema 16% and psoriasis 7.4% of new cases. For return patients, 20% had skin cancer, 16.5% eczema, 13.4% psoriasis and 9% acne. The referral rate has risen over 25 years from 12.6 per 1000 population in 1980 to 21 per 1000 in 2005, with secondary care referrals increasing from 61 in November 1980 to 230 in November 2005. Attendances for benign and malignant skin tumours have increased sixfold since 1980. Patients with eczema and psoriasis account for one third of clinic visits. New referrals have risen by 67%, with those from other hospital specialties almost quadrupling since 1980 to 11% of the total in 2005. These results confirm the demand from both primary and secondary care for a specialist dermatology service.

  12. Management of the psychological comorbidities of dermatological conditions: practitioners' guidelines.

    PubMed

    Connor, Cody J

    2017-01-01

    Dermatological disease can be devastating for patients, and although dermatologists are focused on remedying the cutaneous manifestations of these conditions, it is easy to miss the psychological suffering lurking below. Studies reveal that psychiatric comorbidity in dermatology is highly prevalent. Undetected psychopathology can greatly decrease a patient's quality of life and even contribute significantly to the clinical severity of their skin disease. For these reasons, it is vital that practitioners learn to detect psychological distress when it is present, and it is equally essential that they understand the treatment options available for effective intervention. Without training in psychiatric diagnosis and psychopharmacology, dermatologists can easily feel overwhelmed or out of their comfort zone when faced with the need to manage such conditions, but with the negative stigma associated with psychiatric disease in general, a psychiatric referral is often refused by patients, and the dermatologist is thus left with the responsibility. Uncertainty abounds in such situations, but this review seeks to alleviate the discomfort with psychodermatological disease and share practical and impactful recommendations to assist in diagnosis and treatment. In a busy dermatology clinic, the key is effective and efficient screening, combined with a repertoire of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options that can be dispersed through an algorithmic approach according to the specific findings of that screening. By implementing these recommendations into practice, dermatologists may begin to gain comfort with the management of psychocutaneous disease and, as a specialty, may expand to fill a hole in patient care that is truly significant for patients, their families, and our communities as a whole.

  13. Scientific production of Brazilian dermatology: analysis of abstracts submitted at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology (2005 to 2013) and those eventually published*

    PubMed Central

    Holmo, Nicole França; Orasmo, Cinthia Rosane; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade the presence of Brazilian physicians in International Meetings of Dermatology has been expressive. In parallel it has also been expressive the submission of poster abstracts in those Meetings. Considering the meetings from 2005 to 2013, 379 posters were presented in meetings of the American Academy of Dermatology. Brazilian universities were the origin of 59.9%. The Brazilian Society of Dermatology's recognized residency programs were the origin of 69.9% of the presented posters. Considering the period from 2005 to 2010 (n = 165 posters) the papers effectively published were 19 (11.5%). PMID:28099621

  14. Psychological evaluation of the dermatology patient: a psychoanalyst's perspective.

    PubMed

    Ulnik, Jorge Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Psychoanalysis contributed to the body representation in medicine with a biographic focus in which language, dreams, sexuality, unconscious wishes, and the relationship with the doctor play a fundamental role. In spite of being invisible to the gaze, this anatomy has its fundamental piece on the skin. A piece that has the status-given by Freud-of "erotogenic zone par excellence." In this paper, different levels of psychological/psychiatric functioning and some character types elucidated by psychoanalytic work with dermatology patients are described. Some therapeutic strategies are suggested as a way of orientation to the dermatologist's management of difficult patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dermatology practice management assures practice development and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Wagener, D L

    2000-09-01

    This article provides an overview of the disciplines involved in managing a dermatology practice today. Several key management processes, including strategic planning, financial analysis, advertising and public relations, information systems management, and compliance program development and monitoring are addressed. This article explores several possible tactics that can be used to help guide your practice in the right direction without overtaxing your resources. Also offered are possible solutions for creating an organization that is poised for success, and a management team capable of steering the practice through the sea of change ahead.

  16. Medical devices in dermatology using DLP technology from Texas Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, M.; Lüllau, F.

    2012-03-01

    The market of medical devices is growing continuously worldwide. With the DLP™ technology from Texas Instruments Lüllau Engineering GmbH in Germany has realized different applications in the medical discipline of dermatology. Especially a new digital phototherapy device named skintrek™ PT5 is revolutionizing the treatment of skin diseases like psoriasis , Vitiligo and other Eczema. The functions of the new phototherapy device can only be realized through DLP™ technology which is not only be used for the selective irradiation process. In combination with other optical systems DLP™ technology undertakes also other functionalities like 3D-topology calculation und patient movement compensation.

  17. Overview of Common Sleep Disorders and Intersection with Dermatologic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Harneet K.; Mehra, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders are very common, often under-recognized and therefore undertreated, are associated with a myriad of medical conditions and could lead to significant impairment of quality of life. This review provides an up-to-date synopsis of common sleep disorders encompassing insufficient sleep syndrome, insomnia, circadian rhythm disorders and obstructive sleep apnea with a brief overview of epidemiology, screening, diagnostic testing and treatment. We also emphasize the emerging area of the intersection of sleep disorders and dermatologic conditions and present compelling data regarding underlying mechanisms including sleep dysfunction in relation to disorders of skin inflammation, aging and skin cancer. PMID:27144559

  18. Publication bias in dermatology systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Atakpo, Paul; Vassar, Matt

    2016-05-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analyses in dermatology provide high-level evidence for clinicians and policy makers that influence clinical decision making and treatment guidelines. One methodological problem with systematic reviews is the under representation of unpublished studies. This problem is due in part to publication bias. Omission of statistically non-significant data from meta-analyses may result in overestimation of treatment effect sizes which may lead to clinical consequences. Our goal was to assess whether systematic reviewers in dermatology evaluate and report publication bias. Further, we wanted to conduct our own evaluation of publication bias on meta-analyses that failed to do so. Our study considered systematic reviews and meta-analyses from ten dermatology journals from 2006 to 2016. A PubMed search was conducted, and all full-text articles that met our inclusion criteria were retrieved and coded by the primary author. 293 articles were included in our analysis. Additionally, we formally evaluated publication bias in meta-analyses that failed to do so using trim and fill and cumulative meta-analysis by precision methods. Publication bias was mentioned in 107 articles (36.5%) and was formally evaluated in 64 articles (21.8%). Visual inspection of a funnel plot was the most common method of evaluating publication bias. Publication bias was present in 45 articles (15.3%), not present in 57 articles (19.5%) and not determined in 191 articles (65.2%). Using the trim and fill method, 7 meta-analyses (33.33%) showed evidence of publication bias. Although the trim and fill method only found evidence of publication bias in 7 meta-analyses, the cumulative meta-analysis by precision method found evidence of publication bias in 15 meta-analyses (71.4%). Many of the reviews in our study did not mention or evaluate publication bias. Further, of the 42 articles that stated following PRISMA reporting guidelines, 19 (45.2%) evaluated for publication bias. In

  19. [Photodynamic therapy in dermatology, other indications and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Bédane, Ch

    2013-11-01

    PDT licensed indications in dermatology are actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease and superficial basal cell carcinomas. Skin tumors are sensitized by methyl aminomevulinate then illuminated with red light. Beyond these indication PDT is now widely used for the treatment of various others skin tumors and infectious or inflammatory skin disorders. PDT treatment of large areas can induce intense pain. Optimising PDT treatment needs to optimize pain control. Freezing or cooling procedure is the best way to decrease pain. The most interesting aspects of PDT is the absence of severe delayed adverse events and an optimal healing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of psychiatry and psychology collaboration in pediatric dermatology.

    PubMed

    Perry, Michael; Streusand, William C

    2013-04-01

    Psychiatric issues inherently accompany dermatologic disease in children and adolescents. With body image issues being of paramount importance to adolescents, perceived flaws may be accompanied by depression, anxiety, or loss of usual functioning. Children and adolescents also often have difficulties with treatment compliance. Often medical professionals separate symptoms into physical versus psychosomatic. This differentiation is not a useful dichotomy, and interventions should be aimed at both physical and emotional needs simultaneously. A collaborative team approach with both dermatologist and psychiatrist/psychologist addressing physical and emotional symptoms is therefore favored for desirable results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Life span and life course approaches to dermatological disease.

    PubMed

    Ryff, Carol D

    2013-01-01

    Social and behavioral scientists have long been interested in cumulative, life course processes. This chapter reviews prototypical questions and methods from the life span approach in psychology as well as the life course approach in sociology. Their relevance for understanding the unfolding lives of those who suffer from skin disorders is then considered. Key themes extracted from these approaches are how skin disease impacts life course development, how skin disorders influence personal agency and social networks, whether the historical context surrounding dermatological disease is changing, how accumulation processes occur over time, and the need to consider multiple life pathways, involving both profiles of vulnerability and resilience. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Dermatology in Ghana: a retrospective review of skin disease at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital Dermatology Clinic.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Brooke E; Klein, Rebecca; Hagan, Paa Gyasi; Seadey, Mark-Young; Quarcoo, Naa Larteley; Hoffmann, Rachel; Robinson, Maria; Lartey, Margaret; Leger, Marie C

    2017-01-01

    Ghana is currently developing its provision of dermatology services. Epidemiologic studies of the skin diseases seen by Ghanaian dermatologists are needed to guide these efforts. We aimed to describe the skin conditions seen by and management practices of Ghanaian dermatologists in a specialized clinic. We conducted a chart review of new patients presenting to the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital dermatology clinic during 2014. Among the 529 patients studied, 700 discrete diagnoses were made. The most commonly diagnosed skin conditions were infections (24.6%) and dermatitis (24.6%); atopic dermatitis (8.4%), acne vulgaris (5.3%) and scabies (5.1%) were the most common specific diagnoses. Among infants, children, and adolescents, the most common diagnosis was atopic dermatitis (31.7%, 30.0%, and 14.9%, respectively). Acne vulgaris (12.0%) was the most common skin condition diagnosed in young adults. Irritant contact dermatitis (6.9%) was most common among adults. Lichen planus (9.9%) was the most commonly diagnosed skin condition in the senior population. Diagnoses made by dermatologists differed from the referral diagnosis documented by primary care providers for 65.8% of patients. The most frequently recommended treatments were antihistamines (47.8%) and topical steroids (38.4%). Only 18 diagnostic biopsies were performed. Our study summarizes the skin diseases seen and management practices of Ghanaian dermatologists in a specialized clinic at a large public teaching hospital. The results of this study can help to guide future dermatology education and development efforts in Ghana.

  3. Dermatology in Ghana: a retrospective review of skin disease at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital Dermatology Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Brooke E; Klein, Rebecca; Hagan, Paa Gyasi; Seadey, Mark-Young; Quarcoo, Naa Larteley; Hoffmann, Rachel; Robinson, Maria; Lartey, Margaret; Leger, Marie C

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Ghana is currently developing its provision of dermatology services. Epidemiologic studies of the skin diseases seen by Ghanaian dermatologists are needed to guide these efforts. We aimed to describe the skin conditions seen by and management practices of Ghanaian dermatologists in a specialized clinic. Methods We conducted a chart review of new patients presenting to the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital dermatology clinic during 2014. Results Among the 529 patients studied, 700 discrete diagnoses were made. The most commonly diagnosed skin conditions were infections (24.6%) and dermatitis (24.6%); atopic dermatitis (8.4%), acne vulgaris (5.3%) and scabies (5.1%) were the most common specific diagnoses. Among infants, children, and adolescents, the most common diagnosis was atopic dermatitis (31.7%, 30.0%, and 14.9%, respectively). Acne vulgaris (12.0%) was the most common skin condition diagnosed in young adults. Irritant contact dermatitis (6.9%) was most common among adults. Lichen planus (9.9%) was the most commonly diagnosed skin condition in the senior population. Diagnoses made by dermatologists differed from the referral diagnosis documented by primary care providers for 65.8% of patients. The most frequently recommended treatments were antihistamines (47.8%) and topical steroids (38.4%). Only 18 diagnostic biopsies were performed. Conclusion Our study summarizes the skin diseases seen and management practices of Ghanaian dermatologists in a specialized clinic at a large public teaching hospital. The results of this study can help to guide future dermatology education and development efforts in Ghana. PMID:28533848

  4. [Dermatology in Cambodia: Sustainable establishment of a medical discipline].

    PubMed

    Bendick, Ch

    2015-05-01

    After almost 25 years of dictatorship and civil war, in the mid 1990s, Cambodia was in dire need of improvement of its medical infrastructure on all levels. Attention had already been focused on establishing primary care services such as emergency surgery, paediatrics and gynaecology/obstetrics; however dermatovenereology services had so far not been addressed. Using a comprehensive approach aiming at sustainable development, German, French and Cambodian institutions worked together to identify four core areas in need of improvement: postgraduate training, development of skin clinics, quality management, and integration of dermatology services into the health insurance scheme. Since 2005, this "Masterplan Dermatology" was financially supported by the Centre for International Migration and Development (CIM) based in Frankfurt am Main and Else Kröner Fresenius-Stiftung (EKFS) based in Bad Homburg auf der Höhe. Significant improvements have been made due to the efforts of the above institutions with the support of the donors; however challenges of this complex endeavor still remain.

  5. Predictive analysis of optical ablation in several dermatological tumoral tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Blanco-Gutiérrez, A.; Salas-García, I.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    Optical techniques for treatment and characterization of biological tissues are revolutionizing several branches of medical praxis, for example in ophthalmology or dermatology. The non-invasive, non-contact and non-ionizing character of optical radiation makes it specially suitable for these applications. Optical radiation can be employed in medical ablation applications, either for tissue resection or surgery. Optical ablation may provide a controlled and clean cut on a biological tissue. This is particularly relevant in tumoral tissue resection, where a small amount of cancerous cells could make the tumor appear again. A very important aspect of tissue optical ablation is then the estimation of the affected volume. In this work we propose a complete predictive model of tissue ablation that provides an estimation of the resected volume. The model is based on a Monte Carlo approach for the optical propagation of radiation inside the tissue, and a blow-off model for tissue ablation. This model is applied to several types of dermatological tumoral tissues, specifically squamous cells, basocellular and infiltrative carcinomas. The parameters of the optical source are varied and the estimated resected volume is calculated. The results for the different tumor types are presented and compared. This model can be used for surgical planning, in order to assure the complete resection of the tumoral tissue.

  6. Biopolymers as transdermal drug delivery systems in dermatology therapy.

    PubMed

    Basavaraj, K H; Johnsy, George; Navya, M A; Rashmi, R; Siddaramaiah

    2010-01-01

    The skin is considered a complex organ for drug delivery because of its structure. Drug delivery systems are designed for the controlled release of drugs through the skin into the systemic circulation, maintaining consistent efficacy and reducing the dose of the drugs and their related side effects. Transdermal drug delivery represents one of the most rapidly advancing areas of novel drug delivery. The excellent impervious nature of the skin is the greatest challenge that must be overcome for successful drug delivery. Today, polymers have been proven to be successful for long-term drug delivery applications as no single polymer can satisfy all of the requirements. Biopolymers in the field of dermal application are rare and the mechanisms that affect skin absorption are almost unknown. Biopolymers are widely used as drug delivery systems, but as such the use of biopolymers as drug delivery systems in dermatologic therapy is still in progress. Commonly used biopolymers include hydrocolloids, alginates, hydrogels, polyurethane, collagen, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), chitosan, proteins and peptides, pectin, siRNAs, and hyaluronic acid. These new and exciting methods for drug delivery are already increasing the number and quality of dermal and transdermal therapies. This article reviews current research on biopolymers and focuses on their potential as drug carriers, particularly in relation to the dermatologic aspects of their use.

  7. Early Detection of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    García-Campayo, J; Pérez-Yus, M C; García-Bustinduy, M; Daudén, E

    2016-05-01

    Many skin diseases are associated with mental disorders. When the psychological symptoms are mild, as is often the case in dermatology, it can be difficult to distinguish between normality and the manifestations of a mental disorder. To facilitate the distinction we review the concept of mental disorder in the present article. It is also important to have instruments that can facilitate early detection of psychological disease, i.e. when the symptoms are still mild. Short, simple, self-administered questionnaires have been developed to help dermatologists and other health professionals identify the presence of a mental disorder with a high degree of certainty. In this article, we focus on the questionnaires most often used to detect the 2 most common mental disorders: anxiety and depression. Finally, we describe the circumstances in which it is advisable to refer a dermatological patient to a psychiatrist, who can diagnose and treat the mental disorder in accordance with standard protocols. Copyright © 2015 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Long-term efficacy of biologics in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Castelo-Soccio, Leslie; Van Voorhees, Abby S.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic dermatologic diseases affect millions of people. The long-term nature of these diseases creates psychological and financial burden as well as substantially impacts patients' quality of life. Biologics, including adalimumab, etanercept, alefacept, efalizumab, and infliximab, are the newest therapeutic agents in the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and have been used in a variety of other dermatologic diseases. These agents act relatively quickly and effectively in 12-week clinical trials. Because these agents are used to treat patients for longer than 12 weeks, there is a need to review the safety and efficacy of these agents over longer periods of time. Many levels of evidence are available for biologics including high level of evidence from large, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies. This review focuses on the available data for efficacy and safety for greater than 24 weeks of therapy. The studies supporting the use of rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulin in autoimmune blistering diseases are also presented in this review. PMID:19222514

  9. Why don't we use vitamin E in dermatology?

    PubMed Central

    Pehr, K; Forsey, R R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the possible uses of topical and systemic tocopherols as therapy for skin conditions in light of the widespread use of vitamin E by patients. DATA SOURCES: Index Medicus was searched for articles published from 1922 (when vitamin E was discovered) to 1966 (the beginning of MEDLINE). MEDLINE was searched for articles in English and French on vitamin E or tocopherol in relation to dermatology. Additional original articles were identified from the reference lists of the review articles. STUDY SELECTION: Only well-designed controlled studies were accepted; anecdotes and open studies are cited for completeness and as direction for future research. DATA SYNTHESIS: There was some weak or conflicting evidence that vitamin E is of value in yellow nail syndrome, vibration disease, epidermolysis bullosa, cancer prevention, claudication, cutaneous ulcers, and collagen synthesis and wound healing. It was of no use in atopic dermatitis, dermatitis herpetiformis, psoriasis, subcorneal pustular dermatosis, porphyrias and skin damage induced by ultraviolet light. CONCLUSIONS: After 44 years of research there is still scant proof of vitamin E's effectiveness in treating certain dermatologic conditions. Further research in well-designed controlled trials is needed to clarify vitamin E's role. PMID:8221479

  10. Sutures, needles, and tissue adhesives: a review for dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yag-Howard, Cyndi

    2014-09-01

    Dermatologic surgery generally requires the removal of offending or excessive tissue followed by repair of the resultant defect. The functional and cosmetic outcome is increasingly important as patients' expectations grow and physicians become increasingly aware of surgical materials and techniques that enable them to repair defects in a functionally and cosmetically appealing manner. To perform an updated and thorough review of the literature regarding sutures, surgical tape, tissue adhesives and stitching techniques. A comprehensive literature review was conducted on-line via multiple search engines and sites using the keywords suture, suture techniques, suturing techniques, surgical techniques, surgical tapes, surgical adhesives, and tissue adhesives. There are numerous articles on sutures, surgical tape, and tissue adhesives, but there are no current articles that review them together in a comprehensive manner and combine the review with a discussion of stitching techniques. Suture choice and surgical and stitching techniques may be guided by the TAFT concept of wound closure that recognizes the main function of suture and closure devices: Tension relief; Apposition enhancement; and surface Finishing Touches. The dermatologist's goal is to create functionally and aesthetically pleasing scars for optimal patient satisfaction, which is of ultimate importance considering that the scars patients receive leave a lasting impression of their dermatology experience.

  11. Application of wound dressings in dermatology laser procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzel, Fred W.; Chen, Qun; Hoskins, Greg

    1995-05-01

    High powered lasers have been used in dermatological procedures such as tattoo removal. This use is associated with a potential, biological hazard of high speed tissue particles from the laser field. It has been proposed that by applying a clear dermatological would dressing directly over the laser treatment site, it may be possible to completely trap the potentially airborne tissue particles from the procedure. Some important questions must be addressed prior to the implementation of such a technique. While the use of a wound dressing may significantly reduce the airborne materials during the laser procedures, new problems may arise: 1 . The wound dressing or some of its components may absorb excessive amount of light energy. This would result in a very localized temperature rise which may be harmful to the patient; 2. The smooth surface of the wound dressing material could induce specular reflection of the incident laser beam, thus introducing a laser hazard to the staff and patient. To address these possible problems, we studied a series of ClearSite Wound Dressings which have been reportedly tested for such laser procedures. The objective of the studies were, to determine if the use of ClearSite in conjunction with laser procedures poses a possible hazard to either the patient or to the Operating Room personnel, and to determine the effect of the ClearSite dressing on the optical characteristics of the light beam. The latter includes light absorption and transmittance for various wavelengths.

  12. Hairdressers presenting to an occupational dermatology clinic in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Georgina; Roberts, Hugh; Palmer, Amanda; Matheson, Melanie; Nixon, Rosemary

    2013-05-01

    Hairdressers constitute one of the largest occupational groups attending our occupational dermatology clinic in Melbourne, Australia. To perform a retrospective review of the clinical assessments of hairdressers and trainee hairdressers attending our clinic, including patch testing results. We used our clinic database to identify trainee and qualified hairdressers who had attended our occupational dermatology clinic between January 1993 and December 2010. One hundred and sixty-four hairdressers and hairdressing apprentices were identified. One hundred and fifty-seven had a diagnosis of occupational contact dermatitis (OCD), with allergic contact dermatitis being the primary diagnosis in 71% and irritant contact dermatitis in 20%. Involvement of more than one body part was suggestive of allergic contact dermatitis (p = 0.05). Sixty-five per cent of participants were found to have more than one factor contributing to their OCD. Allergic contact dermatitis was more common in apprentices than in qualified hairdressers. Ammonium persulfate, p-phenylenediamine, toluene-2,5-diamine and glyceryl monothioglycolate were the most common occupational allergens. Nickel allergy was seen in 31% of hairdressers, but considered to be occupationally relevant in only 3%. Multiple sensitizations and multiple factors contributing to OCD in hairdressers are common. More needs to be done to prevent the development of OCD in hairdressers in our geographical region. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Advances in optical coherence tomography imaging for dermatology.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Mark C; Strasswimmer, John; Park, B Hyle; Cense, Barry; de Boer, Johannes F

    2004-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique, which has previously demonstrated potential for use in dermatology. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate how improvements in image quality, speed, and functionality enable qualitative and quantitative information to be obtained from in vivo human skin. We developed a portable fiber-optic based OCT imaging device that requires only 1 second to simultaneously provide high-resolution images of skin structure, collagen birefringence, and blood flow. Images of normal human skin were acquired in vivo, and features compared with clinical and histologic observations. The layered structure and appendages of skin were apparent in conventional OCT images, and correlated well with corresponding histology. Polarization-sensitive OCT images simultaneously revealed birefringent regions within the dermis corresponding to the location of collagen fibers, as confirmed with polarized light microscopy. Properties of collagen-rich tissues including tendon and scar tissues were quantified. Location of blood flow was also displayed alongside structural and polarization-sensitive images. Significant improvements in OCT technology have been made since its early application in dermatology. In particular, combining the previously described structural and Doppler imaging functions with polarization-sensitive imaging increases the utility of the technique for rapid, non-invasive investigations in the skin.

  14. Pharmacogenetics in dermatology: a patient-centered update.

    PubMed

    Comfere, Nneka I; Ikediobi, Ogechi N; Peters, Margot S; el-Azhary, Rokea A; Gibson, Lawrence E

    2013-08-01

    The term pharmacogenetics is used to describe an evolving field that aims to understand the relationship between individual variations in genetic sequence and differences in the therapeutic and toxic response to medications. The promise of pharmacogenetics is empowerment of clinicians with information that will enable them to personalize drug therapy - to prescribe the right medication at the right dose for each patient, while minimizing adverse effects. Despite dramatic advances, wide application of pharmacogenetics to clinical practice has been slow for a number of reasons, including lack of evidence-based therapeutic guidelines as well as ethical concerns and cost. To illustrate applications to dermatology practice, we present three clinical scenarios that serve as a springboard for discussion of the principles of pharmacogenetics and how they can be used to guide treatment with azathioprine, 5-fluorouracil, and trastuzumab. The therapeutic and toxic effects of a given medication ultimately depend on its combined pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacogenetic properties in a given individual. Pharmacodynamic properties of individual medications must be correlated with single nucleotide polymorphisms. Test recommendations and standardization of therapy for specific disorders can then be established. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  15. The beginnings of dermatopathology and dermatologic microbiology in Spain.

    PubMed

    del Río, E

    2014-03-01

    Crisóstomo Martínez from Valencia was a pioneering microscopist in 17th-century Europe. The first microscopic representations of skin in Spain appeared in an 18th-century work by Martín Martínez. Microbiology and histopathology progressed considerably in the late 19th century thanks to anatomists like Maestre de San Juan and surgeons like Federico Rubio Galí. The first Spanish pathologist to specialize in dermatology was Antonio Mendoza, a colleague of José Eugenio de Olavide at the Hospital San Juan de Dios in Madrid. Claudio Sala and Juan de Azúa also made significant contributions, including the description of pseudoepithelioma. Several disciples of Santiago Ramón y Cajal and Jorge FranciscoTello, such as Lorenzo Ruiz de Arcaute and Guillermo de la Rosa King, consolidated the dermatology laboratory, but the Civil War sent many into exile or deprived them of their professional status. Juan Rubió in Barcelona and Julio Rodríguez Puchol in Madrid were the immediate predecessors of today's dermatopathologists.

  16. Diagnostic microbiology in veterinary dermatology: present and future.

    PubMed

    Guardabassi, Luca; Damborg, Peter; Stamm, Ivonne; Kopp, Peter A; Broens, Els M; Toutain, Pierre-Louis

    2017-02-01

    The microbiology laboratory can be perceived as a service provider rather than an integral part of the healthcare team. The aim of this review is to discuss the current challenges of providing a state-of-the-art diagnostic veterinary microbiology service including the identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of key pathogens in veterinary dermatology. The Study Group for Veterinary Microbiology (ESGVM) of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) identified scientific, technological, educational and regulatory issues impacting the predictive value of AST and the quality of the service offered by microbiology laboratories. The advent of mass spectrometry has significantly reduced the time required for ID of key pathogens such as Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. However, the turnaround time for validated AST methods has remained unchanged for many years. Beyond scientific and technological constraints, AST methods are not harmonized and clinical breakpoints for some antimicrobial drugs are either missing or inadequate. Small laboratories, including in-clinic laboratories, are usually not adequately equipped to run up-to-date clinical microbiologic diagnostic tests. ESGVM recommends the use of laboratories employing mass spectrometry for ID and broth micro-dilution for AST, and offering assistance by expert microbiologists on pre- and post-analytical issues. Setting general standards for veterinary clinical microbiology, promoting antimicrobial stewardship, and the development of new, validated and rapid diagnostic methods, especially for AST, are among the missions of ESGVM. © 2017 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the ESVD and ACVD.

  17. Manual search approaches used by systematic reviewers in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Vassar, Matt; Atakpo, Paul; Kash, Melissa J

    2016-10-01

    Manual searches are supplemental approaches to database searches to identify additional primary studies for systematic reviews. The authors argue that these manual approaches, in particular hand-searching and perusing reference lists, are often considered the same yet lead to different outcomes. We conducted a PubMed search for systematic reviews in the top 10 dermatology journals (January 2006-January 2016). After screening, the final sample comprised 292 reviews. Statements related to manual searches were extracted from each review and categorized by the primary and secondary authors. Each statement was categorized as either "Search of Reference List," "Hand Search," "Both," or "Unclear." Of the 292 systematic reviews included in our sample, 143 reviews (48.97%) did not report a hand-search or scan of reference lists. One-hundred thirty-six reviews (46.58%) reported searches of reference lists, while 4 reviews (1.37%) reported systematic hand-searches. Three reviews (1.03%) reported use of both hand-searches and scanning reference lists. Six reviews (2.05%) were classified as unclear due to vague wording. Authors of systematic reviews published in dermatology journals in our study sample scanned reference lists more frequently than they conducted hand-searches, possibly contributing to biased search outcomes. We encourage systematic reviewers to routinely practice hand-searching in order to minimize bias.

  18. Dermatology in the military field: What physicians should know?

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Wei-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In the civilian dermatological setting, the top 5 skin diseases usually seen are eczema/dermatitis, acne, benign skin tumors, viral infections and pigmentary disorders. In comparison, the top 5 skin conditions encountered in the military sector are usually fungal infections, eczema/dermatitis, insect bite reactions, bacterial infections and acne. This is not surprising as military personnel, due to the special environment and vocations they are in, are prone to getting eczema as heat, sweating and wearing of the military uniform aggravate the condition. Fungal infections are common in those who wear the army boots. Insect bite reactions are not an uncommon sight among those who have to go to the jungle regularly for outfield training. Grass allergy or intolerance, contact dermatitis or acneiform eruption due to the application of military camouflage cream on the face, contact dermatitis to insect repellents, and military uniform allergy and intolerance are amongst the commonest dermatological problems encountered in the military field, and physicians should recognize them, investigate and manage these problems accordingly. Lastly, a diagnosis not to be missed in the military field is cutaneous melioidosis, especially when a military personnel presents with a non-healing ulcer. PMID:24340268

  19. Malassezia species in healthy skin and in dermatological conditions.

    PubMed

    Prohic, Asja; Jovovic Sadikovic, Tamara; Krupalija-Fazlic, Mersiha; Kuskunovic-Vlahovljak, Suada

    2016-05-01

    The genus Malassezia comprises lipophilic species, the natural habitat of which is the skin of humans and other warm-blooded animals. However, these species have been associated with a diversity of dermatological disorders and even systemic infections. Pityriasis versicolor is the only cutaneous disease etiologically connected to Malassezia yeasts. In the other dermatoses, such as Malassezia folliculitis, seborrheic dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis, these yeasts have been suggested to play pathogenic roles either as direct agents of infection or as trigger factors because there is no evidence that the organisms invade the skin. Malassezia yeasts have been classified into at least 14 species, of which eight have been isolated from human skin, including Malassezia furfur, Malassezia pachydermatis, Malassezia sympodialis, Malassezia slooffiae, Malassezia globosa, Malassezia obtusa, Malassezia restricta, Malassezia dermatis, Malassezia japonica, and Malassezia yamatoensis. Distributions of Malassezia species in the healthy body and in skin diseases have been investigated using culture-based and molecular techniques, and variable results have been reported from different geographical regions. This article reviews and discusses the latest available data on the pathogenicity of Malassezia spp., their distributions in dermatological conditions and in healthy skin, discrepancies in the two methods of identification, and the susceptibility of Malassezia spp. to antifungals.

  20. Manual search approaches used by systematic reviewers in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Vassar, Matt; Atakpo, Paul; Kash, Melissa J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Manual searches are supplemental approaches to database searches to identify additional primary studies for systematic reviews. The authors argue that these manual approaches, in particular hand-searching and perusing reference lists, are often considered the same yet lead to different outcomes. Methods We conducted a PubMed search for systematic reviews in the top 10 dermatology journals (January 2006–January 2016). After screening, the final sample comprised 292 reviews. Statements related to manual searches were extracted from each review and categorized by the primary and secondary authors. Each statement was categorized as either “Search of Reference List,” “Hand Search,” “Both,” or “Unclear.” Results Of the 292 systematic reviews included in our sample, 143 reviews (48.97%) did not report a hand-search or scan of reference lists. One-hundred thirty-six reviews (46.58%) reported searches of reference lists, while 4 reviews (1.37%) reported systematic hand-searches. Three reviews (1.03%) reported use of both hand-searches and scanning reference lists. Six reviews (2.05%) were classified as unclear due to vague wording. Conclusions Authors of systematic reviews published in dermatology journals in our study sample scanned reference lists more frequently than they conducted hand-searches, possibly contributing to biased search outcomes. We encourage systematic reviewers to routinely practice hand-searching in order to minimize bias. PMID:27822152

  1. The elements of dermatology: the legacy of Covisa and Bejarano.

    PubMed

    Leis-Dosil, V M; Garrido-Gutiérrez, C; Díaz-Díaz, R M

    2014-04-01

    In 1936, Covisa and Bejarano published a treatise entitled Elementos de Dermatología (The Elements of Dermatology). In this surprisingly modern book they abandoned the nosological debates characteristic of the 19th century and instead classified diseases according to their etiology and pathogenesis based on the scientific and technical advances of the time. Moreover, unlike other books available at the time, which were essentially adaptations of foreign texts, this was the first medical work to reflect the reality of Spanish medicine. However, the future of both the book and its authors was to be determined by the start of the Spanish Civil War in the same year. Covisa and Bejarano, who were both extremely active in the public health system and medical education during the Second Republic, were obliged to seek exile in America. Due to the difficulties of the time, very few copies of the book reached the public and no new editions were ever printed. We will never know what would have happened if the war had not started, but we believe that this important work should be remembered. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  2. Dermatology in the military field: What physicians should know?

    PubMed

    Chong, Wei-Sheng

    2013-10-16

    In the civilian dermatological setting, the top 5 skin diseases usually seen are eczema/dermatitis, acne, benign skin tumors, viral infections and pigmentary disorders. In comparison, the top 5 skin conditions encountered in the military sector are usually fungal infections, eczema/dermatitis, insect bite reactions, bacterial infections and acne. This is not surprising as military personnel, due to the special environment and vocations they are in, are prone to getting eczema as heat, sweating and wearing of the military uniform aggravate the condition. Fungal infections are common in those who wear the army boots. Insect bite reactions are not an uncommon sight among those who have to go to the jungle regularly for outfield training. Grass allergy or intolerance, contact dermatitis or acneiform eruption due to the application of military camouflage cream on the face, contact dermatitis to insect repellents, and military uniform allergy and intolerance are amongst the commonest dermatological problems encountered in the military field, and physicians should recognize them, investigate and manage these problems accordingly. Lastly, a diagnosis not to be missed in the military field is cutaneous melioidosis, especially when a military personnel presents with a non-healing ulcer.

  3. The science of dermocosmetics and its role in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Dreno, B; Araviiskaia, E; Berardesca, E; Bieber, T; Hawk, J; Sanchez-Viera, M; Wolkenstein, P

    2014-11-01

    Our increased knowledge of normal skin physiology has ushered in a subtle revolution in cosmetic science. Originally designed as preparations to enhance personal appearance by direct application on to the skin, cosmetics have now taken on a new role in dermatology, through the support of the management of many skin disorders. This evolving role of cosmetics in skin care is primarily due to scientific and technological advancements that have changed our understanding of normal skin physiology and how cosmetics modify its appearance both physically and biologically. The vast array of techniques currently available to investigate skin responsivity to multiple stimuli has brought about a new era in cosmetic and dermocosmetic development based on a robust understanding of skin physiology and its varied responses to commonly encountered environmental insults. Most cosmetic research is undertaken on reconstructed skin models crucial in dermatological research, given the strict ban imposed by the European Union on animal testing. In addition, the design and conduct of trials evaluating cosmetics now follow rules comparable to those used in the development and evaluation of pharmaceutical products. Cosmetic research should now aim to ensure all trials adhere to strictly reproducible and scientifically sound methodologies. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the multidisciplinary scientific approach used in formulating dermocosmetics, and to examine the major advances in dermocosmetic development and assessment, the safety and regulatory guidelines governing their production and the exciting future outlook for these dermocosmetic processes following good practice rules.

  4. “Pseudo” Nomenclature in Dermatology: What's in a Name?

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sangita; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    In the bewildering array of scientific nomenclature in the medical field, it is important to use correct terminology, know their aberrations and the reason behind a specific terminology. This paper is an attempt towards compiling all the pseudo-nomenclatures coined in dermatology, in order to make it easier to retain and recollect these pseudo names, signs, morphology, diseases, and conditions. It is also imperative to know the true entities that these pseudo names masquerade as, so as to understand the explanation for assigning the term ‘pseudo’ to these conditions. A total of 52 pseudo-terms have been compiled here in reference to dermatology. Most of these pseudo-nomenclatures were coined due to some clinical or histopathological resemblance to the true conditions, while some were premature conclusions drawn from a flawed understanding of the basic nature of the condition. Clear understanding of each of these terms and the explanation behind them being pseudo will enable a dermatologist to avoid misdiagnosis and needless confusion. PMID:24082182

  5. 75 FR 26264 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee...

  6. 76 FR 30176 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee...

  7. Pulsed dermatologic 20W diode-laser emitting at 975-nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piechowski, L.; Cenian, W.; Sawczak, M.; Cenian, A.

    2013-01-01

    The pulsed dermatologic laser for photothermolysis is constructed basing on technology of 975 nm diode lasers developed for fiber-laser excitation. In near future these lasers can replace ND:YAG ones for dermatologic applications, especially therapy of deep skin diseases.

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Dermatology in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Erin T.; Davis, Scott A.; Taylor, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has an increasing presence in dermatology. Complementary therapies have been studied in many skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Objectives: This study sought to assess oral CAM use in dermatology relative to medicine as a whole in the United States, using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Design: Variables studied include patient demographic characteristics, diagnoses, and CAM documented at the visits. A brief literature review of the top 5 CAM treatments unique to dermatology visits was performed. Results: Most CAM users in both dermatology and medicine as a whole were female and white and were insured with private insurance or Medicare. Fish oil, glucosamine, glucosamine chondroitin, and omega-3 were the most common complementary supplements used in both samples. Conclusions: CAM use in dermatology appears to be part of a larger trend in medicine. Knowledge of common complementary therapies can help dermatologists navigate this expanding field. PMID:24517329

  9. Pattern of Inpatient Dermatology Consultations in a Tertiary Care Centre from Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Anuradha; Kanish, Bimal; Chaudhary, Paulina Rose; Samuel, Clarence James

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The importance of dermatology inpatient consultation is of significant importance yet is not well documented. Aim To retrospectively analyse the spectrum of dermatology inpatient consultations from the various departments and to document the most commonly occurring dermatological disorders from each speciality. Materials and Methods This study was done in an 800 bedded premier teaching hospital in Ludhiana, Punjab, North Western India. It was an audit of inpatient referrals to the dermatology department from January 2014 to August 2014. We analysed the spectrum of dermatological disorders in relation to the various specialities, demographic profile and age groups. Statistical Analysis The data was entered in Microsoft Excel and analysed using SPSS Version 21. Descriptive statistics, frequency and proportions were used. Results Of the 559 in-patients, 60% were males. The majority of the patients belonged to age group 51-60 years (25.9%). The departments most commonly requesting for dermatology consultations were Medicine (27.7%), Neurology (9.7%), Cardiology (8.8%), Urology (7%), Haematology (6.4%), Nephrology (6.1%), Intensive Care Unit (ICU) (5.4%), General Surgery (5.2%), Orthopaedics (5%), Gynaecology and Neurosurgery (2.9%) and Paediatrics (2.7%). The commonest dermatological diagnoses for which consultations were sought were eczematous dermatitis (12.9%), superficial dermatophytosis (12.3%), drug reactions (8.9%) and viral skin infections (8.5%). Conclusion Dermatology consultations offer a significant role in diagnosis and management of the in-patients from various clinical speciality departments. There is a significant need of inter-departmental dermatology consultations which help to decrease morbidity and improve the quality of the patient’s hospital stay. Knowledge about the pattern of dermatoses in the inpatients can help the primary clinician to recognize when to seek dermatology consultation on a priority basis. PMID:28208985

  10. [Factitious disorders in dermatology: Value of the dissociative state concept].

    PubMed

    Fekih-Romdhane, F; Homri, W; Labbane, R

    2016-03-01

    Factitious disorders in dermatology consist of intentionally self-inflicted skin lesions that vary in morphology and distribution and occur on surfaces readily accessible to the patient's hands. They tend to be a chronic condition that waxes and wanes according to the circumstances of the patient's life. Patient management poses a particular challenge to the clinician and the prognosis is considered poor. The aetiopathogenesis of factitious disorders in dermatology is not completely understood. We present a case in which we suggested the occurrence of factitious behaviour during a dissociative state, and we briefly describe our diagnostic and therapeutic approach. A 48-year-old unemployed woman was referred to our department of psychiatry by her dermatologist for suspected factitious disorder. The patient was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 1 and had been hospitalized repeatedly for confirmed diabetic ketoacidosis. The onset of the disease was related to marital discord with her spouse. Numerous skin lesions had appeared on her face, arms, legs, neck and back. These lesions resulted in multiple hospital admissions and in amputation of her left leg. The condition had worsened considerably after her separation from her husband. During the initial conversation, the patient was unable to provide a clear history of the disease. She denied any knowledge of the circumstances in which these skin lesions appeared, and she did not admit self-infliction. Her mood was depressed and her speech was slow. We suspected that our patient was herself causing her skin lesions while in a dissociative state. Several arguments militate in favour of our hypothesis, particularly her history of childhood maltreatment and the association of traumatic life events with simultaneous deterioration of the skin. The explanation of the dissociative mechanism helped us to strengthen the therapeutic relationship. Within a few days, we noted a slow regression of the lesions, but the patient was

  11. A Proposal for the Consolidation of Dermatology Services of Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the National Naval Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    Phototherapy , Laser Surgery, Pediatric Dermatology, HIV Dermatology, Patch Testing, MOHS Micrographic Surgery, and Dermatologic Surgery. The entire...Lesion 460 87220 KOH Slide for Fungus 443 96910 Phototherapy 298 11900 Intralesional Injection 264 17304 Moh’s Surgery, 1st stage 211 17001 Destruction of

  12. Towards the use of OCT angiography in clinical dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Utku; Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a popular imaging technique used in ophthalmology, and on the way to become clinically viable alternative in dermatology due to its capability of acquiring histopathology level images of in vivo tissue, noninvasively. In this study, we demonstrate the capabilities of OCT-based angiography (OMAG) in detecting high-resolution, volumetric structural and microvascular features of in vivo human skin with various conditions using a swept source OCT system that operates on a central wavelength of 1310 nm with an A-line rate of 100 kHz. OMAG images provide detailed in vivo visualization of microvasculature of abnormal human skin conditions from face, chest and belly. Moreover, the progress of wound healing on human skin from arm is monitored during longitudinal wound healing process. The presented results promise the clinical use of OCT angiography in treatment of prevalent cutaneous diseases within human skin, in vivo.

  13. Dermatological diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gagnon1, Amy L; Desai, Tejas

    2013-04-01

    There are a variety of dermatological diseases that are more commonly seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplants than the general population. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science has been searched. Some cutaneous diseases are clearly unique to this population. Of them, Lindsay's Nails, xerosis cutis, dryness of the skin, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and acquired perforating dermatosis have been described in chronic kidney disease patients. The most common malignancy found in all transplant recipients is non-melanoma skin cancer. It is important for patients and physicians to recognize the manifestations of skin disease in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease to mitigate the morbidity associated with these conditions.

  14. Dermatological diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon1, Amy L.; Desai, Tejas

    2013-01-01

    Context: There are a variety of dermatological diseases that are more commonly seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplants than the general population. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science has been searched. Results: Some cutaneous diseases are clearly unique to this population. Of them, Lindsay’s Nails, xerosis cutis, dryness of the skin, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and acquired perforating dermatosis have been described in chronic kidney disease patients. The most common malignancy found in all transplant recipients is non-melanoma skin cancer. Conclusions: It is important for patients and physicians to recognize the manifestations of skin disease in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease to mitigate the morbidity associated with these conditions. PMID:24475435

  15. [Prominent personalities from the tropical dermatology field in Peru].

    PubMed

    Burstein Alva, Zuño

    2014-01-01

    This article pays tribute to three Peruvian medical personalities: José Neyra Ramirez (1929-2012), Abelardo Tejada (1931-2013) and Oscar Romero Rivas (1929-2011), highlighting their valuable contributions to the field of Tropical Dermatology and Health Medicine that benefited public health and Peruvian medical education. The article mentions the formation of a group of young researchers called “The Anacoretas”, including professors Hugo Pesce, Enrique Encinas, Juan Francisco Valegas in Lima; and Enerst Nausk and Victor Manchego in Germany, who, with the support of the Peruvian and German governments promoted and created the first university research center of Tropical Medicine on the Pacific Coast of Latin America called Daniel A. Carrion Tropical Medicine Institute at Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos in Lima (TMI/UNMSM).

  16. The practical use of cytology for diagnosis in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, E; Brunetti, G; Del Vecchio, M; Ruocco, V

    2011-02-01

    Exfoliative cytology for diagnostic purposes is rarely used in Dermatology despite the rapid and reliable results which this procedure can offer in many clinical conditions. This simple procedure may prove advantageous in a wide range of skin diseases, including genodermatoses (Hailey-Hailey disease), infections (mainly herpetic infections, molluscum contagiosum, leishmaniasis), immune disorders (early oral pemphigus) and tumours (basal and squamous cell carcinomas, Paget disease, erythroplasia of Queyrat, and others). The specific circumstances where cytological examination provides a very helpful and practical aid to confirmation or exclusion of a clinically suspected diagnosis are briefly reviewed. Cytological patterns, along with some technical hints on how to take and stain Tzanck smears correctly, are described in connection with the diseases considered.

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Reichrath, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Since their discovery it has become clear that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors involved in the genetic regulation of the lipid metabolism and energy homoeostasis. Subsequently, accumulating evidence suggests a role of PPARs in genomic pathways including the regulation of cell growth, apoptosis and differentiation. These findings indicate that PPARs and PPAR agonists play an important role in inflammatory responses and tumor promotion. Because of their diverse biologic activities on keratinocytes and other skin cells, PPARs represent a major research target for the understanding and treatment of many skin pathologies, such as hyperproliferative and inflammatory diseases. Overmore recent clinical trials identified PPARs as promising drug targets for the prevention and treatment of various diseases in the field of dermatology. The present review summarizes the current knowledge of PPAR functions in various skin disorders particularly those involving inflammation and epidermal hyperproliferation (i.e., psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne, scleroderma, skin malignancies). PMID:22110772

  18. The dermatology of Kauai, Hawaii, 1981-1982.

    PubMed

    Elpern, D J

    1985-12-01

    The distribution of skin disease within a population can be used as the basis for research as well as planning for the delivery of health services. In this prospective study, the cutaneous diagnoses and demographic data on all patients seen in the only dermatology clinic on Kauai, Hawaii, were recorded from March 1981 to February 1982. Kauai is relatively unique in that the population is comprised of four racial groups with roughly equal representation; these groups live under similar conditions. A total of 3,277 patients were seen and 4,106 diagnoses were made. Three hundred twenty-four separate diagnoses were rendered: acne vulgaris, contact dermatitis, verrucae, and dermatophytosis were the most common. Various diseases were not equally divided among the racial groups. These data are compared to similar previous studies.

  19. [Strategy for educating senior dermatological residents in mycology].

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Takashi; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Sei, Yoshihiro; Hiruma, Masataro; Watanabe, Shinichi; Makimura, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    To improve the ability of dermatologists to diagnose cutaneous mycoses, we have proposed a list of the minimum mycological knowledge and skills required by senior residents of dermatology. The list includes ability to select the most appropriate sampling method, knowledge of the basic method of potassium hydroxide (KOH) examination and skill in performing fungal cultures and identifying the most prevalent fungal species isolated from skin lesions. It is not possible for the Japanese Society of Medical Mycology to train every senior resident directly, and it is difficult for them to acquire sufficient expertise independently. Consequently, training and advice given by instructors in residents' home institutes is essential. A project of an advanced course for instructors, who are in charge of educating senior residents in their own institute, may be possible. Therefore, we have proposed here a list for instructors of the knowledge and skills required to educate senior residents. Employing this list should realize improved skill in dermatologists.

  20. Tunable solid state laser system for dermatology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azar, Zion; Bank, Alexander; Donskoy, Dmitri M.; Nechitailo, Vladimir S.

    1994-12-01

    The Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is the most recent in a series of pulsed laser systems for plastic surgery. The 532 nm wavelength has been shown to be absorbed by a variety of chromophores. These include tattoo pigments, oxygenated hemoglobin and melanin-containing epidermal cells. A simple multi-line solid state laser module pumped by double-frequency Q- switched YAG laser is presented. This solid state multi-line module enables tuning of the wavelength in the yellow spectral range to 560 nm or to 580 nm for dermatology applications. Conversion efficiency in excess of 70% was achieved at 10 Hz pulse repetition frequency and output energy per pulse of approximately 200 mJ.

  1. Newer Hemostatic Agents Used in the Practice of Dermatologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Jerry D.

    2013-01-01

    Minor postoperative bleeding is the most common complication of cutaneous surgery. Because of the commonality of this complication, hemostasis is an important concept to address when considering dermatologic procedures. Patients that have a bleeding diathesis, an inherited/acquired coagulopathy, or who are on anticoagulant/antiplatelet medications pose a greater risk for bleeding complications during the postoperative period. Knowledge of these conditions preoperatively is of the utmost importance, allowing for proper preparation and prevention. Also, it is important to be aware of the various hemostatic modalities available, including electrocoagulation, which is among the most effective and widely used techniques. Prompt recognition of hematoma formation and knowledge of postoperative wound care can prevent further complications such as wound dehiscence, infection, or skin-graft necrosis, minimizing poor outcomes. PMID:23997764

  2. Selected applications of technology in the pediatric dermatology office.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Erin E; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2008-03-01

    The pediatric dermatologist is equipped with several diagnostic and therapeutic tools that can be used in the office. The Wood's lamp, introduced nearly a century ago, continues to be a safe, noninvasive diagnostic tool used today for diagnosing cutaneous infections, pigmentary disorders, and porphyrias. The pulsed dye laser is the treatment of choice for vascular lesions and has an expanding list of other applications, such as warts, which are extremely common in the pediatric population. Dermoscopy has emerged as an effective adjunctive tool in the in vivo examination of pigmented skin lesions and early diagnosis of cutaneous malignant melanoma. Other uses are also being explored including diagnosis of scabies. Future directions of technology in the pediatric dermatology office include implementation of electronic medical record systems and treatment of conditions such as molluscum, warts, and acne vulgaris with photodynamic therapy.

  3. Photodynamic therapy in dermatology: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2013-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive therapeutic method first introduced in the field of dermatology. It is mainly used for the treatment of precancerous and superficial malignant skin tumors. Today PDT finds new applications not only for nononcologic dermatoses but also in the field of other medical specialties such as otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology, neurology, gastroenterology, and urology. We are witnessing a broadening of the spectrum of skin diseases that are treated by PDT. Since its introduction, PDT protocol has evolved significantly in terms of increasing method efficacy and patient safety. In this era of evidence-based medicine, it is expected that much effort will be put into creating a worldwide accepted consensus on PDT. A review on the current knowledge of PDT is given, and the historical basis of the method's evolution since its introduction in the 1900s is presented. At the end, future challenges of PDT are focused on discussing gaps that exist for research in the field.

  4. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Joint Management in Gastroenterology and Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, M A; Garcia-Planella, E; Laiz, A; Puig, L

    2017-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex entity that includes Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. It is characterized by a chronic proinflammatory state of varying intensity that often leads to considerable morbidity. In the last decade, several therapeutic targets have been identified that are susceptible to the use of biological agents, including anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibodies, which are associated with paradoxical psoriasiform reactions in 5% of patients. Decision-making in the management of these cases requires close collaboration between the dermatologist and gastroenterologist. Inflammatory bowel disease is also associated with various other dermatologic and rheumatologic manifestations, and presents a genetic and pathogenic association with psoriasis that justifies both the interdisciplinary approach to these patients and the present review.

  5. The use of ciclosporin A in veterinary dermatology.

    PubMed

    Kovalik, Marcel; Thoday, Keith L; van den Broek, Adri H M

    2012-08-01

    Ciclosporin A (CsA) has potent immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory activity that has been exploited in human medicine to prevent the rejection of transplanted organs and to manage atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Over the past decade, CsA has been employed more frequently in veterinary dermatology and its value in the management of several canine and feline dermatoses is now well established. CsA inhibits calcineurin phosphatase, suppressing T cell activation and the synthesis of T cell cytokines consequently impairing the activity of B cells, antigen-presenting cells, mast cells, basophils and eosinophils. The pharmacokinetics of CsA are similar in humans, dogs and cats and the drug has a wide safety margin in dogs, cats and rabbits. Adverse effects, principally transient vomiting and soft faeces/diarrhoea, may be seen shortly after instituting treatment but often resolve despite continuing treatment. Gingival hyperplasia and cutaneous effects such as hirsutism may occur after prolonged treatment.

  6. Maintenance of Certification in dermatology: requirements for diplomates.

    PubMed

    Stratman, Erik; Kirsner, Robert S; Horn, Thomas D

    2013-07-01

    Since 2006, after completing a cognitive certifying or recertifying examination, dermatologists are automatically enrolled into Maintenance of Certification (MOC) and can access a personalized electronic table (at www.abderm.org) that presents the requirements over the 10-year cycle. On this web site, diplomates can also pay the annual fee and attest to completion of the various components. Clicking on hyperlinks in the table launches explanations of the requirements. A hyperlink below the table takes the reader to the various resources approved for completion of the MOC requirements. There is a login tab in the upper left corner with a login help feature below. Clicking on the MOC tab will bring up the table. The timeline is specific to the individual. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Infrared Imaging Tools for Diagnostic Applications in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gurjarpadhye, Abhijit Achyut; Parekh, Mansi Bharat; Dubnika, Arita; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Inayathullah, Mohammed

    Infrared (IR) imaging is a collection of non-invasive imaging techniques that utilize the IR domain of the electromagnetic spectrum for tissue assessment. A subset of these techniques construct images using back-reflected light, while other techniques rely on detection of IR radiation emitted by the tissue as a result of its temperature. Modern IR detectors sense thermal emissions and produce a heat map of surface temperature distribution in tissues. Thus, the IR spectrum offers a variety of imaging applications particularly useful in clinical diagnostic area, ranging from high-resolution, depth-resolved visualization of tissue to temperature variation assessment. These techniques have been helpful in the diagnosis of many medical conditions including skin/breast cancer, arthritis, allergy, burns, and others. In this review, we discuss current roles of IR-imaging techniques for diagnostic applications in dermatology with an emphasis on skin cancer, allergies, blisters, burns and wounds.

  8. Improved clinical outcomes with moisturization in dermatologic disease.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Fred E

    2005-12-01

    Controlled clinical studies have provided strong evidence that moisturizers not only enhance the efficacy of topical corticosteroids in patients with atopic dermatitis but also may prevent disease reexacerbation. Furthermore, moisturizers have been shown to have a steroid-sparing effect both in patients with atopic dermatitis and in those with psoriasis. In particular, certain lipid-dominant moisturizers have been shown to significantly (P<.05) improve the condition of the skin based on objectively assessed changes in clinical parameters when used by patients with various dermatoses. Although further research is warranted, moisturizers represent a valuable first-line treatment option for many dermatologic diseases and confer a number of important therapeutic benefits beyond mere cosmetic effects.

  9. The use of therapeutic moisturizers in various dermatologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Bikowski, J

    2001-12-01

    Moisturizers can serve as important adjunctive therapeutic modalities for patients with various dermatologic disorders, including acne vulgaris, rosacea, retinoid-induced irritant dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and the skin dryness that appears to occur with intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Therapeutic moisturizers, defined as those proven in clinical trials to be both compatible with topical therapies and biocompatible with the skin, not only improve the signs and symptoms of dry skin but also, as research has demonstrated, help maintain hydration and overall integrity of the stratum corneum. The type of humectants and emollients contained in a therapeutic moisturizer can affect the overall tolerability of the formulation. Dermatologists should recommend therapeutic moisturizers that are noncomedogenic, devoid of irritant ingredients, and compatible with many therapeutic regimens.

  10. Dermatological and immunological conditions due to nerve lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Domenico; Lupoli, Amalia; Caccavale, Stefano; Piccolo, Vincenzo; Ruocco, Eleonora

    2013-01-01

    Summary Some syndromes are of interest to both neurologists and dermatologists, because cutaneous involvement may harbinger symptoms of a neurological disease. The aim of this review is to clarify this aspect. The skin, because of its relationships with the peripheral sensory nervous system, autonomic nervous system and central nervous system, constitutes a neuroimmunoendocrine organ. The skin contains numerous neuropeptides released from sensory nerves. Neuropeptides play a precise role in cutaneous physiology and pathophysiology, and in certain skin diseases. A complex dysregulation of neuropeptides is a feature of some diseases of both dermatological and neurological interest (e.g. cutaneous and nerve lesions following herpes zoster infection, cutaneous manifestations of carpal tunnel syndrome, trigeminal trophic syndrome). Dermatologists need to know when a patient should be referred to a neurologist and should consider this option in those presenting with syndromes of unclear etiology. PMID:24125557

  11. [Dermatological aspects in the risk of biological warfare].

    PubMed

    Carsuzaa, F; Boyé, T; Debord, T; Guennoc, B; Fournier, B; Cavallo, J-D

    2005-01-29

    The possible cutaneous manifestations of infectious biological warfare are multiple and vary depending on the agent used. An ulcerous and/or necrotic syndrome and/or regional lymphadenitis syndrome are possible with anthrax, tularaemia, bubonic plague and emission of trichotecene mycotoxins. A vesiculo-pustular syndrome with fever is provoked by smallpox, melioidosis and glanders. A purpural and/or haemorrhagic syndrome is seen during haemorrhagic fever viruses and septicaemic plague. These cutaneous manifestations are excellent markers that orient and alert when they occur in a context of a situation at risk, when several cases are observed in a usually non-exposed population and with extra-dermatological syndromes. They permit the early initiation of treatment.

  12. Neutrophil extracellular traps in dermatology: Caught in the NET.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jochen H O; Enk, Alexander H

    2016-10-01

    Neutrophil, or polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) constitute the most abundant type of leucocytes in peripheral human blood. One of the major advances in the last decade was the discovery of neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation: a process by which neutrophils externalize web-like chromatin strands decorated with antimicrobial peptides. These structures were soon implicated in immune defense and auto-immunity alike and now link neutrophils to the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases of dermatological relevance. Currently, NET formation is mainly subdivided into suicidal and vital NETosis. Controversy exists regarding the capacity of NETs to kill pathogens, and little is known about the way NETs are formed in vivo. Here, we discuss the current terminology, methods for NET quantification, pathways leading to NET formation, and the role of NETs in systemic and cutaneous immune defense and auto-immunity, with a focus on psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

  13. Heat shock proteins (HSP): dermatological implications and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vidal Magalhães, Wagner; Gouveia Nogueira, Marcelo Fábio; Kaneko, Telma Mary

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have demonstrated the protective effect of Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) on different organs and tissues under stressful conditions. However, most research explores the performance of those molecular chaperones during immune responses or pathological conditions like cancer, whereas the number of studies related to the performance of HSPs in the skin during diverse natural or physiopathological conditions is very low. Therefore, the aim of this article was to summarize the main concepts concerning the expression and performance of HSPs, from analysis of current medicine and cosmetics publications, as well as exploring the importance of these proteins in the dermatological area in physiological events such as cutaneous aging, skin cancer and wound healing and to present final considerations related to biotechnology performance in this area.

  14. Practical applications of hand-held computers in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Goldblum, Orin M

    2002-09-01

    For physicians, hand-held computers are gaining popularity as point of care reference tools. The convergence of hand-held computers, the Internet, and wireless networks will enable these devices to assume more essential roles as mobile transmitters and receivers of digital medical Information. In addition to serving as portable medical reference sources, these devices can be Internet-enabled, allowing them to communicate over wireless wide and local area networks. With enhanced wireless connectivity, hand-held computers can be used at the point of patient care for charge capture, electronic prescribing, laboratory test ordering, laboratory result retrieval, web access, e-mail communication, and other clinical and administrative tasks. Physicians In virtually every medical specialty have begun using these devices in various ways. This review of hand-held computer use in dermatology illustrates practical examples of the many different ways hand-held computers can be effectively used by the practicing dermatologist.

  15. Role of dermatology in pharmacogenomics: drug-induced skin injury.

    PubMed

    Borroni, Riccardo G

    2015-01-01

    Different individuals may respond diversely to the same drug, in terms of efficacy and toxicity. Adverse drug reactions cause about 6% of all hospital admissions and account for up to 9% of hospitalization costs. Drug-induced skin injury (DISI) is the most common presentation of adverse drug reactions, ranging from maculopapular eruptions to severe adverse cutaneous drug reactions (SCARs) with mortality of up to 40%. Specific genetic polymorphisms confer susceptibility to different types of DISI. Identifying patients genetically at risk for SCARs is one of the goals of pharmacogenomics. In this article, the aspects of clinical dermatology relevant to the pharmacogenetics of DISI are reviewed. Many SCARs are now preventable, with consequent reduction of morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs.

  16. Dermatologic manifestation of hyperandrogenism: a retrospective chart review.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charlotte M; Rudolph, Jennifer; Gerber, Donald A; Glick, Sharon; Shalita, Alan R; Lowenstein, Eve J

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have described a wide spectrum of hyperandrogenism diseases, many of which are difficult to distinguish from each other. In order to better understand diseases of hyperandrogenism, the authors performed a retrospective study of the cutaneous features and metabolic findings in women with hyperandrogenism. A retrospective chart analysis compiled by three dermatologists in both academic and private settings was performed, including patients presenting with > or = 2 manifestations of hyperandrogenism. Relevant dermatologic and associated manifestations and laboratory and imaging study findings were reviewed. Moderate to severe acne was the most common manifestation. Other common manifestations that patients first presented with include hirsutism, acanthosis nigricans, androgenic alopecia, and skin tags. Oligomenorrhea was the most common systemic presenting sign. Statistical analysis of various clinical markers revealed correlations with hyperandrogenemia. Acanthosis nigricans and hirsutism were found to be useful clinical markers for hyperandrogenism, whereas androgenic alopecia was not. This study provides some insights into the presentation and diverse manifestations seen in hyperandrogenism.

  17. Toll-Like Receptors: Role in Dermatological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hari, Aswin; Flach, Tracy L.; Shi, Yan; Mydlarski, P. Régine

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a class of conserved receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) present in microbes. In humans, at least ten TLRs have been identified, and their recognition targets range from bacterial endotoxins to lipopeptides, DNA, dsRNA, ssRNA, fungal products, and several host factors. Of dermatological interest, these receptors are expressed on several skin cells including keratinocytes, melanocytes, and Langerhans cells. TLRs are essential in identifying microbial products and are known to link the innate and adaptive immune systems. Over the years, there have been significant advances in our understanding of TLRs in skin inflammation, cutaneous malignancies, and defence mechanisms. In this paper, we will describe the association between TLRs and various skin pathologies and discuss proposed TLR therapeutics. PMID:20847936

  18. Photodynamic therapy in dermatology: past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Fluhr, Joachim W.

    2013-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive therapeutic method first introduced in the field of dermatology. It is mainly used for the treatment of precancerous and superficial malignant skin tumors. Today PDT finds new applications not only for nononcologic dermatoses but also in the field of other medical specialties such as otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology, neurology, gastroenterology, and urology. We are witnessing a broadening of the spectrum of skin diseases that are treated by PDT. Since its introduction, PDT protocol has evolved significantly in terms of increasing method efficacy and patient safety. In this era of evidence-based medicine, it is expected that much effort will be put into creating a worldwide accepted consensus on PDT. A review on the current knowledge of PDT is given, and the historical basis of the method's evolution since its introduction in the 1900s is presented. At the end, future challenges of PDT are focused on discussing gaps that exist for research in the field.

  19. Infrared Imaging Tools for Diagnostic Applications in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Gurjarpadhye, Abhijit Achyut; Parekh, Mansi Bharat; Dubnika, Arita; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Inayathullah, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) imaging is a collection of non-invasive imaging techniques that utilize the IR domain of the electromagnetic spectrum for tissue assessment. A subset of these techniques construct images using back-reflected light, while other techniques rely on detection of IR radiation emitted by the tissue as a result of its temperature. Modern IR detectors sense thermal emissions and produce a heat map of surface temperature distribution in tissues. Thus, the IR spectrum offers a variety of imaging applications particularly useful in clinical diagnostic area, ranging from high-resolution, depth-resolved visualization of tissue to temperature variation assessment. These techniques have been helpful in the diagnosis of many medical conditions including skin/breast cancer, arthritis, allergy, burns, and others. In this review, we discuss current roles of IR-imaging techniques for diagnostic applications in dermatology with an emphasis on skin cancer, allergies, blisters, burns and wounds. PMID:26691203

  20. In Vitro Antifungal Activities against Moulds Isolated from Dermatological Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Nizam, Tzar; Binting, Rabiatul Adawiyah AG.; Mohd Saari, Shafika; Kumar, Thivyananthini Vijaya; Muhammad, Marianayati; Satim, Hartini; Yusoff, Hamidah; Santhanam, Jacinta

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of various antifungal agents against moulds isolated from dermatological specimens. Methods We identified 29 moulds from dermatological specimens between October 2012 and March 2013 by conventional methods. We performed antifungal susceptibility testing on six antifungal agents, amphotericin B, clotrimazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole and terbinafine, according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines contained in the M38-A2 document. Results Most antifungal agents were active against the dermatophytes, except for terbinafine against Trichophyton rubrum (geometric mean MIC, MICGM 3.17 μg/mL). The dematiaceous moulds were relatively susceptible to amphotericin B and azoles (MICGM 0.17–0.34 μg/mL), but not to terbinafine (MICGM 3.62 μg/mL). Septate hyaline moulds showed variable results between the relatively more susceptible Aspergillus spp. (MICGM 0.25–4 μg/mL) and the more resistant Fusarium spp. (MICGM 5.66–32 μg/mL). The zygomycetes were susceptible to amphotericin B (MICGM 0.5 μg/mL) and clotrimazole (MICGM 0.08 μg/mL), but not to other azoles (MICGM 2.52–4 μg/mL). Conclusion Amphotericin B and clotrimazole were the most effective antifungal agents against all moulds excepting Fusarium spp., while terbinafine was useful against dermatophytes (except T. rubrum) and Aspergillus spp. However, a larger study is required to draw more solid conclusions. PMID:27418867

  1. Botanicals in dermatology: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Juliane; Merfort, Irmgard; Schempp, Christoph M

    2010-01-01

    Botanical extracts and single compounds are increasingly used in cosmetics but also in over-the-counter drugs and food supplements. The focus of the present review is on controlled clinical trials with botanicals in the treatment of acne, inflammatory skin diseases, skin infections, UV-induced skin damage, skin cancer, alopecia, vitiligo, and wounds. Studies with botanical cosmetics and drugs are discussed, as well as studies with botanical food supplements. Experimental research on botanicals was considered to a limited extent when it seemed promising for clinical use in the near future. In acne therapy, Mahonia, tea tree oil, and Saccharomyces may have the potential to become standard treatments. Mahonia, Hypericum, Glycyrrhiza and some traditional Chinese medicines appear promising for atopic dermatitis. Some plant-derived substances like dithranol and methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen) [in combination with UVA] are already accepted as standard treatments in psoriasis; Mahonia and Capsicum (capsaicin) are the next candidates suggested by present evidence. Oral administration and topical application of antioxidant plant extracts (green and black tea, carotenoids, coffee, and many flavonoids from fruits and vegetables) can protect skin from UV-induced erythema, early aging, and irradiation-induced cancer. Hair loss and vitiligo are also traditional fields of application for botanicals. According to the number and quality of clinical trials with botanicals, the best evidence exists for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases, i.e. atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. However, many more controlled clinical studies are needed to determine the efficacy and risks of plant-derived products in dermatology. Safety aspects, especially related to sensitization and photodermatitis, have to be taken into account. Therefore, clinicians should not only be informed of the beneficial effects but also the specific adverse effects of botanicals used for dermatologic disorders and

  2. Dermatological problems in geriatric patients: a hospital based study.

    PubMed

    Thapa, D P; Jha, A K; Kharel, C; Shrestha, S

    2012-09-01

    Geriatric health care has become a major issue worldwide. There are no data regarding geriatric dermatologic diseases are available from Nepal. Patients of 60 years and above were enrolled in the Nepali fiscal year 2067(April 2010-April 2011). The data included age, sex, place, and diagnosis. The aim of the study is to determine the characteristic pattern and frequency of dermatoses in dermatologic patients aged 60 years and above. There were total of 6442 patients who visited out patients department. Out of which frequency of geriatric patients were 330, which constitute about 5.1%. The male to female ratio was 50% each. The most common cutaneous dermatoses was eczema 35.8%, fungal infection 13.6%, viral infection 7%, followed by pruritus 7.3%, scabies and photodermatitis 4.5% each, Inflammatory papulosquamous disorder 3.3%, Bacterial infection and Icthyosis 2.1% each, vesiculobullous 1.8%, tumors and pigmentary disorder 0.6% and Miscellaneous group (keratoderma, callus, urticaria, diabetic ulcer, burgers disease, burning feet syndrome, Rosacea, Drug rash-amoxicillin, senile acne, prurigo nodularis, hansens disease, pellagra, Actinic cheilitis) 15.8%. Few patients had more than one dermatoses which constitute < 1% .Photodermatitis was found to be statistically significant. The most common dermatoses were Eczema in females followed by Photodermatitis and comparatively in males viral and fungal infections were common. This study depicts various characteristic patterns of dermatoses seen in elderly. Eczema and infections was found to be most common diseases seen in elderly. Further epidemiologic studies including treatment, follow-up of elderly patients has to be carried out to know the burden of the disease and decrease morbidity and psychological concern associated with diseases.

  3. The emerging role of physician assistants in the delivery of dermatologic health care.

    PubMed

    Clark, A R; Monroe, J R; Feldman, S R; Fleischer, A B; Hauser, D A; Hinds, M A

    2000-04-01

    The NAMCS provides a wealth of information on use of PAs in all practices, including dermatology. Two important points regarding the NAMCS and SDPA data are addressed here: the number of visits to PAs for dermatologic symptoms and the expected growth of PA use in dermatologists' offices. Dermatologic symptoms were evaluated frequently by PAs, accounting for 14% of PA visits. These statistics do not address the number of referrals those PAs made to dermatologists. Perhaps PAs as a group should be targeted for increased dermatologic education, particularly stressing the need for appropriate referral to a dermatologist. PAs could increase the number of dermatology referrals from primary care offices with improved understanding of the importance of the dermatologist in the management of patients' overall skin health. At projected growth rates, the number of PAs employed by dermatologists should exceed 500 by the end of 2000. Most of this growth has been in private practices and rarely in HMOs or in large multispecialty clinics. There are a number of reasons for this growth, as follows: A PA may help reduce the patient load on the dermatologist, especially with sameday appointments and drop-ins. Some dermatologists are moving away from clinical dermatology into cosmetics, which not only leaves a vacuum in clinical dermatology, but also creates job opportunities for PAs in cosmetic dermatology. Regarding managed care growth, PAs can have a positive impact on the problem of having to see more patients for less money. PAs are cost-effective. In the 1998 SDPA survey, the ratio of billings generated (production) to gross income for the average dermatology PA ranged from 3:1 to 6:1. Even with inexperienced PAs new to dermatology, this ratio was usually at least 2:1 at the end of the first year. PAs can cover satellite offices, allowing for practice expansion. Effective with the new Medicare laws of January 1, 1998, PAs can now see new Medicare patients or Medicare patients

  4. Pediatric hospital dermatology: experience with inpatient and consult services at the Mayo Clinic.

    PubMed

    Storan, Eoin R; McEvoy, Marian T; Wetter, David A; el-Azhary, Rokea A; Hand, Jennifer L; Davis, Dawn M R; Bridges, Alina G; Camilleri, Michael J; Davis, Mark D P

    2013-01-01

    Data describing the management of pediatric patients admitted to a hospital under the care of a dermatologist and dermatology hospital consults for pediatric inpatients are limited. We aim to describe the role of an inpatient hospital service jointly run by dermatology and pediatrics and the activities of a pediatric dermatology hospital consult service. We retrospectively identified pediatric (age < 18 yrs) dermatology inpatients and hospital consult patients from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2010. We examined patient demographics, indications for admission, length of stay, treatment provided, consult-requesting service, and consult diagnosis. One hundred eight admissions were by a dermatologist. The mean age was 5.8 years; the median length of stay was 3 days. Indications for admission included atopic dermatitis (86.1%), psoriasis (3.7%), and eczema herpeticum (2.8%). The main treatment provided was wet dressings (97.2%). Eighty-three dermatology hospital consults were requested. The mean age was 7.4 years. The main indications for dermatology consultation included drug rash (12.1%), cutaneous infections (12.1%), contact dermatitis (9.6%), psoriasis (8.4%), atopic dermatitis (6.0%), and hemangiomas (6.0%). This study describes the utility of the hospital pediatric dermatology inpatient and consult services in treating patients with severe skin disease.

  5. Critical review of generic and dermatology-specific health-related quality of life instruments.

    PubMed

    Both, Hilde; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Busschbach, Jan; Nijsten, Tamar

    2007-12-01

    The measurement of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is increasingly important in patients with skin diseases. Despite the availability of a variety of instruments and new psychometric techniques, there is no consensus as to which HRQOL instruments are to be preferred in dermatology. The objective of this review is to evaluate the generic HRQOL measures (i.e., health profiles) that have been used in dermatology (Short-Form-36 (SF-36) and -12, NHP, SIP, World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-100 and -BREF) and all dermatology-specific HRQOL measures (Dermatology Life Questionnaire Index, Skindex-29, -16, and -17, Dermatology Quality of Life Scales, and Dermatology-Specific Quality of Life). Criteria for evaluation were adapted from existing guidelines and included conceptual and measurement model, reliability, validity, responsiveness, item functioning, meaning of scores, administrative burden, respondent burden, the availability of alternative forms, and of cultural and language adaptations. Furthermore, an overview of skin diseases in which the included HRQOL tools have been used is presented. Although the selection of the appropriate HRQOL instrument remains a trade-off between various psychometric properties and research objectives, for now, we recommend the combination of SF-36 and Skindex-29 as the instruments of choice in dermatology. Promising new instruments for future research are the WHOQOL and the Skindex-17.

  6. Prophylaxis and treatment of dermatologic adverse events from epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peggy A; Balagula, Yevgeniy; Lacouture, Mario E; Anadkat, Milan J

    2011-07-01

    As the number and uses for targeted therapies such as epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRIs) increase, so does the need to recognize and treat the dermatologic side-effects of these agents. Although agents such as gefitinib, erlotinib, cetuximab, lapatinib, and panitumumab have less systemic side-effects than traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, dermatologic adverse events from EGFRIs are significantly more common. These dermatologic toxicities have previously led to reduction or cessation of therapy and recently have been shown to decrease patients' quality of life. This review provides a symptom-based treatment approach to the common dermatologic adverse effects seen with the epidermal growth factor receptor antagonists: papulopustular rash, xerosis, pruritus as well as hair, nail, and mucosal changes. Each dermatologic toxicity is described; prophylaxis and treatment options, from topical to systemic, are presented based on a review of the current literature with emphasis on new clinical trials results. We also provide specific recommendations based on our practice in a specialty clinic. Although the field continues to evolve, this review presents the most up-to-date information on managing dermatologic adverse effects of EGFRIs. Practitioners should find this article to be a practical resource in approaching patients on EGFRIs with dermatologic toxicities. As we learn how to optimally manage the adverse effects of these agents, we practitioners have the opportunity to increase patients' quality of life and decrease reductions or cessations of life-prolonging therapy.

  7. No Difference in Psychotropic Medication Use in Cosmetic and General Dermatology Patients.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Heather K; Lilly, Evelyn; Arndt, Kenneth A; Dover, Jeffrey S

    2016-07-01

    Patients presenting for appearance-related concerns are often perceived as being more difficult (ie, more needy, more difficult to satisfy) than patients presenting for medical dermatologic problems. While the reasons for this perception are many, some hypothesize that this may be related to a higher rate of anxiety, depression, or body image issues among these patients.
    To determine the prevalence of psychotropic medication use in cosmetic dermatology patients compared to the prevalence of such medication use in general dermatology patients.
    METHODS & The study was a retrospective chart review of female patients, 18 or older, new to a private practice. Exclusion criteria included dermatologic disorders with known psychosocial comorbidity. Psychotropic medication use was recorded.
    The percentage of subjects in the medical group (n=156) who reported using psychotropic medications was 22.2% compared to 26.8% in the cosmetic group (n=154; P=0.09).
    The prevalence of psychotropic medication use among all dermatology patients in our practice was relatively high, but there was no statistically significant difference in the rate of psychotropic medication use in cosmetic dermatology patients compared to general dermatology patients.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(7):858-861.

  8. Future prospects in dermatologic applications of lasers, nanotechnology, and other new technologies.

    PubMed

    Boixeda, P; Feltes, F; Santiago, J L; Paoli, J

    2015-04-01

    We review novel technologies with diagnostic and therapeutic applications in dermatology. Among the diagnostic techniques that promise to become part of dermatologic practice in the future are optical coherence tomography, multiphoton laser scanning microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermography, and 7-T magnetic resonance imaging. Advances in therapy include novel light-based treatments, such as those applying lasers to new targets and in new wavelengths. Devices for home therapy are also appearing. We comment on the therapeutic uses of plasma, ultrasound, radiofrequency energy, total reflection amplification of spontaneous emission of radiation, light stimulation, and transepidermal drug delivery. Finally, we mention some basic developments in nanotechnology with prospects for future application in dermatology.

  9. Poverty, dignity, and forgotten skin care: dermatology in the stream of human mobile population.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    Skin diseases represent the greatest public health care problem in all developing countries. Tropical diseases tend to cluster in poor populations and often are defined as "neglected" because the investments made to combat them seem negligible compared with the massive amounts expended globally on the health problems of developed countries. After reviewing the worldwide situation, this article explains the principles of community dermatology and discusses the work of the San Gallicano Institute in Rome, which has developed a model for reducing the number of people suffering from dermatologic and other diseases and has established the first dermatologic hospital in Ethiopia.

  10. Dermatologic surgery emergencies: Complications caused by systemic reactions, high-energy systems, and trauma.

    PubMed

    Minkis, Kira; Whittington, Adam; Alam, Murad

    2016-08-01

    While the overall incidence of emergencies in dermatologic surgery is low, emergent situations can occasionally pose a risk to patients undergoing such procedures. The clinical importance of several types of emergences related to systemic reactions, high energy systems, and trauma are reviewed, and relevant epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, work-up, management, and prevention are discussed. Early detection of surgical emergencies can mitigate any associated adverse outcomes, thereby allowing the outstanding record of safety of dermatologic surgery to continue. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Patient safety in dermatologic surgery: Part I. Safety related to surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Timothy J; Lolis, Margarita; Goldberg, David J; MacFarlane, Deborah F

    2015-07-01

    Surgical procedures involve unique elements related to patient safety. One must be aware of potential complications and safety issues within the practice of dermatologic surgery. Developing a high level of competence in skin surgery will address some safety issues, while implementing protocols and redundancies provides systems-based correction for other safety issues. We provide an in-depth review of patient safety in dermatologic surgery. In particular, we highlight the most common safety issues and methods for reducing error. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Recommendations for patients on preparing for dermatology-allergology consultations: Evaluation of the information notice of the French Society for Dermatology].

    PubMed

    Desmond, C; Giordano-Labadie, F; Barbaud, A; Avenel-Audran, M; Bourrain, J-L; Raison-Peyron, N; Truchetet, F; Assier, A; Milpied, B

    2016-12-01

    Skin patch-tests in dermatology-allergology practice require good preparation. To this end, the dermatology-allergology group of the French Society of Dermatology introduced an information notice informing patients about patch testing procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility and understanding of the notice. The information notice was sent out to patients before testing. On the day of the test, a questionnaire was submitted to patients to evaluate their comprehension of the notice. Another questionnaire was submitted simultaneously to the dermatology-allergology practitioner to evaluate whether the patient had complied with the guidelines given in the information notice. Paired questionnaires were analyzed for this study. Eight dermatology-allergology hospital departments participated in the study and collected 921 paired questionnaires over a period of 18months. Among the vast majority (96.2%) of patients who had read the information notice, most found it useful (98.8%), easy to read (97.4%), and appropriate (91.5%). Ten percent of patients had difficulty understanding. This study shows that the information notice was clear and explicit for the immense majority of patients. Thanks to the feedback of a number of patients, the information notice was further improved to enhance patient understanding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. [Implicit personality theories in dermatology. An empirical study on the image that physicians have of patients of diverse dermatologic diagnosis groups].

    PubMed

    Windemuth, D; Stücker, M; Altmeyer, P

    2000-03-01

    Studies about the personality of dermatological patients are numerous. The results are inconsistent and peculiarities of the personality are rarely confirmed. Contrary to the usual procedure, this study asks for the impressions physicians have about their patients. To elicit associations dependent on a dermatological diagnosis, 27 physicians filled in a three-dimensional differential asking for their impressions about patients with atopic dermatitis, leg ulcer, malignant melanoma, or psoriasis vulgaris in order to quantify these impressions. The dimension valence (good-bad) did not differ between the groups. The dimensions of excitation (active-passive) and potency (strong-weak) showed the biggest differences between patients with atopic dermatitis and ulcus cruris. The latter get significantly lower values on both dimensions. The correlations between the impression and the duration of employment in dermatology were low. In our opinion it is necessary to raise the impression of medical personal about their patients because these impressions affect the interaction of the personal with the patient.

  14. Fractional lasers in dermatology--current status and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Goel, Apratim; Krupashankar, D S; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev; Nischal, K C; Omprakash, H M; Mysore, Venkataram

    2011-01-01

    Fractional laser technology is a new emerging technology to improve scars, fine lines, dyspigmentation, striae and wrinkles. The technique is easy, safe to use and has been used effectively for several clinical and cosmetic indications in Indian skin. Different fractional laser machines, with different wavelengths, both ablative and non-ablative, are now available in India. A detailed understanding of the device being used is recommended. Common indications include resurfacing for acne, chickenpox and surgical scars, periorbital and perioral wrinkles, photoageing changes, facial dyschromias. The use of fractional lasers in stretch marks, melasma and other pigmentary conditions, dermatological conditions such as granuloma annulare has been reported. But further data are needed before adopting them for routine use in such conditions. Any qualified dermatologist may administer fractional laser treatment. He/ she should possess a Master's degree or diploma in dermatology and should have had specific hands-on training in lasers, either during postgraduation or later at a facility which routinely performs laser procedures under a competent dermatologist or plastic surgeon with experience and training in using lasers. Since parameters may vary with different systems, specific training tailored towards the concerned device at either the manufacturer's facility or at another center using the machine is recommended. Fractional lasers can be used in the dermatologist's minor procedure room for the above indications. Detailed counseling with respect to the treatment, desired effects and possible postoperative complications should be provided to the patient. The patient should be provided brochures to study and also adequate opportunity to seek information. A detailed consent form needs to be completed by the patient. Consent form should include information on the machine, possible postoperative course expected and postoperative complications. Preoperative photography should be

  15. Strengths and Limitations of Evidence-Based Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Hywel C

    2014-01-01

    The need for understanding and reflecting on evidence-based dermatology (EBD) has never been greater given the exponential growth of new external evidence to inform clinical practice. Like any other branch of medicine, dermatologists need to acquire new skills in constructing answerable questions, efficiently searching electronic bibliographic databases, and critically appraising different types of studies. Secondary summaries of evidence in the form of systematic reviews (SR), that is, reviews that are conducted in a systematic, unbiased and explicit manner, reside at the top of the evidence hierarchy, because they are less prone to bias than traditional expert reviews. In addition to providing summaries of the best external evidence, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are also powerful ways of identifying research gaps and ultimately setting the agenda of future clinical research in dermatology. But like any paradigm, EBD can have its limitations. Wrong application, misuse and overuse of EBD can have serious consequences. For example, mindless pooling together of data from dissimilar studies in a meta-analysis may render it a form of reductionism that does not make any sense. Similarly, even highly protocolised study designs such as SRs and RCTs are still susceptible to some degree of dishonesty and bias. Over-reliance on randomized controlled trials (RCT) may be inappropriate, as RCTs are not a good source for picking up rare but important adverse effects such as lupus syndrome with minocycline. A common criticism leveled against SRs is that these frequently conclude that there is lack of sufficient evidence to inform current clinical practice, but arguably, such a perception is grounded more on the interpretation of the SRs than anything else. The apparent absence of evidence should not paralyze the dermatologist to adopt a state of therapeutic nihilism. Poor primary data and an SR based on evidence that is not up-to-date are also

  16. Validation of a computer based objective structured clinical examination in the assessment of undergraduate dermatology courses.

    PubMed

    Kaliyadan, Feroze; Khan, Abdul Sattar; Kuruvilla, Joel; Feroze, Kaberi

    2014-01-01

    Many teaching centers have now adopted objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) as an assessment method for undergraduate dermatology courses. A modification of the standard OSCE in dermatology is computer based or electronic OSCE (eOSCE). We attempted to validate the use of a computer-based OSCE in dermatology in a group of fifth year medical students. The scores of the students in the computer-based OSCE showed a strong positive correlation with the scores on the clinical presentation (Pearson's co-efficient - 0.923, P value <0.000, significant at the 0.01 level) and a good correlation with overall scores of the student (Pearson's co-efficient - 0.728, P value <0.000, significant at the 0.01 level), indicating that this is a reliable method for assessment in dermatology. Generally, the students' feedback regarding the methods was positive.

  17. [The characteristics of medical manpower of dermatologic venereal service at the territorial level].

    PubMed

    Jyltsova, Ye Ye; Konovalov, O Ye

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the medical social characteristics of medical manpower af dermatologic venereal services of Ryazan, Tula and Lipetsk oblasts from the position of quality of specialized medical care of population.

  18. GA-ANFIS Expert System Prototype for Prediction of Dermatological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Begic Fazlic, Lejla; Avdagic, Korana; Omanovic, Samir

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents novel GA-ANFIS expert system prototype for dermatological disease detection by using dermatological features and diagnoses collected in real conditions. Nine dermatological features are used as inputs to classifiers that are based on Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference Systems (ANFIS) for the first level of fuzzy model optimization. After that, they are used as inputs in Genetic Algorithm (GA) for the second level of fuzzy model optimization within GA-ANFIS system. GA-ANFIS system performs optimization in two steps. Modelling and validation of the novel GA-ANFIS system approach is performed in MATLAB environment by using validation set of data. Some conclusions concerning the impacts of features on the detection of dermatological diseases were obtained through analysis of the GA-ANFIS. We compared GA-ANFIS and ANFIS results. The results confirmed that the proposed GA-ANFIS model achieved accuracy rates which are higher than the ones we got by ANFIS model.

  19. Dermatologic adverse events of checkpoint inhibitors: what an oncologist should know.

    PubMed

    Habre, Maya; Habre, Samer Bassilios; Kourie, Hampig R

    2016-12-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) represent a new revolutionary weapon in the armamentarium of anti-cancer therapies. The side effects of these new agents represent a new challenge for oncologists; they are usually unpredictable and sometimes life threatening, if not managed rapidly and adequately. The most frequent side effects are the dermatologic, but they are usually low grade side effects and consequently easily manageable. Rash, pruritus and vitiligo are the most frequent dermatologic side effects. We aimed in this review to describe first all the dermatologic side effects of ICI according to the subtype of ICI and combination therapies in the clinical trials, then to report all the rare case reports dermatologic side effects, and finally to present the management algorithm of these side effects.

  20. Attachment Styles of Dermatological Patients in Europe: A Multi-centre Study in 13 Countries.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Csanád; Altmayer, Anita; Lien, Lars; Poot, Françoise; Gieler, Uwe; Tomas-Aragones, Lucía; Kupfer, Jörg; Jemec, Gregor B E; Misery, Laurent; Linder, M Dennis; Sampogna, Francesca; Middendorp, Henriët van; Halvorsen, Jon Anders; Balieva, Flora; Szepietowski, Jacek C; Romanov, Dmitry; Marron, Servando E; Altunay, Ilknur K; Finlay, Andrew Y; Salek, Sam S; Dalgard, Florence

    2017-01-25

    Attachment styles of dermatological outpatients and satisfaction with their dermatologists were investigated within the framework of a multicentre study conducted in 13 European countries, organized by the European Society for Dermatology and Psychiatry. Attachment style was assessed with the Adult Attachment Scale. Patient satisfaction with the dermatologist was assessed with an 11-degree scale. A total of 3,635 adult outpatients and 1,359 controls participated in the study. Dermatological outpatients were less able to depend on others, were less comfortable with closeness and intimacy, and experienced similar rates of anxiety in relationships as did the controls. Participants who had secure attachment styles reported stressful life events during the last 6 months significantly less often than those who had insecure attachment styles. Patients with secure attachment styles tended to be more satisfied with their dermatologist than did insecure patients. These results suggest that secure attachment of dermatological outpatients may be a protective factor in the management of stress.

  1. Dermatology Roundup: The Latest Tips, Techniques, and Technologies for Busy Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Rapid advances in use of technology and discovery of innovative therapeutic tips or clinically relevant epidemiological clues are discussed. Much of the literature-based review was drawn from somewhat non-traditional sources of dermatological information. PMID:28360972

  2. Surgical site infections in dermatologic surgery: etiology, pathogenesis, and current preventative measures.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Karim; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2015-05-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) after dermatologic surgery continue to represent undesirable complications that affect patients in several aspects. The etiology and pathogenesis of SSIs are not completely understood, and as a result, current preventative measures are debatable. To review and summarize the current available literature specific to SSIs in dermatologic surgery. The pathogenesis of SSIs, factors contributing to SSIs, current preventative guidelines, and evidence supporting their use are explored. A review of the medical literature. Most measures used to prevent SSIs in dermatologic surgery are based on studies of wounds in general surgery. Evidence specific to dermatologic surgery is scarce. More research related to the pathogenesis of SSIs is needed to establish effective preventative measures that are key to reducing incidences of SSIs.

  3. Generational dermatology: model for prevention and multi decade approach toward the evolving, aging patient.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Wendy E

    2013-12-01

    The proposed terminology Generational Dermatology encompasses prevention and involves medical, cosmetic, surgical and oncologic strategies over the decades to optimize skin performance throughout the course of a lifetime. Organ failure is the inability of the organ to perform its determined function as a part of normal physiology and it may be possible to take a Generational preventive approach toward reducing morbidities associated with the failure of our largest organ, the skin. Outside of skin cancer prevention efforts we have as a specialty primarily worked on the tertiary prevention realm. I advocate that we can increase our focus on the primary and secondary tiers where we as Dermatologists have the training and education to identify risk factors and detect early symptoms of skin disease. I appeal to the house of Dermatology to embrace this concept of Generational Dermatology as preventive medicine for the evolving aging patient. The practice of Generational Dermatology will decrease patient morbidity and bring down the cost of healthcare. Our global increased longevity increases the number of elderly worldwide. Longer lifespan means dermatologic needs will increase as the skin must perform its basic function longer. There are also new unknowns and skin issues which arise from large numbers of people in the 9th and 10th decades. Generational Dermatology is well suited to be a model for prevention as our patient's age and we can intervene at any decade. I believe the specialty will increasingly focus on how the skin can optimally perform for a longer period. Lastly, the practice of Generational Dermatology unifies the house of Dermatology as we need the innovations and input of every subspecialty to contribute to the health of the people we serve.

  4. The Suitability of Gray-Scale Electronic Readers for Dermatology Journals

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Eun; Kim, Dai Hyun; Seo, Soo Hong; Kye, Young Chul

    2014-01-01

    Background The rapid development of information and communication technology has replaced traditional books by electronic versions. Most print dermatology journals have been replaced with electronic journals (e-journals), which are readily used by clinicians and medical students. Objective The objectives of this study were to determine whether e-readers are appropriate for reading dermatology journals, to conduct an attitude study of both medical personnel and students, and to find a way of improving e-book use in the field of dermatology. Methods All articles in the Korean Journal of Dermatology published from January 2010 to December 2010 were utilized in this study. Dermatology house officers, student trainees in their fourth year of medical school, and interns at Korea University Medical Center participated in the study. After reading the articles with Kindle 2, their impressions and evaluations were recorded using a questionnaire with a 5-point Likert scale. Results The results demonstrated that gray-scale e-readers might not be suitable for reading dermatology journals, especially for case reports compared to the original articles. Only three of the thirty-one respondents preferred e-readers to printed papers. The most common suggestions from respondents to encourage usage of e-books in the field of dermatology were the introduction of a color display, followed by the use of a touch screen system, a cheaper price, and ready-to-print capabilities. Conclusion In conclusion, our study demonstrated that current e-readers might not be suitable for reading dermatology journals. However, they may be utilized in selected situations according to the type and topic of the papers. PMID:25473221

  5. The suitability of gray-scale electronic readers for dermatology journals.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Eun; Kim, Dai Hyun; Seo, Soo Hong; Kye, Young Chul; Ahn, Hyo Hyun

    2014-12-01

    The rapid development of information and communication technology has replaced traditional books by electronic versions. Most print dermatology journals have been replaced with electronic journals (e-journals), which are readily used by clinicians and medical students. The objectives of this study were to determine whether e-readers are appropriate for reading dermatology journals, to conduct an attitude study of both medical personnel and students, and to find a way of improving e-book use in the field of dermatology. All articles in the Korean Journal of Dermatology published from January 2010 to December 2010 were utilized in this study. Dermatology house officers, student trainees in their fourth year of medical school, and interns at Korea University Medical Center participated in the study. After reading the articles with Kindle 2, their impressions and evaluations were recorded using a questionnaire with a 5-point Likert scale. The results demonstrated that gray-scale e-readers might not be suitable for reading dermatology journals, especially for case reports compared to the original articles. Only three of the thirty-one respondents preferred e-readers to printed papers. The most common suggestions from respondents to encourage usage of e-books in the field of dermatology were the introduction of a color display, followed by the use of a touch screen system, a cheaper price, and ready-to-print capabilities. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that current e-readers might not be suitable for reading dermatology journals. However, they may be utilized in selected situations according to the type and topic of the papers.

  6. An Overview of Laser in Dermatology: The Past, the Present and … the Future (?)

    PubMed Central

    Gianfaldoni, Serena; Tchernev, Georgi; Wollina, Uwe; Fioranelli, Massimo; Roccia, Maria Grazia; Gianfaldoni, Roberto; Lotti, Torello

    2017-01-01

    The authors discuss a brief history of lasers and their use in dermatology. Although the excellent results achieved by the use of laser in dermatology, this special treatment modality is in continuous evolution. At present, new devices have been under development for the therapy of different kind of diseases, while lasers, already in use, has been changing, in order to be more secure, effective and be useful in many others disorders. PMID:28785350

  7. Analysis of Dermatologic Diseases in Neurosurgical In-Patients: A Retrospective Study of 463 Cases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Hei Sung; Yu, Jeesuk; Kim, Jong Tae; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Both the skin and the neurologic system are derived from the ectoderm during embryogenesis, and thus patients with neurologic disorders may have accompanying dermatologic diseases. For example, seborrheic dermatitis is more frequently observed in patients with Parkinsonism and other neurologic disorders. To date, however, there has been limited review on dermatologic diseases in neurosurgical in-patients. The purpose of this study was to characterize dermatological problems encountered in a neurosurgery unit and to compare these data to previous reports of in-patient dermatologic consultations. A retrospective review was conducted over all in-patient dermatology consultations from the neurosurgery unit during a 3-year period. Of 2,770 dermatology consultations, 463 (16.7%) came from the department of neurosurgery. The most frequent age group was the 6th decade of life, and the ratio of men to women was 1.07. Consults were most frequently placed from patients with intracranial hemorrhage (23.8%). Eczema/dermatitis (36.5%; n=204) and cutaneous infections (27.0%; n=151) accounted for more than half of all dermatological consultations, followed by cutaneous adverse drug reactions (11.8%; n=66). Additionally, seborrheic dermatitis was significantly more frequent (p=0.048, odds ratio=1.96) in patients with intracranial hemorrhage. This study characterizes the distribution of skin disorders in patients admitted to the neurosurgery service based on the consultations that have been made for dermatologic evaluation. Collaboration between the neurosurgeons and dermatologists may improve the quality of patient care and help to better predict the occurrence of these conditions.

  8. Analysis of Dermatologic Diseases in Neurosurgical In-Patients: A Retrospective Study of 463 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Hei Sung; Yu, Jeesuk

    2016-01-01

    Background Both the skin and the neurologic system are derived from the ectoderm during embryogenesis, and thus patients with neurologic disorders may have accompanying dermatologic diseases. For example, seborrheic dermatitis is more frequently observed in patients with Parkinsonism and other neurologic disorders. To date, however, there has been limited review on dermatologic diseases in neurosurgical in-patients. Objective The purpose of this study was to characterize dermatological problems encountered in a neurosurgery unit and to compare these data to previous reports of in-patient dermatologic consultations. Methods A retrospective review was conducted over all in-patient dermatology consultations from the neurosurgery unit during a 3-year period. Results Of 2,770 dermatology consultations, 463 (16.7%) came from the department of neurosurgery. The most frequent age group was the 6th decade of life, and the ratio of men to women was 1.07. Consults were most frequently placed from patients with intracranial hemorrhage (23.8%). Eczema/dermatitis (36.5%; n=204) and cutaneous infections (27.0%; n=151) accounted for more than half of all dermatological consultations, followed by cutaneous adverse drug reactions (11.8%; n=66). Additionally, seborrheic dermatitis was significantly more frequent (p=0.048, odds ratio=1.96) in patients with intracranial hemorrhage. Conclusion This study characterizes the distribution of skin disorders in patients admitted to the neurosurgery service based on the consultations that have been made for dermatologic evaluation. Collaboration between the neurosurgeons and dermatologists may improve the quality of patient care and help to better predict the occurrence of these conditions. PMID:27274629

  9. Comparison of publication trends in dermatology among Japan, South Korea and Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously showed that the number of publications in dermatology is increasing year by year, and positively correlates with improved economic conditions in mainland China, a still developing Asian country. However, the characteristics of publications in dermatology departments in more developed Asian countries such as Japan and South Korea are unknown. Methods In the present study, publications from 2003 through 2012 in dermatology in Japan, South Korea and mainland China were characterized. All data were obtained from http://www.pubmed.com. Results Dermatology departments in Japan published 4,094 papers, while mainland China and South Korea published 1528 and 1,758 articles, respectively. 48% of articles from dermatology in Japan were original research and 36% were case reports; The number of publications in Japan remained stable over time, but the overall impact factors per paper increased linearly over the last 10 year period (p < 0.05). In mainland China, 67% of articles from dermatology were original research, while 19% were case reports; The number of publications and their impact factors per paper increased markedly. In South Korea, 65% of articles from dermatology were original research and 20% were case reports. The impact factors per paper remained unchanged, despite of the fact that the number of publications increased over the last 10 year period (r2 = 0.6820, p = 0.0032). Only mainland China showed a positive correlation of the number of publications with gross domestic product per capita during this study period. Conclusions These results suggest that the total number of publications in dermatology correlates with economic conditions only in developing country, but not in more developed countries in Asia. The extent of economic development could determine both the publication quantity and quality. PMID:24405832

  10. Association of Dermatology Consultations With Patient Care Outcomes in Hospitalized Patients With Inflammatory Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Zhang, Myron; Kaffenberger, Benjamin H

    2017-06-01

    The value of inpatient dermatology consultations has traditionally been demonstrated with frequency in changes of diagnosis and management; however, the impact of dermatology consultations on metrics such as hospital length of stay and readmission rates remains unknown. To determine the association of dermatology consultations with patient care in hospitalized patients using objective values. We retrospectively queried the deidentified database of patients hospitalized between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014, at a single university medical center. A total of 413 patients with a primary inflammatory skin condition discharge diagnosis and 647 patients with primary inflammatory skin condition admission diagnosis were selected. Hospital length of stay and 1-year readmission with inflammatory skin conditions. The 413 patients with a primary inflammatory skin condition discharge diagnosis were 61.0% female and had a mean (SD) age of 55.1 (16.4) years. The 647 patients with primary inflammatory skin condition admission diagnosis were 50.8% female and had a mean (SD) age of 57.8 (15.9) years. Multivariable modeling showed that dermatology consultations were associated with a reduction of 1-year inflammatory skin condition readmissions among patients who were discharged primarily with an inflammatory skin condition (readmission probability, 0.0025; 95% CI, 0.00020-0.030 with dermatology consult vs 0.026; 95% CI, 0.0065-0.10 without; odds ratio, 0.093; 95% CI, 0.010-0.840; P = .03). No other confounding variable was associated with reduction in readmissions. Multivariable modeling also showed that dermatology consultations were associated with a reduction in the adjusted hospital length of stay by 2.64 days (95% CI, 1.75-3.53 days; P < .001). Dermatology consultations were associated with improvements of outcomes among hospitalized patients. The expansion of the role of dermatology consultation services may improve patient care in a cost-effective manner.

  11. A gender gap in the dermatology literature? Cross-sectional analysis of manuscript authorship trends in dermatology journals during 3 decades.

    PubMed

    Feramisco, Jamison D; Leitenberger, Justin J; Redfern, Shelley I; Bian, Aihua; Xie, Xian-Jin; Resneck, Jack S

    2009-01-01

    Despite a dramatic influx of female dermatologists during the last 30 years, women in academic dermatology departments remain relatively clustered in junior faculty positions. Research in other specialties showing a disparity in the academic productivity of women has led to many hypotheses regarding factors that may place them at a competitive disadvantage. It is unknown, however, whether similar differences in academic productivity might also serve as barriers to advancement in dermatology, or whether any productivity gap actually exists in this specialty that experienced a more substantial entry of women. Because publication in peer-reviewed journals is one of the core measures of academic productivity used in the promotion process, we evaluated trends in the prevalence of female authorship in top dermatology journals during the last 3 decades. We conducted an observational study of trends in the sex distribution of US authors in 3 prestigious general dermatology journals (in 1976, 1986, 1996, and 2006) and 3 subspecialty dermatology journals (in 2006 only). Journals were chosen based on published impact factors and citation half-lives. During the last 3 decades, the proportion of women authoring manuscripts in the 3 major general dermatology journals increased from 12% to 48% of US-affiliated first authors (P < .001) and from 6.2% to 31% of US-affiliated senior authors (P < .001). Separate analyses by journal and by article type showed similar increases. The prevalence of female authors in subspecialty journals in 2006 was slightly more variable. Although the publications selected for this study capture many of the most respected US journals in dermatology, they may not be representative of all journals in which dermatologists publish. Female dermatologists are authoring publications in growing numbers that match or exceed their prevalence in the academic and overall workforce. This suggests that other factors (differences in productivity outside of the

  12. Green tea in dermatology--myths and facts.

    PubMed

    Zink, Alexander; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia

    2015-08-01

    Green tea consumption has a long tradition in Asian countries--especially China. The epidemiologically and experimentally observed anticarcinogenic and antiinflammatory effects of green tea have led to the implementation of green tea extracts in multiple therapeutic applications - both in dermatological and cosmeceutical preparations. The most abundant evidence exists for the anticarcinogenic and chemopreventive effect of green tea or its major constituent epigallocatechin-3-gallate. Almost equally evident is the effect in infectious diseases such as cutaneous viral infections. For external genital warts, a topical ointment with green tea extracts was licensed in the USA in 2010, and recently also in Europe. Experimental evidence pinpointing the block of central signal transduction factors in inflammatory mechanisms has led to the evaluation of catechins in inflammatory disorders such as atopic dermatitis. The belief of green tea as a "wonder weapon" against diseases dates back thousands of years. According to a Chinese legend, ancient Emperor Shen Nung noted a delightful aroma after some leaves of a nearby tree had fallen into boiling water. He immediately proclaimed the new "drink" as "heaven-sent", starting the belief - persisting until today - of green tea as a medication from nature against many different diseases. This review summarizes biological effects and clinical implications of green tea. © 2015 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Q-switched ruby laser in cosmetic dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopera, Daisy

    1996-12-01

    The q-switched ruby laser has shown promising results in the treatment of blue and black tattoos. The red light of the ruby laser, 694 nm wavelength, selectively absorbed by dark pigments, is converted into heat and pigments are immediately vaporized. Energy levels range between 4, 5 and 12 J/cm2. Short exposure time does not exceed the thermal relaxation time of the target structures. Thus, thermal damage of the surrounding tissue is minimal. Not only exogenous pigment as tattoo ink but also physiological pigmented structures as melanocytes, melanosome loaden keratinocytes, and melanophages are affected by this type of laser application. Therefore the ruby laser represents a new option in the treatment of a variety of benign pigmented lesions in cosmetic dermatology. The benefit of this source can be seen in efficient clearing of the lesions without scarring. As a side effect transient hypopigmentation may occur. Ruby laser treatment of melanocytic lesions cannot be recommended because unpigmented nevus cells do not absorb red light and persist unaltered. They still bear the potency of further transformation, as into malignancy.

  14. Ocular changes induced by drugs commonly used in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Turno-Kręcicka, Anna; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Misiuk-Hojło, Marta; Patryn, Eliza; Czajor, Karolina; Nita, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The use of many drugs in dermatologic diseases may cause ocular side effects. Some may regress after discontinuation of the therapy, but others persist or progress even after the cessation of treatment. This review presents four groups of commonly prescribed drugs-antimalarial medicines, glucocorticoids, retinoids, and psoralens + ultraviolet A (UVA) therapy-and discusses their possible ocular side effects. The most significant complication of antimalarial drugs is retinopathy with the risk of permanent visual impairment. There are different recommendations for screening for this drug-related retinopathy. The most important ocular manifestations of steroid management are irreversible optic nerve damage in "steroid responders" (steroid glaucoma) and cataract. Some other side effects may disappear after discontinuation of the therapy. Retinoid-induced ocular side effects include ocular surface disease as well as retinal dysfunction. It is recommended to modify the therapy when night blindness occurs or after the decrease of color vision. Protective eyewear is sufficient to avoid ocular surface problems during psoralen + UVA therapy. The knowledge of screening schemes and closer cooperation between physicians may decrease the risk of serious or irreversible ocular side effects. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Dermatological marks in athletes of artistic and rhythmic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Biolcati, G; Berlutti, G; Bagarone, A; Caselli, G

    2004-11-01

    The authors present dermatological signs in: a) rhythmic gymnastics athletes, b) male artistic gymnastics athletes, compared to a control group of fitness athletes. Athletes from the artistic gymnastics group were observed twice. The signs they showed on their first examination (20 days previous to the competition) were two circular zones of thickening of the skin with relation to the radial epiphysis. In all of them, two zones of frictional alopecia were present, one on the dorsal face of the forearms, slantwise outlined, the other on the wrists. A noticeable thickening of the skin was present on the palms of the hands. On a second examination, at the beginning of the training, after about two months of inactivity, the alopecic area was replaced by hypertrichosis, although featuring different patterns in each athlete. Thickening of the skin was slightly smaller than that observed at the first examination. The authors describe onychopathology shown in its different forms in 94 % of the athletes of the rhythmic group. Subsequently the authors discuss the pathogenesis of the above described signs.

  16. The use of emollients as sophisticated therapy in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Nola, Ivana; Kostović, Kresimir; Kotrulja, Lena; Lugović, Liborija

    2003-01-01

    Emollients are agents designed to make the stratum corneum softer and more plant by increasing its hydration. A large number of preparations are available today, many of which are marketed as cosmetic and therapeutic moisturizers. They are the most prescribed products in dermatology. Their structure and function are surprisingly complex and sophisticated, and many are equidistant between cosmetics and drugs. The use of the emollients corrects the problems in scaling disorders. It is well known that the electrical properties of the stratum corneum change after application of an emollient. It is also possible that they have suppressive effects on epidermal thickening. Emollients have an anti-inflammatory activity and also give some transient relief from irritation. In clinical use emollients are employed as treatments for ichthyoses, xeroderma and disorders of keratinization, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and photodamaged skin. Emollients of the new millennium include agents that mimic natural ingredients and function as botanicals, including vitamins, hydroxy acids, and retinoids. Emollients can cause a few side effects, such as irritant dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, fragrance allergy or allergy to other constituents (preservatives or additives), stinging, cosmetic acne, and pigmentary disorders. We can conclude that emollients, continuously evolving to ever more sophisticated products, are very important in the treatment of different dermatoses.

  17. Recent advances in X-ray microanalysis in dermatology

    SciTech Connect

    Forslind, B.; Grundin, T.G.; Lindberg, M.; Roomans, G.M.; Werner, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Electron microprobe and proton microprobe X-ray analysis can be used in several areas of dermatological research. With a proton probe, the distribution of trace elements in human hair can be determined. Electron microprobe analysis on freeze-dried cryosections of guinea-pig and human epidermis shows a marked gradient of Na, P and K over the stratum granulosum. In sections of freeze-substituted human skin this gradient is less steep. This difference is likely to be due to a decrease in water content of the epidermis towards the stratum corneum. Electron microprobe analysis of the epidermis can, for analysis of trace elements, be complemented by the proton microprobe. Quantitative agreement between the two techniques can be obtained by the use of a standard. Proton microprobe analysis was used to determine the distribution of Ni or Cr in human epidermis exposed to nickel or chromate ions. Possible differences in water content between the stratum corneum of patients with atopic eczema and normal stratum corneum was investigated in skin freeze-substituted with Br-doped resin. No significant differences were observed.

  18. Academics or private practice? The future of dermatologic surgery education.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher J; Wood, G Craig; Miller, Jeffrey J; Marks, Victor J

    2006-01-01

    The career choices of Mohs fellows have important implications for ensuring the quality of dermatologic surgery training during residency. No published data examine the career choices of fellows in Mohs micrographic surgery. To determine the number of Mohs fellows entering academics and to examine the influence of fellowship characteristics, scholarly activities, and personal background on career decision. A voluntary survey was distributed by mail in June 2004 to all Mohs fellows-in-training during 2003-2004. Twenty-nine percent (12 of 42) of the fellows chose jobs in an academic or university setting. The practice setting of the fellowship, personal factors, and scholarly activities prior to fellowship did not correlate with career decision. By contrast, increased scholarly activities during fellowship and an interest in teaching did correlate with the choice to enter academics. A significant percentage of Mohs fellows pursued academics. Increased academic productivity during the fellowship and an interest in teaching correlated with the decision to pursue an academic career. Fellowship directors interested in encouraging academic careers may find these data useful to structure their curricula and to mentor fellows inquiring about academic careers.

  19. Infection control practices and infectious complications in dermatological surgery.

    PubMed

    Rogues, A M; Lasheras, A; Amici, J M; Guillot, P; Beylot, C; Taïeb, A; Gachie, J P

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess infection control practices and their impact upon infectious complications in skin surgery conducted by private dermatologists. A prospective study was carried out by 73 volunteers belonging to the Surgical Group of the Société Française de Dermatologie over a period of three months. Data were collected for surgical procedures performed during this period, including the excision of all benign or malignant tumours, but excluding sebaceous cysts and pyodermas. A total of 3491 dermatological surgical procedures were included in the survey. Post-operative infections occurred in 67 patients (1.9%), with superficial suppuration accounting for 92.5% of surgical site infections. The incidence was higher in the excision group with a reconstructive procedure (4.3%) than in excisions alone (1.6%). Infection control precautions varied according to the site of procedure; multivariate analysis showed that haemorrhagic complications were an independent factor for infection in both types of surgical procedure. The male gender, immunosuppressive therapy and not wearing sterile gloves were independent factors for infections occurring following excisions with reconstruction. Not all of the procedures needed the use of a hospital theatre. It is clear that for excisions with a reconstructive procedure or for certain anatomical sites, such as the nose, there should be more emphasis upon infection control precautions. Further studies are needed to establish optimal guidelines for this kind of surgery.

  20. Blue light curing units--a dermatological hazard?

    PubMed

    Chadwick, R G; Traynor, N; Moseley, H; Gibbs, N

    1994-01-08

    The setting reactions of a large number of dental materials are activated upon exposure to visible blue light emitted from a curing unit. Although the wavelength (lambda) from such devices is principally in the visible spectrum (lambda > 400 nm) a small amount of ultraviolet radiation (UV) is also present. Little attention has been paid to the consequences of such exposure upon the skin of dental surgeons' fingers. This investigation studied the level of UVA I (lambda = 340-400 nm) emitted by three commonly used polymerisation sources and assessed the level of protection afforded by six brands of surgical glove. The integrated irradiances of the Translux, Topaz T100 and Heliomat units in the UVA I range were 15861, 3611 and 305 mW/m2 respectively. For all gloves the mean % transmission, at lambda = 400 nm, was less than 4% with the exception of one brand where, in the stretched state, the level of transmission was 7%. It is concluded that the risk of initiating adverse dermatological consequences as a result of exposure to UVA I, emitted by light polymerisation units, is minimal in normal usage. The combined effects of exposure to radiation of this type and contamination of the fingers with quantities of irritant chemicals, such as found in many dental materials, are unknown. Due to the ability of the gloves to shield the skin from both chemicals and UVA I it is recommended that gloves are routinely worn for all light curing procedures.

  1. Cutaneous Lyme borreliosis: Guideline of the German Dermatology Society

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Heidelore; Fingerle, Volker; Hunfeld, Klaus-Peter; Huppertz, Hans-Iko; Krause, Andreas; Rauer, Sebastian; Ruf, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    This guideline of the German Dermatology Society primarily focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. It has received consensus from 22 German medical societies and 2 German patient organisations. It is the first part of an AWMF (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften e.V.) interdisciplinary guideline: “Lyme Borreliosis – Diagnosis and Treatment, development stage S3”. The guideline is directed at physicians in private practices and clinics who treat Lyme borreliosis. Objectives of this guideline are recommendations for confirming a clinical diagnosis, recommendations for a stage-related laboratory diagnosis (serological detection of IgM and IgG Borrelia antibodies using the 2-tiered ELISA/immunoblot process, sensible use of molecular diagnostic and culture procedures) and recommendations for the treatment of the localised, early-stage infection (erythema migrans, erythema chronicum migrans, and borrelial lymphocytoma), the disseminated early-stage infection (multiple erythemata migrantia, flu-like symptoms) and treatment of the late-stage infection (acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans with and without neurological manifestations). In addition, an information sheet for patients containing recommendations for the prevention of Lyme borreliosis is attached to the guideline. PMID:28943834

  2. Topical delivery of active principles: the field of dermatological research.

    PubMed

    Nino, Massimiliano; Calabrò, Gabriella; Santoianni, Pietro

    2010-01-15

    To be effective an active drug or principle must cross the stratum corneum barrier; this process can be influenced to obtain better functional and therapeutical effects. In spite of the wide variety of the methods studied in order to improve the transdermal transfer to obtain systemic effects, the applicability is limited in this field. Attention to the epidermal barrier and penetration of active principles has been reported mostly in studies concerning dermocosmetics. Studies regarding methods of penetration are gaining experimental and clinical interest. Cutaneous bioavailability of most commercially available dermatological formulations is low. Increase of intradermal delivery can relate to chemical, biochemical, or physical manipulations. Chemical enhancers have been adopted to: (a) increase the diffusibility of the substance across the barrier; (b) increase product solubility in the vehicle; (c) improve the partition coefficient. Moreover methods of interference with the biosynthesis of some lipids allow the modification of the structure of the barrier to increase the penetration. The main physical techniques that increase cutaneous penetration of substances are: iontophoresis (that increases the penetration of ionized substances), electroporation (that electrically induces penetration through the barrier), and sonophoresis, based on 20 to 25 KHz ultrasound that induces alterations of the horny barrier, allowing penetration of active principles. Recent development of these methods are here reported and underline the importance and role of vehicles and other factors that determine effects of partition and diffusion, crucial to absorption.

  3. Biological therapy for dermatological manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zippi, Maddalena; Pica, Roberta; De Nitto, Daniela; Paoluzi, Paolo

    2013-05-16

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are the two forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The advent of biological drugs has significantly changed the management of these conditions. Skin manifestations are not uncommon in IBD. Among the reactive lesions (immune-mediated extraintestinal manifestations), erythema nodosum (EN) and pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) are the two major cutaneous ills associated with IBD, while psoriasis is the dermatological comorbidity disease observed more often. In particular, in the last few years, anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents have been successfully used to treat psoriasis, especially these kinds of lesions that may occur during the treatment with biological therapies. The entity of the paradoxical manifestations has been relatively under reported as most lesions are limited and a causal relationship with the treatment is often poorly understood. The reason for this apparent side-effect of the therapy still remains unclear. Although side effects may occur, their clinical benefits are undoubted. This article reviews the therapeutic effects of the two most widely used anti-TNF-α molecules, infliximab (a fusion protein dimer of the human TNF-α receptor) and adalimumab (a fully human monoclonal antibody to TNF-α), for the treatment of the major cutaneous manifestations associated with IBD (EN, PG and psoriasis).

  4. [What's new in aesthetic dermatology: filler and laser treatments].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C

    2009-05-01

    In esthetic dermatology, filling and laser treatments are two essential techniques. Several recent studies on calcium hydroxyapatite in filling treatments and facial volumetry, in esthetics, but also in HIV patients, have been published. It was also tested in accentuated melomental folds where it is superior to hyaluronic acid. In aging of the skin of the dorsal aspect of the hands, hyaluronic acid provides slightly better results than collagen. Filler rhinoplasty can correct minor deformations of the nose. Lipofilling is advantageous for linear scleroderma of the face, at least in the forehead region, and adipocyte stem cells may be a future solution for facial aging or lipoatrophy. The risk of local and/or general sarcoid reactions related to interferon in patients having undergone filling injections has been reported. In the field of laser treatment, fractionated photothermolysis has motivated much more research and seem particularly valuable in treating acne scars, aging of the dorsal aspect of the hands, and, more anecdotally, in colloid milium and pearly penile papules. Laser is also useful in preventing surgical scars where a mini-diode can also be used. For axillary hyperhidrosis, subdermic Nd-YAG laser competes with botulinum toxin, with longer-lasting results. Solutions are appearing for treatment of red or white striae cutis distensae. Intense pulsed light is the reference technique for poikiloderma of Civatte, and seems effective, with new devices, for melasma. However, inappropriately used by nonphysicians, IPL can cause serious ocular accidents; one case of uveitis has been reported.

  5. THE TOPICAL AND SYSTEMIC USE OF CORTISONE IN DERMATOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Ben A.; Feldman, Fred F.

    1951-01-01

    Part I of this report deals with the topical use of cortisone in a variety of skin diseases. Fifteen patients with chronic discoid lupus erythematosus, four patients with necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, four with psoriasis, one with lichen planus and one with granuloma annulare were treated with cortisone ointment. All the patients with chronic discoid lupus erythematosus had some degree of improvement. In two patients with chronic lupus erythematosus, complete clearing of the eruption occurred. In four patients with necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum remarkable involution resulted. Patients with psoriasis, lichen planus and granuloma annulare were not benefited. Part II deals with the systemic use of cortisone. Eight patients with severe serum sickness-like penicillin reaction responded dramatically to parenterally administered cortisone. In two cases of pemphigus vulgaris and one case of Sulzberger-Garbe disease, the disease was kept in remission with cortisone administered intramuscularly as well as orally. Partial improvement resulted in a case of localized myxedema associated with malignant exophthalmus. Two patients with exfoliative dermatitis due to therapy with heavy metals responded dramatically to cortisone. No beneficial effects were noted in patients with chronic urticaria and atopic dermatitis. The systemic use of ACTH and cortisone in dermatology at present should be confined to patients with known fatal or hopelessly incapacitating diseases and to patients with extreme hypersensitivity reactions which may be protracted or life-endangering, and which can be controlled or cured with a relatively small total dosage of the agents in a short time. PMID:14886729

  6. The application of ultra-weak photon emission in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Hao

    2014-10-05

    Ultra-weak photo emission (UPE) is a phenomenon closely associated with life and provides us a rare window to look into oxidative reactions in life directly without the aid of other agents. Dozens of independent studies have investigated UPE in skin in the last 2 decades. Skin serves as a convenient target for the application of UPE. As the outmost layer of our body, skin is also subjected to the influences from environmental factors such as ultraviolet light. Therefore UPE measurement can help us better understand the interaction between skin and the outside world. A variety of dermatological interventions may benefit from UPE studies. In particular, those treatments aiming to manage the oxidative status of the skin can be monitored directly by UPE measurements. In recent years, UPE has already been used as a valuable in vivo tool to assist the selection of better skin care ingredients and products. The knowledge gained by UPE studies of skin may also help generate new insights and new targets for future treatments. This review emphasizes in vivo and clinical measurement of UPE in skin. The applications of UPE in skin research related to antioxidants and sunscreens are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [The excimer laser in dermatology and esthetic medicine].

    PubMed

    Grema, H; Raulin, C

    2004-01-01

    First reports about the use of the excimer laser in dermatology date back to 1997. It is seen as an improvement on conventional phototherapy and photochemotherapy because of the lower cumulative UV-dose involved, the shorter time frame required for treatment and the option of targeting individual lesions without affecting the surrounding healthy skin. In addition to the indications of psoriasis vulgaris, vitiligo and atopic eczema (for which there is now FDA approval in the US), the spectrum of possible uses for the excimer laser is growing rapidly, especially in the field of light-sensitive dermatoses. Case studies so far have ranged from post-operative hypopigmentation to acne vulgaris and from alopecia areata to parapsoriasis en plaque. The foremost priorities in the future will be to evaluate reproducible therapeutic regimens with realistic prospects of success in large-scale studies; assess potential iatrogenic risks in treatment; develop pathogenetic models for the mechanism of action; and define therapeutic approaches to new indications. This paper summarizes the publications to date and discusses our observations and experiences.

  8. Skin improvement and stability of Echinacea purpurea dermatological formulations.

    PubMed

    Yotsawimonwat, S; Rattanadechsakul, J; Rattanadechsakul, P; Okonogi, S

    2010-10-01

    Echinacea purpurea contains many beneficial constituents for protection of skin from oxidative stress and for improving hydration of skin. This study aimed to investigate the stability and dermatological efficacy of E. purpurea cream and gel. Echinacea purpurea extract was incorporated into suitable cream and gel bases. Stability of the extract in the formulations was investigated by determining its residual total phenolic content and antioxidant activity after storage at 4°C, 30°C and 40°C for 6 months. The effect of those formulations on skin irritation, hydration level and wrinkle reduction was evaluated in 10 healthy volunteers, aged 25-40 years. The shelf lives of E. purpurea cream and gel in terms of total phenolic content and antioxidant activity were only 2 and 4 months respectively at 4°C and could be extended up to 7 months by incorporation of α-tocopherol or disodium editate. The corneometer hydration indices increased up to 10.6 AU and 11.4 AU, and the wrinkles decreased 9.47% and 14.92% because of the application of E. purpurea cream and gel for 1 month. Both formulations showed no irritation to skin. Echinacea purpurea cream and gel developed in this study were effective in improving skin hydration and reducing wrinkle, but showed low storage stability.

  9. Nanotechnology in Medicine and Relevance to Dermatology: Present Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraj, K H

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology and nanomedicine are complementary disciplines aimed at the betterment of human life. Nanotechnology is an emerging branch of science for designing tools and devices of size 1–100 nm, with unique functions at the cellular, atomic and molecular levels. The concept of using nanotechnology in medical research and clinical practice is known as nanomedicine. Today, nanotechnology and nanoscience approaches to particle design and formulations are beginning to expand the market for many drugs and forming the basis for a highly profitable niche within the industry, but some predicted benefits are hyped. Under many conditions, dermal penetration of nanoparticles may be limited for consumer products such as sunscreens, although additional studies are needed on potential photooxidation products, experimental methods and the effect of skin condition on penetration. Today, zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (20–30 nm) are widely used in several topical skin care products such as sunscreens. Thus, in the present scenario, nanotechnology is spreading its wings to address the key problems in the field of medicine. The benefits of nanoparticles have been shown in several scientific fields, but very little is known about their potential to penetrate the skin. Hence, this review discusses in detail the applications of nanotechnology in medicine with more emphasis on the dermatologic aspects. PMID:22707765

  10. Discrete-cosine-transform-based image compression applied to dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cookson, John P.; Sneiderman, Charles; Rivera, Christopher

    1991-05-01

    The research reported in this paper concerns an evaluation of the impact of compression on the quality of digitized color dermatologic images. 35 mm slides of four morphologic types of skin lesions were captured at 1000 pixels per inch (ppi) in 24 bit RGB color, to give an approximate 1K X 1K image. The discrete cosine transform (DCT) algorithm, was applied to the resulting image files to achieve compression ratios of about 7:1, 28:1, and 70:1. The original scans and the decompressed files were written to a 35 mm film recorder. Together with the original photo slides, the slides resulting from digital images were evaluated in a study of morphology recognition and image quality assessment. A panel of dermatologists was asked to identify the morphology depicted and to rate the image quality of each slide. The images were shown in a progression from highest level of compression to original photo slides. We conclude that the use of DCT file compression yields acceptable performance for skin lesion images since differences in morphology recognition performance do not correlate significantly with the use of original photos versus compressed versions. Additionally, image quality evaluation does not correlate significantly with level of compression.

  11. History of dermatologic surgery. From the beginnings to late antiquity.

    PubMed

    Marmelzat, W L

    1987-01-01

    We stop short, with Celsus, our glimpse of ancient dermatologic surgery in the West. As was stated at the beginning of the chapter, only a few examples and speculations are mentioned in this brief account. Much has gone unmentioned, including the contributions of great Eastern civilizations, such as ancient India, China, and Persia; the Bible; and the "ancient" inhabitants of the "new" world. We note especially the omission of the amazing ancient Hindu cosmetic operations that successfully employed rotating pedicle flaps in reconstructing amputated ears and noses. Important names before Celsus are missing from this account, especially the two Alexandrian physician-surgeons who flourished three centuries earlier--Herophilus (the Father of Anatomy) and Erasistratus (the Father of Physiology). Except for a few extant anatomic fragments, the works of Herophilus and Erasistratus are completely lost. We may with confidence, however, infer from the writings of Celsus and Galen that the brillant anatomy and physiology of the Alexandrian period made for good surgical diagnosis and practice. We must remember, too, that after Celsus' time, the slow disintergration of the Roman Empire took more than 500 years. This period of 500 years saw a number of important Roman physician-surgeons who contributed significantly with daring new operations and original surgical concepts and techniques: Heliodorus, Soranus, Rufus, Archigenes, Galen, Antyllus, Leonides, Oribasius, Aetius, Paulus, and others. The positive surgical contributions of these giants would be lost and rediscovered, many times.

  12. Diverse types of dermatologic toxicities from immune checkpoint blockade therapy.

    PubMed

    Curry, Jonathan L; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Nagarajan, Priyadharsini; Drucker, Carol; Diab, Adi; Hymes, Sharon R; Duvic, Madeleine; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Wargo, Jennifer A; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Rapini, Ronald P; Prieto, Victor G

    2017-02-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs that leverages host immune mechanisms to destroy tumor cells have been met with great promise in the treatment of cancer. Immunotherapy, targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) receptor and its ligand (PD-L1) have shown tremendous improvements in the survival of patients with advanced solid tumors. However, the development of dermatologic toxicity (DT) is a consequence to immunotherapy. Review of published reports of the DT to immunotherapy revealed patients receiving anti-CTCLA-4 antibody or anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibody often develop a DT of any type and grade. In this article, of the 3825 patients who were treated with anti-PD-1 and of 556 patients receiving anti-PD-L1, DT of any type and grade were reported in 1474 (∼39%) and 95 (∼17%) of patients, respectively. The emergence of specific types of DT to immunotherapy is beginning to be recognized can be categorized into four groups: (a) inflammatory, (b) immunobullous, (c) alteration of keratinocytes and (d) alteration of melanocytes. Lichenoid dermatitis and bullous pemphigoid appear to be DT more associated with anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibody. The DT profile in patients receiving immunotherapy is diverse, and early recognition of specific types of DT that clinicians may encounter is critical for optimal patient care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Development of a Flipped Medical School Dermatology Module.

    PubMed

    Fox, Joshua; Faber, David; Pikarsky, Solomon; Zhang, Chi; Riley, Richard; Mechaber, Alex; O'Connell, Mark; Kirsner, Robert S

    2017-05-01

    The flipped classroom module incorporates independent study in advance of in-class instructional sessions. It is unproven whether this methodology is effective within a medical school second-year organ system module. We report the development, implementation, and effectiveness of the flipped classroom methodology in a second-year medical student dermatology module at the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine. In a retrospective cohort analysis, we compared attitudinal survey data and mean scores for a 50-item multiple-choice final examination of the second-year medical students who participated in this 1-week flipped course with those of the previous year's traditional, lecture-based course. Each group comprised nearly 200 students. Students' age, sex, Medical College Admission Test scores, and undergraduate grade point averages were comparable between the flipped and traditional classroom students. The flipped module students' mean final examination score of 92.71% ± 5.03% was greater than that of the traditional module students' 90.92% ± 5.51% (P < 0.001) score. Three of the five most commonly missed questions were identical between the two cohorts. The majority of students preferred the flipped methodology to attending live lectures or watching previously recorded lectures. The flipped classroom can be an effective instructional methodology for a medical school second-year organ system module.

  14. Comparison of Dermatology and Allergy Guidelines for Atopic Dermatitis Management.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Girish C; Lio, Peter A

    2015-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin condition treated by dermatologists, allergists, pediatricians, and primary care physicians. Several treatment guidelines and therapeutic parameters exist for the management of this disease. Health care professionals may be unaware of guidelines created by specialty organizations other than their own. To review, compare, and contrast the most recent AD management guidelines. The guidelines for AD management published by the American Academy of Dermatology 2014 work group were compared with those created by the 2012 Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. International guidelines created by the 2012 European Task Force on Atopic Dermatitis and the 2013 Asia-Pacific Consensus Group for Atopic Dermatitis were also considered. Several differences among the guidelines suggest that there may be disparity in the perceptions of AD between US dermatologists and allergists and health care professionals in other areas of the world. There are notable differences among the guidelines regarding the recommendations for the use of diluted bleach baths, vitamin D, and environmental modifications. Comparison of different guidelines may ultimately augment knowledge of treatment strategies and enhance realization of biases in the understanding and management of AD.

  15. Dermatological risk of indoor ultraviolet exposure from contemporary lighting sources.

    PubMed

    Sayre, Robert M; Dowdy, John C; Poh-Fitzpatrick, Maureen

    2004-01-01

    Discussions of risks and implications of cutaneous exposure to indoor lighting, including hypothetical contribution to causality of melanoma, have mainly concentrated on ultraviolet (UV) A and B (UVA, UVB) spectral emissions from fluorescent bulbs. Only studies of quartz halogen lamps have suggested that users might sustain UVC-induced injury. Examination of light sources in the home and school of a child with xeroderma pigmentosum revealed that several different types emitted surprising levels of UV. Our purpose was to assess the extent of UV emissions from a variety of commonly used light sources to identify potential dermatological risks. UV and visible spectral emissions of commercially obtained lamps of several types were measured using a calibrated spectral radiometer traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Indoor light sources including fluorescent, quartz halogen and even tungsten filament incandescent lamps provided UVA, UVB and sometimes UVC emissions. Intensities of some emissions were of similar magnitude to those in sunlight. Chronic exposure to indoor lighting may deliver unexpected cumulative UV exposure to the skin and eyes. Patients with UV-exacerbated dermatoses should be cautioned about potential adverse reactions from indoor lighting.

  16. Interactive large-group teaching in a dermatology course.

    PubMed

    Ochsendorf, F R; Boehncke, W-H; Sommerlad, M; Kaufmann, R

    2006-12-01

    This is a prospective study to find out whether an interactive large-group case-based teaching approach combined with small-group bedside teaching improves student satisfaction and learning outcome in a practical dermatology course. During two consecutive terms a rotating system of large-group interactive case-study-method teaching with two tutors (one content expert, one process facilitator) and bedside teaching with randomly appointed tutors was evaluated with a nine-item questionnaire and multiple-choice test performed at the beginning and the end of the course (n = 204/231 students evaluable). The results of three different didactic approaches utilized over the prior year served as a control. The interactive course was rated significantly better (p < 0.0001) than the standard course with regard to all items. The aggregate mark given by the students for the whole course was 1.58-0.61 (mean +/- SD, range 1 (good)-5 (poor)). This was significantly better than the standard course (p < 0.0001) and not different from small-group teaching approaches. The mean test results in the final examination improved significantly (p < 0.01). The combination of large-group interactive teaching and small-group bedside teaching was well accepted, improved the learning outcome, was rated as good as a small-group didactic approach and needed fewer resources in terms of personnel.

  17. Development of a curriculum in molecular diagnostics, genomics and personalized medicine for dermatology trainees.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael J; Shahriari, Neda; Payette, Michael; Mnayer, Laila; Elaba, Zendee

    2016-10-01

    Results of molecular studies are redefining the diagnosis and management of a wide range of skin disorders. Dermatology training programs maintain a relative gap in relevant teaching. To develop a curriculum in molecular diagnostics, genomics and personalized medicine for dermatology trainees at our institution. The aim is to provide trainees with a specialty-appropriate, working knowledge in clinical molecular dermatology. The Departments of Dermatology and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine collaborated on the design and implementation of educational objectives and teaching modalities for the new curriculum. A multidisciplinary curriculum was developed. It comprises: (i) assigned reading from the medical literature and reference textbook; (ii) review of teaching sets; (iii) two 1 hour lectures; (iv) trainee presentations; (v) 1-week rotation in a clinical molecular pathology and cytogenetics laboratory; and (vi) assessments and feedback. Residents who participated in the curriculum to date have found the experience to be of value. Our curriculum provides a framework for other dermatology residency programs to develop their own specific approach to molecular diagnostics education. Such training will provide a foundation for lifelong learning as molecular testing evolves and becomes integral to the practice of dermatology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Delivering value in dermatology: insights from skin cancer detection in routine clinical visits.

    PubMed

    Enamandram, Monica; Duncan, Lyn M; Kimball, Alexandra B

    2015-02-01

    There are increasing demands to demonstrate and report on outcomes in dermatology. Skin cancer diagnosis through skin examination has been well studied, and is promising as a value-delivering intervention. This study seeks to identify the rate of skin cancer diagnosis during routine visits to a large tertiary dermatology clinic. Medical records of patients presenting for routine dermatologic care at Massachusetts General Hospital between March 28 and September 28, 2012, were retrospectively reviewed. All patients given a diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) confirmed on biopsy specimen were identified. Billing data were used to identify the total number of patients evaluated during the study period. NMSC was diagnosed in 1266 skin biopsy specimens from 1047 (7.0%) of the 14,829 patients who presented for routine care. In all, 55% of patients with NMSC were men (mean age 70 years). Chief symptoms of patients with NMSC included general dermatologic concerns (37%), routine cancer screening (43%), and specific lesion(s) of concern (19%). Retrospective design and restriction to a single institution may limit the generalizability of our findings. The incidence of NMSC in routine dermatology is high; these findings validate the value of care provided by dermatologists and highlight the likely increasing need for their diagnostic skills as the population ages in the United States. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of obesity rates for dermatologic ambulatory office visits to United States physicians.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Alan B

    2017-03-01

    Obesity continues to increase in the United States (US) and elsewhere, with a number of published dermatologic associations. The purpose of this study was to characterize obesity among US office visits for dermatologic diseases. Data from the 2005 to 2011 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) were searched for the most common dermatologic diagnoses for which body mass index (BMI) could be classified. For all dermatologic patient visits, 10% were underweight, 36.5% were normal weight, 23.8% were overweight and 29.7% were obese. Increasing age predicted the yearly increased likelihood of obesity (OR 1.02; 95% CI 1.01, 1.02; p < 0.0001). Logistic regression controlling for age, sex, race and dataset found that in addition to age, NHAMCS dermatologic diagnosis patients were more likely to be obese than NAMCS patients (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.03, 1.45; p = 0.02). Specific diseases were found to have the highest obesity rates, including psoriasis, hidradenitis suppurativa and acanthosis nigricans. A large proportion of dermatologic diagnosis patients are obese, and awareness could lead to interventions that may improve their disease and decrease risks of comorbidities.

  20. Polypharmacy in dermatology: analysis of a nationally representative sample of 46,273 dermatology patient visits in the United States from 1995 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhulika A; Gupta, Aditya K; Fink, Naomi H

    2013-01-01

    There are no large-scale studies ofpolypharmacy (PP) in dermatology. The authors examined trends in PP (simultaneous use of > or = 4 medications in our study) and associated clinical factors among a nationally representative sample of 46,273 (weighted count +/- standard error [SE]: 617,970,596 +/- 25,187,959) dermatology-related (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes 680-709) patient visits from 1995 to 2009. Data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Care Survey were examined. The overall frequency (+/- SE) of PP was 8.9% +/- 0.4%. There was almost a doubling in the frequency of PP in dermatology from 1995 to 2009 (odds ratio [OR], 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.67-2.44, after controlling for comorbidities and sex). This increase was noted among patients with > 1 diagnoses, and all age groups including the younger than 25 age category (PP frequency +/- SE, 7.4% +/- 0.4%; OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.12-1.88), and not just among patients in the geriatric age range with multiple complex dermatologic problems. Some of the most frequent conditions in the PP group included acne, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, conditions that are known to be affected by psychodermatologic factors. PP among these patients may in part be an indication of their complex presentation caused by psychosocial vs dermatopathologic factors.